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Sample records for normal neurological development

  1. NEUROLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT DURING TODDLING AGE IN NORMAL-CHILDREN AND CHILDREN AT RISK OF DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HEMPEL, MS

    1993-01-01

    Toddling age (1.5-4 years) is a period in which the quality rather than the quantity of motor functions changes. We examined 305 normal and 43 so called 'risk' children with an examination technique which concentrates on observations of motor functions (grasping, sitting, crawling, standing and walk

  2. NEUROLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT DURING TODDLING AGE IN NORMAL-CHILDREN AND CHILDREN AT RISK OF DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HEMPEL, MS

    1993-01-01

    Toddling age (1.5-4 years) is a period in which the quality rather than the quantity of motor functions changes. We examined 305 normal and 43 so called 'risk' children with an examination technique which concentrates on observations of motor functions (grasping, sitting, crawling, standing and walk

  3. Uroflowmetry in neurologically normal children with voiding disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K M; Nielsen, K.K.; Kristensen, E S

    1985-01-01

    of neurological deficits underwent a complete diagnostic program including intravenous urography, voiding cystography and cystoscopy as well as spontaneous uroflowmetry, cystometry-emg and pressure-flow-emg study. The incidence of dyssynergia was 22%. However, neither the flow curve pattern nor single flow...... variables were able to identify children with dyssynergia. Consequently uroflowmetry seems inefficient in the screening for dyssynergia in neurological normal children with voiding disorders in the absence of anatomical bladder outlet obstruction....

  4. Practice guideline: Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: Response to shunting and predictors of response: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

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    Halperin, John J; Kurlan, Roger; Schwalb, Jason M; Cusimano, Michael D; Gronseth, Gary; Gloss, David

    2015-12-08

    We evaluated evidence for utility of shunting in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and for predictors of shunting effectiveness. We identified and classified relevant published studies according to 2004 and 2011 American Academy of Neurology methodology. Of 21 articles, we identified 3 Class I articles. Shunting is possibly effective in iNPH (96% chance subjective improvement, 83% chance improvement on timed walk test at 6 months) (3 Class III). Serious adverse event risk was 11% (1 Class III). Predictors of success included elevated Ro (1 Class I, multiple Class II), impaired cerebral blood flow reactivity to acetazolamide (by SPECT) (1 Class I), and positive response to either external lumbar drainage (1 Class III) or repeated lumbar punctures. Age may not be a prognostic factor (1 Class II). Data are insufficient to judge efficacy of radionuclide cisternography or aqueductal flow measurement by MRI. Clinicians may choose to offer shunting for subjective iNPH symptoms and gait (Level C). Because of significant adverse event risk, risks and benefits should be carefully weighed (Level B). Clinicians should inform patients with iNPH with elevated Ro and their families that they have an increased chance of responding to shunting compared with those without such elevation (Level B). Clinicians may counsel patients with iNPH and their families that (1) positive response to external lumbar drainage or to repeated lumbar punctures increases the chance of response to shunting, and (2) increasing age does not decrease the chance of shunting being successful (both Level C). © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Challenges in neurological practice in developing countries

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    Sanjay Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of neurological illness is much higher in developing countries. Neurological disorders in these countries are mainly due to poverty and malnutrition. Spectrums of diseases are also different in comparison with developed countries. Lack of resources, ignorance, and overpopulation make it very difficult and challenging to tackle this problem. Majority of the patients are seen by general practitioners who have little knowledge about neurological illnesses. Most of the countries have very few or no neurologist. There is a greater need of taking neurological care at primary care level where majority of the patients struggle with epilepsy, stroke and neuroinfections.

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids rich foods free from contaminants and suitable for vegetarians, and its significance in the normal neurological development

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    Ángeles Molina-Peralta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Essential long chain v-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as a-linolenic acid (ALA and its derivatives, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA are involved in the growth and function of nervous tissue as structural components of the neuronal membrane. The maternal intake of v-3 fatty acid during pregnancy and breastfeeding must come from non-animal sources free from dioxins and heavy metals to ensure the normal development of the neural structures of infants. Various lead sources were consulted, including scientific reviews, studies with animal models, cellular assays and clinical trials in the following data bases: PubMed central (PMC-NBCI, Elsevier Journal, Scielo España, Scirus and Science Direct, in order to assess the potential effect of algae, fungi, marine bacteria and other vegetarian sources of v-3 fatty acids on the neural development of infant.

  7. Secondary Myelitis in Dermal Sinus Causing Paraplegia in a Child with Previously Normal Neurological Function

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    Sakina Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects result from failure of neural tube fusion during early embryogenesis, the fourth week after conception. The spectrum of severity is not uniform across the various forms of this congenital anomaly as certain presentations are not compatible with extrauterine life (anencephaly while, on the other hand, other defects may remain undiagnosed as they are entirely asymptomatic (occult spina bifida. We report a child with previously normal neurological development, a devastating clinical course following superinfection of a subtle spina bifida defect which resulted in a flaccid paralysis below the level of the lesion and permanent neurological deficits following resolution of the acute infection and a back closure surgery.

  8. Hemimegalencephaly and normal intellectual development.

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    Fusco, L; Ferracuti, S; Fariello, G; Manfredi, M; Vigevano, F.

    1992-01-01

    Hemimegalencephaly is a rare congenital malformation characterised by overgrowth of one hemisphere. Although it is commonly thought to be associated with neurological deficits, developmental delay, and intractable epilepsy, the clinical expression of hemimegalencephaly, can vary widely. This patient was neurologically and neuropsychologically normal apart from rare partial seizures.

  9. Hemimegalencephaly and normal intellectual development.

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    Fusco, L; Ferracuti, S; Fariello, G; Manfredi, M; Vigevano, F

    1992-01-01

    Hemimegalencephaly is a rare congenital malformation characterised by overgrowth of one hemisphere. Although it is commonly thought to be associated with neurological deficits, developmental delay, and intractable epilepsy, the clinical expression of hemimegalencephaly, can vary widely. This patient was neurologically and neuropsychologically normal apart from rare partial seizures. Images PMID:1326602

  10. Neurological findings in Alzheimer's disease and normal aging.

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    Galasko, D; Kwo-on-Yuen, P F; Klauber, M R; Thal, L J

    1990-06-01

    To determine the potential value of abnormal neurological findings as markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their relationship to the stage of AD, we compared standardized neurological examinations in 135 community-dwelling patients with AD and 91 nondemented elderly individuals. After correcting for differences in age and education between the two groups, we found that rigidity, stooped posture, graphesthesia, neglect of simultaneous tactile stimuli (face-hand test), and snout, grasp, and glabella reflexes were present significantly more often in patients with AD than in control subjects. These findings increased in prevalence in patients with AD according to the severity of dementia. However, in a multivariate logistic regression model only the grasp reflex, graphesthesia, and the face-hand test were statistically significantly associated with the degree of cognitive impairment. Although abnormal neurological findings occur regularly in AD, they are too infrequent early in the course of AD to serve as diagnostic markers. Prospective studies are needed to determine whether patients with the early onset of extrapyramidal or other findings form a distinct subgroup of AD.

  11. Normal pressure hydrocephalus in the spectrum of neurological complications of systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    de Oliveira, Fabricio Ferreira; Cardoso, Tania Aparecida Marchiori; Sampaio-Barros, Percival Degrava; Damasceno, Benito Pereira

    2013-06-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus is an unusual manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus and its pathogenesis is still unclear. We report the case of a 39-year-old white woman with systemic lupus erythematosus who developed magnetic gait, speech difficulties, progressive memory impairment, urinary incontinence and episodes of involuntary closure of the eyelids. Signs and symptoms, associated with ventriculomegaly and normal cerebrospinal fluid pressure, suggested normal pressure hydrocephalus, which as a complication of systemic lupus erythematosus believably develops due to the insidious inflammatory process that occurs in the meningeal tissues or to the vasculitis itself. Normal pressure hydrocephalus tends to develop secondary to trauma, infection or subarachnoid haemorrhage, but in 50 % of patients no aetiology is found. Shunt surgery is the only effective treatment, specifically for the gait disorder, which usually improves more than the cognitive symptoms. Since the tap-test showed a strongly positive result, a medium pressure ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted, further replaced by a high pressure one in view of the complications, with less than expected improvement. Subdural hematomas and empyemas developed, requiring surgery and antibiotic therapy. A new tap-test was positive, and the patient improved only after a programmable valve was finally placed. However, pressure regulation shall be continuously required, and shunt dysfunction might still develop in the long term. The few similar case reports in the literature are reviewed, confirming the rarity of this neurological complication of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  12. Development of an oximeter for neurology

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    Aleinik, A.; Serikbekova, Z.; Zhukova, N.; Zhukova, I.; Nikitina, M.

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral desaturation can occur during surgery manipulation, whereas other parameters vary insignificantly. Prolonged intervals of cerebral anoxia can cause serious damage to the nervous system. Commonly used method for measurement of cerebral blood flow uses invasive catheters. Other techniques include single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tomographic methods frequently use isotope administration, that may result in anaphylactic reactions to contrast media and associated nerve diseases. Moreover, the high cost and the need for continuous monitoring make it difficult to apply these techniques in clinical practice. Cerebral oximetry is a method for measuring oxygen saturation using infrared spectrometry. Moreover reflection pulse oximetry can detect sudden changes in sympathetic tone. For this purpose the reflectance pulse oximeter for use in neurology is developed. Reflectance oximeter has a definite advantage as it can be used to measure oxygen saturation in any part of the body. Preliminary results indicate that the device has a good resolution and high reliability. Modern applied schematics have improved device characteristics compared with existing ones.

  13. Neurological damage disrupts normal sex differences in psychophysiological responsiveness to music.

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    Belfi, Amy M; Chen, Kuan-Hua; Schneider, Brett; Tranel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Men and women often display different physiological responses to emotional stimuli, and these responses can be affected by brain damage. Here, we investigated how brain damage differentially affects electrodermal responses based on sex. We studied neurologically normal, healthy adults and a sample of neurological patients. Participants listened to music, an emotional stimulus that reliably elicits skin conductance responses (SCRs). Electrodermal activity was recorded while participants listened to musical clips. When analyzing the data without regard to sex, there were no differences between healthy and brain-damaged participants in their SCRs. However, we found a significant interaction between brain injury status and sex. For men, brain damage significantly reduced SCRs. For women, there were no differences between brain-damaged participants and neurologically healthy participants. These findings illustrate the importance of including demographic variables, such as sex, when investigating brain-behavior relationships with a psychophysiological dependent variable.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in epileptic cats with a normal interictal neurological examination: 188 cases.

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    Raimondi, F; Shihab, N; Gutierrez-Quintana, R; Smith, A; Trevail, R; Sanchez-Masian, D; Smith, P M

    2017-06-24

    Epilepsy is a common neurological condition in dogs and cats. Although an increased likelihood of significant brain lesions with age has been identified in neurologically normal dogs with epileptic seizures, the underlying aetiology of epileptic seizures in cats that present with normal physical and neurological examinations remains unknown. In this cross-sectional study, the authors examined MRI findings in a large population of cats with a normal interictal physical and neurological examination. They hypothesised that age would have an impact on the prevalence of detectable lesions. First, following the guidelines for dogs and in accordance with previous studies, the authors divided the cats into three age groups (aged one year or younger, between one and six, and older than six) and calculated the proportion of cats with a detectable lesion on MRI in these groups. In the first group, 3/32 cats (9.4 per cent) had significant MRI abnormalities that were all consistent with congenital malformation; in the second group, only 5/92 (5.4 per cent) MRI scans were abnormal and in the third group, 15/ 65 (23.1 per cent) cats showed abnormal findings that were predominantly lesions of neoplastic origin. Second, to investigate the impact of age further, data were investigated as a continuous variable using receiver operating characteristic analysis. This indicated an optimal cut-off age of five years, above which MRI abnormalities were more likely, with an increase in the odds of a significant structural lesion increasing by 14 per cent per year. British Veterinary Association.

  15. Clinical NMR imaging of the brain in children: normal and neurologic disease

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    Johnson, M.A, (Hammersmith Hospital, London, England); Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.; Steiner, R.E.; Thomas, D.J.; Hayward, R.; Bryant, D.R.T.; Payne, J.A.; Levene, M.I.; Whitelaw, A.; Dubowitz, L.M.S.; Dubowitz, V.

    1983-11-01

    The results of initial clinical nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in eight normal and 52 children with a wide variety of neurologic diseases were reviewed. The high level of gray-white matter contrast available with inversion-recovery sequences provided a basis for visualizing normal myelination as well as delays or deficits in this process. The appearances seen in cases of parenchymal hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and proencephalic cysts are described. Ventricular enlargement was readily identified and marginal edema was demonstrated with spin-echo sequences. Abnormalities were seen in cerebral palsy, congenital malformations, Hallervorden-Spatz disease, aminoaciduria, and meningitis. Space-occupying lesions were identified by virtue of their increased relaxation times and mass effects. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has considerable potential in pediatric neuroradiologic practice, in some conditions supplying information not available by computed tomography or sonography.

  16. Language dominance in neurologically normal and epilepsy subjects: a functional MRI study.

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    Springer, J A; Binder, J R; Hammeke, T A; Swanson, S J; Frost, J A; Bellgowan, P S; Brewer, C C; Perry, H M; Morris, G L; Mueller, W M

    1999-11-01

    Language dominance and factors that influence language lateralization were investigated in right-handed, neurologically normal subjects (n = 100) and right-handed epilepsy patients (n = 50) using functional MRI. Increases in blood oxygenation-dependent signal during a semantic language activation task relative to a non-linguistic, auditory discrimination task provided an index of language system lateralization. As expected, the majority of both groups showed left hemisphere dominance, although a continuum of activation asymmetry was evident, with nearly all subjects showing some degree of right hemisphere activation. Using a categorical dominance classification, 94% of the normal subjects were considered left hemisphere dominant and 6% had bilateral, roughly symmetric language representation. None of the normal subjects had rightward dominance. There was greater variability of language dominance in the epilepsy group, with 78% showing left hemisphere dominance, 16% showing a symmetric pattern and 6% showing right hemisphere dominance. Atypical language dominance in the epilepsy group was associated with an earlier age of brain injury and with weaker right hand dominance. Language lateralization in the normal group was weakly related to age, but was not significantly related to sex, education, task performance or familial left-handedness.

  17. α-Synuclein in the colon and premotor markers of Parkinson disease in neurologically normal subjects.

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    Kim, Joong-Seok; Park, In-Seok; Park, Hyung-Eun; Kim, Su-Young; Yun, Jung A; Jung, Chan Kwon; Sung, Hye-Young; Lee, Jin-Kwon; Kang, Won-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Extranigral non-motor signs precede the first motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease by many years in some patients. The presence of α-synuclein deposition within colon tissues in patients with Parkinson's disease can aid in identifying early neuropathological changes prior to disease onset. In the present study, we evaluated the roles of non-motor symptoms and signs and imaging biomarkers of nigral neuronal changes and α-synuclein accumulation in the colon. Twelve subjects undergoing colectomy for primary colon cancer were recruited for this study. Immunohistochemical staining for α-synuclein in normal and phosphorylated forms was performed in normally appearing colonic tissue. We evaluated 16 candidate premotor risk factors in this study cohort. Among them, ten subjects showed positive immunostaining with normal- and phosphorylated-α-synuclein. An accumulation of premotor markers in each subject was accompanied with positive normal- and phosphorylated-α-synuclein immunostaining, ranging from 2 to 7 markers per subject, whereas the absence of Lewy bodies in the colon was associated with relative low numbers of premotor signs. A principal component analysis and a cluster analysis of these premotor markers suggest that urinary symptoms were commonly clustered with deposition of peripheral phosphorylated-α-synuclein. Among other premotor marker, color vision abnormalities were related to non-smoking. This mathematical approach confirmed the clustering of premotor markers in preclinical stage of Parkinson's disease. This is the first report showing that α-synuclein in the colon and other premotor markers are related to each other in neurologically normal subjects.

  18. Delays in clinical development of neurological drugs in Japan.

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    Ikeda, Masayuki

    2017-06-28

    The delays in the approval and development of neurological drugs between Japan and other countries have been a major issue for patients with neurological diseases. The objective of this study was to analyze factors contributing to the delay in the launching of neurological drugs in Japan. We analyzed data from Japan and the US for the approval of 42 neurological drugs, all of which were approved earlier in the US than in Japan, and examined the potential factors that may cause the delay of their launch. Introductions of the 42 drugs in Japan occurred at a median of 87 months after introductions in the US. The mean review time of new drug applications for the 20 drugs introduced in Japan in January 2011 or later (15 months) was significantly shorter than that for the other 22 drugs introduced in Japan in December 2010 or earlier (24 months). The lag in the Japan's review time behind the US could not explain the approval delays. In the 31 of the 42 drugs, the application data package included overseas data. The mean review time of these 31 drugs (17 months) was significantly shorter than that of the other 11 drugs without overseas data (26 months). The mean approval lag behind the US of the 31 drugs (78 months) was also significantly shorter than that of the other 11 drugs (134 months). These results show that several important reforms in the Japanese drug development and approval system (e.g., inclusion of global clinical trial data) have reduced the delays in the clinical development of neurological drugs.

  19. Early treatment of a child with NAGS deficiency using N-carbamyl glutamate results in a normal neurological outcome.

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    Van Leynseele, Anouk; Jansen, Anna; Goyens, Philippe; Martens, Geert; Peeters, Stefaan; Jonckheere, An; De Meirleir, Linda

    2014-12-01

    Acute hyperammonemia has a variety of etiologies and clinical manifestations. If not treated early in neonates, it leads to irreversible brain damage or death. We present a 7-day-old female patient who was brought to the emergency department with drownsiness and vomiting. Metabolic work-up revealed a blood ammonia level of 290 μmol/L (normal carbamylglutamate (NCG) was added resulting in a rapid normalisation of ammonemia. Feedings were progressively reintroduced, the ammonia levels remained low. The results of the metabolic work-up were compatible with carbamyl phosphate synthase 1 (CPS1) or N-acetyl glutamate synthase (NAGS) deficiency. Genetic analysis confirmed the latter diagnosis with a homozygous mutation c. 1450T > C (p.W484R) in exon 6 of the NAGS gene in the patient and a carrier state in both parents. At the age of 9 months, the child is growing well with normal neurological development, under treatment with NCG 100 mg/kg/day and a normal diet. Conclusion: This case highlights the importance of keeping a high index of suspicion and early testing for ammonia levels in neonates/children with unexplained encephalopathy. In neonates with congenital hyperammonemia, NCG should always be started together with the standard management of hyperammonemia until all laboratory investigations are complete or indicate another disease.

  20. Neurology in the United Kingdom. I: Historical development.

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    Langton Hewer, R; Wood, V A

    1992-01-01

    International comparisons suggest that British neurological services are underdeveloped. Historical factors which have contributed to the current state of neurological services in the United Kingdom are described. Key issues include the dominance of London and the concept of specialised hospitals in the early history of neurology; the subsequent recognition of the needs of other parts of the United Kingdom, of district general hospitals, and of patients with chronic neurological disabilities ...

  1. Idiopathic detrusor sphincter dyssynergia in neurologically normal patients with voiding abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, T M; Djurhuus, J C; Schrøder, H D

    1982-01-01

    Symptomatology and clinical manifestations of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia are described in 23 patients without neurological disease. Their cardinal symptoms were recurrent cystitis, enuresis, frequent voiding, back pain during voiding and anal discomfort. The major objective finding was vesico...

  2. The use of an electronic von Frey device for evaluation of sensory threshold in neurologically normal dogs and those with acute spinal cord injury.

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    Moore, S A; Hettlich, B F; Waln, A

    2013-08-01

    The utility and inter-session repeatability of sensory threshold measurements using an electronic von Frey anesthesiometer (VFA) were assessed in a group of six neurologically normal dogs. Sensory threshold values obtained in neurologically normal dogs were compared to those of dogs with acute spinal cord injury (SCI) caused by intervertebral disc extrusion (n=6) and to a group of neurologically normal dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR; n=6). Sensory threshold values in neurologically normal dogs were 155.8 ± 37.7 g and 154.7 ± 67.2 g for the left and right pelvic limbs, respectively. The difference in mean sensory threshold values obtained for the group when two distinct testing sessions were compared was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Mean sensory threshold values for the group with SCI were significantly higher than those for neurologically normal dogs at 351.1 ± 116.5 g and 420.3 ± 157.7 g for the left and right pelvic limbs, respectively (P=0.01). A comparison of sensory threshold values for the group with CCLR and neurologically normal dogs was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The modified dorsal technique for VFA described here represents a reliable method to assess sensory threshold in neurologically normal dogs and in those with SCI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Frontiers in therapeutic development of allopregnanolone for Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders

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    Ronald W. Irwin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Allopregnanolone (Allo, a neurosteroid, has emerged as a promising promoter of endogenous regeneration in brain. In a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, Allo induced neurogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, white matter generation and cholesterol homeostasis while simultaneously reducing β-amyloid and neuroinflammatory burden. Allo activates signaling pathways and gene expression required for regeneration of neural stem cells and their differentiation into neurons. In parallel, Allo activates systems to sustain cholesterol homeostasis and reduce β-amyloid generation. To advance Allo into studies for chronic human neurological conditions, we examined translational and clinical parameters: dose, regimen, route, formulation, outcome measures, and safety regulations. A treatment regimen of once per week at sub-sedative doses of Allo was optimal for regeneration and reduction in Alzheimer’s pathology. This regimen had a high safety profile following chronic exposure in aged normal and Alzheimer’s mice. Formulation of Allo for multiple routes of administration has been developed for both preclinical and clinical testing. Preclinical evidence for therapeutic efficacy of Allo spans multiple neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, Niemann-Pick, diabetic neuropathy, status epilepticus, and traumatic brain injury. To successfully translate Allo as a therapeutic for multiple neurological disorders, it will be necessary to tailor dose and regimen to the targeted therapeutic mechanisms and disease etiology. Treatment paradigms conducted in accelerated disease models in young animals have a low probability of successful translation to chronic diseases in adult and aged humans. Gender, genetic risks, stage and burden of disease are critical determinants of efficacy. This review focuses on recent advances in development of Allo for Alzheimer’s disease that have the potential to accelerate therapeutic translation for

  4. Chapter 8: the development of neurology and the neurological sciences in the 17th century.

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    Isler, Hansruedi

    2010-01-01

    Circa 1660 several favorable factors, instrumental to the invention of neurology, converged at the University of Oxford. Animals and men were believed to have a material soul whose functions throughout the nervous system were accessible to research. In 1659 inductive methods were introduced in clinical medicine by Thomas Willis, the founder of English epidemiology and biochemistry. The Vertuosi,who later founded the Royal Society, performed chemical experiments in teams, and Willis, head of their laboratory, gained experience in teamwork. In 1658 J.J. Wepfer published his method of dye injection in cerebral vessels at autopsy, and Christopher Wren had already experimented with intravenous injections. William Petty had performed dissections at Leiden, training with Francis Sylvius's brain and comparative anatomy. Petty came to Oxford in 1650, began to study chemistry with Willis, and instructed him in Sylvius's methods of cerebral and comparative anatomy. Willis continued this work with a team of highly qualified colleagues, Wren included, and published the first monograph on brain anatomy, Cerebri anatome, in 1664. This Latin book, illustrated by Wren, came out in four editions in the first year, and was reprinted up to 1720. It contained a definition of reflex action, the recognition of the general functions of cortex, white matter, and brain tracts, a complete description of the autonomic nervous system, Willis's new term "Neurologia," and his promise to follow up with his "Psychologia." He presented the latter in 1672 as De anima brutorum, a book on the material soul of animals and man as the carrier of all functions of the nervous system. There was a physiological part, a textbook of neurophysiology, and a pathological part, a compendium of neurological and psychiatric syndromes, with early descriptions of myasthenia, restless legs, narcolepsy, dissociative and bipolar disease, and general paralysis of the insane. In 1667 he published a book on convulsive

  5. Spatial control of reflexes, posture and movement in normal conditions and after neurological lesions

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    Feldman Anatol G.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Control of reflexes is usually associated with central modulation of their sensitivity (gain or phase-dependent inhibition and facilitation of their influences on motoneurons (reflex gating. Accumulated empirical findings show that the gain modulation and reflex gating are secondary, emergent properties of central control of spatial thresholds at which reflexes become functional. In this way, the system pre-determines, in a feedforward and task-specific way, where, in a spatial domain or a frame of reference, muscles are allowed to work without directly prescribing EMG activity and forces. This control strategy is illustrated by considering reflex adaptation to repeated muscle stretches in healthy subjects, a process associated with implicit learning and generalization. It has also been shown that spasticity, rigidity, weakness and other neurological motor deficits may have a common source – limitations in the range of spatial threshold control elicited by neural lesions.

  6. Dock protein family in brain development and neurological disease.

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    Shi, Lei

    2013-11-01

    The family of dedicator of cytokinesis (Dock), a protein family that belongs to the atypical Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rac and/or Cdc42 GTPases, plays pivotal roles in various processes of brain development. To date, 11 members of Docks have been identified in the mammalian system. Emerging evidence has suggested that members of the Dock family are associated with several neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases, including Alzheimer disease and autism spectrum disorders. This review summarizes recent advances on the understanding of the roles of the Dock protein family in normal and diseased processes in the nervous system. Furthermore, interacting proteins and the molecular regulation of Docks are discussed.

  7. Development of a neurology rotation for internal medicine residents in Haiti.

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    Berkowitz, Aaron L; Martineau, Louine; Morse, Michelle E; Israel, Kerling

    2016-01-15

    In many low-income countries where there are few or no neurologists, patients with neurologic diseases are cared for by primary care physicians who receive no formal training in neurology. Here, we report our experience creating a neurology rotation for internal medicine residents in rural Haiti through a collaboration between a public academic medical center in Haiti and a visiting neurologist. We describe the structure of the rotation and the factors that led to its development.

  8. [Contribution of E. W. Schmidt to the development of Soviet neurology and its international relations].

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    Schulze, H A

    1987-05-01

    A short retrospect, occasioned by the death on July 13, 1985, of E. W. Schmidt, of his career as director of the Neurological Research Institute at the Academy of Medical Sciences of the USSR, and his influence as scientist, medical man, and humanist on the development of neurology in the Soviet Union and its representation on the international scene.

  9. MRI findings with periventricular leukomalacia. Correlation with neurological development

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    Uehara, Hisakazu; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Koh; Doi, Yasuo; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Murata, Miyuki; Sawada, Tadashi [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan); Kotani, Hiromi; Goma, Hideyo

    1998-08-01

    In 22 infants with PVL, who were born at 35 weeks gestational age or less, correlation between severity of white matter lesions on MRI and developmental quotient (DQ) of infants was studied. MRI was obtained later than 7 months of age and the severity of white matter lesions was classified as follows: Group I: periventricular white matter is focally affected (n=7), Group II: periventricular white matter is diffusely affected (n=10), and Group III: subcortical white matter is also affected (n=5). Perinatal characteristics including gestational weeks, birth weight, Apgar score, procedure of delivery, and duration of mechanical ventilation revealed no significant differences between the groups. Seventeen infants developed cerebral palsy, while the other 5 infants (4 in Group I, 1 in Group II) showed normal development at 1 year of age, MRI of 4 among these 5 infants only revealed unilateral cysts around the anterior horn of lateral ventricles. Enjoji developmental test showed significant differences in gross motor DQ between Group I and III at both 1 and 2 corrected ages. Although more quantitative criteria will be required for precise classification, it is suggested that the severity of the white matter lesions on MRI is well correlated with gross motor development in PVL. (author)

  10. Hybrid embryonic stem cell-derived tetraploid mice show apparently normal morphological, physiological, and neurological characteristics.

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    Schwenk, Frieder; Zevnik, Branko; Brüning, Jens; Röhl, Mathias; Willuweit, Antje; Rode, Anja; Hennek, Thomas; Kauselmann, Gunther; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Kühn, Ralf

    2003-06-01

    ES cell-tetraploid (ES) mice are completely derived from embryonic stem cells and can be obtained at high efficiency upon injection of hybrid ES cells into tetraploid blastocysts. This method allows the immediate generation of targeted mouse mutants from genetically modified ES cell clones, in contrast to the standard protocol, which involves the production of chimeras and several breeding steps. To provide a baseline for the analysis of ES mouse mutants, we performed a phenotypic characterization of wild-type B6129S6F(1) ES mice in relation to controls of the same age, sex, and genotype raised from normal matings. The comparison of 90 morphological, physiological, and behavioral parameters revealed elevated body weight and hematocrit as the only major difference of ES mice, which exhibited an otherwise normal phenotype. We further demonstrate that ES mouse mutants can be produced from mutant hybrid ES cells and analyzed within a period of only 4 months. Thus, ES mouse technology is a valid research tool for rapidly elucidating gene function in vivo.

  11. Prevalence of lateral ventricle asymmetry in brain MRI studies of neurologically normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivetta, Mauro; De Risio, Luisa; Newton, Richard; Dennis, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetry of the cerebral lateral ventricles is a common finding in cross-sectional imaging of otherwise normal canine brains and has been assumed to be incidental. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the prevalence of ventricular asymmetry in brain MRI studies of normal dogs and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Brain MRI archives were searched for 100 neurologically normal dogs (Group 1) and 100 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (Group 2). For each dog, asymmetry of the lateral ventricles was subjectively classified as absent, mild, moderate, and severe based on a consensus of two observers who were unaware of group status. Ventricular areas were measured from transverse T1W images at the level of the interthalamic adhesion. An asymmetry ratio was calculated as the ratio of the larger to smaller ventricular transverse area. There was excellent agreement between subjective assessments of ventricular asymmetry and quantitative assessments using asymmetry ratios (k = 0.995). The prevalence of asymmetry was 38% in Group 1 dogs and 44% in Group 2 dogs. Assymmetry was scored as mild in the majority of Group 2 dogs. There was no significant association between presence/absence and degree of ventricular asymmetry vs. dog group, age, gender, or skull conformation. Findings from the current study supported previously published assumptions that asymmetry of the lateral cerebral ventricles is an incidental finding in MRI studies of the canine brain.

  12. Neurological channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2010-01-01

    Inherited ion channel mutations can affect the entire nervous system. Many cause paroxysmal disturbances of brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or skeletal muscle function, with normal neurological development and function in between attacks. To fully understand how mutations of ion channel genes cause disease, we need to know the normal location and function of the channel subunit, consequences of the mutation for biogenesis and biophysical properties, and possible compensatory changes in other channels that contribute to cell or circuit excitability. Animal models of monogenic channelopathies increasingly help our understanding. An important challenge for the future is to determine how more subtle derangements of ion channel function, which arise from the interaction of genetic and environmental influences, contribute to common paroxysmal disorders, including idiopathic epilepsy and migraine, that share features with rare monogenic channelopathies.

  13. Physical Development: What's Normal? What's Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Physical Development: What’s Normal? What’s Not? Page Content Article ... growth . The timing and speed of a child's physical development can vary a lot, because it is ...

  14. Characterization of the various forms of the Reelin protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of normal subjects and in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Nina; Sindic, Christian J M; Goffinet, André M

    2004-03-01

    Reelin is a large extracellular glycoprotein that is defective in reeler mutant mice and plays a well-established role during brain development in human as well as rodents. In the adult brain, Reelin is expressed in a subset of GABAergic interneurons. Its role in disease states is not clearly defined, although it is implicated in autism and psychoses such as schizophrenia. In this report, we show that Reelin immunoreactive proteins can be detected in the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with monoclonal antibodies directed against the N- and C-terminal regions of the protein. In CSF, Reelin is present as different products due to processing at two main sites; preservation at -20 degrees C increases processing further. CSF Reelin originates from the brain tissue and not from plasma. The protein was detected in comparable concentrations in children and adults, and the signal varied largely from subject to subject with no obvious correlation with age or neurological disease state.

  15. Genome-wide genotyping in Parkinson's disease and neurologically normal controls: first stage analysis and public release of data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Hon-Chung; Scholz, Sonja; Matarin, Mar; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Hernandez, Dena; Britton, Angela; Gibbs, J Raphael; Langefeld, Carl; Stiegert, Matt L; Schymick, Jennifer; Okun, Michael S; Mandel, Ronald J; Fernandez, Hubert H; Foote, Kelly D; Rodríguez, Ramón L; Peckham, Elizabeth; De Vrieze, Fabienne Wavrant; Gwinn-Hardy, Katrina; Hardy, John A; Singleton, Andrew

    2006-11-01

    Several genes underlying rare monogenic forms of Parkinson's disease have been identified over the past decade. Despite evidence for a role for genetics in sporadic Parkinson's disease, few common genetic variants have been unequivocally linked to this disorder. We sought to identify any common genetic variability exerting a large effect in risk for Parkinson's disease in a population cohort and to produce publicly available genome-wide genotype data that can be openly mined by interested researchers and readily augmented by genotyping of additional repository subjects. We did genome-wide, single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP) genotyping of publicly available samples from a cohort of Parkinson's disease patients (n=267) and neurologically normal controls (n=270). More than 408,000 unique SNPs were used from the Illumina Infinium I and HumanHap300 assays. We have produced around 220 million genotypes in 537 participants. This raw genotype data has been and as such is the first publicly accessible high-density SNP data outside of the International HapMap Project. We also provide here the results of genotype and allele association tests. We generated publicly available genotype data for Parkinson's disease patients and controls so that these data can be mined and augmented by other researchers to identify common genetic variability that results in minor and moderate risk for disease.

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms in the development of memory and their involvement in certain neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Reynoso, M A; Ochoa-Hernández, A B; Juárez-Vázquez, C I; Barros-Núñez, P

    Today, scientists accept that the central nervous system of an adult possesses considerable morphological and functional flexibility, allowing it to perform structural remodelling processes even after the individual is fully developed and mature. In addition to the vast number of genes participating in the development of memory, different known epigenetic mechanisms are involved in normal and pathological modifications to neurons and therefore also affect the mechanisms of memory development. This study entailed a systematic review of biomedical article databases in search of genetic and epigenetic factors that participate in synaptic function and memory. The activation of gene expression in response to external stimuli also occurs in differentiated nerve cells. Neural activity induces specific forms of synaptic plasticity that permit the creation and storage of long-term memory. Epigenetic mechanisms play a key role in synaptic modification processes and in the creation and development of memory. Changes in these mechanisms result in the cognitive and memory impairment seen in neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease) and in neurodevelopmental disorders (Rett syndrome, fragile X, and schizophrenia). Nevertheless, results obtained from different models are promising and point to potential treatments for some of these diseases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of the Neurological Institute: a strategic, improvement, and systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, Nancy; McCartney, Leigh Ann; Hdeib, Alia; Selman, Warren R

    2011-06-01

    The Neurological Institute at University Hospitals Case Medical Center is designed to be responsive to the ever-changing healthcare environment, aligning clinical services and goals in response to internal and external pressures for change. These goals are many, including the further development of system integration across disciplines and geographic locations, creation of a regional strategy, and research as well as education strategies that are aligned with clinical services, patient outcomes that demonstrate improved health status management, and improved financial strength. There are many details to the development of a strategic business unit such as the Neurological Institute, but this article focuses on the high-level strategies of developing the Neurological Institute and takes a closer look at the growth of one of its 16 centers of excellence.

  18. Maternal Intimate Partner Violence: Relationships with Language and Neurological Development of Infants and Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Ifeyinwa E; Sharps, Phyllis; Bronner, Yvonne; Hossain, Mian B

    2016-07-01

    Objectives This longitudinal study examined the influence of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) experience of pregnant women participating in the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program on the language and neurological development of infants and toddlers. Methods A total of 210 infants and toddlers born to women reporting low, moderate, and high levels of IPV were included in the analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the bivariate association between maternal IPV and risk of language and neurological delay of infants and toddlers and between covariates and language and neurological delay. Generalized estimating equation models with logit link was used to predict the risk of language and neurological delay of infants and toddlers as a result of maternal IPV. Results Infants and toddlers born to women exposed to moderate levels of IPV had increased odds of language delay compared to infants and toddlers of women who experienced low levels of violence (OR 5.31, 95 % CI 2.94, 9.50, p Maternal IPV is associated with increased risk of language and neurological delay of infants and toddlers. These findings have implications for health care for women and infants exposed to IPV. Clinicians including pediatricians working with pregnant women should screen for IPV throughout pregnancy to identify women and children at risk. Interventions to reduce maternal IPV and early intervention services for infants and toddlers exposed to IPV are necessary for optimal maternal and child health.

  19. Two dynamin-2 genes are required for normal zebrafish development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M Gibbs

    Full Text Available Dynamin-2 (DNM2 is a large GTPase involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and related trafficking pathways. Mutations in human DNM2 cause two distinct neuromuscular disorders: centronuclear myopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Zebrafish have been shown to be an excellent animal model for many neurologic disorders, and this system has the potential to inform our understanding of DNM2-related disease. Currently, little is known about the endogenous zebrafish orthologs to human DNM2. In this study, we characterize two zebrafish dynamin-2 genes, dnm2 and dnm2-like. Both orthologs are structurally similar to human DNM2 at the gene and protein levels. They are expressed throughout early development and in all adult tissues examined. Knockdown of dnm2 and dnm2-like gene products resulted in extensive morphological abnormalities during development, and expression of human DNM2 RNA rescued these phenotypes. Our findings suggest that dnm2 and dnm2-like are orthologs to human DNM2, and that they are required for normal zebrafish development.

  20. Impact of Maternal Folate Deficiencies on Early Neurological Development: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua T Emmerson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Folates are B-vitamins that cannot be generated de novo and are therefore obtained from the diet. In the brain, these vitamins are involved in nucleotide synthesis, DNA repair, lipid metabolism, methylation and neurotransmitter synthesis. It is well established that adequate levels of maternal folates are required for closure of the neural tube within the first month of pregnancy, however, it is not clear whether maternal folates are needed throughout pregnancy for brain development and whether they influence offspring neurological function after birth. The aim of this review is to outline current literature from epidemiological and animal model studies that shows maternal supplementation of folates throughout pregnancy does indeed affect offspring neurological function after birth. Evidence Acquisition A Medline search was performed using the following mesh terms, maternal-fetal exchange, folic acid, offspring neurologic manifestations, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR, embryology, and behavior. Results The studies described in the present review have reported that maternal deficiencies in folates during pregnancy result in changes in behavior as well as in blood and brain tissue in offspring, including altered methylation, including reduced levels of the global methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM, and increased levels of oxidative stress. Conclusions The data summarized here outlines the importance of adequate levels of folates throughout pregnancy to facilitate appropriate neurological development of offspring after birth.

  1. [Psychomotor development and its disorders: between normal and pathological development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vericat, Agustina; Bibiana Orden, Alicia

    2013-10-01

    This article discusses some aspects of psychomotor development and its disorders, with special emphasis on psychomotor retardation. Diagnostic classifications of psychomotor problems, such as DSM-IV and CIE-10, are referred to and their advantages and disadvantages are analyzed. The concept of normality as a synonym for the statistical mean in the context of psychomotor disorders is also analyzed in order to consider its dynamic and variability, thereby avoiding the normality/pathology opposition, while some issues, such as the social and cultural aspects, are highlighted, making it possible to rethink the universality and relativity of psychomotor development.

  2. MRI of normal fetal brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayer, Daniela; Kasprian, Gregor; Krampl, Elisabeth; Ulm, Barbara; Witzani, Linde; Prayer, Lucas; Brugger, Peter C

    2006-02-01

    Normal fetal brain maturation can be studied by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from the 18th gestational week (GW) to term, and relies primarily on T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted (DW) sequences. These maturational changes must be interpreted with a knowledge of the histological background and the temporal course of the respective developmental steps. In addition, MR presentation of developing and transient structures must be considered. Signal changes associated with maturational processes can mainly be ascribed to the following changes in tissue composition and organization, which occur at the histological level: (1) a decrease in water content and increasing cell-density can be recognized as a shortening of T1- and T2-relaxation times, leading to increased T1-weighted and decreased T2-weighted intensity, respectively; (2) the arrangement of microanatomical structures to create a symmetrical or asymmetrical environment, leading to structural differences that may be demonstrated by DW-anisotropy; (3) changes in non-structural qualities, such as the onset of a membrane potential in premyelinating axons. The latter process also influences the appearance of a structure on DW sequences. Thus, we will review the in vivo MR appearance of different maturational states of the fetal brain and relate these maturational states to anatomical, histological, and in vitro MRI data. Then, the development of the cerebral cortex, white matter, temporal lobe, and cerebellum will be reviewed, and the MR appearance of transient structures of the fetal brain will be shown. Emphasis will be placed on the appearance of the different structures with the various sequences. In addition, the possible utility of dynamic fetal sequences in assessing spontaneous fetal movements is discussed.

  3. MRI of normal fetal brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: Daniela.prayer@meduniwien.ac.at; Kasprian, Gregor [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Krampl, Elisabeth [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Ulm, Barbara [Department of Prenatal Diagnosis, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Witzani, Linde [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Lucas [Diagnosezentrum Urania, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    Normal fetal brain maturation can be studied by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from the 18th gestational week (GW) to term, and relies primarily on T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted (DW) sequences. These maturational changes must be interpreted with a knowledge of the histological background and the temporal course of the respective developmental steps. In addition, MR presentation of developing and transient structures must be considered. Signal changes associated with maturational processes can mainly be ascribed to the following changes in tissue composition and organization, which occur at the histological level: (1) a decrease in water content and increasing cell-density can be recognized as a shortening of T1- and T2-relaxation times, leading to increased T1-weighted and decreased T2-weighted intensity, respectively; (2) the arrangement of microanatomical structures to create a symmetrical or asymmetrical environment, leading to structural differences that may be demonstrated by DW-anisotropy; (3) changes in non-structural qualities, such as the onset of a membrane potential in premyelinating axons. The latter process also influences the appearance of a structure on DW sequences. Thus, we will review the in vivo MR appearance of different maturational states of the fetal brain and relate these maturational states to anatomical, histological, and in vitro MRI data. Then, the development of the cerebral cortex, white matter, temporal lobe, and cerebellum will be reviewed, and the MR appearance of transient structures of the fetal brain will be shown. Emphasis will be placed on the appearance of the different structures with the various sequences. In addition, the possible utility of dynamic fetal sequences in assessing spontaneous fetal movements is discussed.

  4. The development of neurosurgery at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Michael; Kitchen, Neil

    2007-11-01

    The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London is one of the oldest clinical neuroscience hospitals in the world. It was formed from the fusion of itself with the Maida Vale Hospital in 1948. More recently, in 1996, it was incorporated into the University College London Hospitals group. It has had many distinguished neurosurgeons on its staff, whose history from Sir Victor Horsley to the present is described with particular reference to the development of the specialty of neurosurgery. The current neurosurgical staff and future developments of neurosurgery at the hospital are also elucidated.

  5. Normal neurologic and developmental outcome after an accidental intravenous infusion of expressed breast milk in a neonate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, C Anthony

    2012-02-03

    Here we describe a premature male infant who was accidentally given 10 mL of expressed breast milk intravenously over a 3.5-hour period. Having survived this event with supportive care, this boy was attending regular school with no obvious neurologic or learning difficulties at 6 years of age. In 1998, after a query on an e-mail discussion group for health care providers in neonatology (NICU-net), we were informed of 8 similar events that proved fatal in 3 infants. A root-cause analysis revealed that accidental intravenous administration of breast milk or formula can be avoided by the use of color-coded enteral-administration sets with Luer connections that are not compatible with intravenous cannulas. The addition of methylene blue to feeds, or bolus enteral feeds (instead of continuous gastric feedings), may also help prevent such errors. These cases show the value of gathering information about rare but important events through a neonatal network. In addition, they confirm that prevention of medical error should focus on faulty systems rather than faulty people.

  6. Parent development in clinical child neurological assessment process: encounters with the assimilation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, Soile; Stiles, William B; Leiman, Mikael

    2011-09-01

    Child neurological diagnostic procedures involve extensive encounters with a multi-professional team and may have therapeutic effects. This study explored the therapeutic potential of the diagnostic process using the assimilation model as the conceptual frame of reference. The process of assimilation was tracked across nine consecutive encounters during the assessment of a 4-year-old girl who was referred to the child neurological team due to contact and communication problems. All parent-professional dialogues were transcribed and analyzed using dialogical sequence analysis, which yielded a core problematic reciprocal pattern that was named "controlling in relation to defiant and uncontrolled." Parent development in finding alternative patterns to excessive control was traced using the assimilation model. We could identify assimilation stages in parent development, from disowning the impact of their own actions and mainly seeing the problem as belonging to the child into a more flexible and self-related understanding of the problem. The parents also described more accommodating ways of managing the child at the follow-up. Benefits and limitations in applying the assimilation model in a non-therapy context are discussed.

  7. Normal development of the female reproductive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The embryonic development of the female reproductive system involves a progression of events that is conserved across vertebrate species. The early gonad progresses from a form that is undifferentiated in both genotypic males and females. Rudimentary male (Wolffian) and female (M...

  8. Development and implementation of a quality improvement curriculum for child neurology residents: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maski, Kiran P; Loddenkemper, Tobias; An, Sookee; Allred, Elizabeth N; Urion, David K; Leviton, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Quality improvement is a major component of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies required of all medical trainees. Currently, neither the Neurology Residency Review Committee nor the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defines the process by which this competency should be taught and assessed. We developed a quality improvement curriculum that provides mentorship for resident quality improvement projects and is clinically relevant to pediatric neurologists. Before and after implementation of the quality improvement curriculum, a 14-item survey assessed resident comfort with quality improvement project skills and attitudes about implementation of quality improvement in clinical practice using a 5-point Likert scale. We used the Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher exact tests to evaluate pre to post changes. Residents' gained confidence in their abilities to identify measures (P = 0.02) and perform root cause analysis (P = 0.02). Overall, 73% of residents were satisfied or very satisfied with the quality improvement curriculum. Our child neurology quality improvement curriculum was well accepted by trainees. We report the details of this curriculum and its impact on residents and discuss its potential to meet the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System requirements. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Annotation: Development of Facial Expression Recognition from Childhood to Adolescence--Behavioural and Neurological Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herba, Catherine; Phillips, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Background: Intact emotion processing is critical for normal emotional development. Recent advances in neuroimaging have facilitated the examination of brain development, and have allowed for the exploration of the relationships between the development of emotion processing abilities, and that of associated neural systems. Methods: A literature…

  10. Annotation: Development of Facial Expression Recognition from Childhood to Adolescence--Behavioural and Neurological Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herba, Catherine; Phillips, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Background: Intact emotion processing is critical for normal emotional development. Recent advances in neuroimaging have facilitated the examination of brain development, and have allowed for the exploration of the relationships between the development of emotion processing abilities, and that of associated neural systems. Methods: A literature…

  11. Hematological- and Neurological-Expressed Sequence 1 Gene Products in Progenitor Cells during Newt Retinal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsushi Goto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urodele amphibians such as Japanese common newts have a remarkable ability to regenerate their injured neural retina, even as adults. We found that hematological- and neurological-expressed sequence 1 (Hn1 gene was induced in depigmented retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells, and its expression was maintained at later stages of newt retinal regeneration. In this study, we investigated the distribution of the HN1 protein, the product of the Hn1 gene, in the developing retinas. Our immunohistochemical analyses suggested that the HN1 protein was highly expressed in an immature retina, and the subcellular localization changed during this retinogenesis as observed in newt retinal regeneration. We also found that the expression of Hn1 gene was not induced in mouse after retinal removal. Our results showed that Hn1 gene can be useful for detection of undifferentiated and dedifferentiated cells during both newt retinal development and regeneration.

  12. Development of a Kinect-based exergaming system for motor rehabilitation in neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estepa, A.; Sponton Piriz, S.; Albornoz, E.; Martínez, C.

    2016-04-01

    The development of videogames for physical therapy, known as exergames, has gained much interest in the last years. In this work, a sytem for rehabilitation and clinical evaluation of neurological patients is presented. The Microsoft Kinect device is used to track the full body of patients, and three games were developed to exercise and assess different aspects of balance and gait rehabilitation. The system provides visual feedback by means of an avatar that follows the movements of the patients, and sound and visual stimuli for giving orders during the experience. Also, the system includes a database and management tools for further analysis and monitoring of therapies. The results obtained show, on the one side, a great reception and interest of patients to use the system. On the other side, the specialists considered very useful the data collected and the quantitative analysis provided by the system, which was then adopted for the clinical routine.

  13. Adolescent brain development in normality and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciana, Monica

    2013-11-01

    Since this journal's inception, the field of adolescent brain development has flourished, as researchers have investigated the underpinnings of adolescent risk-taking behaviors. Explanations based on translational models initially attributed such behaviors to executive control deficiencies and poor frontal lobe function. This conclusion was bolstered by evidence that the prefrontal cortex and its interconnections are among the last brain regions to structurally and functionally mature. As substantial heterogeneity of prefrontal function was revealed, applications of neuroeconomic theory to adolescent development led to dual systems models of behavior. Current epidemiological trends, behavioral observations, and functional magnetic resonance imaging based brain activity patterns suggest a quadratic increase in limbically mediated incentive motivation from childhood to adolescence and a decline thereafter. This elevation occurs in the context of immature prefrontal function, so motivational strivings may be difficult to regulate. Theoretical models explain this patterning through brain-based accounts of subcortical-cortical integration, puberty-based models of adolescent sensation seeking, and neurochemical dynamics. Empirically sound tests of these mechanisms, as well as investigations of biology-context interactions, represent the field's most challenging future goals, so that applications to psychopathology can be refined and so that developmental cascades that incorporate neurobiological variables can be modeled.

  14. Visual Functions in Relation with Neonatal Cerebral Ultrasound, Neurology and Cognitive Development in Very-Low-Birthweight Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisglas-Kuperus, N.; Heersema, D. J.; Baerts, W.; Fetter, W. P. F.; Smrkovsky, M.; van Hof-van Duin, J.; Sauer, P. J. J.

    1993-01-01

    In order to determine the relationship between visual functions and neonatal cerebral ultrasound, neurological examinations and cognitive development, a prospective longitudinal study was conducted in 69 high-risk very-low-birthweight children. Visual development was studied at 1 and 2.6 years of co

  15. Development of clinical guidelines for the prescription of orthoses in patients with neurological disorders in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, J. M.; Geertzen, J. H. B.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop guidelines for the prescription of ankle-foot, knee, wrist-hand and elbow orthoses for patients with neurological disorders. The study is part of a more comprehensive study focusing on the development of clinical guidelines for the prescription of these ort

  16. Assessment of speech in neurological disorders: Development of a Swahili screening test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Miller

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessments for acquired motor-speech disorders that look at movements of the articulators would appear at first glance to be universal. This may be true for the most basic non-speech aspects of movement. We argue that assessments for speech motor control must be attuned to language-specific variables to be fully valid. We describe the rationale for, and development of a motor-speech-disorder screening test for Swahili speakers which includes impairment measures as well as measures of intelligibility and speech-voice naturalness. We further describe its initial validation in terms of content validity, feasibility of administration and scoring without requirements for lengthy training and technical expertise and application to groups of people with and without Parkinson’s disease in Tanzania. Results indicate that the protocol is ready to use in so far as it is acceptable to users (clinicians, patients, is feasible to use, shows good interrater reliability, and is capable of differentiating performance in healthy speakers and those whose speech is disordered. We highlight needs for further development, including issues around training, development of local norms for healthy speakers and for speakers with a variety of neurological disturbances, and extension of the tool to cover culturally valid assessment of impact of communication disorders.

  17. Annotation: Development of facial expression recognition from childhood to adolescence: behavioural and neurological perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herba, Catherine; Phillips, Mary

    2004-10-01

    Intact emotion processing is critical for normal emotional development. Recent advances in neuroimaging have facilitated the examination of brain development, and have allowed for the exploration of the relationships between the development of emotion processing abilities, and that of associated neural systems. A literature review was performed of published studies examining the development of emotion expression recognition in normal children and psychiatric populations, and of the development of neural systems important for emotion processing. Few studies have explored the development of emotion expression recognition throughout childhood and adolescence. Behavioural studies suggest continued development throughout childhood and adolescence (reflected by accuracy scores and speed of processing), which varies according to the category of emotion displayed. Factors such as sex, socio-economic status, and verbal ability may also affect this development. Functional neuroimaging studies in adults highlight the role of the amygdala in emotion processing. Results of the few neuroimaging studies in children have focused on the role of the amygdala in the recognition of fearful expressions. Although results are inconsistent, they provide evidence throughout childhood and adolescence for the continued development of and sex differences in amygdalar function in response to fearful expressions. Studies exploring emotion expression recognition in psychiatric populations of children and adolescents suggest deficits that are specific to the type of disorder and to the emotion displayed. Results from behavioural and neuroimaging studies indicate continued development of emotion expression recognition and neural regions important for this process throughout childhood and adolescence. Methodological inconsistencies and disparate findings make any conclusion difficult, however. Further studies are required examining the relationship between the development of emotion expression

  18. Developing Visualization Support System for Teaching/Learning Database Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folorunso, Olusegun; Akinwale, AdioTaofeek

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In tertiary institution, some students find it hard to learn database design theory, in particular, database normalization. The purpose of this paper is to develop a visualization tool to give students an interactive hands-on experience in database normalization process. Design/methodology/approach: The model-view-controller architecture…

  19. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  20. GABAB receptor trafficking and interacting proteins: targets for the development of highly specific therapeutic strategies to treat neurological disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benke, Dietmar

    2013-12-01

    GABAB receptors mediate slow inhibitory neurotransmission throughout the central nervous system thereby controlling the excitability of neurons. They have been implicated in numerous neurological disorders making them an attractive drug target. However, due to considerable side effects, the agonist baclofen is so far the only drug on the market targeting GABAB receptors, primarily for the treatment of spasticity. Because GABAB receptors are involved in a variety of brain functions it is rather unlikely to avoid unwanted effects with systemically administered drugs directly addressing ligand binding sites of the receptor. To minimize side effects, it would be desirable to target only those receptors involved in a given pathological state. This commentary discusses the idea that restoring impaired GABAB receptor function in diseased neurons by interfering with receptor-protein interactions may be an approach to specifically target only those receptors involved in the pathological state. Two recently discovered mechanisms that down-regulate the level of functional GABAB receptors most likely contribute to cerebral ischemia and neuropathic pain, respectively. In both mechanisms, small interfering peptides disrupting protein-protein interactions may offer a highly specific means to restore normal receptor function selectively at the site of malfunction. If restored functional GABAB receptor expression in these diseases has beneficial effects, this may serve as a starting point for the development of a highly specific therapeutic interventions. Such an approach is expected to minimize side effects because it promises to leave those GABAB receptors unaffected which are not involved in the dysfunction.

  1. Increased nuchal translucency, normal karyotype and infant development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miltoft, Caroline Borregaard; Ekelund, Charlotte Kvist; Hansen, Bo Mølholm

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether chromosomally normal fetuses with a nuchal translucency (NT) = 99th percentile(3.5 mm) in the first trimester have an increased risk of delayed development at 2 years of age.......To investigate whether chromosomally normal fetuses with a nuchal translucency (NT) = 99th percentile(3.5 mm) in the first trimester have an increased risk of delayed development at 2 years of age....

  2. Minor neurological dysfunction, cognitive development, and somatic development at the age of 3 to 7 years after dexamethasone treatment in very-low birth-weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, J; Tomaselli, J; Maurer, U; Mueller, W; Urlesberger, B

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess minor neurological dysfunction, cognitive development, and somatic development after dexamethasone therapy in very-low-birthweight infants. Thirty-three children after dexamethasone treatment were matched to 33 children without dexamethasone treatment. Data were assessed at the age of 3-7 years. Dexamethasone was started between the 7th and the 28th day of life over 7 days with a total dose of 2.35 mg/kg/day. Exclusion criteria were asphyxia, malformations, major surgical interventions, small for gestational age, intraventricular haemorrhage grades III and IV, periventricular leukomalacia, and severe psychomotor retardation. Each child was examined by a neuropediatrician for minor neurological dysfunctions and tested by a psychologist for cognitive development with a Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children and a Draw-a-Man Test. There were no differences in demographic data, growth, and socio-economic status between the two groups. Fine motor skills and gross motor function were significantly better in the control group (pdevelopment of speech, social development, and the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children. After dexamethasone treatment, children showed a higher rate of minor neurological dysfunctions. Neurological development was affected even without neurological diagnosis. Further long-term follow-up studies will be necessary to fully evaluate the impact of dexamethasone on neurological and cognitive development.

  3. [Intermediate neurological development of 60 neonates weighing 1500 grams or less at birth. Predictive value of initial findings (clinical aspects, electroencephalograms and brain imaging)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannot, E; Fessard, C; Parain, D; Ensel, P; Le Dosseur, P; Brossard, V; Pierre, G; Devaux, A M; Thiebot, J

    1986-06-01

    60 low birthweight (less than or equal to 1,500 g) are distributed according to existence or not, and intensity of brain disturbances, during the neonatal period; appreciated by neurological examinations, early EEG and brain imaging during the second month of life. At 18 months, at least, neurological outcome is normal for 46 children (but 6 had transient neuromotor anomalies), 14 have sequelae (7 mild, 7 major). All children with clinical neurological examination carried out during the neonatal period are normal at follow up. It is true also for the children without EEG anomaly and normal brain imaging. The early prediction of neurological outcome can be made easily with consideration of these three data. Standardised test are proposed, during the neonatal period, for these low birth weight infants.

  4. Iatrogenic neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposato, Luciano A; Fustinoni, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic disease is one of the most frequent causes of hospital admissions and constitutes a growing public health problem. The most common type of iatrogenic neurologic disease is pharmacologic, and the central and peripheral nervous systems are particularly vulnerable. Despite this, iatrogenic disease is generally overlooked as a differential diagnosis among neurologic patients. The clinical picture of pharmacologically mediated iatrogenic neurologic disease can range from mild to fatal. Common and uncommon forms of drug toxicity are comprehensively addressed in this chapter. While the majority of neurologic adverse effects are listed and referenced in the tables, the most relevant issues are further discussed in the text.

  5. Development of suspended normal-metal-type tunneling junction refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Kashiwaya, Hiromi; Koyanagi, Masao; Tanaka, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a suspended normal-metal-type superconducting-normal metal-superconductor tunneling junction refrigerator for the cooling of highly sensitive sensors operating at ultralow temperatures. The performance of the refrigerator is evaluated by comparing the experimental conductance with the numerical results of a theoretical formulation. The lowest temperature of 0.093 K at a bath temperature of 0.334 K indicates the successful operation of the refrigerator. The maximum cooling power of the present refrigerator estimated on the basis of the nonequilibrium stationary state model is 213 pW for a junction area of 40 × 7 µm2.

  6. MRI of normal and pathological fetal lung development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprian, Gregor; Balassy, Csilla; Brugger, Peter C; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-02-01

    Normal fetal lung development is a complex process influenced by mechanical and many biochemical factors. In addition to ultrasound, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) constitutes a new method to investigate this process in vivo during the second and third trimester. The techniques of MRI volumetry, assessment of signal intensities, and MRI spectroscopy of the fetal lung have been used to analyze this process and have already been applied clinically to identify abnormal fetal lung growth. Particularly in conditions such as oligohydramnios and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), pulmonary hypoplasia may be the cause of neonatal death. A precise diagnosis and quantification of compromised fetal lung development may improve post- and perinatal management. The main events in fetal lung development are reviewed and MR volumetric data from 106 normal fetuses, as well as different examples of pathological lung growth, are provided.

  7. MRI of normal and pathological fetal lung development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasprian, Gregor [University Clinic of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: gregor.kasprian@meduniwien.ac.at; Balassy, Csilla [University Clinic of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela [University Clinic of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    Normal fetal lung development is a complex process influenced by mechanical and many biochemical factors. In addition to ultrasound, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) constitutes a new method to investigate this process in vivo during the second and third trimester. The techniques of MRI volumetry, assessment of signal intensities, and MRI spectroscopy of the fetal lung have been used to analyze this process and have already been applied clinically to identify abnormal fetal lung growth. Particularly in conditions such as oligohydramnios and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), pulmonary hypoplasia may be the cause of neonatal death. A precise diagnosis and quantification of compromised fetal lung development may improve post- and perinatal management. The main events in fetal lung development are reviewed and MR volumetric data from 106 normal fetuses, as well as different examples of pathological lung growth, are provided.

  8. The discovery of human auditory-motor entrainment and its role in the development of neurologic music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaut, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of rhythmic auditory-motor entrainment in clinical populations was a historical breakthrough in demonstrating for the first time a neurological mechanism linking music to retraining brain and behavioral functions. Early pilot studies from this research center were followed up by a systematic line of research studying rhythmic auditory stimulation on motor therapies for stroke, Parkinson's disease, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy, and other movement disorders. The comprehensive effects on improving multiple aspects of motor control established the first neuroscience-based clinical method in music, which became the bedrock for the later development of neurologic music therapy. The discovery of entrainment fundamentally shifted and extended the view of the therapeutic properties of music from a psychosocially dominated view to a view using the structural elements of music to retrain motor control, speech and language function, and cognitive functions such as attention and memory. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Depression and neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piber, D; Hinkelmann, K; Gold, S M; Heesen, C; Spitzer, C; Endres, M; Otte, C

    2012-11-01

    In many neurological diseases a depressive syndrome is a characteristic sign of the primary disease or is an important comorbidity. Post-stroke depression, for example, is a common and relevant complication following ischemic brain infarction. Approximately 4 out of every 10 stroke patients develop depressive disorders in the course of the disease which have a disadvantageous effect on the course and the prognosis. On the other hand depression is also a risk factor for certain neurological diseases as was recently demonstrated in a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies which revealed a much higher stroke risk for depressive patients. Furthermore, depression plays an important role in other neurological diseases with respect to the course and quality of life, such as Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. This article gives a review of the most important epidemiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of depressive disorders as a comorbidity of neurological diseases and as a risk factor for neurological diseases.

  10. Trps1 is necessary for normal temporomandibular joint development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michikami, Ikumi; Fukushi, Toshiya; Honma, Shiho; Yoshioka, Seisuke; Itoh, Shunji; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Kurisu, Kojiro; Ooshima, Takashi; Wakisaka, Satoshi; Abe, Makoto

    2012-04-01

    Mutation of the human TRPS1 gene leads to trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS), which is characterized by an abnormal development of various organs including the craniofacial skeleton. Trps1 has recently been shown to be expressed in the jaw joints of zebrafish; however, whether Trps1 is expressed in the mammalian temporomandibular joint (TMJ), or whether it is necessary for TMJ development is unknown. We have analyzed (1) the expression pattern of Trps1 during TMJ development in mice and (2) TMJ development in Trps1 knockout animals. Trps1 is expressed in the maxillo-mandibular junction at embryonic day (E) 11.5. At E15.5, expression is restricted to the developing condylar cartilage and to the surrounding joint disc progenitor cells. In Trps1 knockout mice, the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone forms relatively normally but the condylar process is extremely small and the joint disc and cavities do not develop. The initiation of condyle formation is slightly delayed in the mutants at E14.5; however, at E18.5, the flattened chondrocyte layer is narrowed and most of the condylar chondrocytes exhibit precocious chondrocyte maturation. Expression of Runx2 and its target genes is expanded toward the condylar apex in the mutants. These observations underscore the indispensable role played by Trps1 in normal TMJ development in supporting the differentiation of disc and synoviocyte progenitor cells and in coordinating condylar chondrocyte differentiation.

  11. Vitronectin is not essential for normal mammalian development and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X; Saunders, T L; Camper, S A; Samuelson, L C; Ginsburg, D

    1995-01-01

    Vitronectin (VN) is an abundant glycoprotein present in plasma and the extracellular matrix of most tissues. Though the precise function of VN in vivo is unknown, it has been implicated as a participant in diverse biological processes, including cell attachment and spreading, complement activation, and regulation of hemostasis. The major site of synthesis appears to be the liver, though VN is also found in the brain at an early stage of mouse organogenesis, suggesting that it may play an important role in mouse development. Genetic deficiency of VN has not been reported in humans or in other higher organisms. To examine the biologic function of VN within the context of the intact animal, we have established a murine model for VN deficiency through targeted disruption of the murine VN gene. Southern blot analysis of DNA obtained from homozygous null mice demonstrates deletion of all VN coding sequences, and immunological analysis confirms the complete absence of VN protein expression in plasma. However, heterozygous mice carrying one normal and one null VN allele and homozygous null mice completely deficient in VN demonstrate normal development, fertility, and survival. Sera obtained from VN-deficient mice are completely deficient in "serum spreading factor" and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 binding activities. These observations demonstrate that VN is not essential for cell adhesion and migration during normal mouse development and suggest that its role in these processes may partially overlap with other adhesive matrix components. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8618914

  12. The long and the short of it: Gene and environment interactions during early cortical development and consequences for long-term neurological disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen eStolp

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical development is a complex amalgamation of proliferation, migration, differentiation and circuit formation. These processes follow defined timescales and are controlled by a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. It is currently unclear how robust and flexible these processes are and whether the developing brain has the capacity to recover from disruptions to normal cortical development. What is clear is that there are a number of cognitive disorders or conditions that are elicited as a result of disrupted cortical development, although it may take a long time for the full pathophysiology of the conditions to be realised clinically. The critical window for the manifestation of a neurodevelopmental disorder is prolonged, and there is the potential for a complex interplay between genes and environment. While there have been extended investigations into the genetic basis of a number of neurological disorders, limited definitive associations have been discovered. Many environmental factors, including inflammation and stress, have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, and it may be that a better understanding of the interplay between genes and environment will speed progress in this field. In particular, the development of the brain needs to be considered in the context of the whole materno-foetal unit as the degree of the metabolic, endocrine or inflammatory responses, for example, will greatly influence the environment in which the brain develops. This review will emphasize the importance of extending neurodevelopmental studies to the contribution of the placenta, vasculature, cerebrospinal fluid, and to maternal and foetal immune response. These combined investigations are more likely to reveal genetic and environmental factors that influence the different stages of neuronal development and potentially lead to the better understanding of the aetiology of neurological disorders such as autism, epilepsy, cerebral palsy and

  13. [Palliative care in neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provinciali, Leandro; Tarquini, Daniela; De Falco, Fabrizio A; Carlini, Giulia; Zappia, Mario; Toni, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care in neurology is characterized by the need of taking into account some distinguishing features which supplement and often differ from the general palliative approach to cancer or to severe organ failures. Such position is emphasized by a new concept of palliative assistance which is not limited to the "end of life" stage, as it was the traditional one, but is applied along the entire course of progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions. There are various reasons accounting for a differentiation of palliative care in neurology and for the development of specific expertise; the long duration of the advanced stages of many neurological diseases and the distinguishing features of some clinical problems (cognitive disorders, psychic disorders, etc.), in addition to the deterioration of some general aspects (nutrition, etc.), make the general criteria adopted for cancer, severe respiratory, hepatic or renal failures and heart failure inadequate. The neurological diseases which could benefit from the development of a specific palliative approach are dementia, cerebrovascular diseases, movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases, severe traumatic brain injury, brain cancers and multiple sclerosis, as well as less frequent conditions. The growing literature on palliative care in neurology provides evidence of the neurological community's increasing interest in taking care of the advanced and terminal stages of nervous system diseases, thus encouraging research, training and updating in such direction. This document aims to underline the specific neurological requirements concerning the palliative assistance.

  14. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  15. [Elevation of proinflammatory cytokines level at early age as the risk factor of neurological and mental pathology development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubarev, O E; Klimenko, V M

    2011-10-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines Interleukin-1, Interleukin-6 (IL-1, IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), the key mediators of neuroimmune interactions, are the common pathogenic part of various kinds of the perinatal pathology leading to severe neurological and mental diseases. In the review, features of expression of the proinflammatory cytokines and their receptors in the brain at early age under normal and pathological conditions, their influence on processes of maturing of the CNS cells are described, the data of experimental and clinical researches of disturbances of the mental functions arising in adults owing to elevation of the IL-1, IL-6 levels and TNFalpha in early ontogenesis are cited. The role of the cytokines in pathogenesis of schizophrenia, a syndrome of attention deficiency, autism and a Parkinsonism is discussed.

  16. Neurology in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chong-Tin

    2015-02-10

    Asia is important as it accounts for more than half of the world population. The majority of Asian countries fall into the middle income category. As for cultural traditions, Asia is highly varied, with many languages spoken. The pattern of neurologic diseases in Asia is largely similar to the West, with some disease features being specific to Asia. Whereas Asia constitutes 60% of the world's population, it contains only 20% of the world's neurologists. This disparity is particularly evident in South and South East Asia. As for neurologic care, it is highly variable depending on whether it is an urban or rural setting, the level of economic development, and the system of health care financing. To help remedy the shortage of neurologists, most counties with larger populations have established training programs in neurology. These programs are diverse, with many areas of concern. There are regional organizations serving as a vehicle for networking in neurology and various subspecialties, as well as an official journal (Neurology Asia). The Asian Epilepsy Academy, with its emphasis on workshops in various locations, EEG certification examination, and fellowships, may provide a template of effective regional networking for improving neurology care in the region. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Development and validation of a computerized algorithm for International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walden, K; Bélanger, L M; Biering-Sørensen, F

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Validation study. OBJECTIVES: To describe the development and validation of a computerized application of the international standards for neurological classification of spinal cord injury (ISNCSCI). SETTING: Data from acute and rehabilitation care. METHODS: The Rick Hansen Institute......-validation of the algorithm in phase five using 108 new RHSCIR cases did not identify the need for any further changes, as all discrepancies were due to clinician errors. The web-based application and the algorithm code are freely available at www.isncscialgorithm.com. CONCLUSION: The RHI-ISNCSCI Algorithm provides...... by funding from Health Canada and Western Economic Diversification Canada....

  18. The normal development of Platynereis dumerilii (Nereididae, Annelida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrich Thorsten

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii is an emerging model organism for the study of molecular developmental processes, evolution, neurobiology and marine biology. Annelids belong to the Lophotrochozoa, the so far understudied third major branch of bilaterian animals besides deuterostomes and ecdysozoans. P. dumerilii has proven highly relevant to explore ancient bilaterian conditions via comparison to the deuterostomes, because it has accumulated less evolutionary change than conventional ecdysozoan models. Previous staging was mainly referring to hours post fertilization but did not allow matching stages between studies performed at (even slightly different temperatures. To overcome this, and to provide a first comprehensive description of P. dumerilii normal development, a temperature-independent staging system is needed. Results Platynereis dumerilii normal development is subdivided into 16 stages, starting with the zygote and ending with the death of the mature worms after delivering their gametes. The stages described can be easily identified by conventional light microscopy or even by dissecting scope. Developmental landmarks such as the beginning of phototaxis, the visibility of the stomodeal opening and of the chaetae, the first occurrence of the ciliary bands, the formation of the parapodia, the extension of antennae and cirri, the onset of feeding and other characteristics are used to define different developmental stages. The morphology of all larval stages as well as of juveniles and adults is documented by light microscopy. We also provide an overview of important steps in the development of the nervous system and of the musculature, using fluorescent labeling techniques and confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Timing of each developmental stage refers to hours post fertilization at 18 ± 0.1°C. For comparison, we determined the pace of development of larvae raised at 14°C, 16°C, 20°C, 25°C, 28°C and

  19. Noncoding RNAs and RNA editing in brain development, functional diversification, and neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Mark F; Mattick, John S

    2007-07-01

    The progressive maturation and functional plasticity of the nervous system in health and disease involve a dynamic interplay between the transcriptome and the environment. There is a growing awareness that the previously unexplored molecular and functional interface mediating these complex gene-environmental interactions, particularly in brain, may encompass a sophisticated RNA regulatory network involving the twin processes of RNA editing and multifaceted actions of numerous subclasses of non-protein-coding RNAs. The mature nervous system encompasses a wide range of cell types and interconnections. Long-term changes in the strength of synaptic connections are thought to underlie memory retrieval, formation, stabilization, and effector functions. The evolving nervous system involves numerous developmental transitions, such as neurulation, neural tube patterning, neural stem cell expansion and maintenance, lineage elaboration, differentiation, axonal path finding, and synaptogenesis. Although the molecular bases for these processes are largely unknown, RNA-based epigenetic mechanisms appear to be essential for orchestrating these precise and versatile biological phenomena and in defining the etiology of a spectrum of neurological diseases. The concerted modulation of RNA editing and the selective expression of non-protein-coding RNAs during seminal as well as continuous state transitions may comprise the plastic molecular code needed to couple the intrinsic malleability of neural network connections to evolving environmental influences to establish diverse forms of short- and long-term memory, context-specific behavioral responses, and sophisticated cognitive capacities.

  20. Determinants of the developing oral flora in normal newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, S S; Swenson, R M

    1976-10-01

    The ability of Streptococcus species to selectively adhere to the oral epithelial cells of newborns was studied in vitro. On day 1 of life, mucosal cells from normal infants demonstrated selective attraction for the natural distribution of streptococci that would soon colonize these surfaces. Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus mitis adhered well in vitro to scraped cells from cheek and tongue surfaces. Streptococcus mutans, on the other hand, exhibited feeble or no adherence to cheek or tongue cells. Adherence of Escherichia coli to oral epithelial cells was also studied. The ability of strains of E. coli to adhere to cheek and tongue cells correlated solely with the presence of cell surface substances, probably pili. These observations, made on infants at the critical moment of their developing flora, strengthen the hypothesis that the ability of bacteria to adhere to surfaces is an important determinant of their ecological place in the oral microflora.

  1. Permanent chemical phenylketonuria and a normal phenylalanine tolerance in two sisters with a normal mental development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadman, S.K.; Ketting, D.; Bree, P.K. de; Heiden, C. van der; Grimberg, M.Th.; Kruijswijk, H.

    1975-01-01

    A positive ferric chloride reaction was found at routine examination of the urine of a 14 year old mentally normal girl, admitted for complaints of headache and other meningitis-like symptoms. It turned out that she excreted permanently increased amounts of phenylpyruvic, phenyllactic and

  2. Permanent chemical phenylketonuria and a normal phenylalanine tolerance in two sisters with a normal mental development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadman, S.K.; Ketting, D.; Bree, P.K. de; Heiden, C. van der; Grimberg, M.Th.; Kruijswijk, H.

    1975-01-01

    A positive ferric chloride reaction was found at routine examination of the urine of a 14 year old mentally normal girl, admitted for complaints of headache and other meningitis-like symptoms. It turned out that she excreted permanently increased amounts of phenylpyruvic, phenyllactic and o-hydroxy

  3. The neurological disease ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark; Cox, Alexander P; Chaudhry, Naveed; Ng, Marcus; Sule, Donat; Duncan, William; Ray, Patrick; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Smith, Barry; Ruttenberg, Alan; Szigeti, Kinga; Diehl, Alexander D

    2013-12-06

    We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms 'disease', 'diagnosis', 'disease course', and 'disorder'. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. ND seeks to provide a formal foundation for the representation of clinical and research data

  4. The transcription factor Nfix is essential for normal brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litwack E David

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Nuclear Factor I (NFI multi-gene family encodes site-specific transcription factors essential for the development of a number of organ systems. We showed previously that Nfia-deficient mice exhibit agenesis of the corpus callosum and other forebrain defects; Nfib-deficient mice have defects in lung maturation and show callosal agenesis and forebrain defects resembling those seen in Nfia-deficient animals, while Nfic-deficient mice have defects in tooth root formation. Recently the Nfix gene has been disrupted and these studies indicated that there were largely uncharacterized defects in brain and skeletal development in Nfix-deficient mice. Results Here we show that disruption of Nfix by Cre-recombinase mediated excision of the 2nd exon results in defects in brain development that differ from those seen in Nfia and Nfib KO mice. In particular, complete callosal agenesis is not seen in Nfix-/- mice but rather there appears to be an overabundance of aberrant Pax6- and doublecortin-positive cells in the lateral ventricles of Nfix-/- mice, increased brain weight, expansion of the cingulate cortex and entire brain along the dorsal ventral axis, and aberrant formation of the hippocampus. On standard lab chow Nfix-/- animals show a decreased growth rate from ~P8 to P14, lose weight from ~P14 to P22 and die at ~P22. If their food is supplemented with a soft dough chow from P10, Nfix-/- animals show a lag in weight gain from P8 to P20 but then increase their growth rate. A fraction of the animals survive to adulthood and are fertile. The weight loss correlates with delayed eye and ear canal opening and suggests a delay in the development of several epithelial structures in Nfix-/- animals. Conclusion These data show that Nfix is essential for normal brain development and may be required for neural stem cell homeostasis. The delays seen in eye and ear opening and the brain morphology defects appear independent of the nutritional

  5. Tractography of the corticospinal tracts in infants with focal perinatal injury: comparison with normal controls and to motor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roze, Elise [Imperial College, Centre for the Developing Brain, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Robert Steiner MR Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); University Medical Center Groningen, Division of Neonatology, Beatrix Children' s Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands); Harris, Polly A.; Ball, Gareth; Braga, Rodrigo M.; Allsop, Joanna M.; Counsell, Serena J. [Imperial College, Centre for the Developing Brain, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Robert Steiner MR Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); Elorza, Leire Zubiaurre [Imperial College, Centre for the Developing Brain, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Robert Steiner MR Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); University of Barcelona, Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Barcelona (Spain); Merchant, Nazakat; Arichi, Tomoki; Edwards, A.D.; Cowan, Frances M. [Imperial College, Centre for the Developing Brain, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Robert Steiner MR Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Division of Neonatology, London (United Kingdom); Porter, Emma [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Division of Neonatology, London (United Kingdom); Rutherford, Mary A. [Imperial College, Centre for the Developing Brain, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Division of Neonatology, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    Our aims were to (1) assess the corticospinal tracts (CSTs) in infants with focal injury and healthy term controls using probabilistic tractography and (2) to correlate the conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and tractography findings in infants with focal injury with their later motor function. We studied 20 infants with focal lesions and 23 controls using MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. Tract volume, fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity (RD) of the CSTs were determined. Asymmetry indices (AIs) were calculated by comparing ipsilateral to contralateral CSTs. Motor outcome was assessed using a standardized neurological examination. Conventional MRI was able to predict normal motor development (n = 9) or hemiplegia (n = 6). In children who developed a mild motor asymmetry (n = 5), conventional MRI predicted a hemiplegia in two and normal motor development in three infants. The AIs for tract volume, FA, ADC and RD showed a significant difference between controls and infants who developed a hemiplegia, and RD also showed a significant difference in AI between controls and infants who developed a mild asymmetry. Conventional MRI was able to predict subsequent normal motor development or hemiplegia following focal injury in newborn infants. Measures of RD obtained from diffusion tractography may offer additional information for predicting a subsequent asymmetry in motor function. (orig.)

  6. Development of a patient reported outcome measure for fatigue in motor neurone disease: the Neurological Fatigue Index (NFI-MND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibbons Chris J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this research was to develop a disease-specific measure for fatigue in patients with motor neurone disease (MND by generating data that would fit the Rasch measurement model. Fatigue was defined as reversible motor weakness and whole-body tiredness that was predominantly brought on by muscular exertion and was partially relieved by rest. Methods Qualitative interviews were undertaken to confirm the suitability of a previously identified set of 52 neurological fatigue items as relevant to patients with MND. Patients were recruited from five U.K. MND clinics. Questionnaires were administered during clinic or by post. A sub-sample of patients completed the questionnaire again after 2-4 weeks to assess test-retest validity. Exploratory factor analyses and Rasch analysis were conducted on the item set. Results Qualitative interviews with ten MND patients confirmed the suitability of 52 previously identified neurological fatigue items as relevant to patients with MND. 298 patients consented to completing the initial questionnaire including this item set, with an additional 78 patients completing the questionnaire a second time after 4-6 weeks. Exploratory Factor Analysis identified five potential subscales that could be conceptualised as representing: 'Energy', 'Reversible muscular weakness' (shortened to 'Weakness', 'Concentration', 'Effects of heat' and 'Rest'. Of the original five factors, two factors 'Energy' and 'Weakness' met the expectations of the Rasch model. A higher order fatigue summary scale, consisting of items from the 'Energy' and 'Weakness' subscales, was found to fit the Rasch model and have acceptable unidimensionality. The two scales and the higher order summary scale were shown to fulfil model expectations, including assumptions of unidimensionality, local independency and an absence of differential item functioning. Conclusions The Neurological Fatigue Index for MND (NFI-MND is a simple, easy

  7. Design and development of "biomechatronic gym" for early detection of neurological disorders in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, F; Serio, S M; Del Maestro, M; Laschi, C; Sgandurra, G; Cioni, G; Dario, P

    2010-01-01

    The study and measurement of grasping actions and forces in humans is important in a variety of contexts. In infants, it can give insights on the typical and atypical motor development, while it poses functional and operative requirements that are not fully matched by current sensing technology. Novel approaches for measuring infants' grasping actions are based on sensorized platform usable in natural settings. A new set of instrumented toys has been designed for the assessment/stimulation of upper limbs of infants between 4 and 9 months. A purposive biomechatronic gym has been developed by integrating pressure and force sensors and visual/auditory stimulations to the usual gym structure and hanging toys (cow, flower and ring puppets), so that the infants' actions on the gym can be monitored, measured and stimulated. With the developed system, a longitudinal clinical validation has been carried out with seven healthy infants. From data analysis it is possible to identify a trend in manual forces development and this result confirms the usefulness of the system proposed as a clinical tool for monitoring infants' grasping development.

  8. Human Embryonic Stem Cells: A Model for the Study of Neural Development and Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piya Prajumwongs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the mechanism of neurogenesis has been well documented in other organisms, there might be fundamental differences between human and those species referring to species-specific context. Based on principles learned from other systems, it is found that the signaling pathways required for neural induction and specification of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs recapitulated those in the early embryo development in vivo at certain degree. This underscores the usefulness of hESCs in understanding early human neural development and reinforces the need to integrate the principles of developmental biology and hESC biology for an efficient neural differentiation.

  9. Placental Pathology, Perinatal Death, Neonatal Outcome, and Neurological Development : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roescher, Annemiek M.; Timmer, Albert; Erwich, Jan Jaap H. M.; Bos, Arend F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The placenta plays a crucial role during pregnancy for growth and development of the fetus. Less than optimal placental performance may result in morbidity or even mortality of both mother and fetus. Awareness among pediatricians, however, of the benefit of placental findings for

  10. Placental Pathology, Perinatal Death, Neonatal Outcome, and Neurological Development : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roescher, Annemiek M.; Timmer, Albert; Erwich, Jan Jaap H. M.; Bos, Arend F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The placenta plays a crucial role during pregnancy for growth and development of the fetus. Less than optimal placental performance may result in morbidity or even mortality of both mother and fetus. Awareness among pediatricians, however, of the benefit of placental findings for neonata

  11. Normal gut microbiota modulates brain development and behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rochellys Diaz Heijtz; Shugui Wang; Farhana Anuar; Yu Qian; Britta Björkholm; Annika Samuelsson; Martin L. Hibberd; Hans Forssberg; Sven Pettersson; Arturo Zychlinsky

    2011-01-01

    ...) mice with a normal gut microbiota. This behavioral phenotype is associated with altered expression of genes known to be involved in second messenger pathways and synaptic long-term potentiation in brain regions implicated in motor...

  12. [Neurology and literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2010-10-01

    Literature complements medical literature in the academic and clinical development of neurologists. The present article explores the contributions of writers of fiction on neurology. Literary works of fiction with particular reference to neurology. A symbiosis between writers of fiction and doctors has been well recognised. From Shakespeare to Cervantes by way of Dickens and Cela to writer - physicians such as Anton Chekhov or António Lobo Antunes have contributed through their medically informed literature to the better understanding of neurology. Some writers like Dostoevsky, Machado de Assis and Margiad Evans have written about their own experiences with disease thus bringing new insights to medicine. Furthermore, some neurological disorders have been largely based on literary descriptions. For instance, Dostoevsky's epilepsy has been retrospectively analysed by famous neurologists including Freud, Alajouanine or Gastaut, whilst his writings and biography have prompted others like Waxman and Geschwind to describe typical behavioural changes in temporal lobe epilepsy, finding their source of inspiration in Dostoevsky. Likewise, Cirignotta et al have named an unusual type of seizure after the Russian novelist. Inspired by Lewis Carroll, Todd introduced the term Alice in Wonderland Syndrome to refer to visual distortions generally associated with migraine. Writers of fiction offer a humanised perception of disease by contributing new insights into the clinical history, informing about the subjective experience of the illness and helping to eradicate the stigma associated to neurological disorders.

  13. Development and validation of the positive affect and well-being scale for the neurology quality of life (Neuro-QOL) measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsman, John M; Victorson, David; Choi, Seung W; Peterman, Amy H; Heinemann, Allen W; Nowinski, Cindy; Cella, David

    2013-11-01

    To develop and validate an item-response theory-based patient-reported outcomes assessment tool of positive affect and well-being (PAW). This is part of a larger NINDS-funded study to develop a health-related quality of life measurement system across major neurological disorders, called Neuro-QOL. Informed by a literature review and qualitative input from clinicians and patients, item pools were created to assess PAW concepts. Items were administered to a general population sample (N = 513) and a group of individuals with a variety of neurologic conditions (N = 581) for calibration and validation purposes, respectively. A 23-item calibrated bank and a 9-item short form of PAW was developed, reflecting components of positive affect, life satisfaction, or an overall sense of purpose and meaning. The Neuro-QOL PAW measure demonstrated sufficient unidimensionality and displayed good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, model fit, convergent and discriminant validity, and responsiveness. The Neuro-QOL PAW measure was designed to aid clinicians and researchers to better evaluate and understand the potential role of positive health processes for individuals with chronic neurological conditions. Further psychometric testing within and between neurological conditions, as well as testing in non-neurologic chronic diseases, will help evaluate the generalizability of this new tool.

  14. Recovery of neurological function of ischemic stroke by application of conditioned medium of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells derived from normal and cerebral ischemia rats

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Several lines of evidence have demonstrated that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) release bioactive factors and provide neuroprotection for CNS injury. However, it remains elusive whether BM-MSC derived from healthy donors or stroke patients provides equal therapeutic potential. The present work aims to characterize BM-MSC prepared from normal healthy rats (NormBM-MSC) and cerebral ischemia rats (IschBM-MSC), and examine the effects of their conditioned medium (C...

  15. Neurological examination in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Paluš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This clinical review about the neurological examination in small animals describes the basics about the first steps of investigation when dealing with neurological patients. The knowledge of how to perform the neurological examination is important however more important is how to correctly interpret these performed tests. A step-by-step approach is mandatory and examiners should master the order and the style of performing these tests. Neurological conditions can be sometimes very distressing for owners and for pets that might not be the most cooperating. The role of a veterinary surgeon, as a professional, is therefore to collect the most relevant history, to examine a patient in a professional manner and to give to owners an educated opinion about the further treatment and prognosis. However neurological examinations might look challenging for many. But it is only the clinical application of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to an every-day situation for practicing veterinarians and it does not require any specific in-to-depth knowledge. This clinical review is aimed not only to provide the information on how to perform the neurological examination but it is also aimed to appeal on veterinarians to challenge their daily routine and to start practicing on neurologically normal patients. This is the best and only way to differentiate between the normal and abnormal in a real situation.

  16. Prenatal craniofacial development: new insights on normal and abnormal mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M C; Bronsky, P T

    1995-01-01

    Technical advances are radically altering our concepts of normal prenatal craniofacial development. These include concepts of germ layer formation, the establishment of the initial head plan in the neural plate, and the manner in which head segmentation is controlled by regulatory (homeobox) gene activity in neuromeres and their derived neural crest cells. There is also a much better appreciation of ways in which new cell associations are established. For example, the associations are achieved by neural crest cells primarily through cell migration and subsequent cell interactions that regulate induction, growth, programmed cell death, etc. These interactions are mediated primarily by two groups of regulatory molecules: "growth factors" (e.g., FGF and TGF alpha) and the so-called steroid/thyroid/retinoic acid superfamily. Considerable advances have been made with respect to our understanding of the mechanisms involved in primary and secondary palate formation, such as growth, morphogenetic movements, and the fusion/merging phenomenon. Much progress has been made on the mechanisms involved in the final differentiation of skeletal tissues. Molecular genetics and animal models for human malformations are providing many insights into abnormal development. A mouse model for the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), a mild form of holoprosencephaly, demonstrates a mid-line anterior neural plate deficiency which leads to olfactory placodes being positioned too close to the mid-line, and other secondary changes. Work on animal models for the retinoic acid syndrome (RAS) shows that there is major involvement of neural crest cells. There is also major crest cell involvement in similar syndromes, apparently including hemifacial microsomia. Later administration of retinoic acid prematurely and excessively kills ganglionic placodal cells and leads to a malformation complex virtually identical to the Treacher Collins syndrome. Most clefts of the lip and/or palate appear to have a

  17. Kaspar Hauser's recovery and autopsy: a perspective on neurological and sociological requirements for language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, N

    1978-06-01

    The feral children literature has frequently been cited for relevance to understanding historical antecedents of autism. Kaspar Hauser, who appeared in Nuremberg, Germany in 1828, is one of these children, raised under conditions of extreme deprivation. His case history and gradual acquisition of language after age 17 years are summarized. There is strong evidence that he was the prince of Baden, abducted from his cradle in 1812. Findings of postmortem examination, conducted after his assassination, are discussed. Hauser's postadolescent recovery of language contradicts the notion of a "critical period" for language development.

  18. Clinical trials in neurology: design, conduct, analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravina, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    .... Clinical Trials in Neurology aims to improve the efficiency of clinical trials and the development of interventions in order to enhance the development of new treatments for neurologic diseases...

  19. Development of dopamine receptor radiopharmaceuticals for the study of neurological and psychiatric disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Jogeshwar Mukherjee

    2009-01-02

    Our goals in this grant application are directed towards the development of radiotracers that may allow the study of the high-affinity state (functional state) of the dopamine receptors. There have been numerous reports on the presence of two inter-convertible states of these (G-protein coupled) receptors in vitro. However, there is no report that establishes the presence of these separate affinity states in vivo. We have made efforts in this direction in order to provide such direct in vivo evidence about the presence of the high affinity state. This understanding of the functional state of the receptors is of critical significance in our overall diagnosis and treatment of diseases that implicate the G-protein coupled receptors. Four specific aims have been listed in the grant application: (1). Design and syntheses of agonists (2). Radiosyntheses of agonists (3). In vitro pharmacology of agonists (4). In vivo distribution and pharmacology of labeled derivatives. We have accomplished the syntheses and radiosyntheses of three agonist radiotracers labeled with carbon-11. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological experiments have been accomplished in rats and preliminary PET studies in non-human primates have been carried out. Various accomplishments during the funded years, briefly outlined in this document, have been disseminated by several publications in various journals and presentations in national and international meetings (Society of Nuclear Medicine, Society for Neuroscience and International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry).

  20. Spinal Anesthesia in Infant Rats: Development of a Model and Assessment of Neurological Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahalom, Barak; Athiraman, Umeshkumar; Soriano, Sulpicio G.; Zurakowski, David; Carpino, Elizabeth; Corfas, Gabriel; Berde, Charles B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies in infant rats and case-control studies of human infants undergoing surgery have raised concerns about potential neurodevelopmental toxicities of general anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia is an alternative to general anesthesia for some infant surgeries. To test for potential toxicity, we developed a spinal anesthesia model in infant rats. Methods Rats of postnatal ages 7, 14, and 21 days were assigned to: no treatment; 1% isoflurane for either 1 h or 6 h, or lumbar spinal injection of saline or bupivacaine, at doses of 3.75 mg/kg (low dose) or 7.5 mg/kg (high dose). Subgroups of animals underwent neurobehavioral testing and blood gas analysis. Brain and lumbar spinal cord sections were examined for apoptosis using cleaved caspase-3 immunostaining. Lumbar spinal cord was examined histologically. Rats exposed to spinal or general anesthesia as infants underwent Rotarod testing of motor performance as adults. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) using general linear models, Friedman Tests, and Mann–Whitney U tests, as appropriate. Results Bupivacaine 3.75 mg/kg was effective for spinal anesthesia in all age groups, and produced sensory and motor function recovered in 40 to 60 min. Blood gases were similar among groups. Brain and spinal cord apoptosis increased in rats receiving 6 h of 1% isoflurane, but not among the other treatments. All groups showed intact motor performance at adulthood. Conclusions Spinal anesthesia is technically feasible in infant rats, and appears benign in terms of neuroapoptotic and neuromotor sequelae. PMID:21555934

  1. NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH RELEVANT TO READING--1967.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ISOM, JOHN B.

    ASPECTS OF NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH ARE PRESENTED UNDER THE TOPICS OF NEUROLOGICAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT, CEREBRAL DOMINANCE, "SPLIT-BRAIN" SYNDROME, AND SEQUENCING. THE FIRST TWO AREAS INDICATE THAT ASSESSMENT OF A CHILD'S NEUROLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT MUST TAKE INTO ACCOUNT VARIATION OF RATE AND DEGREE OF DEVELOPMENT, AND THAT THE SIGNIFICANCE OF…

  2. Child neurology practice and neurological disorders in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idro, Richard; Newton, Charles; Kiguli, Sarah; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina

    2010-04-01

    Neurological disorders, including neurodevelopmental disorders, have been identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as one of the greatest threats to global public health. It is generally believed that these conditions are more prevalent in the developing than the developed world because of multiple known risk factors such as infections, malnutrition, and limited resources for obstetric and neonatal management. In East Africa, few investigations have been conducted to obtain data on the magnitude and description of neurological disorders among children, and the practice of child neurology is faced with challenges cutting across areas of health personnel, patient diagnosis, management, and rehabilitation. This article reviews the burden, types, and causes of neurological disorders in the East African region. The challenges and successes in the practice of child neurology and recommendations for the future are discussed.

  3. Neurological Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008563 Skin nerve biopsy in the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy. QIAN Min(钱敏),et al.Dept Neurol,PUMC & CAMS,Beijing 100730. Chin J Neurol 2008;41(10):666-669. Objective To find out a reference range of epidermal nerve fiber density in normal humans and compare the concordance between clinical features,electrophysiology and the results of skin biopsy.

  4. Foreland normal fault control on northwest Himalayan thrust front development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blisniuk, Peter M.; Sonder, Leslie J.; Lillie, Robert J.

    1998-10-01

    In the Trans-Indus Ranges along the western part of the northwest Himalayan thrust front, unconformities, changes in paleocurrent directions, and locally derived conglomerates in synorogenic foreland basin deposits provide evidence for major local deformation at ≥3.5 Ma. The tectonic history of the Trans-Indus Ranges has previously been described in terms of a single episode of major thrusting at ≤1 Ma, thus our work implies that there were two distinct phases of deformation. In conjunction with published evidence in the Salt Range to the east for two phases of deformation (˜6 to 5 Ma, and ˜2.5 Ma to present), this study demonstrates that these two phases of deformation are regionally significant and probably correlative along the entire present-day NW Himalayan thrust front. Reconstruction of possible source areas for the locally derived conglomerates shows that the earlier deformation is probably related to normal faulting. These results suggest that the tectonic evolution of the area along the present-day thrust front is characterized by (1) latest Miocene to early Pliocene formation of north dipping normal fault zones (total throw ≥ 600 m) within the foreland basin, related to syn-orogenic flexure of the Indian plate, and (2) late Pliocene to early Pleistocene initiation of south directed thrusting along the present-day thrust front, related to outward growth of the NW Himalayan thrust wedge. The location of the present-day thrust front appears to be controlled by north dipping normal faults and monoclines that formed during the earlier deformation and subsequently localized structural ramps during later thrusting.

  5. Performance of non-neurological older adults on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and the Stroop Color-Word Test: normal variability or cognitive impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, Jessica H; Miele, Andrea S; Lynch, Julie K; McCaffrey, Robert J

    2012-06-01

    There is currently no standard criterion for determining abnormal test scores in neuropsychology; thus, a number of different criteria are commonly used. We investigated base rates of abnormal scores in healthy older adults using raw and T-scores from indices of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and Stroop Color-Word Test. Abnormal scores were examined cumulatively at seven cutoffs including >1.0, >1.5, >2.0, >2.5, and >3.0 standard deviations (SD) from the mean as well as those below the 10th and 5th percentiles. In addition, the number of abnormal scores at each of the seven cutoffs was also examined. Results showed when considering raw scores, ∼15% of individuals obtained scores>1.0 SD from the mean, around 10% were less than the 10th percentile, and 5% fell >1.5 SD or scores, approximately 15%-20% and 5%-10% of scores were >1.0 and >1.5 SD from the mean, respectively. Roughly 15% and 5% fell at the scores>2.0 SD from the mean were infrequent. Although the presence of a single abnormal score at 1.0 and 1.5 SD from the mean or at the 10th and 5th percentiles was not unusual, the presence of ≥2 abnormal scores using any criteria was uncommon. Consideration of base rate data regarding the percentage of healthy individuals scoring in the abnormal range should help avoid classifying normal variability as neuropsychological impairment.

  6. Understanding normal development of adolescent sexuality: A bumpy ride

    OpenAIRE

    Sujita Kumar Kar; Ananya Choudhury; Abhishek Pratap Singh

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence, derived from the Latin word "adolescere" meaning "to grow up" is a critical developmental period. During adolescence, major biological as well as psychological developments take place. Development of sexuality is an important bio-psycho-social development, which takes an adult shape during this period. During adolescence, an individual′s thought, perception as well as response gets colored sexually. Puberty is an important landmark of sexuality development that occurs in the adol...

  7. American Academy of Neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... early career neurologists. Register Today Stand up for Neurology! Join your AAN colleagues at Neurology on the Hill from February 26 to 27, ... for Members' Hurricane Relief, Will You Join Us? Neurology practices affected by the recent US hurricanes are ...

  8. Understanding normal development of adolescent sexuality: A bumpy ride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujita Kumar Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence, derived from the Latin word "adolescere" meaning "to grow up" is a critical developmental period. During adolescence, major biological as well as psychological developments take place. Development of sexuality is an important bio-psycho-social development, which takes an adult shape during this period. During adolescence, an individual′s thought, perception as well as response gets colored sexually. Puberty is an important landmark of sexuality development that occurs in the adolescence. The myriad of changes that occurs in adolescents puts them under enormous stress, which may have adverse physical, as well as psychological consequences. Understanding adolescent sexuality has important clinical, legal, social, cultural, as well as educational implications.

  9. [THE DEVELOPMENT OF MEDICAL CARE OF POPULATION IN CONDITIONS OF SPECIALIZED DAY-TIME HOSPITALS OF NEUROLOGICAL PROFILE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishina, N K; Solovieva, N B; Abdulsalamova, Z A

    2015-01-01

    The article considers issues concerning increasing of quality and accessibility of medical care in Moscow neurological profile included at the expense of wide-spread implementation of specialized day-time hospitals in health care practice. The analysis applied was based on average Moscow indicators of functioning of public health institutions and characteristics of clinical course of diseases of the mentioned profile.

  10. MINOR NEUROLOGICAL DYSFUNCTION AND QUALITY OF MOVEMENT IN RELATION TO NEONATAL CEREBRAL-DAMAGE AND SUBSEQUENT DEVELOPMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WEISGLASKUPERUS, N; BAERTS, W; FETTER, WPF; HEMPEL, MS; MULDER, PGH; TOUWEN, BCL; SAUER, PJJ

    1994-01-01

    Minor neurological dysfunction (MND) and quality of movement were studied in relation to neonatal cerebral damage and developmental assessments at 3 1/2 years of age in 66 very low-birthweight children without obvious disability. MND was found in 19 children and was significantly related to the qual

  11. MINOR NEUROLOGICAL DYSFUNCTION AND QUALITY OF MOVEMENT IN RELATION TO NEONATAL CEREBRAL-DAMAGE AND SUBSEQUENT DEVELOPMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WEISGLASKUPERUS, N; BAERTS, W; FETTER, WPF; HEMPEL, MS; MULDER, PGH; TOUWEN, BCL; SAUER, PJJ

    Minor neurological dysfunction (MND) and quality of movement were studied in relation to neonatal cerebral damage and developmental assessments at 3 1/2 years of age in 66 very low-birthweight children without obvious disability. MND was found in 19 children and was significantly related to the

  12. Clinical neurological examination of infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Robert H A

    2013-01-01

    A thorough but focused history and neurological examination remain the most important initial elements of neurological diagnosis at all ages. Advances over the past two decades in clinical neurophysiology, neuroimaging, genetics, and neuropathological examination of tissue have at times appeared to predominate over traditional history and physical exam, but no laboratory studies can provide the focus and clues to diagnosis that clinical findings offer. History taking and the techniques of neurological examination are skills to be learned by the student, refined by the resident, and practiced and perfected throughout the career of a pediatric neurologist. Examination must be specifically modified to correspond to age and with the expectation of developmental skills achieved at various ages, in addition to the localizing value of particular signs that may apply at all ages. Hypotonia, extensor plantar responses, and lack of visual fixation may be normal in a preterm infant but abnormal at several months of age. "Primitive" reflexes disappear at a certain age, but really are only suppressed or inhibited and may become re-expressed with disinhibition many decades later. Finally, the pediatric neurologist needs to have a firm foundation in normal development, neuroembryology, and changes in the expression of diseases at various stages of maturation of the nervous system.

  13. Human neurologic function and the aging process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, A R; Syndulko, K; Tourtellotte, W W; Lemmon, J A; Potvin, J H

    1980-01-01

    Sixty-one normal men whose ages ranged from 20 to 80 years were evaluated on two occasions by means of a comprehensive series of 128 instrumented tests of neurologic function. The tests measured cognition, vision, strength, steadiness, reactions, speed, coordination, fatigue, gait, station, sensations, and tasks of daily living. The reliability of each test measured was determined, and any measure found unreliable (r less than or equal to 0.41) was not further analyzed. Significant age-related linear decreases were found for almost all neurologic functions. The declines over the age span varied from less than 10 percent to more than 90 percent for different functions. For the upper extremities, the largest declines (greater than 50 percent) were in hand-force steadiness, speed of hand-arm movements, and vibration sense; for the lower extremities, the largest declines were in one-legged balance with eyes closed and in vibration sense. For 13 of 14 tests in which significant dominant body-side effects were found, larger re-testing 7-10 days later, the subjects improved their scores by more than 5 percent on only 17 tests, 9 of which concerned the activities of daily living. No significant differential learning effects were found across age groups. The results point to the importance of developing a data bank on age-based neurologic function so that therapeutic effects can be evaluated in terms of age- and sex-matched normal functioning.

  14. Using the Neurofibromatosis Tumor Predisposition Syndromes to Understand Normal Nervous System Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Development is a tightly regulated process that involves stem cell self-renewal, differentiation, cell-to-cell communication, apoptosis, and blood vessel formation. These coordinated processes ensure that tissues maintain a size and architecture that is appropriate for normal tissue function. As such, tumors arise when cells acquire genetic mutations that allow them to escape the normal growth constraints. In this regard, the study of tumor predisposition syndromes affords a unique platform to better understand normal development and the process by which normal cells transform into cancers. Herein, we review the processes governing normal brain development, discuss how brain cancer represents a disruption of these normal processes, and highlight insights into both normal development and cancer made possible by the study of tumor predisposition syndromes.

  15. Neurological Aspects of Reading Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Louis R.

    The author, a neurologist, looks at the nature of reading disabilities. He suggests that many reading disabilities are the result of normal constitutional differences and that the term "minimal brain dysfunction" is rarely appropriate and does not help the remediation process. Noted are various theories which relate neurology and reading ability.…

  16. Vaccination and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  17. Clinical neurology of ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Figueroa, Orlando; Smith, Mary O

    2007-09-01

    Neurology represents an important specialty within ferret clinical medicine. Veterinarians should become familiar with the unique anatomic and physiologic differences between ferrets to improve their management of theses cases. In addition, veterinarians should use available diagnostic tests to confirm the presence of neurologic diseases. Recent advances in ferret medicine and veterinary neurology offer new capabilities to investigate and treat neurological disease in ferrets.

  18. The Comparison of Sugar Components in the Developing Grains of Sweet Corn and Normal Corn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Peng; HU Chang-hao; DONG Shu-ting; WANG Kong-jun; ZHANG Ji-wang

    2003-01-01

    The sugar components and their dynamic variation in the developing grains of sweet corn(Zeamays L. seccharata Sturt)and normal corn (Zea mays L. indentata Sturt) were compared. There are WSP(water-soluble polysaccharides), sucrose, fructose, glucose, mannitol and sorbitol in both sweet corn and nor-mal corn, but no maltose. Two components with different degrees of polymerization (D. P. N) were detected inthe sweet corn; only one of them was detected in the normal corn 20 days after pollination. With the develop-ment of grains, the total soluble sugar content(TSS)in sweet corn increased, but in normal corn it decreased.The dynamic variation of WSP, sucrose, glucose, fructose, mannitol and sorbitol in sweet and normal corngrains are different. The contents of sugar components in the sweet corn grains are higher than that in the nor-mal corn. Sweet corn accumulates less starch than normal corn.

  19. Male sexual dysfunction and infertility associated with neurological disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Krogh-Jespersen, Sheila; Brackett, Nancy L

    2012-01-01

    Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms. Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic...

  20. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  1. Neurology and literature 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, I

    2014-05-01

    Good literary fiction has the potential to move us, extend our sense of life, transform our prospective views and help us in the face of adversity. A neurological disorder is likely to be the most challenging experience a human being may have to confront in a lifetime. As such, literary recreations of illnesses have a doubly powerful effect. Study the synergies between neurology and fictional literature with particular reference to narrative based medicine (NBM). Doctors establish boundaries between the normal and the abnormal. Taking a clinical history is an act of interpretation in which the doctor integrates the science of objective signs and measurable quantities with the art of subjective clinical judgment. The more discrepancy there is between the patient's experience with the illness and the doctor's interpretation of that disease, the less likely the doctor-patient interaction is to succeed. NBM contributes to a better discernment of the meanings, thus considering disease as a biographical event rather than just a natural fact. Drawing from their own experience with disease, writers of fiction provide universal insights through their narratives, whilst neuroscientists, like Cajal, have occasionally devoted their scientific knowledge to literary narratives. Furthermore, neurologists from Alzheimer to Oliver Sacks remind us of the essential value of NBM in the clinic. Integrating NBM (the narrative of patients) and the classic holistic approach to patients with our current paradigm of evidence based medicine represents a challenge as relevant to neurologists as keeping up with technological and scientific advances. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Simulation in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micieli, Giuseppe; Cavallini, Anna; Santalucia, Paola; Gensini, Gianfranco

    2015-10-01

    Simulation is a frontier for disseminating knowledge in almost all the fields of medicine and it is attracting growing interest because it offers a means of developing new teaching and training models, as well as of verifying what has been learned in a critical setting that simulates clinical practice. The role of simulation in neurology, until now limited by the obvious physical limitations of the dummies used to train students and learners, is now increasing since, today, it allows anamnestic data to be related to the instrumental evidence necessary for diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making, i.e., to the findings of neurophysiological investigations (EEG, carotid and vertebral echography and transcranial Doppler, for example) and neuroradiological investigations (CT, MRI imaging), as well as vital parameter monitoring (ECG, saturimetry, blood pressure, respiratory frequency, etc.). Simulation, by providing learners with opportunities to discuss, with experts, different profiles of biological parameters (both during the simulation itself and in the subsequent debriefing session), is becoming an increasingly important tool for training those involved in evaluation of critical neurological patients (stroke, Guillan Barrè syndrome, myasthenia, status epilepticus, headache, vertigo, confusional status, etc.) and complex cases. In this SIMMED (Italian Society for Simulation in Medicine) position paper, the applications (present and, possibly, future) of simulation in neurology are reported.

  3. Repeat cranial tomography in patients with mild head injury and stable neurological examination - a perspective from a developing country

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sadaf Nasir; Manzar Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of altered findings on repeat cranial tomography (CT) in patients with mild head injury along with stable neurological examination at tertiary care hospital.Methods: Cross-sectional study was done in the Department of Radiology, Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi from January 2008 to September 2010. All patients with mild head injury in terms of Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) who underwent repeat scan without clinical or neurological deterioration in the emergency department of a tertiary care centre were included. The collected data were accordingly entered and analyzed by the principal investigator using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16.0.Results: In all 275 patients, only 17 (6%) of the patients were found worseing on repeat CT, 120 (43.63%)scans improved, 138 (50.18%) unchanged and 17 (6.18%)worsened. None of these patients showed signs of clinical deterioration.Conclusion: Our results suggest that for patients with mild head injury and stable neurological examination, only 6% of them show deterioration on repeat CT, especially when patients' GCS is below 13.

  4. [Development of the normal infantile hip joints assessed by MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierusz-Kozłowska, M; Ziemiański, A; Kruczyński, J; Borkowski, W

    2000-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the time of appearance of the secondary ossification centers and closure of the growth plates of the acetabulum and proximal epiphysis of the femur: the triradiate cartilage, the acetabular roof growth cartilage, the subcapital growth cartilage, the growth cartilage of the major trochanter, the growth cartilage of the minor trochanter. The study is based upon 62 MRI scans of healthy hips in 45 patients aged 3-21. The examined hips showed no pathologic traits--neither in the MRI scan nor in X-ray investigation. In Spin Echo and Turbo Spin Echo sequential imaging all obtained slices were used, on GRADIENT ECHO: FISP 3D, FLASH 2D, and FLASH 3D FAT SAT only chosen slices were included in the study. This way the following results were obtained: the ossification center of the major trochanter appears at the age of 3 in girls and at the age of 6 in boys, while the ossification center of the minor trochanter appears at the age of 6 in both sexes. The times of complete ossification of following growth cartilages were observed: for the triradiate cartilage ossification was observed at age 12-15 in girls and 15-16 in boys; for the cartilage of the acetabular roof ossification was noted at age 12-15 in girls and 15-18 in boys; ossification in the subcapital growth cartilage occurred at age 15-17 in girls and 16-18 in boys; the major trochanter growth cartilage ossifies at age 15-16 in girls and 16-18 in boys; for the minor trochanter ossification of the growth cartilage occurs at age 14-16 in girls and at age 16-18 in boys. The secondary ossification center of the pubic bone appears at age 9-11 in girls and 13-16 in boys and the secondary ossification center of the acetabular roof appears at age 13-17 in girls and boys. This study expand our knowledge on the development of the hip joint and facilitate the assessment of hip pathology.

  5. Thermography in Neurologic Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, Eduardo Borba; Vilaça-Alves, José; Rosa, Claudio; Reis, Victor Machado

    2015-01-01

    One kind of medical images that has been developed in the last decades is thermal images. These images are assessed by infrared cameras and have shown an exponential development in recent years. In this sense, the aim of this study was to describe possibilities of thermography usage in the neurologic practice. It was performed a systematic review in Web of Knowledge (Thompson Reuters), set in all databases which used two combination of keywords as “topic”: “thermography” and “neurology”; and ...

  6. Consciousness: a neurological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanna, Andrea E; Shah, Sachin; Eddy, Clare M; Williams, Adrian; Rickards, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Consciousness is a state so essentially entwined with human experience, yet so difficult to conceptually define and measure. In this article, we explore how a bidimensional model of consciousness involving both level of arousal and subjective awareness of the contents of consciousness can be used to differentiate a range of healthy and altered conscious states. These include the different sleep stages of healthy individuals and the altered states of consciousness associated with neurological conditions such as epilepsy, vegetative state and coma. In particular, we discuss how arousal and awareness are positively correlated in normal physiological states with the exception of REM sleep, while a disturbance in this relationship is characteristic of vegetative state, minimally conscious state, complex partial seizures and sleepwalking.

  7. Consciousness: A Neurological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E. Cavanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness is a state so essentially entwined with human experience, yet so difficult to conceptually define and measure. In this article, we explore how a bidimensional model of consciousness involving both level of arousal and subjective awareness of the contents of consciousness can be used to differentiate a range of healthy and altered conscious states. These include the different sleep stages of healthy individuals and the altered states of consciousness associated with neurological conditions such as epilepsy, vegetative state and coma. In particular, we discuss how arousal and awareness are positively correlated in normal physiological states with the exception of REM sleep, while a disturbance in this relationship is characteristic of vegetative state, minimally conscious state, complex partial seizures and sleepwalking.

  8. Why neurology? Factors which influence career choice in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Hoyle, Chad; Yin, Han; McCoyd, Matthew; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the factors which influence the decision to pursue a career in neurology. An anonymous survey was developed using a Likert scale to rate responses. The survey was sent to adult and child neurology faculty, residents and fellows, as well as medical students applying for neurology. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the factors of influence. Respondents were subsequently categorized into pre-neurology trainees, neurology trainees, child neurologists and adult neurologists, and differences between the groups were analysed using Pearson's chi-square test. One hundred and thirty-three anonymous responses were received. The respondents were neurologists across all levels of training and practice. Across all respondents, the most common factor of high importance was intellectual content of specialty, challenging diagnostic problems, type of patient encountered and interest in helping people. Responses were similar across the groups; however, the earliest trainees cited interest in helping people as most important, while those in neurology training and beyond cite intellectual content of the specialty as most important. As trainees transition from their earliest levels of clinical experience into working as residents and faculty, there is a shift in the cited important factors. Lifestyle and financial factors seem to be the least motivating across all groups. Encouragement from peers, mentors, faculty and practicing physicians is considered high influences in a smaller number of neurologists. This may present an opportunity for practicing neurologists to make connections with medical students early in their education in an effort to encourage and mentor candidates.

  9. Magnetic resonance methods in fetal neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailath-Pokorny, M; Kasprian, G; Mitter, C; Schöpf, V; Nemec, U; Prayer, D

    2012-10-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an established clinical adjunct for the in-vivo evaluation of human brain development. Normal fetal brain maturation can be studied with MRI from the 18th week of gestation to term and relies primarily on T2-weighted sequences. Recently diffusion-weighted sequences have gained importance in the structural assessment of the fetal brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides quantitative information about water motion and tissue microstructure and has applications for both developmental and destructive brain processes. Advanced magnetic resonance techniques, such as spectroscopy, might be used to demonstrate metabolites that are involved in brain maturation, though their development is still in the early stages. Using fetal MRI in addition to prenatal ultrasound, morphological, metabolic, and functional assessment of the fetus can be achieved. The latter is not only based on observation of fetal movements as an indirect sign of activity of the fetal brain but also on direct visualization of fetal brain activity, adding a new component to fetal neurology. This article provides an overview of the MRI methods used for fetal neurologic evaluation, focusing on normal and abnormal early brain development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a research protocol for neurological disease using ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging; Desenvolvimento de um protocolo de investigacao de doencas neurologicas utilizando imagens de ultrassonografia e fotoacustica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio, D.R.T; Carneiro, A.A.O.; Pavan, T.Z. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica

    2015-04-15

    Neurological studies, for example, an investigation of hydrocephalus depends on the diagnostic tool used to determine the dimensions of the brain cavities. For this purpose, many studies have been used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); however, this technique is expensive, which sometimes restricts research. Another way to investigate hydrocephalus is using conventional ultrasound that produces images based on the anatomical acoustic impedance difference, providing measurements of the neurological structures size. In addition, a technique that has gained relevance in biomedical scope is called photoacoustic imaging (PA), which consists in an anatomical image based on the optical contrast, allowing differentiate tissue by optical absorption and ultrasonic waves scattering. In order to continue the development of ultrasonic techniques, we present here a protocol using conventional ultrasound and PA imaging techniques focused to provide information for neurological research. We proposed a configuration for both, conventional and FA, which acquires data in RAW format. Then we use brains post-mortem of mice as a target. The collected data was processed into B-mode images and rendered in a 3D volume. This process permitted to measure the volume of intraventricular liquid. (author)

  11. [Neurology at the border of centuries: achievements and prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslina, Z A

    2012-01-01

    A significant role of neurology for medicine and society is caused by severity of clinical presentations and consequences of the nervous system diseases, as well as by huge economic burden related to neurological pathology. The paper presents a review of the current state and prospects for the development of socially most important fields of modern neurology, among which one can list studies of cerebrovascular, neurodegenerative, demyelinating and hereditary disorders, discovery of molecular mechanisms of their pathogenesis, and improvement of the methods of treatment, neurorehabilitation and prophylaxis on the basis of new medical technologies. An essential link between clinical and basic research in expanding the existing knowledge about the structure/functions of the brain in normal conditions and different-type pathological processes is stressed.

  12. Thermography in Neurologic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Eduardo Borba; Vilaça-Alves, José; Rosa, Claudio; Reis, Victor Machado

    2015-01-01

    One kind of medical images that has been developed in the last decades is thermal images. These images are assessed by infrared cameras and have shown an exponential development in recent years. In this sense, the aim of this study was to describe possibilities of thermography usage in the neurologic practice. It was performed a systematic review in Web of Knowledge (Thompson Reuters), set in all databases which used two combination of keywords as “topic”: “thermography” and “neurology”; and “thermography” and “neurologic”. The chronological period was defined from 2000 to 2014 (the least 15 years). Among the studies included in this review, only seven were with experimental design. It is few to bring thermography as a daily tool in clinical practice. However, these studies have suggested good results. The studies of review and an analyzed patent showed that the authors consider the thermography as a diagnostic tool and they recommend its usage. It can be concluded that thermography is already used as a diagnostic and monitoring tool of patients with neuropathies, particularly in complex regional pain syndrome, and stroke. And yet, this tool has great potential for future research about its application in diagnosis of other diseases of neurological origin. PMID:26191090

  13. Estado neurológico e cardiorrespiratório de filhotes de cães nascidos de parto normal ou de cesariana sob anestesia geral inalatória com sevofluorano Neurological and cardiocirculatory investigation of dog neonates born by normal parturition or cesarean section on sevoflurane inhalation anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Tozadore Gabas

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available A anestesia obstétrica possibilita um procedimento mais seguro para a mãe e para os fetos. Em medicina veterinária, no entanto, a literatura científica a respeito do assunto é deficiente. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o grau de depressão neurológica, hemodinâmica e respiratória fetais provocado pelo agente anestésico, em que as mães foram submetidas ao parto normal ou à cesariana, utilizando-se sevofluorano como agente de manutenção anestésica, comparando-o com o parto normal. Foram realizados seis partos normais (GN e seis cesarianas (GC, avaliando-se um total de 36 filhotes. As cesarianas foram realizadas utilizando-se acepromazina, propofol e sevofluorano (GC e os neonatos foram avaliados clinicamente ao primeiro, quinto e décimo minuto de nascimento, nos dois grupos. Observou-se maior depressão respiratória nos filhotes nascidos de cesariana. Contudo, apesar dessa depressão, o protocolo anestésico empregado não comprometeu de maneira importante a viabilidade e a saúde das mães e dos filhotes, demonstrando ser seguro em cadelas gestantes.The obstetric anesthesia must be safe for mother and puppies and about this, the literature is pour. This study was aimed at evaluating the neurological, hemodinamic and respiratory changes in neonates provoked by the anestesic agent as a result of normal parturition and cesarean section employing sevoflurane as the maintenance agent. Six deliveries (GN and six cesarean sections (GC were performed. The cesarean sections were performed under general anesthesia using acepromazina maleate, propofol and sevoflurane. Thirty six puppies were evaluated and the neurologic reflexes were worse in that were born through cesarean section. However, we concluded that despite the anesthetic depression, the protocol employed didn,t affect in any important way the viability and health of the mothers and puppies, being suitable for cesarean sections.

  14. Summary of evidence-based guideline update: evaluation and management of concussion in sports: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giza, Christopher C; Kutcher, Jeffrey S; Ashwal, Stephen; Barth, Jeffrey; Getchius, Thomas S D; Gioia, Gerard A; Gronseth, Gary S; Guskiewicz, Kevin; Mandel, Steven; Manley, Geoffrey; McKeag, Douglas B; Thurman, David J; Zafonte, Ross

    2013-06-11

    To update the 1997 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) practice parameter regarding sports concussion, focusing on 4 questions: 1) What factors increase/decrease concussion risk? 2) What diagnostic tools identify those with concussion and those at increased risk for severe/prolonged early impairments, neurologic catastrophe, or chronic neurobehavioral impairment? 3) What clinical factors identify those at increased risk for severe/prolonged early postconcussion impairments, neurologic catastrophe, recurrent concussions, or chronic neurobehavioral impairment? 4) What interventions enhance recovery, reduce recurrent concussion risk, or diminish long-term sequelae? The complete guideline on which this summary is based is available as an online data supplement to this article. We systematically reviewed the literature from 1955 to June 2012 for pertinent evidence. We assessed evidence for quality and synthesized into conclusions using a modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation process. We used a modified Delphi process to develop recommendations. Specific risk factors can increase or decrease concussion risk. Diagnostic tools to help identify individuals with concussion include graded symptom checklists, the Standardized Assessment of Concussion, neuropsychological assessments, and the Balance Error Scoring System. Ongoing clinical symptoms, concussion history, and younger age identify those at risk for postconcussion impairments. Risk factors for recurrent concussion include history of multiple concussions, particularly within 10 days after initial concussion. Risk factors for chronic neurobehavioral impairment include concussion exposure and APOE ε4 genotype. Data are insufficient to show that any intervention enhances recovery or diminishes long-term sequelae postconcussion. Practice recommendations are presented for preparticipation counseling, management of suspected concussion, and management of diagnosed concussion.

  15. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) expression in the developing human brain: comparative immunohistochemical study between patients with normal and mutated CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcorelles, Pascale; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Uguen, Arnaud; Ledé, Françoise; Férec, Claude; Laquerrière, Annie

    2014-11-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) protein has recently been shown to be expressed in the human adult central nervous system (CNS). As CFTR expression has also been documented during embryonic development in several organs, such as the respiratory tract, the intestine and the male reproductive system, suggesting a possible role during development we decided to investigate the expression of CFTR in the human developing CNS. In addition, as some, although rare, neurological symptoms have been reported in patients with CF, we compared the expression of normal and mutated CFTR at several fetal stages. Immunohistochemistry was performed on brain and spinal cord samples of foetuses between 13 and 40 weeks of gestation and compared with five patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) of similar ages. We showed in this study that CFTR is only expressed in neurons and has an early and widespread distribution during development. Although we did not observe any cerebral abnormality in patients with CF, we observed a slight delay in the maturation of several brain structures. We also observed different expression and localization of CFTR depending on the brain structure or the cell maturation stage. Our findings, along with a literature review on the neurological phenotypes of patients with CF, suggest that this gene may play previously unsuspected roles in neuronal maturation or function.

  16. Utility of functional MRI in pediatric neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, Emily R; Gaillard, William D

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI), a tool increasingly used to study cognitive function, is also an important tool for understanding not only normal development in healthy children, but also abnormal development, as seen in children with epilepsy, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism. Since its inception almost 15 years ago, fMRI has seen an explosion in its use and applications in the adult literature. However, only recently has it found a home in pediatric neurology. New adaptations in study design and technologic advances, especially the study of resting state functional connectivity as well as the use of passive task design in sedated children, have increased the utility of functional imaging in pediatrics to help us gain understanding into the developing brain at work. This article reviews the background of fMRI in pediatrics and highlights the most recent literature and clinical applications.

  17. Fish oil and mental health: the role of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in cognitive development and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assisi, Alessandro; Banzi, Rita; Buonocore, Carmela; Capasso, Filippo; Di Muzio, Valeria; Michelacci, Francesca; Renzo, Danila; Tafuri, Giovanni; Trotta, Francesco; Vitocolonna, Maria; Garattini, Silvio

    2006-11-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have indicated that consumption of more n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce the risk for a variety of diseases, including cardiovascular, neurological and immunological disorders, diabetes and cancer. This article focuses on the role of marine n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in brain functions, including the development of the central nervous system and neurological disorders. An overview of the major animal studies and clinical trials is provided here, focusing on fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy and infancy, and prevention and management of Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, depression and attention deficit hyperactive disorder. Although an optimal balance in n-3/n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio is important for proper neurodevelopment and cognitive functions, results from randomized controlled trials are controversial and do not confirm any useful effect of supplementation on development of preterm and term infants. The relationship between fatty acid status and mental disorders is confirmed by reduced levels of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes of patients with central nervous system disorders. Nevertheless, there are very little data supporting the use of fish oil in those patients. The only way to verify whether n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are a potential therapeutic option in the management and prevention of mental disorders is to conduct a large definitive randomized controlled trials similar to those required for the licensing of any new pharmacological treatment.

  18. Stem Cell Transplantation in Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ozlem Herguner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurological diseases are characterized by loss of cells in response to an injury or a progressive insult. In recent years, neurons and glia have been generated successfully from stem cells in cultures, fuelling efforts to develop stem-cell-based transplantation therapies for human neurological diseases, such as Parkinson disease, stroke or neuromuscular disorders. In this review, the potential of various cell therapies in childhood neurological diseases are discussed.

  19. Disability at Neurological Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Evlice; Turgay Demir; Kezban Aslan; Hacer Bozdemir; Meltem Demirkiran; ilker Unal; sebnem Bicakci

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is aimed to identify cases who had disability rates because of Neurological diseases and applied to Health Committee in Cukurova University Faculty of Medicine Department of Neurology. Material and Methods: Cases who applied to Health Committee in Cukurova University Faculty of Medicine Department of Neurology between January 2013 - December 2013 were evaluated retrospectively. It was investigated their diagnosis, age, gender, disability rate and relationships with each othe...

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor deficient thymic and peripheral T cells develop normally in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purton, Jared F; Zhan, Yifan; Liddicoat, Douglas R; Hardy, Charles L; Lew, Andrew M; Cole, Timothy J; Godfrey, Dale I

    2002-12-01

    The involvement of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling in T cell development is highly controversial, with several studies for and against. We have previously demonstrated that GR(-/-) mice, which usually die at birth because of impaired lung development, exhibit normal T cell development, at least in embryonic mice and in fetal thymus organ cultures. To directly investigate the role of GR signaling in adult T cell development, we analyzed the few GR(-/-) mice that occasionally survive birth, and irradiated mice reconstituted with GR(-/-) fetal liver precursors. All thymic and peripheral T cells, as well as other leukocyte lineages, developed and were maintained at normal levels. Anti-CD3-induced cell death of thymocytes in vitro, T cell repertoire heterogeneity and T cell proliferation in response to anti-CD3 stimulation were normal in the absence of GR signaling. Finally, we show that metyrapone, an inhibitor of glucocorticoid synthesis (commonly used to demonstrate a role for glucocorticoids in T cell development), impaired thymocyte development regardless of GR genotype indicating that this reagent inhibits thymocyte development in a glucocorticoid-independent fashion. These data demonstrate that GR signaling is not required for either normal T cell development or peripheral maintenance in embryonic or adult mice.

  1. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, Roberto; Jiménez-Antona, Carmen; Muñoz-Hellín, Elena

    2012-08-01

    Literature has always been attracted to neurological pathologies and the numerous works published on the subject are proof of this. Likewise, a number of physicians have been fiction writers and have drawn on their scientific knowledge to help develop their stories. The study addresses the appearance of neurological pathologies in a sample of literary works and examines the description of the disease, its treatment, the patient's view and the relationship between healthcare professionals and the socio-familial milieu. We review some of the greatest literary works of all times that deal with neurological pathologies, such as Don Quixote, Julius Caesar, David Copperfield, The Idiot or Miau, and many of them are seen to offer a very faithful portrayal of the disease. Similarly, we have also reviewed works that provide a personal account of life with neurological diseases and the ensuing disability written either by the patients themselves or by their relatives, examples being The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, My Left Foot or One Chance in a Thousand. Literature has helped to offer a realistic vision of neurologically-based pathologies and the healthcare professionals who work with them; there are many examples that portray the experiences of the patients themselves and the importance of support from the family is a feature that is constantly underlined.

  2. Neurology of endemic skeletal fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic skeletal fluorosis is widely prevalent in India and is a major public health problem. The first ever report of endemic skeletal fluorosis and neurological manifestation was from Prakasam district in Andhra Pradesh in the year 1937. Epidemiological and experimental studies in the endemic areas suggest the role of temperate climate, hard physical labor, nutritional status, presence of abnormal concentrations of trace elements like strontium, uranium, silica in water supplies, high fluoride levels in foods and presence of kidney disease in the development of skeletal fluorosis. Neurological complications of endemic skeletal fluorosis, namely radiculopathy, myelopathy or both are mechanical in nature and till date the evidence for direct neurotoxicity of fluoride is lacking. Prevention of the disease should be the aim, knowing the pathogenesis of fluorosis. Surgery has a limited role in alleviating the neurological disability and should be tailored to the individual based on the imaging findings.

  3. Sporadic hemiplegic migraine with permanent neurological deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J; Zhou, Jiying; Dodick, David W

    2014-01-01

    By definition, the neurologic impairments of hemiplegic migraine are reversible. However, a few cases of permanent neurologic deficits associated with hemiplegic migraine have been reported. Herein, we present the case of a patient with permanent impairments because of hemiplegic migraine despite normalization of associated brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. Cases like these suggest the need to consider aggressive prophylactic therapy for patients with recurrent hemiplegic migraine attacks.

  4. [Neurologic manifestations in a child of a mother with gestational herpes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, M; Nasimi, A; Boussemart, T; Cardona, J; Oriot, D

    1996-05-01

    Herpes gestationis in the neonate is usually associated with an increased risk of premature birth and/or low birth weight for gestational age (GA) and sometimes skin lesions. Neurologic manifestations are nos described in these babies. A boy was born at 35 weeks of GA from a mother who developed skin eruption typical of herpes gestationis. His weight was 2320 g and his height was 46 cm. He had transient respiratory distress syndrome and was given antibiotics due to suspected group B streptococcus infection. He developed on day 3 skin vesiculous eruption which disappeared within 3 days and neurologic manifestations: hypertonia and hyperkinesis, abnormal EEG. The CSF was normal. The manifestations spontaneously disappeared within 5 days. The herpes gestationis factor was present in both mother and infant. A relationship between the maternal herpes gestationis and neonatal neurologic manifestations is possible; there was no other known causes for the transient neurological disease.

  5. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify propri

  6. [Application of psychophysics to neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2008-04-01

    Although psychophysics has already been used in many neurological evaluations including the visual and hearing tests, the use of psychophysics has been limited to the evaluation of sensory disorders. In this review paper, however, the author introduced recent attempts to apply psychophysics to the evaluation of higher cognitive functions such as perception of scenes and facial expressions. Psychophysics was also used to measure visual hypersensitivity in a patient with migraine. The benefits of the use of psychophysics in neurological and neuropsychological settings would be as follows. (1) We can evaluate higher cognitive functions quantitatively. (2) We can measure performance both above and below the normal range by the same method. (3) We can use the same stimulus and task as other research areas such as neuroscience and neuroimaging, and compare results between research areas.

  7. Happiness and neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Yoram; Achiron, Anat

    2009-04-01

    addition, specific interventions to increase happiness developed by PoP clinicians have demonstrated efficacy and validity. Several measurement scales now exist that reliably measure happiness as a long-term state, rather than as a fluctuating condition resulting from prevailing mood. These enable the use of happiness as an end point in clinical trials. As happiness becomes increasingly accepted as an important consideration in neurological disease, it is likely to be monitored more extensively, with measures to raise happiness levels being taken as an effective means of improving patient outcomes.

  8. Effect of glycemic control on microalbuminuria development among type 2 diabetes with high-normal albuminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Zhi; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Wen, Yu-Wen; Ning, Hsiao-Chen; Gau, Bing-Ru; Huang, Yu-Yao

    2014-03-01

    This study was aimed at revealing the factors and the interrelationships between factors on microalbuminuria development among type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Between 2004 and 2011, 461 T2D patients with a baseline urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) of 60 mL/min were evaluated retrospectively. Sixty-eight (14.8%) subjects had developed microalbuminuria in a mean follow-up of 6.82 years. Statistical analysis had revealed that the higher baseline UACR (10 mg/g; sensitivity, 80.9%, specificity, 63.6%; AUC = 0.774) and glycohemoglobin level (HbA1c) (8%; sensitivity, 72.1%, specificity, 61.6%; AUC = 0.698) were the two independent microalbuminuria risk factors. When considering the risk of microalbuminuria, the data were normalized with respect to subjects with low-normal UACR ( 8%, high-normal UACR/HbA1c 8% were 2.59 (p = 0.107), 6.15 (p = 0.001), and 16.96 (p 10%) showed a progressively increase of the hazard risk in baseline high-normal UACR group. But the same correlation was not shown in the low-normal UACR group. This study identified the relationships of high-normal albuminuria and glycemic control on microalbuminuria development among T2D patients. Glycemic control is especially beneficial for T2D patients with baseline high-normal UACR in preventing microalbuminuria development.

  9. LF-interpretability and language development: a study of verbal and nominal features in Greek normally developing and SLI children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimpli, I M

    2001-06-01

    This paper includes (i) a comparison of the developmental pattern of certain morphosyntactic features in normally developing (ND) Greek children with similar data from a group of children with specific language impairment and (ii) a new analysis of the differences found. The analysis is based on a minimalist notion of LF interpretability. Depending on the feature-specification of lexical items (i.e., [+/- interpretable] at LF), a different route of development follows. In addition, phonological salience of both interpretable and noninterpretable features is argued to play an important role in an account of crosslinguistic differences in both normal and exceptional development.

  10. Analysis of the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway in normal and abnormal bladder development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSouza, Kristin R; Saha, Monalee; Carpenter, Ashley R; Scott, Melissa; McHugh, Kirk M

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the expression of Sonic Hedgehog, Patched, Gli1, Gli2, Gli3 and Myocardin in the developing bladders of male and female normal and megabladder (mgb-/-) mutant mice at embryonic days 12 through 16 by in situ hybridization. This analysis indicated that each member of the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway as well as Myocardin displayed distinct temporal and spatial patterns of expression during normal bladder development. In contrast, mgb-/- bladders showed both temporal and spatial changes in the expression of Patched, Gli1 and Gli3 as well as a complete lack of Myocardin expression. These changes occurred primarily in the outer mesenchyme of developing mgb-/- bladders consistent with the development of an amuscular bladder phenotype in these animals. These results provide the first comprehensive analysis of the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway during normal bladder development and provide strong evidence that this key signaling cascade is critical in establishing radial patterning in the developing bladder. In addition, the lack of detrusor smooth muscle development observed in mgb-/- mice is associated with bladder-specific temporospatial changes in Sonic Hedgehog signaling coupled with a lack of Myocardin expression that appears to result in altered patterning of the outer mesenchyme and poor initiation and differentiation of smooth muscle cells within this region of the developing bladder.

  11. Fractal description and quantitative analysis of normal brain development in infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hehong Li; Liangping Luo; Li Huang

    2011-01-01

    We examined the fractal pattern of cerebral computerized tomography images in 158 normal infants, aged 0-3 years, based on the quantitative analysis of chaotic theory. Results showed that the fractal dimension of cerebral computerized tomography images in normal infants remained stable from 1.86-1.91. The normal distribution range in the neonatal period, 1-2 months old infants, 1-2 year old infants, and of 2-3 year old infants was 1.88-1.90 (mean: 1.891 3 ± 0.006 4), 1.89-1.90 (mean: 1.892 7 ± 0.004 5), 1.86-1.90 (mean: 1.886 3 ± 0.008 5), and 1.88-1.91 (mean: 1.895 8 ± 0.008 3), respectively. The spectrum width of the multifractal spectrum (△α) in normal infants was 1.4618. These data suggest that the spectral width parameters of the multifractal spectrum and the fractal dimension criteria in normal children may be useful as a practical specific parameter for assessing the fractal mode of brain development in normal infants.

  12. Child neurology: Past, present, and future: part 1: history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millichap, John J; Millichap, J Gordon

    2009-08-18

    The founding period of child neurology occurred in 3 phases: 1) early individual contributory phase, 2) organized training phase, and 3) expansion phase. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, individuals in pediatrics, neurology, and psychiatry established clinics and made important contributions to the literature on childhood epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and pediatric neurology. The latter half of the 20th century saw the organization of training programs in pediatric neurology, with fellowships supported by the NIH. This development was followed by a rapid expansion in the number of trainees certified in child neurology and their appointment to divisions of neurology in children's hospitals. In recent years, referrals of children with neurologic disorders have increased, and disorders previously managed by pediatricians are often seen in neurology clinics. The era of subspecialization is embraced by the practicing physician. The present day status of pediatric neurology and suggestions for the future development of the specialty are subjects for further discussion.

  13. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of Spatial Release from Masking in Mandarin-Speaking Children with Normal Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Kevin C. P.; Yuan, Meng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the development of spatial release from masking in children using closed-set Mandarin disyllabic words and monosyllabic words carrying lexical tones as test stimuli and speech spectrum-weighted noise as a masker. Method: Twenty-six children ages 4-9 years and 12 adults, all with normal hearing, participated in…

  16. The Dens: Normal Development, Developmental Variants and Anomalies, and Traumatic Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T O′Brien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate interpretation of cervical spine imagining can be challenging, especially in children and the elderly. The biomechanics of the developing pediatric spine and age-related degenerative changes predispose these patient populations to injuries centered at the craniocervical junction. In addition, congenital anomalies are common in this region, especially those associated with the axis/dens, due to its complexity in terms of development compared to other vertebral levels. The most common congenital variations of the dens include the os odontoideum and a persistent ossiculum terminale. At times, it is necessary to distinguish normal development, developmental variants, and developmental anomalies from traumatic injuries in the setting of acute traumatic injury. Key imaging features are useful to differentiate between traumatic fractures and normal or variant anatomy acutely; however, the radiologist must first have a basic understanding of the spectrum of normal developmental anatomy and its anatomic variations in order to make an accurate assessment. This review article attempts to provide the basic framework required for accurate interpretation of cervical spine imaging with a focus on the dens, specifically covering the normal development and ossification of the dens, common congenital variants and their various imaging appearances, fracture classifications, imaging appearances, and treatment options.

  17. Normal Development and Psychopathological Impairment of the Concept of the Object on the Rorschach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Sidney J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Human responses to the Rorschach were analyzed according to developmental principles of differentiation, articulation, and integration in a longitudinal study of normal development (ages 11-12, 13-14, 17-18, and 30) and in a sample of adolescent and young adult inpatients. (Editor)

  18. On the Influence of Poverty Relief and Educational Aid on Normal University Students' Specialty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Pei

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the influence of poverty relief and educational aid on the development of normal university students in their specialty; in particular, it focuses on its influence on their teaching internship, their study of professional courses, and the formation of professional ethics. The implementation of poverty relief and educational…

  19. MRI and neurological findings in patients with spinal metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Switlyk, M.D.; Hole, K.H.; Knutstad, K. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: marta.switlyk@radiumhospitalet.no; Skjeldal, S.; Zaikova, O. [Department of Orthopedics, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Hald, J.K. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Seierstad, T. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen (Norway)

    2012-12-15

    Background. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the recommended primary investigation method for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Initiating treatment before the development of motor deficits is essential to preserve neurological function. However, the relationship between MRI-assessed grades of spinal metastatic disease and neurological status has not been widely investigated. Purpose. To analyze the association between neurological function and MRI-based assessment of the extent of spinal metastases using two different grading systems. Material and Methods. A total of 284 patients admitted to our institution for initial radiotherapy or surgery for symptomatic spinal metastases were included in the study. Motor and sensory deficits were categorized according to the Frankel classification system. Pre-treatment MRI evaluations of the entire spine were scored for the extent of spinal metastases, presence and severity of spinal cord compression, and nerve root compression. Two MRI-based scales were used to evaluate the degree of cord compression and spinal canal narrowing and relate these findings to neurological function. Results. Of the patients included in the study, 28 were non-ambulatory, 49 were ambulatory with minor motor deficits, and 207 had normal motor function. Spinal cord compression was present in all patients with Frankel scores of B or C, 23 of 35 patients with a Frankel score of D (66%), and 48 of 152 patients with a Frankel score of E (32%). The percentage of patients with severe spinal canal narrowing increased with increasing Frankel grades. The grading according to the scales showed a significant association with the symptoms according to the Frankel scale (P < 0.001). Conclusion. In patients with neurological dysfunction, the presence and severity of impairment was associated with the epidural tumor burden. A significant number of patients had radiological spinal cord compression and normal motor function (occult MSCC)

  20. Neurology and international organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J

    2013-07-23

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private-public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and colleges. The continued engagement of neurologists is essential for the growing number of international organizations that can and should incorporate neurologic disease into their global agendas.

  1. Stromal Androgen Receptor Roles in the Development of Normal Prostate, Benign Prostate Hyperplasia, and Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Simeng; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Tian, Jing; Shang, Zhiqun; Niu, Yuanjie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is an androgen-sensitive organ that needs proper androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signals for normal development. The progression of prostate diseases, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa), also needs proper androgen/AR signals. Tissue recombination studies report that stromal, but not epithelial, AR plays more critical roles via the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions to influence the early process of prostate development. However, in BPH and PCa,...

  2. Paraneoplastic Neurological Disorder in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sze Yin; Kongg, Min Han; Yunus, Mohd Razif Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological disorder (PND) is a condition due to immune cross-reactivity between the tumour cells and the normal tissue, whereby the “onconeural” antibodies attack the normal host nervous system. It can present within weeks to months before or after the diagnosis of malignancies. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is associated with paraneoplastic syndrome, for example, dermatomyositis, and rarely with a neurological disorder. We report on a case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with probable PND. Otolaryngologists, oncologists and neurologists need to be aware of this condition in order to make an accurate diagnosis and to provide prompt treatment. PMID:28381934

  3. The impact of continuous and ongoing professional development on the nursing process of taking care of neurological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacević, Lenka; Mihelcić, Vesna Bozan; Antić, Sonja; Demarin, Vida

    2013-03-01

    Nurses distinguish continuous professional development intended for career improvement and personal development from continuous professional development intended for improvement of skills and knowledge. Too many requests are put in front of an individual unacceptably stretching it onto the life outside work. Students have various expectations from their education. Factors that motivate nurses to study are to improve knowledge, patient care and professional relations. Factors connected to personal development include boost of confidence and embracing of other values. Motivation for additional education is also connected to the change of work, practice improvement, self-confidence improvement, nursing career plans, and necessary intellectual stimulation. The reasons for which nurses decide to undertake further education are also desire for maintenance of clinical competence, but also enjoyment in studying itself. An employer who expects from nurses to opt for such a type of education or stimulate it is another common reason.

  4. [Neurology of hysteria (conversion disorder)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Hysteria has served as an important driving force in the development of both neurology and psychiatry. Jean Martin Charcot's devotion to mesmerism for treating hysterical patients evoked the invention of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud. Meanwhile, Joseph Babinski took over the challenge to discriminate between organic and hysterical patients from Charcot and found Babinski's sign, the greatest milestone in modern neurological symptomatology. Nowadays, the usage of the term hysteria is avoided. However, new terms and new classifications are complicated and inconsistent between the two representative taxonomies, the DSM-IV and ICD-10. In the ICD-10, even the alternative term conversion disorder, which was becoming familiar to neurologists, has also disappeared as a group name. The diagnosis of hysteria remains important in clinical neurology. Extensive exclusive diagnoses and over investigation, including various imaging studies, should be avoided because they may prolong the disease course and fix their symptoms. Psychological reasons that seem to explain the conversion are not considered reliable. Positive neurological signs suggesting nonorganic etiologies are the most reliable measures for diagnosing hysteria, as Babinski first argued. Hysterical paresis has several characteristics, such as giving-way weakness or peculiar distributions of weakness. Signs to uncover nonorganic paresis utilizing synergy include Hoover's test and the Sonoo abductor test.

  5. [Neurology in medieval regimina sanitatis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Frutos González, V; Guerrero Peral, A L

    2011-09-01

    In medical medieval literature some works about dietetics stand out. Dietetics, as a separate branch of medicine, includes not only food or drinks, but other environmental factors influencing on health. They are known as regimina sanitatis or salutis, and specially developed in the Christian west. They generally consisted of a balance between the Galenic "six non-natural things"; factors regulating health and its protection: environment, exercise, food, sleep, bowel movements and emotions. After reviewing the sources and defining the different stages of this genre, we have considered three of the most out-standing medieval regimina, the anonymous Regimen sanitatis salernitanum, Arnaldo de Vilanova's Regimen sanitatis ad regem aragonum and Bernardo de Gordon's Tractatus of conservatione vite humane. In them we review references to neurological disease. Though not independently considered, there is a significant presence of neurological diseases in the regimina. Dietetics measures are proposed to preserve memory, nerves, or hearing, as well as for the treatment of migraine, epilepsy, stroke or dizziness. Regimina are quiet representative among medical medieval literature, and they show medieval physicians vision of neurological diseases. Dietetics was considered useful to preserve health, and therapeutics was based on natural remedies. 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Haematology and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Steven; Cohen, Hannah; Losseff, Nick

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to update the reader on advances in the understanding of haematological conditions that may arise in neurological practice. Thrombophilia, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, sickle cell and clonal disorders associated with neuropathy are discussed. PMID:17369588

  7. Focal neurological deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other examples of focal loss of function include: Horner syndrome : small pupil on one side, one-sided ... 403. Read More Alertness - decreased Fine motor control Horner syndrome Hypotonia Movement - uncoordinated Muscle function loss Neurologic ...

  8. Microstructure, length, and connection of limbic tracts in normal human brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaowen eYu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cingulum and fornix play an important role in memory, attention, spatial orientation and feeling functions. Both microstructure and length of these limbic tracts can be affected by mental disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, depression, autism, anxiety, and schizophrenia. To date, there has been little systematic characterization of their microstructure, length and functional connectivity in normally developing brains. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI data from 65 normally developing right-handed subjects from birth to young adulthood was acquired. After cingulate gyrus part of the cingulum (cgc, hippocampal part of the cingulum (cgh and fornix (fx were traced with DTI tractography, absolute and normalized tract lengths and DTI-derived metrics including fractional anisotropy, mean, axial and radial diffusivity were measured for traced limbic tracts. Free water elimination (FWE algorithm was adopted to improve accuracy of the measurements of DTI-derived metrics. The role of these limbic tracts in the functional network at birth and adulthood was explored. We found a logarithmic age-dependent trajectory for FWE-corrected DTI metric changes with fast increase of microstructural integrity from birth to 2-year-old followed by a slow increase to 25-year-old. Normalized tract length of cgc increases with age, while no significant relationship with age was found for normalized tract lengths of cgh and fx. Stronger microstructural integrity on the left side compared to that of right side was found. With integrated DTI and rs-fMRI, the key connectional role of cgc and cgh in the default mode network (DMN was confirmed as early as birth. Systematic characterization of length and DTI metrics after FWE correction of limbic tracts offers insight into their morphological and microstructural developmental trajectories. These trajectories may serve as a normal reference for pediatric patients with

  9. Microstructure, length, and connection of limbic tracts in normal human brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaowen; Peng, Yun; Mishra, Virendra; Ouyang, Austin; Li, Hang; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Min; Liu, Shuwei; Huang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The cingulum and fornix play an important role in memory, attention, spatial orientation, and feeling functions. Both microstructure and length of these limbic tracts can be affected by mental disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, depression, autism, anxiety, and schizophrenia. To date, there has been little systematic characterization of their microstructure, length, and functional connectivity in normally developing brains. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) data from 65 normally developing right-handed subjects from birth to young adulthood was acquired. After cingulate gyrus part of the cingulum (cgc), hippocampal part of the cingulum (cgh) and fornix (fx) were traced with DTI tractography, absolute and normalized tract lengths and DTI-derived metrics including fractional anisotropy, mean, axial, and radial diffusivity were measured for traced limbic tracts. Free water elimination (FWE) algorithm was adopted to improve accuracy of the measurements of DTI-derived metrics. The role of these limbic tracts in the functional network at birth and adulthood was explored. We found a logarithmic age-dependent trajectory for FWE-corrected DTI metric changes with fast increase of microstructural integrity from birth to 2 years old followed by a slow increase to 25 years old. Normalized tract length of cgc increases with age, while no significant relationship with age was found for normalized tract lengths of cgh and fx. Stronger microstructural integrity on the left side compared to that of the right side was found. With integrated DTI and rs-fMRI, the key connectional role of cgc and cgh in the default mode network was confirmed as early as birth. Systematic characterization of length and DTI metrics after FWE correction of limbic tracts offers insight into their morphological and microstructural developmental trajectories. These trajectories may serve as a normal reference for pediatric patients with mental

  10. Relationships between protein and mineral during enamel development in normal and genetically altered mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles E.; Hu, Yuanyuan; Richardson, Amelia S.; Bartlett, John D.; Hu, Jan C-C.; Simmer, James P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify and compare the amounts of volatiles (mostly protein) and mineral present in developing incisor enamel in normal mice and in those genetically engineered for absence of intact enamelin, ameloblastin, matrix metalloproteinase 20 (MMP20) or kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4). Data indicated that all mice showed peaks in the gross weight of volatiles and a similar weight of mineral at locations on incisors normally associated with early maturation. Thereafter, the content of volatiles on normal incisors declined rapidly by as much as 62%, but not by 100%, over 2 mm, accompanied by increases of ~threefold in mineral weights. Enamelin heterozygous mice (lower incisors) showed a decrease in volatile content across the maturation stage, yet mineral failed to increase significantly. Mmp20 null mice showed no significant loss of volatiles from maturing enamel, yet the amount of mineral increased. Klk4 null mice showed normal mineral acquisition up to early maturation, but the input of new volatiles in mid to late maturation caused the final mineralization to slow below normal levels. These results suggest that it is not only the amount of protein but also the nature or type of protein or fragments present in the local crystallite environment that affects their volumetric expansion as they mature. PMID:22243238

  11. DISTURBANCE OF NORMAL MOTOR DEVELOPMENT IN THE FIRST YEAR OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Dimitrijević

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of the basic motor skills in the first year of life (postural head control, lateral transfers into a lying position, sitting, standing, walking, crawling, grasping... goes on quite spontaneously. A child learns all the motor actions by itself and that is why it is not necessary to “teach” a child to seat, grasp, stand, walk... Teaching a child the basic motor skills stands for a rough, unnecessary and undesirable involvement into spontaneous motor development, and, due to this, the normal adoption of motor skills is slowed down. For the normal motor development, children do not need helping devices (baby buggy, baby jump.... Helping devices suppress in children their natural urge to walk, complicate its development and may have harmful effects like equinus feet, deformed feet and spine and so on.

  12. Neurologic complications in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pace

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic side effects related to cancer therapy are a common problem in oncology practice. These complications can negatively affect the management of the patient, because they can inhibit treatment and diminish quality of life. Therefore specific skills are required to recognise symptoms and clinical manifestations. This review focuses on the most common neurologic complications to improve physician’s familiarity in determining the aetiology of these symptoms.

  13. Placental lesions and outcome in preterm born children : the relation between placental lesions, neonatal morbidity and neurological development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roescher, Annemiek

    2014-01-01

    The placenta is the link between the mother and her fetus during pregnancy and plays a crucial role in fetal growth and development. A less than optimal placental function as a result of placental lesions, may lead to maternal and or fetal problems. It is known that placental lesions are an importan

  14. Implications of a neural network model of early sensori-motor development for the field of developmental neurology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heijst, JJ; Touwen, BCL; Vos, JE

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports on a neural network model for early sensori-motor development and on the possible implications of this research for our understanding and, eventually, treatment of motor disorders like cerebral palsy. We recapitulate the results we published in detail in a series of papers [1-4].

  15. Preclinical models of muscle spasticity: valuable tools in the development of novel treatment for neurological diseases and conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalov, Anton; Mus, Liudmila; Zvartau, Edwin

    2016-05-01

    Poor validity of preclinical animal models is one of the most commonly discussed explanations for the failures to develop novel drugs in general and in neuroscience in particular. However, there are several areas of neuroscience such as injury-induced spasticity where etiological factor can be adequately recreated and models can focus on specific pathophysiological mechanisms that likely contribute to spasticity syndrome in humans (such as motoneuron hyperexcitability and spinal hyperreflexia). Methods used to study spasticity in preclinical models are expected to have a high translational value (e.g., electromyogram (EMG)-based electrophysiological tools) and can efficiently assist clinical development programs. However, validation of these models is not complete yet. First, true predictive validity of these models is not established as clinically efficacious drugs have been used to reverse validate preclinical models while newly discovered mechanisms effective in preclinical models are yet to be fully explored in humans (e.g., 5-HT2C receptor inverse agonists, fatty acid amid hydrolase inhibitors). Second, further efforts need to be invested into cross-laboratory validation of study protocols and tools, adherence to the highest quality standards (blinding, randomization, pre-specified study endpoints, etc.), and systematic efforts to replicate key sets of data. These appear to be readily achievable tasks that will enable development not only of symptomatic but also of disease-modifying therapy of spasticity, an area that seems to be currently not in focus of research efforts.

  16. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Information Page Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease Information Page What research is being done? The ...

  17. Research and analysis of contradictions and strategies of Hainan tourism development under the new normal background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Xiangxiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, China’s economic and social development has entered into a new normal state, the construction of Hainan international tourism island also has entered into the middle and late period. Hainan tourism has made brilliant achievements, but the development contradictions have become increasingly serious. Based on the analysis of the current situation and realistic problems of Hainan tourism, this paper points out five principal problems of Hainan tourism development--industrial status, supply-demand relationship, cultural preservation, subject-object relationship and government-business relationship, and it also proposes strategic suggestions on the great tourism, large interconnection, great culture, big Hainan and big special zone.

  18. [The neuropediatrician and the pediatric neurological emergencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Peñas, J J; Muñoz-Orduña, R

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of the spectrum and frequencies of pediatric neurological emergencies presenting to an emergency department is vital in optimizing the quality of care delivered locally. To know the real incidence of pediatric neurological emergencies. We present an observational study of a cohort of histories of neurological emergencies at a pediatric tertiary hospital during a period of one year. On analysis of all emergencies (93,469 cases), 1,760 were neurological conditions. The commonest causes of consultation were acute paroxysmal episodes (48%), headache (41%) and gait disturbances (5%). Headache was the most often made diagnoses (39%), followed by acute non-epileptic paroxysmal episodes (20%) and e pileptic seizures (15%). Only 17% of patients needed hospital admission, being epilepsy the most frequent diagnoses involved (41%). The most common reasons for attending the pediatric emergency department are gastrointestinal and respiratory illnesses, neurological emergencies, and neonatal problems. Four illnesses, i.e. headaches, acute non-epileptic paroxysmal episodes, epileptic seizures and febrile convulsions, comprise nearly 85% of all the emergency visits of neurological origin. Neurological emergencies constitute a large percentage of pediatric emergencies. Guidelines developed for neurological emergencies should target the commonest presenting problem categories.

  19. NEUROLOGIC MANIFESTATION OF ORGANIC ACADEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Hassan TONEKABONI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Inborn errors of organic acid metabolism are relatively recently recognized diseases with a wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms: ranging from asymptomatic, normal appearing children to death during first few days of life.In my presentation I will try to explain some of the most common clinical presentation of these disorder with stress on neurologic findings. Organic acidemia usually have three clinical manifestations Severe neonatal form, Intermittent late-onset form and chronic progressive form. Recurrent coma, The main feature of these disorders is due to accumulation of toxic metabolites in Central Nervous system with direct effect on the function, while chronic accumulation of these materials may interfere with CNS development or cerebral metabolism leading to developmental delay.Severe neonatal formsFollowing a symptom free interval of a few days from birth, poor sucking and difficult feeding appears in the newborn, followed by unexplained and progressive coma. Seizures may appear during the course of the disease and EEG may show a burst-suppression pattern. During this stage most infants have axial hypotonia with peripheral dystonia, choreoathetosis, episodic opisthotonus and some repetitive bicycling and boxing movements.Associated biochemical abnormalities including metabolic acidosis, ketonuria and hyperammonemia also is usually present. The overall short-term prognosis with recent advances in medical care is improving. But later in life acute intercurrent episodes triggered by a stress often occur, which can be occasionally fatal.bulging fontanelle and cerebral edema may mimic CNS infection in these babies.Intermittent late-onset formsRecurrent attacks of coma or lethargy with ataxia can occur in childhood or even in adolescence or adulthood. These episodes may be frequent, though in between these the child is entirely normal. These attacks are precipitated by conditions that enhance protein catabolism (trauma, infection etc

  20. A human TREK-1/HEK cell line: a highly efficient screening tool for drug development in neurological diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Moha ou Maati

    Full Text Available TREK-1 potassium channels are involved in a number of physiopathological processes such as neuroprotection, pain and depression. Molecules able to open or to block these channels can be clinically important. Having a cell model for screening such molecules is of particular interest. Here, we describe the development of the first available cell line that constituvely expresses the TREK-1 channel. The TREK-1 channel expressed by the h-TREK-1/HEK cell line has conserved all its modulation properties. It is opened by stretch, pH, polyunsaturated fatty acids and by the neuroprotective molecule, riluzole and it is blocked by spadin or fluoxetine. We also demonstrate that the h-TREK-1/HEK cell line is protected against ischemia by using the oxygen-glucose deprivation model.

  1. China's natural gas exploration and development strategies under the new normal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialiang Lu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available China's natural gas industry has experienced a great leap-forward development in the past decade. Since the second half of 2014, however, international oil price has dropped sharply and global oil and gas markets have been sluggish. In China, economy growth rate slows down and resource environments tend to be more restricted. And energy production and consumption revolution speed up, and the development of natural gas industry experience profound changes internally and externally. Through review on the achievements in recent high-speed development and analysis on the future development of China's natural gas industry, it is believed that the growth rates of China's natural gas output and consumption will slow down and the supply and demand fundamentals present loose states. Low-permeability tight, deep–extra deep and unconventional reservoirs will be the principal targets of natural gas exploration and development and the tendency of resource deterioration is inevitable. The pressure to the decrease of gas price rises due to the sustained recession of oil price and the sharp decrease of alternative energy price. The normal means to increase benefits is to control investment strictly and reduce cost greatly. As for the new normal, five suggestions are proposed for natural gas exploration and development in China. Firstly, reinforce exploration continuously by guaranteeing work load and investment at the required level, and tamp the development basis. Secondly, pay much attention to early development evaluation, give prominence to plan implementation design and control productivity construction rhythm. Thirdly, pay attention to the top-level design of mature gas field development and adjustment, with fine description and management as the priority, and improve overall development level. Fourthly, strengthen the researches on exploration and development technologies, with the simplification and practicability of technologies as the focus, and

  2. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Is Required for Normal Follicle Development and Ovulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Takashi; Kim, Jaeyeon; Li, Qinglei; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lyons, Karen M.

    2011-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a cysteine-rich protein the synthesis and secretion of which are hypothesized to be selectively regulated by activins and other members of the TGF-β superfamily. To investigate the in vivo roles of CTGF in female reproduction, we generated Ctgf ovarian and uterine conditional knockout (cKO) mice. Ctgf cKO mice exhibit severe subfertility and multiple reproductive defects including disrupted follicle development, decreased ovulation rates, increased numbers of corpus luteum, and smaller but functionally normal uterine horns. Steroidogenesis is disrupted in the Ctgf cKO mice, leading to increased levels of serum progesterone. We show that disrupted follicle development is accompanied by a significant increase in granulosa cell apoptosis. Moreover, despite normal cumulus expansion, Ctgf cKO mice exhibit a significant decrease in oocytes ovulated, likely due to impaired ovulatory process. During analyses of mRNA expression, we discovered that Ctgf cKO granulosa cells show gene expression changes similar to our previously reported granulosa cell-specific knockouts of activin and Smad4, the common TGF-β family intracellular signaling protein. We also discovered a significant down-regulation of Adamts1, a progesterone-regulated gene that is critical for the remodeling of extracellular matrix surrounding granulosa cells of preovulatory follicles. These findings demonstrate that CTGF is a downstream mediator in TGF-β and progesterone signaling cascades and is necessary for normal follicle development and ovulation. PMID:21868453

  3. Self-regulation during pretend play in children with intellectual disability and in normally developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieillevoye, Sandrine; Nader-Grosbois, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the symbolic behavior and the self-regulation in dyads of children with intellectual disability and of normally developing children. Specifically, these processes were studied in link with the children's characteristics (mental age, linguistic level, individual pretend play level). The sample included 80 participants, 40 children with intellectual disability and 40 normally developing children, matched according to their mental age, ranged from 3 to 6 years old. First, a developmental assessment was performed (about cognitive, language and pretend play dimensions); then, in peers dyads, the children were elicited to pretend play by means of four kinds of material referring to four types of scripts (tea party, doctor, transportation, substitute objects eliciting creativity). The average symbolic behavior in individual and dyadic play contexts did not differ in both groups, but the average self-regulation in the group with intellectual disability was lower than in the normally developing group. Some positive partial correlations were obtained between mental age, language abilities, individual pretend play, dyadic pretend play and several self-regulatory strategies in both groups although they varied in importance between groups. Clusters analyses showed that individual and dyadic pretend play explained self-regulation in children of both groups. Specifically, in both groups, the higher was symbolic behavior in creativity context, the higher was self-regulation.

  4. Learning with sublexical information from emerging reading vocabularies in exceptionally early and normal reading development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, G Brian; Fletcher-Flinn, Claire M; Wilson, Kathryn J; McKay, Michael F; Margrain, Valerie G

    2015-03-01

    Predictions from theories of the processes of word reading acquisition have rarely been tested against evidence from exceptionally early readers. The theories of Ehri, Share, and Byrne, and an alternative, Knowledge Sources theory, were so tested. The former three theories postulate that full development of context-free letter sounds and awareness of phonemes are required for normal acquisition, while the claim of the alternative is that with or without such, children can use sublexical information from their emerging reading vocabularies to acquire word reading. Results from two independent samples of children aged 3-5, and 5 years, with mean word reading levels of 7 and 9 years respectively, showed underdevelopment of their context-free letter sounds and phoneme awareness, relative to their word reading levels and normal comparison samples. Despite such underdevelopment, these exceptional readers engaged in a form of phonological recoding that enabled pseudoword reading, at the level of older-age normal controls matched on word reading level. Moreover, in the 5-year-old sample further experiments showed that, relative to normal controls, they had a bias toward use of sublexical information from their reading vocabularies for phonological recoding of heterophonic pseudowords with irregular consistent spelling, and were superior in accessing word meanings independently of phonology, although only if the readers were without exposure to explicit phonics. The three theories were less satisfactory than the alternative theory in accounting for the learning of the exceptionally early readers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a theory of implementation and integration: Normalization Process Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Carl R

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theories are important tools in the social and natural sciences. The methods by which they are derived are rarely described and discussed. Normalization Process Theory explains how new technologies, ways of acting, and ways of working become routinely embedded in everyday practice, and has applications in the study of implementation processes. This paper describes the process by which it was built. Methods Between 1998 and 2008, we developed a theory. We derived a set of empirical generalizations from analysis of data collected in qualitative studies of healthcare work and organization. We developed an applied theoretical model through analysis of empirical generalizations. Finally, we built a formal theory through a process of extension and implication analysis of the applied theoretical model. Results Each phase of theory development showed that the constructs of the theory did not conflict with each other, had explanatory power, and possessed sufficient robustness for formal testing. As the theory developed, its scope expanded from a set of observed regularities in data with procedural explanations, to an applied theoretical model, to a formal middle-range theory. Conclusion Normalization Process Theory has been developed through procedures that were properly sceptical and critical, and which were opened to review at each stage of development. The theory has been shown to merit formal testing.

  6. Effects of pre- and postnatal exposure to the UV-filter octyl methoxycinnamate (OMC) on the reproductive, auditory and neurological development of rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelstad, Marta; Boberg, Julie; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Christiansen, Sofie; Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Nellemann, Christine; Lund, Søren Peter; Hass, Ulla

    2011-02-01

    Octyl Methoxycinnamate (OMC) is a frequently used UV-filter in sunscreens and other cosmetics. The aim of the present study was to address the potential endocrine disrupting properties of OMC, and to investigate how OMC induced changes in thyroid hormone levels would be related to the neurological development of treated offspring. Groups of 14-18 pregnant Wistar rats were dosed with 0, 500, 750 or 1000 mg OMC/kg bw/day during gestation and lactation. Serum thyroxine (T(4)), testosterone, estradiol and progesterone levels were measured in dams and offspring. Anogenital distance, nipple retention, postnatal growth and timing of sexual maturation were assessed. On postnatal day 16, gene expression in prostate and testes, and weight and histopathology of the thyroid gland, liver, adrenals, prostate, testes, epididymis and ovaries were measured. After weaning, offspring were evaluated in a battery of behavioral and neurophysiological tests, including tests of activity, startle response, cognitive and auditory function. In adult animals, reproductive organ weights and semen quality were investigated. Thyroxine (T(4)) levels showed a very marked decrease during the dosing period in all dosed dams, but were less severely affected in the offspring. On postnatal day 16, high dose male offspring showed reduced relative prostate and testis weights, and a dose-dependent decrease in testosterone levels. In OMC exposed female offspring, motor activity levels were decreased, while low and high dose males showed improved spatial learning abilities. The observed behavioral changes were probably not mediated solely by early T(4) deficiencies, as the observed effects differed from those seen in other studies of developmental hypothyroxinemia. At eight months of age, sperm counts were reduced in all three OMC-dosed groups, and prostate weights were reduced in the highest dose group. Taken together, these results indicate that perinatal OMC-exposure can affect both the reproductive and

  7. Spatial contrast sensitivity in clinical neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Wildt, G J; Keemink, C J

    1988-01-01

    We studied contrast sensitivity function in normal subjects and in three illustrative cases with various neurological disorders. This was done by measuring contrast sensitivity over a range of spatial frequencies for vertical sinewave grating stimuli. It is demonstrated that contrast sensitivity function can give information about visual function not obtainable by conventional test procedures.

  8. C4.4A gene ablation is compatible with normal epidermal development and causes modest overt phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegbaum, Mette Camilla; Jacobsen, Benedikte; Füchtbauer, Annette

    2016-01-01

    of C4.4A in normal physiology and cancer progression. The unchallenged C4.4A-deficient mice were viable, fertile, born in a normal Mendelian distribution and, surprisingly, displayed normal development of squamous epithelia. The C4.4A-deficient mice were, nonetheless, significantly lighter than...

  9. EEG in Sarcoidosis Patients Without Neurological Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin Topçuoğlu, Özgür; Kavas, Murat; Öztaş, Selahattin; Arınç, Sibel; Afşar, Gülgün; Saraç, Sema; Midi, İpek

    2017-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease affecting nervous system in 5% to 10% of patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is accepted as the most sensitive method for detecting neurosarcoidosis. However, the most common findings in MRI are the nonspecific white matter lesions, which may be unrelated to sarcoidosis and can occur because of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and other inflammatory or infectious disorders, as well. Autopsy studies report more frequent neurological involvement than the ante mortem studies. The aim of this study is to assess electroencephalography (EEG) in sarcoidosis patients without neurological findings in order to display asymptomatic neurological dysfunction. We performed EEG on 30 sarcoidosis patients without diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis or prior neurological comorbidities. Fourteen patients (46.7%) showed intermittant focal and/or generalized slowings while awake and not mentally activated. Seven (50%) of these 14 patients with EEG slowings had nonspecific white matter changes while the other half showed EEG slowings in the absence of MRI changes. We conclude that EEG slowings, when normal variants (psychomotor variant, temporal theta of elderly, frontal theta waves) are eliminated, may be an indicator of dysfunction in brain activity even in the absence of MRI findings. Hence, EEG may contribute toward detecting asymptomatic neurological dysfunction or probable future neurological involvement in sarcoidosis patients. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2016.

  10. Neurological Complications of Endocrine Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Karen S; Grunwald, Tal; De Luca, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    The endocrine system is a complex group of organs and glands that relates to multiple other organs and systems in the body with the ultimate goal of maintaining homeostasis. This complex network functions through hormones excreted by several glands and released in the blood, targeting different body tissues and modulating their function. Any primary disorders affecting the endocrine glands and altering the amount of hormones synthesized and released will lead to disruption in the functions of multiple organs. The central nervous system of a developing child is particularly sensitive to endocrine disorders. A variety of neurological manifestations have been described as features of several endocrine diseases in childhood. Their knowledge may contribute to an early diagnosis of a particular endocrine condition, especially when more typical features are not present yet. In this article, we discuss specific neurological manifestations found in various endocrine disorders in children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genomics in Neurological Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangchun Han; Jiya Sun; Jiajia Wang; Zhouxian Bai; Fuhai Song; Hongxing Lei

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders comprise a variety of complex diseases in the central nervous system, which can be roughly classified as neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. The basic and translational research of neurological disorders has been hindered by the difficulty in accessing the pathological center (i.e., the brain) in live patients. The rapid advancement of sequencing and array technologies has made it possible to investigate the disease mechanism and biomarkers from a systems perspective. In this review, recent progresses in the discovery of novel risk genes, treatment targets and peripheral biomarkers employing genomic technologies will be dis-cussed. Our major focus will be on two of the most heavily investigated neurological disorders, namely Alzheimer’s disease and autism spectrum disorder.

  12. Neurologic Complications of Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Rajat

    2017-03-01

    Neurologic disturbances including encephalopathy, seizures, and focal deficits complicate the course 10-30% of patients undergoing organ or stem cell transplantation. While much or this morbidity is multifactorial and often associated with extra-cerebral dysfunction (e.g., graft dysfunction, metabolic derangements), immunosuppressive drugs also contribute significantly. This can either be through direct toxicity (e.g., posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome from calcineurin inhibitors such as tacrolimus in the acute postoperative period) or by facilitating opportunistic infections in the months after transplantation. Other neurologic syndromes such as akinetic mutism and osmotic demyelination may also occur. While much of this neurologic dysfunction may be reversible if related to metabolic factors or drug toxicity (and the etiology is recognized and reversed), cases of multifocal cerebral infarction, hemorrhage, or infection may have poor outcomes. As transplant patients survive longer, delayed infections (such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy) and post-transplant malignancies are increasingly reported.

  13. Plasticity in the development of handedness: evidence from normal development and early asymmetric brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbetta, Daniela; Williams, Joshua; Snapp-Childs, Winona

    2006-09-01

    Previous research revealed that shifting patterns of hand preference in the first year of life are linked to infants' sensory-motor experiences as they learn to sit, creep, and walk. In this report, we examine whether new and different forms of locomotion and sensory-motor experiences similarly contribute to alter patterns of hand preference in early development. We examined the cases of three infants with unique developmental histories. Two infants adopted distinctive forms of locomotion in lieu of typical hands-and-knees crawling. One infant scooted using both hands and legs in a coupled fashion, while the other infant performed an asymmetrical, left-biased belly-crawl using only one arm to drag his body. The third infant suffered damage to his left-brain hemisphere shortly after birth and received intense physical therapy to his right arm as a result of it. We followed all three infants on a weekly basis and tracked changes in their reaching behavior, mode of locomotion, and postural achievements. The two infants with unique locomotor patterns displayed changes in hand preference that reciprocated the arm patterns that they used during locomotion. The infant who coupled his body for scooting began to reach bimanually, while the infant who adopted the left-biased belly-crawl developed a strong unimanual, right-hand, preference. The infant with left-hemisphere damage initially displayed a right-hand preference, then a temporary decline in preferred hand use as he began to cruise and walk, and ultimately resumed a right-hand preference in the 2nd year of life. This data is consistent with previous work showing that the development of hand preference in the 1st year of life is highly malleable and sensitive to a variety of new sensory-motor experiences.

  14. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, the mean transverse diameter at the same levels ranges from 24.45 mm to 27.00 mm and the mean value of Torg ratio is 0.96. With respect to narrow cervical spinal canal, the following charaterstics are found: firstly, extension of the cervical spine results in statistically significant stenosis as compared with the flexed or neutral positions; secondly, females sustain cervical spinal canal narrowing more easily than males; finally, the consistent narrowest cervical canal level is at C 4 for all ethnicity, but there is a slight variation in the sagittal diameter of cervical spinal stenosis (≤14 mm in Whites, ≤ 12 mm in Japanese, ≤13.7 mm in Chinese. Narrow sagittal cervical canal diameter brings about an increased risk of neurological injuries in traumatic, degenerative and inflam-matory conditions and is related with extension of cervical spine, gender, as well as ethnicity. It is hoped that this re-view will be helpful in diagnosing spinal cord and neuro-logical injuries with the geometric parameters of cervical spine in the future. Key words: Spinal cord injuries; Spinal stenosis; Trauma, nervous system

  15. Neurocritical care education during neurology residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogan, O.; Manno, E.; Geocadin, R.G.; Ziai, W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Limited information is available regarding the current state of neurocritical care education for neurology residents. The goal of our survey was to assess the need and current state of neurocritical care training for neurology residents. Methods: A survey instrument was developed and, with the support of the American Academy of Neurology, distributed to residency program directors of 132 accredited neurology programs in the United States in 2011. Results: A response rate of 74% (98 of 132) was achieved. A dedicated neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) existed in 64%. Fifty-six percent of residency programs offer a dedicated rotation in the neuro-ICU, lasting 4 weeks on average. Where available, the neuro-ICU rotation was required in the vast majority (91%) of programs. Neurology residents' exposure to the fundamental principles of neurocritical care was obtained through a variety of mechanisms. Of program directors, 37% indicated that residents would be interested in performing away rotations in a neuro-ICU. From 2005 to 2010, the number of programs sending at least one resident into a neuro-ICU fellowship increased from 14% to 35%. Conclusions: Despite the expansion of neurocritical care, large proportions of US neurology residents have limited exposure to a neuro-ICU and neurointensivists. Formal training in the principles of neurocritical care may be highly variable. The results of this survey suggest a charge to address the variability of resident education and to develop standardized curricula in neurocritical care for neurology residents. PMID:22573636

  16. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  17. Prefrontal GABA(A) receptor alpha-subunit expression in normal postnatal human development and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Carlotta E; Webster, Maree J; Rothmond, Debora A; Bahn, Sabine; Elashoff, Michael; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2010-07-01

    Cortical GABA deficits that are consistently reported in schizophrenia may reflect an etiology of failed normal postnatal neurotransmitter maturation. Previous studies have found prefrontal cortical GABA(A) receptor alpha subunit alterations in schizophrenia, yet their relationship to normal developmental expression profiles in the human cortex has not been determined. The aim of this study was to quantify GABA(A) receptor alpha-subunit mRNA expression patterns in human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during normal postnatal development and in schizophrenia cases compared to controls. Transcript levels of GABA(A) receptor alpha subunits were measured using microarray and qPCR analysis of 60 normal individuals aged 6weeks to 49years and in 37 patients with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder and 37 matched controls. We detected robust opposing changes in cortical GABA(A) receptor alpha1 and alpha5 subunits during the first few years of postnatal development, with a 60% decrease in alpha5 mRNA expression and a doubling of alpha1 mRNA expression with increasing age. In our Australian schizophrenia cohort we detected decreased GAD67 mRNA expression (p=0.0012) and decreased alpha5 mRNA expression (p=0.038) in the DLPFC with no significant change of other alpha subunits. Our findings confirm that GABA deficits (reduced GAD67) are a consistent feature of schizophrenia postmortem brain studies. Our study does not confirm alterations in cortical alpha1 or alpha2 mRNA levels in the schizophrenic DLPFC, as seen in previous studies, but instead we report a novel down-regulation of alpha5 subunit mRNA suggesting that post-synaptic alterations of inhibitory receptors are an important feature of schizophrenia but may vary between cohorts. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Neurological manifestations of tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, M M; Vdovin, A V; Chichanovskaia, L V

    2001-01-01

    One hundred and forty-four new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis were examined. The examination revealed the following neurological syndromes: vegetovascular dystonia, disseminated cerebral microsymptoms, focal lesion of the brain, sensory polyneuropathy. The presence of positive specific basophilic degranulation reactions and intracutaneous tuberculin test suggests that the body shows allergic reactions in response to Mycobacteria tuberculosis. And since connective tissue that presents in the vessels and tunics in the nervous system is involved into a pathological process in allergy, neurological disorders are always secondary in tuberculosis and due to the primary vascular wall lesion that following the type of secondary allergic vasculitis.

  19. Expression of anti-Müllerian hormone during normal and pathological gonadal development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Jørgensen, N; Graem, N

    1999-01-01

    The ontogeny of expression of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) was examined by immunohistochemistry in 135 human gonadal tissue specimens of various developmental age, ranging from 6 weeks of fetal development to 38 yr of postnatal age. The series included specimens from normal testes and ovaries...... and from individuals either with pathological conditions affecting gonadal development or with idiopathic infertility manifested as azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia. AMH expression was found only in Sertoli and granulosa cells. A 6-week-old fetal testis at the indifferent gonad stage did not yet...... express AMH. The protein was first visible at 8.5 weeks of development, when sex cords have not yet been formed. Afterward, a majority of testicular specimens, including those from pathological conditions, strongly expressed AMH through fetal development and childhood until puberty. Markedly prolonged...

  20. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mammalian TOR (mTOR). mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid) synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development.

  1. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki eTakei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Target of rapamycin (TOR was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mTOR (mammalian TOR. mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system (CNS, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development.

  2. Neurological examination: pioneering authors and their books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péricles Maranhão-Filho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to highlight some of the most important pioneering books specifically focused on the neurological examination and their authors. During the XIX Century, Alexander Hammond, William Gowers and Charles Mills pioneered the neurological literature, followed in the XX Century by Aloysio de Castro, Monrad-Krohn, Derek Denny-Brown, Robert Wartenberg, Gordon Holmes, and Russel DeJong. With determination and a marked sense of observation and research, they competently developed and spread the technique and art of the neurological exam.

  3. Hypophosphatemia and neurological changes secondary to oral caloric intake: a variant of hyperalimentation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvis, S E; DiBartolomeo, A G; Aaker, H M

    1980-03-01

    Previous reports have described a syndrome of paresthesias, weakness, seizures and hypophosphatemia in patients and animals receiving intravenous hyperalimentation. In this report we describe a group of five patients who developed this syndrome while on oral caloric intake and three patients who received only modest amounts of hyperalimentation therapy. As an experimental corollary, studies were performed in starved and normal dogs with calories infused via an intragastric catheter. The serum inorganic phosphorus (Pi) fell slightly in normal animals from 4.8-2.5 mg. %. In the starved dogs with diarrhea or vomiting the Pi fell gradually from 4.8-1.6. In starved dogs without gastrointestinal symptoms the Pi fell precipitously from 3.7-1.4 mg % on the first day of infusion and remained at that level. Approximately 50% of the starved animals developed the neurological syndrome; none of the normal animals had neurological symptoms.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of iron deposition in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brass, Steven D; Chen, Nan-kuei; Mulkern, Robert V; Bakshi, Rohit

    2006-02-01

    Deposition of iron in the brain is proposed to play a role in the pathophysiology of the normal aging process and neurodegenerative diseases. Whereas iron is required for normal neuronal metabolism, excessive levels can contribute to the formation of free radicals, leading to lipid peroxidation and neurotoxicity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool to detect excessive iron in the brain and longitudinally monitor changes in iron levels. Iron deposition is associated with a reduction in the T2 relaxation time, leading to hypointensity on spin-echo and gradient-echo T2-weighted images. The MRI changes associated with iron deposition have been observed both in normal aging and in various chronic neurological diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease. Magnetic resonance imaging metrics providing information about iron concentrations include R2, R2', and R2*. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role of iron and its detection by MRI in various neurological disorders. We will review the basic biochemical properties of iron and its influence on MRI signal. We will also summarize the sensitivity and specificity of MRI techniques in detecting iron. The MRI and pathological findings pertaining to brain iron will be reviewed with respect to normal aging and a variety of neurological disorders. Finally, the biochemistry and pathophysiology surrounding iron, oxidative stress, free radicals, and lipid peroxidation in the brain will be discussed, including therapeutic implications. The potential role of iron deposition and its assessment by MRI provides exciting potential applications to the diagnosis, longitudinal monitoring, and therapeutic development for disorders of the brain.

  5. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...

  6. Wikipedia and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C.; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, WM|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/168455706

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popu

  7. Ravel's neurological illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, R J; Pascuzzi, R M

    1999-01-01

    In the last 10 years of his life, Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) experienced a gradually progressive decline in neurological function. Dr. Alajouanine examined Ravel, noting the presence of aphasia and apraxia with relative preservation of comprehension and memory. The exact diagnosis remains unclear, but the likelihood of a progressive degenerative disorder, such as frontotemporal dementia, is herein discussed.

  8. IL-1RI participates in normal growth plate development and bone modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsa-Maziel, Stav; Zaretsky, Janna; Reich, Adi; Koren, Yoav; Shahar, Ron; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat

    2013-07-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) signals through IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) and induces osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption mainly during pathological conditions. Little is known about the effect of excess or absence of IL-1 signaling on the physiological development of the growth plate and bone. In this study, we examine growth plate morphology, bone structure, and mechanical properties as well as osteoclast number in IL-1RI knockout mice to evaluate the role of IL-1RI in the normal development of the growth plate and bone. We show for the first time that IL-1RI knockout mice have narrower growth plates due to a smaller hypertrophic zone, suggesting a role for this cytokine in hypertrophic differentiation, together with higher proteoglycan content. The bones of theses mice exhibit higher trabecular and cortical mass, increased mineral density, and superior mechanical properties. In addition, IL-1RI knockout mice have significantly reduced osteoclast numbers in the chondro-osseous junction, trabecular bone, and cortical bone. These results suggest that IL-1RI is involved in normal growth plate development and ECM homeostasis and that it is significant in the physiological process of bone modeling.

  9. Celsr3 is required for normal development of GABA circuits in the inner retina.

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    Alaron Lewis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The identity of the specific molecules required for the process of retinal circuitry formation is largely unknown. Here we report a newly identified zebrafish mutant in which the absence of the atypical cadherin, Celsr3, leads to a specific defect in the development of GABAergic signaling in the inner retina. This mutant lacks an optokinetic response (OKR, the ability to visually track rotating illuminated stripes, and develops a super-normal b-wave in the electroretinogram (ERG. We find that celsr3 mRNA is abundant in the amacrine and ganglion cells of the retina, however its loss does not affect synaptic lamination within the inner plexiform layer (IPL or amacrine cell number. We localize the ERG defect pharmacologically to a late-stage disruption in GABAergic modulation of ON-bipolar cell pathway and find that the DNQX-sensitive fast b1 component of the ERG is specifically affected in this mutant. Consistently, we find an increase in GABA receptors on mutant ON-bipolar terminals, providing a direct link between the observed physiological changes and alterations in GABA signaling components. Finally, using blastula transplantation, we show that the lack of an OKR is due, at least partially, to Celsr3-mediated defects within the brain. These findings support the previously postulated inner retina origin for the b1 component and reveal a new role for Celsr3 in the normal development of ON visual pathway circuitry in the inner retina.

  10. Mesenchymal Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Is Required for Normal Pancreas Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnfelt-Rønne, Jonas; Ravassard, Philippe; Pardanaud-Glavieux, Corinne; Scharfmann, Raphaél; Serup, Palle

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Pancreas organogenesis is orchestrated by interactions between the epithelium and the mesenchyme, but these interactions are not completely understood. Here we investigated a role for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling within the pancreas mesenchyme and found it to be required for the normal development of the mesenchyme as well as for the pancreatic epithelium. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed active BMP signaling by immunostaining for phospho-Smad1,5,8 and tested whether pancreas development was affected by BMP inhibition after expression of Noggin and dominant negative BMP receptors in chicken and mouse pancreas. RESULTS Endogenous BMP signaling is confined to the mesenchyme in the early pancreas and inhibition of BMP signaling results in severe pancreatic hypoplasia with reduced epithelial branching. Notably, we also observed an excessive endocrine differentiation when mesenchymal BMP signaling is blocked, presumably secondary to defective mesenchyme to epithelium signaling. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that BMP signaling plays a previously unsuspected role in the mesenchyme, required for normal development of the mesenchyme as well as for the epithelium. PMID:20522595

  11. Diagnosis of the human fetal age based on the development of the normal kidney

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    Lizardo-Daudt Helena Maria

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The diagnosis of human fetal age is usually estimated based on the measurement of crown-rump length or crown-heel length and the weight of the fetus. However, this estimate is not totally accurate and sometimes is necessary to combine other data to determine the fetal age. An analysis of the normal embryological development of the kidney may assist in this determination. The histology of this process, although well described, lacks photographic documentation. We intend to fill this gap by providing histologists and pathologists, especially inexperienced ones, with information about the staging of the renal development through microphotography. The objective of the present study was to achieve greater accuracy for the diagnosis of human fetal age through the proposed classification and the photographic documentation presented. Material and methods: Normal embryological development of the human kidney was studied by light microscopy. The fetal period from 6 to 40 weeks of gestation was observed according the stage of maturity of glomeruli and tubules; localization of glomeruli, occurrence of nephrogenic tissue and cortico-medullary differentiation. At least 5 different exams were observed from each week of development. Two hundred four exams were analyzed in the whole study. The histological characteristics were quantified and the process was documented by microphotography. Results and final considerations: The fetal development of the kidney was divided into 8 stages, which was documented through microphotography. Nephron structural formation occurred until the 34th week of prenatal development. From the 35th week on, tubules and glomeruli continued to mature without the formation of new nephrons. The proposed classification intends to improve the accuracy of the fetal age diagnosis.

  12. Belief term development in children with autism, Asperger syndrome, specific language impairment, and normal development: links to theory of mind development.

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    Ziatas, K; Durkin, K; Pratt, C

    1998-07-01

    This study examined the relationship between the development of theory of mind and the development of the belief terms think, know, and guess. Children with autism and Asperger syndrome, matched to children with specific language impairment and normal development, completed false belief, belief term comprehension, and belief term expression tasks. The autistic group's performance on the false belief, belief term comprehension, and belief term expression tasks was significantly poorer than that of the Asperger, language impaired, and normal groups. Across groups an association was found between false belief and belief term performance. Results support a growing body of literature demonstrating links between the development of theory of mind and communicative competence.

  13. Control of Abnormal Synchronization in Neurological Disorders

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    Oleksandr V. Popovych

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the nervous system synchronization processes play an important role, e.g., in the context of information processing and motor control. However, pathological, excessive synchronization may strongly impair brain function and is a hallmark of several neurological disorders. This focused review addresses the question of how an abnormal neuronal synchronization can specifically be counteracted by invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation as, for instance, by deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, or by acoustic stimulation for the treatment of tinnitus. On the example of coordinated reset (CR neuromodulation we illustrate how insights into the dynamics of complex systems contribute to successful model-based approaches, which use methods from synergetics, nonlinear dynamics, and statistical physics, for the development of novel therapies for normalization of brain function and synaptic connectivity. Based on the intrinsic multistability of the neuronal populations induced by spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP,CR neuromodulation utilizes the mutual interdependence between synaptic connectivity and dynamics of the neuronal networks in order to restore more physiological patterns of connectivity via desynchronization of neuronal activity. The very goal is to shift the neuronal population by stimulation from anabnormally coupled and synchronized state to a desynchronized regime with normalized synaptic connectivity, which significantly outlasts the stimulation cessation, so that long-lasting therapeutic effects can be achieved.

  14. Multiple roles of metalloproteinases in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Hill, Jeff W; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    Once thought to mainly act in brain to remodel the extracellular matrix, the family of metalloproteinases is important in many normal and pathological processes in the nervous system. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are the two major families of metalloproteinases in the brain. MMPs are comprised of several related enzymes that act on extracellular molecules. Normally, they are important in angiogenesis and neurogenesis in development. In neuroinflammatory illnesses, they disrupt the basal lamina and tight junction proteins to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB). ADAMs are important in neuroinflammation through activation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and their action as secretases that modulate the action of receptors on the cell surface. Four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are the main inhibitors of the MMPs and ADAMs. Recently, MMPs were found to affect DNA repair processes by an unexpected intranuclear action. MMPs and ADAMs have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and vascular cognitive impairment. Growing literature on the functions of MMPs and ADAMs in the central nervous system is opening up new and exciting areas of research that may lead to novel approaches to treatment of neurological diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of Social Media GIS to Support Information Utilization from Normal Times to Disaster Outbreak Times

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    Kayoko YAMAMOTO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to design, develop, operate and evaluate a social media GIS (Geographical Information Systems specially tailored to mash-up the information that local residents and governments provide to support information utilization from normal times to disaster outbreak times in order to promote disaster reduction. The conclusions of the present study are summarized in the following three points. (1 Social media GIS, an information system which integrates a Web-GIS, an SNS and Twitter in addition to an information classification function, a button function and a ranking function into a single system, was developed. This made it propose an information utilization system based on the assumption of disaster outbreak times when information overload happens as well as normal times. (2 The social media GIS was operated for fifty local residents who are more than 18 years old for ten weeks in Mitaka City of Tokyo metropolis. Although about 32% of the users were in their forties, about 30% were aged fifties, and more than 10% of the users were in their twenties, thirties and sixties or more. (3 The access survey showed that 260 pieces of disaster information were distributed throughout the whole city of Mitaka. Among the disaster information, danger-related information occupied 20%, safety-related information occupied 68%, and other information occupied 12%.

  16. GENDER DIFFERENCES IN FINE AND GROSS MOTOR SKILLS OF NORMALLY DEVELOPING OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE ADOLESCENTS

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    Şehmus ASLAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to compare girls’ and boys’ fine and gross motor skills in normally developing overweight and obese adolescents. 18 girls and 28 boys with 12-18 age range, in totally 46 overweight and obese adolecents participated in the study. Body mass index of participants were calculated. Fine and gross motor skills of adolescents were assessed by Short Form Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOT-2 SF. There was no differences between girls and boys for BOT-2 SF total scores (p>0.05, but it was found differences in several items of BOT-2 SF. Scores of test items for fine motor scores in the girls were higher than the boys (p0.05. Gross motor skill tests including jumping in place, dribling a ball, sit-ups, one- legged stationary hop test scores were higher in the boys, while tapping feet and fingers test score was higher in the girls (p<0.05. Our results suggested that there is differences between girls’ and boys’ fine and gross motor skills in normally developing overweight and obese adolescents. Girls have better fine motor skill performance while boys have better gross motor skill performance in overweight and obese adolescents.

  17. Callosal agenesis, chorioretinal lacunae, absence of infantile spasms, and normal development: Aicardi syndrome without epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats Viñas, Jose Maria; Martinez Gonzalez, María Jesús; Garcia Ribes, Ainhoa; Martinez Gonzalez, Sonia; Martinez Fernandez, Ricardo

    2005-06-01

    Aicardi syndrome is defined by the clinical triad of infantile spasms, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and pathognomonic chorioretinal lacunae. Almost all patients are females with severe cognitive and physical disabilities. All of the cases reported in the literature have had early-onset seizures. Most cases of Aicardi syndrome exhibit very slow development, even when seizures are eventually controlled, and the cases with a relatively favourable outcome are associated with low intelligence quotient levels. A relationship between chorioretinal changes or severity of the agenesis of the corpus callosum and prognosis of Aicardi syndrome has been claimed, but few data are available about the clinical features that can predict clinical outcome. We describe a case of Aicardi syndrome in a female aged 24 months. Magnetic resonance imaging showed complete agenesis of the corpus callosum and ophthalmoscopy revealed chorioretinal lacunae in the left eye. She had never had seizures and her psychomotor and language development were normal for age.

  18. Folate deficiency and neurological disorders in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botez, M I

    1976-01-01

    The restless legs syndrome could represent a folate responsive disorder in both patients with acquired-folate deficiency and those with familial symptomatology. Patients with acquired folate-deficiency could be divided into two subgroups. (i) those with minor neurological signs (restless legs syndrome, vibration sense impairment and tactile hypoesthesia in both legs with diminished ankle jerks and a prolonged or assymetrical Achilles-reflex time) and (ii) those with major neurological signs (subacute combined degeneration with or without neuropathies). In some of these patients the classical triad of the malabsorption syndrome is replaced by another triad, constipation, abnormal jejunal biopsy and abnormal d-xylose absorption. A low folic serum acid level could induce minor neuropsychiatric symptoms while an additional low CSF folate could induce major neurological symptoms in spite of the presence of a normal erythrocyte folate level and in the absence of frank anemia. Possible further studies are described.

  19. Program Director Survey: Attitudes Regarding Child Neurology Training and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ignacio; Feist, Terri B; Gilbert, Donald L

    2016-04-01

    As a result of major clinical and scientific advances and changes in clinical practice, the role of adult neurology training for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability (NDD) certification has become controversial. The most recently approved requirements for board eligibility for child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents still include 12 months in adult neurology rotations. The objective of this study was to assess United States child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residency program directors' opinions regarding optimal residency training. The authors developed an 18-item questionnaire and contacted all 80 child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors via e-mail, using SurveyMonkey. A total of 44 program directors responded (55%), representing programs that train 78 categorical and 94 total resident positions, approximately 70% of those filled in the match. Respondents identified multiple areas where child neurology residents need more training, including genetics and neuromuscular disease. A substantial majority (73%) believed child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents need less than 12 adult neurology training months; however, most (75%) also believed adult hospital service and man-power needs (55%) and finances (34%) would pose barriers to reducing adult neurology. Most (70%) believed reductions in adult neurology training should be program flexible. A majority believed the written initial certification examination should be modified with more child neurology and fewer basic neuroscience questions. Nearly all (91%) felt the views of child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors are under-represented within the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Residency Review Committee. The requirement for 12 adult neurology months for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability certification is not consistent with the views of the majority of program

  20. laminin alpha 1 gene is essential for normal lens development in zebrafish

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    Bosenko Dmitry V

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laminins represent major components of basement membranes and play various roles in embryonic and adult tissues. The functional laminin molecule consists of three chains, alpha, beta and gamma, encoded by separate genes. There are twelve different laminin genes identified in mammals to date that are highly homologous in their sequence but different in their tissue distribution. The laminin alpha -1 gene was shown to have the most restricted expression pattern with strong expression in ocular structures, particularly in the developing and mature lens. Results We identified the zebrafish lama1 gene encoding a 3075-amino acid protein (lama1 that possesses strong identity with the human LAMA1. Zebrafish lama1 transcripts were detected at all stages of embryo development with the highest levels of expression in the developing lens, somites, nervous and urogenital systems. Translation of the lama1 gene was inhibited using two non-overlapping morpholino oligomers that were complementary to sequences surrounding translation initiation. Morphant embryos exhibited an arrest in lens development and abnormalities in the body axis length and curvature. Conclusion These results underline the importance of the laminin alpha 1 for normal ocular development and provide a basis for further analysis of its developmental roles.

  1. Neurology and detective writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempster, Peter A; Lees, Andrew J

    2013-12-01

    When searching for clues to reach a diagnosis, neurologists often empathise with the detective who is trying to solve a case. The premise of this article is that detective stories have been part of the fabric of neurology ever since the time that it evolved into a discrete medical speciality. We will examine how this form of narrative has found expression in detective mystery fiction and popular science publications created by 20th century neurologist physician-writers. We will also investigate the power of the neurologist's alter ego, Sherlock Holmes: his relationship to founders of clinical neuroscience such as Jean-Martin Charcot, William Gowers and Sigmund Freud, and his influences on neurological practice and its literary traditions.

  2. Key sleep neurologic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Louis, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sleep disorders are frequent comorbidities in neurologic patients. This review focuses on clinical aspects and prognosis of 3 neurologic sleep disorders: narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED), and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Narcolepsy causes pervasive, enduring excessive daytime sleepiness, adversely affecting patients' daily functioning. RLS/WED is characterized by an uncomfortable urge to move the legs before sleep, often evolving toward augmentation and resulting in daylong bothersome symptoms. RBD causes potentially injurious dream enactment behaviors that often signify future evolution of overt synucleinopathy neurodegeneration in as many as 81% of patients. Timely recognition, referral for polysomnography, and longitudinal follow-up of narcolepsy, RLS/WED, and RBD patients are imperatives for neurologists in providing quality comprehensive patient care. PMID:24605270

  3. Neurological legal disability

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    Radhakrishna H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders with a prolonged course, either remediable or otherwise are being seen increasingly in clinical practice and many such patients are young and are part of some organization or other wherein their services are needed if they were healthy and fit. The neurologists who are on the panel of these organizations are asked to certify whether these subjects are fit to work or how long they should be given leave. These certificates may be produced in the court of law and may be subjected to verification by another neurologist or a medical board. At present there are no standard guidelines in our country to effect such certification unlike in orthopedic specialty or in ophthalmology. The following is a beginning, based on which the neurologist can certify the neurological disability of such subjects and convey the same meaning to all neurologists across the country.

  4. Perimenopause as a neurological transition state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Roberta D; Yao, Jia; Yin, Fei; Mack, Wendy J; Cadenas, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    Perimenopause is a midlife transition state experienced by women that occurs in the context of a fully functioning neurological system and results in reproductive senescence. Although primarily viewed as a reproductive transition, the symptoms of perimenopause are largely neurological in nature. Neurological symptoms that emerge during perimenopause are indicative of disruption in multiple estrogen-regulated systems (including thermoregulation, sleep, circadian rhythms and sensory processing) and affect multiple domains of cognitive function. Estrogen is a master regulator that functions through a network of estrogen receptors to ensure that the brain effectively responds at rapid, intermediate and long timescales to regulate energy metabolism in the brain via coordinated signalling and transcriptional pathways. The estrogen receptor network becomes uncoupled from the bioenergetic system during the perimenopausal transition and, as a corollary, a hypometabolic state associated with neurological dysfunction can develop. For some women, this hypometabolic state might increase the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases later in life. The perimenopausal transition might also represent a window of opportunity to prevent age-related neurological diseases. This Review considers the importance of neurological symptoms in perimenopause in the context of their relationship to the network of estrogen receptors that control metabolism in the brain.

  5. Effect of transforming growth factor-beta1 on embryonic and posthatch muscle growth and development in normal and low score normal chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Velleman, S G

    2009-02-01

    During skeletal muscle development, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) is a potent inhibitor of muscle cell proliferation and differentiation. The TGF-beta1 signal is carried by Smad proteins into the cell nucleus, inhibiting the expression of key myogenic regulatory factors including MyoD and myogenin. However, the molecular mechanism by which TGF-beta1 inhibits muscle cell proliferation and differentiation has not been well documented in vivo. The present study investigated the effect of TGF-beta1 on in vivo skeletal muscle growth and development. A chicken line, Low Score Normal (LSN) with reduced muscling and upregulated TGF-beta1 expression, was used and compared to a normal chicken line. The injection of TGF-beta1 at embryonic day (ED) 3 significantly reduced the pectoralis major (p. major) muscle weight in the normal birds at 1 wk posthatch, whereas no significant difference was observed in the LSN birds. The difference between normal and LSN birds in response to TGF-beta1 is likely due to different levels of endogenous TGF-beta1 where the LSN birds have increased TGF-beta1 expression in their p. major muscle at both 17 ED and 6 wk posthatch. Smad3 expression was reduced by TGF-beta1 from 10 ED to 1 wk posthatch in normal p. major muscle. Unlike Smad3, Smad7 expression was not significantly affected by TGF-beta1 until posthatch in both normal and LSN p. major muscle. Expression of MyoD was reduced 35% by TGF-beta1 during embryonic development in normal p. major muscle, whereas LSN p. major muscle showed a delayed decrease at 1 d posthatch in MyoD expression in response to the TGF-beta1 treatment. Myogenin expression was reduced 29% by TGF-beta1 after hatch in normal p. major muscle. In LSN p. major muscle, TGF-beta1 treatment significantly decreased myogenin expression by 43% at 1 d posthatch and 32% at 1 wk posthatch. These data suggested that TGF-beta1 reduced p. major muscle growth by inhibiting MyoD and myogenin expression during both embryonic

  6. [Neurological Disorders and Pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlit, P

    2016-02-01

    Neurological disorders caused by pregnancy and puerperium include the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, the amniotic fluid embolism syndrome (AFES), the postpartum angiopathy due to reversible vasoconstriction syndrome, and the Sheehan syndrome. Hypertension and proteinuria are the hallmarks of preeclampsia, seizures define eclampsia. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets constitute the HELLP syndrome. Vision disturbances including cortical blindness occur in the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). The Sheehan syndrome presents with panhypopituitarism post partum due to apoplexia of the pituitary gland in severe peripartal blood loss leading to longstanding hypotension. Some neurological disorders occur during pregnancy and puerperium with an increased frequency. These include stroke, sinus thrombosis, the restless legs syndrome and peripheral nerve syndromes, especially the carpal tunnel syndrome. Chronic neurologic diseases need an interdisciplinary approach during pregnancy. Some anticonvulsants double the risk of birth defects. The highest risk exists for valproic acid, the lowest for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. For MS interval treatment, glatiramer acetate and interferones seem to be safe during pregnancy. All other drugs should be avoided.

  7. Palliative care and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  8. Neurologic Health in Combat Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Tad

    2017-08-01

    Neurologic injuries of both an acute and chronic nature have been reported in the literature for various combat sport styles; however, reports of the incidence and prevalence of these injury types vary greatly. Combat sports clinicians must continue to strive for the development, implementation, and enforcement of uniform minimum requirements for brain safety. These health care providers must also seize on the honor to provide this oft-underserved population with the health care advocacy they very much deserve, but often do not receive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of Appropriate Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization during Watermelon Fruit Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qiusheng; Yuan, Jingxian; Gao, Lingyun; Zhao, Liqiang; Cheng, Fei; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression analysis in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) fruit has drawn considerable attention with the availability of genome sequences to understand the regulatory mechanism of fruit development and to improve its quality. Real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a routine technique for gene expression analysis. However, appropriate reference genes for transcript normalization in watermelon fruits have not been well characterized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of 12 genes for their potential use as reference genes in watermelon fruits. Expression variations of these genes were measured in 48 samples obtained from 12 successive developmental stages of parthenocarpic and fertilized fruits of two watermelon genotypes by using qRT-PCR analysis. Considering the effects of genotype, fruit setting method, and developmental stage, geNorm determined clathrin adaptor complex subunit (ClCAC), β-actin (ClACT), and alpha tubulin 5 (ClTUA5) as the multiple reference genes in watermelon fruit. Furthermore, ClCAC alone or together with SAND family protein (ClSAND) was ranked as the single or two best reference genes by NormFinder. By using the top-ranked reference genes to normalize the transcript abundance of phytoene synthase (ClPSY1), a good correlation between lycopene accumulation and ClPSY1 expression pattern was observed in ripening watermelon fruit. These validated reference genes will facilitate the accurate measurement of gene expression in the studies on watermelon fruit biology.

  10. E-cadherin promotes incorporation of mouse epiblast stem cells into normal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ohtsuka

    Full Text Available Mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs are pluripotent stem cells derived from epiblasts of postimplantation mouse embryos. Their pluripotency is distinct from that of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs in several cell biological criteria. One of the distinctions is that mEpiSCs contribute either not at all or at much lower efficiency to chimeric embryos after blastocyst injection compared to mESCs. However, here we showed that mEpiSCs can be incorporated into normal development after blastocyst injection by forced expression of the E-cadherin transgene for 2 days in culture. Using this strategy, mEpiSCs gave rise to live-born chimeras from 5% of the manipulated blastocysts. There were no obvious signs of reprogramming of mEpiSCs toward the mESC-like state during the 2 days after induction of the E-cadherin transgene, suggesting that mEpiSCs possess latent ability to integrate into the normal developmental process as its origin, epiblasts.

  11. Survival of motor neurone protein is required for normal postnatal development of the spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Alison K; Somers, Eilidh; Powis, Rachael A; Shorrock, Hannah K; Murphy, Kelley; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Parson, Simon H

    2017-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), traditionally described as a predominantly childhood form of motor neurone disease, is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Although motor neurones are undoubtedly the primary affected cell type, the severe infantile form of SMA (Type I SMA) is now widely recognised to represent a multisystem disorder where a variety of organs and systems in the body are also affected. Here, we report that the spleen is disproportionately small in the 'Taiwanese' murine model of severe SMA (Smn(-/-) ;SMN2(tg/0) ), correlated to low levels of cell proliferation and increased cell death. Spleen lacks its distinctive red appearance and presents with a degenerated capsule and a disorganised fibrotic architecture. Histologically distinct white pulp failed to form and this was reflected in an almost complete absence of B lymphocytes necessary for normal immune function. In addition, megakaryoctyes persisted in the red pulp. However, the vascular density remained unchanged in SMA spleen. Assessment of the spleen in SMA patients with the infantile form of the disease indicated a range of pathologies. We conclude that development of the spleen fails to occur normally in SMA mouse models and human patients. Thus, further analysis of immune function is likely to be required to fully understand the full extent of systemic disease pathology in SMA.

  12. Roles of retinoic acid signaling in normal and abnormal development of the palate and tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Junko; Udagawa, Jun; Shiota, Kohei

    2014-05-01

    Palatogenesis involves various developmental events such as growth, elevation, elongation and fusion of opposing palatal shelves. Extrinsic factors such as mouth opening and subsequent tongue withdrawal are also needed for the horizontal elevation of palate shelves. Failure of any of these steps can lead to cleft palate, one of the most common birth defects in humans. It has been shown that retinoic acid (RA) plays important roles during palate development, but excess RA causes cleft palate in fetuses of both rodents and humans. Thus, the coordinated regulation of retinoid metabolism is essential for normal palatogenesis. The endogenous RA level is determined by the balance of RA-synthesizing (retinaldehyde dehydrogenases: RALDHs) and RA-degrading enzymes (CYP26s). Cyp26b1 is a key player in normal palatogenesis. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the study of the pathogenesis of RA-induced cleft palate, with special reference to the regulation of endogenous RA levels by RA-degrading enzymes.

  13. E-cadherin promotes incorporation of mouse epiblast stem cells into normal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Nishikawa-Torikai, Satomi; Niwa, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs) are pluripotent stem cells derived from epiblasts of postimplantation mouse embryos. Their pluripotency is distinct from that of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) in several cell biological criteria. One of the distinctions is that mEpiSCs contribute either not at all or at much lower efficiency to chimeric embryos after blastocyst injection compared to mESCs. However, here we showed that mEpiSCs can be incorporated into normal development after blastocyst injection by forced expression of the E-cadherin transgene for 2 days in culture. Using this strategy, mEpiSCs gave rise to live-born chimeras from 5% of the manipulated blastocysts. There were no obvious signs of reprogramming of mEpiSCs toward the mESC-like state during the 2 days after induction of the E-cadherin transgene, suggesting that mEpiSCs possess latent ability to integrate into the normal developmental process as its origin, epiblasts.

  14. The neurology of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyebode, Femi

    2008-01-01

    The neural basis of psychosis is yet to be fully elucidated. In this review the contribution of schizophrenia-like psychosis of epilepsy, delusional misidentification syndromes and psychotic phenomena, such as auditory and visual hallucinations, to our understanding of the neural basis of psychosis is examined. Schizophrenia-like psychosis of epilepsy is associated with seizures originating from the limbic structures. Reduced seizure frequency, left-sided electrical foci, and neurodevelopmental lesions manifesting as cortical dysgenesis are known to influence the likelihood of developing schizophrenia-like psychosis of epilepsy. The delusional misidentification syndromes are a group of rare psychiatric symptoms in which impairments of face recognition memory are present. These conditions appear also to be associated with organic lesions affecting limbic structures and also involving both the frontal and parietal lobes. There is evidence that right-sided lesions predominate in the aetiology of delusional misidentification syndromes. Thus, the common link between schizophrenia, schizophrenia-like psychosis of epilepsy and delusional misidentification syndromes appears to be involvement of limbic structures in their pathophysiology. Discrete psychotic phenomena such as visual and auditory hallucinations appear to arise from functional changes in the same cortical areas subserving the normal physiological functions of vision and audition but also involving limbic structures. In conclusion, the limbic structures appear to be central to the psychopathology of psychosis but with involvement of frontal and parietal structures. These inquiries are revealing as much about psychosis as they are about the nature of normal brain function.

  15. Galnt1 is required for normal heart valve development and cardiac function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Tian

    Full Text Available Congenital heart valve defects in humans occur in approximately 2% of live births and are a major source of compromised cardiac function. In this study we demonstrate that normal heart valve development and cardiac function are dependent upon Galnt1, the gene that encodes a member of the family of glycosyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts responsible for the initiation of mucin-type O-glycosylation. In the adult mouse, compromised cardiac function that mimics human congenital heart disease, including aortic and pulmonary valve stenosis and regurgitation; altered ejection fraction; and cardiac dilation, was observed in Galnt1 null animals. The underlying phenotype is aberrant valve formation caused by increased cell proliferation within the outflow tract cushion of developing hearts, which is first detected at developmental stage E11.5. Developing valves from Galnt1 deficient animals displayed reduced levels of the proteases ADAMTS1 and ADAMTS5, decreased cleavage of the proteoglycan versican and increased levels of other extracellular matrix proteins. We also observed increased BMP and MAPK signaling. Taken together, the ablation of Galnt1 appears to disrupt the formation/remodeling of the extracellular matrix and alters conserved signaling pathways that regulate cell proliferation. Our study provides insight into the role of this conserved protein modification in cardiac valve development and may represent a new model for idiopathic valve disease.

  16. Combined soft and skeletal tissue modelling of normal and dysmorphic midface postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Amel; Suttie, Michael; Bulstrode, Neil W; Britto, Jonathan A; Dunaway, David; Hammond, Peter; Ferretti, Patrizia

    2016-11-01

    Midface hypoplasia as exemplified by Treacher Collins Syndrome (TCS) can impair appearance and function. Reconstruction involves multiple invasive surgeries with variable long-term outcomes. This study aims to describe normal and dysmorphic midface postnatal development through combined modelling of skeletal and soft tissues and to develop a surgical evaluation tool. Midface skeletal and soft tissue surfaces were extracted from computed tomography scans of 52 control and 14 TCS children, then analysed using dense surface modelling. The model was used to describe midface growth, morphology, and asymmetry, then evaluate postoperative outcomes. Parameters responsible for the greatest variation in midface size and shape showed differences between TCS and controls with close alignment between skeletal and soft tissue models. TCS children exhibited midface dysmorphology and hypoplasia when compared with controls. Asymmetry was also significantly higher in TCS midfaces. Combined modelling was used to evaluate the impact of surgery in one TCS individual who showed normalisation immediately after surgery but reversion towards TCS dysmorphology after 1 year. This is the first quantitative analysis of postnatal midface development using combined modelling of skeletal and soft tissues. We also provide an approach for evaluation of surgical outcomes, laying the foundations for future development of a preoperative planning tool. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of Normalization Factors for Canada and the United States and Comparison with European Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lautier, Anne; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Margni, Manuele

    2010-01-01

    showed that normalized profiles are highly dependent on the selected reference due to differences in the industrial and economic activities. To meet practitioners' needs, Canadian normalization factors have been calculated using the characterization factors from LUCAS (Canadian), IMPACT 2002+ (European...

  18. Rett syndrome: disruption of epigenetic control of postnatal neurological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohodich, Amy E; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-10-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in the X-linked gene Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) cause a devastating pediatric neurological disorder called Rett syndrome. In males, these mutations typically result in severe neonatal encephalopathy and early lethality. On the other hand, owing to expression of the normal allele in ∼50% of cells, females do not suffer encephalopathy but instead develop Rett syndrome. Typically females with Rett syndrome exhibit a delayed onset of neurologic dysfunction that manifests around the child's first birthday and progresses over the next few years. Features of this disorder include loss of acquired language and motor skills, intellectual impairment and hand stereotypies. The developmental regression observed in patients with Rett syndrome arises from altered neuronal function and is not the result of neurodegeneration. Maintenance of an appropriate level of MeCP2 appears integral to the function of healthy neurons as patients with increased levels of MeCP2, owing to duplication of the Xq28 region encompassing the MECP2 locus, also present with intellectual disability and progressive neurologic symptoms. Despite major efforts over the past two decades to elucidate the molecular functions of MeCP2, the mechanisms underlying the delayed appearance of symptoms remain unclear. In this review, we will highlight recent findings that have expanded our knowledge of MeCP2's functions, and we will discuss how epigenetic regulation, chromatin organization and circuit dynamics may contribute to the postnatal onset of Rett syndrome.

  19. Cug2 is essential for normal mitotic control and CNS development in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Nam-Soon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently identified a novel oncogene, Cancer-upregulated gene 2 (CUG2, which is essential for kinetochore formation and promotes tumorigenesis in mammalian cells. However, the in vivo function of CUG2 has not been studied in animal models. Results To study the function of CUG2 in vivo, we isolated a zebrafish homologue that is expressed specifically in the proliferating cells of the central nervous system (CNS. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of cug2 resulted in apoptosis throughout the CNS and the development of neurodegenerative phenotypes. In addition, cug2-deficient embryos contained mitotically arrested cells displaying abnormal spindle formation and chromosome misalignment in the neural plate. Conclusions Therefore, our findings suggest that Cug2 is required for normal mitosis during early neurogenesis and has functions in neuronal cell maintenance, thus demonstrating that the cug2 deficient embryos may provide a model system for human neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. PRUNE is crucial for normal brain development and mutated in microcephaly with neurodevelopmental impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollo, Massimo; Ahmed, Mustafa; Ferrucci, Veronica; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Asadzadeh, Fatemeh; Carotenuto, Marianeve; Maroofian, Reza; Al-Amri, Ahmed; Singh, Royana; Scognamiglio, Iolanda; Mojarrad, Majid; Musella, Luca; Duilio, Angela; Di Somma, Angela; Karaca, Ender; Rajab, Anna; Al-Khayat, Aisha; Mohan Mohapatra, Tribhuvan; Eslahi, Atieh; Ashrafzadeh, Farah; Rawlins, Lettie E.; Prasad, Rajniti; Gupta, Rashmi; Kumari, Preeti; Srivastava, Mona; Cozzolino, Flora; Kumar Rai, Sunil; Monti, Maria; Harlalka, Gaurav V.; Simpson, Michael A.; Rich, Philip; Al-Salmi, Fatema; Patton, Michael A.; Chioza, Barry A.; Efthymiou, Stephanie; Granata, Francesca; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Wiethoff, Sarah; Borgione, Eugenia; Scuderi, Carmela; Mankad, Kshitij; Hanna, Michael G.; Pucci, Piero; Houlden, Henry; Lupski, James R.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract PRUNE is a member of the DHH (Asp-His-His) phosphoesterase protein superfamily of molecules important for cell motility, and implicated in cancer progression. Here we investigated multiple families from Oman, India, Iran and Italy with individuals affected by a new autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental and degenerative disorder in which the cardinal features include primary microcephaly and profound global developmental delay. Our genetic studies identified biallelic mutations of PRUNE1 as responsible. Our functional assays of disease-associated variant alleles revealed impaired microtubule polymerization, as well as cell migration and proliferation properties, of mutant PRUNE. Additionally, our studies also highlight a potential new role for PRUNE during microtubule polymerization, which is essential for the cytoskeletal rearrangements that occur during cellular division and proliferation. Together these studies define PRUNE as a molecule fundamental for normal human cortical development and define cellular and clinical consequences associated with PRUNE mutation. PMID:28334956

  1. [Fetal lung development on MRT. Normal course and impairment due to premature rupture of membranes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprian, G; Brugger, P C; Helmer, H; Langer, M; Balassy, C; Prayer, D

    2006-02-01

    A well-organized interplay between many molecular factors as well as mechanical forces influence fetal lung development. At the end of this complex process a sufficiently sized and structurally mature organ should ensure the postnatal survival of the newborn. Besides prenatal ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can now be used to investigate normal and pathological human lung growth in utero. Oligohydramnios, due to premature rupture of membranes (PROM), is an important risk factor for compromised fetal lung growth. In these situations MR volumetry can be used to measure the size of the fetal lung quite accurately. Together with the evaluation of lung signal intensities on T2-weighted sequences, fetuses with pulmonary hypoplasia can be readily detected.

  2. Neoplasms with schwannian differentiation express transcription factors known to regulate normal schwann cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Peter; Karrison, Theodore; Can Gong; Tonsgard, James H; Krausz, Thomas; Montag, Anthony G

    2010-12-01

    A number of transcription factors have been identified as important in guiding normal Schwann cell development. This study used immunohistochemistry on tissue arrays to assess the expression of some of these transcription factors (Sox5, Sox9, Sox10, AP-2α, Pax7, and FoxD3) on 76 schwannomas, 105 neurofibromas, and 34 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Sox9 and Sox10 were found to be widely expressed in all tumor types. FoxD3 reactivity was stronger and more frequently found in schwannomas and MPNSTs than neurofibromas. AP-2α was positive in 31% to 49% of all tumors, but strong reactivity was limited to MPNSTs and schwannomas. Pax7 and Sox5 expression was restricted to subsets of MPNSTs. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between the 3 tumor types in the expression of these markers. No differences were found in the analyzed tumor subgroups, including schwannomas of different sites, schwannomas with or without NF2 association, neurofibromas of different types, or sporadic versus NF1-associated MPNSTs. These results suggest that the transcription factors that guide normal Schwann cell development also play a role in the biology of neoplastic cells with Schwannian differentiation. FoxD3, AP-2α, Pax7, and Sox5 are upregulated in MPNSTs compared with neurofibromas and may be markers of malignant transformation. Screening the expression of FoxD3, Sox9, and Sox10 on 23 cases of other spindle-cell proliferations that may be considered in the differential diagnosis of MPNST, including synovial sarcoma and spindle cell melanoma, suggests that these 3 are helpful markers of Schwannian differentiation in the context of diagnosing MPNSTs.

  3. NORMAL VALUES AND FACTORS AFFECTING FUNCTIONAL REACH TEST IN SAUDI ARABIA SCHOOL CHILDREN WITH TYPICAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem A. Emara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most critical feature of motor development is the ability to balance the body in sitting or standing. Impaired balance limits a child’s ability to recover from unexpected threats to stability. The functional reach test (FRT defines the maximal distance an individual is able to reach forward beyond arm’s length in a standing position without loss of balance, taking a step, or touching the wall. The Purpose of this study was to establish the normal values for FRT in Saudi Arabia school children with typical development and to study the correlation of anthropometric measures with FRT values. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Almadinah Almonawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A total of 280 children without disabilities aged 6 to 12 years were randomly selected. Functional reach was assessed by having subjects extend their arms to 90 degrees and reach as far forward as they could without taking a step. Reach distance was recorded by noting the beginning and final position of the subject's extended arm parallel to a yard stick attached to the wall. Three successive trials of FRT were performed and the mean of the three trials was calculated. Pearson product moment correlation was used to examine the association of FR to age, and anthropometric measures. Results: Normal mean values of FR ranged from 24.2cm to 33.95cm. Age, height and weight significantly correlate with FRT. Conclusion: The FRT is a feasible test to examine the balance of 6-12 year-old children. FRT may be useful for detecting balance impairment, change in balance performance over time.

  4. Generalized lymphedema associated with neurologic signs (GLANS) syndrome: a new entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Marine; Lorette, Gérard; Baulieu, Françoise; Lagrue, Emmanuelle; Blesson, Sophie; Cambazard, Frédéric; Vaillant, Loïc; Maruani, Annabel

    2015-02-01

    Primary lymphedema in children, especially generalized disease with facial involvement, is rare. We sought to report 3 childhood cases of lymphedema with associated neurologic findings and to provide a pathophysiologic explanation for this association. Clinical observations, electroencephalography, and neuroimaging studies were evaluated. Microcomparative genomic hybridization was performed in 1 case. The 3 children had primary lymphedema of all 4 limbs and the face. This was confirmed by lymphoscintigraphy, which showed hypoplasia of vessels and hypofixation of lymph nodes. They had nonspecific neurologic disorders and electroencephalography abnormalities, without intellectual deficit. Neuroimaging revealed normal findings. Microcomparative genomic hybridization in 1 patient revealed no cytogenetic anomaly. The outcome was fatal in 1 case with development of visceral lymphedema and coma. Genetic studies were performed in only 1 case. These observations suggest that neurologic assessment and electroencephalography are indicated for patients with lymphedema of the limbs and face to identify this syndrome. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fog2 is required for normal diaphragm and lung development in mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diaphragmatic hernia and other congenital diaphragmatic defects are associated with significant mortality and morbidity in neonates; however, the molecular basis of these developmental anomalies is unknown. In an analysis of E18.5 embryos derived from mice treated with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, we identified a mutation that causes pulmonary hypoplasia and abnormal diaphragmatic development. Fog2 (Zfpm2 maps within the recombinant interval carrying the N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutation, and DNA sequencing of Fog2 identified a mutation in a splice donor site that generates an abnormal transcript encoding a truncated protein. Human autopsy cases with diaphragmatic defect and pulmonary hypoplasia were evaluated for mutations in FOG2. Sequence analysis revealed a de novo mutation resulting in a premature stop codon in a child who died on the first day of life secondary to severe bilateral pulmonary hypoplasia and an abnormally muscularized diaphragm. Using a phenotype-driven approach, we have established that Fog2 is required for normal diaphragm and lung development, a role that has not been previously appreciated. FOG2 is the first gene implicated in the pathogenesis of nonsyndromic human congenital diaphragmatic defects, and its necessity for pulmonary development validates the hypothesis that neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia may also have primary pulmonary developmental abnormalities.

  6. [Pediatric neurology in rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Mana

    2007-07-01

    There are some criteria for administering pediatric rehabilitation, such as (1) plasticity of the child's brain sometimes plays an enormous roles in recovery, (2) on the other hand, break-down of the child's brain is sometimes worse than expected, (3) rehabilitation should be continued with the prospect that child grows and develops everyday, (4) family members should join their child's rehabilitation. The team approach is very effective for pediatric rehabilitation. The pediatric neurologist will be one of the best members of the team because he/she can manage a disabled child and his/her family members well, and is familiar with a normal child's development. Rehabilitation should be performed appropriates, which means that the child is evaluated first, a rehabilitation program is developed and rehabilitation is implemented. The World Health Organization published the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), which moves away from being a "consequence of disease" classification to "components of health". The concept of disability is changing.

  7. The beginnings of the Southern Child/Pediatric Neurology Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyken, Paul Richard; Bodensteiner, John B

    2015-04-01

    The founding and early development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society was in many ways parallel to that of the Child Neurology Society. The organization started out as the Southern Child Neurology Society but the name was changed at the time of incorporation so as to avoid confusion of identity and purpose with the larger Child Neurology Society. Although there are archives of early days and the later development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society, the details have never been set down in a narrative explaining the events that led to the development of the organization. In this paper, we try to produce a written record of the history of the founding and early development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society.

  8. Neurological syndromes following organophosphate poisoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh S

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorous compounds, the anticholinesterases, produce significant morbidity and mortality in India. Although exact estimates are not available, hospital based statistics suggest that nearly half of the admissions to emergency with acute poisoning are due to organophosphates. Following accidental or suicidal exposure, these anticholinesterases lead to three well defined neurological syndromes i.e. initial life threatening acute cholinergic crisis which often requires management in intensive care unit, intermediate syndrome in which cranial nerve palsies, proximal muscle weakness and respiratory muscle weakness are common and patients often require respiratory support and delayed organophosphate induced polyneuropathy. In addition to these three classical neurological syndromes following acute exposure and in some following low dose chronic exposure, several neurobehavioural changes have been observed and these have been termed together as ′chronic organophosphate induced neuropsychiatric disorders′ (COPIND. Organo-phosphate compounds produce significant pesticide related illness in developing countries. There is, thus, a need to determine exact extent of the problem and to develop appropriate strategies to manage these cases with available resources in these countries.

  9. The neurology of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Todd J

    2005-11-01

    Neurology, by virtue of its study of the brain, is the primary medical science for the elucidation of the anatomy, physiology, pathology and, ultimately, the function of sleep. There has been nothing short of a revolution in the science of sleep over the past 50 years. From the discovery of REM sleep to the identification of Hypocretin/Orexin the basic science and clinical field of sleep medicine has blossomed. This article will explore the anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and, to a limited extent, pathophysiology of the sleep/wake centers of the brain. The field of chronobiology will also be touched upon.

  10. Trends in normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) associated with urban development in northern West Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Igor; Miles, Victoria V.; Davy, Richard; Miles, Martin W.; Kurchatova, Anna

    2016-08-01

    Exploration and exploitation of oil and gas reserves of northern West Siberia has promoted rapid industrialization and urban development in the region. This development leaves significant footprints on the sensitive northern environment, which is already stressed by the global warming. This study reports the region-wide changes in the vegetation cover as well as the corresponding changes in and around 28 selected urbanized areas. The study utilizes the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from high-resolution (250 m) MODIS data acquired for summer months (June through August) over 15 years (2000-2014). The results reveal the increase of NDVI (or "greening") over the northern (tundra and tundra-forest) part of the region. Simultaneously, the southern, forested part shows the widespread decrease of NDVI (or "browning"). These region-wide patterns are, however, highly fragmented. The statistically significant NDVI trends occupy only a small fraction of the region. Urbanization destroys the vegetation cover within the developed areas and at about 5-10 km distance around them. The studied urbanized areas have the NDVI values by 15 to 45 % lower than the corresponding areas at 20-40 km distance. The largest NDVI reduction is typical for the newly developed areas, whereas the older areas show recovery of the vegetation cover. The study reveals a robust indication of the accelerated greening near the older urban areas. Many Siberian cities become greener even against the wider browning trends at their background. Literature discussion suggests that the observed urban greening could be associated not only with special tending of the within-city green areas but also with the urban heat islands and succession of more productive shrub and tree species growing on warmer sandy soils.

  11. Differentiating os acromiale from normally developing acromial ossification centers using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfeld, Matthew [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Wang, Annie; Bencardino, Jenny [New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Acromial fusion may not be complete until age 18-25, making it questionable to diagnose os acromiale in adolescents. Os acromiale may exist in adolescents and can be differentiated from a developing acromial ossification center based on MRI findings. A total of 128 MRIs of the shoulder were randomly and blindly reviewed retrospectively by two musculoskeletal radiologists. The MRIs consisted of two groups: (1) 56 of os acromiale in adults (25-74 years old, mean, 50) and (2) 72 consecutive of adolescents (12-17 years old, mean, 14.5). The following were assessed at the interface between the distal acromion and os acromiale/developing ossification center(s): presence of os acromiale vs. developing acromion, orientation, margins, and edema within and adjacent to it. Fifty-one adults and 49 adolescents were included. Exclusions were due to poor image quality or confounding findings (n = 7) or complete acromial fusion (n = 21 adolescents). Utilizing accepted definitions of os acromiale, all adult cases (100 %) were accurately diagnosed as os acromiale, with transverse interface orientation and irregular margins (94 %, R = 0.86, p < 0.00001). Forty-five (92 %) adolescent cases were accurately diagnosed as normally developing acromion with arched interface and lobulated margins (92 %, R = 0.92, p < 0.000001). Four (8 %) adolescent cases were diagnosed as having os acromiale, with transverse orientation and irregular margins. Thirty-five (69 %) and 46 (90 %) adults had marrow and interface edema, respectively. Six (12 %) and eight (16 %) adolescents had marrow and interface edema, respectively, including the four concluded to be os acromiale. Adolescents may have imaging findings consistent with os acromiale. The diagnosis of os acromiale should be based on imaging features and not limited by age. (orig.)

  12. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  13. EHD1 mediates vesicle trafficking required for normal muscle growth and tubule development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, Avery D.; Swanson, Kaitlin E.; Alvarez, Manuel G.; Krishnan, Swathi; Earley, Judy E.; Band, Hamid; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.; Demonbreun, Alexis R.

    2014-01-01

    EHD proteins have been implicated in intracellular trafficking, especially endocytic recycling, where they mediate receptor and lipid recycling back to the plasma membrane. Additionally, EHDs help regulate cytoskeletal reorganization and induce tubule formation. It was previously shown that EHD proteins bind directly to the C2 domains in myoferlin, a protein that regulates myoblast fusion. Loss of myoferlin impairs normal myoblast fusion leading to smaller muscles in vivo but the intracellular pathways perturbed by loss of myoferlin function are not well known. We now characterized muscle development in EHD1-null mice. EHD1-null myoblasts display defective receptor recycling and mislocalization of key muscle proteins, including caveolin-3 and Fer1L5, a related ferlin protein homologous to myoferlin. Additionally, EHD1-null myoblast fusion is reduced. We found that loss of EHD1 leads to smaller muscles and myofibers in vivo. In wildtype skeletal muscle EHD1 localizes to the transverse tubule (T-tubule), and loss of EHD1 results in overgrowth of T-tubules with excess vesicle accumulation in skeletal muscle. We provide evidence that tubule formation in myoblasts relies on a functional EHD1 ATPase domain. Moreover, we extended our studies to show EHD1 regulates BIN1 induced tubule formation. These data, taken together and with the known interaction between EHD and ferlin proteins, suggests that the EHD proteins coordinate growth and development likely through mediating vesicle recycling and the ability to reorganize the cytoskeleton. PMID:24440153

  14. The Relationship between Socioeconomic Status and Narrative Abilities in a Group of Italian Normally Developing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzanica, Francesco; Ambrogi, Federico; Salvadorini, Renata; Sai, Elena; Pozzoli, Raffaella; Barillari, Maria Rosaria; Scarponi, Letizia; Schindler, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Only limited and conflicting information is available regarding the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and narrative abilities. Besides, the role fathers' SES plays in the development of their children's narrative abilities has never been investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between fathers' and mothers' SES and narrative abilities of their children assessed with the Italian version of the Bus Story Test (I-BST). A total of 505 normally developing Italian children were enrolled in the study. Information regarding parents' educational level and employment was collected for each child. Narrative abilities were evaluated using the I-BST. The relationships between parents' employment, educational level, and I-BST scores were analyzed by univariate and multivariate regression analysis. In univariate analysis, both fathers' and mothers' education and employment were associated with most I-BST subscale scores, especially when higher educational and employment levels were contrasted with the lowest educational and employment levels. In multiple regression analysis, significant associations were found only between the fathers' working status and educational level and I-BST subscale scores. Parental education and employment might impact narrative abilities of children. When both fathers' and mothers' SES variables are considered together, only fathers' education and working status seemed to be associated with I-BST scores. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. EHD1 mediates vesicle trafficking required for normal muscle growth and transverse tubule development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, Avery D; Swanson, Kaitlin E; Alvarez, Manuel G; Krishnan, Swathi; Earley, Judy U; Band, Hamid; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M; Demonbreun, Alexis R

    2014-03-15

    EHD proteins have been implicated in intracellular trafficking, especially endocytic recycling, where they mediate receptor and lipid recycling back to the plasma membrane. Additionally, EHDs help regulate cytoskeletal reorganization and induce tubule formation. It was previously shown that EHD proteins bind directly to the C2 domains in myoferlin, a protein that regulates myoblast fusion. Loss of myoferlin impairs normal myoblast fusion leading to smaller muscles in vivo but the intracellular pathways perturbed by loss of myoferlin function are not well known. We now characterized muscle development in EHD1-null mice. EHD1-null myoblasts display defective receptor recycling and mislocalization of key muscle proteins, including caveolin-3 and Fer1L5, a related ferlin protein homologous to myoferlin. Additionally, EHD1-null myoblast fusion is reduced. We found that loss of EHD1 leads to smaller muscles and myofibers in vivo. In wildtype skeletal muscle EHD1 localizes to the transverse tubule (T-tubule), and loss of EHD1 results in overgrowth of T-tubules with excess vesicle accumulation in skeletal muscle. We provide evidence that tubule formation in myoblasts relies on a functional EHD1 ATPase domain. Moreover, we extended our studies to show EHD1 regulates BIN1 induced tubule formation. These data, taken together and with the known interaction between EHD and ferlin proteins, suggests that the EHD proteins coordinate growth and development likely through mediating vesicle recycling and the ability to reorganize the cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurological complications after liver retransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, O L; Estol, C; Colina, I; Quiroga, J; Imvertarza, O C; van Thiel, D H

    1992-07-01

    Postoperative neurological complications in 185 patients who underwent two or more orthotopic liver transplantations were reviewed. The most common neurological complications were alteration of mental status (84%), seizures (33%) and focal motor deficits (15%). The frequency of neurological complications after a second orthotopic liver transplantation was significantly greater than that after a single orthotopic liver transplantation. However, neurological complications were more frequent after a second orthotopic liver transplantation than after a third transplant. Significantly more neurological complications occurred in patients who did not survive a year than in those who did, regardless of the number of transplants they underwent. These findings indicate that the risk of neurological complications among patients with multiple orthotopic liver transplantations is greater in those who require a second transplant; this risk appears to diminish after a third transplant. Importantly, the presence of neurological complications is associated with increased post-orthotopic liver transplantation mortality rate.

  17. History of Neurology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xinde

    2000-01-01

    @@In 1921, the first independent department of neurology was established in Beijing. Before 1949, all over China only 12 professional doctors lectured neurology in medical colleges. Only 30 medically trained personnel were engaged in the neurological departments. The neurological departments contained roughly 200 beds. The thesis on stroke was written by Zhang Shanlei and published in 1922. Author discussed the cerebral stroke on basis of Chinese traditional medicine and European medicine. The first Textbook of Neurology in China was written by Professor Cheng Yu-lin and was published in 1939. In 1952, the Chinese Society of Neurology and Psychiatry of Chinese Medical Association was established. In 1955, the first issue of the Chinese Journal of Neurology and Psychiatry was published.

  18. Postpartum cerebral angiopathy presenting with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and interval development of neurological deficits: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum cerebral angiopathy (PCA is a cerebrovascular disease that occurs during the postpartum period. It is characterized by reversible multifocal vasoconstriction of the cerebral arteries. We report a patient with PCA proven by cerebral angiography that revealed multifocal, segmental narrowing of the cerebral arteries and non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient suddenly deteriorated with focal neurological deficits on the 5 th day of hospitalization. She was treated with calcium-channel blockers and monitored with daily transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Her symptoms gradually improved and she was discharged on the 11 th day of hospitalization. At 1-month follow-up, patient was completely symptom-free with no neurological deficits.

  19. Neurological Recovery after Amantadine Treatment in a Patient with Septic Arthritis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Özayar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY In this case report a patient with septic arthritis who developed impaired consciousness that responded to amantadine sulfate treatment was presented. A 67 years old male patient who had high fever, leukocytosis, hypotension, and generalized organ failure findings after knee prosthesis revision surgery was accepted to intensive care unit. Patient was intubated and connected to mechanical ventilation as he lost consciousness during non-invasive mechanical ventilation. In the follow-up he was diagnosed with bone abscess and was started penicillin according to culture results. Despite of clinical and laboratory resolving of sepsis finding, patient had tonic-clonic seizures especially on the right upper extremity with normal cranial computerized tomography findings. Septic course of the patient improved with antibiotic treatment, while impaired consciousness and seizures continued. Radiological evaluation of the patient was within normal ranges; however he was diagnosed as organic neurological dysfunction that developed secondary to sepsis. Amantadine sulfate 200 mg/day was initiated after neurology department consultation. Neurological suppression and seizures started to improve after the 6th day and completely resolved after the 10th day of the treatment. Patient was discharged from intensive care unit after resolution of septic clinic after 57 days. As a result we believe that amantadine is an efficient agent in treatment of neurological patients with coma and significantly decrease rehabilitation duration

  20. MicroRNAs: Key Regulators in the Central Nervous System and Their Implication in Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Dan Cao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small, well-conserved noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They have been demonstrated to regulate a lot of biological pathways and cellular functions. Many miRNAs are dynamically regulated during central nervous system (CNS development and are spatially expressed in adult brain indicating their essential roles in neural development and function. In addition, accumulating evidence strongly suggests that dysfunction of miRNAs contributes to neurological diseases. These observations, together with their gene regulation property, implicated miRNAs to be the key regulators in the complex genetic network of the CNS. In this review, we first focus on the ways through which miRNAs exert the regulatory function and how miRNAs are regulated in the CNS. We then summarize recent findings that highlight the versatile roles of miRNAs in normal CNS physiology and their association with several types of neurological diseases. Subsequently we discuss the limitations of miRNAs research based on current studies as well as the potential therapeutic applications and challenges of miRNAs in neurological disorders. We endeavor to provide an updated description of the regulatory roles of miRNAs in normal CNS functions and pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  1. MicroRNAs: Key Regulators in the Central Nervous System and Their Implication in Neurological Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dan-Dan; Li, Lu; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2016-05-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, well-conserved noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They have been demonstrated to regulate a lot of biological pathways and cellular functions. Many miRNAs are dynamically regulated during central nervous system (CNS) development and are spatially expressed in adult brain indicating their essential roles in neural development and function. In addition, accumulating evidence strongly suggests that dysfunction of miRNAs contributes to neurological diseases. These observations, together with their gene regulation property, implicated miRNAs to be the key regulators in the complex genetic network of the CNS. In this review, we first focus on the ways through which miRNAs exert the regulatory function and how miRNAs are regulated in the CNS. We then summarize recent findings that highlight the versatile roles of miRNAs in normal CNS physiology and their association with several types of neurological diseases. Subsequently we discuss the limitations of miRNAs research based on current studies as well as the potential therapeutic applications and challenges of miRNAs in neurological disorders. We endeavor to provide an updated description of the regulatory roles of miRNAs in normal CNS functions and pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  2. Denver developmental screening test II for early identification of the infants who will develop major neurological deficit as a sequalea of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallioglu, O; Topaloglu, A K; Zenciroglu, A; Duzovali, O; Yilgor, E; Saribas, S

    2001-08-01

    The primary aim of this study was to find widely available, inexpensive, and non-invasive parameters for early identification or prediction of the infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) who will have a severe adverse outcome (classified as death or a major neurological deficit). Fifty-seven full-term or near-term newborn infants with a diagnosis of HIE were consecutively admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit and studied. Occurrence of seizures during the first 24 h, cranial ultrasonography (US) findings within the first 5 days of life, and Denver developmental screening test II (DDST II) at 6 months of age, were analyzed in relation to mortality and neurological status at 2 years of age. Of the 57 infants, 10 were lost to follow-up. Twenty of the remaining 47 infants had a severe adverse outcome. Among the predictors of severe adverse outcome, occurrence of seizures was found to have a poor predictive accuracy. Cranial US had 100% sensitivity, however with a rather low specificity (55%). However, DDST II at 6 months of age, yielded a very high predictive accuracy (sensitivity=100%, specificity=95%). We conclude that DDST II at 6 months of age could be used in predicting severe neurological outcome in infants with HIE.

  3. Neurological aspects of grief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Adriana C; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Natalia P; de Mello Schier, Alexandre R; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flavia; Nardi, Antonio E; Machado, Sergio; Pessoa, Tamires M

    2014-01-01

    Despite grief being a universal experience and the increased scientific attention paid to grief and bereavement in recent years, studies that seek to better understand the role of the neurological aspects of grief are still scarce. We found 5 studies that discussed the relationship between the neurological aspects of grief due to the death of a loved one. All studies showed an activation of common areas, i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), insula and amygdala. These findings could indicate that there is a group of areas working together and responding to generate the symptomatology of grief. Because grief is a universal experience, it is essential that the necessary and effective support can be provided to those who experience the loss of someone considered important in their lives, and this requires understanding grief's manifestation, its differential diagnosis in reference to other clinical conditions, mainly psychiatric ones, and adequate forms of intervention and treatment when necessary. Proper understanding and support can help prevent the emergence of more serious health problems.

  4. Neurology and diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent.

  5. Bridging neuroanatomy, neuroradiology and neurology: three-dimensional interactive atlas of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, W L; Chua, B C

    2013-06-01

    Understanding brain pathology along with the underlying neuroanatomy and the resulting neurological deficits is of vital importance in medical education and clinical practice. To facilitate and expedite this understanding, we created a three-dimensional (3D) interactive atlas of neurological disorders providing the correspondence between a brain lesion and the resulting disorder(s). The atlas contains a 3D highly parcellated atlas of normal neuroanatomy along with a brain pathology database. Normal neuroanatomy is divided into about 2,300 components, including the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord, arteries, veins, dural sinuses, tracts, cranial nerves (CN), white matter, deep gray nuclei, ventricles, visual system, muscles, glands and cervical vertebrae (C1-C5). The brain pathology database contains 144 focal and distributed synthesized lesions (70 vascular, 36 CN-related, and 38 regional anatomy-related), each lesion labeled with the resulting disorder and associated signs, symptoms, and/or syndromes compiled from materials reported in the literature. The initial view of each lesion was preset in terms of its location and size, surrounding surface and sectional (magnetic resonance) neuroanatomy, and labeling of lesion and neuroanatomy. In addition, a glossary of neurological disorders was compiled and for each disorder materials from textbooks were included to provide neurological description. This atlas of neurological disorders is potentially useful to a wide variety of users ranging from medical students, residents and nurses to general practitioners, neuroanatomists, neuroradiologists and neurologists, as it contains both normal (surface and sectional) brain anatomy and pathology correlated with neurological disorders presented in a visual and interactive way.

  6. Kruppel-like factor 2 is required for normal mouse cardiac development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi R Chiplunkar

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2 is expressed in endothelial cells in the developing heart, particularly in areas of high shear stress, such as the atrioventricular (AV canal. KLF2 ablation leads to myocardial thinning, high output cardiac failure and death by mouse embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5 in a mixed genetic background. This work identifies an earlier and more fundamental role for KLF2 in mouse cardiac development in FVB/N mice. FVB/N KLF2-/- embryos die earlier, by E11.5. E9.5 FVB/N KLF2-/- hearts have multiple, disorganized cell layers lining the AV cushions, the primordia of the AV valves, rather than the normal single layer. By E10.5, traditional and endothelial-specific FVB/N KLF2-/- AV cushions are hypocellular, suggesting that the cells accumulating at the AV canal have a defect in endothelial to mesenchymal transformation (EMT. E10.5 FVB/N KLF2-/- hearts have reduced glycosaminoglycans in the cardiac jelly, correlating with the reduced EMT. However, the number of mesenchymal cells migrating from FVB/N KLF2-/- AV explants into a collagen matrix is reduced considerably compared to wild-type, suggesting that the EMT defect is not due solely to abnormal cardiac jelly. Echocardiography of E10.5 FVB/N KLF2-/- embryos indicates that they have abnormal heart function compared to wild-type. E10.5 C57BL/6 KLF2-/- hearts have largely normal AV cushions. However, E10.5 FVB/N and C57BL/6 KLF2-/- embryos have a delay in the formation of the atrial septum that is not observed in a defined mixed background. KLF2 ablation results in reduced Sox9, UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (Ugdh, Gata4 and Tbx5 mRNA in FVB/N AV canals. KLF2 binds to the Gata4, Tbx5 and Ugdh promoters in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, indicating that KLF2 could directly regulate these genes. In conclusion, KLF2-/- heart phenotypes are genetic background-dependent. KLF2 plays a role in EMT through its regulation of important cardiovascular genes.

  7. Visuo-manual coordination in preterm infants without neurological impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkovic, Maja; Chokron, Sylvie; Fagard, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The extent of and reasons for visuo-manual coordination deficits in moderate and late preterm born infants without neurological impairments are not well known. This paper presents a longitudinal study on the visuo-manual development of twelve preterm infants, born after 33-36 weeks of gestation without neurological complications, between the ages of 6 and 12 months. Visuo-manual integration and grasping were assessed using the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, along with bimanual coordination and handedness tests. Visual function was examined once prior to the beginning of the study. Gross motor development was also evaluated every month. Preterm infants were compared to a control group of ten full-term infants according to corrected age. Compared to full-terms, the visual perception of preterm infants was close to normal, with only a measure of visual fixation lower than in full-terms. In contrast, preterm infants had delayed development of visuo-manual integration, grasping, bimanual coordination, and handedness even when compared using corrected age. Tonicity and gestational age at birth were the main variables associated to the delays. These results are discussed in terms of the possible factors underlying such delays. They need to be confirmed on a larger sample of preterm born children, and to be correlated with later development. This would allow developing markers of future neuropsychological impairments during childhood.

  8. NMDA receptors on zebrafish Mauthner cells require CaMKII-α for normal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Birbickram; Ferdous, Jannatul; Ali, Declan W

    2015-02-01

    Calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase 2 (CaMKII) is a multifunctional protein that is highly enriched in the synapse. It plays important roles in neuronal functions such as synaptic plasticity, synaptogenesis, and neural development. Gene duplication in zebrafish has resulted in the occurrence of seven CaMKII genes (camk2a, camk2b1, camk2b2, camk2g1, camk2g2, camk2d1, and camk2d2) that are developmentally expressed. In this study, we used single cell, real-time quantitative PCR to investigate the expression of CaMKII genes in individual Mauthner cells (M-cells) of 2 days post fertilization (dpf) zebrafish embryos. We found that out of seven different CaMKII genes, only the mRNA for CaMKII-α was expressed in the M-cell at detectable levels, while all other isoforms were undetectable. Morpholino knockdown of CaMKII-α had no significant effect on AMPA synaptic currents (mEPSCs) but decreased the amplitude of NMDA mEPSCs. NMDA events exhibited a biexponential decay with τfast ≈ 30 ms and τslow ≈ 300 ms. Knockdown of CaMKII-α specifically reduced the amplitude of the slow component of the NMDA-mediated currents (mEPSCs), without affecting the fast component, the frequency, or the kinetics of the mEPSCs. Immunolabelling of the M-cell showed increased dendritic arborizations in the morphants compared with controls, and knockdown of CaMKII-α altered locomotor behaviors of touch responses. These results suggest that CaMKII-α is present in embryonic M-cells and that it plays a role in the normal development of excitatory synapses. Our findings pave the way for determining the function of specific CaMKII isoforms during the early stages of M-cell development.

  9. Normal skeletal development and imaging pitfalls of the calcaneal apophysis: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Ignacio [Musculoskeletal Research Fellow at NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Centro de Diagnostico Dr. Enrique Rossi, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rosenberg, Zehava [NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Zember, Jonathan [Albert Einstein College of Medicine Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Heel pain in children and secondary MR imaging (MRI) of the hindfoot have been increasing in incidence. Our purpose is to illustrate the, previously unreported, MRI stages in development of the posterior calcaneal apophysis, with attention to imaging pitfalls. This should aid in distinguishing normal growth from true disease. Consecutive ankle MRIs in children <18 years, from 2008-2014, were subdivided into 0≤5, 5≤10, 10≤15 and 15≤18 age groups and retrospectively reviewed for development of the calcaneal apophysis. 204 ankle MRI studies in 188 children were identified. 40 studies were excluded with final cohort of 164 studies in 154 patients (82 boys, 72 girls). The calcaneal apophysis was cartilaginous until age 5. Foci of decreased as well as increased signal were embedded in cartilage, prior to ossification. Early, secondary ossification centers appeared in plantar third of the apophysis in 100 % of children by age 7. Increased T2 signal in the ossifications was seen in 30 % of children. Apohyseal fusion began at 12 and was complete in 78 % of 14≤15 year olds and in 88 % of 15≤18 year olds. Curvilinear low signal in the ossification centers, paralleling, but distinguished from growth plate, and not be confused with fracture line, was common. Development of the posterior calcaneus follows a unique sequence. Apophyseal fusion occurs earlier than reported in the literature. Familiarity with this maturation pattern, in particular the apophyseal increased T2 signal and the linear low signal paralleling the growth plate, will avoid misinterpreting it for pathology. (orig.)

  10. Human pluripotent stem cells as a model of trophoblast differentiation in both normal development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Mariko; Li, Yingchun; Wakeland, Anna K; Pizzo, Donald P; Nelson, Katharine K; Sabatini, Karen; Laurent, Louise Chang; Liu, Ying; Parast, Mana M

    2016-07-05

    Trophoblast is the primary epithelial cell type in the placenta, a transient organ required for proper fetal growth and development. Different trophoblast subtypes are responsible for gas/nutrient exchange (syncytiotrophoblasts, STBs) and invasion and maternal vascular remodeling (extravillous trophoblasts, EVTs). Studies of early human placental development are severely hampered by the lack of a representative trophoblast stem cell (TSC) model with the capacity for self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into both STBs and EVTs. Primary cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) isolated from early-gestation (6-8 wk) human placentas are bipotential, a phenotype that is lost with increasing gestational age. We have identified a CDX2(+)/p63(+) CTB subpopulation in the early postimplantation human placenta that is significantly reduced later in gestation. We describe a reproducible protocol, using defined medium containing bone morphogenetic protein 4 by which human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can be differentiated into CDX2(+)/p63(+) CTB stem-like cells. These cells can be replated and further differentiated into STB- and EVT-like cells, based on marker expression, hormone secretion, and invasive ability. As in primary CTBs, differentiation of hPSC-derived CTBs in low oxygen leads to reduced human chorionic gonadotropin secretion and STB-associated gene expression, instead promoting differentiation into HLA-G(+) EVTs in an hypoxia-inducible, factor-dependent manner. To validate further the utility of hPSC-derived CTBs, we demonstrated that differentiation of trisomy 21 (T21) hPSCs recapitulates the delayed CTB maturation and blunted STB differentiation seen in T21 placentae. Collectively, our data suggest that hPSCs are a valuable model of human placental development, enabling us to recapitulate processes that result in both normal and diseased pregnancies.

  11. Neurologic management following cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, N G

    1989-10-01

    Optimal neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest requires careful attention to the details of both intracranial and extracranial homeostasis. A high index of suspicion regarding the potential causes and complications of cardiac arrest facilitates discovery and treatment of problems before they adversely affect neurologic outcome. The future is bright for resuscitation research: Our fundamental understanding of cerebral ischemia and its consequences has dramatically improved, and this knowledge can hopefully be transferred to clinical useful modes of therapy. However, the transition from a promising, therapeutically effective intervention in animals to the demonstration that treatment is effective following cardiac arrest in humans is an important and difficult step. The patient population is heterogeneous before the insult, the duration and severity of the insult are variable, and the effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation varies among institutions. Therefore, the only means of demonstrating clinical efficacy is the performance of a large clinical trial. The Resuscitation Research Center at the University of Pittsburgh has developed and coordinated a multicenter, multinational team of investigators who have completed one definitive trial of postarrest barbiturate therapy and are currently completing a similar trial using a calcium entry blocker. Despite the formidable obstacles posed by such comprehensive efforts, they provide the mechanism for determining whether the cost of a new treatment modality is justified by the likelihood of improved mortality or morbidity.

  12. Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Vakhnina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common vascular diseases. The brain as target organs in hypertension is damaged more often and earlier. Neurological complications due to hypertension are frequently hyperdiagnosed in Russian neurological practice. Thus, headache, dizziness, impaired recall of recent events, nocturnal sleep disorders, and many other complaints in a hypertensive patient are usually regarded as a manifestation of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. At the same time headaches (tension headache and migraine in hypertensive patients are predominantly primary; headache associated with dramatic marked elevations in blood pressure is encountered in only a small number of patients. The role of cerebrovascular diseases in the development of dizziness in hypertensive patients is also overestimated. The vast majority of cases, patients with this complaint are in fact identified to have benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, Mеniеre’s disease, vestibular neuronitis, or vestibular migraine. Psychogenic disorders or multisensory insufficiency are generally responsible for non-systemic vertigo in hypertensive patients. Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency may cause non-systemic vertigo as a subjective equivalent of postural instability.Cognitive impairments (CIs are the most common and earliest manifestation of cerebrovascular lesion in hypertension. In most cases, CIs in hypertension were vascular and associated with cerebrovascular lesion due to lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis. However, mixed CIs frequently occur when hypertensive patients are also found to have signs of a degenerative disease, most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease.

  13. White matter and behavioral neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filley, Christopher M

    2005-12-01

    Although the study of higher brain function has traditionally focused on the cortical gray matter, recent years have witnessed the recognition that white matter also makes an important contribution to cognition and emotion. White matter comprises nearly half the brain volume and plays a key role in development, aging, and many neurologic and psychiatric disorders across the life span. More than 100 disorders exist in which white matter neuropathology is the primary or a prominent feature. A variety of neurobehavioral syndromes may result from these disorders; the concept of white matter dementia has been introduced as characteristic of many patients with white matter involvement, and a wide range of focal neurobehavioral syndromes and psychiatric disorders can also be related to dysfunction of myelinated tracts. Understanding the neurobehavioral aspects of white matter disorders is important for clinical diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and research on brain-behavior relationships. Central to these investigations is the use of modern neuroimaging techniques, which have already provided substantial information on the characterization of white matter and its disorders, and which promise to advance our knowledge further with continued innovation. Diffusion tensor imaging is an exciting method that will assist with the identification of critical white matter tracts in the brain, and the localization of specific lesions that can be correlated with neurobehavioral syndromes. A behavioral neurology of white matter is thus emerging in which clinical observation combined with sophisticated neuroimaging will enable elucidation of the role of white matter connectivity in the distributed neural networks subserving higher brain function.

  14. Development of Normalization Factors for Canada and the United States and Comparison with European Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), normalization calculates the magnitude of an impact (midpoint or endpoint) relative to the total effect of a given reference. Using a country or a continent as a reference system is a first step towards global normalization. The goal of this wor...

  15. NEUROLOGICAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN 9-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN FED BREAST-MILK OR FORMULA-MILK AS BABIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LANTING, CI; FIDLER, [No Value; HUISMAN, M; TOUWEN, BCL; BOERSMA, ER

    1994-01-01

    The presence of minor neurological dysfunction is associated with behavioural and cognitive development at school age. We have previously shown a relation between minor neurological dysfunction and perinatal disorders, especially abnormal neonatal neurological condition. We have now investigated the

  16. NEUROLOGICAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN 9-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN FED BREAST-MILK OR FORMULA-MILK AS BABIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LANTING, CI; FIDLER, [No Value; HUISMAN, M; TOUWEN, BCL; BOERSMA, ER

    1994-01-01

    The presence of minor neurological dysfunction is associated with behavioural and cognitive development at school age. We have previously shown a relation between minor neurological dysfunction and perinatal disorders, especially abnormal neonatal neurological condition. We have now investigated the

  17. The Effect of Executive Function on Science Achievement Among Normally Developing 10-Year Olds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Sheri G.

    Executive function (EF) is an umbrella term used to identify a set of discrete but interrelated cognitive abilities that enable individuals to engage in goal-directed, future-oriented action in response to a novel context. Developmental studies indicate that EF is predictive of reading and math achievement in middle childhood. The purpose of this study was to identify the association between EF and science achievement among normally developing 10 year olds. A sample of fifth grade students from a Northeastern suburban community participated in tests of EF, science, and intelligence. Consistent with adult models of EF, principal components analysis identified a three-factor model of EF organization in middle childhood, including cognitive flexibility, working memory, and inhibition. Multiple regression analyses revealed that executive function processes of cognitive flexibility, working memory, and inhibition were all predictive of science performance. Post hoc analyses revealed that high-performing science students differed significantly from low-performing students in both cognitive flexibility and working memory. These findings suggest that complex academic demands specific to science achievement rely on the emergence and maturation of EF components.

  18. Metacognition and Reading: Comparing Three Forms of Metacognition in Normally Developing Readers and Readers with Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnes, Bjarte; Norman, Elisabeth

    2015-08-01

    Metacognition refers to 'cognition about cognition' and includes metacognitive knowledge, strategies and experiences (Efklides, 2008; Flavell, 1979). Research on reading has shown that better readers demonstrate more metacognitive knowledge than poor readers (Baker & Beall, 2009), and that reading ability improves through strategy instruction (Gersten, Fuchs, Williams, & Baker, 2001). The current study is the first to specifically compare the three forms of metacognition in dyslexic (N = 22) versus normally developing readers (N = 22). Participants read two factual texts, with learning outcome measured by a memory task. Metacognitive knowledge and skills were assessed by self-report. Metacognitive experiences were measured by predictions of performance and judgments of learning. Individuals with dyslexia showed insight into their reading problems, but less general knowledge of how to approach text reading. They more often reported lack of available reading strategies, but groups did not differ in the use of deep and surface strategies. Learning outcome and mean ratings of predictions of performance and judgments of learning were lower in dyslexic readers, but not the accuracy with which metacognitive experiences predicted learning. Overall, the results indicate that dyslexic reading and spelling problems are not generally associated with lower levels of metacognitive knowledge, metacognitive strategies or sensitivity to metacognitive experiences in reading situations.

  19. Statistical thermodynamics of transcription profiles in normal development and tumorigeneses in cohorts of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacle, F; Levine, R D

    2015-12-01

    Experimental biology is providing the distribution of numerous different biological molecules inside cells and in body fluids of patients. Statistical methods of analysis have very successfully examined these rather large databases. We seek to use a thermodynamic analysis to provide a physical understanding and quantitative characterization of human cancers and other pathologies within a molecule-centered approach. The key technical development is the introduction of a Lagrangian. By imposing constraints the minimal value of the Lagrangian defines a thermodynamically stable state of the cellular system. The minimization also allows using experimental data measured at a number of different conditions to evaluate the steady-state distribution of biomolecules such as messenger RNAs. Thereby the number of effectively accessible quantum states of biomolecules is determined from the experimentally measured expression levels. With the increased resolution provided by the minimization of the Lagrangian one can differentiate between normal and diseased patients and further between disease subtypes. Each such refinement corresponds to imposing an additional constraint of biological origin. The constraints are the unbalanced ongoing biological processes in the system. MicroRNA expression level data for control and diseased lung cancer patients are analyzed as an example.

  20. List intonation in pre-schoolers with normal and disordered language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, David

    2015-01-01

    The principal aim of this study was to evaluate pre-schoolers' expressive intonation in light of current debates about the underlying nature of language impairment (LI). Children with LI typically have deficits in grammar, a component of language that is phonologically represented on the segmental level. The hypothesis is that children with LI do not have deficits of this type when grammar is conveyed by intonation, a pitch-based component of language that is phonologically represented on the suprasegmental level. This study focused on the richly diversified suprasegmental patterns of sentences in which the speaker produces a series of items in a list. To address the hypothesis, list intonation in the speech of 4-year-olds with and without LI was acoustically analysed. Lists produced by children with LI were comparable to those produced by children with normal language development (NL). The results do not support the claim that LI stems from a poor understanding of grammatical principles. Rather, LI reflects an underlying impairment of segmental information processing. The discussion focuses on two characteristics of pitch contours which may account for the resilience of intonation in children with LI. Namely, steady state versus transient signals and universal symbol meanings versus arbitrary relationships between form and function.

  1. The Wilms' tumor gene Wt1 is required for normal development of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Wagner, Nicole; Vidal, Valerie P I; Schley, Gunnar; Wilhelm, Dagmar; Schedl, Andreas; Englert, Christoph; Scholz, Holger

    2002-03-15

    The Wilms' tumor gene Wt1 is known for its important functions during genitourinary and mesothelial formation. Here we show that Wt1 is necessary for neuronal development in the vertebrate retina. Mouse embryos with targeted disruption of Wt1 exhibit remarkably thinner retinas than age-matched wild-type animals. A large fraction of retinal ganglion cells is lost by apoptosis, and the growth of optic nerve fibers is severely disturbed. Strikingly, expression of the class IV POU-domain transcription factor Pou4f2 (formerly Brn-3b), which is critical for the survival of most retinal ganglion cells, is lost in Wt1(-/-) retinas. Forced expression of Wt1 in cultured cells causes an up-regulation of Pou4f2 mRNA. Moreover, the Wt1(-KTS) splice variant can activate a reporter construct carrying 5'-regulatory sequences of the human POU4F2. The lack of Pou4f2 and the ocular defects in Wt1(-/-) embryos are rescued by transgenic expression of a 280 kb yeast artificial chromosome carrying the human WT1 gene. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a continuous requirement for Wt1 in normal retina formation with a critical role in Pou4f2-dependent ganglion cell differentiation.

  2. Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) protein is required for normal mouse liver development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szunyogova, Eva; Zhou, Haiyan; Maxwell, Gillian K.; Powis, Rachael A.; Francesco, Muntoni; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Parson, Simon H.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is caused by mutation or deletion of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Decreased levels of, cell-ubiquitous, SMN protein is associated with a range of systemic pathologies reported in severe patients. Despite high levels of SMN protein in normal liver, there is no comprehensive study of liver pathology in SMA. We describe failed liver development in response to reduced SMN levels, in a mouse model of severe SMA. The SMA liver is dark red, small and has: iron deposition; immature sinusoids congested with blood; persistent erythropoietic elements and increased immature red blood cells; increased and persistent megakaryocytes which release high levels of platelets found as clot-like accumulations in the heart. Myelopoiesis in contrast, was unaffected. Further analysis revealed significant molecular changes in SMA liver, consistent with the morphological findings. Antisense treatment from birth with PMO25, increased lifespan and ameliorated all morphological defects in liver by postnatal day 21. Defects in the liver are evident at birth, prior to motor system pathology, and impair essential liver function in SMA. Liver is a key recipient of SMA therapies, and systemically delivered antisense treatment, completely rescued liver pathology. Liver therefore, represents an important therapeutic target in SMA. PMID:27698380

  3. PRUNE is crucial for normal brain development and mutated in microcephaly with neurodevelopmental impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollo, Massimo; Ahmed, Mustafa; Ferrucci, Veronica; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Asadzadeh, Fatemeh; Carotenuto, Marianeve; Maroofian, Reza; Al-Amri, Ahmed; Singh, Royana; Scognamiglio, Iolanda; Mojarrad, Majid; Musella, Luca; Duilio, Angela; Di Somma, Angela; Karaca, Ender; Rajab, Anna; Al-Khayat, Aisha; Mohan Mohapatra, Tribhuvan; Eslahi, Atieh; Ashrafzadeh, Farah; Rawlins, Lettie E; Prasad, Rajniti; Gupta, Rashmi; Kumari, Preeti; Srivastava, Mona; Cozzolino, Flora; Kumar Rai, Sunil; Monti, Maria; Harlalka, Gaurav V; Simpson, Michael A; Rich, Philip; Al-Salmi, Fatema; Patton, Michael A; Chioza, Barry A; Efthymiou, Stephanie; Granata, Francesca; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Wiethoff, Sarah; Borgione, Eugenia; Scuderi, Carmela; Mankad, Kshitij; Hanna, Michael G; Pucci, Piero; Houlden, Henry; Lupski, James R; Crosby, Andrew H; Baple, Emma L

    2017-04-01

    PRUNE is a member of the DHH (Asp-His-His) phosphoesterase protein superfamily of molecules important for cell motility, and implicated in cancer progression. Here we investigated multiple families from Oman, India, Iran and Italy with individuals affected by a new autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental and degenerative disorder in which the cardinal features include primary microcephaly and profound global developmental delay. Our genetic studies identified biallelic mutations of PRUNE1 as responsible. Our functional assays of disease-associated variant alleles revealed impaired microtubule polymerization, as well as cell migration and proliferation properties, of mutant PRUNE. Additionally, our studies also highlight a potential new role for PRUNE during microtubule polymerization, which is essential for the cytoskeletal rearrangements that occur during cellular division and proliferation. Together these studies define PRUNE as a molecule fundamental for normal human cortical development and define cellular and clinical consequences associated with PRUNE mutation. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  4. Development of a new family of normalized modulus reduction and material damping curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darendeli, Mehmet Baris

    2001-12-01

    As part of various research projects [including the SRS (Savannah River Site) Project AA891070, EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) Project 3302, and ROSRINE (Resolution of Site Response Issues from the Northridge Earthquake) Project], numerous geotechnical sites were drilled and sampled. Intact soil samples over a depth range of several hundred meters were recovered from 20 of these sites. These soil samples were tested in the laboratory at The University of Texas at Austin (UTA) to characterize the materials dynamically. The presence of a database accumulated from testing these intact specimens motivated a re-evaluation of empirical curves employed in the state of practice. The weaknesses of empirical curves reported in the literature were identified and the necessity of developing an improved set of empirical curves was recognized. This study focused on developing the empirical framework that can be used to generate normalized modulus reduction and material damping curves. This framework is composed of simple equations, which incorporate the key parameters that control nonlinear soil behavior. The data collected over the past decade at The University of Texas at Austin are statistically analyzed using First-order, Second-moment Bayesian Method (FSBM). The effects of various parameters (such as confining pressure and soil plasticity) on dynamic soil properties are evaluated and quantified within this framework. One of the most important aspects of this study is estimating not only the mean values of the empirical curves but also estimating the uncertainty associated with these values. This study provides the opportunity to handle uncertainty in the empirical estimates of dynamic soil properties within the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis framework. A refinement in site-specific probabilistic seismic hazard assessment is expected to materialize in the near future by incorporating the results of this study into state of practice.

  5. Primary care perceptions of neurology and neurology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Angela M; Wade, Carrie; McCarron, Mark O

    2016-06-01

    Neurophobia (fear of neural sciences) and evaluation of independent sector contracts in neurology have seldom been examined among general practitioners (GPs). A questionnaire determined GPs' perceptions of neurology compared with other medical specialties. GP experiences of neurology services with independent sector companies and the local National Health Service (NHS) were compared. Areas of potential improvement in NHS neurology services were recorded from thematic analyses. Among 76 GPs neurology was perceived to be as interesting as other medical specialties. GPs reported less knowledge, more difficulty and less confidence in neurology compared with other medical specialties. There was a preference for a local NHS neurology service (pneurology services provided better patient satisfaction. GPs prefer local NHS neurology services to independent sector contracts. GPs' evaluations should inform commissioning of neurology services. Combating neurophobia should be an integral part of responsive commissioning. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Status of neurology medical school education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran I.; Isaacson, Richard S.; Safdieh, Joseph E.; Finney, Glen R.; Sowell, Michael K.; Sam, Maria C.; Anderson, Heather S.; Shin, Robert K.; Kraakevik, Jeff A.; Coleman, Mary; Drogan, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To survey all US medical school clerkship directors (CDs) in neurology and to compare results from a similar survey in 2005. Methods: A survey was developed by a work group of the American Academy of Neurology Undergraduate Education Subcommittee, and sent to all neurology CDs listed in the American Academy of Neurology database. Comparisons were made to a similar 2005 survey. Results: Survey response rate was 73%. Neurology was required in 93% of responding schools. Duration of clerkships was 4 weeks in 74% and 3 weeks in 11%. Clerkships were taken in the third year in 56%, third or fourth year in 19%, and fourth year in 12%. Clerkship duration in 2012 was slightly shorter than in 2005 (fewer clerkships of ≥4 weeks, p = 0.125), but more clerkships have moved into the third year (fewer neurology clerkships during the fourth year, p = 0.051). Simulation training in lumbar punctures was available at 44% of schools, but only 2% of students attempted lumbar punctures on patients. CDs averaged 20% protected time, but reported that they needed at least 32%. Secretarial full-time equivalent was 0.50 or less in 71% of clerkships. Eighty-five percent of CDs were “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied,” but more than half experienced “burnout” and 35% had considered relinquishing their role. Conclusion: Trends in neurology undergraduate education since 2005 include shorter clerkships, migration into the third year, and increasing use of technology. CDs are generally satisfied, but report stressors, including inadequate protected time and departmental support. PMID:25305155

  7. New York City at the dawn of neurological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Robert A

    2016-11-01

    Although there are many cities that can claim to have been the incubator of modern neurological surgery, the rise of this surgical subspecialty in New York City in the late 19th and early 20th century mirrors what was occurring around the world. The first confirmed brain tumor operation in the US was performed there in 1887. The author describes the role of several pioneers in the development of neurological surgery. Charles Elsberg was the first dedicated neurological surgeon in New York City and was instrumental in the development of the Neurological Institute and the careers of several other notable neurosurgeons.

  8. Multiple ribosomal proteins are expressed at high levels in developing zebrafish endoderm and are required for normal exocrine pancreas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Elayne; Weier, Christopher A; Leach, Steven D

    2013-06-01

    Ribosomal protein L (rpl) genes are essential for assembly of the 60S subunit of the eukaryotic ribosome and may also carry out additional extra-ribosomal functions. We have identified a common expression pattern for rpl genes in developing zebrafish larvae. After initially widespread expression in early embryos, the expression of multiple rpl genes becomes increasingly restricted to the endoderm. With respect to the pancreas, rpl genes are highly expressed in ptf1a-expressing pancreatic progenitors at 48 hpf, suggesting possible functional roles in pancreatic morphogenesis and/or differentiation. Utilizing two available mutant lines, rpl23a(hi2582) and rpl6(hi3655b), we found that ptf1a-expressing pancreatic progenitors fail to properly expand in embryos homozygous for either of these genes. In addition to these durable homozygous phenotypes, we also demonstrated recoverable delays in ptf1a-expressing pancreatic progenitor expansion in rpl23a(hi2582) and rpl6(hi3655b) heterozygotes. Disruptions in ribosome assembly are generally understood to initiate a p53-dependent cellular stress response. However, concomitant p53 knockdown was unable to rescue normal pancreatic progenitor expansion in either rpl23a(hi2582) or rpl6(hi3655b) mutant embryos, suggesting required and p53-independent roles for rpl23a and rpl6 in pancreas development.

  9. The Spectrum of Neurological Manifestations Associated with Gaucher Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamanna Roshan Lal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder, is due to a deficiency in the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. This leads to the accumulation of its normal substrate, glucocerebroside, in tissue macrophages, affecting the hematological, visceral, bone and neurologic systems. Gaucher disease is classified into three broad phenotypes based upon the presence or absence of neurological involvement: type 1 (non-neuronopathic, type 2 (acute neuronopathic, and type 3 (subacute neuronopathic. Phenotypically, there is a wide spectrum of visceral and neurological manifestations. Enzyme replacement is effective in managing the visceral disease; however, treating the neurological manifestations has proved to be more challenging. This review discusses the various neurological manifestations encountered in Gaucher disease, and provides a brief overview regarding the treatment and ongoing research challenges.

  10. Episodic neurological channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Devon P; Ptácek, Louis J

    2010-10-21

    Inherited episodic neurological disorders are often due to mutations in ion channels or their interacting proteins, termed channelopathies. There are a wide variety of such disorders, from those causing paralysis, to extreme pain, to ataxia. A common theme in these is alteration of action potential properties or synaptic transmission and a resulting increased propensity of the resulting tissue to enter into or stay in an altered excitability state. Manifestations of these disorders are triggered by an array of precipitants, all of which stress the particular affected tissue in some way and aid in propelling its activity into an aberrant state. Study of these disorders has aided in the understanding of disease risk factors and elucidated the cause of clinically related sporadic disorders. The findings from study of these disorders will aid in the diagnosis and efficient targeted treatment of affected patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Standards in Neurological Rehabilitation, June 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Barnes

    1997-01-01

    neurological services. We believe that disabled individuals should have access to a regional specialist service as well as a local community service. The regional specialist service would cater for people with more complicated and severe disabilities, including spinal injury and severe brain injury. The regional centres would provide specialist expertise for wheelchairs and special seating, orthotics, continence and urological services, aids and equipment including communication aids and environmental controls, prosthetics and driving assessment. The Task Force additionally endorses the development of local and community based rehabilitation teams with clear links to the regional centre. (6 The Task Force recognizes the limited amount of rehabilitation research and encourages individuals, universities and governments to invest more in rehabilitation research. Such investment should produce benefits for disabled people and their carers and in the long term benefits for the national economy. (7 The Task Force realizes that neurological rehabilitation is poorly developed both in Europe and the world as a whole. We firmly endorse international co-operation in this field and are happy to co-operate with any international organization in order to develop such links for clinical, educational or research initiatives. (8 The Task Force encourages individual countries to produce a document summarizing their own situation with regard to these standards and to produce a timetable for action to improve their situation. The EFNS Task Force would be pleased to assist in the publication of such deliberations or to act as a focus for international education and research or for sharing of examples of good practice.

  12. History of neurologic examination books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors).

  13. Fetal lung development on MRI. Normal course and impairment due to premature rupture of membranes; Fetale Lungenentwicklung in der MRT. Normaler Verlauf und Beeintraechtigung durch vorzeitigen Blasensprung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasprian, G. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik; Zentrum fuer Anatomie und Zellbiologie der Medizinischen Universitaet Wien (Austria). Arbeitsgruppe Integrative Morphologie; Brugger, P.C. [Zentrum fuer Anatomie und Zellbiologie der Medizinischen Universitaet Wien (Austria). Arbeitsgruppe Integrative Morphologie; Helmer, H.; Langer, M. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). Klinik fuer Frauenheilkunde; Balassy, C.; Prayer, D. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik

    2006-02-15

    A well-organized interplay between many molecular factors as well as mechanical forces influence fetal lung development. At the end of this complex process a sufficiently sized and structurally mature organ should ensure the postnatal survival of the newborn. Besides prenatal ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can now be used to investigate normal and pathological human lung growth in utero. Oligohydramnios, due to premature rupture of membranes (PROM), is an important risk factor for compromised fetal lung growth. In these situations MR volumetry can be used to measure the size of the fetal lung quite accurately. Together with the evaluation of lung signal intensities on T2-weighted sequences, fetuses with pulmonary hypoplasia can be readily detected. (orig.) [German] Die fetale Lungenentwicklung wird einerseits durch eine Vielzahl molekularer Faktoren und andererseits durch mechanisch-physiologische Kraefte beeinflusst. Ein geordnetes Zusammenspiel dieser Mechanismen fuehrt zu einem ausreichend grossen und strukturell reifen Organ, das sofort nach der Geburt das Ueberleben des Neugeborenen sicherstellt. Neben der praenatalen Ultraschalluntersuchung bietet nun auch die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) die Moeglichkeit, die normale und pathologische fetale Lungenentwicklung zu untersuchen. Ein wesentlicher Risikofaktor fuer eine Beeintraechtigung der Lungenentwicklung ist die verminderte Fruchtwassermenge nach vorzeitigem Blasensprung. In diesen Faellen kann die MR-Volumetrie dazu eingesetzt werden, die Groesse der fetalen Lungen relativ genau zu bestimmen. Gemeinsam mit der Beurteilung der MR-Signalintensitaeten des Lungengewebes auf T2-gewichteten Sequenzen koennen Feten mit hypoplastischen Lungen mit zunehmender Sicherheit bereits praenatal identifiziert werden. (orig.)

  14. Dengue: a new challenge for neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Puccioni-Sohler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue infection is a leading cause of illness and death in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Forty percent of the world’s population currently lives in these areas. The clinical picture resulting from dengue infection can range from relatively minor to catastrophic hemorrhagic fever. Recently, reports have increased of neurological manifestations. Neuropathogenesis seems to be related to direct nervous system viral invasion, autoimmune reaction, metabolic and hemorrhagic disturbance. Neurological manifestations include encephalitis, encephalopathy, meningitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, and cerebromeningeal hemorrhage. The development of neurological symptoms in patients with positive Immunoglobulin M (IgM dengue serology suggests a means of diagnosing the neurological complications associated with dengue. Viral antigens, specific IgM antibodies, and the intrathecal synthesis of dengue antibodies have been successfully detected in cerebrospinal fluid. However, despite diagnostic advancements, the treatment of neurological dengue is problematic. The launch of a dengue vaccine is expected to be beneficial.

  15. Perioperative Management of Neurological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjeet Singh Dhallu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative care of the patients with neurological diseases can be challenging. Most important consideration is the management and understanding of pathophysiology of these disorders and evaluation of new neurological changes that occur perioperatively. Perioperative generally refers to 3 phases of surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. We have tried to address few commonly encountered neurological conditions in clinical practice, such as delirium, stroke, epilepsy, myasthenia gravis, and Parkinson disease. In this article, we emphasize on early diagnosis and management strategies of neurological disorders in the perioperative period to minimize morbidity and mortality of patients.

  16. Detecting functional decline from normal ageing to dementia: development and validation of a short version of the Amsterdam IADL Questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Jutten, Roos J.; Peeters, Carel F. W.; Leijdesdorff, Sophie M. J.; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Maier, Andrea B.; Terwee, Caroline B.; Scheltens, Philip; Sikkes, Sietske A. M.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Detecting functional decline from normal ageing to dementia is relevant for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Therefore, the Amsterdam IADL Questionnaire (A-IADL-Q) was developed: a 70-item proxy-based tool with good psychometric properties. We aimed to design a short version whilst preserving its psychometric quality. METHODS: Study partners of subjects (n=1326), ranging from cognitively normal to dementia subjects, completed the original A-IADL-Q. We selected the short versi...

  17. Neurological manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of celiac disease: A comprehensive review

    OpenAIRE

    Shahriar Nikpour

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity may initially present as one or more neurological signs and/or symptoms. On the other hand, it may be associated with or complicated by neurological manifestations. Neurological presentations are rare in children but as many as 36% of adult patients present with neurological changes. With severe malnutrition after progression of celiac disease, different vitamin deficiencies may develop. Such problems can in turn overlap with previous neurological abnormal...

  18. Targeting sonic hedgehog signaling in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Tomar, Sunil; Sharma, Diksha; Mahindroo, Neeraj; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2017-03-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling influences neurogenesis and neural patterning during the development of central nervous system. Dysregulation of Shh signaling in brain leads to neurological disorders like autism spectrum disorder, depression, dementia, stroke, Parkinson's diseases, Huntington's disease, locomotor deficit, epilepsy, demyelinating disease, neuropathies as well as brain tumors. The synthesis, processing and transport of Shh ligand as well as the localization of its receptors and signal transduction in the central nervous system has been carefully reviewed. Further, we summarize the regulation of small molecule modulators of Shh pathway with potential in neurological disorders. In conclusion, further studies are warranted to demonstrate the potential of positive and negative regulators of the Shh pathway in neurological disorders.

  19. Neurological disorders and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Giovanni; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Pastorelli, Luca; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Spina, Luisa; Baldini, Vittorio; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-07-21

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur in about one-third of patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and may precede the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms by many years. Neurologic disorders associated with IBD are not frequent, being reported in 3% of patients, but they often represent an important cause of morbidity and a relevant diagnostic issue. In addition, the increasing use of immunosuppressant and biological therapies for IBD may also play a pivotal role in the development of neurological disorders of different type and pathogenesis. Hence, we provide a complete and profound review of the main features of neurological complications associated with IBD, with particular reference to those related to drugs and with a specific focus on their clinical presentation and possible pathophysiological mechanisms.

  20. Nonlocal neurology: beyond localization to holonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globus, G G; O'Carroll, C P

    2010-11-01

    The concept of local pathology has long served neurology admirably. Relevant models include self-organizing nonlinear brain dynamics, global workspace and dynamic core theories. However such models are inconsistent with certain clinical phenomena found in Charles Bonnet syndrome, disjunctive agnosia and schizophrenia, where there is disunity of content within the unity of consciousness. This is contrasted with the split-brain case where there is disunity of content and disunity of consciousnesses. The development of quantum brain theory with it nonlocal mechanisms under the law of the whole ("holonomy") offers new possibilities for explaining disintegration within unity. Dissipative quantum brain dynamics and its approach to the binding problem, memory and consciousness are presented. A nonlocal neurology armed with a holonomic understanding might see more deeply into what clinical neurology has always aspired to: the patient as a whole.

  1. Cannabinoids in neurology – Brazilian Academy of Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. D. Brucki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of cannabidiol in some neurological conditions was allowed by Conselho Regional de Medicina de São Paulo and by Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA. Specialists on behalf of Academia Brasileira de Neurologia prepared a critical statement about use of cannabidiol and other cannabis derivatives in neurological diseases.

  2. Prevalence and Distribution of Neurological Disease in a Neurology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uche

    Epilepsy was the commonest neurological diagnosis in the clinic, followed by stroke. Conclusion: ... Disorder. %. 1. Blackouts. 12.5. Epilepsy. 10.4. Vasovagal attacks. 2.1. 2. Headache. 12.5 ... paediatric neurology clinic at Enugu. 3. However ...

  3. [Cannabinoids in neurology--Brazilian Academy of Neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucki, Sonia M D; Frota, Norberto Anísio; Schestatsky, Pedro; Souza, Adélia Henriques; Carvalho, Valentina Nicole; Manreza, Maria Luiza Giraldes; Mendes, Maria Fernanda; Comini-Frota, Elizabeth; Vasconcelos, Cláudia; Tumas, Vitor; Ferraz, Henrique B; Barbosa, Egberto; Jurno, Mauro Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The use of cannabidiol in some neurological conditions was allowed by Conselho Regional de Medicina de São Paulo and by Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA). Specialists on behalf of Academia Brasileira de Neurologia prepared a critical statement about use of cannabidiol and other cannabis derivatives in neurological diseases.

  4. A Developmental Study of Static Postural Control and Superimposed Arm Movements in Normal and Slowly Developing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Janet M.

    Selected electromyographic parameters underlying static postural control in 4, 6, and 8 year old normally and slowly developing children during performance of selected arm movements were studied. Developmental delays in balance control were assessed by the Cashin Test of Motor Development (1974) and/or the Williams Gross Motor Coordination Test…

  5. Syntactic Development in the Oral Language of Learning Disabled and Normal Students at the Intermediate and Secondary Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Rochelle B.; Crump, W. Donald

    1983-01-01

    Syntactic development in the oral language of learning disabled and normal students at two intermediate and two secondary-school age levels was compared using two indices, the T-unit and the Syntactic Density Score. It was concluded that no single, sensitive, numerical index exists to quantify syntactic development. (SW)

  6. Normal development of refractive state and ocular dimensions in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangtian; Qu, Jia; Xie, Ruozhong; Wang, Ruiqing; Jiang, Liqin; Zhao, Hailan; Wen, Jiquan; Lu, Fan

    2006-09-01

    This study investigated changes in refraction, corneal curvature, axial components and weight of posterior sclera in guinea pig eyes during the normal development from birth. Sixty-four guinea pigs were assigned to eight groups (n=8 each). Each group underwent a series of ocular measurements at one of the eight time-points (0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 weeks), including refraction (streak retinoscopy), corneal radius of curvature (CRC; keratometry), anterior segment length (AS: corneal thickness and depth of the anterior chamber), thickness of the crystalline lens (CL), vitreous chamber length (VC; all A-scan ultrasonography) and dry weight of a circular 6mm diameter punch in the posterior sclera (electronic balance). Results of all the measurements were statistically compared between right eye and left eye, male and female and among different age groups. Artifacts of retinoscopy due to small eye artifact were also estimated at different ages. The refraction in guinea pig eyes was +5.22+/-0.23 D (Mean, SE) at birth. This value decreased rapidly during the first 3 weeks followed by a slow decline. The overall decrease in refraction was highly significant from birth to 11 weeks (pweeks. The guinea pig eyes were emmetropic by 3 weeks of age when the small eye artifact was taken into account. The CRC (3.24+/-0.01 mm at birth), AS (1.20+/-0.01 mm at birth), CL (2.72+/-0.03 mm at birth) and VC (3.28+/-0.01 mm at birth) increased within the first 3 weeks despite a transient decrease in the CRC within the first week. The increase in CRC, CL and VC continued after 3 weeks, however, the AS remained constant after this age. The increase in VC was better correlated to the decline of hyperopia (R(2)=0.70) than the other components (R(2)=0.33-0.39). Dry weight of the posterior sclera increased linearly from birth (pweeks) and had a moderately linear correlation with the VC (R(2)=0.60). There were no significant differences between the right eye and left eye or between male and

  7. Gluten sensitivity and neurological manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Berio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors report on six cases of gluten-sensitivity, also defined non-celiac gluten sensitivity, characterized by abdominal features (diarrhea, bloating, pain, genetic positivity for predisposition to celiac disease (DQB1* 02 in all cases; DQA1*05 in three; DQA1*02 in two, DQB1*03 in two, negative anti-t-Transglutaminase antibodies, normal mucosa on biopsy in four cases, type 1 of Marsh in one case. The subjects presented frequent central nervous system (CNS symptoms: headache in three patients, somnolence in one, electroencephalogram aspecific alterations in three (in two of them with previous seizures, leptomeningeal cyst in one, intracranial calcification in one, cerebral gliosis in two. After a gluten-free diet, all intestinal and clinical CNS features remitted, but re-appeared after gluten reintroduction. On the basis of the neurological signs, the authors stress the relevance of immune innate system in the pathogenesis of these cases with possible subsequent evolution on immune adaptive system involvement.

  8. Positive clinical neuroscience: explorations in positive neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Narinder; Cole, Jonathan; Manly, Tom; Viskontas, Indre; Ninteman, Aafke; Hasher, Lynn; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-08-01

    Disorders of the brain and its sensory organs have traditionally been associated with deficits in movement, perception, cognition, emotion, and behavior. It is increasingly evident, however, that positive phenomena may also occur in such conditions, with implications for the individual, science, medicine, and for society. This article provides a selective review of such positive phenomena--enhanced function after brain lesions, better-than-normal performance in people with sensory loss, creativity associated with neurological disease, and enhanced performance associated with aging. We propose that, akin to the well-established field of positive psychology and the emerging field of positive clinical psychology, the nascent fields of positive neurology and positive neuropsychology offer new avenues to understand brain-behavior relationships, with both theoretical and therapeutic implications.

  9. Mutations of glucocerebrosidase: discrimination of neurologic and non-neurologic phenotypes of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginns, E I; Brady, R O; Pirruccello, S; Moore, C; Sorrell, S; Furbish, F S; Murray, G J; Tager, J; Barranger, J A

    1982-01-01

    Multiple molecular forms of beta-glucocerebrosidase that permit discrimination between neurologic and non-neurologic phenotypes of Gaucher disease have been identified radioimmunologically in fibroblasts and human brain tissue. In normal human fibroblasts these forms have been shown by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to have apparent Mr of 63,000 (form A1), 61,000 (form A2), and 56,000 (form B). The Mr 63,000 form may be a precursor of the Mr 56,000 form. Non-neurologic Gaucher disease (type 1) fibroblasts and normal brain tissue are characteristic in that they contain only one major immunoreactive protein, the Mr 56,000 form. In contrast, fibroblast extracts and brain tissue from neurologic Gaucher disease phenotypes contain only the higher molecular weight forms A1 and A2. These data and the low residual activity of the enzyme in all the variants of Gaucher disease suggest that the mutations of beta-glucocerebrosidase are allelic and involve the active site. Images PMID:6957882

  10. Developing TOPSIS method using statistical normalization for selecting knowledge management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Zadeh Sarraf

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Numerous companies are expecting their knowledge management (KM to be performed effectively in order to leverage and transform the knowledge into competitive advantages. However, here raises a critical issue of how companies can better evaluate and select a favorable KM strategy prior to a successful KM implementation. Design/methodology/approach: An extension of TOPSIS, a multi-attribute decision making (MADM technique, to a group decision environment is investigated. TOPSIS is a practical and useful technique for ranking and selection of a number of externally determined alternatives through distance measures. The entropy method is often used for assessing weights in the TOPSIS method. Entropy in information theory is a criterion uses for measuring the amount of disorder represented by a discrete probability distribution. According to decrease resistance degree of employees opposite of implementing a new strategy, it seems necessary to spot all managers’ opinion. The normal distribution considered the most prominent probability distribution in statistics is used to normalize gathered data. Findings: The results of this study show that by considering 6 criteria for alternatives Evaluation, the most appropriate KM strategy to implement  in our company was ‘‘Personalization’’. Research limitations/implications: In this research, there are some assumptions that might affect the accuracy of the approach such as normal distribution of sample and community. These assumptions can be changed in future work. Originality/value: This paper proposes an effective solution based on combined entropy and TOPSIS approach to help companies that need to evaluate and select KM strategies. In represented solution, opinions of all managers is gathered and normalized by using standard normal distribution and central limit theorem. Keywords: Knowledge management; strategy; TOPSIS; Normal distribution; entropy

  11. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed.

  12. Neurological mitochondrial cytopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehndiratta M

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial cytopathies are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of disorders caused by structural and functional abnormalities in mitochondria. To the best of our knowledge, there are very few studies published from India till date. Selected and confirmed fourteen cases of neurological mitochondrial cytopathies with different clinical syndromes admitted between 1997 and 2000 are being reported. There were 8 male and 6 female patients. The mean age was 24.42+/-11.18 years (range 4-40 years. Twelve patients could be categorized into well-defined syndromes, while two belonged to undefined group. In the defined syndrome categories, three patients had MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke like episodes, three had MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibre myopathy, three cases had KSS (Kearns-Sayre Syndrome and three were diagnosed to be suffering from mitochondrial myopathy. In the uncategorized group, one case presented with paroxysmal kinesogenic dystonia and the other manifested with generalized chorea alone. Serum lactic acid level was significantly increased in all the patients (fasting 28.96+/-4.59 mg%, post exercise 41.02+/-4.93 mg%. Muscle biopsy was done in all cases. Succinic dehydrogenase staining of muscle tissue showed subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria in 12 cases. Mitochondrial DNA study could be performed in one case only and it did not reveal any mutation at nucleotides 3243 and 8344. MRI brain showed multiple infarcts in MELAS, hyperintensities in putaminal areas in chorea and bilateral cerebellar atrophy in MERRF.

  13. The neurology of ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeki, Semir

    2004-03-01

    One of the primordial functions of the brain is the acquisition of knowledge. The apparatus that it has evolved to do so is flexible enough to allow it to acquire knowledge about unambiguous conditions on the one hand (colour vision being a good example), and about situations that are capable of two or more interpretations, each one of which has equal validity with the others. However, in the latter instance, we can only be conscious of one interpretation at any given moment. The study of ambiguity thus gives us some insights into how activity at different stations of the brain can result in a micro-consciousness for an attribute, and also tell us something about interactions between different cerebral areas that result in several potential micro-conscious correlates, though only one predominates at any given time. Finally, the study of ambiguity also gives us insights into the neurological machinery that artists have tapped to create the ambiguity that is commonly a hallmark of great works of art.

  14. [Music and neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Gómez, M

    2007-01-01

    Music perception and output are special functions of the human brain. Investigation in this field is growing with the support of modern neuroimaging techniques (functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography). Interest in the music phenomenon and the disorders regarding its processing has been limited. Music is not just an artistic activity but a language to communicate, evoke and reinforce several emotions. Although the subject is still under debate, processing of music is independent of common language and each one uses independent circuits. One may be seriously affected and the other practically unharmed. On the other hand, there may be separate channels within the processing of music for the temporary elements (rhythm), melodic elements (pitch, timbre, and melody), memory and emotional response. The study of subjects with absolute pitch, congenital and acquired amusias, musicogenic epilepsy and musical hallucinations has greatly contributed to the knowledge of how the brain processes music. Music training involves some changes in morphology and physiology of professional musicians' brains. Stress, chronic pain and professional dystonias constitute a special field of musicians' disturbances that concerns neurological practice. Listening to and playing music may have some educational and therapeutic benefits.

  15. Development of Planning Abilities in Normal Aging: Differential Effects of Specific Cognitive Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köstering, Lena; Stahl, Christoph; Leonhart, Rainer; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaller, Christoph P.

    2014-01-01

    In line with the frontal hypothesis of aging, the ability to plan ahead undergoes substantial change during normal aging. Although impairments on the Tower of London planning task were reported earlier, associations between age-related declines and specific cognitive demands on planning have not been studied. Here we investigated the impact of…

  16. Monocular and binocular development in children with albinism, infantile nystagmus syndrome and normal vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurneman, B.; Boonstra, F.N.

    2013-01-01

    Background/aims: To compare interocular acuity differences, crowding ratios, and binocular summation ratios in 4- to 8-year-old children with albinism (nn=n16), children with infantile nystagmus syndrome (nn=n10), and children with normal vision (nn=n72). Methods: Interocular acuity differences and

  17. Monocular and binocular development in children with albinism, infantile nystagmus syndrome, and normal vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurneman, B.; Boonstra, F.N.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background/aims: To compare interocular acuity differences, crowding ratios, and binocular summation ratios in 4- to 8-year-old children with albinism (n = 16), children with infantile nystagmus syndrome (n = 10), and children with normal vision (n = 72). Methods: Interocular acuity differe

  18. Sonographic assessment of normal and abnormal fetal development; early and late aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.S. den Hollander (Nicolette)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis consists of two parts. The first part deals with an increasingly important area of first and early second trimester (<14 weeks) normal and abnmmal fetal sonoanatomy and its validity and impact in the early diagnosis of fetal anomalies in a high-risk population. The second par

  19. Monocular and binocular development in children with albinism, infantile nystagmus syndrome and normal vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurneman, B.; Boonstra, F.N.

    2013-01-01

    Background/aims: To compare interocular acuity differences, crowding ratios, and binocular summation ratios in 4- to 8-year-old children with albinism (nn=n16), children with infantile nystagmus syndrome (nn=n10), and children with normal vision (nn=n72). Methods: Interocular acuity differences and

  20. Monocular and binocular development in children with albinism, infantile nystagmus syndrome, and normal vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurneman, B.; Boonstra, F.N.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background/aims: To compare interocular acuity differences, crowding ratios, and binocular summation ratios in 4- to 8-year-old children with albinism (n = 16), children with infantile nystagmus syndrome (n = 10), and children with normal vision (n = 72). Methods: Interocular acuity

  1. Development of a theory of implementation and integration: Normalization Process Theory.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, C.R.; Mair, F.; Finch, T.; Macfarlane, A.; Dowrick, C.; Treweek, S.; Rapley, T.; Ballini, L.; Ong, B.N.; Rogers, A.; Murray, E.; Elwyn, G.; Legare, F.; Gunn, J.; Montori, V.M.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Theories are important tools in the social and natural sciences. The methods by which they are derived are rarely described and discussed. Normalization Process Theory explains how new technologies, ways of acting, and ways of working become routinely embedded in everyday pract

  2. Histological versus stereological methods applied at spermatogonia during normal human development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, D

    1990-01-01

    The number of spermatogonia per tubular transverse section (S/T), and the percentage of seminiferous tubulus containing spermatogonia (the fertility index (FI] were measured in 40 pairs of normal autopsy testes aged 28 weeks of gestation-40 years. S/T and FI showed similar changes during the whol...

  3. Development of Planning Abilities in Normal Aging: Differential Effects of Specific Cognitive Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köstering, Lena; Stahl, Christoph; Leonhart, Rainer; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaller, Christoph P.

    2014-01-01

    In line with the frontal hypothesis of aging, the ability to plan ahead undergoes substantial change during normal aging. Although impairments on the Tower of London planning task were reported earlier, associations between age-related declines and specific cognitive demands on planning have not been studied. Here we investigated the impact of…

  4. Histological versus stereological methods applied at spermatogonia during normal human development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, Dina

    1990-01-01

    The number of spermatogonia per tubular transverse section (S/T), and the percentage of seminiferous tubulus containing spermatogonia (the fertility index (FI] were measured in 40 pairs of normal autopsy testes aged 28 weeks of gestation-40 years. S/T and FI showed similar changes during the whol...

  5. [Neurological soft signs in schizophrenia: correlations with age, sex, educational status and psychopathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotidis, P; Kaprinis, G; Iacovides, A; Fountoulakis, K

    2013-01-01

    Though the pathobiology of schizophrenia can be examined in multiple levels, the organic notion of brain disease suggests that neurological features will be present. One straightforward, inexpensive method of investigating brain dysfunction in schizophrenia is thought the bedside assessment of neurological abnormalities with a standard neurological examination. Neurological abnormalities are traditionally classified as "hard signs" (impairments in basic motor, sensory, and reflex behaviors, which do not appear to be affected in schizophrenia) and "soft signs", which refer to more complex phenomena such as abnormalities in motor control, integrative sensory function, sensorimotor integration, and cerebral laterality. Additionally, neurological soft signs (NSS) are minor motor and sensory abnormalities that are considered to be normal in the course of early development but abnormal when elicited in later life or persist beyond childhood. Soft signs also, have no definitive localizing significance but are indicative of subtle brain dysfunction. Most authors believe that they are a reflection not only of deficient integration between the sensory and motor systems, but also of dysfunctional neuronal circuits linking subcortical brain structures such as the basal ganglia, the brain stem, and the limbic system. Throughout the last four decades, studies have consistently shown that NSS are more frequently present in patients with schizophrenia than in normal subjects and non-psychotic psychiatric patients. However, the functional relevance of NSS remains unclear and their specificity has often been challenged, even though there is indication for a relative specificity with regard to diagnosis, or symptomatology. Many studies have considered soft signs as categorical variables thus hampering the evaluation of fluctuation with symptomatology and/or treatment, whereas other studies included insufficient number of assessed signs, or lacked a comprehensive assessment of

  6. Practice advisory: Recurrent stroke with patent foramen ovale (update of practice parameter): Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messé, Steven R; Gronseth, Gary; Kent, David M; Kizer, Jorge R; Homma, Shunichi; Rosterman, Lee; Kasner, Scott E

    2016-08-23

    To update the 2004 American Academy of Neurology guideline for patients with stroke and patent foramen ovale (PFO) by addressing whether (1) percutaneous closure of PFO is superior to medical therapy alone and (2) anticoagulation is superior to antiplatelet therapy for the prevention of recurrent stroke. Systematic review of the literature and structured formulation of recommendations. Percutaneous PFO closure with the STARFlex device possibly does not provide a benefit in preventing stroke vs medical therapy alone (risk difference [RD] 0.13%, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.2% to 2.0%). Percutaneous PFO closure with the AMPLATZER PFO Occluder possibly decreases the risk of recurrent stroke (RD -1.68%, 95% CI -3.18% to -0.19%), possibly increases the risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) (RD 1.64%, 95% CI 0.07%-3.2%), and is highly likely to be associated with a procedural complication risk of 3.4% (95% CI 2.3%-5%). There is insufficient evidence to determine the efficacy of anticoagulation compared with antiplatelet therapy in preventing recurrent stroke (RD 2%, 95% CI -21% to 25%). Clinicians should not routinely offer percutaneous PFO closure to patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke outside of a research setting (Level R). In rare circumstances, such as recurrent strokes despite adequate medical therapy with no other mechanism identified, clinicians may offer the AMPLATZER PFO Occluder if it is available (Level C). In the absence of another indication for anticoagulation, clinicians may routinely offer antiplatelet medications instead of anticoagulation to patients with cryptogenic stroke and PFO (Level C). © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Summary of comprehensive systematic review: Rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselkorn, Jodie K; Hughes, Christina; Rae-Grant, Alex; Henson, Lily Jung; Bever, Christopher T; Lo, Albert C; Brown, Theodore R; Kraft, George H; Getchius, Thomas; Gronseth, Gary; Armstrong, Melissa J; Narayanaswami, Pushpa

    2015-11-24

    To systematically review the evidence regarding rehabilitation treatments in multiple sclerosis (MS). We systematically searched the literature (1970-2013) and classified articles using 2004 American Academy of Neurology criteria. This systematic review highlights the paucity of well-designed studies, which are needed to evaluate the available MS rehabilitative therapies. Weekly home/outpatient physical therapy (8 weeks) probably is effective for improving balance, disability, and gait (MS type unspecified, participants able to walk ≥5 meters) but probably is ineffective for improving upper extremity dexterity (1 Class I). Inpatient exercises (3 weeks) followed by home exercises (15 weeks) possibly are effective for improving disability (relapsing-remitting MS [RRMS], primary progressive MS [PPMS], secondary progressive MS [SPMS], Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] 3.0-6.5) (1 Class II). Six weeks' worth of comprehensive multidisciplinary outpatient rehabilitation possibly is effective for improving disability/function (PPMS, SPMS, EDSS 4.0-8.0) (1 Class II). Motor and sensory balance training or motor balance training (3 weeks) possibly is effective for improving static and dynamic balance, and motor balance training (3 weeks) possibly is effective for improving static balance (RRMS, SPMS, PPMS) (1 Class II). Breathing-enhanced upper extremity exercises (6 weeks) possibly are effective for improving timed gait and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (RRMS, SPMS, PPMS, mean EDSS 4.5); this change is of unclear clinical significance. This technique possibly is ineffective for improving disability (1 Class II). Inspiratory muscle training (10 weeks) possibly improves maximal inspiratory pressure (RRMS, SPMS, PPMS, EDSS 2-6.5) (1 Class II). © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Practice guideline update summary: Corticosteroid treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: Report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloss, David; Moxley, Richard T; Ashwal, Stephen; Oskoui, Maryam

    2016-02-02

    To update the 2005 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) guideline on corticosteroid treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We systematically reviewed the literature from January 2004 to July 2014 using the AAN classification scheme for therapeutic articles and predicated recommendations on the strength of the evidence. Thirty-four studies met inclusion criteria. In children with DMD, prednisone should be offered for improving strength (Level B) and pulmonary function (Level B). Prednisone may be offered for improving timed motor function (Level C), reducing the need for scoliosis surgery (Level C), and delaying cardiomyopathy onset by 18 years of age (Level C). Deflazacort may be offered for improving strength and timed motor function and delaying age at loss of ambulation by 1.4-2.5 years (Level C). Deflazacort may be offered for improving pulmonary function, reducing the need for scoliosis surgery, delaying cardiomyopathy onset, and increasing survival at 5-15 years of follow-up (Level C for each). Deflazacort and prednisone may be equivalent in improving motor function (Level C). Prednisone may be associated with greater weight gain in the first years of treatment than deflazacort (Level C). Deflazacort may be associated with a greater risk of cataracts than prednisone (Level C). The preferred dosing regimen of prednisone is 0.75 mg/kg/d (Level B). Over 12 months, prednisone 10 mg/kg/weekend is equally effective (Level B), with no long-term data available. Prednisone 0.75 mg/kg/d is associated with significant risk of weight gain, hirsutism, and cushingoid appearance (Level B). © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Development of gene microarray in screening differently expressed genes in keloid and normal-control skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟; 付小兵; 葛世丽; 孙晓庆; 周岗; 赵志力; 盛志勇

    2004-01-01

    Background Keloid is an intricate lesion that is probably regulated by many genes. In this study, the authors used the technique of complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray to analyse abnormal gene expression in keloids and normal control skins. Methods The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of 8400 genes were spotted in an array on chemical-material-coated-glass plates. The DNAs were fixed on the glass plates. The total RNAs were isolated from freshly excised human keloid and normal control skins, and the mRNAs were then purified. The mRNA from both keloid and normal control skins were reversely transcribed to cDNAs, with the incorporation of fluorescent dUTP, for preparing the hybridisation probes. The mixed probes were then hybridised to the cDNA microarray. After thorough washing, the cDNA microarray was scanned for differing fluorescent signals from two types of tissues. Gene expression of tissue growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and of c-myc was detected with both RT-PCR and Northern blot hybridisation to confirm the effectiveness of cDNA microarray. Results Among the 8400 human genes, 402 were detected with different expression levels between keloid and normal control skins. Two hundred and fifty genes, including TGF-β1 and c-myc, were up-regulated and 152 genes were down-regulated. Higher expressions of TGF-β1 and c-myc in keloid were also revealed using RT-PCR and Northern blot methods. Conclusion cDNA microarray analysis provides a powerful tool for investigating differential gene expression in keloid and normal control skins. Keloid is a complicated lesion with many genes involved.

  10. Origins of the sensory examination in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Cassiopeia; Okun, Michael S

    2002-12-01

    Formal testing of sensation as part of the neurological examination followed the improvements in examination techniques as well as advances in neuroscience. By the 1890s, the observation that temperature sense was frequently impaired at the same time that pain was appreciated led to the supposition that the two paths traveled closely. Through the works of Brown-Séquard and Edinger the existence of a crossed afferent tract was verified. The distinction between two sensory pathways was clear by 1898, when van Gehuchten reported a case of syringomyelia and suggested that the pain and temperature fibers were carried anterolaterally and the position sense fibers carried posteriorly in the spinal cord. Many authors describing patients with tabes dorsalis suspected the posterior columns of the spinal cord played a key role in position sense. It is difficult to determine in the 19th century who first employed the use of movements of joints as a test for proprioceptive function; however, Bell in 1826 recognized what he termed a sixth sense, which later was characterized as proprioceptive function. Goldscheider went on to report the degrees of movement that were considered normal for each joint. Although vibratory sense had been described by Cardano and Ingrassia in the 16th century and tests had been developed by Rinne and Rumpf by the 19th century, it was not until 1903 that Rydel and Seiffer found that vibratory sense and proprioceptive sense were closely related and that both senses were carried in the posterior columns of the spinal cord. By 1955, the sensory examination included tests for light-touch, superficial pain, temperature, position sense, vibration, muscle (deep pain), and two-point discrimination. Tests for these sensibilities still remain in use. We will review the origins of the understanding of sensation, which ultimately led to the development of the sensory examination. We will highlight individuals who made important discoveries and observations, as

  11. Neurologic complications of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzhard, E; Pfausler, B

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades, the incidence of sepsis and resultant neurologic sequelae has increased, both in industrialized and low- or middle-income countries, by approximately 5% per year. Up to 300 patients per 100 000 population per year are reported to suffer from sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. Mortality is up to 30%, depending on the precision of diagnostic criteria. The increasing incidence of sepsis is partially explained by demographic changes in society, with aging, increasing numbers of immunocompromised patients, dissemination of multiresistant pathogens, and greater availability of supportive medical care in both industrialized and middle-income countries. This results in more septic patients being admitted to intensive care units. Septic encephalopathy is a manifestation especially of severe sepsis and septic shock where the neurologist plays a crucial role in diagnosis and management. It is well known that timely treatment of sepsis improves outcome and that septic encephalopathy may precede other signs and symptoms. Particularly in the elderly and immunocompromised patient, the brain may be the first organ to show signs of failure. The neurologist diagnosing early septic encephalopathy may therefore contribute to the optimal management of septic patients. The brain is not only an organ failing in sepsis (a "sepsis victim" - as with other organs), but it also overwhelmingly influences all inflammatory processes on a variety of pathophysiologic levels, thus contributing to the initiation and propagation of septic processes. Therefore, the best possible pathophysiologic understanding of septic encephalopathy is essential for its management, and the earliest possible therapy is crucial to prevent the evolution of septic encephalopathy, brain failure, and poor prognosis. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Arterial calcifications at the hand: Normal development and its course in patients on maintenance dialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, E.

    1987-03-01

    Normally, the arterial calcifications at the hand progress form proximal to distal and do not reach the fingers in the 8th decade. In patients on maintenance dialysis the arterial calcifications begin earlier and do not progress with age. The most severe arterial calcifications occur in patients with renal failure caused by diabetic nephropathy. Prognostically arterial calcifications in the finger-metacarpal region are an unfavourable sign.

  13. Development of numerical algorithms for practical computation of nonlinear normal modes

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    When resorting to numerical algorithms, we show that nonlinear normal mode (NNM) computation is possible with limited implementation effort, which paves the way to a practical method for determining the NNMs of nonlinear mechanical systems. The proposed method relies on two main techniques, namely a shooting procedure and a method for the continuation of NNM motions. In addition, sensitivity analysis is used to reduce the computational burden of the algorithm. A simplified discrete model of a...

  14. Liver transplantation in neurological Wilson's Disease: is there indication? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocchegiani, F; Gemini, S; Vincenzi, P; Montalti, R; Vecchi, A; Nicolini, D; Federici, A; Coletta, M; Pansini, M; Lanari, J; Svegliati Baroni, G; Risaliti, A; Vivarelli, M

    2014-09-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by copper overload. In this disease, inadequate hepatic excretion leads to copper accumulation in the liver, brain, kidney, and cornea. Severe neurological symptoms can develop in patients with WD, often in the absence of relevant liver damage: it is unclear whether liver transplantation (LT) could reverse neurological symptoms, and at present LT is not recommended in this setting. We report a case of regression of neurological symptoms in a patient affected by WD with prevalent neurological involvement. A 19-year-old man with disabling neuropsychiatric symptoms from WD that included frontal ataxia, akinesia, dystonia, tremors, and behavioral disorders in the presence of preserved liver function (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score=7; Child-Turcotte-Pugh score=A5) underwent LT in November 2009. At the time of LT, encephalic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated diffuse neurodegenerative alterations involving subtentorial and supratentorial structures; bilateral Kayser-Fleischer ring was present. Four years after LT, laboratory tests show normalized copper metabolism and excellent liver function test results. Encephalic MRI shows a substantial improvement of already-known signal alterations at nuclei thalamus and putamen, mesencephalon, and pons. Kayser-Fleischer ring disappeared from the right eye, but a little remnant is still visible in the left eye. At neurological examination, all of the previous symptoms and signs are no longer present and behavioral disorders are no longer present; psychosocial functions are completely restored. The present case provides some evidence that LT may be a valid therapeutic option for WD patients with marked neurological impairment, particularly in those no longer responsive to chelation therapy.

  15. Differences in assertive speech acts produced by children with autism, Asperger syndrome, specific language impairment, and normal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziatas, Kathryn; Durkin, Kevin; Pratt, Chris

    2003-01-01

    The assertive speech acts of children with autism (n = 12) and Asperger syndrome (n = 12), individually matched to children with specific language impairment (SLI; n = 24) and children with normal development (n = 24) were studied in the context of gently structured conversation. These children also completed the false belief test of theory of mind. The children with autism used significantly lower proportions of assertions involving explanations and descriptions than the children with SLI or normal development and significantly lower proportions of assertions involving internal state and explanations than the children with Asperger syndrome. The children with autism used a higher proportion of assertions involving identifications than any other group. The assertions of the children with Asperger syndrome were generally not different than those of the children with SLI or normal development except for a higher proportion of assertions involving own internal state. Further analysis of the mental assertions revealed that the children with autism and Asperger syndrome predominantly referred to desire and made few references to thought and belief, whereas the children with SLI and those with normal development used a higher proportion of references to thought and belief.

  16. Implicit Attitudes towards Children with Autism versus Normally Developing Children as Predictors of Professional Burnout and Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Amanda; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Tutors trained in applied behaviour analysis (n = 16) and mainstream school teachers (n = 16) were exposed to an Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) designed to assess implicit attitudes towards individuals with autism versus normally developing individuals. Participants also completed a range of explicit measures, including measures…

  17. Ontogeny and localization of gamma-crystallins in Rana temporaria, Ambystoma mexicanum and Pleurodeles waltlii normal lens development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brahma, S.K.; McDevitt, David S.

    1974-01-01

    Rana pipiens lens γ-crystallin antibodies were used in the indirect immunofluorescence staining method to investigate the role of γ-crystallins in the normal lens development of the amphibians Rana temporaria, Ambystoma mexicanum and Pleurodeles waltlii Michah. In each case, the fluorescence was fir

  18. Ontogeny and localization of gamma-crystallins in Rana temporaria, Ambystoma mexicanum and Pleurodeles waltlii normal lens development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brahma, S.K.; McDevitt, David S.

    1974-01-01

    Rana pipiens lens γ-crystallin antibodies were used in the indirect immunofluorescence staining method to investigate the role of γ-crystallins in the normal lens development of the amphibians Rana temporaria, Ambystoma mexicanum and Pleurodeles waltlii Michah. In each case, the fluorescence was

  19. Implicit Attitudes towards Children with Autism versus Normally Developing Children as Predictors of Professional Burnout and Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Amanda; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Tutors trained in applied behaviour analysis (n = 16) and mainstream school teachers (n = 16) were exposed to an Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) designed to assess implicit attitudes towards individuals with autism versus normally developing individuals. Participants also completed a range of explicit measures, including measures…

  20. A century of Dutch neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, P J; Bruyn, G W; Moffie, D

    1998-12-01

    The Netherlands Society of Neurology evolved from the Society of Psychiatry founded in 1871. The name was changed into Netherlands Society of Psychiatry and Neurology (NSPN) in 1897. In the same year, the word neurology was also added to the name of the journal. The Society steadily blossomed, but in 1909 the first signs of dissatisfaction occurred: the Amsterdam Neurologists Society was founded. A few split-offs would follow. The number of members of the NSPN increased from 205 in 1920 to 585 in 1960. In the early 1960s, the Society was reorganised and would consist of two sections, one for psychiatry and one for neurology. However, this would not last, as a full separation was established in 1974. For several reasons, the name of the journal was changed four times until it assumed its present name in 1974. The 100th volume of CNN was not published, as expected. in 1996, but in 1998, because of two skipped publication years, one during WWII and another in the 1970s. During the last decades of the nineteenth century, teaching of neurology was mostly given within the frame of psychiatry, following the German tradition of 'brainpsychiatry' (organic or biologic psychiatry). The first official chair of psychiatry was founded at Utrecht, 1893 (Winkler). In Amsterdam, private teachers such as Delprat taught 'electro-therapy and nervous diseases' since the 1880s. The first extraordinary chair of neurology and electrotherapy was founded for his successor, Wertheim Salomonson in 1899. The first university clinic for psychiatry and neurology started at the Amsterdam Municipal University, when Winkler became professor of psychiatry and neurology in Amsterdam in 1896. Around the turn of the century, chairs of psychiatry and neurology were also founded in Groningen and Leiden. Separate chairs for neurology and psychiatry appeared in Amsterdam in 1923 and in Utrecht in 1936. Following an initiative of Brouwer, the first neurological university clinic opened its doors in

  1. Cytokine Therapies in Neurological Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodi, Shila; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines are a heterogeneous group of glycoproteins that coordinate physiological functions. Cytokine deregulation is observed in many neurological diseases. This article reviews current research focused on human clinical trials of cytokine and anticytokine therapies in the treatment of several neurological disease including stroke, neuromuscular diseases, neuroinfectious diseases, demyelinating diseases, and neurobehavioral diseases. This research suggests that cytokine therapy applications may play an important role in offering new strategies for disease modulation and treatment. Further, this research provides insights into the causal link between cytokine deregulation and neurological diseases.

  2. Neurological findings of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachner, A. R.; Steere, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    Neurologic involvement of Lyme disease typically consists of meningitis, cranial neuropathy, and radiculoneuritis, alone or in combination, lasting for months. From 1976 to 1983, we studied 38 patients with Lyme meningitis. Headache and mild neck stiffness, which fluctuated in intensity, and lymphocytic pleocytosis were the common findings. Half of the patients also had facial palsies, which were unilateral in 12 and bilateral in seven. In addition, 12 patients had motor and/or sensory radiculoneuropathies; asymmetric weakness of extremities was the most common finding. Although incomplete presentations of neurologic involvement of Lyme disease may be confused with other entities, the typical constellation of neurologic symptoms represents a unique clinical picture. PMID:6516450

  3. Astrocytes: a central element in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekny, Milos; Pekna, Marcela; Messing, Albee; Steinhäuser, Christian; Lee, Jin-Moo; Parpura, Vladimir; Hol, Elly M; Sofroniew, Michael V; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-03-01

    The neurone-centred view of the past disregarded or downplayed the role of astroglia as a primary component in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. As this concept is changing, so is also the perceived role of astrocytes in the healthy and diseased brain and spinal cord. We have started to unravel the different signalling mechanisms that trigger specific molecular, morphological and functional changes in reactive astrocytes that are critical for repairing tissue and maintaining function in CNS pathologies, such as neurotrauma, stroke, or neurodegenerative diseases. An increasing body of evidence shows that the effects of astrogliosis on the neural tissue and its functions are not uniform or stereotypic, but vary in a context-specific manner from astrogliosis being an adaptive beneficial response under some circumstances to a maladaptive and deleterious process in another context. There is a growing support for the concept of astrocytopathies in which the disruption of normal astrocyte functions, astrodegeneration or dysfunctional/maladaptive astrogliosis are the primary cause or the main factor in neurological dysfunction and disease. This review describes the multiple roles of astrocytes in the healthy CNS, discusses the diversity of astroglial responses in neurological disorders and argues that targeting astrocytes may represent an effective therapeutic strategy for Alexander disease, neurotrauma, stroke, epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease as well as other neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Cardiometabolic risks profile of normal weight obese and multi-ethnic women in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Foong Ming; Loh, Debbie Ann

    2015-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of normal weight obesity among multi-ethnic women in Peninsular Malaysia and examine its associations with cardiometabolic risks and lifestyle behaviours. This was a cross-sectional study involving women recruited via multi-stage sampling from six states in Malaysia. Anthropometric and body composition analysis were performed. Normal weight obese (NWO) was defined as normal body mass index for Asians and the highest tertile of % body fat (BF). Biochemical measurements included fasting lipid and blood glucose levels. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed based on the Harmonization criteria. Participants completed self-reported questionnaires that included physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable intake and sleep duration. Body mass index, %BF, cardiometabolic risk factors, lifestyle behaviours. A total of 6854 women were recruited and the prevalence of NWO was 19.8% (95% CI: 17.3-22.5). NWO was more prevalent among the Indians and older women. NWO women had higher odds for abdominal obesity (OR: 2.64, 95% CI: 1.73-4.04), hypertriglyceridemia (2.51, 1.47-4.29) and hypertension (1.63, 1.15-2.31) compared to women with lower % body fat after adjusted for age and ethnicity. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome among NWO women was 5.4% (95% CI: 3.0-9.8). None of the lifestyle behaviours were significantly associated with NWO. Women with NWO had cardiometabolic abnormalities including abdominal obesity, dyslipidaemia and increased blood pressure. Health promotion efforts should include NWO women who may be oblivious of their deleterious health risks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multimodality evoked responses in the neurological assessment of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, E; von Siebenthal, K; Daniëls, H; Guzzetta, F; Casaer, P

    1994-09-01

    In recent years increased attention has been devoted to evoked potentials (EP) in newborns. This paper reviews the literature and data from our research group in an attempt to assess the diagnostic and prognostic value of evoked responses in the first weeks of life and their use in different age-specific clinical conditions. The results show that EP are a very sensitive measure of the integrity of the sensory pathways. They make it possible to follow normal physiological maturation and the abnormalities of development resulting from neurological lesions. Repeated measurements of visual evoked potentials and somatosensorial evoked potential are prognostically useful in term infants, but seem much more limited in preterm newborns in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

  6. Evidence-based guideline update: steroids and antivirals for Bell palsy: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronseth, Gary S; Paduga, Remia

    2012-11-27

    To review evidence published since the 2001 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) practice parameter regarding the effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of steroids and antiviral agents for Bell palsy. We searched Medline and the Cochrane Database of Controlled Clinical Trials for studies published since January 2000 that compared facial functional outcomes in patients with Bell palsy receiving steroids/antivirals with patients not receiving these medications. We graded each study (Class I-IV) using the AAN therapeutic classification of evidence scheme. We compared the proportion of patients recovering facial function in the treated group with the proportion of patients recovering facial function in the control group. Nine studies published since June 2000 on patients with Bell palsy receiving steroids/antiviral agents were identified. Two of these studies were rated Class I because of high methodologic quality. For patients with new-onset Bell palsy, steroids are highly likely to be effective and should be offered to increase the probability of recovery of facial nerve function (2 Class I studies, Level A) (risk difference 12.8%-15%). For patients with new-onset Bell palsy, antiviral agents in combination with steroids do not increase the probability of facial functional recovery by >7%. Because of the possibility of a modest increase in recovery, patients might be offered antivirals (in addition to steroids) (Level C). Patients offered antivirals should be counseled that a benefit from antivirals has not been established, and, if there is a benefit, it is likely that it is modest at best.

  7. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in neurologic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Man Chung; Wan, Chu Wan; Myung, Ho Jin; Choi, Kil Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Chang Beom; Oh, Chang Hyun; Cho, Zang Hee [Koear Advanced Institute of Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-02-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 0.15 Tesla resistive magnet developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science were performed in 27 patients with various neurologic diseases and compared with x-ray computed tomography (CT). The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the image quality, the diagnostic value and limitation, and the optimal pulse sequence of MR imagings with a resistive magnet. The MR images were obtained by using a variety of pulse sequence with spin echo technique including saturation recovery. T2-weighted spin echo, and/or inversion recovery with various pulse repetition (TR) and echo delay (TE) times. The MR imaging demonstrated the capability of detecting the lesions shown on CT in al cases and also detected an additional finding in one case (multiple sclerosis) which was not seen on CT. The MR imaging appeared to be more useful than CT in the evaluation of syringomyelia of spinal cord and white matter disease, while it failed to demonstrated small calcific lesion or inflammatory nodule (less than 1 cm) shown on CT and has shown somewhat poor contrast resolution in the case of meingloma. The spatial resolution of saturation recovery images was similar or superior to CT, whereas the contrast resolution of saturation recovery was inferior to CT. While the saturation recovery images have shown false negative findings in 5 patients (19%), the inversion recovery and T2-weighted spin echo have shown consistently positive findings. The inversive recovery and T2-weighted spin echo images demonstrated better contrast discrimination between normal and pathologic conditions than the saturation recovery images, but somewhat poorer spatial resolution. Authors suggest that the MR images of both the saturation recovery with 300/30 and T2-weighted spin echo with 1000/90 be used as a routine procedure and additional inversion recovery of 1300/300/30 sequence as a option if white matter disease is suspected.

  9. Canadian Paediatric Neurology Workforce Survey and Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif; Orr, Serena L; McMillan, Hugh J; Kirton, Adam; Brna, Paula; Esser, Michael; Tang-Wai, Richard; Major, Philippe; Poulin, Chantal; Prasad, Narayan; Selby, Kathryn; Weiss, Shelly K; Yeh, E Ann; Callen, David Ja

    2016-05-01

    Little knowledge exists on the availability of academic and community paediatric neurology positions. This knowledge is crucial for making workforce decisions. Our study aimed to: 1) obtain information regarding the availability of positions for paediatric neurologists in academic centres; 2) survey paediatric neurology trainees regarding their perceptions of employment issues and career plans; 3) survey practicing community paediatric neurologists 4) convene a group of paediatric neurologists to develop consensus regarding how to address these workforce issues. Surveys addressing workforce issues regarding paediatric neurology in Canada were sent to: 1) all paediatric neurology program directors in Canada (n=9) who then solicited information from division heads and from paediatric neurologists in surrounding areas; 2) paediatric neurology trainees in Canada (n=57) and; 3) community paediatric neurologists (n=27). A meeting was held with relevant stakeholders to develop a consensus on how to approach employment issues. The response rate was 100% from program directors, 57.9% from residents and 44% from community paediatric neurologists. We found that the number of projected positions in academic paediatric neurology is fewer than the number of paediatric neurologists that are being trained over the next five to ten years, despite a clinical need for paediatric neurologists. Paediatric neurology residents are concerned about job availability and desire more career counselling. There is a current and projected clinical demand for paediatric neurologists despite a lack of academic positions. Training programs should focus on community neurology as a viable career option.

  10. Development of the Parent Form of the Preschool Children's Communication Skills Scale and Comparison of the Communication Skills of Children with Normal Development and with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Aydan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at developing an assessment scale for identifying preschool children's communication skills, at distinguishing children with communication deficiencies and at comparing the communication skills of children with normal development (ND) and those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants were 427 children of up to 6 years of…

  11. Neurological complications following bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It was to report on Brazilian cases of neurological complications from bariatric surgery. The literature on the subject is scarce. METHOD: Cases attended by neurologists in eight different Brazilian cities were collected and described in the present study. RESULTS: Twenty-six cases were collected in this study. Axonal polyneuropathy was the most frequent neurological complication, but cases of central demyelination, Wernicke syndrome, optical neuritis, radiculits, meralgia paresthetica and compressive neuropathies were also identified. Twenty-one patients (80% had partial or no recovery from the neurological signs and symptoms. CONCLUSION: Bariatric surgery, a procedure that is continuously increasing in popularity, is not free of potential neurological complications that should be clearly presented to the individual undergoing this type of surgery. Although a clear cause-effect relation cannot be established for the present cases, the cumulative literature on the subject makes it important to warn the patient of the potential risks of this procedure.

  12. Neurologic Complications of Smallpox Vaccination

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Smallpox and smallpox vaccination is reviewed from the Departments of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, and University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque.

  13. Medical Marijuana in Certain Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treating certain neurological disorders. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the world’s largest association of neurologists ... the table that follows. ©2014 American Academy of Neurology AAN.com Symptoms of MS The studies showed ...

  14. Comparison of Changes in Body Composition during Puberty Development of Obese and Normal-weight Children in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUN MA; NING FENG; SHI-WEI ZHANG; YONG-PING PAN; YONG-BO HUANG

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the changes in body composition, including fat mass index (FMI) and fat free mass index (FFMI) during puberty development of obese and normal-weight children in China, and to explore the effect of age and gender on body composition. Methods A total of 356 children at the age of 7-15 years were enrolled in this study. Body composition of 10 normal-weight and obese children in each age group was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). FFMI and FMI were calculated according to the following formula: FFMI (kg·mT~(-2))= FFM(kg) / height~2 (m~2) and FMI (kg· m~2)= FM (kg) / height~2 (m~2). Results The fat mass and fat free mass of obese children were significantly higher than those of normal-weight children (P<0.05). The FMI and FFMI of obese children increased significantly with age and were higher than those of the same sex, gender, and age normal-weight children (P<0.05). Conclusion The levels of fat mass, fat free mass, FMI, and FFMI are different in obese and normal-weight children, and gender effects are significant in boys having higher levels of these indicators than in girls. FFMI and FMI can be used as monitoring indexes in weight control of obese children.

  15. Development and validation of the Chinese version of the Reintegration to Normal Living Index for use with stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Marco Y C; Lau, Ricky W K; Yeung, Paul K C; Liao, Lin-Rong; Chung, Raymond C K

    2011-02-01

    To develop and validate a Chinese version of the Reintegration to Normal Living Index. Descriptive case-series. Seventy-five individuals with chronic stroke and 55 age-matched healthy subjects. The English version of the Reintegration to Normal Living Index was translated into Chinese using standardized procedures, and then administered to both the stroke and control groups. The same instrument was administered again to the stroke subjects 1-2 weeks later. The Chinese version of the Reintegration to Normal Living Index had good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.92) and test-retest reliability (intraclass coefficient = 0.87). The minimal detectable difference of the Index score was 14.8 (out of 100). Convergent validity of the Index was demonstrated by its significant association with Frenchay Activities Index (r = 0.439, p Reintegration to Normal Living Index score was significantly lower in the stroke group than in controls (p Reintegration to Normal Living Index is a reliable and valid tool for assessing satisfaction with community reintegration among Chinese people with chronic stroke.

  16. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

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    Shrikant Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C. during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation′s first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835, Calcutta (1835 and Mumbai (1848. Prior to India′s independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI. Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN. Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930′s. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951 include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991. The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in

  17. Chapter 40: history of neurology in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarac, François; Boller, François

    2010-01-01

    The history of neurology in France is characterized by the very high degree of centralization in that country where "everything seems to happen in Paris," and yet the considerable degree of autonomous diversity in the evolution of some other medical schools such as Montpellier and Strasbourg. It could be argued that France saw the birth of clinical neurology as a separate discipline since Jean Martin Charcot at the Salpêtrière Hospital obtained a chair of diseases of the nervous system in 1892, a first in the history of the academic world. The chapter shows, however, that the work of Charcot was preceded by a long evolution in medical thinking, which culminated with the introduction of experimental medicine developed by Claude Bernard and François Magendie, and by the study of aphasia by Paul Broca and its localization of language in a specific area of the brain. Many of the great neurologists of France like Duchenne de Boulogne, Gilles de la Tourette, Joseph Babinski and Pierre Marie gravitated around Charcot while others like Charles-Edward Brown-Sequard and Jules Dejerine developed their talents independently. The history of Sainte-Anne Hospital further illustrates this independence. It also shows the relation between neurology and psychiatry with Henri Ey, Jean Delay and Pierre Deniker, who collaborated with Henri Laborit in the clinical development of chlorpromazine. Sainte Anne also saw the birth of modern neuropsychology with Henry Hécaen. Jean Talairach and his group developed human stereotaxic neurosurgery and a 3-dimensional brain atlas that is used around the world. The chapter also mentions institutions (the CNRS and INSERM) that have contributed to developments partially independently from medical schools. It concludes with a presentation of schools located outside of Paris that have played a significant role in the development of neurology. Six of the most important ones are described: Montpellier, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Strasbourg, Lyon, and

  18. Hippocrates: the forefather of neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenfeld, T; Jurasic, M J; Breitenfeld, D

    2014-09-01

    Hippocrates is one of the most influential medical doctors of all times. He started observing and experimenting in times of mysticism and magic. He carried a holistic and humanitarian approach to the patient with examination as the principal approach-inspection, palpation and auscultation are still the most important tools in diagnosing algorithms of today. He had immense experience with the human body most likely due to numerous wound treatments he had performed; some even believe he performed autopsies despite the negative trend at the time. Hippocrates identified the brain as the analyst of the outside world, the interpreter of consciousness and the center of intelligence and willpower. Interestingly, Hippocrates was aware of many valid concepts in neurology; his treatise On the Sacred Disease was the most important for understanding neurology and epilepsy. His other ideas pioneered modern day neurology mentioning neurological diseases like apoplexy, spondylitis, hemiplegia, and paraplegia. Today, 10 % of neurological Pubmed and 7 % of neuroscience Scopus reviews mention Corpus Hippocraticum as one of the sources. Therefore, Hippocrates may be considered as the forefather of neurology.

  19. Neurologic complications after heart transplantation

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    Malheiros Suzana M.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Neurologic complications are known as important cause of morbidity and mortality in orthotopic heart transplantation. Our aim was to identify the frequency and outcome of neurologic complications after heart transplantation in a prospective observational study. METHOD: From September 93 to September 99, as part of our routine heart transplantation protocol all patients with end-stage cardiac failure were evaluated by the same neurologist before and at the time of any neurologic event (symptom or complaint after transplantation. RESULTS: Out of 120 candidates evaluated, 62 were successfully transplanted (53 male; median age 45.5 years, median follow-up 26.8 months. Fifteen patients (24% had ischemic, 22 (35% idiopathic, 24 (39% Chagas' disease and 1 (2% had congenital cardiomyopathy. Neurologic complications occurred in 19 patients (31%: tremor, severe headache, transient encephalopathy and seizures related to drug toxicity or metabolic changes in 13; peripheral neuropathy in 4; and spinal cord compression in two (metastatic prostate cancer and epidural abscess. No symptomatic postoperative stroke was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Although frequent, neurologic complications were seldom related to persistent neurologic disability or death. Most of the complications resulted from immunosuppression, however, CNS infection was rare. The absence of symptomatic stroke in our series may be related to the lower frequency of ischemic cardiomyopathy.

  20. Personality traits and personality disorders in older women: an explorative study between normal development and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques-Calado, Joana; Duarte-Silva, Maria Eugénia; Keong, Ana Marta; Sacoto, Carlota; Junqueira, Diana

    2014-01-01

    The relationships between Axis II personality disorders (DSM-IV) and the Five-Factor Model (FFM) were explored in older women. The sample consists of 90 participants (M = 72.29 years, SD = 7.10) who were administered the NEO-Five-Factor Inventory and the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire. The highest prevalence of A and C clusters and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder was observed. Also, elevated neuroticism and decreased agreeableness and openness appear as valuable traits in the description of psychopathology. The study of maladaptive personality functioning within an aging population can be described with the same traits that underlie normal personality functioning, extending the range of psychopathology to a dimensional approach.

  1. A comparative study of monocot and dicot root development in normal /earth/ and hypogravity /space/ environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, R. D.; Galston, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    The anatomy and fine structure of roots from oat and mung bean seedlings grown under hypogravity conditions aboard NASA's Space Shuttle were examined and compared to those of roots from ground control plants grown under similar conditions. Oat roots from both sets of plants exhibited normal tissue organization and ultrastructural features, with the exception of cortex cell mitochondria, which characteristically showed a 'swollen' morphology. Flight-grown mung bean roots differed significantly from the controls in that root cap cells were somewhat disorganized and degraded in appearance, especially at the cap periphery. At the EM level, these cells exhibited a loss organelle integrity and a condensed cytoplasm. The potential significance of this finding for the putative gravity-sensing cap cells were noted.

  2. Neurological Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Celiac Disease: A Comprehensive Review

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    Shahriar Nikpour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity may initially present asone or more neurological signs and/or symptoms. On the other hand, it may be associated with or complicated by neurological manifestations. Neurological presentations are rare in children but as many as 36% of adult patients present with neurological changes. With severe malnutrition after progression of celiac disease, different vitamin deficiencies may develop. Such problems can in turn overlap with previous neurological abnormalities including ataxia,epilepsy, neuropathy, dementia, and cognitive disorders. Inthis study, we aimed to review the neurological aspects of celiac disease. Early diagnosis and treatment could prevent related disability in patients with celiac disease.

  3. Insomnia in central neurologic diseases--occurrence and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Geert; Jennum, Poul; Riemann, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this review is to highlight the impact of insomnia in central neurological disorders by providing information on its prevalence and give recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. Insomnia in neurological disorders is a frequent, but underestimated symptom. Its occurrence may...... the cause of insomnia must be clearly identified. First line treatment aims at the underlying neurologic disease. The few high quality treatment studies show that short term treatment with hypnotics may be recommended in most disorders after having ruled out high risk for adverse effects. Sedating...... associated with most of the central neurological diseases. The prevalence and treatment of insomnia in neurological diseases still need to be studied in larger patient groups with randomized clinical trials to a) better understand their impact and causal relationship and b) to develop and improve specific...

  4. Neurology check list. 5. rev. and enl. ed.; Checkliste Neurologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grehl, Holger [Evangelisches und Johanniter Klinikum, Duisburg (Germany). Neurologische Klinik; Reinhardt, Frank

    2013-02-01

    The neurology check list covers the following issues, organized in four parts: Grey part - diagnostic fundamentals, therapeutic principles: clinical neurological examination, liquor puncture, specific laboratory diagnostics, neurophysical diagnostics, imaging techniques, therapeutic principles, legal aspects, neurological assessment. Green Part - leading syndromes and leading symptoms. Blue part - neurological disease appearance: pains in head and face, pain syndrome, congenital and development disturbances, liquor circulation disturbances, ZNS hemorrhages, tumors and neoplasm, paraneoplastic syndromes, inflammatory diseases of the nervous system, dementia diseases, metabolic and other encephalopathy, cerebellum diseases and system surmounting processes, movement degeneration, basal ganglion diseases, epilepsy, non-epileptic attacks, medulla diseases, brain nerve diseases, plexus lesions, radicular lesions, peripheric neuropathy, neuromuscular transfer disturbances, muscular diseases. Red part: neurological intensive medicine.

  5. Gene Editing for Treatment of Neurological Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Martyn K; Kaminski, Rafal; Wollebo, Hassen; Hu, Wenhui; Malcolm, Thomas; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-07-01

    The study of neurological infections by viruses defines the field of neurovirology, which has emerged in the last 30 years and was founded upon the discovery of a number of viruses capable of infecting the human nervous system. Studies have focused on the molecular and biological basis of viral neurological diseases with the aim of revealing new therapeutic options. The first studies of neurovirological infections can be traced back to the discovery that some viruses have an affinity for the nervous system with research into rabies by Louis Pasteur and others in the 1880s. Today, the immense public health impact of neurovirological infections is illustrated by diseases such as neuroAIDS, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and viral encephalitis. Recent research has seen the development of powerful new techniques for gene editing that promise revolutionary opportunities for the development of novel therapeutic options. In particular, clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeat-associated 9 system provides an effective, highly specific and versatile tool for targeting DNA viruses that are beginning to allow the development of such new approaches. In this short review, we discuss these recent developments, how they pertain to neurological infections, and future prospects.

  6. PYRITINOL USAGE IN PEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY

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    N. N. Zavadenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of developmental disorders, correction of learning disabilities and behavioral problems in children should be prompt, complex and include pharmacotherapy with nootropic agents. The results of recent studies shown in this review proved effectiveness of pharmacotherapy with pyritinol in children with perinatal injury of central nervous system and its consequences, psychomotor and speech development delay, dyslexia, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, cognitive disorders and learning disabilities (including manifestations of epilepsy, chronic tic disorders and Tourette syndrome. Due to its ability to optimize metabolic processes in central nervous system, pyritinol is used in treatment of vegetative dysfunction in children and adolescents, especially associated with asthenical manifestations, as well as in complex therapy of exertion headache and migraine. The drug is effective in treatment of cognitive disorders in children and adolescents with epilepsy, pyritinol was administered without changing of the basic anticonvulsive therapy and no deterioration (increase of severity of seizures or intensity of epileptiform activity on electroencephalogramms was observed. Significant nootropic effect of pyritinol, including neurometabolic, neuroprotective, neurodynamic and other mechanisms, in association with safety and rare side effects of this drug determines its wide usage in pediatric neurology.

  7. Neurology of acute organophosphate poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gagandeep

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute organophosphate (OP poisoning is one of the most common poisonings in emergency medicine and toxicological practice in some of the less-developed nations in South Asia. Traditionally, OP poisoning comes under the domain of emergency physicians, internists, intensivists, and toxicologists. However, some of the complications following OP poisoning are neurological and involve neurologists. The pathophysiological basis for the clinical manifestations of OP poisoning is inactivation of the enzyme, acetylcholinesterase at the peripheral nicotinic and muscarinic and central nervous system (CNS nerve terminals and junctions. Nicotinic manifestations occur in severe cases and late in the course; these comprise of fasciculations and neuromuscular paralysis. There is a good correlation between the electrophysiological abnormalities and the severity of the clinical manifestations. Neurophysiological abnormalities characteristic of nicotinic junctions (mainly neuromuscular junction dysfunction include: (1 single, supramaximal electrical-stimulus-induced repetitive response/s, (2 decrement-increment response to high frequency (30 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS, and (3 decremental response to high frequency (30 Hz RNS. Atropine ameliorates muscarinic manifestations. Therapeutic agents that can ameliorate nicotinic manifestations, mainly neuromuscular, are oximes. However, the evidence for this effect is inconclusive. This may be due to the fact that there are several factors that determine the therapeutic effect of oximes. These factors include: The OP compound responsible for poisoning, duration of poisoning, severity of poisoning, and route of exposure. There is also a need to study the effect of oximes on the neurophysiological abnormalities.

  8. Interpersonal Relatedness and Self-Definition in Normal and Disrupted Personality Development: Retrospect and Prospect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyten, Patrick; Blatt, Sidney J.

    2013-01-01

    Two-polarities models of personality propose that personality development evolves through a dialectic synergistic interaction between two fundamental developmental psychological processes across the life span--the development of interpersonal relatedness on the one hand and of self-definition on the other. This article offers a broad review of…

  9. 槲皮素对肥胖母鼠后代生长发育的影响%Effect of Quercetin on Physiological and Neurological Development of Obese Female Rat Offspring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵佳夕; 赵洁; 董文红; 徐琳琳; 桑田; 许雅君

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究孕、哺乳期给予槲皮素对肥胖母鼠后代生理和神经发育的影响。方法:建立营养性肥胖雌性SD大鼠模型,交配受孕,随机分成5组,每组16只孕鼠,整个实验期进食高脂饲料,并分别以0、50、100、200mg/kg剂量的槲皮素灌胃;以16只正常体质量孕鼠作为空白对照,整个实验期喂食基础饲料并以溶剂灌胃。记录仔鼠出生体质量,并观察主要生理和神经发育指标。结果:高脂对照组后代出生体质量显著高于空白对照组,随槲皮素干预剂量增大,出生体质量逐渐降低,接近空白对照水平。该作用持续到断乳。生理发育:高脂对照组雄性仔鼠睾丸下降迟于空白对照组,槲皮素能在一定程度上逆转此影响,200mg/kg效果最显著;神经发育:200mg/kg组的平面翻正、悬崖回避反射达标时间明显早于空白对照组和高脂对照组。结论:肥胖孕鼠后代出生体质量显著增加,而孕期槲皮素干预可有效逆转新生仔鼠体质量,控制其哺乳期体质量过快增长。一定剂量的槲皮素能够有效逆转孕期肥胖造成的雄性后代睾丸下降延迟,并能够促进后代特定神经反射的形成。%Purpose: To study the effect of quercetin given during pregnancy and lactation periods of obese rats on physiological and neurological development of the offspring.Methods: Nutritional obese rats were mated,and the pregnant rats were randomly divided into 5 groups of 16 rats each.Fed high fat diet during pregnancy and lactation,obese pregnant rats were administered with quercetin at the dosed of 0,50,100,200 mg/kg by intragastric route throughout pregnancy and lactation.As a negative control group,16 pregnant SD rats of normal weight were fed basic diet throughout the experimental period.The birth weight and main indicators of physiological and neurological development of the offspring were observed.Results: The verage offspring birth weight of the high

  10. Definition and Research of Internet Neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Feng(Central China Normal University, Wuhan, 430079, People's Republic of China)

    2015-01-01

    More and more scientific research shows that there is a close correlation between the Internet and brain science. This paper presents the idea of establishing the Internet neurology, which means to make a cross-contrast between the two in terms of physiology and psychology, so that a complete infrastructure system of the Internet is established, predicting the development trend of the Internet in the future as well as the brain structure and operation mechanism, and providing theoretical supp...

  11. [COMPARISON OF PSYCHOMOTOR DEVELOPMENT IN PRESCHOOL CHILEAN NORMAL WEIGHT VERSUS OVERWEIGHT/OBESITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez Ruíz, Mariela; Estay Carvajal, Jessica; Calzadilla Nuñez, Aracelis; Durán Agüero, Samuel; Díaz-Narváez, Víctor Patricio

    2015-07-01

    Objetivo: comparar cómo se distribuye el Desarrollo Psicomotor (DSM) en tres estados nutricionales: normal, sobrepeso y obeso. Material y métodos: se aplicó el Test de DSM “TEPSI” a 58 niños (muestra intencionada) de un total de 150, de 4 a 4,5 años, los cuales se dividieron en 3 grupos: normopeso (n = 28); sobrepeso (n = 18) y obeso (n = 12). El peso y la talla se midieron utilizando una balanza SECA y un cartabón de pared (metodología de Frankfurt). La evaluación nutricional se realizó por IMC/edad según la propuesta del Center for Disease Control de Estados Unidos (CDC). Las comparaciones se realizaron mediante un análisis de varianza, prueba Tukey y prueba de Kruskal- Wallis. Se emplearon gráficos de cajas. El nivel de significación empleado fue de ≤ 0,05 en todos los casos. Resultados: los preescolares con obesidad y sobrepeso estudiados mostraron un perfil motriz clasificado como inferior y muy inferior, respectivamente, cuando eran comparados con el grupo de preescolares normopeso. Conclusiones: el sobrepeso/obesidad es un factor que influye en el desarrollo de la psicomotricidad de forma negativa en preescolares de 4 años de edad.

  12. Normal Development of Sutures and synchondroses in the central skull base : CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Hong Gee; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kang, Jee Hee; Lee, Kyung Hee; Lim, Myung Kwan; Cho, Young Kuk; Ok, Cheol Su; Suh, Chang Hae [College of Medicine, Inha University, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-02-01

    To evaluate the developmental patterns of the sutures and synchondroses in the central skull base. We evaluated the CT scans of 109 children (age range 29 days to 15 years) with no skull base abnormality who had undergone axial CT of the skull base with 1-mm collimation. Using a five-tier scheme, we analyzed the developmental patterns of the 18 sutures and synchondroses related to the sphenoid and occipital bones. Fusion of the sutures and synchondroses related to the sphenoid bone progressed rapidly during the first two years. Thereafter, changes in the sphenoid bone were dominated by pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus. Fusion of the synchondroses within the sphenoid body, including intersphenoidal, intrapresphenoidal, intrapostsphenoidal synchondrosis occurred early and in most cases was graded {>=}3D4. Fusion of the sphenosquamosal, sphenoethmoidal, and frontosphenoidal sutures was delayed, and residual sclerosis was a common finding. Except for Kerckring-supraoccipital synchondrosis, fusion of the six sutures and synchondroses related to the occipital bone occurred more gradually than that of those related to the sphenoid bone. Among these, fusion of the occipitomastoidal suture and petro-occipital synchondrosis was the last to occur. A knowledge of the developmental patterns of sutures and synchondroses can help differentiate normal conditions from those such as fracture, osseous dysplasia, or congenital malformation, which are abnormal. Our results provide certain basic information about skull base maturity in children. (author)

  13. High-normal levels of hs-CRP predict the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver in healthy men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Yoon, Kijung; Ryu, Seungho; Chang, Yoosoo; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul

    2017-01-01

    We performed a follow-up study to address whether high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels within the normal range can predict the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in healthy male subjects. Among15347 male workers between 30 and 59 years old who received annual health check-ups in 2002, a NAFLD-free cohort of 4,138 was followed through December 2009. Alcohol consumption was assessed with a questionnaire. At each visit, abdominal ultrasonography was performed to identify fatty liver disease. The COX proportional hazard model was used to evaluate the relationship between hs-CRP and incident NAFLD. During the follow-up period, 28.8% (1191 of 4138) of participants developed NAFLD. The hazard ratios of NAFLD were increased by hs-CRP categories within the normal range in the non-adjusted model and age-adjusted model. After adjusting for age, exercise, smoking, BMI, systolic BP, triglyceride, and fasting glucose, these incidences were only increased between the lowest and the highest hs-CRP categories. The risk for NAFLD increased as the hs-CRP level increased (p< 0.001). As the hs-CRP level increased within the healthy cohort, the risk of developing NAFLD increased. This trend remained true even if the hs-CRP level remained within the normal range. hs-CRP can be used as a predictor of NAFLD, as well as other obesity-associated diseases. Therefore, individuals with higher hs-CRP levels (even within the normal range) may require appropriate follow-up and management to prevent NAFLD development. PMID:28234943

  14. High-normal levels of hs-CRP predict the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Yoon, Kijung; Ryu, Seungho; Chang, Yoosoo; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul

    2017-01-01

    We performed a follow-up study to address whether high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels within the normal range can predict the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in healthy male subjects. Among15347 male workers between 30 and 59 years old who received annual health check-ups in 2002, a NAFLD-free cohort of 4,138 was followed through December 2009. Alcohol consumption was assessed with a questionnaire. At each visit, abdominal ultrasonography was performed to identify fatty liver disease. The COX proportional hazard model was used to evaluate the relationship between hs-CRP and incident NAFLD. During the follow-up period, 28.8% (1191 of 4138) of participants developed NAFLD. The hazard ratios of NAFLD were increased by hs-CRP categories within the normal range in the non-adjusted model and age-adjusted model. After adjusting for age, exercise, smoking, BMI, systolic BP, triglyceride, and fasting glucose, these incidences were only increased between the lowest and the highest hs-CRP categories. The risk for NAFLD increased as the hs-CRP level increased (phs-CRP level increased within the healthy cohort, the risk of developing NAFLD increased. This trend remained true even if the hs-CRP level remained within the normal range. hs-CRP can be used as a predictor of NAFLD, as well as other obesity-associated diseases. Therefore, individuals with higher hs-CRP levels (even within the normal range) may require appropriate follow-up and management to prevent NAFLD development.

  15. Signaling Proteins and Transcription Factors in Normal and Malignant Early B Cell Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Pérez-Vera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available B cell development starts in bone marrow with the commitment of hematopoietic progenitors to the B cell lineage. In murine models, the IL-7 and preBCR receptors, and the signaling pathways and transcription factors that they regulate, control commitment and maintenance along the B cell pathway. E2A, EBF1, PAX5, and Ikaros are among the most important transcription factors controlling early development and thereby conditioning mice homeostatic B cell lymphopoiesis. Importantly, their gain or loss of function often results in malignant development in humans, supporting conserved roles for these transcription factors. B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of pediatric cancer, and it is characterized by unpaired early B cell development resulting from genetic lesions in these critical signaling pathways and transcription factors. Fine mapping of these genetic abnormalities is allowing more specific treatments, more accurately predicting risk profiles for this disease, and improving survival rates.

  16. Pmch expression during early development is critical for normal energy homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, J.D.; Yi, C.X.; van den Berg, S.A.; Ruiter, M.; Toonen, P.W.; van der Elst, M.; Voshol, P.J.; Ellenbroek, B.A.; Kalsbeek, A.; la Fleur, S.E.; Cuppen, E.

    2009-01-01

    Postnatal development and puberty are times of strong physical maturation and require large quantities of energy. The hypothalamic neuropeptide Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH) regulates nutrient intake and energy homeostasis, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Here we

  17. Structural and functional MRI of normal and compromised rat brain development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marel, K. van der

    2013-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric illness constitutes a major disease burden worldwide, yet its neurobiological substrates remain elusive. It is increasingly believed that early disturbances during critical and sensitive periods of brain development contribute to a delayed manifestation of psychiatric disease. This

  18. The Brazilian Neurology centenary (1912-2012 and the common origin of the fields of Neurology and Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleide da Mota Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is reported the Brazilian Neurology birth (1912, that has as the hallmark its first Neurology Cathedra of Rio de Janeiro, and the links between Neurology and Psychiatry, besides the main medical protagonists at that time in Rio de Janeiro: João Carlos Teixeira Brandão (1854-1921, first professor of the cathedra of Clinical Psychiatry and Nervous Diseases (1883-1921; Juliano Moreira (1873-1933, the founder of the Brazilian scientific Psychiatry and director of the Hospício Nacional de Alienados (National Hospice for the Insane (1903-1930; Antônio Austregésilo Rodrigues de Lima (1876-1960, first professor of the cathedra of Neurology, considered the father of the Brazilian Neurology. Aloysio de Castro (1881-1959 was a great Brazilian neurosemiologist at that time. Austregésilo practiced both disciplines, Neurology and Psychiatry, and like Jean-Martin-Charcot, he was very interested in a typically psychiatric disorder, the hysteria. It is also considered in this paper the first Brazilian authors of Neurology and/or Psychiatric texts and the places where Neurology was initially developed by the main founders: Hospício Nacional de Alienados, Santa Casa de Misericórdia do Rio de Janeiro and Policlínica Geral do Rio de Janeiro.

  19. Interpersonal relatedness and self-definition in normal and disrupted personality development: retrospect and prospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyten, Patrick; Blatt, Sidney J

    2013-04-01

    Two-polarities models of personality propose that personality development evolves through a dialectic synergistic interaction between two fundamental developmental psychological processes across the life span-the development of interpersonal relatedness on the one hand and of self-definition on the other. This article offers a broad review of extant research concerning these models, discusses their implications for psychology and psychiatry, and addresses future research perspectives deriving from these models. We first consider the implications of findings in this area for clinical research and practice. This is followed by a discussion of emerging research findings concerning the role of developmental, cross-cultural, evolutionary, and neurobiological factors influencing the development of these two fundamental personality dimensions. Taken together, this body of research suggests that theoretical formulations that focus on interpersonal relatedness and self-definition as central coordinates in personality development and psychopathology provide a comprehensive conceptual paradigm for future research in psychology and psychiatry exploring the interactions among neurobiological, psychological, and sociocultural factors in adaptive and disrupted personality development across the life span.

  20. Using mouse models to understand normal and abnormal urogenital tract development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    Removal of toxic substances from the blood depends on patent connections between the kidneys, ureters and bladder that are established when the ureter is transposed from its original insertion site in the Wolffian duct, to the bladder, its final insertion site. The Ureteral Bud Theory of Mackie and Stephens suggests that repositioning of the ureter orifice occurs as the trigone forms from the common nephric duct (CND), the caudal-most Wolffian duct segment. According to this model, insertion of the CND into the bladder and its expansion into the trigone both repositions the ureter in the bladder and enables it to separate from the Wolffian duct. The availability of new mouse models has enabled to re-examine this hypothesis using morphological analysis and lineage studies to follow the fate of the ureter and CND during the maturation process. We find that in contrast to what has been previously thought, the CND does not differentiate into the trigone but instead, undergoes apoptosis, a step that enables the ureter to separate from the Wolffian duct. Apoptosis occurs as the CND and ureter merge with the urogenital sinus positioning the ureter orifice at a site close to the Wolffian duct. Finally, expansion of the bladder moves the ureter orifice which is now fused with epithelium to its final position which is at the bladder neck. Interestingly, CND apoptosis appears to depend on close proximity to the bladder, suggesting that the bladder may be a source of signals that induce cell death. Together, these studies provide new insights into the normal process of ureter maturation, and shed light on possible causes of obstruction and reflux, ureteral abnormalities that affect 1-2% of the human population.

  1. Use of the interRAI CHESS scale to predict mortality among persons with neurological conditions in three care settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Hirdes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Persons with certain neurological conditions have higher mortality rates than the population without neurological conditions, but the risk factors for increased mortality within diagnostic groups are less well understood. The interRAI CHESS scale has been shown to be a strong predictor of mortality in the overall population of persons receiving health care in community and institutional settings. This study examines the performance of CHESS as a predictor of mortality among persons with 11 different neurological conditions. METHODS: Survival analyses were done with interRAI assessments linked to mortality data among persons in home care (n = 359,940, complex continuing care hospitals/units (n = 88,721, and nursing homes (n = 185,309 in seven Canadian provinces/territories. RESULTS: CHESS was a significant predictor of mortality in all 3 care settings for the 11 neurological diagnostic groups considered after adjusting for age and sex. The distribution of CHESS scores varied between diagnostic groups and within diagnostic groups in different care settings. CONCLUSIONS: CHESS is a valid predictor of mortality in neurological populations in community and institutional care. It may prove useful for several clinical, administrative, policy-development, evaluation and research purposes. Because it is routinely gathered as part of normal clinical practice in jurisdictions (like Canada that have implemented interRAI assessment instruments, CHESS can be derived without additional need for data collection.

  2. Clinical problems in neurodevelopmental diagnosis: a 7-year neurological and psychological follow-up study of low risk preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedrizzi, E; Zuccarino, M L; Vizziello, P

    1986-04-01

    24 selected urban middle class low risk preterm infants and 10 full term infants have been followed up to the age of 7 years in a prospective neurodevelopmental study. The aim was to find out whether the neurological and behavioral peculiarities of the preterm infant fall within the range of variability of sign and function development or whether they are the clinical features of minor neurological dysfunction. The infants were assessed neurologically according to Amiel-Tison at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of corrected age and by Touwen's examination for minor neurological dysfunction at 3, 5 and 7 years. They were assessed psychologically at 6, 9, 12 and 36 months on Griffiths' Developmental Scale and at 7 years on the Wechsler Bellevue Scale. 33% of the sample was lost to follow-up. The outcome of neurological assessment was as follows: no major sequelae such as cerebral palsy or mental deficiency; 50% had transient neurological anomalies (TNA) during the first year of life, lasting more than 6 months in 16.7%; no minor neurological dysfunctions were detected at 5 and 7 years but the non optimal signs scores were higher in infants of low gestational age. The scores on the Griffiths scale were poorer in the preterm infants between 6 months and 5 years of corrected age, especially in the performance and hearing-speech areas. Performance failures seemed to be related to the duration and type of TNA in the first year of life. General, verbal and performance quotients on the WISC at 7 years were normal and there were no learning or behavior problems. The mild TNA found in low risk preterm infants in the first year of life appear to be of no predictive value for school age problems.

  3. Neurological Manifestations of Takayasu Arteritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-xin Zhou; Jun Ni; Shan Gao; Bin Peng; Li-ying Cui

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical neurological manifestations of Takayasu arteritis (TA).Methods A retrospective study was conducted with 63 consecutive TA cases admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January 2009 to May 2010.All the patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of TA by the American College of Rheumatology.Among the 63 TA patients,27 with neurological manifestations were included in the present study.All the patients were evaluated using standardized neurological examination,sonography,computed tomography (CT) angiography,and cerebral CT or magnetic resonance imaging.Results Dizziness and visual disturbance were the most common symptoms,which occurred in 20 (74.1%) and 16 (59.3%) patients respectively.Another common symptom was headache,observed in 15 (55.6%) patients.Six (22.2%) patients had suffered from ischemic stroke; 7 (25.9%) patients had epileptic seizures.Two (7.4%) patients were diagnosed as reversible posterior encephalopathy syndrome (RPES) based on typical clinical and imaging manifestations.Conclusions Neurological manifestations are common symptoms in TA patients in the chronic phase,including dizziness,visual disturbance,headache,ischemic stroke,seizures,and some unusual ones such as RPES.We suggested RPES be included into the differential diagnosis of acute neurological changes in TA.

  4. A new Approach to the Study of Russian Language Acquisition in Preschool Children with Normal and Abnormal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebedeva T.V

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the possibilities of using a standardized method of psychological evaluation of the Russian language development in preschool children. We provide a rationale for the relevance of timely differentiation of children with language and speech difficulties in modern educational practice. We present the results of comparative analysis of language and speech development in the two groups of children 5-6 years old: normally developing (N=92 and with language and speech disorders (N=59. We describe the diagnostic potential of this research tool for clinical sample of children with speech and language disorders, reveal differences in the development of Russian language between the two groups of children. The data obtained can be used in solving the problems of differentiated correctional help to pre-school children with impaired language and speech development.

  5. Adenomatous polyposis coli is required for early events in the normal growth and differentiation of the developing cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price David J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc is a large multifunctional protein known to be important for Wnt/β-catenin signalling, cytoskeletal dynamics, and cell polarity. In the developing cerebral cortex, Apc is expressed in proliferating cells and its expression increases as cells migrate to the cortical plate. We examined the consequences of loss of Apc function for the early development of the cerebral cortex. Results We used Emx1Cre to inactivate Apc specifically in proliferating cerebral cortical cells and their descendents starting from embryonic day 9.5. We observed reduction in the size of the mutant cerebral cortex, disruption to its organisation, and changes in the molecular identity of its cells. Loss of Apc leads to a decrease in the size of the proliferative pool, disrupted interkinetic nuclear migration, and increased apoptosis. β-Catenin, pericentrin, and N-cadherin proteins no longer adopt their normal high concentration at the apical surface of the cerebral cortical ventricular zone, indicating that cell polarity is disrupted. Consistent with enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signalling resulting from loss of Apc we found increased levels of TCF/LEF-dependent transcription and expression of endogenous Wnt/β-catenin target genes (Axin2 (conductin, Lef1, and c-myc in the mutant cerebral cortex. In the Apc mutant cerebral cortex the expression of transcription factors Foxg1, Pax6, Tbr1, and Tbr2 is drastically reduced compared to normal and many cells ectopically express Pax3, Wnt1, and Wt1 (but not Wnt2b, Wnt8b, Ptc, Gli1, Mash1, Olig2, or Islet1. This indicates that loss of Apc function causes cerebral cortical cells to lose their normal identity and redirect to fates normally found in more posterior-dorsal regions of the central nervous system. Conclusion Apc is required for multiple aspects of early cerebral cortical development, including the regulation of cell number, interkinetic nuclear migration, cell polarity, and

  6. Development of School-Aged Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Normally Hearing Students' Written Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Downey, Doris M.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of the written language of students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing addressed, among other topics, level of reading skills, development of language skills after age 12, and evidence of a critical age for language learning. Data collection methods, research outcomes, and an overview of other articles in the theme issue are discussed. (CR)

  7. Cerebral Cortex Expression of Gli3 Is Required for Normal Development of the Lateral Olfactory Tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni-Maria Amaniti

    Full Text Available Formation of the lateral olfactory tract (LOT and innervation of the piriform cortex represent fundamental steps to allow the transmission of olfactory information to the cerebral cortex. Several transcription factors, including the zinc finger transcription factor Gli3, influence LOT formation by controlling the development of mitral cells from which LOT axons emanate and/or by specifying the environment through which these axons navigate. Gli3 null and hypomorphic mutants display severe defects throughout the territory covered by the developing lateral olfactory tract, making it difficult to identify specific roles for Gli3 in its development. Here, we used Emx1Cre;Gli3fl/fl conditional mutants to investigate LOT formation and colonization of the olfactory cortex in embryos in which loss of Gli3 function is restricted to the dorsal telencephalon. These mutants form an olfactory bulb like structure which does not protrude from the telencephalic surface. Nevertheless, mitral cells are formed and their axons enter the piriform cortex though the LOT is shifted medially. Mitral axons also innervate a larger target area consistent with an enlargement of the piriform cortex and form aberrant projections into the deeper layers of the piriform cortex. No obvious differences were found in the expression patterns of key guidance cues. However, we found that an expansion of the piriform cortex temporally coincides with the arrival of LOT axons, suggesting that Gli3 affects LOT positioning and target area innervation through controlling the development of the piriform cortex.

  8. Involvement of endothelin receptors in normal and pathological development of neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Patrick; Larue, Lionel

    2003-06-01

    Endothelin receptors (Ednr) are G-protein-coupled receptors with seven membrane-spanning domains and are involved in various physiological processes in adults. We review here the function of these receptors during the development and transformation of the neural crest cell-specific lineage. Neural crest cells (NCC) may be classified according to their location in the body. In particular, there are clear differences between the neural crest cells arising from the cephalic part of the embryo and those arising from the vagal and truncal part. The development of cranial and cardiac NCC requires the endothelin-1/Ednra system to be fully functional whereas the development of more posterior NCC requires full functionality of the endothelin-3/Ednrb system. Mutations have been found in the genes corresponding to these systems in mammals. These mutations principally impair pigmentation and enteric ganglia development. The precise patterns of expression of these receptors and their ligands have been determined in avian and mammalian models. Data obtained in vitro and in vivo have provided insight into the roles of these proteins in cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and transformation.

  9. Developing High Quality Decision-Making Discussions about Biological Conservation in a Normal Classroom Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Marcus

    2009-01-01

    The conservation of biodiversity is an important socio-scientific issue that is often regarded as a precondition to sustainable development. The foundation for citizens' understanding of conservation issues can be laid down in formal school education. This research focuses on decision-making discussions about biological conservation issues among…

  10. BMI Development of Normal Weight and Overweight Children in the PIAMA Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willers, Saskia M.; Brunekreef, Bert; Smit, Henriette A.; van der Beek, Eline M.; Gehring, Ulrike; de Jongste, Johan C.; Kerkhof, Marjan; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Wijga, Alet H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that rapid weight gain during the first year of life is associated with overweight later in life. However, results from studies exploring other critical periods for the development of overweight are inconsistent. Objective: The objective was to investigate BMI developme

  11. p120 Catenin is required for normal tubulogenesis but not epithelial integrity in developing mouse pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendley, Audrey M; Provost, Elayne; Bailey, Jennifer M; Wang, Yue J; Cleveland, Megan H; Blake, Danielle; Bittman, Ross W; Roeser, Jeffrey C; Maitra, Anirban; Reynolds, Albert B; Leach, Steven D

    2015-03-01

    The intracellular protein p120 catenin aids in maintenance of cell-cell adhesion by regulating E-cadherin stability in epithelial cells. In an effort to understand the biology of p120 catenin in pancreas development, we ablated p120 catenin in mouse pancreatic progenitor cells, which resulted in deletion of p120 catenin in all epithelial lineages of the developing mouse pancreas: islet, acinar, centroacinar, and ductal. Loss of p120 catenin resulted in formation of dilated epithelial tubules, expansion of ductal epithelia, loss of acinar cells, and the induction of pancreatic inflammation. Aberrant branching morphogenesis and tubulogenesis were also observed. Throughout development, the phenotype became more severe, ultimately resulting in an abnormal pancreas comprised primarily of duct-like epithelium expressing early progenitor markers. In pancreatic tissue lacking p120 catenin, overall epithelial architecture remained intact; however, actin cytoskeleton organization was disrupted, an observation associated with increased cytoplasmic PKCζ. Although we observed reduced expression of adherens junction proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, and α-catenin, p120 catenin family members p0071, ARVCF, and δ-catenin remained present at cell membranes in homozygous p120(f/f) pancreases, potentially providing stability for maintenance of epithelial integrity during development. Adult mice homozygous for deletion of p120 catenin displayed dilated main pancreatic ducts, chronic pancreatitis, acinar to ductal metaplasia (ADM), and mucinous metaplasia that resembles PanIN1a. Taken together, our data demonstrate an essential role for p120 catenin in pancreas development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. When dialogue fails. Music therapy with elderly with neurological degenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2004-01-01

    When dialogue fails. Music therapy with elderly with neurological degenerative diseases. In persons suffering from neurological degenerative diseases we often see the following symptoms: difficulties in remembering, concentrating, perceiving input, and controlling and timing movements. Normal every...... interaction with others means that psychosocial needs are not met, and this leads to secondary symptoms of the neurological degeneration. Secondary symptoms might be expressed as repetitive behaviour, catastrophic reactions and situationally inappropriate behaviour. In a music therapeutical setting...

  13. Cyclin D and cdk4 Are Required for Normal Development beyond the Blastula Stage in Sea Urchin Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jennifer C.; Sumerel, Jan L.; Schnackenberg, Bradley J.; Nichols, Jason A.; Wikramanayake, Athula; Wessel, Gary M.; Marzluff, William F.

    2002-01-01

    cdk4 mRNA and protein are constitutively expressed in sea urchin eggs and throughout embryonic development. In contrast, cyclin D mRNA is barely detectable in eggs and early embryos, when the cell cycles consist of alternating S and M phases. Cyclin D mRNA increases dramatically in embryos at the early blastula stage and remains at a constant level throughout embryogenesis. An increase in cdk4 kinase activity occurs concomitantly with the increase in cyclin D mRNA. Ectopic expression of cyclin D mRNA in eggs arrests development before the 16-cell stage and causes eventual embryonic death, suggesting that activation of cyclin D/cdk4 in cleavage cell cycles is lethal to the embryo. In contrast, blocking cyclin D or cdk4 expression with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides results in normal development of early gastrula-stage embryos but abnormal, asymmetric larvae. These results suggest that in sea urchins, cyclin D and cdk4 are required for normal development and perhaps the patterning of the developing embryo, but may not be directly involved in regulating entry into the cell cycle. PMID:12052892

  14. Evaluation of growth and development pattern in normal, low and very low birth weight neonates at 18 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Ehsanpour, Soheila; Hemmati, Elahe

    2014-01-01

    Growth and development monitoring could lead to general judgment about children's health. With advances in NICUs establishment, the survival rate of very low birth weight (VLBW) neonates has increased in many countries including Iran. Because of the lack of studies about growth and development pattern of low birth weight (LBW) and VLBW neonates in Iran, the present study aimed to compare growth and development of normal, low and very low birth weight neonates at 18 months of age. In a cross- sectional descriptive study, 214 children with age 18 months were enrolled (90 LBW, 90 LBW and 34 VLBW) and their growth and development were assessed. Data gathering tool was a researcher made questionnaire including anthropometrics measures and developmental key points. Data analyzed by descriptive (mean and SD) and inferential (ANOVA) tests using SPSS version 15. There were significant differences in the mean of anthropometric indexes between three groups. Majority of subjects in three groups had normal weight growth trend. Mean scores of gross motor and fine motor development indexes had significant association with birth weight. Meanwhile, there was no significant association between mean scores of social/cognitive and also language developmental aspects and birth weight. Findings revealed that in LBW and VLBW children, growth indexes at the age of 18 months are so far from those of NBW neonates. Further nationwide prospective studies, with a longer period of time is needed to estimate when Iranian LBW children reach at the levels of NBW ones.

  15. The pivotal role of insulin-like growth factor I in normal mammary development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, David L; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2011-09-01

    Mammary development begins in puberty in response to an estrogen (E(2)) surge. E(2) does not act alone. It relies on pituitary growth hormone (GH) to induce insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) production in the mammary stromal compartment. In turn, IGF-I permits E(2) (and progesterone) action. During puberty, E(2) and IGF-I synergize for ductal morphogenesis. During pregnancy, progesterone joins IGF-I and E(2) to stimulate secretory differentiation necessary to produce milk. Prolactin stimulates milk production, while transforming growth factor-β inhibits proliferation. The orchestrated action of hormones, growth factors, and receptors necessary for mammary development and function are also critical in breast cancer.

  16. Approaching Normal: Essays on the Political Impact of Development Assistance Allocation in Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Burrowes, Sahai

    2014-01-01

    Development aid comprises a significant share of government budgets in many resource-poor countries and is a significant source of funding for health and social service delivery. Yet little is known about the strategies that political actors in these countries use to determine the geographic allocation of aid resources or how such allocation patterns affect the political behavior and attitudes of citizens. Poor aid reporting and a lack of transparency in budget processes have made it extremel...

  17. Prefoldin 5 Is Required for Normal Sensory and Neuronal Development in a Murine Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, YongSuk; Smith, Richard S.; Jordan, Wanda; King, Benjamin L.; Won, Jungyeon; Valpuesta, Jose M.; Naggert, Jurgen K; Nishina, Patsy M.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular chaperones and co-chaperones are crucial for cellular development and maintenance as they assist in protein folding and stabilization of unfolded or misfolded proteins. Prefoldin (PFDN), a ubiquitously expressed heterohexameric co-chaperone, is necessary for proper folding of nascent proteins, in particular, tubulin and actin. Here we show that a genetic disruption in the murine Pfdn5 gene, a subunit of prefoldin, causes a syndrome characterized by photoreceptor degeneration, centra...

  18. Usherin is required for maintenance of retinal photoreceptors and normal development of cochlear hair cells

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Usher syndrome type IIA (USH2A), characterized by progressive photoreceptor degeneration and congenital moderate hearing loss, is the most common subtype of Usher syndrome. In this article, we show that the USH2A protein, also known as usherin, is an exceptionally large (≈600-kDa) matrix protein expressed specifically in retinal photoreceptors and developing cochlear hair cells. In mammalian photoreceptors, usherin is localized to a spatially restricted membrane microdomain at the apical inne...

  19. Overlapping Requirements for Tet2 and Tet3 in Normal Development and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Tet family of methylcytosine dioxygenases (Tet1, Tet2, and Tet3 convert 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. To date, functional overlap among Tet family members has not been examined systematically in the context of embryonic development. To clarify the potential for overlap among Tet enzymes during development, we mutated the zebrafish orthologs of Tet1, Tet2, and Tet3 and examined single-, double-, and triple-mutant genotypes. Here, we identify Tet2 and Tet3 as the major 5-methylcytosine dioxygenases in the zebrafish embryo and uncover a combined requirement for Tet2 and Tet3 in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC emergence. We demonstrate that Notch signaling in the hemogenic endothelium is regulated by Tet2/3 prior to HSC emergence and show that restoring expression of the downstream gata2b/scl/runx1 transcriptional network can rescue HSCs in tet2/3 double mutant larvae. Our results reveal essential, overlapping functions for tet genes during embryonic development and uncover a requirement for 5hmC in regulating HSC production.

  20. Milk Fat Globule Membrane Supplementation in Formula Modulates the Neonatal Gut Microbiome and Normalizes Intestinal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhinder, Ganive; Allaire, Joannie M.; Garcia, Cyrielle; Lau, Jennifer T.; Chan, Justin M.; Ryz, Natasha R.; Bosman, Else S.; Graef, Franziska A.; Crowley, Shauna M.; Celiberto, Larissa S.; Berkmann, Julia C.; Dyer, Roger A.; Jacobson, Kevan; Surette, Michael G.; Innis, Sheila M.; Vallance, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    Breast milk has many beneficial properties and unusual characteristics including a unique fat component, termed milk fat globule membrane (MFGM). While breast milk yields important developmental benefits, there are situations where it is unavailable resulting in a need for formula feeding. Most formulas do not contain MFGM, but derive their lipids from vegetable sources, which differ greatly in size and composition. Here we tested the effects of MFGM supplementation on intestinal development and the microbiome as well as its potential to protect against Clostridium difficile induced colitis. The pup-in-a-cup model was used to deliver either control or MFGM supplemented formula to rats from 5 to 15 days of age; with mother’s milk (MM) reared animals used as controls. While CTL formula yielded significant deficits in intestinal development as compared to MM littermates, addition of MFGM to formula restored intestinal growth, Paneth and goblet cell numbers, and tight junction protein patterns to that of MM pups. Moreover, the gut microbiota of MFGM and MM pups displayed greater similarities than CTL, and proved protective against C. difficile toxin induced inflammation. Our study thus demonstrates that addition of MFGM to formula promotes development of the intestinal epithelium and microbiome and protects against inflammation. PMID:28349941

  1. [Neurologic complications of cocaine abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Viet, H; Chevalier, P; Sereni, C; Bornet, P; Bautier, P; Degos, C F; Rullière, R

    1990-06-02

    Cocaine is increasingly used by drug addicts. It is considered harmless, but numerous, varied and often serious complications due to its abuse have been published. Among these, neurological complications are in the forefront. They include generalized or partial epileptic seizures, ischaemic or haemorrhagic cerebral vascular accidents, visual loss caused by optic neuropathy or by retinal artery occlusion, headaches and exacerbation of tics. Infections of the central nervous system are possible via endocarditis or septicaemia of venous or nasal origin. Neurological disorders may also occur as a consequence of a major cardiovascular complication induced by cocaine (myocardial infarction and/or dysrhythmia, aortic dissection). These neurological complications are unpredictable, and they weigh heavily on the functional and sometimes vital prognosis in habitual or occasional cocaine abusers.

  2. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers.

  3. Quality Metrics in Inpatient Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Amar

    2015-12-01

    Quality of care in the context of inpatient neurology is the standard of performance by neurologists and the hospital system as measured against ideal models of care. There are growing regulatory pressures to define health care value through concrete quantifiable metrics linked to reimbursement. Theoretical models of quality acknowledge its multimodal character with quantitative and qualitative dimensions. For example, the Donabedian model distils quality as a phenomenon of three interconnected domains, structure-process-outcome, with each domain mutually influential. The actual measurement of quality may be implicit, as in peer review in morbidity and mortality rounds, or explicit, in which criteria are prespecified and systemized before assessment. As a practical contribution, in this article a set of candidate quality indicators for inpatient neurology based on an updated review of treatment guidelines is proposed. These quality indicators may serve as an initial blueprint for explicit quality metrics long overdue for inpatient neurology.

  4. Residency Training: Work engagement during neurology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zis, Panagiotis; Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Artemiadis, Artemios K

    2016-08-02

    Work engagement, defined as a positive, fulfilling, work-related state of mind that is characterized by vigor, dedication, and absorption, can ameliorate patient care and reduce medical errors. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate work engagement among neurology residents in the region of Attica, Greece. In total, 113 residents participated in this study. Demographic and work-related characteristics, as well as emotional exhaustion and personality traits (neuroticism), were examined via an anonymous questionnaire. Work engagement was measured by the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. The study sample had a mean age of 34.6 ± 3.6 years, ranging from 26 to 45 years. Sixty-two (54.9%) participants were women and 45 (39.8%) were married. After adjusting for sex, emotional exhaustion, and neuroticism, the main factors associated with work engagement were autonomy and chances for professional development. Providing more chances for trainees' professional development as well as allowing for and supporting greater job autonomy may improve work engagement during neurology training. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Bi-iliac distance and iliac bone position compared to the vertebral column in normal fetal development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartling, U B; Fischer Hansen, B; Skovgaard, L T

    2001-01-01

    Prenatal standards of bi-iliac width were not found in the literature based on autopsy investigations, nor was the caudo-cranial position of the ilia compared to the vertebral column. The first purpose of the present study was to establish normal standard values for the bi-iliac distance in fetal...... life, the second to evaluate the level of the iliac bones proportional to the ossified vertebral column. Whole body radiographs in antero-posterior projections from 98 human fetuses (36 female and 44 male fetuses, as well as 18 fetuses on which the sex had not been determined) were analyzed...... caliper. The caudo-cranial position of the iliac bones was evaluated. The present study shows that in normal fetal development there is a continuous linear enlargement of the pelvic region in the transverse and vertical planes. The upper iliac contour stays at the level of the first sacral vertebral body...

  6. Chest physiotherapy techniques in neurological intensive care units of India: A survey

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Context: Neurological intensive care units (ICUs) are a rapidly developing sub-specialty of neurosciences. Chest physiotherapy techniques are of great value in neurological ICUs in preventing, halting, or reversing the impairments caused due to neurological disorder and ICU stay. However, chest physiotherapy techniques should be modified to a greater extent in the neurological ICU as compared with general ICUs. Aim: The aim of this study is to obtain data on current chest physiotherapy practi...

  7. Liver transplantation for hepatic and neurological Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, I; Heinemann, K; Rohm, S; Hauss, J; Lamesch, P

    2003-06-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal-recessive inherited disorder of copper metabolism characterized by excessive deposition of copper throughout the body. If medical treatment fails in cases of fulminant hepatic failure and progressive hepatic dysfunction due to advanced cirrhosis, liver transplantation (OLTx) has been demonstrated to be a valuable treatment option. Between December 1993 and December 2002, 225 OLTxs in 198 patients were performed in our institution. In this consecutive series six patients (three females and three males) were liver grafted for WD. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 7 years. All patients are alive with well-functioning grafts at present. The ceruloplasmin levels increased after transplantation and remained normal. The Kayser-Fleischer ring disappeared in all patients, and urinary copper excretion normalized. The neurological manifestations in the two patients with severe neurological symptoms showed after 2 to 5 years a downward tendency; in one the ataxic movements disappeared completely. The psychiatric disorder in one patient disappeared as well the mild neurological symptoms in the patient with CHILD A cirrhosis. These two patients are fully recovered and returned to work. OLTx should be considered as a treatment option in patients with severe progressive neurological deficits even in cases with stable liver function since liver grafting definitely cures the underlying biochemical defect. In such cases an early decision for liver transplantation is justified because neurological deficits may become irreversible.

  8. Morphogenesis of the inner ear at different stages of normal human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Saki; Shiraki, Naoto; Yamada, Shigehito; Uwabe, Chigako; Imai, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Yoneyama, Akio; Takeda, Tohoru; Takakuwa, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the external morphology and morphometry of the human embryonic inner ear membranous labyrinth and documented its three-dimensional position in the developing embryo using phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 27 samples between Carnegie stage (CS) 17 and the postembryonic phase during trimester 1 (approximately 6-10 weeks after fertilization) were included. The otic vesicle elongated along the dorso-ventral axis and differentiated into the end lymphatic appendage and cochlear duct (CD) at CS 17. The spiral course of the CD began at CS18, with anterior and posterior semicircular ducts (SDs) forming prominent circles with a common crus. The spiral course of the CD comprised more than two turns at the postembryonic phase, at which time the height of the CD was evident. A linear increase was observed in the length of anterior, posterior, and lateral SDs, in that order, and the length of the CD increased exponentially over the course of development. Bending in the medial direction was observed between the cochlear and vestibular parts from the latero-caudal view, with the angle decreasing during development. The position of the inner ear was stable throughout the period of observation on the lateral to ventral side of the rhombencephalon, caudal to the pontine flexure, and adjacent to the auditory ganglia. The plane of the lateral semicircular canal was approximately 8.0°-14.6° with respect to the cranial caudal (z-)axis, indicating that the orientation of the inner ear changes during growth to adulthood.

  9. Diffusion-weighted imaging in chronic Behcet patients with and without neurological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baysal, T.; Dogan, M.; Bulut, T.; Sarac, K. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Malatya (Turkey); Karlidag, R. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Malatya (Turkey); Ozisik, H.I. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Malatya (Turkey); Baysal, O. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Malatya (Turkey)

    2005-06-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether neurological impairment in chronic Behcet's disease (BD) patients with normal appearing brain can be assessed by means of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). The averaged apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated in 22 different radiologically normal appearing brain regions in 32 patients with and without neurological findings and 20 control subjects. The ADC values in bilateral frontal, temporal and occipital normal appearing white matter were significantly higher in the patient groups compared with the control subjects (p<0.05). In these brain regions, DWI revealed differences in the ADC values between patients with neurological findings (including symptomatic and neuro-Behcet patients) and the asymptomatic patient group. The similarity of the ADC values of patients without symptoms to those of the control group allowed clear discrimination between patients with and without neurological findings. DWI may serve to assess subclinical neurological involvement in BD, even when structural changes are absent. (orig.)

  10. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    . Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement...... treatment is available to prevent irreversible organ damage. Females with Fabry's disease who present with pain have often been ignored and misdiagnosed because of the disorder's X-linked inheritance. This Review will stress the importance of recognizing neurological symptoms for the diagnosis of Fabry...

  11. Dermatitis herpetiformis and neurological dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, A J; Turner, B; Lock, R J; Johnston, S L; Unsworth, D J; Fry, L

    2002-02-01

    Dermatitis herpetiformis and coeliac disease are gluten sensitive diseases, which have common immunopathological and genetic mechanisms. Neuropsychiatric complications have been reported in up to 26% of patients with coeliac disease. This is probably an overestimate, because of the chance associations with some common neurological conditions such as epilepsy. The pathogenesis is speculative but it has been postulated that gluten is neurotoxic possibly via immune mechanisms. The frequency of neurological dysfunction in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis has not been characterised. Patients with dermatitis herpetiformis might be expected to be particularly susceptible to neuronal damage as some continue to consume gluten when their dermatological symptoms are controlled by dapsone. Thirty five patients were recruited with dermatitis herpetiformis from dermatology clinics at St Mary's Hospital, London and Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham and investigated for evidence of neurological abnormality. All patients underwent a full neurological examination and were asked about their neurological and general medical history by means of a structured questionnaire. Serum samples were taken and screened for the presence of anti-neuronal antibodies (anti-Hu and Yo) as well as anti-gliadin (IgA and G) anti-endomysial (IgA), and anti-tissue transglutaminase (IgA) antibodies. Neurophysiological tests were carried out where appropriate. Only two patients were identified with unexplained neurological abnormalities (one essential tremor, and one chorea). Two other patients had a history of migraine. The patient with chorea also had borderline/equivocally positive anti-Hu antibodies by immunofluorescence assay. All other samples were negative for anti-neuronal antibodies. Fifteen patients were positive for anti-gliadin antibodies (IgA and/or IgG), four for anti-endomysial antibodies (monkey oesophagus or umbilical cord), and six for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies. The

  12. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  13. Mammary gland specific knockdown of the physiological surge in Cx26 during lactation retains normal mammary gland development and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K G Stewart

    Full Text Available Connexin26 (Cx26 is the major Cx protein expressed in the human mammary gland and is up-regulated during pregnancy while remaining elevated throughout lactation. It is currently unknown if patients with loss-of-function Cx26 mutations that result in hearing loss and skin diseases have a greater susceptibility to impaired breast development. To investigate if Cx26 plays a critical role in mammary gland development and differentiation, a novel Cx26 conditional knockout mouse model was generated by crossing Cx26fl/fl mice with mice expressing Cre under the β-Lactoglobulin promoter. Conditional knockdown of Cx26 from the mammary gland resulted in a dramatic reduction in detectable gap junction plaques confirmed by a significant ∼65-70% reduction in Cx26 mRNA and protein throughout parturition and lactation. Interestingly, this reduction was accompanied by a decrease in mammary gland Cx30 gap junction plaques at parturition, while no change was observed for Cx32 or Cx43. Whole mount, histological and immunofluorescent assessment of breast tissue revealed comparatively normal lobuloalveolar development following pregnancy in the conditionally knockdown mice compared to control mice. In addition, glands from genetically-modified mice were capable of producing milk proteins that were evident in the lumen of alveoli and ducts at similar levels as controls, suggesting normal gland function. Together, our results suggest that low levels of Cx26 expression throughout pregnancy and lactation, and not the physiological surge in Cx26, is sufficient for normal gland development and function.

  14. Brain molecular aging, promotion of neurological disease and modulation by sirtuin 5 longevity gene polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorioso, Christin; Oh, Sunghee; Douillard, Gaelle Guilloux; Sibille, Etienne

    2011-02-01

    Mechanisms determining characteristic age-of-onset for neurological diseases are largely unknown. Normal brain aging associates with robust and progressive transcriptome changes ("molecular aging"), but the intersection with disease pathways is mostly uncharacterized. Here, using cross-cohort microarray analysis of four human brain areas, we show that neurological disease pathways largely overlap with molecular aging and that subjects carrying a newly-characterized low-expressing polymorphism in a putative longevity gene (Sirtuin5; SIRT5(prom2)) have older brain molecular ages. Specifically, molecular aging was remarkably conserved across cohorts and brain areas, and included numerous developmental and transcription-regulator genes. Neurological disease-associated genes were highly overrepresented within age-related genes and changed almost unanimously in pro-disease directions, together suggesting an underlying genetic "program" of aging that progressively promotes disease. To begin testing this putative pathway, we developed and used an age-biosignature to assess five candidate longevity gene polymorphisms' association with molecular aging rates. Most robustly, aging was accelerated in cingulate, but not amygdala, of subjects carrying a SIRT5 promoter polymorphism (+9 years, p=0.004), in concordance with cingulate-specific decreased SIRT5 expression. This effect was driven by a set of core transcripts (+24 years, p=0.0004), many of which were mitochondrial, including Parkinson's disease genes, PINK-1 and DJ-1/PARK7, hence suggesting that SIRT5(prom2) may represent a risk factor for mitochondrial dysfunction-related diseases, including Parkinson's, through accelerated molecular aging of disease-related genes. Based on these results we speculate that a "common mechanism" may underlie age-of-onset across several neurological diseases. Confirming this pathway and its regulation by common genetic variants would provide new strategies for predicting, delaying, and

  15. Chapter 15: Jean-Martin Charcot and the anatomo-clinical method of neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Christopher G

    2010-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) was the premier clinical neurologist of the 19th century. Charcot's research was anchored in the anatomo-clinical method, a two-part methodology that linked clinical signs with anatomical lesions. The first step of this method involved the careful documentation of clinical signs with longitudinal observation. At the time of death, the second step involved autopsy examination of the brain and spinal cord. With combined clinical and anatomical data, Charcot was able to suggest concrete clinical-anatomical correlations. This method helped to define the tracts and nuclei responsible for normal and abnormal neurological signs and was pivotal to a new classification of neurological diseases based on anatomy. The best-developed example of this method was Charcot's work with motor system degenerative disorders, specifically amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These studies led to the international designation of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as Charcot's disease. Other examples of the fruits of the anatomo-clinical method included several stroke syndromes and the linkage of specific signs to specific lesions in multiple sclerosis. The discipline fostered cortical localization theory, which moved neurologists away from the concept of the brain as a homogenous organ in preference to the concept that brain regions controlled specific motor, sensory and language functions. Charcot's attempts to apply his anatomo-clinical method to the knotty neurological diagnosis of hysteria led him to experiments and conclusions that drew criticism and even scorn from colleagues. These events tarnished Charcot's reputation at the close of his career. In the context of Charcot's extensive discoveries and lasting contributions, the anatomo-clinical method remains the anchor of modern neurological diagnosis and is Charcot's most important contribution to clinical neurology.

  16. Develop high quality nursing service and normalize management of neonatal ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua YANG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To tamp basic neonatal care, provide high quality nursing service, improve the quality of neonatal care, guarantee the safety of nursing care, achieve satisfactory project. Methods:Adjust the staff of the neonatal ward , optimize schedule; strengthen the training and knowledge; strengthen the supervision and ensure the basic nursing; the nursing quality management group work out the rate of incidence of high quality nursing service, the incidence rate of hospital infection of the newborn as well as the satisfaction of their families. Results: The different data between the control group and observation group was statistically significant ( P < 0.05 . Conclusion: Develop the neonatal ward of high quality nursing service, ensure the basic nursing implement, significantly improve the quality of nursing, reduce nursing adverse events and neonatal hospital infection incidence to" zero defects and zero tolerance", and that ensures nursing safety, and achieve the goal of " quality care demonstration project" --- patient satisfaction, social satisfaction, and government satisfaction.

  17. Hippocampal shape is predictive for the development of dementia in a normal, elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achterberg, Hakim C.; van der Lijn, Fedde; den Heijer, Tom

    2014-01-01

    were, respectively, 0.724, 0.743, and 0.766. A logistic regression model showed that adding shape to a model using volume corrected for age and gender increased the global model-fit significantly (P = 0.0063). We conclude that hippocampal shape derived from MRI scans is predictive for dementia before...... assessed whether hippocampal shape provides additional predictive value independent of hippocampal volume. Five hundred eleven brain MRI scans from elderly nondemented participants of a prospective population-based imaging study were used. During the 10-year follow-up period, 52 of these subjects developed...... dementia. For training and evaluation independent of age and gender, a subset of 50 cases and 150 matched controls was selected. The hippocampus was segmented using an automated method. From the segmentation, the volume was determined and a statistical shape model was constructed. We trained a classifier...

  18. Loss of all 3 Extended Synaptotagmins does not affect normal mouse development, viability or fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Michel G; Moss, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The extended synaptotagmins, E-Syt1, 2 and 3, are multiple C2 domain membrane proteins that are tethered to the endoplasmic reticulum and interact in a calcium dependent manner with plasma membrane phospholipids to form endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junctions. These junctions have been implicated in the exchange of phospholipids between the 2 organelles. The E-Syts have further been implicated in receptor signaling and endocytosis and can interact directly with fibroblast growth factor and other cell surface receptors. Despite these multiple functions, the search for a requirement in vivo has been elusive. Most recently, we found that the genes for E-Syt2 and 3 could be inactivated without effect on mouse development, viability, fertility or morphology. We have now created insertion and deletion mutations in the last of the mouse E-Syt genes. We show that E-Syt1 is specifically expressed throughout the embryonic skeleton during the early stages of chrondrogenesis in a pattern quite distinct from that of E-Syt2 or 3. Despite this, E-Syt1 is also not required for mouse development and propagation. We further show that even the combined inactivation of all 3 E-Syt genes has no effect on mouse viability or fertility in the laboratory. However, this inactivation induces an enhancement in the expression of the genes encoding Orp5/8, Orai1, STIM1 and TMEM110, endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junction proteins that potentially could compensate for E-Syt loss. Given the multiple functions suggested for the E-Syts and their evolutionary conservation, our unexpected findings suggest that they may only provide a survival advantage under specific conditions that have as yet to be identified.

  19. Neurological Soft Signs in Indian Children with Specific Developmental Disorders of Scholastic Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Raja; Mehta, Manju; Kalra, Veena; Sagar, Rajesh; Mongia, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To compare the occurrence of neurological soft signs (NSS) in children with specific developmental disorders of scholastic skills (SDDSS) and normal children. Methods: 36 cases of SDDSS were compared with 30 control children regarding sociodemographic and clinical variables and neurological soft signs. Results: Children with SDDSS had…

  20. NOCTURNAL ENURESIS AND MINOR NEUROLOGICAL DYSFUNCTION AT 12 YEARS - A FOLLOW-UP-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunsing, R J; Hadders-Algra, M; Touwen, B C; Huisjes, H J

    On follow-up at 12 years to assess the relationship between minor neurological dysfunction (MND) and primary nocturnal enuresis (NE), the frequency of NE was found to be significantly higher in children with MND (N = 167) than in those who were neurologically normal (N = 174). There was no

  1. Nocturnal enuresis and minor neurological dysfunction at 12 years : a follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunsing, R J; Hadders-Algra, M; Touwen, B C; Huisjes, H J

    1991-01-01

    On follow-up at 12 years to assess the relationship between minor neurological dysfunction (MND) and primary nocturnal enuresis (NE), the frequency of NE was found to be significantly higher in children with MND (N = 167) than in those who were neurologically normal (N = 174). There was no relations

  2. NOCTURNAL ENURESIS AND MINOR NEUROLOGICAL DYSFUNCTION AT 12 YEARS - A FOLLOW-UP-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunsing, R J; Hadders-Algra, M; Touwen, B C; Huisjes, H J

    1991-01-01

    On follow-up at 12 years to assess the relationship between minor neurological dysfunction (MND) and primary nocturnal enuresis (NE), the frequency of NE was found to be significantly higher in children with MND (N = 167) than in those who were neurologically normal (N = 174). There was no relations

  3. Expanding the neurological examination using functional neurologic assessment: part II neurologic basis of applied kinesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, W H; Yanuck, S F

    1999-03-01

    Functional Neurologic Assessment and treatment methods common to the practice of applied kinesiology are presented. These methods are proposed to enhance neurological examination and treatment procedures toward more effective assessment and care of functional impairment. A neurologic model for these procedures is proposed. Manual assessment of muscular function is used to identify changes associated with facilitation and inhibition, in response to the introduction of sensory receptor-based stimuli. Muscle testing responses to sensory stimulation of known value are compared with usually predictable patterns based on known neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, guiding the clinician to an understanding of the functional status of the patient's nervous system. These assessment procedures are used in addition to other standard diagnostic measures to augment rather than replace the existing diagnostic armamentarium. The proper understanding of the neurophysiologic basis of muscle testing procedures will assist in the design of further investigations into applied kinesiology. Accordingly, the neurophysiologic basis and proposed mechanisms of these methods are reviewed.

  4. Beyond Normal Competencies: Understanding Organisation Designs to Develop and Sustain IT-Related Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acklesh Prasad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is apparent that IT resources are important for organisations. It is also clear that organisations unique competencies, their IT-related capabilities, leverage the IT resources uniquely to create and sustain competitive advantage. However, IT resources are dynamic, and evolve at an exponential rate. This means that organisations will need to sustain their competencies to leverage opportunities offered by new IT resources. Research on ways to sustain IT-related capabilities is limited and a deeper understanding of this situation is important. Amongst other factors, a possible reason for this lack of progress in this area could be due to the lack of validated measurement items of the theoretical constructs to conduct such studies. We suggest an environment in which organisations could build new and sustain their existing IT-related capabilities. We then report on the development of valid and reliable measures for this environment. The validated measures would be useful in extending our understanding on how firms could sustain their IT-related capabilities. This effort will provide a deeper understanding of how firms can secure sustainable IT-related business value from their acquired IT resources.

  5. Polo-Like Kinase 3 Appears Dispensable for Normal Retinal Development Despite Robust Embryonic Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian J Goetz

    Full Text Available During retinogenesis seven different cell types are generated in distinct yet overlapping timepoints from a population of retinal progenitor cells. Previously, we performed single cell transcriptome analyses of retinal progenitor cells to identify candidate genes that may play roles in the generation of early-born retinal neurons. Based on its expression pattern in subsets of early retinal cells, polo-like kinase 3 (Plk3 was identified as one such candidate gene. Further characterization of Plk3 expression by in situ hybridization revealed that this gene is expressed as cells exit the cell cycle. We obtained a Plk3 deficient mouse and investigated changes in the retina's morphology and transcriptome through immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and gene expression profiling. These experiments have been performed initially on adult mice and subsequently extended throughout retinal development. Although morphological studies revealed no consistent changes in retinogenesis upon Plk3 loss, microarray profiling revealed potential candidate genes altered in Plk3-KO mice. Further studies will be necessary to understand the connection between these changes in gene expression and the loss of a protein kinase such as Plk3.

  6. DNA methylation profiling of transcription factor genes in normal lymphocyte development and lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivascu, Claudia; Wasserkort, Reinhold; Lesche, Ralf; Dong, Jun; Stein, Harald; Thiel, Andreas; Eckhardt, Florian

    2007-01-01

    Transcription factors play a crucial role during hematopoiesis by orchestrating lineage commitment and determining cellular fate. Although tight regulation of transcription factor expression appears to be essential, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms involved in transcription factor gene regulation. We have analyzed DNA methylation profiles of 13 key transcription factor genes in primary cells of the hematopoietic cascade, lymphoma cell lines and lymph node biopsies of diffuse large B-cell- and T-cell-non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients. Several of the transcription factor genes (SPI1, GATA3, TCF-7, Etv5, c-maf and TBX21) are differentially methylated in specific cell lineages and stages of the hematopoietic cascade. For some genes, such as SPI1, Etv5 and Eomes, we found an inverse correlation between the methylation of the 5' untranslated region and expression of the associated gene suggesting that these genes are regulated by DNA methylation. Differential methylation is not limited to cells of the healthy hematopoietic cascade, as we observed aberrant methylation of c-maf, TCF7, Eomes and SPI1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Our results suggest that epigenetic remodelling of transcription factor genes is a frequent mechanism during hematopoietic development. Aberrant methylation of transcription factor genes is frequently observed in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and might have a functional role during tumorigenesis.

  7. Qilin is essential for cilia assembly and normal kidney development in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Li

    Full Text Available Defects in the cilium, a once thought vestigial organelle, have recently been implicated in many human diseases, including a number of cystic kidney diseases such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD, Bardet Bieldl Syndrome, and Meckel-Gruber Syndrome. In a forward genetic screen, qilin was identified as a novel gene important in the pathogenesis of kidney cysts in zebrafish. In this paper we characterized qilin(hi3959A mutant's phenotypes in detail, investigated cilia formation in this mutant and performed structural and functional analysis of the Qilin protein. Results reveal Qilin's essential role in cilia assembly and maintenance in multiple organs, including the kidney, the lateral line organ, and the outer segment of the photoreceptor cell. In addition, rescue experiments suggest that defective pronephric cilia correlate with the formation of kidney cysts in qilin(hi3959A mutants. Further, genetic analysis suggests that qilin interacts with multiple intraflagellar transport (IFT complex B genes, which is supported by the striking phenotypic similarities between qilin(hi3959A and IFT complex B mutants. Finally, through deletion analysis we provide evidence that the well-conserved N-terminus and the coiled-coil domain of Qilin are both essential and sufficient for its function. Taken all the observations together, we propose that Qilin acts in a similar role as IFT complex B proteins in cilia assembly, maintenance and kidney development in zebrafish.

  8. Historical notes about the development of cement normalization In European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calleja, J.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The European Standard EN 197-1:2000 for Cement, prepared by CEN/TC 51, is from now (2002-04-01 onwards, compulsory in all the countries of the European Union. It has been considered suitable to expose some details on the historical development of the steps and difficulties during the elaboration of the standard ENV 197-1:92 first, and of the present and final standard EN 197-1:2000 already in force, and now in Spain as Spanish Standard AENOR/UNE-EN 197-1:2000 (1.

    Al hacerse de obligado cumplimiento en todos los países de la VE a partir del 1 de abril de 2002 la Norma Europea EN 197-1:2000 para cementos, elaborada por el CEN/TC 51, se ha considerado oportuno dar una información general, muy resumida, acerca del desarrollo histórico de las etapas, vicisitudes y dificultades por las que ha pasado la culminación de la misma, hasta alcanzar, primero, la Norma Experimental ENV 197-1:92 y, finalmente, la actual y definitiva EN 197-1:2000, ya en vigor como Norma Española UNE-EN 197-1:2000, de AENOR (1.

  9. The neurology of poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, G

    1982-01-01

    An intellectual deficit is known to exist in populations where extreme poverty is rife and is thus seen extensively in the lower socio-economic strata of underdeveloped nations. Poverty is a complex entity whose sociological and economic indicators often bear little relevance to the biological agents which can affect the central nervous system. An attempt is made to express poverty in terms of identifiable defects, physiological in nature. Thus adverse socio-economic factors are converted into specific biological entities which, though necessary for adequate development of the brain, are restricted where there is poverty. A number of causative deficiencies, including nutritional, visual, auditory, tactile, vestibular, affective, and other stimuli are postulated. These interact and potentiate one another. Each is capable of an independent action on the brain and examples are given of some sensory deprivations as well as malnutrition and their possible mechanism of action. If the various deficiencies can independently harm the brain, then a number of separate specific functions should be affected; examples are offered. The nature of this intellectual deficit is probably a non-fulfillment of genetic potential of certain specific functions of the brain, which may exhibit limited variations between one community and another, depending on cultural differences. The deleterious effect of this intellectual impairment is seen most clearly in figures of school desertion, for example in Latin America. Analogous data for adults is scarce.

  10. Brain mechanisms for reading in children with and without dyslexia: a review of studies of normal development and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, Andrew C; Simos, Panagiotis G; Breier, Joshua I; Fletcher, Jack M; Foorman, Barbara R; Francis, David; Castillo, Eduardo M; Davis, Robert N

    2003-01-01

    In this article we review our experience with the application of magnetic source imaging (MSI), the newest of the functional imaging methods, to the study of brain mechanisms for reading among children who read normally and among those with dyslexia. After giving a general description of MSI, we present evidence for reliable and valid maps of the brain mechanism for aural language comprehension as well as for reading. Next, we present data from 39 normal readers, 40 children with dyslexia, and 30 younger children at risk for developing a reading disability. These data show different brain activation maps for individual children with dyslexia and children at risk for dyslexia than for those of normal readers. Such differences most likely reflect aberrant brain organization underlying phonological decoding, rather than variables such as degree of effort. Finally, we present preliminary data demonstrating that the aberrant activation profiles of children with dyslexia may return to normative patterns as a result of a successful reading intervention that enables children to improve phonological decoding skills.

  11. C4.4A gene ablation is compatible with normal epidermal development and causes modest overt phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegbaum, Mette Camilla; Jacobsen, Benedikte; Füchtbauer, Annette; Hansen, Gert Helge; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Rundsten, Carsten Friis; Persson, Morten; Engelholm, Lars Henning; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard; Di Meo, Ivano; Lund, Ida Katrine; Holst, Birgitte; Kjaer, Andreas; Lærum, Ole Didrik; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Ploug, Michael

    2016-01-01

    C4.4A is a modular glycolipid-anchored Ly6/uPAR/α-neurotoxin multidomain protein that exhibits a prominent membrane-associated expression in stratified squamous epithelia. C4.4A is also expressed in various solid cancer lesions, where high expression levels often are correlated to poor prognosis. Circumstantial evidence suggests a role for C4.4A in cell adhesion, migration, and invasion, but a well-defined biological function is currently unknown. In the present study, we have generated and characterized the first C4.4A-deficient mouse line to gain insight into the functional significance of C4.4A in normal physiology and cancer progression. The unchallenged C4.4A-deficient mice were viable, fertile, born in a normal Mendelian distribution and, surprisingly, displayed normal development of squamous epithelia. The C4.4A-deficient mice were, nonetheless, significantly lighter than littermate controls predominantly due to differences in fat mass. Congenital C4.4A deficiency delayed migration of keratinocytes enclosing incisional skin wounds in male mice. In chemically induced bladder carcinomas, C4.4A deficiency attenuated the incidence of invasive lesions despite having no effect on total tumour burden. This new C4.4A-deficient mouse line provides a useful platform for future studies on functional aspects of C4.4A in tumour cell invasion in vivo. PMID:27169360

  12. Case of clear-cell hepatocellular carcinoma that developed in the normal liver of a middle-aged woman

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsushi Takahashi; Hiromasa Ohira; Hironobu Saito; Yukiko Kanno; Kazumichi Abe; Junko Yokokawa; Atsushi Irisawa; Akira Kenjo; Takuro Saito; Mitsukazu Gotoh

    2008-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman was admitted to our department for close examination of a liver tumor that was found during a medical checkup. Abdominal US, CT and MRI showed a tumor in segment 7 (S7) of the liver. Although imaging suggested hepatocellular carcinoma, laboratory tests showed no abnormality in liver function, hepatitis virus markers were negative, and tumor markers including protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist Ⅱ (PIVKA-Ⅱ), a-fetoprotein (AFP), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)were all within normal ranges. Upon aspiration biopsy of the liver, the histopathological diagnosis was moderately differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Therefore, right hepatectomy was performed. Although a part of the tumor was necrotic, about 60% of the viable part showed a clear-cell variant. Consequently, it was diagnosed as clear-cell hepatocellular carcinoma. It was noted that the background liver tissue was normal. This case is worthy of reporting because development of clear-cell hepatocellular carcinoma in the normal liver of a middle-aged woman is rarely seen.

  13. Pkd1 and Pkd2 are required for normal placental development.

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    Miguel A Garcia-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is a common cause of inherited renal failure that results from mutations in PKD1 and PKD2. The disorder is characterized by focal cyst formation that involves somatic mutation of the wild type allele in a large fraction of cysts. Consistent with a two-hit mechanism, mice that are homozygous for inactivating mutations of either Pkd1 or Pkd2 develop cystic kidneys, edema and hemorrhage and typically die in midgestation. Cystic kidney disease is unlikely to be the cause of fetal loss since renal function is not required to complete gestation. One hypothesis is that embryonic demise is due to leaky vessels or cardiac pathology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In these studies we used a series of genetically modified Pkd1 and Pkd2 murine models to investigate the cause of embryonic lethality in mutant embryos. Since placental defects are a frequent cause of fetal loss, we conducted histopathologic analyses of placentas from Pkd1 null mice and detected abnormalities of the labyrinth layer beginning at E12.5. We performed placental rescue experiments using tetraploid aggregation and conditional inactivation of Pkd1 with the Meox2 Cre recombinase. We found that both strategies improved the viability of Pkd1 null embryos. Selective inactivation of Pkd1 and Pkd2 in endothelial cells resulted in polyhydramnios and abnormalities similar to those observed in Pkd1(-/- placentas. However, endothelial cell specific deletion of Pkd1 or Pkd2 did not yield the dramatic vascular phenotypes observed in null animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Placental abnormalities contribute to the fetal demise of Pkd(-/- embryos. Endothelial cell specific deletion of Pkd1 or Pkd2 recapitulates a subset of findings seen in Pkd null animals. Our studies reveal a complex role for polycystins in maintaining vascular integrity.

  14. Normal and malignant B-cell development with special reference to Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajewsky, K; Kanzler, H; Hansmann, M L; Küppers, R

    1997-01-01

    During their development, B lymphocytes are repeatedly selected for the expression of an appropriate surface receptor: the pre-B-cell receptor at the pre-B-cell stage and surface immunoglobulin (Ig) at the transition from a pre-B cell to a mature B cell. Furthermore, stringent selection for B cells expressing high affinity antibodies operates when antigen-activated B cells proliferate within germinal centers (GC). Here, somatic point mutations are introduced into rearranged V region genes at a high rate, and B cells acquiring favorable mutations are selected to differentiate into memory B cells or plasma cells. In the frame of this developmental scheme, extending a recent analysis, we investigated 10 primary cases of Hodgkin's disease (HD) for B-lineage origin and clonality [1]. Single Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (H-RS) cells were micromanipulated from frozen tissue sections and analyzed by PCR for rearranged V genes. Clonal VH and/or V kappa/ V delta gene rearrangements were obtained from 9 of the cases. This shows that H-RS cells represent a clonal, B-lineage-derived population of tumor cells. Somatic mutations were found in all clonal VH gene rearrangements. Interestingly, mutations leading to stop codons in in-frame V gene rearrangements were detected in four cases. Since GC B cells acquiring such crippling mutations are usually efficiently eliminated within the GC, the finding of those mutations indicates that H-RS cells are derived from precursors within the GC that escaped apoptosis by a transforming event.

  15. Developmental acceleration of bradykinin-dependent relaxation by prenatal chronic hypoxia impedes normal development after birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum-Johnston, Carla; Thorpe, Richard B.; Wee, Chelsea; Romero, Monica; Brunelle, Alexander; Blood, Quintin; Blood, Arlin B.; Francis, Michael; Taylor, Mark S.; Longo, Lawrence D.; Pearce, William J.; Wilson, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Bradykinin-induced activation of the pulmonary endothelium triggers nitric oxide production and other signals that cause vasorelaxation, including stimulation of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels in myocytes that hyperpolarize the plasma membrane and decrease intracellular Ca2+. Intrauterine chronic hypoxia (CH) may reduce vasorelaxation in the fetal-to-newborn transition and contribute to pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. Thus we examined the effects of maturation and CH on the role of BKCa channels during bradykinin-induced vasorelaxation by examining endothelial Ca2+ signals, wire myography, and Western immunoblots on pulmonary arteries isolated from near-term fetal (∼140 days gestation) and newborn, 10- to 20-day-old, sheep that lived in normoxia at 700 m or in CH at high altitude (3,801 m) for >100 days. CH enhanced bradykinin-induced relaxation of fetal vessels but decreased relaxation in newborns. Endothelial Ca2+ responses decreased with maturation but increased with CH. Bradykinin-dependent relaxation was sensitive to 100 μM nitro-l-arginine methyl ester or 10 μM 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, supporting roles for endothelial nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase activation. Indomethacin blocked relaxation in CH vessels, suggesting upregulation of PLA2 pathways. BKCa channel inhibition with 1 mM tetraethylammonium reduced bradykinin-induced vasorelaxation in the normoxic newborn and fetal CH vessels. Maturation reduced whole cell BKCa channel α1-subunit expression but increased β1-subunit expression. These results suggest that CH amplifies the contribution of BKCa channels to bradykinin-induced vasorelaxation in fetal sheep but stunts further development of this vasodilatory pathway in newborns. This involves complex changes in multiple components of the bradykinin-signaling axes. PMID:26637638

  16. Stem cell therapy in pediatric neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Torabian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric neurological disorders including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury are defined as a heterogenous group of diseases, of which some are known to be genetic. The two significant features represented for stem cells, leading to distinguish them from other cell types are addressed as below: they can renew themselves besides the ability to differentiate into cells with special function as their potency. Researches about the role of stem cells in repair of damaged tissues in different organs like myocardium, lung, wound healing, and others are developing. In addition, the use of stem cells in the treatment and improving symptoms of neurological diseases such as autism are known. Many epigenetic and immunological studies on effects of stem cells have been performed. The action of stem cells in tissue repair is a need for further studies. The role of these cells in the secretion of hormones and growth factors in the niche, induction of cell division and differentiation in local cells and differentiation of stem cells in damaged tissue is the samples of effects of tissue repair by stem cells.Cognitive disorders, epilepsy, speech and language disorders, primary sensory dysfunction, and behavioral challenges are symptoms of non-neuromotor dysfunction in half of pediatrics with CP. Occupational therapy, oral medications, and orthopedic surgery for supportive and rehabilitative approaches are part of Conventional remedy for cerebral palsy. This paper summarizes the clinical world wide experience about stem cell based therapeutic procedures for pediatric neurological disorders.

  17. Stem Cell Therapy in Pediatric Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Torabian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric neurological disorders including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury are defined as a heterogenous group of diseases, of which some are known to be genetic. The two significant features represented for stem cells, leading to distinguish them from other cell types are addressed as below: they can renew themselves besides the ability to differentiate into cells with special function as their potency. Researches about the role of stem cells in repair of damaged tissues in different organs like myocardium, lung, wound healing, and others are developing. In addition, the use of stem cells in the treatment and improving symptoms of neurological diseases such as autism are known. Many epigenetic and immunological studies on effects of stem cells have been performed. The action of stem cells in tissue repair is a need for further studies. The role of these cells in the secretion of hormones and growth factors in the niche, induction of cell division and differentiation in local cells and differentiation of stem cells in damaged tissue is the samples of effects of tissue repair by stem cells.Cognitive disorders, epilepsy, speech and language disorders, primary sensory dysfunction, and behavioral challenges are symptoms of non-neuromotor dysfunction in half of pediatrics with CP. Occupational therapy, oral medications, and orthopedic surgery for supportive and rehabilitative approaches are part of Conventional remedy for cerebral palsy. This paper summarizes the clinical world wide experience about stem cell based therapeutic procedures for pediatric neurological disorders.

  18. Nanotechnology based diagnostics for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurek, Nicholas S.; Chandra, Sathees B., E-mail: schandra@roosevelt.edu [Department of Biological, Chemical and Physical Sciences, Roosevelt University, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Nanotechnology involves probing and manipulating matter at the molecular level. Nanotechnology based molecular diagnostics have the potential to alleviate the suffering caused by many diseases, including neurological disorders, due to the unique properties of nanomaterials. Most neurological illnesses are multifactorial conditions and many of these are also classified as neurobehavioral disorders. Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington disease, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders like Rett syndrome are some examples of neurological disorders that could be better treated, diagnosed, prevented and possibly cured using nanotechnology. In order to improve the quality of life for disease afflicted people, a wide range of nanomaterials that include gold and silica nanoparticles, quantum dots and DNA along with countless other forms of nanotechnology have been investigated regarding their usefulness in advancing molecular diagnostics. Other small scaled materials like viruses and proteins also have potential for use as molecular diagnostic tools. Information obtained from nanotechnology based diagnostics can be stored and manipulated using bioinformatics software. More advanced nanotechnology based diagnostic procedures for the acquisition of even greater proteomic and genomic knowledge can then be developed along with better ways to fight various diseases. Nanotechnology also has numerous applications besides those related to biotechnology and medicine. In this article, we will discuss and analyze many novel nanotechnology based diagnostic techniques at our disposal today. (author)

  19. Sparring And Neurological Function In Professional Boxers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Stiller

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDespite increased interest regarding the potentially long-term negative impact of chronic traumatic brain injury (CTBI, limited research had been conducted regarding such injuries and neurological outcomes in real world settings. To increase understanding regarding the relationship between sparring (e.g., number of years actively training for professional boxing and neurological functioning, professional boxers (n = 237 who competed in Maryland between 2003 to 2008 completed measures regarding sparring exposure (Cumulative Sparring Index; CSI and performance on tests of cognition (Symbol Digit Modalities Test; SDMT and balance (Sharpened Romberg Test; SRT. Measures were completed prior to boxing matches. Higher scores on the CSI (increased sparring exposure were associated with poorer performance on both tests of cognition (SDMT and balance (SRT. A threshold effect was noted regarding performance on the SDMT, with those reporting CSI values greater than about 150 experiencing a decline in cognition. A history of frequent and/or intense sparring may pose a significant risk for developing boxing associated neurological sequelae. Implementing administration of clinically meaningful tests before bouts, such as the CSI, SDMT, and/or the SRT, as well as documentation of results into the boxer’s physicals or medical profiles may be an important step for improving boxing safety.

  20. Education Research: Neurology training reassessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Matthew B.; Coleman, Mary; Jozefowicz, Ralph; Engstrom, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the strengths and weaknesses of neurology resident education using survey methodology. Methods: A 27-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2011. Results: Of eligible respondents, 49.8% of residents returned the survey. Most residents believed previously instituted duty hour restrictions had a positive impact on resident quality of life without impacting patient care. Most residents rated their faculty and clinical didactics favorably. However, many residents reported suboptimal preparation in basic neuroscience and practice management issues. Most residents (71%) noted that the Residency In-service Training Examination (RITE) assisted in self-study. A minority of residents (14%) reported that the RITE scores were used for reasons other than self-study. The vast majority (86%) of residents will enter fellowship training following residency and were satisfied with the fellowship offers they received. Conclusions: Graduating residents had largely favorable neurology training experiences. Several common deficiencies include education in basic neuroscience and clinical practice management. Importantly, prior changes to duty hours did not negatively affect the resident perception of neurology residency training. PMID:23091077

  1. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive; Luciano de Paola; Renato Puppi Munhoz

    2014-01-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  2. Ion Channels in Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravir; Kumar, Dhiraj; Jha, Saurabh Kumar; Jha, Niraj Kumar; Ambasta, Rashmi K

    2016-01-01

    The convergent endeavors of the neuroscientist to establish a link between clinical neurology, genetics, loss of function of an important protein, and channelopathies behind neurological disorders are quite intriguing. Growing evidence reveals the impact of ion channels dysfunctioning in neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs). Many neurological/neuromuscular disorders, viz, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and age-related disorders are caused due to altered function or mutation in ion channels. To maintain cell homeostasis, ion channels are playing a crucial role which is a large transmembrane protein. Further, these channels are important as it determines the membrane potential and playing critically in the secretion of neurotransmitter. Behind NDDs, losses of pathological proteins and defective ion channels have been reported and are found to aggravate the disease symptoms. Moreover, ion channel dysfunctions are eliciting a range of symptoms, including memory loss, movement disabilities, neuromuscular sprains, and strokes. Since the possible mechanistic role played by aberrant ion channels, their receptor and associated factors in neurodegeneration remained elusive; therefore, it is a challenging task for the neuroscientist to implement the therapeutics for targeting NDDs. This chapter reviews the potential role of the ion channels in membrane physiology and brain homeostasis, where ion channels and their associated factors have been characterized with their functional consequences in neurological diseases. Moreover, mechanistic role of perturbed ion channels has been identified in various NDDs, and finally, ion channel modulators have been investigated for their therapeutic intervention in treating common NDDs.

  3. Neurological Implications of Reading Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Edith G.

    1981-01-01

    A review of studies into the neurological aspects of reading disabilities indicates that two positions have been taken with regard to the brain and reading: (1) language skills are generally considered to be the function of the left hemisphere of the brain; and (2) very poor reading may be related to bilateral spatial processing for both boys and…

  4. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  5. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  6. [Sleep disorders in neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotterba, S

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disorders can be diagnosed in approximately 15 % of the population and have been shown to increase with age. The relationship between sleep disorders and neurological disorders, however, is still insufficiently considered in the clinical practice. Sleep disorders can be an early symptom of the disease, such as the presence of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) as an early indicator of neurodegeneration. Sleep disorders have also been shown to be a main symptom of various neurological syndromes, such as in restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) and narcolepsy. The international classification of sleep disorders 2nd edition (ICSD 2) describes the main diagnoses, insomnia, circadian rhythm sleep disorders, sleep-related breathing disorders and hypersomnia but all of these can also appear as symptoms in various neurological diseases. Parasomnias are largely considered a differential diagnosis to nocturnal epilepsy. In this review, the main sleep disorders are described with a particular focus on how they relate to neurological diseases; in particular, how they influence disease-related symptoms and how they affect the course of the disease.

  7. Somatic comorbidity in neurological disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuyen, J.; Bos, G.A.M. van den; Groenewegen, P.P.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Patients with comorbidity in general have a higher risk of dying, a poorer quality of life and greater use of health services. Relativel few studies have examined the occurrence of somatic comorbid conditions in neurological diseases. Aim: Therefore, the size of somatic comorbidity in fo

  8. Association between neurological assessment and developmental outcome in preterm toddlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kodrič

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been an increase in prevalence of low severity dysfunctions such as minor neurological dysfunction and cognitive deficits which consequently lead to school and behavior problems. The study presents the outcomes of a small group of preterm children with different medical complications at birth on follow-up at toddler age. In the neonatal period and at three months corrected age the neurological examination by the Amiel-Tison neurological assessment and the assessment of general movements was done. Both measures were compared with the criterion measure Bayley Scales of Infant Development - II. Results of the preterm group were compared with results of the normative group. According to results for both methods of neurological examination, children were classified into different categories meaning optimal or different degrees of non-optimal neurological results. The results of the children from different categories of neurological functioning were compared with the criterion measure. Children from the preterm group attained lower results on the developmental test compared to normative data. Children from groups with the lowest birth weight and gestational age attained the lowest results. These findings suggest that children from less optimal or non-optimal categories according to both methods of neurological examination attained lower developmental scores. The difference between groups was higher on the mental scale than on the motor scale of the developmental test.

  9. Breast Cancer Presents with a Paraneoplastic Neurologic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Coelho Barata

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes (PNS pose quite an uncommon neurological complication, affecting less than 1% of patients with breast cancer. Nearly one third of these patients lack detectable onconeural antibodies (ONAs, and improvement in neurologic deficits with concomitant cancer treatments is achieved in less than 30% of cases. Case Presentation: A 42-year-old, premenopausal woman presented with facial paralysis on the central left side accompanied by a left tongue deviation, an upward vertical nystagmus, moderate spastic paraparesis, dystonic posturing of the left foot, lower limb hyperreflexia and bilateral extensor plantar reflex. After ruling out all other potential neurologic causes, PNS was suspected but no ONAs were found. A PET-CT scan detected increased metabolism in the right breast, as well as an ipsilateral thoracic interpectoral adenopathy. Core biopsy confirmed the presence of an infiltrating duct carcinoma. After breast surgery, the neurologic symptoms disappeared. One week later, the patient was readmitted to the hospital with a bilateral fatigable eyelid ptosis, and two weeks later, there was a noticeable improvement in eyelid ptosis, accompanied by a rapid and progressive development of lower spastic paraparesis. She started adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy with marked clinical and neurological improvement, and by the end of radiotherapy, there were no signs of neurologic impairment. Conclusion: This case study highlights the importance of a high level of vigilance for the detection of PNS, even when ONAs are not detected, as the rapid identification and treatment of the underlying tumor offers the best chance for a full recovery.

  10. Suitable internal control genes for qRT-PCR normalization in cotton fiber development and somatic embryogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of cotton fiber development and somatic embryogenesis have been explored systematically with microarray and suppression subtractive hybridization. Real-time RT-PCR provides the simultaneous measurement of gene expression in many different samples, with which the data from microarray or others can be confirmed in detail. To achieve accurate and reliable gene expression results, normalization of real-time PCR data against one or several internal control genes is required, which should not fluctuate in different tissues during various stages of development. We assessed the gene expression of 7 frequently used housekeeping genes, including 18S rRNA, Histone3, UBQ7, Actin, Cyclophilin, Gbpolyubiquitin-1 and Gbpolyubiquitin-2, in a diverse set of 21 cotton samples. For fiber developmental series the expression of all housekeeping genes had the same down tendency after 17 DPA. But the expression of the AGP gene (arabinogalactan protein) that has high expression level at the later fiber development stage was up-regulated from 15 to 27 DPA. So the relative absolute quantification should be an efficient and convenient method for the fiber developmental series. The expression of nonfiber tissues series varied not so much against the fiber developmental series. And three best control genes Histone3, UBQ7 and Gbpolyubiquitin-1 have to be used in a combinated way to get better normalization.

  11. Cephalic Index in the First Three Years of Life: Study of Children with Normal Brain Development Based on Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirginia Likus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cephalic index is a highly useful method for planning surgical procedures, as well as assessing their effectiveness in correcting cranial deformations in children. There are relatively very few studies measuring cephalic index in healthy Caucasian young children. The aim of our study was to develop a classification of current cephalic index for healthy Caucasian children up to 3 years of age with normal brain development, using axial slice computer tomography performed with very thin slices (0.5 mm resulting in more accurate measurements. 180 healthy infants (83 females and 97 males were divided into 5 age categories: 0–3, 4–6, 7–12, 13–24, and 25–36 months. The average value of cephalic index in children up to 3 years of age amounted to 81.45 ± 7.06. The index value in case of children under 3 months was 80.19, 4 to 6 months was 81.45, 7 to 12 months was 83.15, in children under 2 years was 81.05, and in children under 3 years was 79.76. Mesocephaly is the dominating skull shape in children. In this study, we formulated a classification of current cephalic indices of children with normal brain development. Our date appears to be of utmost importance in anthropology, anatomy forensic medicine, and genetics.

  12. Development of visual peak selection system based on multi-ISs normalization algorithm to apply to methamphetamine impurity profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hun Joo; Han, Eunyoung; Lee, Jaesin; Chung, Heesun; Min, Sung-Gi

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to improve resolution of impurity peaks using a newly devised normalization algorithm for multi-internal standards (ISs) and to describe a visual peak selection system (VPSS) for efficient support of impurity profiling. Drug trafficking routes, location of manufacture, or synthetic route can be identified from impurities in seized drugs. In the analysis of impurities, different chromatogram profiles are obtained from gas chromatography and used to examine similarities between drug samples. The data processing method using relative retention time (RRT) calculated by a single internal standard is not preferred when many internal standards are used and many chromatographic peaks present because of the risk of overlapping between peaks and difficulty in classifying impurities. In this study, impurities in methamphetamine (MA) were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) method using ethylacetate containing 4 internal standards and analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The newly developed VPSS consists of an input module, a conversion module, and a detection module. The input module imports chromatograms collected from GC and performs preprocessing, which is converted with a normalization algorithm in the conversion module, and finally the detection module detects the impurities in MA samples using a visualized zoning user interface. The normalization algorithm in the conversion module was used to convert the raw data from GC-FID. The VPSS with the built-in normalization algorithm can effectively detect different impurities in samples even in complex matrices and has high resolution keeping the time sequence of chromatographic peaks the same as that of the RRT method. The system can widen a full range of chromatograms so that the peaks of impurities were better aligned for easy separation and classification. The resolution, accuracy, and speed of impurity profiling showed remarkable improvement. Copyright

  13. International electives in neurology training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jennifer L.; Coleman, Mary E.; Engstrom, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the current status of global health training and humanitarian relief opportunities in US and Canadian postgraduate neurology programs. Background: There is a growing interest among North American trainees to pursue medical electives in low- and middle-income countries. Such training opportunities provide many educational and humanitarian benefits but also pose several challenges related to organization, human resources, funding, and trainee and patient safety. The current support and engagement of neurology postgraduate training programs for trainees to pursue international rotations is unknown. Methods: A survey was distributed to all program directors in the United States and Canada (December 2012–February 2013) through the American Academy of Neurology to assess the training opportunities, institutional partnerships, and support available for international neurology electives. Results: Approximately half of responding programs (53%) allow residents to pursue global health–related electives, and 11% reported that at least 1 trainee participated in humanitarian relief during training (survey response rate 61%, 143/234 program directors). Canadian programs were more likely to allow residents to pursue international electives than US programs (10/11, 91% vs 65/129, 50%, p = 0.023). The number of trainees participating in international electives was low: 0%–9% of residents (55% of programs) and 10%–19% of residents (21% of programs). Lack of funding was the most commonly cited reason for residents not participating in global health electives. If funding was available, 93% of program directors stated there would be time for residents to participate. Most program directors (75%) were interested in further information on global health electives. Conclusions: In spite of high perceived interest, only half of US neurology training programs include international electives, mostly due to a reported lack of funding. By contrast, the majority

  14. Fetal MRI: obstetrical and neurological perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gressens, Pierre [INSERM E 9935 and Service de Neurologie Pediatrique, Hopital Robert Debre, 48 Blvd Serurier, 75019, Paris (France); Luton, Dominique [Maternity Department, Hopital Robert Debre, Paris (France)

    2004-09-01

    Despite major advances in the understanding and in the genetics of several diseases of the developing brain, early prediction of the neurological prognosis of brain abnormality discovered in utero or of white matter damage discovered in a preterm neonate remains particularly difficult. Advances in prenatal diagnosis and the increased rate of survival of extremely preterm infants who are at higher risk of developing white matter damage underline the critical and urgent need for reliable predictive techniques. New imaging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy or functional MRI applied to the fetus represent promising tools in this perspective. (orig.)

  15. Milestone-compatible neurology resident assessments: A role for observable practice activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lyell K; Dimberg, Elliot L; Boes, Christopher J; Eggers, Scott D Z; Dodick, David W; Cutsforth-Gregory, Jeremy K; Leep Hunderfund, Andrea N; Capobianco, David J

    2015-06-02

    Beginning in 2014, US neurology residency programs were required to report each trainee's educational progression within 29 neurology Milestone competency domains. Trainee assessment systems will need to be adapted to inform these requirements. The primary aims of this study were to validate neurology resident assessment content using observable practice activities (OPAs) and to develop assessment formats easily translated to the Neurology Milestones. A modified Delphi technique was used to establish consensus perceptions of importance of 73 neurology OPAs among neurology educators and trainees at 3 neurology residency programs. A content validity score (CVS) was derived for each neurology OPA, with scores ≥4.0 determined in advance to indicate sufficient content validity. The mean CVS for all OPAs was 4.4 (range 3.5-5.0). Fifty-seven (78%) OPAs had a CVS ≥4.0, leaving 16 (22%) below the pre-established threshold for content validity. Trainees assigned a higher importance to individual OPAs (mean CVS 4.6) compared to faculty (mean 4.4, p = 0.016), but the effect size was small (η(2) = 0.10). There was no demonstrated effect of length of education experience on perceived importance of neurology OPAs (p = 0.23). Two sample resident assessment formats were developed, one using neurology OPAs alone and another using a combination of neurology OPAs and the Neurology Milestones. This study provides neurology training programs with content validity evidence for items to include in resident assessments, and sample assessment formats that directly translate to the Neurology Milestones. Length of education experience has little effect on perceptions of neurology OPA importance. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. [Specific features of neurological complications developing in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome: possibility for correction and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkova, V N

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and preceding metabolic disturbances has reached epidemic proportions. Oxidative stress plays a significant role in the development of micro- and macrovascular complications in patients with DM. The accumulation of free radicals is responsible for the development of systemic and vascular inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and hypercoagulable and ischemic states. Since vascular and nervous system damages do not level off even under adequate glycemic control, there is a need for complex pathogenetic treatment strategies. Antioxidant therapy using mexidol is one of the compulsory components of combination therapy for complications of DM.

  17. Neurological Complications following Blood Transfusions in Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawar, Nayaab; Kulpa, Jolanta; Bellin, Anne; Proteasa, Simona; Sundaram, Revathy

    2017-01-01

    In Sickle Cell Anemia (SCA) patient blood transfusions are an important part of treatment for stroke and its prevention. However, blood transfusions can also lead to complications such as Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS). This brief report highlights two cases of SCA who developed such neurological complications after a blood transfusion. RLPS should be considered as the cause of neurologic finding in patients with SCA and hypertension following a blood transfusion.

  18. Early and Late Neurological Complications after Cardiac Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Balkanay

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The clinical use of cyclosporine as an immunosuppressant improved the recipient’s life span and revolutionized the field of cardiac transplantation. But most of the immunesuppressant drugs including cyclosporine may cause neurological and many other side effects. In this article we present three cases, from 58 patients, undergoing cardiac transplantation at our hospital from 1989 to 2008 in whom developed transient neurological complications.

  19. Presidential Oration: The 18 th Annual Conference of the Indian Academy of Neurology, Trichi, Tamil Nadu, September 24-26, 2010, Epilepsy Care in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Kurupath

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 80% of the 50 million people with epilepsy worldwide reside in developing countries that are least equipped to tackle the enormous medical, social and economic challenges posed by epilepsy. These include widespread poverty, illiteracy, inefficient and unevenly distributed health care systems, and social stigma and misconceptions associated with epilepsy. Several studies have reported that a large proportion of patients with epilepsy in developing countries never receive appropriate treatment for their condition, and many, though diagnosed and initiated on treatment, soon discontinue treatment. Unaffordable cost of treatment, unavailability of antiepileptic drugs, and superstitious and cultural beliefs contribute to high epilepsy treatment gap in resource-poor countries. A significant proportion of the current burden of epilepsy in developing countries can be minimized by educating the public about the positive aspects of life with epilepsy and the primary and secondary physicians about current trends in the management of epilepsies, scaling up routine availability of low-cost antiepileptic drugs, and developing cost-effective epilepsy surgery programs.

  20. Maternal obesity induced by a high fat diet causes altered cellular development in fetal brains suggestive of a predisposition of offspring to neurological disorders in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Ewa K; Srinivasan, Malathi; Stachowiak, Michal K; Patel, Mulchand S

    2013-12-01

    Fetal development in an obese maternal intrauterine environment has been shown to predispose the offspring for a number of metabolic disorders in later life. The observation that a large percentage of women of child-bearing age in the US are overweight/obese during pregnancy is therefore a source of concern. A high fat (HF) diet-induced obesity in female rats has been used as a model for maternal obesity. The objective of this study was to determine cellular development in brains of term fetuses of obese rats fed a HF diet from the time of weaning. Fetal brains were dissected out on gestational day 21 and processed for immunohistochemical analysis in the hypothalamic as well as extra-hypothalamic regions. The major observation of this study is that fetal development in the obese HF female rat induced several alterations in the HF fetal brain. Marked increases were observed in orexigenic signaling and a significant decrease was observed for anorexigenic signaling in the vicinity of the 3rd ventricle in HF brains. Additionally, our results indicated diminished migration and maturation of stem-like cells in the 3rd ventricular region as well as in the brain cortex. The results from the present study indicate developmental alterations in the hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic regions in the HF fetal brain suggestive of a predisposition for the development of obesity and possibly neurodevelopmental abnormalities in the offspring.

  1. 'Beyond Milestones': a randomised controlled trial evaluating an innovative digital resource teaching quality observation of normal child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Anne M; Cunningham, Clare; Sinclair, Adriane J; Rao, Arjun; Lonergan, Amy; Bye, Ann M E

    2014-05-01

    The study aimed to create and evaluate the educational effectiveness of a digital resource instructing paediatric trainees in a systematic approach to critical and quality observation of normal child development. A digital educational resource was developed utilising the skills of an expert developmental paediatrician who was videoed assessing normal early child development at a series of critical stages. Videos illustrated aspects of language, sophistication of play and socialisation, cognition, and motor progress. Expert commentary, teaching text and summaries were used. A randomised controlled trial evaluated the resource. Paediatric trainees were recruited from The Sydney Children's Hospitals Network. Outcome measures were repeated at three time points (pre-teaching, immediate-post and 1 month) and included self-rated attitudes, knowledge of markers of development and observational expertise. Qualitative data on teaching usefulness were obtained through open-ended questions. Fifty-six paediatric trainees (registrar 79%, women 82%; mean age 31 years) completed the pre-assessment, 46 the immediate-post and 45 the 1-month follow-up (20% attrition). Compared with the Control group, the Teaching group scored higher over time on markers of development (P = 0.006), observational expertise (P video and expert commentary and reported improvement in confidence and understanding and acquiring a more structured approach. The 'Beyond Milestones' free online resource for medical professionals improves knowledge, increases confidence and is useful, providing a structured approach to developmental assessment. The techniques taught can be applied to every paediatric consultation. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  2. Assessment of gait in toddlers with normal motor development and in hemiplegic children with mild motor impairment: a validity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla R. P. Figueiredo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The optimization of gait performance is an important goal in the rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy (CP who present a prognosis associated with locomotion. Gait analysis using videos captured by digital cameras requires validation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the validity of a method that involves the analysis of videos captured using a digital camera for quantifying the temporal parameters of gait in toddlers with normal motor development and children with CP. METHOD: Eleven toddlers with normal motor development and eight children with spastic hemiplegia who were able to walk without assistive devices were asked to walk through a space contained in the visual field of two instruments: a digital camera and a three-dimensional motion analysis system, Qualisys Pro-Reflex. The duration of the stance and swing phases of gait and of the entire gait cycle were calculated by analyzing videos captured by a digital camera and compared to those obtained by Qualisys Pro-Reflex, which is considered a highly accurate system. RESULTS: The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC demonstrated excellent agreement (ICC>0.90 between the two procedures for all measurements, except for the swing phase of the normal toddlers (ICC=0.35. The standard error of measurement was less than 0.02 seconds for all measures. CONCLUSIONS: The results reveal similarities between the two instruments, suggesting that digital cameras can be valid instruments for quantifying two temporal parameters of gait. This congruence is of clinical and scientific relevance and validates the use of digital cameras as a resource for helping the assessment and documentation of the therapeutic effects of interventions targeted at the gait of children with CP.

  3. Development of a normalized extraction to further aid in fast, high-throughput processing of forensic DNA reference samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connon, Catherine C; LeFebvre, Aaron K; Benjamin, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a "normalized" extraction procedure to be used in conjunction with previously validated 3μL fast PCR reactions (42-51min utilizing KAPA2G™ Fast Multiplex PCR Kit) and alternative capillary electrophoresis (24-28min injection using POP-6™ Polymer and a 22cm array). This was the final phase of a workflow overhaul for the database unit at Cellmark Forensics to achieve a substantial reduction in processing time for forensic DNA database samples without incurring significant added costs and/or the need for new instrumentation, while still generating high quality STR profiles. Extraction normalization aimed to consistently yield a small range of DNA concentrations, thereby eliminating the need for sample quantification and dilution. This was specifically achieved using the ChargeSwitch(®) Forensic DNA Purification Kit and a reduction in extraction bead quantity, thereby forcing an increase in bead binding efficiency. Following development of this extraction procedure, an evaluation ensued to assess the combination of normalized extraction, 3μL fast PCR (with PowerPlex 16 HS, Identifiler Plus and Identifiler primer sets), and alternative CE detection - further referred to as new "first pass" procedures. These modifications resulted in a 37% reduction in processing time and were evaluated via an in depth validation, from which nearly 2000 STR profiles were generated, of which 554 profiles from 77 swab donors and 210 profiles from 35 buccal collector donors specifically arose from the new first pass procedures. This validation demonstrates the robustness of these processes for buccal swabs and Buccal DNA Collectors™ using the three primer sets evaluated and their ability to generate high quality STR profiles with 95-99% and 88-91% pass rates, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Neurological complication after a vertical infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Case report of possible differential diagnoses of a neurological deficit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, R; Bucher, M; Graf, B

    2009-08-01

    A 72-year-old man with an obliteration of the brachial artery received a vertical infraclavicular block (VIP) for vascular surgery but 20 h after the operation a complete paresis of the affected extremity occurred. A new vascular obliteration could be excluded. During the diagnostic examination the patient noticed a snapping noise in the cervical column when moving his head and an abrupt recovery of the neurological deficits occurred. The radiological diagnostic provided no indication of cerebral ischemia or lesions of the brachial plexus. An additional diagnostic finding was a profound herniated vertebral disc with compression of the myelon. Fortunately, the neurological deficits completely returned to normal.

  5. Fundamental Study on the Development of Structural Lightweight Concrete by Using Normal Coarse Aggregate and Foaming Agent

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    Han-Seung Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Structural lightweight concrete (SLWC has superior properties that allow the optimization of super tall structure systems for the process of design. Because of the limited supply of lightweight aggregates in Korea, the development of structural lightweight concrete without lightweight aggregates is needed. The physical and mechanical properties of specimens that were cast using normal coarse aggregates and different mixing ratios of foaming agent to evaluate the possibility of creating structural lightweight concrete were investigated. The results show that the density of SLWC decreases as the dosage of foaming agent increases up to a dosage of 0.6%, as observed by SEM. It was also observed that the foaming agent induced well separated pores, and that the size of the pores ranged from 50 to 100 μm. Based on the porosity of concrete specimens with foaming agent, compressive strength values of structural lightweight foam concrete (SLWFC were obtained. It was also found that the estimated values from proposed equations for compressive strength and modulus of elasticity of SLWFC, and values obtained by actual measurements were in good agreement. Thus, this study confirms that new structural lightweight concrete using normal coarse aggregates and foaming agent can be developed successfully.

  6. Osteoblast ablation reduces normal long-term hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal but accelerates leukemia development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Marisa; Zhang, Bin; Ho, Yinwei; Agarwal, Puneet; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Bhatia, Ravi

    2015-04-23

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in regulatory niches in the bone marrow (BM). Although HSC niches have been extensively characterized, the role of endosteal osteoblasts (OBs) in HSC regulation requires further clarification, and the role of OBs in regulating leukemic stem cells (LSCs) is not well studied. We used an OB visualization and ablation mouse model to study the role of OBs in regulating normal HSCs and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) LSCs. OB ablation resulted in increase in cells with a LSK Flt3(-)CD150(+)CD48(-) long-term HSC (LTHSC) phenotype but reduction of a more highly selected LSK Flt3(-)CD34(-)CD49b(-)CD229(-) LTHSC subpopulation. LTHSCs from OB-ablated mice demonstrated loss of quiescence and reduced long-term engraftment and self-renewal capacity. Ablation of OB in a transgenic CML mouse model resulted in accelerated leukemia development with reduced survival compared with control mice. The notch ligand Jagged-1 was overexpressed on CML OBs. Normal and CML LTHSCs cultured with Jagged-1 demonstrated reduced cell cycling, consistent with a possible role for loss of Jagged-1 signals in altered HSC and LSC function after OB ablation. These studies support an important role for OBs in regulating quiescence and self-renewal of LTHSCs and a previously unrecognized role in modulating leukemia development in CML. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Development and evaluation of different normalization strategies for gene expression studies in Candida albicans biofilms by real-time PCR

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    Deforce Dieter

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans biofilms are commonly found on indwelling medical devices. However, the molecular basis of biofilm formation and development is not completely understood. Expression analysis of genes potentially involved in these processes, such as the ALS (Agglutinine Like Sequence gene family can be performed using quantitative PCR (qPCR. In the present study, we investigated the expression stability of eight housekeeping genes potentially useful as reference genes to study gene expression in Candida albicans (C. albicans biofilms, using the geNorm Visual Basic Application (VBA for Microsoft Excel. To validate our normalization strategies we determined differences in ALS1 and ALS3 expression levels between C. albicans biofilm cells and their planktonic counterparts. Results The eight genes tested in this study are ranked according to their expression stability (from most stable to least stable as follows: ACT1 (β-actin/PMA1 (adenosine triphosphatase, RIP (ubiquinol cytochrome-c reductase complex component, RPP2B (cytosolic ribosomal acidic protein P2B, LSC2 (succinyl-CoA synthetase β-subunit fragment, IMH3 (inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase fragment, CPA1 (carbamoyl-phosphate synthethase small subunit and GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Our data indicate that five genes are necessary for accurate and reliable normalization of gene expression data in C. albicans biofilms. Using different normalization strategies, we found a significant upregulation of the ALS1 gene and downregulation of the ALS3 gene in C. albicans biofilms grown on silicone disks in a continous flow system, the CDC reactor (Centre for Disease Control, for 24 hours. Conclusion In conclusion, we recommend the use of the geometric mean of the relative expression values from the five housekeeping genes (ACT1, PMA1, RIP, RPP2B and LSC2 for normalization, when analysing differences in gene expression levels between C. albicans biofilm

  8. Snipper, an Eri1 homologue, affects histone mRNA abundance and is crucial for normal Drosophila melanogaster development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiadis, Anastasios; Delidakis, Christos; Kalantidis, Kriton

    2017-07-01

    The conserved 3'-5' RNA exonuclease ERI1 is implicated in RNA interference inhibition, 5.8S rRNA maturation and histone mRNA maturation and turnover. The single ERI1 homologue in Drosophila melanogaster Snipper (Snp) is a 3'-5' exonuclease, but its in vivo function remains elusive. Here, we report Snp requirement for normal Drosophila development, since its perturbation leads to larval arrest and tissue-specific downregulation results in abnormal tissue development. Additionally, Snp directly interacts with histone mRNA, and its depletion results in drastic reduction in histone transcript levels. We propose that Snp protects the 3'-ends of histone mRNAs and upon its absence, histone transcripts are readily degraded. This in turn may lead to cell cycle delay or arrest, causing growth arrest and developmental perturbations. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. Accommodation of workers with chronic neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleecker, Margit L; Barnes, Sheryl K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to work is important to those with chronic neurologic disorders (CND) and to the aging workforce. Many signs and symptoms are similar in those with CND and normal aging, but may interfere with the ability to work if not appropriately accommodated. This requires the healthcare provider to recognize the specific features of the CND that interferes with work and how it can be accommodated. Review of the American with Disabilities Act and the subsequent amendment informs the healthcare provider as to what is covered under the law and how the disability can be accommodated. Overall employers want to retain qualified employees and therefore accommodating workers is beneficial to both the employee with CND and the employer.

  10. Ictal kissing behavior: neurological and psychodynamic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşkıran, Emine; Özmen, Mine; Kılıc, Özge; Sentürk, Aslı; Özkara, Cigdem

    2013-11-01

    This study is based on the psychodynamic and neurological analysis of three Turkish patients who displayed ictal kissing automatism during their seizures. To unveil the probable underlying causes of their kissing behaviors, all patients underwent psychiatric interviews after being evaluated by ictal video-EEG recordings. The group consisted of two females (ages 35 and 29) and one male (age 26). In addition to prominent oral automatisms, each patient also displayed behaviors of kissing or blowing kisses to individuals at close proximity. Seizures were related to the right temporal lobe in two patients and the left temporal lobe in one patient. Magnetic resonance imaging showed mesial temporal sclerosis in two of the patients (one left, one right) and was normal in one. According to the DSM-IV-TR criteria, each of the three patients also suffered from major depression, while the psychodynamic interviews revealed traumatic childhood histories and intense unfulfilled affective needs. © 2013.

  11. Normal growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more likely to get sick and miss school. Breakfast is very important. Children may feel tired and unmotivated if they do not eat a good breakfast. The relationship between breakfast and improved learning has ...

  12. [Neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Arseny A; Rossetti, Andrea O; Michel, Patrik; Benninger, David; Nater, Bernard; Wider, Christian; Hirt, Lorenz; Kuntzer, Thierry; Démonet, Jean-François; Du Pasquier, Renaud A; Vingerhoets, François

    2016-01-13

    In 2015, cerebral stimulation becomes increasingly established in the treatment of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Efficacy of endovascular treatment has been demonstrated for acute ischemic stroke. Deep brain stimulation at low frequency improves dysphagia and freezing of gait in Parkinson patients. Bimagrumab seems to increase muscular volume and force in patients with inclusion body myositis. In cluster-type headache, a transcutaneous vagal nerve stimulator is efficient in stopping acute attacks and also reducing their frequency. Initial steps have been undertaken towards modulating memory by stimulation of the proximal fornix. Teriflunomide is the first oral immunomodulatory drug for which efficacy has been shown in preventing conversion from clinical isolated syndrome to multiple sclerosis.

  13. Dysprosody nonassociated with neurological diseases--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, José Antonio; Corso, Renato José; Guilherme, Ana Cláudia Rocha; Pinho, Sílvia Rebelo; Nóbrega, Monica de Oliveira

    2004-03-01

    Dysprosody also known as pseudo-foreign dialect, is the rarest neurological speech disorder. It is characterized by alterations in intensity, in the timing of utterance segments, and in rhythm, cadency, and intonation of words. The terms refers to changes as to duration, fundamental frequency, and intensity of tonic and atonic syllables of the sentences spoken, which deprive an individual's particular speech of its characteristics. The cause of this disease is usually associated with neurological pathologies such as brain vascular accidents, cranioencephalic traumatisms, and brain tumors. The authors report a case of dysprosody attended to at the Núcleo de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço de São Paulo (NOSP). It is about a female patient with bilateral III degree Reinke's edema and normal neurological examinations that started presenting characteristics of the German dialect following a larynx microsurgery.

  14. Fragile X syndrome and an isodicentric X chromosome in a woman with multiple anomalies, developmental delay, and normal pubertal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedenberg, D L; Gane, L W; Richards, C S; Lampe, M; Hills, J; O'Connor, R; Manchester, D; Taylor, A; Tassone, F; Hulseberg, D; Hagerman, R J; Patil, S R

    1999-07-30

    We report on an individual with developmental delays, short stature, skeletal abnormalities, normal pubertal development, expansion of the fragile X triplet repeat, as well as an isodicentric X chromosome. S is a 19-year-old woman who presented for evaluation of developmental delay. Pregnancy was complicated by a threatened miscarriage. She was a healthy child with intellectual impairment noted in infancy. Although she had global delays, speech was noted to be disproportionately delayed with few words until age 3.5 years. Facial appearance was consistent with fragile X syndrome. Age of onset of menses was 11 years with normal breast development. A maternal male second cousin had been identified with fragile X syndrome based on DNA studies. The mother of this child (S's maternal first cousin) and the grandfather (S's maternal uncle) were both intellectually normal but were identified as carrying triplet expansions in the premutation range. S's mother had some school difficulties but was not identified as having global delays. Molecular analysis of S's fragile X alleles noted an expansion of more than 400 CGG repeats in one allele. Routine cytogenetic studies of peripheral blood noted the presence of an isodicentric X in 81of 86 cells scored. Five of 86 cells were noted to be 45,X. Cytogenetic fra(X) studies from peripheral blood showed that the structurally normal chromosome had the fragile site in approximately 16% of the cells. Analysis of maternal fragile X alleles identified an allele with an expansion to approximately 110 repeats. FMRP studies detected the expression of the protein in 24% of cells studied. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported with an isodicentric X and fragile X syndrome. Whereas her clinical phenotype is suggestive of fragile X syndrome, her skeletal abnormalities may represent the presence of the isodicentric X. Treatment of S with 20 mg/day of Prozac improved her behavior. In the climate of cost con trol, this individual

  15. The risk of developing depression when suffering from neurological diseases [Wie hoch ist das Risiko, im Gefolge einer neurologischen Erkrankung eine Depression zu entwickeln?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thielscher, S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aim of the study: To investigate the comorbidity of Alzheimer’s/dementia, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s with depression.Methods: 42,914 patients who were newly diagnosed with the four comorbid diseases were included in the study. We analyzed how many of these patients developed depression within five years.Results: Between 21% (males with epilepsy and 39% (women with Parkinson’s/44% (Alzheimer’s patients under 60 years developed depression within five years. Conclusion: We recommend routine checks for depression in patients diagnosed with one of these diseases, especially in the most comorbid ones.[german] Zweck der Untersuchung: Ermittlung der Häufigkeit des Auftretens von Depressionen im Gefolge von neurologischen Erkrankungen (M. Alzheimer, Demenz, Epilepsie, multiple Sklerose, M. Parkinson.Methodik: Wir beobachteten den Krankheitsverlauf von 42.914 Patienten, bei denen die genannten neurologischen Erkrankungen erstmals auftraten, über fünf Jahre, im Hinblick auf das Auftreten einer Depression.Ergebnisse: Bei 21% (männliche Patienten mit Epilepsie bis 39% (weibliche Parkinson-Patientinnen bzw. 44% (beide Geschlechter, Patienten unter 60 Jahren mit Alzheimer-Diagnose der Patientinnen und Patienten wurde innerhalb von fünf Jahren zusätzlich eine Depression diagnostiziert. Schlussfolgerung: Wir empfehlen, alle Patientinnen und Patienten mit einer der genannten Erkrankungen, v. a. den besonders komorbiden, auf Depression zu untersuchen.

  16. Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background ‘Neuromarketing’ is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods ‘neuromarketing’ and scientific ones ‘consumer neuroscience’. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. Discussion In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. Summary We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology: First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington’s disease. Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom

  17. Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javor, Andrija; Koller, Monika; Lee, Nick; Chamberlain, Laura; Ransmayr, Gerhard

    2013-02-06

    'Neuromarketing' is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods 'neuromarketing' and scientific ones 'consumer neuroscience'. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology:First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington's disease.Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom.Third, trust research in the medical context lacks

  18. [Neuropediatrics: epidemiological features and etiologies at the Dakar neurology service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, M; Sene-Diouf, F; Diop, A G; Ndao, A K; Ndiaye, M M; Ndiaye, I P

    1999-01-01

    Child neurology is a relatively young speciality of neurosciences which is at the frontier of Neurology and Paediatrics. Its development has been impulsed by the diagnosis techniques such as Neurobiology, Genetics, Neuroimaging and pedo-psychology. We conducted a retrospective survey among the in-patients from January 1980 to December 1997 in the service of Neurology of the University Hospital. Have been included children ranged from 0 to 15 years old without any racial, sexual or origin distinctive. In Neurology Department, children of 0 to 15 years old represent 10.06% of the in-patients received from 1980 to 1997. The mortality rate was 9.23%. The diseases are dominated by epilepsy and infantile encephalopathies with 31.02%, infectious diseases with 19.36% represented by tuberculosis, other bacterial, viral and parasitical etiologies, tumors with 10.36%, vascular pathology and degenerative disorders.

  19. Feasibility of ballistic strengthening exercises in neurologic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gavin; Clark, Ross A; Hansson, Jessica; Paterson, Kade

    2014-09-01

    Conventional methods for strength training in neurologic rehabilitation are not task specific for walking. Ballistic strength training was developed to improve the functional transfer of strength training; however, no research has investigated this in neurologic populations. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of applying ballistic principles to conventional leg strengthening exercises in individuals with mobility limitations as a result of neurologic injuries. Eleven individuals with neurologic injuries completed seated and reclined leg press using conventional and ballistic techniques. A 2 × 2 repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare power measures (peak movement height and peak velocity) between exercises and conditions. Peak jump velocity and peak jump height were greater when using the ballistic jump technique rather than the conventional concentric technique (P exercises, the incorporation of ballistic principles was associated with increased peak height and peak velocities.

  20. Neurology for internal medicine residents: working towards a national Canadian curriculum consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarou, Jason; Hopyan, Julia; Panisko, Danny; Tai, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Partly due to the absence of a standardized neurology curriculum, internal medicine residents often perceive neurology lowest in terms of the level of knowledge and clinical confidence. To compare the learning needs of internal medicine residents with the perceived learning needs of neurology and internal medicine program directors and to integrate these needs by developing a focused nationwide neurology curriculum for internal medicine residents rotating through neurology. Medical residents and neurology and internal medicine program directors from programs across the Canada were asked to complete an online survey and to rank an exhaustive list of neurology topics. A modified Delphi approach was used to obtain consensus on the top 20 topics to include in the curriculum. Over 80% of residents felt their competency in neurology was average or below after completing their neurology rotation. There was very high correlation between the topics ranked by residents and staff. We were able to achieve consensus on 20 topics to be included in a neurology curriculum for internal medicine residents. Through a modified Delphi approach we were able to produce a neurology curriculum for internal medicine residents rotating through neurology based on the input of program directors across the country.

  1. Reaction time of patients with Parkinson's disease, with reference to asymmetry of neurological signs.

    OpenAIRE

    Yokochi, F. (Fusako); Nakamura, R; Narabayashi, H

    1985-01-01

    Electromyographic reaction times of the left and the right finger extensor muscles in extension movement of the wrist were examined in 42 patients with Parkinson's disease, and 20 normal subjects. Compared to the normal subjects and the patients with neurological signs confined to the right side, the patients with neurological signs on the left side or on both sides showed slowing of reaction times regardless of the side of responding hand. The patients with asymmetry of bilateral neurologica...

  2. Neurological disorders and celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Giovanni; Bordo, Bianca M; Schalling, Renzo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; Di Bella, Camillo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) determines neurologic manifestations in 10% of all CD patients. We describe the most common clinical manifestations as cerebellar ataxia, gluten encephalopathy, multiple sclerosis, peripheral neuropathies, sensorineural hearing loss, epilepsy, headache, depression, cognitive deficiencies and other less described clinical conditions. Our aim is to perform, as more as possible, a review about the most recent update on the topics in international literature. It is important to consider clinical neurological manifestations in celiac patients and to research these conditions also in the follow-up because they may start also one year after the start of gluten free diet (GFD) as peripheral neuropathy. The association with autism is analysed and possible new association with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) are considered.

  3. Neurologic complications of liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, A J; Estol, C; Faris, A A

    1988-05-01

    The clinical and neuropathologic findings of 55 adults and 30 children who received liver transplants were reviewed. Encephalopathy was the most common clinical neurologic syndrome and was usually caused by metabolic or anoxic causes. (Alzheimer type astrocytes were present in 73 per cent of patients, and evidence of diffuse hypoxic damage was present in 40 per cent of children and 25 per cent of adults.) Cerebrovascular lesions were a common finding with infarcts or hemorrhages present in 30 per cent of patients. CNS infections were documented in 34 per cent of patients. Seizures were present in a third of patients. Central pontine myelinolysis was present in 12 per cent of patients and was more common in adults than in children. Antemortem diagnosis of neurologic complications was more often based on clinical presentation rather than specific radiologic or laboratory tests.

  4. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  5. Botulinum Toxin in Pediatric Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M. I. Moawad MD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins are natural molecules produced by anaerobic spore-forming bacteria called Clostradium boltulinum. The toxin has a peculiar mechanism of action by preventing the release of acetylcholine from the presynaptic membrane. Consequently, it has been used in the treatment of various neurological conditions related to muscle hyperactivity and/or spasticity. Also, it has an impact on the autonomic nervous system by acting on smooth muscle, leading to its use in the management of pain syndromes. The use of botulinum toxin in children separate from adults has received very little attention in the literature. This review presents the current data on the use of botulinum neurotoxin to treat various neurological disorders in children.

  6. Neurological manifestations in Fabry disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph Bruno Bidin Brooks; Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare, progressive, multisystem and highly debilitating disease. FD is an X-linked lysosome storage disorder that results in α-galactosidase A deifciency. The subsequent accumulation of glycosphingolipids is more evident in vascular endothelium and smooth-muscle cells. The resulting effect of the deposition is generalized inlfammation and vasculopathy, which can also affect the central and peripheral nervous system. FD progresses with kidney dysfunction, angiokeratoma of the skin, cardiomyopathy, cerebrovascular events and neurological disorders. In the present review, the neurological manifestations of FD are summarized with emphasis on cerebral vasculopathy, cochlear nerve dysfunction, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms, autonomic dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy. Enzyme replacement therapy is also discussed in the light of its more prominent effects when administered early in life, which make it essential to diagnose FD as soon as possible.

  7. Neurological abnormalities and neurocognitive functions in healthy elder people: A structural equation modeling analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Raymond CK

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aims Neurological abnormalities have been reported in normal aging population. However, most of them were limited to extrapyramidal signs and soft signs such as motor coordination and sensory integration have received much less attention. Very little is known about the relationship between neurological soft signs and neurocognitive function in healthy elder people. The current study aimed to examine the underlying relationships between neurological soft signs and neurocognition in a group of healthy elderly. Methods One hundred and eighty healthy elderly participated in the current study. Neurological soft signs were evaluated with the subscales of Cambridge Neurological Inventory. A set of neurocognitive tests was also administered to all the participants. Structural equation modeling was adopted to examine the underlying relationship between neurological soft signs and neurocognition. Results No significant differences were found between the male and female elder people in neurocognitive function performances and neurological soft signs. The model fitted well in the elderly and indicated the moderate associations between neurological soft signs and neurocognition, specifically verbal memory, visual memory and working memory. Conclusions The neurological soft signs are more or less statistically equivalent to capture the similar information done by conventional neurocognitive function tests in the elderly. The implication of these findings may serve as a potential neurological marker for the early detection of pathological aging diseases or related mental status such as mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Bravo! Neurology at the opera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Brandy R

    2010-01-01

    Opera is a complex musical form that reflects the complexity of the human condition and the human brain. This article presents an introduction to the portrayal of medical professionals in opera, including one neurologist, as well as two characters in whom neurological disease contributes to the action of the musical drama. Consideration is also given to the neuroanatomy and neuropathology of opera singers with further speculation regarding the neural underpinnings of the passion of opera's audience.

  9. HTLV-1 Associated Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Yasir; Khan, Ishaq Nasib; Farman, Muhammad; Al Karim, Saleh; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Kamal, Muhammad Amjad; Al Ghamdi, Khalid; Harakeh, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus which is endemic to certain regions of the world and infects around 10-20 million people. HTLV-1 is the etiologic agent of Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and HTLV-1 associated neurological disorders including mainly HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/Tropical spastic paraparesis. The involvement of the central nervous diseases occurs among: HTLV-1 infected patients from endemic areas, HIV positive individuals and drug users. The ability of HTLV-1 to cause associated neuropathies starts with the virus crossing the blood brain barrier (BBB), then entering and infecting the cells of the central nervous system. As a consequence, to the viral attack, HTLV-1 infected lymphocytes produce pro-inflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor alpha, Interleukin 1 beta and interleukin 6 which further disrupts the BBB. Different serological tests have been used in the diagnosis of HTLV-1. These include: ELISA, Western Blotting (WB), Immunofluorescence, Particle Agglutination and Polymerase Chain Reaction which is used as a confirmatory test. Danazol, pentoxifylline, azathioprine and vitamin C have been used in the treatment of the HTLV-1 associated neurological disorders. Other antiviral drugs (lamivudine, zidovudine), monoclonal antibodies (Daclizumab) and therapeutic agents (valporic acid, interferons) have also been evaluated. No known drug, so far, has been shown to be efficacious. The aim of this review is to present the complexities of HTLV-1 associated neurological disorders and their current ongoing treatment. In addition to discussing future possible therapeutic strategies, by targeting HTVL-1 viral components and gene/s products, for the treatment of those neurological conditions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. [Deficiency, disability, neurology and cinema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Cano de la Cuerda, Roberto; Jiménez-Antona, Carmen

    2010-12-16

    Cinema has been defined in many different ways, but most of them agree that it should be considered both a technique and an art. Although films often depict fantasy stories, in many cases they also reflect day-to-day realities. In its earliest days cinema was already attracted to the world of health and sickness, and frequently addressed topics like medical practice, how patients lived with their illnesses, bioethical issues, the relationship between physician and patient or research. To review the presence of neurological pathologies in the cinema with a view to identifying the main neurological disorders that have been portrayed in films. Likewise it also intends to describe the medical praxis that is employed, the relationship between physician and patient, how the experiences of the patient and the family are represented, the adaptation to social and occupational situations, and the intervention of other health care professionals related with neurological patients. Some of the most significant films that have addressed these topics were reviewed and it was seen that in some of them the illness is dealt with in a very true-to-life manner, whereas others tend to include a greater number of inaccuracies and a larger degree of fiction. Cinema has helped to shape certain ways of thinking about the health care professionals who work with neurological patients, the importance of support from the family and the social role, among other things. This confirms that resorting to cinematographic productions is a fruitful tool for stimulating a critical interest in the past and present of medical practice.

  11. Different Neurologic Aspects of Nutritional B12 Deficiency in Infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Sanem; Serdaroglu, Gul; Tekgul, Hasan; Gokben, Sarenur

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate neurologic problems caused by nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy. Twenty-four cases between 2 and 18 months of age with neurologic symptoms and/or signs and diagnosed as nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency were analyzed. The most common symptoms were developmental retardation, afebrile seizures, and involuntary movements. The mean vitamin B12 levels were lower in patients with both neurologic and extraneurologic involvement when compared to those with only neurologic symptoms. All of the cases were treated with vitamin B12. In patients with severe deficiencies, involuntary movements were observed during vitamin B12 treatment using cyanocobalamin form. At the 1-year follow-up, all but 3 patients were considered neurodevelopmentally normal. The 3 patients that did not fully recover, on admission, had the lowest vitamin B12 levels. It is of great importance to prevent, diagnose, and treat vitamin B12 deficiency promptly to prevent the long-term neurologic problems.

  12. Auditory-Verbal Comprehension Development of 2-5 Year Old Normal Persian Speaking Children in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Yadegari

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Understanding and defining developmental norms of auditory comprehension is a necessity for detecting auditory-verbal comprehension impairments in children. We hereby investigated lexical auditory development of Persian (Farsi speaking children.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, auditory comprehension of four 2-5 year old normal children of adult’s child-directed utterance at available nurseries was observed by researchers primarily to gain a great number of comprehendible words for the children of the same age. The words were classified into nouns, verbs and adjectives. Auditory-verbal comprehension task items were also considered in 2 sections of subordinates and superordinates auditory comprehension. Colored pictures were provided for each item. Thirty 2-5 year old normal children were randomly selected from nurseries all over Tehran. Children were tested by this task and subsequently, mean of their correct response were analyzed. Results: The findings revealed that there is a high positive correlation between auditory-verbal comprehension and age (r=0.804, p=0.001. Comparing children in 3 age groups of 2-3, 3-4 and 4-5 year old, showed that subordinate and superordinate auditory comprehension of the former group is significantly lower (p0.05, while the difference between subordinate and superordinate auditory comprehension was significant in all age groups (p<0.05.Conclusion: Auditory-verbal comprehension develop much faster at lower than older ages and there is no prominent difference between word linguistic classes including nouns, verbs and adjectives. Slower development of superordinate auditory comprehension implies semantic hierarchical evolution of words.

  13. Joint development normal to regional compression during flexural-flow folding: the Lilstock buttress anticline, Somerset, England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelder, Terry; Peacock, David C. P.

    2001-02-01

    Alpine inversion in the Bristol Channel Basin includes reverse-reactivated normal faults with hanging wall buttress anticlines. At Lilstock Beach, joint sets in Lower Jurassic limestone beds cluster about the trend of the hinge of the Lilstock buttress anticline. In horizontal and gently north-dipping beds, J3 joints ( 295-285° strike) are rare, while other joint sets indicate an anticlockwise sequence of development. In the steeper south-dipping beds, J3 joints are the most frequent in the vicinity of the reverse-reactivated normal fault responsible for the anticline. The J3 joints strike parallel to the fold hinge, and their poles tilt to the south when bedding is restored to horizontal. This southward tilt aims at the direction of σ 1 for Alpine inversion. Finite-element analysis is used to explain the southward tilt of J3 joints that propagate under a local σ 3 in the direction of σ 1 for Alpine inversion. Tilted principal stresses are characteristic of limestone-shale sequences that are sheared during parallel (flexural-flow) folding. Shear tractions on the dipping beds generate a tensile stress in the stiffer limestone beds even when remote principal stresses are compressive. This situation favors the paradoxical opening of joints in the direction of the regional maximum horizontal stress. We conclude that J3 joints propagated during the Alpine compression caused the growth of the Lilstock buttress anticline.

  14. Recognition of faux pas by normally developing children and children with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron-Cohen, S; O'Riordan, M; Stone, V; Jones, R; Plaisted, K

    1999-10-01

    Most theory of mind (ToM) tests are designed for subjects with a mental age of 4-6 years. There are very few ToM tests for subjects who are older or more able than this. We report a new test of ToM, designed for children 7-11 years old. The task involves recognizing faux pas. Study 1 tested 7-9, and 11-year-old normal children. Results showed that the ability to detect faux pas developed with age and that there was a differential developmental profile between the two sexes (female superiority). Study 2 tested children with Asperger syndrome (AS) or high-functioning autism (HFA), selected for being able to pass traditional 4- to 6-year level (first- and second-order) false belief tests. Results showed that whereas normal 9- to 11-year-old children were skilled at detecting faux pas, children with AS or HFA were impaired on this task. Study 3 reports a refinement in the test, employing control stimuli. This replicated the results from Study 2. Some patients with AS or HFA were able to recognize faux pas but still produced them. Future research should assess faux pas production.

  15. Bi-iliac distance and iliac bone position compared to the vertebral column in normal fetal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartling, U B; Fischer Hansen, B; Skovgaard, L T; Kjaer, I

    2001-03-01

    Prenatal standards of bi-iliac width were not found in the literature based on autopsy investigations, nor was the caudo-cranial position of the ilia compared to the vertebral column. The first purpose of the present study was to establish normal standard values for the bi-iliac distance in fetal life, the second to evaluate the level of the iliac bones proportional to the ossified vertebral column. Whole body radiographs in antero-posterior projections from 98 human fetuses (36 female and 44 male fetuses, as well as 18 fetuses on which the sex had not been determined) were analyzed in the study. The fetuses derived from spontaneous or induced abortions and they were radiographed as part of the required autopsy procedure. The crown-rump-length (CRL) of the fetuses varied from 32 to 245 mm. The outer and inner bi-iliac distance was measured from the radiographs with a digital Helios slide caliper. The caudo-cranial position of the iliac bones was evaluated. The present study shows that in normal fetal development there is a continuous linear enlargement of the pelvic region in the transverse and vertical planes. The upper iliac contour stays at the level of the first sacral vertebral body, whereas the lower iliac line moves caudally. Significant differences between male and female fetuses were not found. The value of the present study is that the results can be used as reference standards in prenatal pathology. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Functional Disorders in Neurology : Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new

  17. Paediatric Neurological Conditions Seen at the Physiotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric Neurological Conditions Seen at the Physiotherapy Department of Federal Medical Centre, ... of published works on the patterns of neurological conditions seen in Nigerian physiotherapy clinics of rural locations. ... Article Metrics.

  18. Monitoring of neurological parameters in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đinđić Jasmina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Asphyxia i a condition caused by lack of oxygen in tissues and organs. The basic pathogenic mechanisms of asphyxia are: 1hypoxemia, 2 ischemia. The effects of perinatal asphyxia on the brain of a neonatal baby are critical in development of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The diagnosis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is based on clinical data including course of pregnancy and delivery (Apgar score and especially on the neurological status of the newborn (consciousness, tonus, convulsions, reflexes, vegetative functions, etc. and it can be confirmed by biochemical analysis and neurological examinations. The aim of this paper is to determine the importance of prenatal and perinatal risk factors for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, as well as their effects on the development of neurological complications and further neurological problems. The research included 148 newborn infants born in the period from January 1, 1996 to January 1, 1999, with gestational age of 27 to 42 weeks, with hypoxic ischemic lesions of the central nervosus system. The control group included 58 children of the same age and the same gestation, with generalized hypotonia ("floppy infant" but without any signs of hypoxic ischemic lesions of the central nervous system. In the group of examined newborn infants with hypoxic ischemic lesions, from 149 children 1 (0.67% died, 87 (53.89% had normal findings, whereas the handicap was established in 61 (40.94%. Perinatal asphyxia affects the fetus and newborn infants not by individual factors, but with at least three or four associated factors. The disorders caused by asphyxia are in inverse proportion to the duration and intensity of hypoxic insults and the gestational age of the newborn. .

  19. Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN) Stroke Interventional Laboratory Consensus (SILC) Criteria: A 7M Management Approach to Developing a Stroke Interventional Laboratory in the Era of Stroke Thrombectomy for Large Vessel Occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Tanzila; Zaidat, Osama; Yavagal, Dileep; Xavier, Andrew; Jovin, Tudor; Janardhan, Vallabh

    2016-06-01

    Brain attack care is rapidly evolving with cutting-edge stroke interventions similar to the growth of heart attack care with cardiac interventions in the last two decades. As the field of stroke intervention is growing exponentially globally, there is clearly an unmet need to standardize stroke interventional laboratories for safe, effective, and timely stroke care. Towards this goal, the Society of Vascular and Interventional Neurology (SVIN) Writing Committee has developed the Stroke Interventional Laboratory Consensus (SILC) criteria using a 7M management approach for the development and standardization of each stroke interventional laboratory within stroke centers. The SILC criteria include: (1) manpower: personnel including roles of medical and administrative directors, attending physicians, fellows, physician extenders, and all the key stakeholders in the stroke chain of survival; (2) machines: resources needed in terms of physical facilities, and angiography equipment; (3) materials: medical device inventory, medications, and angiography supplies; (4) methods: standardized protocols for stroke workflow optimization; (5) metrics (volume): existing credentialing criteria for facilities and stroke interventionalists; (6) metrics (quality): benchmarks for quality assurance; (7) metrics (safety): radiation and procedural safety practices.

  20. Unexplained neurological events during bathing in young people: Possible association with the use of gas geysers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Prabhjeet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report sudden, unexplained neurological collapse in 14 young people while bathing with hot water associated with the use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG-based water heaters (gas geysers in ill-ventilated bathrooms. None of the patients reported any circumstantial evidence of seizures or prior epilepsy. One patient developed cortical blindness and demonstrated posterior leucoencephalopathy on imaging studies. The remaining patients made rapid and excellent recovery without any residual neurological sequelae. In these cases, the results of all routine investigations, i.e., serum chemistry, brain imaging (computed tomography in 2 and magnetic resonance imaging in 10 and electroencephalography were normal. The clinical clustering of these cases in winter months with similar presentations of reversible encephalopathy probably indicates an inhalational toxin exposure. Therefore, we postulate a hypothesis that harmful emissions consisting of carbon monoxide (CO, hydrocarbon gases (HC and nitrogen oxides (NOx, produced by incomplete combustion of LPG might be responsible for the cellular injury and subsequent transient neurological deficits. Physicians should be aware of this entity in order to avoid misdiagnosis of this condition as seizures, and a public awareness should also be created regarding the proper use of these devices.