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Sample records for nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis

  1. Nonribosomal biosynthesis of backbone-modified peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niquille, David L.; Hansen, Douglas A.; Mori, Takahiro; Fercher, David; Kries, Hajo; Hilvert, Donald

    2018-03-01

    Biosynthetic modification of nonribosomal peptide backbones represents a potentially powerful strategy to modulate the structure and properties of an important class of therapeutics. Using a high-throughput assay for catalytic activity, we show here that an L-Phe-specific module of an archetypal nonribosomal peptide synthetase can be reprogrammed to accept and process the backbone-modified amino acid (S)-β-Phe with near-native specificity and efficiency. A co-crystal structure with a non-hydrolysable aminoacyl-AMP analogue reveals the origins of the 40,000-fold α/β-specificity switch, illuminating subtle but precise remodelling of the active site. When the engineered catalyst was paired with downstream module(s), (S)-β-Phe-containing peptides were produced at preparative scale in vitro (~1 mmol) and high titres in vivo (~100 mg l-1), highlighting the potential of biosynthetic pathway engineering for the construction of novel nonribosomal β-frameworks.

  2. Biosynthesis of the Peptide Antibiotic Feglymycin by a Linear Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsior, Melanie; Mühlenweg, Agnes; Tietzmann, Marcel; Rausch, Saskia; Poch, Annette; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2015-12-01

    Feglymycin, a peptide antibiotic produced by Streptomyces sp. DSM 11171, consists mostly of nonproteinogenic phenylglycine-type amino acids. It possesses antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains and antiviral activity against HIV. Inhibition of the early steps of bacterial peptidoglycan synthesis indicated a mode of action different from those of other peptide antibiotics. Here we describe the identification and assignment of the feglymycin (feg) biosynthesis gene cluster, which codes for a 13-module nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) system. Inactivation of an NRPS gene and supplementation of a hydroxymandelate oxidase mutant with the amino acid l-Hpg proved the identity of the feg cluster. Feeding of Hpg-related unnatural amino acids was not successful. This characterization of the feg cluster is an important step to understanding the biosynthesis of this potent antibacterial peptide. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Tandem heterocyclization domains in a nonribosomal peptide synthetase essential for siderophore biosynthesis in Vibrio anguillarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lorenzo, M.; Stork, M.; Naka, H.; Tolmasky, M.E.; Crosa, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Anguibactin, the siderophore produced by Vibrio anguillarum 775, is synthesized via a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) mechanism. Most of the genes required for anguibactin biosynthesis are harbored by the pJM1 plasmid. Complete sequencing of this plasmid identified an orf encoding a 108 kDa

  4. Engineering Biosynthesis of Non-ribosomal Peptides and Polyketides by Directed Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Zhe; Zhang, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs) play key roles in pharmaceutical industry due to their promising biological activities. The structural complexity of NRPs and PKs, however, creates significant synthetic challenges for producing these natural products and their analogues by purely chemical means. Alternatively, difficult syntheses can be achieved by using biosynthetic enzymes with improved efficiency and altered selectivity that are acquired from directed evolution. Key to the successful directed evolution is the methodology of screening/selection. This review summarizes the screening/selection strategies that have been employed to improve or modify the functions of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), in the hope of triggering the wide adoption of the directed evolution approaches in the engineered biosynthesis of NRPs and PKs for drug discovery.

  5. ClbP is a prototype of a peptidase subgroup involved in biosynthesis of nonribosomal peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Damien; Baron, Olivier; Cougnoux, Antony; Delmas, Julien; Pradel, Nathalie; Boury, Michèle; Bouchon, Bernadette; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric; Bonnet, Richard

    2011-10-14

    The pks genomic island of Escherichia coli encodes polyketide (PK) and nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthases that allow assembly of a putative hybrid PK-NRP compound named colibactin that induces DNA double-strand breaks in eukaryotic cells. The pks-encoded machinery harbors an atypical essential protein, ClbP. ClbP crystal structure and mutagenesis experiments revealed a serine-active site and original structural features compatible with peptidase activity, which was detected by biochemical assays. Ten ClbP homologs were identified in silico in NRP genomic islands of closely and distantly related bacterial species. All tested ClbP homologs were able to complement a clbP-deficient E. coli mutant. ClbP is therefore a prototype of a new subfamily of extracytoplasmic peptidases probably involved in the maturation of NRP compounds. Such peptidases will be powerful tools for the manipulation of NRP biosynthetic pathways.

  6. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Involved in the Biosynthesis of Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niran Roongsawang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipopeptide biosurfactants (LPBSs consist of a hydrophobic fatty acid portion linked to a hydrophilic peptide chain in the molecule. With their complex and diverse structures, LPBSs exhibit various biological activities including surface activity as well as anti-cellular and anti-enzymatic activities. LPBSs are also involved in multi-cellular behaviors such as swarming motility and biofilm formation. Among the bacterial genera, Bacillus (Gram-positive and Pseudomonas (Gram-negative have received the most attention because they produce a wide range of effective LPBSs that are potentially useful for agricultural, chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. The biosynthetic mechanisms and gene regulation systems of LPBSs have been extensively analyzed over the last decade. LPBSs are generally synthesized in a ribosome-independent manner with megaenzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs. Production of active‑form NRPSs requires not only transcriptional induction and translation but also post‑translational modification and assemblage. The accumulated knowledge reveals the versatility and evolutionary lineage of the NRPSs system. This review provides an overview of the structural and functional diversity of LPBSs and their different biosynthetic mechanisms in Bacillus and Pseudomonas, including both typical and unique systems. Finally, successful genetic engineering of NRPSs for creating novel lipopeptides is also discussed.

  7. Putative Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Cytochrome P450 Genes Responsible for Tentoxin Biosynthesis in Alternaria alternata ZJ33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You-Hai; Han, Wen-Jin; Gui, Xi-Wu; Wei, Tao; Tang, Shuang-Yan; Jin, Jian-Ming

    2016-08-02

    Tentoxin, a cyclic tetrapeptide produced by several Alternaria species, inhibits the F₁-ATPase activity of chloroplasts, resulting in chlorosis in sensitive plants. In this study, we report two clustered genes, encoding a putative non-ribosome peptide synthetase (NRPS) TES and a cytochrome P450 protein TES1, that are required for tentoxin biosynthesis in Alternaria alternata strain ZJ33, which was isolated from blighted leaves of Eupatorium adenophorum. Using a pair of primers designed according to the consensus sequences of the adenylation domain of NRPSs, two fragments containing putative adenylation domains were amplified from A. alternata ZJ33, and subsequent PCR analyses demonstrated that these fragments belonged to the same NRPS coding sequence. With no introns, TES consists of a single 15,486 base pair open reading frame encoding a predicted 5161 amino acid protein. Meanwhile, the TES1 gene is predicted to contain five introns and encode a 506 amino acid protein. The TES protein is predicted to be comprised of four peptide synthase modules with two additional N-methylation domains, and the number and arrangement of the modules in TES were consistent with the number and arrangement of the amino acid residues of tentoxin, respectively. Notably, both TES and TES1 null mutants generated via homologous recombination failed to produce tentoxin. This study provides the first evidence concerning the biosynthesis of tentoxin in A. alternata.

  8. Genetic and Functional Analysis of the Biosynthesis of a Non-Ribosomal Peptide Siderophore in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Vargas-Straube

    Full Text Available B. xenovorans LB400 is a model bacterium for the study of the metabolism of aromatic compounds. The aim of this study was the genomic and functional characterization of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase containing gene cluster that encodes a siderophore in B. xenovorans LB400. The mba gene cluster from strain LB400 encodes proteins involved in the biosynthesis and transport of a hydroxamate-type siderophore. Strain LB400 has a unique mba gene organization, although mba gene clusters have been observed in diverse Burkholderiales. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of promoters in the mba gene cluster that strongly suggest regulation by the ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur and by the alternative RNA polymerase extracytoplasmic function sigma factor MbaF. Reverse transcriptase PCR analyses showed the expression of iron-regulated transcriptional units mbaFGHIJKL, mbaN, mbaABCE, mbaO, mbaP and mbaD genes under iron limitation. Chrome azurol S (CAS assay strongly suggests that strain LB400 synthesized a siderophore under iron limitation. Mass spectrometry ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses revealed that the siderophore is a non-ribosomal peptide, and forms an iron complex with a molecular mass of 676 Da. Based on bioinformatic prediction, CAS assay and MS analyses, we propose that the siderophore is L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-D-β-hydroxyAsp-L-Ser-L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-1,4-diaminobutane that is closely related to malleobactin-type siderophores reported in B. thailandensis.

  9. Functional Exchangeability of Oxidase and Dehydrogenase Reactions in the Biosynthesis of Hydroxyphenylglycine, a Nonribosomal Peptide Building Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Veronica; Loznik, Mark; Taylor, Sandra; Winn, Michael; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Podmore, Helen; Micklefield, Jason; Goodacre, Royston; Medema, Marnix H; Müller, Ulrike; Bovenberg, Roel; Janssen, Dick B; Takano, Eriko

    2015-07-17

    A key problem in the engineering of pathways for the production of pharmaceutical compounds is the limited diversity of biosynthetic enzymes, which restricts the attainability of suitable traits such as less harmful byproducts, enhanced expression features, or different cofactor requirements. A promising synthetic biology approach is to redesign the biosynthetic pathway by replacing the native enzymes by heterologous proteins from unrelated pathways. In this study, we applied this method to effectively re-engineer the biosynthesis of hydroxyphenylglycine (HPG), a building block for the calcium-dependent antibiotic of Streptomyces coelicolor, a nonribosomal peptide. A key step in HPG biosynthesis is the conversion of 4-hydroxymandelate to 4-hydroxyphenylglyoxylate, catalyzed by hydroxymandelate oxidase (HmO), with concomitant generation of H2O2. The same reaction can also be catalyzed by O2-independent mandelate dehydrogenase (MdlB), which is a catabolic enzyme involved in bacterial mandelate utilization. In this work, we engineered alternative HPG biosynthetic pathways by replacing the native HmO in S. coelicolor by both heterologous oxidases and MdlB dehydrogenases from various sources and confirmed the restoration of calcium-dependent antibiotic biosynthesis by biological and UHPLC-MS analysis. The alternative enzymes were isolated and kinetically characterized, confirming their divergent substrate specificities and catalytic mechanisms. These results demonstrate that heterologous enzymes with different physiological contexts can be used in a Streptomyces host to provide an expanded library of enzymatic reactions for a synthetic biology approach. This study thus broadens the options for the engineering of antibiotic production by using enzymes with different catalytic and structural features.

  10. A nonribosomal peptide synthase containing a stand-alone condensation domain is essential for phytotoxin zeamine biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yingying; Liu, Xiaoling; An, Shuwen; Chang, Changqing; Zou, Yuanqiang; Huang, Luhao; Zhong, Jin; Liu, Qiongguang; Jiang, Zide; Zhou, Jianuan; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2013-11-01

    Dickeya zeae is the causal agent of rice foot rot and maize stalk rot diseases, which could cause severe economic losses. The pathogen is known to produce two phytotoxins known as zeamine and zeamine II which are also potent antibiotics against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria pathogens. Zeamine II is a long-chain aminated polyketide and zeamine shares the same polyketide structure as zeamine II, with an extra valine derivative moiety conjugated to the primary amino group of zeamine II. In this study, we have identified a gene designated as zmsK encoding a putative nonribosomal peptide synthase (NRPS) by screening of the transposon mutants defective in zeamine production. Different from most known NRPS enzymes, which are commonly multidomain proteins, ZmsK contains only a condensation domain. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses showed that the ZmsK deletion mutant produced only zeamine II but not zeamine, suggesting that ZmsK catalyzes the amide bond formation by using zeamine II as a substrate to generate zeamine. We also present evidence that a partially conserved catalytic motif within the condensation domain is critical for zeamine production. Furthermore, we show that deletion of zmsK substantially decreased the total antimicrobial activity and virulence of D. zeae. Our findings provide a new insight into the biosynthesis pathway of zeamines and the virulence mechanisms of the bacterial pathogen D. zeae.

  11. Engineering the biosynthesis of the polyketide-nonribosomal peptide collismycin A for generation of analogs with neuroprotective activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ignacio; Vior, Natalia M; González-Sabín, Javier; Braña, Alfredo F; Rohr, Jürgen; Moris, Francisco; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, José A

    2013-08-22

    Collismycin A is a member of the 2,2'-bipyridyl family of natural products that shows cytotoxic activity. Structurally, it belongs to the hybrid polyketides-nonribosomal peptides. After the isolation and characterization of the collismycin A gene cluster, we have used the combination of two different approaches (insertional inactivation and biocatalysis) to increase structural diversity in this natural product class. Twelve collismycin analogs were generated with modifications in the second pyridine ring of collismycin A, thus potentially maintaining biologic activity. None of these analogs showed better cytotoxic activity than the parental collismycin. However, some analogs showed neuroprotective activity and one of them (collismycin H) showed better values for neuroprotection against oxidative stress in a zebrafish model than those of collismycin A. Interestingly, this analog also showed very poor cytotoxic activity, a feature very desirable for a neuroprotectant compound. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic analysis of the biosynthesis of non-ribosomal peptide- and polyketide-like antibiotics, iron uptake and biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis A1/3.

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    Hofemeister, J; Conrad, B; Adler, B; Hofemeister, B; Feesche, J; Kucheryava, N; Steinborn, G; Franke, P; Grammel, N; Zwintscher, A; Leenders, F; Hitzeroth, G; Vater, J

    2004-11-01

    The Bacillus subtilis strain A1/3 shows exceptionally diverse antibiotic capacities compared to other B. subtilis strains. To analyze this phenomenon, mutants for the putative pantotheinyltransferase gene (pptS), and for several genes involved in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis and polyketide synthesis were constructed and characterized, using bioassays with blood cells, bacterial and fungal cells, and mass spectrometry. Among at least nine distinct bioactive compounds, five antibiotics and one siderophore activity were identified. The anti-fungal and hemolytic activities of strain A1/3 could be eliminated by mutation of the fen and srf genes essential for the synthesis of fengycins and surfactins. Both pptS- and dhb -type mutants were defective in iron uptake, indicating an inability to produce a 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate-type iron siderophore. Transposon mutants in the malonyl CoA transacylase gene resulted in the loss of hemolytic and anti-fungal activities due to the inhibition of bacillomycin L synthesis, and this led to the discovery of bmyLD-LA-LB* genes. In mutants bearing disruption mutations in polyketide (pksM- and/or pksR -like) genes, the biosynthesis of bacillaene and difficidins, respectively, was inactivated and was accompanied by the loss of discrete antibacterial activities. The formation of biofilms (pellicles) was shown to require the production of surfactins, but no other lipopeptides, indicating that surfactins serve specific developmental functions.

  13. Non-ribosomal Peptide Synthases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Play a Role in Cyclodipeptide Biosynthesis, Quorum-Sensing Regulation, and Root Development in a Plant Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Omar; Ortíz-Castro, Randy; Díaz-Pérez, César; Díaz-Pérez, Alma L; Magaña-Dueñas, Viridiana; López-Bucio, José; Campos-García, Jesús

    2017-04-01

    Diverse molecules mediate cross-kingdom communication between bacteria and their eukaryotic partners and determine pathogenic or symbiotic relationships. N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone-dependent quorum-sensing signaling represses the biosynthesis of bacterial cyclodipeptides (CDPs) that act as auxin signal mimics in the host plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In this work, we performed bioinformatics, biochemical, and plant growth analyses to identify non-ribosomal peptide synthase (NRPS) proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are involved in CDP synthesis. A reverse genetics strategy allowed the identification of the genes encoding putative multi-modular-NRPS (MM-NRPS). Mutations in these genes affected the synthesis of the CDPs cyclo(L-Pro-L-Val), cyclo(L-Pro-L-Leu), and cyclo(L-Pro-L-Tyr), while showing wild-type-like levels of virulence factors, such as violacein, elastase, and pyocyanin. When analyzing the bioactivity of purified, naturally produced CDPs, it was found that cyclo(L-Pro-L-Tyr) and cyclo(L-Pro-L-Val) were capable of antagonizing quorum-sensing-LasR (QS-LasR)-dependent signaling in a contrasting manner in the cell-free supernatants of the selected NRPS mutants, which showed QS induction. Using a bacteria-plant interaction system, we further show that the pvdJ, ambB, and pchE P. aeruginosa mutants failed to repress primary root growth, but improved root branching in A. thaliana seedlings. These results indicated that the CDP production in P. aeruginosa depended on the functional MM-NRPS, which influences quorum-sensing of bacteria and plays a role in root architecture remodeling.

  14. Engineering polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gavin J

    2013-08-01

    Naturally occurring polyketides and nonribosomal peptides with broad and potent biological activities continue to inspire the discovery of new and improved analogs. The biosynthetic apparatus responsible for the construction of these natural products has been the target of intensive protein engineering efforts. Traditionally, engineering has focused on substituting individual enzymatic domains or entire modules with those of different building block specificity, or by deleting various enzymatic functions, in an attempt to generate analogs. This review highlights strategies based on site-directed mutagenesis of substrate binding pockets, semi-rational mutagenesis, and whole-gene random mutagenesis to engineer the substrate specificity, activity, and protein interactions of polyketide and nonribosomal peptide biosynthetic machinery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes pesL and pes1 Are Essential for Fumigaclavine C Production in Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Gallagher, Lorna; Schrettl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The identity of metabolites encoded by the majority of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, remains outstanding. We found that the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthetases PesL and Pes1 were essential for fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, the end produc...

  16. Structural pattern matching of nonribosomal peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leclère Valérie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs, bioactive secondary metabolites produced by many microorganisms, show a broad range of important biological activities (e.g. antibiotics, immunosuppressants, antitumor agents. NRPs are mainly composed of amino acids but their primary structure is not always linear and can contain cycles or branchings. Furthermore, there are several hundred different monomers that can be incorporated into NRPs. The NORINE database, the first resource entirely dedicated to NRPs, currently stores more than 700 NRPs annotated with their monomeric peptide structure encoded by undirected labeled graphs. This opens a way to a systematic analysis of structural patterns occurring in NRPs. Such studies can investigate the functional role of some monomeric chains, or analyse NRPs that have been computationally predicted from the synthetase protein sequence. A basic operation in such analyses is the search for a given structural pattern in the database. Results We developed an efficient method that allows for a quick search for a structural pattern in the NORINE database. The method identifies all peptides containing a pattern substructure of a given size. This amounts to solving a variant of the maximum common subgraph problem on pattern and peptide graphs, which is done by computing cliques in an appropriate compatibility graph. Conclusion The method has been incorporated into the NORINE database, available at http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/norine. Less than one second is needed to search for a pattern in the entire database.

  17. Bioinformatics Tools for the Discovery of New Nonribosomal Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leclère, Valérie; Weber, Tilmann; Jacques, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    This chapter helps in the use of bioinformatics tools relevant to the discovery of new nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) produced by microorganisms. The strategy described can be applied to draft or fully assembled genome sequences. It relies on the identification of the synthetase genes and the decip......This chapter helps in the use of bioinformatics tools relevant to the discovery of new nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) produced by microorganisms. The strategy described can be applied to draft or fully assembled genome sequences. It relies on the identification of the synthetase genes...

  18. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases: Identifying the cryptic gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-19

    Jan 19, 2017 ... Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) present in bacteria and fungi are the major multi-modular enzyme complexes which synthesize secondary metabolites like the pharmacologically impor- tant antibiotics and siderophores. Each of the multiple modules of an ...

  19. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases: Identifying the cryptic gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) present in bacteria and fungi are themajor multi-modular enzyme complexes which synthesize secondary metabolites like the pharmacologically importantantibiotics and siderophores. Each of the multiple modules of an NRPS activates a ...

  20. Identification of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase responsible for biosynthesis of the potential anti-cancer drug sansalvamide in Fusarium solani

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romans-Fuertes, Patricia; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Sandmann, Manuela Ilse Helga

    2016-01-01

    for sansalvamide. Sansalvamide is structurally related to the cyclic hexadepsipeptide destruxin, which both contain an α-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) unit. A gene cluster responsible for destruxin production has previously been identified in Metarhizium robertsii together with a hypothetical biosynthetic pathway....... Using comparative bioinformatic analyses of the catalytic domains in the destruxin and sansalvamide NRPSs, we were able to propose a model for sansalvamide biosynthesis. Orthologues of the gene clusters were also identified in species from several other genera including Acremonium chrysogenum...

  1. Cyclization of polyketides and non-ribosomal peptides on and off their assembly lines.

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    Pang, Bo; Wang, Min; Liu, Wen

    2016-02-01

    Modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are multifunctional megaenzymes that serve as templates to program the assembly of short carboxylic acids and amino acids in a primarily co-linear manner. The variation, combination, permutation and evolution of their functional units (e.g., modules, domains and proteins) along with their association with external enzymes have resulted in the generation of numerous versions of templates, the roles of which have not been fully recognized in the structural diversification of polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides and their hybrids present in nature. In this Highlight, we focus on the assembly-line enzymology and associated chemistry by providing examples of some newly characterized cyclization reactions that occur on and off the assembly lines during and after chain elongation for the purpose of elucidating the template effects of PKSs and NRPSs. A fundamental understanding of the underlying biosynthetic logic would facilitate the elucidation of chemical information contained within the PKS or NRPS templates and benefit the development of strategies for genome mining, biosynthesis-inspired chemical synthesis and combinatorial biosynthesis.

  2. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes in the Microbial Metagenomes of Marine Sponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hentschel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Genomic mining revealed one major nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS phylogenetic cluster in 12 marine sponge species, one ascidian, an actinobacterial isolate and seawater. Phylogenetic analysis predicts its taxonomic affiliation to the actinomycetes and hydroxy-phenyl-glycine as a likely substrate. Additionally, a phylogenetically distinct NRPS gene cluster was discovered in the microbial metagenome of the sponge Aplysina aerophoba, which shows highest similarities to NRPS genes that were previously assigned, by ways of single cell genomics, to a Chloroflexi sponge symbiont. Genomic mining studies such as the one presented here for NRPS genes, contribute to on-going efforts to characterize the genomic potential of sponge-associated microbiota for secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  3. Resistance to nonribosomal peptide antibiotics mediated by D-stereospecific peptidases.

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    Li, Yong-Xin; Zhong, Zheng; Hou, Peng; Zhang, Wei-Peng; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2018-04-01

    Nonribosomal peptide antibiotics, including polymyxin, vancomycin, and teixobactin, most of which contain D-amino acids, are highly effective against multidrug-resistant bacteria. However, overusing antibiotics while ignoring the risk of resistance arising has inexorably led to widespread emergence of resistant bacteria. Therefore, elucidation of the emerging mechanisms of resistance to nonribosomal peptide antibiotics is critical to their implementation. Here we describe a networking-associated genome-mining platform for linking biosynthetic building blocks to resistance components associated with biosynthetic gene clusters. By applying this approach to 5,585 complete bacterial genomes spanning the entire domain of bacteria, with subsequent chemical and enzymatic analyses, we demonstrate a mechanism of resistance toward nonribosomal peptide antibiotics that is based on hydrolytic cleavage by D-stereospecific peptidases. Our finding reveals both the widespread distribution and broad-spectrum resistance potential of D-stereospecific peptidases, providing a potential early indicator of antibiotic resistance to nonribosomal peptide antibiotics.

  4. Targeted Disruption of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase pes3 Augments the Virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Cairns, Timothy; Stack, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthesis (NRPS) is a documented virulence factor for the opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus and other fungi. Secreted or intracellularly located NRP products include the toxic molecule gliotoxin and the iron-chelating siderophores triacetylfusarinine C and ferricro...

  5. De novo design and engineering of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhüyük, Kenan A. J.; Fleischhacker, Florian; Linck, Annabell; Wesche, Frank; Tietze, Andreas; Niesert, Claus-Peter; Bode, Helge B.

    2018-03-01

    Peptides derived from non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) represent an important class of pharmaceutically relevant drugs. Methods to generate novel non-ribosomal peptides or to modify peptide natural products in an easy and predictable way are therefore of great interest. However, although the overall modular structure of NRPSs suggests the possibility of adjusting domain specificity and selectivity, only a few examples have been reported and these usually show a severe drop in production titre. Here we report a new strategy for the modification of NRPSs that uses defined exchange units (XUs) and not modules as functional units. XUs are fused at specific positions that connect the condensation and adenylation domains and respect the original specificity of the downstream module to enable the production of the desired peptides. We also present the use of internal condensation domains as an alternative to other peptide-chain-releasing domains for the production of cyclic peptides.

  6. Structure Elucidation and Activity of Kolossin A, the D-/L-Pentadecapeptide Product of a Giant Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Helge B; Brachmann, Alexander O; Jadhav, Kirtikumar B; Seyfarth, Lydia; Dauth, Christina; Fuchs, Sebastian W; Kaiser, Marcel; Waterfield, Nick R; Sack, Holger; Heinemann, Stefan H; Arndt, Hans-Dieter

    2015-08-24

    The largest continuous bacterial nonribosomal peptide synthetase discovered so far is described. It consists of 15 consecutive modules arising from an uninterrupted, fully functional gene in the entomopathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. The identification of its cryptic biosynthesis product was achieved by using a combination of genome analysis, promoter exchange, isotopic labeling experiments, and total synthesis of a focused collection of peptide candidates. Although it belongs to the growing class of D-/ L-peptide natural products, the encoded metabolite kolossin A was found to be largely devoid of antibiotic activity and is likely involved in interspecies communication. A stereoisomer of this peculiar natural product displayed high activity against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, a recalcitrant parasite that causes the deadly disease African sleeping sickness. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Predicted class-I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase-like proteins in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Lakshminarayan M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies point to a great diversity of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis systems with major roles in amino acid and co-factor biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and post-translational modifications of proteins by peptide tags. The least studied of these systems are those utilizing tRNAs or aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AAtRS in non-ribosomal peptide ligation. Results Here we describe novel examples of AAtRS related proteins that are likely to be involved in the synthesis of widely distributed peptide-derived metabolites. Using sensitive sequence profile methods we show that the cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs are members of the HUP class of Rossmannoid domains and are likely to be highly derived versions of the class-I AAtRS catalytic domains. We also identify the first eukaryotic CDPSs in fungi and in animals; they might be involved in immune response in the latter organisms. We also identify a paralogous version of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase, which is widespread in bacteria, and present evidence using contextual information that it might function independently of protein synthesis as a peptide ligase in the formation of a peptide- derived secondary metabolite. This metabolite is likely to be heavily modified through multiple reactions catalyzed by a metal-binding cupin domain and a lysine N6 monooxygenase that are strictly associated with this paralogous methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MtRS. We further identify an analogous system wherein the MtRS has been replaced by more typical peptide ligases with the ATP-grasp or modular condensation-domains. Conclusions The prevalence of these predicted biosynthetic pathways in phylogenetically distant, pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria suggests that metabolites synthesized by them might participate in interactions with the host. More generally, these findings point to a complete spectrum of recruitment of AAtRS to various non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways, ranging from the

  8. Computational discovery of specificity-conferring sites in non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Michael; Søndergaard, Dan Ariel; Tofting-Olesen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: By using a class of large modular enzymes known as Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases (NRPS), bacteria and fungi are capable of synthesizing a large variety of secondary metabolites, many of which are bioactive and have potential, pharmaceutical applications as e.g.~antibiotics. There ...

  9. CycloBranch: De Novo Sequencing of Nonribosomal Peptides from Accurate Product Ion Mass Spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Jiří; Lemr, Karel; Schug, K. A.; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 10 (2015), s. 1780-1786 ISSN 1044-0305 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/1150 Grant - others:OPPC(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24023 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : De novo sequencing * Nonribosomal peptides * Linear Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.031, year: 2015

  10. Genomic insights into the distribution, genetic diversity and evolution of polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Sivonen, Kaarina; Fewer, David P

    2015-12-01

    Polyketides and nonribosomal peptides are important secondary metabolites that exhibit enormous structural diversity, have many pharmaceutical applications, and include a number of clinically important drugs. These complex metabolites are most commonly synthesized on enzymatic assembly lines of polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Genome-mining studies making use of the recent explosion in the number of genome sequences have demonstrated unexpected enzymatic diversity and greatly expanded the known distribution of these enzyme systems across the three domains of life. The wealth of data now available suggests that genome-mining efforts will uncover new natural products, novel biosynthetic mechanisms, and shed light on the origin and evolution of these important enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Exploration of Nonribosomal Peptide Families with an Automated Informatic Search Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lian; Ibrahim, Ashraf; Johnston, Chad W; Skinnider, Michael A; Ma, Bin; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2015-09-17

    Microbial natural products are some of the most important pharmaceutical agents and possess unparalleled chemical diversity. Here we present an untargeted metabolomics algorithm that builds on our validated iSNAP platform to rapidly identify families of peptide natural products. By utilizing known or in silico-dereplicated seed structures, this algorithm screens tandem mass spectrometry data to elaborate extensive molecular families within crude microbial culture extracts with high confidence and statistical significance. Analysis of peptide natural product producers revealed an abundance of unreported congeners, revealing one of the largest families of natural products described to date, as well as a novel variant with greater potency. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of the iSNAP platform as an accurate tool for rapidly profiling large families of nonribosomal peptides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Biosynthesis of opioid peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossier, J

    1988-01-01

    The endogenous opioid peptides all contain the enkephalin sequence Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met and Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu at their aminoterminus. Three distinct families of these peptides (endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins) are present in different neuronal pathways within the central nervous system. Molecular genetics have shown that these three families of opioid peptides are derived from three distinct precursors. Pro-opiomelanocortin gives rise to the endorphins, as well as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and the melanotropic hormones (MSH's). [Met] enkephalin, [Leu] enkephalin and the related heptapeptide [Met] enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 and octapeptide [Met] enkephalin-Arg6-Gly7-Leu8 are derived from proenkephalin. The third family is derived from prodynorphin and includes dynorphin A, dynorphin B (also known as rimorphin) and alpha- and beta-neo-endorphin. The structure of the genes coding for these precursors are similar, suggesting the possibility of one common ancestral gene. The most common scheme for enzymatic maturation of precursors proposes the action of a trypsin-like endopeptidase followed by a carboxypeptidase B-like exopeptidase. However, we have provided evidence that this combination of trypsin-like and carboxypeptidase B-like enzymes may not be the only mechanism for liberating enkephalin from low molecular weight enkephalin-containing peptides. Indeed, endo-oligopeptidase A, an enzyme, known to hydrolyze the Phe5-Ser6 bond of bradykinin and the Arg8-Arg9 bond of neurotensin, has been shown to produce, by a single cleavage, [Leu] enkephalin or [Met] enkephalin from small enkephalin-containing peptides, (Camargo et al., 1987, J. Neurochem. 48, 1258-1263).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The Pharmacological Potential of Nonribosomal Peptides from Marine Sponge and Tunicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivankar Agrawal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine biodiversity is recognized by a wide and unique array of fascinating structures. The complex associations of marine microorganisms, especially with sponges, bryozoans, and tunicates, make it extremely difficult to define the biosynthetic source of marine natural products or to deduce their ecological significance. Marine sponges and tunicates are important source of novel compounds for drug discovery and development. Majority of these compounds are nitrogen containing and belong to non-ribosomal peptide (NRPs or mixed polyketide–NRP natural products. Several of these peptides are currently under trial for developing new drugs against various disease areas, including inflammatory, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and infectious disease. This review features pharmacologically active NRPs from marine sponge and tunicates based on their biological activities.

  14. New Insight into the Ochratoxin A Biosynthetic Pathway through Deletion of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Gene in Aspergillus carbonarius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, A.; Bruno, K. S.; Solfrizzo, M.; Perrone, G.; Mule, G.; Visconti, A.; Baker, S. E.

    2012-09-14

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, is composed of a dihydroisocoumarin ring linked to phenylalanine and its biosynthetic pathway has not yet been completely elucidated. Most of the knowledge regarding the genetic and enzymatic aspects of OTA biosynthesis has been obtained in Penicillium species. In Aspergillus species only pks genes involved in the initial steps of the pathway have been partially characterized. In our study, the inactivation of a gene encoding a nonribosomal peptide synthetase in OTA producing A. carbonarius ITEM 5010 has removed the ability of the fungus to produce OTA. This is the first report on the involvement of an nrps gene product in OTA biosynthetic pathway in Aspergillus species. The absence of OTA and ochratoxin α-the isocoumaric derivative of OTA, and the concomitant increase of ochratoxin β- the dechloro analog of ochratoxin α- were observed in the liquid culture of transformed strain. The data provide the first evidence that the enzymatic step adding phenylalanine to polyketide dihydroisocoumarin precedes the chlorination step to form OTA in A. carbonarius, and that ochratoxin α is a product of hydrolysis of OTA, giving an interesting new insight in the biosynthetic pathway of the toxin.

  15. A genome-wide analysis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters and their peptides in a Planktothrix rubescens strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nederbragt Alexander J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria often produce several different oligopeptides, with unknown biological functions, by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS. Although some cyanobacterial NRPS gene cluster types are well described, the entire NRPS genomic content within a single cyanobacterial strain has never been investigated. Here we have combined a genome-wide analysis using massive parallel pyrosequencing ("454" and mass spectrometry screening of oligopeptides produced in the strain Planktothrix rubescens NIVA CYA 98 in order to identify all putative gene clusters for oligopeptides. Results Thirteen types of oligopeptides were uncovered by mass spectrometry (MS analyses. Microcystin, cyanopeptolin and aeruginosin synthetases, highly similar to already characterized NRPS, were present in the genome. Two novel NRPS gene clusters were associated with production of anabaenopeptins and microginins, respectively. Sequence-depth of the genome and real-time PCR data revealed three copies of the microginin gene cluster. Since NRPS gene cluster candidates for microviridin and oscillatorin synthesis could not be found, putative (gene encoded precursor peptide sequences to microviridin and oscillatorin were found in the genes mdnA and oscA, respectively. The genes flanking the microviridin and oscillatorin precursor genes encode putative modifying enzymes of the precursor oligopeptides. We therefore propose ribosomal pathways involving modifications and cyclisation for microviridin and oscillatorin. The microviridin, anabaenopeptin and cyanopeptolin gene clusters are situated in close proximity to each other, constituting an oligopeptide island. Conclusion Altogether seven nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS gene clusters and two gene clusters putatively encoding ribosomal oligopeptide biosynthetic pathways were revealed. Our results demonstrate that whole genome shotgun sequencing combined with MS-directed determination of oligopeptides successfully

  16. Characterization of the Functional Variance in MbtH-like Protein Interactions with a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomer, Rebecca A; Thomas, Michael G

    2017-10-10

    Many nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) require MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) for solubility or for activation of amino acid substrate by the adenylation domain. MLPs are capable of functional crosstalk with noncognate NRPSs at varying levels. Using enterobactin biosynthesis in Escherichia coli as a model MLP-dependent NRPS system, we use in vivo and in vitro techniques to characterize how seven noncognate MLPs influence the function of the enterobactin NRPS EntF when the cognate MLP, YbdZ, is absent. Using a series of in vitro assays to analyze EntF solubility, adenylation, aminoacylation, and in vitro enterobactin production, we show that interactions between MLPs and NRPSs are multifaceted and more complex than previously appreciated. We separate MLP influence on solubility and function in a manner that shows altered solubility is not indicative of a functional MLP/NRPS pair. Although much of the functional variation among these noncognates can be explained by differences in EntF affinity for an MLP or the extent an MLP alters EntF l-Ser affinity, we demonstrate that MLPs can have a broader impact beyond solubility and adenylation. First, we show that a noncognate MLP can affect formation of l-Ser-S-EntF. Second, under in vitro conditions saturating for substrate and MLP, enterobactin production remains compromised in the absence of an appropriate MLP partner. These data suggest that we expand our investigations into how the MLPs influence NRPS enzymology. A more detailed understanding of these influences will be essential for downstream engineering of hybrid NRPS systems.

  17. Bioactivities by a crude extract from the Greenlandic Pseudomonas sp. In5 involves the nonribosomal peptides, nunamycin and nunapeptin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Jensen, Helle; Venditto, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive microbial metabolites provide a successful source of novel compounds with pharmaceutical potentials. The bacterium Pseudomonas sp. In5 is a biocontrol strain isolated from a plant disease suppressive soil in Greenland, which produces two antimicrobial nonribosomal peptides (NRPs), nunap......), nunapeptin and nunamycin. In this study, we used in vitro antimicrobial and anticancer bioassays to evaluate the potential bioactivities of both a crude extract derived from Pseudomonas sp. In5 and NRPs purified from the crude extract....

  18. Heterologous production of non-ribosomal peptide LLD-ACV in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewers, Verena; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Le; Zhang, Jie; Nielsen, Jens

    2009-11-01

    Non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) are a diverse family of secondary metabolites with a broad range of biological activities. We started to develop an eukaryotic microbial platform based on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterologous production of NRPs using delta-(l-alpha-aminoadipyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine (ACV) as a model NRP. The Penicillium chrysogenum gene pcbAB encoding ACV synthetase was expressed in S. cerevisiae from a high-copy plasmid together with phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase) encoding genes from Aspergillus nidulans, P. chrysogenum and Bacillus subtilis, and in all the three cases production of ACV was observed. To improve ACV synthesis, several factors were investigated. Codon optimization of the 5' end of pcbAB did not significantly increase ACV production. However, a 30-fold enhancement was achieved by lowering the cultivation temperature from 30 to 20 degrees C. When ACVS and PPTase encoding genes were integrated into the yeast genome, a 6-fold decrease in ACV production was observed indicating that gene copy number was one of the rate-limiting factors for ACV production in yeast.

  19. Nonribosomal peptides and polyketides of Burkholderia: new compounds potentially implicated in biocontrol and pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeel, Qassim; Pupin, Maude; Jacques, Philippe; Leclère, Valérie

    2017-05-25

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Burkholderia live in various ecological niches and present a significant role in the environments through the excretion of a wide variety of secondary metabolites including modular nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs). These metabolites represent a widely distributed biomedically and biocontrol important class of natural products including antibiotics, siderophores, and anticancers as well as biopesticides that are considered as a novel source that can be used to defend ecological niche from competitors and to promote plant growth. The aim of this review is to present all NRPs produced or potentially produced by strains of Burkholderia, as NRPs represent a major source of active compounds implicated in biocontrol. The review is a compilation of results from a large screening we have performed on 48 complete sequenced genomes available in NCBI to identify NRPS gene clusters, and data found in the literature mainly because some interesting compounds are produced by strains not yet sequenced. In addition to NRPs, hybrids NRPs/PKs are also included. Specific features about biosynthetic gene clusters and structures of the modular enzymes responsible for the synthesis, the biological activities, and the potential uses in agriculture and pharmaceutical of NRPs and hybrids NRPs/PKs will also be discussed.

  20. SCREENING OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND GENES CODING POLYKETIDE SYNTHETASE AND NONRIBOSOMAL PEPTIDE SYNTHETASE OF ACTINOMYCETE ISOLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Kovácsová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe antimicrobial activity using agar plate diffusion method and screening genes coding polyketide synthetase (PKS-I and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS from actinomycetes. A total of 105 actinomycete strains were isolated from arable soil. Antimicrobial activity was demonstrated at 54 strains against at least 1 of total 12 indicator organisms. Antifungal properties were recorded more often than antibacterial properties. The presence of PKS-I and NRPS genes were founded at 61 of total 105 strains. The number of strains with mentioned biosynthetic enzyme gene fragments matching the anticipated length were 19 (18% and 50 (47% respectively. Overall, five actinomycete strains carried all the biosynthetical genes, yet no antimicrobial activity was found against any of tested pathogens. On the other hand, twenty-one strains showed antimicrobial activity even though we were not able to amplify any of the PKS or NRPS genes from them. Combination of the two methods showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of actinomycetes isolated from arable soil, which indicate that actinomycetes are valuable reservoirs of novel bioactive compounds.

  1. Detection of polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase biosynthetic genes from antimicrobial coral-associated actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Dong, Jun-De; Yang, Jian; Luo, Xiong-Ming; Zhang, Si

    2014-10-01

    The diversity and properties of actinobacteria, predominant residents in coral holobionts, have been rarely documented. In this study, we aimed to explore the species diversity, antimicrobial activities and biosynthetic potential of culturable actinomycetes within the tissues of the scleractinian corals Porites lutea, Galaxea fascicularis and Acropora millepora from the South China Sea. A total of 70 strains representing 13 families and 15 genera of actinobacteria were isolated. The antimicrobial activity and biosynthetic potential of fifteen representative filamentous actinomycetes were estimated. Crude fermentation extracts of 6 strains exhibited comparable or greater activities against Vibrio alginolyticus than ciprofloxacin. Seven of the 15 actinomycetes strains possess type I polyketide synthases (PKS-I) and/or nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) genes. Nine tested strains possess type II polyketide synthases (PKS-II). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that these PKS and NRPS gene screening positive strains belong to genera Nocardiopsis, Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Amycolatopsis and Prauserella. One PKS-I and four NRPS fragments showed actinomycetes to produce bioactive molecules.

  2. Nonribosomal peptides, key biocontrol components for Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, isolated from a Greenlandic suppressive soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Charlotte F; Watrous, Jeramie; Glaring, Mikkel A; Kersten, Roland; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Stougaard, Peter

    2015-03-17

    Potatoes are cultivated in southwest Greenland without the use of pesticides and with limited crop rotation. Despite the fact that plant-pathogenic fungi are present, no severe-disease outbreaks have yet been observed. In this report, we document that a potato soil at Inneruulalik in southern Greenland is suppressive against Rhizoctonia solani Ag3 and uncover the suppressive antifungal mechanism of a highly potent biocontrol bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, isolated from the suppressive potato soil. A combination of molecular genetics, genomics, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) revealed an antifungal genomic island in P. fluorescens In5 encoding two nonribosomal peptides, nunamycin and nunapeptin, which are key components for the biocontrol activity by strain In5 in vitro and in soil microcosm experiments. Furthermore, complex microbial behaviors were highlighted. Whereas nunamycin was demonstrated to inhibit the mycelial growth of R. solani Ag3, but not that of Pythium aphanidermatum, nunapeptin instead inhibited P. aphanidermatum but not R. solani Ag3. Moreover, the synthesis of nunamycin by P. fluorescens In5 was inhibited in the presence of P. aphanidermatum. Further characterization of the two peptides revealed nunamycin to be a monochlorinated 9-amino-acid cyclic lipopeptide with similarity to members of the syringomycin group, whereas nunapeptin was a 22-amino-acid cyclic lipopeptide with similarity to corpeptin and syringopeptin. Crop rotation and systematic pest management are used to only a limited extent in Greenlandic potato farming. Nonetheless, although plant-pathogenic fungi are present in the soil, the farmers do not experience major plant disease outbreaks. Here, we show that a Greenlandic potato soil is suppressive against Rhizoctonia solani, and we unravel the key biocontrol components for Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, one of the potent biocontrol bacteria

  3. Enzymatic assembly of epothilones: the EpoC subunit and reconstitution of the EpoA-ACP/B/C polyketide and nonribosomal peptide interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Sarah E; Chen, Huawei; Walsh, Christopher T

    2002-04-30

    The biosynthesis of epothilones, a family of hybrid polyketide (PK)/nonribosomal peptide (NRP) antitumor agents, provides an ideal system to study a hybrid PK/NRP natural product with significant biomedical value. Here the third enzyme involved in epothilone production, the five domain 195 kDa polyketide synthase (PKS) EpoC protein, has been expressed and purified from Escherichia coli. EpoC was combined with the first two enzymes of the epothilone biosynthesis pathway, the acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain of EpoA and EpoB, to reconstitute the early steps in epothilone biosynthesis. The acyltransferase (AT) domain of EpoC transfers the methylmalonyl moiety from methylmalonyl-CoA to the holo HS-acyl carrier protein (ACP) in an autoacylation reaction. The ketosynthase (KS) domain of EpoC decarboxylates the methylmalonyl-S-EpoC acyl enzyme to generate the carbon nucleophile that reacts with methylthiazolylcarboxyl-S-EpoB. The resulting condensation product can be reduced in the presence of NADPH by the ketoreductase (KR) domain of EpoC and then dehydrated by the dehydratase (DH) domain to produce the methylthiazolylmethylacrylyl-S-EpoC acyl enzyme intermediate that serves as the acyl donor for subsequent elongation of the epothilone chain. The acetyl-CoA donor can be replaced with propionyl-CoA, isobutyryl-CoA, and benzoyl-CoA and the acyl chains accepted by both EpoB and EpoC subunits to produce ethyl-, isopropyl-, and phenylthiazolylmethylacrylyl-S-EpoC acyl enzyme intermediates, suggesting that future combinatorial biosynthetic variations in epothilone assembly may be feasible. These results demonstrate in vitro reconstitution of both the PKS/NRPS interface (EpoA-ACP/B) and the NRPS/PKS interface (EpoB/C) in the assembly line for this antitumor natural product.

  4. Non-ribosomal peptides produced by Planktothrix agardhii from Siemianówka Dam Reservoir SDR (northeast Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, Magdalena; Kobos, Justyna; Toruńska-Sitarz, Anna; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna

    2014-10-01

    Planktothtrix agardhii (Oscillatoriales) is a filamentous cyanobacterium, which frequently forms blooms in shallow, polymictic and eutrophicated waters. This species is also a rich source of unique linear and cyclic peptides. In the current study, the profile of the peptides in samples from the P. agardhii-dominated Siemianówka Dam Reservoir (SDR) (northeast Poland) was analyzed for four subsequent years (2009-2012). The LC-MS/MS analyses revealed the presence of 33 peptides. Twelve of the most abundant ones, including five microcystins, five anabaenopeptins, one aeruginosin and one planktocyclin, were present in all field samples collected during the study. The detection of different peptides in two P. agardhii isolates indicated that the SDR population was composed of several chemotypes, characterized by different peptide patterns. The total concentration of microcystins (MCs) positively correlated with the biomass of P. agardhii. Between subsequent years, the changes in the ratio of the total MCs concentration to the biomass of P. agardhii were noticed, but they were less than threefold. This is the first study on the production of different classes of non-ribosomal peptides by freshwater cyanobacteria in Poland.

  5. Comparative analysis of oligonucleotide primers for high-throughput screening of genes encoding adenylation domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in actinomycetes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bakal, Tomáš; Goo, K.-S.; Najmanová, Lucie; Plháčková, Kamila; Kadlčík, Stanislav; Ulanová, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 5 (2015), s. 1267-1274 ISSN 0003-6072 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Nonribosomal peptide synthetase * Adenylation domain * Actinomycetes Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.944, year: 2015

  6. Discovery Strategies of Bioactive Compounds Synthesized by Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and Type-I Polyketide Synthases Derived from Marine Microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoutzias, Grigoris D; Chaliotis, Anargyros; Mossialos, Dimitris

    2016-04-16

    Considering that 70% of our planet's surface is covered by oceans, it is likely that undiscovered biodiversity is still enormous. A large portion of marine biodiversity consists of microbiomes. They are very attractive targets of bioprospecting because they are able to produce a vast repertoire of secondary metabolites in order to adapt in diverse environments. In many cases secondary metabolites of pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest such as nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs) are synthesized by multimodular enzymes named nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSes) and type-I polyketide synthases (PKSes-I), respectively. Novel findings regarding the mechanisms underlying NRPS and PKS evolution demonstrate how microorganisms could leverage their metabolic potential. Moreover, these findings could facilitate synthetic biology approaches leading to novel bioactive compounds. Ongoing advances in bioinformatics and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are driving the discovery of NRPs and PKs derived from marine microbiomes mainly through two strategies: genome-mining and metagenomics. Microbial genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and this vast quantity of biological information can be analyzed through genome mining in order to identify gene clusters encoding NRPSes and PKSes of interest. On the other hand, metagenomics is a fast-growing research field which directly studies microbial genomes and their products present in marine environments using culture-independent approaches. The aim of this review is to examine recent developments regarding discovery strategies of bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and type-I PKS derived from marine microbiomes and to highlight the vast diversity of NRPSes and PKSes present in marine environments by giving examples of recently discovered bioactive compounds.

  7. Discovery Strategies of Bioactive Compounds Synthesized by Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and Type-I Polyketide Synthases Derived from Marine Microbiomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoris D. Amoutzias

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering that 70% of our planet’s surface is covered by oceans, it is likely that undiscovered biodiversity is still enormous. A large portion of marine biodiversity consists of microbiomes. They are very attractive targets of bioprospecting because they are able to produce a vast repertoire of secondary metabolites in order to adapt in diverse environments. In many cases secondary metabolites of pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest such as nonribosomal peptides (NRPs and polyketides (PKs are synthesized by multimodular enzymes named nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSes and type-I polyketide synthases (PKSes-I, respectively. Novel findings regarding the mechanisms underlying NRPS and PKS evolution demonstrate how microorganisms could leverage their metabolic potential. Moreover, these findings could facilitate synthetic biology approaches leading to novel bioactive compounds. Ongoing advances in bioinformatics and next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies are driving the discovery of NRPs and PKs derived from marine microbiomes mainly through two strategies: genome-mining and metagenomics. Microbial genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and this vast quantity of biological information can be analyzed through genome mining in order to identify gene clusters encoding NRPSes and PKSes of interest. On the other hand, metagenomics is a fast-growing research field which directly studies microbial genomes and their products present in marine environments using culture-independent approaches. The aim of this review is to examine recent developments regarding discovery strategies of bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and type-I PKS derived from marine microbiomes and to highlight the vast diversity of NRPSes and PKSes present in marine environments by giving examples of recently discovered bioactive compounds.

  8. Structures of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module Bound to MbtH-like Proteins Support a Highly Dynamic Domain Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bradley R; Drake, Eric J; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C; Gulick, Andrew M

    2016-10-21

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) produce a wide variety of peptide natural products. During synthesis, the multidomain NRPSs act as an assembly line, passing the growing product from one module to the next. Each module generally consists of an integrated peptidyl carrier protein, an amino acid-loading adenylation domain, and a condensation domain that catalyzes peptide bond formation. Some adenylation domains interact with small partner proteins called MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) that enhance solubility or activity. A structure of an MLP bound to an adenylation domain has been previously reported using a truncated adenylation domain, precluding any insight that might be derived from understanding the influence of the MLP on the intact adenylation domain or on the dynamics of the entire NRPS module. Here, we present the structures of the full-length NRPS EntF bound to the MLPs from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa These new structures, along with biochemical and bioinformatics support, further elaborate the residues that define the MLP-adenylation domain interface. Additionally, the structures highlight the dynamic behavior of NRPS modules, including the module core formed by the adenylation and condensation domains as well as the orientation of the mobile thioesterase domain. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Structures of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module Bound to MbtH-like Proteins Support a Highly Dynamic Domain Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bradley R.; Drake, Eric J.; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M. (UMM); (HWMRI)

    2016-09-05

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) produce a wide variety of peptide natural products. During synthesis, the multidomain NRPSs act as an assembly line, passing the growing product from one module to the next. Each module generally consists of an integrated peptidyl carrier protein, an amino acid-loading adenylation domain, and a condensation domain that catalyzes peptide bond formation. Some adenylation domains interact with small partner proteins called MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) that enhance solubility or activity. A structure of an MLP bound to an adenylation domain has been previously reported using a truncated adenylation domain, precluding any insight that might be derived from understanding the influence of the MLP on the intact adenylation domain or on the dynamics of the entire NRPS module. Here, we present the structures of the full-length NRPS EntF bound to the MLPs from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These new structures, along with biochemical and bioinformatics support, further elaborate the residues that define the MLP-adenylation domain interface. Additionally, the structures highlight the dynamic behavior of NRPS modules, including the module core formed by the adenylation and condensation domains as well as the orientation of the mobile thioesterase domain.

  10. Mining for Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Polyketide Synthase Genes Revealed a High Level of Diversity in the Sphagnum Bog Metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christina A; Oberauner-Wappis, Lisa; Peyman, Armin; Amos, Gregory C A; Wellington, Elizabeth M H; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-01

    Sphagnum bog ecosystems are among the oldest vegetation forms harboring a specific microbial community and are known to produce an exceptionally wide variety of bioactive substances. Although the Sphagnum metagenome shows a rich secondary metabolism, the genes have not yet been explored. To analyze nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs), the diversity of NRPS and PKS genes in Sphagnum-associated metagenomes was investigated by in silico data mining and sequence-based screening (PCR amplification of 9,500 fosmid clones). The in silico Illumina-based metagenomic approach resulted in the identification of 279 NRPSs and 346 PKSs, as well as 40 PKS-NRPS hybrid gene sequences. The occurrence of NRPS sequences was strongly dominated by the members of the Protebacteria phylum, especially by species of the Burkholderia genus, while PKS sequences were mainly affiliated with Actinobacteria. Thirteen novel NRPS-related sequences were identified by PCR amplification screening, displaying amino acid identities of 48% to 91% to annotated sequences of members of the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria. Some of the identified metagenomic clones showed the closest similarity to peptide synthases from Burkholderia or Lysobacter, which are emerging bacterial sources of as-yet-undescribed bioactive metabolites. This report highlights the role of the extreme natural ecosystems as a promising source for detection of secondary compounds and enzymes, serving as a source for biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Inhibition of Grape Crown Gall by Agrobacterium vitis F2/5 Requires Two Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and One Polyketide Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Desen; Burr, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Agrobacterium vitis nontumorigenic strain F2/5 is able to inhibit crown gall disease on grapevines. The mechanism of grape tumor inhibition (GTI) by F2/5 has not been fully determined. In this study, we demonstrate that two nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes (F-avi3342 and F-avi5730) and one polyketide synthase gene (F-avi4330) are required for GTI. Knockout of any one of them resulted in F/25 losing GTI capacity. We previously reported that F-avi3342 and F-avi4330 but not F-avi5730 are required for induction of grape tissue necrosis and tobacco hypersensitive response. F-avi5730 is predicted to encode a single modular NRPS. It is located in a cluster that is homologous to the siderophore vicibactin biosynthesis locus in Rhizobium species. Individual disruption of F-avi5730 and two immediate downstream genes, F-avi5731 and F-avi5732, all resulted in reduced siderophore production; however, only F-avi5730 was found to be required for GTI. Complemented F-avi5730 mutant (ΔF-avi5730(+)) restored a wild-type level of GTI activity. It was determined that, over time, populations of ΔF-avi4330, ΔF-avi3342, and ΔF-avi5730 at inoculated wound sites on grapevine did not differ from those of ΔF-avi5730(+) indicating that loss of GTI was not due to reduced colonization of wound sites by mutants.

  12. The Insect Pathogen Serratia marcescens Db10 Uses a Hybrid Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase-Polyketide Synthase to Produce the Antibiotic Althiomycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challis, Gregory L.; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.; Coulthurst, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    There is a continuing need to discover new bioactive natural products, such as antibiotics, in genetically-amenable micro-organisms. We observed that the enteric insect pathogen, Serratia marcescens Db10, produced a diffusible compound that inhibited the growth of Bacillis subtilis and Staphyloccocus aureus. Mapping the genetic locus required for this activity revealed a putative natural product biosynthetic gene cluster, further defined to a six-gene operon named alb1–alb6. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteins encoded by alb1–6 predicted a hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase (NRPS-PKS) assembly line (Alb4/5/6), tailoring enzymes (Alb2/3) and an export/resistance protein (Alb1), and suggested that the machinery assembled althiomycin or a related molecule. Althiomycin is a ribosome-inhibiting antibiotic whose biosynthetic machinery had been elusive for decades. Chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses confirmed that wild type S. marcescens produced althiomycin and that production was eliminated on disruption of the alb gene cluster. Construction of mutants with in-frame deletions of specific alb genes demonstrated that Alb2–Alb5 were essential for althiomycin production, whereas Alb6 was required for maximal production of the antibiotic. A phosphopantetheinyl transferase enzyme required for althiomycin biosynthesis was also identified. Expression of Alb1, a predicted major facilitator superfamily efflux pump, conferred althiomycin resistance on another, sensitive, strain of S. marcescens. This is the first report of althiomycin production outside of the Myxobacteria or Streptomyces and paves the way for future exploitation of the biosynthetic machinery, since S. marcescens represents a convenient and tractable producing organism. PMID:23028578

  13. Synthetic fermentation of bioactive non-ribosomal peptides without organisms, enzymes or reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Lin; Bode, Jeffrey W.

    2014-10-01

    Microbial fermentation can rapidly provide potent compounds that can be easily screened for biological activity, and the active components can be isolated. Its success in drug discovery has inspired extensive efforts to modulate and control the products. In this Article, we document a ‘synthetic fermentation’ of bioactive, unnatural peptides ‘grown’ from small building blocks in water using amide-forming ligations. No organisms, enzymes or reagents are needed. The sequences, structures and compositions of the products can be modulated by adjusting the building blocks and conditions. No specialized knowledge of organic chemistry or handling of toxic material is required to produce complex organic molecules. The ‘fermentations’ can be conducted in arrays and screened for biological activity without isolation or workup. As a proof-of-concept, about 6,000 unnatural peptides were produced from just 23 building blocks, from which a hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease inhibitor with a half-maximum inhibitory concentration of 1.0 μM was identified and characterized.

  14. A hybrid non-ribosomal peptide/polyketide synthetase containing fatty-acyl ligase (FAAL synthesizes the β-amino fatty acid lipopeptides puwainaphycins in the Cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum alatosporum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mareš

    Full Text Available A putative operon encoding the biosynthetic pathway for the cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides puwainphycins was identified in Cylindrospermum alatosporum. Bioinformatics analysis enabled sequential prediction of puwainaphycin biosynthesis; this process is initiated by the activation of a fatty acid residue via fatty acyl-AMP ligase and continued by a multidomain non-ribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthetase. High-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements proved the production of puwainaphycin F/G congeners differing in FA chain length formed by either 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl dodecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahdoa or 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl tetradecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahtea. Because only one puwainaphycin operon was recovered in the genome, we suggest that the fatty acyl-AMP ligase and one of the amino acid adenylation domains (Asn/Gln show extended substrate specificity. Our results provide the first insight into the biosynthesis of frequently occurring β-amino fatty acid lipopeptides in cyanobacteria, which may facilitate analytical assessment and development of monitoring tools for cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides.

  15. Genome based analysis of type-I polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters in seven strains of five representative Nocardia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaki, Hisayuki; Ichikawa, Natsuko; Hosoyama, Akira; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Matsuzawa, Tetsuhiro; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Gonoi, Tohru

    2014-04-30

    Actinobacteria of the genus Nocardia usually live in soil or water and play saprophytic roles, but they also opportunistically infect the respiratory system, skin, and other organs of humans and animals. Primarily because of the clinical importance of the strains, some Nocardia genomes have been sequenced, and genome sequences have accumulated. Genome sizes of Nocardia strains are similar to those of Streptomyces strains, the producers of most antibiotics. In the present work, we compared secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters of type-I polyketide synthase (PKS-I) and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) among genomes of representative Nocardia species/strains based on domain organization and amino acid sequence homology. Draft genome sequences of Nocardia asteroides NBRC 15531(T), Nocardia otitidiscaviarum IFM 11049, Nocardia brasiliensis NBRC 14402(T), and N. brasiliensis IFM 10847 were read and compared with published complete genome sequences of Nocardia farcinica IFM 10152, Nocardia cyriacigeorgica GUH-2, and N. brasiliensis HUJEG-1. Genome sizes are as follows: N. farcinica, 6.0 Mb; N. cyriacigeorgica, 6.2 Mb; N. asteroides, 7.0 Mb; N. otitidiscaviarum, 7.8 Mb; and N. brasiliensis, 8.9 - 9.4 Mb. Predicted numbers of PKS-I, NRPS, and PKS-I/NRPS hybrid clusters ranged between 4-11, 7-13, and 1-6, respectively, depending on strains, and tended to increase with increasing genome size. Domain and module structures of representative or unique clusters are discussed in the text. We conclude the following: 1) genomes of Nocardia strains carry as many PKS-I and NRPS gene clusters as those of Streptomyces strains, 2) the number of PKS-I and NRPS gene clusters in Nocardia strains varies substantially depending on species, and N. brasiliensis strains carry the largest numbers of clusters among the species studied, 3) the seven Nocardia strains studied in the present work have seven common PKS-I and/or NRPS clusters, some of whose products are yet to be studied

  16. tRNA-dependent peptide bond formation by the transferase PacB in biosynthesis of the pacidamycin group of pentapeptidyl nucleoside antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Ntai, Ioanna; Kelleher, Neil L; Walsh, Christopher T

    2011-07-26

    Pacidamycins are a family of uridyl tetra/pentapeptide antibiotics with antipseudomonal activities through inhibition of the translocase MraY in bacterial cell wall assembly. The biosynthetic gene cluster for pacidamycins has recently been identified through genome mining of the producer Streptomyces coeruleorubidus, and the highly dissociated nonribosomal peptide assembly line for the uridyl tetrapeptide scaffold of pacidamycin has been characterized. In this work a hypothetical protein PacB, conserved in known uridyl peptide antibiotics gene clusters, has been characterized by both genetic deletion and enzymatic analysis of the purified protein. PacB catalyzes the transfer of the alanyl residue from alanyl-tRNA to the N terminus of the tetrapeptide intermediate yielding a pentapeptide on the thio-templated nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) assembly line protein PacH. PacB thus represents a new group of tRNA-dependent peptide bond-forming enzymes in secondary metabolite biosynthesis in addition to the recently identified cyclodipeptide synthases. The characterization of PacB completes the assembly line reconstitution of pacidamycin pentapeptide antibiotic scaffolds, bridging the primary and secondary metabolic pathways by hijacking an aminoacyl-tRNA to the antibiotic biosynthetic pathway.

  17. X-Ray Crystallography and Electron Microscopy of Cross- and Multi-Module Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Proteins Reveal a Flexible Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarry, Michael J; Haque, Asfarul S; Bui, Khanh Huy; Schmeing, T Martin

    2017-05-02

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) are macromolecular machines that produce peptides with diverse activities. Structural information exists for domains, didomains, and even modules, but little is known about higher-order organization. We performed a multi-technique study on constructs from the dimodular NRPS DhbF. We determined a crystal structure of a cross-module construct including the adenylation (A) and peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domains from module 1 and the condensation domain from module 2, complexed with an adenosine-vinylsulfonamide inhibitor and an MbtH-like protein (MLP). The action of the inhibitor and the role of the MLP were investigated using adenylation reactions and isothermal titration calorimetry. In the structure, the PCP and A domains adopt a novel conformation, and noncovalent, cross-module interactions are limited. We calculated envelopes of dimodular DhbF using negative-stain electron microscopy. The data show large conformational variability between modules. Together, our results suggest that NRPSs lack a uniform, rigid supermodular architecture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recognition of hybrid peptidyl carrier proteins/acyl carrier proteins in nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules by the 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferases AcpS and Sfp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Finking, Robert; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2002-05-10

    The acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) of fatty acid synthase and polyketide synthase as well as peptidyl carrier proteins (PCPs) of nonribosomal peptide synthetases are modified by 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferases from inactive apo-enzymes to their active holo forms by transferring the 4'-phosphopantetheinyl moiety of coenzyme A to a conserved serine residue of the carrier protein. 4'-Phosphopantetheinyl transferases have been classified into two types; the AcpS type accepts ACPs of fatty acid synthase and some ACPs of type II polyketide synthase as substrates, whereas the Sfp type exhibits an extraordinarily broad substrate specificity. Based on the previously published co-crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis AcpS and ACP that provided detailed information about the interacting residues of the two proteins, we designed a novel hybrid PCP by replacing the Bacillus brevis TycC3-PCP helix 2 with the corresponding helix of B. subtilis ACP that contains the interacting residues. This was performed for the PCP domain as a single protein as well as for the TycA-PCP domain within the nonribosomal peptide synthetase module TycA from B. brevis. Both resulting proteins, designated hybrid PCP (hPCP) and hybrid TycA (hTycA), were modified in vivo during heterologous expression in Escherichia coli (hPCP, 51%; hTycA, 75%) and in vitro with AcpS as well as Sfp to 100%. The designated hTycA module contains two other domains: an adenylation domain (activating phenylalanine to Phe-AMP and afterward transferring the Phe to the PCP domain) and an epimerization domain (converting the PCP-bound l-Phe to d-Phe). We show here that the modified PCP domain of hTycA communicates with the adenylation domain and that the co-factor of holo-hPCP is loaded with Phe. However, communication between the hybrid PCP and the epimerization domain seems to be disabled. Nevertheless, hTycA is recognized by the next proline-activating elongation module TycB1 in vitro, and the dipeptide is formed and

  19. An Sfp-type PPTase and associated polyketide and nonribosomal peptide synthases in Agrobacterium vitis are essential for induction of tobacco hypersensitive response and grape necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Desen; Burr, Thomas J

    2013-07-01

    An Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase) encoding gene F-avi5813 in Agrobacterium vitis F2/5 was found to be required for the induction of a tobacco hypersensitive response (HR) and grape necrosis. Sfp-type PPTases are post-translation modification enzymes that activate acyl-carry protein (ACP) domains in polyketide synthases (PKS) and peptidyl-carrier protein (PCP) domains of nonribosomal peptide synthases (NRPS). Mutagenesis of PKS and NRPS genes in A. vitis led to the identification of a PKS gene (F-avi4330) and NRPS gene (F-avi3342) that are both required for HR and necrosis. The gene immediately downstream of F-avi4330 (F-avi4329) encoding a predicted aminotransferase was also found to be required for HR and necrosis. Regulation of F-avi4330 and F-avi3342 by quorum-sensing genes avhR, aviR, and avsR and by a lysR-type regulator, lhnR, was investigated. It was determined that F-avi4330 expression is positively regulated by avhR, aviR, and lhnR and negatively regulated by avsR. F-avi3342 was found to be positively regulated by avhR, aviR, and avsR and negatively regulated by lhnR. Our results suggest that a putative hybrid peptide-polyketide metabolite synthesized by F-avi4330 and F-avi3342 is associated with induction of tobacco HR and grape necrosis. This is the first report that demonstrates that NRPS and PKS play essential roles in conferring the unique ability of A. vitis to elicit a non-host-specific HR and host-specific necrosis.

  20. Biosynthesis of amidated joining peptide from pro-adrenocorticotropin-endorphin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, E.I.; Mains, R.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1987-09-01

    Joining peptide is the major alpha-amidated product of pro-ACTH/endorphin (PAE) in AtT-20 corticotropic tumor cells. To study intracellular joining peptide synthesis, affinity purified antibodies directed against gamma-MSH, joining peptide, and ACTH were used to immunoprecipitate extracts from biosynthetically labeled AtT-20 cells. Immunoprecipitates were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by tryptic peptide mapping on HPLC. In steady labeling experiments, radioactivity in amidated joining peptide (JP) increased roughly linearly with time, in the manner of a final product, whereas radioactivity associated with PAE (1-94)NH2 reached a constant value after 2-4 h, indicating that PAE(1-94)NH2 is an intermediate in the biosynthesis of JP. Radioactivity appeared in ACTH(1-39) well before JP, consistent with a cleavage order in which ACTH is cleaved from PAE(1-95) before JP sequences are cleaved from PAE(1-74). This conclusion was supported by tryptic peptide analyses of immunoprecipitates, which indicated that less than 5% of JP-related material is cleaved from PAE(1-74) before being cleaved from ACTH-related sequences. After a pulse label, radioactivity in PAE(1-94)NH2 reached a peak value after 1 h of chase and declined with a half-life of less than 1 h. Amidated JP increased to a constant level after 2 h of chase. Enough radiolabeled PAE(1-94)NH2 was detected to account for about half of the radioactivity found in amidated JP, indicating that about half of JP-related material is first cleaved from PAE(1-95) before being amidated. This result was corroborated using HPLC purification to determine both amidated and glycine-extended forms of JP.

  1. Establishing a new methodology for genome mining and biosynthesis of polyketides and peptides through yeast molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiuchi, Kan'ichiro; Nakazawa, Takehito; Ookuma, Takashi; Sugimoto, Satoru; Sato, Michio; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Ishikawa, Noriyasu; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Hotta, Kinya; Moriya, Hisao; Watanabe, Kenji

    2012-04-16

    Fungal genome sequencing has revealed many genes coding for biosynthetic enzymes, including polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases. However, characterizing these enzymes and identifying the compounds they synthesize remains a challenge, whether the genes are expressed in their original hosts or in more tractable heterologous hosts, such as yeast. Here, we developed a streamlined method for isolating biosynthetic genes from fungal sources and producing bioactive molecules in an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae host strain. We used overlap extension PCR and yeast homologous recombination to clone desired fungal polyketide synthase or a nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes (5-20 kb) into a yeast expression vector quickly and efficiently. This approach was used successfully to clone five polyketide synthases and one nonribosomal peptide synthetase, from various fungal species. Subsequent detailed chemical characterizations of the resulting natural products identified six polyketide and two nonribosomal peptide products, one of which was a new compound. Our system should facilitate investigating uncharacterized fungal biosynthetic genes, identifying novel natural products, and rationally engineering biosynthetic pathways for the production of enzyme analogues possessing modified bioactivity. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Toward steadfast growth of antibiotic research in China: from natural products to engineered biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Qianjin; Bai, Linquan; Deng, Zixin

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics are widely used for clinical treatment and preventing or curing diseases in agriculture. Cloning and studies of their biosynthetic gene clusters are vital for yield enhancement and engineering new derivatives with new and prominent activities. In recent years, research in this aspect is impressively active in China. This article reviews biosynthetic progress on 28 antibiotics, including polyketides, nonribosomal peptides, hybrid polyketide-nonribosomal peptides, peptidyl nucleoside, nucleoside, and others. Their biosynthetic mechanisms were disclosed, and their derivatives with new structures/activities were obtained by gene inactivation, mutasynthesis and combinatorial biosynthesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-19

    Jan 19, 2017 ... 2009). In other words, the characterization of A-domains can help in the structure prediction of the NRP, encoded by a cryptic NRPS BGC. A-domain specificity can also be altered for the synthesis of unnatural products with novel physicochemical properties over the original natural product (Hur et al. 2012).

  4. Mutagenesis of NosM Leader Peptide Reveals Important Elements in Nosiheptide Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liang; Wu, Xuri; Xue, Yanjiu; Jin, Yue; Wang, Shuzhen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nosiheptide, a typical member of the ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs), exhibits potent activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. The precursor peptide of nosiheptide (NosM) is comprised of a leader peptide with 37 amino acids and a core peptide containing 13 amino acids. To pinpoint elements in the leader peptide that are essential for nosiheptide biosynthesis, a collection of mutants with unique sequence features, including N- and C-terminal motifs, peptide length, and specific sites in the leader peptide, was generated by mutagenesis in vivo. The effects of various mutants on nosiheptide biosynthesis were evaluated. In addition to the necessity of a conserved motif LEIS box, native length and the N-terminal 12 amino acid residues were indispensable, and single-site substitutions of these 12 amino acid residues resulted in changes ranging from a greater-than-5-fold decrease to a 2-fold increase of nosiheptide production, depending on the sites and substituted residues. Moreover, although the C-terminal motif is not conservative, significant effects of this portion on nosiheptide production were also evident. Taken together, the present results further highlight the importance of the leader peptide in nosiheptide biosynthesis, and provide new insights into the diversity and specificity of leader peptides in the biosynthesis of various RiPPs. IMPORTANCE As a representative thiopeptide, nosiheptide exhibits excellent antibacterial activity. Although the biosynthetic gene cluster and several modification steps have been revealed, the presence and roles of the leader peptide within the precursor peptide of the nosiheptide gene cluster remain elusive. Thus, identification of specific elements in the leader peptide can significantly facilitate the genetic manipulation of the gene cluster for increasing nosiheptide production or generating diverse analogues. Given the complexity of the

  5. Structural aspects of phenylglycines, their biosynthesis and occurrence in peptide natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Toma, Rashed S; Brieke, Clara; Cryle, Max J; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2015-08-01

    Phenylglycine-type amino acids occur in a wide variety of peptide natural products, including glycopeptide antibiotics and biologically active linear and cyclic peptides. Sequencing of biosynthesis gene clusters of chloroeremomycin, balhimycin and pristinamycin paved the way for intensive investigations on the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxyphenylglycine (Hpg), 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (Dpg) and phenylglycine (Phg) in recent years. The significance and importance of this type of unusual non-proteinogenic aromatic amino acids also for medicinal chemistry has drawn the attention of many research groups and pharmaceutical companies. Herein structures and properties of phenylglycine containing natural products as well as the biosynthetic origin and incorporation of phenylglycines are discussed.

  6. Structure, Biosynthesis, and Occurrence of Bacterial Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimming, Olivia; Challinor, Victoria L; Tobias, Nicholas J; Adihou, Hélène; Grün, Peter; Pöschel, Laura; Richter, Christian; Schwalbe, Harald; Bode, Helge B

    2015-10-19

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are widespread plant natural products with potent toxicity and bioactivity. Herein, the identification of bacterial PAs from entomopathogenic bacteria using differential analysis by 2D NMR spectroscopy (DANS) and mass spectrometry is described. Their biosynthesis was elucidated to involve a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase. The occurrence of these biosynthesis gene clusters in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria indicates an important biological function in bacteria. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Saccharomonospora sp. Strain LRS4.154, a Moderately Halophilic Actinobacterium with the Biotechnologically Relevant Polyketide Synthase and Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Carmona, Scarlett; Vera-Gargallo, Blanca; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Ventosa, Antonio; Sandoval-Trujillo, Horacio

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The draft genome sequence of Saccharomonospora sp. strain LRS4.154, a moderately halophilic actinobacterium, has been determined. The genome has 4,860,108 bp, a G+C content of 71.0%, and 4,525 open reading frames (ORFs). The clusters of PKS and NRPS genes, responsible for the biosynthesis of a large number of biomolecules, were identified in the genome. PMID:28546487

  8. Quick guide to polyketide synthase and nonribosomal synthetase genes in Fusarium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen T.; Sørensen, Jens L.; Giese, Henriette

    2012-01-01

    for future polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptides synthetases (NRPSs) nomenclature assignment and classification. Sequence similarities of the adenylation and ketosynthase domain sequences were used to group the identified NRPS and PKS genes. We present the current state of knowledge of PKS......Fusarium species produce a plethora of bioactive polyketides and nonribosomal peptides that give rise to health problems in animals and may have drug development potential. Using the genome sequences for Fusarium graminearum, F. oxysporum, F. solani and F. verticillioides we developed a framework...

  9. How the Prohormone Theory Solved Two Important Controversies in Hormonal and Neural Peptide Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel eChretien

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This Prohormone Theory was simultaneously proposed in 1967 by two independent groups using two different approaches and two experimental models. Donald Steiner, in elegant pulse-chase experiments, proposed the existence of proinsulin when he observed that a human insulinoma was producing higher MW forms of immunoreactive insulin, subsequently transformed into insulin-like material (Steiner et al., 1967. Simultaneously and independently, Michel Chrétien, based on amino acid sequence homologies between three pituitary peptides, -lipotropic hormone (β-LPH, -LPH and -melanocycte-stimulating hormone (β-MSH, concluded that active peptide hormones are derived from endoproteolytic cleavages of inactive precursors, apparently at pairs of basic amino acids (Chrétien and Li, 1967. One year later, Donald Chance confirmed that the cleavage sites in proinsulin were also made of paired basic amino acids (Chance et al., 1968. This novel paradigm solved two major controversies on the biosynthesis of both insulin and neuropeptides. This short review describes how.

  10. A protein interaction map of the kalimantacin biosynthesis assembly line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Uytterhoeven

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial secondary metabolite kalimantacin is produced by a hybrid polyketide/ non-ribosomal peptide system in Pseudomonas fluorescens BCCM_ID9359. In this study, the kalimantacin biosynthesis gene cluster is analyzed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, creating a protein-protein interaction map of the entire assembly line. In total, 28 potential interactions were identified, of which 13 could be confirmed further. These interactions include the dimerization of ketosynthase domains, a link between assembly line modules 9 and 10, and a specific interaction between the trans-acting enoyl reductase BatK and the carrier proteins of modules 8 and 10. These interactions reveal fundamental insight into the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.This study is the first to reveal interactions in a complete biosynthetic pathway. Similar future studies could build a strong basis for engineering strategies in such clusters.

  11. Biosynthesis of Tetrahydroisoquinoline Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gong-Li; Tang, Man-Cheng; Song, Li-Qiang; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    The tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ) alkaloids are naturally occurring antibiotics isolated from a variety of microorganisms and marine invertebrates. This family of natural products exhibit broad spectrum antimicrobial and strong antitumor activities, and the potency of clinical application has been validated by the marketing of ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743) as anticancer drug. In the past 20 years, the biosynthetic gene cluster of six THIQ antibiotics has been characterized including saframycin Mx1 from Myxococcus xanthus, safracin-B from Pseudomonas fluorescens, saframycin A, naphthyridinomycin, and quinocarcin from Streptomyces, as well as ET-743 from Ecteinascidia turbinata. This review gives a brief summary of the current status in understanding the molecular logic for the biosynthesis of these natural products, which provides new insights on the biosynthetic machinery involved in the nonribosomal peptide synthetase system. The proposal of the THIQ biosynthetic pathway not only shows nature's route to generate such complex molecules, but also set the stage to develop a different process for production of ET-743 by synthetic biology.

  12. Entomopathogenic bacteria use multiple mechanisms for bioactive peptide library design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaofeng; Nowak, Sarah; Wesche, Frank; Bischoff, Iris; Kaiser, Marcel; Fürst, Robert; Bode, Helge. B.

    2017-04-01

    The production of natural product compound libraries has been observed in nature for different organisms such as bacteria, fungi and plants; however, little is known about the mechanisms generating such chemically diverse libraries. Here we report mechanisms leading to the biosynthesis of the chemically diverse rhabdopeptide/xenortide peptides (RXPs). They are exclusively present in entomopathogenic bacteria of the genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus that live in symbiosis with nematodes delivering them to insect prey, which is killed and utilized for nutrition by both nematodes and bacteria. Chemical diversity of the biologically active RXPs results from a combination of iterative and flexible use of monomodular nonribosomal peptide synthetases including substrate promiscuity, enzyme cross-talk and enzyme stoichiometry as shown by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Together, this highlights several of nature's methods for diversification, or evolution, of natural products and sheds light on the biosynthesis of the bioactive RXPs.

  13. Macromolecule biosynthesis assay and fluorescence spectroscopy methods to explore antimicrobial peptide mode(s) of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jana, Bimal; Baker, Kristin Renee; Guardabassi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    the biosynthesis rate of macromolecules (e.g., DNA, RNA, protein, and cell wall) and the cytoplasmic membrane proton motive force (PMF) energy can help to unravel the diverse modes of action of AMPs. Here, we present an overview of macromolecule biosynthesis rate measurement and fluorescence spectroscopy methods...

  14. A hybrid non-ribosomal peptide/polyketide synthetase containing fatty-acyl ligase (FAAL) synthesizes the β-amino fatty acid lipopeptides puwainaphycins in the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum alatosporum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Jan; Hájek, Jan; Urajová, P.; Kopecký, J.; Hrouzek, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 11 (2014), e111904 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-18067S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cyanobacteria * lipopeptides * biosynthesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  15. Major gene-regulatory mechanisms operating in ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide (RiPP) biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomae, Maike; Buivydas, Andrius; Viel, Jakob H; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2017-10-01

    Post-translationally modified peptides commonly display antimicrobial activity, but can also aid the development of bacterial colonies, giving a competitive advantage in the ecological niche. The production of post-translationally modified peptides by bacteria is a complex and energetically costly process that is strictly orchestrated in the cell. The onset of peptide production is linked to the different enzymes that take part during maturation, the transporters and the immunity determinants (if required). Thus, the population can make optimal use of available resources and obtain the benefits of production at an advantageous moment during growth, avoiding toxicity to itself. The timing and level of expression of the different operons is controlled by diverse (complex) regulatory pathways in response to environmental changes, stress or master regulators during specific growth transition phases. In this review, we highlight the basic principles and mechanisms of regulation of expression of post-translationally modified peptides and the relationship with the overall culture developmental processes and/or cellular differentiation. We also discuss the biotechnological consequences derived from the understanding of regulatory networks involved in the biosynthesis of these natural products. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Ces locus embedded proteins control the non-ribosomal synthesis of the cereulide toxin in emetic Bacillus cereus on multiple levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genia eLücking

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The emetic toxin cereulide produced by Bacillus cereus is synthesized by the modular enzyme complex Ces that is encoded on a pXO1-like mega-plasmid. To decipher the role of the genes adjacent to the structural genes cesA/cesB, coding for the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS, gene inactivation- and overexpression mutants of the emetic strain F4810/72 were constructed and their impact on cereulide biosynthesis was assessed. The hydrolase CesH turned out to be a part of the complex regulatory network controlling cereulide synthesis on a transcriptional Level, while the ABC transporter CesCD was found to be essential for post-translational control of cereulide synthesis. Using a gene inactivation approach, we show that the NRPS activating function of the phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPtase embedded in the ces locus was complemented by a chromosomally encoded Sfp-like PPtase, representing an interesting example for the functional interaction between a plasmid encoded NRPS and a chromosomally encoded activation enzyme. In summary, our results highlight the complexity of cereulide biosynthesis and reveal multiple levels of toxin formation control. ces operon internal genes were shown to play a pivotal role by acting at different levels of toxin production, thus complementing the action of the chromosomal key transcriptional regulators AbrB and CodY.

  17. Biosynthesis of the Polycyclic Antimicrobial Peptides Lacticin 481, Haloduracin, and Cinnamycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lisa E.

    2009-01-01

    Lantibiotics are bacterial-derived polycyclic antimicrobial peptides. They are genetically encoded and ribosomally synthesized as precursor peptides containing a structural region that undergoes post-translational modification and a leader sequence that is not modified. Specific serine and threonine residues in the pre-lantibiotic structural…

  18. Enabling techniques in the search for new antibiotics: Combinatorial biosynthesis of sugar-containing antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Je Won; Nam, Sang-Jip; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2017-06-15

    Nature has a talent for inventing a vast number of natural products, including hybrids generated by blending different scaffolds, resulting in a myriad of bioactive chemical entities. Herein, we review the highlights and recent trends (2010-2016) in the combinatorial biosynthesis of sugar-containing antibiotics where nature's structural diversification capabilities are exploited to enable the creation of new anti-infective and anti-proliferative drugs. In this review, we describe the modern combinatorial biosynthetic approaches for polyketide synthase-derived complex and aromatic polyketides, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-directed lipo-/glycopeptides, aminoglycosides, nucleoside antibiotics, and alkaloids, along with their therapeutic potential. Finally, we present the feasible nexus between combinatorial biosynthesis, systems biology, and synthetic biology as a toolbox to provide new antibiotics that will be indispensable in the post-antibiotic era. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Microbial biosynthesis of secondary metabolites involved in biocontrol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Michelsen, Charlotte Frydenlund; Olsson, Stefan

    secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters. A combination of random and targeted mutagenesis, together with MALDI-TOF imaging mass spectrometry, linked two non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) designated nunapeptin and nunamycin respectively, to antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, Pythium...... aphanidermatum and Fusarium graminearum1, 2. In order to unravel the complex genetic regulation of these large NRP synthetase gene clusters, antisense RNAs (asRNAs) and CRISPR/Cas9 based systems are being tested and developed as tools to target transcripts of interest and elucidate gene function3, 4....... To investigate the effect of purified nunamycin and nunapeptin at the omics level against pathogenic fungi, an NRP production platform is being developed which, could additionally provide a source of antifungal compounds for industrial applications (e.g. food production, pharmaceutical, personal care). Methods...

  20. A Cell-Based Approach for the Biosynthesis/Screening of Cyclic Peptide Libraries against Bacterial Toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Kimura, R; Woo, Y; Cantor, J; Steenblock, E

    2007-10-24

    Available methods for developing and screening small drug-like molecules able to knockout toxins or pathogenic microorganisms have some limitations. In order to be useful, these new methods must provide high-throughput analysis and identify specific binders in a short period of time. To meet this need, we are developing an approach that uses living cells to generate libraries of small biomolecules, which are then screened inside the cell for activity. Our group is using this new, combined approach to find highly specific ligands capable of disabling anthrax Lethal Factor (LF) as proof of principle. Key to our approach is the development of a method for the biosynthesis of libraries of cyclic peptides, and an efficient screening process that can be carried out inside the cell.

  1. Combinatorial biosynthesis of cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics: a model for synthetic biology to accelerate the evolution of secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltz, Richard H

    2014-10-17

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are giant multi-enzymes that carry out sequencial assembly line couplings of amino acids to generate linear or cyclic peptides. NRPSs are composed of repeating enzyme domains with modular organization to activate and couple specific amino acids in a particular order. From a synthetic biology perspective, they can be considered as peptide assembly machines composed of devices to couple fatty acids to l-amino acids, l-amino acids to l-amino acids, and d-amino acids to l-amino acids. The coupling devices are composed of specific parts that contain two or more enzyme domains that can be exchanged combinatorially to generate novel peptide assembly machines to produce novel peptides. The potent lipopeptide antibiotics daptomycin and A54145E have identical cyclic depsipeptide ring structures and stereochemistry but have divergent amino acid sequences. As their biosynthetic gene clusters are derived from an ancient ancestral lipopetide pathway, these lipopeptides provided an attractive model to develop combinatorial biosynthesis to generate antibiotics superior to daptomycin. These studies on combinatorial biosynthesis have helped generate guidelines for the successful assembly of NRPS parts and devices that can be used to generate novel lipopeptide structures and have established a basis for future synthetic biology studies to further develop combinatorial biosynthesis as a robust approach to natural product drug discovery.

  2. Recent advances in combinatorial biosynthesis for drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun H

    2015-02-01

    strategies will also be highlighted in this review. Keywords: combinatorial biosynthesis, drug discovery, natural products, polyketide synthases, nonribosomal peptide synthetases, biosynthetic pathways

  3. Plant-like biosynthesis of isoquinoline alkaloids in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccile, Joshua A; Spraker, Joseph E; Le, Henry H; Brandenburger, Eileen; Gomez, Christian; Bok, Jin Woo; Macheleidt, Juliane; Brakhage, Axel A; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Keller, Nancy P; Schroeder, Frank C

    2016-06-01

    Natural product discovery efforts have focused primarily on microbial biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) containing large multimodular polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases; however, sequencing of fungal genomes has revealed a vast number of BGCs containing smaller NRPS-like genes of unknown biosynthetic function. Using comparative metabolomics, we show that a BGC in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus named fsq, which contains an NRPS-like gene lacking a condensation domain, produces several new isoquinoline alkaloids known as the fumisoquins. These compounds derive from carbon-carbon bond formation between two amino acid-derived moieties followed by a sequence that is directly analogous to isoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in plants. Fumisoquin biosynthesis requires the N-methyltransferase FsqC and the FAD-dependent oxidase FsqB, which represent functional analogs of coclaurine N-methyltransferase and berberine bridge enzyme in plants. Our results show that BGCs containing incomplete NRPS modules may reveal new biosynthetic paradigms and suggest that plant-like isoquinoline biosynthesis occurs in diverse fungi.

  4. Pristinamycin I biosynthesis in Streptomyces pristinaespiralis: molecular characterization of the first two structural peptide synthetase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Crécy-Lagard, V; Blanc, V; Gil, P; Naudin, L; Lorenzon, S; Famechon, A; Bamas-Jacques, N; Crouzet, J; Thibaut, D

    1997-01-01

    Two genes involved in the biosynthesis of the depsipeptide antibiotics pristinamycins I (PI) produced by Streptomyces pristinaespiralis were cloned and sequenced. The 1.7-kb snbA gene encodes a 3-hydroxypicolinic acid:AMP ligase, and the 7.7-kb snbC gene encodes PI synthetase 2, responsible for incorporating L-threonine and L-aminobutyric acid in the PI macrocycle. snbA and snbC, which encode the two first structural enzymes of PI synthesis, are not contiguous. Both genes are located in PI-specific transcriptional units, as disruption of one gene or the other led to PI-deficient strains producing normal levels of the polyunsaturated macrolactone antibiotic pristinamycin II, also produced by S. pristinaespiralis. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that the SnbA protein is a member of the adenylate-forming enzyme superfamily and that the SnbC protein contains two amino acid-incorporating modules and a C-terminal epimerization domain. A model for the initiation of PI synthesis analogous to the established model of initiation of fatty acid synthesis is proposed. PMID:9006024

  5. Identification and functional analysis of gene cluster involvement in biosynthesis of the cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic pelgipeptin produced by Paenibacillus elgii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Chao-Dong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pelgipeptin, a potent antibacterial and antifungal agent, is a non-ribosomally synthesised lipopeptide antibiotic. This compound consists of a β-hydroxy fatty acid and nine amino acids. To date, there is no information about its biosynthetic pathway. Results A potential pelgipeptin synthetase gene cluster (plp was identified from Paenibacillus elgii B69 through genome analysis. The gene cluster spans 40.8 kb with eight open reading frames. Among the genes in this cluster, three large genes, plpD, plpE, and plpF, were shown to encode non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs, with one, seven, and one module(s, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis of the substrate specificity of all nine adenylation domains indicated that the sequence of the NRPS modules is well collinear with the order of amino acids in pelgipeptin. Additional biochemical analysis of four recombinant adenylation domains (PlpD A1, PlpE A1, PlpE A3, and PlpF A1 provided further evidence that the plp gene cluster involved in pelgipeptin biosynthesis. Conclusions In this study, a gene cluster (plp responsible for the biosynthesis of pelgipeptin was identified from the genome sequence of Paenibacillus elgii B69. The identification of the plp gene cluster provides an opportunity to develop novel lipopeptide antibiotics by genetic engineering.

  6. Role of MbtH-like Proteins in the Adenylation of Tyrosine during Aminocoumarin and Vancomycin Biosynthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Björn; Taubitz, Tatjana; Heide, Lutz

    2011-01-01

    MbtH-like proteins consist of ∼70 amino acids and are encoded in the biosynthetic gene clusters of non-ribosomally formed peptides and other secondary metabolites derived from amino acids. Recently, several MbtH-like proteins have been shown to be required for the adenylation of amino acid in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis. We now investigated the role of MbtH-like proteins in the biosynthesis of the aminocoumarin antibiotics novobiocin, clorobiocin, and simocyclinone D8 and of the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin. The tyrosine-adenylating enzymes CloH, SimH, and Pcza361.18, involved in the biosynthesis of clorobiocin, simocyclinone D8, and vancomycin, respectively, required the presence of MbtH-like proteins in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming heterotetrameric complexes. In contrast, NovH, involved in novobiocin biosynthesis, showed activity in the absence of MbtH-like proteins. Comparison of the active centers of CloH and NovH showed only one amino acid to be different, i.e. Leu-383 versus Met-383. Mutation of this amino acid in CloH (L383M) indeed led to MbtH-independent adenylating activity. All investigated tyrosine-adenylating enzymes exhibited remarkable promiscuity for MbtH-like proteins from different pathways and organisms. YbdZ, the MbtH-like protein from the expression host Escherichia coli, was found to bind to adenylating enzymes during expression and to influence their biochemical properties markedly. Therefore, the use of ybdZ-deficient expression hosts is important in biochemical studies of adenylating enzymes. PMID:21890635

  7. Rapid access to glycopeptide antibiotic precursor peptides coupled with cytochrome P450-mediated catalysis: towards a biomimetic synthesis of glycopeptide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieke, Clara; Kratzig, Veronika; Haslinger, Kristina; Winkler, Andreas; Cryle, Max J

    2015-02-21

    Understanding the mechanisms underpinning glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis is key to the future ability to reinvent these compounds. For effective in vitro characterization of the crucial later steps of the biosynthesis, facile access to a wide range of substrate peptides as their Coenzyme A (CoA) conjugates is essential. Here we report the development of a rapid route to glycopeptide precursor CoA conjugates that affords both high yields and excellent purities. This synthesis route is applicable to the synthesis of peptide CoA-conjugates containing racemization-prone arylglycine residues: such residues are hallmarks of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis and have previously been inaccessible to peptide synthesis using Fmoc-type chemistry. We have applied this route to generate glycopeptide precursor peptides in their carrier protein-bound form as substrates to explore the specificity of the first oxygenase enzyme from vancomycin biosynthesis (OxyBvan). Our results indicate that OxyBvan is a highly promiscuous catalyst for phenolic coupling of diverse glycopeptide precursors that accepts multiple carrier protein substrates, even on carrier protein domains from alternate glycopeptide biosynthetic machineries. These results represent the first important steps in the development of an in vitro biomimetic synthesis of modified glycopeptide aglycones.

  8. Systems biology approaches to understand natural products biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuauhtemoc eLicona-Cassani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycetes populate soils and aquatic sediments which impose biotic and abiotic challenges for their survival. As a result, actinomycetes metabolism and genomes have evolved to produce an overwhelming diversity of specialized molecules. Polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, post-translationally modified peptides, lactams and terpenes are well known bioactive natural products with enormous industrial potential. Accessing such biological diversity has proven difficult due to the complex regulation of cellular metabolism in actinomycetes and to the sparse knowledge of their physiology. The past decade, however, has seen the development of omics technologies that have significantly contributed to our better understanding of their biology. Key observations have contributed towards a shift in the exploitation of actinomycetes biology, such as using their full genomic potential, activating entire pathways through key metabolic elicitors and pathway engineering to improve biosynthesis. Here, we review recent efforts devoted to achieving enhanced discovery, activation and manipulation of natural product biosynthetic pathways in model actinomycetes using genome-scale biological datasets.

  9. Biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis in Colletotrichum graminicola is required for modulation of immune responses of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarouki, Emad; Schafferer, Lukas; Ye, Fanghua; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Haas, Hubertus; Deising, Holger B

    2014-04-01

    The hemibiotrophic maize pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola synthesizes one intracellular and three secreted siderophores. eGFP fusions with the key siderophore biosynthesis gene, SID1, encoding l-ornithine-N(5) -monooxygenase, suggested that siderophore biosynthesis is rigorously downregulated specifically during biotrophic development. In order to investigate the role of siderophores during vegetative development and pathogenesis, SID1, which is required for synthesis of all siderophores, and the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene NPS6, synthesizing secreted siderophores, were deleted. Mutant analyses revealed that siderophores are required for vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, ROS tolerance, and cell wall integrity. Δsid1 and Δnps6 mutants were hampered in formation of melanized appressoria and impaired in virulence. In agreement with biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis, Δsid1 and Δnps6 strains were not affected in biotrophic development, but spread of necrotrophic hyphae was reduced. To address the question why siderophore biosynthesis is specifically downregulated in biotrophic hyphae, maize leaves were infiltrated with siderophores. Siderophore infiltration alone did not induce defence responses, but formation of biotrophic hyphae in siderophore-infiltrated leaves caused dramatically increased ROS formation and transcriptional activation of genes encoding defence-related peroxidases and PR proteins. These data suggest that fungal siderophores modulate the plant immune system. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Biosynthesis of a Complex Yersiniabactin-Like Natural Product via the mic Locus in Phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Martin F.; Kage, Hirokazu; Gebhardt, Peter; Wackler, Barbara; Saluz, Hans P.; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Nett, Markus

    2011-01-01

    A genome mining study in the plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000 unveiled a polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene cluster putatively involved in siderophore biosynthesis. Insertional mutagenesis confirmed the respective locus to be operational under iron-deficient conditions and spurred the isolation of the associated natural product. Bioinformatic analyses of the gene cluster facilitated the structural characterization of this compound, which was subsequently identified as the antimycoplasma agent micacocidin. The metal-chelating properties of micacocidin were evaluated in competition experiments, and the cellular uptake of gallium-micacocidin complexes was demonstrated in R. solanacearum GMI1000, indicating a possible siderophore role. Comparative genomics revealed a conservation of the micacocidin gene cluster in defined, but globally dispersed phylotypes of R. solanacearum. PMID:21724891

  11. The mbo operon is specific and essential for biosynthesis of mangotoxin in Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Víctor J; Arrebola, Eva; Cazorla, Francisco M; Murillo, Jesús; de Vicente, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Mangotoxin is an antimetabolite toxin produced by certain Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains. This toxin is an oligopeptide that inhibits ornithine N-acetyl transferase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ornithine and arginine. Previous studies have reported the involvement of the putative nonribosomal peptide synthetase MgoA in virulence and mangotoxin production. In this study, we analyse a new chromosomal region of P. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158, which contains six coding sequences arranged as an operon (mbo operon). The mbo operon was detected in only mangotoxin-producing strains, and it was shown to be essential for the biosynthesis of this toxin. Mutants in each of the six ORFs of the mbo operon were partially or completely impaired in the production of the toxin. In addition, Pseudomonas spp. mangotoxin non-producer strains transformed with the mbo operon gained the ability to produce mangotoxin, indicating that this operon contains all the genetic information necessary for mangotoxin biosynthesis. The generation of a single transcript for the mbo operon was confirmed and supported by the allocation of a unique promoter and Rho-independent terminator. The phylogenetic analysis of the P. syringae strains harbouring the mbo operon revealed that these strains clustered together.

  12. Major gene-regulatory mechanisms operating in ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide (RiPP) biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartholomae, Maike; Buivydas, Andrius; Viel, Jakob H; Montalban-Lopez, Manuel; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2017-01-01

    Post-translationally modified peptides commonly display antimicrobial activity, but can also aid the development of bacterial colonies, giving a competitive advantage in the ecological niche. The production of post-translationally modified peptides by bacteria is a complex and energetically costly

  13. Ribosomally Synthesized and Post-translationally Modified Peptide Natural Products: New Insights Into the Role of Leader and Core Peptides During Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a major class of natural products with a high degree of structural diversity and a wide variety of bioactivities. Understanding the biosynthetic machinery of these RiPPs will benefit the discovery and development of new molecules with potential pharmaceutical applications. In this review, we discuss the features of the biosynthetic pathways to different RiPP classes, and propose mechanisms regarding recognition of the precursor peptide by the posttranslational modification enzymes. We propose that the leader peptides function as allosteric regulators that bind the active form of the biosynthetic enzymes in a conformational selection process. We also speculate how enzymes that generate polycyclic products of defined topologies may have been selected for during evolution. PMID:23666908

  14. Identification of the promoter for a peptide antibiotic biosynthesis gene from Bacillus brevis and its regulation in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Marahiel, M A; Zuber, P; Czekay, G; Losick, R

    1987-01-01

    Tyrocidine is a cyclic decapeptide antibiotic which is produced and secreted by stationary-phase cells of the sporeforming bacterium Bacillus brevis. We identified the promoter for the B. brevis structural gene (tycA) for tyrocidine synthetase I, the enzyme catalyzing the first step in tyrocidine biosynthesis, and studied its regulation in cells of B. brevis and Bacillus subtilis. Transcription from the tycA promoter was induced at the end of the exponential phase of the growth cycle in B. br...

  15. Antimicrobial peptides of the genus Bacillus: a new era for antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Chandra Datta; Yang, Byung Wook; Yeo, In-Cheol; Hahm, Young Tae

    2015-02-01

    The rapid onset of resistance reduces the efficacy of most conventional antimicrobial drugs and is a general cause of concern for human well-being. Thus, there is great demand for a continuous supply of novel antibiotics to combat this problem. Bacteria-derived antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have long been used as food preservatives; moreover, prior to the development of conventional antibiotics, these AMPs served as an efficient source of antibiotics. Recently, peptides produced by members of the genus Bacillus were shown to have a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microbes. Bacillus-derived AMPs can be synthesized both ribosomally and nonribosomally and can be classified according to peptide biosynthesis, structure, and molecular weight. The precise mechanism of action of these AMPs is not yet clear; however, one proposed mechanism is that these AMPs kill bacteria by forming channels in and (or) disrupting the bacterial cell wall. Bacillus-derived AMPs have potential in the pharmaceutical industry, as well as the food and agricultural sectors. Here, we focus on Bacillus-derived AMPs as a novel alternative approach to antibacterial drug development. We also provide an overview of the biosynthesis, mechanisms of action, applications, and effectiveness of different AMPs produced by members of the Bacillus genus, including several recently identified novel AMPs.

  16. Role of the phosphopantetheinyltransferase enzyme, PswP, in the biosynthesis of antimicrobial secondary metabolites by Serratia marcescens Db10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerc, Amy J; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R; Coulthurst, Sarah J

    2014-08-01

    Phosphopantetheinyltransferase (PPTase) enzymes fulfil essential roles in primary and secondary metabolism in prokaryotes, archaea and eukaryotes. PPTase enzymes catalyse the essential modification of the carrier protein domain of fatty acid synthases, polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). In bacteria and fungi, NRPS and PKS enzymes are often responsible for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites with clinically relevant properties; these secondary metabolites include a variety of antimicrobial peptides. We have previously shown that in the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens Db10, the PPTase enzyme PswP is essential for the biosynthesis of an NRPS-PKS dependent antibiotic called althiomycin. In this work we utilize bioinformatic analyses to classify PswP as belonging to the F/KES subfamily of Sfp type PPTases and to putatively identify additional NRPS substrates of PswP, in addition to the althiomycin NRPS-PKS, in Ser. marcescens Db10. We show that PswP is required for the production of three diffusible metabolites by this organism, each possessing antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Genetic analyses identify the three metabolites as althiomycin, serrawettin W2 and an as-yet-uncharacterized siderophore, which may be related to enterobactin. Our results highlight the use of an individual PPTase enzyme in multiple biosynthetic pathways, each contributing to the ability of Ser. marcescens to inhibit competitor bacteria by the production of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. © 2014 The Authors.

  17. Pep2Path: automated mass spectrometry-guided genome mining of peptidic natural products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnix H Medema

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonribosomally and ribosomally synthesized bioactive peptides constitute a source of molecules of great biomedical importance, including antibiotics such as penicillin, immunosuppressants such as cyclosporine, and cytostatics such as bleomycin. Recently, an innovative mass-spectrometry-based strategy, peptidogenomics, has been pioneered to effectively mine microbial strains for novel peptidic metabolites. Even though mass-spectrometric peptide detection can be performed quite fast, true high-throughput natural product discovery approaches have still been limited by the inability to rapidly match the identified tandem mass spectra to the gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of the corresponding compounds. With Pep2Path, we introduce a software package to fully automate the peptidogenomics approach through the rapid Bayesian probabilistic matching of mass spectra to their corresponding biosynthetic gene clusters. Detailed benchmarking of the method shows that the approach is powerful enough to correctly identify gene clusters even in data sets that consist of hundreds of genomes, which also makes it possible to match compounds from unsequenced organisms to closely related biosynthetic gene clusters in other genomes. Applying Pep2Path to a data set of compounds without known biosynthesis routes, we were able to identify candidate gene clusters for the biosynthesis of five important compounds. Notably, one of these clusters was detected in a genome from a different subphylum of Proteobacteria than that in which the molecule had first been identified. All in all, our approach paves the way towards high-throughput discovery of novel peptidic natural products. Pep2Path is freely available from http://pep2path.sourceforge.net/, implemented in Python, licensed under the GNU General Public License v3 and supported on MS Windows, Linux and Mac OS X.

  18. Three Principles of Diversity-Generating Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenjia; Schmidt, Eric W

    2017-10-17

    Natural products are significant therapeutic agents and valuable drug leads. This is likely owing to their three-dimensional structural complexity, which enables them to form complex interactions with biological targets. Enzymes from natural product biosynthetic pathways show great potential to generate natural product-like compounds and libraries. Many challenges still remain in biosynthesis, such as how to rationally synthesize small molecules with novel structures and how to generate maximum chemical diversity. In this Account, we describe recent advances from our laboratory in the synthesis of natural product-like libraries using natural biosynthetic machinery. Our work has focused on the pat and tru biosynthetic pathways to patellamides, trunkamide, and related compounds from cyanobacterial symbionts in marine tunicates. These belong to the cyanobactin class of natural products, which are part of the larger group of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs). These results have enabled the synthesis of rationally designed small molecules and libraries covering more than 1 million estimated derivatives. Because the RiPPs are translated on the ribosome and then enzymatically modified, they are highly compatible with recombinant technologies. This is important because it means that the resulting natural products, their derivatives, and wholly new compounds can be synthesized using the tools of genetic engineering. The RiPPs also represent possibly the most widespread group of bioactive natural products, although this is in part because of the broad definition of what constitutes a RiPP. In addition, the underlying ideas may form the basis for broad-substrate biosynthetic pathways beyond the RiPPs. For example, some of the ideas about kinetic ordering of broad substrate pathways may apply to polyketide or nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis as well. While making these products, we have sought to understand what makes biosynthetic

  19. A PKS/NRPS/FAS hybrid gene cluster from Serratia plymuthica RVH1 encoding the biosynthesis of three broad spectrum, zeamine-related antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masschelein, Joleen; Mattheus, Wesley; Gao, Ling-Jie; Moons, Pieter; Van Houdt, Rob; Uytterhoeven, Birgit; Lamberigts, Chris; Lescrinier, Eveline; Rozenski, Jef; Herdewijn, Piet; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris; Lavigne, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica strain RVH1, initially isolated from an industrial food processing environment, displays potent antimicrobial activity towards a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Isolation and subsequent structure determination of bioactive molecules led to the identification of two polyamino antibiotics with the same molecular structure as zeamine and zeamine II as well as a third, closely related analogue, designated zeamine I. The gene cluster encoding the biosynthesis of the zeamine antibiotics was cloned and sequenced and shown to encode FAS, PKS as well as NRPS related enzymes in addition to putative tailoring and export enzymes. Interestingly, several genes show strong homology to the pfa cluster of genes involved in the biosynthesis of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in marine bacteria. We postulate that a mixed FAS/PKS and a hybrid NRPS/PKS assembly line each synthesize parts of the backbone that are linked together post-assembly in the case of zeamine and zeamine I. This interaction reflects a unique interplay between secondary lipid and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Most likely, the zeamine antibiotics are produced as prodrugs that undergo activation in which a nonribosomal peptide sequence is cleaved off.

  20. A PKS/NRPS/FAS hybrid gene cluster from Serratia plymuthica RVH1 encoding the biosynthesis of three broad spectrum, zeamine-related antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joleen Masschelein

    Full Text Available Serratia plymuthica strain RVH1, initially isolated from an industrial food processing environment, displays potent antimicrobial activity towards a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Isolation and subsequent structure determination of bioactive molecules led to the identification of two polyamino antibiotics with the same molecular structure as zeamine and zeamine II as well as a third, closely related analogue, designated zeamine I. The gene cluster encoding the biosynthesis of the zeamine antibiotics was cloned and sequenced and shown to encode FAS, PKS as well as NRPS related enzymes in addition to putative tailoring and export enzymes. Interestingly, several genes show strong homology to the pfa cluster of genes involved in the biosynthesis of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in marine bacteria. We postulate that a mixed FAS/PKS and a hybrid NRPS/PKS assembly line each synthesize parts of the backbone that are linked together post-assembly in the case of zeamine and zeamine I. This interaction reflects a unique interplay between secondary lipid and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Most likely, the zeamine antibiotics are produced as prodrugs that undergo activation in which a nonribosomal peptide sequence is cleaved off.

  1. Streptogramin B biosynthesis in Streptomyces pristinaespiralis and Streptomyces virginiae: molecular characterization of the last structural peptide synthetase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Crécy-Lagard, V; Saurin, W; Thibaut, D; Gil, P; Naudin, L; Crouzet, J; Blanc, V

    1997-01-01

    Streptomyces pristinaespiralis and S. virginiae both produce closely related hexadepsipeptide antibiotics of the streptogramin B family. Pristinamycins I and virginiamycins S differ only in the fifth incorporated precursor, di(mono)methylated amine and phenylalanine, respectively. By using degenerate oligonucleotide probes derived from internal sequences of the purified S. pristinaespiralis SnbD and SnbE proteins, the genes from two streptogramin B producers, S. pristinaespiralis and S. virginiae, encoding the peptide synthetase involved in the activation and incorporation of the last four precursors (proline, 4-dimethylparaaminophenylalanine [for pristinamycin I(A)] or phenylalanine [for virginiamycin S], pipecolic acid, and phenylglycine) were cloned. Analysis of the sequence revealed that SnbD and SnbE are encoded by a unique snbDE gene. SnbDE (4,849 amino acids [aa]) contains four amino acid activation domains, four condensation domains, an N-methylation domain, and a C-terminal thioesterase domain. Comparison of the sequences of 55 amino acid-activating modules from different origins confirmed that these sequences contain enough information for the performance of legitimate predictions of their substrate specificity. Partial sequencing (1,993 aa) of the SnbDE protein of S. virginiae allowed comparison of the proline and aromatic acid activation domains of the two species and the identification of coupled frameshift mutations. PMID:9303382

  2. Regiospecific cytochrome P450-catalyzed nitration of L-tryptophan in thaxtomin phytotoxin biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaxtomins, phytotoxins produced by plant pathogenic Streptomyces species, contain a rare nitro group that is essential for phytotoxicity. The N,N'-dimethyldiketopiperazine core of thaxtomins is assembled from L-phenylalanine and L-4-nitrotryptophan by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase. Nitric oxide...

  3. Genetic determinants of reutericyclin biosynthesis in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoxi B; Lohans, Christopher T; Duar, Rebbeca; Zheng, Jinshui; Vederas, John C; Walter, Jens; Gänzle, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Reutericyclin is a unique antimicrobial tetramic acid produced by some strains of Lactobacillus reuteri. This study aimed to identify the genetic determinants of reutericyclin biosynthesis. Comparisons of the genomes of reutericyclin-producing L. reuteri strains with those of non-reutericyclin-producing strains identified a genomic island of 14 open reading frames (ORFs) including genes coding for a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), a polyketide synthase (PKS), homologues of PhlA, PhlB, and PhlC, and putative transport and regulatory proteins. The protein encoded by rtcN is composed of a condensation domain, an adenylation domain likely specific for d-leucine, and a thiolation domain. rtcK codes for a PKS that is composed of a ketosynthase domain, an acyl-carrier protein domain, and a thioesterase domain. The products of rtcA, rtcB, and rtcC are homologous to the diacetylphloroglucinol-biosynthetic proteins PhlABC and may acetylate the tetramic acid moiety produced by RtcN and RtcK, forming reutericyclin. Deletion of rtcN or rtcABC in L. reuteri TMW1.656 abrogated reutericyclin production but did not affect resistance to reutericyclin. Genes coding for transport and regulatory proteins could be deleted only in the reutericyclin-negative L. reuteri strain TMW1.656ΔrtcN, and these deletions eliminated reutericyclin resistance. The genomic analyses suggest that the reutericyclin genomic island was horizontally acquired from an unknown source during a unique event. The combination of PhlABC homologues with both an NRPS and a PKS has also been identified in the lactic acid bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus plantarum, suggesting that the genes in these organisms and those in L. reuteri share an evolutionary origin. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Possible intermediates in the biosynthesis of proteins. I. Evidence for the presence of nucleotide-bound carboxyl-activated peptides in baker's yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, V.V.; Grinten, Chr.O. van der; Overbeek, J.Th.G.

    1957-01-01

    1. 1. In this paper evidence is presented for the occurrence of dialysable nucleotide-bound carboxyl-activated peptide compounds in extracts of ether-CO2-frozen fresh pressed baker's yeast. 2. 2. Furthermore, some data are given indicating the presence of carboxyl-activated peptides in “80S”

  5. Interrogation of Benzomalvin Biosynthesis Using Fungal Artificial Chromosomes with Metabolomic Scoring (FAC-MS): Discovery of a Benzodiazepine Synthase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenger, Kenneth D; Ye, Rosa; Bok, Jin Woo; Thomas, Paul M; Islam, Md Nurul; Miley, Galen P; Robey, Matthew T; Chen, Cynthia; Yang, KaHoua; Swyers, Michael; Wu, Edward; Gao, Peng; Wu, Chengcang C; Keller, Nancy P; Kelleher, Neil L

    2018-03-20

    The benzodiazepine benzomalvin A/D is a fungally derived specialized metabolite and inhibitor of the substance P receptor NK1, biosynthesized by a three-gene nonribosomal peptide synthetase cluster. Here, we utilize fungal artificial chromosomes with metabolomic scoring (FAC-MS) to perform molecular genetic pathway dissection and targeted metabolomics analysis to assign the in vivo role of each domain in the benzomalvin biosynthetic pathway. The use of FAC-MS identified the terminal cyclizing condensation domain as BenY-C T and the internal C-domains as BenZ-C 1 and BenZ-C 2 . Unexpectedly, we also uncovered evidence suggesting BenY-C T or a yet to be identified protein mediates benzodiazepine formation, representing the first reported benzodiazepine synthase enzymatic activity. This work informs understanding of what defines a fungal C T domain and shows how the FAC-MS platform can be used as a tool for in vivo analyses of specialized metabolite biosynthesis and for the discovery and dissection of new enzyme activities.

  6. Protein acetylation involved in streptomycin biosynthesis in Streptomyces griseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Yuji; Akanuma, Genki; Yoshida, Minoru; Horinouchi, Sueharu; Kosono, Saori; Ohnishi, Yasuo

    2017-02-23

    that acetylation was found in proteins related to primary metabolism and translation in Streptomyces griseus, similarly to other bacteria. However, five proteins involved in secondary metabolism were also identified as acetylated proteins; these proteins are enzymes in the biosynthesis of streptomycin (StrB1 and StrS), grixazone (GriF), a nonribosomal peptide (NRPS1-2), and a siderophore (AlcC). Additionally, StrM in streptomycin biosynthesis was identified as a highly acetylated protein by 2-DE-based proteomic analysis; approximately 13% of StrM molecules were acetylated. The acetylation occurs at Lys70 to abolish the enzymatic activity of StrM, suggesting that StrM acetylation functions as a limiter of streptomycin biosynthesis in S. griseus. This is the first detailed analysis of protein acetylation of an enzyme involved in secondary metabolism. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. A vacuolar membrane protein affects drastically the biosynthesis of the ACV tripeptide and the beta-lactam pathway of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Aguado, Marta; Teijeira, Fernando; Martín, Juan F; Ullán, Ricardo V

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge about enzymes' compartmentalization and transport processes involved in the penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum is very limited. The genome of this fungus contains multiple genes encoding transporter proteins, but very little is known about them. A bioinformatic search was made to find major facilitator supefamily (MFS) membrane proteins related to CefP transporter protein involved in the entry of isopenicillin N to the peroxisome in Acremonium chrysogenum. No strict homologue of CefP was observed in P. chrysogenum, but the penV gene was found to encode a membrane protein that contained 10 clear transmembrane spanners and two other motifs COG5594 and DUF221, typical of membrane proteins. RNAi-mediated silencing of penV gene provoked a drastic reduction of the production of the δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl-L-cysteinyl-D-valine) (ACV) and isopenicillin N intermediates and the final product of the pathway. RT-PCR and northern blot analyses confirmed a reduction in the expression levels of the pcbC and penDE biosynthetic genes, whereas that of the pcbAB gene increased. Localization studies by fluorescent laser scanning microscopy using Dsred and GFP fluorescent fusion proteins and the FM 4-64 fluorescent dye showed clearly that the protein was located in the vacuolar membrane. These results indicate that PenV participates in the first stage of the beta-lactam biosynthesis (i.e., the formation of the ACV tripeptide), probably taking part in the supply of amino acids from the vacuolar lumen to the vacuole-anchored ACV synthetase. This is in agreement with several reports on the localization of the ACV synthetase and provides increased evidence for a compartmentalized storage of precursor amino acids for non-ribosomal peptides. PenV is the first MFS transporter of P. chrysogenum linked to the beta-lactam biosynthesis that has been located in the vacuolar membrane.

  8. A single Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase plays a major role in the biosynthesis of PKS and NRPS derived metabolites in Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bunet

    Full Text Available The phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases are responsible for the activation of the carrier protein domains of the polyketide synthases (PKS, non ribosomal peptide synthases (NRPS and fatty acid synthases (FAS. The analysis of the Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877 genome has revealed the presence of four putative PPTase encoding genes. One of these genes appears to be essential and is likely involved in fatty acid biosynthesis. Two other PPTase genes, samT0172 (alpN and samL0372, are located within a type II PKS gene cluster responsible for the kinamycin production and an hybrid NRPS-PKS cluster involved in antimycin production, respectively, and their products were shown to be specifically involved in the biosynthesis of these secondary metabolites. Surprisingly, the fourth PPTase gene, which is not located within a secondary metabolite gene cluster, appears to play a pleiotropic role. Its product is likely involved in the activation of the acyl- and peptidyl-carrier protein domains within all the other PKS and NRPS complexes encoded by S. ambofaciens. Indeed, the deletion of this gene affects the production of the spiramycin and stambomycin macrolide antibiotics and of the grey spore pigment, all three being PKS-derived metabolites, as well as the production of the nonribosomally produced compounds, the hydroxamate siderophore coelichelin and the pyrrolamide antibiotic congocidine. In addition, this PPTase seems to act in concert with the product of samL0372 to activate the ACP and/or PCP domains of the antimycin biosynthesis cluster which is also responsible for the production of volatile lactones.

  9. A single Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase plays a major role in the biosynthesis of PKS and NRPS derived metabolites in Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunet, Robert; Riclea, Ramona; Laureti, Luisa; Hôtel, Laurence; Paris, Cédric; Girardet, Jean-Michel; Spiteller, Dieter; Dickschat, Jeroen S; Leblond, Pierre; Aigle, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    The phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases) are responsible for the activation of the carrier protein domains of the polyketide synthases (PKS), non ribosomal peptide synthases (NRPS) and fatty acid synthases (FAS). The analysis of the Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877 genome has revealed the presence of four putative PPTase encoding genes. One of these genes appears to be essential and is likely involved in fatty acid biosynthesis. Two other PPTase genes, samT0172 (alpN) and samL0372, are located within a type II PKS gene cluster responsible for the kinamycin production and an hybrid NRPS-PKS cluster involved in antimycin production, respectively, and their products were shown to be specifically involved in the biosynthesis of these secondary metabolites. Surprisingly, the fourth PPTase gene, which is not located within a secondary metabolite gene cluster, appears to play a pleiotropic role. Its product is likely involved in the activation of the acyl- and peptidyl-carrier protein domains within all the other PKS and NRPS complexes encoded by S. ambofaciens. Indeed, the deletion of this gene affects the production of the spiramycin and stambomycin macrolide antibiotics and of the grey spore pigment, all three being PKS-derived metabolites, as well as the production of the nonribosomally produced compounds, the hydroxamate siderophore coelichelin and the pyrrolamide antibiotic congocidine. In addition, this PPTase seems to act in concert with the product of samL0372 to activate the ACP and/or PCP domains of the antimycin biosynthesis cluster which is also responsible for the production of volatile lactones.

  10. Heterologous production of non-ribosomal peptide LLD-ACV in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewers, Verena; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Le

    2009-01-01

    production of ACV was observed. To improve ACV synthesis, several factors were investigated. Codon optimization of the 5′ end of pcbAB did not significantly increase ACV production. However, a 30-fold enhancement was achieved by lowering the cultivation temperature from 30 to 20 °C. When ACVS and PPTase...... encoding genes were integrated into the yeast genome, a 6-fold decrease in ACV production was observed indicating that gene copy number was one of the rate-limiting factors for ACV production in yeast....

  11. Cell wall peptidolipids of Mycobacterium avium: from genetic prediction to exact structure of a nonribosomal peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total lipids from an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) ovine strain (S-type) contained no identifiable glycopeptidolipids or lipopentapeptide, yet both lipids are present in other M. avium subspecies. We determined the genetic and phenotypic basis for this difference using sequence analysis and...

  12. An iterative nonribosomal peptide synthetase assembles the pyrrole-amide antibiotic congocidine in Streptomyces ambofaciens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juguet, M.; Lautru, S.; Francou, F.-X.; Nezbedová, Šárka; Leblond, P.; Gondry, M.; Pernodet, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 4 (2009), s. 421-431 ISSN 1074-5521 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : ADENYLATION DOMAINS * ESCHERICHIA-COLI * FUNCTIONAL-ANALYSIS Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.523, year: 2009

  13. Lincosamide Synthetase-A Unique Condensation System Combining Elements of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase and Mycothiol Metabolism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janata, Jiří; Kadlčík, Stanislav; Koběrská, Markéta; Ulanová, Dana; Kameník, Zdeněk; Novák, Petr; Kopecký, Jan; Novotná, Jitka; Radojevič, Bojana; Plháčková, Kamila; Gažák, Radek; Najmanová, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2015) E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0055; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : BIOSYNTHETIC GENE-CLUSTER * MOLECULAR-WEIGHT THIOL * PHOSPHOPANTETHEINYL TRANSFERASE Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  14. Implementation of communication-mediating domains for non-ribosomal peptide production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewers, Verena; San-Bento, Rita; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    are often organized in enzyme complexes. In these complexes, partner NRPSs interact via communication-mediating domains (COM domains). In order to test whether functional interaction between separate NRPS modules is possible in yeast we constructed a yeast strain expressing two modules with compatible COM...

  15. Characterization of the metallo-dependent amidohydrolases responsible for “auxiliary” leucinyl removal in the biosynthesis of 2,2′-bipyridine antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available 2,2′-Bipyridine (2,2′-BiPy is an attractive core structure present in a number of biologically active natural products, including the structurally related antibiotics caerulomycins (CAEs and collismycins (COLs. Their biosynthetic pathways share a similar key 2,2′-BiPy-l-leucine intermediate, which is desulfurated or sulfurated at C5, arises from a polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrid assembly line. Focusing on the common off-line modification steps, we here report that the removal of the “auxiliary” l-leucine residue relies on the metallo-dependent amidohydrolase activity of CaeD or ColD. This activity leads to the production of similar 2,2′-BiPy carboxylate products that then receive an oxime functionality that is characteristic for both CAEs and COLs. Unlike many metallo-dependent amidohydrolase superfamily proteins that have been previously reported, these proteins (particularly CaeD exhibited a strong zinc ion-binding capacity that was proven by site-specific mutagenesis studies to be essential to proteolytic activity. The kinetics of the conversions that respectively involve CaeD and ColD were analyzed, showing the differences in the efficiency and substrate specificity of these two proteins. These findings would generate interest in the metallo-dependent amidohydrolase superfamily proteins that are involved in the biosynthesis of bioactive natural products.

  16. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and other preprovasoactive intestinal polypeptide-derived peptides in the female and male genital tract: localization, biosynthesis, and functional and clinical significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, B; Fahrenkrug, J

    1995-01-01

    in the control of erection. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide has been suggested as a causative factor in some diseases of the genital organs (e.g., it may play a pathophysiologic role in male impotence and the peptide is currently used in the treatment of this condition). Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide may...... be important for control of the low resistance in the fetomaternal vascular bed and is therefore a putative factor involved in the development of preeclampsia. The therapeutic potential of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and future agonists and antagonists will be revealed by ongoing and forthcoming studies....

  17. Filling the Gaps in the Kirromycin Biosynthesis: Deciphering the Role of Genes Involved in Ethylmalonyl-CoA Supply and Tailoring Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertsen, Helene L.; Musiol-Kroll, Ewa M.; Ding, Ling

    2018-01-01

    Kirromycin is the main product of the soil-dwelling Streptomyces collinus Tü 365. The elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway revealed that the antibiotic is synthesised via a unique combination of trans-/cis-AT type I polyketide synthases and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (PKS I...

  18. Arabinogalactan biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian Peter; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Geshi, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins are abundant cell surface proteoglycans in plants and are implicated to act as developmental markers during plant growth. We previously reported that AtGALT31A, AtGALT29A, and AtGLCAT14A-C, which are involved in the biosynthesis of arabinogalactan proteins, localize......GALT29A. Therefore, the electrostatic status of Y144, which is regulated by an unknown kinase/phosphatase system, may regulate AtGALT29A enzyme activity. Moreover, we have identified additional proteins, apyrase 3 (APY3; At1g14240) and UDPglucuronate epimerases 1 and 6 (GAE1, At4g30440; GAE6, At3g23820...

  19. Baulamycins A and B, broad-spectrum antibiotics identified as inhibitors of siderophore biosynthesis in Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ashootosh; Schofield, Michael M; Chlipala, George E; Schultz, Pamela J; Yim, Isaiah; Newmister, Sean A; Nusca, Tyler D; Scaglione, Jamie B; Hanna, Philip C; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H

    2014-01-29

    Siderophores are high-affinity iron chelators produced by microorganisms and frequently contribute to the virulence of human pathogens. Targeted inhibition of the biosynthesis of siderophores staphyloferrin B of Staphylococcus aureus and petrobactin of Bacillus anthracis hold considerable potential as a single or combined treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and anthrax infection, respectively. The biosynthetic pathways for both siderophores involve a nonribosomal peptide synthetase independent siderophore (NIS) synthetase, including SbnE in staphyloferrin B and AsbA in petrobactin. In this study, we developed a biochemical assay specific for NIS synthetases to screen for inhibitors of SbnE and AsbA against a library of marine microbial-derived natural product extracts (NPEs). Analysis of the NPE derived from Streptomyces tempisquensis led to the isolation of the novel antibiotics baulamycins A (BmcA, 6) and B (BmcB, 7). BmcA and BmcB displayed in vitro activity with IC50 values of 4.8 μM and 19 μM against SbnE and 180 μM and 200 μM against AsbA, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that the compounds function as reversible competitive enzyme inhibitors. Liquid culture studies with S. aureus , B. anthracis , E. coli , and several other bacterial pathogens demonstrated the capacity of these natural products to penetrate bacterial barriers and inhibit growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species. These studies provide proof-of-concept that natural product inhibitors targeting siderophore virulence factors can provide access to novel broad-spectrum antibiotics, which may serve as important leads for the development of potent anti-infective agents.

  20. Annotating and Interpreting Linear and Cyclic Peptide Tandem Mass Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeyer, Timo Horst Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptides often possess pronounced bioactivity, and thus, they are often interesting hit compounds in natural product-based drug discovery programs. Their mass spectrometric characterization is difficult due to the predominant occurrence of non-proteinogenic monomers and, especially in the case of cyclic peptides, the complex fragmentation patterns observed. This makes nonribosomal peptide tandem mass spectra annotation challenging and time-consuming. To meet this challenge, software tools for this task have been developed. In this chapter, the workflow for using the software mMass for the annotation of experimentally obtained peptide tandem mass spectra is described. mMass is freely available (http://www.mmass.org), open-source, and the most advanced and user-friendly software tool for this purpose. The software enables the analyst to concisely annotate and interpret tandem mass spectra of linear and cyclic peptides. Thus, it is highly useful for accelerating the structure confirmation and elucidation of cyclic as well as linear peptides and depsipeptides.

  1. A Multidisciplinary Workshop: Self-Assembling Peptide Systems in Biology, Medicine and Engineering, Crete, Greece, July 1-6, 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-06

    Nanoparticles on Self- Assembled Biolipid Tubular Templates." Chem. Commun., 1996, 321-322. 4. S. L. Burkett, S. D. Sims, and S. Mann, "Synthesis of...exploitation of biocatalysis, ribosomal and non-ribosomal biosynthesis to enhance permissiveness toward elaboration of useful biomolecular structures and...1999).L. Bromberg, I. Lewin, H. Gottlieb and A. Warshawsky Interaction of mercury (II) and silver (I) with bis[di(2-ethylhexyloxy)- thiophosphoryl

  2. The pobA gene of Burkholderia cenocepacia encodes a group I Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyltransferase required for biosynthesis of the siderophores ornibactin and pyochelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Atif H; Shastri, Sravanthi; Dave, Emma; Wowk, Irena; Agnoli, Kirsty; Cook, Anne M; Thomas, Mark S

    2011-02-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia produces the siderophores ornibactin and pyochelin under iron-restricted conditions. Biosynthesis of both siderophores requires the involvement of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Using a transposon containing the lacZ reporter gene, two B. cenocepacia mutants were isolated which were deficient in siderophore production. Mutant IW10 was shown to produce normal amounts of ornibactin but only trace amounts of pyochelin, whereas synthesis of both siderophores was abolished in AHA27. Growth of AHA27, but not IW10, was inhibited under iron-restricted conditions. In both mutants, the transposon had integrated into the pobA gene, which encodes a polypeptide exhibiting similarity to the Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyltransferases (PPTases). These enzymes are responsible for activation of NRPSs by the covalent attachment of the 4'-phosphopantetheine (P-pant) moiety of coenzyme A. Previously characterized PPTase genes from other bacteria were shown to efficiently complement both mutants for siderophore production when provided in trans. The B. cenocepacia pobA gene was also able to efficiently complement an Escherichia coli entD mutant for production of the siderophore enterobactin. Using mutant IW10, in which the lacZ gene carried by the transposon is inserted in the same orientation as pobA, it was shown that pobA is not appreciably iron-regulated. Finally, we confirmed that Sfp-type bacterial PPTases can be subdivided into two distinct groups, and we present the amino acid signature sequences which characterize each of these groups.

  3. Adaptation of an L-Proline Adenylation Domain to Use 4-Propyl-L-Proline in the Evolution of Lincosamide Biosynthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kadlčík, Stanislav; Kučera, Tomáš; Chalupská, Dominika; Gažák, Radek; Koběrská, Markéta; Ulanová, Dana; Kopecký, Jan; Kutejová, Eva; Najmanová, Lucie; Janata, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 12 (2013) E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0055; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : NONRIBOSOMAL PEPTIDE SYNTHETASES * GENE-CLUSTER * BIOCHEMICAL-CHARACTERIZATION Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  4. Metabologenomics: Correlation of Microbial Gene Clusters with Metabolites Drives Discovery of a Nonribosomal Peptide with an Unusual Amino Acid Monomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goering, Anthony W; McClure, Ryan A; Doroghazi, James R; Albright, Jessica C; Haverland, Nicole A; Zhang, Yongbo; Ju, Kou-San; Thomson, Regan J; Metcalf, William W; Kelleher, Neil L

    2016-02-24

    For more than half a century the pharmaceutical industry has sifted through natural products produced by microbes, uncovering new scaffolds and fashioning them into a broad range of vital drugs. We sought a strategy to reinvigorate the discovery of natural products with distinctive structures using bacterial genome sequencing combined with metabolomics. By correlating genetic content from 178 actinomycete genomes with mass spectrometry-enabled analyses of their exported metabolomes, we paired new secondary metabolites with their biosynthetic gene clusters. We report the use of this new approach to isolate and characterize tambromycin, a new chlorinated natural product, composed of several nonstandard amino acid monomeric units, including a unique pyrrolidine-containing amino acid we name tambroline. Tambromycin shows antiproliferative activity against cancerous human B- and T-cell lines. The discovery of tambromycin via large-scale correlation of gene clusters with metabolites (a.k.a. metabologenomics) illuminates a path for structure-based discovery of natural products at a sharply increased rate.

  5. Peptídeos cíclicos de biomassa vegetal: características, diversidade, biossíntese e atividades biológicas Cyclic peptide from plant biomass: chemical features and diversity, biosynthesis and biological activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Gatte Picchi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural peptides are outstanding as the most promising macromolecules in the search for new drugs, especially those of cyclic nature. The higher plants revealed a very peculiar composition of their cyclic peptides, which distinguish themselves by a "head-to-tail" cyclization. It is possible to define two groups of cyclic peptides from plant biomass. Those called in this review as Eucyclopeptides formed by 2-12 amino acid, and Cyclotides considered as circular polypeptides, composed of 29-37 amino acid that retain three disulfides bridges in an arrangement known as cyclic cystine knot. Searching for plant peptides should form into a subject for scientific research in the forefront of great importance for bioprospecting natural products macromolecular.

  6. Ant trail pheromone biosynthesis is triggered by a neuropeptide hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Yeon Choi

    Full Text Available Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200 have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia or PBAN receptor gene (in DG expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta.

  7. Systems biosynthesis of secondary metabolic pathways within the oral human microbiome member Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvanych, Rostyslav; Lukenda, Nikola; Li, Xiang; Kim, Janice J; Tharmarajah, Satheeisha; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram-positive human commensal and pathogen, is commonly recognized as a primary causative agent in dental caries. Metabolic activity of this strain results in the creation of acids and secreted products are recognized as pathogenic factors and agents that promote immunomodulation by stimulating the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Products of secondary metabolic pathways of microorganisms from the human microbiome are increasingly investigated for their immunomodulatory functions. In this study, we sought to explore the metabolomic output of nonribosomal peptide pathways within the model S. mutans strain, S. mutans UA159, using a systems metabolomic approach to gain in-depth analysis on products created by this organism and probe these molecules for their immunomodulatory function. Comparative metabolomics and biosynthetic studies using wild-type and nonribosomal peptide deletion strains (within the mutanobactin biosynthetic locus), precursor feedings (fatty acid derivatives) led to the identification of 58 metabolites, 13 of which were structurally elucidated. In addition to these, an assembly line derailment product, mutanamide, was also identified and used to assess immunomodulatory properties of mutanobactins and actions relating to their previously reported functions describing hyphal inhibitory profiles in Candida albicans. The results of this study demonstrate both the complexity and the divergent roles of products stemming from this unique biosynthetic assembly line.

  8. Endogenous cross-talk of fungal metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J Sheridan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-ribosomal peptide synthesis in fungi requires a ready supply of proteogenic and non-proteogenic amino acids which are subsequently incorporated into the nascent non-ribosomal peptide via a thiotemplate mechanism catalysed by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases. Substrate amino acids can be modified prior to or during incorporation into the non-ribosomal peptide, or following incorporation into an early stage amino acid-containing biosynthetic intermediate. These post-incorporation modifications involve a range of additional enzymatic activities including but not exclusively, monooxygenases, methyltransferases, epimerases, oxidoreductases and glutathione transferases which are essential to effect biosynthesis of the final non-ribosomal peptide. Likewise, polyketide biosynthesis is directly by polyketide synthase megaenzymes and cluster-encoded ancilliary decorating enzymes. Additionally, a suite of additional primary metabolites, for example: CoA, acetyl CoA, S-adenosylmethionine, glutathione, NADPH, malonyl CoA and molecular oxygen, amongst others are required for non-ribosomal peptide and polyketide synthesis. Clearly these processes must involve exquisite orchestration to facilitate the simultaneous biosynthesis of different types of non-ribosomal peptides, polyketides, and related metabolites requiring identical or similar biosynthetic precursors or co-factors. Moreover, the near identical structures of many natural products within a given family (e.g., ergot alkaloids, along with localization to similar regions within fungi (e.g., conidia suggests that cross-talk may exist, in terms of biosynthesis and functionality. Finally, we speculate if certain biosynthetic steps involved in non-ribosomal peptide and polyketide synthesis play a role in cellular protection or environmental adaptation, and wonder if these enzymatic reactions are of equivalent importance to the actual biosynthesis of the final metabolite.

  9. Characterization of native 40 S particles from Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells: resolution, nomenclature and molecular weights of the nonribosomal proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichert, G; Issinger, O G

    1981-01-01

    Native 40 S particles from Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells were isolated on a large scale. A nonribosomal protein moiety of about 30 proteins could be removed from the ribosomal particles by treatment with 250 mM KCl. These proteins were analysed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electroph......Native 40 S particles from Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells were isolated on a large scale. A nonribosomal protein moiety of about 30 proteins could be removed from the ribosomal particles by treatment with 250 mM KCl. These proteins were analysed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel...

  10. Agrobacterium-mediated disruption of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene in the invertebrate pathogen Metarhizium anisopliae reveals a peptide spore factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous secondary metabolites have been isolated from the insect pathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae, but the roles of these compounds as virulence factors in disease development are poorly understood. We targeted for disruption by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation a putative n...

  11. Exploring cyanobacterial genomes for natural product biosynthesis pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, Melinda L; D'Agostino, Paul M; Al-Sinawi, Bakir; Neilan, Brett A; Moffitt, Michelle C

    2015-06-01

    Cyanobacteria produce a vast array of natural products, some of which are toxic to human health, while others possess potential pharmaceutical activities. Genome mining enables the identification and characterisation of natural product gene clusters; however, the current number of cyanobacterial genomes remains low compared to other phyla. There has been a recent effort to rectify this issue by increasing the number of sequenced cyanobacterial genomes. This has enabled the identification of biosynthetic gene clusters for structurally diverse metabolites, including non-ribosomal peptides, polyketides, ribosomal peptides, UV-absorbing compounds, alkaloids, terpenes and fatty acids. While some of the identified biosynthetic gene clusters correlate with known metabolites, genome mining also highlights the number and diversity of clusters for which the product is unknown (referred to as orphan gene clusters). A number of bioinformatic tools have recently been developed in order to predict the products of orphan gene clusters; however, in some cases the complexity of the cyanobacterial pathways makes the prediction problematic. This can be overcome by the use of mass spectrometry-guided natural product genome mining, or heterologous expression. Application of these techniques to cyanobacterial natural product gene clusters will be explored. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Phosphorylation in vivo of non-ribosomal proteins from native 40 S ribosomal particles of Krebs II mouse ascites-tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuck, J; Reichert, G; Issinger, O G

    1981-01-01

    Four non-ribosomal proteins from native 40 S ribosomal subunits with mol.wts. of 110 000, 84 000, 68 000 and 26 000 were phosphorylated in vivo when ascites cells were incubated in the presence of [32P]Pi. The 110 000-, 84 000- and 26 000-dalton proteins are identical with phosphorylated products...

  13. Biosynthesis of tylophora alkaloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulchandani, N.B.; Iyer, S.S.; Badheka, L.P.

    1974-01-01

    Using labelled precursors, biosynthesis of the tylophora alkaloids, tylophorine, tylophorinidine and tylophorinide has been investigated in Tylophora asthmatica plants. The radioactive precursors, phenylalanine-2- 14 C, benzoic acid-1- 14 C, benzoic acid-ring 14 C, acetate-2- 14 C, ornithine-5- 14 C, acetate-2- 14 C, ornithine-5- 14 C and cinnamic acid-2- 14 C were administered to the plants individually by wick technique. Tylophorine was isolated in each case and assayed for its radioactivity to find out the incorporation of the label into it. The results indicate that: (1) phenylalanine via cinnamic acid is an important precursor in the biosynthesis of tylophorine (2) orinithine participates in tylophorine biosynthesis via pyrroline and (3) tylophorinidine may be a direct precursor of tylophorine. (M.G.B.)

  14. Aflatoxin biosynthesis: current frontiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze, Ludmila V; Hong, Sung-Yong; Linz, John E

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins are among the principal mycotoxins that contaminate economically important food and feed crops. Aflatoxin B1 is the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen known and is also an immunosuppressant. Occurrence of aflatoxins in crops has vast economic and human health impacts worldwide. Thus, the study of aflatoxin biosynthesis has become a focal point in attempts to reduce human exposure to aflatoxins. This review highlights recent advances in the field of aflatoxin biosynthesis and explores the functional connection between aflatoxin biosynthesis, endomembrane trafficking, and response to oxidative stress. Dissection of the regulatory mechanisms involves a complete comprehension of the aflatoxin biosynthetic process and the dynamic network of transcription factors that orchestrates coordinated expression of the target genes. Despite advancements in the field, development of a safe and effective multifaceted approach to solve the aflatoxin food contamination problem is still required.

  15. Peptide dendrimers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niederhafner, Petr; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Ježek, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), 757-788 ISSN 1075-2617 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : multiple antigen peptides * peptide dendrimers * synthetic vaccine * multipleantigenic peptides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.803, year: 2005

  16. Regulation of Neurosteroid Biosynthesis by Neurotransmitters and Neuropeptides

    OpenAIRE

    Do Rego, Jean Luc; Seong, Jae Young; Burel, Delphine; Leprince, Jerôme; Vaudry, David; Luu-The, Van; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Pelletier, Georges; Vaudry, Hubert

    2012-01-01

    The enzymatic pathways leading to the synthesis of bioactive steroids in the brain are now almost completely elucidated in various groups of vertebrates and, during the last decade, the neuronal mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurosteroid production have received increasing attention. This report reviews the current knowledge concerning the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones, and neuropeptides on the biosynthesis of neurosteroids. Anatomical studies have been carried out...

  17. The pyrroloquinoline quinone biosynthesis pathway revisited: A structural approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzenbacher Robert

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biosynthesis pathway of Pyrroloquinoline quinone, a bacterial redox active cofactor for numerous alcohol and aldose dehydrogenases, is largely unknown, but it is proven that at least six genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae (PqqA-F are required, all of which are located in the PQQ-operon. Results New structural data of some PQQ biosynthesis proteins and their homologues provide new insights and functional assignments of the proteins in the pathway. Based on sequence analysis and homology models we propose the role and catalytic function for each enzyme involved in this intriguing biosynthesis pathway. Conclusion PQQ is derived from the two amino acids glutamate and tyrosine encoded in the precursor peptide PqqA. Five reactions are necessary to form this quinone cofactor. The PqqA peptide is recognised by PqqE, which links the C9 and C9a, afterwards it is accepted by PqqF which cuts out the linked amino acids. The next reaction (Schiff base is spontaneous, the following dioxygenation is catalysed by an unknown enzyme. The last cyclization and oxidation steps are catalysed by PqqC. Taken together the known facts of the different proteins we assign a putative function to all six proteins in PQQ biosynthesis pathway.

  18. Biosynthesis of natural products containing β-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Fumitaka; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    Covering: up to January, 2014. We focus here on β-amino acids as components of complex natural products because the presence of β-amino acids produces structural diversity in natural products and provides characteristic architectures beyond those of ordinary α-L-amino acids, thus generating significant and unique biological functions in nature. In this review, we first survey the known bioactive β-amino acid-containing natural products including nonribosomal peptides, macrolactam polyketides, and nucleoside-β-amino acid hybrids. Next, the biosynthetic enzymes that form β-amino acids from α-amino acids and the de novo synthesis of β-amino acids are summarized. Then, the mechanisms of β-amino acid incorporation into natural products are reviewed. Because it is anticipated that the rational swapping of the β-amino acid moieties with various side chains and stereochemistries by biosynthetic engineering should lead to the creation of novel architectures and bioactive compounds, the accumulation of knowledge regarding β-amino acid-containing natural product biosynthetic machinery could have a significant impact in this field. In addition, genome mining of characteristic β-amino acid biosynthetic genes and unique β-amino acid incorporation machinery could lead to the discovery of new β-amino acid-containing natural products.

  19. [Optimization of oxytetracycline biosynthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, E A; Falkov, N N; Izmaĭlov, N N; Romanchuk, N N

    1988-06-01

    It was shown that rising of temperature up to 30 degrees C at the stage of the oxytetracycline-producing organism growth promoted acceleration of the culture growth rate and increasing of the antibiotic concentration by the 114th hour of the biosynthetic process. For the apparatus used in the study optimal aeration and agitation conditions were developed. To provide optimal parameters during biosynthesis of oxytetracycline, it was recommended to use the aeration rate of 1 v/v.min and the specific mechanical power for mixing of not less than 1 kW/m3.

  20. Biosynthesis of Rishirilide B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Schwarzer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Rishirilide B was isolated from Streptomyces rishiriensis and Streptomyces bottropensis on the basis of its inhibitory activity towards alpha-2-macroglobulin. The biosynthesis of rishirilide B was investigated by feeding experiments with different 13C labelled precursors using the heterologous host Streptomyces albus J1074::cos4 containing a cosmid encoding of the gene cluster responsible for rishirilide B production. NMR spectroscopic analysis of labelled compounds demonstrate that the tricyclic backbone of rishirilide B is a polyketide synthesized from nine acetate units. One of the acetate units is decarboxylated to give a methyl group. The origin of the starter unit was determined to be isobutyrate.

  1. Regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc eDo-Rego

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic pathways leading to the synthesis of bioactive steroids in the brain are now almost completely elucidated in various groups of vertebrates and, during the last decade, the neuronal mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurosteroid production have received increasing attention. This report reviews the current knowledge concerning the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones and neuropeptides on the biosynthesis of neurosteroids. Anatomical studies have been carried out to visualize the neurotransmitter- or neuropeptide-containing fibers contacting steroid-synthesizing neurons as well as the neurotransmitter, peptide hormones or neuropeptide receptors expressed in these neurons. Biochemical experiments have been conducted to investigate the effects of neurotransmitters, peptide hormones or neuropeptides on neurosteroid biosynthesis, and to characterize the type of receptors involved. Thus, it has been found that glutamate, acting through kainate and/or AMPA receptors, rapidly inactivates P450arom, and that melatonin produced by the pineal gland and eye inhibits the biosynthesis of 7-hydroxypregnenolone (7-OH-5P, while prolactin produced by the adenohypophysis enhances the formation of 7-OH-5P. It has also been demonstrated that the biosynthesis of neurosteroids is inhibited by GABA, acting through GABAA receptors, and neuropeptide Y, acting through Y1 receptors. In contrast, it has been shown that the octadecaneuropetide ODN, acting through central-type benzodiazepine receptors, the triakontatetraneuropeptide TTN, acting though peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, and vasotocine, acting through V1a-like receptors, stimulate the production of neurosteroids. Since neurosteroids are implicated in the control of various neurophysiological and behavioral processes, these data suggest that some of the neurophysiological effects exerted by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides may be mediated via the regulation

  2. (+)-Germacrene A Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kraker, Jan-Willem; Franssen, Maurice C.R.; de Groot, Aede; König, Wilfried A.; Bouwmeester, Harro J.

    1998-01-01

    The leaves and especially the roots of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) contain high concentrations of bitter sesquiterpene lactones such as the guianolides lactupicrin, lactucin, and 8-deoxylactucin. Eudesmanolides and germacranolides are present in smaller amounts. Their postulated biosynthesis through the mevalonate-farnesyl diphosphate-germacradiene pathway has now been confirmed by the isolation of a (+)-germacrene A synthase from chicory roots. This sesquiterpene cyclase was purified 200-fold using a combination of anion-exchange and dye-ligand chromatography. It has a Km value of 6.6 μm, an estimated molecular mass of 54 kD, and a (broad) pH optimum around 6.7. Germacrene A, the enzymatic product, proved to be much more stable than reported in literature. Its heat-induced Cope rearrangement into (−)-β-elemene was utilized to determine its absolute configuration on an enantioselective gas chromatography column. To our knowledge, until now in sesquiterpene biosynthesis, germacrene A has only been reported as an (postulated) enzyme-bound intermediate, which, instead of being released, is subjected to additional cyclization(s) by the same enzyme that generated it from farnesyl diphosphate. However, in chicory germacrene A is released from the sesquiterpene cyclase. Apparently, subsequent oxidations and/or glucosylation of the germacrane skeleton, together with a germacrene cyclase, determine whether guaiane- or eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactones are produced. PMID:9701594

  3. Ovarian ecdysteroid biosynthesis and female germline stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameku, Tomotsune; Yoshinari, Yuto; Fukuda, Ruriko; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2017-07-03

    The germline stem cells (GSCs) are critical for gametogenesis throughout the adult life. Stem cell identity is maintained by local signals from a specialized microenvironment called the niche. However, it is unclear how systemic signals regulate stem cell activity in response to environmental cues. In our previous article, we reported that mating stimulates GSC proliferation in female Drosophila. The mating-induced GSC proliferation is mediated by ovarian ecdysteroids, whose biosynthesis is positively controlled by Sex peptide signaling. Here, we characterized the post-eclosion and post-mating expression pattern of the genes encoding the ecdysteroidogenic enzymes in the ovary. We further investigated the biosynthetic functions of the ovarian ecdysteroid in GSC maintenance in the mated females. We also briefly discuss the regulation of the ecdysteroidogenic enzyme-encoding genes and the subsequent ecdysteroid biosynthesis in the ovary of the adult Drosophila.

  4. Comparative analysis of oligonucleotide primers for high-throughput screening of genes encoding adenylation domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in actinomycetes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vopálenská, I.; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 72, OCT 2015 (2015), s. 160-167 ISSN 0956-5663 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011461; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Yeast biosensor * Copper ion detection * Purine synthesis pathway Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 7.476, year: 2015

  5. Serine biosynthesis and transport defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hattab, Ayman W

    2016-07-01

    l-serine is a non-essential amino acid that is biosynthesized via the enzymes phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH), phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP). Besides its role in protein synthesis, l-serine is a potent neurotrophic factor and a precursor of a number of essential compounds including phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, glycine, and d-serine. Serine biosynthesis defects result from impairments of PGDH, PSAT, or PSP leading to systemic serine deficiency. Serine biosynthesis defects present in a broad phenotypic spectrum that includes, at the severe end, Neu-Laxova syndrome, a lethal multiple congenital anomaly disease, intermediately, infantile serine biosynthesis defects with severe neurological manifestations and growth deficiency, and at the mild end, the childhood disease with intellectual disability. A serine transport defect resulting from deficiency of the ASCT1, the main transporter for serine in the central nervous system, has been recently described in children with neurological manifestations that overlap with those observed in serine biosynthesis defects. l-serine therapy may be beneficial in preventing or ameliorating symptoms in serine biosynthesis and transport defects, if started before neurological damage occurs. Herein, we review serine metabolism and transport, the clinical, biochemical, and molecular aspects of serine biosynthesis and transport defects, the mechanisms of these diseases, and the potential role of serine therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Fusarium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Avalos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many fungi of the genus Fusarium stand out for the complexity of their secondary metabolism. Individual species may differ in their metabolic capacities, but they usually share the ability to synthesize carotenoids, a family of hydrophobic terpenoid pigments widely distributed in nature. Early studies on carotenoid biosynthesis in Fusarium aquaeductuum have been recently extended in Fusarium fujikuroi and Fusarium oxysporum, well-known biotechnological and phytopathogenic models, respectively. The major Fusarium carotenoid is neurosporaxanthin, a carboxylic xanthophyll synthesized from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate through the activity of four enzymes, encoded by the genes carRA, carB, carT and carD. These fungi produce also minor amounts of β-carotene, which may be cleaved by the CarX oxygenase to produce retinal, the rhodopsin’s chromophore. The genes needed to produce retinal are organized in a gene cluster with a rhodopsin gene, while other carotenoid genes are not linked. In the investigated Fusarium species, the synthesis of carotenoids is induced by light through the transcriptional induction of the structural genes. In some species, deep-pigmented mutants with up-regulated expression of these genes are affected in the regulatory gene carS. The molecular mechanisms underlying the control by light and by the CarS protein are currently under investigation.

  7. Stereoselectivity in Polyphenol Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.

    1992-01-01

    Stereoselectivity plays an important role in the late stages of phenyl-propanoid metabolism, affording lignins, lignans, and neolignans. Stereoselectivity is manifested during monolignol (glucoside) synthesis, e.g., where the geometry (E or Z) of the pendant double bond affects the specificity of UDPG:coniferyl alcohol glucosyltransferases in different species. Such findings are viewed to have important ramifications in monolignol transport and storage processes, with roles for both E- and Z-monolignols and their glucosides in lignin/lignan biosynthesis being envisaged. Stereoselectivity is also of great importance in enantiose-lective enzymatic processes affording optically active lignans. Thus, cell-free extracts from Forsythia species were demonstrated to synthesize the enantiomerically pure lignans, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, and (-)-pinoresinol, when NAD(P)H, H2O2 and E-coniferyl alcohol were added. Progress toward elucidating the enzymatic steps involved in such highly stereoselective processes is discussed. Also described are preliminary studies aimed at developing methodologies to determine the subcellular location of late-stage phenylpropanoid metabolites (e.g., coniferyl alcohol) and key enzymes thereof, in intact tissue or cells. This knowledge is essential if questions regarding lignin and lignan tissue specificity and regulation of these processes are to be deciphered.

  8. Glycolipid biosynthesis in cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dusen, W.J.; Jaworski, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    The biosynthesis of monogalactosyldiacyl-glycerol (MGDG) was studied in five different cyanobacteria. Previous work has shown Anabaena variabilis to synthesize both MGDG and monoglucosyl-diacylglycerol (MG1cDG) with MG1cDG being the precursor of MGDG. They have examined four other cyanobacteria to determine if a similar relationship exists. The cyanobacteria studied were Anabaena variabilis, Chlorogloeopsis sp., Schizothrix calcicola, Anacystis nidulans, and Anacystis marina. Each were grown in liquid culture and lipids were labeled with 14 C]CO 2 for 20 min., 1.0 hr, 1.0 hr + 10 hr chase. Glycolipids were analyzed by initial separation of MGDG and MG1cDG by TLC followed by further analysis by HPLC. Complete separation of molecular species was obtained isocratically on an ODS column. All of the cyanobacteria labeled 16-C and 18-C fatty acids except for A. marina which labeled only 14-C and 16-C fatty acids. Desaturation of the fatty acids could be observed in the 1.0 hr and chase experiments. All were capable of labeling both MG1cDG and MGDG with the precursor-product relationship being observed. There does not appear to be a direct relationship between the epimerization of the sugar moiety and fatty acid desaturation

  9. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulose, Subin; Panda, Tapobrata; Nair, Praseetha P; Théodore, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Metal nanoparticles have unique optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. There exist well-defined physical and chemical processes for their preparation. Those processes often yield small quantities of nanoparticles having undesired morphology, and involve high temperatures for the reaction and the use of hazardous chemicals. Relatively, the older technique of bioremediation of metals uses either microorganisms or their components for the production of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles obtained from bacteria, fungi, algae, plants and their components, etc. appear environment-friendly, as toxic chemicals are not used in the processes. In addition to this, the formation of nanoparticles takes place at almost normal temperature and pressure. Control of the shape and size of the nanoparticles is possible by appropriate selection of the pH and temperature. Three important steps are the bioconversion of Ag+ ions, conversion of desired crystals to nanoparticles, and nanoparticle stability. Generally, nanoparticles are characterized by the UV-visible spectroscopy and use of the electron microscope. Silver nanoparticles are used as antimicrobial agents and they possess antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenic properties. This review highlights the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by various organisms, possible mechanisms of their synthesis, their characterization, and applications of silver nanoparticles.

  10. Nunamycin and Nunapeptin: Two novel cyclic peptides are key components of the antimicrobial activity of the Greenlandic isolate Pseudomonas fluorescens In5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian F.

    Pseudomonas spp. are a rich source of secondary metabolites including bioactive non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides. NRPs are synthesised in large assembly lines by multi-domain modular enzymes known as NRP-synthetases (NRPS). Nunamycin and nunapeptin are two cyclic NRPs synthesised...... by the Greenlandic isolate P. fluorescens In5. Nunamycin shows antifungal activity against the basidiomycete Rhizoctonia solani whereas the only partially structure elucidated nunapeptin appears most active against the ascomycete Fusarium graminearum and the oomycete Pythium aphanidermatum. Originally isolated from...

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Adem Bahar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics.

  12. Genetics, Biosynthesis, Structure, and Mode of Action of Lantibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Anneke; Rink, Rick; Moll, Gert N.

    Lantibiotics are lanthionine-containing peptide antibiotics. They are characterized by having meso-lanthionine(s) and/or β-methyllanthionine(s) or both. These intramolecular monosulfide cross-links render the peptide resistant against breakdown by peptidases. Moreover, in several cases, the (methyl)lanthionines are essential for interaction with the so-called docking molecule lipid II. The best known lantibiotic, nisin, highly effectively inhibits growth of target cells via two mechanisms: (1) abduction of the cell wall precursor lipid II from the septum and (2) formation of pores composed of lipid II and nisin. (Methyl)lanthionines result from two enzyme-catalyzed posttranslational modifications: dehydration of serines/threonines and coupling of the resulting dehydro amino acids to cysteines. Besides the localization of the thioether bridges and dehydro amino acids in the lantibiotics, also the three-dimensional structure of some lantibiotics has been resolved by NMR. Genes encoding proteins involved in the biosynthesis of lantibiotics are present in clusters and may comprise combinations of the following genes in varying order: a structural gene that encodes a leader peptide and the lantibiotic propeptide, modification enzyme(s), a transporter responsible for the export of the lantibiotic and in some cases for cleavage of the leader peptide, a leader peptidase, a so-called immunity protein involved in self-protection of the host cell, components of a transporter also involved in self-protection, and two components of an autoinduction system.

  13. Auxin biosynthesis and storage forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Lucia C.

    2013-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin drives plant growth and morphogenesis. The levels and distribution of the active auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) are tightly controlled through synthesis, inactivation, and transport. Many auxin precursors and modified auxin forms, used to regulate auxin homeostasis, have been identified; however, very little is known about the integration of multiple auxin biosynthesis and inactivation pathways. This review discusses the many ways auxin levels are regulated through biosynthesis, storage forms, and inactivation, and the potential roles modified auxins play in regulating the bioactive pool of auxin to affect plant growth and development. PMID:23580748

  14. Hypericin: chemical synthesis and biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin-Fang; Wang, Zeng-Hui; Chen, Shi-Lin

    2014-02-01

    Hypericin is one of the most important phenanthoperylene quinones extracted mainly from plants of the genus Hypericum belonging to the sections Euhypericum and Campylosporus of Keller's classification. Widespread attention to the antiviral and anti-tumor properties of hypericin has spurred investigations of the chemical synthesis and biosynthesis of this unique compound. However, the synthetic strategies are challenging for organic and biological chemists. In this review, specific significant advances in total synthesis, semi-synthesis, and biosynthesis in the past decades are summarized. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Feed-forward regulation of microbisporicin biosynthesis in Microbispora corallina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulston, Lucy; Bibb, Mervyn

    2011-06-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized, posttranslationally modified peptide antibiotics. Microbisporicin is a potent lantibiotic produced by the actinomycete Microbispora corallina and contains unique chlorinated tryptophan and dihydroxyproline residues. The biosynthetic gene cluster for microbisporicin encodes several putative regulatory proteins, including, uniquely, an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factor, σ(MibX), a likely cognate anti-σ factor, MibW, and a potential helix-turn-helix DNA binding protein, MibR. Here we examine the roles of these proteins in regulating microbisporicin biosynthesis. S1 nuclease protection assays were used to determine transcriptional start sites in the microbisporicin gene cluster and confirmed the presence of the likely ECF sigma factor -10 and -35 sequences in five out of six promoters. In contrast, the promoter of mibA, encoding the microbisporicin prepropeptide, has a typical Streptomyces vegetative sigma factor consensus sequence. The ECF sigma factor σ(MibX) was shown to interact with the putative anti-sigma factor MibW in Escherichia coli using bacterial two-hybrid analysis. σ(MibX) autoregulates its own expression but does not directly regulate expression of mibA. On the basis of quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) data, we propose a model for the biosynthesis of microbisporicin in which MibR functions as an essential master regulator and the ECF sigma factor/anti-sigma factor pair, σ(MibX)/MibW, induces feed-forward biosynthesis of microbisporicin and producer immunity.

  16. Autoregulation of subtilin biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis: the role of the spa-box in subtilin-responsive promoters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleerebezem, M.; Bongers, R.; Rutten, G.; Vos, de W.M.; Kuipers, O.P.

    2004-01-01

    The production of the type 1 antimicrobial peptide (AMP) subtilin by Bacillus subtilis is regulated in a cell-density-dependent manner [Kleerebezem M, de Vos WM, Kuipers OP. The lantibiotics nisin and subtilin act as extracellular regulators of their own biosynthesis. In: Dunny GM, Winans SC,

  17. (vitamin B1) biosynthesis genes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the gene transcripts of first two enzymes in thiamine biosynthesis pathway, THIC and THI1/THI4 were identified and amplified from oil palm tissues. Primers were designed based on sequence comparison of the genes from Arabidopsis thaliana, Zea mays, Oryza sativa and Alnus glutinosa. Oil palm's responses ...

  18. Peptide Bond Synthesis by a Mechanism Involving an Enzymatic Reaction and a Subsequent Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Zhuang, Ye; Ge, Yin; Kumano, Takuto; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that an amide bond is unexpectedly formed by an acyl-CoA synthetase (which catalyzes the formation of a carbon-sulfur bond) when a suitable acid and l-cysteine are used as substrates. DltA, which is homologous to the adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetase, belongs to the same superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, which includes many kinds of enzymes, including the acyl-CoA synthetases. Here, we demonstrate that DltA synthesizes not only N-(d-alanyl)-l-cysteine (a dipeptide) but also various oligopeptides. We propose that this enzyme catalyzes peptide synthesis by the following unprecedented mechanism: (i) the formation of S-acyl-l-cysteine as an intermediate via its "enzymatic activity" and (ii) subsequent "chemical" S → N acyl transfer in the intermediate, resulting in peptide formation. Step ii is identical to the corresponding reaction in native chemical ligation, a method of chemical peptide synthesis, whereas step i is not. To the best of our knowledge, our discovery of this peptide synthesis mechanism involving an enzymatic reaction and a subsequent chemical reaction is the first such one to be reported. This new process yields peptides without the use of a thioesterified fragment, which is required in native chemical ligation. Together with these findings, the same mechanism-dependent formation of N-acyl compounds by other members of the above-mentioned superfamily demonstrated that all members most likely form peptide/amide compounds by using this novel mechanism. Each member enzyme acts on a specific substrate; thus, not only the corresponding peptides but also new types of amide compounds can be formed. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Exploring the fungal protein cadre in the biosynthesis of PbSe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Jaya Mary; Sharma, Sumit; Balakrishnan, Raj Mohan, E-mail: rajmohanbala@gmail.com

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Pb and Se stress activates specific metal detoxification surge in the fungus. • Fungus releases phytochelatins, metallothioneins, super oxide dismutases etc. • These mechanisms capacitate the fungi as bio-factories for synthesis of PbSe QDs. • A pathway for PbSe QD biosynthesis by marine Aspergillus terreus was elucidated - Abstract: While a large number of microbial sources have recently emerged as potent sources for biosynthesis of chalcogenide quantum dots (QDs), studies regarding their biomimetic strategies that initiate QD biosynthesis are scarce. The present study describes several mechanistic aspects of PbSe QD biosynthesis using marine Aspergillus terreus. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies indicated distinctive morphological features such as abrasion and agglomeration on the fungal biomass after the biosynthesis reaction. Further, the biomass subsequent to the heavy metal/metalloid precursor was characterized with spectral signatures typical to primary and secondary stress factors such as thiol compounds and oxalic acid using Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopic (FTIR) analysis. An increase in the total protein content in the reaction mixture after biosynthesis was another noteworthy observation. Further, metal-phytochelatins were identified as the prominent metal-ion trafficking components in the reaction mixture using Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectroscopic analysis (LCMS). Subsequent assays confirmed the involvement of metal binding peptides namely metallothioneins and other anti-oxidant enzymes that might have played a prominent role in the microbial metal detoxification system for the biosynthesis of PbSe QDs. Based on these findings a possible mechanism for the biosynthesis of PbSe QDs by marine A. terreus has been elucidated.

  20. The importance of mass spectrometric dereplication in fungal secondary metabolite analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2015-01-01

    Having entered the Genomic Era, it is now evident that the biosynthetic potential of filamentous fungi is much larger than was thought even a decade ago. Fungi harbor many cryptic gene clusters encoding for the biosynthesis of polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, and terpenoids - which can all...

  1. Genome-based discovery, structure prediction and functional analysis of cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics in Pseudomonas species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.; Kock, de M.J.D.; Meng, Y.; Waard, de P.; Beek, van T.A.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of microbial genome sequences have revealed numerous genes involved in antibiotic biosynthesis. In Pseudomonads, several gene clusters encoding non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) were predicted to be involved in the synthesis of cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) antibiotics. Most of these

  2. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Davis, Edward M.; Ringer, Kerry L.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint ( Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4 S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general “allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction” scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1 R, 3 R, 4 S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil.

  3. Synthetic antifreeze peptide

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A synthetic antifreeze peptide and a synthetic gene coding for the antifreeze peptide have been produced. The antifreeze peptide has a greater number of repeating amino acid sequences than is present in the native antifreeze peptides from winter flounder upon which the synthetic antifreeze peptide was modeled. Each repeating amino acid sequence has two polar amino acid residues which are spaced a controlled distance apart so that the antifreeze peptide may inhibit ice formation. The synthetic...

  4. Homocysteine Editing, Thioester Chemistry, Coenzyme A, and the Origin of Coded Peptide Synthesis †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieronim Jakubowski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs have evolved “quality control” mechanisms which prevent tRNA aminoacylation with non-protein amino acids, such as homocysteine, homoserine, and ornithine, and thus their access to the Genetic Code. Of the ten AARSs that possess editing function, five edit homocysteine: Class I MetRS, ValRS, IleRS, LeuRS, and Class II LysRS. Studies of their editing function reveal that catalytic modules of these AARSs have a thiol-binding site that confers the ability to catalyze the aminoacylation of coenzyme A, pantetheine, and other thiols. Other AARSs also catalyze aminoacyl-thioester synthesis. Amino acid selectivity of AARSs in the aminoacyl thioesters formation reaction is relaxed, characteristic of primitive amino acid activation systems that may have originated in the Thioester World. With homocysteine and cysteine as thiol substrates, AARSs support peptide bond synthesis. Evolutionary origin of these activities is revealed by genomic comparisons, which show that AARSs are structurally related to proteins involved in coenzyme A/sulfur metabolism and non-coded peptide bond synthesis. These findings suggest that the extant AARSs descended from ancestral forms that were involved in non-coded Thioester-dependent peptide synthesis, functionally similar to the present-day non-ribosomal peptide synthetases.

  5. On-line enzymatic tailoring of polyketides and peptides in thiotemplate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Srividhya; Hertweck, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) and type I polyketide synthases (PKS) are versatile thiotemplate systems for the programmed assembly of biosynthetic building blocks. Typically, the post-PKS/NRPS enzymes tailor the resulting chains to yield the bioactive natural product scaffolds. However, more and more examples have surfaced showing that important structural modifications take place while the intermediates are still bound to the assembly line. A growing number of enzymatic domains and trans-acting enzymes as well as their recruiting areas in the modules have been identified and characterized. In addition to the widespread on-line alkylations, hydroxylations and heterocyclizations into oxazole/thiazole residues, on-line modifications lead to a variety of ring systems such as cycloethers, lactones, lactams, glutarimides, cyclopropanes, decalins and cyclic biaryls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2, wh...

  7. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  8. C-Peptide Effects on Renal Physiology and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tsimaratos

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The C-peptide of proinsulin is important for the biosynthesis of insulin and has for a long time been considered to be biologically inert. Animal studies have shown that some of the renal effects of the C-peptide may in part be explained by its ability to stimulate the Na,K-ATPase activity. Precisely, the C-peptide reduces diabetes-induced glomerular hyperfiltration both in animals and humans, therefore, resulting in regression of fibrosis. The tubular function is also concerned as diabetic animals supplemented with C-peptide exhibit better renal function resulting in reduced urinary sodium waste and protein excretion together with the reduction of the diabetes-induced glomerular hyperfiltration. The tubular effectors of C-peptide were considered to be tubule transporters, but recent studies have shown that biochemical pathways involving cellular kinases and inflammatory pathways may also be important. The matter theory concerning the C-peptide effects is a metabolic one involving the effects of the C-peptide on lipidic metabolic status.This review concentrates on the most convincing data which indicate that the C-peptide is a biologically active hormone for renal physiology.

  9. A systematic computational analysis of biosynthetic gene cluster evolution: lessons for engineering biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnix H Medema

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial secondary metabolites are widely used as antibiotics, anticancer drugs, insecticides and food additives. Attempts to engineer their biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs to produce unnatural metabolites with improved properties are often frustrated by the unpredictability and complexity of the enzymes that synthesize these molecules, suggesting that genetic changes within BGCs are limited by specific constraints. Here, by performing a systematic computational analysis of BGC evolution, we derive evidence for three findings that shed light on the ways in which, despite these constraints, nature successfully invents new molecules: 1 BGCs for complex molecules often evolve through the successive merger of smaller sub-clusters, which function as independent evolutionary entities. 2 An important subset of polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases evolve by concerted evolution, which generates sets of sequence-homogenized domains that may hold promise for engineering efforts since they exhibit a high degree of functional interoperability, 3 Individual BGC families evolve in distinct ways, suggesting that design strategies should take into account family-specific functional constraints. These findings suggest novel strategies for using synthetic biology to rationally engineer biosynthetic pathways.

  10. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  11. Development and evaluation of a non-ribosomal random PCR and next-generation sequencing based assay for detection and sequencing of hand, foot and mouth disease pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh To; Tran, Thanh Tan; Hoang, Van Minh Tu; Nghiem, Ngoc My; Le, Nhu Nguyen Truc; Le, Thanh Thi My; Phan, Qui Tu; Truong, Khanh Huu; Le, Nhan Nguyen Thanh; Ho, Viet Lu; Do, Viet Chau; Ha, Tuan Manh; Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Thwaites, Guy; van Doorn, H Rogier; Le, Tan Van

    2016-07-07

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) has become a major public health problem across the Asia-Pacific region, and is commonly caused by enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) and coxsackievirus A6 (CV-A6), CV-A10 and CV-A16. Generating pathogen whole-genome sequences is essential for understanding their evolutionary biology. The frequent replacements among EV serotypes and a limited numbers of available whole-genome sequences hinder the development of overlapping PCRs for whole-genome sequencing. We developed and evaluated a non-ribosomal random PCR (rPCR) and next-generation sequencing based assay for sequence-independent whole-genome amplification and sequencing of HFMD pathogens. A total of 16 EV-A71/CV-A6/CV-A10/CV-A16 PCR positive rectal/throat swabs (Cp values: 20.9-33.3) were used for assay evaluation. Our assay evidently outperformed the conventional rPCR in terms of the total number of EV-A71 reads and the percentage of EV-A71 reads: 2.6 % (1275/50,000 reads) vs. 0.1 % (31/50,000) and 6 % (3008/50,000) vs. 0.9 % (433/50,000) for two samples with Cp values of 30 and 26, respectively. Additionally the assay could generate genome sequences with the percentages of coverage of 94-100 % of 4 different enterovirus serotypes in 73 % of the tested samples, representing the first whole-genome sequences of CV-A6/10/16 from Vietnam, and could assign correctly serotyping results in 100 % of 24 tested specimens. In all but three the obtained consensuses of two replicates from the same sample were 100 % identical, suggesting that our assay is highly reproducible. In conclusion, we have successfully developed a non-ribosomal rPCR and next-generation sequencing based assay for sensitive detection and direct whole-genome sequencing of HFMD pathogens from clinical samples.

  12. Vitamin B biosynthesis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roje, Sanja

    2007-07-01

    The vitamin B complex comprises water-soluble enzyme cofactors and their derivatives that are essential contributors to diverse metabolic processes in plants as well as in animals and microorganisms. Seven vitamins form this complex: B1 (thiamin (1)), B2 (riboflavin (2)), B3 (niacin (3)), B5 (pantothenic acid (4)), B6 (pyridoxine, pyridoxal (5), and pyridoxamine), B8 (biotin (6)), and B9 (folate (7)). All seven B vitamins are required in the human diet for proper nutrition because humans lack enzymes to synthesize these compounds de novo. This review aims to summarize the present knowledge of vitamin B biosynthesis in plants.

  13. Biosynthesis of human sialophorins and analysis of the polypeptide core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Kenney, D.; Rosen, F.S.

    1987-01-01

    Biosynthesis was examined of sialophorin (formerly called gpL115) which is altered in the inherited immunodeficiency Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Sialophorin is greater than 50% carbohydrate, primarily O-linked units of sialic acid, galactose, and galactosamine. Pulse-labeling with [ 35 S]methionine and chase incubation established that sialophorin is synthesized in CEM lymphoblastoid cells as an Mr 62,000 precursor which is converted within 45 min to mature glycosylated sialophorin, a long-lived molecule. Experiments with tunicamycin and endoglycosidase H demonstrated that sialophorin contains N-linked carbohydrate (approximately two units per molecule) and is therefore an N,O-glycoprotein. Pulse-labeling of tunicamycin-treated CEM cells together with immunoprecipitation provided the means to isolate the [ 35 S]-methionine-labeled polypeptide core of sialophorin and determine its molecular weight (58,000). This datum allowed us to express the previously established composition on a per molecule basis and determine that sialophorin molecules contain approximately 520 amino acid residues and greater than or equal to 100 O-linked carbohydrate units. A recent study showed that various blood cells express sialophorin and that there are two molecular forms: lymphocyte/monocyte sialophorin and platelet/neutrophil sialophorin. Biosynthesis of the two forms was compared by using sialophorin of CEM cells and sialophorin of MOLT-4 cells (another lymphoblastoid line) as models for lymphocyte/monocyte sialophorin and platelet/neutrophil sialophorin, respectively. The time course of biosynthesis and the content of N units were found to be identical for the two sialophorin species. [ 35 S]Methionine-labeled polypeptide cores of CEM sialophorin and MOLT sialophorin were isolated and compared by electrophoresis, isoelectrofocusing, and a newly developed peptide mapping technique

  14. DBAASP v.2: an enhanced database of structure and antimicrobial/cytotoxic activity of natural and synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirtskhalava, Malak; Gabrielian, Andrei; Cruz, Phillip; Griggs, Hannah L; Squires, R Burke; Hurt, Darrell E; Grigolava, Maia; Chubinidze, Mindia; Gogoladze, George; Vishnepolsky, Boris; Alekseyev, Vsevolod; Rosenthal, Alex; Tartakovsky, Michael

    2016-01-04

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are anti-infectives that may represent a novel and untapped class of biotherapeutics. Increasing interest in AMPs means that new peptides (natural and synthetic) are discovered faster than ever before. We describe herein a new version of the Database of Antimicrobial Activity and Structure of Peptides (DBAASPv.2, which is freely accessible at http://dbaasp.org). This iteration of the database reports chemical structures and empirically-determined activities (MICs, IC50, etc.) against more than 4200 specific target microbes for more than 2000 ribosomal, 80 non-ribosomal and 5700 synthetic peptides. Of these, the vast majority are monomeric, but nearly 200 of these peptides are found as homo- or heterodimers. More than 6100 of the peptides are linear, but about 515 are cyclic and more than 1300 have other intra-chain covalent bonds. More than half of the entries in the database were added after the resource was initially described, which reflects the recent sharp uptick of interest in AMPs. New features of DBAASPv.2 include: (i) user-friendly utilities and reporting functions, (ii) a 'Ranking Search' function to query the database by target species and return a ranked list of peptides with activity against that target and (iii) structural descriptions of the peptides derived from empirical data or calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The three-dimensional structural data are critical components for understanding structure-activity relationships and for design of new antimicrobial drugs. We created more than 300 high-throughput MD simulations specifically for inclusion in DBAASP. The resulting structures are described in the database by novel trajectory analysis plots and movies. Another 200+ DBAASP entries have links to the Protein DataBank. All of the structures are easily visualized directly in the web browser. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Post-translational modification of ribosomally synthesized peptides by a radical SAM epimerase in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Guillot, Alain; Ruffié, Pauline; Leprince, Jérôme; Berteau, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    Ribosomally synthesized peptides are built out of L-amino acids, whereas D-amino acids are generally the hallmark of non-ribosomal synthetic processes. Here we show that the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis is able to produce a novel type of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide that contains D-amino acids, and which we propose to call epipeptides. We demonstrate that a two [4Fe-4S]-cluster radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme converts L-amino acids into their D-counterparts by catalysing Cα-hydrogen-atom abstraction and using a critical cysteine residue as the hydrogen-atom donor. Unexpectedly, these D-amino acid residues proved to be essential for the activity of a peptide that induces the expression of LiaRS, a major component of the bacterial cell envelope stress-response system. Present in B. subtilis and in several members of the human microbiome, these epipeptides and radical SAM epimerases broaden the landscape of peptidyl structures accessible to living organisms.

  16. Biosynthesis of bacterial aromatic polyketides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jixun

    2009-01-01

    Aromatic polyketides represent important members of the family of polyketides, which have displayed a wide assortment of bioactive properties, such as antibacterial, antitumor, and antiviral activities. Bacterial aromatic polyketides are mainly synthesized by type II polyketide synthases (PKSs). Whereas malonyl-CoA is exclusively used as the extender unit, starter units can vary in different aromatic polyketide biosynthetic pathways, leading to a variety of polyketide backbones. Once the polyketide chains are elongated by the minimal PKSs to the full length, the immediate tailoring enzymes including ketoreductases, oxygenases and cyclases will work on the nascent chains to form aromatic structures, which will be further decorated by those late tailoring enzymes such as methyltransferases and glycosyltransferases. The mechanistic studies on the biosynthetic pathways of aromatic polyketides such as oxytetracycline and pradimicin A have been extensively carried out in recent years. Engineered biosynthesis of novel "unnatural" polyketides has been achieved in heterologous hosts such as Streptomyces coelicolor and Escherichia coli. This review covers the most recent advances in aromatic polyketide biosynthesis, which provide new enzymes or methods for building novel polyketide biosynthetic machinery.

  17. Fatty acid biosynthesis in actinomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago, Gabriela; Diacovich, Lautaro; Arabolaza, Ana; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Gramajo, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    All organisms that produce fatty acids do so via a repeated cycle of reactions. In mammals and other animals, these reactions are catalyzed by a type I fatty acid synthase (FAS), a large multifunctional protein to which the growing chain is covalently attached. In contrast, most bacteria (and plants) contain a type II system in which each reaction is catalyzed by a discrete protein. The pathway of fatty acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli is well established and has provided a foundation for elucidating the type II FAS pathways in other bacteria (White et al., 2005). However, fatty acid biosynthesis is more diverse in the phylum Actinobacteria: Mycobacterium, possess both FAS systems while Streptomyces species have only the multi-enzyme FAS II system and Corynebacterium species exclusively FAS I. In this review we present an overview of the genome organization, biochemical properties and physiological relevance of the two FAS systems in the three genera of actinomycetes mentioned above. We also address in detail the biochemical and structural properties of the acyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCases) that catalyzes the first committed step of fatty acid synthesis in actinomycetes, and discuss the molecular bases of their substrate specificity and the structure-based identification of new ACCase inhibitors with anti-mycobacterial properties. PMID:21204864

  18. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  19. Designer Natriuretic Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Candace Y. W.; Lieu, Hsiao; Burnett, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Designer natriuretic peptides (NPs) are novel hybrid peptides that are engineered from the native NPs through addition, deletion, or substitution of amino acid(s) with a goal toward optimization of pharmacological actions while minimizing undesirable effects. In this article, selected peptides that were designed in our laboratory are reviewed, and future directions for research and development of designer NPs are discussed. PMID:19158603

  20. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  2. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  3. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  4. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  5. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  6. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  7. The first N-terminal unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide: H-Gly-Aib-Gly-Aib-OtBu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2015-12-01

    Glycine (Gly) is incorporated in roughly half of all known peptaibiotic (nonribosomally biosynthesized antibiotic peptides of fungal origin) sequences and is the residue with the greatest conformational flexibility. The conformational space of Aib (α-aminoisobutyric acid) is severely restricted by the second methyl group attached to the Cα atom. Most of the crystal structures containing Aib are N-terminal protected. Deprotection of the N- or C-terminus of peptides may alter the hydrogen-bonding scheme and/or the structure and may facilitate crystallization. The structure reported here for glycyl-α-aminoisobutyrylglycyl-α-aminoisobutyric acid tert-butyl ester, C16H30N4O5, describes the first N-terminal-unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide. The achiral peptide could form an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the C=O group of Gly1 and the N-H group of Aib4. This hydrogen bond is found in all tetrapeptides and N-terminal-protected tripeptides containing Aib, apart from one exception. In the present work, this hydrogen bond is not observed (N...O = 5.88 Å). Instead, every molecule is hydrogen bonded to six other symmetry-related molecules with a total of eight hydrogen bonds per molecule. The backbone conformation starts in the right-handed helical region (and the left-handed helical region for the inverted molecule) and reverses the screw sense in the last two residues.

  8. Regulatory variability of camalexin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhegger, Regina; Rauhut, Thomas; Glawischnig, Erich

    2007-05-01

    The anthranilate synthase ASA1, CYP79B2 and CYP71B15 (PAD3) are biosynthetic genes of the Arabidopsis phytoalexin camalexin, which are induced after pathogen infection and abiotic treatments like silver nitrate spraying. The natural variation of camalexin biosynthesis in response to Pseudomonas syringae infection was determined in several ecotypes, and differential CYP71B15 regulation as a potential basis for this variation was investigated. The expression of camalexin biosynthetic genes was restricted to the tissue undergoing cell death. After droplet infection with Alternaria alternata, a potent camalexin inducer in the Col-0 ecotype, camalexin formation and the induction of ASA1, CYP79B2 and CYP71B15 were strictly co-localized with the infection site.

  9. Acylation of Therapeutic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Jensen, Simon Bjerregaard

    to the harsh and selective gastrointestinal system, and development has lacked far behind injection therapy. Peptide acylation is a powerful tool to alter the pharmacokinetics, biophysical properties and chemical stability of injectable peptide drugs, primarily used to prolong blood circulation....... This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of two therapeutic peptides by systematically increasing acyl chain length in order to elucidate its influence on membrane interaction and intestinal cell translocation in vitro. The studied peptides are the 33 amino acid Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2...... peptides can increase in vitro intestinal permeability, modestly for GLP-2 and drastically for sCT, and might benefit oral delivery. GLP-2 results provide a well-founded predictive power for future peptide analogues, whereas sCT results hold great promise for future analogues, albeit with a larger...

  10. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  11. A model of proteolysis and amino acid biosynthesis for Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Enuo; Zheng, Huajun; Hao, Pei; Konno, Tomonobu; Yu, Yao; Kume, Hisae; Oda, Munehiro; Ji, Zai-Si

    2012-12-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2038 (L. bulgaricus 2038) is a bacterium that is used as a starter for dairy products by Meiji Co., Ltd of Japan. Culturing L. bulgaricus 2038 with whey as the sole nitrogen source results in a shorter lag phase than other milk proteins under the same conditions (carbon source, minerals, and vitamins). Microarray results of gene expression revealed characteristics of amino acid anabolism with whey as the nitrogen source and established a model of proteolysis and amino acid biosynthesis for L. bulgaricus. Whey peptides and free amino acids are readily metabolized, enabling rapid entry into the logarithmic growth phase. The oligopeptide transport system is the primary pathway for obtaining amino acids. Amino acid biosynthesis maintains the balance between amino acids required for cell growth and the amount obtained from environment. The interconversion of amino acids is also important for L. bulgaricus 2038 growth.

  12. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  13. Monoterpene biosynthesis potential of plant subcellular compartments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, L.; Jongedijk, E.J.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Krol, van der A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular monoterpene biosynthesis capacity based on local geranyl diphosphate (GDP) availability or locally boosted GDP production was determined for plastids, cytosol and mitochondria. A geraniol synthase (GES) was targeted to plastids, cytosol, or mitochondria. Transient expression in Nicotiana

  14. Antibacterial Targets in Fatty Acid Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, H. Tonie; Reynolds, Kevin A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The fatty acid biosynthesis pathway is an attractive but still largely unexploited target for development of new anti-bacterial agents. The extended use of the anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid and the antiseptic triclosan, which are inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis, validates this pathway as a target for anti-bacterial development. Differences in subcellular organization of the bacterial and eukaryotic multi-enzyme fatty acid synthase systems offer the prospect of inhibitors with host vs. target specificity. Platensimycin, platencin, and phomallenic acids, newly discovered natural product inhibitors of the condensation steps in fatty acid biosynthesis, represent new classes of compounds with antibiotic potential. An almost complete catalogue of crystal structures for the enzymes of the type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway can now be exploited in the rational design of new inhibitors, as well as the recently published crystal structures of type I FAS complexes. PMID:17707686

  15. Lincomycin, cultivation of producing strains and biosynthesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spížek, Jaroslav; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 63, - (2004), s. 510-519 ISSN 0175-7598 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : lincomycin * cultivation * biosynthesis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.358, year: 2004

  16. Control of tylosin biosynthesis in Streptomyces fradiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundliffe, Eric

    2008-09-01

    Tylosin biosynthesis is controlled in cascade fashion by multiple transcriptional regulators, acting positively or negatively, in conjunction with a signalling ligand that acts as a classical inducer. The roles of regulatory gene products have been characterized by a combination of gene expression analysis and fermentation studies, using engineered strains of S. fradiae in which specific genes were inactivated or overexpressed. Among various novel features of the regulatory model, involvement of the signalling ligand is not essential for tylosin biosynthesis.

  17. Biosynthesis of antibiotic chuangxinmycin from Actinoplanes tsinanensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Shi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Chuangxinmycin is an antibiotic isolated from Actinoplanes tsinanensis CPCC 200056 in the 1970s with a novel indole-dihydrothiopyran heterocyclic skeleton. Chuangxinmycin showed in vitro antibacterial activity and in vivo efficacy in mouse infection models as well as preliminary clinical trials. But the biosynthetic pathway of chuangxinmycin has been obscure since its discovery. Herein, we report the identification of a stretch of DNA from the genome of A. tsinanensis CPCC 200056 that encodes genes for biosynthesis of chuangxinmycin by bioinformatics analysis. The designated cxn cluster was then confirmed to be responsible for chuangxinmycin biosynthesis by direct cloning and heterologous expressing in Streptomyces coelicolor M1146. The cytochrome P450 CxnD was verified to be involved in the dihydrothiopyran ring closure reaction by the identification of seco-chuangxinmycin in S. coelicolor M1146 harboring the cxn gene cluster with an inactivated cxnD. Based on these results, a plausible biosynthetic pathway for chuangxinmycin biosynthesis was proposed, by hijacking the primary sulfur transfer system for sulfur incorporation. The identification of the biosynthetic gene cluster of chuangxinmycin paves the way for elucidating the detail biochemical machinery for chuangxinmycin biosynthesis, and provides the basis for the generation of novel chuangxinmycin derivatives by means of combinatorial biosynthesis and synthetic biology. KEY WORDS: Chuangxinmycin, Actinoplanes tsinanensis, Biosynthesis gene cluster, Heterologous expression, Cytochrome P450, Seco-chuangxinmycin, C–S bond formation, Sulfur incorporation

  18. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  19. Bacterial biosynthesis and maturation of the didemnin anti-cancer agents

    KAUST Repository

    Xü, Ying

    2012-05-23

    The anti-neoplastic agent didemnin B from the Caribbean tunicate Trididemnum solidum was the first marine drug to be clinically tested in humans. Because of its limited supply and its complex cyclic depsipeptide structure, considerable challenges were encountered during didemnin B\\'s development that continue to limit aplidine (dehydrodidemnin B), which is currently being evaluated in numerous clinical trials. Herein we show that the didemnins are bacterial products produced by the marine α-proteobacteria Tistrella mobilis and Tistrella bauzanensis via a unique post-assembly line maturation process. Complete genome sequence analysis of the 6,513,401 bp T. mobilis strain KA081020-065 with its five circular replicons revealed the putative didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster (did) on the 1,126,962 bp megaplasmid pTM3. The did locus encodes a 13-module hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase enzyme complex organized in a collinear arrangement for the synthesis of the fatty acylglutamine ester derivatives didemnins X and Y rather than didemnin B as first anticipated. Imaging mass spectrometry of T. mobilis bacterial colonies captured the time-dependent extracellular conversion of the didemnin X and Y precursors to didemnin B, in support of an unusual post-synthetase activation mechanism. Significantly, the discovery of the didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster may provide a long-term solution to the supply problem that presently hinders this group of marine natural products and pave the way for the genetic engineering of new didemnin congeners. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  20. Inhibitory peptides of the sulfotransferase domain of the heparan sulfate enzyme, N-deacetylase-N-sulfotransferase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesteira, Tarsis F; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien J; Taunay-Rodrigues, Alessandro; Oliveira, Vitor; Thacker, Bryan E; Juliano, Maria A; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Tersariol, Ivarne L S; Nader, Helena B; Esko, Jeffrey D; Pinhal, Maria A S

    2011-02-18

    N-Deacetylase-N-sulfotransferase 1 (Ndst1) catalyzes the initial modification of heparan sulfate and heparin during their biosynthesis by removal of acetyl groups from subsets of N-acetylglucosamine units and subsequent sulfation of the resulting free amino groups. In this study, we used a phage display library to select peptides that interact with Ndst1, with the aim of finding inhibitors of the enzyme. The phage library consisted of cyclic random 10-mer peptides expressed in the phage capsid protein pIII. Selection was based on the ability of engineered phage to bind to recombinant murine Ndst1 (mNdst1) and displacement with heparin. Peptides that were enriched through multiple cycles of binding and disassociation displayed two specific sequences, CRGWRGEKIGNC and CNMQALSMPVTC. Both peptides inhibited mNdst1 activity in vitro, however, by distinct mechanisms. The peptide CRGWRGEKIGNC presents a chemokine-like repeat motif (BXX, where B represents a basic amino acid and X is a noncharged amino acid) and binds to heparan sulfate, thus blocking the binding of substrate to the enzyme. The peptide NMQALSMPVT inhibits mNdst1 activity by direct interaction with the enzyme near the active site. The discovery of inhibitory peptides in this way suggests a method for developing peptide inhibitors of heparan sulfate biosynthesis.

  1. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  2. Production of Sactipeptides in Escherichia coli: Probing the Substrate Promiscuity of Subtilosin A Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, Paul M; Allen, Scott E; Hwang, Sungwon; Bowers, Albert A

    2016-06-17

    Sactipeptides are peptide-derived natural products that are processed by remarkable, radical-mediated cysteine sulfur to α-carbon coupling reactions. The resulting sactionine thioether linkages give rise to the unique defined structures and concomitant biological activities of sactipeptides. An E. coli heterologous expression system, based on the biosynthesis of one such sactipeptide, subtilosin A, is described and this expression system is exploited to probe the promiscuity of the subtilosin A sactionine bond-forming enzyme, AlbA. These efforts allowed the facile expression and isolation of a small library of mutant sactipeptides based on the subtilosin A precursor peptide, demonstrating broad substrate promiscuity where none was previously known. Importantly, we show that the positions of the sactionine linkages can be moved, giving rise to new, unnatural sactipeptide structures. E. coli heterologous expression also allowed incorporation of unnatural amino acids into sactipeptides by means of amber-suppression technology, potentially opening up new chemistry and new applications for unnatural sactipeptides.

  3. Structural and dynamic characterization of a freestanding acyl carrier protein involved in the biosynthesis of cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Subrata; Ishida, Hiroaki; Nguyen, Leonard T; Liu, Zhihong; Vogel, Hans J

    2017-05-01

    Friulimicin is a cyclic lipodecapeptide antibiotic that is produced by Actinoplanes friuliensis. Similar to the related lipopeptide drug daptomycin, the peptide skeleton of friulimicin is synthesized by a large multienzyme nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) system. The LipD protein plays a major role in the acylation reaction of friulimicin. The attachment of the fatty acid group promotes its antibiotic activity. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that LipD is most closely related to other freestanding acyl carrier proteins (ACPs), for which the genes are located near to NRPS gene clusters. Here, we report that the solution NMR structure of apo-LipD is very similar to other four-helix bundle forming ACPs from fatty acid synthase (FAS), polyketide synthase, and NRPS systems. By recording NMR dynamics data, we found that the backbone motions in holo-LipD are more restricted than in apo-LipD due to the attachment of phosphopantetheine moiety. This enhanced stability of holo-LipD was also observed in differential scanning calorimetry experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, unlike several other ACPs, the folding of LipD does not depend on the presence of divalent cations, although the presence of Mg 2+ or Ca 2+ can increase the protein stability. We propose that small structural rearrangements in the tertiary structure of holo-LipD which lead to the enhanced stability are important for the cognate enzyme recognition for the acylation reaction. Our results also highlight the different surface charges of LipD and FAS-ACP from A. friuliensis that would allow the acyl-CoA ligase to interact preferentially with the LipD instead of binding to the FAS-ACP. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  4. The Spatial Organization of Glucosinolate Biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nintemann, Sebastian

    between the individual classes of glucosinolates under constitutive and induced conditions and identified the source tissues of these defense compounds. Protein-protein interaction studies were carried out to investigate the subcellular organization of glucosinolate biosynthesis. We identified a family...... resistance and nutritional value and many plant specialized metabolites are of high value due to their health promoting characteristics. Glucosinolates are defense compounds found in many crops from the Brassicaceae family and are of high interest because of their nutritional and antinutritional properties...... cells is an open question. Likewise, it is not known how glucosinolate biosynthesis is orchestrated at the subcellular level. These open questions were addressed with several approaches in this project, with the aim of shedding light on the spatial organization of glucosinolate biosynthesis from...

  5. Functional and Evolutionary Relationship between Arginine Biosynthesis and Prokaryotic Lysine Biosynthesis through α-Aminoadipate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Junichi; Kobashi, Nobuyuki; Nishiyama, Makoto; Yamane, Hisakazu

    2001-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that lysine is synthesized through α-aminoadipate in an extremely thermophilic bacterium, Thermus thermophilus HB27. Sequence analysis of a gene cluster involved in the lysine biosynthesis of this microorganism suggested that the conversion from α-aminoadipate to lysine proceeds in a way similar to that of arginine biosynthesis. In the present study, we cloned an argD homolog of T. thermophilus HB27 which was not included in the previously cloned lysine biosynthetic gene cluster and determined the nucleotide sequence. A knockout of the argD-like gene, now termed lysJ, in T. thermophilus HB27 showed that this gene is essential for lysine biosynthesis in this bacterium. The lysJ gene was cloned into a plasmid and overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the LysJ protein was purified to homogeneity. When the catalytic activity of LysJ was analyzed in a reverse reaction in the putative pathway, LysJ was found to transfer the ɛ-amino group of N2-acetyllysine, a putative intermediate in lysine biosynthesis, to 2-oxoglutarate. When N2-acetylornithine, a substrate for arginine biosynthesis, was used as the substrate for the reaction, LysJ transferred the δ-amino group of N2-acetylornithine to 2-oxoglutarate 16 times more efficiently than when N2-acetyllysine was the amino donor. All these results suggest that lysine biosynthesis in T. thermophilus HB27 is functionally and evolutionarily related to arginine biosynthesis. PMID:11489859

  6. Triterpenoid biosynthesis in Euphorbia lathyris latex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, D.R.

    1987-11-01

    The structures of triterpenols, not previously been known, from Euphorbia lathyris latex are reported. A method for quantifying very small amounts of these compounds was developed. Concerning the biochemistry of the latex, no exogenous cofactors were required for the biosynthesis and the addition of compounds such as NADPAH and ATP do not stimulate the biosynthesis. The addition of DTE or a similar anti-oxidant was found to help reduce the oxidation of the latex, thus increasing the length of time that the latex remains active. The requirement of a divalent cation and the preference for Mn in the pellet was observed. The effect of several inhibitors on the biosynthesis of the triterpenoids was examined. Mevinolin was found to inhibit the biosynthesis of the triterpenoids from acetate, but not mevalonate. A dixon plot of the inhibition of acetate incorporation showed an I 50 concentration of 3.2 μM. Fenpropimorph was found to have little or no effect on the biosynthesis. Tridemorph was found to inhibit the biosynthesis of all of the triterpenoids with an I 50 of 4 μM. It was also observed that the cyclopropyl containing triterpenols, cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol were inhibited much more strongly than those containing an 8-9 double bond, lanosterol and 24-methylenelanosterol. The evidence indicates, but does not definetely prove, that lanosterol and 24-methylenelanosterol are not made from cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol via a ring-opening enzyme such as cycloeucalenol-obtusifoliol isomerase. The possibilty that cycloartenol is made via lanosterol was investigated by synthesizing 4-R-4- 3 H-mevalonic acid and incubating latex with a mixture of this and 14 C-mevalonic acid. From the 3 H/ 14 C ratio it was shown that cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol are not made via an intermediate containing as 8-9 double bond. 88 refs., 15 figs., 30 tabs

  7. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Combinatorial Biosynthesis of Polyketides – A Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Fong T.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-01-01

    Since their discovery, polyketide synthases have been attractive targets of biosynthetic engineering to make “unnatural” natural products. Although combinatorial biosynthesis has made encouraging advances over the past two decades, the field remains in its infancy. In this enzyme-centric perspective, we discuss the scientific and technological challenges that could accelerate the adoption of combinatorial biosynthesis as a method of choice for the preparation of encoded libraries of bioactive small molecules. Borrowing a page from the protein structure prediction community, we propose a periodic challenge program to vet the most promising methods in the field, and to foster the collective development of useful tools and algorithms. PMID:22342766

  9. Method for determining heterologous biosynthesis pathways

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Xin

    2017-08-10

    The present invention relates to a method and system for dynamically analyzing, determining, predicting and displaying ranked suitable heterologous biosynthesis pathways for a specified host. The present invention addresses the problem of finding suitable pathways for the endogenous metabolism of a host organism because the efficacy of heterologous biosynthesis is affected by competing endogenous pathways. The present invention is called MRE (Metabolic Route Explorer), and it was conceived and developed to systematically and dynamically search for, determine, analyze, and display promising heterologous pathways while considering competing endogenous reactions in a given host organism.

  10. Convergent Evolution of Ergothioneine Biosynthesis in Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Cangsong; Seebeck, Florian P

    2017-11-02

    Biosynthesis of N-α-trimethyl-2-thiohistidine (ergothioneine) is a frequent trait in cyanobacteria. This sulfur compound may provide essential relief from oxidative stress related to oxygenic photosynthesis. The central steps in ergothioneine biosynthesis are catalyzed by a histidine methyltransferase and an iron-dependent sulfoxide synthase. In this report, we present evidence that some cyanobacteria recruited and adapted a sulfoxide synthase from a different biosynthetic pathway to make ergothioneine. The discovery of a second origin of ergothioneine production underscores the physiological importance of this metabolite and highlights the evolutionary malleability of the thiohistidine biosynthetic machinery. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by Aspergillus niger , Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results indicate the synthesis of silver nanoparticles in the reaction mixture. The synthesis of nanoparticles would be suitable for developing a microbial nanotechnology biosynthesis process for mass scale production. Keywords: Silver nanoparticles, biosynthesis, fungi, Aspergillus.

  12. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class...... of antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which...

  13. Post-translational modifications involved in the biosynthesis of thiopeptide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qingfei; Fang, Hui; Liu, Wen

    2017-04-18

    Thiopeptide antibiotics are a class of typical ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) with complex chemical structures that are difficult to construct via chemical synthesis. To date, more than 100 thiopeptides have been discovered, and most of these compounds exhibit remarkable biological activities, such as antibacterial, antitumor and immunosuppressive activities. Therefore, studies of the biosynthesis of thiopeptides can contribute to the development of new drug leads and facilitate the understanding of the complex post-translational modifications (PTMs) of peptides and/or proteins. Since the biosynthetic gene clusters of thiopeptides were first discovered in 2009, several research studies regarding the biochemistry and enzymology of thiopeptide biosyntheses have been reported, indicating that their characteristic framework is constructed via a cascade of common PTMs and that additional specific PTMs diversify the molecules. In this review, we primarily summarize recent advances in understanding the biosynthesis of thiopeptide antibiotics and propose some potential applications based on our insights into the biosynthetic logic and machinery.

  14. Phosphonate biosynthesis and catabolism: a treasure trove of unusual enzymology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Spencer C; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2013-08-01

    Natural product biosynthesis has proven a fertile ground for the discovery of novel chemistry. Herein we review the progress made in elucidating the biosynthetic pathways of phosphonate and phosphinate natural products such as the antibacterial compounds dehydrophos and fosfomycin, the herbicidal phosphinothricin-containing peptides, and the antimalarial compound FR-900098. In each case, investigation of the pathway has yielded unusual, and often unprecedented, biochemistry. Likewise, recent investigations have uncovered novel ways to cleave the CP bond to yield phosphate under phosphorus starvation conditions. These include the discovery of novel oxidative cleavage of the CP bond catalyzed by PhnY and PhnZ as well as phosphonohydrolases that liberate phosphate from phosphonoacetate. Perhaps the crown jewel of phosphonate catabolism has been the recent resolution of the longstanding problem of the C-P lyase responsible for reductively cleaving the CP bond of a number of different phosphonates to release phosphate. Taken together, the strides made on both metabolic and catabolic fronts illustrate an array of fascinating biochemistry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of pro-opiomelanocortin and secretion of its peptide fragments in bovine adrenals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennov, A.V.; Dmitriev, A.D.; Kizim, E.A.; Ustinova, E.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an investigation to show that biosynthesis of POMC, its proteolytic processing, an secretion of the peptide products of that processing take place in the bovine adrenals. Rabbit antisera against endorphins were obtained and used for radioimmunoassay of peptides. I 125-labeled peptides were obtained by the chloramine method and purified from free I 125 on Sephadex G-10 (0.7 x 5 cm, centrifugation for 10 min at 1500 g). To detect secretion of peptide fragments of POMC in the adrenals experiments were undertaken to determine the beta-endorphin content in perfusates obtained during retrograde perfusion of the bovine adrenals. It was found that immunoreactive compounds, indistinguishable in their immunochemical properties from beta-endorphin, are present in the perfusates, just as in the tissue extracts.

  16. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  17. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  18. Novel Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Nordahl, Emma

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides serve as a first line of defence against invading microorganisms and are an essential part of our fast innate immune system. They are ancient molecules found in all classes of life. Antimicrobial peptides rapidly kill a broad spectrum of microbes and are immunomodulatory, i.e. having additional actions influencing inflammation and other innate immune responses. Results presented in this thesis demonstrate that proteases of common human pathogens degrade and inactivate t...

  19. Biosynthesis and metabolic pathways of pivalic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Kolouchová, I.; Čejková, A.; Sigler, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 6 (2012), s. 1371-1376 ISSN 0175-7598 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/0215 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Pivalic acid * Isooctane * Biosynthesis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.689, year: 2012

  20. Combinatorial biosynthesis of medicinal plant secondary metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julsing, Mattijs K.; Koulman, Albert; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Quax, Wim J.; Kayser, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Combinatorial biosynthesis is a new tool in the generation of novel natural products and for the production of rare and expensive natural products. The basic concept is combining metabolic pathways in different organisms on a genetic level. As a consequence heterologous organisms provide precursors

  1. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles synthesized by Aspergillus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and its antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities were investigated. Silver nanoparticles were extracellularly synthesized using Aspergillus flavus and the formation of nanoparticles was observed after 72 h of incubation. The results recorded from colour ...

  2. Bile acid biosynthesis and its regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areta Hebanowska

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bile acid biosynthesis is the main pathway of cholesterol catabolism. Bile acids are more soluble than cholesterol so are easier to excrete. As amphipathic molecules they participate in lipid digestion and absorption in the intestine and they help to excrete free cholesterol with bile. They are also ligands for nuclear receptors regulating the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Interconversion of cholesterol into bile acids is an important point of its homeostasis. Seventeen enzymes are engaged in this process and many of them are cytochromes P450. Bile acid synthesis initiation may proceed with the “classical” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C7α position or the “alternative” pathway (starting with cholesterol hydroxylation at the C27 position. Two additional pathways are possible, though their quantitative significance is small (initiated with cholesterol hydroxylations of C24 and C25 positions. Oxysterols produced are not only intermediates of bile acid biosynthesis but also important regulators of metabolism. Bile acid biosynthesis takes place in the liver, but some enzymes are also present in other organs, where they participate in regulation of cholesterol metabolism. Those enzymes are potential targets for new drugs against cholesterol metabolism disturbances. This article is a brief description of the bile acid biosynthesis pathway and participating enzymes.

  3. Biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanotes in wildtype yeasts | Desuoky ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biosynthesis of the biodegradable polymers polyhydroxyalkanotes (PHAs) are studied extensively in wild type and genetically modified prokaryotic cells, however the content and structure of PHA in wild type yeasts are not well documented. The purpose of this study was to screen forty yeast isolates collected from different ...

  4. Unedoside derivatives in Nuxia and their biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Rosendal; Ravnkilde, Lene; Schripsema, Jan

    1998-01-01

    isolated, while from N. oppositifolia 2 "-acetyl-3 "-benzoyl-nuxioside was obtained. Both plants contained verbascoside. The biosynthesis of unedoside in N. floribunda was investigated and deoxyloganic acid was found to be a precursor, similar to wh;lt was found for the eight-carbon iridoids in Thunbergia...

  5. Biosynthesis of furanochromones in Pimpinella monoica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    polyketide origin of their aromatic and pyrone rings while the furan ring originates via an acetate-mevalonate pathway. The plant also utilises glycine and leucine as substrate via acetate. Biotransformation of 3-H-visnagin to (6) but not to (2) was also observed. Keywords. Biosynthesis; furochromones; polyketide origin; ...

  6. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles synthesized by Aspergillus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and its antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities were investigated. Silver nanoparticles were extracellularly synthesized using Aspergillus flavus and the formation of nanoparticles was observed after 72 h of incubation. The results recorded from colour ...

  7. Peptide aldehyde inhibitors of bacterial peptide deformylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, D J; Gordon Green, B; O'Connell, J F; Grant, S K

    1999-07-15

    Bacterial peptide deformylases (PDF, EC 3.5.1.27) are metalloenzymes that cleave the N-formyl groups from N-blocked methionine polypeptides. Peptide aldehydes containing a methional or norleucinal inhibited recombinant peptide deformylase from gram-negative Escherichia coli and gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. The most potent inhibitor was calpeptin, N-CBZ-Leu-norleucinal, which was a competitive inhibitor of the zinc-containing metalloenzymes, E. coli and B. subtilis PDF with Ki values of 26.0 and 55.6 microM, respectively. Cobalt-substituted E. coli and B. subtilis deformylases were also inhibited by these aldehydes with Ki values for calpeptin of 9.5 and 12.4 microM, respectively. Distinct spectral changes were observed upon binding of calpeptin to the Co(II)-deformylases, consistent with the noncovalent binding of the inhibitor rather than the formation of a covalent complex. In contrast, the chelator 1,10-phenanthroline caused the time-dependent inhibition of B. subtilis Co(II)-PDF activity with the loss of the active site metal. The fact that calpeptin was nearly equipotent against deformylases from both gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial sources lends further support to the idea that a single deformylase inhibitor might have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  8. Alterations of HIV-1 envelope phenotype and antibody-mediated neutralization by signal peptide mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhyay, Chitra; Feyznezhad, Roya; Yang, Weiming; Zhang, Hui; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Hioe, Catarina E.

    2018-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) mediates virus attachment and entry into the host cells. Like other membrane-bound and secreted proteins, HIV-1 Env contains at its N terminus a signal peptide (SP) that directs the nascent Env to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where Env synthesis and post-translational modifications take place. SP is cleaved during Env biosynthesis but potentially influences the phenotypic traits of the Env protein. The Env SP sequences of HIV-1 isolates display high sequenc...

  9. Genome Sequence of Vibrio campbellii Strain UMTGB204, a Marine Bacterium Isolated from a Green Barrel Tunicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Huan You; Noor, Mohd Ezhar Mohd; Saari, Nur Azna; Musa, Najiah; Mustapha, Baharim; Usup, Gires

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio campbellii strain UMTGB204 was isolated from a green barrel tunicate. The genome of this strain comprises 5,652,224 bp with 5,014 open reading frames, 9 rRNAs, and 116 tRNAs. It contains genes related to virulence and environmental tolerance. Gene clusters for the biosynthesis of nonribosomal peptides and bacteriocin were also identified. PMID:25814609

  10. Granin-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troger, Josef; Theurl, Markus; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Pasqua, Teresa; Tota, Bruno; Angelone, Tommaso; Cerra, Maria C; Nowosielski, Yvonne; Mätzler, Raphaela; Troger, Jasmin; Gayen, Jaur R; Trudeau, Vance; Corti, Angelo; Helle, Karen B

    2017-07-01

    The granin family comprises altogether 7 different proteins originating from the diffuse neuroendocrine system and elements of the central and peripheral nervous systems. The family is dominated by three uniquely acidic members, namely chromogranin A (CgA), chromogranin B (CgB) and secretogranin II (SgII). Since the late 1980s it has become evident that these proteins are proteolytically processed, intragranularly and/or extracellularly into a range of biologically active peptides; a number of them with regulatory properties of physiological and/or pathophysiological significance. The aim of this comprehensive overview is to provide an up-to-date insight into the distribution and properties of the well established granin-derived peptides and their putative roles in homeostatic regulations. Hence, focus is directed to peptides derived from the three main granins, e.g. to the chromogranin A derived vasostatins, betagranins, pancreastatin and catestatins, the chromogranin B-derived secretolytin and the secretogranin II-derived secretoneurin (SN). In addition, the distribution and properties of the chromogranin A-derived peptides prochromacin, chromofungin, WE14, parastatin, GE-25 and serpinins, the CgB-peptide PE-11 and the SgII-peptides EM66 and manserin will also be commented on. Finally, the opposing effects of the CgA-derived vasostatin-I and catestatin and the SgII-derived peptide SN on the integrity of the vasculature, myocardial contractility, angiogenesis in wound healing, inflammatory conditions and tumors will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. ORF Sequence: NC_006349 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006349 gi|53716750 >gi|53716750|ref|YP_105775.1| nonribosomal peptide synthetas...AIVALDAMPLTPNGKLDRAALPAPIVTGTSRRAPENRIEQQVCAMFAELLDAQTLGAEDNFFELGGDSLLAMRAINKLRQTFDVELTIRDLFSAPTVAALSMRLDAQLAARRAHADGAELPAG

  13. Diversity-oriented peptide stapling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thu Phuong; Larsen, Christian Ørnbøl; Røndbjerg, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of macrocyclic constraints in peptides (peptide stapling) is an important tool within peptide medicinal chemistry for stabilising and pre-organising peptides in a desired conformation. In recent years, the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has emerged as a power......The introduction of macrocyclic constraints in peptides (peptide stapling) is an important tool within peptide medicinal chemistry for stabilising and pre-organising peptides in a desired conformation. In recent years, the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has emerged...... incorporating two azide-modified amino acids with 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene efficiently provides (i, i+7)- and (i, i+9)-stapled peptides with a single free alkyne positioned on the staple, that can be further conjugated or dimerised. A unique feature of the present method is that it provides easy access...

  14. A Hybrid Non-Ribosomal Peptide/Polyketide Synthetase Containing Fatty-Acyl Ligase (FAAL) Synthesizes the beta-Amino Fatty Acid Lipopeptides Puwainaphycins in the Cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum alatosporum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, J.; Hájek, J.; Urajová, Petra; Kopecký, Jiří; Hrouzek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 11 (2014) E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0110; GA ČR GA14-18067S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : blue green alga * FAAL * Cylindrospermum alatosporum Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  15. Biosynthesis of vitamins and enzymes in fermented foods by lactic acid bacteria and related genera - A promising approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are widely employed in food fermentation processes for the biosynthesis of certain important products or metabolites. Fermented food provides plenty of vital nutrients and bioactive components that affect a number of functions of human body in a positive way. Fermented milks can be made more functional by incorporating probiotic strains and furthermore, if they are capable of synthesizing essential biomolecules such as vitamins, enzymes, exopolysaccharides, bacteriocins or bioactive peptides serve into the functional and technological properties of the products. Current paper reviews recent advances associated with biosynthesis of vitamins and enzymes by virtue of LAB and related genera. The outcomes of several studies indicate promising applications at commercial level; however adequate selection of strain is vital to increase the concentration and bioavailability of such biomolecules in fermented foods.

  16. Peptide Integrated Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Lapshina, Nadezda; Apter, Boris; Rosenman, Gil

    2018-02-01

    Bio-nanophotonics is a wide field in which advanced optical materials, biomedicine, fundamental optics, and nanotechnology are combined and result in the development of biomedical optical chips. Silk fibers or synthetic bioabsorbable polymers are the main light-guiding components. In this work, an advanced concept of integrated bio-optics is proposed, which is based on bioinspired peptide optical materials exhibiting wide optical transparency, nonlinear and electrooptical properties, and effective passive and active waveguiding. Developed new technology combining bottom-up controlled deposition of peptide planar wafers of a large area and top-down focus ion beam lithography provides direct fabrication of peptide optical integrated circuits. Finding a deep modification of peptide optical properties by reconformation of biological secondary structure from native phase to β-sheet architecture is followed by the appearance of visible fluorescence and unexpected transition from a native passive optical waveguiding to an active one. Original biocompatibility, switchable regimes of waveguiding, and multifunctional nonlinear optical properties make these new peptide planar optical materials attractive for application in emerging technology of lab-on-biochips, combining biomedical photonic and electronic circuits toward medical diagnosis, light-activated therapy, and health monitoring. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Combinatorial Biosynthesis – Potential and Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floss, Heinz G.

    2007-01-01

    Because of their ecological functions, natural products have been optimized in evolution for interaction with biological systems and receptors. However, they have not necessarily been optimized for other desirable drug properties and thus can often be improved by structural modification. Using examples from the literature, this paper reviews the opportunities for increasing structural diversity among natural products by combinatorial biosynthesis, i.e., the genetic manipulation of biosynthetic pathways. It distinguishes between combinatorial biosynthesis in a narrower sense to generate libraries of modified structures, and metabolic engineering for the targeted formation of specific structural analogs. Some of the problems and limitations encountered with these approaches are also discussed. Work from the author’s laboratory on ansamycin antibiotics is presented which illustrates some of the opportunities and limitations. PMID:16414140

  19. Combinatorial biosynthesis of polyketides--a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Fong T; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-04-01

    Since their discovery, polyketide synthases have been attractive targets of biosynthetic engineering to make 'unnatural' natural products. Although combinatorial biosynthesis has made encouraging advances over the past two decades, the field remains in its infancy. In this enzyme-centric perspective, we discuss the scientific and technological challenges that could accelerate the adoption of combinatorial biosynthesis as a method of choice for the preparation of encoded libraries of bioactive small molecules. Borrowing a page from the protein structure prediction community, we propose a periodic challenge program to vet the most promising methods in the field, and to foster the collective development of useful tools and algorithms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural basis for phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Oliver B.; Tomasek, David; Jorge, Carla D.; Dufrisne, Meagan Belcher; Kim, Minah; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Santos, Helena; Mancia, Filippo

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol is critical for intracellular signalling and anchoring of carbohydrates and proteins to outer cellular membranes. The defining step in phosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is catalysed by CDP-alcohol phosphotransferases, transmembrane enzymes that use CDP-diacylglycerol as donor substrate for this reaction, and either inositol in eukaryotes or inositol phosphate in prokaryotes as the acceptor alcohol. Here we report the structures of a related enzyme, the phosphatidylinositol-phosphate synthase from Renibacterium salmoninarum, with and without bound CDP-diacylglycerol to 3.6 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal the location of the acceptor site, and the molecular determinants of substrate specificity and catalysis. Functional characterization of the 40%-identical ortholog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, supports the proposed mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis. This work therefore provides a structural and functional framework to understand the mechanism of phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis.

  1. Occurrence and biosynthesis of carotenoids in phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jim Junhui; Lin, Shaoling; Xu, Wenwen; Cheung, Peter Chi Keung

    2017-09-01

    Naturally occurring carotenoids are important sources of antioxidants, anti-cancer compounds and anti-inflammatory agents and there is thus considerable market demand for their pharmaceutical applications. Carotenoids are widely distributed in marine and freshwater organisms including microalgae, phytoplankton, crustaceans and fish, as well as in terrestrial plants and birds. Recently, phytoplankton-derived carotenoids have received much attention due to their abundance, rapid rate of biosynthesis and unique composition. The carotenoids that accumulate in particular phytoplankton phyla are synthesized by specific enzymes and play unique physiological roles. This review focuses on studies related to the occurrence of carotenoids in different phytoplankton phyla and the molecular aspects of their biosynthesis. Recent biotechnological advances in the isolation and characterization of some representative carotenoid synthases in phytoplankton are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical genetics to examine cellulose biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth eDebolt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term efforts to decode plant cellulose biosynthesis via molecular genetics and biochemical strategies are being enhanced by the ever-expanding scale of omics technologies. An alternative approach to consider are the prospects for inducing change in plant metabolism using exogenously supplied chemical ligands. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors (CBI have been identified among known herbicides, during diverse combinatorial chemical libraries screens, and natural chemical screens from microbial agents. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the inhibitory effects of CBIs and further group them by how they influence fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase A (CESA proteins. Additional attention is paid to the continuing development of the CBI toolbox to explore the cell biology and genetic mechanisms underpinning effector molecule activity.

  3. Microbial biosynthesis of nontoxic gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Swarup, E-mail: swaruproy@klyuniv.ac.in [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India); Das, Tapan Kumar [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India); Maiti, Guru Prasad [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India); Department of Anesthesiology, Texas Tech University Health science Center, 3601 4th Street, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Basu, Utpal [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India)

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: The manuscript deals with the fungus mediated optimized biologically synthesized GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus and characterization of biosynthesized GNPs using various physico-chemical methods. The fairly stable synthesized nanoparticles have size in the range of 10–40 nm. Cytotoxicity study of biosynthesized GNPs on Human lung cancer cell line A549 showed no significant toxicity of GNPs. - Highlights: • A novel biosynthesis process of GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus. • Biosynthesized GNPs are in the range of 10–40 nm as observed from TEM. • This process of synthesis is an optimized biosynthesis process of GNPs. • Biosynthesized GNPs are noncytotoxic against A549 cell line. - Abstract: We study the extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using the fungal species Aspergillus foetidus. The formation of GNPs were initially monitored by visual observation and then characterized with the help of various characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results revealed distinctive formation of face centered cubic crystalline GNPs. From field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) the morphology of the nanoparticles were found to be roughly spherical and within the size range of 30–50 nm. The spherical and polydispersed GNPs in the range of 10–40 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. It was established that alkaline pH, 1 mM gold salt concentration and 75 °C temperature were the respective optimum parameter for biosynthesis of GNPs. Cell cytotoxicity of GNP was compared with that of normal gold salt solution on A549 cell. The A549 cell growth in presence of GNPs was found to be comparatively less toxic than the gold ion.

  4. Microbial biosynthesis of nontoxic gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Swarup; Das, Tapan Kumar; Maiti, Guru Prasad; Basu, Utpal

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The manuscript deals with the fungus mediated optimized biologically synthesized GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus and characterization of biosynthesized GNPs using various physico-chemical methods. The fairly stable synthesized nanoparticles have size in the range of 10–40 nm. Cytotoxicity study of biosynthesized GNPs on Human lung cancer cell line A549 showed no significant toxicity of GNPs. - Highlights: • A novel biosynthesis process of GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus. • Biosynthesized GNPs are in the range of 10–40 nm as observed from TEM. • This process of synthesis is an optimized biosynthesis process of GNPs. • Biosynthesized GNPs are noncytotoxic against A549 cell line. - Abstract: We study the extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using the fungal species Aspergillus foetidus. The formation of GNPs were initially monitored by visual observation and then characterized with the help of various characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results revealed distinctive formation of face centered cubic crystalline GNPs. From field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) the morphology of the nanoparticles were found to be roughly spherical and within the size range of 30–50 nm. The spherical and polydispersed GNPs in the range of 10–40 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. It was established that alkaline pH, 1 mM gold salt concentration and 75 °C temperature were the respective optimum parameter for biosynthesis of GNPs. Cell cytotoxicity of GNP was compared with that of normal gold salt solution on A549 cell. The A549 cell growth in presence of GNPs was found to be comparatively less toxic than the gold ion.

  5. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  6. Peptide Vaccine Against Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborda, Carlos P; Travassos, Luiz R

    2017-01-01

    The chapter reviews methods utilized for the isolation and characterization of a promising immunogen candidate, aiming at a human vaccine against paracoccidioidomycosis. Peptide P10 carries a T-CD4+ epitope and was identified as an internal sequence of the major diagnostic antigen known as gp43 glycoprotein. It successfully treated massive intratracheal infections by virulent Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in combination with chemotherapy.An introduction about the systemic mycosis was found essential to understand the various options that were considered to design prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine protocols using peptide P10.

  7. Muraymycin nucleoside-peptide antibiotics: uridine-derived natural products as lead structures for the development of novel antibacterial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wiegmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Muraymycins are a promising class of antimicrobial natural products. These uridine-derived nucleoside-peptide antibiotics inhibit the bacterial membrane protein translocase I (MraY, a key enzyme in the intracellular part of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. This review describes the structures of naturally occurring muraymycins, their mode of action, synthetic access to muraymycins and their analogues, some structure–activity relationship (SAR studies and first insights into muraymycin biosynthesis. It therefore provides an overview on the current state of research, as well as an outlook on possible future developments in this field.

  8. Transcriptional characteristics associated with lichenysin biosynthesis in Bacillus licheniformis from Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qun; Zhang, Rong; Peng, Suqin; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-28

    This work investigated the biosynthetic mechanism of lichenysin, the newly identified nonvolatile matrix component in Chinese liquors. Transcriptomes were analyzed in three producers, Bacillus licheniformis CGMCC 3961, 3962, and 3963, which were isolated from Maotai-flavor liquor-making process and produced 386.3, 553.5, and 795.2 μg/L lichenysin in a simulative liquor fermentation process. Lichenysin synthetase genes lchAA-AD in these three producers were expressed much more highly than those of the nonproducer B. licheniformis ATCC 14580 (>18.4-fold). In addition, ABC transporters were the most significant responsive metabolic pathway, and the expression levels of peptide transporter genes dppABCDE all increased more than 19.2-fold. When B. licheniformis CGMCC 3963 was cultured in synthetic medium, the expression of dppABCDE and lichenysin both increased with the addition of casein hydrolysate (containing various peptides). This indicated that peptide would act as a substrate for lichenysin synthesis. This work sheds new light on the mechanism for lichenysin biosynthesis.

  9. Tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis, utilization and pharmacological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner-Felmayer, G; Golderer, G; Werner, E R

    2002-04-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (H4-biopterin) is an essential cofactor of a set of enzymes that are of central metabolic importance, i.e. the hydroxylases of the three aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, of ether lipid oxidase, and of the three nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoenzymes. As a consequence, H4-biopterin plays a key role in a vast number of biological processes and pathological states associated with neurotransmitter formation, vasorelaxation, and immune response. In mammals, its biosynthesis is controlled by hormones, cytokines and certain immune stimuli. This review aims to summarize recent developments concerning regulation of H4-biopterin biosynthetic and regulatory enzymes and pharmacological effects of H4-biopterin in various conditions, e.g. endothelial dysfunction or apoptosis of neuronal cells. Also, approaches towards gene therapy of diseases like the different forms of phenylketonuria or of Parkinson's disease are reviewed. Additional emphasis is given to H4-biopterin biosynthesis and function in non-mammalian species such as fruit fly, zebra fish, fungi, slime molds, the bacterium Nocardia as well as to the parasitic protozoan genus of Leishmania that is not capable of pteridine biosynthesis but has evolved a sophisticated salvage network for scavenging various pteridine compounds, notably folate and biopterin.

  10. Exopolysaccharide biosynthesis by Lactobacillus helveticus ATCC 15807.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torino, M I; Mozzi, F; Font de Valdez, G

    2005-08-01

    Exopolysaccharide (EPS) production and the activities of the enzymes involved in sugar nucleotide biosynthesis in Lactobacillus helveticus ATCC 15807 under controlled pH conditions were investigated. Batch fermentations using lactose as energy source showed higher EPS synthesis by L. helveticus ATCC 15807 at pH 4.5 with respect to pH 6.2, the enzyme alpha-phosphoglucomutase (alpha-PGM) being correlated with both total and specific EPS production. When glucose was used as carbon source instead of lactose, the lower EPS synthesis obtained was linked to a decrease in alpha-PGM and galactose 1-phosphate-uridyltransferase (GalT) activities, the reduction of the latter being more pronounced. Higher EPS production by L. helveticus ATCC 15807 at the acidic constant pH of 4.5 requires that both alpha-PGM and GalT activities are high. These enzymes are needed to synthesize UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose for supplying the corresponding monomers for EPS biosynthesis. Although differences are observed in EPS production by this strain regarding the energy source (lactose or glucose), the monomeric composition of the polymers produced is independent of the carbohydrate used. The obtained results contribute to a better understanding of the physiological factors that affect EPS biosynthesis by lactobacilli, which could help in the correct handling of the fermentation parameters within the fermented dairy industry.

  11. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Biosynthesis and biotransformation of bile acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarenac Tanja M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile acids are steroidal compounds, which contain 24 carbon atoms. They can be classified into two major groups: primary and secondary. The most abundant bile acids: The primary bile acids include cholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid, while the major secondary bile acids are deoxycholic acid and litocholic acid. Bile acids are important physiological agents for intestinal absorption of nutrients and are used for biliary lipid secretion, toxic metabolites and xenobiotics. The aim of this paper is to analyze biosynthesis and biotransformation of bile acids, as preparation for practical usage in laboratory and clinical conditions. Topic: Biosynthesis and biotransformation of bile acids: The biosynthesis of bile acids is the dominant metabolic pathway for catabolism of cholesterol in humans. The classical route of biosynthesis of bile acids is embarking on the conversion of cholesterol into 7α-hydroxycholesterol using enzyme 7α-cholesterol hydroxylase (CYP7A1. This enzyme is one of the microsomal cytochrome P450 enzyme is localized exclusively in the liver. Classical road is the main road in the biosynthesis of bile acids, and its total contribution amounts to 90% for people, and 75% in mice. CYP 7A1 enzyme is considered to be sensitive to the inhibition of carbon monoxide, and the condition for the effect of NADPH, the oxygen, lecithin, and the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. Bile acids are important signaling molecules and metabolic controls which activate the nuclear receptor and the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR, a signaling lipid regulation of the liver, glucose and energy homeostasis. Also, bile acids maintain metabolic homeostasis. Biotransformation of bile acids: The conversion of cholesterol into bile acids just important for maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis, but also to prevent the accumulation of cholesterol, triglycerides and toxic metabolites as well as violations of the liver and other organs. Enterohepatic circulation of

  13. NCAM Mimetic Peptides: An Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    of combinatorial peptide libraries. The C3 and NBP10 peptides target the first Ig module whereas the ENFIN2 and ENFIN11 peptides target fibronectin type III (FN3) modules of NCAM. A number of NCAM mimetics can induce neurite outgrowth and exhibit neuroprotective and synaptic plasticity modulating properties...

  14. brain natriuretic peptide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recently brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level has been introduced as a screening test for congestive heart failure (CHF) in children. The current CHF assessment scores are not satisfactory as they use a large number of variables. Objective: To evaluate two CHF scores: a modified clinical score and an echo-.

  15. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  16. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  17. Construction and in vitro analysis of a new bi-modular polypeptide synthetase for synthesis of N-methylated acyl peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauwecker, F; Pfennig, F; Grammel, N; Keller, U

    2000-04-01

    Many active peptides are synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs), large multimodular enzymes. Each module incorporates one amino acid, and is composed of two domains: an activation domain that activates the substrate amino acid and a condensation domain for peptide-bond formation. Activation domains sometimes contain additional activities (e.g. N-methylation or epimerization). Novel peptides can be generated by swapping domains. Exchange of domains containing N-methylation activity has not been reported, however. The actinomycin NRPS was used to investigate domain swapping. The first two amino acids of actinomycin are threonine and valine. We replaced the valine activation domain of module 2 with an N-methyl valine (MeVal) activation domain. The recombinant NRPS (AcmTmVe) catalyzes the formation of threonyl-valine. In the presence of S-adenosyl-methionine, valine was converted to MeVal but subsequent dipeptide formation was blocked. When acyl-threonine (the natural intermediate) was present at module 1, formation of acyl-threonine-MeVal occurred. The epimerization domain of AcmTmVe was impaired. A simple activation domain can be replaced by one with N-methylation activity. The same condensation domain can catalyze peptide-bond formation between N-methyl and nonmethylated amino acids. Modification of the upstream amino acid (i.e. acylation of threonine), however, was required for condensation with MeVal. Steric hindrance reduces chemical reactivity of N-methyl amino acids - perfect substrate positioning may only be achieved with acylated threonine. Loss of the epimerase activity of AcmTmVe suggests N-methyltransferase and epimerase domains, not found together naturally, are incompatible.

  18. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column.

  19. Highly Potent Antibacterial Organometallic Peptide Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albada, Bauke; Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    2017-10-17

    -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Moreover, by making use of the unique physicochemical properties of ruthenocene, we were able to determine the mode of action of these short AMPs in unprecedented detail. We propose that the OM-AMP integrates into the bacterial membrane and changes its biophysical properties, which ultimately results in detachment of vital enzymes for respiration and cell-wall biosynthesis such as specifically cytochrome c and MurG from their locations in the membrane. Further explorations of these small OM-AMP derivatives that are summarized in this Account include lipid substitution, multivalent display of metalated di- or tripeptides on a trivalent scaffold with different linkers, and increasing the metal-to-peptide ratio such that every tryptophan in the (RW) 3 scaffold is eventually replaced by a metalated lysine. While initial experiments with our OM-AMPs for systemic applications were largely disappointing, these OM-AMPs turned out to be potent antibiotics for topical applications. In this sense, two applications are described as examples in this Account, namely, bacterial decontamination of wastewater by reverse osmosis membranes (coated with our OM-AMPs by Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction) and synergistic activities of one of our synAMPs with colistin and tobramycin for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections that are associated with cystic fibrosis.

  20. Manipulation of regulatory genes reveals complexity and fidelity in hormaomycin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaofeng; Teta, Roberta; Kohlhaas, Christoph; Crüsemann, Max; Ueoka, Reiko; Mangoni, Alfonso; Freeman, Michael F; Piel, Jörn

    2013-06-20

    Hormaomycin (HRM) is a structurally remarkable peptide produced by Streptomyces griseoflavus W-384 that acts as a Streptomyces signaling metabolite and exhibits potent antibiotic activity against coryneform actinomycetes. HRM biosynthetic studies have been hampered by inconsistent and low production. To enhance fermentation titers, the role of its cluster-encoded regulatory genes was investigated. Extra copies of the putative regulators hrmA and hrmB were introduced into the wild-type strain, resulting in an increase of HRM production and its analogs up to 135-fold. For the HrmB overproducer, six bioactive analogs were isolated and characterized. This study demonstrates that HrmA and HrmB are positive regulators in HRM biosynthesis. A third gene, hrmH, was identified as encoding a protein capable of shifting the metabolic profile of HRM and its derivatives. Its manipulation resulted in the generation of an additional HRM analog. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of α sex factor on the biosynthesis of the cell wall from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, S.; Zinker, S.; Ruiz-Herrera, J.

    1984-01-01

    Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae produce peptide hormones (a and α) which dramatically affect the physiology, structure, and behavior of cells from the opposite mating type, presumably in preparation for conjugation. Some cell division cycle mutants mimick several of the changes induced by α factor. Accordingly, conditional mutants cdc 28, cdc 36, cdc 37, and cdc 39 undergo arrest in G1, exhibit shmoo morphology and are able to mate when they are transferred to the restrictive temperature. Formation of shmoo cells would require increased synthesis of glycosyl transferases involved in the biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides. Accordingly, the authors investigated the effect of G1 arrest on the chemical composition of the cell wall and on the levels of glycosyl transferases. Arrest in G1 was obtained by two methods: addition of α factor, and transfer of a cdc 28 mutant to the restrictive temperature

  2. Lanthipeptides: chemical synthesis versus in vivo biosynthesis as tools for pharmaceutical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongey, Elvis Legala; Neubauer, Peter

    2016-06-07

    Lanthipeptides (also called lantibiotics for those with antibacterial activities) are ribosomally synthesized post-translationally modified peptides having thioether cross-linked amino acids, lanthionines, as a structural element. Lanthipeptides have conceivable potentials to be used as therapeutics, however, the lack of stable, high-yield, well-characterized processes for their sustainable production limit their availability for clinical studies and further pharmaceutical commercialization. Though many reviews have discussed the various techniques that are currently employed to produce lanthipeptides, a direct comparison between these methods to assess industrial applicability has not yet been described. In this review we provide a synoptic comparison of research efforts on total synthesis and in vivo biosynthesis aimed at fostering lanthipeptides production. We further examine current applications and propose measures to enhance product yields. Owing to their elaborate chemical structures, chemical synthesis of these biomolecules is economically less feasible for large-scale applications, and hence biological production seems to be the only realistic alternative.

  3. The Biosynthesis of Capuramycin-type Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenlong; Goswami, Anwesha; Yang, Zhaoyong; Liu, Xiaodong; Green, Keith D.; Barnard-Britson, Sandra; Baba, Satoshi; Funabashi, Masanori; Nonaka, Koichi; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J.; Spork, Anatol P.; Ducho, Christian; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Thorson, Jon S.; Van Lanen, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    A-500359s, A-503083s, and A-102395 are capuramycin-type nucleoside antibiotics that were discovered using a screen to identify inhibitors of bacterial translocase I, an essential enzyme in peptidoglycan cell wall biosynthesis. Like the parent capuramycin, A-500359s and A-503083s consist of three structural components: a uridine-5′-carboxamide (CarU), a rare unsaturated hexuronic acid, and an aminocaprolactam, the last of which is substituted by an unusual arylamine-containing polyamide in A-102395. The biosynthetic gene clusters for A-500359s and A-503083s have been reported, and two genes encoding a putative non-heme Fe(II)-dependent α-ketoglutarate:UMP dioxygenase and an l-Thr:uridine-5′-aldehyde transaldolase were uncovered, suggesting that C–C bond formation during assembly of the high carbon (C6) sugar backbone of CarU proceeds from the precursors UMP and l-Thr to form 5′-C-glycyluridine (C7) as a biosynthetic intermediate. Here, isotopic enrichment studies with the producer of A-503083s were used to indeed establish l-Thr as the direct source of the carboxamide of CarU. With this knowledge, the A-102395 gene cluster was subsequently cloned and characterized. A genetic system in the A-102395-producing strain was developed, permitting the inactivation of several genes, including those encoding the dioxygenase (cpr19) and transaldolase (cpr25), which abolished the production of A-102395, thus confirming their role in biosynthesis. Heterologous production of recombinant Cpr19 and CapK, the transaldolase homolog involved in A-503083 biosynthesis, confirmed their expected function. Finally, a phosphotransferase (Cpr17) conferring self-resistance was functionally characterized. The results provide the opportunity to use comparative genomics along with in vivo and in vitro approaches to probe the biosynthetic mechanism of these intriguing structures. PMID:25855790

  4. Heme biosynthesis and its regulation : Toward understanding and improvement of heme biosynthesis in filamentous fungi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. de Weert; P.J. Punt; Christien Lokman; C.A. van den Hondel; A.C. Franken; A.F. Ram

    2011-01-01

    Heme biosynthesis in fungal host strains has acquired considerable interest in relation to the production of secreted heme-containing peroxidases. Class II peroxidase enzymes have been suggested as eco-friendly replacements of polluting chemical processes in industry. These peroxidases are naturally

  5. Heme biosynthesis and its regulation: Towards understanding and improvement of heme biosynthesis in filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, A.C.W.; Lokman, B.C.; Ram, A.F.J.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Weert, S. de

    2011-01-01

    Heme biosynthesis in fungal host strains has acquired considerable interest in relation to the production of secreted heme-containing peroxidases. Class II peroxidase enzymes have been suggested as eco-friendly replacements of polluting chemical processes in industry. These peroxidases are naturally

  6. Peptides in the nervous systems of cnidarians: structure, function, and biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Leviev, I; Carstensen, Kathrine

    1996-01-01

    Cnidarians are the lowest animal group having a nervous system and it was probably within this phylum or in a related ancestor group that nervous systems first evolved. The primitive nervous systems of cnidarians are strongly peptidergic. From a single sea anemone species, Anthopleura elegantissima...... molecule. In addition to well-known, "classical" processing enzymes, novel prohormone processing enzymes must be present in cnidarian neurons. These include a processing enzyme hydrolyzing at the C-terminal sides of acidic (Asp and Glu) residues and a dipeptidyl aminopeptidase digesting at the C......-terminal sides of N-terminally located X-Pro and X-Ala sequences. All this shows that the primitive nervous systems of cnidarians are already quite complex, and that neuropeptides play a central role in the physiology of these animals....

  7. Unedoside derivatives in Nuxia and their biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Rosendal; Ravnkilde, Lene; Schripsema, Jan

    1998-01-01

    An investigation of two species of Nuxia showed that this genus is characterized by the presence of the eight-carbon iridoid glucoside unedoside and/or its derivatives. From N. floribunda unedoside, nuxioside (6-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-unedoside) and 2 "-acetyl-3 "-cinnamoyl-nuxioside were...... isolated, while from N. oppositifolia 2 "-acetyl-3 "-benzoyl-nuxioside was obtained. Both plants contained verbascoside. The biosynthesis of unedoside in N. floribunda was investigated and deoxyloganic acid was found to be a precursor, similar to wh;lt was found for the eight-carbon iridoids in Thunbergia...

  8. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Aziz, M.; Badr, Y.; Mahmoud, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Consequently, Au NPs were formed due to reduction of gold ion by bacterial cell supernatant of P. aeruginos ATCC 90271, P. aeruginos (2) and P. aeruginos (1). The UV-Vis. and fluorescence spectra of the bacterial as well as chemical prepared Au NPs were recorded. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrograph showed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the range of 15-30 nm. The process of reduction being extracellular and may lead to the development of an easy bioprocess for synthesis of Au NPs

  9. Developing New Antibiotics with Combinatorial Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Nicola L.

    2000-11-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs), a class of enzymes found in soil bacteria that produce antibiotics such as erythromycin, string together acetate units using basic organic reactions. The manipulation of the sequence of these reactions at the genetic level has resulted in an alteration of the corresponding chemical structure of the antibiotic produced by the bacteria. This process, called combinatorial biosynthesis, allows the generation of many presently unknown complex structures that can be tested for antibacterial activity, thereby contributing to the race against antibiotic-resistant infectious bacteria.

  10. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Mohseni, Soudabeh; Mardani Jouneghani, Rasoul; Pourhossein, Meraj; Iravani, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (NPs) by biotransformations using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and analysis of the sizes and shapes of the NPs produced. Dried and freshly cultured S. cerevisiae were used as the biocatalyst. Dried yeast synthesized few NPs, but freshly cultured yeast produced a large amount of them. Silver NPs were spherical, 2-20 nm in diameter, and the NPs with the size of 5.4 nm were the most frequent ones. NPs were seen inside the cells, within the cell membrane, attached to the cell membrane during the exocytosis, and outside of the cells.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  12. Production of drugs by microbial biosynthesis and biotransformation. Possibilities, limits and future developments (1st communication).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieslich, K

    1986-04-01

    Before the advent of alchemy the therapeutic aids for man and animals consisted exclusively of using natural products in many different forms. Chemical syntheses have been used for little more than 100 years as a means of obtaining drugs. The discovery of penicillin and the first industrial production of this compound in 1941/42 opened the door to a third way for the preparation of drugs by exploitation of the manifold biosynthetic capabilities of microorganisms to produce antibiotics or more recently other pharmacologically active substances. The selective use of individual enzymatic transformation stages with microorganisms in chemical production pathways in particular by biotransformations of steroids in 1950 expanded the field of biotechnological production of pharmaceuticals. The increasing knowledge in the regulation of the biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites, the growing experience in the use of microorganisms as biocatalysts and source of valuable enzymes and the development of new economical technical procedures raised the number and volume of drugs prepared by microbial biosynthesis and biotransformation. The modern method of the genetic engineering supported by the chemical DNA-synthesis enabled the preparation of important proteohormones and physiologically active peptides in microorganisms. Finally, the development of monoclonal antibodies, although at present still formed in mammalian cells, will lead to new ways of therapy in future. A review is given on the present state of biotechnological productions of antibiotics, vitamins, steroids, alkaloids, amino acids and pharmaceutical enzymes combined with new developments in the preparation of blood factors, enzyme inhibitors, hormones and physiologically active peptides and the possible future use of monoclonal antibodies.

  13. Two enzymes involved in biosynthesis of the host-selective phytotoxin HC-toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Cochliobolus carbonum race 1 produces a cyclic tetrapeptide HC-toxin, which is necessary for its exceptional virulence on certain varieties of maize. Previous genetic analysis of HC-toxin production by the fungus has indicated that a single genetic locus controls HC-toxin production. Enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of HC-toxin have been sought by following the precedents established for the biosynthetic enzymes of cyclic peptide antibiotics. Two enzymatic activities from C. carbonum race 1 were found, a D-alanine- and an L-proline-dependent ATP/PP/sub i/ exchange, which by biochemical and genetic criteria were shown to be involved in the biosynthesis of HC-toxin. These two activities were present in all tested race 1 isolates of C. carbonum, which produce HC-toxin, and in none of the tested race 2 and race 3 isolates, which do not produce the toxin. In a genetic cross between two isolates of C. carbonum differing at the tox locus, all tox + progeny had both activities, and all tox - progeny lacked both activities

  14. Radiolabelled peptides vs. nanoparticle-peptide complexes for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro F, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The principle that peptide receptors can be used successfully for in vivo targeting of human cancers has been provided and the peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy for malignant tumors is a real treatment option. Targeted entry into cells is an increasingly important area of research. The diagnoses and treatment of disease by novel methods would be enhanced greatly by the efficient transport of materials to living cell nuclei. Membrane-trans locating peptides complexed to nanoparticles are small enough (30 nm) to cross the nuclear membrane and to enter the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis, emerging as a new type of pharmaceuticals. Pharmacokinetic properties and molecular specificity of iron or gold nanoparticle-peptide complexes that do not induce biological toxicity is a topic of world interest in current and future medical investigations. Some perspectives and achievements on the preparation, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of radiolabelled peptides versus nanoparticle-peptide complexes for medical applications are presented. (Author)

  15. Expression of antimicrobial peptides under control of a camalexin-biosynthetic promoter confers enhanced resistance against Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Alexandra; Lindermayr, Christian; Glawischnig, Erich

    2016-02-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana phytoalexin biosynthesis is tightly regulated. The camalexin biosynthetic gene CYP71B15/PAD3 is highly expressed in response to pathogens and specific abiotic triggers, while constitutive expression is very low. Based on this property we expressed artificial antimicrobial peptides under control of the CYP71B15 promoter avoiding potential toxic effects to the plant related to constitutive expression. Significant and substantial growth inhibition of Pseudomonas syringae was observed, demonstrating that expression of these peptides under control of a phytoalexin promoter is an effective approach for enhancement of resistance against bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis Inhibitors Targeting Bacterial Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Janish; Wang, Yang; Wang, Ke; Malwal, Satish R; Oldfield, Eric

    2016-10-06

    We synthesized potential inhibitors of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), or undecaprenyl diphosphate phosphatase (UPPP), and tested them in bacterial cell growth and enzyme inhibition assays. The most active compounds were found to be bisphosphonates with electron-withdrawing aryl-alkyl side chains which inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) at ∼1-4 μg mL -1 levels. They were found to be potent inhibitors of FPPS; cell growth was partially "rescued" by the addition of farnesol or overexpression of FPPS, and there was synergistic activity with known isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway inhibitors. Lipophilic hydroxyalkyl phosphonic acids inhibited UPPS and UPPP at micromolar levels; they were active (∼2-6 μg mL -1 ) against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative organisms, and again exhibited synergistic activity with cell wall biosynthesis inhibitors, but only indifferent effects with other inhibitors. The results are of interest because they describe novel inhibitors of FPPS, UPPS, and UPPP with cell growth inhibitory activities as low as ∼1-2 μg mL -1 . © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. BIOSYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF ANTIBIOTIC BATUMIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Klochko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Biosynthesis of antistaphylococcal antibiotic batumin under periodic conditions of Pseudomonas batumici growth has been studied. Antibiotic synthesis in fermenter occurred across the culture growth and achieved its maximal value after 50–55 hours. The active oxygen utilization by the producing strain was observed during 20–55 hours of fermentation with maximum after 40–45 hours. Antibiotic yield was 175–180 mg/l and depended on intensity of aeration. contrast to «freshly isolated» antibiotic after fermentation the long-term kept batumin has shown two identical by molecular mass peaks according to the chromato-mass spectrometric analysis. Taking into account of batumin molecule structure the conclusion has been made that the most probable isomerization type is keto-enolic tautomerism. At the same time batumin is diastereoisomer of kalimantacin A which has the same chemical structure. The optic rotation angle is [α]d25 = +56.3° for kalimantacin and [α]d25 = –13.5° for batumin. The simultaneous P. batumici growth and antibiotic biosynthesis and the ability of this molecule to optical isomerisation and keto-enolic forms formation allow us to suppose that batumin plays a certain role in metabolism of the producing strain.

  18. Essences in Metabolic Engineering of Lignan Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honoo Satake

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lignans are structurally and functionally diverse phytochemicals biosynthesized in diverse plant species and have received wide attentions as leading compounds of novel drugs for tumor treatment and healthy diets to reduce of the risks of lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases. However, the lineage-specific distribution and the low-amount of production in natural plants, some of which are endangered species, hinder the efficient and stable production of beneficial lignans. Accordingly, the development of new procedures for lignan production is of keen interest. Recent marked advances in the molecular and functional characterization of lignan biosynthetic enzymes and endogenous and exogenous factors for lignan biosynthesis have suggested new methods for the metabolic engineering of lignan biosynthesis cascades leading to the efficient, sustainable, and stable lignan production in plants, including plant cell/organ cultures. Optimization of light conditions, utilization of a wide range of elicitor treatments, and construction of transiently gene-transfected or transgenic lignan-biosynthesizing plants are mainly being attempted. This review will present the basic and latest knowledge regarding metabolic engineering of lignans based on their biosynthetic pathways and biological activities, and the perspectives in lignan production via metabolic engineering.

  19. Fatty acid biosynthesis in pea root plastids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, R.J.; Sparace, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis from [1- 14 C]acetate was optimized in plastids isolated from primary root tips of 7-day-old germinating pea seeds. Fatty acid synthesis was maximum at approximately 80 nmoles/hr/mg protein in the presence of 200 μM acetate, 0.5 mM each of NADH, NADPH and CoA, 6 mM each of ATP and MgCl 2 , 1 mM each of the MnCl 2 and glycerol-3-phosphate, 15 mM KHCO 3 , and 0.1M Bis-tris-propane, pH 8.0 incubated at 35C. At the standard incubation temperature of 25C, fatty acid synthesis was linear from up to 6 hours with 80 to 100 μg/mL plastid protein. ATP and CoA were absolute requirements, whereas KHCO 3 , divalent cations and reduced nucleotides all improved activity by 80 to 85%. Mg 2+ and NADH were the preferred cation and nucleotide, respectively. Dithiothreitol and detergents were generally inhibitory. The radioactive products of fatty acid biosynthesis were approximately 33% 16:0, 10% 18:0 and 56% 18:1 and generally did not vary with increasing concentrations of each cofactor

  20. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants and remains the only commercial source for the narcotic analgesics morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic derivatives such as oxycodone and naltrexone. The plant also produces several other benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with potent pharmacological properties including the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Opium poppy has served as a model system to investigate the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in plants. The application of biochemical and functional genomics has resulted in a recent surge in the discovery of biosynthetic genes involved in the formation of major benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in opium poppy. The availability of extensive biochemical genetic tools and information pertaining to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism is facilitating the study of a wide range of phenomena including the structural biology of novel catalysts, the genomic organization of biosynthetic genes, the cellular and sub-cellular localization of biosynthetic enzymes and a variety of biotechnological applications. In this review, we highlight recent developments and summarize the frontiers of knowledge regarding the biochemistry, cellular biology and biotechnology of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

  1. Molecular Regulation of Antibiotic Biosynthesis in Streptomyces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Chandra, Govind; Niu, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptomycetes are the most abundant source of antibiotics. Typically, each species produces several antibiotics, with the profile being species specific. Streptomyces coelicolor, the model species, produces at least five different antibiotics. We review the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. coelicolor and other, nonmodel streptomycetes in the light of recent studies. The biosynthesis of each antibiotic is specified by a large gene cluster, usually including regulatory genes (cluster-situated regulators [CSRs]). These are the main point of connection with a plethora of generally conserved regulatory systems that monitor the organism's physiology, developmental state, population density, and environment to determine the onset and level of production of each antibiotic. Some CSRs may also be sensitive to the levels of different kinds of ligands, including products of the pathway itself, products of other antibiotic pathways in the same organism, and specialized regulatory small molecules such as gamma-butyrolactones. These interactions can result in self-reinforcing feed-forward circuitry and complex cross talk between pathways. The physiological signals and regulatory mechanisms may be of practical importance for the activation of the many cryptic secondary metabolic gene cluster pathways revealed by recent sequencing of numerous Streptomyces genomes. PMID:23471619

  2. Biosynthesis of nanoparticles using microbes- a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulkoti, Nasreen I; Taranath, T C

    2014-09-01

    The biosynthesis of nanoparticles by microorganism is a green and eco-friendly technology. This review focuses on the use of consortium of diverse microorganisms belonging to both prokaryotes and eukaryotes for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles viz. silver, gold, platinum, zirconium, palladium, iron, cadmium and metal oxides such as titanium oxide, zinc oxide, etc. These microorganisms include bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi and algae. The synthesis of nanoparticles may be intracellular or extracellular. The several workers have reported that NADH dependent nitrate reductase enzyme plays a vital role in the conversion of metallic ions to nanoparticles. The FTIR study reveals that diverse biomolecules viz. carboxyl group, primary and secondary amines, amide I, II, and III bands etc serve as a tool for bioreduction and capping agents there by offering stability to particles by preventing agglomeration and growth. The size and shape of the nanoparticles vary with the organism employed and conditions employed during the synthesis which included pH, temperature and substrate concentration. The microorganisms provide diverse environment for biosynthesis of nanoparticles. These particles are safe and eco-friendly with a lot of applications in medicine, agriculture, cosmetic industry, drug delivery and biochemical sensors. The challenges for redressal include optimal production and minimal time to obtain desired size and shape, to enhance the stability of nanoparticles and optimization of specific microorganisms for specific application. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Rare cause of post-squalene disorder of cholesterol biosynthesis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Errors of cholesterol biosynthesis represent a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders. The aim of the authors of this article is to present a case of a patient with typical symptoms of a rare post-squalene disorder of cholesterol biosynthesis, its diagnostics and progress in neonatal period. The differential diagnosis of a ...

  4. Rapid biosynthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid biosynthesis of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles using culture supernatants of Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633 and Lactobacillus ... The process of extracellular and fast biosynthesis may help in the development of an easy and eco-friendly route for the synthesis of CdS nanoparticles.

  5. Glucose Sensor MdHXK1 Phosphorylates and Stabilizes MdbHLH3 to Promote Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Apple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Da-Gang; Zhang, Quan-Yan; An, Jian-Ping; You, Chun-Xiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Glucose induces anthocyanin accumulation in many plant species; however, the molecular mechanism involved in this process remains largely unknown. Here, we found that apple hexokinase MdHXK1, a glucose sensor, was involved in sensing exogenous glucose and regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis. In vitro and in vivo assays suggested that MdHXK1 interacted directly with and phosphorylated an anthocyanin-associated bHLH transcription factor (TF) MdbHLH3 at its Ser361 site in response to glucose. Furthermore, both the hexokinase_2 domain and signal peptide are crucial for the MdHXK1-mediated phosphorylation of MdbHLH3. Moreover, phosphorylation modification stabilized MdbHLH3 protein and enhanced its transcription of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, thereby increasing anthocyanin biosynthesis. Finally, a series of transgenic analyses in apple calli and fruits demonstrated that MdHXK1 controlled glucose-induced anthocyanin accumulation at least partially, if not completely, via regulating MdbHLH3. Overall, our findings provide new insights into the mechanism of the glucose sensor HXK1 modulation of anthocyanin accumulation, which occur by directly regulating the anthocyanin-related bHLH TFs in response to a glucose signal in plants. PMID:27560976

  6. Glucose Sensor MdHXK1 Phosphorylates and Stabilizes MdbHLH3 to Promote Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Apple.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Gang Hu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Glucose induces anthocyanin accumulation in many plant species; however, the molecular mechanism involved in this process remains largely unknown. Here, we found that apple hexokinase MdHXK1, a glucose sensor, was involved in sensing exogenous glucose and regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis. In vitro and in vivo assays suggested that MdHXK1 interacted directly with and phosphorylated an anthocyanin-associated bHLH transcription factor (TF MdbHLH3 at its Ser361 site in response to glucose. Furthermore, both the hexokinase_2 domain and signal peptide are crucial for the MdHXK1-mediated phosphorylation of MdbHLH3. Moreover, phosphorylation modification stabilized MdbHLH3 protein and enhanced its transcription of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, thereby increasing anthocyanin biosynthesis. Finally, a series of transgenic analyses in apple calli and fruits demonstrated that MdHXK1 controlled glucose-induced anthocyanin accumulation at least partially, if not completely, via regulating MdbHLH3. Overall, our findings provide new insights into the mechanism of the glucose sensor HXK1 modulation of anthocyanin accumulation, which occur by directly regulating the anthocyanin-related bHLH TFs in response to a glucose signal in plants.

  7. Peptide-enhanced oral delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mie; Foged, Camilla; Berthelsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Systemic therapy upon oral delivery of biologics, such as peptide and protein drugs is limited due to their large molecular size, their low enzymatic stability and their inability to cross the intestinal epithelium. Ways to overcome the epithelial barrier include the use of peptide-based excipients...... throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, chemical stability is an inherent challenge when employing amino acid-based excipients for oral delivery, and multiple approaches have been investigated to improve this. The exact mechanisms of transepithelial translocation are discussed, and it is believed...... for oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs highlighting recent studies and the most promising compounds from these classes of peptide excipients....

  8. Quantitative changes in proteins responsible for flavonoid and anthocyanin biosynthesis in strawberry fruit at different ripening stages: A targeted quantitative proteomic investigation employing multiple reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Du, Lina; Li, Li; Kalt, Wilhelmina; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, ZhaoQi; Li, XiHong

    2015-06-03

    To better understand the regulation of flavonoid and anthocyanin biosynthesis, a targeted quantitative proteomic investigation employing LC-MS with multiple reaction monitoring was conducted on two strawberry cultivars at three ripening stages. This quantitative proteomic workflow was improved through an OFFGEL electrophoresis to fractionate peptides from total protein digests. A total of 154 peptide transitions from 47 peptides covering 21 proteins and isoforms related to anthocyanin biosynthesis were investigated. The normalized protein abundance, which was measured using isotopically-labeled standards, was significantly changed concurrently with increased anthocyanin content and advanced fruit maturity. The protein abundance of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase; anthocyanidin synthase, chalcone isomerase; flavanone 3-hydroxylase; dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, UDP-glucose:flavonoid-3-O-glucosyltransferase, cytochrome c and cytochrome C oxidase subunit 2, was all significantly increased in fruit of more advanced ripeness. An interaction between cultivar and maturity was also shown with respect to chalcone isomerase. The good correlation between protein abundance and anthocyanin content suggested that a metabolic control point may exist for anthocyanin biosynthesis. This research provides insights into the process of anthocyanin formation in strawberry fruit at the level of protein concentration and reveals possible candidates in the regulation of anthocyanin formation during fruit ripening. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms contributing to flavonoids and anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation of strawberry fruit during ripening is challenging due to limited molecular biology tools and established hypothesis. Our targeted proteomic approach employing LC-MS/MS analysis and MRM technique to quantify proteins in relation to flavonoids and anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation in strawberry fruit during fruit ripening is novel. The identification of peptides

  9. Peptide Signals Encode Protein Localization▿

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Jay H.; Keiler, Kenneth C.

    2007-01-01

    Many bacterial proteins are localized to precise intracellular locations, but in most cases the mechanism for encoding localization information is not known. Screening libraries of peptides fused to green fluorescent protein identified sequences that directed the protein to helical structures or to midcell. These peptides indicate that protein localization can be encoded in 20-amino-acid peptides instead of complex protein-protein interactions and raise the possibility that the location of a ...

  10. The Equine PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Louise; Jacobsen, Stine; Sorensen, Mette A.

    2014-01-01

    Equine PeptideAtlas encompassing high-resolution tandem MS analyses of 51 samples representing a selection of equine tissues and body fluids from healthy and diseased animals. The raw data were processed through the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline to yield high quality identification of proteins and peptides...... analyses, and emphasizes the value of the Equine PeptideAtlas as a resource for the design of targeted quantitative proteomic studies....

  11. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  12. One Hundred Years of Peptide Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    thus a chiral center. Today, 20 amino acids are known as genetically encoded as building blocks of peptides and proteins. Almost all of them present in peptides have L-configura- tion. D-amino acids have been found only in small peptides of bacterial cell walls, peptide antibiotics and peptides in South American frog skin.

  13. Role of tomato lipoxygenase D in wound-induced jasmonate biosynthesis and plant immunity to insect herbivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuhua Yan

    Full Text Available In response to insect attack and mechanical wounding, plants activate the expression of genes involved in various defense-related processes. A fascinating feature of these inducible defenses is their occurrence both locally at the wounding site and systemically in undamaged leaves throughout the plant. Wound-inducible proteinase inhibitors (PIs in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum provide an attractive model to understand the signal transduction events leading from localized injury to the systemic expression of defense-related genes. Among the identified intercellular molecules in regulating systemic wound response of tomato are the peptide signal systemin and the oxylipin signal jasmonic acid (JA. The systemin/JA signaling pathway provides a unique opportunity to investigate, in a single experimental system, the mechanism by which peptide and oxylipin signals interact to coordinate plant systemic immunity. Here we describe the characterization of the tomato suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses8 (spr8 mutant, which was isolated as a suppressor of (prosystemin-mediated signaling. spr8 plants exhibit a series of JA-dependent immune deficiencies, including the inability to express wound-responsive genes, abnormal development of glandular trichomes, and severely compromised resistance to cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera and Botrytis cinerea. Map-based cloning studies demonstrate that the spr8 mutant phenotype results from a point mutation in the catalytic domain of TomLoxD, a chloroplast-localized lipoxygenase involved in JA biosynthesis. We present evidence that overexpression of TomLoxD leads to elevated wound-induced JA biosynthesis, increased expression of wound-responsive genes and, therefore, enhanced resistance to insect herbivory attack and necrotrophic pathogen infection. These results indicate that TomLoxD is involved in wound-induced JA biosynthesis and highlight the application potential of this gene for crop protection against

  14. Cysteine Biosynthesis Controls Serratia marcescens Phospholipase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark T; Mitchell, Lindsay A; Mobley, Harry L T

    2017-08-15

    Serratia marcescens causes health care-associated opportunistic infections that can be difficult to treat due to a high incidence of antibiotic resistance. One of the many secreted proteins of S. marcescens is the PhlA phospholipase enzyme. Genes involved in the production and secretion of PhlA were identified by screening a transposon insertion library for phospholipase-deficient mutants on phosphatidylcholine-containing medium. Mutations were identified in four genes ( cyaA , crp , fliJ , and fliP ) that are involved in the flagellum-dependent PhlA secretion pathway. An additional phospholipase-deficient isolate harbored a transposon insertion in the cysE gene encoding a predicted serine O -acetyltransferase required for cysteine biosynthesis. The cysE requirement for extracellular phospholipase activity was confirmed using a fluorogenic phospholipase substrate. Phospholipase activity was restored to the cysE mutant by the addition of exogenous l-cysteine or O -acetylserine to the culture medium and by genetic complementation. Additionally, phlA transcript levels were decreased 6-fold in bacteria lacking cysE and were restored with added cysteine, indicating a role for cysteine-dependent transcriptional regulation of S. marcescens phospholipase activity. S. marcescens cysE mutants also exhibited a defect in swarming motility that was correlated with reduced levels of flhD and fliA flagellar regulator gene transcription. Together, these findings suggest a model in which cysteine is required for the regulation of both extracellular phospholipase activity and surface motility in S. marcescens IMPORTANCE Serratia marcescens is known to secrete multiple extracellular enzymes, but PhlA is unusual in that this protein is thought to be exported by the flagellar transport apparatus. In this study, we demonstrate that both extracellular phospholipase activity and flagellar function are dependent on the cysteine biosynthesis pathway. Furthermore, a disruption of cysteine

  15. Peptide Vaccines for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kono K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In general, the preferable characteristic of the target molecules for development of cancer vaccines are high immunogenicity, very common expression in cancer cells, specific expression in cancer cells and essential molecules for cell survival (to avoid loss of expression. We previously reported that three novel HLA-A24-restricted immunodominant peptides, which were derived from three different oncoantigens, TTK, LY6K, and IMP-3,were promising targets for cancer vaccination for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCCpatients. Then, we had performed a phase I clinical trial using three HLA-A24-binding peptides and the results had been shown to be promising for ESCC. Therefore, we further performed a multicenter, non-randomized phase II clinical trial. Patients and Methods: Sixty ESCC patients were enrolled to evaluate OS, PFS, immunological response employing ELISPOT and pentamer assays. Each of the three peptides was administered with IFA weekly. All patients received the vaccination without knowing an HLA-A type, and the HLA types were key-opened at the analysis point. Hence, the endpoints were set to evaluate differences between HLA-A*2402-positive (24(+ and -negative (24(- groups. Results: The OS in the 24 (+ group (n=35 tended to be better than that in the 24(- group (n=25 (MST 4.6 vs. 2.6 month, respectively, p = 0.121, although the difference was not statistically significant. However, the PFS in the 24(+ group was significantly better than that in the 24(- group (p = 0.032. In the 24(+ group, ELISPOT assay indicated that the LY6K-, TTK-, and IMP3-specific CTL responses were observed after the vaccination in 63%, 45%, and 60% of the 24(+ group, respectively. The patients having LY6K-, TTK-, and IMP3-specific CTL responses revealed the better OS than those not having CTL induction, respectively. The patients showing the CTL induction for multiple peptides have better clinical responses. Conclusion: The immune response induced

  16. Effects of Trimetaphosphate on Abiotic Formation and Hydrolysis of Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela K. Sibilska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The primordial Earth probably had most of the factors needed for the emergence and development of life. It is believed that it had not only water, but also simple inorganic and organic materials. While studies since the 1950s on the origins of organic matter have established key roles for amino acids, conditions that would have promoted their condensation to make polymers, such as peptides or proteins, have yet to be fully defined. The condensation of amino acids in a water-rich environment is not thermodynamically favored. Therefore, the efficient formation of peptides requires the presence of a catalyst or the activation of a substrate. In living cells, the biosynthesis of proteins is assisted by enzymes and requires adenosine triphosphate (ATP, a relatively complex organic polyphosphate, which serves as an energy source. Outside the living organism, simpler inorganic polyphosphates can form active aminoacyl–phosphate anhydrides, which suggests the broader potential of phosphorus for enabling the polymerization of amino acids. However, this has yet to be demonstrated. To address this gap, aqueous solutions containing a simple dipeptide, diglycine, and a simple polyphosphate, trimetaphosphate, were dried, and reaction products were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS. Different reaction environments, which were defined by the initial solution composition, pH, temperature, and incubation time, were found to affect the distribution and yield of products. Our results collectively provide strong evidence for reactions that both condense and hydrolyze peptides. It is noteworthy that the co-occurrence of reactions that form and cleave peptides are a central feature of Kauffman’s theory for the emergence of autocatalytic sets, which is a key step in the chemical origins of life.

  17. Polyamine biosynthesis during germination of yeast ascospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawley, J V; Ferro, A J

    1979-01-01

    The role of the diamine putrescine during germination and outgrowth of ascospores of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was examined. Ornithine decarboxylase activity increased and declined rapidly during germination and outgrowth; peak activity was attained after the cells had proceeded through the G1 interval of the cell cycle, whereas minimal activity was present at the completion of the first cell division. alpha-Methylornithine inhibited both ornithine decarboxylase activity and the in vivo accumulation of putrescine. In the presence of alpha-methylornithireak dormancy and proceed through one cell division. Subsequent cellular growth, however, was retarded but not completely inhibited. The supplementation of Methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) to sporulation medium greatly inhibited this sexual process. These data suggest that the synthesis of putrescine is not required for the breaking of spore dormancy, but that polyamine biosynthesis may be essential for meiosis and sporulation. PMID:387744

  18. Biosynthesis and function of plant lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, W.W.; Mudd, J.B.; Gibbs, M.

    1983-01-01

    The Sixth Annual Symposium in Botany and Plant Physiology was held January 13-15, 1983, at the University of California, Riverside. This volume comprises the papers that were presented. Subjects discussed at the symposium covered a wide range in the field of plant lipids. Biosynthesis of lipids occupied an important fraction of the presentations at the symposium. Subjects included detailed studies of the enzymes of fatty acid synthesis, several discussions of the incorporation of fatty acids into glycerolipids and the further modification of the fatty acids, and the synthesis of glycerolipids and desaturation of fatty acids in both maturing oilseeds and chloroplasts. The physicochemical studies of glycerolipids and sterols in artificial membranes have led to distinct conclusions about their behaviour which must be relevant in the biological membrane. Results on the functional consequences of modifying the galactolipid composition in the chloroplast were an encouraging sign of progress in the attempts to relate membrane lipid composition to physiological function

  19. Biosurfactant Mediated Biosynthesis of Selected Metallic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płaza, Grażyna A.; Chojniak, Joanna; Banat, Ibrahim M.

    2014-01-01

    Developing a reliable experimental protocol for the synthesis of nanomaterials is one of the challenging topics in current nanotechnology particularly in the context of the recent drive to promote green technologies in their synthesis. The increasing need to develop clean, nontoxic and environmentally safe production processes for nanoparticles to reduce environmental impact, minimize waste and increase energy efficiency has become essential in this field. Consequently, recent studies on the use of microorganisms in the synthesis of selected nanoparticles are gaining increased interest as they represent an exciting area of research with considerable development potential. Microorganisms are known to be capable of synthesizing inorganic molecules that are deposited either intra- or extracellularly. This review presents a brief overview of current research on the use of biosurfactants in the biosynthesis of selected metallic nanoparticles and their potential importance. PMID:25110864

  20. Terpenoids and Their Biosynthesis in Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagmi Pattanaik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Terpenoids, or isoprenoids, are a family of compounds with great structural diversity which are essential for all living organisms. In cyanobacteria, they are synthesized from the methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP pathway, using glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and pyruvate produced by photosynthesis as substrates. The products of the MEP pathway are the isomeric five-carbon compounds isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, which in turn form the basic building blocks for formation of all terpenoids. Many terpenoid compounds have useful properties and are of interest in the fields of pharmaceuticals and nutrition, and even potentially as future biofuels. The MEP pathway, its function and regulation, and the subsequent formation of terpenoids have not been fully elucidated in cyanobacteria, despite its relevance for biotechnological applications. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge about cyanobacterial terpenoid biosynthesis, both regarding the native metabolism and regarding metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria for heterologous production of non-native terpenoids.

  1. Terpenoids and Their Biosynthesis in Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, Bagmi; Lindberg, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoids, or isoprenoids, are a family of compounds with great structural diversity which are essential for all living organisms. In cyanobacteria, they are synthesized from the methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP) pathway, using glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and pyruvate produced by photosynthesis as substrates. The products of the MEP pathway are the isomeric five-carbon compounds isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, which in turn form the basic building blocks for formation of all terpenoids. Many terpenoid compounds have useful properties and are of interest in the fields of pharmaceuticals and nutrition, and even potentially as future biofuels. The MEP pathway, its function and regulation, and the subsequent formation of terpenoids have not been fully elucidated in cyanobacteria, despite its relevance for biotechnological applications. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge about cyanobacterial terpenoid biosynthesis, both regarding the native metabolism and regarding metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria for heterologous production of non-native terpenoids. PMID:25615610

  2. A Molecular Description of Cellulose Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Joshua T.; Morgan, Jacob L.W.; Zimmer, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, and certain organisms from bacteria to plants and animals synthesize cellulose as an extracellular polymer for various biological functions. Humans have used cellulose for millennia as a material and an energy source, and the advent of a lignocellulosic fuel industry will elevate it to the primary carbon source for the burgeoning renewable energy sector. Despite the biological and societal importance of cellulose, the molecular mechanism by which it is synthesized is now only beginning to emerge. On the basis of recent advances in structural and molecular biology on bacterial cellulose synthases, we review emerging concepts of how the enzymes polymerize glucose molecules, how the nascent polymer is transported across the plasma membrane, and how bacterial cellulose biosynthesis is regulated during biofilm formation. Additionally, we review evolutionary commonalities and differences between cellulose synthases that modulate the nature of the cellulose product formed. PMID:26034894

  3. Biosurfactant Mediated Biosynthesis of Selected Metallic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna A. Płaza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Developing a reliable experimental protocol for the synthesis of nanomaterials is one of the challenging topics in current nanotechnology particularly in the context of the recent drive to promote green technologies in their synthesis. The increasing need to develop clean, nontoxic and environmentally safe production processes for nanoparticles to reduce environmental impact, minimize waste and increase energy efficiency has become essential in this field. Consequently, recent studies on the use of microorganisms in the synthesis of selected nanoparticles are gaining increased interest as they represent an exciting area of research with considerable development potential. Microorganisms are known to be capable of synthesizing inorganic molecules that are deposited either intra- or extracellularly. This review presents a brief overview of current research on the use of biosurfactants in the biosynthesis of selected metallic nanoparticles and their potential importance.

  4. Acylphloroglucinol Biosynthesis in Strawberry Fruit1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chuankui; Ring, Ludwig; Hoffmann, Thomas; Huang, Fong-Chin; Slovin, Janet; Schwab, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Phenolics have health-promoting properties and are a major group of metabolites in fruit crops. Through reverse genetic analysis of the functions of four ripening-related genes in the octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), we discovered four acylphloroglucinol (APG)-glucosides as native Fragaria spp. fruit metabolites whose levels were differently regulated in the transgenic fruits. The biosynthesis of the APG aglycones was investigated by examination of the enzymatic properties of three recombinant Fragaria vesca chalcone synthase (FvCHS) proteins. CHS is involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis during ripening. The F. vesca enzymes readily catalyzed the condensation of two intermediates in branched-chain amino acid metabolism, isovaleryl-Coenzyme A (CoA) and isobutyryl-CoA, with three molecules of malonyl-CoA to form phlorisovalerophenone and phlorisobutyrophenone, respectively, and formed naringenin chalcone when 4-coumaroyl-CoA was used as starter molecule. Isovaleryl-CoA was the preferred starter substrate of FvCHS2-1. Suppression of CHS activity in both transient and stable CHS-silenced fruit resulted in a substantial decrease of APG glucosides and anthocyanins and enhanced levels of volatiles derived from branched-chain amino acids. The proposed APG pathway was confirmed by feeding isotopically labeled amino acids. Thus, Fragaria spp. plants have the capacity to synthesize pharmaceutically important APGs using dual functional CHS/(phloriso)valerophenone synthases that are expressed during fruit ripening. Duplication and adaptive evolution of CHS is the most probable scenario and might be generally applicable to other plants. The results highlight that important promiscuous gene function may be missed when annotation relies solely on in silico analysis. PMID:26169681

  5. Sfp-type PPTase inactivation promotes bacterial biofilm formation and ability to enhance wheat drought tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salme eTimmusk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Paenibacillus polymyxa is a common soil bacterium with broad range of practical applications. An important group of secondary metabolites in P. polymyxa are nonribosomal peptide and polyketide derived metabolites (NRP/PK. Modular nonribosomal peptide synthetases catalyse main steps in the biosynthesis of the complex secondary metabolites. Here we report on the inactivation of an A26 sfp-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase. The inactivation of the gene resulted in loss of NRP/PK production. In contrast to the former Bacillus spp. model the mutant strain compared to wild type showed greatly enhanced biofilm formation ability. Its biofilm promotion is directly mediated by NRP/PK, as exogenous addition of the wild type metabolite extracts restores its biofilm formation level. Wheat inoculation with bacteria that had lost their sfp-type PPTase gene resulted in two times higher plant survival and about three times increased biomass under severe drought stress compared to wild type.

  6. Natriuretic peptides in cardiometabolic regulation and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zois, Nora E; Bartels, Emil D; Hunter, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    these conditions can coexist and potentially lead to heart failure, a syndrome associated with a functional natriuretic peptide deficiency despite high circulating concentrations of immunoreactive peptides. Therefore, dysregulation of the natriuretic peptide system, a 'natriuretic handicap', might be an important...

  7. Radiolabeling of methionine containing proteins and peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlick, R.K.; Jirousek, L.

    1986-01-01

    A process for radiolabeling methionine-containing peptides and proteins is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of oxidizing the protein or peptide, radiolabeling and reducing the radiolabeled protein or peptide. (author)

  8. Peptide radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, D.; Vermeij, P.; Feitsma, R.I.J.; Pauwels, E.J.K.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews the labelling of peptides that are recognised to be of interest for nuclear medicine or are the subject of ongoing nuclear medicine research. Applications and approaches to the labelling of peptide radiopharmaceuticals are discussed, and drawbacks in their development considered. (orig.)

  9. Antimicrobial peptides in the airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, D M; Yim, S; Ryan, L K; Kisich, K O; Diamond, G

    2006-01-01

    The airway provides numerous defense mechanisms to prevent microbial colonization by the large numbers of bacteria and viruses present in ambient air. An important component of this defense is the antimicrobial peptides and proteins present in the airway surface fluid (ASF), the mucin-rich fluid covering the respiratory epithelium. These include larger proteins such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, as well as the cationic defensin and cathelicidin peptides. While some of these peptides, such as human beta-defensin (hBD)-1, are present constitutively, others, including hBD2 and -3 are inducible in response to bacterial recognition by Toll-like receptor-mediated pathways. These peptides can act as microbicides in the ASF, but also exhibit other activities, including potent chemotactic activity for cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, suggesting they play a complex role in the host defense of the airway. Inhibition of antimicrobial peptide activity or gene expression can result in increased susceptibility to infections. This has been observed with cystic fibrosis (CF), where the CF phenotype leads to reduced antimicrobial capacity of peptides in the airway. Pathogenic virulence factors can inhibit defensin gene expression, as can environmental factors such as air pollution. Such an interference can result in infections by airway-specific pathogens including Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and influenza virus. Research into the modulation of peptide gene expression in animal models, as well as the optimization of peptide-based therapeutics shows promise for the treatment and prevention of airway infectious diseases.

  10. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte

    2013-01-01

    properties, peptides were introduced into oligonucleotides via a 2'-alkyne-2'-amino-LNA scaffold. Derivatives of methionine- and leucine-enkephalins were chosen as model peptides of mixed amino acid content, which were singly and doubly incorporated into LNA/DNA strands using highly efficient copper...

  11. Chemical Synthesis of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzker, Lena; Oddo, Alberto; Hansen, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    Solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) is the method of choice for chemical synthesis of peptides. In this nonspecialist review, we describe commonly used resins, linkers, protecting groups, and coupling reagents in 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) SPPS. Finally, a detailed protocol for manual Fmoc SPPS is presented.

  12. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Zegers (Netty)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps

  13. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the

  14. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  15. Solid-phase peptide synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective....

  16. Maize Bioactive Peptides against Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Gómez, Jorge L.; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; Preciado-Ortiz, Ricardo E.; García-Lara, Silverio

    2017-06-01

    Cancer is one of the main chronic degenerative diseases worldwide. In recent years, consumption of whole-grain cereals and their derived food products has been associated with reduction risks of various types of cancer. Cereals main biomolecules includes proteins, peptides, and amino acids present in different quantities within the grain. The nutraceutical properties associated with peptides exerts biological functions that promote health and prevent this disease. In this review, we report the current status and advances on maize peptides regarding bioactive properties that have been reported such as antioxidant, antihypertensive, hepatoprotective, and anti-tumour activities. We also highlighted its biological potential through which maize bioactive peptides exert anti-cancer activity. Finally, we analyse and emphasize the possible areas of application for maize peptides.

  17. Cathepsin-Mediated Cleavage of Peptides from Peptide Amphiphiles Leads to Enhanced Intracellular Peptide Accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, Handan [Institute; Department; Samaeekia, Ravand [Institute; Department; Schnorenberg, Mathew R. [Institute; Department; Medical; Sasmal, Dibyendu K. [Institute; Huang, Jun [Institute; Tirrell, Matthew V. [Institute; Institute; LaBelle, James L. [Department

    2017-08-24

    Peptides synthesized in the likeness of their native interaction domain(s) are natural choices to target protein protein interactions (PPIs) due to their fidelity of orthostatic contact points between binding partners. Despite therapeutic promise, intracellular delivery of biofunctional peptides at concentrations necessary for efficacy remains a formidable challenge. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) provide a facile method of intracellular delivery and stabilization of bioactive peptides. PAs consisting of biofunctional peptide headgroups linked to hydrophobic alkyl lipid-like tails prevent peptide hydrolysis and proteolysis in circulation, and PA monomers are internalized via endocytosis. However, endocytotic sequestration and steric hindrance from the lipid tail are two major mechanisms that limit PA efficacy to target intracellular PPIs. To address these problems, we have constructed a PA platform consisting of cathepsin-B cleavable PAs in which a selective p53-based inhibitory peptide is cleaved from its lipid tail within endosomes, allowing for intracellular peptide accumulation and extracellular recycling of the lipid moiety. We monitor for cleavage and follow individual PA components in real time using a resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tracking system. Using this platform, components in real time using a Forster we provide a better understanding and quantification of cellular internalization, trafficking, and endosomal cleavage of PAs and of the ultimate fates of each component.

  18. Purification and use of E. coli peptide deformylase for peptide deprotection in chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Toma, Claudia; Sonke, Theo; Quaedflieg, Peter J.; Janssen, Dick B.

    Peptide deformylases (PDFs) catalyze the removal of the formyl group from the N-terminal methionine residue in nascent polypeptide chains in prokaryotes. Its deformylation activity makes PDF an attractive candidate for the biocatalytic deprotection of formylated peptides that are used in

  19. Engineering E. coli for caffeic acid biosynthesis from renewable sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoran; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-04-01

    Caffeic acid is a valuable aromatic compound that possesses many important pharmacological activities. In structure, caffeic acid belongs to the hydroxycinnamic acid family and can be biosynthesized from the aromatic amino acid tyrosine. In the present paper, the caffeic acid biosynthesis pathway was reconstituted in engineered Escherichia coli to produce caffeic acid from simple biomass sugar glucose and xylose. Different engineering approaches were utilized to optimize the production. Specifically, two parallel biosynthesis routes leading from tyrosine to caffeic acid were studied. The copy number of the intermediate biosynthesis genes was varied to find appropriate gene doses for caffeic acid biosynthesis. Three different media, including a MOPS medium, a synthetic medium, and a rich medium, were also examined to improve the production. The highest specific caffeic acid production achieved was 38 mg/L/OD. Lastly, cultivation of engineered E. coli in a bioreactor resulted in a production of 106 mg/L caffeic acid after 4 days.

  20. Stimulation of artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua hairy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , the OGA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in stimulating the artemisinin biosynthesis in the hairy roots. This is the first report on the stimulation of artemisinin production in hairy roots by an oligogalacturonide elicitor.

  1. Biosynthesis, regulation and biological role of strigolactones in rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moura Luis Cardoso, De C.S.

    2014-01-01

    In her thesis Catarina Cardoso studied strigolactone biosynthesis in rice. Strigolactones are multifunctional compounds produced by plants. They are plant hormones that regulate plant architecture, but in addition plants release strigolactones into the soil to communicate and initiate beneficial

  2. NAD+ biosynthesis, aging, and disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    OpenAIRE

    Sean Johnson; Shin–ichiro Imai

    2018-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) biosynthesis and its regulation have recently been attracting markedly increasing interest. Aging is marked by a systemic decrease in NAD+ across multiple tissues. The dysfunction of NAD+ biosynthesis plays a critical role in the pathophysiologies of multiple diseases, including age-associated metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and mental disorders. As downstream effectors, NAD+-dependent enzymes, such as sirtuins, are involved in the pro...

  3. Fenarimol, a Pyrimidine-Type Fungicide, Inhibits Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keimei Oh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The plant steroid hormone brassinosteroids (BRs are important signal mediators that regulate broad aspects of plant growth and development. With the discovery of brassinoazole (Brz, the first specific inhibitor of BR biosynthesis, several triazole-type BR biosynthesis inhibitors have been developed. In this article, we report that fenarimol (FM, a pyrimidine-type fungicide, exhibits potent inhibitory activity against BR biosynthesis. FM induces dwarfism and the open cotyledon phenotype of Arabidopsis seedlings in the dark. The IC50 value for FM to inhibit stem elongation of Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the dark was approximately 1.8 ± 0.2 μM. FM-induced dwarfism of Arabidopsis seedlings could be restored by brassinolide (BL but not by gibberellin (GA. Assessment of the target site of FM in BR biosynthesis by feeding BR biosynthesis intermediates indicated that FM interferes with the side chain hydroxylation of BR biosynthesis from campestanol to teasterone. Determination of the binding affinity of FM to purified recombinant CYP90D1 indicated that FM induced a typical type II binding spectrum with a Kd value of approximately 0.79 μM. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the expression level of the BR responsive gene in Arabidopsis seedlings indicated that FM induces the BR deficiency in Arabidopsis.

  4. Delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Randi; Malmsten, Martin

    2017-01-01

    on the identification such peptides, as well as on their optimization to reach potent antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects at simultaneously low toxicity against human cells. In comparison, delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides have attracted considerably less interest. However, such delivery systems......, or through achieving co-localization with intracellular pathogens. Here, an overview is provided of the current understanding of delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides, with special focus on AMP-carrier interactions, as well as consequences of these interactions for antimicrobial and related biological...

  5. Preliminary studies of the biosynthesis of Austin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicnienski, N.A.

    1979-01-01

    Aspergillus ustus is one of the most prevalent fungi in the soil. There are now two reports of the occurrence of toxin-producing strains of this fungus on stored foodstuffs. In addition, strains of A. ustus have been isolated along with Penicillium species from samples of South African cheeses. All A. ustus isolates tested were judged to be highly toxic to ducklings when grown on maize meal, however, the toxins involved were not isolated. Austin is the trivial name of one of the toxins made by the fungus found on stored food. Preliminary work to studying the biosynthesis of this compound using 13 C-labeled sodium acetate is reported here. The feasibility of the biosynthetic study was determined by feeding [1- 14 C]-sodium acetate to A. ustus cultures. The assignments made in the 13 C-nmr spectrum of Austin are shown. The lowest dilution factor obtained in [1- 14 C]-sodium acetate feeding experiments was 14. This dilution factor is sufficiently low to allow a successful feeding of [1,2- 13 C 2 ]-sodium acetate. A new metabolite of A. ustus, deacetylaustin, was isolated and identified. An alkaloid of unknown structure was also isolated from the fungus

  6. Biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. França

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A set of genes related to secondary metabolism was extracted from the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database and was used to investigate both the gene expression pattern of key enzymes regulating the main biosynthetic secondary metabolism pathways and the major classes of metabolites involved in the response of sugarcane to environmental and developmental cues. The SUCEST database was constructed with tissues in different physiological conditions which had been collected under varied situation of environmental stress. This database allows researchers to identify and characterize the expressed genes of a wide range of putative enzymes able to catalyze steps in the phenylpropanoid, isoprenoid and other pathways of the special metabolic mechanisms involved in the response of sugarcane to environmental changes. Our results show that sugarcane cDNAs encoded putative ultra-violet induced sesquiterpene cyclases (SC; chalcone synthase (CHS, the first enzyme in the pathway branch for flavonoid biosynthesis; isoflavone synthase (IFS, involved in plant defense and root nodulation; isoflavone reductase (IFR, a key enzyme in phenylpropanoid phytoalexin biosynthesis; and caffeic acid-O-methyltransferase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of lignin cell wall precursors. High levels of CHS transcripts from plantlets infected with Herbaspirillum rubri or Gluconacetobacter diazotroficans suggests that agents of biotic stress can elicit flavonoid biosynthesis in sugarcane. From this data we have predicted the profile of isoprenoid and phenylpropanoid metabolism in sugarcane and pointed the branches of secondary metabolism activated during tissue-specific stages of development and the adaptive response of sugarcane to agents of biotic and abiotic stress, although our assignment of enzyme function should be confirmed by careful biochemical and genetic supporting evidence.Este trabalho foi realizado com os objetivos de gerar uma coleção de genes

  7. Tyrosine biosynthesis, metabolism, and catabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Craig A; Maeda, Hiroshi A

    2018-05-01

    L-Tyrosine (Tyr) is an aromatic amino acid (AAA) required for protein synthesis in all organisms, but synthesized de novo only in plants and microorganisms. In plants, Tyr also serves as a precursor of numerous specialized metabolites that have diverse physiological roles as electron carriers, antioxidants, attractants, and defense compounds. Some of these Tyr-derived plant natural products are also used in human medicine and nutrition (e.g. morphine and vitamin E). While the Tyr biosynthesis and catabolic pathways have been extensively studied in microbes and animals, respectively, those of plants have received much less attention until recently. Accumulating evidence suggest that the Tyr biosynthetic pathways differ between microbes and plants and even within the plant kingdom, likely to support the production of lineage-specific plant specialized metabolites derived from Tyr. The interspecies variations of plant Tyr pathway enzymes can now be used to enhance the production of Tyr and Tyr-derived compounds in plants and other synthetic biology platforms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Engineering bacteria for enhanced polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Qiang Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA have been produced by some bacteria as bioplastics for many years. Yet their commercialization is still on the way. A few issues are related to the difficulty of PHA commercialization: namely, high cost and instabilities on molecular weights (Mw and structures, thus instability on thermo-mechanical properties. The high cost is the result of complicated bioprocessing associated with sterilization, low conversion of carbon substrates to PHA products, and slow growth of microorganisms as well as difficulty of downstream separation. Future engineering on PHA producing microorganisms should be focused on contamination resistant bacteria especially extremophiles, developments of engineering approaches for the extremophiles, increase on carbon substrates to PHA conversion and controlling Mw of PHA. The concept proof studies could still be conducted on E. coli or Pseudomonas spp. that are easily used for molecular manipulations. In this review, we will use E. coli and halophiles as examples to show how to engineer bacteria for enhanced PHA biosynthesis and for increasing PHA competitiveness.

  9. Engineering bacteria for enhanced polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Qiang; Jiang, Xiao-Ran

    2017-09-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) have been produced by some bacteria as bioplastics for many years. Yet their commercialization is still on the way. A few issues are related to the difficulty of PHA commercialization: namely, high cost and instabilities on molecular weights (Mw) and structures, thus instability on thermo-mechanical properties. The high cost is the result of complicated bioprocessing associated with sterilization, low conversion of carbon substrates to PHA products, and slow growth of microorganisms as well as difficulty of downstream separation. Future engineering on PHA producing microorganisms should be focused on contamination resistant bacteria especially extremophiles, developments of engineering approaches for the extremophiles, increase on carbon substrates to PHA conversion and controlling Mw of PHA. The concept proof studies could still be conducted on E. coli or Pseudomonas spp. that are easily used for molecular manipulations. In this review, we will use E. coli and halophiles as examples to show how to engineer bacteria for enhanced PHA biosynthesis and for increasing PHA competitiveness.

  10. Biosynthesis of myristic acid in luminescent bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    In vivo pulse-label studies have demonstrated that luminescent bacteria can provide myritic acid (14:0) required for the synthesis of the luciferase substrate myristyl aldehyde. Luminescent wild type Vibrio harveyi incubated with [ 14 C] acetate in a nutrient-depleted medium accumulated substantial tree [ 14 C]fatty acid (up to 20% of the total lipid label). Radio-gas chromatography revealed that > 75% of the labeled fatty acid is 14:0. No free fatty acid was detected in wild type cells labeled prior to the development of bioluminescence in the exponential growth phase, or in a dark mutant of V. harveyi (mutant M17) that requires exogenous 14:0 for light emission. The preferential accumulation of 14:0 was not observed when wild type cells were labeled with [ 14 C]acetate in regular growth medium. Moreover, all V. harveyi strains exhibited similar fatty acid mass compositions regardless of the state of bioluminescence. Since earlier work has shown that a luminescence-related acyltransferase (defective in the M17 mutant) can catalyze the deacylation of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein in vitro, the present results are consistent with a model in which this enzyme diverts 14:0 to the luminescence system during fatty acid biosynthesis. Under normal conditions, the supply of 14:0 by this pathway is tightly regulated such that bioluminescence development does not significantly alter the total fatty acid composition

  11. Control of triacylglycerol biosynthesis in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-31

    Seeds of most species of the Umbelliferae (Apiaciae), Araliaceae, and Garryaceae families are characterized by their high content of the unusual C[sub 18] monounsaturated fatty acid petroselinic acid (18:l[Delta][sup 6cis]). Prior to a recent report of this lab, little was known of the biosynthetic origin of the cis[Delta][sup 6] double bond of petroselinic acid. Such knowledge may be of both biochemical and biotechnological significance. Because petroselinic acid is potentially the product of a novel desaturase, information regarding its synthesis may contribute to an understanding of fatty acid desaturation mechanisms in plants. Through chemical cleavage at its double bond, petroselinic acid can be used as a precursor of lauric acid (12:0), a component of detergents and surfactants, and adipic acid (6:0 dicarboxylic), the monomeric component of nylon 6,6. Therefore, the development of an agronomic source of an oil rich in petroselinic acid is of biotechnological interest. As such, studies of petroselinic acid biosynthesis may provide basic information required for any attempt to genetically engineer the production and accumulation of this fatty acid in an existing oilseed.

  12. A Biotin Biosynthesis Gene Restricted to Helicobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hongkai; Zhu, Lei; Jia, Jia; Cronan, John E.

    2016-01-01

    In most bacteria the last step in synthesis of the pimelate moiety of biotin is cleavage of the ester bond of pimeloyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) methyl ester. The paradigm cleavage enzyme is Escherichia coli BioH which together with the BioC methyltransferase allows synthesis of the pimelate moiety by a modified fatty acid biosynthetic pathway. Analyses of the extant bacterial genomes showed that bioH is absent from many bioC-containing bacteria and is replaced by other genes. Helicobacter pylori lacks a gene encoding a homologue of the known pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester cleavage enzymes suggesting that it encodes a novel enzyme that cleaves this intermediate. We isolated the H. pylori gene encoding this enzyme, bioV, by complementation of an E. coli bioH deletion strain. Purified BioV cleaved the physiological substrate, pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester to pimeloyl-ACP by use of a catalytic triad, each member of which was essential for activity. The role of BioV in biotin biosynthesis was demonstrated using a reconstituted in vitro desthiobiotin synthesis system. BioV homologues seem the sole pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester esterase present in the Helicobacter species and their occurrence only in H. pylori and close relatives provide a target for development of drugs to specifically treat Helicobacter infections. PMID:26868423

  13. The regulation and biosynthesis of antimycins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan F. Seipke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimycins (>40 members were discovered nearly 65 years ago but the discovery of the gene cluster encoding antimycin biosynthesis in 2011 has facilitated rapid progress in understanding the unusual biosynthetic pathway. Antimycin A is widely used as a piscicide in the catfish farming industry and also has potent killing activity against insects, nematodes and fungi. The mode of action of antimycins is to inhibit cytochrome c reductase in the electron transport chain and halt respiration. However, more recently, antimycin A has attracted attention as a potent and selective inhibitor of the mitochondrial anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Remarkably, this inhibition is independent of the main mode of action of antimycins such that an artificial derivative named 2-methoxyantimycin A inhibits Bcl-xL but does not inhibit respiration. The Bcl-2/Bcl-xL family of proteins are over-produced in cancer cells that are resistant to apoptosis-inducing chemotherapy agents, so antimycins have great potential as anticancer drugs used in combination with existing chemotherapeutics. Here we review what is known about antimycins, the regulation of the ant gene cluster and the unusual biosynthetic pathway.

  14. Estrogen biosynthesis in human uterine adenomyosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urabe, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Takara; Kitawaki, Jo; Honjo, Hideo; Okada, Hiroji

    1989-01-01

    Estrogen biosynthesis (aromatiase activity) was investigated in human adenomyosis tissue and compared with that of the normal myometrium, endometrium, and endometrical cancer tissues. Homogenates were incubated with [1,2,6,7- 3 H]androstenedione and NADPH at 37 deg. C for 1 h. After stopping the enzymatic reaction with ethyl acetate, [4- 14 C]estrone and [4- 14 C]estradiol-17β were added to the incubated sample. Estrone and estradiol were purified and identified by Bio-Rad AG1-X2 column chromatography, thin-layer chromatography and co-crystallization. Estrogen formed in the incubated sample was calculated from the 3 H/ 14 C ratio of the final crystal. The value for estrone formed from androstenedione was 52-132 fmol . h -1. g -1 wet weight. Aromatase activity in the adenomyosis tissues was higher than that in normal endometrial or myometrial tissues, but lower than that found in myometrial or endometrial tumour tissue. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of danazol, progresterone, and medroxyprogesterone acetate on adenomyosis cells in primary cultures. Aromatase activity in adenomyosis was blocked by danazol, but stimulated by progesterone and MPA. These results indicate that aromatase activity in adenomyosis may contribute to the growth of the ectopic endometrial tissue which occurs in this disease. (author)

  15. Glycoprotein biosynthesis by human normal platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, P.; Bello, O.; Apitz-Castro, R.

    1987-01-01

    Incorporation of radioactive Man, Gal, Fuc, Glc-N, and NANA into washed human normal platelets and endogenous glycoproteins has been found. Both parameters were time dependent. Analysis of hydrolyzed labeled glycoproteins by paper chromatography revealed that the radioactive monosaccharide incubated with the platelets had not been converted into other sugars. Acid hydrolysis demonstrates the presence of a glycosidic linkage. All the effort directed to the demonstration of the existence of a lipid-sugar intermediate in intact human platelets yielded negative results for Man and Glc-N used as precursors. The incorporation of these sugars into glycoproteins is insensitive to bacitracin, suggesting no involvement of lipid-linked saccharides in the synthesis of glycoproteins in human blood platelets. The absence of inhibition of the glycosylation process in the presence of cycloheximide suggests that the sugars are added to proteins present in the intact platelets. These results support the contention that glycoprotein biosynthesis in human blood platelets observed under our experimental conditions is effected through direct sugar nucleotide glycosylation

  16. Biosynthesis and metabolism of steroids in molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Denise; Loi, Barbara; Porte, Cinta

    2011-11-01

    Molluscs are the second most diverse animal group, they are ecologically important and they are considered excellent indicators of ecosystem health. Some species have been widely used in pollution biomonitoring programs; however, their endocrinology is still poorly known. Despite some studies reporting the presence of (vertebrate-type) steroids in molluscs, information regarding enzymatic pathways involved in steroid synthesis and further catabolism of those steroids is still fragmentary. Regarding steroidogenesis, a number of excellent studies were performed in the 70s using different radio-labelled steroid precursors and detecting the formation of different metabolites. But, since then a long gap of research exist until the late 90s when the 'endocrine disruption' issue raised the need of a better knowledge of mollusc (and invertebrate) endocrinology in order to assess alterations caused by pollutants. Here we summarize past and recent studies dealing with steroid biosynthesis and metabolism in different mollusc species. Most of these studies suggest the involvement of steroids in mollusc reproduction. However, the knowledge is still fragmentary and many questions remain to be answered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcriptional analysis of apple fruit proanthocyanidin biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry-Kirk, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are products of the flavonoid pathway, which also leads to the production of anthocyanins and flavonols. Many flavonoids have antioxidant properties and may have beneficial effects for human health. PAs are found in the seeds and fruits of many plants. In apple fruit (Malus × domestica Borkh.), the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway is most active in the skin, with the flavan-3-ols, catechin, and epicatechin acting as the initiating units for the synthesis of PA polymers. This study examined the genes involved in the production of PAs in three apple cultivars: two heritage apple cultivars, Hetlina and Devonshire Quarrenden, and a commercial cultivar, Royal Gala. HPLC analysis shows that tree-ripe fruit from Hetlina and Devonshire Quarrenden had a higher phenolic content than Royal Gala. Epicatechin and catechin biosynthesis is under the control of the biosynthetic enzymes anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR1), respectively. Counter-intuitively, real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of Royal Gala LAR1 and ANR were significantly higher than those of both Devonshire Quarrenden and Hetlina. This suggests that a compensatory feedback mechanism may be active, whereby low concentrations of PAs may induce higher expression of gene transcripts. Further investigation is required into the regulation of these key enzymes in apple. Abbreviations:ANOVAanalysis of varianceANRanthocyanidin reductaseDADdiode array detectorDAFBdays after full bloomDFRdihydroflavonol reductaseLARleucoanthocyanidin reductaseLC-MSliquid chromatography/mass spectrometryPAproanthocyanidinqPCRreal-time quantitative PCR PMID:22859681

  18. Explorations into the biosynthesis of bioscorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelson, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    The biosynthesis of dioscorine in Dioscorea hispida has been studied by the feeding of putative precursors labelled at specific positions with {sup 2}H, {sup 3}H, and {sup 14}C. Administration of (3-{sup 14}C)3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric acid to D. hispida by the wick method afforded dioscorine labelled preferentially at the C{sub 10} position implying that the biosynthetic pathway to the acetate-derived half of the dioscorine skeleton is going through this compound. Administration of ethyl (6-{sup 14}C)orsellinate to D. hispida by the wick method failed to give an appreciable incorporation into dioscroine thereby disproving an alternative mechanism describing the formation of the acetate-derived half of the dioscorine skeleton. Two attempts to simulate the alternative mechanism by oxidatively cleaving ethyl orsellinate also failed, further disfavoring this mechanism. Administration of (2,3){sup 13}C{sub 2}, {sup 14}C{sub 2}succinic acid, (3-{sup 14}C)aspartic acid and (7a-{sup 14}C)tryptophan by the leaf painting method gave very low incorporations into dioscorine making determination of the source of the nicotinic acid half of the dioscorine skeleton inconclusive. Administration of (6-{sup 2}H, {sup 3}H)nicotinic acid to D. hispida by the wick method afforded dioscorine exhibiting complete retention of {sup 3}H thereby disfavoring a mechanism involving a 3,6-dihydropyridine intermediate in the formation of the dioscorine skeleton.

  19. Novel peptides with tyrosinase inhibitory activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, M.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Wichers, H.J.; Boeriu, C.G.

    2007-01-01

    Tyrosinase inhibition by peptides may find its application in food, cosmetics or medicine. In order to identify novel tyrosinase inhibitory peptides, protein-based peptide libraries made by SPOT synthesis were used to screen for peptides that show direct interaction with tyrosinase. One of the

  20. Characterization of Synthetic Peptides by Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman; Højrup, Peter; Hansen, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-MS of synthetic peptides.

  1. Neoglycolipidation for modulating peptide properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Witteloostuijn, Søren Blok

    regulation of appetite, food intake, and glucose homeostasis, and many of these peptides display a signicant potential for treatment of obesity and/or type 2 diabetes. This Ph.D. thesis describes three novel approaches for utilizing gut peptides as the starting point for developing obesity and diabetes drugs....... Subsequent stereological analyses of the pancreata showed that chronic treatment with GUB06-046 led to increased cell mass in db/db mice. The results of projects I and II clearly illustrate how chemical modications can improve the pharmacological properties of native peptides. Collectively, the ndings...... of this thesis contribute to emphasize the tremendous therapeutic potential of gut peptides for treatment of obesity and diabetes....

  2. New vasoactive peptides in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Goetze, Jens Peter; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with cirrhosis have substantial circulatory imbalance between vasoconstrictive and vasodilating forces. The study of circulatory vasoactive peptides may provide important pathophysiological information. This study aimed to assess concentrations, organ extraction and relations...

  3. Moonlighting peptides with emerging function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G Rodríguez Plaza

    Full Text Available Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides. We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated.

  4. Matrix-assisted peptide synthesis on nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandadash, Raz; Machtey, Victoria; Weiss, Aryeh; Byk, Gerardo

    2014-09-01

    We report a new method for multistep peptide synthesis on polymeric nanoparticles of differing sizes. Polymeric nanoparticles were functionalized via their temporary embedment into a magnetic inorganic matrix that allows multistep peptide synthesis. The matrix is removed at the end of the process for obtaining nanoparticles functionalized with peptides. The matrix-assisted synthesis on nanoparticles was proved by generating various biologically relevant peptides. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  6. Phage display-derived inhibitor of the essential cell wall biosynthesis enzyme MurF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blewett Ann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop antibacterial agents having novel modes of action against bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, we targeted the essential MurF enzyme of the antibiotic resistant pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MurF catalyzes the formation of a peptide bond between D-Alanyl-D-Alanine (D-Ala-D-Ala and the cell wall precursor uridine 5'-diphosphoryl N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid (UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm with the concomitant hydrolysis of ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate, yielding UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide. As MurF acts on a dipeptide, we exploited a phage display approach to identify peptide ligands having high binding affinities for the enzyme. Results Screening of a phage display 12-mer library using purified P. aeruginosa MurF yielded to the identification of the MurFp1 peptide. The MurF substrate UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glumeso-A2pm was synthesized and used to develop a sensitive spectrophotometric assay to quantify MurF kinetics and inhibition. MurFp1 acted as a weak, time-dependent inhibitor of MurF activity but was a potent inhibitor when MurF was pre-incubated with UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm or ATP. In contrast, adding the substrate D-Ala-D-Ala during the pre-incubation nullified the inhibition. The IC50 value of MurFp1 was evaluated at 250 μM, and the Ki was established at 420 μM with respect to the mixed type of inhibition against D-Ala-D-Ala. Conclusion MurFp1 exerts its inhibitory action by interfering with the utilization of D-Ala-D-Ala by the MurF amide ligase enzyme. We propose that MurFp1 exploits UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm-induced structural changes for better interaction with the enzyme. We present the first peptide inhibitor of MurF, an enzyme that should be exploited as a target for antimicrobial drug development.

  7. Dithiolopyrrolone Natural Products: Isolation, Synthesis and Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhiwei; Huang, Sheng; Yu, Yi; Deng, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Dithiolopyrrolones are a class of antibiotics that possess the unique pyrrolinonodithiole (4H-[1,2] dithiolo [4,3-b] pyrrol-5-one) skeleton linked to two variable acyl groups. To date, there are approximately 30 naturally occurring dithiolopyrrolone compounds, including holomycin, thiolutin, and aureothricin, and more recently thiomarinols, a unique class of hybrid marine bacterial natural products containing a dithiolopyrrolone framework linked by an amide bridge with an 8-hydroxyoctanoyl chain linked to a monic acid. Generally, dithiolopyrrolone antibiotics have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against various microorganisms, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and even parasites. Holomycin appeared to be active against rifamycin-resistant bacteria and also inhibit the growth of the clinical pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus N315. Its mode of action is believed to inhibit RNA synthesis although the exact mechanism has yet to be established in vitro. A recent work demonstrated that the fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri employs an RNA methyltransferase for self-resistance during the holomycin production. Moreover, some dithiolopyrrolone derivatives have demonstrated promising antitumor activities. The biosynthetic gene clusters of holomycin have recently been identified in S. clavuligerus and characterized biochemically and genetically. The biosynthetic gene cluster of thiomarinol was also identified from the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. SANK 73390, which was uniquely encoded by two independent pathways for pseudomonic acid and pyrrothine in a novel plasmid. The aim of this review is to give an overview about the isolations, characterizations, synthesis, biosynthesis, bioactivities and mode of action of this unique family of dithiolopyrrolone natural products, focusing on the period from 1940s until now. PMID:24141227

  8. Biosynthesis of 2'-deoxycoformycin by Streptomyces antibioticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanvey, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The biosynthesis of 2'-deoxycoformycin by Streptomyces antibioticus has been investigated. Previous studies indicated that a purine nycleoside is the precursor for ten of the eleven carbons of deoxycoformycin. It was proposed that carbon-7 of the seven-membered, 1,3-diazepine-ring of deoxycoformycin is not derived from the purine ring but by an insertion of a one-carbon unit between N-1 and C-6 of the purine ring. Carbon-1 of D-ribose has now been identified as the precursor for carbon 7 (and 1') of deoxycoformycin. Although the tetrahydrofolate/one-carbon pool contributes one carbon units to carbons-2 and 8 of the purine ring, which become carbons-5 and 2 of deoxycoformycin, it is not involved in the formation of carbon-7. The retention of the tritium on carbon-2 of [2,8- 3 H]-adenosine in deoxycoformycin indicates that guanosine is not the nucleoside precursor of deoxycoformycin. The failure to detect the incorporation of 18 O from [6- 18 O]-inosine in deoxycoformycin suggests that inosine is not the purine nucleoside precursor of deoxycoformycin. Therefore, it is proposed that adenosine and carbon-1 and d-ribose are the carbon-nitrogen precursors of deoxycoformycin. A mechanism for the insertion of carbon-1 of d-ribose into the pyrimidine portion of the purine ring has been proposed. Using cell-free extracts of S. antibioticus, 8-ketodeoxycoformycin and 8-ketocoformycin can be converted to deoxycoformycin and coformycin, respectively. The enzyme which reduces the 8-keto groups has been characterized and partially purified

  9. A rapid and clean synthetic approach to cyclic peptides via micro-flow peptide chain elongation and photochemical cyclization: synthesis of a cyclic RGD peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifune, Yuto; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Fuse, Shinichiro

    2016-11-29

    A cyclic RGD peptide was efficiently synthesized based on micro-flow, triphosgene-mediated peptide chain elongation and micro-flow photochemical macrolactamization. Our approach enabled a rapid (amidation for peptide chain elongation peptide.

  10. Abnormal Ergosterol Biosynthesis Activates Transcriptional Responses to Antifungal Azoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengcheng; Zhou, Mi; Wang, Wenzhao; Sun, Xianyun; Yarden, Oded; Li, Shaojie

    2018-01-01

    Fungi transcriptionally upregulate expression of azole efflux pumps and ergosterol biosynthesis pathway genes when exposed to antifungal agents that target ergosterol biosynthesis. To date, these transcriptional responses have been shown to be dependent on the presence of the azoles and/or depletion of ergosterol. Using an inducible promoter to regulate Neurospora crassa erg11 , which encodes the major azole target, sterol 14α-demethylase, we were able to demonstrate that the CDR4 azole efflux pump can be transcriptionally activated by ergosterol biosynthesis inhibition even in the absence of azoles. By analyzing ergosterol deficient mutants, we demonstrate that the transcriptional responses by cdr4 and, unexpectedly, genes encoding ergosterol biosynthesis enzymes ( erg genes) that are responsive to azoles, are not dependent on ergosterol depletion. Nonetheless, deletion of erg2 , which encodes C-8 sterol isomerase, also induced expression of cdr4 . Deletion of erg2 also induced the expression of erg24 , the gene encoding C-14 sterol reductase, but not other tested erg genes which were responsive to erg11 inactivation. This indicates that inhibition of specific steps of ergosterol biosynthesis can result in different transcriptional responses, which is further supported by our results obtained using different ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors. Together with the sterol profiles, these results suggest that the transcriptional responses by cdr4 and erg genes are associated with accumulation of specific sterol intermediate(s). This was further supported by the fact that when the erg2 mutant was treated with ketoconazole, upstream inhibition overrode the effects by downstream inhibition on ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. Even though cdr4 expression is associated with the accumulation of sterol intermediates, intra- and extracellular sterol analysis by HPLC-MS indicated that the transcriptional induction of cdr4 did not result in efflux of the accumulated intermediate

  11. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis to obtain therapeutic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Mäde

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The great versatility and the inherent high affinities of peptides for their respective targets have led to tremendous progress for therapeutic applications in the last years. In order to increase the drugability of these frequently unstable and rapidly cleared molecules, chemical modifications are of great interest. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS offers a suitable technology to produce chemically engineered peptides. This review concentrates on the application of SPPS by Fmoc/t-Bu protecting-group strategy, which is most commonly used. Critical issues and suggestions for the synthesis are covered. The development of automated methods from conventional to essentially improved microwave-assisted instruments is discussed. In order to improve pharmacokinetic properties of peptides, lipidation and PEGylation are described as covalent conjugation methods, which can be applied by a combination of automated and manual synthesis approaches. The synthesis and application of SPPS is described for neuropeptide Y receptor analogs as an example for bioactive hormones. The applied strategies represent innovative and potent methods for the development of novel peptide drug candidates that can be manufactured with optimized automated synthesis technologies.

  12. Peptides and Food Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sobrino Crespo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nutrients created by the digestion of food are proposed to active G protein coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells e.g. the L-cell. This stimulates the release of gut hormones. Hormones released from the gut and adipose tissue play an important rol in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure (1.Many circulating signals, including gut hormones, can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC neurons directly, after passing across the median eminence. The ARC is adjacent to the median eminence, a circumventricular organ with fenestrated capillaries and hence an incomplete blood-brain barrier (2. The ARC of the hypothalamus is believed to play a crucial role in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. The ARC contains two populations of neurons with opposing effect on food intake (3. Medially located orexigenic neurons (i.e those stimulating appetite express neuropeptide Y (NPY and agouti-related protein (AgRP (4-5. Anorexigenic neurons (i.e. those inhibiting appetite in the lateral ARC express alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH derived from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC and cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART (6. The balance between activities of these neuronal circuits is critical to body weight regulation.In contrast, other peripheral signals influence the hypothalamus indirectly via afferent neuronal pathway and brainstem circuits. In this context gastrointestinal’s vagal afferents are activated by mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors, and converge in the nucleus of the tractus solitaries (NTS of the brainstem. Neuronal projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypotalamus (1, 7. Gut hormones also alter the activity of the ascending vagal pathway from the gut to the brainstem. In the cases of ghrelin and Peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY, there are evidences for both to have a direct action on the arcuate nucleus and an action via the vagus nerve a

  13. Jasmonate-induced biosynthesis of andrographolide in Andrographis paniculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shiv Narayan; Jha, Zenu; Sinha, Rakesh Kumar; Geda, Arvind Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Andrographolide is a prominent secondary metabolite found in Andrographis paniculata that exhibits enormous pharmacological effects. In spite of immense value, the normal biosynthesis of andrographolide results in low amount of the metabolite. To induce the biosynthesis of andrographolide, we attempted elicitor-induced activation of andrographolide biosynthesis in cell cultures of A. paniculata. This was carried out by using methyl jasmonate (MeJA) as an elicitor. Among the various concentrations of MeJA tested at different time periods, 5 µM MeJA yielded 5.25 times more andrographolide content after 24 h of treatment. The accumulation of andrographolide was correlated with the expression level of known regulatory genes (hmgs, hmgr, dxs, dxr, isph and ggps) of mevalonic acid (MVA) and 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathways. These results established the involvement of MeJA in andrographolide biosynthesis by inducing the transcription of its biosynthetic pathways genes. The coordination of isph, ggps and hmgs expression highly influenced the andrographolide biosynthesis. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  14. Biosynthesis and functions of sulfur modifications in tRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki eShigi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur is an essential element for a variety of cellular constituents in all living organisms. In tRNA molecules, there are many sulfur-containing nucleosides, such as the derivatives of 2‑thiouridine (s2U, 4-thiouridine (s4U, 2-thiocytidine (s2C, and 2-methylthioadenosine (ms2A. Earlier studies established the functions of these modifications for accurate and efficient translation, including proper recognition of the codons in mRNA or stabilization of tRNA structure. In many cases, the biosynthesis of these sulfur modifications starts with cysteine desulfurases, which catalyze the generation of persulfide (an activated form of sulfur from cysteine. Many sulfur-carrier proteins are responsible for delivering this activated sulfur to each biosynthesis pathway. Finally, specific modification enzymes activate target tRNAs and then incorporate sulfur atoms. Intriguingly, the biosynthesis of 2-thiouridine in all domains of life is functionally and evolutionarily related to the ubiquitin-like post-translational modification system of cellular proteins in eukaryotes. This review summarizes the recent characterization of the biosynthesis of sulfur modifications in tRNA and the novel roles of this modification in cellular functions in various model organisms, with a special emphasis on 2-thiouridine derivatives. Each biosynthesis pathway of sulfur-containing molecules is mutually modulated via sulfur trafficking, and 2-thiouridine and codon usage bias have been proposed to control the translation of specific genes.

  15. Exploration of the Medicinal Peptide Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The chemical properties of peptide medicines, known as the 'medicinal peptide space' is considered a multi-dimensional subset of the global peptide space, where each dimension represents a chemical descriptor. These descriptors can be linked to biofunctional, medicinal properties to varying degrees. Knowledge of this space can increase the efficiency of the peptide-drug discovery and development process, as well as advance our understanding and classification of peptide medicines. For 245 peptide drugs, already available on the market or in clinical development, multivariate dataexploration was performed using peptide relevant physicochemical descriptors, their specific peptidedrug target and their clinical use. Our retrospective analysis indicates that clusters in the medicinal peptide space are located in a relatively narrow range of the physicochemical space: dense and empty regions were found, which can be explored for the discovery of novel peptide drugs.

  16. Cyclic peptide therapeutics: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Cyclic peptides combine several favorable properties such as good binding affinity, target selectivity and low toxicity that make them an attractive modality for the development of therapeutics. Over 40 cyclic peptide drugs are currently in clinical use and around one new cyclic peptide drug enters the market every year on average. The vast majority of clinically approved cyclic peptides are derived from natural products, such as antimicrobials or human peptide hormones. New powerful techniques based on rational design and in vitro evolution have enabled the de novo development of cyclic peptide ligands to targets for which nature does not offer solutions. A look at the cyclic peptides currently under clinical evaluation shows that several have been developed using such techniques. This new source for cyclic peptide ligands introduces a freshness to the field, and it is likely that de novo developed cyclic peptides will be in clinical use in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Perspectives and Peptides of the Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Kim A.

    Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobial peptides from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were recognized as the next potential generation of pharmaceuticals to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and septic shock, to preserve food, or to sanitize surfaces. Initial research focused on identifying the spectrum of antimicrobial agents, determining the range of antimicrobial activities against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and assessing the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides versus their natural counterparts. Subsequent research then focused on the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in model membrane systems not only to identify the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in microorganisms but also to discern differences in cytotoxicity for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Recent, contemporary work now focuses on current and future efforts to construct hybrid peptides, peptide congeners, stabilized peptides, peptide conjugates, and immobilized peptides for unique and specific applications to control the growth of microorganisms in vitro and in vivo.

  18. FoxO mediates the timing of pupation through regulating ecdysteroid biosynthesis in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xianyu; Yu, Na; Smagghe, Guy

    2018-03-01

    The steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), the major developmental hormone in insects, controls all the developmental transitions including ecdysis and metamorphosis. In our study with last larval stages of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, dsRNA-mediated gene silencing of Forkhead box protein O (FoxO) resulted in reduced food intake and larval mass and this agreed with a reduction in the expression of insulin signaling-related genes (insulin-like peptides 2, 3, 4, and chico). Interestingly, we also observed a significant delay in the moment of the pupation and these FoxO-silenced larvae then turned brown at the middle pupal stage followed by death. The observed delay of pupation concurred with a significant delay in 20E titer in dsFoxO-injected larvae and this in turn agreed with a significant delay in expression of prothoracicotropic hormone (ptth) that is a gene stimulating ecdysteroid biosynthesis, and of spook (spo) that is one of the early Halloween genes involved in ecdysteroid biosynthesis. In addition, there was also a delayed expression of the ecdysteroid response gene hormone receptor 3 (HR3). In an attempt to rescue the effects by dsFoxO, injection of 20E into T. castaneum larvae stimulated the expression of HR3 and induced one extra larval-larval molt, confirming the responsiveness for ecdysteroid signaling in dsFoxO-injected larvae. The observations of this project suggest that FoxO is a player in the timing of pupation via the regulating of ecdysteroid biosynthesis, together with the regulation of both insulin signaling and nutrition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Purification of mutacin III from group III Streptococcus mutans UA787 and genetic analyses of mutacin III biosynthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, F; Chen, P; Caufield, P W

    1999-09-01

    Previously, members of our group reported the isolation and characterization of mutacin II from Streptococcus mutans T8 and the genetic analyses of the mutacin II biosynthesis genes (J. Novak, P. W. Caufield, and E. J. Miller, J. Bacteriol. 176:4316-4320, 1994; F. Qi, P. Chen, and P. W. Caufield, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65:652-658, 1999; P. Chen, F. Qi, J. Novak, and P. W. Caufield, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65:1356-1360, 1999). In this study, we cloned and sequenced the mutacin III biosynthesis gene locus from a group III strain of S. mutans, UA787. DNA sequence analysis revealed eight open reading frames, which we designated mutR, -A, -A', -B, -C, -D, -P, and -T. MutR bears strong homology with MutR of mutacin II, while MutA, -B, -C, -D, -P, and -T are counterparts of proteins in the lantibiotic epidermin group. MutA' has 60% amino acid identity with MutA and therefore appears to be a duplicate of MutA. Insertional inactivation demonstrated that mutA is an essential gene for mutacin III production, while mutA' is not required. Mutacin III was purified to homogeneity by using reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. N-terminal peptide sequencing of the purified mutacin III determined mutA to be the structural gene for prepromutacin III. The molecular mass of the purified peptide was measured by laser disorption mass spectrophotometry and found to be 2,266.43 Da, consistent with our supposition that mutacin III has posttranslational modifications similar to those of the lantibiotic epidermin.

  20. Thiol Redox Sensitivity of Two Key Enzymes of Heme Biosynthesis and Pentose Phosphate Pathways: Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase and Transketolase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian McDonagh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Hem12p and transketolase (Tkl1p are key mediators of two critical processes within the cell, heme biosynthesis, and the nonoxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP. The redox properties of both Hem12p and Tkl1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated using proteomic techniques (SRM and label-free quantification and biochemical assays in cell extracts and in vitro with recombinant proteins. The in vivo analysis revealed an increase in oxidized Cys-peptides in the absence of Grx2p, and also after treatment with H2O2 in the case of Tkl1p, without corresponding changes in total protein, demonstrating a true redox response. Out of three detectable Cys residues in Hem12p, only the conserved residue Cys52 could be modified by glutathione and efficiently deglutathionylated by Grx2p, suggesting a possible redox control mechanism for heme biosynthesis. On the other hand, Tkl1p activity was sensitive to thiol redox modification and although Cys622 could be glutathionylated to a limited extent, it was not a natural substrate of Grx2p. The human orthologues of both enzymes have been involved in certain cancers and possess Cys residues equivalent to those identified as redox sensitive in yeast. The possible implication for redox regulation in the context of tumour progression is put forward.

  1. Salinity-induced regulation of the myo-inositol biosynthesis pathway in tilapia gill epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Romina; Li, Johnathon; Villarreal, Fernando; Gardell, Alison M.; Kültz, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The myo-inositol biosynthesis (MIB) pathway converts glucose-6-phosphate to the compatible osmolyte myo-inositol that protects cells from osmotic stress. Using proteomics, the enzymes that constitute the MIB pathway, myo-inositol phosphate synthase (MIPS) and inositol monophosphatase 1 (IMPA1), are identified in tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) gill epithelium. Targeted, quantitative, label-free proteomics reveals that they are both upregulated during salinity stress. Upregulation is stronger when fish are exposed to severe (34 ppt acute and 90 ppt gradual) relative to moderate (70 ppt gradual) salinity stress. IMPA1 always responds more strongly than MIPS, suggesting that MIPS is more stable during salinity stress. MIPS is N-terminally acetylated and the corresponding peptide increases proportionally to MIPS protein, while non-acetylated N-terminal peptide is not detectable, indicating that MIPS acetylation is constitutive and may serve to stabilize the protein. Hyperosmotic induction of MIPS and IMPA1 is confirmed using western blot and real-time qPCR and is much higher at the mRNA than at the protein level. Two distinct MIPS mRNA variants are expressed in the gill, but one is more strongly regulated by salinity than the other. A single MIPS gene is encoded in the tilapia genome whereas the zebrafish genome lacks MIPS entirely. The genome of euryhaline tilapia contains four IMPA genes, two of which are expressed, but only one is salinity regulated in gill epithelium. The genome of stenohaline zebrafish contains a single IMPA gene. We conclude that the MIB pathway represents a major salinity stress coping mechanism that is regulated at multiple levels in euryhaline fish but absent in stenohaline zebrafish. PMID:24072791

  2. Regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis in peach fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Md Abdur; Busatto, Nicola; Trainotti, Livio

    2014-11-01

    MYB10.1 and MYB10.3, with bHLH3, are the likely regulators of anthocyanin biosynthesis in peach fruit. MYB10.1/2/3 forms a cluster on the same genomic fragment where the Anther color ( Ag ) trait is located. Anthocyanins are bioactive compounds responsible for the pigmentation of many plant parts such as leaves, flowers, fruits and roots, and have potential benefits to human health. In peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch], peel color is a key determinant for fruit quality and is regulated by flavonoids including anthocyanins. The R2R3 MYB transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes with the help of co-activators belonging to the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) and WD40 repeat families. In the peach genome six MYB10-like and three bHLH-like TFs were identified as candidates to be the regulators of the anthocyanin accumulation, which, in yellow flesh fruits, is highest in the peel, abundant in the part of the mesocarp surrounding the stone and lowest in the mesocarp. The expression of MYB10.1 and MYB10.3 correlates with anthocyanin levels of different peach parts. They also have positive correlation with the expression of key structural genes of the anthocyanin pathway, such as CHS, F3H, and UFGT. Functions of peach MYB10s were tested in tobacco and shown to activate key genes in the anthocyanin pathway when bHLHs were co-expressed as partners. Overexpression of MYB10.1/bHLH3 and MYB10.3/bHLH3 activated anthocyanin production by up-regulating NtCHS, NtDFR and NtUFGT while other combinations were not, or much less, effective. As three MYB10 genes are localized in a genomic region where the Ag trait, responsible for anther pigmentation, is localized, it is proposed they are key determinant to introduce new peach cultivars with higher antioxidant level and pigmented fruit.

  3. Purine Biosynthesis Metabolically Constrains Intracellular Survival of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Carrie L.; Zhang, Ellisa W.; Dudley, Anne G.; Dixon, Beverly R. E. A.; Guckes, Kirsten R.; Breland, Erin J.; Floyd, Kyle A.; Casella, Daniel P.; Algood, Holly M. Scott; Clayton, Douglass B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to de novo synthesize purines has been associated with the intracellular survival of multiple bacterial pathogens. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections, undergoes a transient intracellular lifestyle during which bacteria clonally expand into multicellular bacterial communities within the cytoplasm of bladder epithelial cells. Here, we characterized the contribution of the conserved de novo purine biosynthesis-associated locus cvpA-purF to UPEC pathogenesis. Deletion of cvpA-purF, or of purF alone, abolished de novo purine biosynthesis but did not impact bacterial adherence properties in vitro or in the bladder lumen. However, upon internalization by bladder epithelial cells, UPEC deficient in de novo purine biosynthesis was unable to expand into intracytoplasmic bacterial communities over time, unless it was extrachromosomally complemented. These findings indicate that UPEC is deprived of purine nucleotides within the intracellular niche and relies on de novo purine synthesis to meet this metabolic requirement. PMID:27795353

  4. NAD+ biosynthesis, aging, and disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Johnson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ biosynthesis and its regulation have recently been attracting markedly increasing interest. Aging is marked by a systemic decrease in NAD+ across multiple tissues. The dysfunction of NAD+ biosynthesis plays a critical role in the pathophysiologies of multiple diseases, including age-associated metabolic disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and mental disorders. As downstream effectors, NAD+-dependent enzymes, such as sirtuins, are involved in the progression of such disorders. These recent studies implicate NAD+ biosynthesis as a potential target for preventing and treating age-associated diseases. Indeed, new studies have demonstrated the therapeutic potential of supplementing NAD+ intermediates, such as nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside, providing a proof of concept for the development of an effective anti-aging intervention.

  5. Zincophorin – biosynthesis in Streptomyces griseus and antibiotic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Zincophorin is a polyketide antibiotic that possesses potent activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including human pathogens. While a number of total syntheses of this highly functionalized natural product were reported since its initial discovery, the genetic basis for the biosynthesis of zincophorin has remained unclear. In this study, the co-linearity inherent to polyketide pathways was used to identify the zincophorin biosynthesis gene cluster in the genome of the natural producer HKI 0741. Interestingly, the same locus is fully conserved in the streptomycin-producing actinomycete IFO 13350, suggesting that the latter bacterium is also capable of zincophorin biosynthesis. Biological profiling of zincophorin revealed a dose-dependent inhibition of the Gram-positive bacterium . The antibacterial effect, however, is accompanied by cytotoxicity. Antibiotic and cytotoxic activities were completely abolished upon esterification of the carboxylic acid group in zincophorin.

  6. Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis and Transport of Acinetobactin in

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    Tarik Hasan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria survive in iron-limited host environments by using several iron acquisition mechanisms. Acinetobacter baumannii, causing serious infections in compromised patients, produces an iron-chelating molecule, called acinetobactin, which is composed of equimolar quantities of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA, L-threonine, and N-hydroxyhistamine, to compete with host cells for iron. Genes that are involved in the production and transport of acinetobactin are clustered within the genome of A. baumannii. A recent study showed that entA, located outside of the acinetobactin gene cluster, plays important roles in the biosynthesis of the acinetobactin precursor DHBA and in bacterial pathogenesis. Therefore, understanding the genes that are associated with the biosynthesis and transport of acinetobactin in the bacterial genome is required. This review is intended to provide a general overview of the genes in the genome of A. baumannii that are required for acinetobactin biosynthesis and transport.

  7. Inhibitors of amino acids biosynthesis as antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzębowska, Kamila; Gabriel, Iwona

    2015-02-01

    Fungal microorganisms, including the human pathogenic yeast and filamentous fungi, are able to synthesize all proteinogenic amino acids, including nine that are essential for humans. A number of enzymes catalyzing particular steps of human-essential amino acid biosynthesis are fungi specific. Numerous studies have shown that auxotrophic mutants of human pathogenic fungi impaired in biosynthesis of particular amino acids exhibit growth defect or at least reduced virulence under in vivo conditions. Several chemical compounds inhibiting activity of one of these enzymes exhibit good antifungal in vitro activity in minimal growth media, which is not always confirmed under in vivo conditions. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge on pathways of amino acids biosynthesis in fungi, with a special emphasis put on enzymes catalyzing particular steps of these pathways as potential targets for antifungal chemotherapy.

  8. Some aspects of genetic control of antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomyces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. P. Teplitskaya

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available These work contain a review of basic hypotheses and experimental information in relation to the problem of antibiotic synthesis regulation by the bacteria of the Streptomyces family. Data on cluster organization of antibiotics biosynthesis genes in these microorganisms were generalized. The examples of the positive and negative specific control of antibiotic production genes were resulted. Except for it, proofs that confirm participation of a few genes of more high level in the process of initiation and expression of antibiotics biosynthesis genes also were found. In this connection А-factor role in the mechanism of cascade-organized process of streptomycin biosynthesis control, some other antibiotics and spore determinations is discussed in detail.

  9. Characterization of Synthetic Peptides by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman; Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI-TOF-MS an......Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI...

  10. Final Report on Regulation of Guaiacyl and Syringyl Monolignol Biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent L. Chiang

    2006-03-09

    The focus of this research is to understand syringyl monolignol biosynthesis that leads to the formation of syringyl lignin, a type of lignin that can be easily removed during biomass conversion. We have achieved the three originally proposed goals for this project. (1) SAD and CAD genes (enzyme catalytic and kinetic properties) and their functional relevance to CAld5H/AldOMT pathway, (2) spatiotemporal expression patterns of Cald5H, AldOMT, SAD and CAD genes, and (3) functions of CAld5H, AldOMT, and SAD genes in vivo using transgenic aspen. Furthermore, we also found that microRNA might be involved in the upstream regulatory network of lignin biosynthesis and wood formation. The achievements are as below. (1) Based on biochemical and molecular studies, we discovered a novel syringyl-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD) involved in monolignol biosynthesis in angiosperm trees. Through CAld5H/OMT/SAD mediation, syringyl monolignol biosynthesis branches out from guaiacyl pathway at coniferaldehyde; (2) The function of CAld5H gene in this syringyl monolignol biosynthesis pathway also was confirmed in vivo in transgenic Populus; (3) The proposed major monolignol biosynthesis pathways were further supported by the involving biochemical functions of CCR based on a detailed kinetic study; (4) Gene promoter activity analysis also supported the cell-type specific expression of SAD and CAD genes in xylem tissue, consistent with the cell-specific locations of SAD and CAD proteins and with the proposed pathways; (5) We have developed a novel small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated stable gene-silencing system in transgenic plants; (6) Using the siRNA and P. trichocarpa transformation/regeneration systems we are currently producing transgenic P. trichocarpa to investigate the interactive functions of CAD and SAD in regulating guaiacyl and syringyl lignin biosynthesis; (7) We have cloned for the first time from a tree species, P. trichocarpa, small regulatory RNAs termed micro

  11. Biosynthesis of oxygen and nitrogen-containing heterocycles in polyketides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Hemmerling

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights the biosynthesis of heterocycles in polyketide natural products with a focus on oxygen and nitrogen-containing heterocycles with ring sizes between 3 and 6 atoms. Heterocycles are abundant structural elements of natural products from all classes and they often contribute significantly to their biological activity. Progress in recent years has led to a much better understanding of their biosynthesis. In this context, plenty of novel enzymology has been discovered, suggesting that these pathways are an attractive target for future studies.

  12. Topical problems in the biosynthesis of red blood pigment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franck, B.

    1982-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III plays a key role in the biosynthesis of heme, the red pigment of blood. In vivo studies with specifically 14 C- and 3 H-labeled precursors have revealed that the formation of uroporphyrinogen III in the organism follows several primary and subsidiary pathways. Model experiments on the pattern of biosynthesis have led to simple and effective methods of synthesizing uroporphyrin analogs and have shwon that their production is strongly favored thermodynamically, The biologically important porphyrins thus available permit a mechanistic explanantion of the light-induced dermatoses in porphyria diseases and suggest promising medical applications in diagnosis and therapy. (orig.)

  13. Carbon extension in peptidylnucleoside biosynthesis by radical-SAM enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilla, Edward A.; Yokoyama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Nikkomycins and polyoxins are antifungal peptidylnucleoside (PN) antibiotics active against human and plant pathogens. Here, we report that during PN biosynthesis in Streptomyces cacaoi and Streptomyces tendae, the C5′-extension of the nucleoside essential for downstream structural diversification is catalyzed by a conserved radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme, PolH or NikJ. This is distinct from the nucleophilic mechanism reported for antibacterial nucleosides and represents a novel mechanism of nucleoside natural product biosynthesis. PMID:27642865

  14. Phosphoribosyl Diphosphate (PRPP): Biosynthesis, Enzymology, Utilization, and Metabolic Significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Andersen, Kasper R; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2017-01-01

    . PRPP is utilized in the biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, the amino acids histidine and tryptophan, the cofactors NAD and tetrahydromethanopterin, arabinosyl monophosphodecaprenol, and certain aminoglycoside antibiotics. The participation of PRPP in each of these metabolic pathways...... analysis. PRPP, furthermore, is an effector molecule of purine and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis, either by binding to PurR or PyrR regulatory proteins or as an allosteric activator of carbamoylphosphate synthetase. Genetic analyses have disclosed a number of mutants altered in the PRPP synthase...

  15. [Biosynthesis of benzoisochromanequinones antibiotics from streptomycetes--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Huili; Li, Aiying

    2012-05-04

    Benzoisochromanequinones antibiotics, a group of bioactive polyketide compounds with aromatic polyketide skeletal cores, are accumulated in streptomycetes. The biosynthesis of benzoisochromanequinones antibiotics has triggered great interest because they not only represent model biosynthetic mechanisms of aromatic polyketide skeletal structures, but also possess a variety of tailoring modifications rendering them highly structural and bioactive diversity. Here we reviewed important advances in biosynthesis of benzoisochromanequinones antibiotics in recent 25 years with focusing on the modification mechanisms of these compounds and on the prospects of the metabolic engineering and pharmaceutical discovery of benzoisochromanequinones antibiotics.

  16. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  17. Dietary bioactive peptides: Human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouglé, Dominique; Bouhallab, Saïd

    2017-01-22

    Current opinion strongly links nutrition and health. Among nutrients, proteins, and peptides which are encrypted in their sequences and released during digestion could play a key role in improving health. These peptides have been claimed to be active on a wide spectrum of biological functions or diseases, including blood pressure and metabolic risk factors (coagulation, obesity, lipoprotein metabolism, and peroxidation), gut and neurological functions, immunity, cancer, dental health, and mineral metabolism. A majority of studies involved dairy peptides, but the properties of vegetal, animal, and sea products were also assessed. However, these allegations are mainly based on in vitro and experimental studies which are seldom confirmed in humans. This review focused on molecules which were tested in humans, and on the mechanisms explaining discrepancies between experimental and human studies.

  18. Purification and biochemical characterization of mutacin I from the group I strain of Streptococcus mutans, CH43, and genetic analysis of mutacin I biosynthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, F; Chen, P; Caufield, P W

    2000-08-01

    Previously, we reported isolation and characterization of mutacin III and genetic analysis of mutacin III biosynthesis genes from the group III strain of Streptococcus mutans, UA787 (F. Qi, P. Chen, and P. W. Caufield, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65:3880-3887, 1999). During the same process of isolating the mutacin III structural gene, we also cloned the structural gene for mutacin I. In this report, we present purification and biochemical characterization of mutacin I from the group I strain CH43 and compare mutacin I and mutacin III biosynthesis genes. The mutacin I biosynthesis gene locus consists of 14 genes in the order mutR, -A, -A', -B, -C, -D, -P, -T, -F, -E, -G, orfX, orfY, orfZ. mutA is the structural gene for mutacin I, while mutA' is not required for mutacin I activity. DNA and protein sequence analysis revealed that mutacins I and III are homologous to each other, possibly arising from a common ancestor. The mature mutacin I is 24 amino acids in size and has a molecular mass of 2, 364 Da. Ethanethiol modification and peptide sequencing of mutacin I revealed that it contains six dehydrated serines, four of which are probably involved with thioether bridge formation. Comparison of the primary sequence of mutacin I with that of mutacin III and epidermin suggests that mutacin I likely has the same bridging pattern as epidermin.

  19. The Peptide Toxin Amylosin of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens from Moisture-Damaged Buildings Is Immunotoxic, Induces Potassium Efflux from Mammalian Cells, and Has Antimicrobial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplova, Vera V.; Andersson, Maria A.; Mikkola, Raimo; Kankkunen, Päivi; Matikainen, Sampsa; Gahmberg, Carl G.; Andersson, Leif C.; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2015-01-01

    Amylosin, a heat-stable channel-forming non-ribosomally synthesized peptide toxin produced by strains of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens isolated from moisture-damaged buildings, is shown in this paper to have immunotoxic and cytotoxic effects on human cells as well as antagonistic effects on microbes. Human macrophages exposed to 50 ng of amylosin ml−1 secreted high levels of cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 within 2 h, indicating activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, an integral part of the innate immune system. At the same exposure level, expression of IL-1β and IL-18 mRNA increased. Amylosin caused dose-dependent potassium ion efflux from all tested mammalian cells (human monocytes and keratinocytes and porcine sperm cells) at 1 to 2 μM exposure. Amylosin also inhibited the motility of porcine sperm cells and depolarized the mitochondria of human keratinocytes. Amylosin may thus trigger the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequently cytokine release by causing potassium efflux from exposed cells. The results of this study indicate that exposure to amylosin activates the innate immune system, which could offer an explanation for the inflammatory symptoms experienced by occupants of moisture-damaged buildings. In addition, the amylosin-producing B. amyloliquefaciens inhibited the growth of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic indoor microbes, and purified amylosin also had an antimicrobial effect. These antimicrobial effects could make amylosin producers dominant and therefore significant causal agents of health problems in some moisture-damaged sites. PMID:25681192

  20. Natriuretic peptides and cerebral hemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Barringer, Filippa; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    in decompensated disease. In contrast, their biological effects on the cerebral hemodynamics are poorly understood. In this mini-review, we summarize the hemodynamic effects of the natriuretic peptides with a focus on the cerebral hemodynamics. In addition, we will discuss its potential implications in diseases...... where alteration of the cerebral hemodynamics plays a role such as migraine and acute brain injury including stroke. We conclude that a possible role of the peptides is feasible as evaluated from animal and in vitro studies, but more research is needed in humans to determine the precise response...

  1. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  2. Biodegradable Peptide-Silica Nanodonuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggini, Laura; Travaglini, Leana; Cabrera, Ingrid; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-07

    We report hybrid organosilica toroidal particles containing a short peptide sequence as the organic component of the hybrid systems. Once internalised in cancer cells, the presence of the peptide allows for interaction with peptidase enzymes, which attack the nanocarrier effectively triggering its structural breakdown. Moreover, these biodegradable nanovectors are characterised by high cellular uptake and exocytosis, showing great potential as biodegradable drug carriers. To demonstrate this feature, doxorubicin was employed and its delivery in HeLa cells investigated. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A re-evaluation of the final step of vanillin biosynthesis in the orchid Vanilla planifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hailian; Barros-Rios, Jaime; Kourteva, Galina; Rao, Xiaolan; Chen, Fang; Shen, Hui; Liu, Chenggang; Podstolski, Andrzej; Belanger, Faith; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Dixon, Richard A

    2017-07-01

    A recent publication describes an enzyme from the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia with the ability to convert ferulic acid directly to vanillin. The authors propose that this represents the final step in the biosynthesis of vanillin, which is then converted to its storage form, glucovanillin, by glycosylation. The existence of such a "vanillin synthase" could enable biotechnological production of vanillin from ferulic acid using a "natural" vanilla enzyme. The proposed vanillin synthase exhibits high identity to cysteine proteases, and is identical at the protein sequence level to a protein identified in 2003 as being associated with the conversion of 4-coumaric acid to 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde. We here demonstrate that the recombinant cysteine protease-like protein, whether expressed in an in vitro transcription-translation system, E. coli, yeast, or plants, is unable to convert ferulic acid to vanillin. Rather, the protein is a component of an enzyme complex that preferentially converts 4-coumaric acid to 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, as demonstrated by the purification of this complex and peptide sequencing. Furthermore, RNA sequencing provides evidence that this protein is expressed in many tissues of V. planifolia irrespective of whether or not they produce vanillin. On the basis of our results, V. planifolia does not appear to contain a cysteine protease-like "vanillin synthase" that can, by itself, directly convert ferulic acid to vanillin. The pathway to vanillin in V. planifolia is yet to be conclusively determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biosynthesis of Conjugate Vaccines Using an O-Linked Glycosylation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Pan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Conjugate vaccines are known to be one of the most effective and safest types of vaccines against bacterial pathogens. Previously, vaccine biosynthesis has been performed by using N-linked glycosylation systems. However, the structural specificity of these systems for sugar substrates has hindered their application. Here, we report a novel protein glycosylation system (O-linked glycosylation via Neisseria meningitidis that can transfer virtually any glycan to produce a conjugate vaccine. We successfully established this system in Shigella spp., avoiding the construction of an expression vector for polysaccharide synthesis. We further found that different protein substrates can be glycosylated using this system and that the O-linked glycosylation system can also effectively function in other Gram-negative bacteria, including some strains whose polysaccharide structure was not suitable for conjugation using the N-linked glycosylation system. The results from a series of animal experiments show that the conjugate vaccine produced by this O-linked glycosylation system offered a potentially protective antibody response. Furthermore, we elucidated and optimized the recognition motif, named MOOR, for the O-glycosyltransferase PglL. Finally, we demonstrated that the fusion of other peptides recognized by major histocompatibility complex class II around MOOR had no adverse effects on substrate glycosylation, suggesting that this optimized system will be useful for future vaccine development. Our results expand the glycoengineering toolbox and provide a simpler and more robust strategy for producing bioconjugate vaccines against a variety of pathogens.

  5. Concholepas hemocyanin biosynthesis takes place in the hepatopancreas, with hemocytes being involved in its metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manubens, Augusto; Salazar, Fabián; Haussmann, Denise; Figueroa, Jaime; Del Campo, Miguel; Pinto, Jonathan Martínez; Huaquín, Laura; Venegas, Alejandro; Becker, María Inés

    2010-12-01

    Hemocyanins are copper-containing glycoproteins in some molluscs and arthropods, and their best-known function is O(2) transport. We studied the site of their biosynthesis in the gastropod Concholepas concholepas by using immunological and molecular genetic approaches. We performed immunohistochemical staining of various organs, including the mantle, branchia, and hepatopancreas, and detected C. concholepas hemocyanin (CCH) molecules in circulating and tissue-associated hemocytes by electron microscopy. To characterize the hemocytes, we purified them from hemolymph. We identified three types of granular cells. The most abundant type was a phagocyte-like cell with small cytoplasmic granules. The second type contained large electron-dense granules. The third type had vacuoles containing hemocyanin molecules suggesting that synthesis or catabolism occurred inside these cells. Our failure to detect cch-mRNA in hemocytes by reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) led us to propose that hemocytes instead played a role in CCH metabolism. This hypothesis was supported by colloidal gold staining showing hemocyanin molecules in electron-dense granules inside hemocytes. RT-PCR analysis, complemented by in situ hybridization analyses with single-stranded antisense RNAs as specific probes, demonstrated the presence of cch-mRNA in the hepatopancreas; this was consistent with the specific hybridization signal and confirmed the hepatopancreas as the site of CCH synthesis. Finally, we investigated the possibility that CCH catabolism in hemocytes was involved in the host immune response and in the generation of secondary metabolites such as antimicrobial peptides and phenoloxidase.

  6. Are small GTPases signal hubs in sugar-mediated induction of fructan biosynthesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tita Ritsema

    Full Text Available External sugar initiates biosynthesis of the reserve carbohydrate fructan, but the molecular processes mediating this response remain obscure. Previously it was shown that a phosphatase and a general kinase inhibitor hamper fructan accumulation. We use various phosphorylation inhibitors both in barley and in Arabidopsis and show that the expression of fructan biosynthetic genes is dependent on PP2A and different kinases such as Tyr-kinases and PI3-kinases. To further characterize the phosphorylation events involved, comprehensive analysis of kinase activities in the cell was performed using a PepChip, an array of >1000 kinase consensus substrate peptide substrates spotted on a chip. Comparison of kinase activities in sugar-stimulated and mock(sorbitol-treated Arabidopsis demonstrates the altered phosphorylation of many consensus substrates and documents the differences in plant kinase activity upon sucrose feeding. The different phosphorylation profiles obtained are consistent with sugar-mediated alterations in Tyr phosphorylation, cell cycling, and phosphoinositide signaling, and indicate cytoskeletal rearrangements. The results lead us to infer a central role for small GTPases in sugar signaling.

  7. Are Small GTPases Signal Hubs in Sugar-Mediated Induction of Fructan Biosynthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritsema, Tita; Brodmann, David; Diks, Sander H.; Bos, Carina L.; Nagaraj, Vinay; Pieterse, Corné M.J.; Boller, Thomas; Wiemken, Andres; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2009-01-01

    External sugar initiates biosynthesis of the reserve carbohydrate fructan, but the molecular processes mediating this response remain obscure. Previously it was shown that a phosphatase and a general kinase inhibitor hamper fructan accumulation. We use various phosphorylation inhibitors both in barley and in Arabidopsis and show that the expression of fructan biosynthetic genes is dependent on PP2A and different kinases such as Tyr-kinases and PI3-kinases. To further characterize the phosphorylation events involved, comprehensive analysis of kinase activities in the cell was performed using a PepChip, an array of >1000 kinase consensus substrate peptide substrates spotted on a chip. Comparison of kinase activities in sugar-stimulated and mock(sorbitol)-treated Arabidopsis demonstrates the altered phosphorylation of many consensus substrates and documents the differences in plant kinase activity upon sucrose feeding. The different phosphorylation profiles obtained are consistent with sugar-mediated alterations in Tyr phosphorylation, cell cycling, and phosphoinositide signaling, and indicate cytoskeletal rearrangements. The results lead us to infer a central role for small GTPases in sugar signaling. PMID:19672308

  8. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies...... are powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors...... such as structure, accessibility and amino acid composition are crucial. Since small peptides tend not to be immunogenic, it may be necessary to conjugate them to carrier proteins in order to enhance immune presentation. Several strategies for conjugation of peptide-carriers applied for immunization exist...

  9. The intracellular pharmacokinetics of terminally capped peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruttekolk, I.R.R.; Witsenburg, J.J.; Glauner, H.B.; Bovee-Geurts, P.H.M.; Ferro, E.S.; Verdurmen, W.P.R.; Brock, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    With significant progress in delivery technologies, peptides and peptidomimetics are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutics also for intracellular applications. However, analyses of the intracellular behavior of peptides are a challenge; therefore, knowledge on the intracellular

  10. Strategic approaches to optimizing peptide ADME properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Li

    2015-01-01

    Development of peptide drugs is challenging but also quite rewarding. Five blockbuster peptide drugs are currently on the market, and six new peptides received first marketing approval as new molecular entities in 2012. Although peptides only represent 2% of the drug market, the market is growing twice as quickly and might soon occupy a larger niche. Natural peptides typically have poor absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties with rapid clearance, short half-life, low permeability, and sometimes low solubility. Strategies have been developed to improve peptide drugability through enhancing permeability, reducing proteolysis and renal clearance, and prolonging half-life. In vivo, in vitro, and in silico tools are available to evaluate ADME properties of peptides, and structural modification strategies are in place to improve peptide developability.

  11. Histidine-Containing Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics.......Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics....

  12. Tumor Associated Antigenic Peptides in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tiwari, Raj

    2001-01-01

    .... Since this tumor rejection property was specifically mediated by tumor denved and not non-tumor derived gp96-peptide complexes, and that gp96 preparations stripped of its peptides are non-immunogenic...

  13. Peptides: Production, bioactivity, functionality, and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajfathalian, Mona; Ghelichi, Sakhi; García Moreno, Pedro Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Production of peptides with various effects from proteins of different sources continues to receive academic attention. Researchers of different disciplines are putting increasing efforts to produce bioactive and functional peptides from different sources such as plants, animals, and food industry...

  14. Biosynthesis of allene oxides in Physcomitrella patens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz Julia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The moss Physcomitrella patens contains C18- as well as C20-polyunsaturated fatty acids that can be metabolized by different enzymes to form oxylipins such as the cyclopentenone cis(+-12-oxo phytodienoic acid. Mutants defective in the biosynthesis of cyclopentenones showed reduced fertility, aberrant sporophyte morphology and interrupted sporogenesis. The initial step in this biosynthetic route is the conversion of a fatty acid hydroperoxide to an allene oxide. This reaction is catalyzed by allene oxide synthase (AOS belonging as hydroperoxide lyase (HPL to the cytochrome P450 family Cyp74. In this study we characterized two AOS from P. patens, PpAOS1 and PpAOS2. Results Our results show that PpAOS1 is highly active with both C18 and C20-hydroperoxy-fatty acid substrates, whereas PpAOS2 is fully active only with C20-substrates, exhibiting trace activity (~1000-fold lower kcat/KM with C18 substrates. Analysis of products of PpAOS1 and PpHPL further demonstrated that both enzymes have an inherent side activity mirroring the close inter-connection of AOS and HPL catalysis. By employing site directed mutagenesis we provide evidence that single amino acid residues in the active site are also determining the catalytic activity of a 9-/13-AOS – a finding that previously has only been reported for substrate specific 13-AOS. However, PpHPL cannot be converted into an AOS by exchanging the same determinant. Localization studies using YFP-labeled AOS showed that PpAOS2 is localized in the plastid while PpAOS1 may be found in the cytosol. Analysis of the wound-induced cis(+-12-oxo phytodienoic acid accumulation in PpAOS1 and PpAOS2 single knock-out mutants showed that disruption of PpAOS1, in contrast to PpAOS2, results in a significantly decreased cis(+-12-oxo phytodienoic acid formation. However, the knock-out mutants of neither PpAOS1 nor PpAOS2 showed reduced fertility, aberrant sporophyte morphology or interrupted sporogenesis

  15. Neurospora tryptophan synthase: N-terminal analysis and the sequence of the pyridoxal phosphate active site peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, M.L.; Hsu, P.Y.; DeMoss, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Tryptophan synthase (TS), which catalyzes the final step of tryptophan biosynthesis, is a multifunctional protein requiring pyridoxal phosphate (B6P) for two of its three distinct enzyme activities. TS from Neurospora has a blocked N-terminal, is a homodimer of 150 KDa and binds one mole of B6P per mole of subunit. The authors shown the N-terminal residue to be acyl-serine. The B6P-active site of holoenzyme was labelled by reduction of the B6P-Schiff base with [ 3 H]-NaBH 4 , and resulted in a proportionate loss of activity in the two B6P-requiring reactions. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CNBr-generated peptides showed the labelled, active site peptide to be 6 KDa. The sequence of this peptide, purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of C-18 reversed phase and TSK gel filtration HPLC is: gly-arg-pro-gly-gln-leu-his-lys-ala-glu-arg-leu-thr-glu-tyr-ala-gly-gly-ala-gln-ile-xxx-leu-lys-arg-glu-asp-leu-asn-his-xxx-gly-xxx-his-/sub ***/-ile-asn-asn-ala-leu. Although four residues (xxx, /sub ***/) are unidentified, this peptide is minimally 78% homologous with the corresponding peptide from yeast TS, in which residue (/sub ***/) is the lysine that binds B6P

  16. Development and use of engineered peptide deformylase in chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Toma, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Deze thesis beschrijft het onderzoek naar potentieel van het gebruik van het peptide deformylase (PDF) in chemo enzymatische peptide synthese. PDF is geschikt voor selective N terminale deformylatie van bepaalde N-formyl-peptides zonder gelijktijdige hydrolyse van de peptide binding. Door de

  17. Peptides, polypeptides and peptide-polymer hybrids as nucleic acid carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Marya

    2017-10-24

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), and protein transduction domains (PTDs) of viruses and other natural proteins serve as a template for the development of efficient peptide based gene delivery vectors. PTDs are sequences of acidic or basic amphipathic amino acids, with superior membrane trespassing efficacies. Gene delivery vectors derived from these natural, cationic and cationic amphipathic peptides, however, offer little flexibility in tailoring the physicochemical properties of single chain peptide based systems. Owing to significant advances in the field of peptide chemistry, synthetic mimics of natural peptides are often prepared and have been evaluated for their gene expression, as a function of amino acid functionalities, architecture and net cationic content of peptide chains. Moreover, chimeric single polypeptide chains are prepared by a combination of multiple small natural or synthetic peptides, which imparts distinct physiological properties to peptide based gene delivery therapeutics. In order to obtain multivalency and improve the gene delivery efficacies of low molecular weight cationic peptides, bioactive peptides are often incorporated into a polymeric architecture to obtain novel 'polymer-peptide hybrids' with improved gene delivery efficacies. Peptide modified polymers prepared by physical or chemical modifications exhibit enhanced endosomal escape, stimuli responsive degradation and targeting efficacies, as a function of physicochemical and biological activities of peptides attached onto a polymeric scaffold. The focus of this review is to provide comprehensive and step-wise progress in major natural and synthetic peptides, chimeric polypeptides, and peptide-polymer hybrids for nucleic acid delivery applications.

  18. STM studies of synthetic peptide monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, David J.; Clauss, Wilfried; Pilloud, Denis L.; Leslie Dutton, P.; Johnson, Alan T.

    1998-08-01

    We have used scanning probe microscopy to investigate self-assembled monolayers of chemically synthesized peptides. We find that the peptides form a dense uniform monolayer, above which is found a sparse additional layer. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, submolecular resolution can be obtained, revealing the alpha helices which constitute the peptide. The nature of the images is not significantly affected by the incorporation of redox cofactors (hemes) in the peptides.

  19. Antimicrobial activities of heparin-binding peptides.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Emma; Rydengård, Victoria; Sonesson, Andreas; Mörgelin, Matthias; Björck, Lars; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are effector molecules of the innate immune system. We recently showed that the human antimicrobial peptides alpha-defensin and LL-37 bind to glycosaminoglycans (heparin and dermatan sulphate). Here we demonstrate the obverse, i.e. structural motifs associated with heparin affinity (cationicity, amphipaticity, and consensus regions) may confer antimicrobial properties to a given peptide. Thus, heparin-binding peptides derived from laminin isoforms, von Willebrand factor...

  20. In vitro biosynthesis of human renin and identification of plasma inactive renin as an activation intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, S; Kim, S; Miyazaki, H; Park, Y S; Murakami, K

    1985-12-25

    The biosynthesis and post-translational modifications, including proteolytic processing and core glycosylation, of the human renin precursor have been studied in vitro in a cell-free system. For this purpose, highly enriched renin mRNA was isolated from a renin-producing juxtaglomerular cell tumor and translated in rabbit reticulocyte lysate containing [35S]methionine in the presence or absence of dog pancreas microsomal membranes. Fluorographic analysis of the radioactive translation products, immunoprecipitated and then resolved on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, revealed that the primary translation product, preprorenin (Mr = 45,000), is initially processed to glycosylated prorenin (Mr = 47,000) during or shortly after its sequestration into the lumen of the microsomal membranes. The vectorial translocation across the membrane was confirmed by the observation that the proform was resistant to digestion with trypsin while preprorenin was sensitive. Radiosequencing and the use of prorenin-specific antibodies established the cleavage points of the pre- and profragment and showed that the in vitro precursor of human renin contains a 23-residue signal peptide and a 43-residue prosegment. The post-translational modification which, despite the removal of signal peptide, resulted in an increase in apparent Mr, reflects the glycosylation as examined using Xenopus oocytes microinjected with renin mRNA in the presence of tunicamycin, an inhibitor of protein glycosylation. Four anti-peptide antibodies which specifically recognize the NH2 terminus (Pro 1), two middle parts (Pro 2A and Pro 2B), and COOH terminus (Pro 3) of the prosegment, respectively, have been raised and used to characterize plasma prorenin. Renin precursors (pre- and prorenin) synthesized in vitro or in the kidney reacted with these antibodies (anti-Pro 1, anti-Pro 2A, anti-Pro 2B, and anti-Pro 3). However, quite unexpectedly, human plasma prorenin was recognized only by anti

  1. One Hundred Years of Peptide Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ber of residues are often denoted as peptides. The chemical synthesis of peptides, as envisaged by Fischer, involves ... known as genetically encoded as building blocks of peptides and proteins. Almost all of .... inhibit final stages of the enzymatic construction of the bacterial peptidoglycan cell wall component, a network of.

  2. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  3. Ribosome evolution: Emergence of peptide synthesis machinery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    allows the histidine to position close to the PTC during the reaction, it may contribute to improving peptide bond formation. Thus, it is important to analyse biomolecular interactions in terms of the dynamic nature of the structure. 3. Origin of peptide bond formation and the RNA world. Minihelix-based peptide bond formation ...

  4. Double-Stranded Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  5. Synthetic Procedures for Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  6. [Advances and prospects of taxol biosynthesis by endophytic fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Yu, Lu; Jin, Yuyan; Ma, Xueling; Liu, Dan; Wang, Xiaohua; Wang, Xin

    2016-08-25

    Taxol is one of the most important chemotherapeutic drugs against cancer. Taxol has been mainly extracted from the bark of yews for a long time. However, methods for the extraction of taxol from the bark of Taxus species were inefficient and environmentally costly. As a result of the high ecological toll exacted on trees with the potential for Pacific yew extinction, investigators began to look for other methods of taxol production. Recently, increasing efforts have been made to develop alternative means of taxol production, such as using complete chemical synthesis, semi-synthesis, Taxus spp. plant cell culture and microbe fermentation. Using microbe fermentation in the production of taxol would be a very prospective method for obtaining a large amount of taxol. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis and genetic regulation mechanisms of taxol biosynthesis by endophytic fungi, which may be helpful to construct the genetic engineering strain with high taxol output. In this paper, the taxol biosynthesis pathway from Taxus cells and the advantages of taxol biosynthesis by endophytic fungi were discussed. The study on the isolation and biodiversity of taxol-producing endophytic fungi and the taxol biosynthesis related genes are also discussed.

  7. Regulation of Isoprenoid Pheromone Biosynthesis in Bumblebee Males

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prchalová, Darina; Buček, Aleš; Brabcová, Jana; Žáček, Petr; Kindl, Jiří; Valterová, Irena; Pichová, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 3 (2016), s. 260-267 ISSN 1439-4227 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1302; GA ČR GA15-06569S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : biosynthesis * Bombus spp. * gene expression * isoprenoids * pheromones * transcriptional regulation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.847, year: 2016

  8. Biosynthesis of the red antibiotic, prodigiosin, in Serratia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, Neil R; Simonsen, Henrik Toft; Ahmed, Raef A A

    2005-01-01

    from Serratia sp. ATCC 39006. The biosynthetic intermediates accumulating in each mutant have been analysed by LC-MS, cross-feeding and genetic complementation studies. Based on these results we assign specific roles in the biosynthesis of MBC to the following Pig proteins: PigI, PigG, PigA, PigJ, Pig...

  9. Biosynthesis of lipophilic compounds in tomato fruit | Angaman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study performed with chromoplasts to know the origin of the precursors for carotenoids biosynthesis using a variety of 14C-labelled precursors showed that the most important incorporation was found in lipids. This study aims to understand the biochemical and metabolic processes operating during tomato fruit ripening.

  10. Temporal expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-10

    Oct 10, 2011 ... Gibberellins (GAs) are a large family of endogenous plant growth regulators. Bioactive GAs influence nearly all processes during plant growth and development. In the present study, we cloned and identified 10 unique genes that are potentially involved in the biosynthesis of GAs, including one. BpGGDP ...

  11. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and its antibacterial activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present research work, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and its activity on bacterial pathogens were investigated. Silver nanoparticles were rapidly synthesized using Urospora sp. and the formation of nanoparticles was observed within 30 min. The results recorded from UV–vis spectrum, Fourier Transform Infrared ...

  12. The magnesium chelation step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. Progress report 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, J.D.

    1993-12-31

    Progress is reported on the identification and fractionation of Magnesium chealatase, an enzyme involved in addition of Mg to chlorophyll during the later`s biosynthesis. Progress is documented as a series of synopsis of published and unpublished papers by the author.

  13. Molecular and biochemical studies of fragrance biosynthesis in rose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roses are one of the most popular ornamental plants, whose floral volatiles are not only involved in environmental interactions but also widely used by industries. The biosynthesis of many of these volatiles in roses is not well understood. This thesis describes alternative pathways for the

  14. Biosynthesis of polyketides by trans-AT polyketide synthases.

    OpenAIRE

    Helfrich Eric J N; Piel Jörn

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses the biosynthesis of natural products that are generated by trans AT polyketide synthases a family of catalytically versatile enzymes that represents one of the major group of proteins involved in the production of bioactive polyketides. The article includes 609 references and covers the literature from 2009 through June 2015.

  15. Biosynthesis of polyketides by trans-AT polyketide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Eric J N; Piel, Jörn

    2016-02-01

    This review discusses the biosynthesis of natural products that are generated by trans-AT polyketide synthases, a family of catalytically versatile enzymes that represents one of the major group of proteins involved in the production of bioactive polyketides. The article includes 609 references and covers the literature from 2009 through June 2015.

  16. Biosynthesis of cellulolytic enzymes by Tricothecium roseum with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among various soluble carbon and complex nitrogen sources tested in this study, carboxymethylcellulose and peptone supported maximum production of both cellulolytic enzymes. Under all suitable growth conditions, the enzyme biosynthesis was remarkably increased when the inducer citric acid was added to the PDYE ...

  17. Anthocyanin biosynthesis in fruit tree crops: Genes and their regulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway is a little complex with branches responsible for the synthesis of a variety of metabolites. In fruit tree crops, during the past decade, many structural genes encoding enzymes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway and various regulatory genes encoding transcription factors that ...

  18. Temporal expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a large family of endogenous plant growth regulators. Bioactive GAs influence nearly all processes during plant growth and development. In the present study, we cloned and identified 10 unique genes that are potentially involved in the biosynthesis of GAs, including one BpGGDP gene, two BpCPS ...

  19. Expression profiles of genes involved in tanshinone biosynthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Expression profiles of genes involved in tanshinone biosynthesis of two. Salvia miltiorrhiza genotypes with different tanshinone contents. Zhenqiao Song, Jianhua Wang and Xingfeng Li. J. Genet. 95, 433–439. Table 1. S. miltiorrhiza genes and primer pairs used for qRT-PCR. Gene. GenBank accession. Primer name.

  20. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by Leishmania tropica | Rahi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel biosynthesis route for Silver Nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) was attempted in the present study using Leishmania tropica the causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in different countries, particularly in Mediterranean region in Iraq. Silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized from AgNO3 by reduction of ...

  1. Biosynthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles by Aspergillus Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamiar Zomorodian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, researchers turn to natural processes such as using biological microorganisms in order to develop reliable and ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. In this study, we have investigated extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using four Aspergillus species including A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, A. niger, and A. flavus. We have also analyzed nitrate reductase activity in the studied species in order to determine the probable role of this enzyme in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. The formation of silver nanoparticles in the cell filtrates was confirmed by the passage of laser light, change in the color of cell filtrates, absorption peak at 430 nm in UV-Vis spectra, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. There was a logical relationship between the efficiencies of studied Aspergillus species in the production of silver nanoparticles and their nitrate reductase activity. A. fumigatus as the most efficient species showed the highest nitrate reductase activity among the studied species while A. flavus exhibited the lowest capacity in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles which was in accord with its low nitrate reductase activity. The present study showed that Aspergillus species had potential for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles depending on their nitrate reductase activity.

  2. Biosynthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles by Aspergillus Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourshahid, Seyedmohammad; Mehryar, Pouyan; Pakshir, Keyvan; Rahimi, Mohammad Javad; Arabi Monfared, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Currently, researchers turn to natural processes such as using biological microorganisms in order to develop reliable and ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. In this study, we have investigated extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using four Aspergillus species including A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, A. niger, and A. flavus. We have also analyzed nitrate reductase activity in the studied species in order to determine the probable role of this enzyme in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. The formation of silver nanoparticles in the cell filtrates was confirmed by the passage of laser light, change in the color of cell filtrates, absorption peak at 430 nm in UV-Vis spectra, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). There was a logical relationship between the efficiencies of studied Aspergillus species in the production of silver nanoparticles and their nitrate reductase activity. A. fumigatus as the most efficient species showed the highest nitrate reductase activity among the studied species while A. flavus exhibited the lowest capacity in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles which was in accord with its low nitrate reductase activity. The present study showed that Aspergillus species had potential for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles depending on their nitrate reductase activity. PMID:27652264

  3. Hacking an Algal Transcription Factor for Lipid Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulai; Hu, Guipeng; Liu, Liming

    2018-03-01

    Transcriptional engineering is a viable means for engineering microalgae to produce lipid, but it often results in a trade-off between production and growth. A recent study shows that engineering a single transcriptional regulator enables efficient carbon partitioning to lipid biosynthesis with high biomass productivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Arogenate Dehydratase Isoforms Differentially Regulate Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingbo; Man, Cong; Li, Danning; Tan, Huijuan; Xie, Ye; Huang, Jirong

    2016-12-05

    Anthocyanins, a group of L-phenylalanine (Phe)-derived flavonoids, have been demonstrated to play important roles in plant stress resistance and interactions between plants and insects. Although the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway and its regulatory mechanisms have been extensively studied, it remains unclear whether the level of Phe supply affects anthocyanin biosynthesis. Here, we investigated the roles of arogenate dehydratases (ADTs), the key enzymes that catalyze the conversion of arogenate into Phe, in sucrose-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. Genetic analysis showed that all six ADT isoforms function redundantly in anthocyanin biosynthesis but have differential contributions. ADT2 contributes the most to anthocyanin accumulation, followed by ADT1 and ADT3, and ADT4-ADT6. We found that anthocyanin content is positively correlated with the levels of Phe and sucrose-induced ADT transcripts in seedlings. Consistently, addition of Phe to the medium could dramatically increase anthocyanin content in the wild-type plants and rescue the phenotype of the adt1 adt3 double mutant regarding the anthocyanin accumulation. Moreover, transgenic plants overexpressing ADT4, which appears to be less sensitive to Phe than overexpression of ADT2, hyperaccumulate Phe and produce elevated level of anthocyanins. Taken together, our results suggest that the level of Phe is an important regulatory factor for sustaining anthocyanin biosynthesis. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lincosamides: Chemical structure, biosynthesis, mechanism of action, resistance, and applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spížek, Jaroslav; Řezanka, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 133, June 1 SI (2017), s. 20-28 ISSN 0006-2952 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Lincosamides * Chemical structure * Biosynthesis and mechanism of action Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.581, year: 2016

  6. Biosynthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles by Aspergillus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Pourshahid, Seyedmohammad; Sadatsharifi, Arman; Mehryar, Pouyan; Pakshir, Keyvan; Rahimi, Mohammad Javad; Arabi Monfared, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Currently, researchers turn to natural processes such as using biological microorganisms in order to develop reliable and ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. In this study, we have investigated extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using four Aspergillus species including A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, A. niger, and A. flavus. We have also analyzed nitrate reductase activity in the studied species in order to determine the probable role of this enzyme in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. The formation of silver nanoparticles in the cell filtrates was confirmed by the passage of laser light, change in the color of cell filtrates, absorption peak at 430 nm in UV-Vis spectra, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). There was a logical relationship between the efficiencies of studied Aspergillus species in the production of silver nanoparticles and their nitrate reductase activity. A. fumigatus as the most efficient species showed the highest nitrate reductase activity among the studied species while A. flavus exhibited the lowest capacity in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles which was in accord with its low nitrate reductase activity. The present study showed that Aspergillus species had potential for the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles depending on their nitrate reductase activity.

  7. Stimulation of reserpine biosynthesis in the callus of Rauvolfia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    So enhancing this alkaloid in the already available system is a beneficial approach. Tryptophan is the starting material in the biosynthesis of reserpine. Callus was induced from leaf explants of Rauvolfia tetraphylla L. on MS medium supplemented with the combination of 9 μM 2,4-D and 25, 50, 75 and 100 mg/l tryptophan.

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, C F; Holst, Jens Juul; Carr, R D

    1999-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease resulting in raised blood sugar which, if not satisfactorily controlled, can cause severe and often debilitating complications. Unfortunately, for many patients, the existing therapies do not give adequate control. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1...

  9. Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy & Oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Bergsma (Hendrik)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractNeuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare neoplasms with differences in clinical presentation, course and prognosis. Most of the NETs express the somatostatine receptor, which can be utilized for imaging and therapy. Radiolabeled somatostatin analogs can be used for peptide receptor

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, C F; Holst, Jens Juul; Carr, R D

    1999-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease resulting in raised blood sugar which, if not satisfactorily controlled, can cause severe and often debilitating complications. Unfortunately, for many patients, the existing therapies do not give adequate control. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1...... advantages offered by GLP-1 and give the hope of providing effective glycemic control without the risk of overt hypoglycemia....

  11. Synthetic peptides for diagnostic use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meloen, R.H.; Langedijk, J.P.M.; Langeveld, J.P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Synthetic peptides representing relevant B-cell epitopes are, potentially, ideal antigens to be used in diagnostic assays because of their superior properties with respect to quality control as compared to those of biologically derived molecules and the much higher specificity that sometimes can be

  12. Next generation natriuretic peptide measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Ingrid; Goetze, Jens P

    2012-01-01

    in the molecular heterogeneity could in itself contain valuable information of clinical status, and the time seems right for industry and dedicated researchers in the field to get together and discuss the next generation natriuretic peptide measurement. In such an environment, new strategies can be developed...

  13. Atrial natriuretic peptides in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens P; Holst Hansen, Lasse; Terzic, Dijana

    2015-01-01

    derivatizations. In this mini-review, we summarize measurement of the principal cardiac hormone, e.g. atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and its precursor fragments. We also highlight some of the analytical pitfalls and problems and the concurrent clinical "proof of concept". We conclude that biochemical research...

  14. Molecular structure and diversity of PBAN/Pyrokinin family peptides in ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Yeon eChoi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides are the largest group of insect hormones. They are produced in the central and peripheral nervous systems and affect insect development, reproduction, feeding and behavior. A variety of neuropeptide families have been identified in insects. One of these families is the PBAN/pyrokinin family defined by a common FXPRLamide or similar amino acid fragment at the C-terminal end. These peptides, found in all insects studied thus far, have been conserved throughout evolution. The most well studied physiological function is regulation of moth sex pheromone biosynthesis through the Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neurohormone (PBAN, although several developmental functions have also been reported. Over the past years we have extended knowledge of the PBAN/pyrokinin family of peptides to ants, focusing mainly on the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. The fire ant is one of the most studied social insects and over the last 60 years a great deal has been learned about many aspects of this ant, including the behaviors and chemistry of pheromone communication. However, virtually nothing is known about the regulation of these pheromone systems. Recently, we demonstrated the presence of PBAN/pyrokinin immunoreactive neurons in the fire ant, and identified and characterized PBAN and additional neuropeptides. We have mapped the fire ant PBAN gene structure and determined the tissue expression level in the central nervous system of the ant. We review here our research to date on the molecular structure and diversity of ant PBAN/pyrokinin peptides in preparation for determining the function of the neuropeptides in ants and other social insects.

  15. YCZ-18 Is a New Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Keimei; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Yamagami, Ayumi; Ogawa, Atushi; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Sawada, Takayuki; Fujioka, Shozo; Yoshizawa, Yuko; Nakano, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Plant hormone brassinosteroids (BRs) are a group of polyhydroxylated steroids that play critical roles in regulating broad aspects of plant growth and development. The structural diversity of BRs is generated by the action of several groups of P450s. Brassinazole is a specific inhibitor of C-22 hydroxylase (CYP90B1) in BR biosynthesis, and the application use of brassinazole has emerged as an effective way of complementing BR-deficient mutants to elucidate the functions of BRs. In this article, we report a new triazole-type BR biosynthesis inhibitor, YCZ-18. Quantitative analysis the endogenous levels of BRs in Arabidopsis indicated that YCZ-18 significantly decreased the BR contents in plant tissues. Assessment of the binding affinity of YCZ-18to purified recombinant CYP90D1 indicated that YCZ-18 induced a typical type II binding spectrum with a Kd value of approximately 0.79 μM. Analysis of the mechanisms underlying the dwarf phenotype associated with YCZ-18 treatment of Arabidopsis indicated that the chemically induced dwarf phenotype was caused by a failure of cell elongation. Moreover, dissecting the effect of YCZ-18 on the induction or down regulation of genes responsive to BRs indicated that YCZ-18 regulated the expression of genes responsible for BRs deficiency in Arabidopsis. These findings indicate that YCZ-18 is a potent BR biosynthesis inhibitor and has a new target site, C23-hydroxylation in BR biosynthesis. Application of YCZ-18 will be a good starting point for further elucidation of the detailed mechanism of BR biosynthesis and its regulation. PMID:25793645

  16. Insect Peptides - Perspectives in Human Diseases Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowanski, Szymon; Adamski, Zbigniew; Lubawy, Jan; Marciniak, Pawel; Pacholska-Bogalska, Joanna; Slocinska, Malgorzata; Spochacz, Marta; Szymczak, Monika; Urbanski, Arkadiusz; Walkowiak-Nowicka, Karolina; Rosinski, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Insects are the largest and the most widely distributed group of animals in the world. Their diversity is a source of incredible variety of different mechanisms of life processes regulation. There are many agents that regulate immunology, reproduction, growth and development or metabolism. Hence, it seems that insects may be a source of numerous substances useful in human diseases treatment. Especially important in the regulation of insect physiology are peptides, like neuropeptides, peptide hormones or antimicrobial peptides. There are two main aspects where they can be helpful, 1) Peptides isolated from insects may become potential drugs in therapy of different diseases, 2) A lot of insect peptide hormones show structural or functional homology to mammalian peptide hormones and the comparative studies may give a new look on human disorders. In our review we focused on three group of insect derived peptides: 1) immune-active peptides, 2) peptide hormones and 3) peptides present in venoms. In our review we try to show the considerable potential of insect peptides in searching for new solutions for mammalian diseases treatment. We summarise the knowledge about properties of insect peptides against different virulent agents, anti-inflammatory or anti-nociceptive properties as well as compare insect and mammalian/vertebrate peptide endocrine system to indicate usefulness of knowledge about insect peptide hormones in drug design. The field of possible using of insect delivered peptide to therapy of various human diseases is still not sufficiently explored. Undoubtedly, more attention should be paid to insects due to searching new drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Biosynthesis of oligosaccharides and fructans in Agave vera cruz : Part III - Biosynthesis of fructans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satyanarayana, M.N.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence has been obtained for the biosynthesis of 'fructans' in Agave vera cruz. A hydrolase-free enzyme preparation from the stem juice with U- 14 C sucrose as substrate and the native fructan as primer leads to incorporation of 14 C fructose into a polymer like compound. This inference is based on criteria such as the chromatographic mobility of the product and the elution volume from a Sephadex G-25 column. Two optimum pHs 4.9 and 6.1 and optimum temperature 377degC are observed for the reaction. The activity is dependent on primer, enzyme, substrate concentration and duration of incubation. The ratio of substrate to primer appears to be a special factor; higher ratios retard synthesis (S:P 5:1, 1.14%, S:P 100:1, 0.36% incorporation), while lower ones enhance (reaching a maximum of 11.35% at an S:P ratio of 1.75 in hr). Inulin in place of the native fructan is less efficient as primer. Each of the higher homologues of sucrose, tri to hexasaccharides (tested so far), leads to fructan formation with elution volumes from a Sephadex G-25 column close to that of the primer. U- 14 C fructose or glucose in place of U- 14 C sucrose or absence of enzyme leads to no incorporation. Sucrose seems to have a key role both in the initiation and lengthening of the fructan chain. (author)

  18. Recent advances in the elucidation of enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Gao-Yi; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2015-01-01

    With the successful production of artemisinic acid in yeast, the promising potential of synthetic biology for natural product biosynthesis is now being realized. The recent total biosynthesis of opioids in microbes is considered to be another landmark in this field. The importance and significance of enzymes in natural product biosynthetic pathways have been re-emphasized by these advancements. Therefore, the characterization and elucidation of enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis are undoubtedly fundamental for the development of new drugs and the heterologous biosynthesis of active natural products. Here, discoveries regarding enzymatic function in natural product biosynthesis over the past year are briefly reviewed.

  19. Preparation of polypeptides comprising multiple TAA peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing; Jia, Zhengcai; Wu, Yuzhang

    2014-01-01

    Polypeptides consisting of multiple tumor-associated antigen epitopes (multiepitope peptides) are commonly used as therapeutic peptide cancer vaccines in experimental studies and clinical trials. These methods include polypeptides composed of multiple major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted cytotoxic T cell (CTL) epitopes and those containing multiple CTL epitopes and one T helper (Th) epitope. This chapter describes a complete set of methods for preparing multiepitope peptides and branched multiple antigen peptides (MAPs), including sequence design, peptide synthesis, purification, preservation, and the preparation of polypeptide solutions.

  20. Regulatory cross-talks and cascades in rice hormone biosynthesis pathways contribute to stress signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Deb

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Crosstalk among different hormone signaling pathways play an important role in modulating plant response to both biotic and abiotic stress. Hormone activity is controlled by its bio-availability, which is again influenced by its biosynthesis. Thus independent hormone biosynthesis pathways must be regulated and co-ordinated to mount an integrated response. One of the possibilities is to use cis-regulatory elements to orchestrate expression of hormone biosynthesis genes. Analysis of CREs, associated with differentially expressed hormone biosynthesis related genes in rice leaf under Magnaporthe oryzae attack and drought stress enabled us to obtain insights about cross-talk among hormone biosynthesis pathways at the transcriptional level. We identified some master transcription regulators that co-ordinate different hormone biosynthesis pathways under stress. We found that Abscisic acid and Brassinosteroid regulate Cytokinin conjugation; conversely Brassinosteroid biosynthesis is affected by both Abscisic acid and Cytokinin. Jasmonic acid and Ethylene biosynthesis may be modulated by Abscisic acid through DREB transcription factors. Jasmonic acid or Salicylic acid biosynthesis pathways are co-regulated but they are unlikely to influence each other’s production directly. Thus multiple hormones may modulate hormone biosynthesis pathways through a complex regulatory network, where biosynthesis of one hormone is affected by several other contributing hormones.

  1. Computer-Aided Design of Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjell, Christopher D.; Hancock, Robert E.W.; Jenssen, Håvard

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of reported cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, demonstrate the urgent need for new therapeutics that are effective against such and other multi-drug resistant bacteria. Antimicrobial peptides have for two decades now been looked upon...... as interesting leads for development of new therapeutics combating these drug resistant microbes. High-throughput screening of peptide libraries have generated large amounts of information on peptide activities. However, scientists still struggle with explaining the specific peptide motifs resulting...... in antimicrobial activity. Consequently, the majority of peptides put into clinical trials have failed at some point, underlining the importance of a thorough peptide optimization. An important tool in peptide design and optimization is quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis, correlating...

  2. Natural and synthetic peptides with antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter; Santinoli, Claudia; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the increase of invasive fungal infections and the emergence of antifungal resistance stressed the need for new antifungal drugs. Peptides have shown to be good candidates for the development of alternative antimicrobial agents through high-throughput screening, and subsequent optimization according to a rational approach. This review presents a brief overview on antifungal natural peptides of different sources (animals, plants, micro-organisms), peptide fragments derived by proteolytic cleavage of precursor physiological proteins (cryptides), synthetic unnatural peptides and peptide derivatives. Antifungal peptides are schematically reported based on their structure, antifungal spectrum and reported effects. Natural or synthetic peptides and their modified derivatives may represent the basis for new compounds active against fungal infections.

  3. Gamma-aminobutyric acid mediates nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco under flooding stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is a four-carbon non-protein amino acid conserved from bacteria to plants and vertebrates. Increasing evidence supports a regulatory role for GABA in plant development and the plant's response to environmental stress. The biosynthesis of nicotine, the main economically important metabolite in tobacco, is tightly regulated. GABA has not hitherto been reported to function in nicotine biosynthesis. Here we report that water flooding treatment (hypoxia markedly induced the accumulation of GABA and stimulated nicotine biosynthesis. Suppressing GABA accumulation by treatment with glutamate decarboxylase inhibitor impaired flooding-induced nicotine biosynthesis, while exogenous GABA application directly induced nicotine biosynthesis. Based on these results, we propose that GABA triggers nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco seedlings subjected to flooding. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanism of nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco plants exposed to environmental stress.

  4. Second extracellular loop of human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) has a critical role in GLP-1 peptide binding and receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, Cassandra; Wootten, Denise; Simms, John; Miller, Laurence J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M

    2012-02-03

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a therapeutically important family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is pleiotropically coupled to multiple signaling effectors and, with actions including regulation of insulin biosynthesis and secretion, is one of the key targets in the management of type II diabetes mellitus. However, there is limited understanding of the role of the receptor core in orthosteric ligand binding and biological activity. To assess involvement of the extracellular loop (ECL) 2 in ligand-receptor interactions and receptor activation, we performed alanine scanning mutagenesis of loop residues and assessed the impact on receptor expression and GLP-1(1-36)-NH(2) or GLP-1(7-36)-NH(2) binding and activation of three physiologically relevant signaling pathways as follows: cAMP formation, intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(i)) mobilization, and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (pERK1/2). Although antagonist peptide binding was unaltered, almost all mutations affected GLP-1 peptide agonist binding and/or coupling efficacy, indicating an important role in receptor activation. However, mutation of several residues displayed distinct pathway responses with respect to wild type receptor, including Arg-299 and Tyr-305, where mutation significantly enhanced both GLP-1(1-36)-NH(2)- and GLP-1(7-36)-NH(2)-mediated signaling bias for pERK1/2. In addition, mutation of Cys-296, Trp-297, Asn-300, Asn-302, and Leu-307 significantly increased GLP-1(7-36)-NH(2)-mediated signaling bias toward pERK1/2. Of all mutants studied, only mutation of Trp-306 to alanine abolished all biological activity. These data suggest a critical role of ECL2 of the GLP-1R in the activation transition(s) of the receptor and the importance of this region in the determination of both GLP-1 peptide- and pathway-specific effects.

  5. Degradation and antioxidant activities of peptides and zinc-peptide complexes during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chan; Li, Bo; Wang, Bo; Xie, Ningning

    2015-04-15

    The degradation characteristics of three peptides (Ser-Met, Asn-Cys-Ser, and glutathione) and their zinc-peptide complexes were studied using a two-stage in vitro digestion model. Enzyme-resistant peptides and zinc-peptide complexes, antioxidant activities, and free amino acids released by digestive enzymes, were measured in this study. The results revealed that the three peptides and their zinc-peptide complexes were resistant to pepsin but not to pancreatin. Pancreatin can partly hydrolyse both peptides and zinc-peptide complexes, but more than half of them remaining in their original form after gastrointestinal digestion. The coordination of zinc improved the enzymatic resistance of the peptide due to lower solubility of complexes and affected the hydrolytic site of pepsin and pancreatin. Zinc-Asn-Cys-Ser, which is highly resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis and maintains Zn in a soluble form, may have potential to improve Zn bioavailability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of peptide uptake and location of root hair-promoting peptide accumulation in plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Yoshiki; Taniguchi, Rikiya; Kubo, Motoki

    2012-03-01

    Peptide uptake by plant roots from degraded soybean-meal products was analyzed in Brassica rapa and Solanum lycopersicum. B. rapa absorbed about 40% of the initial water volume, whereas peptide concentration was decreased by 75% after 24 h. Analysis by reversed-phase HPLC showed that number of peptides was absorbed by the roots during soaking in degraded soybean-meal products for 24 h. Carboxyfluorescein-labeled root hair-promoting peptide was synthesized, and its localization, movement, and accumulation in roots were investigated. The peptide appeared to be absorbed by root hairs and then moved to trichoblasts. Furthermore, the peptide was moved from trichoblasts to atrichoblasts after 24 h. The peptide was accumulated in epidermal cells, suggesting that the peptide may have a function in both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Identification of the Biosynthetic Gene Clusters for the Lipopeptides Fusaristatin A and W493 B in Fusarium graminearum and F. pseudograminearum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Covarelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The closely related species Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium pseudograminearum differ in that each contains a gene cluster with a polyketide synthase (PKS) and a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) that is not present in the other species. To identify their products, we deleted PKS6 and NRPS7...... Fusarium species. On the basis of genes in the putative gene clusters we propose a model for biosynthesis where the polyketide product is shuttled to the NPRS via a CoA ligase and a thioesterase in F. pseudograminearum. In F. graminearum the polyketide is proposed to be directly assimilated by the NRPS....

  8. Harnessing natural product assembly lines: structure, promiscuity, and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Christopher C; Williams, Gavin J

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutically relevant natural products are biosynthesized by the action of giant mega-enzyme assembly lines. By leveraging the specificity, promiscuity, and modularity of assembly lines, a variety of strategies have been developed that enable the biosynthesis of modified natural products. This review briefly summarizes recent structural advances related to natural product assembly lines, discusses chemical approaches to probing assembly line structures in the absence of traditional biophysical data, and surveys efforts that harness the inherent or engineered promiscuity of assembly lines for the synthesis of non-natural polyketides and nonribosomal peptide analogues. PMID:26527577

  9. Harnessing natural product assembly lines: structure, promiscuity, and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Christopher C; Williams, Gavin J

    2016-03-01

    Many therapeutically relevant natural products are biosynthesized by the action of giant mega-enzyme assembly lines. By leveraging the specificity, promiscuity, and modularity of assembly lines, a variety of strategies has been developed that enables the biosynthesis of modified natural products. This review briefly summarizes recent structural advances related to natural product assembly lines, discusses chemical approaches to probing assembly line structures in the absence of traditional biophysical data, and surveys efforts that harness the inherent or engineered promiscuity of assembly lines for the synthesis of non-natural polyketides and non-ribosomal peptide analogues.

  10. Peptide Antibiotics for ESKAPE Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thomas Thyge

    Multi-drug resistance to antibiotics represents a global health challenge that results in increased morbidity and mortality rates. The annual death-toll is >700.000 people world-wide, rising to ~10 million by 2050. New antibiotics are lacking, and few are under development as return on investment...... is considered poor compared to medicines for lifestyle diseases. According to the WHO we could be moving towards a post-antibiotic era in which previously treatable infections become fatal. Of special importance are multidrug resistant bacteria from the ESKAPE group (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus...... and toxicity by utilizing of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a whole animal model. This was carried out by testing of antimicrobial peptides targeting Gram-positive bacteria exemplified by the important human pathogen methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The peptide BP214 was developed from...

  11. Peptide-targeted polymer cancerostatics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Böhmová, Eliška; Pola, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, Suppl. 2 (2016), S153-S164 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : HPMA copolymers * tumor targeting * peptides Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/65%20Suppl%202/65_S153.pdf

  12. In Vivo Roles of Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Enzymes in Biosynthesis of Biotin and α-Lipoic Acid in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masato; Nagashima, Takashi; Nakamura, Eri; Kato, Ryosuke; Ohshita, Masakazu; Hayashi, Mikiro; Takeno, Seiki

    2017-10-01

    For fatty acid biosynthesis, Corynebacterium glutamicum uses two type I fatty acid synthases (FAS-I), FasA and FasB, in addition to acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase (ACC) consisting of AccBC, AccD1, and AccE. The in vivo roles of the enzymes in supplying precursors for biotin and α-lipoic acid remain unclear. Here, we report genetic evidence demonstrating that the biosynthesis of these cofactors is linked to fatty acid biosynthesis through the FAS-I pathway. For this study, we used wild-type C. glutamicum and its derived biotin vitamer producer BFI-5, which was engineered to express Escherichia coli bioBF and Bacillus subtilis bioI Disruption of either fasA or fasB in strain BFI-5 led to decreased production of biotin vitamers, whereas its amplification contributed to increased production, with a larger impact of fasA in both cases. Double disruptions of fasA and fasB resulted in no biotin vitamer production. The acc genes showed a positive effect on production when amplified simultaneously. Augmented fatty acid biosynthesis was also reflected in pimelic acid production when carbon flow was blocked at the BioF reaction. These results indicate that carbon flow down the FAS-I pathway is destined for channeling into the biotin biosynthesis pathway, and that FasA in particular has a significant impact on precursor supply. In contrast, fasB disruption resulted in auxotrophy for lipoic acid or its precursor octanoic acid in both wild-type and BFI-5 strains. The phenotypes were fully complemented by plasmid-mediated expression of fasB but not fasA These results reveal that FasB plays a specific physiological role in lipoic acid biosynthesis in C. glutamicum IMPORTANCE For the de novo biosynthesis of fatty acids, C. glutamicum exceptionally uses a eukaryotic multifunctional type I fatty acid synthase (FAS-I) system comprising FasA and FasB, in contrast to most bacteria, such as E. coli and B. subtilis , which use an individual nonaggregating type II fatty acid synthase

  13. Biopharmaceuticals: From peptide to drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannappel, Margarete

    2017-08-01

    Biologics are therapeutic proteins or peptides that are produced by means of biological processes within living organisms and cells. They are highly specific molecules and play a crucial role as therapeutics for the treatment of severe and chronic diseases (e.g. cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, autoimmune disorders). The development of new biologics and biologics-based drugs gains more and more importance in the fight against various diseases. A short overview on biotherapeutical drug development is given. Cone snails are a large group of poisonous, predatory sea snails with more than 700 species. They use a very powerful venom which rapidly inactivates and paralyzes their prey. Most bioactive venom components are small peptides (conotoxins, conopeptides) which are precisely directed towards a specific target (e.g. ion channel, receptors). Due to their small size, their precision and speed of action, naturally occurring cone snail venom peptides represent an attractive source for the identification and design of novel biological drug entities. The Jagna cone snail project is an encouraging initiative to map the ecological variety of cone snails around the island of Bohol (Philippines) and to conserve the biological information for potential future application.

  14. Coffee, hunger, and peptide YY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, James A; Geliebter, Allan

    2012-06-01

    There is evidence from several empirical studies suggesting that coffee may help people control body weight. Our objective was to assess the effects of caffeine, caffeinated coffee, and decaffeinated coffee, both alone and in combination with 75 g of glucose, on perceived hunger and satiety and related peptides. We conducted a placebo-controlled single-blinded randomized 4-way crossover trial. Eleven healthy male volunteers (mean age, 23.5 ± 5.7 years; mean BMI, 23.6 ± 4.2 kg/m(2)) ingested 1 of 3 test beverages (caffeine in water, caffeinated coffee, or decaffeinated coffee) or placebo (water), and 60 minutes later they ingested the glucose. Eight times during each laboratory visit, hunger and satiety were assessed by visual analog scales, and blood samples were drawn to measure 3 endogenous peptides associated with hunger and satiety: ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and leptin. Compared to placebo, decaffeinated coffee yielded significantly lower hunger during the whole 180-minute study period and higher plasma PYY for the first 90 minutes (p hunger or PYY. Caffeinated coffee showed a pattern between that of decaffeinated coffee and caffeine in water. These findings suggest that one or more noncaffeine ingredients in coffee may have the potential to decrease body weight. Glucose ingestion did not change the effects of the beverages. Our randomized human trial showed that decaffeinated coffee can acutely decrease hunger and increase the satiety hormone PYY.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides: Versatile Biological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuirulan Pushpanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are diverse group of biologically active molecules with multidimensional properties. In recent past, a wide variety of AMPs with diverse structures have been reported from different sources such as plants, animals, mammals, and microorganisms. The presence of unusual amino acids and structural motifs in AMPs confers unique structural properties to the peptide that attribute for their specific mode of action. The ability of these active AMPs to act as multifunctional effector molecules such as signalling molecule, immune modulators, mitogen, antitumor, and contraceptive agent makes it an interesting candidate to study every aspect of their structural and biological properties for prophylactic and therapeutic applications. In addition, easy cloning and recombinant expression of AMPs in heterologous plant host systems provided a pipeline for production of disease resistant transgenic plants. Besides these properties, AMPs were also used as drug delivery vectors to deliver cell impermeable drugs to cell interior. The present review focuses on the diversity and broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of AMPs along with its multidimensional properties that could be exploited for the application of these bioactive peptides as a potential and promising drug candidate in pharmaceutical industries.

  16. Chemical methods for peptide and protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrudu, Saranya; Simerska, Pavla; Toth, Istvan

    2013-04-12

    Since the invention of solid phase synthetic methods by Merrifield in 1963, the number of research groups focusing on peptide synthesis has grown exponentially. However, the original step-by-step synthesis had limitations: the purity of the final product decreased with the number of coupling steps. After the development of Boc and Fmoc protecting groups, novel amino acid protecting groups and new techniques were introduced to provide high quality and quantity peptide products. Fragment condensation was a popular method for peptide production in the 1980s, but unfortunately the rate of racemization and reaction difficulties proved less than ideal. Kent and co-workers revolutionized peptide coupling by introducing the chemoselective reaction of unprotected peptides, called native chemical ligation. Subsequently, research has focused on the development of novel ligating techniques including the famous click reaction, ligation of peptide hydrazides, and the recently reported α-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligations with 5-oxaproline. Several companies have been formed all over the world to prepare high quality Good Manufacturing Practice peptide products on a multi-kilogram scale. This review describes the advances in peptide chemistry including the variety of synthetic peptide methods currently available and the broad application of peptides in medicinal chemistry.

  17. Prediction of twin-arginine signal peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widdick David

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins carrying twin-arginine (Tat signal peptides are exported into the periplasmic compartment or extracellular environment independently of the classical Sec-dependent translocation pathway. To complement other methods for classical signal peptide prediction we here present a publicly available method, TatP, for prediction of bacterial Tat signal peptides. Results We have retrieved sequence data for Tat substrates in order to train a computational method for discrimination of Sec and Tat signal peptides. The TatP method is able to positively classify 91% of 35 known Tat signal peptides and 84% of the annotated cleavage sites of these Tat signal peptides were correctly predicted. This method generates far less false positive predictions on various datasets than using simple pattern matching. Moreover, on the same datasets TatP generates less false positive predictions than a complementary rule based prediction method. Conclusion The method developed here is able to discriminate Tat signal peptides from cytoplasmic proteins carrying a similar motif, as well as from Sec signal peptides, with high accuracy. The method allows filtering of input sequences based on Perl syntax regular expressions, whereas hydrophobicity discrimination of Tat- and Sec-signal peptides is carried out by an artificial neural network. A potential cleavage site of the predicted Tat signal peptide is also reported. The TatP prediction server is available as a public web server at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/TatP/.

  18. Chemical Methods for Peptide and Protein Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Toth

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the invention of solid phase synthetic methods by Merrifield in 1963, the number of research groups focusing on peptide synthesis has grown exponentially. However, the original step-by-step synthesis had limitations: the purity of the final product decreased with the number of coupling steps. After the development of Boc and Fmoc protecting groups, novel amino acid protecting groups and new techniques were introduced to provide high quality and quantity peptide products. Fragment condensation was a popular method for peptide production in the 1980s, but unfortunately the rate of racemization and reaction difficulties proved less than ideal. Kent and co-workers revolutionized peptide coupling by introducing the chemoselective reaction of unprotected peptides, called native chemical ligation. Subsequently, research has focused on the development of novel ligating techniques including the famous click reaction, ligation of peptide hydrazides, and the recently reported a-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligations with 5-oxaproline. Several companies have been formed all over the world to prepare high quality Good Manufacturing Practice peptide products on a multi-kilogram scale. This review describes the advances in peptide chemistry including the variety of synthetic peptide methods currently available and the broad application of peptides in medicinal chemistry.

  19. Natriuretic Peptides: Biochemistry, Physiology, Clinical Implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kozlova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past years, the interest of theorists and clinicians has steadily increased in the myocardially secreted hormones – natriuretic peptides. At the Congress of the European Society of Anesthesiology (Munich, 2007, B-type natriuretic peptides were included into the list of the parameters of perioperative laboratory monitoring that is expedient in the practice of anesthetists and resuscitation specialists. The literature review shows the history of discovery and identification of different types of natriuretic peptides and considers the matters of their biochemistry. It also details information on the synthesis, secretion, and clearance of these peptides, as well as their receptor apparatus in various organs and tissues. The physiology of the regulatory system is described, as applied to the cardiovascular, excretory, central nervous systems, and the neuroendocrine one. Special attention is given to the current publications on the control of B-type natriuretic peptides as biomarkers of cardiac dysfunction. The diagnostic and prognostic values of peptides are analyzed in chronic circulatory insufficiency, coronary heart disease, and other car-diological and non-cardiological diseases. The prognostic value of elevated B-type natriuretic peptide levels in cardiac surgery is separately considered. It is concluded that the changes in the level of B-type natriuretic peptides in different clinical situations are the subject of numerous researches mainly made in foreign countries. The bulk of these researches are devoted to the study of peptides in cardiology and other areas of therapy. Studies on the use of peptides in reanimatology are relatively few and their results are rather discordant. The foregoing opens up wide prospects for studying the use of B-type natriuretic peptides in Russian intensive care and anesthesiology. Key words: natriuretic peptides, brain nautriuretic peptides, NT-proBNP.

  20. Biosynthesis of glycosylated derivatives of tylosin in Streptomyces venezuelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ah Reum; Park, Sung Ryeol; Park, Je Won; Lee, Eun Yeol; Kim, Dong-Myung; Kim, Byung-Gee; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2011-06-01

    Streptomyces venezuelae YJ028, bearing a deletion of the entire biosynthetic gene cluster encoding the pikromycin polyketide synthases and desosamine biosynthetic enzymes, was used as a bioconversion system for combinatorial biosynthesis of glycosylated derivatives of tylosin. Two engineered deoxysugar biosynthetic pathways for the biosynthesis of TDP-3-O-demethyl-D-chalcose or TDP-Lrhamnose in conjunction with the glycosyltransferaseauxiliary protein pair DesVII/DesVIII were expressed in a S. venezuelae YJ028 mutant strain. Supplementation of each mutant strain capable of producing TDP-3-O-demethyl- D-chalcose or TDP-L-rhamnose with tylosin aglycone tylactone resulted in the production of the 3-O-demethyl- D-chalcose, D-quinovose, or L-rhamnose-glycosylated tylactone.

  1. Biosynthesis of Anthocyanins and Their Regulation in Colored Grapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Liang Yan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins, synthesized via the flavonoid pathway, are a class of crucial phenolic compounds which are fundamentally responsible for the red color of grapes and wines. As the most important natural colorants in grapes and their products, anthocyanins are also widely studied for their numerous beneficial effects on human health. In recent years, the biosynthetic pathway of anthocyanins in grapes has been thoroughly investigated. Their intracellular transportation and accumulation have also been further clarified. Additionally, the genetic mechanism regulating their biosynthesis and the phytohormone influences on them are better understood. Furthermore, due to their importance in the quality of wine grapes, the effects of the environmental factors and viticulture practices on anthocyanin accumulation are being investigated increasingly. The present paper summarizes both the basic information and the most recent advances in the study of the anthocyanin biosynthesis in red grapes, emphasizing their gene structure, the transcriptional factors and the diverse exterior regulation factors.

  2. Cholesterol biosynthesis in polychlorinated biphenyl-treated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kling, D.; Gamble, W.

    1982-01-01

    After administration of polychlorinated biphenly (PCB) at 0.055 (w/w) of the diet to Wistar rats for 30 days, followed by intraperitioneal injection of tritiated water, [ 14 C]mevalonate, and [ 14 C]acetate, there was a decrease in cholesterol biosynthesis in rat liver. No significant change in cholesterol formation was observed when PCB was administered at 0.01% (w/w) of the diet. In vitro inhibition of cholesterol synthesis by rat liver microsomes was observed with PCB. Squalene 2,3-oxidocyclase activity of rat liver microsomes was not significantly altered. Desmosterol delta 24 reductase activity was inhibited only at relatively high concentrations of PCB. There was increased incorporation of radioactivity into squalene and lanosterol, in vitro, in the presence of PCB. The primary inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis appears to be at the demethylation and rearrangement reactions between lanosterol and cholesterol in the biosynthetic pathway

  3. Biosynthesis of collagen by fibroblasts kept in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado-Santelli, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    The sinthesis of collagen is studied in fibroblasts of different origins with the purpose of obtaining an appropriate system for the study of its biosynthesis and processing. The percentage of collagen synthesis vary according to the fibroblast origin. Experiences are performed with fibroblasts kept in culture from: chicken - and guinea pig embryos, carragheenin - induced granulomas in adult guinea pig and from human skin. The collagen pattern synthesized after acetic acid - or saline extractions in the presence of inhibitors is also determined. This pattern is then assayed by poliacrilamide - 5% - SDS gel electrophoresis accompanied by fluorography. The importance of the cell culture system in the elucidation of collagen biosynthesis is pointed out. (M.A.) [pt

  4. Enzymatic Reductive Dehalogenation Controls the Biosynthesis of Marine Bacterial Pyrroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gamal, Abrahim; Agarwal, Vinayak; Rahman, Imran; Moore, Bradley S

    2016-10-12

    Enzymes capable of performing dehalogenating reactions have attracted tremendous contemporary attention due to their potential application in the bioremediation of anthropogenic polyhalogenated persistent organic pollutants. Nature, in particular the marine environment, is also a prolific source of polyhalogenated organic natural products. The study of the biosynthesis of these natural products has furnished a diverse array of halogenation biocatalysts, but thus far no examples of dehalogenating enzymes have been reported from a secondary metabolic pathway. Here we show that the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of the highly brominated marine bacterial product pentabromopseudilin is catalyzed by an unusual debrominase Bmp8 that utilizes a redox thiol mechanism to remove the C-2 bromine atom of 2,3,4,5-tetrabromopyrrole to facilitate oxidative coupling to 2,4-dibromophenol. To the best of our knowledge, Bmp8 is first example of a dehalogenating enzyme from the established genetic and biochemical context of a natural product biosynthetic pathway.

  5. Biosynthesis and chemical synthesis of presilphiperfolanol natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Allen Y; Stoltz, Brian M

    2014-05-19

    Presilphiperfolanols constitute a family of biosynthetically important sesquiterpenes which can rearrange to diverse sesquiterpenoid skeletons. While the origin of these natural products can be traced to simple linear terpene precursors, the details of the enzymatic cyclization mechanism that forms the stereochemically dense tricyclic skeleton has required extensive biochemical, computational, and synthetic investigation. Parallel efforts to prepare the unique and intriguing structures of these compounds by total synthesis have also inspired novel strategies, thus resulting in four synthetic approaches and two completed syntheses. While the biosynthesis and chemical synthesis studies performed to date have provided much insight into the role and properties of these molecules, emerging questions regarding the biosynthesis of newer members of the family and subtle details of rearrangement mechanisms have yet to be explored. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Engineering fatty acid biosynthesis in microalgae for sustainable biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatti, Jillian L; Michaud, Jennifer; Burkart, Michael D

    2013-06-01

    Microalgae are a promising feedstock for biodiesel and other liquid fuels due to their fast growth rate, high lipid yields, and ability to grow in a broad range of environments. However, many microalgae achieve maximal lipid yields only under stress conditions hindering growth and providing compositions not ideal for biofuel applications. Metabolic engineering of algal fatty acid biosynthesis promises to create strains capable of economically producing fungible and sustainable biofuels. The algal fatty acid biosynthetic pathway has been deduced by homology to bacterial and plant systems, and much of our understanding is gleaned from basic studies in these systems. However, successful engineering of lipid metabolism in algae will necessitate a thorough characterization of the algal fatty acid synthase (FAS) including protein-protein interactions and regulation. This review describes recent efforts to engineer fatty acid biosynthesis toward optimizing microalgae as a biodiesel feedstock. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biosynthesis of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles and Their Antibacterial Property

    OpenAIRE

    Prachi Singh

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a low-cost, eco-friendly and reproducible microbe mediated biosynthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles. TiO2 nanoparticles synthesized using the bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, from titanium as a precursor, were confirmed by TEM analysis. The morphological characteristics state spherical shape, with the size of individual or aggregate nanoparticles, around 30-40 nm. Microbial resistance represents a challenge for the scientific community to develop new bioactive compounds. Here, the ...

  8. Oxylipin Pathway in the Biosynthesis of Fresh Tomato Volatiles

    OpenAIRE

    YILMAZ, Emin

    2001-01-01

    Fresh tomato volatiles are formed in intact fruit during ripening and upon tissue disruption. There are different pathways involved in the biosynthesis of these volatiles. The oxylipin pathway uses free unsaturated fatty acids with the sequential action of lipoxygenase, hydroperoxide lyase and alcohol dehydrogenase to produce volatile aldehyde and alcohol compounds. Oxylipin volatiles are the most important components in fresh tomato aroma. In order to genetically improve the quality of tomat...

  9. Biosynthesis and Application of Silver and Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Sadowski, Zygmunt

    2010-01-01

    A green chemistry synthetic route has been used for both silver and gold nanoparticles synthesis. The reaction occurred at ambient temperature. Among the nanoparticles biological organism, some microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, and yeast have been exploited for nanoparticles synthesis. Several plant biomass or plant extracts have been successfully used for extracellular biosynthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles. Analytical techniques, such as ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis...

  10. Biosynthesis of sterols and ecdysteroids in Ajuga hairy roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Y; Ohyama, K; Nomura, K; Hyodo, R; Takahashi, K; Yamada, J; Morisaki, M

    2000-03-01

    Hairy roots of Ajuga reptans var. atropurpurea produce clerosterol, 22-dehydroclerosterol, and cholesterol as sterol constituents, and 20-hydroxyecdysone, cyasterone, isocyasterone, and 29-norcyasterone as ecdysteroid constituents. To better understand the biosynthesis of these steroidal compounds, we carried out feeding studies of variously 2H- and 13C-labeled sterol substrates with Ajuga hairy roots. In this article, we review our studies in this field. Feeding of labeled desmosterols, 24-methylenecholesterol, and 13C2-acetate established the mechanism of the biosynthesis of the two C29-sterols and a newly accumulated codisterol, including the metabolic correlation of C-26 and C-27 methyl groups. In Ajuga hairy roots, 3alpha-, 4alpha-, and 4beta-hydrogens of cholesterol were all retained at their original positions after conversion into 20-hydroxyecdysone, in contrast to the observations in a fern and an insect. Furthermore, the origin of 5beta-H of 20-hydroxyecdysone was found to be C-6 hydrogen of cholesterol exclusively, which is inconsistent with the results in the fern and the insect. These data strongly support the intermediacy of 7-dehydrocholesterol 5alpha,6alpha-epoxide. Moreover, 7-dehydrocholesterol, 3beta-hydroxy-5beta-cholest-7-en-6-one (5beta-ketol), and 3beta,14alpha-dihydroxy-5beta-cholest-7-en-6-one (5beta-ketodiol) were converted into 20-hydroxyecdysone. Thus, the pathway cholesterol-->7-dehydrocholesterol-->7-dehydrocholesterol 5alpha,6alpha-epoxide-->5beta-ketol-->5beta-k etodiol is proposed for the early stages of 20-hydroxyecdysone biosynthesis. 3beta-Hydroxy-5beta-cholestan-6-one was also incorporated into 20-hydroxyecdysone, suggesting that the introduction of a 7-ene function is not necessarily next to cholesterol. C-25 Hydroxylation during 20-hydroxyecdysone biosynthesis was found to proceed with ca. 70% retention and 30% inversion. Finally, clerosterol was shown to be a precursor of cyasterone and isocyasterone.

  11. Biosynthesis and engineering of kaempferol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Lijin; Ding, Wentao; Liu, Xiaonan; Cheng, Xiaozhi; Cai, Jing; Hua, Erbing; Jiang, Huifeng

    2017-01-01

    Background Kaempferol is a flavonol with broad bioactivity of anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-microbial, cardio-protective and anti-asthma. Microbial synthesis of kaempferol is a promising strategy because of the low content in primary plant source. Methods In this study, the biosynthesis pathway of kaempferol was constructed in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce kaempferol de novo, and several biological measures were taken for high production. Results First...

  12. Sex differences in prostaglandin biosynthesis in neutrophils during acute inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, Simona; Rossi, Antonietta; Krauth, Verena; Dehm, Friederike; Troisi, Fabiana; Bilancia, Rossella; Weinigel, Christina; Rummler, Silke; Werz, Oliver; Sautebin, Lidia

    2017-01-01

    The severity and course of inflammatory processes differ between women and men, but the biochemical mechanisms underlying these sex differences are elusive. Prostaglandins (PG) and leukotrienes (LT) are lipid mediators linked to inflammation. We demonstrated superior LT biosynthesis in human neutrophils and monocytes, and in mouse macrophages from females, and we confirmed these sex differences in vivo where female mice produced more LTs during zymosan-induced peritonitis versus males. Here, ...

  13. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    OpenAIRE

    Bruijn, de, I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence and attachment/detachment to and from surfaces. In this Ph.D. thesis project, two new CLP biosynthesis clusters were identified in Pseudomonas fluorescens and fully sequenced. In P. fluorescens strain SBW2...

  14. Engineered polyketide biosynthesis and biocatalysis in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xue; Wang, Peng; Tang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Polyketides are important bioactive natural products biosynthesized by bacteria, fungi, and plants. The enzymes that synthesize polyketides are collectively referred to as polyketide synthases (PKSs). Because many of the natural hosts that produce polyketides are difficult to culture or manipulate, establishing a universal heterologous host that is genetically tractable has become an important goal toward the engineered biosynthesis of polyketides and analogues. Here, we summarize the recent ...

  15. Engineered biosynthesis of bacterial aromatic polyketides in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Li, Yanran; Tang, Yi

    2008-12-30

    Bacterial aromatic polyketides are important therapeutic compounds including front line antibiotics and anticancer drugs. It is one of the last remaining major classes of natural products of which the biosynthesis has not been reconstituted in the genetically superior host Escherichia coli. Here, we demonstrate the engineered biosynthesis of bacterial aromatic polyketides in E. coli by using a dissected and reassembled fungal polyketide synthase (PKS). The minimal PKS of the megasynthase PKS4 from Gibberella fujikuroi was extracted by using two approaches. The first approach yielded a stand-alone Ketosynthase (KS)_malonyl-CoA:ACP transferase (MAT) didomain and an acyl-carrier protein (ACP) domain, whereas the second approach yielded a compact PKS (PKS_WJ) that consists of KS, MAT, and ACP on a single polypeptide. Both minimal PKSs produced nonfungal polyketides cyclized via different regioselectivity, whereas the fungal-specific C2-C7 cyclization mode was not observed. The kinetic properties of the two minimal PKSs were characterized to confirm both PKSs can synthesize polyketides with similar efficiency as the parent PKS4 megasynthase. Both minimal PKSs interacted effectively with exogenous polyketide cyclases as demonstrated by the synthesis of predominantly PK8 3 or NonaSEK4 6 in the presence of a C9-C14 or a C7-C12 cyclase, respectively. When PKS_WJ and downstream tailoring enzymes were expressed in E. coli, the expected nonaketide anthraquinone SEK26 was recovered in good titer. High-cell density fermentation was performed to demonstrate the scale-up potential of the in vivo platform for the biosynthesis of bacterial polyketides. Using engineered fungal PKSs can therefore be a general approach toward the heterologous biosynthesis of bacterial aromatic polyketides in E. coli.

  16. A new strategy for aromatic ring alkylation in cylindrocyclophane biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hitomi; Schultz, Erica E; Balskus, Emily P

    2017-08-01

    Alkylation of aromatic rings with alkyl halides is an important transformation in organic synthesis, yet an enzymatic equivalent is unknown. Here, we report that cylindrocyclophane biosynthesis in Cylindrospermum licheniforme ATCC 29412 involves chlorination of an unactivated carbon center by a novel halogenase, followed by a previously uncharacterized enzymatic dimerization reaction featuring sequential, stereospecific alkylations of resorcinol aromatic rings. Discovery of the enzymatic machinery underlying this unique biosynthetic carbon-carbon bond formation has implications for biocatalysis and metabolic engineering.

  17. ENDOCANNABINOIDS AND EICOSAMOIDS: BIOSYNTHESIS AND INTERACTIONS WITH IMMUNE RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. K. Karaman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is dedicated to modern concepts of arachidonic acid metabolites, i.e., endocannabinoids and eicosanoids, their biosynthetic pathways, cross-talk mechanisms and participation in immune response. New information from literature and own results include data concerning overlapping enzymatic pathways controlling biosynthesis of endocannabinoids and eicosanoids. Impact of synthetic cannabinoid receptor ligands upon production rates of proinflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids is discussed, as like as relationships among immune system reactivity and expression levels of cannabinoid receptors.

  18. A Comparison between Chemical Synthesis Magnetite Nanoparticles and Biosynthesis Magnetite

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Abolghasem Kahani; Zahra Yagini

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of Fe3O4 from ferrous salt by air in alkaline aqueous solution at various temperatures was proposed. The synthetic magnetites have different particle size distributions. We studied the properties of the magnetite prepared by chemical methods compared with magnetotactic bacterial nanoparticles. The results show that crystallite size, morphology, and particle size distribution of chemically prepared magnetite at 293 K are similar to biosynthesis of magnetite. The new preparation...

  19. Protein biosynthesis in isolated human scalp hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermorken, A J; Weterings, P J; Bloemendal, H

    1979-02-15

    The present study demonstrates that protein biosynthesis can be studied in single isolated human scalp hair follicles. The matrix and the sheath are the main regions where amino acids are built in. Incorporation is linear for at least five hours. The newly synthesized proteins can be separated into a water-soluble, a urea-soluble and a urea-insoluble fraction. Product analysis has been performed on the first two fractions, revealing different protein patterns.

  20. Biosynthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles by Aspergillus Species

    OpenAIRE

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Pourshahid, Seyedmohammad; Sadatsharifi, Arman; Mehryar, Pouyan; Pakshir, Keyvan; Rahimi, Mohammad Javad; Arabi Monfared, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Currently, researchers turn to natural processes such as using biological microorganisms in order to develop reliable and ecofriendly methods for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. In this study, we have investigated extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using four Aspergillus species including A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, A. niger, and A. flavus. We have also analyzed nitrate reductase activity in the studied species in order to determine the probable role of this enzyme in ...

  1. Microbial Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles in Different Culture Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ke; Jung, Samuel; Park, Kyu-Hwan; Kim, Young-Rok

    2018-01-31

    Microbial biosynthesis of metal nanoparticles has been extensively studied for the applications in biomedical sciences and engineering. However, the mechanism for their synthesis through microorganism is not completely understood. In this study, several culture media were investigated for their roles in the microbial biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The size and morphology of the synthesized AgNPs were analyzed by UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier-transform-infrared (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The results demonstrated that nutrient broth (NB) and Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) among tested media effectively reduced silver ions to form AgNPs with different particle size and shape. Although the involved microorganism enhanced the reduction of silver ions, the size and shape of the particles were shown to mainly depend on the culture media. Our findings suggest that the growth media of bacterial culture play an important role in the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles with regard to their size and shape. We believe our findings would provide useful information for further exploration of microbial biosynthesis of AgNPs and their biomedical applications.

  2. Genome of wild olive and the evolution of oil biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unver, Turgay; Wu, Zhangyan; Sterck, Lieven; Turktas, Mine; Lohaus, Rolf; Li, Zhen; Yang, Ming; He, Lijuan; Deng, Tianquan; Escalante, Francisco Javier; Llorens, Carlos; Roig, Francisco J; Parmaksiz, Iskender; Dundar, Ekrem; Xie, Fuliang; Zhang, Baohong; Ipek, Arif; Uranbey, Serkan; Erayman, Mustafa; Ilhan, Emre; Badad, Oussama; Ghazal, Hassan; Lightfoot, David A; Kasarla, Pavan; Colantonio, Vincent; Tombuloglu, Huseyin; Hernandez, Pilar; Mete, Nurengin; Cetin, Oznur; Van Montagu, Marc; Yang, Huanming; Gao, Qiang; Dorado, Gabriel; Van de Peer, Yves

    2017-10-31

    Here we present the genome sequence and annotation of the wild olive tree ( Olea europaea var. sylvestris ), called oleaster, which is considered an ancestor of cultivated olive trees. More than 50,000 protein-coding genes were predicted, a majority of which could be anchored to 23 pseudochromosomes obtained through a newly constructed genetic map. The oleaster genome contains signatures of two Oleaceae lineage-specific paleopolyploidy events, dated at ∼28 and ∼59 Mya. These events contributed to the expansion and neofunctionalization of genes and gene families that play important roles in oil biosynthesis. The functional divergence of oil biosynthesis pathway genes, such as FAD2 , SACPD, EAR , and ACPTE , following duplication, has been responsible for the differential accumulation of oleic and linoleic acids produced in olive compared with sesame, a closely related oil crop. Duplicated oleaster FAD2 genes are regulated by an siRNA derived from a transposable element-rich region, leading to suppressed levels of FAD2 gene expression. Additionally, neofunctionalization of members of the SACPD gene family has led to increased expression of SACPD2 , 3 , 5 , and 7 , consequently resulting in an increased desaturation of steric acid. Taken together, decreased FAD2 expression and increased SACPD expression likely explain the accumulation of exceptionally high levels of oleic acid in olive. The oleaster genome thus provides important insights into the evolution of oil biosynthesis and will be a valuable resource for oil crop genomics.

  3. Dual diaminopimelate biosynthesis pathways in Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium thermocellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, André O; Klartag, Ayelet; Gilvarg, Charles; Dobson, Renwick C J; Marques, Felipe Garbelini; Leustek, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium thermocellum were recently found to synthesize diaminopimelate (DAP) by way of LL-DAP aminotransferase. Both species also contain an ortholog of meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase (Ddh), suggesting that they may have redundant pathways for DAP biosynthesis. The B. fragilis Ddh ortholog shows low homology with other examples of Ddh and this species belongs to a phylum, the Bacteriodetes, not previously known to contain this enzyme. By contrast, the C. thermocellum ortholog is well conserved with known examples of Ddh. Using in vitro and in vivo assays both the B. fragilis and C. thermocellum enzymes were found to be authentic examples of Ddh, displaying kinetic properties typical of this enzyme. The result indicates that B. fragilis contains a sequence diverged form of Ddh. Phylogenomic analysis of the microbial genome database revealed that 77% of species with a Ddh ortholog also contain a second pathway for DAP biosynthesis suggesting that Ddh evolved as an ancillary mechanism for DAP biosynthesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Stereochemistry of Complex Polyketide Biosynthesis by Modular Polyketide Synthases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Kwan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyketides are a diverse class of medically important natural products whose biosynthesis is catalysed by polyketide synthases (PKSs, in a fashion highly analogous to fatty acid biosynthesis. In modular PKSs, the polyketide chain is assembled by the successive condensation of activated carboxylic acid-derived units, where chain extension occurs with the intermediates remaining covalently bound to the enzyme, with the growing polyketide tethered to an acyl carrier domain (ACP. Carboxylated acyl-CoA precursors serve as activated donors that are selected by the acyltransferase domain (AT providing extender units that are added to the growing chain by condensation catalysed by the ketosynthase domain (KS. The action of ketoreductase (KR, dehydratase (DH, and enoylreductase (ER activities can result in unreduced, partially reduced, or fully reduced centres within the polyketide chain depending on which of these enzymes are present and active. The PKS-catalysed assembly process generates stereochemical diversity, because carbon–carbon double bonds may have either cis- or trans- geometry, and because of the chirality of centres bearing hydroxyl groups (where they are retained and branching methyl groups (the latter arising from use of propionate extender units. This review shall cover the studies that have determined the stereochemistry in many of the reactions involved in polyketide biosynthesis by modular PKSs.

  5. Purine Biosynthesis Metabolically Constrains Intracellular Survival of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Carrie L; Zhang, Ellisa W; Dudley, Anne G; Dixon, Beverly R E A; Guckes, Kirsten R; Breland, Erin J; Floyd, Kyle A; Casella, Daniel P; Algood, Holly M Scott; Clayton, Douglass B; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The ability to de novo synthesize purines has been associated with the intracellular survival of multiple bacterial pathogens. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections, undergoes a transient intracellular lifestyle during which bacteria clonally expand into multicellular bacterial communities within the cytoplasm of bladder epithelial cells. Here, we characterized the contribution of the conserved de novo purine biosynthesis-associated locus cvpA-purF to UPEC pathogenesis. Deletion of cvpA-purF, or of purF alone, abolished de novo purine biosynthesis but did not impact bacterial adherence properties in vitro or in the bladder lumen. However, upon internalization by bladder epithelial cells, UPEC deficient in de novo purine biosynthesis was unable to expand into intracytoplasmic bacterial communities over time, unless it was extrachromosomally complemented. These findings indicate that UPEC is deprived of purine nucleotides within the intracellular niche and relies on de novo purine synthesis to meet this metabolic requirement. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Peroxisomes contribute to biosynthesis of extracellular glycolipids in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Johannes; Ast, Julia; Linne, Uwe; Stehlik, Thorsten; Martorana, Domenica; Bölker, Michael; Sandrock, Björn

    2014-07-01

    Many microorganisms secrete surface-active glycolipids. The basidiomycetous fungus Ustilago maydis produces two different classes of glycolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL) and ustilagic acids (UAs). Here we report that biosynthesis of MELs is partially localized in peroxisomes and coupled to peroxisomal fatty acid degradation. The acyltransferases, Mac1 and Mac2, which acylate mannosylerythritol with fatty acids of different length, contain a type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1). We demonstrate that Mac1 and Mac2 are targeted to peroxisomes, while other enzymes involved in MEL production reside in different compartments. Mis-targeting of Mac1 and Mac2 to the cytosol did not block MEL synthesis but promoted production of MEL species with altered acylation pattern. This is in contrast to peroxisome deficient mutants that produced MELs similar to the wild type. We could show that cytosolic targeting of Mac1 and Mac2 reduces the amount of UA presumably due to competition for overlapping substrates. Interestingly, hydroxylated fatty acids characteristic for UAs appear in MELs corroborating cross-talk between both biosynthesis pathways. Therefore, peroxisomal localization of MEL biosynthesis is not only prerequisite for generation of the natural spectrum of MELs, but also facilitates simultaneous assembly of different glycolipids in a single cell. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Essential oil biosynthesis and regulation in the genus Cymbopogon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjewala, Deepak; Luthra, Rajesh

    2010-01-01

    Essential oils distilled from Cymbopogon species are of immense commercial value as flavors and fragrances in the perfumery, cosmetics, soaps, and detergents and in pharmaceutical industries. Two major constituents of the essential oil, geraniol and citral, due to their specific rose and lemon like aromas are widely used as flavors, fragrances and cosmetics. Citral is also used for the synthesis of vitamin A and ionones (for example, beta-ionone, methyl ionone). Moreover, Cymbopogon essential oils and constituents possess many useful biological activities including cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant. Despite the immense commercial and biological significance of the Cymbopogon essential oils, little is known about their biosynthesis and regulatory mechanisms. So far it is known that essential oils are biosynthesized via the classical acetate-MVA route and existence of a newly discovered MEP pathway in Cymbopogon remains as a topic for investigation. The aim of the present review is to discuss the biosynthesis and regulation of essential oils in the genus Cymbopogon with given emphasis to two elite members, lemongrass (C. flexuosus Nees ex Steud) and palmarosa (C. martinii Roxb.). This article highlights the work done so far towards understanding of essential oil biosynthesis and regulation in the genus Cymbopogon. Also, based on our experiences with Cymbopogon species, we would like to propose C. flexuosus as a model system for the study of essential oil metabolism beyond the much studied plant family Lamiaceae.

  8. Evaluation of Biosynthetic Pathway and Engineered Biosynthesis of Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kishimoto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Varieties of alkaloids are known to be produced by various organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants, as secondary metabolites that exhibit useful bioactivities. However, understanding of how those metabolites are biosynthesized still remains limited, because most of these compounds are isolated from plants and at a trace level of production. In this review, we focus on recent efforts in identifying the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of those nitrogen-containing natural products and elucidating the mechanisms involved in the biosynthetic processes. The alkaloids discussed in this review are ditryptophenaline (dimeric diketopiperazine alkaloid, saframycin (tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid, strictosidine (monoterpene indole alkaloid, ergotamine (ergot alkaloid and opiates (benzylisoquinoline and morphinan alkaloid. This review also discusses the engineered biosynthesis of these compounds, primarily through heterologous reconstitution of target biosynthetic pathways in suitable hosts, such as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Those heterologous biosynthetic systems can be used to confirm the functions of the isolated genes, economically scale up the production of the alkaloids for commercial distributions and engineer the biosynthetic pathways to produce valuable analogs of the alkaloids. In particular, extensive involvement of oxidation reactions catalyzed by oxidoreductases, such as cytochrome P450s, during the secondary metabolite biosynthesis is discussed in details.

  9. Lipophagy Contributes to Testosterone Biosynthesis in Male Rat Leydig Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Zhou, Yan; Zhu, Yin-Ci; Wang, Si-Qi; Ping, Ping; Chen, Xiang-Feng

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, autophagy was found to regulate lipid metabolism through a process termed lipophagy. Lipophagy modulates the degradation of cholesteryl esters to free cholesterol (FC), which is the substrate of testosterone biosynthesis. However, the role of lipophagy in testosterone production is unknown. To investigate this, primary rat Leydig cells and varicocele rat models were administered to inhibit or promote autophagy, and testosterone, lipid droplets (LDs), total cholesterol (TC), and FC were evaluated. The results demonstrated that inhibiting autophagy in primary rat Leydig cells reduced testosterone production. Further studies demonstrated that inhibiting autophagy increased the number and size of LDs and the level of TC, but decreased the level of FC. Furthermore, hypoxia promoted autophagy in Leydig cells. We found that short-term hypoxia stimulated testosterone secretion; however, the inhibition of autophagy abolished stimulated testosterone release. Hypoxia decreased the number and size of LDs in Leydig cells, but the changes could be largely rescued by blocking autophagy. In experimental varicocele rat models, the administration of autophagy inhibitors substantially reduced serum testosterone. These data demonstrate that autophagy contributes to testosterone biosynthesis at least partially through degrading intracellular LDs/TC. Our observations might reveal an autophagic regulatory mode regarding testosterone biosynthesis. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  10. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits – which differ among various taxa – affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating expression of biosynthesis apparatus, export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of the resulting biofilm, which is particularly important for interactions of bacteria with higher organisms that lead to rhizosphere colonization and modulate virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. Here we review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operons found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode likely components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms formed by a variety of free-living and pathogenic bacteria and, for the latter, in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  11. Metabolic routes affecting rubber biosynthesis in Hevea brasiliensis latex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Keng-See; Mat-Isa, Mohd.-Noor; Bahari, Azlina; Ghazali, Ahmad-Kamal; Alias, Halimah; Mohd.-Zainuddin, Zainorlina; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Wan, Kiew-Lian

    2012-01-01

    The cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathway in Hevea brasiliensis latex is the conventionally accepted pathway which provides isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) for cis-polyisoprene (rubber) biosynthesis. However, the plastidic 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway may be an alternative source of IPP since its more recent discovery in plants. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) expression profiles of genes from both pathways in latex showed that subcellular compartmentalization of IPP for cis-polyisoprene synthesis is related to the degree of plastidic carotenoid synthesis. From this, the occurrence of two schemes of IPP partitioning and utilization within one species is proposed whereby the supply of IPP for cis-polyisoprene from the MEP pathway is related to carotenoid production in latex. Subsequently, a set of latex unique gene transcripts was sequenced and assembled and they were then mapped to IPP-requiring pathways. Up to eight such pathways, including cis-polyisoprene biosynthesis, were identified. Our findings on pre- and post-IPP metabolic routes form an important aspect of a pathway knowledge-driven approach to enhancing cis-polyisoprene biosynthesis in transgenic rubber trees. PMID:22162870

  12. ODORANT1 Regulates Fragrance Biosynthesis in Petunia FlowersW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Julian C.; Haring, Michel A.; van Tunen, Arjen J.; Schuurink, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Floral scent is important to plant reproduction because it attracts pollinators to the sexual organs. Therefore, volatile emission is usually tuned to the foraging activity of the pollinators. In Petunia hybrida, volatile benzenoids determine the floral aroma. Although the pathways for benzenoid biosynthesis have been characterized, the enzymes involved are less well understood. How production and emission are regulated is unknown. By targeted transcriptome analyses, we identified ODORANT1 (ODO1), a member of the R2R3-type MYB family, as a candidate for the regulation of volatile benzenoids in Petunia hybrida cv W115 (Mitchell) flowers. These flowers are only fragrant in the evening and at night. Transcript levels of ODO1 increased before the onset of volatile emission and decreased when volatile emission declined. Downregulation of ODO1 in transgenic P. hybrida Mitchell plants strongly reduced volatile benzenoid levels through decreased synthesis of precursors from the shikimate pathway. The transcript levels of several genes in this pathway were reduced by suppression of ODO1 expression. Moreover, ODO1 could activate the promoter of the 5-enol-pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase gene. Flower pigmentation, which is furnished from the same shikimate precursors, was not influenced because color and scent biosynthesis occur at different developmental stages. Our studies identify ODO1 as a key regulator of floral scent biosynthesis. PMID:15805488

  13. Deconvoluting heme biosynthesis to target blood-stage malaria parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigala, Paul A; Crowley, Jan R; Henderson, Jeffrey P; Goldberg, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    Heme metabolism is central to blood-stage infection by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Parasites retain a heme biosynthesis pathway but do not require its activity during infection of heme-rich erythrocytes, where they can scavenge host heme to meet metabolic needs. Nevertheless, heme biosynthesis in parasite-infected erythrocytes can be potently stimulated by exogenous 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), resulting in accumulation of the phototoxic intermediate protoporphyrin IX (PPIX). Here we use photodynamic imaging, mass spectrometry, parasite gene disruption, and chemical probes to reveal that vestigial host enzymes in the cytoplasm of Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes contribute to ALA-stimulated heme biosynthesis and that ALA uptake depends on parasite-established permeability pathways. We show that PPIX accumulation in infected erythrocytes can be harnessed for antimalarial chemotherapy using luminol-based chemiluminescence and combinatorial stimulation by low-dose artemisinin to photoactivate PPIX to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen. This photodynamic strategy has the advantage of exploiting host enzymes refractory to resistance-conferring mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09143.001 PMID:26173178

  14. Potent peptidic fusion inhibitors of influenza virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Juraszek, Jarek; Brandenburg, Boerries; Buyck, Christophe; Schepens, Wim B. G.; Kesteleyn, Bart; Stoops, Bart; Vreeken, Rob J.; Vermond, Jan; Goutier, Wouter; Tang, Chan; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H. E.; Goudsmit, Jaap; van Dongen, Maria J. P.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2017-09-28

    Influenza therapeutics with new targets and mechanisms of action are urgently needed to combat potential pandemics, emerging viruses, and constantly mutating strains in circulation. We report here on the design and structural characterization of potent peptidic inhibitors of influenza hemagglutinin. The peptide design was based on complementarity-determining region loops of human broadly neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (FI6v3 and CR9114). The optimized peptides exhibit nanomolar affinity and neutralization against influenza A group 1 viruses, including the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and avian H5N1 strains. The peptide inhibitors bind to the highly conserved stem epitope and block the low pH–induced conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion. These peptidic compounds and their advantageous biological properties should accelerate the development of new small molecule– and peptide-based therapeutics against influenza virus.

  15. Designing anticancer peptides by constructive machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisoni, Francesca; Neuhaus, Claudia; Gabernet, Gisela; Müller, Alex; Hiss, Jan; Schneider, Gisbert

    2018-04-21

    Constructive machine learning enables the automated generation of novel chemical structures without the need for explicit molecular design rules. This study presents the experimental application of such a generative model to design membranolytic anticancer peptides (ACPs) de novo. A recurrent neural network with long short-term memory cells was trained on alpha-helical cationic amphipathic peptide sequences and then fine-tuned with 26 known ACPs. This optimized model was used to generate unique and novel amino acid sequences. Twelve of the peptides were synthesized and tested for their activity on MCF7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells and selectivity against human erythrocytes. Ten of these peptides were active against cancer cells. Six of the active peptides killed MCF7 cancer cells without affecting human erythrocytes with at least threefold selectivity. These results advocate constructive machine learning for the automated design of peptides with desired biological activities. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Prediction of twin-arginine signal peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Nielsen, Henrik; Widdick, D.

    2005-01-01

    a publicly available method, TatP, for prediction of bacterial Tat signal peptides. Results: We have retrieved sequence data for Tat substrates in order to train a computational method for discrimination of Sec and Tat signal peptides. The TatP method is able to positively classify 91% of 35 known Tat signal...... peptides and 84% of the annotated cleavage sites of these Tat signal peptides were correctly predicted. This method generates far less false positive predictions on various datasets than using simple pattern matching. Moreover, on the same datasets TatP generates less false positive predictions than...... expressions, whereas hydrophobicity discrimination of Tat- and Sec- signal peptides is carried out by an artificial neural network. A potential cleavage site of the predicted Tat signal peptide is also reported. The TatP prediction server is available as a public web server at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/TatP/....

  17. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  18. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2017-03-21

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  19. Use of galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2018-04-03

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  20. Production of peptide antisera specific for mouse and rat proinsulin C-peptide 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, N; Madsen, O D; Kofod, Hans

    1990-01-01

    Mice and rats have two functional non-allelic insulin genes. By using a synthetic peptide representing a common sequence in mouse and rat C-peptide 2 as antigen, we have produced rabbit antisera specific for an epitope which is not present in mouse or rat C-peptide 1. Long-term immunization did...... not seem to increase the end point titre as tested in direct ELISA. The specificity of the antiserum was determined by competitive ELISA and histochemistry on pancreas sections. Only the synthetic C-peptide 2, but not the homologous synthetic C-peptide 1 from mouse and rat competed efficiently in ELISA...... for antibody binding to the immunizing antigen. Antisera to C-peptide 2, stained islet beta-cells on mouse and rat, but not monkey pancreas sections in immunocytochemical analysis. Preabsorption to the synthetic C-peptide 2, but not the synthetic mouse and rat C-peptide 1 abolished staining. In conclusion we...