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Sample records for nonribosomal peptide antibiotics

  1. β-Lactam formation by a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase during antibiotic biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudelli, Nicole M; Long, Darcie H; Townsend, Craig A

    2015-04-16

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases are giant enzymes composed of modules that house repeated sets of functional domains, which select, activate and couple amino acids drawn from a pool of nearly 500 potential building blocks. The structurally and stereochemically diverse peptides generated in this manner underlie the biosynthesis of a large sector of natural products. Many of their derived metabolites are bioactive such as the antibiotics vancomycin, bacitracin, daptomycin and the β-lactam-containing penicillins, cephalosporins and nocardicins. Penicillins and cephalosporins are synthesized from a classically derived non-ribosomal peptide synthetase tripeptide (from δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase). Here we report an unprecedented non-ribosomal peptide synthetase activity that both assembles a serine-containing peptide and mediates its cyclization to the critical β-lactam ring of the nocardicin family of antibiotics. A histidine-rich condensation domain, which typically performs peptide bond formation during product assembly, also synthesizes the embedded four-membered ring. We propose a mechanism, and describe supporting experiments, that is distinct from the pathways that have evolved to the three other β-lactam antibiotic families: penicillin/cephalosporins, clavams and carbapenems. These findings raise the possibility that β-lactam rings can be regio- and stereospecifically integrated into engineered peptides for application as, for example, targeted protease inactivators.

  2. Structural pattern matching of nonribosomal peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leclère Valérie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs, bioactive secondary metabolites produced by many microorganisms, show a broad range of important biological activities (e.g. antibiotics, immunosuppressants, antitumor agents. NRPs are mainly composed of amino acids but their primary structure is not always linear and can contain cycles or branchings. Furthermore, there are several hundred different monomers that can be incorporated into NRPs. The NORINE database, the first resource entirely dedicated to NRPs, currently stores more than 700 NRPs annotated with their monomeric peptide structure encoded by undirected labeled graphs. This opens a way to a systematic analysis of structural patterns occurring in NRPs. Such studies can investigate the functional role of some monomeric chains, or analyse NRPs that have been computationally predicted from the synthetase protein sequence. A basic operation in such analyses is the search for a given structural pattern in the database. Results We developed an efficient method that allows for a quick search for a structural pattern in the NORINE database. The method identifies all peptides containing a pattern substructure of a given size. This amounts to solving a variant of the maximum common subgraph problem on pattern and peptide graphs, which is done by computing cliques in an appropriate compatibility graph. Conclusion The method has been incorporated into the NORINE database, available at http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/norine. Less than one second is needed to search for a pattern in the entire database.

  3. Dissecting and Exploiting Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Tao SHEN; Xiu-Lan CHEN; Cai-Yun SUN; Yu-Zhong ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    A large number of therapeutically useful cyclic and linear peptides of bacteria or fungal origin are synthesized via a template-directed, nucleic-acid-independent nonribosomal mechanism. This process is carried out by mega-enzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). NRPSs contain repeated coordinated groups of active sites called modules, and each module is composed of several domains with different catalytic activities. The familiarity to these domains lays base for the future genetic engineering of NRPSs to generate entirely "unnature" Products. The details about NRPSs domain structures and the exploitation of NRPSs are described in this review.

  4. Enhancing Nonribosomal Peptide Biosynthesis in Filamentous Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Alexandra A; Keller, Nancy P; Wiemann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are historically known as rich sources for production of biologically active natural products, so-called secondary metabolites. One particularly pharmaceutically relevant chemical group of secondary metabolites is the nonribosomal peptides synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). As most of the fungal NRPS gene clusters leading to production of the desired molecules are not expressed under laboratory conditions, efforts to overcome this impediment are crucial to unlock the full chemical potential of each fungal species. One way to activate these silent clusters is by overexpressing and deleting global regulators of secondary metabolism. The conserved fungal-specific regulator of secondary metabolism, LaeA, was shown to be a valuable target for sleuthing of novel gene clusters and metabolites. Additionally, modulation of chromatin structures by either chemical or genetic manipulation has been shown to activate cryptic metabolites. Furthermore, NRPS-derived molecules seem to be affected by cross talk between the specific gene clusters and some of these metabolites have a tissue- or developmental-specific regulation. This chapter summarizes how this knowledge of different tiers of regulation can be combined to increase production of NRPS-derived metabolites in fungal species.

  5. Enhancing Nonribosomal Peptide Biosynthesis in Filamentous Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Alexandra A.; Keller, Nancy P.; Wiemann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are historically known as rich sources for production of biologically active natural products, so-called secondary metabolites. One particularly pharmaceutically relevant chemical group of secondary metabolites is the nonribosomal peptides synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). As most of the fungal NRPS gene clusters leading to production of the desired molecules are not expressed under laboratory conditions, efforts to overcome this impediment are crucial to unlock the full chemical potential of each fungal species. One way to activate these silent clusters is by overexpressing and deleting global regulators of secondary metabolism. The conserved fungal-specific regulator of secondary metabolism, LaeA, was shown to be a valuable target for sleuthing of novel gene clusters and metabolites. Additionally, modulation of chromatin structures by either chemical or genetic manipulation has been shown to activate cryptic metabolites. Furthermore, NRPS-derived molecules seem to be affected by cross talk between the specific gene clusters and some of these metabolites have a tissue- or developmental-specific regulation. This chapter summarizes how this knowledge of different tiers of regulation can be combined to increase production of NRPS-derived metabolites in fungal species. PMID:26831707

  6. Discovery of antibacterials and other bioactive compounds from microorganisms-evaluating methodologies for discovery and generation of non-ribosomal peptide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witting, K; Süssmuth, R D

    2011-10-01

    After decades of neglect in industrial research the comeback of natural products is due since improved screening approaches are at disposal, yielding a multitude of new compounds from natural sources. Besides traditional compound libraries peptides are characterized by an enormous structural complexity, thus increasing the chance of finding a hit in a screening. Emphasizing antibacterial compounds structural complexity is a prerequisite for their success. This review focuses on the screening approaches employed for the discovery of mostly antibacterial, non-ribosomal peptides derived from natural sources. Traditional screening methodologies as well as genetic approaches are discussed in this context. Utilizing genetic engineering methods e.g., precursor-directed biosynthesis, mutasynthesis, combinatorial biosynthesis, as well as chemoenzymatics to achieve greater structural diversity is thoroughly discussed and exemplified by recent discoveries.

  7. Structural insights into nonribosomal peptide enzymatic assembly lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koglin, Alexander; Walsh, Christopher T

    2009-08-01

    Nonribosomal peptides have a variety of medicinal activities including activity as antibiotics, antitumor drugs, immunosuppressives, and toxins. Their biosynthesis on multimodular assembly lines as a series of covalently tethered thioesters, in turn covalently attached on pantetheinyl arms on carrier protein way stations, reflects similar chemical logic and protein machinery to fatty acid and polyketide biosynthesis. While structural information on excised or isolated catalytic adenylation (A), condensation (C), peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) and thioesterase (TE) domains had been gathered over the past decade, little was known about how the NRPS catalytic and carrier domains interact with each other both within and across elongation or termination modules. This Highlight reviews recent breakthrough achievements in both X-ray and NMR spectroscopic studies that illuminate the architecture of NRPS PCP domains, PCP-containing didomain-fragments and of a full termination module (C-A-PCP-TE).

  8. Recent advances in engineering nonribosomal peptide assembly lines.

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    Winn, M; Fyans, J K; Zhuo, Y; Micklefield, J

    2016-02-01

    Nonribosomal peptides are amongst the most widespread and structurally diverse secondary metabolites in nature with many possessing bioactivity that can be exploited for therapeutic applications. Due to the major challenges associated with total- and semi-synthesis, bioengineering approaches have been developed to increase yields and generate modified peptides with improved physicochemical properties or altered bioactivity. Here we review the major advances that have been made over the last decade in engineering the biosynthesis of nonribosomal peptides. Structural diversity has been introduced by the modification of enzymes required for the supply of precursors or by heterologous expression of tailoring enzymes. The modularity of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) assembly lines further supports module or domain swapping methodologies to achieve changes in the amino acid sequence of nonribosomal peptides. We also review the new synthetic biology technologies promising to speed up the process, enabling the creation and optimisation of many more assembly lines for heterologous expression, offering new opportunities for engineering the biosynthesis of novel nonribosomal peptides.

  9. Chemical Probes Allow Structural Insight into the Condensation Reaction of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloudoff, Kristjan; Alonzo, Diego A; Schmeing, T Martin

    2016-03-17

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) synthesize a vast variety of small molecules, including antibiotics, antitumors, and immunosuppressants. The NRPS condensation (C) domain catalyzes amide bond formation, the central chemical step in nonribosomal peptide synthesis. The catalytic mechanism and substrate determinants of the reaction are under debate. We developed chemical probes to structurally study the NRPS condensation reaction. These substrate analogs become covalently tethered to a cysteine introduced near the active site, to mimic covalent substrate delivery by carrier domains. They are competent substrates in the condensation reaction and behave similarly to native substrates. Co-crystal structures show C domain-substrate interactions, and suggest that the catalytic histidine's principle role is to position the α-amino group for nucleophilic attack. Structural insight provided by these co-complexes also allowed us to alter the substrate specificity profile of the reaction with a single point mutation.

  10. Bioinformatics Tools for the Discovery of New Nonribosomal Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leclère, Valérie; Weber, Tilmann; Jacques, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    -dimensional structure of the peptides can be compared with the structural patterns of all known NRPs. The presented workflow leads to an efficient and rapid screening of genomic data generated by high throughput technologies. The exploration of such sequenced genomes may lead to the discovery of new drugs (i......This chapter helps in the use of bioinformatics tools relevant to the discovery of new nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) produced by microorganisms. The strategy described can be applied to draft or fully assembled genome sequences. It relies on the identification of the synthetase genes...

  11. Implementation of communication-mediating domains for non-ribosomal peptide production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewers, Verena; San-Bento, Rita; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has in several cases been proven to be a suitable host for the production of natural products and was recently exploited for the production of non-ribosomal peptides. Synthesis of non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) is mediated by NRP synthetases (NRPSs), modular enzymes, which...

  12. Portability of oxidase domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules.

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    Schneider, Tanya L; Walsh, Christopher T

    2004-12-21

    Oxazole and thiazole rings are present in numerous nonribosomal peptide natural products. Oxidase domains are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of thiazolines and oxazolines to yield fully aromatic heterocycles. Unlike most domains, the placement of oxidase domains within assembly line modules varies. Noting this tolerance, we investigated the portability of an oxidase domain to a heterologous assembly line. The epimerase domain of PchE, involved in pyochelin biosynthesis, was replaced with the oxidase domain from MtaD, involved in myxothiazol biosynthesis. The chimeric module was expressed in soluble form as a flavin mononucleotide-containing flavoprotein. The functionality of the inserted oxidase domain was assayed within PchE and in transfer of the growing siderophore acyl chain from PchE to the next downstream module. While pyochelin-like product release was not observed downstream, the robust activity of the transplanted oxidase domain and the ability of the chimeric module to produce an advanced intermediate bound to the synthetase underscore the possibility of future engineering within nonribosomal peptide synthetase pathways using oxidase domains.

  13. Anthranilate-activating modules from fungal nonribosomal peptide assembly lines.

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    Ames, Brian D; Walsh, Christopher T

    2010-04-20

    Fungal natural products containing benzodiazepinone- and quinazolinone-fused ring systems can be assembled by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) using the conformationally restricted beta-amino acid anthranilate as one of the key building blocks. We validated that the first module of the acetylaszonalenin synthetase of Neosartorya fischeri NRRL 181 activates anthranilate to anthranilyl-AMP. With this as a starting point, we then used bioinformatic predictions about fungal adenylation domain selectivities to identify and confirm an anthranilate-activating module in the fumiquinazoline A producer Aspergillus fumigatus Af293 as well as a second anthranilate-activating NRPS in N. fischeri. This establishes an anthranilate adenylation domain code for fungal NRPS and should facilitate detection and cloning of gene clusters for benzodiazepine- and quinazoline-containing polycyclic alkaloids with a wide range of biological activities.

  14. Photooxidation of the Antimicrobial, Nonribosomal Peptide Bacitracin A by Singlet Oxygen under Environmentally Relevant Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundeen, Rachel A; Chu, Chiheng; Sander, Michael; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-08-16

    Bacitracin is a mixture of nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) that is extensively used as an antibiotic in both human and veterinary medicine. Despite its widespread use over the past six decades, very few studies have addressed the environmental fate of bacitracin and zinc-bacitracin complexes. In this study, the photochemical transformation of bacitracin components (i.e., cyclic dodecapeptides) in the aquatic environment was investigated. A high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS)-based approach enabled monitoring of the photochemical degradation kinetics of individual bacitracin components, investigation of the relative contribution of reactive oxygen species (e.g., singlet oxygen, (1)O2) in dissolved organic matter-sensitized photoreactions, and identification of oxidative modifications in bacitracin photoproducts. The results of this study support the hypothesis that indirect photochemical oxidation of the histidine (His) residue by (1)O2 is a major degradation pathway for bacitracin A, the most potent congener of the mixture. Furthermore, the photooxidation rate of bacitracin A with (1)O2 decreased upon bacitracin A coordination with Zn(2+), demonstrating that the photochemistry of metal-bound His is different from that of metal-free His. Overall, these results provide insight into the fate of bacitracin components in the aquatic environment and highlight the potential of utilizing this HRMS-based methodology to study transformations of other environmentally relevant NRPs.

  15. Nonribosomal peptides and polyketides of Burkholderia: new compounds potentially implicated in biocontrol and pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeel, Qassim; Pupin, Maude; Jacques, Philippe; Leclère, Valérie

    2017-05-25

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Burkholderia live in various ecological niches and present a significant role in the environments through the excretion of a wide variety of secondary metabolites including modular nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs). These metabolites represent a widely distributed biomedically and biocontrol important class of natural products including antibiotics, siderophores, and anticancers as well as biopesticides that are considered as a novel source that can be used to defend ecological niche from competitors and to promote plant growth. The aim of this review is to present all NRPs produced or potentially produced by strains of Burkholderia, as NRPs represent a major source of active compounds implicated in biocontrol. The review is a compilation of results from a large screening we have performed on 48 complete sequenced genomes available in NCBI to identify NRPS gene clusters, and data found in the literature mainly because some interesting compounds are produced by strains not yet sequenced. In addition to NRPs, hybrids NRPs/PKs are also included. Specific features about biosynthetic gene clusters and structures of the modular enzymes responsible for the synthesis, the biological activities, and the potential uses in agriculture and pharmaceutical of NRPs and hybrids NRPs/PKs will also be discussed.

  16. Norine, the knowledgebase dedicated to non-ribosomal peptides, is now open to crowdsourcing.

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    Flissi, Areski; Dufresne, Yoann; Michalik, Juraj; Tonon, Laurie; Janot, Stéphane; Noé, Laurent; Jacques, Philippe; Leclère, Valérie; Pupin, Maude

    2016-01-01

    Since its creation in 2006, Norine remains the unique knowledgebase dedicated to non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs). These secondary metabolites, produced by bacteria and fungi, harbor diverse interesting biological activities (such as antibiotic, antitumor, siderophore or surfactant) directly related to the diversity of their structures. The Norine team goal is to collect the NRPs and provide tools to analyze them efficiently. We have developed a user-friendly interface and dedicated tools to provide a complete bioinformatics platform. The knowledgebase gathers abundant and valuable annotations on more than 1100 NRPs. To increase the quantity of described NRPs and improve the quality of associated annotations, we are now opening Norine to crowdsourcing. We believe that contributors from the scientific community are the best experts to annotate the NRPs they work on. We have developed MyNorine to facilitate the submission of new NRPs or modifications of stored ones. This article presents MyNorine and other novelties of Norine interface released since the first publication. Norine is freely accessible from the following URL: http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/NRP.

  17. Predicted class-I aminoacyl tRNA synthetase-like proteins in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Lakshminarayan M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies point to a great diversity of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis systems with major roles in amino acid and co-factor biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, and post-translational modifications of proteins by peptide tags. The least studied of these systems are those utilizing tRNAs or aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AAtRS in non-ribosomal peptide ligation. Results Here we describe novel examples of AAtRS related proteins that are likely to be involved in the synthesis of widely distributed peptide-derived metabolites. Using sensitive sequence profile methods we show that the cyclodipeptide synthases (CDPSs are members of the HUP class of Rossmannoid domains and are likely to be highly derived versions of the class-I AAtRS catalytic domains. We also identify the first eukaryotic CDPSs in fungi and in animals; they might be involved in immune response in the latter organisms. We also identify a paralogous version of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase, which is widespread in bacteria, and present evidence using contextual information that it might function independently of protein synthesis as a peptide ligase in the formation of a peptide- derived secondary metabolite. This metabolite is likely to be heavily modified through multiple reactions catalyzed by a metal-binding cupin domain and a lysine N6 monooxygenase that are strictly associated with this paralogous methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MtRS. We further identify an analogous system wherein the MtRS has been replaced by more typical peptide ligases with the ATP-grasp or modular condensation-domains. Conclusions The prevalence of these predicted biosynthetic pathways in phylogenetically distant, pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria suggests that metabolites synthesized by them might participate in interactions with the host. More generally, these findings point to a complete spectrum of recruitment of AAtRS to various non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways, ranging from the

  18. A Proteomic Survey of Nonribosomal Peptide and Polyketide Biosynthesis in Actinobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yunqiu; Ntai, Ioanna; Ju, Kou-San; Unger, Michelle; Zamdborg, Leonid; Robinson, Sarah J.; Doroghazi, James R.; Labeda, David P.; Metcalf, William W.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2011-01-01

    Actinobacteria such as streptomycetes are renowned for their ability to produce bioactive natural products including nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs). The advent of genome sequencing has revealed an even larger genetic repertoire for secondary metabolism with most of the small molecule products of these gene clusters still unknown. Here, we employed a “protein-first” method called PrISM (Proteomic Investigation of Secondary Metabolism) to screen 26 unsequenced actinomycetes ...

  19. Prediction of monomer isomery in Florine: a workflow dedicated to nonribosomal peptide discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Caradec

    Full Text Available Nonribosomal peptides represent a large variety of natural active compounds produced by microorganisms. Due to their specific biosynthesis pathway through large assembly lines called NonRibosomal Peptide Synthetases (NRPSs, they often display complex structures with cycles and branches. Moreover they often contain non proteogenic or modified monomers, such as the D-monomers produced by epimerization. We investigate here some sequence specificities of the condensation (C and epimerization (E domains of NRPS that can be used to predict the possible isomeric state (D or L of each monomer in a putative peptide. We show that C- and E- domains can be divided into 2 sub-regions called Up-Seq and Down-Seq. The Up-Seq region corresponds to an InterPro domain (IPR001242 and is shared by C- and E-domains. The Down-Seq region is specific to the enzymatic activity of the domain. Amino-acid signatures (represented as sequence logos previously described for complete C-and E-domains have been restricted to the Down-Seq region and amplified thanks to additional sequences. Moreover a new Down-Seq signature has been found for Ct-domains found in fungi and responsible for terminal cyclization of the peptides. The identification of these signatures has been included in a workflow named Florine, aimed to predict nonribosomal peptides from NRPS sequence analyses. In some cases, the prediction of isomery is guided by genus-specific rules. Florine was used on a Pseudomonas genome to allow the determination of the type of pyoverdin produced, the update of syringafactin structure and the identification of novel putative products.

  20. A proteomic survey of nonribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthesis in actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunqiu; Ntai, Ioanna; Ju, Kou-San; Unger, Michelle; Zamdborg, Leonid; Robinson, Sarah J; Doroghazi, James R; Labeda, David P; Metcalf, William W; Kelleher, Neil L

    2012-01-01

    Actinobacteria such as streptomycetes are renowned for their ability to produce bioactive natural products including nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs). The advent of genome sequencing has revealed an even larger genetic repertoire for secondary metabolism with most of the small molecule products of these gene clusters still unknown. Here, we employed a "protein-first" method called PrISM (Proteomic Investigation of Secondary Metabolism) to screen 26 unsequenced actinomycetes using mass spectrometry-based proteomics for the targeted detection of expressed nonribosomal peptide synthetases or polyketide synthases. Improvements to the original PrISM screening approach (Nat. Biotechnol. 2009, 27, 951-956), for example, improved de novo peptide sequencing, have enabled the discovery of 10 NRPS/PKS gene clusters from 6 strains. Taking advantage of the concurrence of biosynthetic enzymes and the secondary metabolites they generate, two natural products were associated with their previously "orphan" gene clusters. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of a proteomics-based strategy for use in screening for NRP/PK production in actinomycetes (often >8 Mbp, high GC genomes) versus the bacilli (2-4 Mbp genomes) used previously.

  1. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases: Identifying the cryptic gene clusters and decoding the natural product

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MANGAL SINGH; SANDEEP CHAUDHARY; DIPTI SAREEN

    2017-03-01

    Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) present in bacteria and fungi are themajor multi-modular enzyme complexes which synthesize secondary metabolites like the pharmacologically importantantibiotics and siderophores. Each of the multiple modules of an NRPS activates a different amino or aryl acid,followed by their condensation to synthesize a linear or cyclic natural product. The studies on NRPS domains, theknowledge of their gene cluster architecture and tailoring enzymes have helped in the in silico genetic screening of theever-expanding sequenced microbial genomic data for the identification of novel NRPS/PKS clusters and thusdeciphering novel non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs). Adenylation domain is an integral part of the NRPSs and is thesubstrate selecting unit for the final assembled NRP. In some cases, it also requires a small protein, the MbtHhomolog, for its optimum activity. The presence of putative adenylation domain and MbtH homologs in a sequencedgenome can help identify the novel secondary metabolite producers. The role of the adenylation domain in the NRPSgene clusters and its characterization as a tool for the discovery of novel cryptic NRPS gene clusters are discussed.

  2. SANDPUMA: Ensemble Predictions of Nonribosomal Peptide Chemistry Reveals Biosynthetic Diversity across Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrette, Marc G; Aicheler, Fabian; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Currie, Cameron R; Medema, Marnix H

    2017-06-19

    Nonribosomally synthesized peptides (NRPs) are natural products with widespread applications in medicine and biotechnology. Many algorithms have been developed to predict the substrate specificities of nonribosomal peptide synthetase adenylation (A) domains from DNA sequences, which enables prioritization and dereplication, and integration with other data types in discovery efforts. However, insufficient training data and a lack of clarity regarding prediction quality have impeded optimal use. Here, we introduce prediCAT, a new phylogenetics-inspired algorithm, which quantitatively estimates the degree of predictability of each A-domain. We then systematically benchmarked all algorithms on a newly-gathered, independent test set of 434 A-domain sequences, showing that active-site-motif-based algorithms outperform whole-domain-based methods. Subsequently, we developed SANDPUMA, a powerful ensemble algorithm, based on newly-trained versions of all high-performing algorithms, which significantly outperforms individual methods. Finally, we deployed SANDPUMA in a systematic investigation of 7,635 Actinobacteria genomes, suggesting that NRP chemical diversity is much higher than previously estimated. SANDPUMA has been integrated into the widely-used antiSMASH biosynthetic gene cluster analysis pipeline and is also available as an open-source, standalone tool. SANDPUMA is freely available at https://bitbucket.org/chevrm/sandpuma and as a docker image at https://hub.docker.com/r/chevrm/sandpuma / under the GNU Public License 3 (GPL3). chevrette@wisc.edu , marnix.medema@wur.nl. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  3. Diversity of nature's assembly lines - recent discoveries in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis.

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    Payne, Jennifer A E; Schoppet, Melanie; Hansen, Mathias Henning; Cryle, Max J

    2016-12-20

    The biosynthesis of complex natural products by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and the related polyketide synthases (PKSs) represents a major source of important bioactive compounds. These large, multi-domain machineries are able to produce a fascinating range of molecules due to the nature of their modular architectures, which allows natural products to be assembled and tailored in a modular, step-wise fashion. In recent years there has been significant progress in characterising the important domains and underlying mechanisms of non-ribosomal peptide synthesis. More significantly, several studies have uncovered important examples of novel activity in many NRPS domains. These discoveries not only greatly increase the structural diversity of the possible products of NRPS machineries but - possibly more importantly - they improve our understanding of what is a highly important, yet complex, biosynthetic apparatus. In this review, several recent examples of novel NRPS function will be introduced, which highlight the range of previously uncharacterised activities that have now been detected in the biosynthesis of important natural products by these mega-enzyme synthetases.

  4. Cyclization of polyketides and non-ribosomal peptides on and off their assembly lines.

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    Pang, Bo; Wang, Min; Liu, Wen

    2016-02-01

    Modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are multifunctional megaenzymes that serve as templates to program the assembly of short carboxylic acids and amino acids in a primarily co-linear manner. The variation, combination, permutation and evolution of their functional units (e.g., modules, domains and proteins) along with their association with external enzymes have resulted in the generation of numerous versions of templates, the roles of which have not been fully recognized in the structural diversification of polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides and their hybrids present in nature. In this Highlight, we focus on the assembly-line enzymology and associated chemistry by providing examples of some newly characterized cyclization reactions that occur on and off the assembly lines during and after chain elongation for the purpose of elucidating the template effects of PKSs and NRPSs. A fundamental understanding of the underlying biosynthetic logic would facilitate the elucidation of chemical information contained within the PKS or NRPS templates and benefit the development of strategies for genome mining, biosynthesis-inspired chemical synthesis and combinatorial biosynthesis.

  5. Structural and mutational analysis of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase heterocyclization domain provides insight into catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloudoff, Kristjan; Fage, Christopher D; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Schmeing, T Martin

    2017-01-03

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are a family of multidomain, multimodule enzymes that synthesize structurally and functionally diverse peptides, many of which are of great therapeutic or commercial value. The central chemical step of peptide synthesis is amide bond formation, which is typically catalyzed by the condensation (C) domain. In many NRPS modules, the C domain is replaced by the heterocyclization (Cy) domain, a homologous domain that performs two consecutive reactions by using hitherto unknown catalytic mechanisms. It first catalyzes amide bond formation, and then the intramolecular cyclodehydration between a Cys, Ser, or Thr side chain and the backbone carbonyl carbon to form a thiazoline, oxazoline, or methyloxazoline ring. The rings are important for the form and function of the peptide product. We present the crystal structure of an NRPS Cy domain, Cy2 of bacillamide synthetase, at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Despite sharing the same fold, the active sites of C and Cy domains have important differences. The structure allowed us to probe the roles of active-site residues by using mutational analyses in a peptide synthesis assay with intact bacillamide synthetase. The drastically different effects of these mutants, interpreted by using our structural and bioinformatic results, provide insight into the catalytic mechanisms of the Cy domain and implicate a previously unexamined Asp-Thr dyad in catalysis of the cyclodehydration reaction.

  6. Molecular Cross-Talk between Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Carrier Proteins and Unstructured Linker Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Bradley J; Frueh, Dominique P

    2017-01-24

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) employ multiple domains separated by linker regions to incorporate substrates into natural products. During synthesis, substrates are covalently tethered to carrier proteins that translocate between catalytic partner domains. The molecular parameters that govern translocation and associated linker remodeling remain unknown. Here, we used NMR to characterize the structure, dynamics, and invisible states of a peptidyl carrier protein flanked by its linkers. We showed that the N-terminal linker stabilizes and interacts with the protein core while modulating dynamics at specific sites involved in post-translational modifications and/or domain interactions. The results detail the molecular communication between peptidyl carrier proteins and their linkers and could guide efforts in engineering NRPSs to obtain new pharmaceuticals.

  7. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes in the Microbial Metagenomes of Marine Sponges

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    Ute Hentschel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Genomic mining revealed one major nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS phylogenetic cluster in 12 marine sponge species, one ascidian, an actinobacterial isolate and seawater. Phylogenetic analysis predicts its taxonomic affiliation to the actinomycetes and hydroxy-phenyl-glycine as a likely substrate. Additionally, a phylogenetically distinct NRPS gene cluster was discovered in the microbial metagenome of the sponge Aplysina aerophoba, which shows highest similarities to NRPS genes that were previously assigned, by ways of single cell genomics, to a Chloroflexi sponge symbiont. Genomic mining studies such as the one presented here for NRPS genes, contribute to on-going efforts to characterize the genomic potential of sponge-associated microbiota for secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  8. A genome-wide analysis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters and their peptides in a Planktothrix rubescens strain

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    Nederbragt Alexander J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria often produce several different oligopeptides, with unknown biological functions, by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS. Although some cyanobacterial NRPS gene cluster types are well described, the entire NRPS genomic content within a single cyanobacterial strain has never been investigated. Here we have combined a genome-wide analysis using massive parallel pyrosequencing ("454" and mass spectrometry screening of oligopeptides produced in the strain Planktothrix rubescens NIVA CYA 98 in order to identify all putative gene clusters for oligopeptides. Results Thirteen types of oligopeptides were uncovered by mass spectrometry (MS analyses. Microcystin, cyanopeptolin and aeruginosin synthetases, highly similar to already characterized NRPS, were present in the genome. Two novel NRPS gene clusters were associated with production of anabaenopeptins and microginins, respectively. Sequence-depth of the genome and real-time PCR data revealed three copies of the microginin gene cluster. Since NRPS gene cluster candidates for microviridin and oscillatorin synthesis could not be found, putative (gene encoded precursor peptide sequences to microviridin and oscillatorin were found in the genes mdnA and oscA, respectively. The genes flanking the microviridin and oscillatorin precursor genes encode putative modifying enzymes of the precursor oligopeptides. We therefore propose ribosomal pathways involving modifications and cyclisation for microviridin and oscillatorin. The microviridin, anabaenopeptin and cyanopeptolin gene clusters are situated in close proximity to each other, constituting an oligopeptide island. Conclusion Altogether seven nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS gene clusters and two gene clusters putatively encoding ribosomal oligopeptide biosynthetic pathways were revealed. Our results demonstrate that whole genome shotgun sequencing combined with MS-directed determination of oligopeptides successfully

  9. The Role of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase in l-Lysine Lactamization During Capuramycin Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Jin, Yuanyuan; Cui, Zheng; Nonaka, Koichi; Baba, Satoshi; Funabashi, Masanori; Yang, Zhaoyong; Van Lanen, Steven G

    2016-05-03

    Capuramycins are one of several known classes of natural products that contain an l-Lys-derived l-α-amino-ɛ-caprolactam (l-ACL) unit. The α-amino group of l-ACL in a capuramycin is linked to an unsaturated hexuronic acid component through an amide bond that was previously shown to originate by an ATP-independent enzymatic route. With the aid of a combined in vivo and in vitro approach, a predicted tridomain nonribosomal peptide synthetase CapU is functionally characterized here as the ATP-dependent amide-bond-forming catalyst responsible for the biosynthesis of the remaining amide bond present in l-ACL. The results are consistent with the adenylation domain of CapU as the essential catalytic component for l-Lys activation and thioesterification of the adjacent thiolation domain. However, in contrast to expectations, lactamization does not require any additional domains or proteins and is likely a nonenzymatic event. The results set the stage for examining whether a similar NRPS-mediated mechanism is employed in the biosynthesis of other l-ACL-containing natural products and, just as intriguingly, how spontaneous lactamization is avoided in the numerous NRPS-derived peptides that contain an unmodified l-Lys residue.

  10. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Involved in the Biosynthesis of Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niran Roongsawang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipopeptide biosurfactants (LPBSs consist of a hydrophobic fatty acid portion linked to a hydrophilic peptide chain in the molecule. With their complex and diverse structures, LPBSs exhibit various biological activities including surface activity as well as anti-cellular and anti-enzymatic activities. LPBSs are also involved in multi-cellular behaviors such as swarming motility and biofilm formation. Among the bacterial genera, Bacillus (Gram-positive and Pseudomonas (Gram-negative have received the most attention because they produce a wide range of effective LPBSs that are potentially useful for agricultural, chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. The biosynthetic mechanisms and gene regulation systems of LPBSs have been extensively analyzed over the last decade. LPBSs are generally synthesized in a ribosome-independent manner with megaenzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs. Production of active‑form NRPSs requires not only transcriptional induction and translation but also post‑translational modification and assemblage. The accumulated knowledge reveals the versatility and evolutionary lineage of the NRPSs system. This review provides an overview of the structural and functional diversity of LPBSs and their different biosynthetic mechanisms in Bacillus and Pseudomonas, including both typical and unique systems. Finally, successful genetic engineering of NRPSs for creating novel lipopeptides is also discussed.

  11. Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes pesL and pes1 Are Essential for Fumigaclavine C Production in Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Gallagher, Lorna; Schrettl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The identity of metabolites encoded by the majority of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, remains outstanding. We found that the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthetases PesL and Pes1 were essential for fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, the end product...... of the complex ergot alkaloid (EA) pathway in A. fumigatus. Deletion of either pesL (ΔpesL) or pes1 (Δpes1) resulted in complete loss of fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, relatively increased production of fumitremorgins such as TR-2, fumitremorgin C and verruculogen, increased sensitivity to H2O2, and increased...... sensitivity to the antifungals, voriconazole, and amphotericin B. Deletion of pesL resulted in severely reduced virulence in an invertebrate infection model (P

  12. Bioactivities by a crude extract from the Greenlandic Pseudomonas sp. In5 involves the nonribosomal peptides, nunamycin and nunapeptin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Jensen, Helle; Venditto, Vincent J.;

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive microbial metabolites provide a successful source of novel compounds with pharmaceutical potentials. The bacterium Pseudomonas sp. In5 is a biocontrol strain isolated from a plant disease suppressive soil in Greenland, which produces two antimicrobial nonribosomal peptides (NRPs......), nunapeptin and nunamycin. In this study, we used in vitro antimicrobial and anticancer bioassays to evaluate the potential bioactivities of both a crude extract derived from Pseudomonas sp. In5 and NRPs purified from the crude extract....

  13. Heterologous production of non-ribosomal peptide LLD-ACV in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewers, Verena; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Le; Zhang, Jie; Nielsen, Jens

    2009-11-01

    Non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) are a diverse family of secondary metabolites with a broad range of biological activities. We started to develop an eukaryotic microbial platform based on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterologous production of NRPs using delta-(l-alpha-aminoadipyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine (ACV) as a model NRP. The Penicillium chrysogenum gene pcbAB encoding ACV synthetase was expressed in S. cerevisiae from a high-copy plasmid together with phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase) encoding genes from Aspergillus nidulans, P. chrysogenum and Bacillus subtilis, and in all the three cases production of ACV was observed. To improve ACV synthesis, several factors were investigated. Codon optimization of the 5' end of pcbAB did not significantly increase ACV production. However, a 30-fold enhancement was achieved by lowering the cultivation temperature from 30 to 20 degrees C. When ACVS and PPTase encoding genes were integrated into the yeast genome, a 6-fold decrease in ACV production was observed indicating that gene copy number was one of the rate-limiting factors for ACV production in yeast.

  14. Optimization of nonribosomal peptides production by a psychrotrophic fungus: Trichoderma velutinum ACR-P1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Singh, Varun P; Singh, Deepika; Yusuf, Farnaz; Kumar, Anil; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Chaubey, Asha

    2016-11-01

    Trichoderma is an anamorphic filamentous fungal genus with immense potential for production of small valuable secondary metabolites with indispensable biological activities. Microbial dynamics of a psychrotrophic strain Trichoderma velutinum ACR-P1, isolated from unexplored niches of the Shiwalik region, bestowed with rich biodiversity of microflora, was investigated for production of nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) by metabolite profiling by intact-cell mass spectrometry (ICMS) employing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer. Being the first report on NRPs production by T. velutinum, studies on optimization of growth conditions by Response Surface Methodology (RSM) for production of NRPs by ACR-P1 was carried out strategically. Multifold enhancement in the yield of NRPs belonging to subfamily SF4 with medium chain of amino acid residues having m/z 1437.9, 1453.9, and 1452.0 at pH 5.9 at 20 °C and of subfamily SF1 with long-chain amino acid residues having m/z 1770.2, 1784.2, 1800.1, 1802.1, and 1815.1 was achieved at pH 7.0 at 25 °C. Complexities of natural mixtures were thus considerably reduced under respective optimized culture conditions accelerating the production of novel microbial natural products by saving time and resources.

  15. Nonribosomal peptide synthase gene clusters for lipopeptide biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis 916 and their phenotypic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chuping; Liu, Xuehui; Zhou, Huafei; Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Zhiyi

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cyclic lipopeptides (LPs) have been well studied for their phytopathogen-antagonistic activities. Recently, research has shown that these LPs also contribute to the phenotypic features of Bacillus strains, such as hemolytic activity, swarming motility, biofilm formation, and colony morphology. Bacillus subtilis 916 not only coproduces the three families of well-known LPs, i.e., surfactins, bacillomycin Ls (iturin family), and fengycins, but also produces a new family of LP called locillomycins. The genome of B. subtilis 916 contains four nonribosomal peptide synthase (NRPS) gene clusters, srf, bmy, fen, and loc, which are responsible for the biosynthesis of surfactins, bacillomycin Ls, fengycins, and locillomycins, respectively. By studying B. subtilis 916 mutants lacking production of one, two, or three LPs, we attempted to unveil the connections between LPs and phenotypic features. We demonstrated that bacillomycin Ls and fengycins contribute mainly to antifungal activity. Although surfactins have weak antifungal activity in vitro, the strain mutated in srfAA had significantly decreased antifungal activity. This may be due to the impaired productions of fengycins and bacillomycin Ls. We also found that the disruption of any LP gene cluster other than fen resulted in a change in colony morphology. While surfactins and bacillomycin Ls play very important roles in hemolytic activity, swarming motility, and biofilm formation, the fengycins and locillomycins had little influence on these phenotypic features. In conclusion, B. subtilis 916 coproduces four families of LPs which contribute to the phenotypic features of B. subtilis 916 in an intricate way.

  16. Stereochemistry and conformation of skyllamycin, a non-ribosomally synthesized peptide from Streptomyces sp. Acta 2897.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Vivien; Di Meo, Florent; Saaidi, Pierre-Loïc; Bartoschek, Stefan; Fiedler, Hans-Peter; Trouillas, Patrick; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2014-04-22

    Skyllamycin is a non-ribosomally synthesized cyclic depsipeptide from Streptomyces sp. Acta 2897 that inhibits PDGF-signaling. The peptide scaffold contains an N-terminal cinnamoyl moiety, a β-methylation of aspartic acid, three β-hydroxylated amino acids and one rarely occurring α-hydroxy glycine. With the exception of α-hydroxy glycine, the stereochemistry of the amino acids was assigned by comparison to synthetic reference amino acids applying chiral GC-MS and Marfey-HPLC analysis. The stereochemistry of α-hydroxy glycine, which is unstable under basic and acidic conditions, was determined by conformational analysis, employing a combination of data from NOESY-NMR spectroscopy, simulated annealing and free MD simulations. The simulation procedures were applied for both R- and S-configured α-hydroxy glycine of the skyllamycin structure and compared to the NOESY data. Both methods, simulated annealing and free MD simulations independently support S-configured α-hydroxy glycine thus enabling the assignment of all stereocenters in the structure of skyllamycin and devising the role of two-component flavin dependent monooxygenase (Sky39) as S-selective.

  17. SCREENING OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND GENES CODING POLYKETIDE SYNTHETASE AND NONRIBOSOMAL PEPTIDE SYNTHETASE OF ACTINOMYCETE ISOLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Kovácsová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe antimicrobial activity using agar plate diffusion method and screening genes coding polyketide synthetase (PKS-I and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS from actinomycetes. A total of 105 actinomycete strains were isolated from arable soil. Antimicrobial activity was demonstrated at 54 strains against at least 1 of total 12 indicator organisms. Antifungal properties were recorded more often than antibacterial properties. The presence of PKS-I and NRPS genes were founded at 61 of total 105 strains. The number of strains with mentioned biosynthetic enzyme gene fragments matching the anticipated length were 19 (18% and 50 (47% respectively. Overall, five actinomycete strains carried all the biosynthetical genes, yet no antimicrobial activity was found against any of tested pathogens. On the other hand, twenty-one strains showed antimicrobial activity even though we were not able to amplify any of the PKS or NRPS genes from them. Combination of the two methods showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of actinomycetes isolated from arable soil, which indicate that actinomycetes are valuable reservoirs of novel bioactive compounds.

  18. Kinetics profiling of gramicidin S synthetase A, a member of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xun; Li, Hao; Alfermann, Jonas; Mootz, Henning D; Yang, Haw

    2014-12-23

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) incorporate assorted amino acid substrates into complex natural products. The substrate is activated via the formation of a reactive aminoacyl adenylate and is subsequently attached to the protein template via a thioester bond. The reactive nature of such intermediates, however, leads to side reactions that also break down the high-energy anhydride bond. The off-pathway kinetics or their relative weights compared to that of the on-pathway counterpart remains generally elusive. Here, we introduce multiplatform kinetics profiling to quantify the relative weights of on- and off-pathway reactions. Using the well-defined stoichiometry of thioester formation, we integrate a mass spectrometry (MS) kinetics assay, a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay, and an ATP-pyrophosphate (PPi) exchange assay to map out a highly efficient on-pathway kinetics profile of the substrate activation and intermediate uploading (>98% relative weight) for wide-type gramicidin S synthetase A (GrsA) and a 87% rate profile for a cysteine-free GrsA mutant. Our kinetics profiling approach complements the existing enzyme-coupled byproduct-release assays, unraveling new mechanistic insights of substrate activation/channeling in NRPS enzymes.

  19. Peptide Antibiotics for ESKAPE Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thomas Thyge

    a cecropin-mellitin hybrid peptide and proved effective in killing colistin resistant Gram-negative A. baumannii in vitro. The molecule was improved with regard to toxicity, as measured by hemolytic ability. Further, this peptide is capable of specifically killing non-growing cells of colistin resistant A......Multi-drug resistance to antibiotics represents a global health challenge that results in increased morbidity and mortality rates. The annual death-toll is >700.000 people world-wide, rising to ~10 million by 2050. New antibiotics are lacking, and few are under development as return on investment...

  20. Nonribosomal peptides, key biocontrol components for Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, isolated from a Greenlandic suppressive soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Charlotte F; Watrous, Jeramie; Glaring, Mikkel A; Kersten, Roland; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Stougaard, Peter

    2015-03-17

    Potatoes are cultivated in southwest Greenland without the use of pesticides and with limited crop rotation. Despite the fact that plant-pathogenic fungi are present, no severe-disease outbreaks have yet been observed. In this report, we document that a potato soil at Inneruulalik in southern Greenland is suppressive against Rhizoctonia solani Ag3 and uncover the suppressive antifungal mechanism of a highly potent biocontrol bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, isolated from the suppressive potato soil. A combination of molecular genetics, genomics, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) revealed an antifungal genomic island in P. fluorescens In5 encoding two nonribosomal peptides, nunamycin and nunapeptin, which are key components for the biocontrol activity by strain In5 in vitro and in soil microcosm experiments. Furthermore, complex microbial behaviors were highlighted. Whereas nunamycin was demonstrated to inhibit the mycelial growth of R. solani Ag3, but not that of Pythium aphanidermatum, nunapeptin instead inhibited P. aphanidermatum but not R. solani Ag3. Moreover, the synthesis of nunamycin by P. fluorescens In5 was inhibited in the presence of P. aphanidermatum. Further characterization of the two peptides revealed nunamycin to be a monochlorinated 9-amino-acid cyclic lipopeptide with similarity to members of the syringomycin group, whereas nunapeptin was a 22-amino-acid cyclic lipopeptide with similarity to corpeptin and syringopeptin. Crop rotation and systematic pest management are used to only a limited extent in Greenlandic potato farming. Nonetheless, although plant-pathogenic fungi are present in the soil, the farmers do not experience major plant disease outbreaks. Here, we show that a Greenlandic potato soil is suppressive against Rhizoctonia solani, and we unravel the key biocontrol components for Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, one of the potent biocontrol bacteria

  1. Peptide Antibiotics for ESKAPE Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thomas Thyge

    Multi-drug resistance to antibiotics represents a global health challenge that results in increased morbidity and mortality rates. The annual death-toll is >700.000 people world-wide, rising to ~10 million by 2050. New antibiotics are lacking, and few are under development as return on investment...... is considered poor compared to medicines for lifestyle diseases. According to the WHO we could be moving towards a post-antibiotic era in which previously treatable infections become fatal. Of special importance are multidrug resistant bacteria from the ESKAPE group (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus...... and toxicity by utilizing of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a whole animal model. This was carried out by testing of antimicrobial peptides targeting Gram-positive bacteria exemplified by the important human pathogen methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The peptide BP214 was developed from...

  2. The Stress-responsive and Host-oriented Role of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases in an Entomopathogenic Fungus, Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hang; Xie, Linan; Wang, Jing; Guo, Qiannan; Yang, Shengnan; Liang, Pei; Wang, Chengshu; Lin, Min; Xu, Yuquan; Zhang, Liwen

    2016-11-14

    Beauveria bassiana infects numbers of pest species and is known to produce insecticidal substances, e.g., the nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) beauvericin and bassianolide. However, most NRPs and their biological roles in B. bassiana remain undiscovered. To identify NRPs that potentially contribute to pathogenesis, the 21 predicted NRP synthetases (NRPSs) or NRPS-like proteins of B. bassiana ARSEF2860 were primarily ranked into three functional groups: basic metabolism (7 NRPSs), pathogenicity (12 NRPSs) and unknown function (2 NRPSs). Based on the transcript levels during in vivo growth on diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella, Linnaeus), half of the Group II NRPSs were likely to be involved in infection. Given that the metabolites biosynthesized by these NRPSs remaining to determined, our result underlines the importance of NRPSome in fungal pathogenesis, and will serve as a guide for future genomic mining projects to discover functionally essential and structurally diverse NRPs in fungal genomes.

  3. Discovery Strategies of Bioactive Compounds Synthesized by Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and Type-I Polyketide Synthases Derived from Marine Microbiomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoris D. Amoutzias

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering that 70% of our planet’s surface is covered by oceans, it is likely that undiscovered biodiversity is still enormous. A large portion of marine biodiversity consists of microbiomes. They are very attractive targets of bioprospecting because they are able to produce a vast repertoire of secondary metabolites in order to adapt in diverse environments. In many cases secondary metabolites of pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest such as nonribosomal peptides (NRPs and polyketides (PKs are synthesized by multimodular enzymes named nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSes and type-I polyketide synthases (PKSes-I, respectively. Novel findings regarding the mechanisms underlying NRPS and PKS evolution demonstrate how microorganisms could leverage their metabolic potential. Moreover, these findings could facilitate synthetic biology approaches leading to novel bioactive compounds. Ongoing advances in bioinformatics and next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies are driving the discovery of NRPs and PKs derived from marine microbiomes mainly through two strategies: genome-mining and metagenomics. Microbial genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and this vast quantity of biological information can be analyzed through genome mining in order to identify gene clusters encoding NRPSes and PKSes of interest. On the other hand, metagenomics is a fast-growing research field which directly studies microbial genomes and their products present in marine environments using culture-independent approaches. The aim of this review is to examine recent developments regarding discovery strategies of bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and type-I PKS derived from marine microbiomes and to highlight the vast diversity of NRPSes and PKSes present in marine environments by giving examples of recently discovered bioactive compounds.

  4. Nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes pesL and pes1 are essential for Fumigaclavine C production in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, Karen A; Gallagher, Lorna; Schrettl, Markus; Jöchl, Christoph; Kavanagh, Kevin; Larsen, Thomas O; Doyle, Sean

    2012-05-01

    The identity of metabolites encoded by the majority of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, remains outstanding. We found that the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthetases PesL and Pes1 were essential for fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, the end product of the complex ergot alkaloid (EA) pathway in A. fumigatus. Deletion of either pesL (ΔpesL) or pes1 (Δpes1) resulted in complete loss of fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, relatively increased production of fumitremorgins such as TR-2, fumitremorgin C and verruculogen, increased sensitivity to H(2)O(2), and increased sensitivity to the antifungals, voriconazole, and amphotericin B. Deletion of pesL resulted in severely reduced virulence in an invertebrate infection model (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that NRP synthesis plays an essential role in mediating the final prenylation step of the EA pathway, despite the apparent absence of NRP synthetases in the proposed EA biosynthetic cluster for A. fumigatus. Liquid chromatography/diode array detection/mass spectrometry analysis also revealed the presence of fumiquinazolines A to F in both A. fumigatus wild-type and ΔpesL strains. This observation suggests that alternative NRP synthetases can also function in fumiquinazoline biosynthesis, since PesL has been shown to mediate fumiquinazoline biosynthesis in vitro. Furthermore, we provide here the first direct link between EA biosynthesis and virulence, in agreement with the observed toxicity associated with EA exposure. Finally, we demonstrate a possible cluster cross-talk phenomenon, a theme which is beginning to emerge in the literature.

  5. Discovery Strategies of Bioactive Compounds Synthesized by Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and Type-I Polyketide Synthases Derived from Marine Microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoutzias, Grigoris D; Chaliotis, Anargyros; Mossialos, Dimitris

    2016-04-16

    Considering that 70% of our planet's surface is covered by oceans, it is likely that undiscovered biodiversity is still enormous. A large portion of marine biodiversity consists of microbiomes. They are very attractive targets of bioprospecting because they are able to produce a vast repertoire of secondary metabolites in order to adapt in diverse environments. In many cases secondary metabolites of pharmaceutical and biotechnological interest such as nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs) are synthesized by multimodular enzymes named nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSes) and type-I polyketide synthases (PKSes-I), respectively. Novel findings regarding the mechanisms underlying NRPS and PKS evolution demonstrate how microorganisms could leverage their metabolic potential. Moreover, these findings could facilitate synthetic biology approaches leading to novel bioactive compounds. Ongoing advances in bioinformatics and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are driving the discovery of NRPs and PKs derived from marine microbiomes mainly through two strategies: genome-mining and metagenomics. Microbial genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and this vast quantity of biological information can be analyzed through genome mining in order to identify gene clusters encoding NRPSes and PKSes of interest. On the other hand, metagenomics is a fast-growing research field which directly studies microbial genomes and their products present in marine environments using culture-independent approaches. The aim of this review is to examine recent developments regarding discovery strategies of bioactive compounds synthesized by NRPS and type-I PKS derived from marine microbiomes and to highlight the vast diversity of NRPSes and PKSes present in marine environments by giving examples of recently discovered bioactive compounds.

  6. Structures of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module Bound to MbtH-like Proteins Support a Highly Dynamic Domain Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bradley R.; Drake, Eric J.; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2016-09-05

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) produce a wide variety of peptide natural products. During synthesis, the multidomain NRPSs act as an assembly line, passing the growing product from one module to the next. Each module generally consists of an integrated peptidyl carrier protein, an amino acid-loading adenylation domain, and a condensation domain that catalyzes peptide bond formation. Some adenylation domains interact with small partner proteins called MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) that enhance solubility or activity. A structure of an MLP bound to an adenylation domain has been previously reported using a truncated adenylation domain, precluding any insight that might be derived from understanding the influence of the MLP on the intact adenylation domain or on the dynamics of the entire NRPS module. Here, we present the structures of the full-length NRPS EntF bound to the MLPs from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These new structures, along with biochemical and bioinformatics support, further elaborate the residues that define the MLP-adenylation domain interface. Additionally, the structures highlight the dynamic behavior of NRPS modules, including the module core formed by the adenylation and condensation domains as well as the orientation of the mobile thioesterase domain.

  7. Insect-specific polyketide synthases (PKSs), potential PKS-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrids, and novel PKS clades in tropical fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn; Phonghanpot, Suranat; Sengpanich, Nattapong; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Tanticharoen, Morakot

    2009-06-01

    Polyketides draw much attention because of their potential use in pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. This study identifies an abundant pool of polyketide synthase (PKS) genes from local isolates of tropical fungi found in Thailand in three different ecological niches: insect pathogens, marine inhabitants, and lichen mutualists. We detected 149 PKS genes from 48 fungi using PCR with PKS-specific degenerate primers. We identified and classified 283 additional PKS genes from 13 fungal genomes. Phylogenetic analysis of all these PKS sequences the comprising ketosynthase (KS) conserved region and the KS-acyltransferase interdomain region yielded results very similar to those for phylogenies of the KS domain and suggested a number of remarkable points. (i) Twelve PKS genes amplified from 12 different insect-pathogenic fungi form a tight cluster, although along with two PKS genes extracted from genomes of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus, in reducing clade III. Some of these insect-specific fungal PKSs are nearly identical. (ii) We identified 38 new PKS-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrid genes in reducing clade II. (iii) Four distinct clades were discovered with more than 75% bootstrap support. We propose to designate the novel clade D1 with 100% bootstrap support "reducing clade V." The newly cloned PKS genes from these tropical fungi should provide useful and diverse genetic resources for future research on the characterization of polyketide compounds synthesized by these enzymes.

  8. New Insight into the Ochratoxin A Biosynthetic Pathway through Deletion of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Gene in Aspergillus carbonarius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, A.; Bruno, K. S.; Solfrizzo, M.; Perrone, G.; Mule, G.; Visconti, A.; Baker, S. E.

    2012-09-14

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, is composed of a dihydroisocoumarin ring linked to phenylalanine and its biosynthetic pathway has not yet been completely elucidated. Most of the knowledge regarding the genetic and enzymatic aspects of OTA biosynthesis has been obtained in Penicillium species. In Aspergillus species only pks genes involved in the initial steps of the pathway have been partially characterized. In our study, the inactivation of a gene encoding a nonribosomal peptide synthetase in OTA producing A. carbonarius ITEM 5010 has removed the ability of the fungus to produce OTA. This is the first report on the involvement of an nrps gene product in OTA biosynthetic pathway in Aspergillus species. The absence of OTA and ochratoxin α-the isocoumaric derivative of OTA, and the concomitant increase of ochratoxin β- the dechloro analog of ochratoxin α- were observed in the liquid culture of transformed strain. The data provide the first evidence that the enzymatic step adding phenylalanine to polyketide dihydroisocoumarin precedes the chlorination step to form OTA in A. carbonarius, and that ochratoxin α is a product of hydrolysis of OTA, giving an interesting new insight in the biosynthetic pathway of the toxin.

  9. The long-overlooked enzymology of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase-independent pathway for virulence-conferring siderophore biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oves-Costales, Daniel; Kadi, Nadia; Challis, Gregory L

    2009-11-21

    Siderophores are high-affinity ferric iron chelators biosynthesised and excreted by most microorganisms that play an important role in iron acquisition. Siderophore-mediated scavenging of ferric iron from hosts contributes significantly to the virulence of pathogenic microbes. As a consequence siderophore biosynthesis is an attractive target for chemotherapeutic intervention. Two main pathways for siderophore biosynthesis exist in microbes. One pathway involves nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) multienzymes while the other is NRPS-independent. The enzymology of NRPS-mediated siderophore biosynthesis has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In contrast, the enzymology of NRPS-independent siderophore (NIS) biosynthesis was overlooked for almost thirty years since the first genetic characterisation of the NIS biosynthetic pathway to aerobactin. However, the past three years have witnessed an explosion of interest in the enzymology of NIS synthetases, the key enzymes in the assembly of siderophores via the NIS pathway. The biochemical characterisation of ten purified recombinant synthetases has been reported since 2007, along with the first structural characterisation of a synthetase by X-ray crystallography in 2009. In this feature article we summarise the recent progress that has been made in understanding the long-overlooked enzymology of NRPS-independent siderophore biosynthesis, highlight important remaining questions, and suggest likely directions for future research.

  10. Computational discovery of specificity-conferring sites in non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Michael; Søndergaard, Dan Ariel; Tofting-Olesen, Claus;

    2016-01-01

    .g.~antibiotics. There is thus an interest in predicting the compound synthesized by an NRPS from its primary structure (amino acid sequence) alone, as this would enable an in silico search of whole genomes for NRPS enzymes capable of synthesizing potentially useful compounds. Results: NRPS synthesis happens in a conveyor belt...

  11. Vibriobactin biosynthesis in Vibrio cholerae: VibH is an amide synthase homologous to nonribosomal peptide synthetase condensation domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, T A; Marshall, C G; Walsh, C T

    2000-12-19

    The Vibrio cholerae siderophore vibriobactin is biosynthesized from three molecules of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB), two molecules of L-threonine, and one of norspermidine. Of the four genes positively implicated in vibriobactin biosynthesis, we have here expressed, purified, and assayed the products of three: vibE, vibB, and vibH. All three are homologous to nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) domains: VibE is a 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate-adenosyl monophosphate ligase, VibB is a bifunctional isochorismate lyase-aryl carrier protein (ArCP), and VibH is a novel amide synthase that represents a free-standing condensation (C) domain. VibE and VibB are homologous to EntE and EntB from Escherichia coli enterobactin synthetase; VibE activates DHB as the acyl adenylate and then transfers it to the free thiol of the phosphopantetheine arm of VibB's ArCP domain. VibH then condenses this DHB thioester (the donor) with the small molecule norspermidine (the acceptor), forming N(1)-(2, 3-dihydroxybenzoyl)norspermidine (DHB-NSPD) with a k(cat) of 600 min(-1) and a K(m) for acyl-VibB of 0.88 microM and for norspermidine of 1.5 mM. Exclusive monoacylation of a primary amine of norspermidine was observed. VibH also tolerates DHB-acylated EntB and 1,7-diaminoheptane, octylamine, and hexylamine as substrates, albeit at lowered catalytic efficiencies. DHB-NSPD possesses one of three acylations required for mature vibriobactin, and its formation confirms VibH's role in vibriobactin biosynthesis. VibH is a unique NRPS condensation domain that acts upon an upstream carrier-protein-bound donor and a downstream amine, turning over a soluble amide product, in contrast to an archetypal NRPS-embedded C domain that condenses two carrier protein thioesters.

  12. The crystal structure of BlmI as a model for nonribosomal peptide synthetase peptidyl carrier proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Jeremy R; Ma, Ming; Cuff, Marianne E; Bigelow, Lance; Bearden, Jessica; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N; Shen, Ben

    2014-07-01

    Carrier proteins (CPs) play a critical role in the biosynthesis of various natural products, especially in nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) enzymology, where the CPs are referred to as peptidyl-carrier proteins (PCPs) or acyl-carrier proteins (ACPs), respectively. CPs can either be a domain in large multifunctional polypeptides or standalone proteins, termed Type I and Type II, respectively. There have been many biochemical studies of the Type I PKS and NRPS CPs, and of Type II ACPs. However, recently a number of Type II PCPs have been found and biochemically characterized. In order to understand the possible interaction surfaces for combinatorial biosynthetic efforts we crystallized the first characterized and representative Type II PCP member, BlmI, from the bleomycin biosynthetic pathway from Streptomyces verticillus ATCC 15003. The structure is similar to CPs in general but most closely resembles PCPs. Comparisons with previously determined PCP structures in complex with catalytic domains reveals a common interaction surface. This surface is highly variable in charge and shape, which likely confers specificity for interactions. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of a prototypical Type I PCP excised from the multimodular context revealed three conformational states. Comparison of the states with the structure of BlmI and other PCPs reveals that only one of the NMR states is found in other studies, suggesting the other two states may not be relevant. The state represented by the BlmI crystal structure can therefore serve as a model for both Type I and Type II PCPs.

  13. Rational design of a bimodular model system for the investigation of heterocyclization in nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerfahrt, Thomas; Eppelmann, Katrin; Müller, Rolf; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2004-02-01

    Cyclization (Cy) domains in NRPS catalyze the heterocyclization of cysteine and serine/threonine to thiazoline and oxazoline rings. A model system consisting of the first two modules of bacitracin synthetase A fused to the thioesterase (Te) domain of tyrocidine synthetase was constructed (BacA1-2-Te) and shown to be active in production of the heterocyclic IleCys(thiazoline). Based on this model system, the feasibility of Cy domain module fusions was investigated by replacing the BacA2 Cy-A-PCP-module with modules of MbtB and MtaD from the biosynthesis systems of mycobactin and myxothiazol, revealing the formation of novel heterocyclic dipeptides. To dissect the reaction sequence of the Cy domain in peptide bond formation and heterocyclization, several residues of the BacA1-2-Te Cy domain were analyzed by mutagenesis. Two mutants exhibited formation of the noncyclic dipeptide, providing clear evidence for the independence of condensation and cyclization.

  14. Type I pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent enzymatic domains embedded within multimodular nonribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase assembly lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa; Paiardini, Alessandro; Grgurina, Ingeborg; Pascarella, Stefano

    2013-10-23

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes of fold type I, the most studied structural class of the PLP-dependent enzyme superfamily, are known to exist as stand-alone homodimers or homotetramers. These enzymes have been found also embedded in multimodular and multidomain assembly lines involved in the biosynthesis of polyketides (PKS) and nonribosomal peptides (NRPS). The aim of this work is to provide a proteome-wide view of the distribution and characteristics of type I domains covalently integrated in these assemblies in prokaryotes. An ad-hoc Hidden Markov profile was calculated using a sequence alignment derived from a multiple structural superposition of distantly related PLP-enzymes of fold type I. The profile was utilized to scan the sequence databank and to collect the proteins containing at least one type I domain linked to a component of an assembly line in bacterial genomes. The domains adjacent to a carrier protein were further investigated. Phylogenetic analysis suggested the presence of four PLP-dependent families: Aminotran_3, Beta_elim_lyase and Pyridoxal_deC, occurring mainly within mixed NRPS/PKS clusters, and Aminotran_1_2 found mainly in PKS clusters. Sequence similarity to the reference PLP enzymes with solved structures ranged from 24 to 42% identity. Homology models were built for each representative type I domain and molecular docking simulations with putative substrates were carried out. Prediction of the protein-protein interaction sites evidenced that the surface regions of the type I domains embedded within multienzyme assemblies were different from those of the self-standing enzymes; these structural features appear to be required for productive interactions with the adjacent domains in a multidomain context. This work provides a systematic view of the occurrence of type I domain within NRPS and PKS assembly lines and it predicts their structural characteristics using computational methods. Comparison with the corresponding stand

  15. Molecular genetic analysis reveals that a nonribosomal peptide synthetase-like (NRPS-like) gene in Aspergillus nidulans is responsible for microperfuranone biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Chiang, Yi Ming; Entwistle, Ruth; Ahuja, Mammeet; Lee, Kuan-Han; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wu, Tung-Kung; Oakley, Berl R.; Wang, Clay C.

    2012-04-10

    Genome sequencing of Aspergillus species including A. nidulans has revealed that there are far more secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters than secondary metabolites isolated from these organisms. This implies that these organisms can produce additional secondary metabolites have not yet been elucidated. The A. nidulans genome contains twelve nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), one hybrid polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS/NRPS), and fourteen NRPS-like genes. The only NRPS-like gene in A. nidulans with a known product is tdiA which is involved in terrequinone A biosynthesis. To attempt to identify the products of these NRPS-like genes, we replaced the native promoters of the NRPS-like genes with the inducible alcohol dehydrogenase (alcA) promoter. Our results demonstrated that induction of the single NRPS-like gene AN3396.4 led to the enhanced production of microperfuranone. Furthermore, heterologous expression of AN3396.4 in A. niger confirmed that only one NRPS-like gene, AN3396.4, is necessary for the production of microperfuranone.

  16. Antimicrobial peptides of the genus Bacillus: a new era for antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Chandra Datta; Yang, Byung Wook; Yeo, In-Cheol; Hahm, Young Tae

    2015-02-01

    The rapid onset of resistance reduces the efficacy of most conventional antimicrobial drugs and is a general cause of concern for human well-being. Thus, there is great demand for a continuous supply of novel antibiotics to combat this problem. Bacteria-derived antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have long been used as food preservatives; moreover, prior to the development of conventional antibiotics, these AMPs served as an efficient source of antibiotics. Recently, peptides produced by members of the genus Bacillus were shown to have a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microbes. Bacillus-derived AMPs can be synthesized both ribosomally and nonribosomally and can be classified according to peptide biosynthesis, structure, and molecular weight. The precise mechanism of action of these AMPs is not yet clear; however, one proposed mechanism is that these AMPs kill bacteria by forming channels in and (or) disrupting the bacterial cell wall. Bacillus-derived AMPs have potential in the pharmaceutical industry, as well as the food and agricultural sectors. Here, we focus on Bacillus-derived AMPs as a novel alternative approach to antibacterial drug development. We also provide an overview of the biosynthesis, mechanisms of action, applications, and effectiveness of different AMPs produced by members of the Bacillus genus, including several recently identified novel AMPs.

  17. Surveys of non-ribosomal peptide and polyketide assembly lines in fungi and prospects for their analysis in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Bradley S; Robinson, Sarah J; Kelleher, Neil L

    2011-01-01

    With many bioactive non-ribosomal peptides and polyketides produced in fungi, studies of their biosyntheses are an active area of research. Practical limitations of working with mega-dalton synthetases including cell lysis and protein extraction to recombinant gene and pathway expression has slowed understanding of many secondary metabolic processes relative to bacterial counterparts. Recent advances in accessing fungal biosynthetic machinery are beginning to change this. Here we describe the successes of some studies of thiotemplate biosynthesis in fungal systems, along with very recent advances in chemical tagging and mass spectrometric strategies to selectively study biosynthetic conveyer belts in isolation, and within a few years, in endogenous fungal proteomes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Semi-synthesis of nisin-based peptide antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need for novel antibiotics since there are more and more cases of infections caused by resistant bacteria. Possible novel antibiotics are antimicrobial peptides, especially the lantibiotic nisin. Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized cationic peptides that contain several unnat

  19. A sensitive single-enzyme assay system using the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase BpsA for measurement of L-glutamine in biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alistair S.; Robins, Katherine J.; Ackerley, David F.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to rapidly, economically and accurately measure L-glutamine concentrations in biological samples is important for many areas of research, medicine or industry, however there is room for improvement on existing methods. We describe here how the enzyme BpsA, a single-module non-ribosomal peptide synthetase able to convert L-glutamine into the blue pigment indigoidine, can be used to accurately measure L-glutamine in biological samples. Although indigoidine has low solubility in aqueous solutions, meaning direct measurements of indigoidine synthesis do not reliably yield linear standard curves, we demonstrate that resolubilisation of the reaction end-products in DMSO overcomes this issue and that spontaneous reduction to colourless leuco-indigoidine occurs too slowly to interfere with assay accuracy. Our protocol is amenable to a 96-well microtitre format and can be used to measure L-glutamine in common bacterial and mammalian culture media, urine, and deproteinated plasma. We show that active BpsA can be prepared in high yield by expressing it in the apo-form to avoid the toxicity of indigoidine to Escherichia coli host cells, then activating it to the holo-form in cell lysates prior to purification; and that BpsA has a lengthy shelf-life, retaining >95% activity when stored at either −20 °C or 4 °C for 24 weeks. PMID:28139746

  20. Identification of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase responsible for biosynthesis of the potential anti-cancer drug sansalvamide in Fusarium solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romans-Fuertes, Patricia; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Sandmann, Manuela Ilse Helga; Wollenberg, Rasmus Dam; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Hansen, Frederik T; Giese, Henriette; Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2016-11-01

    Sansalvamide is a cyclic pentadepsipeptide produced by Fusarium solani and has shown promising results as potential anti-cancer drug. The biosynthetic pathway has until now remained unidentified, but here we used an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) approach to generate knockout mutants of two candidate non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS29 and NRPS30). Comparative studies of secondary metabolites in the two deletion mutants and wild type confirmed the absence of sansalvamide in the NRPS30 deletion mutant, implicating this synthetase in the biosynthetic pathway for sansalvamide. Sansalvamide is structurally related to the cyclic hexadepsipeptide destruxin, which both contain an α-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) unit. A gene cluster responsible for destruxin production has previously been identified in Metarhizium robertsii together with a hypothetical biosynthetic pathway. Using comparative bioinformatic analyses of the catalytic domains in the destruxin and sansalvamide NRPSs, we were able to propose a model for sansalvamide biosynthesis. Orthologues of the gene clusters were also identified in species from several other genera including Acremonium chrysogenum and Trichoderma virens, which suggests that the ability to produce compounds related to destruxin and sansalvamide is widespread.

  1. Comparative analysis of oligonucleotide primers for high-throughput screening of genes encoding adenylation domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakal, Tomas; Goo, Kian-Sim; Najmanova, Lucie; Plhackova, Kamila; Kadlcik, Stanislav; Ulanova, Dana

    2015-11-01

    In the biosynthesis of diverse natural bioactive products the adenylation domains (ADs) of nonribosomal peptide synthetases select specific precursors from the cellular pool and activate them for further incorporation into the scaffold of the final compound. Therefore, the drug discovery programs employing PCR-based screening studies of microbial collections or metagenomic libraries often use AD-coding genes as markers of relevant biosynthetic gene clusters. However, due to significant sequence diversity of ADs, the conventional approach using only one primer pair in a single screening experiment could be insufficient for maximal coverage of AD abundance. In this study, the widely used primer pair A3F/A7R was compared with the newly designed aa194F/aa413R one by 454 pyrosequencing of two sets of actinomycete strains from highly dissimilar environments: subseafloor sediments and forest soil. Individually, none of the primer pairs was able to cover the overall diversity of ADs. However, due to slightly shifted specificity of the primer pairs, the total number and diversity of identified ADs were noticeably extended when both primer pairs were used in a single assay. Additionally, the efficiency of AD detection by different primer combinations was confirmed on the model of Salinispora tropica genomic DNA of known sequence.

  2. Molecular genetic analysis reveals that a nonribosomal peptide synthetase-like (NRPS-like) gene in Aspergillus nidulans is responsible for microperfuranone biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Entwistle, Ruth; Ahuja, Manmeet; Lee, Kuan-Han; Bruno, Kenneth S; Wu, Tung-Kung; Oakley, Berl R; Wang, Clay C C

    2012-11-01

    Genome sequencing of Aspergillus species including Aspergillus nidulans has revealed that there are far more secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters than secondary metabolites isolated from these organisms. This implies that these organisms can produce additional secondary metabolites, which have not yet been elucidated. The A. nidulans genome contains 12 nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), one hybrid polyketide synthase/NRPS, and 14 NRPS-like genes. The only NRPS-like gene in A. nidulans with a known product is tdiA, which is involved in terrequinone A biosynthesis. To attempt to identify the products of these NRPS-like genes, we replaced the native promoters of the NRPS-like genes with the inducible alcohol dehydrogenase (alcA) promoter. Our results demonstrated that induction of the single NRPS-like gene AN3396.4 led to the enhanced production of microperfuranone. Furthermore, heterologous expression of AN3396.4 in Aspergillus niger confirmed that only one NRPS-like gene, AN3396.4, is necessary for the production of microperfuranone.

  3. Accurate Detection of Adenylation Domain Functions in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases by an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay System Using Active Site-directed Probes for Adenylation Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Miyamoto, Kengo; Konno, Sho; Kasai, Shota; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-12-18

    A significant gap exists between protein engineering and enzymes used for the biosynthesis of natural products, largely because there is a paucity of strategies that rapidly detect active-site phenotypes of the enzymes with desired activities. Herein, we describe a proof-of-concept study of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for the adenylation (A) domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) using a combination of active site-directed probes coupled to a 5'-O-N-(aminoacyl)sulfamoyladenosine scaffold with a biotin functionality that immobilizes probe molecules onto a streptavidin-coated solid support. The recombinant NRPSs have a C-terminal His-tag motif that is targeted by an anti-6×His mouse antibody as the primary antibody and a horseradish peroxidase-linked goat antimouse antibody as the secondary antibody. These probes can selectively capture the cognate A domains by ligand-directed targeting. In addition, the ELISA technique detected A domains in the crude cell-free homogenates from the Escherichia coli expression systems. When coupled with a chromogenic substrate, the antibody-based ELISA technique can visualize probe-protein binding interactions, which provides accurate readouts of the A-domain functions in NRPS enzymes. To assess the ELISA-based engineering of the A domains of NRPSs, we reprogramed 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB)-activating enzyme EntE toward salicylic acid (Sal)-activating enzymes and investigated a correlation between binding properties for probe molecules and enzyme catalysts. We generated a mutant of EntE that displayed negligible loss in the kcat/Km value with the noncognate substrate Sal and a corresponding 48-fold decrease in the kcat/Km value with the cognate substrate DHB. The resulting 26-fold switch in substrate specificity was achieved by the replacement of a Ser residue in the active site of EntE with a Cys toward the nonribosomal codes of Sal-activating enzymes. Bringing a laboratory ELISA technique

  4. Peptide antibiotics: holy or heretic grails of innate immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boman, H G

    1996-05-01

    In the last 2 years (1994-95), two symposium volumes and three reviews have been published that were fully devoted to peptide antibiotics (antibacterial peptides or antimicrobial peptides). Since the field has been growing rapidly, this review is largely a follow-up of new results published in the last 2 years. Sequencing of the 16S RNA of the small ribosomal subunit indicate that the microbial world is much larger than generally appreciated. The importance of the natural flora is stressed and its effect on the evolution of peptide antibiotics and immunity in general is discussed.

  5. Enzymatic assembly of epothilones: the EpoC subunit and reconstitution of the EpoA-ACP/B/C polyketide and nonribosomal peptide interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Sarah E; Chen, Huawei; Walsh, Christopher T

    2002-04-30

    The biosynthesis of epothilones, a family of hybrid polyketide (PK)/nonribosomal peptide (NRP) antitumor agents, provides an ideal system to study a hybrid PK/NRP natural product with significant biomedical value. Here the third enzyme involved in epothilone production, the five domain 195 kDa polyketide synthase (PKS) EpoC protein, has been expressed and purified from Escherichia coli. EpoC was combined with the first two enzymes of the epothilone biosynthesis pathway, the acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain of EpoA and EpoB, to reconstitute the early steps in epothilone biosynthesis. The acyltransferase (AT) domain of EpoC transfers the methylmalonyl moiety from methylmalonyl-CoA to the holo HS-acyl carrier protein (ACP) in an autoacylation reaction. The ketosynthase (KS) domain of EpoC decarboxylates the methylmalonyl-S-EpoC acyl enzyme to generate the carbon nucleophile that reacts with methylthiazolylcarboxyl-S-EpoB. The resulting condensation product can be reduced in the presence of NADPH by the ketoreductase (KR) domain of EpoC and then dehydrated by the dehydratase (DH) domain to produce the methylthiazolylmethylacrylyl-S-EpoC acyl enzyme intermediate that serves as the acyl donor for subsequent elongation of the epothilone chain. The acetyl-CoA donor can be replaced with propionyl-CoA, isobutyryl-CoA, and benzoyl-CoA and the acyl chains accepted by both EpoB and EpoC subunits to produce ethyl-, isopropyl-, and phenylthiazolylmethylacrylyl-S-EpoC acyl enzyme intermediates, suggesting that future combinatorial biosynthetic variations in epothilone assembly may be feasible. These results demonstrate in vitro reconstitution of both the PKS/NRPS interface (EpoA-ACP/B) and the NRPS/PKS interface (EpoB/C) in the assembly line for this antitumor natural product.

  6. ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDES: AN EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVE FOR ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KK PULICHERLA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive use of classical antibiotics has led to the growing emergence of many resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria. Evidence has suggested that cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMP’s are of greatest potential to represent a new class of antibiotics. These peptides have a good scope in current antibiotic research. During the past two decades several AMPs have been isolated from a wide variety of animals (both vertebrates and invertebrates, and plants as well as from bacteria and fungi. These are relatively small (<10kDa, cationic and amphipathic peptides of variable length, sequence and structure. These peptides exhibit broad-spectrum activity against a wide range of microorganisms including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, protozoa, yeast, fungi and viruses. Most of these peptides are believed to act by disrupting the plasma membrane leading to the lysis of the cell. Antimicrobial peptides encompass a wide variety of structural motifs such as α -helical peptides, β -sheet peptides, looped peptides and extended peptides. Preparations enriched by a specific protein are rarely easily obtained from natural host cells. Hence, recombinant protein production is frequently the sole applicable procedure. Several fusion strategies have been developed for the expression and purification of small antimicrobial peptides (AMPs in recombinant bacterial expression systems which were produced by cloning. This article aims to review in brief the sources of antimicrobial peptides, diversity in structural features, mode of action, production strategies and insight into the current data on their antimicrobial activity followed by a brief comment on the peptides that have entered clinical trials.

  7. Sponge-Derived Kocuria and Micrococcus spp. as Sources of the New Thiazolyl Peptide Antibiotic Kocurin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Sara; González, Ignacio; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Martín, Jesús; Tormo, José Rubén; Anderson, Matthew; Hill, Russell T.; Vicente, Francisca; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Forty four marine actinomycetes of the family Microccocaceae isolated from sponges collected primarily in Florida Keys (USA) were selected from our strain collection to be studied as new sources for the production of bioactive natural products. A 16S rRNA gene based phylogenetic analysis showed that the strains are members of the genera Kocuria and Micrococcus. To assess their biosynthetic potential, the strains were PCR screened for the presence of secondary metabolite genes encoding nonribosomal synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthases (PKS). A small extract collection of 528 crude extracts generated from nutritional microfermentation arrays was tested for the production of bioactive secondary metabolites against clinically relevant strains (Bacillus subtilis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Acinetobacter baumannii and Candida albicans). Three independent isolates were shown to produce a new anti-MRSA bioactive compound that was identified as kocurin, a new member of the thiazolyl peptide family of antibiotics emphasizing the role of this family as a prolific resource for novel drugs. PMID:23538871

  8. Sponge-Derived Kocuria and Micrococcus spp. as Sources of the New Thiazolyl Peptide Antibiotic Kocurin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Genilloud

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Forty four marine actinomycetes of the family Microccocaceae isolated from sponges collected primarily in Florida Keys (USA were selected from our strain collection to be studied as new sources for the production of bioactive natural products. A 16S rRNA gene based phylogenetic analysis showed that the strains are members of the genera Kocuria and Micrococcus. To assess their biosynthetic potential, the strains were PCR screened for the presence of secondary metabolite genes encoding nonribosomal synthetase (NRPS and polyketide synthases (PKS. A small extract collection of 528 crude extracts generated from nutritional microfermentation arrays was tested for the production of bioactive secondary metabolites against clinically relevant strains (Bacillus subtilis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Acinetobacter baumannii and Candida albicans. Three independent isolates were shown to produce a new anti-MRSA bioactive compound that was identified as kocurin, a new member of the thiazolyl peptide family of antibiotics emphasizing the role of this family as a prolific resource for novel drugs.

  9. Genome-based discovery, structure prediction and functional analysis of cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics in Pseudomonas species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.; Kock, de M.J.D.; Meng, Y.; Waard, de P.; Beek, van T.A.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of microbial genome sequences have revealed numerous genes involved in antibiotic biosynthesis. In Pseudomonads, several gene clusters encoding non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) were predicted to be involved in the synthesis of cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) antibiotics. Most of these

  10. Genome-based discovery, structure prediction and functional analysis of cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics in Pseudomonas species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.; Kock, de M.J.D.; Meng, Y.; Waard, de P.; Beek, van T.A.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of microbial genome sequences have revealed numerous genes involved in antibiotic biosynthesis. In Pseudomonads, several gene clusters encoding non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) were predicted to be involved in the synthesis of cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) antibiotics. Most of these pre

  11. Laspartomycin, an acidic lipopeptide antibiotic with a unique peptide core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, Donald B; Leese, Richard A; Jarolmen, Howard; Francis, Noreen D; Fantini, Amadeo A; Falla, Tim; Fiddes, John C; Aumelas, André

    2007-03-01

    Laspartomycin was originally isolated and characterized in 1968 as a lipopeptide antibiotic related to amphomycin. The molecular weight and structure remained unknown until now. In the present study, laspartomycin was purified by a novel calcium chelate procedure, and the structure of the major component (1) was determined. The structure of laspartomycin C (1) differs from that of amphomycin and all related antibiotics as a result of its peptide region being acidic rather than amphoteric and the amino acid branching into the side chain being diaminopropionic rather than diaminobutyric. In addition, the fatty acid side chain is 2,3-unsaturated compared to 3,4-unsaturated for amphomycin and other related antibiotics. Calcium ion addition to stabilize a particular conformer was found to be important for an enzymatic deacylation of the antibiotic. A peptide resulting from the deacylation was critical for chemical structure determination by NMR studies, which also involved addition of calcium ions to stabilize a conformer.

  12. Invited Lecture: From Host Defence Peptides to New Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    Antimicrobial peptides hold promise as the next generation of antimicrobial agents. However, the potential is weakened by their susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, poor bioavailabillity , toxicity and high cost. Our research interest is in determining the structure/activity relationships o...... the elucidation of their structure/activity relationships, and our efforts towards developing them into antibiotics....

  13. Invited Lecture: From Host Defence Peptides to New Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    Antimicrobial peptides hold promise as the next generation of antimicrobial agents. However, the potential is weakened by their susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, poor bioavailabillity , toxicity and high cost. Our research interest is in determining the structure/activity relationships o...... the elucidation of their structure/activity relationships, and our efforts towards developing them into antibiotics....

  14. Use of the cell wall precursor lipid II by a pore-forming peptide antibiotic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukink, E; Wiedemann, [No Value; van Kraaij, C; Kuipers, OP; Sahl, HG; de Kruijff, B; Wiedemann, I.

    1999-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is increasing in some groups of clinically important pathogens. For instance, high vancomycin resistance has emerged in enterococci. Promising alternative antibiotics are the peptide antibiotics, abundant in host defense systems, which kill their targets by permeabilizing t

  15. Broad spectrum antibiotic compounds and use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koglin, Alexander; Strieker, Matthias

    2016-07-05

    The discovery of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster in the genome of Clostridium thermocellum that produces a secondary metabolite that is assembled outside of the host membrane is described. Also described is the identification of homologous NRPS gene clusters from several additional microorganisms. The secondary metabolites produced by the NRPS gene clusters exhibit broad spectrum antibiotic activity. Thus, antibiotic compounds produced by the NRPS gene clusters, and analogs thereof, their use for inhibiting bacterial growth, and methods of making the antibiotic compounds are described.

  16. From peptide precursors to oxazole and thiazole-containing peptide antibiotics: microcin B17 synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y M; Milne, J C; Madison, L L; Kolter, R; Walsh, C T

    1996-11-15

    Esherichia coli microcin B17 is a posttranslationally modified peptide that inhibits bacterial DNA gyrase. It contains four oxazole and four thiazole rings and is representative of a broad class of pharmaceutically important natural products with five-membered heterocycles derived from peptide precursors. An in vitro assay was developed to detect heterocycle formation, and an enzyme complex, microcin B17 synthase, was purified and found to contain three proteins, McbB, McbC, and McbD, that convert 14 residues into the eight mono- and bisheterocyclic moieties in vitro that confer antibiotic activity on mature microcin B17. These enzymatic reactions alter the peptide backbone connectivity. The propeptide region of premicrocin is the major recognition determinant for binding and downstream heterocycle formation by microcin B17 synthase. A general pathway for the enzymatic biosynthesis of these heterocycles is formulated.

  17. A hybrid non-ribosomal peptide/polyketide synthetase containing fatty-acyl ligase (FAAL synthesizes the β-amino fatty acid lipopeptides puwainaphycins in the Cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum alatosporum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mareš

    Full Text Available A putative operon encoding the biosynthetic pathway for the cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides puwainphycins was identified in Cylindrospermum alatosporum. Bioinformatics analysis enabled sequential prediction of puwainaphycin biosynthesis; this process is initiated by the activation of a fatty acid residue via fatty acyl-AMP ligase and continued by a multidomain non-ribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthetase. High-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements proved the production of puwainaphycin F/G congeners differing in FA chain length formed by either 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl dodecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahdoa or 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl tetradecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahtea. Because only one puwainaphycin operon was recovered in the genome, we suggest that the fatty acyl-AMP ligase and one of the amino acid adenylation domains (Asn/Gln show extended substrate specificity. Our results provide the first insight into the biosynthesis of frequently occurring β-amino fatty acid lipopeptides in cyanobacteria, which may facilitate analytical assessment and development of monitoring tools for cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides.

  18. Elucidation and modeling of the in-vivo kinetics of enzymes and membrane transporters associated with β-lactam and non-ribosomal peptide production in Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deshmukh, A.T.

    2013-01-01

    Even 80 years after the discovery of penicillin, it still holds 16% of total antibiotics market. This makes it crucial, from an economical point of view, to improve our understanding of the production organism Penicillium chrysogenum to maximize the penicillin production, as its theoretical yields a

  19. Characterization of Antimicrobial Peptides toward the Development of Novel Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Aoki

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial agents have eradicated many infectious diseases and significantly improved our living environment. However, abuse of antimicrobial agents has accelerated the emergence of multidrug-resistant microorganisms, and there is an urgent need for novel antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have attracted attention as a novel class of antimicrobial agents because AMPs efficiently kill a wide range of species, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses, via a novel mechanism of action. In addition, they are effective against pathogens that are resistant to almost all conventional antibiotics. AMPs have promising properties; they directly disrupt the functions of cellular membranes and nucleic acids, and the rate of appearance of AMP-resistant strains is very low. However, as pharmaceuticals, AMPs exhibit unfavorable properties, such as instability, hemolytic activity, high cost of production, salt sensitivity, and a broad spectrum of activity. Therefore, it is vital to improve these properties to develop novel AMP treatments. Here, we have reviewed the basic biochemical properties of AMPs and the recent strategies used to modulate these properties of AMPs to enhance their safety.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, Producer of the Methymycin/Pikromycin Family of Macrolide Antibiotics, Using PacBio Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingxuan; Sundararajan, Anitha; Devitt, Nicholas P; Schilkey, Faye D; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Melançon, Charles E

    2016-05-05

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Streptomyces venezuelae ATCC 15439, a producer of the methymycin/pikromycin family of macrolide antibiotics and a model host for natural product studies, obtained exclusively using PacBio sequencing technology. The 9.03-Mbp genome harbors 8,775 genes and 11 polyketide and nonribosomal peptide natural product gene clusters.

  1. Snake cathelicidin from Bungarus fasciatus is a potent peptide antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cathelicidins are a family of antimicrobial peptides acting as multifunctional effector molecules of innate immunity, which are firstly found in mammalians. Recently, several cathelicidins have also been found from chickens and fishes. No cathelicidins from other non-mammalian vertebrates have been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, a cathelicidin-like antimicrobial peptide named cathelicidin-BF has been purified from the snake venoms of Bungarus fasciatus and its cDNA sequence was cloned from the cDNA library, which confirm the presence of cathelicidin in reptiles. As other cathelicidins, the precursor of cathelicidin-BF has cathelin-like domain at the N terminus and carry the mature cathelicidin-BF at the C terminus, but it has an atypical acidic fragment insertion between the cathelin-like domain and the C-terminus. The acidic fragment is similar to acidic domains of amphibian antimicrobial precursors. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the snake cathelicidin had the nearest evolution relationship with platypus cathelicidin. The secondary structure of cathelicidin-BF investigated by CD and NMR spectroscopy in the presence of the helicogenic solvent TFE is an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation as many other cathelicidins. The antimicrobial activities of cathelicidin BF against forty strains of microorganisms were tested. Cathelicidin-BF efficiently killed bacteria and some fungal species including clinically isolated drug-resistance microorganisms. It was especially active against Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, it could exert antimicrobial activity against some saprophytic fungus. No hemolytic and cytotoxic activity was observed at the dose of up to 400 microg/ml. Cathelicidin-BF could exist stably in the mice plasma for at least 2.5 hours. CONCLUSION: Discovery of snake cathelicidin with atypical structural and functional characterization offers new insights on the evolution of cathelicidins. Potent, broad

  2. Characterization and localization of a hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase gene from the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Legentil, Susanna; Song, Bongkeun; DeTure, Michael; Baden, Daniel G

    2010-02-01

    The toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, a causative agent of the red tides in Florida, produces a series of toxic compounds known as brevetoxins and their derivatives. Recently, several putative genes encoding polyketide synthase (PKS) were identified from K. brevis in an effort to elucidate the genetic systems involved in brevetoxin production. In this study, novel PKS sequences were isolated from three clones of K. brevis. Eighteen unique sequences were obtained for the PKS ketosynthase (KS) domain of K. brevis. Phylogenetic comparison with closely related PKS genes revealed that 16 grouped with cyanobacteria sequences, while the remaining two grouped with Apicomplexa and previously reported sequences for K. brevis. A fosmid library was also constructed to further characterize PKS genes detected in K. brevis Wilson clone. Several fosmid clones were positive for the presence of PKS genes, and one was fully sequenced to determine the full structure of the PKS cluster. A hybrid non ribosomal peptide synthetase and PKS (NRPS-PKS) gene cluster of 16,061 bp was isolated. In addition, we assessed whether the isolated gene was being actively expressed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and determined its localization at the cellular level by chloroplast isolation. RT-PCR analyses revealed that this gene was actively expressed in K. brevis cultures. The hybrid NRPS-PKS gene cluster was located in the chloroplast, suggesting that K. brevis acquired the ability to produce some of its secondary metabolites through endosymbiosis with ancestral cyanobacteria. Further work is needed to determine the compound produced by the NRPS-PKS hybrid, to find other PKS gene sequences, and to assess their role in K. brevis toxin biosynthetic pathway.

  3. Co-production of two new peptide antibiotics by a bacterial isolate Paenibacillus alvei NP75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandaraj, Balaiah; Vellaichamy, Adaikkalam; Kachman, Maureen; Selvamanikandan, Athinarayanan; Pegu, Shyamanta; Murugan, Vadivel

    2009-02-06

    Two new peptide antibiotics were secreted by a Gram-positive bacterial strain isolated from fermented tomato fruit. Based on its 99% 16S rDNA sequence similarity with Paenibacillus alvei, the isolate was designated as P. alvei NP75. Among these two peptides, one is active against Gram-positive pathogens while the other against Gram-negative pathogens; thus these peptides were named as paenibacillin P and paenibacillin N, respectively. After the purification of those peptide antibiotics from the cell free culture supernatant by RP-HPLC, they were analyzed for their temperature sensitivity and susceptibility to proteases. Higher-temperature tolerant paenibacillin N was easily degraded by proteinase K, while the temperature sensitive paenibacillin P was not affected by any of the proteases used in this study other than a specific protease that was secreted by the same NP75 strain. Mass-spectrometry analysis of the above peptide antibiotics further confirmed their distinction among the known peptide antibiotics. We are reporting first of its kind the co-production of two different new peptide antibiotics from a single bacterial isolate of P. alvei strain.

  4. Engineering antibiotic production and overcoming bacterial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planson, Anne-Gaëlle; Carbonell, Pablo; Grigoras, Ioana; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2011-07-01

    Progress in DNA technology, analytical methods and computational tools is leading to new developments in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, enabling new ways to produce molecules of industrial and therapeutic interest. Here, we review recent progress in both antibiotic production and strategies to counteract bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Advances in sequencing and cloning are increasingly enabling the characterization of antibiotic biosynthesis pathways, and new systematic methods for de novo biosynthetic pathway prediction are allowing the exploration of the metabolic chemical space beyond metabolic engineering. Moreover, we survey the computer-assisted design of modular assembly lines in polyketide synthases and non-ribosomal peptide synthases for the development of tailor-made antibiotics. Nowadays, production of novel antibiotic can be tranferred into any chosen chassis by optimizing a host factory through specific strain modifications. These advances in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology are leading to novel strategies for engineering antimicrobial agents with desired specificities.

  5. Cloning and heterologous expression of the antibiotic peptide (ABP) genes from Rhizopus oligosporus NBRC 8631.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Osamu; Sakamoto, Kazutoshi; Tominaga, Mihoko; Nakayama, Tasuku; Koseki, Takuya; Fujita, Akiko; Akita, Osamu

    2005-03-01

    We carried out protein sequencing of purified Antibiotic Peptide (ABP), and cloned two genes encoding this peptide as abp1 and abp2, from Rhizopus oligosporus NBRC 8631. Both genes contain an almost identical 231-bp segment, with only 3 nucleotide substitutions, encoding a 77 amino acid peptide. The abp gene product comprises a 28 amino acid signal sequence and a 49 amino acid mature peptide. Northern blot analysis showed that at least one of the abp genes is transcribed in R. oligosporus NBRC 8631. A truncated form of abp1 encoding only the mature peptide was fused with the alpha-factor signal peptide and engineered for expression in Pichia pastoris SMD1168H. Culture broth of the recombinant Pichia displayed ABP activity against Bacillus subtilis NBRC 3335 after induction of heterologous gene expression. This result indicates that mature ABP formed the active structure without the aid of other factors from R. oligosporus, and was secreted.

  6. Structure and membrane interactions of the homodimeric antibiotic peptide homotarsinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verly, Rodrigo M.; Resende, Jarbas M.; Junior, Eduardo F. C.; de Magalhães, Mariana T. Q.; Guimarães, Carlos F. C. R.; Munhoz, Victor H. O.; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Almeida, Fábio C. L.; Santoro, Marcelo M.; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from amphibian skin are valuable template structures to find new treatments against bacterial infections. This work describes for the first time the structure and membrane interactions of a homodimeric AMP. Homotarsinin, which was found in Phyllomedusa tarsius anurans, consists of two identical cystine-linked polypeptide chains each of 24 amino acid residues. The high-resolution structures of the monomeric and dimeric peptides were determined in aqueous buffers. The dimer exhibits a tightly packed coiled coil three-dimensional structure, keeping the hydrophobic residues screened from the aqueous environment. An overall cationic surface of the dimer assures enhanced interactions with negatively charged membranes. An extensive set of biophysical data allowed us to establish structure-function correlations with antimicrobial assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Although both peptides present considerable antimicrobial activity, the dimer is significantly more effective in both antibacterial and membrane biophysical assays. PMID:28102305

  7. Structure and membrane interactions of the homodimeric antibiotic peptide homotarsinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verly, Rodrigo M.; Resende, Jarbas M.; Junior, Eduardo F. C.; de Magalhães, Mariana T. Q.; Guimarães, Carlos F. C. R.; Munhoz, Victor H. O.; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Almeida, Fábio C. L.; Santoro, Marcelo M.; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from amphibian skin are valuable template structures to find new treatments against bacterial infections. This work describes for the first time the structure and membrane interactions of a homodimeric AMP. Homotarsinin, which was found in Phyllomedusa tarsius anurans, consists of two identical cystine-linked polypeptide chains each of 24 amino acid residues. The high-resolution structures of the monomeric and dimeric peptides were determined in aqueous buffers. The dimer exhibits a tightly packed coiled coil three-dimensional structure, keeping the hydrophobic residues screened from the aqueous environment. An overall cationic surface of the dimer assures enhanced interactions with negatively charged membranes. An extensive set of biophysical data allowed us to establish structure-function correlations with antimicrobial assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Although both peptides present considerable antimicrobial activity, the dimer is significantly more effective in both antibacterial and membrane biophysical assays.

  8. Use of artificial intelligence in the design of small peptide antibiotics effective against a broad spectrum of highly antibiotic-resistant superbugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkasov, Artem; Hilpert, Kai; Jenssen, Håvard; Fjell, Christopher D; Waldbrook, Matt; Mullaly, Sarah C; Volkmer, Rudolf; Hancock, Robert E W

    2009-01-16

    Increased multiple antibiotic resistance in the face of declining antibiotic discovery is one of society's most pressing health issues. Antimicrobial peptides represent a promising new class of antibiotics. Here we ask whether it is possible to make small broad spectrum peptides employing minimal assumptions, by capitalizing on accumulating chemical biology information. Using peptide array technology, two large random 9-amino-acid peptide libraries were iteratively created using the amino acid composition of the most active peptides. The resultant data was used together with Artificial Neural Networks, a powerful machine learning technique, to create quantitative in silico models of antibiotic activity. On the basis of random testing, these models proved remarkably effective in predicting the activity of 100,000 virtual peptides. The best peptides, representing the top quartile of predicted activities, were effective against a broad array of multidrug-resistant "Superbugs" with activities that were equal to or better than four highly used conventional antibiotics, more effective than the most advanced clinical candidate antimicrobial peptide, and protective against Staphylococcus aureus infections in animal models.

  9. Methylsulfomycin I, a new cyclic peptide antibiotic from a Streptomyces sp. HIL Y-9420704.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Kumar, E K; Kenia, J; Mukhopadhyay, T; Nadkarni, S R

    1999-11-01

    Methylsulfomycin I (1) is a new cyclic peptide antibiotic isolated from the fermentation broth of a Streptomyces sp. HIL Y-9420704. Its structure was elucidated by NMR and GC-MS. The in vitro activity (MIC) against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-, and teicoplanin-resistant strains, is described.

  10. Selective antimicrobial activity and mode of action of adepantins, glycine-rich peptide antibiotics based on anuran antimicrobial peptide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilić, Nada; Novković, Mario; Guida, Filomena; Xhindoli, Daniela; Benincasa, Monica; Tossi, Alessandro; Juretić, Davor

    2013-03-01

    A challenge when designing membrane-active peptide antibiotics with therapeutic potential is how to ensure a useful antibacterial activity whilst avoiding unacceptable cytotoxicity for host cells. Understanding their mode of interaction with membranes and the reasons underlying their ability to distinguish between bacterial and eukaryotic cytoplasmic cells is crucial for any rational attempt to improve this selectivity. We have approached this problem by analysing natural helical antimicrobial peptides of anuran origin, using a structure-activity database to determine an antimicrobial selectivity index (SI) relating the minimal inhibitory concentration against Escherichia coli to the haemolytic activity (SI=HC(50)/MIC). A parameter that correlated strongly with SI, derived from the lengthwise asymmetry of the peptides' hydrophobicity (sequence moment), was then used in the "Designer" algorithm to propose novel, highly selective peptides. Amongst these are the 'adepantins', peptides rich in glycines and lysines that are highly selective for Gram-negative bacteria, have an exceptionally low haemolytic activity, and are less than 50% homologous to any other natural or synthetic antimicrobial peptide. In particular, they showed a very high SI for E. coli (up to 400) whilst maintaining an antimicrobial activity in the 0.5-4μM range. Experiments with monomeric, dimeric and fluorescently labelled versions of the adepantins, using different bacterial strains, host cells and model membrane systems provided insight into their mechanism of action.

  11. Enabling techniques in the search for new antibiotics: Combinatorial biosynthesis of sugar-containing antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Je Won; Nam, Sang-Jip; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2017-06-15

    Nature has a talent for inventing a vast number of natural products, including hybrids generated by blending different scaffolds, resulting in a myriad of bioactive chemical entities. Herein, we review the highlights and recent trends (2010-2016) in the combinatorial biosynthesis of sugar-containing antibiotics where nature's structural diversification capabilities are exploited to enable the creation of new anti-infective and anti-proliferative drugs. In this review, we describe the modern combinatorial biosynthetic approaches for polyketide synthase-derived complex and aromatic polyketides, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-directed lipo-/glycopeptides, aminoglycosides, nucleoside antibiotics, and alkaloids, along with their therapeutic potential. Finally, we present the feasible nexus between combinatorial biosynthesis, systems biology, and synthetic biology as a toolbox to provide new antibiotics that will be indispensable in the post-antibiotic era. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Challenges and Future Prospects of Antibiotic Therapy: From Peptides to Phages Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi M. Mandal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are raising serious concern across the globe. The effectiveness of conventional antibiotics is decreasing due to global emergence of multi-drug-resistant (MDR bacterial pathogens. This process seems to be primarily caused by an indiscriminate and inappropriate use of antibiotics in non-infected patients and in the food industry. New classes of antibiotics with different actions against MDR pathogens need to be developed urgently. In this context, this review focuses on several ways and future directions to search for the next generation of safe and effective antibiotics compounds including antimicrobial peptides, phage therapy, phytochemicals, metalloantibiotics, LPS and efflux pump inhibitors to control the infections caused by MDR pathogens.

  13. Host defence peptides: antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity and potential applications for tackling antibiotic-resistant infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The rapidly increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant infections and the alarmingly low rate of discovery of conventional antibiotics create an urgent need for alternative strategies to treat bacterial infections. Host defence peptides are short cationic molecules produced by the immune systems of most multicellular organisms; they are a class of compounds being actively researched. In this review, we provide an overview of the antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities of natural host defence peptides, and discuss strategies for creating artificial derivatives with improved biological and pharmacological properties, issues of microbial resistance, and challenges associated with their adaptation for clinical use.

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides as Potential Alternatives to Antibiotics in Food Animal Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Zeng, Xiangfang; Yang, Qing; Qiao, Shiyan

    2016-05-03

    Over the last decade, the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens has become a global concern, which has prompted the search for alternative antibacterial agents for use in food animals. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), produced by bacteria, insects, amphibians and mammals, as well as by chemical synthesis, are possible candidates for the design of new antimicrobial agents because of their natural antimicrobial properties and a low propensity for development of resistance by microorganisms. This manuscript reviews the current knowledge of the basic biology of AMPs and their applications in non-ruminant nutrition. Antimicrobial peptides not only have broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, fungi, and viruses but also have the ability to bypass the common resistance mechanisms that are placing standard antibiotics in jeopardy. In addition, AMPs have beneficial effects on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, intestinal morphology and gut microbiota in pigs and broilers. Therefore, AMPs have good potential as suitable alternatives to conventional antibiotics used in swine and poultry industries.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides from Marine Proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Fleury

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR strains, the efficiency of “classical” antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated in marine Proteobacteria. Of these compounds, polyketides (PKs, synthesised by condensation of malonyl-coenzyme A and/or acetyl-coenzyme A, and non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs, obtained through the linkage of (unusual amino acids, have recently generated particular interest. NRPs are good examples of naturally modified peptides. Here, we review and compile the data on the antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine Proteobacteria, especially NRPs.

  16. Production of peptide antifungal antibiotic and biocontrol activity of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Saini, Pragati; Shrivastava, J N

    2009-01-01

    Among different bacterial cultures, a potent Bacillus subtilis MTCC-8114 was isolated from garden soil samples which showed 16 and 14 mm inhibition zones by spot inoculation method and 24 and 22 mm inhibition zones by well agar diffusion method against test fungi i.e. Microsporum fulvum and Trichophyton species. Among four media tested, the maximum growth and antibiotic production was found in trypticase soya broth (TSB) medium at 37 degrees C, pH-7 and 48 h of incubation. The Rf value (0.64) by Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) technique and UV and FTIR spectral data of the active antifungal compound, indicated that the isolated compound belongs to peptide antifungal antibiotic group. MIC value of antifungal antibiotic was 135 and 145 microg/ml.

  17. Synergistic effect and antibiofilm activity between the antimicrobial peptide coprisin and conventional antibiotics against opportunistic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In-sok; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Hwang, Ji Hong; Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Eunjung; Kim, Yangmee; Lee, Dong Gun

    2013-01-01

    Coprisin is a 43-mer defensin-like peptide from the dung beetle, Copris tripartitus. In this study, we tested its minimum inhibitory concentration and performed combination assays to confirm the antibacterial susceptibility of coprisin and synergistic effects with antibiotics. The synergistic effects were evaluated by testing the effects of coprisin in combination with ampicillin, vancomycin, and chloramphenicol. The results showed that coprisin possessed antibacterial properties and had synergistic activities with the antibiotics. To understand the synergistic mechanism(s), we conducted hydroxyl radical assays. Coprisin alone and in combination with antibiotics generated hydroxyl radicals, which are highly reactive oxygen forms and the major property of bactericidal agents. Furthermore, the antibiofilm effect of coprisin alone and in combination with antibiotics was investigated. Biofilm formation is the source of many relentless and chronic bacterial infections. The results indicated that coprisin alone and in combination with antibiotics also had antibiofilm activity. Therefore, we conclude that coprisin has the potential to be used as a combinatorial therapeutic agent for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria.

  18. Synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptide DP7 combined with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaozhe; Li, Zhan; Li, Xiaolu; Tian, Yaomei; Fan, Yingzi; Yu, Chaoheng; Zhou, Bailing; Liu, Yi; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria present a great threat to public health. In this study, the synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and antibiotics on several multidrug-resistant bacterial strains were studied, and their synergistic effects on azithromycin (AZT)-resistance genes were analyzed to determine the relationships between antimicrobial resistance and these synergistic effects. A checkerboard method was used to evaluate the synergistic effects of AMPs (DP7 and CLS001) and several antibiotics (gentamicin, vancomycin [VAN], AZT, and amoxicillin) on clinical bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Escherichia coli). The AZT-resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, mefA, and msrA) were identified in the resistant strains using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. For all the clinical isolates tested that were resistant to different antibiotics, DP7 had high antimicrobial activity (≤32 mg/L). When DP7 was combined with VAN or AZT, the effect was most frequently synergistic. When we studied the resistance genes of the AZT-resistant isolates, the synergistic effect of DP7–AZT occurred most frequently in highly resistant strains or strains carrying more than two AZT-resistance genes. A transmission electron microscopic analysis of the S. aureus strain synergistically affected by DP7–AZT showed no noteworthy morphological changes, suggesting that a molecular-level mechanism plays an important role in the synergistic action of DP7–AZT. AMP DP7 plus the antibiotic AZT or VAN is more effective, especially against highly antibiotic-resistant strains. PMID:28356719

  19. Comparing selection on S. aureus between antimicrobial peptides and common antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Adam J; Purves, Joanne; Kamysz, Wojciech; Rolff, Jens

    2013-01-01

    With a diminishing number of effective antibiotics, there has been interest in developing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as drugs. However, any new drug faces potential bacterial resistance evolution. Here, we experimentally compare resistance evolution in Staphylococcus aureus selected by three AMPs (from mammals, amphibians and insects), a combination of two AMPs, and two antibiotics: the powerful last-resort vancomycin and the classic streptomycin. We find that resistance evolves readily against single AMPs and against streptomycin, with no detectable fitness cost. However the response to selection from our combination of AMPs led to extinction, in a fashion qualitatively similar to vancomycin. This is consistent with the hypothesis that simultaneous release of multiple AMPs during immune responses is a factor which constrains evolution of AMP resistant pathogens.

  20. Enduracididine, a rare amino acid component of peptide antibiotics: Natural products and synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Darcy J; Naysmith, Briar J; Furkert, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    Rising resistance to current clinical antibacterial agents is an imminent threat to global public health and highlights the demand for new lead compounds for drug discovery. One such potential lead compound, the peptide antibiotic teixobactin, was recently isolated from an uncultured bacterial source, and demonstrates remarkably high potency against a wide range of resistant pathogens without apparent development of resistance. A rare amino acid residue component of teixobactin, enduracididine, is only known to occur in a small number of natural products that also possess promising antibiotic activity. This review highlights the presence of enduracididine in natural products, its biosynthesis together with a review of analogues of enduracididine. Reported synthetic approaches to the cyclic guanidine structure of enduracididine are discussed, illustrating the challenges encountered to date in the development of efficient synthetic routes to facilitate drug discovery efforts inspired by the discovery of teixobactin. PMID:28144300

  1. Enduracididine, a rare amino acid component of peptide antibiotics: Natural products and synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy J. Atkinson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rising resistance to current clinical antibacterial agents is an imminent threat to global public health and highlights the demand for new lead compounds for drug discovery. One such potential lead compound, the peptide antibiotic teixobactin, was recently isolated from an uncultured bacterial source, and demonstrates remarkably high potency against a wide range of resistant pathogens without apparent development of resistance. A rare amino acid residue component of teixobactin, enduracididine, is only known to occur in a small number of natural products that also possess promising antibiotic activity. This review highlights the presence of enduracididine in natural products, its biosynthesis together with a review of analogues of enduracididine. Reported synthetic approaches to the cyclic guanidine structure of enduracididine are discussed, illustrating the challenges encountered to date in the development of efficient synthetic routes to facilitate drug discovery efforts inspired by the discovery of teixobactin.

  2. Comparing selection on S. aureus between antimicrobial peptides and common antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J Dobson

    Full Text Available With a diminishing number of effective antibiotics, there has been interest in developing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs as drugs. However, any new drug faces potential bacterial resistance evolution. Here, we experimentally compare resistance evolution in Staphylococcus aureus selected by three AMPs (from mammals, amphibians and insects, a combination of two AMPs, and two antibiotics: the powerful last-resort vancomycin and the classic streptomycin. We find that resistance evolves readily against single AMPs and against streptomycin, with no detectable fitness cost. However the response to selection from our combination of AMPs led to extinction, in a fashion qualitatively similar to vancomycin. This is consistent with the hypothesis that simultaneous release of multiple AMPs during immune responses is a factor which constrains evolution of AMP resistant pathogens.

  3. Antimicrobial peptides from arachnid venoms and their microbicidal activity in the presence of commercial antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Francia; Villegas, Elba; Espino-Solis, Gerardo Pavel; Rodriguez, Alexis; Paniagua-Solis, Jorge F; Sandoval-Lopez, Gabriel; Possani, Lourival D; Corzo, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), named La47 and Css54, were isolated from the venom of the spider Lachesana sp. and from the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus, respectively. The primary structures of both La47 and Css54 were determined using N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. La47 is identical to the AMP latarcin 3a obtained previously from the venom of the spider Lachesana tarabaevi, but the primary structure of Css54 is unique having 60% identities to the AMP ponericin-W2 from the venom of the ant Pachycondyla goeldii. Both La47 and Css54 have typical α-helix secondary structures in hydrophobic mimicking environments. The biological activities of both La47 and Css54 were compared with the AMP Pin2 isolated from the venom of the scorpion Pandinus imperator. La47 has lower antimicrobial and hemolytic activities compared with Css54 and Pin2. In addition, La47 and Pin2 were evaluated in the presence of the commercial antibiotics, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, novobiocin, streptomycin and kanamycin. Interestingly, the best antimicrobial combinations were obtained with mixtures of La47 and Pin2 with the antibiotics chloramphenicol, streptomycin and kanamycin, respectively. Furthermore, the novel peptide Css54 was evaluated in the presence of antibiotics used for the treatment of tuberculosis, isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol. Although the mixtures of Css54 with isoniazid, pyrazinamide or ethambutol inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, the best effect was found with rifampicin. Overall, these data show a motivating outlook for potential clinical treatments of bacterial infections using AMPs and commercial antibiotics.

  4. Ancient antimicrobial peptides kill antibiotic-resistant pathogens: Australian mammals provide new options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianghui; Wong, Emily S W; Whitley, Jane C; Li, Jian; Stringer, Jessica M; Short, Kirsty R; Renfree, Marilyn B; Belov, Katherine; Cocks, Benjamin G

    2011-01-01

    To overcome the increasing resistance of pathogens to existing antibiotics the 10×'20 Initiative declared the urgent need for a global commitment to develop 10 new antimicrobial drugs by the year 2020. Naturally occurring animal antibiotics are an obvious place to start. The recently sequenced genomes of mammals that are divergent from human and mouse, including the tammar wallaby and the platypus, provide an opportunity to discover novel antimicrobials. Marsupials and monotremes are ideal potential sources of new antimicrobials because they give birth to underdeveloped immunologically naïve young that develop outside the sterile confines of a uterus in harsh pathogen-laden environments. While their adaptive immune system develops innate immune factors produced either by the mother or by the young must play a key role in protecting the immune-compromised young. In this study we focus on the cathelicidins, a key family of antimicrobial peptide genes. We identified 14 cathelicidin genes in the tammar wallaby genome and 8 in the platypus genome. The tammar genes were expressed in the mammary gland during early lactation before the adaptive immune system of the young develops, as well as in the skin of the pouch young. Both platypus and tammar peptides were effective in killing a broad range of bacterial pathogens. One potent peptide, expressed in the early stages of tammar lactation, effectively killed multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. Marsupial and monotreme young are protected by antimicrobial peptides that are potent, broad spectrum and salt resistant. The genomes of our distant relatives may hold the key for the development of novel drugs to combat multidrug-resistant pathogens.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides as Potential Alternatives to Antibiotics in Food Animal Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens has become a global concern, which has prompted the search for alternative antibacterial agents for use in food animals. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, produced by bacteria, insects, amphibians and mammals, as well as by chemical synthesis, are possible candidates for the design of new antimicrobial agents because of their natural antimicrobial properties and a low propensity for development of resistance by microorganisms. This manuscript reviews the current knowledge of the basic biology of AMPs and their applications in non-ruminant nutrition. Antimicrobial peptides not only have broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, fungi, and viruses but also have the ability to bypass the common resistance mechanisms that are placing standard antibiotics in jeopardy. In addition, AMPs have beneficial effects on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, intestinal morphology and gut microbiota in pigs and broilers. Therefore, AMPs have good potential as suitable alternatives to conventional antibiotics used in swine and poultry industries.

  6. Natural antimicrobial peptide complexes in the fighting of antibiotic resistant biofilms: Calliphora vicina medicinal maggots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordya, Natalia; Yakovlev, Andrey; Kruglikova, Anastasia; Tulin, Dmitry; Potolitsina, Evdokia; Suborova, Tatyana; Bordo, Domenico; Rosano, Camillo; Chernysh, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms, sedimented microbial communities embedded in a biopolymer matrix cause vast majority of human bacterial infections and many severe complications such as chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Biofilms’ resistance to the host immunity and antibiotics makes this kind of infection particularly intractable. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a ubiquitous facet of innate immunity in animals. However, AMPs activity was studied mainly on planktonic bacteria and little is known about their effects on biofilms. We studied structure and anti-biofilm activity of AMP complex produced by the maggots of blowfly Calliphora vicina living in environments extremely contaminated by biofilm-forming germs. The complex exhibits strong cell killing and matrix destroying activity against human pathogenic antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms as well as non-toxicity to human immune cells. The complex was found to contain AMPs from defensin, cecropin, diptericin and proline-rich peptide families simultaneously expressed in response to bacterial infection and encoded by hundreds mRNA isoforms. All the families combine cell killing and matrix destruction mechanisms, but the ratio of these effects and antibacterial activity spectrum are specific to each family. These molecules dramatically extend the list of known anti-biofilm AMPs. However, pharmacological development of the complex as a whole can provide significant advantages compared with a conventional one-component approach. In particular, a similar level of activity against biofilm and planktonic bacteria (MBEC/MIC ratio) provides the complex advantage over conventional antibiotics. Available methods of the complex in situ and in vitro biosynthesis make this idea practicable. PMID:28278280

  7. Microbiome Changes in Healthy Volunteers Treated with GSK1322322, a Novel Antibiotic Targeting Bacterial Peptide Deformylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arat, Seda; Spivak, Aaron; Van Horn, Stephanie; Thomas, Elizabeth; Traini, Christopher; Sathe, Ganesh; Livi, George P.; Ingraham, Karen; Jones, Lori; Aubart, Kelly; Holmes, David J.; Naderer, Odin

    2014-01-01

    GSK1322322 is a novel antibacterial agent under development, and it has known antibacterial activities against multidrug-resistant respiratory and skin pathogens through its inhibition of the bacterial peptide deformylase. Here, we used next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes from stool samples collected from 61 healthy volunteers at the predosing and end-of-study time points to determine the effects of GSK1322322 on the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota in a phase I, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study. GSK1322322 was administered either intravenously (i.v.) only or in an oral-i.v. combination in single- and repeat-dose-escalation infusions. Analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence data found no significant changes in the relative abundances of GI operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the prestudy and end-of-study samples for either the placebo- or i.v.-only-treated subjects. However, oral-i.v. treatment resulted in significant decreases in some bacterial taxa, the Firmicutes and Bacteroidales, and increases in others, the Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bifidobacteriaceae. Microbiome diversity plots clearly differentiated the end-of-study oral-i.v.-dosed samples from all others collected. The changes in genome function as inferred from species composition suggest an increase in bacterial transporter and xenobiotic metabolism pathways in these samples. A phylogenetic analysis of the peptide deformylase protein sequences collected from the published genomes of clinical isolates previously tested for GSK1322322 in vitro susceptibility and GI bacterial reference genomes suggests that antibiotic target homology is one of several factors that influences the response of GI microbiota to this antibiotic. Our study shows that dosing regimen and target class are important factors when considering the impact of antibiotic usage on GI microbiota. (This clinical trial was registered at the GlaxoSmithKline Clinical Study

  8. [Amino acid and peptide derivatives of the tylosin family of macrolide antibiotics modified at the aldehyde group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbatian, N V; Kuznetsova, I V; Karpenko, V V; Fedorova, N V; Chertkov, V A; Korshunova, G A; Bogdanov, A A

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen new functionally active amino acid and peptide derivatives of the antibiotics tylosin, desmycosin, and 5-O-mycaminosyltylonolide were synthesized in order to study the interaction of the growing polypeptide chain with the ribosomal tunnel. The conjugation of various amino acids and peptides with a macrolide aldehyde group was carried out by two methods: direct reductive amination with the isolation of the intermediate Schiff bases or through binding via oxime using the preliminarily obtained derivatives of 2-aminooxyacetic acid.

  9. Antimicrobial Activity and Stability of Short and Long Based Arachnid Synthetic Peptides in the Presence of Commercial Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Arenas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Four antimicrobial peptides (AMPs named Pin2[G], Pin2[14], P18K and FA1 were chemically synthesized and purified. The four peptides were evaluated in the presence of eight commercial antibiotics against four microorganisms of medical importance: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The commercial antibiotics used were amoxicillin, azithromycin, ceftriaxone, gentamicin, levofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and vancomycin. The best AMP against P. aeruginosa was the peptide FA1, and the best AMP against S. aureus was Pin2[G]. Both FA1 and Pin2[G] were efficient against E. coli, but they were not effective against K. pneumoniae. As K. pneumoniae was resistant to most of the commercial antibiotics, combinations of the AMPs FA1 and Pin2[G] were prepared with these antibiotics. According to the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC index, the best antimicrobial combinations were obtained with concomitant applications of mixtures of FA1 with levofloxacin and sulfamethoxazole. However, combinations of FA1 or Pin2[G] with other antibiotics showed that total inhibitory effect of the combinations were greater than the sum of the individual effects of either the antimicrobial peptide or the antibiotic. We also evaluated the stability of the AMPs. The AMP Pin2[G] manifested the best performance in saline buffer, in supernatants of bacterial growth and in human blood plasma. Nevertheless, all AMPs were cleaved using endoproteolytic enzymes. These data show advantages and disadvantages of AMPs for potential clinical treatments of bacterial infections, using them in conjunction with commercial antibiotics.

  10. The peptide antibiotic microcin 25 is imported through the TonB pathway and the SbmA protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Salomón, R A; Farías, R N

    1995-01-01

    Selection of spontaneous mutants for insensitivity to the peptide antibiotic microcin 25 led to the isolation of five categories of mutants. Phenotypic and mapping studies showed the mutations to be located in the fhuA, exb, tonB, and sbmA genes. The latter encodes a cytoplasmic membrane protein which is also required for the penetration of microcin B17.

  11. A bioinspired peptide scaffold with high antibiotic activity and low in vivo toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabanal, Francesc; Grau-Campistany, Ariadna; Vila-Farrés, Xavier; Gonzalez-Linares, Javier; Borràs, Miquel; Vila, Jordi; Manresa, Angeles; Cajal, Yolanda

    2015-05-29

    Bacterial resistance to almost all available antibiotics is an important public health issue. A major goal in antimicrobial drug discovery is the generation of new chemicals capable of killing pathogens with high selectivity, particularly multi-drug-resistant ones. Here we report the design, preparation and activity of new compounds based on a tunable, chemically accessible and upscalable lipopeptide scaffold amenable to suitable hit-to-lead development. Such compounds could become therapeutic candidates and future antibiotics available on the market. The compounds are cyclic, contain two D-amino acids for in vivo stability and their structures are reminiscent of other cyclic disulfide-containing peptides available on the market. The optimized compounds prove to be highly active against clinically relevant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In vitro and in vivo tests show the low toxicity of the compounds. Their antimicrobial activity against resistant and multidrug-resistant bacteria is at the membrane level, although other targets may also be involved depending on the bacterial strain.

  12. Discovery of MRSA active antibiotics using primary sequence from the human microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, John; Vila-Farres, Xavier; Inoyama, Daigo; Ternei, Melinda; Cohen, Louis J; Gordon, Emma A; Reddy, Boojala Vijay B; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Zebroski, Henry A; Gallardo-Macias, Ricardo; Jaskowski, Mark; Satish, Shruthi; Park, Steven; Perlin, David S; Freundlich, Joel S; Brady, Sean F

    2016-12-01

    Here we present a natural product discovery approach, whereby structures are bioinformatically predicted from primary sequence and produced by chemical synthesis (synthetic-bioinformatic natural products, syn-BNPs), circumventing the need for bacterial culture and gene expression. When we applied the approach to nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters from human-associated bacteria, we identified the humimycins. These antibiotics inhibit lipid II flippase and potentiate β-lactam activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in mice, potentially providing a new treatment regimen.

  13. Cathelicidins from the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana provides novel template for peptide antibiotic design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiying Ling

    Full Text Available Cathelicidins, a class of gene-encoded effector molecules of vertebrate innate immunity, provide a first line of defense against microbial invasions. Although cathelicidins from mammals, birds, reptiles and fishes have been extensively studied, little is known about cathelicidins from amphibians. Here we report the identification and characterization of two cathelicidins (cathelicidin-RC1 and cathelicidin-RC2 from the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana. The cDNA sequences (677 and 700 bp, respectively encoding the two peptides were successfully cloned from the constructed lung cDNA library of R. catesbeiana. And the deduced mature peptides are composed of 28 and 33 residues, respectively. Structural analysis indicated that cathelicidin-RC1 mainly assumes an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation, while cathelicidin-RC2 could not form stable amphipathic structure. Antimicrobial and bacterial killing kinetic analysis indicated that the synthetic cathelicidin-RC1 possesses potent, broad-spectrum and rapid antimicrobial potency, while cathelicidin-RC2 exhibited very weak antimicrobial activity. Besides, the antimicrobial activity of cathelicidin-RC1 is salt-independent and highly stable. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis indicated that cathelicidin-RC1 kills microorganisms through the disruption of microbial membrane. Moreover, cathelicidin-RC1 exhibited low cytotoxic activity against mammalian normal or tumor cell lines, and low hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes. The potent, broad-spectrum and rapid antimicrobial activity combined with the salt-independence, high stability, low cytotoxic and hemolytic activities make cathelicidin-RC1 an ideal template for the development of novel peptide antibiotics.

  14. In vitro synergistic effect of the CM11 antimicrobial peptide in combination with common antibiotics against clinical isolates of six species of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amani, Jafar; Barjini, Kamal A; Moghaddam, Mehrdad M; Asadi, Asadollah

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, increase of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria has been considered as a global concern. Therefore, it is important to find new antimicrobial agents and/or therapeutic strategies. In previous studies we investigated antibacterial activity of the CM11 peptide against multiple drug resistant clinical isolates of six bacteria species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhimurium. In this study, in order to reduce treatment costs and the cytotoxic effect of CM11 peptide, was analyzed its synergic interaction with selected antibiotics. In this reason, specific antibiotics for each bacterium were selected considering the guidelines of the "Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute". Based on the results , using a checkerboard procedure through the broth microdilution method, MICs of antibiotic agents alone and in combination with the peptide were determined. In most cases, synergistic effects between CM11 peptide and selected antibiotics against six bacteria species were observed as partial synergy. However, for S. aureus and P. aeruginosaa synergic interaction between peptide and selective antibiotics was observed with penicillin and ceftazidime, respectively. For K. pneumoniae, synergic effect was observed when CM11 peptide was used in combination with norfloxacin and also the combination of peptide with norfloxacin showed synergic effect against A. baumannii. Combination between the CM11 peptide and ciprofloxacin showed synergic effect on E. coli while only partial synergy was observed for S. typhimurium in combination with cefotaxime and ceftazidime. These results suggest that when selected antibiotic used in combination with the CM11 peptide, the dose of some antibiotics, especially the dose independent antibiotics, may be reduced for eliminating drug resistant bacteria.

  15. Quick guide to polyketide synthase and nonribosomal synthetase genes in Fusarium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen T.; Sørensen, Jens L.; Giese, Henriette;

    2012-01-01

    Fusarium species produce a plethora of bioactive polyketides and nonribosomal peptides that give rise to health problems in animals and may have drug development potential. Using the genome sequences for Fusarium graminearum, F. oxysporum, F. solani and F. verticillioides we developed a framework...... and NRPS genes in sequenced Fusarium species and their known products. With the rapid increase in the number of sequenced fungal genomes a systematic classification will greatly aid the scientific community in obtaining an overview of the number of different NRPS and PKS genes and their potential...

  16. In vitro effectiveness of the antimicrobial peptide eCATH1 against antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlusselhuber, Margot; Guldbech, Kristen; Sevin, Corinne; Leippe, Matthias; Petry, Sandrine; Grötzinger, Joachim; Giguère, Steeve; Cauchard, Julien

    2014-01-01

    The equine antimicrobial peptide eCATH1 previously has been shown to have in vitro activity against antibiotic-susceptible reference strains of Rhodococcus equi and common respiratory bacterial pathogens of foals. Interestingly, eCATH1 was also found to be effective in the treatment of R. equi infection induced in mice. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro activity of eCATH1 against equine isolates of Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas spp.) and Gram-positive (R. equi, Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria resistant to multiple classes of conventional antibiotics. A modified microdilution method was used to evaluate the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the antimicrobial peptide. The study revealed that eCATH1 was active against all equine isolates of E. coli, S. enterica, K. pneumoniae, Pseudomonas spp. and R. equi tested, with MICs of 0.5-16 μg mL(-1), but was not active against most isolates of S. aureus. In conclusion, the activity of the equine antimicrobial peptide eCATH1 appears to not be hampered by the antibiotic resistance of clinical isolates. Thus, the data suggest that eCATH1 could be useful, not only in the treatment of R. equi infections, but also of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens.

  17. Intracellular activity of the peptide antibiotic NZ2114: studies with Staphylococcus aureus and human THP-1 monocytes, and comparison with daptomycin and vancomycin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, Karoline Sidelmann; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Francoise;

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus survives inside eukaryotic cells. Our objective was to assess the activity of NZ2114, a novel peptidic antibiotic, against intracellular S. aureus in comparison with established antistaphylococcal agents acting on the bacterial envelope with a distinct mechanism.......Staphylococcus aureus survives inside eukaryotic cells. Our objective was to assess the activity of NZ2114, a novel peptidic antibiotic, against intracellular S. aureus in comparison with established antistaphylococcal agents acting on the bacterial envelope with a distinct mechanism....

  18. Collision-induced dissociation of noncovalent complexes between vancomycin antibiotics and peptide ligand stereoisomers: evidence for molecular recognition in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Delforge, D; Remacle, J

    1999-01-01

    In solution, the antibiotics of the vancomycin group bind stereospecifically to peptides with the C-terminal sequence: -L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, Substitution by a L-Ala at either of the two C-terminal residues causes a dramatic decrease in the binding affinity to the antibiotics. This solution behavior...... of an antibiotic, a -L-Ala peptide, a -D-Ala stereoisomer, one ligand isotopically labelled. Upon CID of the negatively charged mixed cluster ions a stereoselective loss of the assumed "nonspecifically" bound -L-Ala ligand was observed. (Int J Mass Spectrom 188 (1999) 63-85) (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V....

  19. The peptide antibiotic microcin B17 induces double-strand cleavage of DNA mediated by E. coli DNA gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizán, J L; Hernández-Chico, C; del Castillo, I; Moreno, F

    1991-02-01

    Microcin B17 (MccB17) is a bactericidal peptide antibiotic which inhibits DNA replication. Two Escherichia coli MccB17 resistant mutants were isolated and the mutations were shown to map to 83 min of the genetic map. Cloning of the mutations and Tn5 insertional analysis demonstrated that they were located inside gyrB. The approximate location of the mutations within gyrB was determined by constructing hybrid genes, as a previous step to sequencing. Both mutations were shown to consist of a single AT----GC transition at position 2251 of the gene, which produces a Trp751----Arg substitution in the amino acid sequence of the GyrB polypeptide. The inhibitory effect of MccB17 on replicative cell-free extracts was assayed. In this in vitro system, interaction of MccB17 with a component of the extracts induced double-strand cleavage of plasmid DNA. In vivo treatment with MccB17 also induced a well-defined cleavage pattern on chromosomal DNA. These effects were not observed with a MccB17-resistant, gyrB mutant. Altogether, our results indicate that MccB17 blocks DNA gyrase by trapping an enzyme-DNA cleavable complex. Thus, the mode of action of this peptide antibiotic resembles that of quinolones and a variety of antitumour drugs currently used in cancer chemotherapy. MccB17 is the first peptide shown to inhibit a type II DNA topoisomerase.

  20. Molecular design and genetic optimization of antimicrobial peptides containing unnatural amino acids against antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongkang; He, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been the focus of intense research towards the finding of a viable alternative to current small-molecule antibiotics, owing to their commonly observed and naturally occurring resistance against pathogens. However, natural peptides have many problems such as low bioavailability and high allergenicity that largely limit the clinical applications of AMPs. In the present study, an integrative protocol that combined chemoinformatics modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, and in vitro susceptibility test was described to design AMPs containing unnatural amino acids (AMP-UAAs). To fulfill this, a large panel of synthetic AMPs with determined activity was collected and used to perform quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling. The obtained QSAR predictors were then employed to direct genetic algorithm (GA)-based optimization of AMP-UAA population, to which a number of commercially available, structurally diverse unnatural amino acids were introduced during the optimization process. Subsequently, several designed AMP-UAAs were confirmed to have high antibacterial potency against two antibiotic-resistant strains, i.e. multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRPA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) < 10 μg/ml. Structural dynamics characterizations revealed that the most potent AMP-UAA peptide is an amphipathic helix that can spontaneously embed into an artificial lipid bilayer and exhibits a strong destructuring tendency associated with the embedding process. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 746-756, 2016.

  1. Functional characterization of a three-component regulatory system involved in quorum sensing-based regulation of peptide antibiotic production in Carnobacterium maltaromaticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quadri Luis EN

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quorum sensing is a form of cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to control a wide range of physiological processes in a population density-dependent manner. Production of peptide antibiotics is one of the processes regulated by quorum sensing in several species of Gram-positive bacteria, including strains of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum. This bacterium and its peptide antibiotics are of interest due to their potential applications in food preservation. The molecular bases of the quorum sensing phenomenon controlling peptide antibiotic production in C. maltaromaticum remain poorly understood. The present study was aimed at gaining a deeper insight into the molecular mechanism involved in quorum sensing-mediated regulation of peptide antibiotic (bacteriocin production by C. maltaromaticum. We report the functional analyses of the CS (autoinducer-CbnK (histidine protein kinase-CbnR (response regulator three-component regulatory system and the three regulated promoters involved in peptide antibiotic production in C. maltaromaticum LV17B. Results CS-CbnK-CbnR system-dependent activation of carnobacterial promoters was demonstrated in both homologous and heterologous hosts using a two-plasmid system with a β-glucuronidase (GusA reporter read-out. The results of our analyses support a model in which the CbnK-CbnR two-component signal transduction system is necessary and sufficient to transduce the signal of the peptide autoinducer CS into the activation of the promoters that drive the expression of the genes required for production of the carnobacterial peptide antibiotics and the immunity proteins that protect the producer bacterium. Conclusions The CS-CbnK-CbnR triad forms a three-component regulatory system by which production of peptide antibiotics by C. maltaromaticum LV17B is controlled in a population density-dependent (or cell proximity-dependent manner. This regulatory mechanism would permit the bacterial

  2. Polymeric adsorbents with peptide pendants as artificial receptors for β-Mactam antibiotics by mimicking the binding sites of β-lactamases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马建标; 谢志东; 王永健; 王亦农; 范云鸽; 何炳林

    1997-01-01

    A scries of polymeric adsorbents with peptide pendants were designed as the artificial receptors of β-laetarn antibiotics by mimicking the structures of binding site in β-lactamases.Crosslinked poly(N,N-dimethyl acry-lamide) gel as a carrier was prepared by suspension copolyrnerization of N,N-dimethyl acrylamide and N,N-bisacryl-diaminoethane and then functionalized with ethylenediamine after partial hydrolysis.Using solid-phase peptide synthesis with symmetrical anhydride of protected amino acid step by step,various peptide pendants were respectively anchored onto the functionalized carrier.The adsorption properties of these peptide-containing adsorbents for β-lactam antibiotics such as ampicillin and cefotaxime were then studied.The results showed that only those adsorbents in which peptide chains contained more than one lysine residues could obviously adsorb both β-lactams and that static interaction as well as hydrogen bond played an important role during the adsorption

  3. Muraymycin nucleoside-peptide antibiotics: uridine-derived natural products as lead structures for the development of novel antibacterial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Marius; Niro, Giuliana; Leyerer, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Muraymycins are a promising class of antimicrobial natural products. These uridine-derived nucleoside-peptide antibiotics inhibit the bacterial membrane protein translocase I (MraY), a key enzyme in the intracellular part of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. This review describes the structures of naturally occurring muraymycins, their mode of action, synthetic access to muraymycins and their analogues, some structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies and first insights into muraymycin biosynthesis. It therefore provides an overview on the current state of research, as well as an outlook on possible future developments in this field. PMID:27340469

  4. Muraymycin nucleoside-peptide antibiotics: uridine-derived natural products as lead structures for the development of novel antibacterial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wiegmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Muraymycins are a promising class of antimicrobial natural products. These uridine-derived nucleoside-peptide antibiotics inhibit the bacterial membrane protein translocase I (MraY, a key enzyme in the intracellular part of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. This review describes the structures of naturally occurring muraymycins, their mode of action, synthetic access to muraymycins and their analogues, some structure–activity relationship (SAR studies and first insights into muraymycin biosynthesis. It therefore provides an overview on the current state of research, as well as an outlook on possible future developments in this field.

  5. Peptide antibiotics: an alternative and effective antimicrobial strategy to circumvent fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajesh, K; Sreejith, K

    2009-05-01

    Mycosis, caused by both filamentous fungi and pathogenic yeasts is a major concern nowadays especially in the immunocompromised patient population. The emergence of pathogenic fungi resistant to current therapies in the last few decades has intensified the search for new antifungals like cationic peptides, which are the key components of innate defense mechanism. The review provides an inventory of different peptides from a diverse array of organisms from bacteria to mammals with proven antifungal activity, their therapeutic options and also about those which are in various stages of preclinical development. Literature, on the total and semi-synthetic variants of the parent peptides that exhibit an improved antifungal activity is also reviewed.

  6. A Designed Tryptophan- and Lysine/Arginine-Rich Antimicrobial Peptide with Therapeutic Potential for Clinical Antibiotic-Resistant Candida albicans Vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lin; Bai, Xuewei; Luan, Ning; Yao, Huimin; Zhang, Zhiye; Liu, Weihui; Chen, Yan; Yan, Xiuwen; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren; Lu, Qiumin

    2016-03-10

    New therapeutic agents for Candida albicans vaginitis are urgently awaiting to be developed because of the increasing antibiotic resistance of C. albicans. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are one of the most promising choices for next-generation antibiotics. In this study, novel peptides were designed based on snake venom antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin-BF to promote anti-C. albicans activity and decrease side-effects. The designing strategies include substitutions of charged or hydrophobic amino acid residues for noncharged polar residues to promote antimicrobial activity and insertion of a hydrophobic residue in the hydrophilic side of the helix structure to reduce hemolysis. A designed tryptophan and lysine/arginine-rich cationic peptide 4 (ZY13) (VKRWKKWRWKWKKWV-NH2) exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against either common strain or clinical isolates of antibiotic-resistant C. albicans with little hemolysis. Peptide 4 showed significant therapeutic effects on vaginitis in mice induced by the infection of clinical antibiotic-resistant C. albicans. The approaches herein might be useful for designing of AMPs.

  7. Possible interaction of quinolone antibiotics with peptide transporter 1 in oral absorption of peptide-mimetic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Kamioka, Hiroki; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Hatano, Yasuko; Idota, Yoko; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated whether quinolone antibiotics inhibit the PEPT1-mediated uptake of its substrates. Among the quinolones examined, lomefloxacin, moxifloxacin (MFLX) and purlifloxacin significantly inhibited the uptake of PEPT1 substrate phenylalanine-Ψ(CN-S)-alanine (Phe-Ψ-Ala) in HeLa/PEPT1 cells to 31.6 ± 1.3%, 27.6 ± 2.9%, 36.8 ± 2.2% and 32.6 ± 1.4%, respectively. Further examination showed that MFLX was an uncompetitive inhibitor, with an IC50 value of 4.29 ± 1.29 mm. In addition, MFLX significantly decreased the cephalexin and valacyclovir uptake in HeLa/PEPT1 cells. In an in vivo study in rats, the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) of orally administered Phe-Ψ-Ala was significantly decreased in the presence of MFLX (171 ± 1 ng/ml) compared with that in its absence (244 ± 9 ng/ml). The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of orally administered Phe-Ψ-Ala in the presence of MFLX (338 ± 50 ng/ml · h) tended to decrease compared with that in its absence (399 ± 75 ng/ml · h). The oral bioavailability of Phe-Ψ-Ala in the presence and absence of MFLX was 41.7 ± 6.2% and 49.2 ± 9.2%, respectively. The results indicate that administration of quinolone antibiotics concomitantly with PEPT1 substrate drugs may potentially result in drug-drug interaction.

  8. [Isolation of peptide antibiotic virginiamycin components and selection of their producer Streptomyces virginiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvenigorodskiĭ, V I; Tiaglov, B V; Voeĭkova, T A

    2001-01-01

    A method for chromatographic separation and quantitative determination of individual components of the antibiotic virginiamycin, produced by microbiological synthesis (Streptomyces virginiae strain 147), is described. The components, M1-2 and S1-5, were isolated from fermentation broth and identified by HPTLC and HPLC (the results obtained using the two methods correlate well with each other). Conditions of culturing of the producer and compositions of nutritive media were optimized. Using UV irradiation as a mutagenic factor, the producer was selected for increased level of synthesis of the antibiotic; this was achieved by inducing mutations that impart resistance to virginiamycin and meta-fluorophenylalanine, an analog of phenylalanine.

  9. Novel phospholipase A2 inhibitors from python serum are potent peptide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samy, Ramar Perumal; Thwin, Maung Maung; Stiles, Brad G; Satyanarayana-Jois, Seetharama; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M E; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Sikka, Sakshi; Kumar, Alan Prem; Sethi, Gautam; Lim, Lina Hsiu Kim

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) play a vital role in defense against resistant bacteria. In this study, eight different AMPs synthesized from Python reticulatus serum protein were tested for bactericidal activity against various Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia pseudomallei (KHW and TES strains), and Proteus vulgaris) using a disc-diffusion method (20 μg/disc). Among the tested peptides, phospholipase A2 inhibitory peptide (PIP)-18[59-76], β-Asp65-PIP[59-67], D-Ala66-PNT.II, and D60,65E-PIP[59-67] displayed the most potent bactericidal activity against all tested pathogens in a dose-dependent manner (100-6.8 μg/ml), with a remarkable activity noted against S. aureus at 6.8 μg/ml dose within 6 h of incubation. Determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) by a micro-broth dilution method at 100-3.125 μg/ml revealed that PIP-18[59-76], β-Asp65-PIP[59-67] and D-Ala66-PNT.II peptides exerted a potent inhibitory effect against S. aureus and B. pseudomallei (KHW) (MICs 3.125 μg/ml), while a much less inhibitory potency (MICs 12.5 μg/ml) was noted for β-Asp65-PIP[59-67] and D-Ala66-PNT.II peptides against B. pseudomallei (TES). Higher doses of peptides had no effect on the other two strains (i.e., Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus pneumoniae). Overall, PIP-18[59-76] possessed higher antimicrobial activity than that of chloramphenicol (CHL), ceftazidime (CF) and streptomycin (ST) (30 μg/disc). When the two most active peptides, PIP-18[59-76] and β-Asp65-PIP[59-67], were applied topically at a 150 mg/kg dose for testing wound healing activity in a mouse model of S. aureus infection, the former accelerates faster wound healing than the latter peptide at 14 days post-treatment. The western blot data suggest that the topical application of peptides (PIP-18[59-67] and β-Asp65-PIP[59-67]) modulates NF-kB mediated wound repair in mice with relatively little haemolytic (100-1.56 μg/ml) and cytotoxic (1000

  10. Synthetic studies on kinase inihbitors and cyclic peptides : strategies towards new antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuin, Adriaan Willem

    2008-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an increased occurrence of bacterial resistance against antibiotics. The first part of this thesis describes the discovery of a novel target, protein kinase B / Akt1, that may be used to combat infection with pathogenic bacteria like Salmonella typhimurium. Inhibitors

  11. Medical-grade honey enriched with antimicrobial peptides has enhanced activity against antibiotic-resistant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.H.S. Kwakman; L. de Boer; C.P. Ruyter-Spira; T. Creemers-Molenaar; J.P.F.G. Helsper; C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls; S.A.J. Zaat; A.A. te Velde

    2011-01-01

    Honey has potent activity against both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant bacteria, and is an interesting agent for topical antimicrobial application to wounds. As honey is diluted by wound exudate, rapid bactericidal activity up to high dilution is a prerequisite for its successful application. We

  12. Human commensals producing a novel antibiotic impair pathogen colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipperer, Alexander; Konnerth, Martin C; Laux, Claudia; Berscheid, Anne; Janek, Daniela; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Burian, Marc; Schilling, Nadine A; Slavetinsky, Christoph; Marschal, Matthias; Willmann, Matthias; Kalbacher, Hubert; Schittek, Birgit; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike; Grond, Stephanie; Peschel, Andreas; Krismer, Bernhard

    2016-07-28

    The vast majority of systemic bacterial infections are caused by facultative, often antibiotic-resistant, pathogens colonizing human body surfaces. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus predisposes to invasive infection, but the mechanisms that permit or interfere with pathogen colonization are largely unknown. Whereas soil microbes are known to compete by production of antibiotics, such processes have rarely been reported for human microbiota. We show that nasal Staphylococcus lugdunensis strains produce lugdunin, a novel thiazolidine-containing cyclic peptide antibiotic that prohibits colonization by S. aureus, and a rare example of a non-ribosomally synthesized bioactive compound from human-associated bacteria. Lugdunin is bactericidal against major pathogens, effective in animal models, and not prone to causing development of resistance in S. aureus. Notably, human nasal colonization by S. lugdunensis was associated with a significantly reduced S. aureus carriage rate, suggesting that lugdunin or lugdunin-producing commensal bacteria could be valuable for preventing staphylococcal infections. Moreover, human microbiota should be considered as a source for new antibiotics.

  13. Fungicin M4: a narrow spectrum peptide antibiotic from Bacillus licheniformis M-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebbadi, M; Gálvez, A; Maqueda, M; Martínez-Bueno, M; Valdivia, E

    1994-07-01

    The strain Bacillus licheniformis M-4 produces a 3.4 kDa hydrophilic peptide with antifungal activity, named fungicin M4. Analysis of the purified peptide shows that it contains the amino acids Glu (8), Arg (5), Pro (4), Tyr (8), Val (3), Met (2) and Orn (4). Its inhibitory spectrum is restricted to Microsporum canis CECT 2797, Mucor mucedo CECT 2653, Mucor plumbeus CCM 443, Sporothrix schenckii CECT 2799, Bacillus megaterium and Corynebacterium glutamicum CECT 78. Fungicin M4 exerts biocidal activity on liquid cultures of Sporothrix schenckii CECT 2799.

  14. ATP/GTP hydrolysis is required for oxazole and thiazole biosynthesis in the peptide antibiotic microcin B17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, J C; Eliot, A C; Kelleher, N L; Walsh, C T

    1998-09-22

    In the maturation of the Escherichia coli antibiotic Microcin B17, the product of the mcbA gene is modified posttranslationally by the multimeric Microcin synthetase complex (composed of McbB, C, and D) to cyclize four Cys and four Ser residues to four thiazoles and four oxazoles, respectively. The purified synthetase shows an absolute requirement for ATP or GTP in peptide substrate heterocyclization, with GTP one-third as effective as ATP in initial rate studies. The ATPase/GTPase activity of the synthetase complex is conditional in that ADP or GDP formation requires the presence of substrate; noncyclizable versions of McbA bind to synthetase, but do not induce the NTPase activity. The stoichiometry of ATP hydrolysis and heterocycle formation is 5:1 for a substrate that contains two potential sites of modification. However, at high substrate concentrations (>50Km) heterocycle formation is inhibited, while ATPase activity occurs undiminished, consistent with uncoupling of NTP hydrolysis and heterocycle formation at high substrate concentrations. Sequence homology reveals that the McbD subunit has motifs reminiscent of the Walker B box in ATP utilizing enzymes and of motifs found in small G protein GTPases. Mutagenesis of three aspartates to alanine in these motifs (D132, D147, and D199) reduced Microcin B17 production in vivo and heterocycle formation in vitro, suggesting that the 45 kDa McbD has a regulated ATPase/GTPase domain in its N-terminal region necessary for peptide heterocyclization.

  15. Identification and functional analysis of gene cluster involvement in biosynthesis of the cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic pelgipeptin produced by Paenibacillus elgii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Chao-Dong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pelgipeptin, a potent antibacterial and antifungal agent, is a non-ribosomally synthesised lipopeptide antibiotic. This compound consists of a β-hydroxy fatty acid and nine amino acids. To date, there is no information about its biosynthetic pathway. Results A potential pelgipeptin synthetase gene cluster (plp was identified from Paenibacillus elgii B69 through genome analysis. The gene cluster spans 40.8 kb with eight open reading frames. Among the genes in this cluster, three large genes, plpD, plpE, and plpF, were shown to encode non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs, with one, seven, and one module(s, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis of the substrate specificity of all nine adenylation domains indicated that the sequence of the NRPS modules is well collinear with the order of amino acids in pelgipeptin. Additional biochemical analysis of four recombinant adenylation domains (PlpD A1, PlpE A1, PlpE A3, and PlpF A1 provided further evidence that the plp gene cluster involved in pelgipeptin biosynthesis. Conclusions In this study, a gene cluster (plp responsible for the biosynthesis of pelgipeptin was identified from the genome sequence of Paenibacillus elgii B69. The identification of the plp gene cluster provides an opportunity to develop novel lipopeptide antibiotics by genetic engineering.

  16. PCR-based site-specific mutagenesis of peptide antibiotics FALL-39 and its biologic activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-xia YANG; Yun FENG; Bo-yao WANG; Qi WU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct PGEX-1λT-FALL-39 expression vector and its mutant vector, and study the relationship of function and structure. METHODS: A cDNA encoding mature FALL-39 was cloned from SPCA- 1 cell mRNA and the prokaryotic expression vector PGEX- 1λT-FALL-39 was constructed. Two kinds of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the site-direction mutagenesis were used to construct FALL-39 mutant expression vector, FALL-39-Lys-32 and FALL-39-Lys-24. Minimal effective concentration, minimal inhibitory concentration, and minimal bactericidal concentration were used to assay the antibacterial activities of these peptides. Effects of different solution on the antibacterial activity of FALL-39 and FALL-39-Lys-32 were observed by CFU determination. The hemolytic effects of these peptides were also examined on human red blood cells. RESULTS: Two site-specific mutants FALL-39-Lys-32 and FALL-39-Lys24 were obtained by PCR-induced mutagenesis. In comparison with two-step PCR which required two pairs of primers, one step PCR which required one pair of primers is a simple and efficient method for the PCR based site-specific mutagenesis. Using the prokaryotic expression system, the E coli-based products of recombinant FALL39 and its mutant peptides were also obtained. The antibacterial assay showed that FALL-39-Lys-32 and FALL-39-Lys24 were more potential in the antibacterial activity against E coli ML35p and Pseltdomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 than that of FALL-39, and no increase in hemolysis was observed at the antibacterial concentrations. The antibacterial activity of FALL-39-Lys-32 against E coli was more potent than that of FALL-39 in NaCl-containing LB medium, while its activity was almost the same as FALL-39 in SO2-4 containing Medium E. CONCLUSION: PCR-based mutagensis is a useful model system for studying the structure and function relationship of antimicrobial peptides. Keeping α-helical conformation of FALL-39 and increasing net positive charge can increase the

  17. Cell-penetrating peptide and antibiotic combination therapy: a potential alternative to combat drug resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Harmandeep Kaur; Gautam, Ankur; Sharma, Minakshi; Bhatia, Rakesh; Varshney, Grish C; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh; Nandanwar, Hemraj

    2016-05-01

    The diverse pattern of resistance by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the major obstacle in the treatment of its infections. The key reason of resistance is the poor membrane permeability of drug molecules. Over the last decade, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as efficient drug delivery vehicles and have been exploited to improve the intracellular delivery of numerous therapeutic molecules in preclinical studies. Therefore, to overcome the drug resistance, we have investigated for the first time the effects of two CPPs (P3 and P8) in combination with four antibiotics (viz. oxacillin, erythromycin, norfloxacin, and vancomycin) against MRSA strains. We found that both CPPs internalized into the MRSA efficiently at very low concentration (combinations of CPPs (≤10 μM) and antibiotics showed high toxicity against MRSA as compared to antibiotics alone. The significant finding is that P3 and P8 could lower the MICs against oxacillin, norfloxacin, and vancomycin to susceptible levels (generally antibiotics. In summary, CPPs assist to restore the effectiveness of antibiotics at much lower concentration, eliminate the antibiotic toxicity, and represent the CPP-antibiotic combination therapy as a potential novel weapon to combat MRSA infections.

  18. Functional synergy of α-helical antimicrobial peptides and traditional antibiotics against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Q; Huang, Y; Chen, M; Li, G; Chen, Y

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the antimicrobial activities based on the synergistic effects of traditional antibiotics (imipenem, cefepime, levofloxacin hydrochloride and vancomycin) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs; PL-5, PL-31, PL-32, PL-18, PL-29 and PL-26), alone or in combination, against three Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and three Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) were investigated. In addition, the antimicrobial activity that was based on the synergistic effects of levofloxacin hydrochloride and PL-5 against Staphylococcus aureus in vivo was explored in a mouse infection model. Traditional antibiotics and AMPs showed significant synergistic effects on the antibacterial activities against the different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in vitro. A strong synergistic effect in the PL-5 and levofloxacin hydrochloride combination against Staphylococcus aureus was observed in the mouse infection model in vivo. The mechanism of synergistic action was due to the different targets of AMPs and traditional antibiotics. The combination of AMPs and traditional antibiotics can dramatically enhance antimicrobial activity and may help prevent or delay the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Thus, this combination therapy could be a promising approach to treat bacterial infections, particularly mixed infections and multi-antibiotic-resistant infections, in the clinics.

  19. Evaluation of the mutagenic activity of leucinostatins, a novel class of antibiotic peptides produced by Paecilomyces marquandii, in the modul Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crebelli, R; Carere, A; Conti, G; Conti, L; Rossi, C; Tuttobello, L

    1988-10-01

    Leucinostatins A, B, C, D, E, G, H, and K were thoroughly investigated for their genotoxic activity using the modul Aspergillus nidulans as the test organism. The results of assays for gene mutation (8-azaguanine resistance and methionine suppressors), gene conversion, mitotic crossing-over and mitotic aneuploidy induction suggest that these peptide antibiotics lack significant mutagenicity and that non-genotoxic mechanism(s) underlie their cytotoxic properties.

  20. Persistence of the antibody response to the VlsE sixth invariant region (IR6) peptide of Borrelia burgdorferi after successful antibiotic treatment of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltomaa, Miikka; McHugh, Gail; Steere, Allen C

    2003-04-15

    It has been suggested that a Lyme disease. We studied the response to this peptide in 77 patients with early or late disease, for whom archival samples were available at the time of antibiotic treatment and approximately 6 months or years later. Eight (33%) of the 24 patients with early manifestations and 18 (86%) of the 21 patients with late manifestations had a Lyme disease.

  1. A novel cysteine-free venom peptide with strong antimicrobial activity against antibiotics-resistant pathogens from the scorpion Opistophthalmus glabrifrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Aorigele; Zhong, Jie; Zeng, Xian-Chun; Nie, Yao; Zhang, Lei; Peng, Zhao Feng

    2015-10-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, pose serious threat to human health. The outbreak of antibiotic-resistant pathogens in recent years emphasizes once again the urgent need for the development of new antimicrobial agents. Here, we discovered a novel antimicrobial peptide from the scorpion Opistophthalmus glabrifrons, which was referred to as Opisin. Opisin consists of 19 amino acid residues without disulfide bridges. It is a cationic, amphipathic, and α-helical molecule. Protein sequence homology search revealed that Opisin shares 42.1-5.3% sequence identities to the 17/18-mer antimicrobial peptides from scorpions. Antimicrobial assay showed that Opisin is able to potently inhibit the growth of the tested Gram-positive bacteria with the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 4.0-10.0 μM; in contrast, it possesses much lower activity against the tested Gram-negative bacteria and a fungus. It is interesting to see that Opisin is able to strongly inhibit the growth of methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant pathogens with the MICs ranging from 2.0 to 4.0 μM and from 4.0 to 6.0 μM, respectively. We found that at a concentration of 5 × MIC, Opisin completely killed all the cultured methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. These results suggest that Opisin is a promising therapeutic candidate for the treatment of the antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

  2. An update to polyketide synthase and non-ribosomal synthetase genes and nomenclature in Fusarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Frederik T; Gardiner, Donald M; Lysøe, Erik; Fuertes, Patricia Romans; Tudzynski, Bettina; Wiemann, Philipp; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Giese, Henriette; Brodersen, Ditlev E; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-02-01

    Members of the genus Fusarium produce a plethora of bioactive secondary metabolites, which can be harmful to humans and animals or have potential in drug development. In this study we have performed comparative analyses of polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) from ten different Fusarium species including F. graminearum (two strains), F. verticillioides, F. solani, F. culmorum, F. pseudograminearum, F. fujikuroi, F. acuminatum, F. avenaceum, F. equiseti, and F. oxysporum (12 strains). This led to identification of 52 NRPS and 52 PKSs orthology groups, respectively, and although not all PKSs and NRPSs are assumed to be intact or functional, the analyses illustrate the huge secondary metabolite potential in Fusarium. In our analyses we identified a core collection of eight NRPSs (NRPS2-4, 6, 10-13) and two PKSs (PKS3 and PKS7) that are conserved in all strains analyzed in this study. The identified PKSs and NRPSs were named based on a previously developed classification system (www.FusariumNRPSPKS.dk). We suggest this system be used when PKSs and NRPSs have to be classified in future sequenced Fusarium strains. This system will facilitate identification of orthologous and non-orthologous NRPSs and PKSs from newly sequenced Fusarium genomes and will aid the scientific community by providing a common nomenclature for these two groups of genes/enzymes.

  3. Genome-based discovery, structure prediction and functional analysis of cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics in Pseudomonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Irene; de Kock, Maarten J D; Yang, Meng; de Waard, Pieter; van Beek, Teris A; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of microbial genome sequences have revealed numerous genes involved in antibiotic biosynthesis. In Pseudomonads, several gene clusters encoding non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) were predicted to be involved in the synthesis of cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) antibiotics. Most of these predictions, however, are untested and the association between genome sequence and biological function of the predicted metabolite is lacking. Here we report the genome-based identification of previously unknown CLP gene clusters in plant pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae strains B728a and DC3000 and in plant beneficial Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 and SBW25. For P. fluorescens SBW25, a model strain in studying bacterial evolution and adaptation, the structure of the CLP with a predicted 9-amino acid peptide moiety was confirmed by chemical analyses. Mutagenesis confirmed that the three identified NRPS genes are essential for CLP synthesis in strain SBW25. CLP production was shown to play a key role in motility, biofilm formation and in activity of SBW25 against zoospores of Phytophthora infestans. This is the first time that an antimicrobial metabolite is identified from strain SBW25. The results indicate that genome mining may enable the discovery of unknown gene clusters and traits that are highly relevant in the lifestyle of plant beneficial and plant pathogenic bacteria.

  4. Treatment of microbial biofilms in the post-antibiotic era: prophylactic and therapeutic use of antimicrobial peptides and their design by bioinformatics tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Maccari, Giuseppe; Nifosì, Riccardo

    2014-04-01

    The treatment for biofilm infections is particularly challenging because bacteria in these conditions become refractory to antibiotic drugs. The reduced effectiveness of current therapies spurs research for the identification of novel molecules endowed with antimicrobial activities and new mechanisms of antibiofilm action. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutic agents, because they represent a novel class of antibiotics with a wide spectrum of activity and a low rate in inducing bacterial resistance. Over the past decades, a large number of naturally occurring AMPs have been identified or predicted from various organisms as effector molecules of the innate immune system playing a crucial role in the first line of defense. Recent studies have shown the ability of some AMPs to act against microbial biofilms, in particular during early phases of biofilm development. Here, we provide a review of the antimicrobial peptides tested on biofilms, highlighting their advantages and disadvantages for prophylactic and therapeutic applications. In addition, we describe the strategies and methods for de novo design of potentially active AMPs and discuss how informatics and computational tools may be exploited to improve antibiofilm effectiveness.

  5. 2-Amino-3-(Oxirane-2,3-Dicarboxamido)-Propanoyl-Valine, an Effective Peptide Antibiotic from the Epiphyte Pantoea agglomerans 48b/90 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammer, Ulrike F.; Völksch, Beate; Möllmann, Ute; Schmidtke, Michaela; Spiteller, Peter; Spiteller, Michael; Spiteller, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    The epiphyte Pantoea agglomerans 48b/90, which has been isolated from soybean leaves, belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae, as does the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora, which causes fire blight on rosaceous plants such as apples and leads to severe economic losses. Since P. agglomerans efficiently antagonizes phytopathogenic bacteria, the P. agglomerans strain C9-1 is used as a biocontrol agent (BlightBan C9-1). Here we describe the bioassay-guided isolation of a peptide antibiotic that is highly active against the plant pathogen E. amylovora and pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae, and we elucidate its structure. Bioassay-guided fractionation using anion-exchange chromatography followed by hydrophobic interaction liquid chromatography yielded the bioactive, highly polar antibiotic. The compound was identified as 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine by using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. This peptide was found to be produced by three of the nine P. agglomerans strains analyzed. Notably, the biocontrol strain P. agglomerans C9-1 also produces 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine. Previously, 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine has been characterized only from Serratia plymuthica. 2-Amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine has been shown to inhibit the growth of the human pathogen Candida albicans efficiently, but its involvement in the defense of epiphytes against phytopathogenic bacteria has not been investigated so far. PMID:19820144

  6. Antibiotic-producing ability by representatives of a newly discovered lineage of actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busti, Elena; Monciardini, Paolo; Cavaletti, Linda; Bamonte, Ruggiero; Lazzarini, Ameriga; Sosio, Margherita; Donadio, Stefano

    2006-03-01

    The discovery of new antibiotics and other bioactive microbial metabolites continues to be an important objective in new drug research. Since extensive screening has led to the discovery of thousands of bioactive microbial molecules, new approaches must be taken in order to reduce the probability of rediscovering known compounds. The authors have recently isolated slow-growing acidophiles belonging to the novel genera Catenulispora and Actinospica within the order Actinomycetales. These strains, which likely belong to a new suborder, grow as filamentous mycelia, have a genome size around 8 Mb, and produce antimicrobial activities. In addition, a single strain harbours simultaneously genes encoding type I and type II polyeketide synthases, as well as non-ribosomal peptide synthetases. The metabolite produced by one strain was identified as a previously reported dimeric isochromanequinone. In addition, at least the Catenulispora strains appear globally distributed, since a PCR-specific signal could be detected in a significant fraction of acidic soils from different continents, and similar strains have been independently isolated from an Australian soil (Jospeh et al., Appl Environ Microbiol 69, 7210-7215, 2003). Thus, these previously uncultured actinomycetes share several features with Streptomyces and related antibiotic-producing genera, and represent a promising source of novel antibiotics.

  7. Hassallidins, antifungal glycolipopeptides, are widespread among cyanobacteria and are the end-product of a nonribosomal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestola, Johanna; Shishido, Tania K; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P; Aitio, Olli; Permi, Perttu; Wahlsten, Matti; Wang, Hao; Rouhiainen, Leo; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2014-05-06

    Cyanobacteria produce a wide variety of cyclic peptides, including the widespread hepatotoxins microcystins and nodularins. Another class of peptides, cyclic glycosylated lipopeptides called hassallidins, show antifungal activity. Previously, two hassallidins (A and B) were reported from an epilithic cyanobacterium Hassallia sp. and found to be active against opportunistic human pathogenic fungi. Bioinformatic analysis of the Anabaena sp. 90 genome identified a 59-kb cryptic inactive nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene cluster proposed to be responsible for hassallidin biosynthesis. Here we describe the hassallidin biosynthetic pathway from Anabaena sp. SYKE748A, as well as the large chemical variation and common occurrence of hassallidins in filamentous cyanobacteria. Analysis demonstrated that 20 strains of the genus Anabaena carry hassallidin synthetase genes and produce a multitude of hassallidin variants that exhibit activity against Candida albicans. The compounds discovered here were distinct from previously reported hassallidins A and B. The IC50 of hassallidin D was 0.29-1.0 µM against Candida strains. A large variation in amino acids, sugars, their degree of acetylation, and fatty acid side chain length was detected. In addition, hassallidins were detected in other cyanobacteria including Aphanizomenon, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, Nostoc, and Tolypothrix. These compounds may protect some of the most important bloom-forming and globally distributed cyanobacteria against attacks by parasitic fungi.

  8. Subtle differences in molecular recognition between modified glycopeptide antibiotics and bacterial receptor peptides identified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Staroske, T; Roepstorff, P;

    1999-01-01

    showing that electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) can be used in the rapid quantitative analysis of mixtures of vancomycin-group antibiotics and their bacterial cell-wall receptors allowing the identification of even subtle differences in binding constants. Differences in affinities...... are quantified for a mixture of vancomycin antibiotics (vancomycin, dechlorovancomycin and N-demethylvancomycin) and for a mixture of ristocetin A and its pseudoaglycone. Binding constants determined by ESI-MS were found to be in close agreement with those determined by more direct methods in aqueous solution....

  9. Identification of a New Peptide Deformylase Gene From Enterococcus faecium and Establishment of a New Screening Model Targeted on PDF for Novel Antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAN-BING TANG; SHU-YI SI; YUE-QIN ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    To identify a new peptide deformylase (PDF) gene (Genebank Accession AY238515) from Enterococcus faecium and to establish a new screening model targeted on PDF. Methods A new PDF gene was identified by BLAST analysis and PCR and was subsequently over-expressed in the prokaryotic expression host E.coli Bl21(DE3). Over-expressed protein was purified for enzymatic assay by metal affinity chromatography and a new screening model was established for novel antibiotics. Result A new PDF gene of Enterococcus faecium was identified successfully. Ten positive samples were picked up from 8000 compound library and the microbial fermentation broth samples. Conclusion A new PDF of gene Enterococcus faecium was first identified and the model had a high efficacy. Positive samples screened may be antibacterial agents of broad spectrum.

  10. Biological effects of paenilamicin, a secondary metabolite antibiotic produced by the honey bee pathogenic bacterium Paenibacillus larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Eva; Müller, Sebastian; Hertlein, Gillian; Heid, Nina; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Genersch, Elke

    2014-10-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the etiological agent of American Foulbrood (AFB) a world-wide distributed devastating disease of the honey bee brood. Previous comparative genome analysis and more recently, the elucidation of the bacterial genome, provided evidence that this bacterium harbors putative functional nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) and therefore, might produce nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides (PKs). Such biosynthesis products have been shown to display a wide-range of biological activities such as antibacterial, antifungal or cytotoxic activity. Herein we present an in silico analysis of the first NRPS/PKS hybrid of P. larvae and we show the involvement of this cluster in the production of a compound named paenilamicin (Pam). For the characterization of its in vitro and in vivo bioactivity, a knock-out mutant strain lacking the production of Pam was constructed and subsequently compared to wild-type species. This led to the identification of Pam by mass spectrometry. Purified Pam-fractions showed not only antibacterial but also antifungal and cytotoxic activities. The latter suggested a direct effect of Pam on honey bee larval death which could, however, not be corroborated in laboratory infection assays. Bee larvae infected with the non-producing Pam strain showed no decrease in larval mortality, but a delay in the onset of larval death. We propose that Pam, although not essential for larval mortality, is a virulence factor of P. larvae influencing the time course of disease. These findings are not only of significance in elucidating and understanding host-pathogen interactions but also within the context of the quest for new compounds with antibiotic activity for drug development.

  11. Cellular and molecular insight into the inhibition of primary root growth of Arabidopsis induced by peptaibols, a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei-Ling; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Wang, Li-Xia; Gong, Zhi-Ting; Li, Shuyu; Li, Chun-Long; Xie, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Mei; Li, Chuanyou; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Song, Xiao-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Trichoderma spp. are well known biocontrol agents that produce a variety of antibiotics. Peptaibols are a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma Alamethicin, the most studied peptaibol, is reported as toxic to plants at certain concentrations, while the mechanisms involved are unclear. We illustrated the toxic mechanisms of peptaibols by studying the growth-inhibitory effect of Trichokonin VI (TK VI), a peptaibol from Trichoderma longibrachiatum SMF2, on Arabidopsis primary roots. TK VI inhibited root growth by suppressing cell division and cell elongation, and disrupting root stem cell niche maintenance. TK VI increased auxin content and disrupted auxin response gradients in root tips. Further, we screened the Arabidopsis TK VI-resistant mutant tkr1. tkr1 harbors a point mutation in GORK, which encodes gated outwardly rectifying K(+)channel proteins. This mutation alleviated TK VI-induced suppression of K(+)efflux in roots, thereby stabilizing the auxin gradient. The tkr1 mutant also resisted the phytotoxicity of alamethicin. Our results indicate that GORK channels play a key role in peptaibol-plant interaction and that there is an inter-relationship between GORK channels and maintenance of auxin homeostasis. The cellular and molecular insight into the peptaibol-induced inhibition of plant root growth advances our understanding of Trichoderma-plant interactions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  12. Detection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria endowed with antimicrobial activity from a freshwater lake and their phylogenetic affiliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zothanpuia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance poses a serious challenge to global public health. In this study, fifty bacterial strains were isolated from the sediments of a freshwater lake and were screened for antibiotic resistance. Out of fifty isolates, thirty-three isolates showed resistance against at least two of the selected antibiotics. Analysis of 16S rDNA sequencing revealed that the isolates belonged to ten different genera, namely Staphylococcus(n = 8, Bacillus(n = 7, Lysinibacillus(n = 4, Achromobacter(n=3, bacterium(n = 3, Methylobacterium(n = 2, Bosea(n = 2, Aneurinibacillus(n = 2, Azospirillum(n = 1, Novosphingobium(n = 1. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC and BOX-PCR markers were used to study the genetic relatedness among the antibiotic resistant isolates. Further, the isolates were screened for their antimicrobial activity against bacterial pathogens viz., Staphylococcus aureus(MTCC-96, Pseudomonas aeruginosa(MTCC-2453 and Escherichia coli(MTCC-739, and pathogenic fungi viz., Fusarium proliferatum (MTCC-286, Fusarium oxysporum (CABI-293942 and Fusarium oxy. ciceri (MTCC-2791. In addition, biosynthetic genes (polyketide synthase II (PKS-II and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS were detected in six and seven isolates, respectively. This is the first report for the multifunctional analysis of the bacterial isolates from a wetland with biosynthetic potential, which could serve as potential source of useful biologically active metabolites.

  13. [Construction of plant expression vectors harboring a peptide antibiotic-apidaecin gene and resistance analysis of the transgenic tobacco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Sun, C; Peng, X X

    2001-07-01

    Two plant expression vectors(pBinPRHbI and pBinPRSIHbI) were constructed: Firstly, apidaecin gene were fused to the signal peptide coding sequencing of a PR-protein, and cloned into a binary vector pBin438 to form pBinPRHbI. Then, the cassette consisting of 35S promoter, PR signal peptide coding sequencing and apidaecin gene was cut off from pBinPRHbI and inserted into another plant expression vector pBinPRSI to produce a bivalent plant expression vector pBinPRSIHbI. pBinPRSI was constructed previously in our lab and contained PR signal peptide and Shiva-I fusion gene under control of 35S promoter. The three plant expression vectors were introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The positive rate of PCR was 95% in all putative transgenic plants. Results from Southern blot indicated that foreign genes were integrated into tobacco genome and RT-PCR analysis proved that the foreign gene was transcribed in transgenic tobacco. The transgenic tobacco showed higher resistance to P. syringae pv tabaci, the causal agent of tobacco wild fire disease, than their original cultivars. From the disease index, the transgenic plants carrying apidaecin and Shiva-I genes had highest resistance among three kinds of transgenic plants, and the plants carrying Shiva-I gene alone had lowest resistance.

  14. The first N-terminal unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide: H-Gly-Aib-Gly-Aib-OtBu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2015-12-01

    Glycine (Gly) is incorporated in roughly half of all known peptaibiotic (nonribosomally biosynthesized antibiotic peptides of fungal origin) sequences and is the residue with the greatest conformational flexibility. The conformational space of Aib (α-aminoisobutyric acid) is severely restricted by the second methyl group attached to the Cα atom. Most of the crystal structures containing Aib are N-terminal protected. Deprotection of the N- or C-terminus of peptides may alter the hydrogen-bonding scheme and/or the structure and may facilitate crystallization. The structure reported here for glycyl-α-aminoisobutyrylglycyl-α-aminoisobutyric acid tert-butyl ester, C16H30N4O5, describes the first N-terminal-unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide. The achiral peptide could form an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the C=O group of Gly1 and the N-H group of Aib4. This hydrogen bond is found in all tetrapeptides and N-terminal-protected tripeptides containing Aib, apart from one exception. In the present work, this hydrogen bond is not observed (N...O = 5.88 Å). Instead, every molecule is hydrogen bonded to six other symmetry-related molecules with a total of eight hydrogen bonds per molecule. The backbone conformation starts in the right-handed helical region (and the left-handed helical region for the inverted molecule) and reverses the screw sense in the last two residues.

  15. The macrocyclic peptide antibiotic micrococcin P(1) is secreted by the food-borne bacterium Staphylococcus equorum WS 2733 and inhibits Listeria monocytogenes on soft cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnio, M C; Höltzel, A; Rudolf, M; Henle, T; Jung, G; Scherer, S

    2000-06-01

    Staphylococcus equorum WS 2733 was found to produce a substance exhibiting a bacteriostatic effect on a variety of gram-positive bacteria. The metabolite was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and semipreparative reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed the high purity of the compound and revealed a molecular mass of 1,143 Da. By two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy the substance was identified as micrococcin P(1) which is a macrocyclic peptide antibiotic that has not yet been reported for the genus Staphylococcus. A total of 95 out of 95 Listeria strains and 130 out of 135 other gram-positive bacteria were inhibited by this substance, while none of 37 gram-negative bacteria were affected. The antilisterial potential of this food-grade strain as a protective starter culture was evaluated by its in situ application in cheese-ripening experiments under laboratory conditions. A remarkable growth reduction of Listeria monocytogenes could be achieved compared to control cheese ripened with a nonbacteriocinogenic type strain of Staphylococcus equorum. In order to prove that inhibition was due to micrococcin P(1), a micrococcin-deficient mutant was constructed which did not inhibit L. monocytogenes in cheese-ripening experiments.

  16. The Macrocyclic Peptide Antibiotic Micrococcin P1 Is Secreted by the Food-Borne Bacterium Staphylococcus equorum WS 2733 and Inhibits Listeria monocytogenes on Soft Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnio, Markus C.; Höltzel, Alexandra; Rudolf, Melanie; Henle, Thomas; Jung, Günther; Scherer, Siegfried

    2000-01-01

    Staphylococcus equorum WS 2733 was found to produce a substance exhibiting a bacteriostatic effect on a variety of gram-positive bacteria. The metabolite was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and semipreparative reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed the high purity of the compound and revealed a molecular mass of 1,143 Da. By two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy the substance was identified as micrococcin P1 which is a macrocyclic peptide antibiotic that has not yet been reported for the genus Staphylococcus. A total of 95 out of 95 Listeria strains and 130 out of 135 other gram-positive bacteria were inhibited by this substance, while none of 37 gram-negative bacteria were affected. The antilisterial potential of this food-grade strain as a protective starter culture was evaluated by its in situ application in cheese-ripening experiments under laboratory conditions. A remarkable growth reduction of Listeria monocytogenes could be achieved compared to control cheese ripened with a nonbacteriocinogenic type strain of Staphylococcus equorum. In order to prove that inhibition was due to micrococcin P1, a micrococcin-deficient mutant was constructed which did not inhibit L. monocytogenes in cheese-ripening experiments. PMID:10831414

  17. Targeted Disruption of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase pes3 Augments the Virulence of Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Cairns, Timothy; Stack, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    that in contrast to other NRP synthetases, deletion of pes3 significantly increases the virulence of A. fumigatus, whereby the pes3 deletion strain (A. fumigatus Δpes3) exhibited heightened virulence (increased killing) in invertebrate (P corticosteroid model...... of murine pulmonary aspergillosis. Complementation restored the wild-type phenotype in the invertebrate model. Deletion of pes3 also resulted in increased susceptibility to the antifungal, voriconazole (P

  18. Heterologous production of non-ribosomal peptide LLD-ACV in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewers, Verena; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Le

    2009-01-01

    -(l-α-aminoadipyl)–l-cysteinyl–d-valine (ACV) as a model NRP. The Penicillium chrysogenum gene pcbAB encoding ACV synthetase was expressed in S. cerevisiae from a high-copy plasmid together with phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase) encoding genes from Aspergillus nidulans, P. chrysogenum and Bacillus subtilis, and in all the three cases...... production of ACV was observed. To improve ACV synthesis, several factors were investigated. Codon optimization of the 5′ end of pcbAB did not significantly increase ACV production. However, a 30-fold enhancement was achieved by lowering the cultivation temperature from 30 to 20 °C. When ACVS and PPTase...... encoding genes were integrated into the yeast genome, a 6-fold decrease in ACV production was observed indicating that gene copy number was one of the rate-limiting factors for ACV production in yeast....

  19. Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  20. Antibiotic Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are not effectively treated with an antibiotic • Viral gastroenteritis Bacterial infections should be treated with antibiotics. Some ... you antibiotics for a viral infection. Antibiotics kill bacteria, not viruses. • T ake all of your prescribed ...

  1. Pep2Path: automated mass spectrometry-guided genome mining of peptidic natural products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnix H Medema

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonribosomally and ribosomally synthesized bioactive peptides constitute a source of molecules of great biomedical importance, including antibiotics such as penicillin, immunosuppressants such as cyclosporine, and cytostatics such as bleomycin. Recently, an innovative mass-spectrometry-based strategy, peptidogenomics, has been pioneered to effectively mine microbial strains for novel peptidic metabolites. Even though mass-spectrometric peptide detection can be performed quite fast, true high-throughput natural product discovery approaches have still been limited by the inability to rapidly match the identified tandem mass spectra to the gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of the corresponding compounds. With Pep2Path, we introduce a software package to fully automate the peptidogenomics approach through the rapid Bayesian probabilistic matching of mass spectra to their corresponding biosynthetic gene clusters. Detailed benchmarking of the method shows that the approach is powerful enough to correctly identify gene clusters even in data sets that consist of hundreds of genomes, which also makes it possible to match compounds from unsequenced organisms to closely related biosynthetic gene clusters in other genomes. Applying Pep2Path to a data set of compounds without known biosynthesis routes, we were able to identify candidate gene clusters for the biosynthesis of five important compounds. Notably, one of these clusters was detected in a genome from a different subphylum of Proteobacteria than that in which the molecule had first been identified. All in all, our approach paves the way towards high-throughput discovery of novel peptidic natural products. Pep2Path is freely available from http://pep2path.sourceforge.net/, implemented in Python, licensed under the GNU General Public License v3 and supported on MS Windows, Linux and Mac OS X.

  2. VisG is essential for biosynthesis of virginiamycin S, a streptogramin type B antibiotic, as a provider of the nonproteinogenic amino acid phenylglycine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningsih, Fitria; Kitani, Shigeru; Fukushima, Eriko; Nihira, Takuya

    2011-11-01

    A streptogramin type B antibiotic, virginiamycin S (VS), is produced by Streptomyces virginiae, together with a streptogramin type A antibiotic, virginiamycin M1 (VM), as its synergistic counterpart. VS is a cyclic hexadepsipeptide containing a nonproteinogenic amino acid, Lphenylglycine (L-pheGly), in its core structure. We have identified, in the left-hand extremity of the virginiamycin supercluster, two genes that direct VS biosynthesis with L-pheGly incorporation. Transcriptional analysis revealed that visF, encoding a nonribosomal peptide synthetase, and visG, encoding a protein with homology to a hydroxyphenylacetyl-CoA dioxygenase, are under the transcriptional regulation of virginiae butanolide (VB), a small diffusing signalling molecule that governs virginiamycin production. Gene deletion of visG resulted in complete loss of VS production without any changes in VM production, suggesting that visG is required for VS biosynthesis. The abolished VS production in the visG disruptant was fully recovered either by the external addition of pheGly or by gene complementation, which indicates that VisG is involved in VS biosynthesis as the provider of an L-pheGly molecule. A feeding experiment with L-pheGly analogues suggested that VisF, which is responsible for the last condensation step, has high substrate specificity toward L-pheGly.

  3. Switching antibiotics production on and off in actinomycetes by an IclR family transcriptional regulator from Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Amit Kumar; Singh, Bijay; Maharjan, Sushila; Jha, Amit Kumar; Kim, Byung-Gee; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2014-08-01

    Doxorubicin, produced by Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952, is tightly regulated by dnrO, dnrN, and dnrI regulators. Genome mining of S. peucetius revealed the presence of the IclR (doxR) type family of transcription regulator mediating the signal-dependent expression of operons at the nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene cluster. Overexpression of doxR in native strain strongly repressed the drug production. Furthermore, it also had a negative effect on the regulatory system of doxorubicin, wherein the transcript of dnrI was reduced to the maximum level in comparision with the other two. Interestingly, the overexpression of the same gene also had strong inhibitory effects on the production of actinorhodin (blue pigment) and undecylprodigiosin (red pigment) in Streptomyces coelicolor M145, herboxidiene production in Streptomyces chromofuscus ATCC 49982, and spinosyn production in Saccharopolyspora spinosa NRRL 18395, respectively. Moreover, DoxR exhibited pleiotropic effects on the production of blue and red pigments in S. coelicolor when grown in different agar media, wherein the production of blue pigment was inhibited in R2YE medium and the red pigment was inhibited in YEME medium. However, the production of both blue and red pigments from S. coelicolor harboring doxR was halted in ISP2 medium, whereas S. coelicolor produced both pigmented antibiotics in the same plate. These consequences demonstrate that the on and off production of these antibiotics was not due to salt stress or media compositions, but was selectively controlled in actinomycetes.

  4. Identification of Thiotetronic Acid Antibiotic Biosynthetic Pathways by Target-directed Genome Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Li, Jie; Millán-Aguiñaga, Natalie; Zhang, Jia Jia; O'Neill, Ellis C; Ugalde, Juan A; Jensen, Paul R; Mantovani, Simone M; Moore, Bradley S

    2015-12-18

    Recent genome sequencing efforts have led to the rapid accumulation of uncharacterized or "orphaned" secondary metabolic biosynthesis gene clusters (BGCs) in public databases. This increase in DNA-sequenced big data has given rise to significant challenges in the applied field of natural product genome mining, including (i) how to prioritize the characterization of orphan BGCs and (ii) how to rapidly connect genes to biosynthesized small molecules. Here, we show that by correlating putative antibiotic resistance genes that encode target-modified proteins with orphan BGCs, we predict the biological function of pathway specific small molecules before they have been revealed in a process we call target-directed genome mining. By querying the pan-genome of 86 Salinispora bacterial genomes for duplicated house-keeping genes colocalized with natural product BGCs, we prioritized an orphan polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrid BGC (tlm) with a putative fatty acid synthase resistance gene. We employed a new synthetic double-stranded DNA-mediated cloning strategy based on transformation-associated recombination to efficiently capture tlm and the related ttm BGCs directly from genomic DNA and to heterologously express them in Streptomyces hosts. We show the production of a group of unusual thiotetronic acid natural products, including the well-known fatty acid synthase inhibitor thiolactomycin that was first described over 30 years ago, yet never at the genetic level in regards to biosynthesis and autoresistance. This finding not only validates the target-directed genome mining strategy for the discovery of antibiotic producing gene clusters without a priori knowledge of the molecule synthesized but also paves the way for the investigation of novel enzymology involved in thiotetronic acid natural product biosynthesis.

  5. Squalamine: an aminosterol antibiotic from the shark.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, a variety of low molecular weight antibiotics have been isolated from diverse animal species. These agents, which include peptides, lipids, and alkaloids, exhibit antibiotic activity against environmental microbes and are thought to play a role in innate immunity. We report here the discovery of a broad-spectrum steroidal antibiotic isolated from tissues of the dogfish shark Squalus acanthias. This water-soluble antibiotic, which we have named squalamine, exhibits potent bact...

  6. Post-translational heterocyclic backbone modifications in the 43-peptide antibiotic microcin B17. Structure elucidation and NMR study of a 13C,15N-labelled gyrase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, A; Freund, S; Jung, G

    1995-12-01

    Microcin B17 (McB17), the first known gyrase inhibitor of peptidic nature, is produced by ribosomal synthesis and post-translational modification of the 69-residue precursor protein by an Escherichia coli strain. To elucidate the chemical structure of the mature 43-residue peptide antibiotic, fermentation and purification protocols were established and optimized which allowed the isolation and purification of substantial amounts of highly pure McB17 (non-labelled, 15N-labelled and 13C/15N-labelled peptide. By ultraviolet-absorption spectroscopy. HPLC-electrospray mass spectrometry and GC-mass spectrometry, amino acid analysis, protein sequencing, and, in particular, multidimensional NMR, we could demonstrate and unequivocally prove that the enzymic modification of the precursor backbone at Gly-Cys and Gly-Ser segments leads to the formation of 2-aminomethylthiazole-4-carboxylic acid and 2-aminomethyloxazole-4-carboxylic acid, respectively. In addition, two bicyclic modifications 2-(2-aminomethyloxazolyl)thiazole-4-carboxylic acid and 2-(2-aminomethylthiazolyl)oxazole-4-carboxylic acid were found that consist of directly linked thiazole and oxazole rings derived from one Gly-Ser-Cys and one Gly-Cys-Ser segment. Analogous to the thiazole and oxazole rings found in antitumor peptides of microbial and marine origin, these heteroaromatic ring systems of McB17 presumably play an important role in its gyrase-inhibiting activity, e.g. interacting with the DNA to trap the covalent protein-DNA intermediate of the breakage-reunion reaction of the gyrase.

  7. Ces locus embedded proteins control the non-ribosomal synthesis of the cereulide toxin in emetic Bacillus cereus on multiple levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücking, Genia; Frenzel, Elrike; Rütschle, Andrea; Marxen, Sandra; Stark, Timo D.; Hofmann, Thomas; Scherer, Siegfried; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The emetic toxin cereulide produced by Bacillus cereus is synthesized by the modular enzyme complex Ces that is encoded on a pXO1-like megaplasmid. To decipher the role of the genes adjacent to the structural genes cesA/cesB, coding for the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), gene inactivation- and overexpression mutants of the emetic strain F4810/72 were constructed and their impact on cereulide biosynthesis was assessed. The hydrolase CesH turned out to be a part of the complex regulatory network controlling cereulide synthesis on a transcriptional level, while the ABC transporter CesCD was found to be essential for post-translational control of cereulide synthesis. Using a gene inactivation approach, we show that the NRPS activating function of the phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPtase) embedded in the ces locus was complemented by a chromosomally encoded Sfp-like PPtase, representing an interesting example for the functional interaction between a plasmid encoded NRPS and a chromosomally encoded activation enzyme. In summary, our results highlight the complexity of cereulide biosynthesis and reveal multiple levels of toxin formation control. ces operon internal genes were shown to play a pivotal role by acting at different levels of toxin production, thus complementing the action of the chromosomal key transcriptional regulators AbrB and CodY. PMID:26528255

  8. Ces locus embedded proteins control the non-ribosomal synthesis of the cereulide toxin in emetic Bacillus cereus on multiple levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücking, Genia; Frenzel, Elrike; Rütschle, Andrea; Marxen, Sandra; Stark, Timo D; Hofmann, Thomas; Scherer, Siegfried; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The emetic toxin cereulide produced by Bacillus cereus is synthesized by the modular enzyme complex Ces that is encoded on a pXO1-like megaplasmid. To decipher the role of the genes adjacent to the structural genes cesA/cesB, coding for the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), gene inactivation- and overexpression mutants of the emetic strain F4810/72 were constructed and their impact on cereulide biosynthesis was assessed. The hydrolase CesH turned out to be a part of the complex regulatory network controlling cereulide synthesis on a transcriptional level, while the ABC transporter CesCD was found to be essential for post-translational control of cereulide synthesis. Using a gene inactivation approach, we show that the NRPS activating function of the phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPtase) embedded in the ces locus was complemented by a chromosomally encoded Sfp-like PPtase, representing an interesting example for the functional interaction between a plasmid encoded NRPS and a chromosomally encoded activation enzyme. In summary, our results highlight the complexity of cereulide biosynthesis and reveal multiple levels of toxin formation control. ces operon internal genes were shown to play a pivotal role by acting at different levels of toxin production, thus complementing the action of the chromosomal key transcriptional regulators AbrB and CodY.

  9. Ces locus embedded proteins control the non-ribosomal synthesis of the cereulide toxin in emetic Bacillus cereus on multiple levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genia eLücking

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The emetic toxin cereulide produced by Bacillus cereus is synthesized by the modular enzyme complex Ces that is encoded on a pXO1-like mega-plasmid. To decipher the role of the genes adjacent to the structural genes cesA/cesB, coding for the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS, gene inactivation- and overexpression mutants of the emetic strain F4810/72 were constructed and their impact on cereulide biosynthesis was assessed. The hydrolase CesH turned out to be a part of the complex regulatory network controlling cereulide synthesis on a transcriptional Level, while the ABC transporter CesCD was found to be essential for post-translational control of cereulide synthesis. Using a gene inactivation approach, we show that the NRPS activating function of the phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPtase embedded in the ces locus was complemented by a chromosomally encoded Sfp-like PPtase, representing an interesting example for the functional interaction between a plasmid encoded NRPS and a chromosomally encoded activation enzyme. In summary, our results highlight the complexity of cereulide biosynthesis and reveal multiple levels of toxin formation control. ces operon internal genes were shown to play a pivotal role by acting at different levels of toxin production, thus complementing the action of the chromosomal key transcriptional regulators AbrB and CodY.

  10. Antibiotics Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Antibiotics Quiz Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Try your hand at this quiz. Read each question and then click the button to the right of the answer ...

  11. Influence of the Charge State on the Structures and Interactions of Vancomycin Antibiotics with Cell-Wall Analogue Peptides: Experimental and Theoretical Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhibo; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Laskin, Julia

    2009-02-16

    In this study we examined the effect of the charge state on the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of the non-covalent complex between the vancomycin and the cell wall peptide analogue Nα,Nε-diacetyl-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala (V-Ac2KDADA). The binding energies between the vancomycin and the peptide were obtained from the RRKM modeling of the time- and energy resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) experiments. Our results demonstrate that the stability of the complex toward fragmentation increases in the order: [V+Ac2KDADA+H]+2 < [V+Ac2KDADA+H]+ < [V+Ac2KDADA-H]-. Dissociation of the singly protonated and singly deprotonated complex is characterized by very large entropy effects indicating substantial increase in the conformational flexibility of the resulting products. The experimental threshold energies of 1.75 eV and 1.34 eV obtained for the [V+Ac2KDADA-H]- and [V+Ac2KDADA+H]+ , respectively, are in excellent agreement with the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The increased stability of the deprotonated complex observed experimentally is attributed to the presence of three charged sites in the deprotonated complex as compared to only one charged site in the singly protonated complex. The low binding energy of 0.93 eV obtained for the doubly protonated complex suggests that this ion is destabilized by Coulomb repulsion between the singly protonated vancomycin and the singly protonated peptide comprising the complex.

  12. Characterization of biosynthetic gene cluster for the production of virginiamycin M, a streptogramin type A antibiotic, in Streptomyces virginiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsawat, Nattika; Kitani, Shigeru; Nihira, Takuya

    2007-05-15

    Virginiamycin M (VM) of Streptomyces virginiae is a hybrid polyketide-peptide antibiotic with peptide antibiotic virginiamycin S (VS) as its synergistic counterpart. VM and VS belong to the Streptogramin family, which is characterized by strong synergistic antibacterial activity, and their water-soluble derivatives are a new therapeutic option for combating vancomycin-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Here, the VM biosynthetic gene cluster was isolated from S. virginiae in the 62-kb region located in the vicinity of the regulatory island for virginiamycin production. Sequence analysis revealed that the region consists of 19 complete open reading frames (ORFs) and one C-terminally truncated ORF, encoding hybrid polyketide synthase (PKS)-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), typical PKS, enzymes synthesizing precursors for VM, transporters for resistance, regulatory proteins, and auxiliary enzymes. The involvement of the cloned gene cluster in VM biosynthesis was confirmed by gene disruption of virA encoding a hybrid PKS-NRPS megasynthetase, which resulted in complete loss of VM production without any effect on VS production. To assemble the VM core structure, VirA, VirF, VirG, and VirH consisting, as a whole, of 24 domains in 8 PKS modules and 7 domains in 2 NRPS modules were predicted to act as an acyltransferase (AT)-less hybrid PKS-NRPS, whereas VirB, VirC, VirD, and VirE are likely to be essential for the incorporation of the methyl group into the VM framework by a HMG-CoA synthase-based reaction. Among several uncommon features of gene organization in the VM gene cluster, the lack of AT domain in every PKS module and the presence of a discrete AT encoded by virI are notable. AT-overexpression by an additional copy of virI driven by ermEp() resulted in 1.5-fold increase of VM production, suggesting that the amount of VirI is partly limiting VM biosynthesis.

  13. Diversity of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes in the AnticancerProducing Actinomycetes Isolated from Marine Sediment in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Camelia Herdini; Shinta Hartanto; Sofia Mubarika; Bambang Hariwiyanto; Nastiti Wijayanti; Akira Hosoyama; Atsushi Yamazoe; Hideaki Nojiri; Jaka Widada

    2016-01-01

    Marine actinomycetes is a group of bacteria that is highly potential in producing novel bioactive compound. It has unique characteristics and is different from other terrestrial ones. Extreme environmental condition is suspected to lead marine actinomycetes produce different types of bioactive compound found previously. The aim of this study was to explore the presence and diversity of NRPS genes in 14 anticancer-producing actinomycetes isolated from marine sediment in Indonesia. ...

  14. The cyclochlorotine mycotoxin is produced by the nonribosomal peptide synthetase CctN in Talaromyces islandicus (“Penicillium islandicum”)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schafhauser, Thomas; Kirchner, Norbert; Kulik, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces islandicus (“Penicillium islandicum”) is a widespread foodborne mold that produces numerous secondary metabolites, among them potent mycotoxins belonging to different chemical classes. A notable metabolite is the hepatotoxic and carcinogenic pentapeptide cyclochlorotine that contains...

  15. Forgotten antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulcini, Céline; Bush, Karen; Craig, William A

    2012-01-01

    In view of the alarming spread of antimicrobial resistance in the absence of new antibiotics, this study aimed at assessing the availability of potentially useful older antibiotics. A survey was performed in 38 countries among experts including hospital pharmacists, microbiologists, and infectiou...

  16. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Hoffmann, Tammy C; McCullough, Amanda R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous opportunities are available in primary care for alleviating the crisis of increasing antibiotic resistance. Preventing patients from developing an acute respiratory infection (ARI) will obviate any need for antibiotic use downstream. Hygiene measures such as physical barriers and hand...... will greatly improve the use of antibiotics for ARIs. However, used in concert, combinations are likely to enable clinicians and health care systems to implement the strategies that will reduce antimicrobial resistance in the future....... antibiotic prescribing are a major factor in the prescribing for ARIs. Professional interventions with educational components are effective, although they have modest effects, and are expensive. GPs' perceptions - that mistakenly assume as a default that patients want antibiotics for their ARIs - are often...

  17. An antibiotic complex from Lysobacter enzymogenes strain C3: antimicrobial activity and role in plant disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Jochum, C C; Yu, F; Zaleta-Rivera, K; Du, L; Harris, S D; Yuen, G Y

    2008-06-01

    Lysobacter enzymogenes C3 is a bacterial biological control agent that exhibits antagonism against multiple fungal pathogens. Its antifungal activity was attributed in part to lytic enzymes. In this study, a heat-stable antifungal factor (HSAF), an antibiotic complex consisting of dihydromaltophilin and structurally related macrocyclic lactams, was found to be responsible for antagonism by C3 against fungi and oomycetes in culture. HSAF in purified form exhibited inhibitory activity against a wide range of fungal and oomycetes species in vitro, inhibiting spore germination, and disrupting hyphal polarity in sensitive fungi. When applied to tall fescue leaves as a partially-purified extract, HSAF at 25 mug/ml and higher inhibited germination of conidia of Bipolaris sorokiniana compared with the control. Although application of HSAF at 12.5 mug/ml did not reduce the incidence of conidial germination, it inhibited appressorium formation and suppressed Bipolaris leaf spot development. Two mutant strains of C3 (K19 and DeltaNRPS) that were disrupted in different domains in the hybrid polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene for HSAF biosynthesis and had lost the ability to produce HSAF were compared with the wild-type strain for biological control efficacy against Bipolaris leaf spot on tall fescue and Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, on wheat. Both mutant strains exhibited decreased capacity to reduce the incidence and severity of Bipolaris leaf spot compared with C3. In contrast, the mutant strains were as efficacious as the wild-type strain in reducing the severity of Fusarium head blight. Thus, HSAF appears to be a mechanism for biological control by strain C3 against some, but not all, plant pathogenic fungi.

  18. Characterization of native 40 S particles from Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells: resolution, nomenclature and molecular weights of the nonribosomal proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichert, G; Issinger, O G

    1981-01-01

    Native 40 S particles from Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells were isolated on a large scale. A nonribosomal protein moiety of about 30 proteins could be removed from the ribosomal particles by treatment with 250 mM KCl. These proteins were analysed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electroph......Native 40 S particles from Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells were isolated on a large scale. A nonribosomal protein moiety of about 30 proteins could be removed from the ribosomal particles by treatment with 250 mM KCl. These proteins were analysed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel...

  19. Surveying the potential of secreted antimicrobial peptides to enhance plant disease resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan eBreen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are natural products found across diverse taxa as part of the innate immune system against pathogen attacks. Some AMPs are synthesised through the canonical gene expression machinery and are called ribosomal AMPs. Other AMPs are assembled by modular enzymes generating nonribosomal AMPs and harbour unusual structural diversity. Plants synthesise an array of AMPs, yet are still subject to many pathogen invasions. Crop breeding programs struggle to release new cultivars in which complete disease resistance is achieved, and usually such resistance becomes quickly overcome by the targeted pathogens which have a shorter generation time. AMPs could offer a solution by exploring not only plant-derived AMPs, related or unrelated to the crop of interest, but also non-plant AMPs produced by bacteria, fungi, oomycetes or animals. This review highlights some promising candidates within the plant kingdom and elsewhere, and offers some perspectives on how to identify and validate their bioactivities. Technological advances, particularly in mass spectrometry (MS and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, have been instrumental in identifying and elucidating the structure of novel AMPs, especially nonribosomal peptides which cannot be identified through genomics approaches. The majority of non-plant AMPs showing potential for plant disease immunity are often tested using in vitro assays. The greatest challenge remains the functional validation of candidate AMPs in plants through transgenic experiments, particularly introducing nonribosomal AMPs into crops.

  20. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  1. 转Bt和抗菌肽融合基因油菜植株的获得与鉴定研究%Attainment and Identification of Transgene Rape (Brassica napus)with Bt and Antibiotic Peptide Syncretic Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨凯; 韩伟; 温莹; 刘丹丹; 薛春蕾; 逯晓萍

    2011-01-01

    Rape is one of important oil crop that were widely grown in China. The diseases occures to rape easily,especially for white spot and black spot that caused by fungi. The variety of Huayou No. 6 was used for tranferring Bt and Antibiotic peptide syncretic gene(Bt-AMP), glyphosate as selective marker, by the method of agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The test of PCR and southern blot proved the exogenous DNA was integrated on the genome of rape; RT-PCR test showed the expression of transcriptional level of the introduced gene in rape plant. The tranformation rate of Bt-AMP was 2.33%. The research provided new germ for rape breeding of disease resistance.%油菜极易遭受各种病虫害的侵害,其中白斑病和黑斑病都属于真菌引起的病害.以优良品种花油6号为材料,以抗菌肽和Bt融合基因为目标基因,以草甘膦为筛选标记基因,采用农杆菌介导的方法转入油菜获得转基因植株.经PCR和Southem检测表明外源基因已整合到油菜的基因组DNA中;经RT-PCR检测表明目的基因已在油菜转基因植株的转录水平表达;目的基因(Bt-AMP)的遗传转化率为2.33%.研究结果可为油菜的抗性遗传改良提供新种质.

  2. Recent development of peptide self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiubo Zhao; Fang Pan; Jian R. Lu

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks to build peptides and proteins. Recent development in peptide synthesis has however enabled us to mimic this natural process by preparing various long and short peptides possessing different conformations and biological functions. The self-assembly of short designed peptides into molecular nanostructures is becoming a growing interest in nanobiotechnology. Self-assembled peptides exhibit several attractive features for applications in tissue regeneration, drug delivery, biological surface engineering as well as in food science, cosmetic industry and antibiotics. The aim of this review is to introduce the readers to a number of representative studies on peptide self-assembly.

  3. Multifunctional host defense peptides: antimicrobial peptides, the small yet big players in innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvynet, Constance; Rosenstein, Yvonne

    2009-11-01

    The term 'antimicrobial peptides' refers to a large number of peptides first characterized on the basis of their antibiotic and antifungal activities. In addition to their role as endogenous antibiotics, antimicrobial peptides, also called host defense peptides, participate in multiple aspects of immunity (inflammation, wound repair, and regulation of the adaptive immune system) as well as in maintaining homeostasis. The possibility of utilizing these multifunctional molecules to effectively combat the ever-growing group of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has intensified research aimed at improving their antibiotic activity and therapeutic potential, without the burden of an exacerbated inflammatory response, but conserving their immunomodulatory potential. In this minireview, we focus on the contribution of small cationic antimicrobial peptides - particularly human cathelicidins and defensins - to the immune response and disease, highlighting recent advances in our understanding of the roles of these multifunctional molecules.

  4. Aerosolized Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Marcos I; Keyt, Holly; Reyes, Luis F

    2015-06-01

    Administration of medications via aerosolization is potentially an ideal strategy to treat airway diseases. This delivery method ensures high concentrations of the medication in the targeted tissues, the airways, with generally lower systemic absorption and systemic adverse effects. Aerosolized antibiotics have been tested as treatment for bacterial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The most successful application of this to date is treatment of infections in patients with CF. It has been hypothesized that similar success would be seen in NCFB and in difficult-to-treat hospital-acquired infections such as VAP. This review summarizes the available evidence supporting the use of aerosolized antibiotics and addresses the specific considerations that clinicians should recognize when prescribing an aerosolized antibiotic for patients with CF, NCFB, and VAP.

  5. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources...... of antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I...... to rationally design drug combinations that limit the evolution of antibiotic resistance due to counteracting evolutionary trajectories. My results highlight that an in-depth knowledge about the genetic responses to the individual antimicrobial compounds enables the prediction of responses to drug combinations...

  6. Phosphorylation in vivo of non-ribosomal proteins from native 40 S ribosomal particles of Krebs II mouse ascites-tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuck, J; Reichert, G; Issinger, O G

    1981-01-01

    Four non-ribosomal proteins from native 40 S ribosomal subunits with mol.wts. of 110 000, 84 000, 68 000 and 26 000 were phosphorylated in vivo when ascites cells were incubated in the presence of [32P]Pi. The 110 000-, 84 000- and 26 000-dalton proteins are identical with phosphorylated products...

  7. Characterization of native 40 S particles from Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells: resolution, nomenclature and molecular weights of the nonribosomal proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichert, G; Issinger, O G

    1981-01-01

    Native 40 S particles from Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells were isolated on a large scale. A nonribosomal protein moiety of about 30 proteins could be removed from the ribosomal particles by treatment with 250 mM KCl. These proteins were analysed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electroph...

  8. Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Resistance Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Everyone Should Know What You Can Do Antibiotic Resistance Q&As Fast Facts Antibiotics Quiz Glossary For ... Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Core Elements of Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship ...

  9. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Antibiotic-associated diarrhea refers to passing loose, watery stools ... after taking medications used to treat bacterial infections (antibiotics). Most often, antibiotic-associated diarrhea is mild and ...

  10. Perspectives and Peptides of the Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Kim A.

    Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobial peptides from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were recognized as the next potential generation of pharmaceuticals to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and septic shock, to preserve food, or to sanitize surfaces. Initial research focused on identifying the spectrum of antimicrobial agents, determining the range of antimicrobial activities against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and assessing the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides versus their natural counterparts. Subsequent research then focused on the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in model membrane systems not only to identify the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in microorganisms but also to discern differences in cytotoxicity for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Recent, contemporary work now focuses on current and future efforts to construct hybrid peptides, peptide congeners, stabilized peptides, peptide conjugates, and immobilized peptides for unique and specific applications to control the growth of microorganisms in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Bacteriocins - a viable alternative to antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Paul D; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2013-02-01

    Solutions are urgently required for the growing number of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Bacteriocins, which are antimicrobial peptides produced by certain bacteria, might warrant serious consideration as alternatives to traditional antibiotics. These molecules exhibit significant potency against other bacteria (including antibiotic-resistant strains), are stable and can have narrow or broad activity spectra. Bacteriocins can even be produced in situ in the gut by probiotic bacteria to combat intestinal infections. Although the application of specific bacteriocins might be curtailed by the development of resistance, an understanding of the mechanisms by which such resistance could emerge will enable researchers to develop strategies to minimize this potential problem.

  12. Structure and Design of Multipotent Peptide Microbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Project goal. ~$e goal of this project is to design novel peptide antibiotics using a naturally occurring family of peptides, known as defensins, as...coupling of taurine , glycinamide, and arginine amide. " 3. Solution Structures. in collaborative studies performed with Arthur Pardi, we have

  13. Growth on Chitin Impacts the Transcriptome and Metabolite Profiles of Antibiotic-Producing Vibrio coralliilyticus S2052 and Photobacterium galatheae S2753

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the Vibrionaceae family are often associated with chitin-containing organisms, and they are thought to play a major role in chitin degradation. The purpose of the present study was to determine how chitin affects the transcriptome and metabolome of two bioactive Vibrionaceae strains, Vibrio coralliilyticus and Photobacterium galatheae. We focused on chitin degradation genes and secondary metabolites based on the assumption that these molecules in nature confer an advantage to the producer. Growth on chitin caused upregulation of genes related to chitin metabolism and of genes potentially involved in host colonization and/or infection. The expression of genes involved in secondary metabolism was also significantly affected by growth on chitin, in one case being 34-fold upregulated. This was reflected in the metabolome, where the antibiotics andrimid and holomycin were produced in larger amounts on chitin. Other polyketide synthase/ nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) clusters in P. galatheae were also strongly upregulated on chitin. Collectively, this suggests that both V. coralliilyticus and P. galatheae have a specific lifestyle for growth on chitin and that their secondary metabolites likely play a crucial role during chitin colonization. IMPORTANCE The bacterial family Vibrionaceae (vibrios) is considered a major player in the degradation of chitin, the most abundant polymer in the marine environment; however, the majority of studies on the topic have focused on a small number of Vibrio species. In this study, we analyzed the genomes of two vibrios to assess their genetic potential for the degradation of chitin. We then used transcriptomics and metabolomics to demonstrate that chitin strongly affects these vibrios at both the transcriptional and metabolic levels. We observed a strong increase in production of secondary metabolites, suggesting an ecological role for these molecules during chitin colonization in the marine environment

  14. Entomopathogenic bacteria use multiple mechanisms for bioactive peptide library design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaofeng; Nowak, Sarah; Wesche, Frank; Bischoff, Iris; Kaiser, Marcel; Fürst, Robert; Bode, Helge. B.

    2017-04-01

    The production of natural product compound libraries has been observed in nature for different organisms such as bacteria, fungi and plants; however, little is known about the mechanisms generating such chemically diverse libraries. Here we report mechanisms leading to the biosynthesis of the chemically diverse rhabdopeptide/xenortide peptides (RXPs). They are exclusively present in entomopathogenic bacteria of the genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus that live in symbiosis with nematodes delivering them to insect prey, which is killed and utilized for nutrition by both nematodes and bacteria. Chemical diversity of the biologically active RXPs results from a combination of iterative and flexible use of monomodular nonribosomal peptide synthetases including substrate promiscuity, enzyme cross-talk and enzyme stoichiometry as shown by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Together, this highlights several of nature's methods for diversification, or evolution, of natural products and sheds light on the biosynthesis of the bioactive RXPs.

  15. Design and Application of Antimicrobial Peptide Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Reinhardt

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are an interesting class of antibiotics characterized by their unique antibiotic activity and lower propensity for developing resistance compared to common antibiotics. They belong to the class of membrane-active peptides and usually act selectively against bacteria, fungi and protozoans. AMPs, but also peptide conjugates containing AMPs, have come more and more into the focus of research during the last few years. Within this article, recent work on AMP conjugates is reviewed. Different aspects will be highlighted as a combination of AMPs with antibiotics or organometallic compounds aiming to increase antibacterial activity or target selectivity, conjugation with photosensitizers for improving photodynamic therapy (PDT or the attachment to particles, to name only a few. Owing to the enormous resonance of antimicrobial conjugates in the literature so far, this research topic seems to be very attractive to different scientific fields, like medicine, biology, biochemistry or chemistry.

  16. Beyond Antibiotics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LE Nicolle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The AMMI Canada meeting in March 2006 hosted a symposium exploring the potential alternatives to antibiotics for the prevention and treatment of infection. Four papers summarizing talks from that session are published in this issue of the Journal (1-4. These reviews address the scientific underpinnings for a number of proposed concepts, and summarize the current status of clinical use. The approaches - probiotics, bacteriophage therapy, and manipulation of innate immunity - are all intriguing but are still removed from immediate practical applications.

  17. Colistin : Revival of an Old Polymyxin Antibiotic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkmans, Anneke C.; Wilms, Erik B.; Kamerling, Ingrid M. C.; Birkhoff, Willem; Ortiz-Zacarias, Natalia V.; van Nieuwkoop, Cees; Verbrugh, Henri A.; Touw, Daan J.

    Colistin (polymyxin E) is a positively charged deca-peptide antibiotic that disrupts the integrity of the outer membrane of the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria by binding to the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharides, resulting in cell death. The endotoxic activity of lipopolysaccharides is

  18. Colistin : Revival of an Old Polymyxin Antibiotic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkmans, Anneke C.; Wilms, Erik B.; Kamerling, Ingrid M. C.; Birkhoff, Willem; Ortiz-Zacarias, Natalia V.; van Nieuwkoop, Cees; Verbrugh, Henri A.; Touw, Daan J.

    2015-01-01

    Colistin (polymyxin E) is a positively charged deca-peptide antibiotic that disrupts the integrity of the outer membrane of the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria by binding to the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharides, resulting in cell death. The endotoxic activity of lipopolysaccharides is simul

  19. Simultaneous Determination of 5 Peptide Antibiotics in Bovine Milk Samples by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry%液相色谱-串联质谱法测定牛奶中5种多肤类抗生素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘佳佳; 金芬; 佘永新; 刘洪斌; 史晓梅; 王淼; 王静; 徐思远

    2011-01-01

    建立了牛奶中杆菌肽、粘杆菌素A、粘杆菌素B、维吉尼霉素和万占霉素5种多肽类抗生素的反相液相色谱-串联质谱(HPLC-MS/MS)检测方法.牛奶样品经甲醇-0.1%甲酸水提取后,用4%三氯乙酸乙睛除蛋白,液-液萃取后,采用0.1%甲酸(A)和0.1%甲酸乙腈(B)作为流动相进行梯度洗脱.质谱(ESI+)采用多离子检测模式(MRM)对两价态或三价态的定性和定量离子进行监测.结果表明,5种多肽类抗生素在25,50和100 μg/kg的添加水平的回收率为75.1%~120.1%;相对标准偏差小于15.7%;方法检出限为0.2~5.6 μg/kg.本方法前处理操作快速简单,重复性好,满足对牛奶中多肤类抗生素的快速、准确的检测要求,适合大量样品的准确定性和定量分析.%A sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed for simultaneous determination of bacitracin, colistin A, colistin B, virginiamycin and vancomycin in bovine milk samples. Milk samples were extracted with a mixture of methanol 0. 1% formic acid and water, and deproteinized with 4% trichloroacetic acid in acetonitrile. The five peptide antibiotics in the extract were separated on a reversed phase using a gradient elution program of 0. 1% formic acid aqueous solution (A) and 0. 1% formic acid in acetonitrile solution (B). Using LC-MS/MS (ESI) with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), identification of the major components of the five kinds of peptide antibiotics was performed based upon the intensities of mass fragments from the respective doubly or triply charged precursor ions. The recoveries were 75.1%-120. 1% for the five polypeptides at spiked levels of 25, 50 and 100 tg/kg, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 15.7%. The limit of detection (LOD) for the five peptide antibiotics was 0.2-5.6 μg/kg. The method is suitable for quantitative and qualitative analysis of peptide antibiotics in a sufficient number of

  20. Peptide design for antimicrobial and immunomodulatory applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Evan F; Hancock, Robert E W

    2013-11-01

    The increasing threat of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria and the dwindling supply of antibiotics available to combat these infections poses a significant threat to human health throughout the world. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have long been touted as the next generation of antibiotics capable of filling the anti-infective void. Unfortunately, peptide-based antibiotics have yet to realize their potential as novel pharmaceuticals, in spite of the immense number of known AMP sequences and our improved understanding of their antibacterial mechanism of action. Recently, the immunomodulatory properties of certain AMPs have become appreciated. The ability of small synthetic peptides to protect against infection in vivo has demonstrated that modulation of the innate immune response is an effective strategy to further develop peptides as novel anti-infectives. This review focuses on the screening methods that have been used to assess novel peptide sequences for their antibacterial and immunomodulatory properties. It will also examine how we have progressed in our ability to identify and optimize peptides with desired biological characteristics and enhanced therapeutic potential. In addition, the current challenges to the development of peptides as anti-infectives are examined and the strategies being used to overcome these issues are discussed.

  1. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cost References Español: Datos breves Facts about Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotic resistance is one of the world’s most pressing public ... antibiotic use is a key strategy to control antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance in children and older adults are ...

  2. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Alan P

    2015-01-01

    .... Surveillance of antibiotic resistance involves the collection of antibiotic susceptibility test results undertaken by microbiology laboratories on bacteria isolated from clinical samples sent for investigation...

  3. Insights into the chemical logic and enzymatic machinery of NRPS assembly lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Christopher T

    2016-02-01

    Appreciation that some cyclic peptide antibiotics such as gramicidin S and tyrocidine were nonribosomally synthesized has been known for 50 years. The past two decades of research including advances in bacterial genetics, genomics, protein biochemistry and mass spectrometry have codified the principles of assembly line enzymology for hundreds of nonribosomal peptides and in parallel for thousands of polyketides. The advances in understanding the strategies used for chain initiation, elongation and termination from these assembly lines have revitalized natural product biosynthetic communities.

  4. Coping with antibiotic resistance: combining nanoparticles with antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Kon, Kateryna Volodymyrivna; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Bagirova, Malahat; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2011-11-01

    The worldwide escalation of bacterial resistance to conventional medical antibiotics is a serious concern for modern medicine. High prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria among bacteria-based infections decreases effectiveness of current treatments and causes thousands of deaths. New improvements in present methods and novel strategies are urgently needed to cope with this problem. Owing to their antibacterial activities, metallic nanoparticles represent an effective solution for overcoming bacterial resistance. However, metallic nanoparticles are toxic, which causes restrictions in their use. Recent studies have shown that combining nanoparticles with antibiotics not only reduces the toxicity of both agents towards human cells by decreasing the requirement for high dosages but also enhances their bactericidal properties. Combining antibiotics with nanoparticles also restores their ability to destroy bacteria that have acquired resistance to them. Furthermore, nanoparticles tagged with antibiotics have been shown to increase the concentration of antibiotics at the site of bacterium-antibiotic interaction, and to facilitate binding of antibiotics to bacteria. Likewise, combining nanoparticles with antimicrobial peptides and essential oils generates genuine synergy against bacterial resistance. In this article, we aim to summarize recent studies on interactions between nanoparticles and antibiotics, as well as other antibacterial agents to formulate new prospects for future studies. Based on the promising data that demonstrated the synergistic effects of antimicrobial agents with nanoparticles, we believe that this combination is a potential candidate for more research into treatments for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  5. Lysobacter species: a potential source of novel antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthee, Suresh; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Paudel, Atmika; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-11-01

    Infectious diseases threaten global health due to the ability of microbes to acquire resistance against clinically used antibiotics. Continuous discovery of antibiotics with a novel mode of action is thus required. Actinomycetes and fungi are currently the major sources of antibiotics, but the decreasing rate of discovery of novel antibiotics suggests that the focus should be changed to previously untapped groups of microbes. Lysobacter species have a genome size of ~6 Mb with a relatively high G + C content of 61-70 % and are characterized by their ability to produce peptides that damage the cell walls or membranes of other microbes. Genome sequence analysis revealed that each Lysobacter species has gene clusters for the production of 12-16 secondary metabolites, most of which are peptides, thus making them 'peptide production specialists'. Given that the number of antibiotics isolated is much lower than the number of gene clusters harbored, further intensive studies of Lysobacter are likely to unearth novel antibiotics with profound biomedical applications. In this review, we summarize the structural diversity, activity and biosynthesis of lysobacterial antibiotics and highlight the importance of Lysobacter species for antibiotic production.

  6. Demographics of antibiotic persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerova, Silvia; Jouvet, Lionel; Steiner, Ulrich

    Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch...... even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed....

  7. Alloferon-1抗生肽串联重组表达及重组Alloferon-1体外抗肿瘤活性%Serial recombinant expression and anti-tumor activity in vitro of antibiotic peptide Alloferon-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐小寅; 严杰; 孙琦

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To generate a recombinant expression system of repeated serial antibiotic peptide Alloferon-1 DNA segment with trypsin digestion site and to determine its anti-tumor activity in vitro. Methods: A 14 repeated serial DNA segment of Alloferon-1 with a lysine residual at the C-end that acts as the trypsin digestion site was constructed. pET42a vector and E. Coli BL21DE3 were applied to generate the prokaryotic expression system of the repeated serial DNA segment of Alloferon-1. The yield of target recombinant product was measured by SDS-PAGE and Bio-Rad Gel image system. Ni-NTA affinity column, trypsin digestion and Sephadex G-50 column were used to purify 14 rAlloferon-1-K fusion protein and rAlloferon-1 -K monomer. By using the co-cultivation of BALB/c mouse splenocyte with K562, KB or SGC tumor cells and CCK-8 detection method, the effects of rAlloferon-1 -K, chemosynthetic Alloferon-1 (cAlloferon-1) and Alloferon-1-K ( cAlloferon-1-K) on the growth and proliferation of tumor cells were detected. Results: The prokaryotic expression system E. Coli BL21DE3pET42a-14 Allofron-1-k efficiently expressed 14 rAlloferon-1-K fusion protein under inducement of IPTG.and the yield of fusion protein was approximate 30% of the total bacterial proteins. 0.1 ~ 10 ng/ml rAlloferon-1-K remarkably increased the effect of mouse splenocytes to inhibit the growth and proliferation of K562, KB and SGC cells ( P 0. 05). Conclusion; A prokaryotic expression system of repeated serial Alloferon-1 DNA segment has been successfully constructed with high yield of rAlloferon-1-K, which maintains anti-tumor activity in vitro.%目的:构建含胰蛋白酶酶切位点的Alloferon-1抗生肽重复串联DNA片段及其原核表达系统,了解有赖氨酸尾重组Alloferon-1( rAlloferon-1)体外抗肿瘤活性.方法:根据Alloferon-1序列不合精氨酸和赖氨酸的特点,构建C端加有含胰蛋白酶酶切位点赖氨酸的14 x Alloferon-1抗生肽重复串联DNA片段.采用pET42a

  8. The leader peptide of mutacin 1140 has distinct structural components compared to related class I lantibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escano, Jerome; Stauffer, Byron; Brennan, Jacob; Bullock, Monica; Smith, Leif

    2014-12-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics composed of an N-terminal leader peptide that promotes the core peptide's interaction with the post translational modification (PTM) enzymes. Following PTMs, mutacin 1140 is transported out of the cell and the leader peptide is cleaved to yield the antibacterial peptide. Mutacin 1140 leader peptide is structurally unique compared to other class I lantibiotic leader peptides. Herein, we further our understanding of the structural differences of mutacin 1140 leader peptide with regard to other class I leader peptides. We have determined that the length of the leader peptide is important for the biosynthesis of mutacin 1140. We have also determined that mutacin 1140 leader peptide contains a novel four amino acid motif compared to related lantibiotics. PTM enzyme recognition of the leader peptide appears to be evolutionarily distinct from related class I lantibiotics. Our study on mutacin 1140 leader peptide provides a basis for future studies aimed at understanding its interaction with the PTM enzymes.

  9. A polyketide synthase-peptide synthetase gene cluster from an uncultured bacterial symbiont of Paederus beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Jörn

    2002-10-29

    Many drug candidates from marine and terrestrial invertebrates are suspected metabolites of uncultured bacterial symbionts. The antitumor polyketides of the pederin family, isolated from beetles and sponges, are an example. Drug development from such sources is commonly hampered by low yields and the difficulty of sustaining invertebrate cultures. To obtain insight into the true producer and find alternative supplies of these rare drug candidates, the putative pederin biosynthesis genes were cloned from total DNA of Paederus fuscipes beetles, which use this compound for chemical defense. Sequence analysis of the gene cluster and adjacent regions revealed the presence of ORFs with typical bacterial architecture and homologies. The ped cluster, which is present only in beetle specimens with high pederin content, is located on a 54-kb region bordered by transposase pseudogenes and encodes a mixed modular polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase. Notably, none of the modules contains regions with homology to acyltransferase domains, but two copies of isolated monodomain acyltransferase genes were found at the upstream end of the cluster. In line with an involvement in pederin biosynthesis, the upstream cluster region perfectly mirrors pederin structure. The unexpected presence of additional polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules reveals surprising insights into the evolutionary relationship between pederin-type pathways in beetles and sponges.

  10. Squalamine: an aminosterol antibiotic from the shark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, K S; Wehrli, S; Roder, H; Rogers, M; Forrest, J N; McCrimmon, D; Zasloff, M

    1993-02-15

    In recent years, a variety of low molecular weight antibiotics have been isolated from diverse animal species. These agents, which include peptides, lipids, and alkaloids, exhibit antibiotic activity against environmental microbes and are thought to play a role in innate immunity. We report here the discovery of a broad-spectrum steroidal antibiotic isolated from tissues of the dogfish shark Squalus acanthias. This water-soluble antibiotic, which we have named squalamine, exhibits potent bactericidal activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In addition, squalamine is fungicidal and induces osmotic lysis of protozoa. The chemical structure of the antibiotic 3 beta-N-1-(N-[3-(4-aminobutyl)]- 1,3-diaminopropane)-7 alpha,24 zeta-dihydroxy-5 alpha-cholestane 24-sulfate has been determined by fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy and NMR. Squalamine is a cationic steroid characterized by a condensation of an anionic bile salt intermediate with spermidine. The discovery of squalamine in the shark implicates a steroid as a potential host-defense agent in vertebrates and provides insights into the chemical design of a family of broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  11. Recent Advances in Peptide Immunomodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Gao, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    With the continued rise in antibiotic-resistant bacteria, there is an immense need for the development of new therapeutic agents. Host-defense peptides (HDPs) offer a unique alternative to many of the current approved antibiotics. By targeting the host rather than the pathogen, HDPs offer several benefits over traditional small molecule drug treatments, such as a slower propensity towards resistance, broad-spectrum activity and lower risk of patients developing sepsis. However, natural peptide structures have many disadvantages as well, including susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, significant costs of synthesis and host toxicity. For this reason, much work has been done to examine peptidomimetic structures, in the hopes of finding a structure with all of the desired qualities of an antibiotic drug. Recently, this research has included synthetic constructs that mimic the behavior of HDPs but have no structural similarity to peptides. This review article focuses on the progression of this field of research, beginning with an analysis of a few prominent examples of natural HDPs and moving on to describe how the information learned by studying them have led to the current design platforms.

  12. Two novel cyclic peptides are key components of the antimicrobial activity of the Greenlandic isolate Pseudomonas sp. In5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian F.

    Pseudomonas sp. are a rich source of secondary metabolites including bioactive non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides. NRPs are synthesised in large assembly lines by multi-domain modular enzymes known as NRP-synthetases (NRPS). Nunamycin and nunapeptin are two cyclic NRPs synthesised...... by the Greenlandic isolate Pseudomonas sp. In5. Nunamycin shows antifungal activity against the basidiomycete Rhizoctonia solani whereas the only partially structure elucidated nunapeptin appears most active against the ascomycete Fusarium graminearum and the oomycete Pythium aphanidermatum. Originally isolated from...

  13. Bioactive Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Banan-Mwine Daliri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  14. Bioactive Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H; Lee, Byong H

    2017-04-26

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  15. Antibiotics in the environment

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, D. G. Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Molecules with antibiotic properties, produced by various microbes, have been around long before mankind recognized their usefulness in preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteria have therefore been exposed to selection pressures from antibiotics for very long times, however, generally only on a micro-scale within the immediate vicinity of the antibiotic-producing organisms. In the twentieth century we began mass-producing antibiotics, mainly synthetic derivatives of naturally pro...

  16. Activating and Attenuating the Amicoumacin Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Bong Park

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The amicoumacins belong to a class of dihydroisocoumarin natural products and display antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory activities. Amicoumacins are the pro-drug activation products of a bacterial nonribosomal peptide-polyketide hybrid biosynthetic pathway and have been isolated from Gram-positive Bacillus and Nocardia species. Here, we report the stimulation of a “cryptic” amicoumacin pathway in the entomopathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Xenorhabdus bovienii, a strain not previously known to produce amicoumacins. X. bovienii participates in a multi-lateral symbiosis where it is pathogenic to insects and mutualistic to its Steinernema nematode host. Waxmoth larvae are common prey of the X. bovienii-Steinernema pair. Employing a medium designed to mimic the amino acid content of the waxmoth circulatory fluid led to the detection and characterization of amicoumacins in X. bovienii. The chemical structures of the amicoumacins were supported by 2D-NMR, HR-ESI-QTOF-MS, tandem MS, and polarimeter spectral data. A comparative gene cluster analysis of the identified X. bovienii amicoumacin pathway to that of the Bacillus subtilis amicoumacin pathway and the structurally-related Xenorhabdus nematophila xenocoumacin pathway is presented. The X. bovienii pathway encodes an acetyltransferase not found in the other reported pathways, which leads to a series of N-acetyl-amicoumacins that lack antibacterial activity. N-acetylation of amicoumacin was validated through in vitro protein biochemical studies, and the impact of N-acylation on amicoumacin’s mode of action was examined through ribosomal structural analyses.

  17. Know When Antibiotics Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-15

    This podcast provides a brief background about antibiotics and quick tips to help prevent antibiotic resistance.  Created: 4/15/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  18. Strengthening Control of Antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EthelLu

    2005-01-01

    IT is a well-known fact that buy-ng guns is much easier than purchasing antibiotics in the United States. In China, however, the situation is different. According to a recent WHO survey,about 80 percent of Chinese inpatients take antibiotic medicines, and 58 percent of them are prescribed multifunctional antibiotics,

  19. Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers Language: English (US) Español ( ... Many ear infections Top of Page Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Examples of How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads Click for ...

  20. Identification of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase responsible for biosynthesis of the potential anti-cancer drug sansalvamide in Fusarium solani

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romans-Fuertes, Patricia; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Sandmann, Manuela Ilse Helga

    2016-01-01

    Sansalvamide is a cyclic pentadepsipeptide produced by Fusarium solani and has shown promising results as potential anti-cancer drug. The biosynthetic pathway has until now remained unidentified, but here we used an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) approach to generate kno...... and Trichoderma virens, which suggests that the ability to produce compounds related to destruxin and sansalvamide is widespread....

  1. Perspectives and Insights into the Competition for Aminoacyl-tRNAs between the Translational Machinery and for tRNA Dependent Non-Ribosomal Peptide Bond Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela W. S. Fung

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferases catalyze the transfer of amino acids from aminoacyl-tRNAs to polypeptide substrates. Different forms of these enzymes are found in the different kingdoms of life and have been identified to be central to a wide variety of cellular processes. L/F-transferase is the sole member of this class of enzyme found in Escherichia coli and catalyzes the transfer of leucine to the N-termini of proteins which result in the targeted degradation of the modified protein. Recent investigations on the tRNA specificity of L/F-transferase have revealed the unique recognition nucleotides for a preferred Leu-tRNALeu isoacceptor substrate. In addition to discussing this tRNA selectivity by L/F-transferase, we present and discuss a hypothesis and its implications regarding the apparent competition for this aminoacyl-tRNA between L/F-transferase and the translational machinery. Our discussion reveals a hypothetical involvement of the bacterial stringent response that occurs upon amino acid limitation as a potential cellular event that may reduce this competition and provide the opportunity for L/F-transferase to readily increase its access to the pool of aminoacylated tRNA substrates.

  2. The cyclochlorotine mycotoxin is produced by the nonribosomal peptide synthetase CctN in Talaromyces islandicus (“Penicillium islandicum”)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schafhauser, Thomas; Kirchner, Norbert; Kulik, Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces islandicus (“Penicillium islandicum”) is a widespread foodborne mold that produces numerous secondary metabolites, among them potent mycotoxins belonging to different chemical classes. A notable metabolite is the hepatotoxic and carcinogenic pentapeptide cyclochlorotine that contains ...

  3. High Antibiotic Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; José Rabanaque, María; Feja, Cristina;

    2014-01-01

    with highest consumption) were responsible for 21% of the total DDD consumed and received ≥6 packages per year. Elderly adults (≥60 years) and small children (0-9 years) were those exposed to the highest volume of antibiotics and with the most frequent exposure, respectively. Heavy users received a high...... proportion of antibiotics not recommended as first choice in primary health care. In conclusion, heavy antibiotic users consisted mainly of children and old adults. Inappropriate overuse of antibiotics (high quantity, high frequency, and inappropriate antibiotic choice) leads to a substantial risk...

  4. Systemic antibiotics in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slots, Jørgen

    2004-11-01

    This position paper addresses the role of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal disease. Topical antibiotic therapy is not discussed here. The paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. The document consists of three sections: 1) concept of antibiotic periodontal therapy; 2) efficacy of antibiotic periodontal therapy; and 3) practical aspects of antibiotic periodontal therapy. The conclusions drawn in this paper represent the position of the American Academy of Periodontology and are intended for the information of the dental profession.

  5. Tagging polyketides/non-ribosomal peptides with a clickable functionality and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun eZhu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioorthogonal chemistry has recently emerged to be one of the most powerful tools in drug discovery and chemical biology. The exploration of it has successfully advanced the field of natural product research. In this Perspective, we survey current strategies for the installation of chemical handles into the molecular scaffolds of several major classes of natural products, including polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, and their hybrids. By tagging these natural products with chemical handles and coupling them with subsequent bioorthogonal reactions, researchers have visualized and studied the mode of action of natural products, as well as synthesized derivatives with better pharmaceutical properties. We conclude this Perspective by considering two questions: Is there a general way to synthesize tagged polyketides/non-ribosomal peptides? Does natural product labeling have a broader impact in the field of natural product research beyond current known applications?

  6. Tagging polyketides/non-ribosomal peptides with a clickable functionality and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuejun; Zhang, Wenjun

    2015-02-01

    Bioorthogonal chemistry has recently emerged to be one of the most powerful tools in drug discovery and chemical biology. The exploration of it has successfully advanced the field of natural product research. In this Perspective, we survey current strategies for the installation of chemical handles into the molecular scaffolds of several major classes of natural products, including polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, and their hybrids. By tagging these natural products with chemical handles and coupling them with subsequent bioorthogonal reactions, researchers have visualized and studied the mode of action of natural products, as well as synthesized derivatives with better pharmaceutical properties. We conclude this Perspective by considering two questions: Is there a general way to synthesize tagged polyketides/non-ribosomal peptides? Does natural product labeling have a broader impact in the field of natural product research beyond current known applications?

  7. Antibiotic resistance in Chlamydiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Rockey, Daniel D

    2010-09-01

    There are few documented reports of antibiotic resistance in Chlamydia and no examples of natural and stable antibiotic resistance in strains collected from humans. While there are several reports of clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to antibiotics, these strains either lost their resistance phenotype in vitro, or lost viability altogether. Differences in procedures for chlamydial culture in the laboratory, low recovery rates of clinical isolates and the unknown significance of heterotypic resistance observed in culture may interfere with the recognition and interpretation of antibiotic resistance. Although antibiotic resistance has not emerged in chlamydiae pathogenic to humans, several lines of evidence suggest they are capable of expressing significant resistant phenotypes. The adept ability of chlamydiae to evolve to antibiotic resistance in vitro is demonstrated by contemporary examples of mutagenesis, recombination and genetic transformation. The isolation of tetracycline-resistant Chlamydia suis strains from pigs also emphasizes their adaptive ability to acquire antibiotic resistance genes when exposed to significant selective pressure.

  8. Antimicrobial Dendrimeric Peptides: Structure, Activity and New Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorciapino, Mariano A; Serra, Ilaria; Manzo, Giorgia; Rinaldi, Andrea C

    2017-03-03

    Microbial resistance to conventional antibiotics is one of the most outstanding medical and scientific challenges of our times. Despite the recognised need for new anti-infective agents, however, very few new drugs have been brought to the market and to the clinic in the last three decades. This review highlights the properties of a new class of antibiotics, namely dendrimeric peptides. These intriguing novel compounds, generally made of multiple peptidic sequences linked to an inner branched core, display an array of antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal activities, usually coupled to low haemolytic activity. In addition, several peptides synthesized in oligobranched form proved to be promising tools for the selective treatment of cancer cells.

  9. Peptide identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  10. Peptide consensus sequence determination for the enhancement of the antimicrobial activity and selectivity of antimicrobial peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaaytah, Ammar; Ajingi, Ya’u; Abualhaijaa, Ahmad; Tarazi, Shadi; Alshar’i, Nizar; Al-Balas, Qosay

    2017-01-01

    The rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria is causing a serious threat to the world’s human population. Recent reports have identified bacterial strains displaying pan drug resistance against antibiotics and generating fears among medical health specialists that humanity is on the dawn of entering a post-antibiotics era. Global research is currently focused on expanding the lifetime of current antibiotics and the development of new antimicrobial agents to tackle the problem of antimicrobial resistance. In the present study, we designed a novel consensus peptide named “Pepcon” through peptide consensus sequence determination among members of a highly homologous group of scorpion antimicrobial peptides. Members of this group were found to possess moderate antimicrobial activity with significant toxicity against mammalian cells. The aim of our design method was to generate a novel peptide with an enhanced antimicrobial potency and selectivity against microbial rather than mammalian cells. The results of our study revealed that the consensus peptide displayed potent antibacterial activities against a broad range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Our membrane permeation studies displayed that the peptide efficiently induced membrane damage and consequently led to cell death through the process of cell lysis. The microbial DNA binding assay of the peptide was found to be very weak suggesting that the peptide is not targeting the microbial DNA. Pepcon induced minimal cytotoxicity at the antimicrobial concentrations as the hemolytic activity was found to be zero at the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). The results of our study demonstrate that the consensus peptide design strategy is efficient in generating peptides. PMID:28096686

  11. Antimicrobial peptides important in innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlund, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2011-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are present in all walks of life, from plants to animals, and they are considered to be endogenous antibiotics. In general, antimicrobial peptides are determinants of the composition of the microbiota and they function to fend off microbes and prevent infections. Antimicrobial peptides eliminate micro-organisms through disruption of their cell membranes. Their importance in human immunity, and in health as well as disease, has only recently been appreciated. The present review provides an introduction to the field of antimicrobial peptides in general and discusses two of the major classes of mammalian antimicrobial peptides: the defensins and the cathelicidins. The review focuses on their structures, their main modes of action and their regulation.

  12. Protective role of E. coli outer membrane vesicles against antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Heramb M; Nagaraj, R; Jagannadham, Medicharla V

    2015-12-01

    The outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from bacteria are known to posses both defensive and protective functions and thus participate in community related functions. In the present study, outer membrane vesicles have been shown to protect the producer bacterium and two other bacterial species from the growth inhibitory effects of some antibiotics. The OMVs isolated from E. coli MG1655 protected the bacteria against membrane-active antibiotics colistin, melittin. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 could also protect P. aeruginosa NCTC6751 and A. radiodioresistens MMC5 against these membrane-active antibiotics. However, OMVs could not protect any of these bacteria against the other antibiotics ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and trimethoprim. Hence, OMVs appears to protect the bacterial community against membrane-active antibiotics and not other antibiotics, which have different mechanism of actions. The OMVs of E. coli MG1655 sequester the antibiotic colistin, whereas their protein components degrade the antimicrobial peptide melittin. Proteomic analysis of OMVs revealed the presence of proteases and peptidases which appear to be involved in this process. Thus, the protection of bacteria by OMVs against antibiotics is situation dependent and the mechanism differs for different situations. These studies suggest that OMVs of bacteria form a common defense for the bacterial community against specific antibiotics.

  13. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Auerbach-Nevo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification.

  14. Antibiotics in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, D G Joakim

    2014-05-01

    Molecules with antibiotic properties, produced by various microbes, have been around long before mankind recognized their usefulness in preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteria have therefore been exposed to selection pressures from antibiotics for very long times, however, generally only on a micro-scale within the immediate vicinity of the antibiotic-producing organisms. In the twentieth century we began mass-producing antibiotics, mainly synthetic derivatives of naturally produced antibiotic molecules, but also a few entirely synthetic compounds. As a consequence, entire bacterial communities became exposed to unprecedented antibiotic selection pressures, which in turn led to the rapid resistance development we are facing today among many pathogens. We are, rightly, concerned about the direct selection pressures of antibiotics on the microbial communities that reside in or on our bodies. However, other environments, outside of our bodies, may also be exposed to antibiotics through different routes, most often unintentionally. There are concerns that increased selection pressures from antibiotics in the environment can contribute to the recruitment of resistance factors from the environmental resistome to human pathogens. This paper attempts to 1) provide a brief overview of environmental exposure routes of antibiotics, 2) provide some thoughts about our current knowledge of the associated risks for humans as well as ecosystems, and 3) indicate management options to reduce risks.

  15. Antibiotics and Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Gauthier, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    During the breastfeeding period, bacterial infections can occur in the nursing mother, requiring the use of antibiotics. A lack of accurate information may lead health care professionals and mothers to suspend breastfeeding, which may be unnecessary. This article provides information on the main antibiotics that are appropriate for clinical use and the interference of these antibiotics with the infant to support medical decisions regarding the discontinuation of breastfeeding. We aim to provide information on the pharmacokinetic factors that interfere with the passage of antibiotics into breast milk and the toxicological implications of absorption by the infant. Publications related to the 20 most frequently employed antibiotics and their transfer into breast milk were evaluated. The results demonstrate that most antibiotics in clinical use are considered suitable during breastfeeding; however, the pharmacokinetic profile of each drug must be observed to ensure the resolution of the maternal infection and the safety of the infant.

  16. [Rational use of antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walger, P

    2016-06-01

    International and national campaigns draw attention worldwide to the rational use of the available antibiotics. This has been stimulated by the high prevalence rates of drug-resistant pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), a threatening spread of development of resistance in Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria and the selection of Clostridium difficile with a simultaneous clear reduction in the development of new antibiotics. The implementation of antibiotic stewardship programs aims to maintain their effectiveness by a rational use of the available antibiotics. The essential target of therapy with antibiotics is successful treatment of individual patients with bacterial infections. The optimal clinical treatment results can only be achieved when the toxicity, selection of pathogens and development of resistance are minimized. This article presents the principles of a rational antibiotic therapy.

  17. Platforms for antibiotic discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kim

    2013-05-01

    The spread of resistant bacteria, leading to untreatable infections, is a major public health threat but the pace of antibiotic discovery to combat these pathogens has slowed down. Most antibiotics were originally isolated by screening soil-derived actinomycetes during the golden era of antibiotic discovery in the 1940s to 1960s. However, diminishing returns from this discovery platform led to its collapse, and efforts to create a new platform based on target-focused screening of large libraries of synthetic compounds failed, in part owing to the lack of penetration of such compounds through the bacterial envelope. This article considers strategies to re-establish viable platforms for antibiotic discovery. These include investigating untapped natural product sources such as uncultured bacteria, establishing rules of compound penetration to enable the development of synthetic antibiotics, developing species-specific antibiotics and identifying prodrugs that have the potential to eradicate dormant persisters, which are often responsible for hard-to-treat infections.

  18. Resistance to antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The antibiotics represent the most important therapeutic arsenal in the fight against pathogen microorganisms. Even in the beginning of their use, there was registered bacterial resistance, phenomenon thatbecame an alarming subject in the last decades. There are some types of resistance to antibiotics that are influenced by many factors. The resistance term can be used as microbiological resistance and clinical resistance. The resistance to antibiotics can be a natural phenomenon or a gained ...

  19. The role of antimicrobial peptides in animal defenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Robert E. W.; Scott, Monisha G.

    2000-08-01

    It is becoming clear that the cationic antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the innate defenses of all species of life. Such peptides can be constitutively expressed or induced by bacteria or their products. The best peptides have good activities vs. a broad range of bacterial strains, including antibiotic-resistant isolates. They kill very rapidly, do not easily select resistant mutants, are synergistic with conventional antibiotics, other peptides, and lysozyme, and are able to kill bacteria in animal models. It is known that bacterial infections, especially when treated with antibiotics, can lead to the release of bacterial products such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid, resulting in potentially lethal sepsis. In contrast to antibiotics, the peptides actually prevent cytokine induction by bacterial products in tissue culture and human blood, and they block the onset of sepsis in mouse models of endotoxemia. Consistent with this, transcriptional gene array experiments using a macrophage cell line demonstrated that a model peptide, CEMA, blocks the expression of many genes whose transcription was induced by LPS. The peptides do this in part by blocking LPS interaction with the serum protein LBP. In addition, CEMA itself has a direct effect on macrophage gene expression. Because cationic antimicrobial peptides are induced by LPS and are able to dampen the septic response of animal cells to LPS, we propose that, in addition to their role in direct and lysozyme-assisted killing of microbes, they have a role in feedback regulation of cytokine responses. We are currently developing variant peptides as therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant infections.

  20. Demographics of antibiotic persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Ulrich; Kollerova, Silvia; Jouvet, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch...... cultures, rather than the individual level. Here, we used individual level bacteria data to confirm previous studies in how fast cells switch into a persistence stage, but our results challenge the fundamental idea that persistence comes with major costs of reduced growth (cell elongation) and division due...... even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed....

  1. Antibiotics: Miracle Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-16

    The overuse of antibiotics has led to the development of resistance among bacteria, making antibiotics ineffective in treating certain conditions. This podcast discusses the importance of talking to your healthcare professional about whether or not antibiotics will be beneficial if you’ve been diagnosed with an infectious disease.  Created: 4/16/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  2. Nunamycin and Nunapeptin: Two novel cyclic peptides are key components of the antimicrobial activity of the Greenlandic isolate Pseudomonas fluorescens In5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian F.

    Pseudomonas spp. are a rich source of secondary metabolites including bioactive non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) and polyketides. NRPs are synthesised in large assembly lines by multi-domain modular enzymes known as NRP-synthetases (NRPS). Nunamycin and nunapeptin are two cyclic NRPs synthesised...... by the Greenlandic isolate P. fluorescens In5. Nunamycin shows antifungal activity against the basidiomycete Rhizoctonia solani whereas the only partially structure elucidated nunapeptin appears most active against the ascomycete Fusarium graminearum and the oomycete Pythium aphanidermatum. Originally isolated from...

  3. The role of antimicrobial peptides in cardiovascular physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifeng

    2009-12-18

    Antimicrobial peptides are natural peptide antibiotics, existing ubiquitously in both plant and animal kingdoms. They exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and play an important role in host defense against invading microbes. Recently, these peptides have been shown to possess activities unrelated to direct microbial killing and be involved in the complex network of immune responses and inflammation. Thus, their role has now broadened beyond that of endogenous antibiotics. Because of their wide involvement in inflammatory response and the emerging role of inflammation in atherosclerosis, antimicrobial peptides have been proposed to represent an important link between inflammation and the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. This review highlights recent findings that support a role of these peptides in cardiovascular physiology and disease.

  4. Antimicrobial peptides: natural templates for synthetic membrane-active compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, A; Pirri, G; Bozzi, A; Di Giulio, A; Aschi, M; Rinaldi, A C

    2008-08-01

    The innate immunity of multicellular organisms relies in large part on the action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) to resist microbial invasion. Crafted by evolution into an extremely diversified array of sequences and folds, AMPs do share a common amphiphilic 3-D arrangement. This feature is directly linked with a common mechanism of action that predominantly (although not exclusively) develops upon interaction of peptides with cell membranes of target cells. This minireview reports on current understanding of the modes of interaction of AMPs with biological and model membranes, especially focusing on recent insights into the folding and oligomerization requirements of peptides to bind and insert into lipid membranes and exert their antibiotic effects. Given the potential of AMPs to be developed into a new class of anti-infective agents, emphasis is placed on how the information on peptide-membrane interactions could direct the design and selection of improved biomimetic synthetic peptides with antibiotic properties.

  5. The antibacterial peptide ABP-CM4: the current state of its production and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian Feng; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Xing Zhou; Han, Yang Yang; Cui, Xian Wei; Chen, Yu Qing; Zhang, Shuang Quan

    2012-06-01

    The increasing resistance of bacteria and fungi to currently available antibiotics is a major concern worldwide, leading to enormous efforts to develop new antibiotics with new modes of actions. Antibacterial peptide CM4 (ABP-CM4) is a small cationic peptide with broad-spectrum activities against bacteria, fungi, and tumor cells, which may possibly be used as a promising candidate for a new antibiotic. For pharmaceutical applications, a large quantity of antimicrobial peptides needs to be produced economically. In this communication, the progress in the structural characteristics, heterologous production, and biological evaluation of ABP-CM4 are reviewed.

  6. Handling Time-dependent Variables : Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Price, L. Silvia; Frencken, Jos F.; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods, antibi

  7. Handling Time-dependent Variables : Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Price, L. Silvia; Frencken, Jos F.; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods,

  8. C-Peptide Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities C-peptide Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Insulin C-peptide; Connecting Peptide Insulin; Proinsulin C-peptide Formal ...

  9. Antibacterial Peptide Nucleic Acid-Antimicrobial Peptide (PNA-AMP) Conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anna Mette; Bonke, Gitte; Larsen, Camilla Josephine

    2016-01-01

    Antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers constitute a novel class of potential antibiotics that inhibit bacterial growth via specific knockdown of essential gene expression. However, discovery of efficient, nontoxic delivery vehicles for such PNA oligomers has remained a challenge. In the p...

  10. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  11. Replacement for antibiotics: Lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics have been fed at subtherapeutic levels to swine as growth promoters for more than 60 years, and the majority of swine produced in the U.S. receive antibiotics in their feed at some point in their production cycle. These compounds benefit the producers by minimizing production losses by ...

  12. The future of antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to spread even as society is experiencing a market failure of new antibiotic research and development (R&D). Scientific, economic, and regulatory barriers all contribute to the antibiotic market failure. Scientific solutions to rekindle R&D include finding new screening strategies to identify novel antibiotic scaffolds and transforming the way we think about treating infections, such that the goal is to disarm the pathogen without killing it or modulate the host response to the organism without targeting the organism for destruction. Future economic strategies are likely to focus on ‘push’ incentives offered by public-private partnerships as well as increasing pricing by focusing development on areas of high unmet need. Such strategies can also help protect new antibiotics from overuse after marketing. Regulatory reform is needed to re-establish feasible and meaningful traditional antibiotic pathways, to create novel limited-use pathways that focus on highly resistant infections, and to harmonize regulatory standards across nations. We need new antibiotics with which to treat our patients. But we also need to protect those new antibiotics from misuse when they become available. If we want to break the cycle of resistance and change the current landscape, disruptive approaches that challenge long-standing dogma will be needed. PMID:25043962

  13. History of Antibiotics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Kathrin I

    2016-01-01

    For thousands of years people were delivered helplessly to various kinds of infections, which often reached epidemic proportions and have cost the lives of millions of people. This is precisely the age since mankind has been thinking of infectious diseases and the question of their causes. However, due to a lack of knowledge, the search for strategies to fight, heal, and prevent the spread of communicable diseases was unsuccessful for a long time. It was not until the discovery of the healing effects of (antibiotic producing) molds, the first microscopic observations of microorganisms in the seventeenth century, the refutation of the abiogenesis theory, and the dissolution of the question "What is the nature of infectious diseases?" that the first milestones within the history of antibiotics research were set. Then new discoveries accelerated rapidly: Bacteria could be isolated and cultured and were identified as possible agents of diseases as well as producers of bioactive metabolites. At the same time the first synthetic antibiotics were developed and shortly thereafter, thousands of synthetic substances as well as millions of soil borne bacteria and fungi were screened for bioactivity within numerous microbial laboratories of pharmaceutical companies. New antibiotic classes with different targets were discovered as on assembly line production. With the beginning of the twentieth century, many of the diseases which reached epidemic proportions at the time-e.g., cholera, syphilis, plague, tuberculosis, or typhoid fever, just to name a few, could be combatted with new discovered antibiotics. It should be considered that hundred years ago the market launch of new antibiotics was significantly faster and less complicated than today (where it takes 10-12 years in average between the discovery of a new antibiotic until the launch). After the first euphoria it was quickly realized that bacteria are able to develop, acquire, and spread numerous resistance mechanisms

  14. Front line defenders of the ecological niche! Screening the structural diversity of peptaibiotics from saprotrophic and fungicolous Trichoderma/Hypocrea species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röhrich, Christian René; Jaklitsch, Walter Michael; Voglmayr, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 950 individual sequences of nonribosomally biosynthesised peptides are produced by the genus Trichoderma/Hypocreathat belong to a perpetually growing class of mostly linear antibiotic oligopeptides, which are rich in the non-proteinogenic α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib). Thus, they are......Approximately 950 individual sequences of nonribosomally biosynthesised peptides are produced by the genus Trichoderma/Hypocreathat belong to a perpetually growing class of mostly linear antibiotic oligopeptides, which are rich in the non-proteinogenic α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib). Thus...

  15. Metagenomics and antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, L; Hernandez, A; Sanchez, M B; Martinez, J L

    2012-07-01

    Most of the bacterial species that form part of the biosphere have never been cultivated. In this situation, a comprehensive study of bacterial communities requires the utilization of non-culture-based methods, which have been named metagenomics. In this paper we review the use of different metagenomic techniques for understanding the effect of antibiotics on microbial communities, to synthesize new antimicrobial compounds and to analyse the distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in different ecosystems. These techniques include functional metagenomics, which serves to find new antibiotics or new antibiotic resistance genes, and descriptive metagenomics, which serves to analyse changes in the composition of the microbiota and to track the presence and abundance of already known antibiotic resistance genes in different ecosystems.

  16. Antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottoline, Ana Carolina Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Antibiotic prophylaxis aims to prevent infection of surgical sites before contamination or infection occurs. Prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis does not enhance the prevention of surgical infection and is associated with higher rates of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. This review of the literature concerning antibiotic prophylaxis, with an emphasis on otolaryngologic surgery, aims to develop a guide for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery in order to reduce the numbers of complications stemming from the indiscriminate use of antibiotics.

  17. Ribosomally synthesized peptides from natural sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nidhi; Abraham, Jayanthi

    2014-04-01

    There are many antibiotic-resistant microbial pathogens that have emerged in recent years causing normal infections to become harder and sometimes impossible to treat. The major mechanisms of acquired resistance are the ability of the microorganisms to destroy or modify the drug, alter the drug target, reduce uptake or increase efflux of the drug and replace the metabolic step targeted by the drug. However, in recent years, resistant strains have been reported from almost every environment. New antimicrobial compounds are of major importance because of the growing problem of bacterial resistance, and antimicrobial peptides have been gaining a lot of interest. Their mechanism of action, however, is often obscure. Antimicrobial peptides are widespread and have a major role in innate immunity. An increasing number of peptides capable of inhibiting microbial growth are being reviewed here. In this article, we consider the possible use of antimicrobial peptides against pathogens.

  18. Antimicrobial peptides in human sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas eMartin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP 1-3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs 1-3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP -1-3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP-1-3, lactoferrin, BPI and heparin-binding protein (HBP are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1-11 (hLF 1-11 possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin (talactoferrin alpha, TLF has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe

  19. Recent Advances Towards The Discovery Of Drug-Like Peptides De Novo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eGoldflam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are important natural molecules that possess functions as diverse as antibiotics, toxins, venoms and hormones, for example. However, whilst these peptides have useful properties, there are many targets and pathways that are not addressed through the activities of natural peptidic compounds. In these circumstances, directed evolution techniques, such as phage display, have been developed to sample the diverse chemical and structural repertoire of small peptides for useful means. In this review, we consider recent concepts that relate peptide structure to drug-like attributes and how these are incorporated within display technologies to deliver peptides de novo with valuable pharmaceutical properties.

  20. Recent Advances Towards The Discovery Of Drug-Like Peptides De Novo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldflam, Michael; Ullman, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    Peptides are important natural molecules that possess functions as diverse as antibiotics, toxins, venoms and hormones, for example. However, whilst these peptides have useful properties, there are many targets and pathways that are not addressed through the activities of natural peptidic compounds. In these circumstances, directed evolution techniques, such as phage display, have been developed to sample the diverse chemical and structural repertoire of small peptides for useful means. In this review, we consider recent concepts that relate peptide structure to drug-like attributes and how these are incorporated within display technologies to deliver peptides de novo with valuable pharmaceutical properties.

  1. Biofilm Induced Tolerance Towards Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Zampaloni, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics...... regulated tolerant subpopulation formation and not caused by a general biofilm property. No significant difference in survival was detected when the strains were challenged with ciprofloxacin. Our data show that biofilm formation confers increased colistin tolerance to cells within the biofilm structure...

  2. Identifying producers of antibacterial compounds by screening for antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaker, Maulik N; Wang, Wenliang; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Waglechner, Nicholas; King, Andrew M; Medina, Ricardo; Wright, Gerard D

    2013-10-01

    Microbially derived natural products are major sources of antibiotics and other medicines, but discovering new antibiotic scaffolds and increasing the chemical diversity of existing ones are formidable challenges. We have designed a screen to exploit the self-protection mechanism of antibiotic producers to enrich microbial libraries for producers of selected antibiotic scaffolds. Using resistance as a discriminating criterion we increased the discovery rate of producers of both glycopeptide and ansamycin antibacterial compounds by several orders of magnitude in comparison with historical hit rates. Applying a phylogeny-based screening filter for biosynthetic genes enabled the binning of producers of distinct scaffolds and resulted in the discovery of a glycopeptide antibacterial compound, pekiskomycin, with an unusual peptide scaffold. This strategy provides a means to readily sample the chemical diversity available in microbes and offers an efficient strategy for rapid discovery of microbial natural products and their associated biosynthetic enzymes.

  3. 抗菌肽Cecropin A基因原核表达及表达产物的鉴定%Prokaryotic expression of antibiotic peptide Cecropin A gene and identification of expression products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈磊

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cecropins are a kind of micromolecule protein with antibacterial activity. Eukaryotic cell-expressed or artificially synthesized Cecropins is characterized by low efficiency and high cost. OBJECTIVE: To clone and express an antibacterial peptide gene of Musca domestica Cecropin A, and to identify recombinant expression product. METHODS: Mature Musca domestica Cecropin A encoding nucleotide sequence was searched from the GenBank and amplified by RT-PCR. The gene of Musca domestica Cecropin A was cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET32a and fused with gene of Thioredoxin (Trx) and expressed in E.coli BL2l (DE3). After induction by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside, the sera of the immunized rabbits were collected after rabbits were immunized with the hemolymph of housefly larvae. Recombinant protein was identified by western blot analysis and N-[Tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl]glycine-sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: After induction by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside, E.coli BL21 expressed mature Cecropin. Rabbit anti- housefly larvae sera, N-[Tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl]glycine-sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and western blot analysis results confirmed that expression products were mature Cecropin. These suggest that prokaryotic expression system can be utilized to obtain natural mature Cecropin.%背景:Cecropins是一种具有抗菌活性的小分子蛋白质.采用真核细胞表达或人工合成Cecropins,效率低、成本高.目的:克隆表达家蝇抗菌肽基因Cecropin A,并对其重组表达产物进行鉴定.方法:依据GenBank中家蝇Cecropin A基因序列设计特异性引物,用RT-PCR从家蝇幼虫组织中扩增Cecropin A成熟肽基因,将其克隆入原核表达载体pET32a中,与表达载体中的Thioredoxin基因构成融合基因,并转化E.coli BL21.经异丙基-β-D硫代半乳糖苷诱导表达.采用家蝇幼虫血淋巴

  4. Thiopeptide Antibiotics: Retrospective and Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Just-Baringo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thiopeptides, or thiazolyl peptides, are a relatively new family of antibiotics that already counts with more than one hundred different entities. Although they are mainly isolated from soil bacteria, during the last decade, new members have been isolated from marine samples. Far from being limited to their innate antibacterial activity, thiopeptides have been found to possess a wide range of biological properties, including anticancer, antiplasmodial, immunosuppressive, etc. In spite of their ribosomal origin, these highly posttranslationally processed peptides have posed a fascinating synthetic challenge, prompting the development of various methodologies and strategies. Regardless of their limited solubility, intensive investigations are bringing thiopeptide derivatives closer to the clinic, where they are likely to show their veritable therapeutic potential.

  5. Fatty acid conjugation enhances the activities of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhining; Yuan, Penghui; Xing, Meng; He, Zhumei; Dong, Chuanfu; Cao, Yongchang; Liu, Qiuyun

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules that play a crucial role in innate immunity in multi-cellular organisms, and usually expressed and secreted constantly at basal levels to prevent infection, but local production can be augmented upon an infection. The clock is ticking as rising antibiotic abuse has led to the emergence of many drug resistance bacteria. Due to their broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal activities as well as anti-viral and anti-tumor activities, efforts are being made to develop antimicrobial peptides into future microbial agents. This article describes some of the recent patents on antimicrobial peptides with fatty acid conjugation. Potency and selectivity of antimicrobial peptide can be modulated with fatty acid tails of variable length. Interaction between membranes and antimicrobial peptides was affected by fatty acid conjugation. At concentrations above the critical miscelle concentration (CMC), propensity of solution selfassembly hampered binding of the peptide to cell membranes. Overall, fatty acid conjugation has enhanced the activities of antimicrobial peptides, and occasionally it rendered inactive antimicrobial peptides to be bioactive. Antimicrobial peptides can not only be used as medicine but also as food additives.

  6. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This

  7. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  8. Peptide arrays for screening cancer specific peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sahar; Mathews, Anu Stella; Byeon, Nara; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we describe a novel method to screen peptides for specific recognition by cancer cells. Seventy peptides were synthesized on a cellulose membrane in an array format, and a direct method to study the peptide-whole cell interaction was developed. The relative binding affinity of the cells for different peptides with respect to a lead 12-mer p160 peptide, identified by phage display, was evaluated using the CyQUANT fluorescence of the bound cells. Screening allowed identification of at least five new peptides that displayed higher affinity (up to 3-fold) for MDA-MB-435 and MCF-7 human cancer cells compared to the p160 peptide. These peptides showed very little binding to the control (noncancerous) human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Three of these peptides were synthesized separately and labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to study their uptake and interaction with the cancer and control cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. The results confirmed the high and specific affinity of an 11-mer peptide 11 (RGDPAYQGRFL) and a 10-mer peptide 18 (WXEAAYQRFL) for the cancer cells versus HUVECs. Peptide 11 binds different receptors on target cancer cells as its sequence contains multiple recognition motifs, whereas peptide 18 binds mainly to the putative p160 receptor. The peptide array-whole cell binding assay reported here is a complementary method to phage display for further screening and optimization of cancer targeting peptides for cancer therapy and diagnosis.

  9. Thiopeptide antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, Rachel; Watrous, Jeramie D; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Bowers, Albert A; Shank, Elizabeth A

    2015-03-10

    Bacteria have evolved the ability to produce a wide range of structurally complex natural products historically called "secondary" metabolites. Although some of these compounds have been identified as bacterial communication cues, more frequently natural products are scrutinized for antibiotic activities that are relevant to human health. However, there has been little regard for how these compounds might otherwise impact the physiology of neighboring microbes present in complex communities. Bacillus cereus secretes molecules that activate expression of biofilm genes in Bacillus subtilis. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to identify the thiocillins, a group of thiazolyl peptide antibiotics, as biofilm matrix-inducing compounds produced by B. cereus. We found that thiocillin increased the population of matrix-producing B. subtilis cells and that this activity could be abolished by multiple structural alterations. Importantly, a mutation that eliminated thiocillin's antibiotic activity did not affect its ability to induce biofilm gene expression in B. subtilis. We go on to show that biofilm induction appears to be a general phenomenon of multiple structurally diverse thiazolyl peptides and use this activity to confirm the presence of thiazolyl peptide gene clusters in other bacterial species. Our results indicate that the roles of secondary metabolites initially identified as antibiotics may have more complex effects--acting not only as killing agents, but also as specific modulators of microbial cellular phenotypes.

  10. Antibiotics for uncomplicated diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel M; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Diverticulitis is an inflammatory complication to the very common condition diverticulosis. Uncomplicated diverticulitis has traditionally been treated with antibiotics with reference to the microbiology, extrapolation from trials on complicated intra-abdominal infections and clinical experience....

  11. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms.

  12. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really ...

  13. Peptide Bond Synthesis by a Mechanism Involving an Enzymatic Reaction and a Subsequent Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Zhuang, Ye; Ge, Yin; Kumano, Takuto; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that an amide bond is unexpectedly formed by an acyl-CoA synthetase (which catalyzes the formation of a carbon-sulfur bond) when a suitable acid and l-cysteine are used as substrates. DltA, which is homologous to the adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetase, belongs to the same superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, which includes many kinds of enzymes, including the acyl-CoA synthetases. Here, we demonstrate that DltA synthesizes not only N-(d-alanyl)-l-cysteine (a dipeptide) but also various oligopeptides. We propose that this enzyme catalyzes peptide synthesis by the following unprecedented mechanism: (i) the formation of S-acyl-l-cysteine as an intermediate via its "enzymatic activity" and (ii) subsequent "chemical" S → N acyl transfer in the intermediate, resulting in peptide formation. Step ii is identical to the corresponding reaction in native chemical ligation, a method of chemical peptide synthesis, whereas step i is not. To the best of our knowledge, our discovery of this peptide synthesis mechanism involving an enzymatic reaction and a subsequent chemical reaction is the first such one to be reported. This new process yields peptides without the use of a thioesterified fragment, which is required in native chemical ligation. Together with these findings, the same mechanism-dependent formation of N-acyl compounds by other members of the above-mentioned superfamily demonstrated that all members most likely form peptide/amide compounds by using this novel mechanism. Each member enzyme acts on a specific substrate; thus, not only the corresponding peptides but also new types of amide compounds can be formed.

  14. Antibiotic Precautions in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Fayock, Kristopher; Voltz, Matthew; Sandella, Bradley; Close, Jeremy; Lunser, Matthew; Okon, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Context: Antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment for bacterial infections in patients of all ages. Athletes who maximally train are at risk for illness and various infections. Routinely used antibiotics have been linked to tendon injuries, cardiac arrhythmias, diarrhea, photosensitivity, cartilage issues, and decreased performance. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant articles published from 1989 to 2012 obtained through searching MEDLINE and OVID. Also, the Food and Drug Administration website w...

  15. Antibiotic Resistance in Acne Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Brandon L; Kornmehl, Heather; Armstrong, April W

    2017-08-01

    What is the evidence for antibiotic resistance in acne, and how does resistance affect treatment? Use of topical and systemic antibiotics for acne is associated with formation of resistance in Propionibacterium acnes and other bacteria, with clinical consequences. Guidelines recommend resistance reduction strategies including avoidance of antibiotic monotherapy, combination treatment with topical modalities, and limiting the duration of oral antibiotic use.

  16. [The history of antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdankhah, Siamak; Lassen, Jørgen; Midtvedt, Tore; Solberg, Claus Ola

    2013-12-10

    The development of chemical compounds for the treatment of infectious diseases may be divided into three phases: a) the discovery in the 1600s in South America of alkaloid extracts from the bark of the cinchona tree and from the dried root of the ipecacuanha bush, which proved effective against, respectively, malaria (quinine) and amoebic dysentery (emetine); b) the development of synthetic drugs, which mostly took place in Germany, starting with Paul Ehrlich's (1854-1915) discovery of salvarsan (1909), and crowned with Gerhard Domagk's (1895-1964) discovery of the sulfonamides (1930s); and c) the discovery of antibiotics. The prime example of the latter is the development of penicillin in the late 1920s following a discovery by a solitary research scientist who never worked in a team and never as part of a research programme. It took another ten years or so before drug-quality penicillin was produced, with research now dependent on being conducted in large collaborative teams, frequently between universities and wealthy industrial companies. The search for new antibiotics began in earnest in the latter half of the 1940s and was mostly based on soil microorganisms. Many new antibiotics were discovered in this period, which may be termed «the golden age of antibiotics». Over the past three decades, the development of new antibiotics has largely stalled, while antibiotic resistance has increased. This situation may require new strategies for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  17. eNAP-2, a novel cysteine-rich bactericidal peptide from equine leukocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Couto, M A; Harwig, S S; Cullor, J S; Hughes, J. P.; Lehrer, R I

    1992-01-01

    We purified a novel cysteine-rich antibiotic peptide, eNAP-2 (M(r), approximately 6,500), from acid extracts of equine neutrophils by sequential gel filtration and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and determined its partial N-terminal amino acid sequence. Although its cysteine motif distinguished eNAP-2 from all other currently known endogenous antibiotic peptides, including defensins and granulins, it showed substantial sequence similarity to WDNM1, a putative member of ...

  18. The majority of total nuclear-encoded non-ribosomal RNA in a human cell is 'dark matter' un-annotated RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos Patrice

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discovery that the transcriptional output of the human genome is far more complex than predicted by the current set of protein-coding annotations and that most RNAs produced do not appear to encode proteins has transformed our understanding of genome complexity and suggests new paradigms of genome regulation. However, the fraction of all cellular RNA whose function we do not understand and the fraction of the genome that is utilized to produce that RNA remain controversial. This is not simply a bookkeeping issue because the degree to which this un-annotated transcription is present has important implications with respect to its biologic function and to the general architecture of genome regulation. For example, efforts to elucidate how non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs regulate genome function will be compromised if that class of RNAs is dismissed as simply 'transcriptional noise'. Results We show that the relative mass of RNA whose function and/or structure we do not understand (the so called 'dark matter' RNAs, as a proportion of all non-ribosomal, non-mitochondrial human RNA (mt-RNA, can be greater than that of protein-encoding transcripts. This observation is obscured in studies that focus only on polyA-selected RNA, a method that enriches for protein coding RNAs and at the same time discards the vast majority of RNA prior to analysis. We further show the presence of a large number of very long, abundantly-transcribed regions (100's of kb in intergenic space and further show that expression of these regions is associated with neoplastic transformation. These overlap some regions found previously in normal human embryonic tissues and raises an interesting hypothesis as to the function of these ncRNAs in both early development and neoplastic transformation. Conclusions We conclude that 'dark matter' RNA can constitute the majority of non-ribosomal, non-mitochondrial-RNA and a significant fraction arises from numerous very long

  19. Peptide Bacteriocins--Structure Activity Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etayash, Hashem; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Dangeti, Ramana; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2015-01-01

    With the growing concerns in the scientific and health communities over increasing levels of antibiotic resistance, antimicrobial peptide bacteriocins have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional small molecule antibiotics. A substantial attention has recently focused on the utilization of bacteriocins in food preservation and health safety. Despite the fact that a large number of bacteriocins have been reported, only a few have been fully characterized and structurally elucidated. Since knowledge of the molecular structure is a key for understanding the mechanism of action and therapeutic effects of peptide, we centered our focus in this review on the structure-activity relationships of bacteriocins with a particular focus in seven bacteriocins, namely, nisin, microcin J25, microcin B17, microcin C, leucocin A, sakacin P, and pediocin PA-1. Significant structural changes responsible for the altered activity of the recent bacteriocin analogues are discussed here.

  20. Towards Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides Based on Abstracts Meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana I. Barbosa-Santillán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides (ISAP approach based on abstracts meaning. Laboratories and researchers have significantly increased the report of their discoveries related to antibacterial peptides in primary publications. It is important to find antibacterial peptides that have been reported in primary publications because they can produce antibiotics of different generations that attack and destroy the bacteria. Unfortunately, researchers used heterogeneous forms of natural language to describe their discoveries (sometimes without the sequence of the peptides. Thus, we propose that learning the words meaning instead of the antibacterial peptides sequence is possible to identify and predict antibacterial peptides reported in the PubMed engine. The ISAP approach consists of two stages: training and discovering. ISAP founds that the 35% of the abstracts sample had antibacterial peptides and we tested in the updated Antimicrobial Peptide Database 2 (APD2. ISAP predicted that 45% of the abstracts had antibacterial peptides. That is, ISAP found that 810 antibacterial peptides were not classified like that, so they are not reported in APD2. As a result, this new search tool would complement the APD2 with a set of peptides that are candidates to be antibacterial. Finally, 20% of the abstracts were not semantic related to APD2.

  1. Towards Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides Based on Abstracts Meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Santillán, Liliana I.; Sánchez-Escobar, Juan J.; Calixto-Romo, M. Angeles; Barbosa-Santillán, Luis F.

    2016-01-01

    We present an Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides (ISAP) approach based on abstracts meaning. Laboratories and researchers have significantly increased the report of their discoveries related to antibacterial peptides in primary publications. It is important to find antibacterial peptides that have been reported in primary publications because they can produce antibiotics of different generations that attack and destroy the bacteria. Unfortunately, researchers used heterogeneous forms of natural language to describe their discoveries (sometimes without the sequence of the peptides). Thus, we propose that learning the words meaning instead of the antibacterial peptides sequence is possible to identify and predict antibacterial peptides reported in the PubMed engine. The ISAP approach consists of two stages: training and discovering. ISAP founds that the 35% of the abstracts sample had antibacterial peptides and we tested in the updated Antimicrobial Peptide Database 2 (APD2). ISAP predicted that 45% of the abstracts had antibacterial peptides. That is, ISAP found that 810 antibacterial peptides were not classified like that, so they are not reported in APD2. As a result, this new search tool would complement the APD2 with a set of peptides that are candidates to be antibacterial. Finally, 20% of the abstracts were not semantic related to APD2. PMID:27366202

  2. Homocysteine Editing, Thioester Chemistry, Coenzyme A, and the Origin of Coded Peptide Synthesis †.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2017-02-09

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) have evolved "quality control" mechanisms which prevent tRNA aminoacylation with non-protein amino acids, such as homocysteine, homoserine, and ornithine, and thus their access to the Genetic Code. Of the ten AARSs that possess editing function, five edit homocysteine: Class I MetRS, ValRS, IleRS, LeuRS, and Class II LysRS. Studies of their editing function reveal that catalytic modules of these AARSs have a thiol-binding site that confers the ability to catalyze the aminoacylation of coenzyme A, pantetheine, and other thiols. Other AARSs also catalyze aminoacyl-thioester synthesis. Amino acid selectivity of AARSs in the aminoacyl thioesters formation reaction is relaxed, characteristic of primitive amino acid activation systems that may have originated in the Thioester World. With homocysteine and cysteine as thiol substrates, AARSs support peptide bond synthesis. Evolutionary origin of these activities is revealed by genomic comparisons, which show that AARSs are structurally related to proteins involved in coenzyme A/sulfur metabolism and non-coded peptide bond synthesis. These findings suggest that the extant AARSs descended from ancestral forms that were involved in non-coded Thioester-dependent peptide synthesis, functionally similar to the present-day non-ribosomal peptide synthetases.

  3. Homocysteine Editing, Thioester Chemistry, Coenzyme A, and the Origin of Coded Peptide Synthesis †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieronim Jakubowski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs have evolved “quality control” mechanisms which prevent tRNA aminoacylation with non-protein amino acids, such as homocysteine, homoserine, and ornithine, and thus their access to the Genetic Code. Of the ten AARSs that possess editing function, five edit homocysteine: Class I MetRS, ValRS, IleRS, LeuRS, and Class II LysRS. Studies of their editing function reveal that catalytic modules of these AARSs have a thiol-binding site that confers the ability to catalyze the aminoacylation of coenzyme A, pantetheine, and other thiols. Other AARSs also catalyze aminoacyl-thioester synthesis. Amino acid selectivity of AARSs in the aminoacyl thioesters formation reaction is relaxed, characteristic of primitive amino acid activation systems that may have originated in the Thioester World. With homocysteine and cysteine as thiol substrates, AARSs support peptide bond synthesis. Evolutionary origin of these activities is revealed by genomic comparisons, which show that AARSs are structurally related to proteins involved in coenzyme A/sulfur metabolism and non-coded peptide bond synthesis. These findings suggest that the extant AARSs descended from ancestral forms that were involved in non-coded Thioester-dependent peptide synthesis, functionally similar to the present-day non-ribosomal peptide synthetases.

  4. A tale of chicken cathelicidin-2 : towards the development of peptide-based immunomodulatory antimicrobials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuperus, T.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance and an ever stricter control on the use of antibiotics are a driving force to develop alternative means of infection prevention and treatment. A promising alternative is the use of Host Defense Peptides (HDPs). HDPs are important effector molecules of the innate immu

  5. Prediction, production and characterization of post-translationally modified antimicrobial peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heel, Auke Johan

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria are rapidly becoming resistant to the currently used antibiotics therefore we need novel antibiotics, preferably with new mechanisms of action. One potential source are the so called antimicrobial peptides that are produced by many different organisms. To gain access to these pot

  6. Antibiotics for acute bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom; Smucny, John; Becker, Lorne A

    2017-06-19

    The benefits and risks of antibiotics for acute bronchitis remain unclear despite it being one of the most common illnesses seen in primary care. To assess the effects of antibiotics in improving outcomes and to assess adverse effects of antibiotic therapy for people with a clinical diagnosis of acute bronchitis. We searched CENTRAL 2016, Issue 11 (accessed 13 January 2017), MEDLINE (1966 to January week 1, 2017), Embase (1974 to 13 January 2017), and LILACS (1982 to 13 January 2017). We searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov on 5 April 2017. Randomised controlled trials comparing any antibiotic therapy with placebo or no treatment in acute bronchitis or acute productive cough, in people without underlying pulmonary disease. At least two review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality. We did not identify any new trials for inclusion in this 2017 update. We included 17 trials with 5099 participants in the primary analysis. The quality of trials was generally good. At follow-up there was no difference in participants described as being clinically improved between the antibiotic and placebo groups (11 studies with 3841 participants, risk ratio (RR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99 to 1.15). Participants given antibiotics were less likely to have a cough (4 studies with 275 participants, RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.85; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 6) and a night cough (4 studies with 538 participants, RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.83; NNTB 7). Participants given antibiotics had a shorter mean cough duration (7 studies with 2776 participants, mean difference (MD) -0.46 days, 95% CI -0.87 to -0.04). The differences in presence of a productive cough at follow-up and MD of productive cough did not reach statistical significance.Antibiotic-treated participants were more likely to be improved according to clinician's global assessment (6 studies

  7. Antibiotics after rattlesnake envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVecchio, Frank; Klemens, Jane; Welch, Sharon; Rodriguez, Ron

    2002-11-01

    To record the outcome, with regard to infection rate, of patients with rattlesnake bites (RSBs) who do not receive prophylactic antibiotics, a prospective observational study was performed of patients with RSBs treated at our institution during a consecutive 18-month period. The inclusion criteria were RSBs envenomation. Fifty-six consecutive patients (Median age: 32.8 years [range 4-67 years]) were enrolled. One patient was excluded because of presentation 38 h after envenomation and two patients failed to complete the required follow-up. One patient received a dose of antibiotics before transfer. Antibiotics were discontinued upon arrival. Of the total 56 RSB patients, 34 (61%) RSBs involved the upper extremity and 22 (39%) involved the lower extremity. Six patients (11%) applied ice and two (4%) used a tourniquet before evaluation. The mean arrival time was 2.7 h (Range antibiotics from their primary care physicians at 7-10 day follow-up, with no cases (0%) of documented infection. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated in patients with rattlesnake bites.

  8. Antibiotic modulation of capsular exopolysaccharide and virulence in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Geisinger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen of increasing importance due to its propensity for intractable multidrug-resistant infections in hospitals. All clinical isolates examined contain a conserved gene cluster, the K locus, which determines the production of complex polysaccharides, including an exopolysaccharide capsule known to protect against killing by host serum and to increase virulence in animal models of infection. Whether the polysaccharides determined by the K locus contribute to intrinsic defenses against antibiotics is unknown. We demonstrate here that mutants deficient in the exopolysaccharide capsule have lowered intrinsic resistance to peptide antibiotics, while a mutation affecting sugar precursors involved in both capsule and lipopolysaccharide synthesis sensitizes the bacterium to multiple antibiotic classes. We observed that, when grown in the presence of certain antibiotics below their MIC, including the translation inhibitors chloramphenicol and erythromycin, A. baumannii increases production of the K locus exopolysaccharide. Hyperproduction of capsular exopolysaccharide is reversible and non-mutational, and occurs concomitantly with increased resistance to the inducing antibiotic that is independent of the presence of the K locus. Strikingly, antibiotic-enhanced capsular exopolysaccharide production confers increased resistance to killing by host complement and increases virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection. Finally, we show that augmented capsule production upon antibiotic exposure is facilitated by transcriptional increases in K locus gene expression that are dependent on a two-component regulatory system, bfmRS. These studies reveal that the synthesis of capsule, a major pathogenicity determinant, is regulated in response to antibiotic stress. Our data are consistent with a model in which gene expression changes triggered by ineffectual antibiotic treatment cause A. baumannii to transition

  9. Insulin-like peptide 5 is a microbially regulated peptide that promotes hepatic glucose production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying Shiuan; De Vadder, Filipe; Tremaroli, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) is a recently identified gut hormone that is produced predominantly by L-cells in the colon, but its function is unclear. We have previously shown that colonic expression of the gene for the L-cell hormone GLP-1 is high in mice that lack a microbiota......-D) and antibiotic-treated mice, and also assessed the effect of dietary changes on colonic Insl5 expression. In addition, we characterized the metabolic phenotype of Insl5-/- mice. RESULTS: We showed that colonic Insl5 expression was higher in GF and antibiotic-treated mice than in CONV-R mice, whereas Insl5...

  10. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati eSengupta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic-resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic-resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in subinhibitory concentrations acting as signalling molecules supporting quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host-parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell and so on. The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behaviour of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and genes that confer resistance to antibiotics in

  11. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  12. Putrescine reduces antibiotic-induced oxidative stress as a mechanism of modulation of antibiotic resistance in Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Halfawy, Omar M; Valvano, Miguel A

    2014-07-01

    Communication of antibiotic resistance among bacteria via small molecules is implicated in transient reduction of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics, which could lead to therapeutic failures aggravating the problem of antibiotic resistance. Released putrescine from the extremely antibiotic-resistant bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia protects less-resistant cells from different species against the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B (PmB). Exposure of B. cenocepacia to sublethal concentrations of PmB and other bactericidal antibiotics induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and expression of the oxidative stress response regulator OxyR. We evaluated whether putrescine alleviates antibiotic-induced oxidative stress. The accumulation of intracellular ROS, such as superoxide ion and hydrogen peroxide, was assessed fluorometrically with dichlorofluorescein diacetate, while the expression of OxyR and putrescine synthesis enzymes was determined in luciferase assays using chromosomal promoter-lux reporter system fusions. We evaluated wild-type and isogenic deletion mutant strains with defects in putrescine biosynthesis after exposure to sublethal concentrations of PmB and other bactericidal antibiotics. Exogenous putrescine protected against oxidative stress induced by PmB and other antibiotics, whereas reduced putrescine synthesis resulted in increased ROS generation and a parallel increased sensitivity to PmB. Of the 3 B. cenocepacia putrescine-synthesizing enzymes, PmB induced only BCAL2641, an ornithine decarboxylase. This study reveals BCAL2641 as a critical component of the putrescine-mediated communication of antibiotic resistance and as a plausible target for designing inhibitors that would block the communication of such resistance among different bacteria, ultimately reducing the window of therapeutic failure in treating bacterial infections.

  13. Antibiotics in Animal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Amílcar C.

    The administration of antibiotics to animals to prevent or treat diseases led us to be concerned about the impact of these antibiotics on human health. In fact, animal products could be a potential vehicle to transfer drugs to humans. Using appropri ated mathematical and statistical models, one can predict the kinetic profile of drugs and their metabolites and, consequently, develop preventive procedures regarding drug transmission (i.e., determination of appropriate withdrawal periods). Nevertheless, in the present chapter the mathematical and statistical concepts for data interpretation are strictly given to allow understanding of some basic pharma-cokinetic principles and to illustrate the determination of withdrawal periods

  14. Overdosing on Antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Du, a Beijing resident in her 60s, believes that an antibiotic is a panacea for the maladies of her now 6-year-old grand- daughter Guoguo. Du began to take care of her granddaugh- ter since the child was merely 2 months old, for the gid's parents were busy. She is comfortable with her caretaker duties except when the girl runs high fevers. Then, the anxious grandma will feed the girl antibiotics or take her to a private child clinic nearby for intravenous infusion.

  15. Antibiotics and preterm labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, H L; Ernest, J M

    2001-08-01

    Prematurity is a profound obstetric problem and to date no effective treatment or prevention strategies have been found. Many animal and clinical data exist to link infection and preterm labor, yet clinical trials examining the effect of antibiotic treatment in patients with patterns labor and intact membranes have been conflicting and disappointing. Beyond treatment to reduce neonatal group B streptococcal infection, sexually transmitted infections, symptomatic bacterial vaginosis, and bacteriuria, no clinical data exist at this time to support the routine use of antibiotics in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides: Multifunctional Drugs for Different Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea-Jessica Albrecht

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (APs are an important part of the innate immune system in epithelial and non-epithelial surfaces. So far, many different antimicrobial peptides from various families have been discovered in non-vertebrates and vertebrates. They are characterized by antibiotic, antifungal and antiviral activities against a variety of microorganisms. In addition to their role as endogenous antimicrobials, APs participate in multiple aspects of immunity. They are involved in septic and non-septic inflammation, wound repair, angiogenesis, regulation of the adaptive immune system and in maintaining homeostasis. Due to those characteristics AP could play an important role in many practical applications. Limited therapeutic efficiency of current antimicrobial agents and the emerging resistance of pathogens require alternate antimicrobial drugs. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent literature on functions and mechanisms of APs. It also shows their current practical applications as peptide therapeutics and bioactive polymers and discusses the possibilities of future clinical developments.

  17. Anisotropic membrane curvature sensing by antibacterial peptides

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Llobregat, Jordi; Lindén, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins and peptides have an intrinsic capacity to sense and induce membrane curvature, and play crucial roles for organizing and remodeling cell membranes. However, the molecular driving forces behind these processes are not well understood. Here, we describe a new approach to study curvature sensing, by simulating the direction-dependent interactions of single molecules with a buckled lipid bilayer. We analyze three antimicrobial peptides, a class of membrane-associated molecules that specifically target and destabilize bacterial membranes, and find qualitatively different sensing characteristics that would be difficult to resolve with other methods. These findings provide new insights into the microscopic mechanisms of antimicrobial peptides, which might aid the development of new antibiotics. Our approach is generally applicable to a wide range of curvature sensing molecules, and our results provide strong motivation to develop new experimental methods to track position and orientation of membrane p...

  18. Antimicrobial peptides in innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Ole E; Borregaard, Niels; Cole, Alexander M

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient effector molecules in the innate immune response of eukaryotes. These peptides are important for the antimicrobial efficacy of phagocytes and for the innate immune response mounted by epithelia of humans and other mammals. AMPs are generated either by de novo synthesis or by proteolytic cleavage from antimicrobially inactive proproteins. Studies of human diseases and animal studies have given important clues to the in vivo role of AMPs. It is now evident that dysregulation of the generation of AMPs in innate immune responses plays a role in certain diseases like Crohn's disease and atopic dermatitis. AMPs are attractive candidates for development of novel antibiotics due to their in vivo activity profile and some peptides may serve as templates for further drug development.

  19. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: State of the science

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review article proposes a simple causal model depicting relationships involved in dissemination of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems and potential effects on human health, functioning of natural ecosystems, and agricultural productivity. Available evidence for each causal ...

  20. Synergistic interaction of PMAP-36 and PRW4 with aminoglycoside antibiotics and their antibacterial mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zeyun; Zhang, Licong; Wang, Jue; Wei, Dandan; Shi, Baoming; Shan, Anshan

    2014-12-01

    The antimicrobial peptide PMAP-36 is a highly cationic and amphipathic α-helical peptide. PRW4 is a truncated analog that replaces paired lysine residues with tryptophan along the N-terminal and deletes the C-terminal hydrophobic tail of PMAP-36. Studies on the two peptides have already been performed. However, whether there is a synergistic effect with antibiotics has not been investigated, and the study of the antibacterial mechanism of the peptides is inadequate. In this study, antibiotic-peptide combinations were tested against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, and the confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSCM) and DNA gel retardation were measured. The results indicated synergy between the peptides and gentamicin when tested against E. coli [fractional lethal concentration (FLC) peptides and gentamicin against S. aureus (0.5 peptides against E. coli and S. aureus (1 DNA binding suggest that PMAP-36 was able to translocate across the bacterial membranes and interact with intracellular DNA, but PRW4 presented no DNA-binding ability. These results indicate that the combination of PMAP-36 and PRW4 with aminoglycosides may provide useful information for clinical application, and the antibacterial mechanism of peptides likely does not solely involve cytoplasmic-membrane permeabilization.

  1. Antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities of PR-39 derived peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin J A Veldhuizen

    Full Text Available The porcine cathelicidin PR-39 is a host defence peptide that plays a pivotal role in the innate immune defence of the pig against infections. Besides direct antimicrobial activity, it is involved in immunomodulation, wound healing and several other biological processes. In this study, the antimicrobial- and immunomodulatory activity of PR-39, and N- and C-terminal derivatives of PR-39 were tested. PR-39 exhibited an unexpected broad antimicrobial spectrum including several Gram positive strains such as Bacillus globigii and Enterococcus faecalis. Of organisms tested, only Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to PR-39. Truncation of PR-39 down to 15 (N-terminal amino acids did not lead to major loss of activity, while peptides corresponding to the C-terminal part of PR-39 were hampered in their antimicrobial activity. However, shorter peptides were all much more sensitive to inhibition by salt. Active peptides induced ATP leakage and loss of membrane potential in Bacillus globigii and Escherichia coli, indicating a lytic mechanism of action for these peptides. Finally, only the mature peptide was able to induce IL-8 production in porcine macrophages, but some shorter peptides also had an effect on TNF-α production showing differential regulation of cytokine induction by PR-39 derived peptides. None of the active peptides showed high cytotoxicity highlighting the potential of these peptides for use as an alternative to antibiotics.

  2. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    OpenAIRE

    Saswati eSengupta; Madhab Kumar Chattopadhyay; Hans-Peter eGrossart

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic-resistance is also observe...

  3. Suppression of antibiotic resistance acquisition by combined use of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shingo; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Furusawa, Chikara

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the effect of combinatorial use of antibiotics with a trade-off relationship of resistance, i.e., resistance acquisition to one drug causes susceptibility to the other drug, and vice versa, on the evolution of antibiotic resistance. We demonstrated that this combinatorial use of antibiotics significantly suppressed the acquisition of resistance.

  4. Structural flexibility of Aib-containing peptides: the N-terminal tripeptide of trichotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, R; Brueckner, H; Kokkinidis, M

    1991-01-31

    The sequence Aib-Gly-Aib which corresponds to the N-terminus of the microheterogeneous peptide antibiotic trichotoxin has been studied crystallographically in the context of different protecting groups. Peptides Ac-Aib-Gly-Aib-OH (A) and Z-Aib-Gly-Aib-OH (B) form beta-turns. Both peptides show a remarkable conformational flexibility forming a large variety of beta-turns of different types.

  5. Antibiotic resistance in Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vo, A.T.T.

    2007-01-01

    Immediately after their introduction in the beginning of the fourties of the previous century, the agents used to combat infectious diseases caused by bacteria were regarded with suspicion, but not long thereafter antibiotics had the status of miracle drugs. For decades mankind has lived under the i

  6. Antibiotic resistance reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    One of the major threats to human health in the 21st century is the emergence of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, thereby limiting treatment options. An important route through which pathogens become resistant is via acquisition of resistance genes from environmental a

  7. Antibiotic resistance reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    One of the major threats to human health in the 21st century is the emergence of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, thereby limiting treatment options. An important route through which pathogens become resistant is via acquisition of resistance genes from environmental

  8. Antibiotic resistance in Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vo, A.T.T.

    2007-01-01

    Immediately after their introduction in the beginning of the fourties of the previous century, the agents used to combat infectious diseases caused by bacteria were regarded with suspicion, but not long thereafter antibiotics had the status of miracle drugs. For decades mankind has lived under the

  9. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Gonorrhea Antibiotic Resistance Basic Information Laboratory Information Resources & References Combating the ... Page Surveillance Trends and Treatment Challenges Laboratory Issues Antibiotic resistance (AR) is the ability of bacteria to resist ...

  10. Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... file Error processing SSI file Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Can you ... spp. So, what can we do to prevent antibiotic resistance in healthcare settings? Patients, healthcare providers, healthcare facility ...

  11. Antibiotics and Pregnancy: What's Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week Is it safe to take antibiotics during pregnancy? Answers from Roger W. Harms, M. ... 2014 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/expert-answers/antibiotics-and-pregnancy/ ...

  12. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2, wh...

  13. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen;

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2...

  14. Bacteriocins: New generation of antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Motahari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are used as a first-choice to inhibit microbial growth since the discovery in the first half of the 19th century. Nevertheless, the widespread use of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains that is one of our century problems. Concerns about antibiotic resistant is so serious which huge budget is allocated for discovery of alternative drugs in many countries. Bacteriocin is one of these compounds which was first discovered in 1925, released into the medium by E. coli. Bacteriocins are antimicrobial peptides or proteins ribosomally synthesized by many bacterial species. The use of this antimicrobial molecules in food industry obviate consumers need to safe food with least interference of chemical substances. Nisin, the most well-known bacteriocin, is the first bacteriocin found its way to food industry. Despite the widespread application of bacteriocins, resistance is seen in some species. Although it’s exact mechanism is not clear. So according to the today’s world need to find effective methods to control pathogens, studies of bacteriocins as a substitute for antibiotics are so important. The present review has studied the structure and activity of five classes of bacteriocins from gene to function in gram positive bacteria.

  15. Selected antimicrobial peptides inhibit in vitro growth of Campylobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics are urgently needed for food-animal production. A goal of our laboratory is to develop and evaluate antimicrobial peptides (AMP) to control and reduce foodborne pathogens in poultry. AMP have been found in most every class of living organism where they h...

  16. Antimicrobial peptide exposure selects for Staphylococcus aureus resistance to human defence peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z.; Lofton, Hava; Vestergaard, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    Background: The clinical development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is currently under evaluation to combat the rapid increase in MDR bacterial pathogens. However, many AMPs closely resemble components of the human innate immune system and the ramifications of prolonged bacterial exposure to AMPs...... suggest that therapeutic use of AMPs could select for virulent mutants with crossresistance to human innate immunity as well as antibiotic therapy. Thus, therapeutic use of AMPs and the implications of cross-resistance need to be carefully monitored and evaluated....... of sepsis. Results: AMP-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mutants often displayed little to no fitness cost and caused invasive disease in mice. Further, this phenotype coincided with diminished susceptibility to both clinically prescribed antibiotics and human defence peptides. Conclusions: These findings...

  17. Antimicrobial polymers as synthetic mimics of host-defense peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Kenichi; Caputo, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria 'superbugs' are an emerging threat to public health due to the decrease in effective antibiotics as well as the slowed pace of development of new antibiotics to replace those that become ineffective. The need for new antimicrobial agents is a well-documented issue relating to world health. Tremendous efforts have been given to developing compounds that not only show high efficacy, but also those that are less susceptible to resistance development in the bacteria. However, the development of newer, stronger antibiotics which can overcome these acquired resistances is still a scientific challenge because a new mode of antimicrobial action is likely required. To that end, amphiphilic, cationic polymers have emerged as a promising candidate for further development as an antimicrobial agent with decreased potential for resistance development. These polymers are designed to mimic naturally occurring host-defense antimicrobial peptides which act on bacterial cell walls or membranes. Antimicrobial-peptide mimetic polymers display antibacterial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria including drug-resistant strains and are less susceptible to resistance development in bacteria. These polymers also showed selective activity to bacteria over mammalian cells. Antimicrobial polymers provide a new molecular framework for chemical modification and adaptation to tune their biological functions. The peptide-mimetic design of antimicrobial polymers will be versatile, generating a new generation of antibiotics toward implementation of polymers in biomedical applications. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Investigating the Antibiotic Resistance Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Michael; Lawson, Amy L.

    1998-01-01

    Seeks to give teachers useful information on the extent of the problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, mechanisms bacteria use to resist antibiotics, the causes of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms, and practices that can prevent or reverse this trend. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  19. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies....... This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should...... controlled trials or systematic reviews....

  20. When and How to Take Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us General Background: When & How to take Antibiotics When should you take antibiotics? What is the proper dosage? How safe are antibiotics? How does a physician decide which antibiotic to ...

  1. Danger of Antibiotic Overuse (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Be Smart About Social Media The Danger of Antibiotic Overuse KidsHealth > For Parents > The Danger of Antibiotic ... by not reaching for the prescription pad. How Antibiotics Work Antibiotics, first used in the 1940s, are ...

  2. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandegren, Linus

    2014-05-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed.

  3. Environmental pollution by antibiotics and by antibiotic resistance determinants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jose Luis, E-mail: jlmtnez@cnb.csic.e [Departamento de Biotecnologia Microbiana, Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, and CIBERESP (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    Antibiotics are among the most successful drugs used for human therapy. However, since they can challenge microbial populations, they must be considered as important pollutants as well. Besides being used for human therapy, antibiotics are extensively used for animal farming and for agricultural purposes. Residues from human environments and from farms may contain antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes that can contaminate natural environments. The clearest consequence of antibiotic release in natural environments is the selection of resistant bacteria. The same resistance genes found at clinical settings are currently disseminated among pristine ecosystems without any record of antibiotic contamination. Nevertheless, the effect of antibiotics on the biosphere is wider than this and can impact the structure and activity of environmental microbiota. Along the article, we review the impact that pollution by antibiotics or by antibiotic resistance genes may have for both human health and for the evolution of environmental microbial populations. - The article reviews the current knowledge on the effects that pollution by antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes may have for the microbiosphere.

  4. Side Chain Hydrophobicity Modulates Therapeutic Activity and Membrane Selectivity of Antimicrobial Peptide Mastoparan-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Etzerodt, Thomas Povl; Gjetting, Torben;

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of new anti-infective compounds is stagnating and multi-resistant bacteria continue to emerge, threatening to end the "antibiotic era''. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lipo-peptides such as daptomycin offer themselves as a new potential class of antibiotics; however, further...... optimization is needed if AMPs are to find broad use as antibiotics. In the present work, eight analogues of mastoparan-X (MPX) were investigated, having side chain modifications in position 1, 8 and 14 to modulate peptide hydrophobicity. The self-association properties of the peptides were characterized...... in target selectivity correlated to biophysical parameters showing an increased effective charge and reduction in the partitioning coefficient for membrane insertion. Introduction of an unnatural amino acid, with an octyl side chain by amino acid substitution, at positions 1, 8 and 14 resulted in increased...

  5. Post-translational modification of ribosomally synthesized peptides by a radical SAM epimerase in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Guillot, Alain; Ruffié, Pauline; Leprince, Jérôme; Berteau, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    Ribosomally synthesized peptides are built out of L-amino acids, whereas D-amino acids are generally the hallmark of non-ribosomal synthetic processes. Here we show that the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis is able to produce a novel type of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide that contains D-amino acids, and which we propose to call epipeptides. We demonstrate that a two [4Fe-4S]-cluster radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme converts L-amino acids into their D-counterparts by catalysing Cα-hydrogen-atom abstraction and using a critical cysteine residue as the hydrogen-atom donor. Unexpectedly, these D-amino acid residues proved to be essential for the activity of a peptide that induces the expression of LiaRS, a major component of the bacterial cell envelope stress-response system. Present in B. subtilis and in several members of the human microbiome, these epipeptides and radical SAM epimerases broaden the landscape of peptidyl structures accessible to living organisms.

  6. Antimicrobial peptide exposure selects for Staphylococcus aureus resistance to human defence peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z.; Lofton, Hava; Vestergaard, Martin

    2017-01-01

    of sepsis. Results: AMP-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mutants often displayed little to no fitness cost and caused invasive disease in mice. Further, this phenotype coincided with diminished susceptibility to both clinically prescribed antibiotics and human defence peptides. Conclusions: These findings...... of LL-37, PR-39 or wheat germ histones. WGS and proteomic analysis by MS were used to identify the molecular mechanism associated with increased tolerance of AMPs. AMP-resistant mutants were characterized by measuring in vitro fitness, AMP and antibiotic susceptibility, and virulence in a mouse model...... suggest that therapeutic use of AMPs could select for virulent mutants with crossresistance to human innate immunity as well as antibiotic therapy. Thus, therapeutic use of AMPs and the implications of cross-resistance need to be carefully monitored and evaluated....

  7. Molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jessica M A; Webber, Mark A; Baylay, Alison J; Ogbolu, David O; Piddock, Laura J V

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria that are difficult or impossible to treat are becoming increasingly common and are causing a global health crisis. Antibiotic resistance is encoded by several genes, many of which can transfer between bacteria. New resistance mechanisms are constantly being described, and new genes and vectors of transmission are identified on a regular basis. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which bacteria are either intrinsically resistant or acquire resistance to antibiotics, including the prevention of access to drug targets, changes in the structure and protection of antibiotic targets and the direct modification or inactivation of antibiotics.

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides and Innate Lung Defenses: Role in Infectious and Noninfectious Lung Diseases and Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Pieter S; Amatngalim, Gimano D; van der Does, Anne M; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory infections are a major clinical problem, and treatment is increasingly complicated by the emergence of microbial antibiotic resistance. Development of new antibiotics is notoriously costly and slow; therefore, alternative strategies are needed. Antimicrobial peptides, central effector molecules of the immune system, are being considered as alternatives to conventional antibiotics. These peptides display a range of activities, including not only direct antimicrobial activity, but also immunomodulation and wound repair. In the lung, airway epithelial cells and neutrophils in particular contribute to their synthesis. The relevance of antimicrobial peptides for host defense against infection has been demonstrated in animal models and is supported by observations in patient studies, showing altered expression and/or unfavorable circumstances for their action in a variety of lung diseases. Importantly, antimicrobial peptides are active against microorganisms that are resistant against conventional antibiotics, including multidrug-resistant bacteria. Several strategies have been proposed to use these peptides in the treatment of infections, including direct administration of antimicrobial peptides, enhancement of their local production, and creation of more favorable circumstances for their action. In this review, recent developments in antimicrobial peptides research in the lung and clinical applications for novel therapies of lung diseases are discussed.

  9. NMR analysis of unnatural amino acids in natural antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglione, Franca

    2012-01-01

    A large number of modified amino acids other than the canonical amino acid residues can be found in natural products, especially antibiotics. The structure of these peptide-based compounds is investigated using modern two-dimensional NMR techniques. The automatic assignment of the 2D NMR proton spectra and consequent determination of the primary and 3D structure of peptides or small size proteins containing natural amino acids is nowadays routine. However, a deficiency in the ability to readily sequence peptides containing unnatural amino acids still remains and a great human effort and time is required. The experimental methods and the protocols of manual analysis of the data are described in the following sections.

  10. Antimicrobial peptides of multicellular organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasloff, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Multicellular organisms live, by and large, harmoniously with microbes. The cornea of the eye of an animal is almost always free of signs of infection. The insect flourishes without lymphocytes or antibodies. A plant seed germinates successfully in the midst of soil microbes. How is this accomplished? Both animals and plants possess potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides, which they use to fend off a wide range of microbes, including bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa. What sorts of molecules are they? How are they employed by animals in their defence? As our need for new antibiotics becomes more pressing, could we design anti-infective drugs based on the design principles these molecules teach us?

  11. Three new antimicrobial peptides from the scorpion Pandinus imperator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian-Chun; Zhou, Lingli; Shi, Wanxia; Luo, Xuesong; Zhang, Lei; Nie, Yao; Wang, Jinwei; Wu, Shifen; Cao, Bin; Cao, Hanjun

    2013-07-01

    Three novel cysteine-free venom peptides, which were referred to as Pantinin-1, Pantinin-2 and Pantinin-3, respectively, have been identified from the scorpion Pandinus imperator by cDNA cloning strategy. The precursor of each peptide consists of a signal peptide, a mature peptide with no disulfide bridges, and an acidic propeptide with a typical processing signal. Each of the three peptides is an α-helical, cationic and amphipathic molecule with 13 or 14 amino acid residues. Their amino acid sequences are homologous to those of some 13-mer antimicrobial peptides isolated from scorpions. Antimicrobial assay showed that all the three peptides possess relatively strong activities against Gram-positive bacteria and a fungus, but have very weak antimicrobial activities against Gram-negative bacteria. Toxicity assay showed that the three peptides exhibit very low or mild hemolytic activities against human red blood cells. It is interesting to see that Pantinin-3 is able to potently inhibit the growth of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) S13, a pathogen that can cause a number of human infections; this suggests that Pantinin-3 has great potential to be applied in the treatment of VRE infections. Our findings gain new insights into the structure/function relationships of the small linear cationic antimicrobial peptides from scorpions, and provide new templates for designing of antimicrobial agents targeting antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria.

  12. Prescribing antibiotics in general practice:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    Objectives The majority of antibiotics are prescribed from general practice. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. In spite of guidelines aiming to minimize the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics we see an increase...... in the use of these agents. The overall aim of the project is to explore factors influencing the decision process and the prescribing behaviour of the GPs when prescribing antibiotics. We will study the impact of microbiological testing on the choice of antibiotic. Furthermore the project will explore how...... the GPs’ prescribing behaviour is influenced by selected factors. Method The study consists of a register-based study and a questionnaire study. The register-based study is based on data from the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics (prescribed antibiotics), Statistics Denmark (socio-demographic data...

  13. Reviving old antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuretzbacher, Ursula; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Cantón, Rafael; Giske, Christian G; Mouton, Johan W; Nation, Roger L; Paul, Mical; Turnidge, John D; Kahlmeter, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    In the face of increasing antimicrobial resistance and the paucity of new antimicrobial agents it has become clear that new antimicrobial strategies are urgently needed. One of these is to revisit old antibiotics to ensure that they are used correctly and to their full potential, as well as to determine whether one or several of them can help alleviate the pressure on more recent agents. Strategies are urgently needed to 're-develop' these drugs using modern standards, integrating new knowledge into regulatory frameworks and communicating the knowledge from the research bench to the bedside. Without a systematic approach to re-developing these old drugs and rigorously testing them according to today's standards, there is a significant risk of doing harm to patients and further increasing multidrug resistance. This paper describes factors to be considered and outlines steps and actions needed to re-develop old antibiotics so that they can be used effectively for the treatment of infections.

  14. Antibiotic drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Mast, Yvonne; Stegmann, Evi; Ziemert, Nadine

    2016-09-01

    Due to the threat posed by the increase of highly resistant pathogenic bacteria, there is an urgent need for new antibiotics; all the more so since in the last 20 years, the approval for new antibacterial agents had decreased. The field of natural product discovery has undergone a tremendous development over the past few years. This has been the consequence of several new and revolutionizing drug discovery and development techniques, which is initiating a 'New Age of Antibiotic Discovery'. In this review, we concentrate on the most significant discovery approaches during the last and present years and comment on the challenges facing the community in the coming years. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS ON ESTOMATOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Alfaro, Miguel; Responsable de la cátedra de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Burga Sánchez, Jonny; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Chumpitaz Cerrate, Víctor; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Varas Hilario, Roberto; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Guerra Sanguinetti, Jaime; Cirujano Dentista de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; López Bellido, Roger; Bachiller de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Zegarra Cuya, Juan; Interno de la Facultad de OdontoIogia UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis consists in the use of an antimicrobial drug in a preventive way, that must be active against microorganisms that in high frequency causes posterior infections of our surgical wounds and maintain effective tissue concentrations along the surgery procedure and the posterior time when appears the bacteremia. To reach a successful treatment is necessary to have the knowledge of the resident bactemial flora and the pathogenous flora that infects our surgical wounds...

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides in Innate Immunity against Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2011-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides/proteins are ancient and naturallyoccurring antibiotics in innate immune responses in a variety of organisms. Additionally, these peptides have been recognized as important signaling molecules in regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity. During mycobacterial infection, antimicrobial peptides including cathelicidin, defensin, and hepcidin have antimicrobial activities against mycobacteria, making them promising candidates for future drug development. Additionally, antimicrobial peptides act as immunomodulators in infectious and inflammatory conditions. Multiple crucial functions of cathelicidins in antimycobacterial immune defense have been characterized not only in terms of direct killing of mycobacteria but also as innate immune regulators, i.e., in secretion of cytokines and chemokines, and mediating autophagy activation. Defensin families are also important during mycobacterial infection and contribute to antimycobacterial defense and inhibition of mycobacterial growth both in vitro and in vivo. Hepcidin, although its role in mycobacterial infection has not yet been characterized, exerts antimycobacterial effects in activated macrophages. The present review focuses on recent efforts to elucidate the roles of host defense peptides in innate immunity to mycobacteria.

  17. The structure of ribosome-lankacidin complex reveals ribosomal sites for synergistic antibiotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, Tamar; Mermershtain, Inbal; Davidovich, Chen; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Wekselman, Itai; Zimmerman, Ella; Xiong, Liqun; Klepacki, Dorota; Arakawa, Kenji; Kinashi, Haruyasu; Mankin, Alexander S.; Yonath, Ada (Hiroshima); (WIS-I); (UIC)

    2010-04-26

    Crystallographic analysis revealed that the 17-member polyketide antibiotic lankacidin produced by Streptomyces rochei binds at the peptidyl transferase center of the eubacterial large ribosomal subunit. Biochemical and functional studies verified this finding and showed interference with peptide bond formation. Chemical probing indicated that the macrolide lankamycin, a second antibiotic produced by the same species, binds at a neighboring site, at the ribosome exit tunnel. These two antibiotics can bind to the ribosome simultaneously and display synergy in inhibiting bacterial growth. The binding site of lankacidin and lankamycin partially overlap with the binding site of another pair of synergistic antibiotics, the streptogramins. Thus, at least two pairs of structurally dissimilar compounds have been selected in the course of evolution to act synergistically by targeting neighboring sites in the ribosome. These results underscore the importance of the corresponding ribosomal sites for development of clinically relevant synergistic antibiotics and demonstrate the utility of structural analysis for providing new directions for drug discovery.

  18. Reversible antibiotic tolerance induced in Staphylococcus aureus by concurrent drug exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Friberg, Cathrine; McCreary, Mark

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to beta-lactam antibiotics has led to increasing use of the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin as a life-saving treatment for major S. aureus infections. Coinfection by an unrelated bacterial species may necessitate concurrent treatment with a second...... antibiotic that targets the coinfecting pathogen. While investigating factors that affect bacterial antibiotic sensitivity, we discovered that susceptibility of S. aureus to vancomycin is reduced by concurrent exposure to colistin, a cationic peptide antimicrobial employed to treat infections by Gram......] strains). As colistin-induced vancomycin tolerance is reversible, it may not be detected by routine sensitivity testing and may be responsible for treatment failure at vancomycin doses expected to be clinically effective based on such routine testing. IMPORTANCE: Commonly, antibiotic resistance...

  19. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should be reported and taken into account when interpreting results. Data on emergence of resistance (whether in the body reservoirs or in the bacteria causing infection) are important outcomes. Emergence of resistance should be taken into account when interpreting the evidence on antibiotic treatment in randomized controlled trials or systematic reviews.

  20. Clinical relevance of intestinal peptide uptake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine available information on an independent peptide transporter 1(Pep T1) and its potential relevance to treatment, this evaluation was completed.METHODS: Fully published English language literature articles sourced through Pub Med related to protein digestion and absorption, specifically human peptide and amino acid transport, were accessed and reviewed.Papers from 1970 to the present, with particular emphasis on the past decade, were examined. In addition,abstracted information translated to English in Pub Med was also included. Finally, studies and reviews relevant to nutrient or drug uptake, particularly in human intestine were included for evaluation. This work represents a summary of all of these studies with particular reference to peptide transporter mediated assimilation of nutrients and pharmacologically active medications.RESULTS: Assimilation of dietary protein in humans involves gastric and pancreatic enzyme hydrolysis to luminal oligopeptides and free amino acids. During the ensuing intestinal phase, these hydrolytic products are transported into the epithelial cell and, eventually, the portal vein. A critical component of this process is the uptake of intact di-peptides and tri-peptides by an independent Pep T1. A number of "peptide-mimetic" pharmaceutical agents may also be transported through this carrier, important for uptake of different antibiotics, antiviral agents and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. In addition, specific peptide products of intestinal bacteria may also be transported by Pep T1, with initiation and persistence of an immune response including increased cytokine production and associated intestinal inflammatory changes. Interestingly, these inflammatory changes may also be attenuated with orallyadministered anti-inflammatory tripeptides administered as site-specific nanoparticles and taken up by this Pep T1 transport protein. CONCLUSION: Further evaluation of the role of this transporter in treatment of

  1. Rationalizing antibiotic use to limit antibiotic resistance in India+

    OpenAIRE

    ,

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance, a global concern, is particularly pressing in developing nations, including India, where the burden of infectious disease is high and healthcare spending is low. The Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership (GARP) was established to develop actionable policy recommendations specifically relevant to low- and middle-income countries where suboptimal access to antibiotics - not a major concern in high-income countries - is possibly as severe a problem as is the spread of r...

  2. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes from antibiotic producers to pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinglin; Ellabaan, Mostafa M Hashim; Charusanti, Pep

    2017-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that some antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) found in pathogenic bacteria derive from antibiotic-producing actinobacteria. Here we provide bioinformatic and experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis. We identify genes in proteobacteria, including some pathogens......, that appear to be closely related to actinobacterial ARGs known to confer resistance against clinically important antibiotics. Furthermore, we identify two potential examples of recent horizontal transfer of actinobacterial ARGs to proteobacterial pathogens. Based on this bioinformatic evidence, we propose...... results support the existence of ancient and, possibly, recent transfers of ARGs from antibiotic-producing actinobacteria to proteobacteria, and provide evidence for a defined mechanism....

  3. 高效液相色谱-串联质谱法测定养殖环境沉积物中多肽类抗生素残留量%Determination of Peptide Antibiotics Residues in Sediment From Aquaculture Environment by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱卓真; 罗冬莲; 罗方方; 叶玫; 汤水粉

    2016-01-01

    A new method for the determination of peptide antibiotics in sediment from aquaculture environment by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed. The target analytes in sediments were ultrasonically extracted twice with citrate buffer solution and methol mixture (3∶ 4, V/ V), followed by complexation with 0. 5 g of Na2 EDTA, purification with 5 mL of methyl isobutyl ketone, and clean-up with HLB-SPE column. The analytes were separated on a MGII C18 column by gradient elution with 0. 1% formaic acid-0. 1% formaic acid acetonitrile as mobile phase, detected in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) with electrospray ionization (ESI) under positive ion mode, and quantified by external standard method. The calibration curves were linear (R2 >0. 999) over a concentration range of 10 -10000μg / L for colistin and bacitracin and 4-4000 μg / L for virginiamycin M1 . The limits of detection (S / N = 3) were 5 μg / kg for colistin and bacitracin and 2 μg / kg for virginiamycin M1 . The limits of quantification (S / N=10) was 10 μg / kg for colistin and bacitracin and 4 μg / kg for virginiamycin M1 . At three spiked levels, the recoveries ranged from 79. 7% to 91. 6% (RSD=1. 9% -10. 8% ), showing high sensitivity, good reproducibility and wide applicability.%建立了测定水产养殖环境沉积物中多肽类抗生素残留量的高效液相色谱串联质谱法。沉积物经10 mL甲醇-柠檬酸-Na2 HPO4溶液(3∶4, V/ V)超声提取2次,0.5 g 乙二胺四乙酸二钠络合除杂,5 mL 甲基异丁基甲酮净化,HLB 固相萃取柱进一步富集净化,MGII C18色谱柱分离,0.1%甲酸与0.1%甲酸-乙腈梯度洗脱,ESI+电离,多反应监测模式(MRM)监测,外标法定量。粘菌素和杆菌肽在10~10000μg/ L 范围内,维吉尼霉素 M1在4~4000μg/ L 范围内,线性回归系数均大于0.999,方法检出限为2~5μg/ kg,方法定量限为4~10μg/ kg。在3个浓度添加水平下,多肽类抗生素回收率79.7%~91.6%,

  4. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  5. Oxidative diversification of amino acids and peptides by small-molecule iron catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osberger, Thomas J.; Rogness, Donald C.; Kohrt, Jeffrey T.; Stepan, Antonia F.; White, M. Christina

    2016-09-01

    Secondary metabolites synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases display diverse and complex topologies and possess a range of biological activities. Much of this diversity derives from a synthetic strategy that entails pre- and post-assembly oxidation of both the chiral amino acid building blocks and the assembled peptide scaffolds. The vancomycin biosynthetic pathway is an excellent example of the range of oxidative transformations that can be performed by the iron-containing enzymes involved in its biosynthesis. However, because of the challenges associated with using such oxidative enzymes to carry out chemical transformations in vitro, chemical syntheses guided by these principles have not been fully realized in the laboratory. Here we report that two small-molecule iron catalysts are capable of facilitating the targeted C-H oxidative modification of amino acids and peptides with preservation of α-centre chirality. Oxidation of proline to 5-hydroxyproline furnishes a versatile intermediate that can be transformed to rigid arylated derivatives or flexible linear carboxylic acids, alcohols, olefins and amines in both monomer and peptide settings. The value of this C-H oxidation strategy is demonstrated in its capacity for generating diversity: four ‘chiral pool’ amino acids are transformed to twenty-one chiral unnatural amino acids representing seven distinct functional group arrays; late-stage C-H functionalizations of a single proline-containing tripeptide furnish eight tripeptides, each having different unnatural amino acids. Additionally, a macrocyclic peptide containing a proline turn element is transformed via late-stage C-H oxidation to one containing a linear unnatural amino acid.

  6. Antibiotics in late clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Martens, Evan

    2017-06-01

    Most pharmaceutical companies have stopped or have severely limited investments to discover and develop new antibiotics to treat the increasing prevalence of infections caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, because the return on investment has been mostly negative for antibiotics that received marketing approved in the last few decades. In contrast, a few small companies have taken on this challenge and are developing new antibiotics. This review describes those antibiotics in late-stage clinical development. Most of them belong to existing antibiotic classes and a few with a narrow spectrum of activity are novel compounds directed against novel targets. The reasons for some of the past failures to find new molecules and a path forward to help attract investments to fund discovery of new antibiotics are described. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Antibiotic prevention of postcataract endophthalmitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Flesner, Per; Andresen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Endophthalmitis is one of the most feared complications after cataract surgery. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of intracameral and topical antibiotics on the prevention of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. A systematic literature review in the MEDLINE, CINAHL......, Cochrane Library and EMBASE databases revealed one randomized trial and 17 observational studies concerning the prophylactic effect of intracameral antibiotic administration on the rate of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. The effect of topical antibiotics on endophthalmitis rate was reported by one...... with the use of intracameral antibiotic administration of cefazolin, cefuroxime and moxifloxacin, whereas no effect was found with the use of topical antibiotics or intracameral vancomycin. Endophthalmitis occurred on average in one of 2855 surgeries when intracameral antibiotics were used compared to one...

  8. Antibiotics for acute maxillary sinusitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahovuo-Saloranta, Anneli; Borisenko, Oleg V; Kovanen, Niina;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Expert opinions vary on the appropriate role of antibiotics for sinusitis, one of the most commonly diagnosed conditions among adults in ambulatory care. OBJECTIVES: We examined whether antibiotics are effective in treating acute sinusitis, and if so, which antibiotic classes...... or antibiotics from different classes for acute maxillary sinusitis in adults. We included trials with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, whether or not confirmed by radiography or bacterial culture. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: At least two review authors independently screened search results, extracted...... with a pooled RR of 0.74 (95% CI 0.65 to 0.84) at 7 to 15 days follow up. None of the antibiotic preparations was superior to each other. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Antibiotics have a small treatment effect in patients with uncomplicated acute sinusitis in a primary care setting with symptoms for more than seven...

  9. The macrolide antibiotic renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinos, George P

    2017-09-01

    Macrolides represent a large family of protein synthesis inhibitors of great clinical interest due to their applicability to human medicine. Macrolides are composed of a macrocyclic lactone of different ring sizes, to which one or more deoxy-sugar or amino sugar residues are attached. Macrolides act as antibiotics by binding to bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit and interfering with protein synthesis. The high affinity of macrolides for bacterial ribosomes, together with the highly conserved structure of ribosomes across virtually all of the bacterial species, is consistent with their broad-spectrum activity. Since the discovery of the progenitor macrolide, erythromycin, in 1950, many derivatives have been synthesised, leading to compounds with better bioavailability and acid stability and improved pharmacokinetics. These efforts led to the second generation of macrolides, including well-known members such as azithromycin and clarithromycin. Subsequently, in order to address increasing antibiotic resistance, a third generation of macrolides displaying improved activity against many macrolide resistant strains was developed. However, these improvements were accompanied with serious side effects, leading to disappointment and causing many researchers to stop working on macrolide derivatives, assuming that this procedure had reached the end. In contrast, a recent published breakthrough introduced a new chemical platform for synthesis and discovery of a wide range of diverse macrolide antibiotics. This chemical synthesis revolution, in combination with reduction in the side effects, namely, 'Ketek effects', has led to a macrolide renaissance, increasing the hope for novel and safe therapeutic agents to combat serious human infectious diseases. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Antimicrobial Lactoferrin Peptides: The Hidden Players in the Protective Function of a Multifunctional Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mau Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin is a multifunctional, iron-binding glycoprotein which displays a wide array of modes of action to execute its primary antimicrobial function. It contains various antimicrobial peptides which are released upon its hydrolysis by proteases. These peptides display a similarity with the antimicrobial cationic peptides found in nature. In the current scenario of increasing resistance to antibiotics, there is a need for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. In this context, the structural and functional perspectives on some of the antimicrobial peptides found in N-lobe of lactoferrin have been reviewed. This paper provides the comparison of lactoferrin peptides with other antimicrobial peptides found in nature as well as interspecies comparison of the structural properties of these peptides within the native lactoferrin.

  11. Antimicrobial Lactoferrin Peptides: The Hidden Players in the Protective Function of a Multifunctional Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mau; Kaushik, Sanket; Kaur, Punit; Singh, Tej P.

    2013-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a multifunctional, iron-binding glycoprotein which displays a wide array of modes of action to execute its primary antimicrobial function. It contains various antimicrobial peptides which are released upon its hydrolysis by proteases. These peptides display a similarity with the antimicrobial cationic peptides found in nature. In the current scenario of increasing resistance to antibiotics, there is a need for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs. In this context, the structural and functional perspectives on some of the antimicrobial peptides found in N-lobe of lactoferrin have been reviewed. This paper provides the comparison of lactoferrin peptides with other antimicrobial peptides found in nature as well as interspecies comparison of the structural properties of these peptides within the native lactoferrin. PMID:23554820

  12. Antimicrobial peptides and proteins of the horse - insights into a well-armed organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruhn Oliver

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antimicrobial peptides play a pivotal role as key effectors of the innate immune system in plants and animals and act as endogenous antibiotics. The molecules exhibit an antimicrobial activity against bacteria, viruses, and eukaryotic pathogens with different specificities and potencies depending on the structure and amino-acid composition of the peptides. Several antimicrobial peptides were comprehensively investigated in the last three decades and some molecules with remarkable antimicrobial properties have reached the third phase of clinical studies. Next to the peptides themselves, numerous organisms were examined and analyzed regarding their repertoire of antimicrobial peptides revealing a huge number of candidates with potencies and properties for future medical applications. One of these organisms is the horse, which possesses numerous peptides that are interesting candidates for therapeutical applications in veterinary medicine. Here we summarize investigations and knowledge on equine antimicrobial peptides, point to interesting candidates, and discuss prospects for therapeutical applications.

  13. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Korp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism.

  14. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  16. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  17. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  18. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  19. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  20. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  1. Diversity, evolution and medical applications of insect antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Muhammed, Maged; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2016-05-26

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are short proteins with antimicrobial activity. A large portion of known AMPs originate from insects, and the number and diversity of these molecules in different species varies considerably. Insect AMPs represent a potential source of alternative antibiotics to address the limitation of current antibiotics, which has been caused by the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant pathogens. To get more insight into AMPs, we investigated the diversity and evolution of insect AMPs by mapping their phylogenetic distribution, allowing us to predict the evolutionary origins of selected AMP families and to identify evolutionarily conserved and taxon-specific families. Furthermore, we highlight the use of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a whole-animal model in high-throughput screening methods to identify AMPs with efficacy against human pathogens, including Acinetobacter baumanii and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus We also discuss the potential medical applications of AMPs, including their use as alternatives for conventional antibiotics in ectopic therapies, their combined use with antibiotics to restore the susceptibility of multidrug-resistant pathogens, and their use as templates for the rational design of peptidomimetic drugs that overcome the disadvantages of therapeutic peptides.The article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'.

  2. Use of PNA FISH for blood cultures growing Gram-positive cocci in chains without a concomitant antibiotic stewardship intervention does not improve time to appropriate antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Sara E; Li, David X; Tamma, Pranita D; Avdic, Edina; Hadhazy, Eric; Wakefield, Teresa; Gherna, Michael; Carroll, Karen C

    2016-09-01

    Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA FISH) is a rapid diagnostic assay that can identify certain organisms growing in blood cultures 30-90 min from the time of positive Gram-stain. Existing studies have demonstrated a clinical utility with this assay when antibiotic stewardship programs assist clinicians with interpreting the results. However, the benefit of these rapid assays in the absence of concomitant antibiotic stewardship involvement is unclear. In this randomized study of 220 patients with enterococcal or streptococcal bacteremia, we found that PNA FISH, in the absence of concomitant input from an antibiotic stewardship program, had no impact on time to effective or optimal therapy, length of hospital stay, or in-hospital mortality. Our results suggest that in the absence of guidance from an antibiotic stewardship program, the clinical benefits of rapid diagnostic microbiological tools may be reduced.

  3. Anti-Mycobacterial Peptides: From Human to Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieshan Teng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major pathogen of tuberculosis (TB. With the growing problem of M. tuberculosis resistant to conventional antibiotics, especially multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB and extensively-drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB, the need for new TB drugs is now more prominent than ever. Among the promising candidates for anti-TB drugs, anti-mycobacterial peptides have a few advantages, such as low immunogenicity, selective affinity to prokaryotic negatively charged cell envelopes, and diverse modes of action. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the anti-mycobacterial peptides, highlighting the sources, effectiveness and bactericidal mechanisms of these antimicrobial peptides. Most of the current anti-mycobacterial peptides are derived either from host immune cells, bacterial extraction, or mycobacteriophages. Besides trans-membrane pore formation, which is considered to be the common bactericidal mechanism, many of the anti-mycobacterial peptides have the second non-membrane targets within mycobacteria. Additionally, some antimicrobial peptides play critical roles in innate immunity. However, a few obstacles, such as short half-life in vivo and resistance to antimicrobial peptides, need overcoming before clinical applications. Nevertheless, the multiple functions of anti-mycobacterial peptides, especially direct killing of pathogens and immune-modulators in infectious and inflammatory conditions, indicate that they are promising candidates for future drug development.

  4. [Usage of antibiotics in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternák, G; Almási, I

    1996-12-29

    The authors publish the results of a survey conducted among hospital records of patients discharged from eight inpatient's institutes between 1-31st of January 1995 to gather information on the indications and usage of antibiotics. The institutes were selected from different part of the country to represent the hospital structure as much as possible. Data from the 13,719 documents were recorded and analysed by computer program. It was found that 27.6% of the patients (3749 cases) received antibiotic treatment. 407 different diagnosis and 365 different surgical procedures (as profilaxis) were considered as indications of antibiotic treatment (total: 4450 indications for 5849 antibiotic treatment). The largest group of patients receiving antibiotics was of antibiotic profilaxis (24.56%, 1093 cases), followed by lower respiratory tract infections (19.89%, 849 cases), uroinfections (10.53%, 469 cases) and upper respiratory tract infections. Relatively large group of patients belonged to those who had fever or subfebrility without known reason (7.35%, 327 cases) and to those who did not have any proof in their document indicating the reasons of antibiotic treatment (6.4%, 285 cases). We can not consider the antibiotic indications well founded in those groups of patients (every sixth or every fifth cases). The most frequently used antibiotics were of [2-nd] generation cefalosporins. The rate of nosocomial infections were found as 6.78% average. The results are demonstrated on diagrams and table.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides in Biomedical Device Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn Riool

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades the use of medical devices, such as catheters, artificial heart valves, prosthetic joints, and other implants, has grown significantly. Despite continuous improvements in device design, surgical procedures, and wound care, biomaterial-associated infections (BAI are still a major problem in modern medicine. Conventional antibiotic treatment often fails due to the low levels of antibiotic at the site of infection. The presence of biofilms on the biomaterial and/or the multidrug-resistant phenotype of the bacteria further impair the efficacy of antibiotic treatment. Removal of the biomaterial is then the last option to control the infection. Clearly, there is a pressing need for alternative strategies to prevent and treat BAI. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are considered promising candidates as they are active against a broad spectrum of (antibiotic-resistant planktonic bacteria and biofilms. Moreover, bacteria are less likely to develop resistance to these rapidly-acting peptides. In this review we highlight the four main strategies, three of which applying AMPs, in biomedical device manufacturing to prevent BAI. The first involves modification of the physicochemical characteristics of the surface of implants. Immobilization of AMPs on surfaces of medical devices with a variety of chemical techniques is essential in the second strategy. The main disadvantage of these two strategies relates to the limited antibacterial effect in the tissue surrounding the implant. This limitation is addressed by the third strategy that releases AMPs from a coating in a controlled fashion. Lastly, AMPs can be integrated in the design and manufacturing of additively manufactured/3D-printed implants, owing to the physicochemical characteristics of the implant material and the versatile manufacturing technologies compatible with antimicrobials incorporation. These novel technologies utilizing AMPs will contribute to development of novel

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides in Biomedical Device Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riool, Martijn; de Breij, Anna; Drijfhout, Jan W; Nibbering, Peter H; Zaat, Sebastian A J

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades the use of medical devices, such as catheters, artificial heart valves, prosthetic joints, and other implants, has grown significantly. Despite continuous improvements in device design, surgical procedures, and wound care, biomaterial-associated infections (BAI) are still a major problem in modern medicine. Conventional antibiotic treatment often fails due to the low levels of antibiotic at the site of infection. The presence of biofilms on the biomaterial and/or the multidrug-resistant phenotype of the bacteria further impair the efficacy of antibiotic treatment. Removal of the biomaterial is then the last option to control the infection. Clearly, there is a pressing need for alternative strategies to prevent and treat BAI. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are considered promising candidates as they are active against a broad spectrum of (antibiotic-resistant) planktonic bacteria and biofilms. Moreover, bacteria are less likely to develop resistance to these rapidly-acting peptides. In this review we highlight the four main strategies, three of which applying AMPs, in biomedical device manufacturing to prevent BAI. The first involves modification of the physicochemical characteristics of the surface of implants. Immobilization of AMPs on surfaces of medical devices with a variety of chemical techniques is essential in the second strategy. The main disadvantage of these two strategies relates to the limited antibacterial effect in the tissue surrounding the implant. This limitation is addressed by the third strategy that releases AMPs from a coating in a controlled fashion. Lastly, AMPs can be integrated in the design and manufacturing of additively manufactured/3D-printed implants, owing to the physicochemical characteristics of the implant material and the versatile manufacturing technologies compatible with antimicrobials incorporation. These novel technologies utilizing AMPs will contribute to development of novel and safe

  7. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Nienke L.; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; Van Duijn, Pleun J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to cl

  8. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Nienke L.; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; Van Duijn, Pleun J.; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to cl

  9. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Nienke L.; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; Van Duijn, Pleun J.; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to

  10. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance: a bitter fight against evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Couce, Alejandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2013-08-01

    One of the most terrible consequences of Darwinian evolution is arguably the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance, which is becoming a serious menace to modern societies. While spontaneous mutation, recombination and horizontal gene transfer are recognized as the main causes of this notorious phenomenon; recent research has raised awareness that sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics can also foster resistance as an undesirable side-effect. They can produce genetic changes by different ways, including a raise of free radicals within the cell, induction of error-prone DNA-polymerases mediated by SOS response, imbalanced nucleotide metabolism or affect directly DNA. In addition to certain environmental conditions, subinhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials may increase, even more, the mutagenic effect of antibiotics. Here, we review the state of knowledge on antibiotics as promoters of antibiotic resistance.

  11. Antibiotic adjuvants - A strategy to unlock bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bello, Concepción

    2017-09-15

    Resistance to available antibiotics in pathogenic bacteria is currently a global challenge since the number of strains that are resistant to multiple types of antibiotics has increased dramatically each year and has spread worldwide. To unlock this problem, the use of an 'antibiotic adjuvant' in combination with an antibiotic is now being exploited. This approach enables us to prolong the lifespan of these life-saving drugs. This digests review provides an overview of the main types of antibiotic adjuvants, the basis of their operation and the remaining issues to be tackled in this field. Particular emphasis is placed on those compounds that are already in clinical development, namely β-lactamase inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibiotic Cycling and Antibiotic Mixing: Which One Best Mitigates Antibiotic Resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardmore, Robert Eric; Peña-Miller, Rafael; Gori, Fabio; Iredell, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Can we exploit our burgeoning understanding of molecular evolution to slow the progress of drug resistance? One role of an infection clinician is exactly that: to foresee trajectories to resistance during antibiotic treatment and to hinder that evolutionary course. But can this be done at a hospital-wide scale? Clinicians and theoreticians tried to when they proposed two conflicting behavioral strategies that are expected to curb resistance evolution in the clinic, these are known as "antibiotic cycling" and "antibiotic mixing." However, the accumulated data from clinical trials, now approaching 4 million patient days of treatment, is too variable for cycling or mixing to be deemed successful. The former implements the restriction and prioritization of different antibiotics at different times in hospitals in a manner said to "cycle" between them. In antibiotic mixing, appropriate antibiotics are allocated to patients but randomly. Mixing results in no correlation, in time or across patients, in the drugs used for treatment which is why theorists saw this as an optimal behavioral strategy. So while cycling and mixing were proposed as ways of controlling evolution, we show there is good reason why clinical datasets cannot choose between them: by re-examining the theoretical literature we show prior support for the theoretical optimality of mixing was misplaced. Our analysis is consistent with a pattern emerging in data: neither cycling or mixing is a priori better than the other at mitigating selection for antibiotic resistance in the clinic. : antibiotic cycling, antibiotic mixing, optimal control, stochastic models.

  13. Structural specificity of mucosal-cell transport and metabolism of peptide drugs: implication for oral peptide drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J. P.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The brush border membrane of intestinal mucosal cells contains a peptide carrier system with rather broad substrate specificity and various endo- and exopeptidase activities. Small peptide (di-/tripeptide)-type drugs with or without an N-terminal alpha-amino group, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, are transported by the peptide transporter. Polypeptide drugs are hydrolyzed by brush border membrane proteolytic enzymes to di-/tripeptides and amino acids. Therefore, while the intestinal brush border membrane has a carrier system facilitating the absorption of di-/tripeptide drugs, it is a major barrier limiting oral availability of polypeptide drugs. In this paper, the specificity of peptide transport and metabolism in the intestinal brush border membrane is reviewed.

  14. Structural specificity of mucosal-cell transport and metabolism of peptide drugs: implication for oral peptide drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J. P.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The brush border membrane of intestinal mucosal cells contains a peptide carrier system with rather broad substrate specificity and various endo- and exopeptidase activities. Small peptide (di-/tripeptide)-type drugs with or without an N-terminal alpha-amino group, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, are transported by the peptide transporter. Polypeptide drugs are hydrolyzed by brush border membrane proteolytic enzymes to di-/tripeptides and amino acids. Therefore, while the intestinal brush border membrane has a carrier system facilitating the absorption of di-/tripeptide drugs, it is a major barrier limiting oral availability of polypeptide drugs. In this paper, the specificity of peptide transport and metabolism in the intestinal brush border membrane is reviewed.

  15. Modulation of neutrophil apoptosis by antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Isao; Suzuki, Kaori; Niyonsaba, François; Tamura, Hiroshi; Hirata, Michimasa

    2012-01-01

    Peptide antibiotics possess the potent antimicrobial activities against invading microorganisms and contribute to the innate host defense. Human antimicrobial peptides, α-defensins (human neutrophil peptides, HNPs), human β-defensins (hBDs), and cathelicidin (LL-37) not only exhibit potent bactericidal activities against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, but also function as immunomodulatory molecules by inducing cytokine and chemokine production, and inflammatory and immune cell activation. Neutrophil is a critical effector cell in host defense against microbial infection, and its lifespan is regulated by various pathogen- and host-derived substances. Here, we provided the evidence that HNP-1, hBD-3, and LL-37 cannot only destroy bacteria but also potently modulate (suppress) neutrophil apoptosis, accompanied with the phosphorylation of ERK-1/-2, the downregulation of tBid (an proapoptotic protein) and upregulation of Bcl-xL (an antiapoptotic protein), and the inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential change and caspase 3 activity, possibly via the actions on the distinct receptors, the P2Y6 nucleotide receptor, the chemokine receptor CCR6, and the low-affinity formyl-peptide receptor FPRL1/the nucleotide receptor P2X7, respectively. Suppression of neutrophil apoptosis results in the prolongation of their lifespan and may be advantageous for the host defense against bacterial invasion.

  16. The Antibiotic Resistance Problem Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The term "antibiotic" was first proposed by Vuillemin in 1889 but was first used in the current sense by Walksman in 1941. An antibiotic is defined as a "derivative produced by the metabolism of microorganisms that possess antibacterial activity at low concentrations and is not toxic to the host." In this article, the author describes how…

  17. The Antibiotic Resistance Problem Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The term "antibiotic" was first proposed by Vuillemin in 1889 but was first used in the current sense by Walksman in 1941. An antibiotic is defined as a "derivative produced by the metabolism of microorganisms that possess antibacterial activity at low concentrations and is not toxic to the host." In this article, the author describes how…

  18. The Structural Basis of [beta]-Peptide-Specific Cleavage by the Serine Protease Cyanophycinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Adrienne M.; Lai, Sandy W.S.; Tavares, John; Kimber, Matthew S.; (Guelph)

    2010-10-01

    Cyanophycin, or poly-L-Asp-multi-L-Arg, is a non-ribosomally synthesized peptidic polymer that is used for nitrogen storage by cyanobacteria and other select eubacteria. Upon synthesis, it self-associates to form insoluble granules, the degradation of which is uniquely catalyzed by a carboxy-terminal-specific protease, cyanophycinase. We have determined the structure of cyanophycinase from the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 at 1.5-{angstrom} resolution, showing that the structure is dimeric, with individual protomers resembling aspartyl dipeptidase. Kinetic characterization of the enzyme demonstrates that the enzyme displays Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k{sub cat} of 16.5 s{sup -1} and a k{sub cat}/K{sub M} of 7.5 x 10{sup -6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm that cyanophycinase is a serine protease and that Gln101, Asp172, Gln173, Arg178, Arg180 and Arg183, which form a conserved pocket adjacent to the catalytic Ser132, are functionally critical residues. Modeling indicates that cyanophycinase binds the {beta}-Asp-Arg dipeptide residue immediately N-terminal to the scissile bond in an extended conformation in this pocket, primarily recognizing this penultimate {beta}-Asp-Arg residue of the polymeric chain. Because binding and catalysis depend on substrate features unique to {beta}-linked aspartyl peptides, cyanophycinase is able to act within the cytosol without non-specific cleavage events disrupting essential cellular processes.

  19. Branched Peptide, B2088, Disrupts the Supramolecular Organization of Lipopolysaccharides and Sensitizes the Gram-negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Tan, Wei Xiang; Aung, Thet Tun; Goh, Eunice Tze Leng; Muruganantham, Nandhakumar; Li, Jianguo; Chang, Jamie Ya Ting; Dikshit, Neha; Saraswathi, Padmanabhan; Lim, Rayne Rui; Kang, Tse Siang; Balamuralidhar, Vanniarajan; Sukumaran, Bindu; Verma, Chandra S.; Sivaraman, Jayaraman; Chaurasia, Shyam Sunder; Liu, Shouping; Beuerman, Roger W.

    2016-05-01

    Dissecting the complexities of branched peptide-lipopolysaccharides (LPS) interactions provide rationale for the development of non-cytotoxic antibiotic adjuvants. Using various biophysical methods, we show that the branched peptide, B2088, binds to lipid A and disrupts the supramolecular organization of LPS. The disruption of outer membrane in an intact bacterium was demonstrated by fluorescence spectroscopy and checkerboard assays, the latter confirming strong to moderate synergism between B2088 and various classes of antibiotics. The potency of synergistic combinations of B2088 and antibiotics was further established by time-kill kinetics, mammalian cell culture infections model and in vivo model of bacterial keratitis. Importantly, B2088 did not show any cytotoxicity to corneal epithelial cells for at least 96 h continuous exposure or hemolytic activity even at 20 mg/ml. Peptide congeners containing norvaline, phenylalanine and tyrosine (instead of valine in B2088) displayed better synergism compared to other substitutions. We propose that high affinity and subsequent disruption of the supramolecular assembly of LPS by the branched peptides are vital for the development of non-cytotoxic antibiotic adjuvants that can enhance the accessibility of conventional antibiotics to the intracellular targets, decrease the antibiotic consumption and holds promise in averting antibiotic resistance.

  20. Antimicrobial peptide exposure selects for Staphylococcus aureus resistance to human defence peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z.; Lofton, Hava; Vestergaard, Martin; Hjort, Karin; Ingmer, Hanne; Andersson, Dan I.

    2017-01-01

    Background The clinical development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is currently under evaluation to combat the rapid increase in MDR bacterial pathogens. However, many AMPs closely resemble components of the human innate immune system and the ramifications of prolonged bacterial exposure to AMPs are not fully understood. Objectives We show that in vitro serial passage of a clinical USA300 MRSA strain in a host-mimicking environment containing host-derived AMPs results in the selection of stable AMP resistance. Methods Serial passage experiments were conducted using steadily increasing concentrations of LL-37, PR-39 or wheat germ histones. WGS and proteomic analysis by MS were used to identify the molecular mechanism associated with increased tolerance of AMPs. AMP-resistant mutants were characterized by measuring in vitro fitness, AMP and antibiotic susceptibility, and virulence in a mouse model of sepsis. Results AMP-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mutants often displayed little to no fitness cost and caused invasive disease in mice. Further, this phenotype coincided with diminished susceptibility to both clinically prescribed antibiotics and human defence peptides. Conclusions These findings suggest that therapeutic use of AMPs could select for virulent mutants with cross-resistance to human innate immunity as well as antibiotic therapy. Thus, therapeutic use of AMPs and the implications of cross-resistance need to be carefully monitored and evaluated. PMID:27650186

  1. Antibiotic tolerance and microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We study the dynamics of antibiotic action within hydrodynamic flow chamber biofilms of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using isogenic mutants and fluorescent gene...... expression reporters and we address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. The dynamics of microbial killing is monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Our work shows that the apparent increased antibiotic tolerance is due to the formation...... of antibiotic tolerant subpopulations within the biofilm. The formation of these subpopulations is highly variable and dependent on the antibiotic used, the biofilm structural organization and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms....

  2. Antibiotic tolerance and microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We study the dynamics of antibiotic action within hydrodynamic flow chamber biofilms of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using isogenic mutants and fluorescent gene...... expression reporters and we address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. The dynamics of microbial killing is monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Our work shows that the apparent increased antibiotic tolerance is due to the formation...... of antibiotic tolerant subpopulations within the biofilm. The formation of these subpopulations is highly variable and dependent on the antibiotic used, the biofilm structural organization and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms....

  3. Functions of antimicrobial peptides in host defense and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisswenger, Christoph; Bals, Robert

    2005-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system. AMPs have a broad antimicrobial spectrum and lyse microbial cells by interaction with biomembranes. Besides their direct antimicrobial function, they have multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with impact on epithelial and inflammatory cells influencing diverse processes such as cytokine release, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, wound healing, chemotaxis, immune induction, and protease-antiprotease balance. Furthermore, AMPs qualify as prototypes of innovative drugs that may be used as antibiotics, anti-lipopolysaccharide drugs, or modifiers of inflammation. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the basic and applied biology of antimicrobial peptides and discusses features of AMPs in host defense and inflammation.

  4. Host defense peptides and their antimicrobial-immunomodulatory duality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Kraneburg, Ursula; Jacobsen, Frank; Al-Benna, Sammy

    2011-03-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are short cationic molecules produced by the immune systems of most multicellular organisms and play a central role as effector molecules of innate immunity. Host defence peptides have a wide range of biological activities from direct killing of invading pathogens to modulation of immunity and other biological responses of the host. HDPs have important functions in multiple, clinically relevant disease processes and their imbalanced expression is associated with pathology in different organ systems and cell types. Furthermore, HDPs are now evaluated as model molecules for the development of novel natural antibiotics and immunoregulatory compounds. This review provides an overview of HDPs focused on their antimicrobial-immunomodulatory duality.

  5. Total synthesis of the thiopeptide antibiotic amythiamicin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rachael A; Thompson, Stewart P; Alcaraz, Lilian; Moody, Christopher J

    2005-11-09

    The thiopeptide (or thiostrepton) antibiotics are a class of sulfur containing highly modified cyclic peptides with interesting biological properties, including reported activity against MRSA and malaria. Described herein is the total synthesis of the thiopeptide natural product amythiamicin D, which utilizes a biosynthesis-inspired hetero-Diels-Alder route to the pyridine core of the antibiotic as a key step. Preliminary studies using a range of serine-derived 1-ethoxy-2-azadienes established that hetero-Diels-Alder reaction with N-acetylenamines proceeded efficiently under microwave irradiation to give 2,3,6-trisubstituted pyridines. The thiazole building blocks of the antibiotic were obtained by either classical Hantzsch reactions or by dirhodium(II)-catalyzed chemoselective carbene N-H insertion followed by thionation, and were combined to give the bis-thiazole that forms the left-hand fragment of the antibiotic. The key Diels-Alder reaction of a tris-thiazolyl azadiene with benzyl 2-(1-acetylaminoethenyl)thiazole-4-carboxylate gave the core tetrathiazolyl pyridine, which was elaborated into the natural product by successive incorporation of glycine and bis-thiazole fragments followed by macrocyclization.

  6. The biosynthesis of Caryophyllaceae-like cyclic peptides in Saponaria vaccaria L. from DNA-encoded precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condie, Janet A; Nowak, Goska; Reed, Darwin W; Balsevich, J John; Reaney, Martin J T; Arnison, Paul G; Covello, Patrick S

    2011-08-01

    Cyclic peptides (CPs) are produced in a very wide range of taxa. Their biosynthesis generally involves either non-ribosomal peptide synthases or ribosome-dependent production of precursor peptides. Plants within the Caryophyllaceae and certain other families produce CPs which generally consist of 5-9 proteinogenic amino acids. The biological roles for these CPs in the plant are not very clear, but many of them have activity in mammalian systems. There is currently very little known about the biosynthesis of CPs in the Caryophyllaceae. A collection of expressed sequence tags from developing seeds of Saponaria vaccaria was investigated for information about CP biosynthesis. This revealed genes that appeared to encode CP precursors which are subsequently cyclized to mature CPs. This was tested and confirmed by the expression of a cDNA encoding a putative precursor of the CP segetalin A in transformed S. vaccaria roots. Similarly, extracts of developing S. vaccaria seeds were shown to catalyze the production of segetalin A from the same putative (synthetic) precursor. Moreover, the presence in S. vaccaria seeds of two segetalins, J [cyclo(FGTHGLPAP)] and K [cyclo(GRVKA)], which was predicted by sequence analysis, was confirmed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Sequence analysis also predicts the presence of similar CP precursor genes in Dianthus caryophyllus and Citrus spp. The data support the ribosome-dependent biosynthesis of Caryophyllaceae-like CPs in the Caryophyllaceae and Rutaceae.

  7. D-Lysergyl peptide synthetase from the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer, B; Han, M; Keller, U

    1996-11-01

    The ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea produces the medically important ergopeptines, which consist of a cyclol-structured tripeptide and D-lysergic acid linked by an amide bond. An enzyme activity capable of non-ribosomal synthesis of D-lysergyl-L-alanyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-proline lactam, the non-cyclol precursor of the ergopeptine ergotamine, has been purified about 18-fold from the ergotamine-producing C. purpurea strain D1. Analysis of radioactively labeled enzyme-substrate complexes revealed a 370-kDa lysergyl peptide synthetase 1 (LPS 1) carrying the amino acid activation domains for alanine, phenylalanine, and proline. The activation of D-lysergic acid is catalyzed by a 140-kDa peptide synthetase (LPS 2) copurifying with LPS 1. LPS 1 and LPS 2 contain 4'-phosphopantetheine and bind their substrates covalently by thioester linkage. Kinetic analysis of the synthesis reaction revealed a Km of approximately 1.4 microM for both D-lysergic acid and its structural homolog dihydrolysergic acid, which is one to two orders of magnitude lower than the Km values for the other amino acids involved. The Km values for the amino acids reflect their relative concentrations in the cellular pool of C. purpurea. This may indicate that in in vivo conditions D-lysergyl peptide formation is limited by the D-lysergic acid concentration in the cell. In vitro, the multienzyme preparation catalyzes the formation of several different D-lysergyl peptide lactams according to the amino acids supplied. Specific antiserum was used to detect LPS 1 in various C. purpurea strains. In C. purpurea wild type, the enzyme was expressed at all stages of cultivation and in different media, suggesting that it is produced constitutively.

  8. Molecular, chemical and biological screening of soil actinomycete isolates in seeking bioactive peptide metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Hamedi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Due to the evolution of multidrug-resistant strains, screening of natural resources, especially actinomycetes, for new therapeutic agents discovery has become the interests of researchers. In this study, molecular, chemical and biological screening of soil actinomycetes was carried out in order to search for peptide-producing actinomycetes.Materials and Methods: 60 actinomycetes were isolated from soils of Iran. The isolates were subjected to molecular screening for detection NRPS (non-ribosomal peptide synthetases gene. Phylogenic identification of NRPS containing isolates was performed. Chemical screening of the crude extracts was performed using chlorine o-dianisidine as peptide detector reagent and bioactivity of peptide producing strains was determined by antimicrobial bioassay. High pressure liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS with UV-visible spectroscopy was performed for detection of the metabolite diversity in selected strain.Results: Amplified NRPS adenylation gene (700 bp was detected among 30 strains. Phylogenic identification of these isolates showed presence of rare actinomycetes genera among the isolates and 10 out of 30 strains were subjected to chemical screening. Nocardia sp. UTMC 751 showed antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal test pathogens. HPLC-MSand UV-visible spectroscopy results from the crude extract showed that this strain has probably the ability to produce new metabolites.Conclusion: By application of a combined approach, including molecular, chemical and bioactivity analysis, a promising strain of Nocardia sp. UTMC 751 was obtained. This strain had significant activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Strain Nocardia sp. UTMC 751 produce five unknown and most probably new metabolites with molecular weights of 274.2, 390.3, 415.3, 598.4 and 772.5. This strain had showed 99% similarity to Nocardia ignorata DSM 44496 T.

  9. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Mackie, Roderick I

    2013-07-31

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the "perfect microbial storm". Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  10. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick I. Mackie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  11. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2013-07-31

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  12. Reversible antibiotic tolerance induced in Staphylococcus aureus by concurrent drug exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Friberg, Cathrine; McCreary, Mark;

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to beta-lactam antibiotics has led to increasing use of the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin as a life-saving treatment for major S. aureus infections. Coinfection by an unrelated bacterial species may necessitate concurrent treatment with a second...... antibiotic that targets the coinfecting pathogen. While investigating factors that affect bacterial antibiotic sensitivity, we discovered that susceptibility of S. aureus to vancomycin is reduced by concurrent exposure to colistin, a cationic peptide antimicrobial employed to treat infections by Gram......-negative pathogens. We show that colistin-induced vancomycin tolerance persists only as long as the inducer is present and is accompanied by gene expression changes similar to those resulting from mutations that produce stably inherited reduction of vancomycin sensitivity (vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus [VISA...

  13. Acylation of Therapeutic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Jensen, Simon Bjerregaard

    peptides are similar in size and structure, but oppositely charged at physiological pH. Both peptides were acylated with linear acyl chains of systematically increasing length, where sCT was furthermore acylated at two different positions on the peptide backbone. For GLP-2, we found that increasing acyl...... stems from a synergy between the positive peptide charge and membrane-active acyl moiety, supported by its pH-dependency, whereby the effect increased with decreasing pH and concomitant charge increase. The extent of permeation enhancing effect was highly dependent on acylation chain length and position...

  14. Topical peptides as cosmeceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadraj Vasant Pai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are known to have diverse biological roles, most prominently as signaling/regulatory molecules in a broad variety of physiological processes including defense, immunity, stress, growth, homeostasis and reproduction. These aspects have been used in the field of dermatology and cosmetology to produce short, stable and synthetic peptides for extracellular matrix synthesis, pigmentation, innate immunity and inflammation. The evolution of peptides over the century, which started with the discovery of penicillin, has now extended to their usage as cosmeceuticals in recent years. Cosmeceutical peptides may act as signal modulators of the extracellular matrix component, as structural peptides, carrier peptides and neurotransmitter function modulators. Transdermal delivery of peptides can be made more effective by penetration enhancers, chemical modification or encapsulation of peptides. The advantages of using peptides as cosmeceuticals include their involvement in many physiological functions of the skin, their selectivity, their lack of immunogenicity and absence of premarket regulatory requirements for their use. However, there are disadvantages: clinical evidence for efficacy is often weak, absorption may be poor due to low lipophilicity, high molecular weight and binding to other ingredients, and prices can be quite high.

  15. Antibiotic resistance: A current epilogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, David R

    2017-06-15

    The history of the first commercial antibiotics is briefly reviewed, together with data from the US and WHO, showing the decrease in death due to infectious diseases over the 20th century, from just under half of all deaths, to less than 10%. The second half of the 20th century saw the new use of antibiotics as growth promoters for food animals in the human diet, and the end of the 20th century and beginning of the 21st saw the beginning and rapid rise of advanced microbial resistance to antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP, can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy.

  17. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-09-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy.

  18. Antibiotics as CECs: An Overview of the Hazards Posed by Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Ivan Scott

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTMonitoring programs have traditionally monitored legacy contaminants but are shifting focus to Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs. CECs present many challenges for monitoring and assessment, because measurement methods don't always exist nor have toxicological studies been fully conducted to place results in proper context. Also some CECs affect metabolic pathways to produce adverse outcomes that are not assessed through traditional toxicological evaluations. Antibiotics are CECs that pose significant environmental risks including development of both toxic effects at high doses and antibiotic resistance at doses well below the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC which kill bacteria and have been found in nearly half of all sites monitored in the US. Antimicrobial resistance has generally been attributed to the use of antibiotics in medicine for humans and livestock as well as aquaculture operations. The objective of this study was to assess the extent and magnitude of antibiotics in the environment and estimate their potential hazards in the environment. Antibiotics concentrations were measured in a number of monitoring studies which included Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTP effluent, surface waters, sediments and biota. A number of studies reported levels of Antibiotic Resistant Microbes (ARM in surface waters and some studies found specific ARM genes (e.g. the blaM-1 gene in E. coli which may pose additional environmental risk. High levels of this gene were found to survive WWTP disinfection and accumulated in sediment at levels 100-1000 times higher than in the sewerage effluent, posing potential risks for gene transfer to other bacteria.in aquatic and marine ecosystems. Antibiotic risk assessment approaches were developed based on the use of MICs and MIC Ratios [High (Antibiotic Resistant/Low (Antibiotic Sensitive MIC] for each antibiotic indicating the range of bacterial adaptability to each antibiotic to help define the No

  19. Molecular cloning, expression and in vitro analysis of soluble cationic synthetic antimicrobial peptide from salt-inducible Escherichia coli GJ1158

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawahar Babu Peravali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are the upcoming therapeutic molecules as alternative drugs to the existing antibiotics owing to their potent action against pathogenic microorganisms. In this study, to obtain an antimicrobial peptide with a broad range of activity, the synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide was designed by using in silico tools viz., antimicrobial peptide database, protparam, hierarchical neural network. Later, the peptide was translated back into a core nucleotide sequence and the gene for the peptide was constructed by overlapping PCR. The amplified gene was cloned into pRSET–A vector and transformed into salt inducible expression host E. coli GJ1158. The expression results show high yields of soluble recombinant fusion peptide (0.52 g/L from salt-inducible E. coli. The recombinant peptide was purified by the IMAC purification system and cleaved by enterokinase. The digested product was further purified and 0.12 g/L of biologically active recombinant cationic antimicrobial peptide was obtained. In vitro analysis of the purified peptide demonstrated high antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria devoid of hemolytic activity. Therefore, this synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide could serves as an promising agent over chemical antibiotics. In this study, a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide was designed, cloned and expressed from salt-inducible E. coli GJ1158 using cost effective media in the large scale production of antimicrobial peptide and its biological activity was analysed against different Gram positive and negative organisms.

  20. Mechanisms and Biological Costs of Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Lofton Tomenius, Hava

    2016-01-01

    The global increasing problem of antibiotic resistance necessarily drives the pursuit and discovery of new antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) initially seemed like promising new drug candidates. Already members of the innate immune system, it was assumed that they would be bioactive and non-toxic. Their common trait for fundamental, non-specific mode of action also seemed likely to reduce resistance development. In this thesis, we demonstrate the ease with which two species o...

  1. Effect of Fatty Acid Conjugation on Antimicrobial Peptide Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    killing mechanism of antimicrobial peptides makes them an interesting alternative to traditional antibiotics, as target bacteria may be less able...C14-AKK and C16-AKK to within a 7% error are 220 and 16mM respectively. Since amphipathicity is requisite for antimicrobial action KAK is not...Schnaare, 2000: Antimicrobial evaluation of N-alkyl betaines and N-alkyl-N,N-dimethylamine oxides with variations in chain length. Antimicrobial Agents

  2. Prophylactic antibiotics versus post- operative antibiotics in herniorraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedulla Khan Kayamkani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative surgical site infections are a major source of illness.  Infection results in longer hospital stay and higher costs.  Uses of preoperative antibiotics have been standardized and are being used routinely in most clinical surgeries and include controversial areas like breast surgery and herniorraphy. Objective of the study is to find out the benefit of prophylactic use of antibiotics in the management of herniorraphy.This project was carried out in a multispeciality tertiary care teaching hospital from 1st-30th April in 2002. Group 1 patients were treated prophylactically half an hour before surgery with single dose of I.V. antibiotics (injection.  Ampicillin 1gm + injection.  Gentamicin 80mg. Group 2 patients were treated post surgery with capsule. Ampicillin 500mg 4 times a day for 7 days and injection. Gentamicin twice a day for first 4 days. In case of group 1 patients only one out of 20 patients (5% was infected.  Whereas in-group 2 patients 5 out of 20 patients (25% were infected. The cost of prophylactic antibiotic treatment was Rs. 25.56 per patient.  The postoperative antibiotic treatment cost was Rs. 220.4 per patient.  That means postoperative treatment is around 8.62 times costlier than prophylactic treatment.             From this study it is evident that prophylactic (preoperative treatment is better than postoperative treatment with antibiotics.

  3. Addressing antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kalpana

    2003-02-01

    Management of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) has traditionally been based on 2 important principles: the spectrum of organisms causing acute UTI is highly predictable (Escherichia coli accounts for 75% to 90% and Staphylococcus saprophyticus accounts for 5% to 15% of isolates), and the susceptibility patterns of these organisms have also been relatively predictable. As a result, empiric therapy with short-course trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been a standard management approach for uncomplicated cystitis.However, antibiotic resistance is now becoming a major factor not only in nosocomial complicated UTIs, but also in uncomplicated community-acquired UTIs. Resistance to TMP-SMX now approaches 18% to 22% in some regions of the United States, and nearly 1 in 3 bacterial strains causing cystitis or pyelonephritis demonstrate resistance to amoxicillin. Fortunately, resistance to other agents, such as nitrofurantoin and the fluoroquinolones, has remained low, at approximately 2%. Preliminary data suggest that the increase in TMP-SMX resistance is associated with poorer bacteriologic and clinical outcomes when TMP-SMX is used for therapy. As a result, these trends have necessitated a change in the management approach to community-acquired UTI. The use of TMP-SMX as a first-line agent for empiric therapy of uncomplicated cystitis is only appropriate in areas where TMP-SMX resistance prevalence is resistance to TMP-SMX exceeds this rate, alternative agents need to be considered.

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides: Insights into Membrane Permeabilization, Lipopolysaccharide Fragmentation and Application in Plant Disease Control

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, A.; Ghosh, A; Airoldi, C; Sperandeo, P; Mroue, K; Jimenez-Barbero, J; Kundu, P.; Ramamoorthy, A; Bhunia, A

    2015-01-01

    The recent increase in multidrug resistance against bacterial infections has become a major concern to human health and global food security. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have recently received substantial attention as potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics because of their potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. These peptides have also been implicated in plant disease control for replacing conventional treatment methods that are polluting and hazardous to the en...

  5. Biofilm induced tolerance towards antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Folkesson

    Full Text Available Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. We established Escherichia coli biofilms with differential structural organization due to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics of microbial killing were monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Strains forming structurally organized biofilms show an increased bacterial survival when challenged with colistin, compared to strains forming unstructured biofilms. The increased survival is due to genetically regulated tolerant subpopulation formation and not caused by a general biofilm property. No significant difference in survival was detected when the strains were challenged with ciprofloxacin. Our data show that biofilm formation confers increased colistin tolerance to cells within the biofilm structure, but the protection is conditional being dependent on the structural organization of the biofilm, and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms.

  6. The mycosubtilin synthetase of Bacillus subtilis ATCC6633 : A multifunctional hybrid between a peptide synthetase, an amino transferase, and a fatty acid synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duitman, EH; Hamoen, LW; Rembold, M; Venema, G; Seitz, H; Saenger, W; Bernhard, F; Reinhardt, R; Schmidt, M; Ullrich, C; Stein, T; Leenders, F; Vater, J

    1999-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis strain ATCC6633 has been identified as a producer of mycosubtilin, a potent antifungal peptide antibiotic. Mycosubtilin, which belongs to the iturin family of lipopeptide antibiotics, is characterized by a p-amino fatty acid moiety linked to the circular heptapeptide Asn-Tyr-Asn-Cl

  7. Antibiotic resistance: An ethical challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littmann, Jasper; Buyx, Alena; Cars, Otto

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we argue that antibiotic resistance (ABR) raises a number of ethical problems that have not yet been sufficiently addressed. We outline four areas in which ethical issues that arise in relation to ABR are particularly pressing. First, the emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant infections exacerbates traditional ethical challenges of infectious disease control, such as the restriction of individual liberty for the protection of the public's health. Second, ABR raises issues of global distributive justice, both with regard to the overuse and lack of access to antibiotics. Third, the use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine raises serious concerns for animal welfare and sustainable farming practices. Finally, the diminishing effectiveness of antibiotics leads to questions about intergenerational justice and our responsibility for the wellbeing of future generations. We suggest that current policy discussions should take ethical conflicts into account and engage openly with the challenges that we outline in this paper.

  8. A study of antibiotic prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, L.; Radzeviciene-Jurgute, R.; Jurgutis, A.;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Globally, general practitioners (GPs) write more than 90% of all antibiotic prescriptions. This study examines the experiences of Lithuanian and Russian GPs in antibiotic prescription for upper respiratory tract infections, including their perceptions of when it is not indicated...... clinically or pharmacologically. Methods. 22 Lithuanian and 29 Russian GPs participated in five focus group discussions. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results. We identified four main thematic categories: patients' faith in antibiotics as medication for upper respiratory tract infections...... for upper respiratory tract infections. Conclusions. Understanding the nature of physician-patient interaction is critical to the effective pursuit of clinically grounded antibiotic use as this study undertaken in Lithuania and the Russian Federation has shown. Both physicians and patients must be targeted...

  9. Antibiotic managment in renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, R E

    1976-06-01

    This is a brief compilation of the work of many investigators. It includes facts about toxicity and recommendations about antibiotic management in patients with renal failure. As new data are accrued, changes in these recommendations will be necessary.

  10. Use of Antibiotics in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Broe, Anne; Aabenhus, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to describe the use of systemic antibiotics among children in Denmark. Methods: National data on drug use in Denmark were extracted from the Danish National Prescription Database. We used prescription data for all children in Denmark aged 0 to 11 years from January 1, 2000...... to December 31, 2012. Results: We obtained data on 5,884,301 prescriptions for systemic antibiotics issued to 1,206,107 children. The most used single substances were phenoxymethylpenicillin (45%), amoxicillin (34%) and erythromycin (6%). The highest incidence rate of antibiotic treatment episodes......–1. There was little evidence of heavy users. Conclusion: Prescribing rate of antibiotics to children in Denmark remained stable at a high level from 2000 to 2012. An increase in the use of broad-spectrum beta-lactam penicillin was noted, but otherwise the prescribing pattern adhered well to National guidelines...

  11. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  12. Antibiotic resistance determinants in a Pseudomonas putida strain isolated from a hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro Molina

    Full Text Available Environmental microbes harbor an enormous pool of antibiotic and biocide resistance genes that can impact the resistance profiles of animal and human pathogens via horizontal gene transfer. Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have been seldom isolated from humans. We have established a collection of P. putida strains isolated from in-patients in different hospitals in France. One of the isolated strains (HB3267 kills insects and is resistant to the majority of the antibiotics used in laboratories and hospitals, including aminoglycosides, ß-lactams, cationic peptides, chromoprotein enediyne antibiotics, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones and quinolones, glycopeptide antibiotics, macrolides, polyketides and sulfonamides. Similar to other P. putida clinical isolates the strain was sensitive to amikacin. To shed light on the broad pattern of antibiotic resistance, which is rarely found in clinical isolates of this species, the genome of this strain was sequenced and analysed. The study revealed that the determinants of multiple resistance are both chromosomally-borne as well as located on the pPC9 plasmid. Further analysis indicated that pPC9 has recruited antibiotic and biocide resistance genes from environmental microorganisms as well as from opportunistic and true human pathogens. The pPC9 plasmid is not self-transmissible, but can be mobilized by other bacterial plasmids making it capable of spreading antibiotic resistant determinants to new hosts.

  13. Antibiotic prophylaxis for abdominal hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, G; Loizzi, P; Greco, P; Gargano, G; Varcaccio Garofalo, G; Belsanti, A

    1988-01-01

    Three different regimens of antibiotic treatment have been employed in order to evaluate their efficacy as a profilaxis for abdominal hysterectomy. Two short term administrations (Cephtriaxone and Cephamandole plus Tobramycine) and a conventional full dose treatment (Cephazoline) have been compared over a group of homogeneous patients. No significant differences, except a reduction in postoperative time spent in hospital, have been found among the groups. A reduction in urinary tract infection has also been reported with a single-dose antibiotic prophylaxis.

  14. Prophylactic antibiotics in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokuski, Laura; Clyburn, Terry A; Evans, Richard P; Moucha, Calin S

    2011-01-01

    The use of prophylactic antibiotics in orthopaedic surgery has been proven effective in reducing surgical site infections after hip and knee arthroplasty, spine procedures, and open reduction and internal fixation of fractures. To maximize the beneficial effect of prophylactic antibiotics, while minimizing any adverse effects, the correct antimicrobial agent must be selected, the drug must be administered just before incision, and the duration of administration should not exceed 24 hours.

  15. Antibiotics, the pill, and pregnancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Mastrantonio, M; Minhas, H; Gammon, A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish if advice concerning risks of pregnancy when taking oral contraceptive pill and antibiotics is being offered. METHOD: A retrospective audit of notes of 100 female patients aged 15-39 who were prescribed antibiotics. RESULTS: Documentation of use of contraception was noted in 3% of patients. Advice concerning risks and further precautions was noted in this 3% but not in any other records. CONCLUSION: The audit identified a gap in documentation and/or clinical practice ...

  16. Antibiotic utilisation for hospitalised paediatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luinge, K; Kimpen, JLL; van Houten, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in paediatrics. Because of an overall rise in health care costs, lack of uniformity in drug prescribing and the emergence of antibiotic resistance, monitoring and control of antibiotic use is of growing concern and strict antibiotic policies a

  17. [Self-medication with antibiotics in Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olczak, A.; Grzesiowski, P.; Hryniewicz, W.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance, the important public health threat, depends on antibiotic overuse/misuse. Self-medication with antibiotics is of serious medical concern. The aim of the study, as a part of SAR project (Self-medication with antibiotic in Europe) was to survey the incidence of this phenomenon.

  18. Core Elements of Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Guillermo V; Fleming-Dutra, Katherine E; Roberts, Rebecca M; Hicks, Lauri A

    2016-11-11

    The Core Elements of Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship provides a framework for antibiotic stewardship for outpatient clinicians and facilities that routinely provide antibiotic treatment. This report augments existing guidance for other clinical settings. In 2014 and 2015, respectively, CDC released the Core Elements of Hospital Antibiotic Stewardship Programs and the Core Elements of Antibiotic Stewardship for Nursing Homes. Antibiotic stewardship is the effort to measure and improve how antibiotics are prescribed by clinicians and used by patients. Improving antibiotic prescribing involves implementing effective strategies to modify prescribing practices to align them with evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management. The four core elements of outpatient antibiotic stewardship are commitment, action for policy and practice, tracking and reporting, and education and expertise. Outpatient clinicians and facility leaders can commit to improving antibiotic prescribing and take action by implementing at least one policy or practice aimed at improving antibiotic prescribing practices. Clinicians and leaders of outpatient clinics and health care systems can track antibiotic prescribing practices and regularly report these data back to clinicians. Clinicians can provide educational resources to patients and families on appropriate antibiotic use. Finally, leaders of outpatient clinics and health systems can provide clinicians with education aimed at improving antibiotic prescribing and with access to persons with expertise in antibiotic stewardship. Establishing effective antibiotic stewardship interventions can protect patients and improve clinical outcomes in outpatient health care settings.

  19. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.;

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields.......Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  20. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from...

  1. Avian host defense peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, M.; van Dijk, A.; Haagsman, H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense

  2. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  3. Expedient antibiotics production: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienkowski, P.R.; Byers, C.H.; Lee, D.D.

    1988-05-01

    The literature on the manufacture, separation and purification, and clinical uses of antibiotics was reviewed, and a bibliography of the pertinent material was completed. Five antimicrobial drugs, penicillin V and G, (and amoxicillin with clavulanic acid), Cephalexin (a cephalosporin), tetracycline and oxytetracycline, Bacitracin (topical), and sulfonamide (chemically produced) were identified for emergency production. Plants that manufacture antibiotics in the continental United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico have been identified along with potential alternate sites such as those where SCP, enzyme, and fermentation ethanol are produced. Detailed process flow sheets and process descriptions have been derived from the literature and documented. This investigation revealed that a typical antibiotic-manufacturing facility is composed of two main sections: (1) a highly specialized, but generic, fermentation unit and (2) a multistep, complex separation and purification unit which is specific to a particular antibiotic product. The fermentation section requires specialized equipment for operation in a sterile environment which is not usually available in other industries. The emergency production of antibiotics under austere conditions will be feasible only if a substantial reduction in the complexity and degree of separation and purity normally required can be realized. Detailed instructions were developed to assist state and federal officials who would be directing the resumption of antibiotic production after a nuclear attack. 182 refs., 54 figs., 26 tabs.

  4. APD: the Antimicrobial Peptide Database

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Guangshun

    2004-01-01

    An antimicrobial peptide database (APD) has been established based on an extensive literature search. It contains detailed information for 525 peptides (498 antibacterial, 155 antifungal, 28 antiviral and 18 antitumor). APD provides interactive interfaces for peptide query, prediction and design. It also provides statistical data for a select group of or all the peptides in the database. Peptide information can be searched using keywords such as peptide name, ID, length, net charge, hydrophob...

  5. An in vitro study on the effects of nisin on the antibacterial activities of 18 antibiotics against Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhongchun; Zhang, Yuejiao; Ling, Junqi; Ma, Jinglei; Huang, Lijia; Zhang, Luodan

    2014-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis rank among the leading causes of nosocomial infections worldwide and possesses both intrinsic and acquired resistance to a variety of antibiotics. Development of new antibiotics is limited, and pathogens continually generate new antibiotic resistance. Many researchers aim to identify strategies to effectively kill this drug-resistant pathogen. Here, we evaluated the effect of the antimicrobial peptide nisin on the antibacterial activities of 18 antibiotics against E. faecalis. The MIC and MBC results showed that the antibacterial activities of 18 antibiotics against E. faecalis OG1RF, ATCC 29212, and strain E were significantly improved in the presence of 200 U/ml nisin. Statistically significant differences were observed between the results with and without 200 U/ml nisin at the same concentrations of penicillin or chloramphenicol (pnisin and penicillin or chloramphenicol had a synergetic effect against the three tested E. faecalis strains. The transmission electron microscope images showed that E. faecalis was not obviously destroyed by penicillin or chloramphenicol alone but was severely disrupted by either antibiotic in combination with nisin. Furthermore, assessing biofilms by a confocal laser scanning microscope showed that penicillin, ciprofloxacin, and chloramphenicol all showed stronger antibiofilm actions in combination with nisin than when these antibiotics were administered alone. Therefore, nisin can significantly improve the antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of many antibiotics, and certain antibiotics in combination with nisin have considerable potential for use as inhibitors of this drug-resistant pathogen.

  6. Structure of the complex between teicoplanin and a bacterial cell-wall peptide: use of a carrier-protein approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economou, Nicoleta J.; Zentner, Isaac J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States); Lazo, Edwin; Jakoncic, Jean; Stojanoff, Vivian [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Weeks, Stephen D.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Cocklin, Simon; Loll, Patrick J. [Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 North 15th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Using a carrier-protein strategy, the structure of teicoplanin bound to its bacterial cell-wall target has been determined. The structure reveals the molecular determinants of target recognition, flexibility in the antibiotic backbone and intrinsic radiation sensitivity of teicoplanin. Multidrug-resistant bacterial infections are commonly treated with glycopeptide antibiotics such as teicoplanin. This drug inhibits bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis by binding and sequestering a cell-wall precursor: a d-alanine-containing peptide. A carrier-protein strategy was used to crystallize the complex of teicoplanin and its target peptide by fusing the cell-wall peptide to either MBP or ubiquitin via native chemical ligation and subsequently crystallizing the protein–peptide–antibiotic complex. The 2.05 Å resolution MBP–peptide–teicoplanin structure shows that teicoplanin recognizes its ligand through a combination of five hydrogen bonds and multiple van der Waals interactions. Comparison of this teicoplanin structure with that of unliganded teicoplanin reveals a flexibility in the antibiotic peptide backbone that has significant implications for ligand recognition. Diffraction experiments revealed an X-ray-induced dechlorination of the sixth amino acid of the antibiotic; it is shown that teicoplanin is significantly more radiation-sensitive than other similar antibiotics and that ligand binding increases radiosensitivity. Insights derived from this new teicoplanin structure may contribute to the development of next-generation antibacterials designed to overcome bacterial resistance.

  7. Novel histone-derived antimicrobial peptides use different antimicrobial mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavia, Kathryn E; Spinella, Sara A; Elmore, Donald E

    2012-03-01

    The increase in multidrug resistant bacteria has sparked an interest in the development of novel antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides that operate by crossing the cell membrane may also have the potential to deliver drugs to intracellular targets. Buforin 2 (BF2) is an antimicrobial peptide that shares sequence identity with a fragment of histone subunit H2A and whose bactericidal mechanism depends on membrane translocation and DNA binding. Previously, novel histone-derived antimicrobial peptides (HDAPs) were designed based on properties of BF2, and DesHDAP1 and DesHDAP3 showed significant antibacterial activity. In this study, their DNA binding, permeabilization, and translocation abilities were assessed independently and compared to antibacterial activity to determine whether they share a mechanism with BF2. To investigate the importance of proline in determining the peptides' mechanisms of action, proline to alanine mutants of the novel peptides were generated. DesHDAP1, which shows significant similarities to BF2 in terms of secondary structure, translocates effectively across lipid vesicle and bacterial membranes, while the DesHDAP1 proline mutant shows reduced translocation abilities and antimicrobial potency. In contrast, both DesHDAP3 and its proline mutant translocate poorly, though the DesHDAP3 proline mutant is more potent. Our findings suggest that a proline hinge can promote membrane translocation in some peptides, but that the extent of its effect on permeabilization depends on the peptide's amphipathic properties. Our results also highlight the different antimicrobial mechanisms exhibited by histone-derived peptides and suggest that histones may serve as a source of novel antimicrobial peptides with varied properties.

  8. Macrolide antibiotics and the airway: antibiotic or non-antibiotic effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, D M

    2010-03-01

    The macrolides are a class of antibiotics widely prescribed in infectious disease. More recently, there has been considerable interest in potential indications for these agents, in addition to their simple antibacterial indications, in a number of lung pathophysiologies.

  9. Dielectrophoretic assay of bacterial resistance to antibiotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johari, Juliana [School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK (United Kingdom); Huebner, Yvonne [School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK (United Kingdom); Hull, Judith C [School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK (United Kingdom); Dale, Jeremy W [School of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK (United Kingdom); Hughes, Michael P [School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-21

    The dielectrophoretic collection spectra of antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis have been determined. These indicate that in the absence of antibiotic treatment there is a strong similarity between the dielectric properties of sensitive and resistant strains, and that there is a significant difference between the sensitive strains before and after treatment with the antibiotic streptomycin after 24 h exposure. This method offers possibilities for the assessment of bacterial resistance to antibiotics. (note)

  10. Molecular Dynamics of Peptide Folding at Aqueous Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Chipot, Christophe; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Even though most monomeric peptides are disordered in water they can adopt sequence-dependent, ordered structures, such as a-helices, at aqueous interfaces. This property is relevant to cellular signaling, membrane fusion, and the action of toxins and antibiotics. The mechanism of folding nonpolar peptides at the water-hexane interface was studied in the example of an 11-mer, of poly-L-leucine. Initially placed as a random coil on the water side of the interface, the peptide folded into an a-helix in 36 ns. Simultaneously, the peptide translocated into the hexane side of the interface. Folding was not sequential and involved a 3/10-helix as an intermediate. The folded peptide was either parallel to the interface or had its C-terminus exposed to water. An 11-mer, LQQLLQQLLQL, composed of leucine (L) and glutamine (G), was taken as a model amphiphilic peptide. It rapidly adopted an amphiphilic, disordered structure at the interface. Further folding proceeded through a series of amphiphilic intermediates.

  11. Molecular Dynamics of Peptide Folding at Aqueous Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Chipot, Christophe; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Even though most monomeric peptides are disordered in water they can adopt sequence-dependent, ordered structures, such as a-helices, at aqueous interfaces. This property is relevant to cellular signaling, membrane fusion, and the action of toxins and antibiotics. The mechanism of folding nonpolar peptides at the water-hexane interface was studied in the example of an 11-mer, of poly-L-leucine. Initially placed as a random coil on the water side of the interface, the peptide folded into an a-helix in 36 ns. Simultaneously, the peptide translocated into the hexane side of the interface. Folding was not sequential and involved a 3/10-helix as an intermediate. The folded peptide was either parallel to the interface or had its C-terminus exposed to water. An 11-mer, LQQLLQQLLQL, composed of leucine (L) and glutamine (G), was taken as a model amphiphilic peptide. It rapidly adopted an amphiphilic, disordered structure at the interface. Further folding proceeded through a series of amphiphilic intermediates.

  12. Chromogranin A-derived peptides are involved in innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, R; Atindehou, M; Lavaux, T; Haïkel, Y; Schneider, F; Metz-Boutigue, M-H

    2012-01-01

    New endogenous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) derived from chromogranin A (CgA) are secreted by nervous, endocrine and immune cells during stress. They display antimicrobial activities by lytic effects at micromolar range using a pore-forming mechanism against Gram-positive bacteria, filamentous fungi and yeasts. These AMPs can also penetrate quickly into neutrophils (without lytic effects), where, similarly to "cell penetrating peptides", they interact with cytoplasmic calmodulin, and induce calcium influx via Store Operated Channels therefore triggering neutrophils activation. Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enteritis are bacteria responsible for severe infections. We investigated here the effects of S. aureus and S. enteritis bacterial proteases on CgA-derived peptides and evaluated their antimicrobial activities. We showed that the Glu-C protease produced by S. aureus V8 induces the loss of the AMPs antibacterial activities and produces new antifungal peptides. In addition, four antimicrobial CGA-derived peptides (chromofungin, procatestatin, human/bovine catestatin) are degraded when treated with bacterial supernatants from S. aureus and S. enteritis, whereas, cateslytin, the short active form of catestatin, resists to this degradation. Finally, we demonstrate that several antimicrobial CgA-derived peptides are able to act synergistically with antibiotics against bacteria and fungi indicating their roles in innate defense.

  13. The role of antimicrobial peptides in selected dermatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Błażewicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are natural components of the immune system of organisms from the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. The human body is equipped with more than 100 antimicrobial peptides that are an integral part of innate immunity. The main AMP families in human skin are β-defensins and cathelicidins. They are produced in cells such as keratinocytes, sweat glands, neutrophils, monocytes, NK cells and mast cells. Their particular function is a broad spectrum of antibacterial as well as antifungal, antiviral and antiprotozoal activity. The ability to kill bacteria involves penetration and destruction of the cell membrane, as opposed to traditional antibiotics that act by binding to specific cell structure. The antimicrobial peptides are involved in the pathogenesis of various skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and rosacea. The lack of a specific molecular target in a bacterial cell minimizes the risk of resistance development; hence the AMPs have become the target of intensive research in the last two decades.

  14. New sequences and new fungal producers of peptaibol antibiotics antiamoebins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, A; Brückner, H

    2000-04-01

    Mixtures of the microheterogeneous 16-mer peptaibol antibiotics called antiamoebins (AAM) have been isolated from the culture broths of strains of the filamentous fungi Stilbella erythrocephala ATCC 28144, Stilbella fimetaria CBS 548.84 and Gliocladium catenulatum CBS 511.66. Sequences were determined using on-line HPLC together with positive- and negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Some characteristic features are recognized in the mass spectrometric fragmentation pattern of AAM. From a sample originally used for sequencing AAM (from Hindustan Antibiotics, Ltd., Pimpri, Poona-411018, India), and a sample of AAM commercially available (from Sigma Chemicals, St. Louis, MO, USA) HPLC elution profiles and sequences were assigned. Further, sequences of AAM previously isolated from Emericellopsis synnematicola CBS 176.60 and Emericellopsis salmosynnemata CBS 382.62 were determined. The peptide designated AAM I was the most abundant in all isolates and its structure could be confirmed. AAM II was detectable as a minor component (1.9%) only in the original sample of AAM, but not in the other isolates. The structures of AAM III, IV and V, which had previously been partly assigned, were definitely established, and the new sequences AAM VI-XVI were elucidated. AAM showing Phe1/Leu1 or Phe1/Val1 exchange, respectively, are produced in amounts only by S. erythrocephala. Sequences, HPLC elution profiles ('fingerprints') and relative amounts of peptides of all isolates were correlated.

  15. Delayed antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurling, Geoffrey Kp; Del Mar, Chris B; Dooley, Liz; Foxlee, Ruth; Farley, Rebecca

    2017-09-07

    Concerns exist regarding antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) owing to adverse reactions, cost, and antibacterial resistance. One proposed strategy to reduce antibiotic prescribing is to provide prescriptions, but to advise delay in antibiotic use with the expectation that symptoms will resolve first. This is an update of a Cochrane Review originally published in 2007, and updated in 2010 and 2013. To evaluate the effects on clinical outcomes, antibiotic use, antibiotic resistance, and patient satisfaction of advising a delayed prescription of antibiotics in respiratory tract infections. For this 2017 update we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2017), which includes the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infection Group's Specialised Register; Ovid MEDLINE (2013 to 25 May 2017); Ovid Embase (2013 to 2017 Week 21); EBSCO CINAHL Plus (1984 to 25 May 2017); Web of Science (2013 to 25 May 2017); WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (1 September 2017); and ClinicalTrials.gov (1 September 2017). Randomised controlled trials involving participants of all ages defined as having an RTI, where delayed antibiotics were compared to immediate antibiotics or no antibiotics. We defined a delayed antibiotic as advice to delay the filling of an antibiotic prescription by at least 48 hours. We considered all RTIs regardless of whether antibiotics were recommended or not. We used standard Cochrane methodological procedures. Three review authors independently extracted and collated data. We assessed the risk of bias of all included trials. We contacted trial authors to obtain missing information. For this 2017 update we added one new trial involving 405 participants with uncomplicated acute respiratory infection. Overall, this review included 11 studies with a total of 3555 participants. These 11 studies involved acute respiratory infections including acute otitis media (three studies

  16. A molecular dynamics and circular dichroism study of a novel synthetic antimicrobial peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodina, N. P.; Yudenko, A. N.; Terterov, I. N.; Eliseev, I. E.

    2013-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are a class of small, usually positively charged amphiphilic peptides that are used by the innate immune system to combat bacterial infection in multicellular eukaryotes. Antimicrobial peptides are known for their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and thus can be used as a basis for a development of new antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria. The most challengeous task on the way to a therapeutic use of antimicrobial peptides is a rational design of new peptides with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity. Here we report a molecular dynamics and circular dichroism study of a novel synthetic antimicrobial peptide D51. This peptide was earlier designed by Loose et al. using a linguistic model of natural antimicrobial peptides. Molecular dynamics simulation of the peptide folding in explicit solvent shows fast formation of two antiparallel beta strands connected by a beta-turn that is confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. Obtained from simulation amphipatic conformation of the peptide is analysed and possible mechanism of it's interaction with bacterial membranes together with ways to enhance it's antibacterial activity are suggested.

  17. Management Options For Reducing The Release Of Antibiotics And Antibiotic Resistance Genes To The Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: There is growing concern worldwide about the role of polluted soil and water - 77 environments in the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. 78 Objective: To identify management options for reducing the spread of antibiotics and 79 antibiotic resist...

  18. Management Options For Reducing The Release Of Antibiotics And Antibiotic Resistance Genes To The Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: There is growing concern worldwide about the role of polluted soil and water - 77 environments in the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. 78 Objective: To identify management options for reducing the spread of antibiotics and 79 antibiotic resist...

  19. Background antibiotic resistance patterns in antibiotic-free pastured poultry production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a significant public health issue, and agroecosystems are often viewed as major environmental sources of antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens. While the use of antibiotics in agroecosystems can potentially increase AR, appropriate background resistance levels in th...

  20. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class...... examples of different peptide QSAR studies, this review highlights some of the missing links and illuminates some of the questions that would be interesting to challenge in a more systematic fashion. Expert opinion: Computer-aided peptide QSAR using molecular descriptors may provide the necessary edge...

  1. A transglutaminase homologue as a condensation catalyst in antibiotic assembly lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Pascal D; Walsh, Christopher T; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2007-08-16

    The unrelenting emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens demands the investigation of antibiotics with new modes of action. The pseudopeptide antibiotic andrimid is a nanomolar inhibitor of the bacterial acetyl-CoA carboxylase that catalyses the first committed step in prokaryotic fatty acid biosynthesis. Recently, the andrimid (adm) biosynthetic gene cluster was isolated and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. This establishes a heterologous biological host in which to rapidly probe features of andrimid formation and to use biosynthetic engineering to make unnatural variants of this important and promising new class of antibiotics. Bioinformatic analysis of the adm cluster revealed a dissociated biosynthetic assembly system lacking canonical amide synthases between the first three carrier protein domains. Here we report that AdmF, a transglutaminase (TGase) homologue, catalyses the formation of the first amide bond, an N-acyl-beta-peptide link, in andrimid biosynthesis. Hence, AdmF is a newly discovered biosynthetic enzyme that acts as a stand-alone amide synthase between protein-bound, thiotemplated substrates in an antibiotic enzymatic assembly line. TGases (enzyme class (EC) 2.3.2.13) normally catalyse the cross-linking of (poly)peptides by creating isopeptidic bonds between the gamma-carboxamide group of a glutamine side chain of one protein and various amine donors, including lysine side chains. To the best of our knowledge, the present study constitutes the first report of a TGase-like enzyme recruited for the assembly of an antibiotic. Moreover, genome mining using the AdmF sequence yielded additional TGases in unassigned natural product biosynthetic pathways. With many more microbial genomes being sequenced, such a strategy could potentially unearth biosynthetic pathways producing new classes of antibiotics.

  2. [Antibiotic resistance: A global crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2015-12-01

    The introduction of antibiotics into clinical practice represented one of the most important interventions for the control of infectious diseases. Antibiotics have saved millions of lives and have also brought a revolution in medicine. However, an increasing threat has deteriorated the effectiveness of these drugs, that of bacterial resistance to antibiotics, which is defined here as the ability of bacteria to survive in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit/kill others of the same species. In this review some recent and important examples of resistance in pathogens of concern for mankind are mentioned. It is explained, according to present knowledge, the process that led to the current situation in a short time, evolutionarily speaking. It begins with the resistance genes, continues with clones and genetic elements involved in the maintenance and dissemination, and ends with other factors that contribute to its spread. Possible responses to the problem are also reviewed, with special reference to the development of new antibiotics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Abdul; Kashif, Natasha; Kifayat, Nasira; Ahmad, Shabeer

    2016-09-01

    The antibiotic residues in poultry meat can pose certain hazards to human health among them are sensitivity to antibiotics, allergic reactions, mutation in cells, imbalance of intestinal micro biota and bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The purpose of the present paper was to detect antibiotic residue in poultry meat. During the present study a total of 80 poultry kidney and liver samples were collected and tested for detection of different antibiotic residues at different pH levels Eschericha coli at pH 6, 7 and Staphyloccocus aureus at pH 8 & 9. Out of 80 samples only 4 samples were positive for antibiotic residues. The highest concentrations of antibiotic residue found in these tissues were tetracycline (8%) followed by ampicilin (4%), streptomycine (2%) and aminoglycosides (1%) as compared to other antibiotics like sulfonamides, neomycine and gentamycine. It was concluded that these microorganism at these pH levels could be effectively used for detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

  4. Diversity-oriented peptide stapling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thu Phuong; Larsen, Christian Ørnbøl; Røndbjerg, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    as a powerful method for peptide stapling. However, to date CuAAC stapling has not provided a simple method for obtaining peptides that are easily diversified further. In the present study, we report a new diversity-oriented peptide stapling (DOPS) methodology based on CuAAC chemistry. Stapling of peptides...

  5. Label-free detection of biomolecular interaction — DNA — Antimicrobial peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fojan, Peter; Jensen, Kasper Risgaard; Gurevich, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    an interest in Antimicrobial peptides that are active against broad range of infections including bacteria, fungi and viruses and were shown to be capable of treating multi-resistant infection either alone or in combination with the conventional antibiotics. In this paper , we demonstrate an application...

  6. Antimicrobial peptides with therapeutic potential from skin secretions of polyploid frogs of the Pipidae family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mechkarska, M.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of pathogenic bacteria and fungi resistant to commonly used antibiotics poses a serious threat to public health and necessitates novel treatment approaches in order to control infections. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are one of the central components of the system of innate immunity a

  7. Phytochemicals that modulate amino acid and peptide catabolism by caprine rumen microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Microbe-derived ionophores and macrolide antibiotics are often added to ruminant diets, and growth promotion and feed efficiency are among the benefits. One mechanism is inhibition of microbes that catabolize amino acids or peptides and produce ammonia. Plants also produce antimicrobial ...

  8. In vitro growth of growth of campylobacter spp. inhibited by selected antimicrobial peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics are urgently needed for food-animal production. A goal of our laboratory is to develop and evaluate antimicrobial peptides (AMP) to control and reduce foodborne pathogens in poultry. AMP have been found in most every class of living organism...

  9. Antibiotic drugs targeting bacterial RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiling Hong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available RNAs have diverse structures that include bulges and internal loops able to form tertiary contacts or serve as ligand binding sites. The recent increase in structural and functional information related to RNAs has put them in the limelight as a drug target for small molecule therapy. In addition, the recognition of the marked difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic rRNA has led to the development of antibiotics that specifically target bacterial rRNA, reduce protein translation and thereby inhibit bacterial growth. To facilitate the development of new antibiotics targeting RNA, we here review the literature concerning such antibiotics, mRNA, riboswitch and tRNA and the key methodologies used for their screening.

  10. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  11. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  12. The production of Multiple Small Peptaibol Families by Single 14-Module Peptide Synthetases in Trichoderma/Hypocrea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenkolb, Thomas; Aghchehb, Razieh Karimi; Dieckmann, Ralf; Neuhof, Torsten; Baker, Scott E.; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Brückner, Hans; von Dohren, Hans

    2012-03-01

    The most common peptaibibiotic structures are 11-residue peptaibols found widely distributed in the genus Trichoderma/Hypocrea. Frequently associated are 14-residue peptaibols sharing partial sequence identity. Genome sequencing projects of 3 Trichoderma strains of the major clades reveal the presence of up to 3 types of nonribosomal peptide synthetases with 7, 14, or 18-20 amino acid adding modules. We here provide evidence that the 14-module NRPS type found in T. virens, T. reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina) and T. atroviride produces both 11- and 14- residue peptaibols based on the disruption of the respective NRPS gene of T. reesei, and bioinformatic analysis of their amino acid activating domains and modules. The structures of these peptides may be predicted from the gene structures and have been confirmed by analysis of families of 11- and 14-residue peptaibols from the strain 618, termed hypojecorins A (23 sequences determined, 4 new) and B (3 new sequences), and the recently established trichovirins A from T. virens. The distribution of 11- and 14-residue products is strain-specific and depends on growth conditions as well. Possible mechanisms of module skipping are discussed.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides in Echinoderms

    OpenAIRE

    Li, C; Haug, T; K Stensvåg

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important immune effector molecules for invertebrates, including echinoderms, which lack a vertebrate-type adaptive immune system. Here we summarize the knowledge of such peptides in echinoderms. Strongylocins are a novel family of cysteine-rich AMPs, recently identified in the sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis and S. purpuratus. Although these molecules present diverse amino acid sequences, they share an identical cysteine arrangement pattern, d...

  14. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Larché Mark

    2007-01-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT) is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cro...

  15. Antibiotic Policies in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nese Saltoglu

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial management of patients in the Intensive Care Units are complex. Antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem. Effective strategies for the prevention of antimicrobial resistance in ICUs have focused on limiting the unnecessary use of antibiotics and increasing compliance with infection control practices. Antibiotic policies have been implemented to modify antibiotic use, including national or regional formulary manipulations, antibiotic restriction forms, care plans, antibiotic cycling and computer assigned antimicrobial therapy. Moreover, infectious diseases consultation is a simple way to limit antibiotic use in ICU units. To improve rational antimicrobial using a multidisiplinary approach is suggested. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 299-309

  16. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics.

  17. Mathematical analysis of multi-antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-09-15

    Multi-antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections is a growing threat to public health. Some experiments were carried out to study the multi-antibiotic resistance. The changes of the multi-antibiotic resistance with time were achieved by numerical simulations and the mathematical models, with the calculated temperature field, velocity field, and the antibiotic concentration field. The computed results and experimental results are compared. Both numerical simulations and the analytic models suggest that minor low concentrations of antibiotics could induce antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoiby, N.; Bjarnsholt, T.; Givskov, M.

    2010-01-01

    and other components of the body's defence system. The persistence of, for example, staphylococcal infections related to foreign bodies is due to biofilm formation. Likewise, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients is caused by biofilm-growing mucoid strains...... to antibiotics. Biofilm growth is associated with an increased level of mutations as well as with quorum-sensing-regulated mechanisms. Conventional resistance mechanisms such as chromosomal beta-lactamase, upregulated efflux pumps and mutations in antibiotic target molecules in bacteria also contribute...

  19. Systemic Antibacterial Activity of Novel Synthetic Cyclic Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartois, Véronique; Sanchez-Quesada, Jorge; Cabezas, Edelmira; Chi, Ellen; Dubbelde, Chad; Dunn, Carrie; Granja, Juan; Gritzen, Colleen; Weinberger, Dana; Ghadiri, M. Reza; Parr, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    Cyclic peptides with an even number of alternating d,l-α-amino acid residues are known to self-assemble into organic nanotubes. Such peptides previously have been shown to be stable upon protease treatment, membrane active, and bactericidal and to exert antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and other gram-positive bacteria. The present report describes the in vitro and in vivo pharmacology of selected members of this cyclic peptide family. The intravenous (i.v.) efficacy of six compounds with MICs of less than 12 μg/ml was tested in peritonitis and neutropenic-mouse thigh infection models. Four of the six peptides were efficacious in vivo, with 50% effective doses in the peritonitis model ranging between 4.0 and 6.7 mg/kg against methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). In the thigh infection model, the four peptides reduced the bacterial load 2.1 to 3.0 log units following administration of an 8-mg/kg i.v. dose. Activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus was similar to MSSA. The murine pharmacokinetic profile of each compound was determined following i.v. bolus injection. Interestingly, those compounds with poor efficacy in vivo displayed a significantly lower maximum concentration of the drug in serum and a higher volume of distribution at steady state than compounds with good therapeutic properties. S. aureus was unable to easily develop spontaneous resistance upon prolonged exposure to the peptides at sublethal concentrations, in agreement with the proposed interaction with multiple components of the bacterial membrane canopy. Although additional structure-activity relationship studies are required to improve the therapeutic window of this class of antimicrobial peptides, our results suggest that these amphipathic cyclic d,l-α-peptides have potential for systemic administration and treatment of otherwise antibiotic-resistant infections. PMID:16048940

  20. The causes and consequences of antibiotic resistance evolution in microbial pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochumsen, Nicholas

    activity against bacteria resistant to conventional antibiotics and because resistance evolution is expected to be unlikely since the peptides have complex modes of action due to their interaction with the bacterial membrane. The work presented in this thesis has involved studies to increase our...... patients; and 3) most CF-associated P. aeruginosa infections are clonal, which means that evolution of antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa infections in individual patients probably occurs de novo. The first study presented in this thesis investigated the regulation of CAMP tolerance in P. aeruginosa......The evolution of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial pathogens is a growing global health problem that is gradually making the successful treatment of infectious diseases more difficult. Antimicrobial peptides have been proposed as promising candidates for future drug development as they retain...

  1. Persistence of Borrelia burgdorferi in rhesus macaques following antibiotic treatment of disseminated infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica E Embers

    Full Text Available The persistence of symptoms in Lyme disease patients following antibiotic therapy, and their causes, continue to be a matter of intense controversy. The studies presented here explore antibiotic efficacy using nonhuman primates. Rhesus macaques were infected with B. burgdorferi and a portion received aggressive antibiotic therapy 4-6 months later. Multiple methods were utilized for detection of residual organisms, including the feeding of lab-reared ticks on monkeys (xenodiagnosis, culture, immunofluorescence and PCR. Antibody responses to the B. burgdorferi-specific C6 diagnostic peptide were measured longitudinally and declined in all treated animals. B. burgdorferi antigen, DNA and RNA were detected in the tissues of treated animals. Finally, small numbers of intact spirochetes were recovered by xenodiagnosis from treated monkeys. These results demonstrate that B. burgdorferi can withstand antibiotic treatment, administered post-dissemination, in a primate host. Though B. burgdorferi is not known to possess resistance mechanisms and is susceptible to the standard antibiotics (doxycycline, ceftriaxone in vitro, it appears to become tolerant post-dissemination in the primate host. This finding raises important questions about the pathogenicity of antibiotic-tolerant persisters and whether or not they can contribute to symptoms post-treatment.

  2. Using bacterial genomes and essential genes for the development of new antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Francisco R; Lee, Shaun W; McConnell, Michael J

    2017-06-15

    The shrinking antibiotic development pipeline together with the global increase in antibiotic resistant infections requires that new molecules with antimicrobial activity are developed. Traditional empirical screening approaches of natural and non-natural compounds have identified the majority of antibiotics that are currently available, however this approach has produced relatively few new antibiotics over the last few decades. The vast amount of bacterial genome sequence information that has become available since the sequencing of the first bacterial genome more than 20years ago holds potential for contributing to the discovery of novel antimicrobial compounds. Comparative genomic approaches can identify genes that are highly conserved within and between bacterial species, and thus may represent genes that participate in key bacterial processes. Whole genome mutagenesis studies can also identify genes necessary for bacterial growth and survival under different environmental conditions, making them attractive targets for the development of novel inhibitory compounds. In addition, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches can be used to characterize RNA and protein levels on a cellular scale, providing information on bacterial physiology that can be applied to antibiotic target identification. Finally, bacterial genomes can be mined to identify biosynthetic pathways that produce many intrinsic antimicrobial compounds and peptides. In this review, we provide an overview of past and current efforts aimed at using bacterial genomic data in the discovery and development of novel antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Extreme antimicrobial peptide and polymyxin B resistance in the genus Burkholderia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slade A. Loutet

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides and polymyxins are a group of naturally occurring antibiotics that can also possess immunomodulatory activities. They are considered a new source of antibiotics for treating infections by bacteria that are resistant to conventional antibiotics. Members of the genus Burkholderia, which includes various human pathogens, are inherently resistant to antimicrobial peptides. The resistance is several orders of magnitude higher than that of other Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review summarizes our current understanding of antimicrobial peptide and polymyxin B resistance in the genus Burkholderia. These bacteria possess major and minor resistance mechanisms that will be described in detail. Recent studies have revealed that many other emerging Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens may also be inherently resistant to antimicrobial peptides and polymyxins and we propose that Burkholderia species are a model system to investigate the molecular basis of the resistance in extremely resistant bacteria. Understanding resistance in these types of bacteria will be important if antimicrobial peptides come to be used regularly for the treatment of infections by susceptible bacteria because this may lead to increased resistance in the species that are currently susceptible and may also open up new niches for opportunistic pathogens with high inherent resistance.

  4. Side chain hydrophobicity modulates therapeutic activity and membrane selectivity of antimicrobial peptide mastoparan-X.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas R Henriksen

    Full Text Available The discovery of new anti-infective compounds is stagnating and multi-resistant bacteria continue to emerge, threatening to end the "antibiotic era". Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and lipo-peptides such as daptomycin offer themselves as a new potential class of antibiotics; however, further optimization is needed if AMPs are to find broad use as antibiotics. In the present work, eight analogues of mastoparan-X (MPX were investigated, having side chain modifications in position 1, 8 and 14 to modulate peptide hydrophobicity. The self-association properties of the peptides were characterized, and the peptide-membrane interactions in model membranes were compared with the bactericidal and haemolytic properties. Alanine substitution at position 1 and 14 resulted in higher target selectivity (red blood cells versus bacteria, but also decreased bactericidal potency. For these analogues, the gain in target selectivity correlated to biophysical parameters showing an increased effective charge and reduction in the partitioning coefficient for membrane insertion. Introduction of an unnatural amino acid, with an octyl side chain by amino acid substitution, at positions 1, 8 and 14 resulted in increased bactericidal potency at the expense of radically reduced membrane target selectivity. Overall, optimized membrane selectivity or bactericidal potency was achieved by changes in side chain hydrophobicity of MPX. However, enhanced potency was achieved at the expense of selectivity and vice versa in all cases.

  5. A non-canonical peptide synthetase adenylates 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid for auriculamide biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Braga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Auriculamide is the first natural product known from the predatory bacterium Herpetosiphon aurantiacus. It is composed of three unusual building blocks, including the non-proteinogenic amino acid 3-chloro-L-tyrosine, the α-hydroxy acid L-isoleucic acid, and a methylmalonyl-CoA-derived ethane unit. A candidate genetic locus for auriculamide biosynthesis was identified and encodes four enzymes. Among them, the non-canonical 199 kDa four-domain nonribosomal peptide synthetase, AulA, is extraordinary in that it features two consecutive adenylation domains. Here, we describe the functional characterization of the recombinantly produced AulA. The observed activation of 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid by the enzyme supports the hypothesis that it participates in the biosynthesis of auriculamide. An artificially truncated version of AulA that lacks the first adenylation domain activated this substrate like the full-length enzyme which shows that the first adenylation domain is dispensable. Additionally, we provide evidence that the enzyme tolerates structural variation of the substrate. α-Carbon substituents significantly affected the substrate turnover. While all tested aliphatic α-keto acids were accepted by the enzyme and minor differences in chain size and branches did not interfere with the enzymatic activity, molecules with methylene α-carbons led to low turnover. Such enzymatic plasticity is an important attribute to help in the perpetual search for novel molecules and to access a greater structural diversity by mutasynthesis.

  6. Extremely abundant antimicrobial peptides existed in the skins of nine kinds of Chinese odorous frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinwang; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Peptide agents are regarded as hopeful candidates to solve life-threatening resistance of pathogenic microorganisms to classic antibiotics due to their unique action mechanisms. Peptidomic and genomic investigation of natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from amphibian skin secretions can provide a large amount of structure-functional information to design peptide antibiotics with therapeutic potential. In the present study, we identified a large number of AMPs from the skins of nine kinds of Chinese odorous frogs. Eighty AMPs were purified from three different odorous frogs and confirmed by peptidomic analysis. Our results indicated that post-translational modification of AMPs rarely happened in odorous frogs. cDNAs encoding precursors of 728 AMPs, including all the precursors of the confirmed 80 native peptides, were cloned from the constructed AMP cDNA libraries of nine Chinese odorous frogs. On the basis of the sequence similarity of deduced mature peptides, these 728 AMPs were grouped into 97 different families in which 71 novel families were identified. Out of these 728 AMPs, 662 AMPs were novel and 28 AMPs were reported previously in other frog species. Our results revealed that identical AMPs were widely distributed in odorous frogs; 49 presently identified AMPs could find their identical molecules in different amphibian species. Purified peptides showed strong antimicrobial activities against 4 tested microbe strains. Twenty-three deduced peptides were synthesized and their bioactivities, including antimicrobial, antioxidant, hemolytic, immunomodulatory and insulin-releasing activities, were evaluated. Our findings demonstrate the extreme diversity of AMPs in amphibian skins and provide plenty of templates to develop novel peptide antibiotics.

  7. Probiotic approach to prevent antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; Forssten, Sofia; Hibberd, Ashley A; Lyra, Anna; Stahl, Buffy

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, mainly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although also strain of other species are commercialized, that have a beneficial effect on the host. From the perspective of antibiotic use, probiotics have been observed to reduce the risk of certain infectious disease such as certain types of diarrhea and respiratory tract infection. This may be accompanied with a reduced need of antibiotics for secondary infections. Antibiotics tend to be effective against most common diseases, but increasingly resistance is being observed among pathogens. Probiotics are specifically selected to not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and not carry transferable antibiotic resistance. Concomitant use of probiotics with antibiotics has been observed to reduce the incidence, duration and/or severity of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This contributes to better adherence to the antibiotic prescription and thereby reduces the evolution of resistance. To what extent probiotics directly reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance is still much under investigation; but maintaining a balanced microbiota during antibiotic use may certainly provide opportunities for reducing the spread of resistances. Key messages Probiotics may reduce the risk for certain infectious diseases and thereby reduce the need for antibiotics. Probiotics may reduce the risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhea Probiotics do not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and may even reduce it.

  8. Recent progress in physicochemical characteristics of antimicrobial peptides%抗菌肽理化性质的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈武; 黎定军; 丁彦; 肖启明; 周清明

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) comprise an important part of the innate immunity system of host organism and provide effective protection for the host against bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. They are synthesized either by ribosomal or non-ribosomal peptide synthetase. Usually, AMPs are positively charged small molecular weight proteins and have both a hydrophobic and hydrophilic side that enables the molecule to enter the membrane lipid bilayer. In this review, recent discoveries on such physicochemical characteristics of AMPs as conformation, cationicity, hydrophobicity, amphipathicity etc.are discussed.%抗菌肽(antimicrobial peptides,AMPs)是生物先天免疫系统的重要组成部分,由核糖体或非核糖体肽合成酶合成,可协助宿主有效应对细菌、真菌、原生生物和病毒等病原生物的胁迫.AMPs具有相对分子质量小、两亲性结构和携带正电荷等理化性质.综述抗菌肽构象、电荷及阳离子度、疏水性与疏水力矩、两亲性及其他属性等方面的研究进展.

  9. Antibacterial activity and dual mechanisms of peptide analog derived from cell-penetrating peptide against Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lirong; Shi, Yonghui; Cheserek, Maureen Jepkorir; Su, Guanfang; Le, Guowei

    2013-02-01

    A number of research have proven that antimicrobial peptides are of greatest potential as a new class of antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides and cell-penetrating peptides share some similar structure characteristics. In our study, a new peptide analog, APP (GLARALTRLLRQLTRQLTRA) from the cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20 (GLFRALLRLLRSLWRLLLRA), was identified simultaneously with the antibacterial mechanism of APP against Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus pyogenes. APP displayed potent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration was in the range of 2 to 4 μM. APP displayed higher cell selectivity (about 42-fold increase) as compared to the parent peptide for it decreased hemolytic activity and increased antimicrobial activity. The calcein leakage from egg yolk L-α-phosphatidylcholine (EYPC)/egg yolk L-α-phosphatidyl-DL-glycerol and EYPC/cholesterol vesicles demonstrated that APP exhibited high selectivity. The antibacterial mechanism analysis indicated that APP induced membrane permeabilization in a kinetic manner for membrane lesions allowing O-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactoside uptake into cells and potassium release from APP-treated cells. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that APP induced bacterial live cell membrane damage. Circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra, and gel retardation analysis confirmed that APP interacted with DNA and intercalated into the DNA base pairs after penetrating the cell membrane. Cell cycle assay showed that APP affected DNA synthesis in the cell. Our results suggested that peptides derived from the cell-penetrating peptide have the potential for antimicrobial agent development, and APP exerts its antibacterial activity by damaging bacterial cell membranes and binding to bacterial DNA to inhibit cellular functions, ultimately leading to cell death.

  10. Effects of ultraviolet disinfection on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli from wastewater: inactivation, antibiotic resistance profiles and antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong-Miao; Xu, Li-Mei; Wang, Xiaochang C; Zhuang, Kai; Liu, Qiang-Qiang

    2017-04-29

    To evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) disinfection on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli). Antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains were isolated from a wastewater treatment plant and subjected to UV disinfection. The effect of UV disinfection on the antibiotic resistance profiles and the antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of antibiotic-resistant E. coli was evaluated by a combination of antibiotic susceptibility analysis and molecular methods. Results indicated that multiple-antibiotic-resistant (MAR) E. coli were more resistant at low UV doses and required a higher UV dose (20 mJ cm(-2) ) to enter the tailing phase compared with those of antibiotic-sensitive E. coli (8 mJ cm(-2) ). UV disinfection caused a selective change in the inhibition zone diameters of surviving antibiotic-resistant E. coli and a slight damage to ARGs. The inhibition zone diameters of the strains resistant to antibiotics were more difficult to alter than those susceptible to antibiotics because of the existence and persistence of corresponding ARGs. The resistance of MAR bacteria to UV disinfection at low UV doses and the changes in inhibition zone diameters could potentially contribute to the selection of ARB in wastewater treatment after UV disinfection. The risk of spread of antibiotic resistance still exists owing to the persistence of ARGs. Our study highlights the acquisition of other methods to control the spread of ARGs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.W. Rutten (Joost)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was the f

  12. Peptides actively transported across the tympanic membrane: Functional and structural properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabi, Arwa; Beasley, Kerry A.; Chang, Lisa; McCann, James; Pak, Kwang; Ryan, Allen F.

    2017-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is the most common infectious disease of children under six, causing more antibiotic prescriptions and surgical procedures than any other pediatric condition. By screening a bacteriophage (phage) library genetically engineered to express random peptides on their surfaces, we discovered unique peptides that actively transport phage particles across the intact tympanic membrane (TM) and into the middle ear (ME). Herein our goals were to characterize the physiochemical peptide features that may underlie trans-TM phage transport; assess morphological and functional effects of phage peptides on the ME and inner ear (IE); and determine whether peptide-bearing phage transmigrate from the ME into the IE. Incubation of five peptide-bearing phage on the TM for over 4hrs resulted in demonstrably superior transport of one peptide, in level and in exponential increase over time. This suggests a preferred peptide motif for TM active transport. Functional and structural comparisons revealed unique features of this peptide: These include a central lysine residue, isoelectric point of 0.0 at physiological pH and a hydrophobic C-terminus. When the optimal peptide was applied to the TM independent of phage, similar transport was observed, indicating that integration into phage is not required. When 109 particles of the four different trans-TM phage were applied directly into the ME, no morphological effects were detected in the ME or IE when compared to saline or wild-type (WT) phage controls. Comparable, reversible hearing loss was observed for saline controls, WT phage and trans-TM peptide phage, suggesting a mild conductive hearing loss due to ME fluid. Perilymph titers after ME incubation established that few copies of trans-TM peptide phage crossed into the IE. The results suggest that, within the parameters tested, trans-TM peptides are safe and could be used as potential agents for noninvasive delivery of drugs, particles and gene therapy vectors to the ME

  13. Antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute bronchitis is a self-limiting infectious disease characterized by acute cough with or without sputum but without signs of pneumonia. About 90% of cases are caused by viruses. AREAS COVERED: Antibiotics for acute bronchitis have been associated with an approximately half...

  14. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eGueimonde

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue.

  15. Antibiotic associated diarrhoea: Infectious causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayyagari A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 25% of antibiotic associated diarrhoeas (AAD is caused by Clostridium difficile, making it the commonest identified and treatable pathogen. Other pathogens implicated infrequently include Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Candida spp. and Salmonella spp. Most mild cases of AAD are due to non-infectious causes which include reduced break down of primary bile acids and decrease metabolism of carbohydrates, allergic or toxic effects of antibiotic on intestinal mucosa and pharmacological effect on gut motility. The antibiotics most frequently associated with C. difficile associated diarrhoea are clindamycin, cephalosporin, ampicillin and amoxicillin. Clinical presentation may vary from mild diarrhoea to severe colitis and pseudomembranous colitis associated with high morbidity and mortality. The most sensitive and specific diagnostic test for C. difficile infection is tissue culture assay for cytotoxicity of toxin B. Commercial ELISA kits are available. Though less sensitive, they are easy to perform and are rapid. Withdrawal of precipitating antibiotic is all that is needed for control of mild to moderate cases. For severe cases of AAD, oral metronidazole is the first line of treatment, and oral vancomycin is the second choice. Probiotics have been used for recurrent cases.

  16. Abiotic degradation of antibiotic ionophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohn, Pernille; Bak, Søren A; Björklund, Erland

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolytic and photolytic degradation were investigated for the ionophore antibiotics lasalocid, monensin, salinomycin, and narasin. The hydrolysis study was carried out by dissolving the ionophores in solutions of pH 4, 7, and 9, followed by incubation at three temperatures of 6, 22, and 28 °C f...... because they absorb light of environmentally irrelevant wavelengths....

  17. Antibiotics and the burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravat, François; Le-Floch, Ronan; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Ainaud, Pierre; Bertin-Maghit, Marc; Carsin, Hervé; Perro, Gérard

    2011-02-01

    Infection is a major problem in burn care and especially when it is due to bacteria with hospital-acquired multi-resistance to antibiotics. Moreover, when these bacteria are Gram-negative organisms, the most effective molecules are 20 years old and there is little hope of any new product available even in the distant future. Therefore, it is obvious that currently available antibiotics should not be misused. With this aim in mind, the following review was conducted by a group of experts from the French Society for Burn Injuries (SFETB). It examined key points addressing the management of antibiotics for burn patients: when to use or not, time of onset, bactericidia, combination, adaptation, de-escalation, treatment duration and regimen based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of these compounds. The authors also considered antibioprophylaxis and some other key points such as: infection diagnosis criteria, bacterial inoculae and local treatment. French guidelines for the use of antibiotics in burn patients have been designed up from this work. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of antibiotics on diatom communities

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeCosta, P.M.; Anil, A.C.

    Effect of antibiotics (penicillin (P), streptomycin (S) and chloramphenicol (C)) on benthic diatom communities was evaluated using a modified extinction–dilution method. The high antibiotic combinations (2PSC and PSC) reduced diatoms by 99...

  19. Antibiotic Prescription in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydenham, Rikke Vognbjerg; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov

    2016-01-01

    will explore how the GPs prescription behaviour is influenced by selected factors. Antibiotics are essential when treating potentially lethal infections. An increasing development of resistant bacteria is considered one of the primary threats to public health. The majority of antibiotics (90%) are prescribed...... from general practice. The prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics can cause unnecessary side effects for the individual and increases the risk of development of bacteria resistant to antibiotic treatment. Both the prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics and the level of resistant bacteria......1. Background & Aim The overall aim of the project is to describe antibiotic consumption in Danish general practice with emphasis on specific types of antibiotics. The project will shed light on the impact of microbiological diagnostic methods (MDM) on the choice of antibiotic and the project...

  20. Origins and evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Julian; Davies, Dorothy

    2010-09-01

    Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. This is true, but the real wonder is the rise of antibiotic resistance in hospitals, communities, and the environment concomitant with their use. The extraordinary genetic capacities of microbes have benefitted from man's overuse of antibiotics to exploit every source of resistance genes and every means of horizontal gene transmission to develop multiple mechanisms of resistance for each and every antibiotic introduced into practice clinically, agriculturally, or otherwise. This review presents the salient aspects of antibiotic resistance development over the past half-century, with the oft-restated conclusion that it is time to act. To achieve complete restitution of therapeutic applications of antibiotics, there is a need for more information on the role of environmental microbiomes in the rise of antibiotic resistance. In particular, creative approaches to the discovery of novel antibiotics and their expedited and controlled introduction to therapy are obligatory.

  1. Antibiotics Improve Treatment of Skin Abscesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166919.html Antibiotics Improve Treatment of Skin Abscesses Drainage alone resulted ... children and adults, medical experts say. Giving an antibiotic when draining the infection significantly improves recovery, a ...

  2. Antibiotic 'Report Card' Drills Guidelines into Dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160702.html Antibiotic 'Report Card' Drills Guidelines Into Dentists Seeing their ... HealthDay News) -- Dentists are less likely to prescribe antibiotics for patients after seeing a "report card" on ...

  3. Evolving medicinal chemistry strategies in antibiotic discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Andrew C; Johnson, Jarrod W; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-12-01

    Chemical modification of synthetic or natural product antibiotic scaffolds to expand potency and spectrum and to bypass mechanisms of resistance has dominated antibiotic drug discovery and proven immensely successful. However, the inexorable evolution of drug resistance coupled with a drought in innovation in antibiotic discovery contribute to a dearth of new drugs entering to market. Better understanding of the physicochemical properties of antibiotic chemical space is required to inform new antibiotic discovery. Innovations such as the development of antibiotic adjuvants to preserve efficacy of existing drugs together with expanding antibiotic chemical diversity through synthetic biology or new techniques to mine antibiotic producing organisms, are required to bridge the growing gap between the need for new drugs and their discovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antibiotic Resistance in Human Chronic Periodontitis Microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E.; Degener, John E.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) may yield multiple species of putative periodontal bacterial pathogens that vary in their antibiotic drug susceptibility. This study determines the occurrence of in vitro antibiotic resistance among selected subgingival periodontal pathogens in pa

  5. Design of embedded-hybrid antimicrobial peptides with enhanced cell selectivity and anti-biofilm activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides have attracted considerable attention because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and their low prognostic to induce antibiotic resistance which is the most common source of failure in bacterial infection treatment along with biofilms. The method to design hybrid peptide integrating different functional domains of peptides has many advantages. In this study, we designed an embedded-hybrid peptide R-FV-I16 by replacing a functional defective sequence RR7 with the anti-biofilm sequence FV7 embedded in the middle position of peptide RI16. The results demonstrated that the synthetic hybrid the peptide R-FV-I16 had potent antimicrobial activity over a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as anti-biofilm activity. More importantly, R-FV-I16 showed lower hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity. Fluorescent assays demonstrated that R-FV-I16 depolarized the outer and the inner bacterial membranes, while scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy further indicated that this peptide killed bacterial cells by disrupting the cell membrane, thereby damaging membrane integrity. Results from SEM also provided evidence that R-FV-I16 inherited anti-biofilm activity from the functional peptide sequence FV7. Embedded-hybrid peptides could provide a new pattern for combining different functional domains and showing an effective avenue to screen for novel antimicrobial agents.

  6. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, Joost

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was the fi rst natriuretic peptide to be discovered and in humans ANP is predominantly formed in the cardiomyocytes of the atria.2 B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) was fi rst discovered in porcine brain hen...

  7. The antibiotics relo in bacteria resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Santana, Vinicius Canato; CESUMAR

    2007-01-01

    The paper explains how antibiotics help us to combat bacteriosis, and also presents a brief historical report about the emergence of the antibiotic era with the discovery of penicillin. It introduces the problem of bacteria resistance, and brings the concept of antibiotics and its that produce these substance, and brings the concept of antibiotics and its main function. It questions about the self-defense of the organisms that produce these substances. relates the bacteria structures attacked...

  8. Acquired antibiotic resistance genes: an overview.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela H.A.M. van Hoek

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance mechanisms with special attentions to the antibiotic resistance genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons and integrons, which are associated with antibiotic resistance genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria.

  9. Acquired antibiotic resistance genes: an overview.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoek, Angela H.A.M. van; Dik eMevius; Beatriz eGuerra; Peter eMullany; Adam Paul Roberts; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance mechanisms with special attentions to the antibiotic resistance genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons and integrons, which are associated with antibiotic resistance genes, and involved in the dispersal of anti...

  10. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Espinosa Franco

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Beatriz Espinosa Franco1, Marina Altagracia Martínez2, Martha A Sánchez Rodríguez1, Albert I Wertheimer31Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza (UNAM, Mexico; 2Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Xochimilco, Mexico; 3Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USABackground: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community.Objectives: To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem.Methods: We conducted a MedLine search using the key words “determinants”, “antibiotic”, and “antibiotic resistance” to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded.Results: The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance.Conclusions: Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals.Keywords: antibiotic drug resistance

  11. Controlling resistant bacteria with a novel class of β-lactamase inhibitor peptides: from rational design to in vivo analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Santi M.; Migliolo, Ludovico; Silva, Osmar N.; Fensterseifer, Isabel C. M.; Faria-Junior, Celio; Dias, Simoni C.; Basak, Amit; Hazra, Tapas K.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2014-01-01

    Peptide rational design was used here to guide the creation of two novel short β-lactamase inhibitors, here named dBLIP-1 and -2, with length of five amino acid residues. Molecular modeling associated with peptide synthesis improved bactericidal efficacy in addition to amoxicillin, ampicillin and cefotaxime. Docked structures were consistent with calorimetric analyses against bacterial β-lactamases. These two compounds were further tested in mice. Whereas commercial antibiotics alone failed to cure mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli expressing β-lactamases, infection was cleared when treated with antibiotics in combination with dBLIPs, clearly suggesting that peptides were able to neutralize bacterial resistance. Moreover, immunological assays were also performed showing that dBLIPs were unable to modify mammalian immune response in both models, reducing the risks of collateral effects. In summary, the unusual peptides here described provide leads to overcome β-lactamase-based resistance, a remarkable clinical challenge. PMID:25109311

  12. Peptides from the scorpion Vaejovis punctatus with broad antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Carreto, Santos; Jiménez-Vargas, Juana María; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Corzo, Gerardo; Possani, Lourival D; Becerril, Baltazar; Ortiz, Ernesto

    2015-11-01

    The antimicrobial potential of two new non-disulfide bound peptides, named VpAmp1.0 (LPFFLLSLIPSAISAIKKI, amidated) and VpAmp2.0 (FWGFLGKLAMKAVPSLIGGNKSSSK) is here reported. These are 19- and 25-aminoacid-long peptides with +2 and +4 net charges, respectively. Their sequences correspond to the predicted mature regions from longer precursors, putatively encoded by cDNAs derived from the venom glands of the Mexican scorpion Vaejovis punctatus. Both peptides were chemically synthesized and assayed against a variety of microorganisms, including pathogenic strains from clinical isolates and strains resistant to conventional antibiotics. Two shorter variants, named VpAmp1.1 (FFLLSLIPSAISAIKKI, amidated) and VpAmp2.1 (FWGFLGKLAMKAVPSLIGGNKK), were also synthesized and tested. The antimicrobial assays revealed that the four synthetic peptides effectively inhibit the growth of both Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiaea) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria, with MICs in the range of 2.5-24.0 μM; yeasts (Candida albicans and Candida glabrata) with MICs of 3.1-50.0 μM; and two clinically isolated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-including a multi-drug resistant one- with MICs in the range of 4.8-30.5 μM. A comparison between the activities of the original peptides and their derivatives gives insight into the structural/functional role of their distinctive residues.

  13. [Salmonella interactions with intestinal flora and antibiotics influence on these pathogens infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madajczak, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Human digestive system is colonized by a large number of bacteria, estimated to 10(6) - 10(12) per one gram. Those bacteria through a network of interactions and interdependencies, are integrated superorganism. The intestinal flora is a very important element in host's defense against infections of the gastrointestinal tract, caused by for example Salmonella. Therefore, this bacteria have evolved a number of mechanisms, which adapt pathogen to the conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, and on the other hand to the change this environment, for easier colonization and internalization into host cells. One of elements of mentioned above interactions are antimicrobial peptides produced by host's Paneths cells, which have antimicrobial feature. Salmonella mostly are resistant for those peptides, moreover they can stimulate AMPs production for increasing their abilities in competition for ecological niche. In case of Salmonella quorum sensing mechanism was also identified. It allows for recognition of other bacteria presence, which stimulate Salmonella for higher expression of SPI-1, SPI-4 genes. These genes encoded proteins are involved in many host-pathogens interaction, inter alia inflammatory induction. Using of antibiotics in case of Salmonella infections always cause dramatic changes in intestinal flora compositions, which facilitate Salmonella internalizations to host's cells and sometimes could even stimulate to this process. Antibiotic treatment could also cause increase of antimicrobial resistance. Also antibiotics influence on Salmonella carriage was confirmed. Moreover antibiotics could cause super-shedder phenotype, what was detected on streptomycin-treated mice with Salmonella carriage.

  14. Shift in antibiotic prescribing patterns in relation to antibiotic expenditure in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimpen, JLL; van Houten, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    In paediatrics, antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs. Because of an overall rise in health care costs, lack of uniformity in drug prescribing and the emergence of antibiotic resistance, monitoring and control of antibiotic use is of growing concern and strict antibiotic policies

  15. Shift in antibiotic prescribing patterns in relation to antibiotic expenditure in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimpen, JLL; van Houten, M.A.

    In paediatrics, antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs. Because of an overall rise in health care costs, lack of uniformity in drug prescribing and the emergence of antibiotic resistance, monitoring and control of antibiotic use is of growing concern and strict antibiotic policies

  16. Shift in antibiotic prescribing patterns in relation to antibiotic expenditure in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimpen, JLL; van Houten, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    In paediatrics, antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs. Because of an overall rise in health care costs, lack of uniformity in drug prescribing and the emergence of antibiotic resistance, monitoring and control of antibiotic use is of growing concern and strict antibiotic policies

  17. Structural diversity of marine cyclic peptides and their molecular mechanisms for anticancer, antibacterial, antifungal, and other clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeji; Phat, Chanvorleak; Hong, Soon-Cheol

    2017-09-01

    Many cyclic peptides and analogues derived from marine sources are known to possess biological properties, including anticancer, antitumor, antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, anti-inflammation, anti-proliferative, anti-hypertensive, cytotoxic, and antibiotic properties. These compounds demonstrate different activities and modes of action according to their structure such as cyclic oligopeptide, cyclic lipopeptide, cyclic glycopeptide and cyclic depsipeptide. The recent advances in application of the above-mentioned cyclic peptides were reported in dolastatins, soblidotin, didemnin B, aplidine, salinosporamide A, kahalalide F and bryostatin 1 and they are currently in clinical trials. These cyclic peptides are possible novel drugs discovered and developed from marine origin. Literature data concerning the potential properties of marine cyclic peptides were reviewed here, and the structural diversity and biological activities of marine cyclic peptides are discussed in relation to the molecular mechanisms of these marine cyclic peptides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Electron transfer in peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  19. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of oral pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veloo, A. C. M.; Seme, K.; Raangs, E.; Rurenga, P.; Singadji, Z.; Wekema-Mulder, G.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a bacterial disease that can be treated with systemic antibiotics. The aim of this study was to establish the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of five periodontal pathogens to six commonly used antibiotics in periodontics. A total of 247 periodontal bacterial isolates were tested

  20. New business models for antibiotic innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Anthony D; Shah, Tejen A

    2014-05-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance and the dearth of novel antibiotics have become a growing concern among policy-makers. A combination of financial, scientific, and regulatory challenges poses barriers to antibiotic innovation. However, each of these three challenges provides an opportunity to develop pathways for new business models to bring novel antibiotics to market. Pull-incentives that pay for the outputs of research and development (R&D) and push-incentives that pay for the inputs of R&D can be used to increase innovation for antibiotics. Financial incentives might be structured to promote delinkage of a company's return on investment from revenues of antibiotics. This delinkage strategy might not only increase innovation, but also reinforce rational use of antibiotics. Regulatory approval, however, should not and need not compromise safety and efficacy standards to bring antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action to market. Instead regulatory agencies could encourage development of companion diagnostics, test antibiotic combinations in parallel, and pool and make transparent clinical trial data to lower R&D costs. A tax on non-human use of antibiotics might also create a disincentive for non-therapeutic use of these drugs. Finally, the new business model for antibiotic innovation should apply the 3Rs strategy for encouraging collaborative approaches to R&D in innovating novel antibiotics: sharing resources, risks, and rewards.