WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonresponse bias analysis

  1. Initial nonresponse and survey response mode biases in survey research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L; Chen, Chao Ying

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated survey response factors (particularly initial nonresponse and survey mode) that may be associated with bias in survey research. We examined prevention-related beliefs and outcomes for initial mail survey responders (n=209), follow-up mail survey responders (n=78), and follow-up telephone survey responders (n=74). The Pearson chi-square test and analysis of variance identified beliefs and behavioral outcomes associated with survey response mode. Follow-up options to the initial mail survey improved response rates (22.0-38.0 percent). Initial mail survey responders more strongly believed topical fluoride protects teeth from cavities than others (P=0.04). A significantly larger proportion of parents completing a follow-up telephone survey (30.8 percent) refused topical fluoride for their child than those completing mail surveys (10.3-10.4 percent) (Psurveys with follow-up improve response rates. Initial nonresponse and survey response mode may be associated with biases in survey research. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  2. A Procedure to Assess Interviewer Effects on Nonresponse Bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert Loosveldt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that interviewers have a considerable effect on survey response. The difference between response success and failure does not only affect the response rate, but can also influence the composition of the realized sample or respondent set, and consequently introduce nonresponse bias. To measure these two different aspects of the obtained sample, response propensities will be used. They have an aggregate mean and variance that can both be used to construct quality indicators for the obtained sample of respondents. As these propensities can also be measured on the interviewer level, this allows evaluation of the interviewer group and of the extent to which individual interviewers contribute to a biased respondent set. In this article, a procedure based on a multilevel model with random intercepts and random slopes is elaborated and illustrated. The results show that the procedure is informative to detect influential interviewers with an impact on nonresponse basis.

  3. Measuring Nonresponse Bias in a Cross-Country Enterprise Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bańkowska

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonresponse is a common issue affecting the vast majority of surveys. Efforts to convince those unwilling to participate in a survey might not necessary result in a better picture of the target population and can lead to higher, not lower, nonresponse bias.We investigate the impact of non-response in the European Commission & European Central Bank Survey on the Access to Finance of Enterprises (SAFE, which collects evidence on the financing conditions faced by European SMEs compared with those of large firms. This survey, conducted by telephone bi-annually since 2009 by the ECB and the European Commission, provides a valuable means to search for this kind of bias, given the high heterogeneity of response propensities across countries.The study relies on so-called “Representativity Indicators” developed within the Representativity Indicators of Survey Quality (RISQ project, which measure the distance to a fully representative response. On this basis, we examine the quality of the SAFE Survey at different stages of the fieldwork as well as across different survey waves and countries. The RISQ methodology relies on rich sampling frame information, which is however partly limited in the case of the SAFE. We also assess the representativeness of the SAFE particular subsample created by linking the survey responses with the companies’ financial information from a business register; this sub-sampling is another potential source of bias which we also attempt to quantify. Finally, we suggest possible ways how to improve monitoring of the possible nonresponse bias in the future rounds of the survey.

  4. Geographic Information System mapping as a tool to assess nonresponse bias in survey research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Richard A; Henley, Amanda Clarke; Brouwer, Emily S; Oraefo, Adaora N; Roth, Mary T

    2007-09-01

    Surveys are a useful tool for assessing professional practice patterns, although declining response rates have caused concern over external validity. This is particularly relevant to Web-based surveys, where response rates traditionally have been lower than with paper mail surveys. In a 2005 survey of North Carolina community pharmacy managers using a Web-based data collection instrument, we achieved an overall response rate of 23%. To explore nonresponse bias using accepted methods and to test whether Geographic Information System mapping is a useful tool for assessing response bias. Cross-sectional survey of 1593 community pharmacy managers in North Carolina using a Web-based tool. Nonresponse bias was assessed quantitatively by comparing early responders with late responders (ie, wave analysis) and by comparing respondents with nonrespondents with regard to known pharmacy, pharmacist, and population characteristics. Significant variables from these analyses were then mapped using ArcGIS 9.1. Pharmacy type was identified as a predictor of response, with independent pharmacies less likely to respond than chain pharmacies (odds ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.59-0.95). This conclusion was consistent in the wave analysis and the analysis of known population characteristics. Other county-level variables such as the number of physicians per capita, income, and the percentage of residents eligible for Medicaid showed trends but were not statistically significant (Ppharmacy type but trends were more difficult to detect for statistically insignificant trends. The best way to avoid nonresponse bias is to improve response rates. When this is not possible, Geographic Information System mapping has some utility for assessing nonresponse bias, and for aggregating known population characteristics based on location. It is most useful in conjunction with other accepted techniques such as wave analysis and analysis of known population characteristics.

  5. A primer of nonresponse in the US Forest Inventory and Analysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul L. Patterson; John W. Coulston; Francis A. Roesch; James A. Westfall; Andrew D. Hill

    2012-01-01

    Nonresponse caused by denied access and hazardous conditions are a concern for the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program, whose mission is to quantify status and trends in forest resources across the USA. Any appreciable amount of nonresponse can cause bias in FIA's estimates of population parameters. This paper will quantify the...

  6. An evaluation of nonresponse bias in peer, self, and teacher ratings of children's psychosocial adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrits, M H; van den Oord, E J; Voogt, R

    2001-07-01

    The last decades have shown a rapid increase in nonresponse rates. For this reason it is important to study nonresponse and think about it critically. In this article we investigated whether nonresponse affected estimates of the levels of adjustment problems in children and the correlations between these outcomes. The nonresponse was caused by parents who refused permission to interview their children at school, parents who did not return a questionnaire, teachers who did not complete the questionnaire, and parents who refused to participate in an in-depth study, with nonresponse rates of 9%, 69%, 25%, and 46% respectively. The sample consisted of 1282 children aged 4 5 years and the dependent measures were peer-rated sociometric status, self-rated wellbeing at school, and teacher-rated behaviour problems. Despite considerable nonresponse in some conditions our results showed hardly any evidence for bias. This suggested that bias cannot simply be inferred from the amount of nonresponse and that standard rules such as "nonresponse rates higher than 50% are not acceptable" lack a scientific basis. Instead, we argue that to assess nonresponse bias the specific conditions and analyses of the study will need to be considered and special measures may be required.

  7. Surveys from inside: An assessment of unit nonresponse bias with internal criteria

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    Ulrich Kohler

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The article uses the so called “internal criteria of representativeness” to assess the unit nonresponse bias in five European comparative survey projects. It then goes on investigating several ideas why unit nonresponse bias might vary between surveys and countries. It is proposed that unit nonresponse bias is either caused by country characteristics or survey methodology. The empirical evidence presented speaks more in favour of the latter than of the former. Among the survey characteristics the features that strengthen the leverage to control interviewers’ behaviour have top priority

  8. Methodology of Correcting Nonresponse Bias: Introducing Another Bias? The Case of the Swiss Innovation Survey 2002

    OpenAIRE

    Sydow, Nora

    2006-01-01

    The non-response in a survey can lead to severe bias. In order to manage this problem, it is usual to make a second survey by a sample of non-respondent. This allows us to test if there is a significant difference in the key variables of the survey between respondents and nonrespondents and, if yes, to take it into account. But, the risk is great to introduce another bias depending on the mode (mail vs phone) of survey. The KOF industrial economics group is exploring for many years the innova...

  9. Spanish exit polls. Sampling error or nonresponse bias?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavía, Jose M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Countless examples of misleading forecasts on behalf of both pre-election and exit polls can be found all over the world. Non-representative samples due to differential nonresponse have been claimed as being the main reason for inaccurate exit-poll projections. In real inference problems, it is seldom possible to compare estimates and true values. Electoral forecasts are an exception. Comparisons between estimates and final outcomes can be carried out once votes have been tallied. In this paper, we examine the raw data collected in seven exit polls conducted in Spain and test the likelihood that the data collected in each sampled voting location can be considered as a random sample of actual results. Knowing the answer to this is relevant for both electoral analysts and forecasters as, if the hypothesis is rejected, the shortcomings of the collected data would need amending. Analysts could improve the quality of their computations by implementing local correction strategies. We find strong evidence of nonsampling error in Spanish exit polls and evidence that the political context matters. Nonresponse bias is larger in polarized elections and in a climate of fearExiste un gran número de ejemplos de predicciones inexactas obtenidas a partir tanto de encuestas pre-electorales como de encuestas a pie de urna a lo largo del mundo. La presencia de tasas de no-respuesta diferencial entre distintos tipos de electores ha sido la principal razón esgrimida para justificar las proyecciones erróneas en las encuestas a pie de urna. En problemas de inferencia rara vez es posible comparar estimaciones y valores reales. Las predicciones electorales son una excepción. La comparación entre estimaciones y resultados finales puede realizarse una vez los votos han sido contabilizados. En este trabajo, examinamos los datos brutos recogidos en siete encuestas a pie de urna realizadas en España y testamos la hipótesis de que los datos recolectados en cada punto

  10. Predicting nonresponse bias from teacher ratings of mental health problems in primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormark, Kjell Morten; Heiervang, Einar; Heimann, Mikael; Lundervold, Astri; Gillberg, Christopher

    2008-04-01

    The impact of nonresponse on estimates of mental health problems was examined in a prospective teacher screen in a community survey of 9,155 7-9 year olds. For 6,611 of the children, parents consented to participation in the actual study (Responders), while for 2,544 children parental consent was not obtained (Nonresponders). The teacher screen involved assessment of a broad set of symptoms of mental health problems and functional impairment. Calculations of non-response coefficients, a function of effect sizes and non-response proportion, revealed only ignorable nonresponse bias for both mean scores and correlations. However, the results from binary logistic regressions revealed that children ascribed signs of mental health problems by their teachers were less likely to participate. This was most frequent among children with only moderate symptoms. However, it also involved children with high symptom scores related to inattention, hyperactivity, emotions and peer relationship problems. These findings suggest that measures based on effect size can underestimate the magnitude of non-response bias and that a logistic regression approach may be more appropriate for studies geared at estimating prevalence of mental health problems in children.

  11. Nonresponse bias in randomized controlled experiments in criminology: Putting the Queensland Community Engagement Trial (QCET) under a microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antrobus, Emma; Elffers, Henk; White, Gentry; Mazerolle, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine whether or not the results of the Queensland Community Engagement Trial (QCET)-a randomized controlled trial that tested the impact of procedural justice policing on citizen attitudes toward police-were affected by different types of nonresponse bias. We use two methods (Cochrane and Elffers methods) to explore nonresponse bias: First, we assess the impact of the low response rate by examining the effects of nonresponse group differences between the experimental and control conditions and pooled variance under different scenarios. Second, we assess the degree to which item response rates are influenced by the control and experimental conditions. Our analysis of the QCET data suggests that our substantive findings are not influenced by the low response rate in the trial. The results are robust even under extreme conditions, and statistical significance of the results would only be compromised in cases where the pooled variance was much larger for the nonresponse group and the difference between experimental and control conditions was greatly diminished. We also find that there were no biases in the item response rates across the experimental and control conditions. RCTs that involve field survey responses-like QCET-are potentially compromised by low response rates and how item response rates might be influenced by the control or experimental conditions. Our results show that the QCET results were not sensitive to the overall low response rate across the experimental and control conditions and the item response rates were not significantly different across the experimental and control groups. Overall, our analysis suggests that the results of QCET are robust and any biases in the survey responses do not significantly influence the main experimental findings.

  12. Non-response bias in physical activity trend estimates

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    Bauman Adrian

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increases in reported leisure time physical activity (PA and obesity have been observed in several countries. One hypothesis for these apparently contradictory trends is differential bias in estimates over time. The purpose of this short report is to examine the potential impact of changes in response rates over time on the prevalence of adequate PA in Canadian adults. Methods Participants were recruited in representative national telephone surveys of PA from 1995-2007. Differences in PA prevalence estimates between participants and those hard to reach were assessed using Student's t tests adjusted for multiple comparisons. Results The number of telephone calls required to reach and speak with someone in the household increased over time, as did the percentage of selected participants who initially refused during the first interview attempt. A higher prevalence of adequate PA was observed with 5-9 attempts to reach anyone in the household in 1999-2002, but this was not significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Conclusion No significant impact on PA trend estimates was observed due to differential non response rates. It is important for health policy makers to understand potential biases and how these may affect secular trends in all aspects of the energy balance equation.

  13. Assessing nonresponse bias at follow-up in a large prospective cohort of relatively young and mobile military service members

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    Hooper Tomoko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonresponse bias in a longitudinal study could affect the magnitude and direction of measures of association. We identified sociodemographic, behavioral, military, and health-related predictors of response to the first follow-up questionnaire in a large military cohort and assessed the extent to which nonresponse biased measures of association. Methods Data are from the baseline and first follow-up survey of the Millennium Cohort Study. Seventy-six thousand, seven hundred and seventy-five eligible individuals completed the baseline survey and were presumed alive at the time of follow-up; of these, 54,960 (71.6% completed the first follow-up survey. Logistic regression models were used to calculate inverse probability weights using propensity scores. Results Characteristics associated with a greater probability of response included female gender, older age, higher education level, officer rank, active-duty status, and a self-reported history of military exposures. Ever smokers, those with a history of chronic alcohol consumption or a major depressive disorder, and those separated from the military at follow-up had a lower probability of response. Nonresponse to the follow-up questionnaire did not result in appreciable bias; bias was greatest in subgroups with small numbers. Conclusions These findings suggest that prospective analyses from this cohort are not substantially biased by non-response at the first follow-up assessment.

  14. A randomised trial and economic evaluation of the effect of response mode on response rate, response bias, and item non-response in a survey of doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Anthony; Jeon, Sung-Hee; Joyce, Catherine M; Humphreys, John S; Kalb, Guyonne; Witt, Julia; Leahy, Anne

    2011-09-05

    Surveys of doctors are an important data collection method in health services research. Ways to improve response rates, minimise survey response bias and item non-response, within a given budget, have not previously been addressed in the same study. The aim of this paper is to compare the effects and costs of three different modes of survey administration in a national survey of doctors. A stratified random sample of 4.9% (2,702/54,160) of doctors undertaking clinical practice was drawn from a national directory of all doctors in Australia. Stratification was by four doctor types: general practitioners, specialists, specialists-in-training, and hospital non-specialists, and by six rural/remote categories. A three-arm parallel trial design with equal randomisation across arms was used. Doctors were randomly allocated to: online questionnaire (902); simultaneous mixed mode (a paper questionnaire and login details sent together) (900); or, sequential mixed mode (online followed by a paper questionnaire with the reminder) (900). Analysis was by intention to treat, as within each primary mode, doctors could choose either paper or online. Primary outcome measures were response rate, survey response bias, item non-response, and cost. The online mode had a response rate 12.95%, followed by the simultaneous mixed mode with 19.7%, and the sequential mixed mode with 20.7%. After adjusting for observed differences between the groups, the online mode had a 7 percentage point lower response rate compared to the simultaneous mixed mode, and a 7.7 percentage point lower response rate compared to sequential mixed mode. The difference in response rate between the sequential and simultaneous modes was not statistically significant. Both mixed modes showed evidence of response bias, whilst the characteristics of online respondents were similar to the population. However, the online mode had a higher rate of item non-response compared to both mixed modes. The total cost of the online

  15. The usefulness of the Basic Question Procedure for determining non-response bias in substantive variables - A test of four telephone questionnaires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Henk; van Goor, Annemiek

    2007-01-01

    The Basic Question Procedure (BQP) is a method for determining non-response bias. The BQP involves asking one basic question - that is, the question relating to the central substantive variable of the study - of those persons who refuse to participate in the survey. We studied the usefulness of this

  16. Social Desirability, Non-Response Bias and Reliability in a Long Self-Report Measure: Illustrations from the MMPI-2 Administered to Brunei Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundia, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    The survey investigated the problems of social desirability (SD), non-response bias (NRB) and reliability in the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--Revised (MMPI-2) self-report inventory administered to Brunei student teachers. Bruneians scored higher on all the validity scales than the normative US sample, thereby threatening the…

  17. Nonresponse analysis and adjustment in a mail survey on car accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivesten, Emma; Jonsson, Sofia; Jakobsson, Lotta; Norin, Hans

    2012-09-01

    Statistical accident data plays an important role for traffic safety development involving the road system, vehicle design, and driver education. Vehicle manufacturers use data from accident mail surveys as an integral part of the product development process. Low response rates has, however, lead to concerns on whether estimates from a mail survey can be trusted as a source for making strategic decisions. The main objective of this paper was to investigate nonresponse bias in a mail survey addressing driver behaviour in accident situations. Insurance data, available for both respondents and nonrespondents were used to analyze, as well as adjust for nonresponse. Response propensity was investigated by using descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses. The survey data was then weighted by using inverse propensity weights. Two specific examples of survey estimates are addressed, namely driver vigilance and driver's distraction just before the accident. The results from this paper reveal that driver age and accident type were the most influential variables for nonresponse weighting. Driver gender and size of town where the driver resides also had some influence, but not for all survey variables investigated. The main conclusion of this paper is that nonresponse weighting can increase confidence in accident data collected by a mail survey, especially when response rates are low. Weighting has a moderate influence on this survey, but a larger influence may be expected if applied on a more diverse driver population. The development of auxiliary data collection can further improve accident mail survey methodology in future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Correcting for non-response bias in contingent valuation surveys concerning environmental non-market goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Ole; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    2016-01-01

    to be part of an Internet panel and subsequently whether they wish to participate in the survey, thereby introducing two elements of potential self-selection. These elements may be correlated with preferences, thus making the respondents a non-random and non-representative sample, ultimately biasing results....... This paper analyses a sample used for an Internet contingent valuation method survey eliciting preferences for improvements in water quality of a river. We find that some variables that affect the survey participation decision also affect willingness-to-pay, consequently biasing our welfare estimates. We...... show how adjusting willingness-to-pay for this bias can be accomplished by using a grouped data model incorporating a correlation parameter to account for selection....

  19. Modeling Hurricanes using Principle Component Analysis in conjunction with Non-Response Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wooten, Rebecca D

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how principle component analysis can be used to determine the distinct factors that house the terms that explain the variance among the co-dependent variables and how non-response analysis can be applied to model the non-functional relationship that exist in a dynamic system. Moreover, the analysis indicates that there are pumping actions or ebb and flow between the pressure and the water temperature readings near the surface of the water days before a tropical storm forms in the Atlantic Basin and that there is a high correlation between storm conditions and buoy conditions three-four days before a storm forms. Further analysis shows that that the relationship among the variables is conical.

  20. A middle class image of society : A study of undercoverage and nonresponse bias in a telephone survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Henk; Rispens, S

    2004-01-01

    We studied undercoverage and nonresponse in a telephone survey among the population of the City of Groningen, the Netherlands. The original sample, drawn from the municipal population register, contained 7000 individuals. For 37 percent of them, the telephone company was unable to produce a valid te

  1. Can weighting compensate for nonresponse bias in a dependent variable? An evaluation of weighting methods to correct for substantive bias in a mail survey among Dutch municipalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, H; Stuiver, B

    1998-01-01

    Due to a lack of pertinent data, little is known about nonresponse in substantive, generally "dependent" variables and its consequences. However, in a study on policy performance of Dutch municipalities, we were fortunately able to gather performance data fur respondents and nonrespondents from

  2. Assessment of Non-Response Bias in Estimates of Alcohol Consumption: Applying the Continuum of Resistance Model in a General Population Survey in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholes, Shaun; Shelton, Nicola; Connor, Jennie

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown heavier drinkers are less likely to respond to surveys and require extended efforts to recruit. This study applies the continuum of resistance model to explore how survey estimates of alcohol consumption may be affected by non-response bias in three consecutive years of a general population survey in England. Methods Using the Health Survey for England (HSE) survey years 2011–13, number of contact attempts (1–6 and 7+) were explored by socio-demographic and drinking characteristics. The odds of drinking more than various thresholds were modelled using logistic regression. Assuming that non-participants were similar to those who were difficult to contact (the continuum of resistance model), the effect of non-response on measures of drinking was investigated. Results In the fully-adjusted regression model, women who required 7+ calls were significantly more likely to drink more than the UK Government’s recommended daily limit (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.33, P = 0.003) and to engage in heavy episodic drinking (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.07–1.42, P = 0.004), however this was not significant in men in the fully-adjusted model. When the continuum of resistance model was applied, there was an increase in average weekly alcohol consumption of 1.8 units among men (a 12.6% relative increase), and an increase of 1.5 units among women (a 20.5% relative increase). There was also an increase in the prevalence of heavy episodic drinking of 2.5% among men (an 12.0% relative increase) and of 2.0% among women (a 15.8% relative increase), although other measures of drinking were less affected. Conclusion Overall alcohol consumption and the prevalence of heavy episodic drinking were higher among HSE participants who required more extended efforts to contact. The continuum of resistance model suggests non-response bias does affect survey estimates of alcohol consumption. PMID:28141834

  3. Nonresponse and recall errors in a study of absence because of illness : An analysis of their effects on distributions and relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, H.; Verhage, A.L.

    1999-01-01

    Using administrative data as validating standard, we studied the combined effects of two sources of survey error - nonresponse and recall errors - on distributional and substantive bias in a mail survey of absence because of illness among the employees of a Dutch road building company (response rate

  4. Nonresponse error in mail surveys: top ten problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Jeanette M; Jones, Julie K; Gereau, Patricia L; Levy, Barcey T

    2011-01-01

    Conducting mail surveys can result in nonresponse error, which occurs when the potential participant is unwilling to participate or impossible to contact. Nonresponse can result in a reduction in precision of the study and may bias results. The purpose of this paper is to describe and make readers aware of a top ten list of mailed survey problems affecting the response rate encountered over time with different research projects, while utilizing the Dillman Total Design Method. Ten nonresponse error problems were identified, such as inserter machine gets sequence out of order, capitalization in databases, and mailing discarded by postal service. These ten mishaps can potentiate nonresponse errors, but there are ways to minimize their frequency. Suggestions offered stem from our own experiences during research projects. Our goal is to increase researchers' knowledge of nonresponse error problems and to offer solutions which can decrease nonresponse error in future projects.

  5. Nonresponse Error in Mail Surveys: Top Ten Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette M. Daly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Conducting mail surveys can result in nonresponse error, which occurs when the potential participant is unwilling to participate or impossible to contact. Nonresponse can result in a reduction in precision of the study and may bias results. The purpose of this paper is to describe and make readers aware of a top ten list of mailed survey problems affecting the response rate encountered over time with different research projects, while utilizing the Dillman Total Design Method. Ten nonresponse error problems were identified, such as inserter machine gets sequence out of order, capitalization in databases, and mailing discarded by postal service. These ten mishaps can potentiate nonresponse errors, but there are ways to minimize their frequency. Suggestions offered stem from our own experiences during research projects. Our goal is to increase researchers' knowledge of nonresponse error problems and to offer solutions which can decrease nonresponse error in future projects.

  6. 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Nonresponse Bias Analysis Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    frightening thoughts and memories, emotional detachment or numbness, sleep problems, and a tendency to be easily startled. The scale ranges from 17 to 85...that causes fear, helplessness, or horror and is characterized by persistent frightening thoughts and memories, emotional detachment or numbness...experienced any of the following behaviors where coworkers or supervisors... Used insults, sarcasm , or gestures to humiliate you? 3 1318 4.96 19i

  7. Measurement Bias Detection through Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendse, M. T.; Oort, F. J.; Werner, C. S.; Ligtvoet, R.; Schermelleh-Engel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement bias is defined as a violation of measurement invariance, which can be investigated through multigroup factor analysis (MGFA), by testing across-group differences in intercepts (uniform bias) and factor loadings (nonuniform bias). Restricted factor analysis (RFA) can also be used to detect measurement bias. To also enable nonuniform…

  8. Molecular genetic analysis of pyridoxine-nonresponsive homocystinuric siblings with different blood methionine levels during the neonatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Ito, M; Saijo, T; Naito, E; Kuroda, Y

    1999-08-01

    Two mutations in the cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) gene were found in two Japanese siblings with pyridoxine non-responsive homocystinuria who had different methionine levels in their blood during the neonatal period. Both patients were compound heterozygotes of two mutant alleles: one had an A-to-G transition at nucleotide 194 (A194 G) that caused a histidine-to-arginine substitution at position 65 of the protein (H65R), while the other had a G-to-A transition at nucleotide 346 (G346A) which resulted in a glycine-to-arginine substitution at position 116 of the protein (G116R). The two mutant proteins were separately expressed in Escherichia coli, and they completely lacked catalytic activity. Despite their identical genotypes and almost equal protein intake, these siblings showed different levels of blood methionine during the neonatal period, suggesting that the level of methionine in blood is determined not only by the defect in the CBS gene and protein intake, but also by the activity of other enzymes involved in methionine and homocysteine metabolism, especially during the neonatal period. Therefore, high-risk newborns who have siblings with homocystinuria, even if the level of methionine in their blood is normal in a neonatal mass screening, should be followed up and diagnosed by an assay of enzyme activity or a gene analysis so that treatment can be begun as soon as possible to prevent the development of clinical symptoms. In addition, a new, more sensitive method for the mass screening of CBS deficiency in neonates should be developed.

  9. Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy and Brief Supportive Psychotherapy for Augmentation of Antidepressant Nonresponse in Chronic Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, James H.; Gelenberg, Alan J.; Rothbaum, Barbara O.; Klein, Daniel N.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Manber, Rachel; Keller, Martin B.; Leon, Andrew C.; Wisniewski, Steven R.; Arnow, Bruce A.; Markowitz, John C.; Thase, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Context Previous studies have found that few chronically depressed patients remit with antidepressant medications alone. Objective To determine the role of adjunctive psychotherapy in the treatment of chronically depressed patients with less than complete response to an initial medication trial. Design This trial compared 12 weeks of (1) continued pharmacotherapy and augmentation with cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy (CBASP), (2) continued pharmacotherapy and augmentation with brief supportive psychotherapy (BSP), and (3) continued optimized pharmacotherapy (MEDS) alone. We hypothesized that adding CBASP would produce higher rates of response and remission than adding BSP or continuing MEDS alone. Setting Eight academic sites. Participants Chronically depressed patients with a current DSM-IV–defined major depressive episode and persistent depressive symptoms for more than 2 years. Interventions Phase 1 consisted of open-label, algorithm-guided treatment for 12 weeks based on a history of antidepressant response. Patients not achieving remission received next-step pharmacotherapy options with or without adjunctive psychotherapy (phase 2). Individuals undergoing psychotherapy were randomized to receive either CBASP or BSP stratified by phase 1 response, ie, as nonresponders (NRs) or partial responders (PRs). Main Outcome Measures Proportions of remitters, PRs, and NRs and change on Hamilton Scale for Depression (HAM-D) scores. Results In all, 808 participants entered phase 1, of which 491 were classified as NRs or PRs and entered phase 2 (200 received CBASP and MEDS, 195 received BSP and MEDS, and 96 received MEDS only). Mean HAM-D scores dropped from 25.9 to 17.7 in NRs and from 15.2 to 9.9 in PRs. No statistically significant differences emerged among the 3 treatment groups in the proportions of phase 2 remission (15.0%), partial response (22.5%), and non-response (62.5%) or in changes on HAM-D scores. Conclusions Although 37.5% of the

  10. Item nonresponse in questionnaire research with children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hox, J.J.; Borgers, N.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of item and person characteristics on item nonresponse, for written questionnaires used with school children. Secondary analyses were done on questionnaire data collected in five distinct studies. To analyze the data, logistic multilevel analysis was used with the

  11. Molecular genetic analysis of pyridoxine-nonresponsive homocystinuric siblings with different blood methionine levels during the neonatal period

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Two mutations in the cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) gene were found in two Japanese siblings with pyridoxine non-responsive homocystinuria who had different methionine levels in their blood during the neonatal period. Both patients were com-pound heterozygotes of two mutant alleles:one had an A-to-G transition at nucleotide194 (A194G) that caused a histidine-to-arginine substitution at position 65 of the protein (H65R), while the other had a G-to-A transition at nucleotide346 (G346A) which re...

  12. Nonparametric Bounds on the Income Distribution in the Presence of Item Nonresponse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vazquez-Alvarez, R.; Melenberg, B.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    1999-01-01

    Item nonresponse in micro surveys can lead to biased estimates of the parameters of interest if such nonresponse is nonrandom. Selection models can be used to correct for this, but parametric and semiparametric selection models require additional assumptions. Manski has recently developed a new appr

  13. Early Nonresponse in the Antipsychotic Treatment of Acute Mania : A Criterion for Reconsidering Treatment? Results From an Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welten, Carlijn C M; Koeter, Maarten W J; Wohlfarth, Tamar D; Storosum, Jitschak G; van den Brink, Wim; Gispen-de Wied, Christine C; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Denys, D.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether early nonresponse to antipsychotic treatment of acute mania predicts treatment failure and, if so, to establish the best definition or criterion of an early nonresponse. DATA SOURCES: Short-term efficacy studies assessing antipsychotics that were submitted to the Du

  14. Survey non-response in the Netherlands : Effects on prevalence estimates and associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loon, AJM; Tijhuis, M; Picavet, HSJ; Surtees, PG; Ormel, J

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Differences in respondent characteristics may lead to bias in prevalence estimates and bias in associations. Both forms of non-response bias are investigated in a study on psychosocial factors and cancer risk, which is a sub-study of a large-scale monitoring survey in the Netherlands. METHO

  15. The effect of non-response on estimates of health care utilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundgaard, Jens; Ekholm, Orla; Hansen, Ebba Holme;

    2008-01-01

    living in Funen County. Data were linked with register information on health care utilisation in hospitals and primary care. Health care utilisation was estimated for respondents and non-respondents, and the difference was explained by a decomposition method of bias components. RESULTS: The surveys......-contact, and other reasons were less frequent. Respondents used 3-6% less health care than non-respondents at the aggregate level, but the opposite was true for some specific types of health care. Non-response due to illness was the main contributor to non-response bias. CONCLUSIONS: Different types of non......BACKGROUND: Non-response in health surveys may lead to bias in estimates of health care utilisation. The magnitude, direction and composition of the bias are usually not well known. When data from health surveys are merged with data from registers at the individual level, analyses can reveal non...

  16. Treatment of non-response in longitudinal network studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Mark; Steglich, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The collection of longitudinal data on complete social networks often faces the problem of actor non-response. The resulting incomplete data pose a challenge to statistical analysis, as there typically is no natural way to treat the missing cases. This paper examines the problems caused by actors mi

  17. Cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy and brief supportive psychotherapy for augmentation of antidepressant nonresponse in chronic depression: the REVAMP Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, James H; Gelenberg, Alan J; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Klein, Daniel N; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Manber, Rachel; Keller, Martin B; Leon, Andrew C; Wisniewski, Steven R; Arnow, Bruce A; Markowitz, John C; Thase, Michael E

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies have found that few chronically depressed patients remit with antidepressant medications alone. To determine the role of adjunctive psychotherapy in the treatment of chronically depressed patients with less than complete response to an initial medication trial. This trial compared 12 weeks of (1) continued pharmacotherapy and augmentation with cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy (CBASP), (2) continued pharmacotherapy and augmentation with brief supportive psychotherapy (BSP), and (3) continued optimized pharmacotherapy (MEDS) alone. We hypothesized that adding CBASP would produce higher rates of response and remission than adding BSP or continuing MEDS alone. Eight academic sites. Chronically depressed patients with a current DSM-IV-defined major depressive episode and persistent depressive symptoms for more than 2 years. Phase 1 consisted of open-label, algorithm-guided treatment for 12 weeks based on a history of antidepressant response. Patients not achieving remission received next-step pharmacotherapy options with or without adjunctive psychotherapy (phase 2). Individuals undergoing psychotherapy were randomized to receive either CBASP or BSP stratified by phase 1 response, ie, as nonresponders (NRs) or partial responders (PRs). Proportions of remitters, PRs, and NRs and change on Hamilton Scale for Depression (HAM-D) scores. In all, 808 participants entered phase 1, of which 491 were classified as NRs or PRs and entered phase 2 (200 received CBASP and MEDS, 195 received BSP and MEDS, and 96 received MEDS only). Mean HAM-D scores dropped from 25.9 to 17.7 in NRs and from 15.2 to 9.9 in PRs. No statistically significant differences emerged among the 3 treatment groups in the proportions of phase 2 remission (15.0%), partial response (22.5%), and nonresponse (62.5%) or in changes on HAM-D scores. Although 37.5% of the participants experienced partial response or remitted in phase 2, neither form of adjunctive psychotherapy

  18. Handbook in nonresponse in household surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bethlehem, J.G.; Cobben, F.; Schouten, B.

    2011-01-01

    This volume presents an all-inclusive guide to the problem of nonresponse in household surveys, providing an overview of the theory while also describing practical implications. The book begins with a general overview of the nonresponse problem, outlining existing sources of error and guidelines for

  19. SURVIVAL ANALYSIS AND LENGTH-BIASED SAMPLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Asgharian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When survival data are colleted as part of a prevalent cohort study, the recruited cases have already experienced their initiating event. These prevalent cases are then followed for a fixed period of time at the end of which the subjects will either have failed or have been censored. When interests lies in estimating the survival distribution, from onset, of subjects with the disease, one must take into account that the survival times of the cases in a prevalent cohort study are left truncated. When it is possible to assume that there has not been any epidemic of the disease over the past period of time that covers the onset times of the subjects, one may assume that the underlying incidence process that generates the initiating event times is a stationary Poisson process. Under such assumption, the survival times of the recruited subjects are called “lengthbiased”. I discuss the challenges one is faced with in analyzing these type of data. To address the theoretical aspects of the work, I present asymptotic results for the NPMLE of the length-biased as well as the unbiased survival distribution. I also discuss estimating the unbiased survival function using only the follow-up time. This addresses the case that the onset times are either unknown or known with uncertainty. Some of our most recent work and open questions will be presented. These include some aspects of analysis of covariates, strong approximation, functional LIL and density estimation under length-biased sampling with right censoring. The results will be illustrated with survival data from patients with dementia, collected as part of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA.

  20. Bias Analysis for Uncontrolled Confounding in the Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arah, Onyebuchi A

    2017-03-20

    Uncontrolled confounding due to unmeasured confounders biases causal inference in health science studies using observational and imperfect experimental designs. The adoption of methods for analysis of bias due to uncontrolled confounding has been slow, despite the increasing availability of such methods. Bias analysis for such uncontrolled confounding is most useful in big data studies and systematic reviews to gauge the extent to which extraneous preexposure variables that affect the exposure and the outcome can explain some or all of the reported exposure-outcome associations. We review methods that can be applied during or after data analysis to adjust for uncontrolled confounding for different outcomes, confounders, and study settings. We discuss relevant bias formulas and how to obtain the required information for applying them. Finally, we develop a new intuitive generalized bias analysis framework for simulating and adjusting for the amount of uncontrolled confounding due to not measuring and adjusting for one or more confounders.

  1. Hindsight Bias in Cause Analysis of Accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atsuo Murata; Yasunari Matsushita

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that hindsight becomes an obstacle to the objective investigation of an accident, and that the proper countermeasures for the prevention of such an accident is impossible if we view the accident with hindsight. Therefore, it is important for organizational managers to prevent hindsight from occurring so that hindsight does not hinder objective and proper measures to be taken and this does not lead to a serious accident. In this study, a basic phenomenon potentially related to accidents, that is, hindsight was taken up, and an attempt was made to explore the phenomenon in order to get basically insights into the prevention of accidents caused by such a cognitive bias.

  2. Characteristics of non-response in the Danish Health Interview Surveys, 1987-1994

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Mette; Thoning, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    -response biased the estimated population prevalence of morbidity when solely based on responders. METHODS: The data were for the 23,096 adults sampled for the Danish Health Interview Surveys in 1987, 1991 and 1994. All were followed using the National Patient Registry to obtain such information as hospital...... data collection. CONCLUSIONS: Although admission rates differed between respondents and non-respondents these differences were too small to bias the estimated population prevalence of morbidity when solely based on respondents....... admissions. RESULTS: Non-response increased from 20.0% in 1987 to 22.6% in 1994. Four combinations of background variables characterized the non-response: gender and age; gender and civil status; county of residence and age; survey year and age. Non-respondents and respondents had identical gender- and age...

  3. Improved analysis of bias in Monte Carlo criticality safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Thomas C.

    2000-08-01

    Criticality safety, the prevention of nuclear chain reactions, depends on Monte Carlo computer codes for most commercial applications. One major shortcoming of these codes is the limited accuracy of the atomic and nuclear data files they depend on. In order to apply a code and its data files to a given criticality safety problem, the code must first be benchmarked against similar problems for which the answer is known. The difference between a code prediction and the known solution is termed the "bias" of the code. Traditional calculations of the bias for application to commercial criticality problems are generally full of assumptions and lead to large uncertainties which must be conservatively factored into the bias as statistical tolerances. Recent trends in storing commercial nuclear fuel---narrowed regulatory margins of safety, degradation of neutron absorbers, the desire to use higher enrichment fuel, etc.---push the envelope of criticality safety. They make it desirable to minimize uncertainty in the bias to accommodate these changes, and they make it vital to understand what assumptions are safe to make under what conditions. A set of improved procedures is proposed for (1) developing multivariate regression bias models, and (2) applying multivariate regression bias models. These improved procedures lead to more accurate estimates of the bias and much smaller uncertainties about this estimate, while also generally providing more conservative results. The drawback is that the procedures are not trivial and are highly labor intensive to implement. The payback in savings in margin to criticality and conservatism for calculations near regulatory and safety limits may be worth this cost. To develop these procedures, a bias model using the statistical technique of weighted least squares multivariate regression is developed in detail. Problems that can occur from a weak statistical analysis are highlighted, and a solid statistical method for developing the bias

  4. Estimation of Finite Population Mean in Stratified Random Sampling Using Auxiliary Attribute(s under Non-Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Shabbir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a combined exponential ratio type estimator of finite population mean utilizing information on the auxiliary attribute(s under non-response. Expressions for bias and MSE of the proposed estimator are derived up to first order of approximation. An empirical study is carried out to observe the performances of the estimators.

  5. Selection bias and measures of inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez-alvarez, Rosalia; Melenberg, Bertrand; Soest, Arthur van

    2002-01-01

    Variables typically used to measure inequality (e.g., wage earnings, household income or expenditure), are often plagued by nonrandom item nonresponse. Ignoring non-respondents or making (often untestable) assumptions on the nonresponse sub-population can lead to selection bias on estimates of inequality. This paper draws on the approach by Manski (1989,1994) to derive bounding intervals on both the Gini coefficient and the Inter-Quartile range. Both sets of bounds provide alternative measure...

  6. Analysis of codon usage and nucleotide composition bias in polioviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Yuan-xing

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poliovirus, the causative agent of poliomyelitis, is a human enterovirus and a member of the family of Picornaviridae and among the most rapidly evolving viruses known. Analysis of codon usage can reveal much about the molecular evolution of the viruses. However, little information about synonymous codon usage pattern of polioviruses genome has been acquired to date. Methods The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU values, effective number of codon (ENC values, nucleotide contents and dinucleotides were investigated and a comparative analysis of codon usage pattern for open reading frames (ORFs among 48 polioviruses isolates including 31 of genotype 1, 13 of genotype 2 and 4 of genotype 3. Results The result shows that the overall extent of codon usage bias in poliovirus samples is low (mean ENC = 53.754 > 40. The general correlation between base composition and codon usage bias suggests that mutational pressure rather than natural selection is the main factor that determines the codon usage bias in those polioviruses. Depending on the RSCU data, it was found that there was a significant variation in bias of codon usage among three genotypes. Geographic factor also has some effect on the codon usage pattern (exists in the genotype-1 of polioviruses. No significant effect in gene length or vaccine derived polioviruses (DVPVs, wild viruses and live attenuated virus was observed on the variations of synonymous codon usage in the virus genes. The relative abundance of dinucleotide (CpG in the ORFs of polioviruses are far below expected values especially in DVPVs and attenuated virus of polioviruses genotype 1. Conclusion The information from this study may not only have theoretical value in understanding poliovirus evolution, especially for DVPVs genotype 1, but also have potential value for the development of poliovirus vaccines.

  7. Analysis of the Bias on the Beidou GEO Multipath Combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafei Ning

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Beidou navigation satellite system is a very important sensor for positioning in the Asia-Pacific region. The Beidou inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO and medium Earth orbit (MEO satellites have been analysed in some studies previously conducted by other researchers; this paper seeks to gain more insight regarding the geostationary earth orbit (GEO satellites. Employing correlation analysis, Fourier transformation and wavelet decomposition, we validate whether there is a systematic bias in their multipath combinations. These biases can be observed clearly in satellites C01, C02 and C04 and have a great correlation with time series instead of elevation, being significantly different from those of the Beidou IGSO and MEO satellites. We propose a correction model to mitigate this bias based on its daily periodicity characteristic. After the model has been applied, the performance of the positioning estimations of the eight stations distributed in the Asia-Pacific region is evaluated and compared. The results show that residuals of multipath series behaves random noise; for the single point positioning (SPP and precise point positioning (PPP approaches, the positioning accuracy in the upward direction can be improved by 8 cm and 6 mm, respectively, and by 2 cm and 4 mm, respectively, for the horizontal component.

  8. The perfect match: Do criminal stereotypes bias forensic evidence analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalarz, Laura; Madon, Stephanie; Yang, Yueran; Guyll, Max; Buck, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    This research provided the first empirical test of the hypothesis that stereotypes bias evaluations of forensic evidence. A pilot study (N = 107) assessed the content and consensus of 20 criminal stereotypes by identifying perpetrator characteristics (e.g., sex, race, age, religion) that are stereotypically associated with specific crimes. In the main experiment (N = 225), participants read a mock police incident report involving either a stereotyped crime (child molestation) or a nonstereotyped crime (identity theft) and judged whether a suspect's fingerprint matched a fingerprint recovered at the crime scene. Accompanying the suspect's fingerprint was personal information about the suspect of the type that is routinely available to fingerprint analysts (e.g., race, sex) and which could activate a stereotype. Participants most often perceived the fingerprints to match when the suspect fit the criminal stereotype, even though the prints did not actually match. Moreover, participants appeared to be unaware of the extent to which a criminal stereotype had biased their evaluations. These findings demonstrate that criminal stereotypes are a potential source of bias in forensic evidence analysis and suggest that suspects who fit criminal stereotypes may be disadvantaged over the course of the criminal justice process. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Analysis of the Bias on the Beidou GEO Multipath Combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yafei; Yuan, Yunbin; Chai, Yanju; Huang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The Beidou navigation satellite system is a very important sensor for positioning in the Asia-Pacific region. The Beidou inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) and medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellites have been analysed in some studies previously conducted by other researchers; this paper seeks to gain more insight regarding the geostationary earth orbit (GEO) satellites. Employing correlation analysis, Fourier transformation and wavelet decomposition, we validate whether there is a systematic bias in their multipath combinations. These biases can be observed clearly in satellites C01, C02 and C04 and have a great correlation with time series instead of elevation, being significantly different from those of the Beidou IGSO and MEO satellites. We propose a correction model to mitigate this bias based on its daily periodicity characteristic. After the model has been applied, the performance of the positioning estimations of the eight stations distributed in the Asia-Pacific region is evaluated and compared. The results show that residuals of multipath series behaves random noise; for the single point positioning (SPP) and precise point positioning (PPP) approaches, the positioning accuracy in the upward direction can be improved by 8 cm and 6 mm, respectively, and by 2 cm and 4 mm, respectively, for the horizontal component. PMID:27509503

  10. Adaptive Queue Management with Restraint on Non-Responsive Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Li

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an adaptive queue management scheme (adaptive RED to improve Random Early Detection (RED on restraining non-responsive flows. Due to a lack of flow control mechanism, non-responsive flows can starve responsive flows for buffer and bandwidth at the gateway. In order to solve the disproportionate resource problem, RED framework is modified in this way: on detecting when the non-responsive flows starve the queue, packet-drop intensity (Max_p in RED can be adaptively adjusted to curb non-responsive flows for resource fair-sharing, such as buffer and bandwidth fair-sharing. Based on detection of traffic behaviors, intentionally restraining nonresponsive flows is to increase the throughput and decrease the drop rate of responsive flows. Our experimental results based on adaptive RED shows that the enhancement of responsive traffic and the better sharing of buffer and bandwidth can be achieved under a variety of traffic scenarios.

  11. Sources of nonresponse to the Federal Waterfowl Hunter Questionnaire Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, R.J.; Geissler, P.H.; Hoover, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    Response rates to the Federal Waterfowl Hunter Questionnaire Survey (WHQS) have declined since the 1950's, suggesting that harvest estimates may be biased. Consequently, we investigated reasons for WHQS nonresponse using surveys of waterfowl hunters in Arkansas, California, Louisiana, Minnesota, New Jersey, and Texas [USA]. Sampling frames were constructed using lists of buyers of state hunting licenses or state duck stamps. We mailed questionnaires to 16,452 randomly selected hunters, with 2 follow-up mailings at 3-week intervals. Questionnaires were completed by 8,812 respondents, and a further 587 interviews were conducted by telephone. Post offices accounted for between 53.7% (Minn.) and 92.8% (N.J.) of federal waterfowl duck stamp sales, and stores accounted for most other sales. Of hunters who bought a federal waterfowl stamp from sample post offices, between 16.7% (Minn.) and 40.0% (Ark.) reported receiving a WHQS contact card. Of those receiving contact cards, between 30.0% (N.J.) and 64.3% (La. and Tex.) reported returning them. Because survey coverage of the target population is poor, we recommend that a new sampling frame be developed for the WHQS.

  12. Predictors of nonresponse to intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in Kawasaki disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Min Park

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available <b>Purpose:</b> It has been reported that 10% to 20% of children with Kawasaki disease (KD will not respond to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG treatment. In this study, we aimed to identify useful predictors of therapeutic failure in children with KD. <b>Methods:</b> We examined 309 children diagnosed with KD at the Kyungpook National University Hospital and the Inje University Busan Paik Hospital between January 2005 and June 2011. We retrospectively reviewed their medical records and analyzed multiple parameters in responders and nonresponders to IVIG. <b>Results:</b> Among the 309 children, 30 (9.7% did not respond to IVIG. They had significantly higher proportion of neutrophils, and higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total bilirubin, and N-terminal fragment of B-type natriuretic peptide than did responders. IVIGnonresponders had a significantly longer duration of hospitalization, and more frequently experienced coronary artery lesion, and sterile pyuria. No differences in the duration of fever at initial treatment or, clinical features were noted. <b>Conclusion:</b> Two independent predictors (ALT?#248;4 IU/L, total bilirubin?#240;.9 mg/dL for nonresponse were confirmed through multivariate logistic regression analysis. Thus elevated ALT and total bilirubin levels might be useful in predicting nonresponse to IVIG therapy in children with KD.

  13. Nonresponse error in mail surveys: top ten problems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daly, Jeanette M; Jones, Julie K; Gereau, Patricia L; Levy, Barcey T

    2011-01-01

    ... utilizing the Dillman Total Design Method. Ten nonresponse error problems were identified, such as inserter machine gets sequence out of order, capitalization in databases, and mailing discarded by postal service...

  14. Nonresponse Error in Mail Surveys: Top Ten Problems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daly, Jeanette M; Jones, Julie K; Gereau, Patricia L; Levy, Barcey T

    2011-01-01

    ... utilizing the Dillman Total Design Method. Ten nonresponse error problems were identified, such as inserter machine gets sequence out of order, capitalization in databases, and mailing discarded by postal service...

  15. Botulinum Toxin in Secondarily Nonresponsive Patients with Spasmodic Dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Niv; Tang, Christopher; Blitzer, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Chemodenervation with botulinum toxin (BoNT) has been effective and well tolerated for all types of dystonia for >30 years. We reviewed outcomes of our patients treated with BoNT serotype A (BoNT-A) for spasmodic dysphonia (SD) who became secondarily nonresponsive. We found that 8 of 1400 patients became nonresponsive to BoNT-A (0.57%), which is lower than the secondary nonresponse rate in other dystonias. After a cessation period, 4 of our patients resumed BoNT-A injections, and recurrence of immunoresistance was not seen in any of them. When compared with patients with other dystonias, patients with SD receive extremely low doses of BoNT. Small antigen challenge may explain the lower rate of immunoresistance and long-lasting efficacy after BoNT-A is restarted among secondary nonresponsive patients with SD.

  16. Analysis of Synonymous Codon Usage Bias in Chlamydia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui L(ü); Wei-Ming ZHAO; Yan ZHENG; Hong WANG; Mei QI; Xiu-Ping YU

    2005-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause ocular and sexually transmitted diseases, and are associated with cardiovascular diseases. The analysis of codon usage may improve our understanding of the evolution and pathogenesis of Chlamydia and allow reengineering of target genes to improve their expression for gene therapy. Here, we analyzed the codon usage of C. muridarum, C.trachomatis (here indicating biovar trachoma and LGV), C. pneumoniae, and C. psittaci using the codon usage database and the CUSP (Create a codon usage table) program of EMBOSS (The European Molecular Biology Open Software Suite). The results show that the four genomes have similar codon usage patterns,with a strong bias towards the codons with A and T at the third codon position. Compared with Homo sapiens, the four chlamydial species show discordant seven or eight preferred codons. The ENC (effective number of codons used in a gene)-plot reveals that the genetic heterogeneity in Chlamydia is constrained by the G+C content, while translational selection and gene length exert relatively weaker influences. Moreover,mutational pressure appears to be the major determinant of the codon usage variation among the chlamydial genes. In addition, we compared the codon preferences of C. trachomatis with those of E. coli, yeast,adenovirus and Homo sapiens. There are 23 codons showing distinct usage differences between C. trachomatis and E. coli, 24 between C. trachomatis and adenovirus, 21 between C. trachomatis and Homo sapiens, but only six codons between C. trachomatis and yeast. Therefore, the yeast system may be more suitable for the expression of chlamydial genes. Finally, we compared the codon preferences of C. trachomatis with those of six eukaryotes, eight prokaryotes and 23 viruses. There is a strong positive correlation between the differences in coding GC content and the variations in codon bias (r=0.905, P<0.001). We conclude that the variation of codon bias

  17. Non-response to osteoporosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Roger M

    2004-06-01

    There are now a number of effective treatments for osteoporosis, which increase bone mineral density (BMD) and decrease the risk of fractures. There is no clear consensus on the optimal method for assessing response to treatment in the individual patient. The goal of osteoporosis treatment is to prevent fractures after minimal trauma, but these are relatively uncommon events and cannot be totally avoided by the use of currently available therapies. Alternative methods of assessing response to treatment include serial measurement of BMD or the biochemical markers of bone turnover, but the observed changes may be misleading if they do not exceed the least significant change. The proportion of patients who fail to respond to osteoporosis treatments is difficult to quantify. Clinical trials show continuing bone loss in up to 15% of participants on hormone replacement therapy or bisphosphonates. Non-response to treatment is probably more common in clinical practice, but may be due to poor adherence to treatment recommendations. Other potential causes of an apparent failure to respond to treatment include the use of a weak antiresorptive agent, differences in bioavailability, low dietary calcium intake, vitamin D insufficiency and underlying causes of secondary osteoporosis. The management of patients who fail to respond to treatment includes confirmation that they are adhering to treatment and have an adequate dietary calcium intake and vitamin D status and excluding causes of secondary osteoporosis. Consideration should also be given to the addition of calcium and vitamin D supplementation and the use of alternative treatments for osteoporosis.

  18. Significance analysis of lexical bias in microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falkow Stanley

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genes that are determined to be significantly differentially regulated in microarray analyses often appear to have functional commonalities, such as being components of the same biochemical pathway. This results in certain words being under- or overrepresented in the list of genes. Distinguishing between biologically meaningful trends and artifacts of annotation and analysis procedures is of the utmost importance, as only true biological trends are of interest for further experimentation. A number of sophisticated methods for identification of significant lexical trends are currently available, but these methods are generally too cumbersome for practical use by most microarray users. Results We have developed a tool, LACK, for calculating the statistical significance of apparent lexical bias in microarray datasets. The frequency of a user-specified list of search terms in a list of genes which are differentially regulated is assessed for statistical significance by comparison to randomly generated datasets. The simplicity of the input files and user interface targets the average microarray user who wishes to have a statistical measure of apparent lexical trends in analyzed datasets without the need for bioinformatics skills. The software is available as Perl source or a Windows executable. Conclusion We have used LACK in our laboratory to generate biological hypotheses based on our microarray data. We demonstrate the program's utility using an example in which we confirm significant upregulation of SPI-2 pathogenicity island of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by the cation chelator dipyridyl.

  19. How social processes distort measurement: the impact of survey nonresponse on estimates of volunteer work in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Katharine G; Presser, Stanley; Helms, Sara

    2009-01-01

    The authors argue that both the large variability in survey estimates of volunteering and the fact that survey estimates do not show the secular decline common to other social capital measures are caused by the greater propensity of those who do volunteer work to respond to surveys. Analyses of the American Time Use Survey (ATUS)--the sample for which is drawn from the Current Population Survey (CPS)--together with the CPS volunteering supplement show that CPS respondents who become ATUS respondents report much more volunteering in the CPS than those who become ATUS nonrespondents. This difference is replicated within subgroups. Consequently, conventional adjustments for nonresponse cannot correct the bias. Although nonresponse leads to estimates of volunteer activity that are too high, it generally does not affect inferences about the characteristics of volunteers.

  20. Study retention as bias reduction in a hard-to-reach population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western, Bruce; Braga, Anthony; Hureau, David; Sirois, Catherine

    2016-05-17

    Collecting data from hard-to-reach populations is a key challenge for research on poverty and other forms of extreme disadvantage. With data from the Boston Reentry Study (BRS), we document the extreme marginality of released prisoners and the related difficulties of study retention and analysis. Analysis of the BRS data yields three findings. First, released prisoners show high levels of "contact insecurity," correlated with social insecurity, in which residential addresses and contact information change frequently. Second, strategies for data collection are available to sustain very high rates of study participation. Third, survey nonresponse in highly marginal populations is strongly nonignorable, closely related to social and economic vulnerability. The BRS response rate of 94% over a 1-y follow-up period allows analysis of hypothetically high nonresponse rates. In this setting, nonresponse attenuates regression estimates in analyses of housing insecurity, drug use, and unemployment. These results suggest that in the analysis of very poor and disadvantaged populations, methods that maximize study participation reduce bias and yield data that can usefully supplement large-scale household or administrative data collections.

  1. Estimation and analysis of Galileo differential code biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Yuan, Yunbin; Wang, Ningbo; Li, Zishen; Li, Ying; Huo, Xingliang

    2017-03-01

    When sensing the Earth's ionosphere using dual-frequency pseudorange observations of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS), the satellite and receiver differential code biases (DCBs) account for one of the main sources of error. For the Galileo system, limited knowledge is available about the determination and characteristic analysis of the satellite and receiver DCBs. To better understand the characteristics of satellite and receiver DCBs of Galileo, the IGGDCB (IGG, Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics, Wuhan, China) method is extended to estimate the satellite and receiver DCBs of Galileo, with the combined use of GPS and Galileo observations. The experimental data were collected from the Multi-GNSS Experiment network, covering the period of 2013-2015. The stability of both Galileo satellite and receiver DCBs over a time period of 36 months was thereby analyzed for the current state of the Galileo system. Good agreement of Galileo satellite DCBs is found between the IGGDCB-based DCB estimates and those from the German Aerospace Center (DLR), at the level of 0.22 ns. Moreover, high-level stability of the Galileo satellite DCB estimates is obtained over the selected time span (less than 0.25 ns in terms of standard deviation) by both IGGDCB and DLR algorithms. The Galileo receiver DCB estimates are also relatively stable for the case in which the receiver hardware device stays unchanged. It can also be concluded that the receiver DCB estimates are rather sensitive to the change of the firmware version and that the receiver antenna type has no great impact on receiver DCBs.

  2. Non-response in a survey among immigrants in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deding, Mette; Fridberg, Torben; Jakobsen, Vibeke

    The purpose of this paper is to study how various characteristics of respondents and interviewers affect non-response among immigrants. We use a survey conducted among immigrants in Denmark and ethnic Danes. First, we analyse the determinants of overall non-response. Second, we analyse how...... the determinants of contact and of response given contact differ. We find that characteristics of the respondents are important for the response rate – especially they are important for the probability of getting in contact with the respondent. The lower probability of response among immigrants compared to ethnic...

  3. Analysis of microstructural evolution driven by production bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woo, C.H.; Semenov, A.A.; Singh, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of production bias was first considered in the preceding workshop in this series at Silkeborg in 1989. Since then, much work has been done to investigate the validity of the concept, and its usefulness in complementing the current theory of microstructure evolution based solely on the...

  4. Gender bias in primary education a theoretical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert Osaďan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available For decades, gender bias and inequity have remained extensive issues in nearly all societies in the world. During the past years, the effects of these issues have extended to one of the most important facets in our society - the education sector. Although this may not be immediately shocking, a lot of researchers as well as concerned educators and parents believe otherwise. As a matter of fact, a myriad of studies and research projects have already proven that gender discrimination, bias, and other related issues in sexuality actually exist in most primary schools throughout the globe. These literary materials present vital points that provide the initiative for primary school educators, school administrators, and other parents to become aware of the gender issues, which significantly affect the school performance and achievement of the concerned students, most of them being girls. Also, a number of studies have identified gender bias agents and their contributions in the worsening of the problem. Obviously, this problem needs to be addressed by the people most empowered - the educators. There is no question whether or not primary school teachers possess the knowledge to circumvent this bias inside their classrooms. The true concern is when they will actually start to apply crucial measures to resolve and get rid of gender bias. Once they eliminate their own prejudices about their students in terms of gender- related issues, they will be able to provide each of their pupils the right and proper education that the children deserve to get. And if all students obtain fair educational treatment, academic excellence and competence will merely be two of the countless benefits they can get.

  5. Analysis of tag-position bias in MPSS technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattray Magnus

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS technology was recently developed as a high-throughput technology for measuring the concentration of mRNA transcripts in a sample. It has previously been observed that the position of the signature tag in a transcript (distance from 3' end can affect the measurement, but this effect has not been studied in detail. Results We quantify the effect of tag-position bias in Classic and Signature MPSS technology using published data from Arabidopsis, rice and human. We investigate the relationship between measured concentration and tag-position using nonlinear regression methods. The observed relationship is shown to be broadly consistent across different data sets. We find that there exist different and significant biases in both Classic and Signature MPSS data. For Classic MPSS data, genes with tag-position in the middle-range have highest measured abundance on average while genes with tag-position in the high-range, far from the 3' end, show a significant decrease. For Signature MPSS data, high-range tag-position genes tend to have a flatter relationship between tag-position and measured abundance. Thus, our results confirm that the Signature MPSS method fixes a substantial problem with the Classic MPSS method. For both Classic and Signature MPSS data there is a positive correlation between measured abundance and tag-position for low-range tag-position genes. Compared with the effects of mRNA length and number of exons, tag-position bias seems to be more significant in Arabadopsis. The tag-position bias is reflected both in the measured abundance of genes with a significant tag count and in the proportion of unexpressed genes identified. Conclusion Tag-position bias should be taken into consideration when measuring mRNA transcript abundance using MPSS technology, both in Classic and Signature MPSS methods.

  6. Survey Page Length and Progress Indicators: What Are Their Relationships to Item Nonresponse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Nicholas A.; Herzog, Serge; Sarraf, Shimon; Tukibayeva, Malika

    2014-01-01

    The popularity of online student surveys has been associated with greater item nonresponse. This chapter presents research aimed at exploring what factors might help minimize item nonresponse, such as altering online survey page length and using progress indicators.

  7. Declining Bias and Gender Wage Discrimination? A Meta-Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Stephen B.; Stanley, T. D.

    2004-01-01

    The meta-regression analysis reveals that there is a strong tendency for discrimination estimates to fall and wage discrimination exist against the woman. The biasing effect of researchers' gender of not correcting for selection bias has weakened and changes in labor market have made it less important.

  8. Nonresponse and Underreporting Errors Increase over the Data Collection Week Based on Paradata from the National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mengyao; Gremel, Garrett W; Kirlin, John A; West, Brady T

    2017-05-01

    Background: Food acquisition diary surveys are important for studying food expenditures, factors affecting food acquisition decisions, and relations between these decisions with selected measures of health (e.g., body mass index, self-reported health). However, to our knowledge, no studies have evaluated the errors associated with these diary surveys, which can bias survey estimates and research findings. The use of paradata, which has been largely ignored in previous literature on diary surveys, could be useful for studying errors in these surveys.Objective: We used paradata to assess survey errors in the National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS).Methods: To evaluate the patterns of nonresponse over the diary period, we fit a multinomial logistic regression model to data from this 1-wk diary survey. We also assessed factors influencing respondents' probability of reporting food acquisition events during the diary process by using logistic regression models. Finally, with the use of an ordinal regression model, we studied factors influencing respondents' perceived ease of participation in the survey.Results: As the diary period progressed, nonresponse increased, especially for those starting the survey on Friday (where the odds of a refusal increased by 12% with each fielding day). The odds of reporting food acquisition events also decreased by 6% with each additional fielding day. Similarly, the odds of reporting ≥1 food-away-from-home event (i.e., meals, snacks, and drinks obtained outside the home) decreased significantly over the fielding period. Male respondents, larger households, households that eat together less often, and households with frequent guests reported a significantly more difficult time getting household members to participate, as did non-English-speaking households and households currently experiencing difficult financial conditions.Conclusions: Nonresponse and underreporting of food acquisition events tended to

  9. The hunt for the last respondent : nonresponse in sample surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, I.A.L.

    2005-01-01

    The Hunt for the Last Respondent has been inspired by concerns about the possibly detrimental effect of nonresponse on the accuracy of survey outcomes, as response rates are generally considered to be the most important criterion of survey quality, and the Netherlands is notorious for its low respon

  10. Understanding Nonresponse to the 2007 Medicare CAHPS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, David J.; Elliott, Marc N.; Haviland, Amelia M.; Saliba, Debra; Burkhart, Q.; Edwards, Carol; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The Medicare Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems (MCAHPS) survey, a primarily English-language mail survey with English and Spanish telephone follow-up, is the primary means of assessing the health care experiences of American seniors. We examine unit (whole survey) and item nonresponse for this survey to explore…

  11. Method for exploiting bias in factor analysis using constrained alternating least squares algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Michael R.

    2008-12-30

    Bias plays an important role in factor analysis and is often implicitly made use of, for example, to constrain solutions to factors that conform to physical reality. However, when components are collinear, a large range of solutions may exist that satisfy the basic constraints and fit the data equally well. In such cases, the introduction of mathematical bias through the application of constraints may select solutions that are less than optimal. The biased alternating least squares algorithm of the present invention can offset mathematical bias introduced by constraints in the standard alternating least squares analysis to achieve factor solutions that are most consistent with physical reality. In addition, these methods can be used to explicitly exploit bias to provide alternative views and provide additional insights into spectral data sets.

  12. Cross-validation analysis of bias models in Bayesian multi-model projections of climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, J. M. J.; Räisänen, J.; Nissinen, A.; Lipponen, A.; Kolehmainen, V.

    2017-03-01

    Climate change projections are commonly based on multi-model ensembles of climate simulations. In this paper we consider the choice of bias models in Bayesian multimodel predictions. Buser et al. (Clim Res 44(2-3):227-241, 2010a) introduced a hybrid bias model which combines commonly used constant bias and constant relation bias assumptions. The hybrid model includes a weighting parameter which balances these bias models. In this study, we use a cross-validation approach to study which bias model or bias parameter leads to, in a specific sense, optimal climate change projections. The analysis is carried out for summer and winter season means of 2 m-temperatures spatially averaged over the IPCC SREX regions, using 19 model runs from the CMIP5 data set. The cross-validation approach is applied to calculate optimal bias parameters (in the specific sense) for projecting the temperature change from the control period (1961-2005) to the scenario period (2046-2090). The results are compared to the results of the Buser et al. (Clim Res 44(2-3):227-241, 2010a) method which includes the bias parameter as one of the unknown parameters to be estimated from the data.

  13. Detection and removal of biases in the analysis of next-generation sequencing reads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schraga Schwartz

    Full Text Available Since the emergence of next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies, great effort has been put into the development of tools for analysis of the short reads. In parallel, knowledge is increasing regarding biases inherent in these technologies. Here we discuss four different biases we encountered while analyzing various Illumina datasets. These biases are due to both biological and statistical effects that in particular affect comparisons between different genomic regions. Specifically, we encountered biases pertaining to the distributions of nucleotides across sequencing cycles, to mappability, to contamination of pre-mRNA with mRNA, and to non-uniform hydrolysis of RNA. Most of these biases are not specific to one analyzed dataset, but are present across a variety of datasets and within a variety of genomic contexts. Importantly, some of these biases correlated in a highly significant manner with biological features, including transcript length, gene expression levels, conservation levels, and exon-intron architecture, misleadingly increasing the credibility of results due to them. We also demonstrate the relevance of these biases in the context of analyzing an NGS dataset mapping transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (RNAPII in the context of exon-intron architecture, and show that elimination of these biases is crucial for avoiding erroneous interpretation of the data. Collectively, our results highlight several important pitfalls, challenges and approaches in the analysis of NGS reads.

  14. Do geographical biases exist in published conservation research? An analysis using citation rates.

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    'Do geographical biases exist in published conservation research? An analysis using citation rates' - a project proposal as part of an MSc in Geographical Information Science at the University of Edinburgh.

  15. [Evaluation, correction and impact of non-response in studies of childhood obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Pérez, María Isolina; Pérez-Ríos, Mónica; Malvar, Alberto; Suanzes, Jorge; Hervada, Xurxo

    2017-09-25

    To evaluate and correct the impact of non-response in the prevalence of underweight, overweight and obesity in children aged 6 to 15 years old using silhouette scales. Cross-sectional study carried out in 2013 among 8,145 Galician schoolchildren aged 6-15 years old. The students who agreed to participate were weighed and measured and, based on body mass index, the prevalence of underweight, overweight and obesity was estimated. Teachers rated all students using silhouette scales. The valuations were used to estimate the prevalence corrected by non-response. Using the Bayes theorem, participation rates were estimated according to weight status. The participation rate was 92.3% in the 6 -to 11-year-old group, and 90% in the 12- to 15-year old age group. In both groups, the prevalence of underweight and overweight were similar between participants and non-participants. However, obesity was higher among non-participants, especially at 12 to 15 years of age (6.3% vs. 12.2% ; p < 0.05). The prevalence did not change when corrected by the teacher's valuation. The participation rate of obese students was lower than the overall rate (82% vs. 90% at 12 to 15 years old; p < 0.05). The presence of participation bias, which was greater at 12-15 years old, was confirmed. However, the impact of the bias on prevalence was negligible due to the high participation rate. In obesity studies with objective measures, it is essential to quantify non-participation, as well as to assess its impact and correct it. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Bias in estimating food consumption of fish from stomach-content analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Anna; Lewy, Peter

    2004-01-01

    , a serious positive bias was introduced by estimating food intake from the contents of pooled stomach samples. An expression is given that can be used to correct analytically for this bias. A new method, which takes into account the distribution and evacuation of individual prey types as well as the effect......This study presents an analysis of the bias introduced by using simplified methods to calculate food intake of fish from stomach contents. Three sources of bias were considered: (1) the effect of estimating consumption based on a limited number of stomach samples, (2) the effect of using average...... of other food in the stomach on evacuation, is suggested for estimating the intake of separate prey types. Simplifying the estimation by ignoring these factors biased estimates of consumption of individual prey types by up to 150% in a data example....

  17. A FAMILY OF ESTIMATORS FOR ESTIMATING POPULATION MEAN IN STRATIFIED SAMPLING UNDER NON-RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K. Chaudhary

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Khoshnevisan et al. (2007 proposed a general family of estimators for population mean using known value of some population parameters in simple random sampling. The objective of this paper is to propose a family of combined-type estimators in stratified random sampling adapting the family of estimators proposed by Khoshnevisan et al. (2007 under non-response. The properties of proposed family have been discussed. We have also obtained the expressions for optimum sample sizes of the strata in respect to cost of the survey. Results are also supported by numerical analysis.

  18. Comparison of conditional bias-adjusted estimators for interim analysis in clinical trials with survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Masashi; Gosho, Masahiko; Hirakawa, Akihiro

    2017-02-17

    Group sequential designs are widely used in clinical trials to determine whether a trial should be terminated early. In such trials, maximum likelihood estimates are often used to describe the difference in efficacy between the experimental and reference treatments; however, these are well known for displaying conditional and unconditional biases. Established bias-adjusted estimators include the conditional mean-adjusted estimator (CMAE), conditional median unbiased estimator, conditional uniformly minimum variance unbiased estimator (CUMVUE), and weighted estimator. However, their performances have been inadequately investigated. In this study, we review the characteristics of these bias-adjusted estimators and compare their conditional bias, overall bias, and conditional mean-squared errors in clinical trials with survival endpoints through simulation studies. The coverage probabilities of the confidence intervals for the four estimators are also evaluated. We find that the CMAE reduced conditional bias and showed relatively small conditional mean-squared errors when the trials terminated at the interim analysis. The conditional coverage probability of the conditional median unbiased estimator was well below the nominal value. In trials that did not terminate early, the CUMVUE performed with less bias and an acceptable conditional coverage probability than was observed for the other estimators. In conclusion, when planning an interim analysis, we recommend using the CUMVUE for trials that do not terminate early and the CMAE for those that terminate early. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Bayesian Methods for Statistical Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Puza, Borek

    2015-01-01

    Bayesian methods for statistical analysis is a book on statistical methods for analysing a wide variety of data. The book consists of 12 chapters, starting with basic concepts and covering numerous topics, including Bayesian estimation, decision theory, prediction, hypothesis testing, hierarchical models, Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, finite population inference, biased sampling and nonignorable nonresponse. The book contains many exercises, all with worked solutions, including complete c...

  20. Item Nonresponse in Face-to-Face Interviews with Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haunberger Sigrid

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined item nonresponse and its respondent and interviewer correlates by means of a population-based, panel survey of children aged 8 to 11 who were surveyed using standardised, face-to-face interviews. Using multilevel, logistic analyses with cross-level interactions, this article aims to examine which effects of item nonresponse are subject to children as respondents or to the interviewers and the interview setting. Depending on the type of question, we found different effects for respondent and interviewer variables, as well as interaction effects between child age/interviewer age as well as child gender/interviewer gender. However, interviewer variance is for the most part not significant.

  1. Two successful pregnancies in pyridoxine-nonresponsive homocystinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, M A; Cuartero, M L; Martinez de Salinas, M; Lambruschini, N; Pintó, X; Urreizti, R; Balcells, S; Grinberg, D

    2004-01-01

    Two successful pregnancies are reported in a pyridoxine-nonresponsive woman who was also homozygous for the MTHFR 677C>T polymorphism. Two healthy children were delivered, although there had also been an early miscarriage of an apparently normal fetus in another pregnancy. Management of the patient's homocystine and methionine levels was maintained throughout pregnancy and, in view of the increased thromboembolic risk, anticoagulation therapy was also included in management.

  2. Social mating system and sex-biased dispersal in mammals and birds: a phylogenetic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E Mabry

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that patterns of sex-biased dispersal are related to social mating system in mammals and birds has gained widespread acceptance over the past 30 years. However, two major complications have obscured the relationship between these two behaviors: 1 dispersal frequency and dispersal distance, which measure different aspects of the dispersal process, have often been confounded, and 2 the relationship between mating system and sex-biased dispersal in these vertebrate groups has not been examined using modern phylogenetic comparative methods. Here, we present a phylogenetic analysis of the relationship between mating system and sex-biased dispersal in mammals and birds. Results indicate that the evolution of female-biased dispersal in mammals may be more likely on monogamous branches of the phylogeny, and that females may disperse farther than males in socially monogamous mammalian species. However, we found no support for a relationship between social mating system and sex-biased dispersal in birds when the effects of phylogeny are taken into consideration. We caution that although there are larger-scale behavioral differences in mating system and sex-biased dispersal between mammals and birds, mating system and sex-biased dispersal are far from perfectly associated within these taxa.

  3. Non-response to (statin) therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trompet, S; Postmus, I; Slagboom, P E

    2016-01-01

    : Baseline characteristics of non-responders to statin therapy (≤10 % LDL-C reduction) were compared with those of high responders (>40 % LDL-C reduction) through a linear regression analysis. In addition, pharmacogenetic candidate gene analysis was performed to show the effect of excluding non......-responders from the analysis. RESULTS: Non-responders to statin therapy were younger (p = 0.001), more often smoked (p ....035) compared to subjects who highly responded to pravastatin treatment. Moreover, excluding non-responders from pharmacogenetic studies yielded more robust results, as standard errors decreased. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that non-responders to statin therapy are more likely to actually be non...

  4. Understanding Adolescent Nonresponsiveness to Text Messages: Lessons from the DepoText Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Mallory; Tomaszewski, Kathy; Muñoz Buchanan, Cara R; Trent, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Urban adolescents face economic, social, and behavioral challenges in adhering to long-term contraceptive use. Use of text messaging reminders has the potential to increase adherence to family planning appointments and to educate patients about safe sexual health practices; however, nonresponsiveness to messages is difficult to interpret and may jeopardize programmatic success. We aimed to understand why adolescent girls enrolled in a randomized, controlled pilot trial (DepoText) designed to increase attendance at family planning visits were periodically nonresponsive to text messages through conducting structured interviews with participants whose text reply rates were less than 100 % during the trial period. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected and classified using descriptive data analysis. Reasons for nonresponsiveness, barriers to continuous cell phone coverage, cell phone plan characteristics, and attitudes toward the DepoText program were the primary endpoints of interest. Most participants (78%) attributed instances of nonresponsiveness to being away from the phone or due to a personal conflict such as school or work. Service interruption due to bill nonpayment (44%), phone loss (28%), and cell phone number change (28%) were significant barriers to continuous coverage during the trial period, and many respondents indicated that the downturn in the economy made it more difficult to maintain their cell phone plan. Almost a third reported having to choose between cell phone and other payments, but the vast majority (88%) considered their cell phone a "need" rather than a "want." Participants universally expressed satisfaction with the text messaging program and reported feeling more connected to the clinic (96%) through the messages serving as reminders (64%), encouragement to assume personal responsibility for their health care (12%), and enhanced personal connection with the clinic staff (4%). Our study suggests that a text messaging program can

  5. Bias in estimating food consumption of fish from stomach-content analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Anna; Lewy, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of the bias introduced by using simplified methods to calculate food intake of fish from stomach contents. Three sources of bias were considered: (1) the effect of estimating consumption based on a limited number of stomach samples, (2) the effect of using average...... contents derived from pooled stomach samples rather than individual stomachs, and (3) the effect of ignoring biological factors that affect the evacuation of prey. Estimating consumption from only two stomach samples yielded results close to the actual intake rate in a simulation study. In contrast to this......, a serious positive bias was introduced by estimating food intake from the contents of pooled stomach samples. An expression is given that can be used to correct analytically for this bias. A new method, which takes into account the distribution and evacuation of individual prey types as well as the effect...

  6. Detecting and correcting for publication bias in meta-analysis - A truncated normal distribution approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiaohao; Carriere, K C

    2016-01-01

    Publication bias can significantly limit the validity of meta-analysis when trying to draw conclusion about a research question from independent studies. Most research on detection and correction for publication bias in meta-analysis focus mainly on funnel plot-based methodologies or selection models. In this paper, we formulate publication bias as a truncated distribution problem, and propose new parametric solutions. We develop methodologies of estimating the underlying overall effect size and the severity of publication bias. We distinguish the two major situations, in which publication bias may be induced by: (1) small effect size or (2) large p-value. We consider both fixed and random effects models, and derive estimators for the overall mean and the truncation proportion. These estimators will be obtained using maximum likelihood estimation and method of moments under fixed- and random-effects models, respectively. We carried out extensive simulation studies to evaluate the performance of our methodology, and to compare with the non-parametric Trim and Fill method based on funnel plot. We find that our methods based on truncated normal distribution perform consistently well, both in detecting and correcting publication bias under various situations.

  7. On the Need for Quantitative Bias Analysis in the Peer-Review Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Matthew P; Lash, Timothy L

    2017-05-15

    Peer review is central to the process through which epidemiologists generate evidence to inform public health and medical interventions. Reviewers thereby act as critical gatekeepers to high-quality research. They are asked to carefully consider the validity of the proposed work or research findings by paying careful attention to the methodology and critiquing the importance of the insight gained. However, although many have noted problems with the peer-review system for both manuscripts and grant submissions, few solutions have been proposed to improve the process. Quantitative bias analysis encompasses all methods used to quantify the impact of systematic error on estimates of effect in epidemiologic research. Reviewers who insist that quantitative bias analysis be incorporated into the design, conduct, presentation, and interpretation of epidemiologic research could substantially strengthen the process. In the present commentary, we demonstrate how quantitative bias analysis can be used by investigators and authors, reviewers, funding agencies, and editors. By utilizing quantitative bias analysis in the peer-review process, editors can potentially avoid unnecessary rejections, identify key areas for improvement, and improve discussion sections by shifting from speculation on the impact of sources of error to quantification of the impact those sources of bias may have had. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Bias analysis applied to Agricultural Health Study publications to estimate non-random sources of uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lash Timothy L

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The associations of pesticide exposure with disease outcomes are estimated without the benefit of a randomized design. For this reason and others, these studies are susceptible to systematic errors. I analyzed studies of the associations between alachlor and glyphosate exposure and cancer incidence, both derived from the Agricultural Health Study cohort, to quantify the bias and uncertainty potentially attributable to systematic error. Methods For each study, I identified the prominent result and important sources of systematic error that might affect it. I assigned probability distributions to the bias parameters that allow quantification of the bias, drew a value at random from each assigned distribution, and calculated the estimate of effect adjusted for the biases. By repeating the draw and adjustment process over multiple iterations, I generated a frequency distribution of adjusted results, from which I obtained a point estimate and simulation interval. These methods were applied without access to the primary record-level dataset. Results The conventional estimates of effect associating alachlor and glyphosate exposure with cancer incidence were likely biased away from the null and understated the uncertainty by quantifying only random error. For example, the conventional p-value for a test of trend in the alachlor study equaled 0.02, whereas fewer than 20% of the bias analysis iterations yielded a p-value of 0.02 or lower. Similarly, the conventional fully-adjusted result associating glyphosate exposure with multiple myleoma equaled 2.6 with 95% confidence interval of 0.7 to 9.4. The frequency distribution generated by the bias analysis yielded a median hazard ratio equal to 1.5 with 95% simulation interval of 0.4 to 8.9, which was 66% wider than the conventional interval. Conclusion Bias analysis provides a more complete picture of true uncertainty than conventional frequentist statistical analysis accompanied by a

  9. Determinación de sesgo de no respuesta en una encuesta probabilística de hogares de comportamiento sexual con personas del mismo género Assessment of non-response bias in a probability household survey of male same-gender sexual behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Izazola-Licea

    2000-04-01

    encuesta. La selección cuidadosa del personal de campo y la capacitación de los entrevistadores podría haber coadyuvado en minimizar el sesgo potencial.OBJECTIVE: To assess non-participation bias in a survey of male sexual behavior. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A household survey was carried out in 19921993 using a probability sampling frame in Mexico City. Demographic variables were available for all eligible men. The extent of non-participation bias was estimated using a version of the Heckman method, which utilizes two equations, one to predict participation and the other to predict reports of same-gender sexual behavior. RESULTS: A total of 8 068 of the 13 713 eligible men completed a face-to-face questionnaire (response rate 59%; 173 men (2.1% reported bisexual behavior in their lifetime, and 37 (0.4% reported only male partners. Survey participation was predicted using demographic variables: 67% of the observations were correctly predicted by a probit regression model: 82% of participants and 53% of non-participants (pseudo-r²=0.13. Same-gender sexual behavior was predicted by variables indicating attachment to gay/bisexual social networks, history of sexually transmitted diseases, positive attitudes towards gay and bisexual males, and lack of support from male relatives. Ninety-seven per cent of the cases was correctly predicted by the probit model (pseudo-r²=0.14. The correlation between these two equations was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that prevalence estimates of same-gender sexual behavior among Mexico City men were not biased by selective survey participation. Careful selection and training of household interviewers may have assisted in minimizing potential bias.

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis of Codon Usage Bias in Epichloë festucae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuzhang Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of codon usage data has both practical and theoretical applications in understanding the basics of molecular biology. Differences in codon usage patterns among genes reflect variations in local base compositional biases and the intensity of natural selection. Recently, there have been several reports related to codon usage in fungi, but little is known about codon usage bias in Epichloë endophytes. The present study aimed to assess codon usage patterns and biases in 4870 sequences from Epichloë festucae, which may be helpful in revealing the constraint factors such as mutation or selection pressure and improving the bioreactor on the cloning, expression, and characterization of some special genes. The GC content with 56.41% is higher than the AT content (43.59% in E. festucae. The results of neutrality and effective number of codons plot analyses showed that both mutational bias and natural selection play roles in shaping codon usage in this species. We found that gene length is strongly correlated with codon usage and may contribute to the codon usage patterns observed in genes. Nucleotide composition and gene expression levels also shape codon usage bias in E. festucae. E. festucae exhibits codon usage bias based on the relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU values of 61 sense codons, with 25 codons showing an RSCU larger than 1. In addition, we identified 27 optimal codons that end in a G or C.

  11. Comparative analysis of codon usage bias and codon context patterns between dipteran and hymenopteran sequenced genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K Behura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Codon bias is a phenomenon of non-uniform usage of codons whereas codon context generally refers to sequential pair of codons in a gene. Although genome sequencing of multiple species of dipteran and hymenopteran insects have been completed only a few of these species have been analyzed for codon usage bias. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we use bioinformatics approaches to analyze codon usage bias and codon context patterns in a genome-wide manner among 15 dipteran and 7 hymenopteran insect species. Results show that GAA is the most frequent codon in the dipteran species whereas GAG is the most frequent codon in the hymenopteran species. Data reveals that codons ending with C or G are frequently used in the dipteran genomes whereas codons ending with A or T are frequently used in the hymenopteran genomes. Synonymous codon usage orders (SCUO vary within genomes in a pattern that seems to be distinct for each species. Based on comparison of 30 one-to-one orthologous genes among 17 species, the fruit fly Drosophila willistoni shows the least codon usage bias whereas the honey bee (Apis mellifera shows the highest bias. Analysis of codon context patterns of these insects shows that specific codons are frequently used as the 3'- and 5'-context of start and stop codons, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Codon bias pattern is distinct between dipteran and hymenopteran insects. While codon bias is favored by high GC content of dipteran genomes, high AT content of genes favors biased usage of synonymous codons in the hymenopteran insects. Also, codon context patterns vary among these species largely according to their phylogeny.

  12. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Bias Modification Interventions for Substance Addictions: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Robin N.; Cuijpers, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Cognitive bias modification (CBM) interventions, presumably targeting automatic processes, are considered particularly promising for addictions. We conducted a meta-analysis examining randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CBM for substance addiction outcomes. Methods Studies were identified through systematic searches in bibliographical databases. We included RCTs of CBM interventions, alone or in combination with other treatments, for any type of addiction. We examined trial risk of bias, publication bias and possible moderators. Effects sizes were computed for post-test and follow-up, using a random-effects model. We grouped outcome measures and reported results for addiction (all related measures), craving and cognitive bias. Results We identified 25 trials, 18 for alcohol problems, and 7 for smoking. At post-test, there was no significant effect of CBM for addiction, g = 0.08 (95% CI -0.02 to 0.18) or craving, g = 0.05 (95% CI -0.06 to 0.16), but there was a significant, moderate effect on cognitive bias, g = 0.60 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.79). Results were similar for alcohol and smoking outcomes taken separately. Follow-up addiction outcomes were reported in 7 trials, resulting in a small but significant effect of CBM, g = 0.18 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.32). Results for addiction and craving did not differ by substance type, sample type, delivery setting, bias targeted or number of sessions. Risk of bias was high or uncertain in most trials, for most criteria considered. Meta-regression analyses revealed significant inverse relationships between risk of bias and effect sizes for addiction outcomes and craving. The relationship between cognitive bias and respectively addiction ESs was not significant. There was consistent evidence of publication bias in the form of funnel plot asymmetry. Conclusions Our results cast serious doubts on the clinical utility of CBM interventions for addiction problems, but sounder methodological trials are necessary before

  13. Exploring media bias with semantic analysis tools: validation of the Contrast Analysis of Semantic Similarity (CASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Nicholas S; Schott, John Paul; Jones, Michael N; Balota, David A; Yarkoni, Tal

    2011-03-01

    Text-analytic methods have become increasingly popular in cognitive science for understanding differences in semantic structure between documents. However, such methods have not been widely used in other disciplines. With the aim of disseminating these approaches, we introduce a text-analytic technique (Contrast Analysis of Semantic Similarity, CASS, www.casstools.org), based on the BEAGLE semantic space model (Jones & Mewhort, Psychological Review, 114, 1-37, 2007) and add new features to test between-corpora differences in semantic associations (e.g., the association between democrat and good, compared to democrat and bad). By analyzing television transcripts from cable news from a 12-month period, we reveal significant differences in political bias between television channels (liberal to conservative: MSNBC, CNN, FoxNews) and find expected differences between newscasters (Colmes, Hannity). Compared to existing measures of media bias, our measure has higher reliability. CASS can be used to investigate semantic structure when exploring any topic (e.g., self-esteem or stereotyping) that affords a large text-based database.

  14. Screening for depression and anxiety : Correlates of non-response and cohort attrition in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Veen, Willem Jan; Van Der Meer, Klaas; Penninx, Brenda W.

    2009-01-01

    A major problem in the analysis of attrition of cohorts in Studies on mental health problems is that data on those who do not participate at the outset of a study are largely unavailable. It is not known how underlying psychopathology affects the first stages of screening where non-response and sele

  15. Time-Lag Bias in Trials of Pediatric Antidepressants: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Magdalena M.; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Martin, Andres; Bloch, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is evidence of a time-lag bias in the publication of pediatric antidepressant trials. Method: We conducted a meta-analysis of published and unpublished randomized placebo-controlled trials of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in subjects less than 18 years of age with major depressive disorder. Our main…

  16. Time-Lag Bias in Trials of Pediatric Antidepressants: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Magdalena M.; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Martin, Andres; Bloch, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is evidence of a time-lag bias in the publication of pediatric antidepressant trials. Method: We conducted a meta-analysis of published and unpublished randomized placebo-controlled trials of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in subjects less than 18 years of age with major depressive disorder. Our main…

  17. Cortical surface-based analysis reduces bias and variance in kinetic modeling of brain PET data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Douglas N; Svarer, Claus; Fisher, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    intersubject variance than when volume smoothing was used. This translates into more than 4 times fewer subjects needed in a group analysis to achieve similarly powered statistical tests. Surface-based smoothing has less bias and variance because it respects cortical geometry by smoothing the PET data only...

  18. Convergence among Data Sources, Response Bias, and Reliability and Validity of a Structured Job Analysis Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jack E.; Hakel, Milton D.

    1979-01-01

    Examined are questions pertinent to the use of the Position Analysis Questionnaire: Who can use the PAQ reliably and validly? Must one rely on trained job analysts? Can people having no direct contact with the job use the PAQ reliably and validly? Do response biases influence PAQ responses? (Author/KC)

  19. Bias determination for space accelerometers using the ZARM Catapult system - experimental setup and data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, Hanns; Santos Rodrigues, Manuel; Touboul, Pierre; Liorzou, Françoise

    2012-07-01

    Accelerometers for space applications - like the electrostatic differential accelrometer for the MICROSCOPE mission for testing the equivalence principle in space - have to be tested and qualified in μg-conditions in order to demonstrate the system operation and to determine the characteristic sensor parameters. One important characteristic property is the sensor bias. In principle one can determine the sensor bias directly by using the ZARM catapult system as test platform. Even in the evacuated drop tube the residual air pressure results in an air friction that depends on the capsule velocity. At the apex (highest point of the capsule trajectory) the acceleration (relative to the gravitational acceleration g) becomes zero due to the zero velocity at the apex. The direct measurement of the vertical linear acceleration sensor bias is affected by some additional effects that have to be understood in order to be able to determine the sensor bias. Two catapult campaigns have been carried out to demonstrate the principles of the bias determination using a SuperStar accelerometer (Onera). The presentation gives an overview on the experimental setup and on the corresponding data analysis.

  20. Nonparametric Bounds in the Presence of Item Nonresponse, Unfolding Brackets and Anchoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vazquez-Alvarez, R.; Melenberg, B.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    2001-01-01

    Household surveys often suffer from nonresponse on variables such as income, savings or wealth.Recent work by Manski shows how bounds on conditional quantiles of the variable of interest can be derived, allowing for any type of nonrandom item nonresponse.The width between these bounds can be reduced

  1. Correcting waveform bias using principal component analysis: Applications in multicentre motion analysis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouthier, Allison L; Bohm, Eric R; Rudan, John F; Shay, Barbara L; Rainbow, Michael J; Deluzio, Kevin J

    2017-01-01

    Multicentre studies are rare in three dimensional motion analyses due to challenges associated with combining waveform data from different centres. Principal component analysis (PCA) is a statistical technique that can be used to quantify variability in waveform data and identify group differences. A correction technique based on PCA is proposed that can be used in post processing to remove nuisance variation introduced by the differences between centres. Using this technique, the waveform bias that exists between the two datasets is corrected such that the means agree. No information is lost in the individual datasets, but the overall variability in the combined data is reduced. The correction is demonstrated on gait kinematics with synthesized crosstalk and on gait data from knee arthroplasty patients collected in two centres. The induced crosstalk was successfully removed from the knee joint angle data. In the second example, the removal of the nuisance variation due to the multicentre data collection allowed significant differences in implant type to be identified. This PCA-based technique can be used to correct for differences between waveform datasets in post processing and has the potential to enable multicentre motion analysis studies.

  2. A Multiple Case Series Analysis of Six Variants of Attentional Bias Modification for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Peter; Van der Does, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Background. Attention bias modification (ABM) is a new treatment for affective disorders. A meta-analysis of ABM for anxiety disorders showed that the effect size may be large but the number of studies is low. The working mechanism is still unclear, and little is known about the optimal treatment parameters. ABM for depression is much less studied. A few studies claimed positive effects but the sample sizes are low. Furthermore, the treatment parameters varied widely and differed from the anxiety literature. Aim. To select the most promising version of ABM for depression for further evaluation in clinical trials. Methods. Multiple case series design. We tested six versions of ABM that varied on stimulus duration and training direction. Thirty students with mild to moderate symptoms of depression underwent four sessions of ABM. Change of attentional bias was measured during each session. Generalization of treatment effects and the role of awareness of receiving training were also investigated. Results. None of the investigated versions of ABM had a consistent effect on attentional bias. Changes of attentional bias in individual participants the effects did not generalize to untrained stimuli. Conclusion. It is unlikely that any of these ABM versions will have a specific effect on symptoms in controlled studies. PMID:23738217

  3. Multilinear Biased Discriminant Analysis: A Novel Method for Facial Action Unit Representation

    CERN Document Server

    Khademi, Mahmoud; Manzuri-Shalmani, Mohammad T

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a novel efficient method for representation of facial action units by encoding an image sequence as a fourth-order tensor is presented. The multilinear tensor-based extension of the biased discriminant analysis (BDA) algorithm, called multilinear biased discriminant analysis (MBDA), is first proposed. Then, we apply the MBDA and two-dimensional BDA (2DBDA) algorithms, as the dimensionality reduction techniques, to Gabor representations and the geometric features of the input image sequence respectively. The proposed scheme can deal with the asymmetry between positive and negative samples as well as curse of dimensionality dilemma. Extensive experiments on Cohn-Kanade database show the superiority of the proposed method for representation of the subtle changes and the temporal information involved in formation of the facial expressions. As an accurate tool, this representation can be applied to many areas such as recognition of spontaneous and deliberate facial expressions, multi modal/media huma...

  4. Is in-group bias culture-dependent? A meta-analysis across 18 societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ronald; Derham, Crysta

    2016-01-01

    We report a meta-analysis on the relationship between in-group bias and culture. Our focus is on whether broad macro-contextual variables influence the extent to which individuals favour their in-group. Data from 21,266 participants from 18 societies included in experimental and survey studies were available. Using Hofstede's (1980) and Schwartz (2006) culture-level predictors in a 3-level mixed-effects meta-analysis, we found strong support for the uncertainty-reduction hypothesis. An interaction between Autonomy and real vs artificial groups suggested that in low autonomy contexts, individuals show greater in-group bias for real groups. Implications for social identity theory and intergroup conflict are outlined.

  5. Modified intention-to-treat analysis did not bias trial results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dossing, Anna; Tarp, Simon; Furst, Daniel E;

    2016-01-01

    AND SETTING: Placebo-controlled, blinded randomized trials on biological or targeted interventions for rheumatoid arthritis were identified through a systematic search. Two authors independently extracted data. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to combine odds ratios as an expression of treatment effect....... This suggests that the mITT approach in rheumatoid arthritis trials investigating biological or targeted interventions does not introduce bias compared to ITT....

  6. Real-time Analysis and Selection Biases in the Supernova Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Perrett, K; Sullivan, M; Pritchet, C; Conley, A; Carlberg, R; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Howell, D A; Pain, R; Regnault, N

    2010-01-01

    The Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) has produced a high-quality, homogeneous sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) out to redshifts greater than z=1. In its first four years of full operation (to June 2007), the SNLS discovered more than 3000 transient candidates, 373 of which have been confirmed spectroscopically as SNe Ia. Use of these SNe Ia in precision cosmology critically depends on an analysis of the observational biases incurred in the SNLS survey due to the incomplete sampling of the underlying SN Ia population. This paper describes our real-time supernova detection and analysis procedures, and uses detailed Monte Carlo simulations to examine the effects of Malmquist bias and spectroscopic sampling. Such sampling effects are found to become apparent at z~0.6, with a significant shift in the average magnitude of the spectroscopically confirmed SN Ia sample towards brighter values for z>0.75. We describe our approach to correct for these selection biases in our three-year SNLS cosmological analysis (SNL...

  7. Analysis of bias voltage scan data recorded with hybrid Timepix1 silicon pixel assemblies at the DESY testbeam

    CERN Document Server

    Maimon, Shir

    2014-01-01

    This report will present results from the analysis of bias voltage scans in Timepix1 testbeam data. Three assemblies of varying sensor thickness were used to collect data. The effect of the bias voltage on charge sharing, in particular cluster size, was investigated and found to have a significant impact. The effect of the bias voltage on energy collection was also studied, leading to estimates for the depletion voltage, donor concentration, mobility and resistivity of each assembly. Finally, the effect of the bias voltage on the two-hit cluster resolution and detection efficiency was investigated. This report contains extracts from a longer document (LCD-OPEN-2014-001).

  8. 2013 Workplace and Equal Opportunity Survey of Active Duty Members: Nonresponse Bias Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    surveys) 27 of victims (16% versus 9% for Black and 20% versus 14% for Asian) while All Others Races have the opposite effect and make up the largest...race/ethnicity negatively? ............................. e. Displayed tattoos or wore distinctive clothes which were racist...b. Sex discrimination? ................................ c. Religious discrimination? .............................. d. Other type of

  9. Corrigendum to: “Publication bias and time-trend bias in meta-analysis of bicycle helmet efficacy: a re-analysis of Attewell, Glase and McFadden, 2001” [Accid. Anal. Prev. 43 (2011) 1245–1251].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvik, Rune

    2013-11-01

    This paper is a corrigendum to the previously published paper: “Publication bias and time-trend bias in meta-analysis of bicycle helmet efficacy: A re-analysis of Attewell, Glase and McFadden, 2001” [Accid. Anal. Prev. (2011) 1245–1251]. This corrigendum was prepared to correct errors in data and analysis in the previously published paper. Like the previously published paper, this paper confirms that the meta-analysis of bicycle helmet efficacy reported by Attewell, Glase and McFadden (Accident Analysis and Prevention, 2001, 345–352) was influenced by publication bias and time-trend bias that was not controlled for. As a result, the analysis reported inflated estimates of the effects of bicycle helmets. This paper presents a re-analysis of the study. The re-analysis included: (1) Ensuring the inclusion of all published studies by means of continuity corrections of estimates of effect relying on zero counts; (2) detecting and adjusting for publication bias by means of the trim-and-fill method; (3) detecting and trying to account for a time-trend bias in estimates of the effects of bicycle helmets; (4) updating the study by including recently published studies evaluating the effects of bicycle helmets. The re-analysis shows smaller safety benefits associated with the use of bicycle helmets than the original study.

  10. Design and analysis of experiments in networks: Reducing bias from interference

    CERN Document Server

    Eckles, Dean; Ugander, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the effects of interventions in networks is complicated when the units are interacting, such that the outcomes for one unit may depend on the treatment assignment and behavior of many or all other units (i.e., there is interference). When most or all units are in a single connected component, it is impossible to directly experimentally compare outcomes under two or more global treatment assignments since the network can only be observed under a single assignment. Familiar formalism, experimental designs, and analysis methods assume the absence of these interactions, and result in biased estimators of causal effects of interest. While some assumptions can lead to unbiased estimators, these assumptions are generally unrealistic, and we focus this work on realistic assumptions. Thus, in this work, we evaluate methods for designing and analyzing randomized experiments that aim to reduce this bias and thereby reduce overall error. In design, we consider the ability to perform random assignment to treatm...

  11. FORC analysis of ferro-ferromagnetic exchange bias in nanocrystalline ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-García, J.C.; Rivas, M., E-mail: rivas@uniovi.es; García, J.A.

    2016-04-01

    Horizontal shift and distortion of the hysteresis loops can be induced in some Co-based nanocrystalline systems in which soft and hard ferromagnetic phases coexist. As all the aspects of the phenomenon can be well explained in terms of the exchange interaction between the two phases, it has been identified as an induced ferro-ferromagnetic exchange bias. In this work we use the differential analysis based on first-order reversal curves to analyse this particular kind of exchange bias, through the comparison of the FORC diagrams corresponding to samples with different crystallization degrees. A detailed study of the evolution of such diagrams is presented, pointing in each case to the more outstanding features of the spots corresponding to the different phases as well as to their interactions.

  12. A Large-Scale Analysis of Impact Factor Biased Journal Self-Citations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorus, Caspar; Waltman, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Based on three decades of citation data from across scientific fields of science, we study trends in impact factor biased self-citations of scholarly journals, using a purpose-built and easy to use citation based measure. Our measure is given by the ratio between i) the relative share of journal self-citations to papers published in the last two years, and ii) the relative share of journal self-citations to papers published in preceding years. A ratio higher than one suggests that a journal's impact factor is disproportionally affected (inflated) by self-citations. Using recently reported survey data, we show that there is a relation between high values of our proposed measure and coercive journal self-citation malpractices. We use our measure to perform a large-scale analysis of impact factor biased journal self-citations. Our main empirical result is, that the share of journals for which our measure has a (very) high value has remained stable between the 1980s and the early 2000s, but has since risen strongly in all fields of science. This time span corresponds well with the growing obsession with the impact factor as a journal evaluation measure over the last decade. Taken together, this suggests a trend of increasingly pervasive journal self-citation malpractices, with all due unwanted consequences such as inflated perceived importance of journals and biased journal rankings.

  13. Using Critical Thinking to Identify Bias in the News Media: The Art of Critical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Richard W.; Adamson, Kenneth R.

    1990-01-01

    Urges social studies teachers to help students understand and identify sociocentric, national bias in the news media. Illustrates how the media fosters "us versus them" thinking and how word choice often reflects bias. Outlines activities to help students recognize bias. Provides weak and strong examples of students' analyses of bias in news…

  14. Bias correction and Bayesian analysis of aggregate counts in SAGE libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briggs William M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tag-based techniques, such as SAGE, are commonly used to sample the mRNA pool of an organism's transcriptome. Incomplete digestion during the tag formation process may allow for multiple tags to be generated from a given mRNA transcript. The probability of forming a tag varies with its relative location. As a result, the observed tag counts represent a biased sample of the actual transcript pool. In SAGE this bias can be avoided by ignoring all but the 3' most tag but will discard a large fraction of the observed data. Taking this bias into account should allow more of the available data to be used leading to increased statistical power. Results Three new hierarchical models, which directly embed a model for the variation in tag formation probability, are proposed and their associated Bayesian inference algorithms are developed. These models may be applied to libraries at both the tag and aggregate level. Simulation experiments and analysis of real data are used to contrast the accuracy of the various methods. The consequences of tag formation bias are discussed in the context of testing differential expression. A description is given as to how these algorithms can be applied in that context. Conclusions Several Bayesian inference algorithms that account for tag formation effects are compared with the DPB algorithm providing clear evidence of superior performance. The accuracy of inferences when using a particular non-informative prior is found to depend on the expression level of a given gene. The multivariate nature of the approach easily allows both univariate and joint tests of differential expression. Calculations demonstrate the potential for false positive and negative findings due to variation in tag formation probabilities across samples when testing for differential expression.

  15. Exercise as a treatment for depression: A meta-analysis adjusting for publication bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Felipe B; Vancampfort, Davy; Richards, Justin; Rosenbaum, Simon; Ward, Philip B; Stubbs, Brendon

    2016-06-01

    The effects of exercise on depression have been a source of contentious debate. Meta-analyses have demonstrated a range of effect sizes. Both inclusion criteria and heterogeneity may influence the effect sizes reported. The extent and influence of publication bias is also unknown. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from a recent Cochrane review and searches of major electronic databases from 01/2013 to 08/2015. We included RCTs of exercise interventions in people with depression (including those with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) or ratings on depressive symptoms), comparing exercise versus control conditions. A random effects meta-analysis calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD, 95% confidence interval; CI), meta-regressions, trim and fill and fail-safe n analyses were conducted. Twenty-five RCTs were included comparing exercise versus control comparison groups, including 9 examining participants with MDD. Overall, exercise had a large and significant effect on depression (SMD adjusted for publication bias = 1.11 (95% CI 0.79-1.43)) with a fail-safe number of 1057. Most adjusted analyses suggested publication bias led to an underestimated SMD. Larger effects were found for interventions in MDD, utilising aerobic exercise, at moderate and vigorous intensities, in a supervised and unsupervised format. In MDD, larger effects were found for moderate intensity, aerobic exercise, and interventions supervised by exercise professionals. Exercise has a large and significant antidepressant effect in people with depression (including MDD). Previous meta-analyses may have underestimated the benefits of exercise due to publication bias. Our data strongly support the claim that exercise is an evidence-based treatment for depression.

  16. Differences in undercoverage and nonresponse between city neighbourhoods in a telephone survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, H.; Jansma, F.; Veenstra, R.

    2005-01-01

    Two explanations of differences in undercoverage and nonresponse between neighbourhoods in a telephone survey among the inhabitants of the City of Groningen were studied: differences in Population composition between neighbourhoods or in their social disorganization. Logistic multilevel analyses wer

  17. A selection model for accounting for publication bias in a full network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavridis, Dimitris; Welton, Nicky J; Sutton, Alex; Salanti, Georgia

    2014-12-30

    Copas and Shi suggested a selection model to explore the potential impact of publication bias via sensitivity analysis based on assumptions for the probability of publication of trials conditional on the precision of their results. Chootrakool et al. extended this model to three-arm trials but did not fully account for the implications of the consistency assumption, and their model is difficult to generalize for complex network structures with more than three treatments. Fitting these selection models within a frequentist setting requires maximization of a complex likelihood function, and identification problems are common. We have previously presented a Bayesian implementation of the selection model when multiple treatments are compared with a common reference treatment. We now present a general model suitable for complex, full network meta-analysis that accounts for consistency when adjusting results for publication bias. We developed a design-by-treatment selection model to describe the mechanism by which studies with different designs (sets of treatments compared in a trial) and precision may be selected for publication. We fit the model in a Bayesian setting because it avoids the numerical problems encountered in the frequentist setting, it is generalizable with respect to the number of treatments and study arms, and it provides a flexible framework for sensitivity analysis using external knowledge. Our model accounts for the additional uncertainty arising from publication bias more successfully compared to the standard Copas model or its previous extensions. We illustrate the methodology using a published triangular network for the failure of vascular graft or arterial patency.

  18. Stability and bifurcation analysis of a vector-bias model of malaria transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonomo, Bruno; Vargas-De-León, Cruz

    2013-03-01

    The vector-bias model of malaria transmission, recently proposed by Chamchod and Britton, is considered. Nonlinear stability analysis is performed by means of the Lyapunov theory and the LaSalle Invariance Principle. The classical threshold for the basic reproductive number, R(0), is obtained: if R(0)>1, then the disease will spread and persist within its host population. If R(0)1, the endemic persistence of the disease has been proved to hold also for the extended model. This last result is obtained by means of the geometric approach to global stability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Adjustment for reporting bias in network meta-analysis of antidepressant trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinquart Ludovic

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network meta-analysis (NMA, a generalization of conventional MA, allows for assessing the relative effectiveness of multiple interventions. Reporting bias is a major threat to the validity of MA and NMA. Numerous methods are available to assess the robustness of MA results to reporting bias. We aimed to extend such methods to NMA. Methods We introduced 2 adjustment models for Bayesian NMA. First, we extended a meta-regression model that allows the effect size to depend on its standard error. Second, we used a selection model that estimates the propensity of trial results being published and in which trials with lower propensity are weighted up in the NMA model. Both models rely on the assumption that biases are exchangeable across the network. We applied the models to 2 networks of placebo-controlled trials of 12 antidepressants, with 74 trials in the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA database but only 51 with published results. NMA and adjustment models were used to estimate the effects of the 12 drugs relative to placebo, the 66 effect sizes for all possible pair-wise comparisons between drugs, probabilities of being the best drug and ranking of drugs. We compared the results from the 2 adjustment models applied to published data and NMAs of published data and NMAs of FDA data, considered as representing the totality of the data. Results Both adjustment models showed reduced estimated effects for the 12 drugs relative to the placebo as compared with NMA of published data. Pair-wise effect sizes between drugs, probabilities of being the best drug and ranking of drugs were modified. Estimated drug effects relative to the placebo from both adjustment models were corrected (i.e., similar to those from NMA of FDA data for some drugs but not others, which resulted in differences in pair-wise effect sizes between drugs and ranking. Conclusions In this case study, adjustment models showed that NMA of published data was not

  20. Systematic errors in detecting biased agonism: Analysis of current methods and development of a new model-free approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaran, H. Ongun; Ambrosio, Caterina; Uğur, Özlem; Madaras Koncz, Erzsebet; Grò, Maria Cristina; Vezzi, Vanessa; Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Costa, Tommaso

    2017-01-01

    Discovering biased agonists requires a method that can reliably distinguish the bias in signalling due to unbalanced activation of diverse transduction proteins from that of differential amplification inherent to the system being studied, which invariably results from the non-linear nature of biological signalling networks and their measurement. We have systematically compared the performance of seven methods of bias diagnostics, all of which are based on the analysis of concentration-response curves of ligands according to classical receptor theory. We computed bias factors for a number of β-adrenergic agonists by comparing BRET assays of receptor-transducer interactions with Gs, Gi and arrestin. Using the same ligands, we also compared responses at signalling steps originated from the same receptor-transducer interaction, among which no biased efficacy is theoretically possible. In either case, we found a high level of false positive results and a general lack of correlation among methods. Altogether this analysis shows that all tested methods, including some of the most widely used in the literature, fail to distinguish true ligand bias from “system bias” with confidence. We also propose two novel semi quantitative methods of bias diagnostics that appear to be more robust and reliable than currently available strategies. PMID:28290478

  1. Evaluation of the Relative Contribution of Observing Systems in Reanalyses: Aircraft Temperature Bias and Analysis Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Dasilva, Arindo M.

    2012-01-01

    Reanalyses have become important sources of data in weather and climate research. While observations are the most crucial component of the systems, few research projects consider carefully the multitudes of assimilated observations and their impact on the results. This is partly due to the diversity of observations and their individual complexity, but also due to the unfriendly nature of the data formats. Here, we discuss the NASA Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and a companion dataset, the Gridded Innovations and Observations (GIO). GIO is simply a post-processing of the assimilated observations and their innovations (forecast error and analysis error) to a common spatio-temporal grid, following that of the MERRA analysis fields. This data includes in situ, retrieved and radiance observations that are assimilated and used in the reanalysis. While all these disparate observations and statistics are in a uniform easily accessible format, there are some limitations. Similar observations are binned to the grid, so that multiple observations are combined in the gridding process. The data is then implicitly thinned. Some details in the meta data may also be lost (e.g. aircraft or station ID). Nonetheless, the gridded observations should provide easy access to all the observations input to the reanalysis. To provide an example of the GIO data, a case study evaluating observing systems over the United States and statistics is presented, and demonstrates the evaluation of the observations and the data assimilation. The GIO data is used to collocate 200mb Radiosonde and Aircraft temperature measurements from 1979-2009. A known warm bias of the aircraft measurements is apparent compared to the radiosonde data. However, when larger quantities of aircraft data are available, they dominate the analysis and the radiosonde data become biased against the forecast. When AMSU radiances become available the radiosonde and aircraft analysis and

  2. De-biasing the dynamic mode decomposition for applied Koopman spectral analysis of noisy datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemati, Maziar S.; Rowley, Clarence W.; Deem, Eric A.; Cattafesta, Louis N.

    2017-08-01

    The dynamic mode decomposition (DMD)—a popular method for performing data-driven Koopman spectral analysis—has gained increased popularity for extracting dynamically meaningful spatiotemporal descriptions of fluid flows from snapshot measurements. Often times, DMD descriptions can be used for predictive purposes as well, which enables informed decision-making based on DMD model forecasts. Despite its widespread use and utility, DMD can fail to yield accurate dynamical descriptions when the measured snapshot data are imprecise due to, e.g., sensor noise. Here, we express DMD as a two-stage algorithm in order to isolate a source of systematic error. We show that DMD's first stage, a subspace projection step, systematically introduces bias errors by processing snapshots asymmetrically. To remove this systematic error, we propose utilizing an augmented snapshot matrix in a subspace projection step, as in problems of total least-squares, in order to account for the error present in all snapshots. The resulting unbiased and noise-aware total DMD (TDMD) formulation reduces to standard DMD in the absence of snapshot errors, while the two-stage perspective generalizes the de-biasing framework to other related methods as well. TDMD's performance is demonstrated in numerical and experimental fluids examples. In particular, in the analysis of time-resolved particle image velocimetry data for a separated flow, TDMD outperforms standard DMD by providing dynamical interpretations that are consistent with alternative analysis techniques. Further, TDMD extracts modes that reveal detailed spatial structures missed by standard DMD.

  3. Theoretical analysis and an improvement method of the bias effect on the linearity of RF linear power amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Tuo; Chen Hongyi; Qian Dahong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Gummel-Poon model of BJT, the change of the DC bias as a function of the AC input signal in RF linear power amplifiers is theoretically derived, so that the linearity of different DC bias circuits can be interpreted and compared. According to the analysis results, a quantitative adaptive DC bias circuit is proposed,which can improve the linearity and efficiency. From the simulation and test results, we draw conclusions on how to improve the design of linear power amplifier.

  4. A Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Cognitive Bias Modification on Anxiety and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallion, Lauren S.; Ruscio, Ayelet Meron

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive biases have been theorized to play a critical role in the onset and maintenance of anxiety and depression. Cognitive bias modification (CBM), an experimental paradigm that uses training to induce maladaptive or adaptive cognitive biases, was developed to test these causal models. Although CBM has generated considerable interest in the…

  5. Tuberculous lymphadenitis: FDG PET and CT findings in responsive and nonresponsive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathekge, Mike [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); University of Pretoria, Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Private Bag X169, Pretoria (South Africa); Maes, Alex [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); University Hospital Leuven, Department of Morphology and Medical Imaging, Leuven (Belgium); D' Asseler, Yves [University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Vorster, Mariza [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Gongxeka, Harlem [University of Pretoria, Department of Radiology, Pretoria (South Africa); Wiele, Christophe van de [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-07-15

    No data is available on the different FDG PET and CT findings in the lymph nodes (LN) of patients with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) who respond compared with those who do not respond to anti-TB treatment by 4 months after initiation of TB treatment. These findings were the focus of our study. PET/CT scans performed at 4 months after initiation of TB treatment in 20 consecutive HIV patients were analysed. SUVmax values were obtained for all regions of LN involvement. The diameter of the LNs was measured and the CT enhancement (LNs showing peripheral rim enhancement with central low attenuation, PRECLO, in comparison with homogeneously involved LNs) and the calcification patterns of involved LNs assessed. The relationship between the PET and CT findings and the clinical outcome, response or nonresponse, was evaluated. FDG PET identified 91 sites of LN involvement, 20 of which were not identified by CT. SUVmax values were significantly higher in nonresponders (8 patients, SUVmax 11.2 {+-} 4.0, mean {+-} SD) when compared to responders (12 patients, SUVmax 2.6 {+-} 2.3; p = 0.0001). In ROC analysis (AUC 0.952) a cut-off value of 4.5 for SUVmax yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 95 % and 85 % for discriminating nonresponding from responding LNs. LNs were significantly larger in nonresponders (1.9 {+-} 0.4 cm) than in responders (1.4 {+-} 0.4 cm; p = 0.0001); the AUC in the ROC analysis was 0.76. PRECLO LNs were significantly larger (2.2 {+-} 0.3 cm) than homogeneous involved LN basins (1.5 {+-} 0.4 cm) and LN basins with calcification (1.4 {+-} 0.5 cm; p = 0.001). Using the presence of at least one LN basin with PRECLO as a criterion for nonresponse, responders could be separated from nonresponders with a sensitivity of 88 % and a specificity of 66 %. LNs responding to TB treatment could be differentiated from nonresponding LNs with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 % and 85 % using a SUVmax cut-off value of 4.5 and a sensitivity and specificity of 88 % and 66

  6. Experimental analysis of decay biases in the fossil record of lobopodians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Duncan; Gabbott, Sarah; Purnell, Mark

    2016-04-01

    If fossils are to realize their full potential in reconstructing the tree of life we must understand how our view of ancient organisms is obscured by taphonomic filters of decay and preservation. In most cases, processes of decay will leave behind either nothing or only the most decay resistant body parts, and even in those rare instances where soft tissues are fossilized we cannot assume that the resulting fossil, however exquisite, represents a faithful anatomical representation of the animal as it was in life.Recent experiments have shown that the biases introduced by decay can be far from random; in chordates, for example, the most phylogenetically informative characters are also the most decay-prone, resulting in 'stemward slippage'. But how widespread is this phenomenon, and are there other non-random biases linked to decay? Intuitively, we make assumptions about the likelihood of different kinds of characters to survive and be preserved, with knock-on effects for anatomical and phylogenetic interpretations. To what extent are these assumptions valid? We combine our understanding of the fossil record of lobopodians with insights from decay experiments of modern onychophorans (velvet worms) to test these assumptions. Our analysis demonstrates that taphonomically informed tests of character interpretations have the potential to improve phylogenetic resolution. This approach is widely applicable to the fossil record - allowing us to ground-truth some of the assumptions involved in describing exceptionally preserved fossil material.

  7. Potential predictors of non-response and super-response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Qing; DING Li-gang; HUA Wei; CHEN Ke-ping; WANG Fang-zheng; ZHANG Shu

    2011-01-01

    Background Although cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is already an established treatment, the characteristics of patients who have an excellent response to CRT and those who get no benefit remain to be determined. The purpose of this study was to search for potential predictors of both non-response and super-response to CRT.Methods Seventy-six consecutive patients who received CRT treatment were divided into group A (non-responders),group C (super-responders) and group B (responders exclusive of super-responders). Student's t test, Mann-Whitney test, Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve were employed to identify potential predictors among the patients' demographic characteristics, clinical features, several electrocardiographic parameters before and after CRT implantation, and their pre-implant echocardiographic parameters.Results Group A had the lowest 3-month left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Group C had the smallest pre-implant left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD), the shortest post-implant QRS duration, the smallest 3-month LVEDD and the highest 3-month LVEF. In addition, there was a trend of gradual change in percent of left bundle branch block,severity of pre-implant mitral regurgitation, pre-implant QRS dispersion, post-implant QRS duration as well as post-implant QRS dispersion from group A to group B and from group B to group C. Multivariable Logistic analysis revealed that only pre-implant LVEDD could predict CRT super-response. A pre-implant LVEDD of 68.5 mm was the cut-off value that identified super-responders with 87.5% sensitivity and 79.7% specificity. A pre-implant LVEDD of 62.5mm identified super-responders with 50.0% sensitivity and 89.8% specificity.Conclusions Predictors of a CRT non-response remain unclear at present. But it is credible that patients with a smaller left ventricle would have a better chance to become super-responders to CRT.

  8. Block-diagonal discriminant analysis and its bias-corrected rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Herbert; Tong, Tiejun; Ng, Michael

    2013-06-01

    High-throughput expression profiling allows simultaneous measure of tens of thousands of genes at once. These data have motivated the development of reliable biomarkers for disease subtypes identification and diagnosis. Many methods have been developed in the literature for analyzing these data, such as diagonal discriminant analysis, support vector machines, and k-nearest neighbor methods. The diagonal discriminant methods have been shown to perform well for high-dimensional data with small sample sizes. Despite its popularity, the independence assumption is unlikely to be true in practice. Recently, a gene module based linear discriminant analysis strategy has been proposed by utilizing the correlation among genes in discriminant analysis. However, the approach can be underpowered when the samples of the two classes are unbalanced. In this paper, we propose to correct the biases in the discriminant scores of block-diagonal discriminant analysis. In simulation studies, our proposed method outperforms other approaches in various settings. We also illustrate our proposed discriminant analysis method for analyzing microarray data studies.

  9. De-Biasing the Dynamic Mode Decomposition for Applied Koopman Spectral Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hemati, Maziar S

    2015-01-01

    The Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD)---a popular method for performing Koopman spectral analysis in numerous application areas---processes snapshot measurements sampled from a time-evolving system to extract dynamically meaningful spatio-temporal descriptions of the underlying process. Often times, DMD descriptions can be used for predictive purposes as well, which enables informed decision-making based on DMD model-forecasts. Despite its widespread use and utility, DMD regularly fails to yield accurate dynamical descriptions when the measured snapshot data are even slightly imprecise due to, e.g., sensor noise. Here, we express DMD as a two-stage algorithm in order to isolate a source of systematic error. We show that DMD's first stage, a subspace projection step, systematically introduces bias errors by processing snapshots asymmetrically. In order to remove this systematic error, we propose utilizing an augmented snapshot matrix in a subspace projection step, as in problems of total least-squares, in order...

  10. Chinese and Japanese Reporting of the Yasukuni Shrine Controversy: A Comparative Analysis of Institutional Media Bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAN, Joseph

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies looking at the dynamics of the state-media relationship usually focus on structural reasons, such as geopolitical or economic, to explain how the media frames the news. However, this paper argues that media organizations also have their own agendas independent of existing socio-political restraints, and that they are therefore important social actors in their own right. A news discourse analysis methodology was used to analyze Chinese and Japanese newspapers' reporting on former Japanese Prime Minister Jun'ichiro Koizumi's visits to Yasukuni Shrine to demonstrate empirically the existence of institutional media bias within these newsmaking organizations that is not necessarily consistent with the reconciliatory tone of both countries' state actions. A comparison of the results suggest that while institutional ideology may predict how Japanese newspapers shape their reporting, rhetoric is an important factor in the case of the Chinese press where state control is more stringent.

  11. MCMC Analysis of biases in the interpretation of disk galaxy kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino-Ortíz, E.; Valenzuela, O.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Sánchez-Sánchez, S. F.; Hernández-Toledo, H.

    2016-06-01

    The new generation of galaxy surveys like SAMI, CALIFA and MaNGA opens up the possibility of studying simultaneously properties of galaxies such as spiral arms, bars, disk geometry and orientation, stellar and gas mass distribution, 2D kinematics, etc. The previous task involves exploring a complicated multi-dimensional parameter space. Puglielli et al. (2010) introduced Bayesian statistics and MCMC (Monte Carlo Markov Chain) techniques to construct dynamical models of spiral galaxies. In our study we used synthetic velocity fields that include non-circular motions and assume different disk orientations in order to produce mock observations. We apply popular reconstruction techniques in order to estimate the geometrical disk parameters, systemic velocities, rotation curve shape and maximum circular velocity which are crucial to construct the scaling relations. We conclude that a detailed analysis of kinematics in galaxies using MCMC technique will be reflected in accurate estimations of galaxy properties and more robust scalings relations, otherwise physical conclusions may be importantly biased.

  12. Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Sendhil Mullainathan; Andrei Shleifer

    2002-01-01

    There are two different types of media bias. One bias, which we refer to as ideology, reflects a news outlet's desire to affect reader opinions in a particular direction. The second bias, which we refer to as spin, reflects the outlet's attempt to simply create a memorable story. We examine competition among media outlets in the presence of these biases. Whereas competition can eliminate the effect of ideological bias, it actually exaggerates the incentive to spin stories.

  13. Large Scale Gene Expression Meta-Analysis Reveals Tissue-Specific, Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Benjamin T.; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Buckberry, Sam; Breen, James; Clifton, Vicki; Shoubridge, Cheryl; Roberts, Claire T.

    2016-01-01

    The severity and prevalence of many diseases are known to differ between the sexes. Organ specific sex-biased gene expression may underpin these and other sexually dimorphic traits. To further our understanding of sex differences in transcriptional regulation, we performed meta-analyses of sex biased gene expression in multiple human tissues. We analyzed 22 publicly available human gene expression microarray data sets including over 2500 samples from 15 different tissues and 9 different organs. Briefly, by using an inverse-variance method we determined the effect size difference of gene expression between males and females. We found the greatest sex differences in gene expression in the brain, specifically in the anterior cingulate cortex, (1818 genes), followed by the heart (375 genes), kidney (224 genes), colon (218 genes), and thyroid (163 genes). More interestingly, we found different parts of the brain with varying numbers and identity of sex-biased genes, indicating that specific cortical regions may influence sexually dimorphic traits. The majority of sex-biased genes in other tissues such as the bladder, liver, lungs, and pancreas were on the sex chromosomes or involved in sex hormone production. On average in each tissue, 32% of autosomal genes that were expressed in a sex-biased fashion contained androgen or estrogen hormone response elements. Interestingly, across all tissues, we found approximately two-thirds of autosomal genes that were sex-biased were not under direct influence of sex hormones. To our knowledge this is the largest analysis of sex-biased gene expression in human tissues to date. We identified many sex-biased genes that were not under the direct influence of sex chromosome genes or sex hormones. These may provide targets for future development of sex-specific treatments for diseases.

  14. Large scale gene expression meta-analysis reveals tissue-specific, sex-biased gene expression in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Mayne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The severity and prevalence of many diseases are known to differ between the sexes. Organ specific sex-biased gene expression may underpin these and other sexually dimorphic traits. To further our understanding of sex differences in transcriptional regulation, we performed meta-analyses of sex biased gene expression in multiple human tissues. We analysed 22 publicly available human gene expression microarray data sets including over 2500 samples from 15 different tissues and 9 different organs. Briefly, by using an inverse-variance method we determined the effect size difference of gene expression between males and females. We found the greatest sex differences in gene expression in the brain, specifically in the anterior cingulate cortex, (1818 genes, followed by the heart (375 genes, kidney (224 genes, colon (218 genes and thyroid (163 genes. More interestingly, we found different parts of the brain with varying numbers and identity of sex-biased genes, indicating that specific cortical regions may influence sexually dimorphic traits. The majority of sex-biased genes in other tissues such as the bladder, liver, lungs and pancreas were on the sex chromosomes or involved in sex hormone production. On average in each tissue, 32% of autosomal genes that were expressed in a sex-biased fashion contained androgen or estrogen hormone response elements. Interestingly, across all tissues, we found approximately two-thirds of autosomal genes that were sex-biased were not under direct influence of sex hormones. To our knowledge this is the largest analysis of sex-biased gene expression in human tissues to date. We identified many sex-biased genes that were not under the direct influence of sex chromosome genes or sex hormones. These may provide targets for future development of sex-specific treatments for diseases.

  15. How to boost positive interpretations? A meta-analysis of the effectiveness of cognitive bias modification for interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menne-Lothmann, Claudia; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Höhn, Petra; Kasanova, Zuzana; Haller, Simone P; Drukker, Marjan; van Os, Jim; Wichers, Marieke; Lau, Jennifer Y F

    2014-01-01

    The current meta-analysis explores the strength of effects of cognitive bias modification training for interpretation bias (CBM-I) on positive (i.e., adaptive) interpretations and mood as well as the training and sample characteristics influencing these effects. Data-bases were searched with the key words "interpret* bias AND training" and "interpret* bias AND modif*". Reference lists of identified articles were checked and authors of identified articles were contacted for further relevant articles and unpublished data. Studies were reviewed for inclusion with eligibility criteria being that the study (a) aimed to target interpretation biases through any kind of training, (b) assessed mood and/or interpretation bias as outcome measures, (c) allocated individuals to training conditions at random, and (d) recruited adult samples. A meta-analytic multilevel mixed-effects model was employed to assess standardized mean changes in interpretation bias, negative mood, and emotional reactivity. In addition, several training and sample characteristics were explored for their potential to enhance benign training effectiveness. On average, benign CBM-I resulted in an increase in positive interpretation bias (pcognitive and mood effects, whereas feedback about training performance and inclusion of non-benign training items (instead of including benign items only) boosted cognitive effects only. Finally, training was more effective in women (cognitive and mood effects) and presumably samples with symptomatic emotional dysregulation (cognitive effects). Although the effects of emotional dysregulation and number of training sessions could not well be distinguished, there is an indication that when used with imagery instructions and more training sessions, benign CBM-I can be employed as a useful complementary treatment to usual psychotherapies.

  16. Biomedical journals lack a consistent method to detect outcome reporting bias: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, L N; Tejani, A M; Egan, G

    2014-10-01

    An increasing amount of recently published literature has implicated outcome reporting bias (ORB) as a major contributor to skewing data in both randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews; however, little is known about the current methods in place to detect ORB. This study aims to gain insight into the detection and management of ORB by biomedical journals. This was a cross-sectional analysis involving standardized questions via email or telephone with the top 30 biomedical journals (2012) ranked by impact factor. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was excluded leaving 29 journals in the sample. Of 29 journals, 24 (83%) responded to our initial inquiry of which 14 (58%) answered our questions and 10 (42%) declined participation. Five (36%) of the responding journals indicated they had a specific method to detect ORB, whereas 9 (64%) did not have a specific method in place. The prevalence of ORB in the review process seemed to differ with 4 (29%) journals indicating ORB was found commonly, whereas 7 (50%) indicated ORB was uncommon or never detected by their journal previously. The majority (n = 10/14, 72%) of journals were unwilling to report or make discrepancies found in manuscripts available to the public. Although the minority, there were some journals (n = 4/14, 29%) which described thorough methods to detect ORB. Many journals seemed to lack a method with which to detect ORB and its estimated prevalence was much lower than that reported in literature suggesting inadequate detection. There exists a potential for overestimation of treatment effects of interventions and unclear risks. Fortunately, there are journals within this sample which appear to utilize comprehensive methods for detection of ORB, but overall, the data suggest improvements at the biomedical journal level for detecting and minimizing the effect of this bias are needed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. ANCAC: amino acid, nucleotide, and codon analysis of COGs – a tool for sequence bias analysis in microbial orthologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiler Arno

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The COG database is the most popular collection of orthologous proteins from many different completely sequenced microbial genomes. Per definition, a cluster of orthologous groups (COG within this database exclusively contains proteins that most likely achieve the same cellular function. Recently, the COG database was extended by assigning to every protein both the corresponding amino acid and its encoding nucleotide sequence resulting in the NUCOCOG database. This extended version of the COG database is a valuable resource connecting sequence features with the functionality of the respective proteins. Results Here we present ANCAC, a web tool and MySQL database for the analysis of amino acid, nucleotide, and codon frequencies in COGs on the basis of freely definable phylogenetic patterns. We demonstrate the usefulness of ANCAC by analyzing amino acid frequencies, codon usage, and GC-content in a species- or function-specific context. With respect to amino acids we, at least in part, confirm the cognate bias hypothesis by using ANCAC’s NUCOCOG dataset as the largest one available for that purpose thus far. Conclusions Using the NUCOCOG datasets, ANCAC connects taxonomic, amino acid, and nucleotide sequence information with the functional classification via COGs and provides a GUI for flexible mining for sequence-bias. Thereby, to our knowledge, it is the only tool for the analysis of sequence composition in the light of physiological roles and phylogenetic context without requirement of substantial programming-skills.

  18. Using two-level factor analysis to test for cluster bias in ordinal data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jak, Suzanne; Oort, F.J .; Dolan, Conor V.

    2014-01-01

    The test for cluster bias is a test of measurement invariance across clusters in 2-level data. This article examines the true positive rates (empirical power) and false positive rates of the test for cluster bias using the likelihood ratio test (LRT) and the Wald test with ordinal data. A simulation

  19. Survey nonresponse among ethnic minorities in a national health survey - a mixed-method study of participation, barriers, and potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlmark, Nanna; Algren, Maria Holst; Holmberg, Teresa;

    2015-01-01

    and incentives to participation. Design. This was a mixed-method study. Logistic regression was used to analyze nonresponse using data from DNHS (N = 177,639 and chi-square tests in item nonresponse analyses. We explored barriers and incentives regarding participation through focus groups and cognitive...

  20. Ribavirin rather than PEG-interferon pharmacodynamics predict nonresponse to antiviral therapy in naive chronic hepatitis C patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlerken, L.G. Van; Huisman, E.J.; Soest, H. van; Boland, G.J.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Siersema, P.D.; Burger, D.M.; Erpecum, K.J. van

    2012-01-01

    Twenty to fifty per cent of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) experience nonresponse to current antiviral therapy, which may relate in part to ribavirin or PEG-interferon pharmacodynamics. We evaluated potential relevance of various factors for nonresponse. Two hundred forty-two naive CHC pati

  1. Height bias and scale effect induced by antenna gravitational deformations in geodetic VLBI data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, Pierguido; Abbondanza, Claudio; Petrov, Leonid; Negusini, Monia

    2011-01-01

    The impact of signal path variations (SPVs) caused by antenna gravitational deformations on geodetic very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) results is evaluated for the first time. Elevation-dependent models of SPV for Medicina and Noto (Italy) telescopes were derived from a combination of terrestrial surveying methods to account for gravitational deformations. After applying these models in geodetic VLBI data analysis, estimates of the antenna reference point positions are shifted upward by 8.9 and 6.7 mm, respectively. The impact on other parameters is negligible. To simulate the impact of antenna gravitational deformations on the entire VLBI network, lacking measurements for other telescopes, we rescaled the SPV models of Medicina and Noto for other antennas according to their size. The effects of the simulations are changes in VLBI heights in the range [-3, 73] mm and a net scale increase of 0.3-0.8 ppb. The height bias is larger than random errors of VLBI position estimates, implying the possibility of significant scale distortions related to antenna gravitational deformations. This demonstrates the need to precisely measure gravitational deformations of other VLBI telescopes, to derive their precise SPV models and to apply them in routine geodetic data analysis.

  2. Exchange bias and anisotropy analysis of nano-composite Co{sub 84}Zr{sub 16}N thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jitendra, E-mail: jitendra@ceeri.ernet.in [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute, Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, Chennai 600113 (India); Taube, William Ringal [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute, Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, Chennai 600113 (India); Ansari, Akhtar Saleem [Department of Applied Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India); Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, Chennai 600113 (India); Kulriya, Pawan Kumar [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 110067 (India); Akhtar, Jamil [CSIR-Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute, Pilani, Rajasthan 333031 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Nano-composite Co{sub 84}Zr{sub 16}N (CZN) films were prepared by reactive co-sputter deposition. As-deposited CZN films have not shown any exchange bias effect. But annealed (390 K) and field cooled samples have shown exchange bias phenomena. The observed exchange bias is attributed to inter-cluster exchange coupling between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic nano-composite phase. High resolution transmission electron microscope study reveals that, the CZN films are composed of ordered and crystalline ferromagnetic Cobalt nano-clusters embedded in an antiferromagnetic matrix. X-ray diffraction confirms the poly-crystalline growth of the CZN films with a preferred fcc (622) phase formation. In-plane anisotropy of the exchange biased films was investigated by rotational magnetization curve, and the analysis shows that the magnetization reversal behaves according to the coherent rotation of the magnetic moment vector. Effectively, exchange bias effect in such single layer films could be attributed to co-existing antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic phase within the single layer. Such single layer nano-composite films can be a possible alternative to the bilayer combination of antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic exchange biased films and are ideally suited for spintronics and tunnel junction applications. - Highlights: • Exchange bias effect observed in 390 K annealed and field cooled single layer nanocomposite Co{sub 84}Zr{sub 16}N (CZN) thin films. • CZN films are composed of ordered and crystalline ferromagnetic Cobalt nano-clusters embedded in antiferromagnetic matrix. • Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy investigated by rotational magnetization curve, and magnetization reversal behaves according to coherent rotation of magnetic moment vector. • Co-existing FM and AF phases in composite matrix are lead to extraordinary EB behavior.

  3. Measuring treatment and scale bias effects by linear regression in the analysis of OHI-S scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B J

    1977-05-01

    A linear regression model is presented for estimating unbiased treatment effects from OHI-S scores. An example is given to illustrate an analysis and to compare results of an unbiased regression estimator with those based on a biased simple difference estimator.

  4. Unpredictable bias when using the missing indicator method or complete case analysis for missing confounder values: an empirical example.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, M.J.; Janssen, K.J.; Donders, A.R.T.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Heerdink, E.R.; Grobbee, D.E.; Moons, K.G.; Geerlings, M.I.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Missing indicator method (MIM) and complete case analysis (CC) are frequently used to handle missing confounder data. Using empirical data, we demonstrated the degree and direction of bias in the effect estimate when using these methods compared with multiple imputation (MI). STUDY DESIGN

  5. Analytic bias specifications based on the analysis of effects on performance of medical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, G G; Schryver, P G; Kisabeth, R M

    1999-11-01

    Laboratory tests are key indicators for certain practice guidelines, and analytic bias can significantly alter the performance of these guidelines. Three clinical paradigms are described: serum cholesterol testing for risk assessment of cardiac disease, serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) measurement for the detection of hypothyroidism, and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for prostate cancer risk assessment. Maximum tolerance limits for analytic bias are calculated by assessing the subgroup population fluctuations in the number of patients exceeding the guideline threshold values and limiting the analytic bias to one-half of these fluctuations. Our calculated maximum bias limits are +/-1% for cholesterol and +/-6% for TSH and PSA. Our recommended +/-1% bias limit for cholesterol allows for a -6.5% to + 5.8% change in the number of patients designated as at risk for cardiac disease, whereas the +/-3% National Cholesterol Education Program limits permit a -18.4% to +16.7% variation. Similarly, our +/-6% bias limits for TSH allow a -17.7% to +26.6% change in patients flagged for hypothyroidism, whereas the +/-10% bias values found with many commercial reagents permit a -28.2% to +49.2% variation in patient classification. Our +/-6% PSA bias limits correspond to changes from -14.2% to +11.4% in the number of men classified as at risk for prostate cancer. The +/-10% bias ranges for PSA correspond to -19.9% to +20.4% variation in patient classification. The larger tolerance limits of the CLIA-88 standards for proficiency testing would cause even wider variations in patient classifications.

  6. A meta-analysis of gender stereotypes and bias in experimental simulations of employment decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Amanda J; D'Mello, Susan D; Sackett, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Gender bias continues to be a concern in many work settings, leading researchers to identify factors that influence workplace decisions. In this study we examine several of these factors, using an organizing framework of sex distribution within jobs (including male- and female-dominated jobs as well as sex-balanced, or integrated, jobs). We conducted random effects meta-analyses including 136 independent effect sizes from experimental studies (N = 22,348) and examined the effects of decision-maker gender, amount and content of information available to the decision maker, type of evaluation, and motivation to make careful decisions on gender bias in organizational decisions. We also examined study characteristics such as type of participant, publication year, and study design. Our findings revealed that men were preferred for male-dominated jobs (i.e., gender-role congruity bias), whereas no strong preference for either gender was found for female-dominated or integrated jobs. Second, male raters exhibited greater gender-role congruity bias than did female raters for male-dominated jobs. Third, gender-role congruity bias did not consistently decrease when decision makers were provided with additional information about those they were rating, but gender-role congruity bias was reduced when information clearly indicated high competence of those being evaluated. Fourth, gender-role congruity bias did not differ between decisions that required comparisons among ratees and decisions made about individual ratees. Fifth, decision makers who were motivated to make careful decisions tended to exhibit less gender-role congruity bias for male-dominated jobs. Finally, for male-dominated jobs, experienced professionals showed smaller gender-role congruity bias than did undergraduates or working adults.

  7. Design, Analysis and Simulation of Magnetic Biased Inductors with Saturation-Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguilar, Andres Revilla; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2014-01-01

    , the effective saturation current limit of a given inductor is doubled. This results in a smaller requirement in number of turns and area cross-section, allowing for smaller and/or more efficient inductors. By adding some switching elements, the benefits of biased inductors can also be used in AC applications....... This paper presents a review of the scientific literature on biased hybrid inductors and the evolution of the used magnets and cores configurations. A recently developed biasing configuration, the saturation-gap, will also be analyzed and the design parameter will be identified using finite element software...

  8. Time-frequency analysis of DC bias vibration of transformer core on the basis of Hilbert–Huang transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmou Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a time–frequency analysis of the vibration of transformer under direct current (DC bias through Hilbert–Huang transform (HHT. First, the theory of DC bias for the transformer was analyzed. Next, the empirical mode decomposition (EMD process, which is the key in HHT, was introduced. The results of EMD, namely, intrinsic mode functions (IMFs, were calculated and summed by Hilbert transform(HT to obtain time-dependent series in a 2D time–frequency domain. Lastly, a test system of vibration measurement for the transformer was set up. Three direction (x, y, and z axes components of core vibration were measured. Decomposition of EMD and HHT spectra showed that vibration strength increased, and odd harmonics were produced with DC bias. Results indicated that HHT is a viable signal processing tool for transformer health monitoring.

  9. Analysis of the technical biases of meteor video cameras used in the CILBO system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Thomas; Koschny, Detlef; Molau, Sirko; Srama, Ralf; Poppe, Björn

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we analyse the technical biases of two intensified video cameras, ICC7 and ICC9, of the double-station meteor camera system CILBO (Canary Island Long-Baseline Observatory). This is done to thoroughly understand the effects of the camera systems on the scientific data analysis. We expect a number of errors or biases that come from the system: instrumental errors, algorithmic errors and statistical errors. We analyse different observational properties, in particular the detected meteor magnitudes, apparent velocities, estimated goodness-of-fit of the astrometric measurements with respect to a great circle and the distortion of the camera. We find that, due to a loss of sensitivity towards the edges, the cameras detect only about 55 % of the meteors it could detect if it had a constant sensitivity. This detection efficiency is a function of the apparent meteor velocity. We analyse the optical distortion of the system and the goodness-of-fit of individual meteor position measurements relative to a fitted great circle. The astrometric error is dominated by uncertainties in the measurement of the meteor attributed to blooming, distortion of the meteor image and the development of a wake for some meteors. The distortion of the video images can be neglected. We compare the results of the two identical camera systems and find systematic differences. For example, the peak magnitude distribution for ICC9 is shifted by about 0.2-0.4 mag towards fainter magnitudes. This can be explained by the different pointing directions of the cameras. Since both cameras monitor the same volume in the atmosphere roughly between the two islands of Tenerife and La Palma, one camera (ICC7) points towards the west, the other one (ICC9) to the east. In particular, in the morning hours the apex source is close to the field-of-view of ICC9. Thus, these meteors appear slower, increasing the dwell time on a pixel. This is favourable for the detection of a meteor of a given magnitude.

  10. MMPI Profiles and Code Types of Responsible and Non-Responsible Criminal Defendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlychek, Robert T.; Jordan, L.

    1980-01-01

    Compared MMPI profiles and two-point code types of criminal defendants (N=50) pleading a defense of "not responsible due to mental disease or defect." A sign test was computed, treating the clinical scales as matched pairs, and a significant difference was found; the nonresponsible group profile was more elevated. (Author)

  11. Extreme Nonresponse in Cognitive Therapy: Can Behavioral Activation Succeed where Cognitive Therapy Fails?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Sandra J.; Martell, Christopher R.; Dimidjian, Sona; Gallop, Robert; Hollon, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    In a recent placebo-controlled comparison, behavioral activation was superior to cognitive therapy in the treatment of moderate to severely depressed adults. Moreover, a subset of patients exhibited a pattern of extreme nonresponse to cognitive therapy on self-reports of depression not evident on the clinician ratings. These patients were severely…

  12. Non-Response in Student Surveys: The Role of Demographics, Engagement and Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    What causes a student to participate in a survey? This paper looks at participation across multiple surveys to understand survey non-response; by using multiple surveys we minimize the impact of survey salience. Students at a selective liberal arts college were administered four different surveys throughout the 2002-2003 academic year, and we use…

  13. Bounds on Quantiles in the Presence of Full and Partial Item Nonresponse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vazquez-Alvarez, R.; Melenberg, B.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    1999-01-01

    Microeconomic surveys are usually subject to the problem of item nonresponse, typically associated with variables like income and wealth, where confidentiality and/or lack of accurate information can affect the response behavior of the individual. Follow up categorical questions can reduce item nonr

  14. Host Nonresponsiveness Does not Interfere With Vaccine-Mediated Protection Against Gastric Helicobacter Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, Stacey N; Mitchell, Hazel M; Sutton, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis results from the inflammation induced by chronic infection. CBA mice are nonresponsive to gastric Helicobacter infection, providing a useful model for examining host regulation of Helicobacter-induced gastritis. We examined whether gastric Helicobacter nonresponsiveness impacts upon vaccine efficacy and whether immune-mediated protection could occur in the absence of inflammation. Mice were vaccinated prior to challenge with Helicobacter felis or H. pylori. Gastritis and H. felis colonization was evaluated histologically. H. pylori colonization was quantified by colony-forming assay. Immunizations protected CBA mice against challenge with either H. felis or H. pylori. Protection against H. felis was marked by a loss of nonresponsiveness and development of an atrophic gastritis with mucus metaplasia. However, vaccine-induced protection against H. pylori was only associated with cell infiltration into the gastric mucosa. Nonresponsiveness to gastric Helicobacter infection did not interfere with vaccination-induced protection. Vaccine-induced protective immunity against H. pylori was linked with the induction of cellular infiltration, but importantly not atrophic gastritis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Predicting Non-response to Ranibizumab in Patients with Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asten, F. van; Rovers, M.M.; Lechanteur, Y.T.E.; Smailhodzic, D.; Muether, P.S.; Chen, J.; Hollander, A.I. den; Fauser, S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Klevering, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To validate known and determine new predictors of non-response to ranibizumab in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and to incorporate these factors into a prediction rule. METHODS: This multicenter, observational cohort study included 391 patients tre

  16. A KiDS weak lensing analysis of assembly bias in GAMA galaxy groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvornik, Andrej; Cacciato, Marcello; Kuijken, Konrad; Viola, Massimo; Hoekstra, Henk; Nakajima, Reiko; van Uitert, Edo; Brouwer, Margot; Choi, Ami; Erben, Thomas; Fenech Conti, Ian; Farrow, Daniel J.; Herbonnet, Ricardo; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hopkins, Andrew M.; McFarland, John; Norberg, Peder; Schneider, Peter; Sifón, Cristóbal; Valentijn, Edwin; Wang, Lingyu

    2017-07-01

    We investigate possible signatures of halo assembly bias for spectroscopically selected galaxy groups from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey using weak lensing measurements from the spatially overlapping regions of the deeper, high-imaging-quality photometric Kilo-Degree Survey. We use GAMA groups with an apparent richness larger than 4 to identify samples with comparable mean host halo masses but with a different radial distribution of satellite galaxies, which is a proxy for the formation time of the haloes. We measure the weak lensing signal for groups with a steeper than average and with a shallower than average satellite distribution and find no sign of halo assembly bias, with the bias ratio of 0.85^{+0.37}_{-0.25}, which is consistent with the Λ cold dark matter prediction. Our galaxy groups have typical masses of 1013 M⊙ h-1, naturally complementing previous studies of halo assembly bias on galaxy cluster scales.

  17. Hysteresis analysis in dye-sensitized solar cells based on external bias field effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Li, Xiaoyi; Tong, Yanhua; Zhang, Tiansheng

    2017-02-01

    The current density-voltage (J-V) hysteresis phenomenon occurs in perovskite solar cells as well as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs); however, it has received little attention in DSCs. We consider that the trapping-detrapping-induced variation of the charge collection efficiency might cause J-V hysteresis. Therefore, we conduct a systematic study on the influence of an external bias field during and before J-V measurements in typical DSCs. We find that the J-V performance of DSCs significantly depends on the scan bias direction and the external bias field before and during measurements. Our results indicate that the external-bias-field-modulated charge injection, trapping-detrapping, and accumulation processes in DSCs are possible causes for the anomalous J-V behavior.

  18. Using Two-Level Factor Analysis to Test for Cluster Bias in Ordinal Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jak, Suzanne; Oort, Frans J; Dolan, Conor V

    2014-01-01

    The test for cluster bias is a test of measurement invariance across clusters in 2-level data. This article examines the true positive rates (empirical power) and false positive rates of the test for cluster bias using the likelihood ratio test (LRT) and the Wald test with ordinal data. A simulation study indicates that the scaled version of the LRT that accounts for nonnormality of the data gives untrustworthy results, whereas the unscaled LRT and the Wald test have acceptable false positive rates and perform well in terms of empirical power rate if the amount of cluster bias is large. The test for cluster bias is illustrated with data from research on teacher-student relations.

  19. Development and deployment of an inner detector minimum bias trigger and analysis of minimum bias data of the ATLAS experiment at the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwee, Regina Esther

    2012-01-13

    Soft inelastic QCD processes are the dominant proton-proton interaction type at the LHC. More than 20 of such collisions pile up within a single bunch-crossing at ATLAS, when the LHC is operated at design luminosity of L=10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} colliding proton bunches with an energy of {radical}(s)=14 TeV. Inelastic interactions are characterised by a small transverse momentum transfer and can only be approximated by phenomenological models that need experimental data as input. The initial phase of LHC beam operation in 2009, with luminosities ranging from L=10{sup 27} to 10{sup 31} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, offered an ideal period to select single proton-proton interactions and study general aspects of their properties. As first part of this thesis, a Minimum Bias trigger was developed and used for data-taking in ATLAS. This trigger, mbSpTrk, processes signals of the silicon tracking detectors of ATLAS and was designed to fulfill efficiently reject empty events, while possible biases in the selection of proton-proton collisions is reduced to a minimum. The trigger is flexible enough to cope also with changing background conditions allowing to retain low-p{sub T} events while machine background is highly suppressed. As second part, measurements of inelastic charged particles were performed in two phase-space regions. Centrally produced charged particles were considered with a pseudorapidity smaller than 0.8 and a transverse momentum of at least 0.5 or 1 GeV. Four characteristic distributions were measured at two centre-of-mass energies of {radical}(s)=0.9 and 7 TeV. The results are presented with minimal model dependency to compare them to predictions of different Monte Carlo models for soft particle production. This analysis represents also the ATLAS contribution for the first common LHC analysis to which the ATLAS, CMS and ALICE collaborations agreed. The pseudorapidity distributions for both energies and phase-space regions are compared to the respective

  20. A Diffusion Model Analysis of Decision Biases Affecting Delayed Recognition of Emotional Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Holly J; Spaniol, Julia; Patel, Ronak; Voss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Previous empirical work suggests that emotion can influence accuracy and cognitive biases underlying recognition memory, depending on the experimental conditions. The current study examines the effects of arousal and valence on delayed recognition memory using the diffusion model, which allows the separation of two decision biases thought to underlie memory: response bias and memory bias. Memory bias has not been given much attention in the literature but can provide insight into the retrieval dynamics of emotion modulated memory. Participants viewed emotional pictorial stimuli; half were given a recognition test 1-day later and the other half 7-days later. Analyses revealed that emotional valence generally evokes liberal responding, whereas high arousal evokes liberal responding only at a short retention interval. The memory bias analyses indicated that participants experienced greater familiarity with high-arousal compared to low-arousal items and this pattern became more pronounced as study-test lag increased; positive items evoke greater familiarity compared to negative and this pattern remained stable across retention interval. The findings provide insight into the separate contributions of valence and arousal to the cognitive mechanisms underlying delayed emotion modulated memory.

  1. Intergroup bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewstone, Miles; Rubin, Mark; Willis, Hazel

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews the extensive literature on bias in favor of in-groups at the expense of out-groups. We focus on five issues and identify areas for future research: (a) measurement and conceptual issues (especially in-group favoritism vs. out-group derogation, and explicit vs. implicit measures of bias); (b) modern theories of bias highlighting motivational explanations (social identity, optimal distinctiveness, uncertainty reduction, social dominance, terror management); (c) key moderators of bias, especially those that exacerbate bias (identification, group size, status and power, threat, positive-negative asymmetry, personality and individual differences); (d) reduction of bias (individual vs. intergroup approaches, especially models of social categorization); and (e) the link between intergroup bias and more corrosive forms of social hostility.

  2. Comparison of bias-corrected covariance estimators for MMRM analysis in longitudinal data with dropouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosho, Masahiko; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Noma, Hisashi; Maruo, Kazushi; Sato, Yasunori

    2015-08-11

    In longitudinal clinical trials, some subjects will drop out before completing the trial, so their measurements towards the end of the trial are not obtained. Mixed-effects models for repeated measures (MMRM) analysis with "unstructured" (UN) covariance structure are increasingly common as a primary analysis for group comparisons in these trials. Furthermore, model-based covariance estimators have been routinely used for testing the group difference and estimating confidence intervals of the difference in the MMRM analysis using the UN covariance. However, using the MMRM analysis with the UN covariance could lead to convergence problems for numerical optimization, especially in trials with a small-sample size. Although the so-called sandwich covariance estimator is robust to misspecification of the covariance structure, its performance deteriorates in settings with small-sample size. We investigated the performance of the sandwich covariance estimator and covariance estimators adjusted for small-sample bias proposed by Kauermann and Carroll (J Am Stat Assoc 2001; 96: 1387-1396) and Mancl and DeRouen (Biometrics 2001; 57: 126-134) fitting simpler covariance structures through a simulation study. In terms of the type 1 error rate and coverage probability of confidence intervals, Mancl and DeRouen's covariance estimator with compound symmetry, first-order autoregressive (AR(1)), heterogeneous AR(1), and antedependence structures performed better than the original sandwich estimator and Kauermann and Carroll's estimator with these structures in the scenarios where the variance increased across visits. The performance based on Mancl and DeRouen's estimator with these structures was nearly equivalent to that based on the Kenward-Roger method for adjusting the standard errors and degrees of freedom with the UN structure. The model-based covariance estimator with the UN structure under unadjustment of the degrees of freedom, which is frequently used in applications

  3. The impact of response bias on estimates of health care utilization in a metropolitan area: The use of administrative data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, S.A.; Stronks, K.

    1999-01-01

    Background. Surveys among the general population are an important method for collecting epidemiological data on health and utilization of health care in that population. Selective non-response may affect the validity of these data. This study examines the impact of response bias on estimates of

  4. Critical Overview of the Risk Scoring Systems to Predict Non-Responsiveness to Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Kawasaki Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato Rigante

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Kawasaki syndrome (KS is the most relevant cause of heart disease in children living in developed countries. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG has a preventive function in the formation of coronary artery abnormalities and a poor strictly-curative action in established coronary damage. More than two decades ago, the Harada score was set to assess which children with KS should be subject to administration of IVIG, evaluating retrospectively a large cohort of patients with regard to age, sex and laboratory data. Nowadays, high dose IVIG is administered to all children with a confirmed diagnosis of KS, but a tool for predicting non-responsiveness to the initial infusion of IVIG has not been found. The prediction of IVIG resistance is a crucial issue, as recognising these high-risk patients should consent the administration of an intensified initial treatment in combination with IVIG in order to prevent coronary injuries. Few reports have focused on factors, referring to both clinical parameters and laboratory data at the onset of KS, in order to predict which patients might be IVIG non-responsive. We have analysed three different risk scores which were formulated to predict IVIG resistance in Japanese children with typical KS, but their application in non-Japanese patients or in those with incomplete and atypical patterns of the disease has been studied in a fragmentary way. Overall, our analysis showed that early and definite ascertainment of likely IVIG non-responders who require additional therapies reducing the development of coronary artery involvement in children with KS is still a challenge.

  5. Biased safety reporting in blinded randomized clinical trials: meta-analysis of angiotensin receptor blocker trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Takabayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cough is listed as an adverse drug reaction (ADR on the labels of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB. However, a causal association with cough has also been reported for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI, which have frequently been used as comparator drugs in the registration clinical trials of ARBs. This prompted us to examine the possible influence of using comparator drugs with well-known ADRs on the safety reporting of investigational drugs in blinded randomized clinical trials. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The double-blinded, randomized clinical trials with comparator drugs were identified in the Japanese dossiers for the new drug applications of ARBs. The risk ratios (RR of reporting cough and headache in ARB arms were calculated for each ARB by comparing trials using ACEIs and trials using non-ACEIs, were then combined with a meta-analysis. 23 trials with a total of 6643 patients were identified, consisting 6 trials using an ACEI comparator including 819 ARB patients and 17 trials using a non-ACEI comparator including 5824 ARB patients. The combined RR of cough reporting was significantly elevated (20.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.47 to 57.76, indicating more frequent reporting of cough in clinical trials using an ACEI comparator. In contrast, the combined RR of headache, a negative control, was insignificant (1.45; 95% CI, 0.34 to 6.22. CONCLUSION: The use of comparators with well-known ADRs in blinded randomized trials produces potential bias in the reporting frequency of ADRs for investigational drugs. The selection of appropriate comparator drugs should be critical in unbiased safety assessment in double-blinded, randomized clinical trials and thus have relevance in reviewing the safety results from a regulatory point of view.

  6. Bias in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simundić, Ana-Maria

    2013-01-01

    By writing scientific articles we communicate science among colleagues and peers. By doing this, it is our responsibility to adhere to some basic principles like transparency and accuracy. Authors, journal editors and reviewers need to be concerned about the quality of the work submitted for publication and ensure that only studies which have been designed, conducted and reported in a transparent way, honestly and without any deviation from the truth get to be published. Any such trend or deviation from the truth in data collection, analysis, interpretation and publication is called bias. Bias in research can occur either intentionally or unintentionally. Bias causes false conclusions and is potentially misleading. Therefore, it is immoral and unethical to conduct biased research. Every scientist should thus be aware of all potential sources of bias and undertake all possible actions to reduce or minimize the deviation from the truth. This article describes some basic issues related to bias in research.

  7. Modular reweighting software for statistical mechanical analysis of biased equilibrium data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhikara, Daniel J.

    2012-07-01

    Here a simple, useful, modular approach and software suite designed for statistical reweighting and analysis of equilibrium ensembles is presented. Statistical reweighting is useful and sometimes necessary for analysis of equilibrium enhanced sampling methods, such as umbrella sampling or replica exchange, and also in experimental cases where biasing factors are explicitly known. Essentially, statistical reweighting allows extrapolation of data from one or more equilibrium ensembles to another. Here, the fundamental separable steps of statistical reweighting are broken up into modules - allowing for application to the general case and avoiding the black-box nature of some “all-inclusive” reweighting programs. Additionally, the programs included are, by-design, written with little dependencies. The compilers required are either pre-installed on most systems, or freely available for download with minimal trouble. Examples of the use of this suite applied to umbrella sampling and replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations will be shown along with advice on how to apply it in the general case. New version program summaryProgram title: Modular reweighting version 2 Catalogue identifier: AEJH_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEJH_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 179 118 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8 518 178 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, Python 2.6+, Perl 5+ Computer: Any Operating system: Any RAM: 50-500 MB Supplementary material: An updated version of the original manuscript (Comput. Phys. Commun. 182 (2011) 2227) is available Classification: 4.13 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEJH_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun. 182 (2011) 2227 Does the new

  8. Analysis of Reverse-Bias Leakage Current Mechanisms in Metal/GaN Schottky Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pipinys

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature-dependent reverse-bias current-voltage characteristics obtained by other researchers for Schottky diodes fabricated on GaN are reinterpreted in terms of phonon-assisted tunneling (PhAT model. Temperature dependence of reverse-bias leakage current is shown could be caused by the temperature dependence of electron tunneling rate from traps in the metal-semiconductor interface to the conduction band of semiconductor. A good fit of experimental data with the theory is received in a wide temperature range (from 80 K to 500 K using for calculation the effective mass of 0.222 me. and for the phonon energy the value of 70 meV. The temperature and bias voltages dependences of an apparent barrier height (activation energy are also explicable in the framework of the PhAT model.

  9. Estimating the price elasticity of beer: meta-analysis of data with heterogeneity, dependence, and publication bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jon P

    2014-01-01

    Precise estimates of price elasticities are important for alcohol tax policy. Using meta-analysis, this paper corrects average beer elasticities for heterogeneity, dependence, and publication selection bias. A sample of 191 estimates is obtained from 114 primary studies. Simple and weighted means are reported. Dependence is addressed by restricting number of estimates per study, author-restricted samples, and author-specific variables. Publication bias is addressed using funnel graph, trim-and-fill, and Egger's intercept model. Heterogeneity and selection bias are examined jointly in meta-regressions containing moderator variables for econometric methodology, primary data, and precision of estimates. Results for fixed- and random-effects regressions are reported. Country-specific effects and sample time periods are unimportant, but several methodology variables help explain the dispersion of estimates. In models that correct for selection bias and heterogeneity, the average beer price elasticity is about -0.20, which is less elastic by 50% compared to values commonly used in alcohol tax policy simulations.

  10. Theoretical analysis of a biased photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with a negative dielectric anisotropy liquid crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Wei, Lei; Lægsgaard, Jesper;

    2009-01-01

    We simulate the PBG mode of a biased Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF) infiltrated with a Liquid Crystal (LC) with negative dielectric anisotropy. We analyse the voltage induced change of the transmission spectrum, dispersion and losses and compare them to the experimental values....

  11. A Bias and Variance Analysis for Multistep-Ahead Time Series Forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Taieb, Souhaib; Atiya, Amir F

    2016-01-01

    Multistep-ahead forecasts can either be produced recursively by iterating a one-step-ahead time series model or directly by estimating a separate model for each forecast horizon. In addition, there are other strategies; some of them combine aspects of both aforementioned concepts. In this paper, we present a comprehensive investigation into the bias and variance behavior of multistep-ahead forecasting strategies. We provide a detailed review of the different multistep-ahead strategies. Subsequently, we perform a theoretical study that derives the bias and variance for a number of forecasting strategies. Finally, we conduct a Monte Carlo experimental study that compares and evaluates the bias and variance performance of the different strategies. From the theoretical and the simulation studies, we analyze the effect of different factors, such as the forecast horizon and the time series length, on the bias and variance components, and on the different multistep-ahead strategies. Several lessons are learned, and recommendations are given concerning the advantages, disadvantages, and best conditions of use of each strategy.

  12. Biased News in the 1972 Campaign: A Multi-Media Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, C. Richard

    The purpose of this study is to present systematic findings concerning bias in TV news coverage of the 1972 presidential campaign and to describe the kinds of coverage that the candidates and parties received during the campaign. News about the election was analyzed from weekday network evening news programs, AP day and night wire coverage, a…

  13. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Bias Modification Interventions for Substance Addictions: A Meta-Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristea, Ioana; Kok, Robin; Cuijpers, Pim

    2016-01-01

    -test and follow-up, using a random-effects model. We grouped outcome measures and reported results for addiction (all related measures), craving and cognitive bias. Results We identified 25 trials, 18 for alcohol problems, and 7 for smoking. At post-test, there was no significant effect of CBM for addiction, g...... = 0.08 (95% CI -0.02 to 0.18) or craving, g = 0.05 (95% CI -0.06 to 0.16), but there was a significant, moderate effect on cognitive bias, g = 0.60 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.79). Results were similar for alcohol and smoking outcomes taken separately. Follow-up addiction outcomes were reported in 7 trials......, resulting in a small but significant effect of CBM, g = 0.18 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.32). Results for addiction and craving did not differ by substance type, sample type, delivery setting, bias targeted or number of sessions. Risk of bias was high or uncertain in most trials, for most criteria considered. Meta...

  14. Distinguishing Selection Bias and Confounding Bias in Comparative Effectiveness Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneuse, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) aims to provide patients and physicians with evidence-based guidance on treatment decisions. As researchers conduct CER they face myriad challenges. Although inadequate control of confounding is the most-often cited source of potential bias, selection bias that arises when patients are differentially excluded from analyses is a distinct phenomenon with distinct consequences: confounding bias compromises internal validity, whereas selection bias compromises external validity. Despite this distinction, however, the label "treatment-selection bias" is being used in the CER literature to denote the phenomenon of confounding bias. Motivated by an ongoing study of treatment choice for depression on weight change over time, this paper formally distinguishes selection and confounding bias in CER. By formally distinguishing selection and confounding bias, this paper clarifies important scientific, design, and analysis issues relevant to ensuring validity. First is that the 2 types of biases may arise simultaneously in any given study; even if confounding bias is completely controlled, a study may nevertheless suffer from selection bias so that the results are not generalizable to the patient population of interest. Second is that the statistical methods used to mitigate the 2 biases are themselves distinct; methods developed to control one type of bias should not be expected to address the other. Finally, the control of selection and confounding bias will often require distinct covariate information. Consequently, as researchers plan future studies of comparative effectiveness, care must be taken to ensure that all data elements relevant to both confounding and selection bias are collected.

  15. Consequences of reducing nonresponse in a national telephone survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeter, S; Miller, C; Kohut, A; Groves, R M; Presser, S

    2000-01-01

    Critics of public opinion polls often claim that methodological shortcuts taken to collect timely data produce biased results. This study compares two random digit dial national telephone surveys that used identical questionnaires but very different levels of effort: a "Standard" survey conducted over a 5-day period that used a sample of adults who were home when the interviewer called, and a "Rigorous" survey conducted over an 8-week period that used random selection from among all adult household members. Response rates, computed according to AAPOR guidelines, were 60.6 percent for the Rigorous and 36.0 percent for the Standard study. Nonetheless, the two surveys produced similar results. Across 91 comparisons, no difference exceeded 9 percentage points, and the average difference was about 2 percentage points. Most of the statistically significant differences were among demographic items. Very few significant differences were found on attention to media and engagement in politics, social trust and connectedness, and most social and political attitudes, including even those toward surveys.

  16. Differential recall bias, intermediate confounding, and mediation analysis in life course epidemiology: An analytic framework with empirical example.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashhood Ahmed Sheikh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which childhood socioeconomic status (CSES affects adult mental health, general health, and well-being are not clear. Moreover, the analytical assumptions employed when assessing mediation in social and psychiatric epidemiology are rarely explained. The aim of this paper was to explain the intermediate confounding assumption, and to quantify differential recall bias in the association between CSES, childhood abuse, and mental health (SCL-10, general health (EQ-5D, and subjective well-being (SWLS. Furthermore, we assessed the mediating role of psychological and physical abuse in the association between CSES and mental health, general health, and well-being; and the influence of differential recall bias in the estimation of total effects, direct effects, and proportion of mediated effects. The assumptions employed when assessing mediation are explained with reference to a causal diagram. Poisson regression models (relative risk, RR and 99% CI were used to assess the association between CSES and psychological and physical abuse in childhood. Mediation analysis (difference method was used to assess the indirect effect of CSES (through psychological and physical abuse in childhood on mental health, general health, and well-being. Psychological abuse and physical abuse mediated the association between CSES and adult mental health, general health, and well-being (6-16% among men and 7-14% among women, p<0.001. The results suggest that up to 27% of the association between CSES and childhood abuse, 23% of the association between childhood abuse, and mental health, general health, and well-being, and 44% of the association between CSES and mental health, general health, and well-being is driven by differential recall bias. Assessing mediation with cross-sectional data (exposure, mediator, and outcome measured at the same time showed that the total effects and direct effects were vastly overestimated (biased upwards. Consequently, the

  17. A FAMILY OF ESTIMATORS FOR ESTIMATING POPULATION MEAN IN STRATIFIED SAMPLING UNDER NON-RESPONSE

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, Manoj K.; RAJESH SINGH; Rakesh K. Shukla; MUKESH KUMAR; FLORENTIN SMARANDACHE

    2015-01-01

    Khoshnevisan et al. (2007) proposed a general family of estimators for population mean using known value of some population parameters in simple random sampling. The objective of this paper is to propose a family of combined-type estimators in stratified random sampling adapting the family of estimators proposed by Khoshnevisan et al. (2007) under non-response. The properties of proposed family have been discussed. We have also obtained the expressions for optimum sampl...

  18. A FAMILY OF ESTIMATORS FOR ESTIMATING POPULATION MEAN IN STRATIFIED SAMPLING UNDER NON-RESPONSE

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, Manoj K.; Rajesh Singh; Rakesh K. Shukla; Mukesh Kumar; Florentin Smarandache

    2009-01-01

    Khoshnevisan et al. (2007) proposed a general family of estimators for population mean using known value of some population parameters in simple random sampling. The objective of this paper is to propose a family of combined-type estimators in stratified random sampling adapting the family of estimators proposed by Khoshnevisan et al. (2007) under non-response. The properties of proposed family have been discussed. We have also obtained the expressions for optimum sample sizes of the strata i...

  19. Understanding Adolescent Nonresponsiveness to Text Messages: Lessons from the DepoText Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Irons, Mallory; Tomaszewski, Kathy; Muñoz Buchanan, Cara R.; Trent, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Urban adolescents face economic, social, and behavioral challenges in adhering to long-term contraceptive use. Use of text messaging reminders has the potential to increase adherence to family planning appointments and to educate patients about safe sexual health practices; however, nonresponsiveness to messages is difficult to interpret and may jeopardize programmatic success. We aimed to understand why adolescent girls enrolled in a randomized, controlled pilot trial (DepoText) designed to ...

  20. Are Divorce Studies Trustworthy? The Effects of Survey Nonresponse and Response Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Colter

    2010-01-01

    Researchers rely on relationship data to measure the multifaceted nature of families. This article speaks to relationship data quality by examining the ramifications of different types of error on divorce estimates, models predicting divorce behavior, and models employing divorce as a predictor. Comparing matched survey and divorce certificate information from the 1995 Life Events and Satisfaction Study (N = 1,811) showed that nonresponse error is responsible for the majority of the error in ...

  1. Conflicts of interest in nutritional sciences: The forgotten bias in meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Michel

    2015-12-26

    Awareness of conflicts of interest (COI) in medicine began in the 1980s. More recently, the problem has gained notoriety in nutritional sciences. COI with industry could bias study conclusions in the context of research activities and scientific publications on nutritional sciences. The issue of COI in nutritional sciences deserves more attention and requires careful analyses as biased information can negatively impact the development of dietary guidelines and, ultimately, population health. Decision-making is generally based on available, published evidence, but when the results are ambivalent, it is easier to opt for the status quo and ask for more studies. Readers might wonder if research is subsidized by industry as a counterbalancing strategy based on levels of evidence-only to slow down eminent positions and/or legislation on the food sector? How can this problem be overcome without producing paranoia and McCarthyism while trying to be as methodological as possible?

  2. The Discretization Bias for Processes of the Short-Term Interest Rate : An Empirical Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    This paper compares difference continuous-time specifications for the short-term interest rate dynamics on five European markets. We propose a general specification which encompasses nine well-known processes of the financial literature. A classical estimation of the parameters leads us to the choice of simple models like the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process of Vasicek (1977) or the “Square Root” process of Cox, Ingersoll and Ross (1985). Then we focus on the discretization bias and a methodology t...

  3. Electrochemical impedance analysis of nanoporous TiO2 electrode at low bias potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Jun Li; Yuan Lin; Zeng Chen; Jing Bo Zhang; Xiao Wen Zhou

    2010-01-01

    TiO2 colloid was prepared by the sol-gel method and was bladed on transparent conduction glass to made nanoporous electrode.The impedance performance of TiO2 electrode was studied at various bias potential.A simplified equivalent circuit was proposed to investigate the charge transport impedance of TiO2 film and good fitting results were obtained.

  4. Pineal-independent regulation of photo-nonresponsiveness in the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, B J; Freeman, D A

    1999-02-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin influences circadian rhythms and also mediates reproductive responses to photoperiod. The authors tested whether pinealectomy influences circadian oscillators responsible for induction of nonresponsiveness to short day lengths by preventing normal short-day patterns of circadian entrainment. Adult male Siberian hamsters were pinealectomized or sham operated, maintained in either 18 h light per day (18L) or 15L for 10 weeks, and then tested for responsiveness to 10L. Because pinealectomized hamsters do not show gonadal regression in short day lengths, responsiveness was assessed by measuring phase angle of entrainment and the length of the nightly activity period following transfer to 10L. The incidence of nonresponsiveness was significantly higher in 18L hamsters than in 15L hamsters but was unaffected by pineal status. Fully 88% of 18L hamsters failed to entrain to 10L in the normal short-day manner; the duration of nightly activity remained compressed, and the phase angle of entrainment was large and negative relative to lights off. The 15L hamsters entrained normally to 10L. Exposure to constant light after 10L treatment was equally effective in inducing arrhythmicity in pinealectomized and intact hamsters. Changes in the period of morning and evening circadian oscillators subsequent to 18L treatment did not predict circadian responsiveness to short photoperiod. Long-day induction of photo-nonresponsiveness, which prevents winter responses to short day lengths, occurs independently of pineal melatonin feedback on the circadian system.

  5. Decreased Total Antioxidant Activity in Major Depressive Disorder Patients Non-Responsive to Antidepressant Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Song-Eun; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Rho, Dae-Young; Kim, Do-Hoon; Huh, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the total antioxidant activity (TAA) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and the effect of antidepressants on TAA using a novel potentiometric method. Methods Twenty-eight patients with MDD and thirty-one healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The control group comprised 31 healthy individuals matched for gender, drinking and smoking status. We assessed symptoms of depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We measured TAA using potentiometry. All measurements were made at baseline and four and eight weeks later. Results There was a significant negative correlation between BDI scores and TAA. TAA was significantly lower in the MDD group than in controls. When the MDD group was subdivided into those who showed clinical response to antidepressant therapy (response group) and those who did not (non-response group), only the non-response group showed lower TAA, while the response group showed no significant difference to controls at baseline. After eight weeks of antidepressant treatment, TAA in both the response and non-response groups was similar, and there was no significant difference among the three groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the response to antidepressant treatment in MDD patients might be predicted by measuring TAA. PMID:27081384

  6. Matching consequences to behavior: implications of failing to distinguish between noncompliance and nonresponsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejkowski, Jason; Festinger, David S; Benishek, Lois A; Dugosh, Karen L

    2011-01-01

    Neither punitive nor therapeutic approaches alone are effective at addressing the dual public health and public safety concerns associated with managing criminal behavior perpetrated by people who have psychiatric and substance use disorders. The optimal solution may instead require the integration of both criminal justice supervision and treatment. Using problem-solving courts (PSCs) as a model, we focus on one dimension of this integrated approach, distinguishing between behavior that stems from willful noncompliance with supervision and behavior that results from nonresponsivity to treatment. First, we discuss the public health and public safety consequences of using singular approaches to address the criminal behavior of this population. We then present lessons learned from PSCs that distinguish between noncompliant and nonresponsive behaviors in making treatment and supervision decisions. Finally, we consider how the concepts of nonresponsivity and noncompliance may be extended, via policy, to probation and parole settings as well as mental health and substance abuse treatment services outside the criminal justice setting in order to enhance public health and safety.

  7. A Comparative Analysis of Synonymous Codon Usage Bias Pattern in Human Albumin Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Mirsafian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synonymous codon usage bias is an inevitable phenomenon in organismic taxa across the three domains of life. Though the frequency of codon usage is not equal across species and within genome in the same species, the phenomenon is non random and is tissue-specific. Several factors such as GC content, nucleotide distribution, protein hydropathy, protein secondary structure, and translational selection are reported to contribute to codon usage preference. The synonymous codon usage patterns can be helpful in revealing the expression pattern of genes as well as the evolutionary relationship between the sequences. In this study, synonymous codon usage bias patterns were determined for the evolutionarily close proteins of albumin superfamily, namely, albumin, α-fetoprotein, afamin, and vitamin D-binding protein. Our study demonstrated that the genes of the four albumin superfamily members have low GC content and high values of effective number of codons (ENC suggesting high expressivity of these genes and less bias in codon usage preferences. This study also provided evidence that the albumin superfamily members are not subjected to mutational selection pressure.

  8. Analysis of the giant magnetostrictive actuator with strong bias magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Guangming, E-mail: yy0youxia@163.com; He, Zhongbo; Li, Dongwei; Yang, Zhaoshu; Zhao, Zhenglong

    2015-11-15

    Giant magnetostrictive actuator with strong bias magnetic field is designed to control the injector bullet valve opening and closing. The relationship between actuator displacement amplitude and input signal direction is analyzed. And based on the approximate linearity of strain-magnetic field, second-order system model of the actuator displacement is established. Experimental system suitable for the actuator is designed. The experimental results show that, the square voltage amplitude being 12 V, the actuator displacement amplitude is about 17 μm with backward direction signal input while being 1.5 μm under forward direction signal. From the results, the suitable input direction is confirmed to be backward. With exciting frequncy lower than 200 Hz, the error between the model and experimental result is less than 1.7 μm. So the model is validated under the low-frequency signal input. The testing displacement-voltage curves are approximately straight lines. But due to the biased position, the line slope and the displacement-voltage linearity change as the input voltage changes. - Highlights: • Giant magnetostrictive actuator with strong bias magnetic field is designed. • The relationship between actuator displacement amplitude and input current direction is analyzed. • The model of the actuator displacement is established and its accuracy is verified by the test. • The actuator displacement-voltage curves are achieved by the test, and the curves’ characteristics are analyzed theoretically.

  9. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS AND PRACTICE ON THE SELECTION OF KEY PARAMETERS FOR HORIZONTAL BIAS BURNER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泰生; 许晋源

    2003-01-01

    The air flow ratio and the pulverized-coal mass flux ratio between the rich and lean sides are the key parameters of horizontal bias burner. In order to realize high combustion efficiency, excellent stability of ignition, low NOx emission and safe operation, six principal demands are presented on the selection of key parameters. An analytical model is established on the basis of the demands, the fundamentals of combustion and the operation results. An improved horizontal bias burner is also presented and applied. The experiment and numerical simulation results show the improved horizontal bias burner can realize proper key parameters, lower NOx emission, high combustion efficiency and excellent performance of part load operation without oil support. It also can reduce the circumfluence and low velocity zone existing at the downstream sections of vanes, and avoid the burnout of the lean primary-air nozzle and the jam in the lean primary-air channel. The operation and test results verify the reasonableness and feasibility of the analytical model.

  10. Retrospective analysis of Mexican National Addictions Survey, 2008. Bias identification and correction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Romero-Martínez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the presence of bias on the estimation of the consumption sometime in life of alcohol, tobacco or illegal drugs and inhalable substances, and to propose a correction for this in the case it is present. Materials and methods. Mexican National Addictions Surveys (NAS 2002, 2008, and 2011 were analyzed to compare population estimations of consumption sometime in life of tobacco, alcohol or illegal drugs and inhalable substances. A couple of alternative approaches for bias correction were developed. Results. Estimated national prevalences of consumption sometime in life of alcohol and tobacco in the NAS 2008 are not plausible. There was no evidence of bias on the consumption sometime in life of illegal drugs and inhalable substances. New estimations for tobacco and alcohol consumption sometime in life were made, which resulted in plausible values when compared to other data available. Conclusion. Future analyses regarding tobacco and alcohol using NAS 2008 data will have to rely on these newly generated data weights, that are able to reproduce the new (plausible estimations.

  11. Quantitative analysis of correlation between AT and GC biases among bacterial genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ge

    2017-01-01

    Due to different replication mechanisms between the leading and lagging strands, nucleotide composition asymmetries widely exist in bacterial genomes. A general consideration reveals that the leading strand is enriched in Guanine (G) and Thymine (T), and the lagging strand shows richness in Adenine (A) and Cytosine (C). However, some bacteria like Bacillus subtilis have been discovered composing more A than T in the leading strand. To investigate the difference, we analyze the nucleotide asymmetry from the aspect of AT and GC bias correlations. In this study, we propose a windowless method, the Z-curve Correlation Coefficient (ZCC) index, based on the Z-curve method, and analyzed more than 2000 bacterial genomes. We find that the majority of bacteria reveal negative correlations between AT and GC biases, while most genomes in Firmicutes and Tenericutes have positive ZCC indexes. The presence of PolC, purine asymmetry and stronger genes preference in the leading strand are not confined to Firmicutes, but also likely to happen in other phyla dominated by positive ZCC indexes. This method also provides a new insight into other relevant features like aerobism, and can be applied to analyze the correlation between RY (Purine and Pyrimidine) and MK (Amino and Keto) bias and so on. PMID:28158313

  12. Male-biased genes in catfish as revealed by RNA-Seq analysis of the testis transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanyue Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Catfish has a male-heterogametic (XY sex determination system, but genes involved in gonadogenesis, spermatogenesis, testicular determination, and sex determination are poorly understood. As a first step of understanding the transcriptome of the testis, here, we conducted RNA-Seq analysis using high throughput Illumina sequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 269.6 million high quality reads were assembled into 193,462 contigs with a N50 length of 806 bp. Of these contigs, 67,923 contigs had hits to a set of 25,307 unigenes, including 167 unique genes that had not been previously identified in catfish. A meta-analysis of expressed genes in the testis and in the gynogen (double haploid female allowed the identification of 5,450 genes that are preferentially expressed in the testis, providing a pool of putative male-biased genes. Gene ontology and annotation analysis suggested that many of these male-biased genes were involved in gonadogenesis, spermatogenesis, testicular determination, gametogenesis, gonad differentiation, and possibly sex determination. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the first transcriptome-level analysis of the catfish testis. Our analysis would lay the basis for sequential follow-up studies of genes involved in sex determination and differentiation in catfish.

  13. Male-Biased Genes in Catfish as Revealed by RNA-Seq Analysis of the Testis Transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fanyue; Liu, Shikai; Gao, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Yanliang; Perera, Dayan; Wang, Xiuli; Li, Chao; Sun, Luyang; Zhang, Jiaren; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Dunham, Rex; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Catfish has a male-heterogametic (XY) sex determination system, but genes involved in gonadogenesis, spermatogenesis, testicular determination, and sex determination are poorly understood. As a first step of understanding the transcriptome of the testis, here, we conducted RNA-Seq analysis using high throughput Illumina sequencing. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 269.6 million high quality reads were assembled into 193,462 contigs with a N50 length of 806 bp. Of these contigs, 67,923 contigs had hits to a set of 25,307 unigenes, including 167 unique genes that had not been previously identified in catfish. A meta-analysis of expressed genes in the testis and in the gynogen (double haploid female) allowed the identification of 5,450 genes that are preferentially expressed in the testis, providing a pool of putative male-biased genes. Gene ontology and annotation analysis suggested that many of these male-biased genes were involved in gonadogenesis, spermatogenesis, testicular determination, gametogenesis, gonad differentiation, and possibly sex determination. Conclusion/Significance We provide the first transcriptome-level analysis of the catfish testis. Our analysis would lay the basis for sequential follow-up studies of genes involved in sex determination and differentiation in catfish. PMID:23874634

  14. Analysis of non-response causes and effect of cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with advanced congestive heart failure%心脏再同步治疗中重度心力衰竭的疗效及无应答原因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵永辉; 张嘉莹; 周晗; 张静; 王现青; 付海霞

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the non-response causes and effect of cardiac rcsynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with advanced congestive heart failure by one year follow-up. Method:Twenty-four patients with advanced congestive heart failure underwent CRT with New York Heart association (NYHA) class HI and ft . There were 18 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, 2 patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, one with sick sinus node syndrome with dual-chamber pacemaker implantation, and one with the third AVB with single-chamber pacemaker implantation. Before CRT and 12 months after CRT, the clinical and cchocardiographic parameters and complication were analysed. Result; Twenty-three patients were successfully implanted the bivcntricular pacemaker. The success rate is 95. 8%. Compared with before CRT, NYHA class of patients after 12 months's CRT decreased by 1. 4 class (Pnon-response were complicated with atrial fibrillation, complete right bundle branch block, narraow QRS wave and diatcd cardiomyopathy with postcro-latcral scar tissue. Conclusion: CRT could improve the cardiac function, correct the mechanical desynchronization and reverse left ventricular remodeling in patients with congestive heart failure, however, there were complications related to the implantation procedure and non-response possibilities. In order to improve the cost-effectiveness ratio of CRT, we must pay attention to the indication, standard procedure, follow-up, and program control.%目的:通过对置入三腔起搏器的中重

  15. Non-publication and publication bias in reproductive medicine: a cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensen, S; Jordan, V; Showell, M; Showell, E; Shen, V; Venetis, C; Farquhar, C

    2017-08-01

    Does publication bias or non-publication exist in fertility trials presented as conference abstracts? This study did not detect any publication bias; however, it did identify a high level of non-publication, with only 49% of abstracts reaching full-text publication four or more years after abstract presentation. Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the foundation of evidence based medicine. Non-publication or publication deficit refer to the failure to publish trial results. A publication bias exists when there is any tendency on the parts of the investigators or editors to fail to publish study results on the basis or strength of the study findings. Both present a serious problem for researchers, clinicians and policymakers alike, and ultimately impact on patient care. A retrospective cohort study identified 337 fertility RCTs presented as conference abstracts between 2007 and 2010, as captured by an electronic search of the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Database. After excluding ineligible trials and duplicates, 224 abstracts remained. A search for the full-text papers of each abstract was undertaken in Pubmed, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and Google in May 2015 using a probabilistic approach. Trial authors were contacted to query the publication status of abstracts when no full-text was identified. The association between individual variables and the probability of publication, and time to publication, was assessed using logistic regression and Cox regression, respectively. Of the 224 included abstracts, only 110 (49%; 95% CI: 42.6, 55.6) were found to be published as full-text articles. Publication bias was not identified in this cohort; studies with positive results had a similar probability of reaching full-text publication 52/113 (46%; 95% CI: 37.0, 55.3) as studies with non-positive (negative or null) results 58/111 (52%; 95% CI: 17.8, 33.9) (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.02; 95% CI: 0.53, 1.97). Similarly, the time from abstract

  16. TRMM precipitation analysis of extreme storms in South America: Bias and climatological contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, K. L.; Houze, R.; Zuluaga, M. D.; Choi, S. L.; Chaplin, M.

    2013-12-01

    The TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) satellite was designed both to measure spatial and temporal variation of tropical rainfall around the globe and to understand the factors controlling the precipitation. TRMM observations have led to the realization that storms just east of the Andes in southeastern South America are among the most intense deep convection in the world. For a complete perspective of the impact of intense precipitation systems on the hydrologic cycle in South America, it is necessary to assess the contribution from various forms of extreme storms to the climatological rainfall. However, recent studies have suggested that the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) algorithm significantly underestimates surface rainfall in deep convection over land. Prior to investigating the climatological behavior, this research first investigates the range of the rain bias in storms containing four different types of extreme radar echoes: deep convective cores, deep and wide convective cores, wide convective cores, and broad stratiform regions over South America. The TRMM PR algorithm exhibits bias in all four extreme echo types considered here when the algorithm rates are compared to a range of conventional Z-R relations. Storms with deep convective cores, defined as high reflectivity echo volumes that extend above 10 km in altitude, show the greatest underestimation, and the bias is unrelated to their echo top height. The bias in wide convective cores, defined as high reflectivity echo volumes that extend horizontally over 1,000 km2, relates to the echo top, indicating that storms with significant mixed phase and ice hydrometeors are similarly affected by assumptions in the TRMM PR algorithm. The subtropical region tends to have more intense precipitating systems than the tropics, but the relationship between the TRMM PR rain bias and storm type is the same regardless of the climatological regime. The most extreme storms are typically not collocated with

  17. Experimental analysis of image noise and interpolation bias in digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zeren; Xu, Xiaohai; Su, Yong; Zhang, Qingchuan

    2016-06-01

    The popularization of the digital image correlation (DIC) method has raised urgent needs to evaluate the accuracy of this method. However, there are still some problems to be solved. Among the problems, the effects of various factors, such as the image noise caused by the camera sensors, the employed interpolation algorithm, and the structure of the speckle patterns, have become a major concern. To experimentally measure the position-dependent systematic error (i.e. interpolation bias) caused by non-ideal interpolation algorithm is an important way to evaluate the quality of the speckle patterns in the correlation method, and remains unsolved. In this work, a novel, simple and convenient method is proposed to measure the interpolation bias. In the new method which can avoid the out-of-plane displacements and the mechanical errors of translation stages, integral-pixel shifts are applied to the image shown on the screen so that sub-pixel displacements can be realized in the images captured by the camera via proper experimental settings. Besides, the fluctuations of the image noise and the sub-pixel displacement errors caused by the image noise are experimentally analyzed by employing three types of cameras commonly used in the DIC measurements. Experimental results indicate that the fluctuations of the image noise are not only proportional to the image gray value, but also dependent on the type of the employed camera. On the basis of eliminating the image noise via the image averaging technique, high-precision interpolation bias curves more than one period are experimentally obtained by the proposed method.

  18. Feature analysis of the scale factor variation on a constant rate biased ring laser gyro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiqiao Qin; Zongsheng Huang; Xingshu Wang

    2007-01-01

    Scale factor of a constant rate biased ring laser gyro (RLG) is studied both theoretically and experimentally.By analyzing experimental data, we find that there are three main terms contributing to the scale factor deviation. One of them is independent of time, the second varies linearly with time and the third varies exponentially with time. Theoretical analyses show that the first term is caused by experimental setup,the second and the third are caused by un-uniform thermal expension and cavity loss variation of the RLG.

  19. A fine-grained analysis of the jumping-to-conclusions bias in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Moritz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Impaired decision behavior has been repeatedly observed in schizophrenia patients. We investigated several cognitive mechanisms that might contribute to the jumping-to-conclusions bias (JTC seen in schizophrenia patients: biases in information-gathering, information weighting and integration, and overconfidence, using the process tracing paradigm Mouselab. Mouselab allows for an in-depth exploration of various decision-making processes in a structured information environment. A total of 37 schizophrenia patients and 30 healthy controls participated in the experiment. Although showing less focused and systematic information search, schizophrenia patients practically considered all pieces of information and showed no JTC in the sense of collecting less pieces of evidence. Choices of patients and controls both approximated a rational solution quite well, but patients showed more extreme confidence ratings. Both groups mainly used weighted additive decision strategies for information integration and only a small proportion relied on simple heuristics. Under high stress induced by affective valence plus time pressure, however, schizophrenia patients switched to equal weighting strategies: less valid cues and more valid ones were weighted equally.

  20. Exercise for depression in older adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials adjusting for publication bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe B. Schuch

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antidepressant effects of exercise in older adults, using randomized controlled trial (RCT data. Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis of exercise in older adults, addressing limitations of previous works. RCTs of exercise interventions in older people with depression (≥ 60 years comparing exercise vs. control were eligible. A random-effects meta-analysis calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD (95% confidence interval [95%CI], meta-regressions, and trim, fill, and fail-safe number analyses were conducted. Results: Eight RCTs were included, representing 138 participants in exercise arms and 129 controls. Exercise had a large and significant effect on depression (SMD = -0.90 [95%CI -0.29 to -1.51], with a fail-safe number of 71 studies. Significant effects were found for 1 mixed aerobic and anaerobic interventions, 2 at moderate intensity, 3 that were group-based, 4 that utilized mixed supervised and unsupervised formats, and 5 in people without other clinical comorbidities. Conclusion: Adjusting for publication bias increased the beneficial effects of exercise in three subgroup analysis, suggesting that previous meta-analyses have underestimated the benefits of exercise due to publication bias. We advocate that exercise be considered as a routine component of the management of depression in older adults.

  1. Assessing Nonresponse Bias at Follow-up in a Large Prospective Cohort of Relatively Young and Mobile Military Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    follow-up assessment. - 4 - BACKGROUND Intragroup comparisons over time are a key strength of longitudinal cohort studies ; a major threat to...characteristics. Previously published Millennium Cohort studies [11-20] have included 1) an investigation of differences in early vs. late...inference; efforts to achieve and maintain high response rates are a worthwhile investment in this, and all prospective cohort studies . Abbreviations

  2. Compensating for non-response in a study estimating the incidence of mental disorders in long-term sickness absence by a two-phased design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Bech, Per

    2010-01-01

    at 48% by a two-phase design and weighted logistic regression. The total non-response rate was 53.6%. This motivated the present study to compensate for non-response by applying adjustment of the weights and by multiple imputation of missing data in the estimation of the frequencies of mental disorders...... compensation for non-response was applied, the frequencies of mental disorders were similar. The variables used for the compensation were of problematic value....

  3. Analysis of caries experience taking inter-observer bias and variability into account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesaffre, E; Mwalili, S M; Declerck, D

    2004-12-01

    In larger oral health surveys, clinical measurements are often obtained using several examiners. This raises the issue of inter-observer variability in measurement. Often, the problem is dealt with by reporting kappa values obtained in a calibration exercise. In the present study, the limitations of this statistic are presented, and an alternative, based on a Bayesian approach, is proposed. When the alternative approach was applied to caries experience data obtained in an oral health screening survey in seven-year-old Flemish children (Signal Tandmobiel study), it could be ruled out that the observed geographic East-West gradient was due to bias induced by variability in scoring of the different dental examiners involved. The proposed method offers an opportunity to refine existing analytical approaches and is relevant to any health outcome study.

  4. Assessment of participation bias in cohort studies: systematic review and meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Junior, Sérgio Henrique Almeida da; Santos, Simone M; Coeli, Cláudia Medina; Carvalho, Marilia Sá

    2015-11-01

    The proportion of non-participation in cohort studies, if associated with both the exposure and the probability of occurrence of the event, can introduce bias in the estimates of interest. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of participation and its characteristics in longitudinal studies. A systematic review (MEDLINE, Scopus and Web of Science) for articles describing the proportion of participation in the baseline of cohort studies was performed. Among the 2,964 initially identified, 50 were selected. The average proportion of participation was 64.7%. Using a meta-regression model with mixed effects, only age, year of baseline contact and study region (borderline) were associated with participation. Considering the decrease in participation in recent years, and the cost of cohort studies, it is essential to gather information to assess the potential for non-participation, before committing resources. Finally, journals should require the presentation of this information in the papers.

  5. Assessment of participation bias in cohort studies: systematic review and meta-regression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Henrique Almeida da Silva Junior

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The proportion of non-participation in cohort studies, if associated with both the exposure and the probability of occurrence of the event, can introduce bias in the estimates of interest. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of participation and its characteristics in longitudinal studies. A systematic review (MEDLINE, Scopus and Web of Science for articles describing the proportion of participation in the baseline of cohort studies was performed. Among the 2,964 initially identified, 50 were selected. The average proportion of participation was 64.7%. Using a meta-regression model with mixed effects, only age, year of baseline contact and study region (borderline were associated with participation. Considering the decrease in participation in recent years, and the cost of cohort studies, it is essential to gather information to assess the potential for non-participation, before committing resources. Finally, journals should require the presentation of this information in the papers.

  6. Outcome Reporting Bias in Government-Sponsored Policy Evaluations: A Qualitative Content Analysis of 13 Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaganay, Arnaud

    The reporting of evaluation outcomes can be a point of contention between evaluators and policy-makers when a given reform fails to fulfil its promises. Whereas evaluators are required to report outcomes in full, policy-makers have a vested interest in framing these outcomes in a positive light-especially when they previously expressed a commitment to the reform. The current evidence base is limited to a survey of policy evaluators, a study on reporting bias in education research and several studies investigating the influence of industry sponsorship on the reporting of clinical trials. The objective of this study was twofold. Firstly, it aimed to assess the risk of outcome reporting bias (ORB or 'spin') in pilot evaluation reports, using seven indicators developed by clinicians. Secondly, it sought to examine how the government's commitment to a given reform may affect the level of ORB found in the corresponding evaluation report. To answer these questions, 13 evaluation reports were content-analysed, all of which found a non-significant effect of the intervention on its stated primary outcome. These reports were systematically selected from a dataset of 233 pilot and experimental evaluations spanning three policy areas and 13 years of government-commissioned research in the UK. The results show that the risk of ORB is real. Indeed, all studies reviewed here resorted to at least one of the presentational strategies associated with a risk of spin. This study also found a small, negative association between the seniority of the reform's champion and the risk of ORB in the evaluation of that reform. The publication of protocols and the use of reporting guidelines are recommended.

  7. Candidate's single-nucleotide polymorphism predictors of treatment nonresponse to the first anti-TNF inhibitor in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiotis, Ruxandra; Sánchez, Alejandra; Escudero, Alejandro; Bartolomé, Nerea; Szczypiorska, Magdalena; Font, Pilar; Martínez, Antonio; Tejedor, Diego; Artieda, Marta; Mulero, Juan; Buzoianu, Anca; Collantes-Estévez, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study is to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) predictors of treatment nonresponse to the first anti-TNF-alpha agent in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Patients were classified as "nonresponders" if they failed to achieve improvement ≥50 % of the initial BASDAI. We selected candidate SNPs previously reported, associated with susceptibility or pathogenesis of AS and with other spondylarthropaties (SpAs). The predictors of nonresponse were modeled with multiple logistic regression. The predictive power of the genetic model of nonresponse to treatment was tested with AUC-ROC. One hundred and twenty-one (121) AS patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of the candidate SNPs tested for association with treatment effectiveness, five independent predictors were identified: rs917997, rs755622, rs1800896, rs3740691, and rs1061622. The genetic model of nonresponse to treatment had a predictive power of 0.77 (95 % CI 0.68-0.86). Our study identified several polymorphisms which could be the useful genetic biomarkers in predicting nonresponse to anti-TNF-alpha therapy.

  8. Subarachnoidal Neurocysticercosis non-responsive to cysticidal drugs: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleury Agnès

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurocysticercosis (NC is one of the most frequent parasitic diseases of the central nervous system. Cysticidal drugs, albendazole and praziquantel, are generally effective when parasites localize in the parenchyma. In contrast, parasites lodged in the subarachnoid basal cisterns are less responsive to treatment. Case Presentation The clinical and radiological pictures of six Mexican patients non-respondent to cysticidal treatment are presented. Conclusions The possible factors involved in the cysticidal non-response are discussed and hints are provided of potentially useful changes to therapeutic protocols.

  9. Comparative analysis of contextual bias around the translation initiation sites in plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Paras; Rangan, Latha; Ramesh, T Venkata; Gupta, Mudit

    2016-09-07

    Nucleotide distribution around translation initiation site (TIS) is thought to play an important role in determining translation efficiency. Kozak in vertebrates and later Joshi et al. in plants identified context sequence having a key role in translation efficiency, but a great variation regarding this context sequence has been observed among different taxa. The present study aims to refine the context sequence around initiation codon in plants and addresses the sampling error problem by using complete genomes of 7 monocots and 7 dicots separately. Besides positions -3 and +4, significant conservation at -2 and +5 positions was also found and nucleotide bias at the latter two positions was shown to directly influence translation efficiency in the taxon studied. About 1.8% (monocots) and 2.4% (dicots) of the total sequences fit the context sequence from positions -3 to +5, which might be indicative of lower number of housekeeping genes in the transcriptome. A three base periodicity was observed in 5' UTR and CDS of monocots and only in CDS of dicots as confirmed against random occurrence and annotation errors. Deterministic enrichment of GCNAUGGC in monocots, AANAUGGC in dicots and GCNAUGGC in plants around TIS was also established (where AUG denotes the start codon), which can serve as an arbiter of putative TIS with efficient translation in plants.

  10. A less-biased analysis of metalloproteins reveals novel zinc coordination geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sen; Flight, Robert M; Rouchka, Eric C; Moseley, Hunter N B

    2015-08-01

    Zinc metalloproteins are involved in many biological processes and play crucial biochemical roles across all domains of life. Local structure around the zinc ion, especially the coordination geometry (CG), is dictated by the protein sequence and is often directly related to the function of the protein. Current methodologies in characterizing zinc metalloproteins' CG consider only previously reported CG models based mainly on nonbiological chemical context. Exceptions to these canonical CG models are either misclassified or discarded as "outliers." Thus, we developed a less-biased method that directly handles potential exceptions without pre-assuming any CG model. Our study shows that numerous exceptions could actually be further classified and that new CG models are needed to characterize them. Also, these new CG models are cross-validated by strong correlation between independent structural and functional annotation distance metrics, which is partially lost if these new CGs models are ignored. Furthermore, these new CG models exhibit functional propensities distinct from the canonical CG models.

  11. Reward bias and lateralization in gambling behavior: behavioral activation system and alpha band analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Finocchiaro, Roberta; Canavesio, Ylenia; Messina, Rossella

    2014-11-30

    The present research explored the main factors that can influence subjects' choices in the case of decisions. In order to elucidate the individual differences that influence the decisional processes, making their strategies more or less advantageous, we tested the effect of a reward sensitivity in the behavioral activation system (BAS-Reward) constructed on the ability to distinguish between high- and low-risk decisions. Secondly, the lateralization effect, related to increased activation of the left (BAS-related) hemisphere, was explored. Thirty-one subjects were tested using the Iowa Gambling Task, and the BAS-Reward measure was applied to distinguish between high-BAS and low-BAS groups. Behavioral responses (gain/loss options) and alpha-band modulation were considered. It was found that high-BAS group increased their tendency to opt in favor of the immediate reward (loss strategy) rather than the long-term option (win strategy). Secondly, high-BAS subjects showed an increased left-hemisphere activation in response to losing (with immediate reward) choices in comparison with low-BAS subjects. A "reward bias" effect was supposed to explain both the bad strategy and the unbalanced hemispheric activation for high-BAS and more risk-taking subjects.

  12. Attrition and bias in the MRC cognitive function and ageing study: an epidemiological investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews Fiona E

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Any hypothesis in longitudinal studies may be affected by attrition and poor response rates. The MRC Cognitive Function and Ageing study (MRC CFAS is a population based longitudinal study in five centres with identical methodology in England and Wales each recruiting approximately 2,500 individuals. This paper aims to identify potential biases in the two-year follow-up interviews. Methods Initial non-response: Those not in the baseline interviews were compared in terms of mortality to those who were in the baseline interviews at the time of the second wave interviews (1993–1996. Longitudinal attrition: Logistic regression analysis was used to examine baseline differences between individuals who took part in the two-year longitudinal wave compared with those who did not. Results Initial non-response: Individuals who moved away after sampling but before baseline interview were 1.8 times more likely to die by two years (95% Confidence interval(CI 1.3–2.4 compared to respondents, after adjusting for age. The refusers had a slightly higher, but similar mortality pattern to responders (Odds ratio 1.2, 95%CI 1.1–1.4. Longitudinal attrition: Predictors for drop out due to death were being older, male, having impaired activities of daily living, poor self-perceived health, poor cognitive ability and smoking. Similarly individuals who refused were more likely to have poor cognitive ability, but had less years of full-time education and were more often living in their own home though less likely to be living alone. There was a higher refusal rate in the rural centres. Individuals who moved away or were uncontactable were more likely to be single, smokers, demented or depressed and were less likely to have moved if in warden-controlled accommodation at baseline. Conclusions Longitudinal estimation of factors mentioned above could be biased, particularly cognitive ability and estimates of movements from own home to residential homes

  13. [Analysis of selection bias in the pilot study of a longitudinal study on aging in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Laso, Ángel; Urdaneta Artola, Elena; de la Fuente Sánchez, Miguel; Galindo Moreno, Eva; Yanguas Lezáun, José Javier; Rodríguez Rodríguez, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    To demonstrate that selection of a probabilistic sample at a national level for a study of aging in Spain is subject to selection bias. To quantify the losses produced after each phase of the administration of a questionnaire. We performed a cross-sectional study of the Spanish community-dwelling population aged 50 years or older between 2010 and 2011. Through multivariate logistic regressions, the characteristics of the census tract of the patients' residence were compared between those who agreed (n = 5,813) or refused (n = 7,023) to be included in the sampling frame and between those who agreed (n = 1,677) or refused (n = 2,875) to participate in the study. The individual characteristics of persons who responded (n = 1,398) or refused to respond (n = 346) to a face-to-face questionnaire administered after a telephone interview were also compared. In addition, the reasons for refusal were studied. The most frequent specific reasons for refusing to be included in the sampling frame or to participate in the study were poor health and disability (14.4% and 27.9%, respectively). In both cases, refusal was more frequent in the census tracts of districts with a lower socioeconomic level or those located in Catalonia, Guipúzcoa or Biscay. Individuals older than 81 participated less frequently in the face-to-face questionnaire. Between 8.6% and 18.4% of participants were lost at each stage of information retrieval. Probabilistic sampling in sampling points chosen by the researchers would allow more resources to be devoted to increasing response rates among the groups who are less likely to participate. Questions should be concentrated in only one shorter questionnaire, administered before blood extraction. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Markov state models from short non-equilibrium simulations—Analysis and correction of estimation bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüske, Feliks; Wu, Hao; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Wehmeyer, Christoph; Clementi, Cecilia; Noé, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Many state-of-the-art methods for the thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of large and complex biomolecular systems by simulation rely on ensemble approaches, where data from large numbers of relatively short trajectories are integrated. In this context, Markov state models (MSMs) are extremely popular because they can be used to compute stationary quantities and long-time kinetics from ensembles of short simulations, provided that these short simulations are in "local equilibrium" within the MSM states. However, over the last 15 years since the inception of MSMs, it has been controversially discussed and not yet been answered how deviations from local equilibrium can be detected, whether these deviations induce a practical bias in MSM estimation, and how to correct for them. In this paper, we address these issues: We systematically analyze the estimation of MSMs from short non-equilibrium simulations, and we provide an expression for the error between unbiased transition probabilities and the expected estimate from many short simulations. We show that the unbiased MSM estimate can be obtained even from relatively short non-equilibrium simulations in the limit of long lag times and good discretization. Further, we exploit observable operator model (OOM) theory to derive an unbiased estimator for the MSM transition matrix that corrects for the effect of starting out of equilibrium, even when short lag times are used. Finally, we show how the OOM framework can be used to estimate the exact eigenvalues or relaxation time scales of the system without estimating an MSM transition matrix, which allows us to practically assess the discretization quality of the MSM. Applications to model systems and molecular dynamics simulation data of alanine dipeptide are included for illustration. The improved MSM estimator is implemented in PyEMMA of version 2.3.

  15. The determinants of the bias in Minimum Rank Factor Analysis (MRFA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Socan, G; ten Berge, JMF; Yanai, H; Okada, A; Shigemasu, K; Kano, Y; Meulman, JJ

    2003-01-01

    Minimum Rank Factor Analysis (MRFA), see Ten Berge (1998), and Ten Berge and Kiers (1991), is a method of common factor analysis which yields, for any given covariance matrix Sigma, a diagonal matrix Psi of unique variances which are nonnegative and which entail a reduced covariance matrix Sigma-Psi

  16. Uncertainty in biological monitoring: a framework for data collection and analysis to account for multiple sources of sampling bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Gutierrez, Viviana; Hooten, Melvin B.; Campbell Grant, Evan H.

    2016-01-01

    Biological monitoring programmes are increasingly relying upon large volumes of citizen-science data to improve the scope and spatial coverage of information, challenging the scientific community to develop design and model-based approaches to improve inference.Recent statistical models in ecology have been developed to accommodate false-negative errors, although current work points to false-positive errors as equally important sources of bias. This is of particular concern for the success of any monitoring programme given that rates as small as 3% could lead to the overestimation of the occurrence of rare events by as much as 50%, and even small false-positive rates can severely bias estimates of occurrence dynamics.We present an integrated, computationally efficient Bayesian hierarchical model to correct for false-positive and false-negative errors in detection/non-detection data. Our model combines independent, auxiliary data sources with field observations to improve the estimation of false-positive rates, when a subset of field observations cannot be validated a posteriori or assumed as perfect. We evaluated the performance of the model across a range of occurrence rates, false-positive and false-negative errors, and quantity of auxiliary data.The model performed well under all simulated scenarios, and we were able to identify critical auxiliary data characteristics which resulted in improved inference. We applied our false-positive model to a large-scale, citizen-science monitoring programme for anurans in the north-eastern United States, using auxiliary data from an experiment designed to estimate false-positive error rates. Not correcting for false-positive rates resulted in biased estimates of occupancy in 4 of the 10 anuran species we analysed, leading to an overestimation of the average number of occupied survey routes by as much as 70%.The framework we present for data collection and analysis is able to efficiently provide reliable inference for

  17. A Correction for Recruitment Bias in Norms Derived from Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. Michael; Cottle, Cindy C.

    2011-01-01

    Normative comparisons are an integral component of neuropsychological test interpretation and provide the basis for an inference of abnormal function and impairment. In order to remedy a deficit of normative standards for a large number of neuropsychology tests, Mitrushina, Boone, Razani, and D'Elia (2005) used the meta-analysis of studies that…

  18. Bias in identification of the best treatment in a Bayesian network meta-analysis for binary outcome: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibret, Taddele; Richer, Danielle; Beyene, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Network meta-analysis (NMA) has emerged as a useful analytical tool allowing comparison of multiple treatments based on direct and indirect evidence. Commonly, a hierarchical Bayesian NMA model is used, which allows rank probabilities (the probability that each treatment is best, second best, and so on) to be calculated for decision making. However, the statistical properties of rank probabilities are not well understood. This study investigates how rank probabilities are affected by various factors such as unequal number of studies per comparison in the network, the sample size of individual studies, the network configuration, and effect sizes between treatments. In order to explore these factors, a simulation study of four treatments (three equally effective treatments and one less effective reference) was conducted. The simulation illustrated that estimates of rank probabilities are highly sensitive to both the number of studies per comparison and the overall network configuration. An unequal number of studies per comparison resulted in biased estimates of treatment rank probabilities for every network considered. The rank probability for the treatment that was included in the fewest number of studies was biased upward. Conversely, the rank of the treatment included in the most number of studies was consistently underestimated. When the simulation was altered to include three equally effective treatments and one superior treatment, the hierarchical Bayesian NMA model correctly identified the most effective treatment, regardless of all factors varied. The results of this study offer important insight into the ability of NMA models to rank treatments accurately under several scenarios. The authors recommend that health researchers use rank probabilities cautiously in making important decisions.

  19. Reducing Viability Bias in Analysis of Gut Microbiota in Preterm Infants at Risk of NEC and Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R. Young

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC and sepsis are serious diseases of preterm infants that can result in feeding intolerance, the need for bowel resection, impaired physiological and neurological development, and high mortality rates. Neonatal healthcare improvements have allowed greater survival rates in preterm infants leading to increased numbers at risk of developing NEC and sepsis. Gut bacteria play a role in protection from or propensity to these conditions and have therefore, been studied extensively using targeted 16S rRNA gene sequencing methods. However, exact epidemiology of these conditions remain unknown and the role of the gut microbiota in NEC remains enigmatic. Many studies have confounding variables such as differing clinical intervention strategies or major methodological issues such as the inability of 16S rRNA gene sequencing methods to determine viable from non-viable taxa. Identification of viable community members is important to identify links between the microbiota and disease in the highly unstable preterm infant gut. This is especially important as remnant DNA is robust and persists in the sampling environment following cell death. Chelation of such DNA prevents downstream amplification and inclusion in microbiota characterisation. This study validates use of propidium monoazide (PMA, a DNA chelating agent that is excluded by an undamaged bacterial membrane, to reduce bias associated with 16S rRNA gene analysis of clinical stool samples. We aim to improve identification of the viable microbiota in order to increase the accuracy of clinical inferences made regarding the impact of the preterm gut microbiota on health and disease. Gut microbiota analysis was completed on stools from matched twins (n = 16 that received probiotics. Samples were treated with PMA, prior to bacterial DNA extraction. Meta-analysis highlighted a significant reduction in bacterial diversity in 68.8% of PMA treated samples as well as significantly

  20. Gender bias in a patriarchal society A media analysis on virginity and reproductive health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billy K. Sarwono

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Women and health are two very close issues as family health lies most often in the hands of women. Ironically, their awareness toward their own health is still low. Cultural constraints have made single, unmarried women or virgins feel reluctant to go to obgyn clinics, though there is an increasing prevalence of cervical cancer in Indonesia. Related to the role of the media to reduce the number of women with cervical cancer, a question rises. How do the media represent this conflict? The object of the study is a documentary film about several problems faced by women. The unit of analysis is the episode that contains issues related to the virtue of virginity, and data were collected through an analysis of the media text. The findings show that the media seem to have an awareness of the problems, but they have not fully adopted gender perspectives, and this leads to the strengthening of myths, taboos and traditional values surrounding virginity.

  1. Double Sampling with Ranked Set Selection in the Second Phase with Nonresponse: Analytical Results and Monte Carlo Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaajendra K. Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the study of the behavior of the use of double sampling for dealing with nonresponses, when ranked set sample is used. The characteristics of the sampling strategies are derived. The structure of the errors generated the need of studying of the optimality of the strategies by performing a set Monte Carlo experiments.

  2. Editorial bias in scientific publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, J; García-Ramos, R

    2011-01-01

    Many authors believe that there are biases in scientific publications. Editorial biases include publication bias; which refers to those situations where the results influence the editor's decision, and editorial bias refers to those situations where factors related with authors or their environment influence the decision. This paper includes an analysis of the situation of editorial biases. One bias is where mainly articles with positive results are accepted, as opposed to those with negative results. Another is latent bias, where positive results are published before those with negative results. In order to examine editorial bias, this paper analyses the influence of where the article originated; the country or continent, academic centre of origin, belonging to cooperative groups, and the maternal language of the authors. The article analyses biases in the editorial process in the publication of funded clinical trials. Editorial biases exists. Authors, when submitting their manuscript, should analyse different journals and decide where their article will receive adequate treatment. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Biased random walks, lyapunov functions, and stochastic analysis of best fit bin packing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenyon, C. [CNRS, Lyon (France); Rabani, Y. [Technion, Haifa (Israel); Sinclair, A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We study the average case performance of the Best Fit algorithm for on-line bin packing under the distribution U(j,k), in which the item sizes are uniformly distributed in the discrete range (1/k, 2/k,..., j/k). Our main result is that, in the case j = k - 2, the expected waste for an infinite stream of items remains bounded. This settles an open problem posed recently by Coffman et al. It is also the first result which involves a detailed analysis of the infinite multi-dimensional Markov chain underlying the algorithm.

  4. Membrane gene ontology bias in sequencing and microarray obtained by housekeeping-gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yijuan; Akintola, Oluwafemi S; Liu, Ken J A; Sun, Bingyun

    2016-01-10

    Microarray (MA) and high-throughput sequencing are two commonly used detection systems for global gene expression profiling. Although these two systems are frequently used in parallel, the differences in their final results have not been examined thoroughly. Transcriptomic analysis of housekeeping (HK) genes provides a unique opportunity to reliably examine the technical difference between these two systems. We investigated here the structure, genome location, expression quantity, microarray probe coverage, as well as biological functions of differentially identified human HK genes by 9 MA and 6 sequencing studies. These in-depth analyses allowed us to discover, for the first time, a subset of transcripts encoding membrane, cell surface and nuclear proteins that were prone to differential identification by the two platforms. We hope that the discovery can aid the future development of these technologies for comprehensive transcriptomic studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Authorship bias in violence risk assessment? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay P Singh

    Full Text Available Various financial and non-financial conflicts of interests have been shown to influence the reporting of research findings, particularly in clinical medicine. In this study, we examine whether this extends to prognostic instruments designed to assess violence risk. Such instruments have increasingly become a routine part of clinical practice in mental health and criminal justice settings. The present meta-analysis investigated whether an authorship effect exists in the violence risk assessment literature by comparing predictive accuracy outcomes in studies where the individuals who designed these instruments were study authors with independent investigations. A systematic search from 1966 to 2011 was conducted using PsycINFO, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and US National Criminal Justice Reference Service Abstracts to identify predictive validity studies for the nine most commonly used risk assessment tools. Tabular data from 83 studies comprising 104 samples was collected, information on two-thirds of which was received directly from study authors for the review. Random effects subgroup analysis and metaregression were used to explore evidence of an authorship effect. We found a substantial and statistically significant authorship effect. Overall, studies authored by tool designers reported predictive validity findings around two times higher those of investigations reported by independent authors (DOR=6.22 [95% CI=4.68-8.26] in designers' studies vs. DOR=3.08 [95% CI=2.45-3.88] in independent studies. As there was evidence of an authorship effect, we also examined disclosure rates. None of the 25 studies where tool designers or translators were also study authors published a conflict of interest statement to that effect, despite a number of journals requiring that potential conflicts be disclosed. The field of risk assessment would benefit from routine disclosure and registration of research studies. The extent to which similar conflict of interests exists

  6. Authorship bias in violence risk assessment? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jay P; Grann, Martin; Fazel, Seena

    2013-01-01

    Various financial and non-financial conflicts of interests have been shown to influence the reporting of research findings, particularly in clinical medicine. In this study, we examine whether this extends to prognostic instruments designed to assess violence risk. Such instruments have increasingly become a routine part of clinical practice in mental health and criminal justice settings. The present meta-analysis investigated whether an authorship effect exists in the violence risk assessment literature by comparing predictive accuracy outcomes in studies where the individuals who designed these instruments were study authors with independent investigations. A systematic search from 1966 to 2011 was conducted using PsycINFO, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and US National Criminal Justice Reference Service Abstracts to identify predictive validity studies for the nine most commonly used risk assessment tools. Tabular data from 83 studies comprising 104 samples was collected, information on two-thirds of which was received directly from study authors for the review. Random effects subgroup analysis and metaregression were used to explore evidence of an authorship effect. We found a substantial and statistically significant authorship effect. Overall, studies authored by tool designers reported predictive validity findings around two times higher those of investigations reported by independent authors (DOR=6.22 [95% CI=4.68-8.26] in designers' studies vs. DOR=3.08 [95% CI=2.45-3.88] in independent studies). As there was evidence of an authorship effect, we also examined disclosure rates. None of the 25 studies where tool designers or translators were also study authors published a conflict of interest statement to that effect, despite a number of journals requiring that potential conflicts be disclosed. The field of risk assessment would benefit from routine disclosure and registration of research studies. The extent to which similar conflict of interests exists in those

  7. A Multi-Level Bayesian Analysis of Racial Bias in Police Shootings at the County-Level in the United States, 2011-2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody T Ross

    Full Text Available A geographically-resolved, multi-level Bayesian model is used to analyze the data presented in the U.S. Police-Shooting Database (USPSD in order to investigate the extent of racial bias in the shooting of American civilians by police officers in recent years. In contrast to previous work that relied on the FBI's Supplemental Homicide Reports that were constructed from self-reported cases of police-involved homicide, this data set is less likely to be biased by police reporting practices. County-specific relative risk outcomes of being shot by police are estimated as a function of the interaction of: 1 whether suspects/civilians were armed or unarmed, and 2 the race/ethnicity of the suspects/civilians. The results provide evidence of a significant bias in the killing of unarmed black Americans relative to unarmed white Americans, in that the probability of being {black, unarmed, and shot by police} is about 3.49 times the probability of being {white, unarmed, and shot by police} on average. Furthermore, the results of multi-level modeling show that there exists significant heterogeneity across counties in the extent of racial bias in police shootings, with some counties showing relative risk ratios of 20 to 1 or more. Finally, analysis of police shooting data as a function of county-level predictors suggests that racial bias in police shootings is most likely to emerge in police departments in larger metropolitan counties with low median incomes and a sizable portion of black residents, especially when there is high financial inequality in that county. There is no relationship between county-level racial bias in police shootings and crime rates (even race-specific crime rates, meaning that the racial bias observed in police shootings in this data set is not explainable as a response to local-level crime rates.

  8. A Multi-Level Bayesian Analysis of Racial Bias in Police Shootings at the County-Level in the United States, 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Cody T

    2015-01-01

    A geographically-resolved, multi-level Bayesian model is used to analyze the data presented in the U.S. Police-Shooting Database (USPSD) in order to investigate the extent of racial bias in the shooting of American civilians by police officers in recent years. In contrast to previous work that relied on the FBI's Supplemental Homicide Reports that were constructed from self-reported cases of police-involved homicide, this data set is less likely to be biased by police reporting practices. County-specific relative risk outcomes of being shot by police are estimated as a function of the interaction of: 1) whether suspects/civilians were armed or unarmed, and 2) the race/ethnicity of the suspects/civilians. The results provide evidence of a significant bias in the killing of unarmed black Americans relative to unarmed white Americans, in that the probability of being {black, unarmed, and shot by police} is about 3.49 times the probability of being {white, unarmed, and shot by police} on average. Furthermore, the results of multi-level modeling show that there exists significant heterogeneity across counties in the extent of racial bias in police shootings, with some counties showing relative risk ratios of 20 to 1 or more. Finally, analysis of police shooting data as a function of county-level predictors suggests that racial bias in police shootings is most likely to emerge in police departments in larger metropolitan counties with low median incomes and a sizable portion of black residents, especially when there is high financial inequality in that county. There is no relationship between county-level racial bias in police shootings and crime rates (even race-specific crime rates), meaning that the racial bias observed in police shootings in this data set is not explainable as a response to local-level crime rates.

  9. Non-Response to Antibiotic Treatment in Adolescents for Four Common Infections in UK Primary Care 1991–2012: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Berni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied non-response rates to antibiotics in the under-reported subgroup of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years old, using standardised criteria representing antibiotic treatment failure. Routine, primary care data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD were used. Annual, non-response rates by antibiotics and by indication were determined. We identified 824,651 monotherapies in 415,468 adolescents: 368,900 (45% episodes for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs, 89,558 (11% for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs, 286,969 (35% for skin/soft tissue infections (SSTIs and 79,224 (10% for acute otitis media (AOM. The most frequently prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (27%, penicillin-V (24%, erythromycin (11%, flucloxacillin (11% and oxytetracycline (6%. In 1991, the overall non-response rate was 9.3%: 11.9% for LRTIs, 9.5% for URTIs, 7.1% for SSTIs, 9.7% for AOM. In 2012, the overall non-response rate was 9.2%. Highest non-response rates were for AOM in 1991–1999 and for LRTIs in 2000–2012. Physicians generally prescribed antibiotics to adolescents according to recommendations. Evidence of antibiotic non-response was less common among adolescents during this 22-year study period compared with an all-age population, where the overall non-response rate was 12%.

  10. Non-Response to Antibiotic Treatment in Adolescents for Four Common Infections in UK Primary Care 1991–2012: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni, Ellen; Scott, Laura A.; Jenkins-Jones, Sara; De Voogd, Hanka; Rocha, Monica S.; Butler, Chris C.; Morgan, Christopher Ll.; Currie, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    We studied non-response rates to antibiotics in the under-reported subgroup of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years old, using standardised criteria representing antibiotic treatment failure. Routine, primary care data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) were used. Annual, non-response rates by antibiotics and by indication were determined. We identified 824,651 monotherapies in 415,468 adolescents: 368,900 (45%) episodes for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), 89,558 (11%) for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs), 286,969 (35%) for skin/soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and 79,224 (10%) for acute otitis media (AOM). The most frequently prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (27%), penicillin-V (24%), erythromycin (11%), flucloxacillin (11%) and oxytetracycline (6%). In 1991, the overall non-response rate was 9.3%: 11.9% for LRTIs, 9.5% for URTIs, 7.1% for SSTIs, 9.7% for AOM. In 2012, the overall non-response rate was 9.2%. Highest non-response rates were for AOM in 1991–1999 and for LRTIs in 2000–2012. Physicians generally prescribed antibiotics to adolescents according to recommendations. Evidence of antibiotic non-response was less common among adolescents during this 22-year study period compared with an all-age population, where the overall non-response rate was 12%. PMID:27384588

  11. Non-Response to Antibiotic Treatment in Adolescents for Four Common Infections in UK Primary Care 1991-2012: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni, Ellen; Scott, Laura A; Jenkins-Jones, Sara; De Voogd, Hanka; Rocha, Monica S; Butler, Chris C; Morgan, Christopher Ll; Currie, Craig J

    2016-07-04

    We studied non-response rates to antibiotics in the under-reported subgroup of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years old, using standardised criteria representing antibiotic treatment failure. Routine, primary care data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) were used. Annual, non-response rates by antibiotics and by indication were determined. We identified 824,651 monotherapies in 415,468 adolescents: 368,900 (45%) episodes for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), 89,558 (11%) for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs), 286,969 (35%) for skin/soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and 79,224 (10%) for acute otitis media (AOM). The most frequently prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (27%), penicillin-V (24%), erythromycin (11%), flucloxacillin (11%) and oxytetracycline (6%). In 1991, the overall non-response rate was 9.3%: 11.9% for LRTIs, 9.5% for URTIs, 7.1% for SSTIs, 9.7% for AOM. In 2012, the overall non-response rate was 9.2%. Highest non-response rates were for AOM in 1991-1999 and for LRTIs in 2000-2012. Physicians generally prescribed antibiotics to adolescents according to recommendations. Evidence of antibiotic non-response was less common among adolescents during this 22-year study period compared with an all-age population, where the overall non-response rate was 12%.

  12. Factors affecting study efficiency and item non-response in health surveys in developing countries: the Jamaica national healthy lifestyle survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennett Franklyn

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health surveys provide important information on the burden and secular trends of risk factors and disease. Several factors including survey and item non-response can affect data quality. There are few reports on efficiency, validity and the impact of item non-response, from developing countries. This report examines factors associated with item non-response and study efficiency in a national health survey in a developing Caribbean island. Methods A national sample of participants aged 15–74 years was selected in a multi-stage sampling design accounting for 4 health regions and 14 parishes using enumeration districts as primary sampling units. Means and proportions of the variables of interest were compared between various categories. Non-response was defined as failure to provide an analyzable response. Linear and logistic regression models accounting for sample design and post-stratification weighting were used to identify independent correlates of recruitment efficiency and item non-response. Results We recruited 2012 15–74 year-olds (66.2% females at a response rate of 87.6% with significant variation between regions (80.9% to 97.6%; p Conclusion Informative health surveys are possible in developing countries. While survey response rates may be satisfactory, item non-response was high in respect of income and sexual practice. In contrast to developed countries, non-response to questions on income is higher and has different correlates. These findings can inform future surveys.

  13. Comprehensive Spatial Analysis of the Borrelia burgdorferi Lipoproteome Reveals a Compartmentalization Bias toward the Bacterial Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, Alexander S.; Murphy, Maxwell D.; Azodi, Christina; Swanson, Selene K.; Florens, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    field have predominantly focused on a relatively small number of surface lipoproteins that play important roles in the transmission and pathogenesis of this global human pathogen. Yet, a comprehensive spatial assessment of the entire borrelial lipoproteome has been missing. The current study newly identifies 52 surface and 23 periplasmic lipoproteins. Overall, two-thirds of the B. burgdorferi lipoproteins localize to the surface, while outer membrane lipoproteins facing the periplasm are rare. This analysis underscores the dominant contribution of lipoproteins to the spirochete's rather complex and adaptable host-pathogen interface, and it encourages further functional exploration of its lipoproteome. PMID:28069820

  14. Are We Missing Something Pertinent? A Bias Analysis of Unmeasured Confounding in the Firearm-Suicide Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M; Swanson, S A; Azrael, D

    2016-01-01

    Despite the magnitude and consistency of risk estimates in the peer-reviewed literature linking firearm availability and suicide, inferring causality has been questioned on the theoretical basis that existing studies may have failed to account for the possibility that members of households with firearms differ from members of households without firearms in important ways related to suicide risk. The current bias analysis directly addresses this concern by describing the salient characteristics that such an unmeasured confounder would need to possess in order to yield the associations between firearm availability and suicide observed in the literature when, in fact, the causal effect is null. Four US studies, published between 1992 and 2003, met our eligibility criteria. We find that any such unmeasured confounder would need to possess an untenable combination of characteristics, such as being not only 1) as potent a suicide risk factor as the psychiatric disorders most tightly linked to suicide (e.g., major depressive and substance use disorders) but also 2) an order of magnitude more imbalanced across households with versus without firearms than is any known risk factor. No such confounder has been found or even suggested. The current study strongly suggests that unmeasured confounding alone is unlikely to explain the association between firearms and suicide.

  15. Towards Uniform Accelerometry Analysis: A Standardization Methodology to Minimize Measurement Bias Due to Systematic Accelerometer Wear-Time Variation

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    Tarun R. Katapally, Nazeem Muhajarine

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accelerometers are predominantly used to objectively measure the entire range of activity intensities – sedentary behaviour (SED, light physical activity (LPA and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA. However, studies consistently report results without accounting for systematic accelerometer wear-time variation (within and between participants, jeopardizing the validity of these results. This study describes the development of a standardization methodology to understand and minimize measurement bias due to wear-time variation. Accelerometry is generally conducted over seven consecutive days, with participants' data being commonly considered 'valid' only if wear-time is at least 10 hours/day. However, even within ‘valid’ data, there could be systematic wear-time variation. To explore this variation, accelerometer data of Smart Cities, Healthy Kids study (www.smartcitieshealthykids.com were analyzed descriptively and with repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA. Subsequently, a standardization method was developed, where case-specific observed wear-time is controlled to an analyst specified time period. Next, case-specific accelerometer data are interpolated to this controlled wear-time to produce standardized variables. To understand discrepancies owing to wear-time variation, all analyses were conducted pre- and post-standardization. Descriptive analyses revealed systematic wear-time variation, both between and within participants. Pre- and post-standardized descriptive analyses of SED, LPA and MVPA revealed a persistent and often significant trend of wear-time’s influence on activity. SED was consistently higher on weekdays before standardization; however, this trend was reversed post-standardization. Even though MVPA was significantly higher on weekdays both pre- and post-standardization, the magnitude of this difference decreased post-standardization. Multivariable analyses with standardized SED, LPA and

  16. Biased parameter estimates and inflated Type I error rates in analysis of covariance (and analysis of partial variance) arising from unreliability: alternatives and remedial strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinbarg, Richard E; Suzuki, Satoru; Uliaszek, Amanda A; Lewis, Alison R

    2010-05-01

    Miller and Chapman (2001) argued that 1 major class of misuse of analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) or its multiple regression counterpart, analysis of partial variance (APV), arises from attempts to use an ANCOVA/APV to answer a research question that is not meaningful in the 1st place. Unfortunately, there is another misuse of ANCOVAs/APVs that arises frequently in psychopathology studies even when addressing consensually meaningful research questions. This misuse arises from inflated Type I error rates in ANCOVA/APV inferential tests of the unique association of the independent variable with the dependent variable when the covariate and independent variables are correlated and measured with error. Alternatives to conventional ANCOVAs/APVs are discussed, as are steps that can be taken to minimize the impact of this bias on drawing valid inferences when conventional ANCOVAs/APVs are used.

  17. Homocysteine and coronary heart disease: meta-analysis of MTHFR case-control studies, avoiding publication bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Clarke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133 of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR appreciably increases homocysteine levels, so "Mendelian randomization" studies using this variant as an instrumental variable could help test causality. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Nineteen unpublished datasets were obtained (total 48,175 CHD cases and 67,961 controls in which multiple genetic variants had been measured, including MTHFR C677T. These datasets did not include measurements of blood homocysteine, but homocysteine levels would be expected to be about 20% higher with TT than with CC genotype in the populations studied. In meta-analyses of these unpublished datasets, the case-control CHD odds ratio (OR and 95% CI comparing TT versus CC homozygotes was 1.02 (0.98-1.07; p = 0.28 overall, and 1.01 (0.95-1.07 in unsupplemented low-folate populations. By contrast, in a slightly updated meta-analysis of the 86 published studies (28,617 CHD cases and 41,857 controls, the OR was 1.15 (1.09-1.21, significantly discrepant (p = 0.001 with the OR in the unpublished datasets. Within the meta-analysis of published studies, the OR was 1.12 (1.04-1.21 in the 14 larger studies (those with variance of log OR<0.05; total 13,119 cases and 1.18 (1.09-1.28 in the 72 smaller ones (total 15,498 cases. CONCLUSIONS: The CI for the overall result from large unpublished datasets shows lifelong moderate homocysteine elevation has little or no effect on CHD. The discrepant overall result from previously published studies reflects publication bias or methodological problems.

  18. Applying Recursive Sensitivity Analysis to Multi-Criteria Decision Models to Reduce Bias in Defense Cyber Engineering Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Considerable research has been conducted on the topic of decision aiding methods such as Multi -criteria and Multi - objective Decision Analysis to...the best compromise solution amongst multiple or infinite possibilities. This is generally known as Multi - Objective Decision Making (MODM). For the...from those of the program manager, resource sponsor, or even the user. This research focuses on the use of recursive sensitivity analysis to mitigate

  19. Analysis on Accuracy of Bias, Linearity and Stability of Measurement System in Ball screw Processes by Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Yun Pai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To consistently produce high quality products, a quality management system, such as the ISO9001, 2000 or TS 16949 must be practically implemented. One core instrument of the TS16949 MSA (Measurement System Analysis is to rank the capability of a measurement system and ensure the quality characteristics of the product would likely be transformed through the whole manufacturing process. It is important to reduce the risk of Type I errors (acceptable goods are misjudged as defective parts and Type II errors (defective parts are misjudged as good parts. An ideal measuring system would have the statistical characteristic of zero error, but such a system could hardly exist. Hence, to maintain better control of the variance that might occur in the manufacturing process, MSA is necessary for better quality control. Ball screws, which are a key component in precision machines, have significant attributes with respect to positioning and transmitting. Failures of lead accuracy and axial-gap of a ball screw can cause negative and expensive effects in machine positioning accuracy. Consequently, a functional measurement system can incur great savings by detecting Type I and Type II errors. If the measurement system fails with respect to specification of the product, it will likely misjudge Type I and Type II errors. Inspectors normally follow the MSA regulations for accuracy measurement, but the choice of measuring system does not merely depend on some simple indices. In this paper, we examine the stability of a measuring system by using a Monte Carlo simulation to establish bias, linearity variance of the normal distribution, and the probability density function. Further, we forecast the possible area distribution in the real case. After the simulation, the measurement capability will be improved, which helps the user classify the measurement system and establish measurement regulations for better performance and monitoring of the precision of the ball screw.

  20. Sequential biases in accumulating evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Richard; Dogo, Samson Henry

    2015-01-01

    Whilst it is common in clinical trials to use the results of tests at one phase to decide whether to continue to the next phase and to subsequently design the next phase, we show that this can lead to biased results in evidence synthesis. Two new kinds of bias associated with accumulating evidence, termed ‘sequential decision bias’ and ‘sequential design bias’, are identified. Both kinds of bias are the result of making decisions on the usefulness of a new study, or its design, based on the previous studies. Sequential decision bias is determined by the correlation between the value of the current estimated effect and the probability of conducting an additional study. Sequential design bias arises from using the estimated value instead of the clinically relevant value of an effect in sample size calculations. We considered both the fixed‐effect and the random‐effects models of meta‐analysis and demonstrated analytically and by simulations that in both settings the problems due to sequential biases are apparent. According to our simulations, the sequential biases increase with increased heterogeneity. Minimisation of sequential biases arises as a new and important research area necessary for successful evidence‐based approaches to the development of science. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26626562

  1. Design and analysis of a self-biased broadband magnetoelectric cantilever operated at multi-frequency windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J. N.; Xin, C. Z.; Ma, J.; Lin, Y. H.; Nan, C. W.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) composites with self-biased and wide resonance frequency band properties are promising candidates for magnetic field sensor and energy harvester. Here, we present a ME cantilever by in-series connecting a few SrFe12O19/Metglas/Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 components. Due to the in-built magnetic bias of SrFe12O19, the ME cantilever shows self-biased property. Meanwhile, by merging the resonance responses of the in-series ME components together, the ME cantilever presents multi-wide resonance bands (i.e., 500 Hz ˜ 700 Hz, 3.3 kHz ˜ 4.4 kHz and 44 kHz ˜ 70 kHz). In these three wide frequency windows, the ME voltage coefficients (α V) of the ME cantilever are higher than 40 mV/Oe, 115 mV/Oe and 400 mV/Oe, respectively.

  2. Hopelessness as a predictor of non-response to fluoxetine in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakostas, George I; Petersen, Timothy; Homberger, Caitlin H; Green, Cassandra H; Smith, Juliana; Alpert, Jonathan E; Fava, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to study hopelessness as a predictor of response to fluoxetine in outpatients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The degree of hopelessness was assessed during the baseline visit with the use of the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) in 312 patients with MDD (56.1% women; 39.8 +/- 10.3 years of age) who entered an 8-week, 20-mg, fixed-dose, open trial of fluoxetine. With the use of a logistic regression we tested whether BHS scores at baseline predicted clinical response, controlling for the severity of depression as reflected by the total score on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D-17). With the use of a multiple regression we also tested whether BHS scores at baseline predicted HAM-D-17 scores at endpoint, controlling for HAM-D-17 scores at baseline. After controlling for depression severity at baseline, a greater degree of hopelessness was found to significantly increase the risk of non-response to fluoxetine (p = 0.0413), as well as the risk of greater endpoint depression severity (p = 0.0305). Hopelessness appeared to be associated with poorer response to treatment with fluoxetine in MDD, and this was independent of depression severity. Similar studies involving treatment with higher doses of fluoxetine and for greater duration as well as a placebo comparator arm are needed to further explore the relationship between hopelessness, placebo response and drug response.

  3. Industry sponsorship bias in research findings: a network meta-analysis of LDL cholesterol reduction in randomised trials of statins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Sofia; Ades, A E

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the risk of industry sponsorship bias in a systematically identified set of placebo controlled and active comparator trials of statins. Design Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Eligibility Open label and double blind randomised controlled trials comparing one statin with another at any dose or with control (placebo, diet, or usual care) for adults with, or at risk of developing, cardiovascular disease. Only trials that lasted longer than four weeks with more than 50 participants per trial arm were included. Two investigators assessed study eligibility. Data sources Bibliographic databases and reference lists of relevant articles published between 1 January 1985 and 10 March 2013. Data extraction One investigator extracted data and another confirmed accuracy. Main outcome measure Mean absolute change from baseline concentration of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Data synthesis Study level outcomes from randomised trials were combined using random effects network meta-analyses. Results We included 183 randomised controlled trials of statins, 103 of which were two-armed or multi-armed active comparator trials. When all of the existing randomised evidence was synthesised in network meta-analyses, there were clear differences in the LDL cholesterol lowering effects of individual statins at different doses. In general, higher doses resulted in higher reductions in baseline LDL cholesterol levels. Of a total of 146 industry sponsored trials, 64 were placebo controlled (43.8%). The corresponding number for the non-industry sponsored trials was 16 (43.2%). Of the 35 unique comparisons available in 37 non-industry sponsored trials, 31 were also available in industry sponsored trials. There were no systematic differences in magnitude between the LDL cholesterol lowering effects of individual statins observed in industry sponsored versus non-industry sponsored trials. In industry sponsored trials, the mean change from baseline LDL

  4. Transient analysis and control of bias magnetic state in the transformer of on-line pulse-width-modulation switching full bridge direct current-direct current converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiaxin; Guo, Youguang; Zhu, Jianguo; Wei Lin, Zhi

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a finite element analysis (FEA) based method for analyzing and controlling the bias magnetic state of the transformer of a pulse-width-modulation (PWM) switching full bridge dc-dc converter. A field-circuit indirect coupling method for predicting the transient bias magnetic state is introduced first. To increase flexibility of the proposed method, a novel transformer model which can address not only its basic input-output characteristic, but also the nonlinear magnetizing inductance, is proposed. Both the asymmetric characteristic and the variable laws of the current flowing through the two secondary windings during the period of PWM switching-off state are highlighted. Finally, the peak magnetizing current controlled method based on the on-line magnetizing current computation is introduced. Analysis results show that this method can address the magnetic saturation at winding ends, and hence many previous difficulties, such as the start-up process and asymmetry of power electronics, can be easily controlled.

  5. Does the requirement of getting active consent from parents in school-based research result in a biased sample? An empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsma, Jennifer; Burgess, Theresa; Henley, Lesley

    2012-12-01

    Active parental consent is a requirement that may threaten the validity of including minors in research. This study investigated possible sources of bias between the responses of children whose parents actively consented to their participation in a school-based survey and those of children whose parents were nonresponders. Due to a serious administrative error in a study to examine health-related quality of life (HRQoL), all 514 eligible schoolchildren were tested, although only 177 parents signed consent. After deliberation, the relevant human research ethics committee gave permission to include all results in the analysis. The HRQoL was not different between the groups. Male children returned significantly fewer consent forms (p=.026). More of the nonresponding group reported that their parents "Never had enough time for them" (p=.023). The high nonresponse rate and associations between response and parental interest and gender indicate that some bias may be introduced through the need for active consent, but overall there were no differences in responses to the quality of life questionnaire.

  6. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and impaired proinsulin conversion as newly identified predictors of the long-term non-response to a lifestyle intervention for diabetes prevention: results from the TULIP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Vera; Wagner, Robert; Sailer, Corinna; Fritsche, Louise; Kantartzis, Konstantinos; Peter, Andreas; Heni, Martin; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Stefan, Norbert; Fritsche, Andreas

    2017-08-24

    Lifestyle intervention is effective to prevent type 2 diabetes. However, a considerable long-term non-response occurs to a standard lifestyle intervention. We investigated which risk phenotypes at baseline and their changes during the lifestyle intervention predict long-term glycaemic non-response to the intervention. Of 300 participants at high risk for type 2 diabetes who participated in a 24 month lifestyle intervention with diet modification and increased physical activity, 190 participants could be re-examined after 8.7 ± 1.6 years. All individuals underwent a five-point 75 g OGTT and measurements of body fat compartments and liver fat content with MRI and spectroscopy at baseline, 9 and 24 months during the lifestyle intervention, and at long-term follow-up. Fasting proinsulin to insulin conversion (PI/I ratio) and insulin sensitivity and secretion were calculated from the OGTT. Non-response to lifestyle intervention was defined as no decrease in glycaemia, i.e. no decrease in AUC for glucose at 0-120 min during OGTT (AUCglucose0-120 min). Before the lifestyle intervention, 56% of participants had normal glucose regulation and 44% individuals had impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance. At long-term follow-up, 11% had developed diabetes. Multivariable regression analysis with adjustment for age, sex, BMI and change in BMI during the lifestyle intervention revealed that baseline insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, as well as change in insulin sensitivity during the lifestyle intervention, predicted long-term glycaemic control after 9 years. In addition, increased hepatic lipid content as well as impaired fasting proinsulin conversion at baseline were newly detected phenotypes that independently predicted long-term glycaemic control. Increased hepatic lipid content and impaired proinsulin conversion are new predictors, independent of change in body weight, for non-response to lifestyle intervention in addition to the

  7. Christopher Columbus, Hernando Cortes, and Francisco Pizzaro: A Qualitative Content Analysis Examining Cultural Bias in World History Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillejord, Jebadiah Serril

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate to what extent contemporary high school world history textbooks portray Christopher Columbus, Hernán Cortés, and Francisco Pizarro within the context of being "sacred," "profane," or someplace in between. To evaluate for existence of content bias this study employed qualitative…

  8. Harmonic allocation of authorship credit: source-level correction of bibliometric bias assures accurate publication and citation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils T Hagen

    Full Text Available Authorship credit for multi-authored scientific publications is routinely allocated either by issuing full publication credit repeatedly to all coauthors, or by dividing one credit equally among all coauthors. The ensuing inflationary and equalizing biases distort derived bibliometric measures of merit by systematically benefiting secondary authors at the expense of primary authors. Here I show how harmonic counting, which allocates credit according to authorship rank and the number of coauthors, provides simultaneous source-level correction for both biases as well as accommodating further decoding of byline information. I also demonstrate large and erratic effects of counting bias on the original h-index, and show how the harmonic version of the h-index provides unbiased bibliometric ranking of scientific merit while retaining the original's essential simplicity, transparency and intended fairness. Harmonic decoding of byline information resolves the conundrum of authorship credit allocation by providing a simple recipe for source-level correction of inflationary and equalizing bias. Harmonic counting could also offer unrivalled accuracy in automated assessments of scientific productivity, impact and achievement.

  9. Things I Have Learned about Meta-­Analysis since 1990: Reducing Bias in Search of "The Big Picture"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines sources of potential bias in systematic reviews and meta-analyses which can distort their findings, leading to problems with interpretation and application by practitioners and policymakers. It follows from an article that was published in the "Canadian Journal of Communication" in 1990, "Integrating Research…

  10. The removal of multiplicative, systematic bias allows integration of breast cancer gene expression datasets – improving meta-analysis and prediction of prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepper Stuart D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of gene expression studies in the public domain is rapidly increasing, representing a highly valuable resource. However, dataset-specific bias precludes meta-analysis at the raw transcript level, even when the RNA is from comparable sources and has been processed on the same microarray platform using similar protocols. Here, we demonstrate, using Affymetrix data, that much of this bias can be removed, allowing multiple datasets to be legitimately combined for meaningful meta-analyses. Results A series of validation datasets comparing breast cancer and normal breast cell lines (MCF7 and MCF10A were generated to examine the variability between datasets generated using different amounts of starting RNA, alternative protocols, different generations of Affymetrix GeneChip or scanning hardware. We demonstrate that systematic, multiplicative biases are introduced at the RNA, hybridization and image-capture stages of a microarray experiment. Simple batch mean-centering was found to significantly reduce the level of inter-experimental variation, allowing raw transcript levels to be compared across datasets with confidence. By accounting for dataset-specific bias, we were able to assemble the largest gene expression dataset of primary breast tumours to-date (1107, from six previously published studies. Using this meta-dataset, we demonstrate that combining greater numbers of datasets or tumours leads to a greater overlap in differentially expressed genes and more accurate prognostic predictions. However, this is highly dependent upon the composition of the datasets and patient characteristics. Conclusion Multiplicative, systematic biases are introduced at many stages of microarray experiments. When these are reconciled, raw data can be directly integrated from different gene expression datasets leading to new biological findings with increased statistical power.

  11. The proportionator: unbiased stereological estimation using biased automatic image analysis and non-uniform probability proportional to size sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardi, J E; Nyengaard, J R; Gundersen, H J G

    2008-03-01

    The proportionator is a novel and radically different approach to sampling with microscopes based on the well-known statistical theory (probability proportional to size-PPS sampling). It uses automatic image analysis, with a large range of options, to assign to every field of view in the section a weight proportional to some characteristic of the structure under study. A typical and very simple example, examined here, is the amount of color characteristic for the structure, marked with a stain with known properties. The color may be specific or not. In the recorded list of weights in all fields, the desired number of fields is sampled automatically with probability proportional to the weight and presented to the expert observer. Using any known stereological probe and estimator, the correct count in these fields leads to a simple, unbiased estimate of the total amount of structure in the sections examined, which in turn leads to any of the known stereological estimates including size distributions and spatial distributions. The unbiasedness is not a function of the assumed relation between the weight and the structure, which is in practice always a biased relation from a stereological (integral geometric) point of view. The efficiency of the proportionator depends, however, directly on this relation to be positive. The sampling and estimation procedure is simulated in sections with characteristics and various kinds of noises in possibly realistic ranges. In all cases examined, the proportionator is 2-15-fold more efficient than the common systematic, uniformly random sampling. The simulations also indicate that the lack of a simple predictor of the coefficient of error (CE) due to field-to-field variation is a more severe problem for uniform sampling strategies than anticipated. Because of its entirely different sampling strategy, based on known but non-uniform sampling probabilities, the proportionator for the first time allows the real CE at the section level to

  12. Evidence that the circadian system mediates photoperiodic nonresponsiveness in Siberian hamsters: the effect of running wheel access on photoperiodic responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, D A; Goldman, B D

    1997-04-01

    Juvenile male Siberian hamsters from a line of hamsters selected for nonresponsiveness to short photoperiod (PNRj) and animals from the general colony (UNS) were separated at weaning into two groups. Group 1 males were moved into short days (10 h light:14 h dark [10L:14D]) with free access to running wheels (RW). Group 2 animals were the male siblings of Group 1 hamsters; they were moved at the same time into the same room, but were housed in cages without access to RW. Group 2 hamsters only had access to RW for the final week of short-day exposure (Week 8). Animals were blood sampled at the time of sacrifice for analysis of serum prolactin (PRL) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations. At sacrifice, paired testis weights were obtained and pelage color was scored. Animals from the UNS line showed the expected declines in testis weight, body weight, and serum concentrations of both PRL and FSH, regardless of the presence or absence of RW. These animals also exhibited a high proportion of individuals molting to winter-type pelage. By contrast, a marked difference was noted between siblings from the PNRj line depending on whether RW access was provided at the time of weaning. Animals with access to RW exhibited identical responses to those of the UNS responder animals, whereas PNRj animals without access to RW showed no adjustments to short days (i.e., testis regression, pelage molt, expansion of alpha). In a second experiment, PNRj and UNS males were placed in constant darkness (DD), with or without RW access. The results of this experiment indicated that PNRj animals respond to DD regardless of the presence or absence of RW. In DD, PNRj hamsters also exhibited significantly longer free-running period lengths (taus) than did UNS hamsters; all the PNRj hamsters had taus > 24 h, whereas none of the UNS hamsters had a tau > 24 h. These results indicate that PNRj hamsters retain the proper neural pathways for responding to short day lengths and establish a

  13. 情报分析中的锚定效应及其偏差修正%Anchoring Effect and Its Bias Correction in Intelligence Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘杰

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Significance] For judgment and decision under uncertain situation, the anchoring effect will lead to insufficient ad-justment of the information, which results in a variety of cognitive biases. This study is helpful for intelligence analysts to reduce such bi-as, avoid intelligence failure, and improve the quality of intelligence products. [ Method/Process] The paper presents the properties of an-choring effect and the current status of the research , points out that this kind of bias in intelligence analysis includes selective collecting in-formation, interference of the irrelevant information,subject to authority bias, egocentric bias and so on, and puts forward the correction strategy. [ Results/Conclusions] The paper concludes that modifying the intelligence analystsˊ way of thinking, adjusting their behavior motivation, making scientific and reasonable regulations and providing technical tool support can effectively weaken and reduce the adverse effects of such bias of intelligence analysis.%[目的/意义]在不确定情境的判断与决策中,锚定效应会导致情报分析人员不充分地调整信息,产生多种认知偏差。对此展开研究有助于情报分析人员降低此类偏差,避免情报失察,提升情报产品质量。[方法/过程]通过对锚定效应的属性及其研究现状的考察,指出情报分析中此类偏差的典型样态,如选择性地搜集信息、不相关信息干扰、权威服从偏差、自我中心偏差等等,进而提出修正策略。[结果/结论]认为修正情报分析人员的思维方式、调整其行为动机、制定科学合理的规章制度以及提供技术工具支撑可以有效削弱和降低此类偏差对情报分析的不良影响。

  14. Traditional Dietary Pattern Increases Risk of Prostate Cancer in Argentina: Results of a Multilevel Modeling and Bias Analysis from a Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Niclis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that dietary habits play a role in prostate cancer (PC occurrence. Argentinean cancer risk studies require additional attention because of the singular dietary pattern of this population. A case-control study (147 PC cases, 300 controls was conducted in Córdoba (Argentina throughout 2008–2013. A principal component factor analysis was performed to identify dietary patterns. A mixed logistic regression model was applied, taking into account family history of cancer. Possible bias was evaluated by probabilistic bias analysis. Four dietary patterns were identified: Traditional (fatty red meats, offal, processed meat, starchy vegetables, added sugars and sweets, candies, fats, and vegetable oils, Prudent (nonstarchy vegetables, whole grains, Carbohydrate (sodas/juices and bakery products, and Cheese (cheeses. High adherence to the Traditional (OR 2.82, 95%CI: 1.569–5.099 and Carbohydrate Patterns (OR 2.14, 95%CI: 1.470–3.128 showed a promoting effect for PC, whereas the Prudent and Cheese Patterns were independent factors. PC occurrence was also associated with family history of PC. Bias adjusted ORs indicate that the validity of the present study is acceptable. High adherence to characteristic Argentinean dietary patterns was associated with increased PC risk. Our results incorporate original contributions to knowledge about scenarios in South American dietary patterns and PC occurrence.

  15. A hybrid Bayesian hierarchical model combining cohort and case-control studies for meta-analysis of diagnostic tests: Accounting for partial verification bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoye; Chen, Yong; Cole, Stephen R; Chu, Haitao

    2014-05-26

    To account for between-study heterogeneity in meta-analysis of diagnostic accuracy studies, bivariate random effects models have been recommended to jointly model the sensitivities and specificities. As study design and population vary, the definition of disease status or severity could differ across studies. Consequently, sensitivity and specificity may be correlated with disease prevalence. To account for this dependence, a trivariate random effects model had been proposed. However, the proposed approach can only include cohort studies with information estimating study-specific disease prevalence. In addition, some diagnostic accuracy studies only select a subset of samples to be verified by the reference test. It is known that ignoring unverified subjects may lead to partial verification bias in the estimation of prevalence, sensitivities, and specificities in a single study. However, the impact of this bias on a meta-analysis has not been investigated. In this paper, we propose a novel hybrid Bayesian hierarchical model combining cohort and case-control studies and correcting partial verification bias at the same time. We investigate the performance of the proposed methods through a set of simulation studies. Two case studies on assessing the diagnostic accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in detecting lymph node metastases and of adrenal fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in characterizing adrenal masses are presented.

  16. 情报分析中的认知偏差表征及其克服%Cognitive Biases Characterization in Intelligence Analysis and Correction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严贝妮; 汪传雷; 周贺来; 陈婧

    2011-01-01

    This paper puts intelligence analysis in the perspective of cognitive psychology. The common process of intelligence analy- sis is brought out, the causes of cognitive biases are shown. Furthermore, it discusses the characterizations of cognitive biases d%将情报分析置于认知心理学研究视角中,提炼出基于认知的情报分析通用流程,指出情报分析中认知偏差的诱因。进而,阐释情报采集阶段、情报选择阶段、情报整合阶段与评估论证阶段中最常见的认知偏差表现。最后,提出克服情报分析各阶段认知偏差的对策。

  17. Awareness Reduces Racial Bias

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Can raising awareness of racial bias subsequently reduce that bias? We address this question by exploiting the widespread media attention highlighting racial bias among professional basketball referees that occurred in May 2007 following the release of an academic study. Using new data, we confirm that racial bias persisted in the years after the study's original sample, but prior to the media coverage. Subsequent to the media coverage though, the bias completely disappeared. We examine poten...

  18. A model-based analysis of GC-biased gene conversion in the human and chimpanzee genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Capra

    Full Text Available GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC is a recombination-associated process that favors the fixation of G/C alleles over A/T alleles. In mammals, gBGC is hypothesized to contribute to variation in GC content, rapidly evolving sequences, and the fixation of deleterious mutations, but its prevalence and general functional consequences remain poorly understood. gBGC is difficult to incorporate into models of molecular evolution and so far has primarily been studied using summary statistics from genomic comparisons. Here, we introduce a new probabilistic model that captures the joint effects of natural selection and gBGC on nucleotide substitution patterns, while allowing for correlations along the genome in these effects. We implemented our model in a computer program, called phastBias, that can accurately detect gBGC tracts about 1 kilobase or longer in simulated sequence alignments. When applied to real primate genome sequences, phastBias predicts gBGC tracts that cover roughly 0.3% of the human and chimpanzee genomes and account for 1.2% of human-chimpanzee nucleotide differences. These tracts fall in clusters, particularly in subtelomeric regions; they are enriched for recombination hotspots and fast-evolving sequences; and they display an ongoing fixation preference for G and C alleles. They are also significantly enriched for disease-associated polymorphisms, suggesting that they contribute to the fixation of deleterious alleles. The gBGC tracts provide a unique window into historical recombination processes along the human and chimpanzee lineages. They supply additional evidence of long-term conservation of megabase-scale recombination rates accompanied by rapid turnover of hotspots. Together, these findings shed new light on the evolutionary, functional, and disease implications of gBGC. The phastBias program and our predicted tracts are freely available.

  19. Analysis of Attentional Bias towards Attractive and Unattractive Body Regions among Overweight Males and Females: An Eye-Movement Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Warschburger

    Full Text Available Body image distortion is highly prevalent among overweight individuals. Whilst there is evidence that body-dissatisfied women and those suffering from disordered eating show a negative attentional bias towards their own unattractive body parts and others' attractive body parts, little is known about visual attention patterns in the area of obesity and with respect to males. Since eating disorders and obesity share common features in terms of distorted body image and body dissatisfaction, the aim of this study was to examine whether overweight men and women show a similar attentional bias.We analyzed eye movements in 30 overweight individuals (18 females and 28 normal-weight individuals (16 females with respect to the participants' own pictures as well as gender- and BMI-matched control pictures (front and back view. Additionally, we assessed body image and disordered eating using validated questionnaires.The overweight sample rated their own body as less attractive and showed a more disturbed body image. Contrary to our assumptions, they focused significantly longer on attractive compared to unattractive regions of both their own and the control body. For one's own body, this was more pronounced for women. A higher weight status and more frequent body checking predicted attentional bias towards attractive body parts. We found that overweight adults exhibit an unexpected and stable pattern of selective attention, with a distinctive focus on their own attractive body regions despite higher levels of body dissatisfaction. This positive attentional bias may either be an indicator of a more pronounced pattern of attentional avoidance or a self-enhancing strategy. Further research is warranted to clarify these results.

  20. Analysis of Attentional Bias towards Attractive and Unattractive Body Regions among Overweight Males and Females: An Eye-Movement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warschburger, Petra; Calvano, Claudia; Richter, Eike M.; Engbert, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background Body image distortion is highly prevalent among overweight individuals. Whilst there is evidence that body-dissatisfied women and those suffering from disordered eating show a negative attentional bias towards their own unattractive body parts and others’ attractive body parts, little is known about visual attention patterns in the area of obesity and with respect to males. Since eating disorders and obesity share common features in terms of distorted body image and body dissatisfaction, the aim of this study was to examine whether overweight men and women show a similar attentional bias. Methods/Design We analyzed eye movements in 30 overweight individuals (18 females) and 28 normal-weight individuals (16 females) with respect to the participants’ own pictures as well as gender- and BMI-matched control pictures (front and back view). Additionally, we assessed body image and disordered eating using validated questionnaires. Discussion The overweight sample rated their own body as less attractive and showed a more disturbed body image. Contrary to our assumptions, they focused significantly longer on attractive compared to unattractive regions of both their own and the control body. For one’s own body, this was more pronounced for women. A higher weight status and more frequent body checking predicted attentional bias towards attractive body parts. We found that overweight adults exhibit an unexpected and stable pattern of selective attention, with a distinctive focus on their own attractive body regions despite higher levels of body dissatisfaction. This positive attentional bias may either be an indicator of a more pronounced pattern of attentional avoidance or a self-enhancing strategy. Further research is warranted to clarify these results. PMID:26479500

  1. A bias-reducing pathway enrichment analysis of genome-wide association data confirmed association of the MHC region with schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jia, Peilin

    2012-02-01

    After the recent successes of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), one key challenge is to identify genetic variants that might have a significant joint effect on complex diseases but have failed to be identified individually due to weak to moderate marginal effect. One popular and effective approach is gene set based analysis, which investigates the joint effect of multiple functionally related genes (eg, pathways). However, a typical gene set analysis method is biased towards long genes, a problem that is especially severe in psychiatric diseases.

  2. 'Journal Bias' in peer-reviewed literature: an analysis of the surgical high-grade glioma literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshman, Brian R; Jones, Laurie A; Tang, Jessica A; Proudfoot, James A; Carley, Kathleen M; Carter, Bob S; Chen, Clark C

    2016-11-01

    The core premise of evidence-based medicine is that clinical decisions are informed by the peer-reviewed literature. To extract meaningful conclusions from this literature, one must first understand the various forms of biases inherent within the process of peer review. We performed an exhaustive search that identified articles exploring the question of whether survival benefit was associated with maximal high-grade glioma (HGG) resection and analysed this literature for patterns of publication. We found that the distribution of these 108 articles among the 26 journals to be non-random (p<0.01), with 75 of the 108 published articles (69%) appearing in 6 of the 26 journals (25%). Moreover, certain journals were likely to publish a large number of articles from the same medical academic genealogy (authors with shared training history and/or mentor). We term the tendency of certain types of articles to be published in select journals 'journal bias' and discuss the implication of this form of bias as it pertains to evidence-based medicine. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. A meta-analysis of priming effects on impression formation supporting a general model of informational biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoster, Jamie; Claypool, Heather M

    2004-01-01

    Priming researchers have long investigated how providing information about traits in one context can influence the impressions people form of social targets in another. The literature has demonstrated that this can have 3 different effects: Sometimes primes become incorporated in the impression of the target (assimilation), sometimes they are used as standards of comparison (anchoring), and sometimes they cause people to consciously alter their judgments (correction). In this article, we present meta-analyses of these 3 effects. The mean effect size was significant in each case, such that assimilation resulted in impressions biased toward the primes, whereas anchoring and correction resulted in impressions biased away from the primes. Additionally, moderator analyses uncovered a number of variables that influence the strength of these effects, such as applicability, processing capacity, and the type of response measure. Based on these results, we propose a general model of how irrelevant information can bias judgments, detailing when and why assimilation and contrast effects result from default and corrective processes.

  4. Blending bias impacts the host halo masses derived from a cross-correlation analysis of bright sub-millimetre galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cowley, William I; Baugh, Carlton M; Cole, Shaun; Wilkinson, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Placing bright sub-millimetre galaxies (SMGs) within the broader context of galaxy formation and evolution requires accurate measurements of their clustering, which can constrain the masses of their host dark matter halos. Recent work has shown that the clustering measurements of these galaxies may be affected by a `blending bias,' which results in the angular correlation function of the sources extracted from single-dish imaging surveys being boosted relative to that of the underlying galaxies. This is due to confusion introduced by the coarse angular resolution of the single-dish telescope and could lead to the inferred halo masses being significantly overestimated. We investigate the extent to which this bias affects the measurement of the correlation function of SMGs when it is derived via a cross-correlation with a more abundant galaxy population. We find that the blending bias is essentially the same as in the auto-correlation case and conclude that the best way to reduce its effects is to calculate the...

  5. Minimum Bias Trigger in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kwee, R E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic pp-collisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.09 < |eta| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presen...

  6. A microarray analysis of sex- and gonad-biased gene expression in the zebrafish: Evidence for masculinization of the transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Qianxing

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many taxa, males and females are very distinct phenotypically, and these differences often reflect divergent selective pressures acting on the sexes. Phenotypic sexual dimorphism almost certainly reflects differing patterns of gene expression between the sexes, and microarray studies have documented widespread sexually dimorphic gene expression. Although the evolutionary significance of sexual dimorphism in gene expression remains unresolved, these studies have led to the formulation of a hypothesis that male-driven evolution has resulted in the masculinization of animal transcriptomes. Here we use a microarray assessment of sex- and gonad-biased gene expression to test this hypothesis in zebrafish. Results By using zebrafish Affymetrix microarrays to compare gene expression patterns in male and female somatic and gonadal tissues, we identified a large number of genes (5899 demonstrating differences in transcript abundance between male and female Danio rerio. Under conservative statistical significance criteria, all sex-biases in gene expression were due to differences between testes and ovaries. Male-enriched genes were more abundant than female-enriched genes, and expression bias for male-enriched genes was greater in magnitude than that for female-enriched genes. We also identified a large number of genes demonstrating elevated transcript abundance in testes and ovaries relative to male body and female body, respectively. Conclusion Overall our results support the hypothesis that male-biased evolutionary pressures have resulted in male-biased patterns of gene expression. Interestingly, our results seem to be at odds with a handful of other microarray-based studies of sex-specific gene expression patterns in zebrafish. However, ours was the only study designed to address this specific hypothesis, and major methodological differences among studies could explain the discrepancies. Regardless, all of these studies agree

  7. Potential bias due to outcome-related loss to follow-up in cohort studies on incidence of drug injection: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordo, Luis; Bravo, Maria J; Barrio, Gregorio; Indave, B Iciar; Degenhardt, Louisa; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to synthesize results from cohort studies on initiation into drug injection among vulnerable populations, to quantify heterogeneity in the estimated incidence rates of drug injection and to identify potential sources of heterogeneity and bias. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and LILACS were searched for relevant studies published between 1980 and 2012. Investigators independently reviewed studies for inclusion, retrieved information on baseline population characteristics and follow-up features and assessed study quality. Study-specific incidence rates of drug injection were calculated as the number of new injectors divided by the person-years at risk. The I(2) statistic was used to quantify heterogeneity in incidence rates across studies, and random-effects meta-regression models were used to identify determinants of heterogeneity and bias. Nine cohorts totalling 1843 participants met the inclusion criteria, with individual sample sizes of 70-415 participants and follow-up lengths of 6 months-3.4 years. The incidence of drug injection varied widely, from 2.1 to 24.2 cases per 100 person-years. The strong between-study heterogeneity (I(2)  = 90%, Pcohort studies on drug injection initiation. Low retention rates and potential for downward selection bias in cohort studies on drug injection initiation are caused primarily by greater loss to follow-up among individuals at higher risk of starting injection, compared with other participants. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  8. Measurement Bias in Multilevel Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jak, Suzanne; Oort, Frans J.; Dolan, Conor V.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement bias can be detected using structural equation modeling (SEM), by testing measurement invariance with multigroup factor analysis (Jöreskog, 1971;Meredith, 1993;Sörbom, 1974) MIMIC modeling (Muthén, 1989) or restricted factor analysis (Oort, 1992,1998). In educational research, data often

  9. Measurement bias in multilevel data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jak, S.; Oort, F.J.; Dolan, C.V.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement bias can be detected using structural equation modeling (SEM), by testing measurement invariance with multigroup factor analysis (Jöreskog, 1971;Meredith, 1993;Sörbom, 1974) MIMIC modeling (Muthén, 1989) or restricted factor analysis (Oort, 1992,1998). In educational research, data often

  10. Bias analysis and the simulation-extrapolation method for survival data with covariate measurement error under parametric proportional odds models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Grace Y; He, Wenqing

    2012-05-01

    It has been well known that ignoring measurement error may result in substantially biased estimates in many contexts including linear and nonlinear regressions. For survival data with measurement error in covariates, there has been extensive discussion in the literature with the focus on proportional hazards (PH) models. Recently, research interest has extended to accelerated failure time (AFT) and additive hazards (AH) models. However, the impact of measurement error on other models, such as the proportional odds model, has received relatively little attention, although these models are important alternatives when PH, AFT, or AH models are not appropriate to fit data. In this paper, we investigate this important problem and study the bias induced by the naive approach of ignoring covariate measurement error. To adjust for the induced bias, we describe the simulation-extrapolation method. The proposed method enjoys a number of appealing features. Its implementation is straightforward and can be accomplished with minor modifications of existing software. More importantly, the proposed method does not require modeling the covariate process, which is quite attractive in practice. As the precise values of error-prone covariates are often not observable, any modeling assumption on such covariates has the risk of model misspecification, hence yielding invalid inferences if this happens. The proposed method is carefully assessed both theoretically and empirically. Theoretically, we establish the asymptotic normality for resulting estimators. Numerically, simulation studies are carried out to evaluate the performance of the estimators as well as the impact of ignoring measurement error, along with an application to a data set arising from the Busselton Health Study. Sensitivity of the proposed method to misspecification of the error model is studied as well.

  11. Wushu Sanda: Color bias, home advantage and motor actions analysis in female matches’ from the 13th World Championships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Berny Vasconcelos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wushu Sanda is a mixed orientation combat sport in which athletes duel wearing red or black clothes. Despite its popularity, the knowledge about its technical and psychophysiological aspects are scarce. Objective: The aim of this study was to quantify the motor actions and the color bias and home advantage existence possibility in female matches from the 13th World Wushu Championships, held in Indonesia, 2015. Material and methods: In an observational study were analyzed 46 matches involving 55 athletes. Each match was analyzed twice, and were considered 22 possible techniques (5 types of punches, 5 types of kicks and 12 different throws. All the motor actions were registered for each athlete, aside of match outcome, clothing color and continent of origin. Results: From all applied motor actions, 48.2% were punches, 46.9% were kicks and 4.8% were throws. Athletes applied 11±8.67 punches, 10.7±5.63 kicks and 1.1±1.6 throws per round. The number of throwing techniques applied on the first and second rounds was higher in winners (F=10.24, p=0.002 and F=7.82, p=0.006 respectively. No differences were found in motor behavior among distinct competitive phases (F(3;88=1.87; p=0.140; η2p=0.06. Home advantage was observed supporting Asian athletes (χ2=10.12, p=0.038. Color bias was observed supporting athletes who wore red (χ2=8.52, p=0.004, which won a higher number of matches (65%. Conclusions: To the detriment of grappling actions (throws, female international level Wushu Sanda athletes predominantly used striking motor actions (punches and kicks. Winners applied a higher number of throws than losers. Home advantage was observed supporting Asian athletes. Color bias was observed supporting female athletes who wore red.

  12. A Class of Estimators for Finite Population Mean in Double Sampling under Nonresponse Using Fractional Raw Moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzoor Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new classes of estimators in estimating the finite population mean under double sampling in the presence of nonresponse when using information on fractional raw moments. The expressions for mean square error of the proposed classes of estimators are derived up to the first degree of approximation. It is shown that a proposed class of estimators performs better than the usual mean estimator, ratio type estimators, and Singh and Kumar (2009 estimator. An empirical study is carried out to demonstrate the performance of a proposed class of estimators.

  13. Compensating for non-response in a study estimating the incidence of mental disorders in long-term sickness absence by a two-phased design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Bech, Per

    2010-01-01

    , municipality, and social transfer income variables were used for the adjustment of weights in weighted analyses and in the imputation models. RESULTS: The frequencies were: any mental disorder 46%-49%, depression 31%-36%, anxiety 13%-15%, and somatoform disorder 8%-9%. CONCLUSIONS: Irrespective of whether......AIMS: The study compensates for the non-response that was observed in a previous study that estimated the frequencies of mental disorders in long-term sickness absence (LSA) (more than eight weeks of continuous sickness absence). In this study, the frequency of any mental disorder was estimated...... at 48% by a two-phase design and weighted logistic regression. The total non-response rate was 53.6%. This motivated the present study to compensate for non-response by applying adjustment of the weights and by multiple imputation of missing data in the estimation of the frequencies of mental disorders...

  14. Comparative analysis of codon usage bias in Crenarchaea and Euryarchaea genome reveals differential preference of synonymous codons to encode highly expressed ribosomal and RNA polymerase proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    VISHWA JYOTI BARUAH; SIDDHARTHA SANKAR SATAPATHY; BHESH RAJ POWDEL; ROCKTOTPAL KONWARH; ALAK KUMAR BURAGOHAIN; SUVENDRA KUMAR RAY

    2016-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the pattern of optimal codon usage in Archaea. Comparative analysis was executed to understand the pattern of codon usage bias between the high expression genes (HEG) and the whole genomes in two Archaeal phyla, Crenarchaea and Euryarchaea. The G+C% of the HEG was found to be less in comparison to the genome G+ C% in Crenarchaea, whereas reverse was the case in Euryarchaea. The preponderance of U/A ending codons that code for HEG in Crenarchaea was in sharp contrast to the C/G ended ones in Euryarchaea. The analysis revealed prevalence of U-ending codons even within the WWY (nucleotide ambiguity code) families in Crenarchaea vis-à-vis Euryarchaea, bacteria and Eukarya. No plausible interpretation of the observed disparity could be made either in the context of tRNA gene composition or genome G +C%. The results in this study attested that the preferential biasness for codons in HEG of Crenarchaea might be different from Euryarchaea. The main highlights are (i) varied CUB in the HEG and in the whole genomes in Euryarchaea and Crenarchaea. (ii) Crenarchaea was found to have some unusual optimal codons (OCs) compared to other organisms. (iii) G+ C% (and GC 3) of the HEG were different from the genome G + C% in the two phyla. (iv) Genome G + C% and tRNAgene number failed to explain CUB in Crenarchaea. (v) Translational selection is possibly responsible for A + T rich OCs in Crenarchaea.

  15. Estimating the efficacy of Alcoholics Anonymous without self-selection bias: an instrumental variables re-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Keith; Blodgett, Janet C; Wagner, Todd H

    2014-11-01

    Observational studies of Alcoholics Anonymous' (AA) effectiveness are vulnerable to self-selection bias because individuals choose whether or not to attend AA. The present study, therefore, employed an innovative statistical technique to derive a selection bias-free estimate of AA's impact. Six data sets from 5 National Institutes of Health-funded randomized trials (1 with 2 independent parallel arms) of AA facilitation interventions were analyzed using instrumental variables models. Alcohol-dependent individuals in one of the data sets (n = 774) were analyzed separately from the rest of sample (n = 1,582 individuals pooled from 5 data sets) because of heterogeneity in sample parameters. Randomization itself was used as the instrumental variable. Randomization was a good instrument in both samples, effectively predicting increased AA attendance that could not be attributed to self-selection. In 5 of the 6 data sets, which were pooled for analysis, increased AA attendance that was attributable to randomization (i.e., free of self-selection bias) was effective at increasing days of abstinence at 3-month (B = 0.38, p = 0.001) and 15-month (B = 0.42, p = 0.04) follow-up. However, in the remaining data set, in which preexisting AA attendance was much higher, further increases in AA involvement caused by the randomly assigned facilitation intervention did not affect drinking outcome. For most individuals seeking help for alcohol problems, increasing AA attendance leads to short- and long-term decreases in alcohol consumption that cannot be attributed to self-selection. However, for populations with high preexisting AA involvement, further increases in AA attendance may have little impact. Copyright © 2014 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  16. Role of Editorial and Peer Review Processes in Publication Bias: Analysis of Drug Trials Submitted to Eight Medical Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lent, Marlies; Overbeke, John; Out, Henk Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background Publication bias is generally ascribed to authors and sponsors failing to submit studies with negative results, but may also occur after submission. We evaluated whether submitted manuscripts on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with drugs are more likely to be accepted if they report positive results. Methods Manuscripts submitted from January 2010 through April 2012 to one general medical journal (BMJ) and seven specialty journals (Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, British Journal of Ophthalmology, Gut, Heart, Thorax, Diabetologia, and Journal of Hepatology) were included, if at least one study arm assessed the efficacy or safety of a drug and a statistical test was used to evaluate treatment effects. Publication status was retrospectively retrieved from submission systems or provided by journals. Sponsorship and trial results were extracted from manuscripts and classified according to predefined criteria. Main outcome measure was acceptance for publication. Results Of 15,972 manuscripts submitted, 472 (3.0%) were drug RCTs, of which 98 (20.8%) were published. Among submitted drug RCTs, 287 (60.8%) had positive and 185 (39.2%) negative results. Of these, 60 (20.9%) and 38 (20.5%), respectively, were published. Manuscripts on non-industry trials (n = 213) reported positive results in 138 (64.8%) manuscripts, compared to 71 (47.7%) on industry-supported trials (n = 149), and 78 (70.9%) on industry-sponsored trials (n = 110). Twenty-seven (12.7%) non-industry trials were published, compared to 27 (18.1%) industry-supported and 44 (40.0%) industry-sponsored trials. After adjustment for other trial characteristics, manuscripts reporting positive results were not more likely to be published (OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.61 to 1.66). Submission to specialty journals, sample size, multicentre status, journal impact factor, and corresponding authors from Europe or US were significantly associated with publication. Conclusions For the selected journals

  17. Role of editorial and peer review processes in publication bias: analysis of drug trials submitted to eight medical journals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlies van Lent

    Full Text Available Publication bias is generally ascribed to authors and sponsors failing to submit studies with negative results, but may also occur after submission. We evaluated whether submitted manuscripts on randomized controlled trials (RCTs with drugs are more likely to be accepted if they report positive results.Manuscripts submitted from January 2010 through April 2012 to one general medical journal (BMJ and seven specialty journals (Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, British Journal of Ophthalmology, Gut, Heart, Thorax, Diabetologia, and Journal of Hepatology were included, if at least one study arm assessed the efficacy or safety of a drug and a statistical test was used to evaluate treatment effects. Publication status was retrospectively retrieved from submission systems or provided by journals. Sponsorship and trial results were extracted from manuscripts and classified according to predefined criteria. Main outcome measure was acceptance for publication.Of 15,972 manuscripts submitted, 472 (3.0% were drug RCTs, of which 98 (20.8% were published. Among submitted drug RCTs, 287 (60.8% had positive and 185 (39.2% negative results. Of these, 60 (20.9% and 38 (20.5%, respectively, were published. Manuscripts on non-industry trials (n = 213 reported positive results in 138 (64.8% manuscripts, compared to 71 (47.7% on industry-supported trials (n = 149, and 78 (70.9% on industry-sponsored trials (n = 110. Twenty-seven (12.7% non-industry trials were published, compared to 27 (18.1% industry-supported and 44 (40.0% industry-sponsored trials. After adjustment for other trial characteristics, manuscripts reporting positive results were not more likely to be published (OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.61 to 1.66. Submission to specialty journals, sample size, multicentre status, journal impact factor, and corresponding authors from Europe or US were significantly associated with publication.For the selected journals, there was no tendency to preferably publish

  18. Deep Diversity: Novel Approach to Overcoming the PCR Bias Encountered During Environmental Analysis of Microbial Populations for Alpha-Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Gustavo A; Vaishampayan, Parag A.

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-diversity studies are of crucial importance to environmental microbiologists. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method has been paramount for studies interrogating microbial environmental samples for taxon richness. Phylogenetic studies using this technique are based on the amplification and comparison of the 16S rRNA coding regions. PCR, due disproportionate distribution of microbial species in the environment, increasingly favors the amplification of the most predominant phylotypes with every subsequent reaction cycle. The genetic and chemical complexity of environmental samples are intrinsic factors that exacerbate an inherit bias in PCR-based quantitative and qualitative studies of microbial communities. We report that treatment of a genetically complex total genomic environmental DNA extract with Propidium Monoazide (PMA), a DNA intercalating molecule capable of forming a covalent cross-linkage to organic moieties upon light exposure, disproportionally inactivates predominant phylotypes and results in the exponential amplification of previously shadowed microbial ?-diversity quantified as a 19.5% increase in OUTs reported via phylogenetic screening using PhyloChip.

  19. Bayesian long branch attraction bias and corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susko, Edward

    2015-03-01

    Previous work on the star-tree paradox has shown that Bayesian methods suffer from a long branch attraction bias. That work is extended to settings involving more taxa and partially resolved trees. The long branch attraction bias is confirmed to arise more broadly and an additional source of bias is found. A by-product of the analysis is methods that correct for biases toward particular topologies. The corrections can be easily calculated using existing Bayesian software. Posterior support for a set of two or more trees can thus be supplemented with corrected versions to cross-check or replace results. Simulations show the corrections to be highly effective.

  20. Internal correction of hafnium oxide spectral interferences and mass bias in the determination of platinum in environmental samples using isotope dilution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castrillón, José Angel; Moldovan, Mariella; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2009-05-01

    A method has been developed for the accurate determination of platinum by isotope dilution analysis, using enriched (194)Pt, in environmental samples containing comparatively high levels of hafnium without any chemical separation. The method is based on the computation of the contribution of hafnium oxide as an independent factor in the observed isotope pattern of platinum in the spiked sample. Under these conditions, the ratio of molar fractions between natural abundance and isotopically enriched platinum was independent of the amount of hafnium present in the sample. Additionally, mass bias was corrected by an internal procedure in which the regression variance was minimised. This was possible as the mass bias factor for hafnium oxide was very close to that of platinum. The final procedure required the measurement of three platinum isotope ratios (192/194, 195/194 and 196/194) to calculate the concentration of platinum in the sample. The methodology has been validated using the reference material "BCR-723 road dust" and has been applied to different environmental matrices (road dust, air particles, bulk wet deposition and epiphytic lichens) collected in the Aspe Valley (Pyrenees Mountains). A full uncertainty budget, using Kragten's spreadsheet method, showed that the total uncertainty was limited only by the uncertainty in the measured isotope ratios and not by the uncertainties of the isotopic composition of platinum and hafnium.

  1. CPI Bias in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul Chung

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimate the CPI bias in Korea by employing the approach of Engel’s Law as suggested by Hamilton (2001. This paper is the first attempt to estimate the bias using Korean panel data, Korean Labor and Income Panel Study(KLIPS. Following Hamilton’s model with non­linear specification correction, our estimation result shows that the cumulative CPI bias over the sample period (2000-2005 was 0.7 percent annually. This CPI bias implies that about 21 percent of the inflation rate during the period can be attributed to the bias. In light of purchasing power parity, we provide an interpretation of the estimated bias.

  2. Belief biases and volatility of assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei-Sun, Wen-Zou, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Based on an overlapping generation model, this paper introduces the noise traders with belief biases and rational traders. With an equilibrium analysis, this paper examines the volatility of risky asset. The results show that the belief biases, the probability of economy state, and the domain capability are all the factors that have effects on the volatility of the market.

  3. The M235T polymorphism in the AGT gene and CHD risk: evidence of a Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium violation and publication bias in a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Zafarmand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The M235T polymorphism in the AGT gene has been related to an increased risk of hypertension. This finding may also suggest an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A case-cohort study was conducted in 1,732 unrelated middle-age women (210 CHD cases and 1,522 controls from a prospective cohort of 15,236 initially healthy Dutch women. We applied a Cox proportional hazards model to study the association of the polymorphism with acute myocardial infarction (AMI (n = 71 and CHD. In the case-cohort study, no increased risk for CHD was found under the additive genetic model (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 1.68; P = 0.28. This result was not changed by adjustment (HR = 1.17; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.64; P = 0.38 nor by using dominant, recessive and pairwise genetic models. Analyses for AMI risk under the additive genetic model also did not show any statistically significant association (crude HR = 1.14; 95% CI, 0.93 to 1.39; P = 0.20. To evaluate the association, a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis were undertaken of all studies published up to February 2007 (searched through PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science and EMBASE. The meta-analysis (38 studies with 13284 cases and 18722 controls showed a per-allele odds ratio (OR of 1.08 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.15; P = 0.02. Moderate to large levels of heterogeneity were identified between studies. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE violation and the mean age of cases were statistically significant sources of the observed variation. In a stratum of non-HWE violation studies, there was no effect. An asymmetric funnel plot, the Egger's test (P = 0.066, and the Begg-Mazumdar test (P = 0.074 were all suggestive of the presence of publication bias. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pooled OR of the present meta-analysis, including our own data, presented evidence that there is an increase in the risk of CHD conferred by the M235T variant

  4. Understanding Dry Bias in the Simulations of Indian Monsoon by CFSv2 Through Analysis of Moisture Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheer, Sahana; Pathak, Amey; Mathew, Roxy; Ghosh, Subimal

    2016-04-01

    Simulations of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) with its seasonal and subseasonal characteristics is highly crucial for predictions/ projections towards sustainable agricultural planning and water resources management. The Climate forecast system version 2 (CFSv2), the state of the art coupled climate model developed by National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), is evaluated here for the simulations of ISM. Even though CFSv2 is a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere-land model with advanced physics, increased resolution and refined initialization, its ISM simulations/ predictions/ projections, in terms of seasonal mean and variability are not satisfactory. Numerous works have been done for verifying the CFSv2 forecasts in terms of the seasonal mean, its mean and variability, active and break spells, and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-monsoon interactions. Underestimation of JJAS precipitation over the Indian land mass is one of the major drawbacks of CFSv2. ISM gets the moisture required to maintain the precipitation from different oceanic and land sources. In this work, we find the fraction of moisture supplied by different sources in the CFSv2 simulations and the findings are compared with observed fractions. We also investigate the possible variations in the moisture contributions from these different sources. We suspect that the deviation in the relative moisture contribution from different sources to various sinks over the monsoon region has resulted in the observed dry bias. We also find that over the Arabian Sea region, which is the key moisture source of ISM, there is a premature built up of specific humidity during the month of May and a decline during the later months of JJAS. This is also one of the reasons for the underestimation of JJAS mean precipitation.

  5. On commercial media bias

    OpenAIRE

    Germano, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Within the spokes model of Chen and Riordan (2007) that allows for non-localized competition among arbitrary numbers of media outlets, we quantify the effect of concentration of ownership on quality and bias of media content. A main result shows that too few commercial outlets, or better, too few separate owners of commercial outlets can lead to substantial bias in equilibrium. Increasing the number of outlets (commercial and non-commercial) tends to bring down this bias; but the strongest ef...

  6. Outcome of Referrals for Non-Responsive Celiac Disease in a Tertiary Center: Low Incidence of Refractory Celiac Disease in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wanrooij, R L J; Bouma, G; Bontkes, H J; Neefjes-Borst, A; van Grieken, N C; von Blomberg, B M E; Mulder, C J J

    2017-01-26

    Refractory celiac disease (RCD) is a severe cause of non-responsive celiac disease (CD) due to its association with the enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL). Conflicting data exist on the prevalence and the clinical manifestations of RCD type I (RCD I) and type II (RCD II). The aim of the current study was to provide insight in the incidence of RCD and in the distinction with other causes of non-responsive CD. A total of 106 CD patients were referred to our tertiary referral center between January 2006 and December 2011 for evaluation of non-responsive CD. In addition, a questionnaire was sent to all 82 gastroenterology departments in the Netherlands to reveal whether a patient with RCD was currently being evaluated or had been treated between 2006 and 2012. During a 6 year period, a total of 31 patients were diagnosed with RCD (19 RCD I and 12 RCD II). The nationwide survey revealed 5 additional patients with RCD I and one patient with RCD II. This leads to an annual incidence of RCD of 0.83/10.000 CD patients. The remaining patients were diagnosed with involuntary gluten ingestion (21.7%), delayed mucosal recovery (11.3%), enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (7.5%) and autoimmune enteropathy (1.8%). This nationwide study reveals a low incidence of RCD in the Netherlands. Nevertheless, RCD is a clinically relevant disease entity in CD patients non-responsive to the gluten-free diet.

  7. Interpretation biases in paranoia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savulich, George; Freeman, Daniel; Shergill, Sukhi; Yiend, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Information in the environment is frequently ambiguous in meaning. Emotional ambiguity, such as the stare of a stranger, or the scream of a child, encompasses possible good or bad emotional consequences. Those with elevated vulnerability to affective disorders tend to interpret such material more negatively than those without, a phenomenon known as "negative interpretation bias." In this study we examined the relationship between vulnerability to psychosis, measured by trait paranoia, and interpretation bias. One set of material permitted broadly positive/negative (valenced) interpretations, while another allowed more or less paranoid interpretations, allowing us to also investigate the content specificity of interpretation biases associated with paranoia. Regression analyses (n=70) revealed that trait paranoia, trait anxiety, and cognitive inflexibility predicted paranoid interpretation bias, whereas trait anxiety and cognitive inflexibility predicted negative interpretation bias. In a group comparison those with high levels of trait paranoia were negatively biased in their interpretations of ambiguous information relative to those with low trait paranoia, and this effect was most pronounced for material directly related to paranoid concerns. Together these data suggest that a negative interpretation bias occurs in those with elevated vulnerability to paranoia, and that this bias may be strongest for material matching paranoid beliefs. We conclude that content-specific biases may be important in the cause and maintenance of paranoid symptoms.

  8. Transient electromagnetic simulation and thermal analysis of the DC-biased AC quadrupole magnet for CSNS/RCS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xian-Jing; DENG Chang-Dong; KANG Wen

    2012-01-01

    Due to the large cddy currents at the ends of the quadrupole magnets for CSNS/RCS,the magnetic field properties and the heat generation are of great concern.In this paper,we take transient electromagnetic simulation and make use of the eddy current loss from the transient electromagnetic results to perform thermal analysis.Through analysis of the simulated results,the magnetic field dynamic properties of these magnets and a temperature rise are achieved.Finally,the accuracy of the thermal analysis is confirmed by a test of the prototype quadrupole magnet of the RCS.

  9. Political bias is tenacious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditto, Peter H; Wojcik, Sean P; Chen, Eric Evan; Grady, Rebecca Hofstein; Ringel, Megan M

    2015-01-01

    Duarte et al. are right to worry about political bias in social psychology but they underestimate the ease of correcting it. Both liberals and conservatives show partisan bias that often worsens with cognitive sophistication. More non-liberals in social psychology is unlikely to speed our convergence upon the truth, although it may broaden the questions we ask and the data we collect.

  10. Biases in categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das-Smaal, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    On what grounds can we conclude that an act of categorization is biased? In this chapter, it is contended that in the absence of objective norms of what categories actually are, biases in categorization can only be specified in relation to theoretical understandings of categorization. Therefore, the

  11. Codon Pair Bias Is a Direct Consequence of Dinucleotide Bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Kunec

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Codon pair bias is a remarkably stable characteristic of a species. Although functionally uncharacterized, robust virus attenuation was achieved by recoding of viral proteins using underrepresented codon pairs. Because viruses replicate exclusively inside living cells, we posited that their codon pair preferences reflect those of their host(s. Analysis of many human viruses showed, however, that the encoding of viruses is influenced only marginally by host codon pair preferences. Furthermore, examination of codon pair preferences of vertebrate, insect, and arthropod-borne viruses revealed that the latter do not utilize codon pairs overrepresented in arthropods more frequently than other viruses. We found, however, that codon pair bias is a direct consequence of dinucleotide bias. We conclude that codon pair bias does not play a major role in the encoding of viral proteins and that virus attenuation by codon pair deoptimization has the same molecular underpinnings as attenuation based on an increase in CpG/TpA dinucleotides.

  12. Meta-analysis and systematic review of factors biasing the observed prevalence of congenitally missing teeth in permanent dentition excluding third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshan, Vahid

    2013-10-01

    No meta-analyses or systematic reviews have been conducted to evaluate numerous potential biasing factors contributing to the controversial results on congenitally missing teeth (CMT). We aimed to perform a rather comprehensive meta-analysis and systematic review on this subject. A thorough search was performed during September 2012 until April 2013 to find the available literature regarding CMT prevalence. Besides qualitatively discussing the literature, the meta-sample homogeneity, publication bias, and the effects of sample type, sample size, minimum and maximum ages of included subjects, gender imbalances, and scientific credit of the publishing journals on the reported CMT prevalence were statistically analyzed using Q-test, Egger regression, Spearman coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis, Welch t test (α=0.05), and Mann-Whitney U test (α=0.016, α=0.007). A total of 111 reports were collected. Metadata were heterogeneous (P=0.000). There was not a significant publication bias (Egger Regression P=0.073). Prevalence rates differed in different types of populations (Kruskal-Wallis P=0.001). Studies on orthodontic patients might report slightly (about 1%) higher prevalence (P=0.009, corrected α=0.016). Non-orthodontic dental patients showed a significant 2% decline [P=0.007 (Mann-Whitney U)]. Enrolling more males in researches might significantly reduce the observed prevalence (Spearman ρ=-0.407, P=0.001). Studies with higher minimums of subjects' age showed always slightly less CMT prevalence. This reached about -1.6% around the ages 10 to 13 and was significant for ages 10 to 12 (Welch t test P0.2). Studies' sample sizes were correlated negatively with CMT prevalence (ρ=-0.250, P=0.009). It was not verified whether higher CMT rates have better chances of being published (ρ=0.132, P=0.177). CMT definition should be unified. Samples should be sex-balanced. Enrolling both orthodontic and dental patients in similar proportions might be preferable over sampling from

  13. High level of male-biased Scandinavian admixture in Greenlandic Inuit shown by Y-chromosomal analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Elena; Calafell, Francesc; Rosser, Zoë H;

    2003-01-01

    settlers from Iceland, who may have been assimilated 500 years ago, and the Danish-Norwegian colonists of the eighteenth century. Insufficient differentiation between modern Icelandic and Danish Y chromosomes means that a choice between these cannot be made on the basis of diversity analysis. However...

  14. Distribution bias analysis of germline and somatic single-nucleotide variations that impact protein functional site and neighboring amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yang; Yan, Cheng; Hu, Yu; Fan, Yu; Pan, Qing; Wan, Quan; Torcivia-Rodriguez, John; Mazumder, Raja

    2017-01-01

    Single nucleotide variations (SNVs) can result in loss or gain of protein functional sites. We analyzed the effects of SNVs on enzyme active sites, ligand binding sites, and various types of post translational modification (PTM) sites. We found that, for most types of protein functional sites, the SNV pattern differs between germline and somatic mutations as well as between synonymous and non-synonymous mutations. From a total of 51,138 protein functional site affecting SNVs (pfsSNVs), a pan-cancer analysis revealed 142 somatic pfsSNVs in five or more cancer types. By leveraging patient information for somatic pfsSNVs, we identified 17 loss of functional site SNVs and 60 gain of functional site SNVs which are significantly enriched in patients with specific cancer types. Of the key pfsSNVs identified in our analysis above, we highlight 132 key pfsSNVs within 17 genes that are found in well-established cancer associated gene lists. For illustrating how key pfsSNVs can be prioritized further, we provide a use case where we performed survival analysis showing that a loss of phosphorylation site pfsSNV at position 105 in MEF2A is significantly associated with decreased pancreatic cancer patient survival rate. These 132 pfsSNVs can be used in developing genetic testing pipelines. PMID:28176830

  15. Competition and Commercial Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    A. Blasco; F. Sobbrio

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the empirical evidence on commercial media bias (i.e., advertisers influence over media accuracy) and then introduces a simple model to summarize the main elements of the theoretical literature. The analysis provides three main policy insights for media regulators: i) Media regulators should target their monitoring efforts towards news contents upon which advertisers are likely to share similar preferences; ii) In advertising industries characterized by high correlation in ...

  16. Media Bias and Reputation

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Gentzkow; Jesse M. Shapiro

    2005-01-01

    A Bayesian consumer who is uncertain about the quality of an information source will infer that the source is of higher quality when its reports conform to the consumer's prior expectations. We use this fact to build a model of media bias in which firms slant their reports toward the prior beliefs of their customers in order to build a reputation for quality. Bias emerges in our model even though it can make all market participants worse off. The model predicts that bias will be less severe w...

  17. Biased predecision processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstein, Aaron L

    2003-07-01

    Decision makers conduct biased predecision processing when they restructure their mental representation of the decision environment to favor one alternative before making their choice. The question of whether biased predecision processing occurs has been controversial since L. Festinger (1957) maintained that it does not occur. The author reviews relevant research in sections on theories of cognitive dissonance, decision conflict, choice certainty, action control, action phases, dominance structuring, differentiation and consolidation, constructive processing, motivated reasoning, and groupthink. Some studies did not find evidence of biased predecision processing, but many did. In the Discussion section, the moderators are summarized and used to assess the theories.

  18. Directional Variance Adjustment: Bias Reduction in Covariance Matrices Based on Factor Analysis with an Application to Portfolio Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Daniel; Hatrick, Kerr; Hesse, Christian W.; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lemm, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Robust and reliable covariance estimates play a decisive role in financial and many other applications. An important class of estimators is based on factor models. Here, we show by extensive Monte Carlo simulations that covariance matrices derived from the statistical Factor Analysis model exhibit a systematic error, which is similar to the well-known systematic error of the spectrum of the sample covariance matrix. Moreover, we introduce the Directional Variance Adjustment (DVA) algorithm, which diminishes the systematic error. In a thorough empirical study for the US, European, and Hong Kong stock market we show that our proposed method leads to improved portfolio allocation. PMID:23844016

  19. Directional variance adjustment: bias reduction in covariance matrices based on factor analysis with an application to portfolio optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Daniel; Hatrick, Kerr; Hesse, Christian W; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lemm, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Robust and reliable covariance estimates play a decisive role in financial and many other applications. An important class of estimators is based on factor models. Here, we show by extensive Monte Carlo simulations that covariance matrices derived from the statistical Factor Analysis model exhibit a systematic error, which is similar to the well-known systematic error of the spectrum of the sample covariance matrix. Moreover, we introduce the Directional Variance Adjustment (DVA) algorithm, which diminishes the systematic error. In a thorough empirical study for the US, European, and Hong Kong stock market we show that our proposed method leads to improved portfolio allocation.

  20. Directional variance adjustment: bias reduction in covariance matrices based on factor analysis with an application to portfolio optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bartz

    Full Text Available Robust and reliable covariance estimates play a decisive role in financial and many other applications. An important class of estimators is based on factor models. Here, we show by extensive Monte Carlo simulations that covariance matrices derived from the statistical Factor Analysis model exhibit a systematic error, which is similar to the well-known systematic error of the spectrum of the sample covariance matrix. Moreover, we introduce the Directional Variance Adjustment (DVA algorithm, which diminishes the systematic error. In a thorough empirical study for the US, European, and Hong Kong stock market we show that our proposed method leads to improved portfolio allocation.

  1. Berkson’s bias, selection bias, and missing data

    OpenAIRE

    Westreich, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    While Berkson’s bias is widely recognized in the epidemiologic literature, it remains underappreciated as a model of both selection bias and bias due to missing data. Simple causal diagrams and 2×2 tables illustrate how Berkson’s bias connects to collider bias and selection bias more generally, and show the strong analogies between Berksonian selection bias and bias due to missing data. In some situations, considerations of whether data are missing at random or missing not at random is less i...

  2. The fading affect bias shows positive outcomes at the general but not the individual level of analysis in the context of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Jeffrey A; Horowitz, Kyle A; Dunlap, Spencer M

    2017-08-01

    Unpleasant affect fades faster than pleasant affect (e.g., Walker, Vogl, & Thompson, 1997); this effect is referred to as the Fading Affect Bias (FAB; Walker, Skowronski, Gibbons, Vogl, & Thompson, 2003a). Research shows that the FAB is consistently related to positive/healthy outcomes at a general but not at a specific level of analysis based on event types and individual differences (e.g., Gibbons et al., 2013). Based on the positive outcomes for FAB and negative outcomes for social media (Bolton et al., 2013; Huang, 2010), the current study examined FAB in the context of social media events along with related individual differences. General positive outcomes were shown in the form of robust FAB effects across social media and non-social media events, a larger FAB for non-social media events than for social media events, negative correlations of FAB with depression, anxiety, and stress as well as a positive correlation of FAB with self-esteem. However, the lack of a negative correlation between FAB and anxiety for social media events in a 3-way interaction did not show positive outcomes at a specific level of analysis. Rehearsal ratings mediated the 3-way interaction. Implications are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The proportionator: unbiased stereological estimation using biased automatic image analysis and non-uniform probability proportional to size sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardi, Jonathan Eyal; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb

    2008-01-01

    of its entirely different sampling strategy, based on known but non-uniform sampling probabilities, the proportionator for the first time allows the real CE at the section level to be automatically estimated (not just predicted), unbiased - for all estimators and at no extra cost to the user.......The proportionator is a novel and radically different approach to sampling with microscopes based on well-known statistical theory (probability proportional to size - PPS sampling). It uses automatic image analysis, with a large range of options, to assign to every field of view in the section......, the desired number of fields are sampled automatically with probability proportional to the weight and presented to the expert observer. Using any known stereological probe and estimator, the correct count in these fields leads to a simple, unbiased estimate of the total amount of structure in the sections...

  4. Introduction to Unconscious Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, Joan T.

    2010-05-01

    We all have biases, and we are (for the most part) unaware of them. In general, men and women BOTH unconsciously devalue the contributions of women. This can have a detrimental effect on grant proposals, job applications, and performance reviews. Sociology is way ahead of astronomy in these studies. When evaluating identical application packages, male and female University psychology professors preferred 2:1 to hire "Brian” over "Karen” as an assistant professor. When evaluating a more experienced record (at the point of promotion to tenure), reservations were expressed four times more often when the name was female. This unconscious bias has a repeated negative effect on Karen's career. This talk will introduce the concept of unconscious bias and also give recommendations on how to address it using an example for a faculty search committee. The process of eliminating unconscious bias begins with awareness, then moves to policy and practice, and ends with accountability.

  5. Bias and precision of methods for estimating the difference in restricted mean survival time from an individual patient data meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béranger Lueza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The difference in restricted mean survival time ( rmstD t ∗ $$ rmstD\\left({t}^{\\ast}\\right $$ , the area between two survival curves up to time horizon t ∗ $$ {t}^{\\ast } $$ , is often used in cost-effectiveness analyses to estimate the treatment effect in randomized controlled trials. A challenge in individual patient data (IPD meta-analyses is to account for the trial effect. We aimed at comparing different methods to estimate the rmstD t ∗ $$ rmstD\\left({t}^{\\ast}\\right $$ from an IPD meta-analysis. Methods We compared four methods: the area between Kaplan-Meier curves (experimental vs. control arm ignoring the trial effect (Naïve Kaplan-Meier; the area between Peto curves computed at quintiles of event times (Peto-quintile; the weighted average of the areas between either trial-specific Kaplan-Meier curves (Pooled Kaplan-Meier or trial-specific exponential curves (Pooled Exponential. In a simulation study, we varied the between-trial heterogeneity for the baseline hazard and for the treatment effect (possibly correlated, the overall treatment effect, the time horizon t ∗ $$ {t}^{\\ast } $$ , the number of trials and of patients, the use of fixed or DerSimonian-Laird random effects model, and the proportionality of hazards. We compared the methods in terms of bias, empirical and average standard errors. We used IPD from the Meta-Analysis of Chemotherapy in Nasopharynx Carcinoma (MAC-NPC and its updated version MAC-NPC2 for illustration that included respectively 1,975 and 5,028 patients in 11 and 23 comparisons. Results The Naïve Kaplan-Meier method was unbiased, whereas the Pooled Exponential and, to a much lesser extent, the Pooled Kaplan-Meier methods showed a bias with non-proportional hazards. The Peto-quintile method underestimated the rmstD t ∗ $$ rmstD\\left({t}^{\\ast}\\right $$ , except with non-proportional hazards at t ∗ $$ {t}^{\\ast } $$ = 5 years. In the presence of treatment effect

  6. Increasingly minimal bias routing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataineh, Abdulla; Court, Thomas; Roweth, Duncan

    2017-02-21

    A system and algorithm configured to generate diversity at the traffic source so that packets are uniformly distributed over all of the available paths, but to increase the likelihood of taking a minimal path with each hop the packet takes. This is achieved by configuring routing biases so as to prefer non-minimal paths at the injection point, but increasingly prefer minimal paths as the packet proceeds, referred to herein as Increasing Minimal Bias (IMB).

  7. Biased causal inseparable game

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Some Sankar

    2015-01-01

    Here we study the \\emph{causal inseparable} game introduced in [\\href{http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal/v3/n10/full/ncomms2076.html}{Nat. Commun. {\\bf3}, 1092 (2012)}], but it's biased version. Two separated parties, Alice and Bob, generate biased bits (say input bit) in their respective local laboratories. Bob generates another biased bit (say decision bit) which determines their goal: whether Alice has to guess Bob's bit or vice-verse. Under the assumption that events are ordered with respect to some global causal relation, we show that the success probability of this biased causal game is upper bounded, giving rise to \\emph{biased causal inequality} (BCI). In the \\emph{process matrix} formalism, which is locally in agreement with quantum physics but assume no global causal order, we show that there exist \\emph{inseparable} process matrices that violate the BCI for arbitrary bias in the decision bit. In such scenario we also derive the maximal violation of the BCI under local operations involving tracele...

  8. Extreme-value time-series analysis of Australian Region A gust wind speeds to examine instrument bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cechet, R. P.; Sanabria, L. A.

    2010-08-01

    Australian building codes through the Australia/New Zealand Wind Actions Standard as well as the wind engineering community in general rely to a significant extent on the peak gust wind speed observations collected over more than 70 years by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM). In the mid-1980's BoM commenced a program to replace the aging pressure tube Dines anemometers with cup anemometers. During the replacement procedure, many localities had more than one type of anemometer operating, recording extreme events. Systematic differences between instrument measurements during this overlap period raised serious concerns about the utility of the peak gust wind speed database. This paper presents the results of a reanalysis of the current BoM peak wind gust database for the non-cyclonic region (Region A) of the Australia/New Zealand Wind Actions Standard. The study utilises extreme value distribution analysis and compares estimates of the 500-year return-period (RP) peak gust wind exceedance level derived from segments of the record measured with the Dines and replacement anemometers. Results indicate that the later period appears to have a significant reduction in extreme events; 17 of 31 sites have a mean 500 year RP exceedance level for the replacement anemometer section of the record below the lower 95% confidence limit for the Dines anemometer part of the record. The 3PM mean wind speed time-series observations have also been examined, and they exhibit a similar trend.

  9. Effect of a single session of muscle-biased therapy on pain sensitivity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gay CW

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Charles W Gay,1 Meryl J Alappattu,1 Rogelio A Coronado,1 Maggie E Horn,1 Mark D Bishop21Rehabilitation Science Doctoral Program, College of Public Health and Health Professions, 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FLBackground: Muscle-biased therapies (MBT are commonly used to treat pain, yet several reviews suggest evidence for the clinical effectiveness of these therapies is lacking. Inadequate treatment parameters have been suggested to account for inconsistent effects across studies. Pain sensitivity may serve as an intermediate physiologic endpoint helping to establish optimal MBT treatment parameters. The purpose of this review was to summarize the current literature investigating the short-term effect of a single dose of MBT on pain sensitivity in both healthy and clinical populations, with particular attention to specific MBT parameters of intensity and duration.Methods: A systematic search for articles meeting our prespecified criteria was conducted using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL and MEDLINE from the inception of each database until July 2012, in accordance with guidelines from the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis. Relevant characteristics from studies included type, intensity, and duration of MBT and whether short-term changes in pain sensitivity and clinical pain were noted with MBT application. Study results were pooled using a random-effects model to estimate the overall effect size of a single dose of MBT on pain sensitivity as well as the effect of MBT, dependent on comparison group and population type.Results: Reports from 24 randomized controlled trials (23 articles were included, representing 36 MBT treatment arms and 29 comparative groups, where 10 groups received active agents, 11 received sham/inert treatments, and eight received no treatment. MBT demonstrated a favorable and consistent ability to modulate pain

  10. A STUDY TO INVESTIGATE THE ROLE OF PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE IN CHRONIC NONRESPONSIVE BACK ACHE IN FEMALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf Subhi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic low back pain remains a major health problem. Unfortunately, the majority of treatments for this condition produce small effects because not all patients respond to each treatment. It appears that only 25–50% of patients respond to exercise. At present, however, there are no guidelines regarding the best treatment to help clinicians. As a result, time and money are wasted on treatment which ultimately fail to help the patient. A backache is described as annoying and gripping pain. It can be caused by poor posture, lack of manual handling skills, change in the center of gravity due to expanding abdomen, lack of exercise, or the weight of the baby and the stretching ligaments. Pelvic floor muscle weakness is one of the major cause of chronic backache. Weakness in the pelvic floor muscles is common in females which can lead to debilitating urinary symptoms, affect sexual function and cause chronic backache. Methods: In 3 months, 31 female subjects with mean age of 28 who had taken treatment for their chronic backache, were improvised with pelvic floor strength at our setup, with dramatically good results. 31 subjects with non-responsive chronic back pain who had taken conventional physiotherapy were included in the study. Both married and unmarried were included. Any sign of radiculopathy or inflammation were excluded. After assessing pain using Visual Analogue Scale, the Dr Glazer’s program and Kegel’s contractions were taught. Results: There was significant improvement by 50% on reassessment after 7 days. Then exercises for transverse abdominals were included to get a better response. On completion of the treatment sessions, reduction in pain was 92% on VAS and functional abilities increased by 89%. There was a significant improvement in the quality of life and in pelvic-floor muscle strength. Conclusion: Non-responsive chronic back pain in females when treated with pelvic floor muscle strengthening program showed 40

  11. Analysis of phylogeny and codon usage bias and relationship of GC content, amino acid composition with expression of the structural nif genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sunil Kanti; Kundu, Sudip; Das, Rabindranath; Roy, Sujit

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria and archaea have evolved with the ability to fix atmospheric dinitrogen in the form of ammonia, catalyzed by the nitrogenase enzyme complex which comprises three structural genes nifK, nifD and nifH. The nifK and nifD encodes for the beta and alpha subunits, respectively, of component 1, while nifH encodes for component 2 of nitrogenase. Phylogeny based on nifDHK have indicated that Cyanobacteria is closer to Proteobacteria alpha and gamma but not supported by the tree based on 16SrRNA. The evolutionary ancestor for the different trees was also different. The GC1 and GC2% analysis showed more consistency than GC3% which appeared to below for Firmicutes, Cyanobacteria and Euarchaeota while highest in Proteobacteria beta and clearly showed the proportional effect on the codon usage with a few exceptions. Few genes from Firmicutes, Euryarchaeota, Proteobacteria alpha and delta were found under mutational pressure. These nif genes with low and high GC3% from different classes of organisms showed similar expected number of codons. Distribution of the genes and codons, based on codon usage demonstrated opposite pattern for different orientation of mirror plane when compared with each other. Overall our results provide a comprehensive analysis on the evolutionary relationship of the three structural nif genes, nifK, nifD and nifH, respectively, in the context of codon usage bias, GC content relationship and amino acid composition of the encoded proteins and exploration of crucial statistical method for the analysis of positive data with non-constant variance to identify the shape factors of codon adaptation index.

  12. Assessing the potential for racial bias in hair analysis for cocaine: examining the relative risk of positive outcomes when comparing urine samples to hair samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieczkowski, Tom

    2011-03-20

    This article examines the conjecture that hair analysis, performed to detect cocaine use or exposure, is biased against African Americans. It does so by comparing the outcomes of 33,928 hair and 105,792 urine samples collected from both African American and white subjects. In making this comparison the analysis seeks to determine if there is a departure in rates of positive and negative outcomes when comparing the results of hair analysis for cocaine to the results from urinalysis for cocaine by racial group. It treats urine as an unbiased test. It compares both the relative ratios of positive outcomes when comparing the two groups and it calculates the relative risk of outcomes for each group for having positive or negative outcomes. The findings show that the ratios of each racial group are effectively same for hair and urine assays, and they also show that the relative risk and risk estimates for positive and negative outcomes are the same for both racial groups. Considering all samples, the cocaine positive risk estimate for the hair samples comparing the two racial groups is 3.28 and for urinalysis the risk estimate is 3.10 (Breslow-Day χ(2) .250, 1 df, p = 0.617) a non-significant difference in risk. For pre-employment samples, the cocaine positive risk estimate for the hair samples comparing the two racial groups is 3.10 and for urinalysis the risk estimate is 2.90 (Breslow-Day χ(2) .281, df = 1, p = 0.595), also a non-significant difference in risk.

  13. Outcome of Referrals for Non-Responsive Celiac Disease in a Tertiary Center: Low Incidence of Refractory Celiac Disease in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wanrooij, R L J; Bouma, G; Bontkes, H J; Neefjes-Borst, A; van Grieken, N C; von Blomberg, B M E; Mulder, C J J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Refractory celiac disease (RCD) is a severe cause of non-responsive celiac disease (CD) due to its association with the enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL). Conflicting data exist on the prevalence and the clinical manifestations of RCD type I (RCD I) and type II (RCD II). The aim of the current study was to provide insight in the incidence of RCD and in the distinction with other causes of non-responsive CD. Methods: A total of 106 CD patients were referred to our tertiary referral center between January 2006 and December 2011 for evaluation of non-responsive CD. In addition, a questionnaire was sent to all 82 gastroenterology departments in the Netherlands to reveal whether a patient with RCD was currently being evaluated or had been treated between 2006 and 2012. Results: During a 6 year period, a total of 31 patients were diagnosed with RCD (19 RCD I and 12 RCD II). The nationwide survey revealed 5 additional patients with RCD I and one patient with RCD II. This leads to an annual incidence of RCD of 0.83/10.000 CD patients. The remaining patients were diagnosed with involuntary gluten ingestion (21.7%), delayed mucosal recovery (11.3%), enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (7.5%) and autoimmune enteropathy (1.8%). Conclusions: This nationwide study reveals a low incidence of RCD in the Netherlands. Nevertheless, RCD is a clinically relevant disease entity in CD patients non-responsive to the gluten-free diet. PMID:28125074

  14. Is There a Temperate Bias in Our Understanding of How Climate Change Will Alter Plant-Herbivore Interactions? A Meta-analysis of Experimental Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundim, Fabiane M; Bruna, Emilio M

    2016-09-01

    Climate change can drive major shifts in community composition and interactions between resident species. However, the magnitude of these changes depends on the type of interactions and the biome in which they take place. We review the existing conceptual framework for how climate change will influence tropical plant-herbivore interactions and formalize a similar framework for the temperate zone. We then conduct the first biome-specific tests of how plant-herbivore interactions change in response to climate-driven changes in temperature, precipitation, ambient CO2, and ozone. We used quantitative meta-analysis to compare predicted and observed changes in experimental studies. Empirical studies were heavily biased toward temperate systems, so testing predicted changes in tropical plant-herbivore interactions was virtually impossible. Furthermore, most studies investigated the effects of CO2 with limited plant and herbivore species. Irrespective of location, most studies manipulated only one climate change factor despite the fact that different factors can act in synergy to alter responses of plants and herbivores. Finally, studies of belowground plant-herbivore interactions were also rare; those conducted suggest that climate change could have major effects on belowground subsystems. Our results suggest that there is a disconnection between the growing literature proposing how climate change will influence plant-herbivore interactions and the studies testing these predictions. General conclusions will also be hampered without better integration of above- and belowground systems, assessing the effects of multiple climate change factors simultaneously, and using greater diversity of species in experiments.

  15. Iron, zinc and copper in the Alzheimer's disease brain: a quantitative meta-analysis. Some insight on the influence of citation bias on scientific opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Matthew; Mueller, Claudius; Oyoyo, Udochukwu; Smith, Mark A; Kirsch, Wolff M

    2011-08-01

    Dysfunctional homeostasis of transition metals is believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although questioned by some, brain copper, zinc, and particularly iron overload are widely accepted features of AD which have led to the hypothesis that oxidative stress generated from aberrant homeostasis of these transition metals might be a pathogenic mechanism behind AD. This meta-analysis compiled and critically assessed available quantitative data on brain iron, zinc and copper levels in AD patients compared to aged controls. The results were very heterogeneous. A series of heavily cited articles from one laboratory reported a large increase in iron in AD neocortex compared to age-matched controls (piron and this bias was particularly prominent among narrative review articles. Additionally, while zinc was not significantly changed in the neocortex (p=0.29), copper was significantly depleted in AD (p=0.0003). In light of these findings, it will be important to re-evaluate the hypothesis that transition metal overload accounts for oxidative injury noted in AD.

  16. Fixed points of occasionally weakly biased mappings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Mahendra Singh, M. R. Singh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Common fixed point results due to Pant et al. [Pant et al., Weak reciprocal continuity and fixed point theorems, Ann Univ Ferrara, 57(1, 181-190 (2011] are extended to a class of non commuting operators called occasionally weakly biased pair[ N. Hussain, M. A. Khamsi A. Latif, Commonfixed points for JH-operators and occasionally weakly biased pairs under relaxed conditions, Nonlinear Analysis, 74, 2133-2140 (2011]. We also provideillustrative examples to justify the improvements. Abstract. Common fixed point results due to Pant et al. [Pant et al., Weakreciprocal continuity and fixed point theorems, Ann Univ Ferrara, 57(1, 181-190 (2011] are extended to a class of non commuting operators called occasionally weakly biased pair[ N. Hussain, M. A. Khamsi A. Latif, Common fixed points for JH-operators and occasionally weakly biased pairs under relaxed conditions, Nonlinear Analysis, 74, 2133-2140 (2011]. We also provide illustrative examples to justify the improvements.

  17. Appropriate analysis of CIREN data: using NASS-CDS to reduce bias in estimation of injury risk factors in passenger vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Michael R; Resler, Alexa; Flannagan, Carol A; Rupp, Jonathan D

    2010-03-01

    The Crash Injury Research Engineering Network (CIREN) database contains detailed medical and crash information on a large number of severely injured occupants in motor vehicle crashes. CIREN's major limitation for stand-alone analyses to explore injury risk factors is that control subjects without a given injury type must have another severe injury to be included in the database. This leads to bias toward the null in the estimation of risk associations. One method to cope with this limitation is to obtain information about occupants without a given injury type from the National Automotive Sampling System's Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS), which is a probability sample of towaway crashes, containing similar crash information, but less medical detail. Combining CIREN and NASS-CDS in this manner takes advantage of the increased sample size when outcomes are available in both datasets; otherwise NASS-CDS can serve as a sample of controls to be combined with CIREN cases, possibly under a sensitivity analysis that includes and excludes NASS-CDS subjects whose status as a control is uncertain. Because CIREN is not a probability sample of crashes that meet its inclusion criteria, we develop a method to estimate the probability of selection for the CIREN cases using data from NASS-CDS. These estimated probabilities are then used to compute "pseudo-weights" for the CIREN cases. These pseudo-weights not only allow for reduced bias in the estimation of risk associations, they allow direct prevalence estimates to be made using medical outcome data available only in CIREN. We illustrate the use of these methods with both simulation studies and application to estimation of prevalence and predictors of AIS 3+ injury risk to head, thorax, and lower extremity regions, as well as prevalence and predictors of acetabular pelvic fractures. Results of these analyses demonstrate combining NASS and CIREN data can yield improvements in mean square error and nominal confidence

  18. A comparison of nonresponse in mail, telephone, and face-to-face surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hox, J.J.; Leeuw, E.D. de

    1994-01-01

    This article reports a meta-analysis of 45 studies that explicitly compare the response obtained using a mail, telephone or face-to-face survey. The data analysis uses a generalized hierarchical linear model. Sampling procedure (e.g., local convenience sample, random general sample), saliency of

  19. A comparison of nonresponse in mail, telephone, and face-to-face surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hox, J.J.; Leeuw, E.D. de

    1994-01-01

    This article reports a meta-analysis of 45 studies that explicitly compare the response obtained using a mail, telephone or face-to-face survey. The data analysis uses a generalized hierarchical linear model. Sampling procedure (e.g., local convenience sample, random general sample), saliency of top

  20. Comparison of 2010 Census Nonresponse Follow-Up Proxy Responses with Administrative Records Using Census Coverage Measurement Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulry Mary H.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. Census Bureau is currently conducting research on ways to use administrative records to reduce the cost and improve the quality of the 2020 Census Nonresponse Followup (NRFU at addresses that do not self-respond electronically or by mail. Previously, when a NRFU enumerator was unable to contact residents at an address, he/she found a knowledgeable person, such as a neighbor or apartment manager, who could provide the census information for the residents. This was called a proxy response. The Census Bureau’s recent advances in merging federal and third-party databases raise the question: Are proxy responses for NRFU addresses more accurate than the administrative records available for the housing unit? Our study attempts to answer this question by comparing the quality of proxy responses and the administrative records for those housing units in the same timeframe using the results of 2010 Census Coverage Measurement (CCM Program. The assessment of the quality of the proxy responses and the administrative records in the CCM sample of block clusters takes advantage of the extensive fieldwork, processing, and clerical matching conducted for the CCM.

  1. Measuring Agricultural Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    . For the 15 sample countries, the results indicate that the agricultural price incentive bias, which was generally perceived to exist during the 1980s, was largely eliminated during the 1990s. The results also demonstrate that general equilibrium effects and country-specific characteristics - including trade...... shares and intersectoral linkages - are crucial for determining the sign and magnitude of trade policy bias. The GE-ERP measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on agricultural price incentives. A Monte Carlo procedure confirms that the results are robust...

  2. Measuring agricultural policy bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    2010-01-01

    Measurement is a key issue in the literature on price incentive bias induced by trade policy. We introduce a general equilibrium measure of the relative effective rate of protection, which generalizes earlier protection measures. For our fifteen sample countries, results indicate that the agricul......Measurement is a key issue in the literature on price incentive bias induced by trade policy. We introduce a general equilibrium measure of the relative effective rate of protection, which generalizes earlier protection measures. For our fifteen sample countries, results indicate...... protection measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on relative agricultural price incentives....

  3. Placebo non-response measure in sequential parallel comparison design studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybin, Denis; Doros, Gheorghe; Pencina, Michael J; Fava, Maurizio

    2015-07-10

    The Sequential Parallel Comparison Design (SPCD) is one of the novel approaches addressing placebo response. The analysis of SPCD data typically classifies subjects as 'placebo responders' or 'placebo non-responders'. Most current methods employed for analysis of SPCD data utilize only a part of the data collected during the trial. A repeated measures model was proposed for analysis of continuous outcomes that permitted the inclusion of information from all subjects into the treatment effect estimation. We describe here a new approach using a weighted repeated measures model that further improves the utilization of data collected during the trial, allowing the incorporation of information that is relevant to the placebo response, and dealing with the problem of possible misclassification of subjects. Our simulations show that when compared to the unweighted repeated measures model method, our approach performs as well or, under certain conditions, better, in preserving the type I error, achieving adequate power and minimizing the mean squared error.

  4. Commentary: A glass half full or half empty? Cognitive bias modification for mental health problems in children and adolescents--reflections on the meta-analysis by Cristea et al. (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jennifer Y F

    2015-07-01

    The last decade has cognitive bias modification (CBM) training paradigms, emerging first as an experimental test of the causal role of information-processing biases on mood and anxiety symptoms, and then, as the clinical implications of these findings were realised, as a potential clinical 'vaccine' that could be used to modify biases and reduce symptoms. CBM is an umbrella term for methods designed to modify cognitive factors that maintain psychiatric conditions such as anxiety and depression through simple repetitive learning. Two biases that have most often been targeted by these training programs are the tendency to orient attention towards threat and distortions in the interpretation of ambiguous situations. This commentary reflects on an accompanying meta-analysis by Crsitea et al., which pooled effect sizes from over 20 statistical comparisons between a CBM group and a control group on post-training measures of mental health (mostly anxiety and depression). Cristea et al. reported that any CBM training-associated difference on measures of anxiety and depression were weak and non-significant (although training effects were generally evident on measures of cognitive biases). Heterogeneity across studies was high, but with exception to the setting in which CBM was delivered (home, school, laboratory or mental health facility), there was no persuasive evidence for significant moderation of training effects by other key variables. In their conclusions the authors suggested that CBM had little clinical utility and that it was unclear whether positive results in any individual study arose from experimenter or participant bias. So if the glass is half empty, what should the next stage of CBM research usefully focus on?

  5. Systematic review of the empirical evidence of study publication bias and outcome reporting bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Dwan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increased use of meta-analysis in systematic reviews of healthcare interventions has highlighted several types of bias that can arise during the completion of a randomised controlled trial. Study publication bias has been recognised as a potential threat to the validity of meta-analysis and can make the readily available evidence unreliable for decision making. Until recently, outcome reporting bias has received less attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We review and summarise the evidence from a series of cohort studies that have assessed study publication bias and outcome reporting bias in randomised controlled trials. Sixteen studies were eligible of which only two followed the cohort all the way through from protocol approval to information regarding publication of outcomes. Eleven of the studies investigated study publication bias and five investigated outcome reporting bias. Three studies have found that statistically significant outcomes had a higher odds of being fully reported compared to non-significant outcomes (range of odds ratios: 2.2 to 4.7. In comparing trial publications to protocols, we found that 40-62% of studies had at least one primary outcome that was changed, introduced, or omitted. We decided not to undertake meta-analysis due to the differences between studies. CONCLUSIONS: Recent work provides direct empirical evidence for the existence of study publication bias and outcome reporting bias. There is strong evidence of an association between significant results and publication; studies that report positive or significant results are more likely to be published and outcomes that are statistically significant have higher odds of being fully reported. Publications have been found to be inconsistent with their protocols. Researchers need to be aware of the problems of both types of bias and efforts should be concentrated on improving the reporting of trials.

  6. Simulating currency substitution bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boon (Martin); C.J.M. Kool (Clemens); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe sign and size of estimates of the elasticity of currency substitution critically depend on the definition of the oppurtunity costs of holding money. We investigate possible biases by means of Monte Carlo experiments, as sufficient real data are not available.

  7. Sex Bias in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalk, Sue Rosenberg; And Others

    This study investigated children's sex biased attitudes as a function of the sex, age, and race of the child as well as a geographical-SES factor. Two attitudes were measured on a 55-item questionnaire: Sex Pride (attributing positive characteristics to a child of the same sex) and Sex Prejudice (attributing negative characteristics to a child of…

  8. Need for Cognitive Closure in the Analysis of Criminal Investigation Intelligence and Its Bias Correction%侦查情报分析中的认知闭合需要及其偏差修正

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘杰

    2016-01-01

    [目的/意义]情报分析中过高的认知闭合需要水平会产生多种认知偏差,导致情报分析人员匆忙而有失偏颇地处理信息材料,急于得出结论。对此展开研究有助于情报分析人员改善因该动机而导致的偏差,提升情报产品质量。[方法/过程]通过对认知闭合需要的属性及其研究现状的考察,指出侦查情报分析中此类偏差的典型样态,如证实偏差、首因效应偏差、启发式思维偏差等,进而提出修正策略。[结果/结论]认为引入批判性思维工具、缓解和调试时间压力、让侦查人员承担相应的过错责任以及优化侦查情报分析与决策人员搭配组合等方法可有效削弱和降低此类偏差对情报分析的不良影响。%Purpose/Significance] A high level of cognitive closure in the intelligence analysis can lead to a variety of cognitive biases, which may result in a situation of dealing with the information material in a hurry and being eager to draw a conclusion by the intelligence analysts. This study will help the intelligence analysts to correct the biases caused by this motivation and improve the quality of intelligence products. [ Method/Process] The study explores the cognitive closure properties, reviews the status quo of the related research, points out that this kind of bias in the criminal investigation intelligence analysis includes confirmation bias, primacy effects bias and heuristic think-ing bias, and then puts forward correction strategy. [ Result/Conclusion] Mastering critical thinking, easing debugging time pressure, tak-ing responsibility for fault and optimizing the team arrangement of investigation intelligence analyst and decision support personnel are found to be effective in weakening and reducing the adverse effects of such biases on intelligence analysis.

  9. Power spectrum analysis with least-squares fitting: Amplitude bias and its elimination, with application to optical tweezers and atomic force microscope cantilevers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørlykke, Simon F.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Optical tweezers and atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers are often calibrated by fitting their experimental power spectra of Brownian motion. We demonstrate here that if this is done with typical weighted least-squares methods, the result is a bias of relative size between -2/n and + 1/n....... The fitted value for the characteristic frequency is not affected by this bias. For the AFM then, force measurements are not affected provided an independent length-scale calibration is available. For optical tweezers there is no such luck, since the spring constant is found as the ratio...... of the characteristic frequency and the diffusion coefficient. We give analytical results for the weight-dependent bias for the wide class of systems whose dynamics is described by a linear (integro)differential equation with additive noise, white or colored. Examples are optical tweezers with hydrodynamic self...

  10. Skill-Biased Technological Change in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Rose Skaksen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Skill-Biased Technological Change in Denmark:A Disaggregate Perspective@*In this paper, we provide an industry-level analysis of skill-biased technological change(SBTC) in Denmark over the last two decades. The analysis shows that SBTC has variedconsiderably across industries, and traditionally l...... information aboutfuture labour requirements, as the relative importance of these industries must be expectedto grow, thereby reinforcing the shift in demand for skilled labour.JEL Classification: J24, J31, L6Keywords: skill-biased technological change, Danish industries......Skill-Biased Technological Change in Denmark:A Disaggregate Perspective@*In this paper, we provide an industry-level analysis of skill-biased technological change(SBTC) in Denmark over the last two decades. The analysis shows that SBTC has variedconsiderably across industries, and traditionally...... large Danish industries have experiencedrelatively less SBTC. This may partly explain why wage inequality between skilled and lessskilled has risen less in Denmark than in other countries. We also find that SBTC has beenconcentrated in already skill-intensive industries. This contains important...

  11. Analysis of DC-biasing characteristics based on Epstein frame%基于爱泼斯坦方圈的直流偏磁特性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁宇超; 赵小军; 徐静

    2013-01-01

      由高压直流输电产生的直流电流会给电力变压器造成一系列危害。基于爱泼斯坦方圈设计了实验方案并对电力变压器进行了直流偏磁实验。通过对励磁电流测量值分析,研究了直流偏磁对励磁电流各次谐波的影响;通过对铁心损耗的测量分析了直流偏磁条件下硅钢片的损耗特性。基于爱泼斯坦方圈的直流偏磁实验研究有利于揭示直流偏磁机理,同时对电力变压器的工程设计有着重要的指导意义。%The DC bias current arising from the HVDC system may lead to a series of damages to power transformer. The DC-biasing experiment based on Epstein frame are designed and carried out. The measured magnetizing current are analyzed to study the influence of DC bias on harmonic components of magnetizing current. The iron loss is measured and analyzed under DC-biased magnetization. The DC-biasing experiment based on Epstein frame contributes to exploring the mechanism of DC bias phenomenon and designing the power transformer in engineering.

  12. Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel J; Eijsvogels, Thijs; Bouts, Yvette M; Maiorana, Andrew J; Naylor, Louise H; Scholten, Ralph R; Spaanderman, Marc E A; Pugh, Christopher J A; Sprung, Victoria S; Schreuder, Tim; Jones, Helen; Cable, Tim; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-08-15

    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to exercise-induced changes in artery function. We pooled data from our laboratories involving 182 subjects who underwent supervised, large-muscle group, endurance-type exercise training interventions with pre-/posttraining measures of flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) to assess artery function. All studies adopted an identical FMD protocol (5-min ischemia, distal cuff inflation), contemporary echo-Doppler methodology, and observer-independent automated analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors contributing to changes in FMD%. We found that cardiopulmonary fitness improved, and weight, body mass index (BMI), cholesterol, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased after training, while FMD% increased in 76% of subjects (P cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly related to changes in FMD% (P > 0.05). In conclusion, we found that, while some subjects do not demonstrate increases following exercise training, improvement in FMD% is present in those with lower pretraining body weight and endothelial function. Moreover, exercise training-induced change in FMD% did not correlate with changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors, indicating that some cardioprotective effects of exercise training are independent of improvement in risk factors.

  13. Analysis of bias thermal stability of interferometer fiber-optic gyroscope using a solid-core polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuoming, Sun; Shuhua, Wang; Junwei, Li; Yazhou, Zhang; Dapeng, Chen

    2016-12-01

    Bias thermal stability of a fiber-optic gyroscope using polarization-maintaining photonic crystal (PM-PCF) was studied. The thermal sensitivity of birefringence in PM-PCF and polarization cross talking in fiber coil was measured. Using an OCDP method, the polarization cross talking causing phase error of the fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG) was analyzed. The contrast experiment result of the FOGs with the PM-PCF coil and PMF coil showed that using PM-PCF instead of PMF can improve the FOG's bias thermal stability by about 50 %.

  14. Uncovering racial bias in nursing fundamentals textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, M M

    2001-01-01

    This article describes research that sought to identify and critique selected content areas from three nursing fundamentals textbooks for the presence or absence of racial bias embedded in the portrayal of African Americans. The analyzed content areas were the history of nursing, cultural content, and physical assessment/hygiene parameters. A researcher-developed guide was used for data collection and analysis of textual language, illustrations, linguistics, and references. A thematic analysis resulted in I I themes reflecting the portrayal of African Americans in these sampled textbooks. An interpretive analysis with a lens of Sadker and Sadker's categories of bias, along with other literary and theoretical contexts, were used to explore for the presence or absence of racial bias. Recommendations for nursing education are provided.

  15. Temperature trend biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venema, Victor; Lindau, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    In an accompanying talk we show that well-homogenized national dataset warm more than temperatures from global collections averaged over the region of common coverage. In this poster we want to present auxiliary work about possible biases in the raw observations and on how well relative statistical homogenization can remove trend biases. There are several possible causes of cooling biases, which have not been studied much. Siting could be an important factor. Urban stations tend to move away from the centre to better locations. Many stations started inside of urban areas and are nowadays more outside. Even for villages the temperature difference between the centre and edge can be 0.5°C. When a city station moves to an airport, which often happened around WWII, this takes the station (largely) out of the urban heat island. During the 20th century the Stevenson screen was established as the dominant thermometer screen. This screen protected the thermometer much better against radiation than earlier designs. Deficits of earlier measurement methods have artificially warmed the temperatures in the 19th century. Newer studies suggest we may have underestimated the size of this bias. Currently we are in a transition to Automatic Weather Stations. The net global effect of this transition is not clear at this moment. Irrigation on average decreases the 2m-temperature by about 1 degree centigrade. At the same time, irrigation has increased significantly during the last century. People preferentially live in irrigated areas and weather stations serve agriculture. Thus it is possible that there is a higher likelihood that weather stations are erected in irrigated areas than elsewhere. In this case irrigation could lead to a spurious cooling trend. In the Parallel Observations Science Team of the International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI-POST) we are studying influence of the introduction of Stevenson screens and Automatic Weather Stations using parallel measurements

  16. Bias in collegiate courts

    OpenAIRE

    Olowofoyeku, AA

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the issues attending common law collegiate courts’ engagements with allegations of bias within their own ranks. It will be argued that, in such cases, it would be inappropriate to involve the collegiate panel or any member thereof in the decision, since such involvement inevitably encounters difficulties. The common law’s dilemmas require drastic solutions, but the common law arguably is illequipped to implement the required change. The answer, it will be argued, is ...

  17. A thermalization energy analysis of the threshold voltage shift in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors under positive gate bias stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niang, K.M.; Barquinha, P.M.C.; Martins, R.F.P.; Cobb, B.; Powell, M.J.; Flewitt, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Thin film transistors (TFTs) employing an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) channel layer exhibit a positive shift in the threshold voltage under the application of positive gate bias stress (PBS). The time and temperature dependence of the threshold voltage shift was measured and analyse

  18. What Boys and Girls Learn through Song: A Content Analysis of Gender Traits and Sex Bias in Two Choral Classroom Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Patrick J.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to further the understanding of gender traits or sexual bias that high school-aged choral music students might be exposed to in their curricular materials, two choral textbooks Choral Connections Beginning Level 1 Treble Voices and Choral Connections Beginning Level 1 Tenor-Bass Voices published by Glencoe MacGraw-Hill in 1999 were…

  19. Bias in the reporting of harms in clinical trials of second-generation antidepressants for depression and anxiety : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Ymkje Anna; Roest, Annelieke M.; Beijers, Lian; Turner, Erick H.; de Jonge, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that reporting bias has inflated the apparent efficacy of antidepressants. We investigated whether apparent safety was also affected. We included 133 trials, involving 31,296 patients, of second-generation antidepressants for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MD

  20. Genome-wide analysis reveals diverged patterns of codon bias, gene expression, and rates of sequence evolution in picea gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Torre, Amanda R; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Van de Peer, Yves; Ingvarsson, Pär K

    2015-03-05

    The recent sequencing of several gymnosperm genomes has greatly facilitated studying the evolution of their genes and gene families. In this study, we examine the evidence for expression-mediated selection in the first two fully sequenced representatives of the gymnosperm plant clade (Picea abies and Picea glauca). We use genome-wide estimates of gene expression (>50,000 expressed genes) to study the relationship between gene expression, codon bias, rates of sequence divergence, protein length, and gene duplication. We found that gene expression is correlated with rates of sequence divergence and codon bias, suggesting that natural selection is acting on Picea protein-coding genes for translational efficiency. Gene expression, rates of sequence divergence, and codon bias are correlated with the size of gene families, with large multicopy gene families having, on average, a lower expression level and breadth, lower codon bias, and higher rates of sequence divergence than single-copy gene families. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression were more common in large gene families with large gene expression divergence than in single-copy families. Recent family expansions combined with large gene expression variation in paralogs and increased rates of sequence evolution suggest that some Picea gene families are rapidly evolving to cope with biotic and abiotic stress. Our study highlights the importance of gene expression and natural selection in shaping the evolution of protein-coding genes in Picea species, and sets the ground for further studies investigating the evolution of individual gene families in gymnosperms.

  1. Biased information processing in the escalation paradigm: information search and information evaluation as potential mediators of escalating commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, Thomas; Pfeiffer, Felix; Schulz-Hardt, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Escalation of commitment denotes decision makers' increased reinvestment of resources in a losing course of action. Despite the relevance of this topic, little is known about how information is processed in escalation situations, that is, whether decision makers who receive negative outcome feedback on their initial decision search for and/or process information biasedly and whether these biases contribute to escalating commitment. Contrary to a widely cited study by E. J. Conlon and J. M. Parks (1987), in 3 experiments, the authors found that biases do not occur on the level of information search. Neither in a direct replication and extension of the original study with largely increased test power (Experiment 1) nor under methodologically improved conditions (Experiments 2 and 3) did decision makers responsible for failure differ from nonresponsible decision makers with regards to information search, and no selective search for information supporting the initial decision or voting for further reinvestment was observed. However, Experiments 3 and 4 show that the evaluation of the previously sought information is biased among participants who were responsible for initiating the course of action. Mediation analyses show that this evaluation bias in favor of reinvestment partially mediated the responsibility effect on escalation of commitment.

  2. Deep transcriptome-sequencing and proteome analysis of the hydrothermal vent annelid Alvinella pompejana identifies the CvP-bias as a robust measure of eukaryotic thermostability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holder Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alvinella pompejana is an annelid worm that inhabits deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific Ocean. Living at a depth of approximately 2500 meters, these worms experience extreme environmental conditions, including high temperature and pressure as well as high levels of sulfide and heavy metals. A. pompejana is one of the most thermotolerant metazoans, making this animal a subject of great interest for studies of eukaryotic thermoadaptation. Results In order to complement existing EST resources we performed deep sequencing of the A. pompejana transcriptome. We identified several thousand novel protein-coding transcripts, nearly doubling the sequence data for this annelid. We then performed an extensive survey of previously established prokaryotic thermoadaptation measures to search for global signals of thermoadaptation in A. pompejana in comparison with mesophilic eukaryotes. In an orthologous set of 457 proteins, we found that the best indicator of thermoadaptation was the difference in frequency of charged versus polar residues (CvP-bias, which was highest in A. pompejana. CvP-bias robustly distinguished prokaryotic thermophiles from prokaryotic mesophiles, as well as the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum from mesophilic eukaryotes. Experimental values for thermophilic proteins supported higher CvP-bias as a measure of thermal stability when compared to their mesophilic orthologs. Proteome-wide mean CvP-bias also correlated with the body temperatures of homeothermic birds and mammals. Conclusions Our work extends the transcriptome resources for A. pompejana and identifies the CvP-bias as a robust and widely applicable measure of eukaryotic thermoadaptation. Reviewer This article was reviewed by Sándor Pongor, L. Aravind and Anthony M. Poole.

  3. The risk of bias and sample size of trials of spinal manipulative therapy for low back and neck pain: analysis and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Sidney M; van Eekelen, Rik; Oosterhuis, Teddy; de Boer, Michiel R; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in methodological quality and sample size in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) for neck and low back pain over a specified period. A secondary purpose was to make recommendations for improvement for future SMT trials based upon our findings. Randomized controlled trials that examined the effect of SMT in adults with neck and/or low back pain and reported at least 1 patient-reported outcome measure were included. Studies were identified from recent Cochrane reviews of SMT, and an update of the literature was conducted (March 2013). Risk of bias was assessed using the 12-item criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. In addition, sample size was examined. The relationship between the overall risk of bias and sample size over time was evaluated using regression analyses, and RCTs were grouped into periods (epochs) of approximately 5 years. In total, 105 RCTs were included, of which 41 (39%) were considered to have a low risk of bias. There is significant improvement in the mean risk of bias over time (P statistically (odds ratio, 2.1; confidence interval, 1.5-3.0). Sensitivity analyses suggest no appreciable difference between studies for neck or low back pain for risk of bias or sample size. Methodological quality of RCTs of SMT for neck and low back pain is improving, whereas overall sample size has shown only small and nonsignificant increases. There is an increasing trend among studies to conduct sample size calculations, which relate to statistical power. Based upon these findings, 7 areas of improvement for future SMT trials are suggested. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Behavioral Biases in Interpersonal Contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Liu (Ning)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis presents evidence suggesting that the same types of biases in individual decision making under uncertainty pertain in interpersonal contexts. The chapters above demonstrate in specific contexts how specific interpersonal factors attenuate, amplify, or replicate these bias

  5. 侦查情报分析中的群体思维偏差及其修正%Groupthink in the Analysis of Criminal Investigation Intelligence and Its Bias Correction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘杰

    2016-01-01

    [目的/意义]侦查情报分析中的群体思维会产生多种偏差,导致侦查人员忽视解决问题这一根本目标而转向对群体结构稳定及群体关系维护之上。对此展开研究有助于侦查人员明确情报分析重点,提升情报分析的准确性。[方法/过程]通过对群体思维的属性及其研究现状的考察,指出侦查情报分析中此类偏差的典型样态,如信息搜寻不全与片面、信息评估偏差、风险评估偏差等,进而提出修正策略。[结果/结论]认为强化对群体思维现象认知、调整案件研判模式、引入辅助决策人员,淡化群体意识等方法可有效削弱和降低此类偏差对情报分析的不良影响。%Purpose/Significance] The group think in the analysis of the investigation intelligence will produce various kinds of bias, which leads to the neglect of the basic goal of the intelligence analysis and turns to the stability of the group structure and the maintenance of group relationship. This research will help to clarify the focus of intelligence analysis and improve the accuracy of intelligence analysis. [ Method/Process] The paper presents groupthink properties and the current status of the research, points out that this kind of bias in the criminal investigation intelligence analysis includes incomplete collection of information, information assessment bias and risk assessment bias, and puts forward correction strategy. [ Results/Conclusion] The paper concludes that strengthening cognition of groupthink, adjus-ting cases judged model, introducing an auxiliary decision-making personnel and diluting group awareness can effectively weaken and re-duce the adverse effects of such bias of intelligence analysis.

  6. Some Concerns in Evaluating News Coverage: The Case of Biased Reporting of Political Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, C. Richard; Buss, Terry F.

    This paper presents a conceptual analysis of bias and outlines the complexity and subtlety of the questions engulfing bias by sorting out views of bias that have been implicit in debates about the media, assessing the scientific value of these competing views in identifying and understanding bias in the media, offering an alternative view which is…

  7. Transcript profiling of two alfalfa genotypes with contrasting cell wall composition in stems using a cross-species platform: optimizing analysis by masking biased probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array, developed for Medicago truncatula, is a suitable platform for transcript profiling in tetraploid alfalfa [Medicago sativa (L.) subsp. sativa]. However, previous research involving cross-species hybridization (CSH) has shown that sequence variation between two species can bias transcript profiling by decreasing sensitivity (number of expressed genes detected) and the accuracy of measuring fold-differences in gene expression. Results Transcript profiling using the Medicago GeneChip® was conducted with elongating stem (ES) and post-elongation stem (PES) internodes from alfalfa genotypes 252 and 1283 that differ in stem cell wall concentrations of cellulose and lignin. A protocol was developed that masked probes targeting inter-species variable (ISV) regions of alfalfa transcripts. A probe signal intensity threshold was selected that optimized both sensitivity and accuracy. After masking for both ISV regions and previously identified single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs), the number of differentially expressed genes between the two genotypes in both ES and PES internodes was approximately 2-fold greater than the number detected prior to masking. Regulatory genes, including transcription factor and receptor kinase genes that may play a role in development of secondary xylem, were significantly over-represented among genes up-regulated in 252 PES internodes compared to 1283 PES internodes. Several cell wall-related genes were also up-regulated in genotype 252 PES internodes. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR of differentially expressed regulatory and cell wall-related genes demonstrated increased sensitivity and accuracy after masking for both ISV regions and SFPs. Over 1,000 genes that were differentially expressed in ES and PES internodes of genotypes 252 and 1283 were mapped onto putative orthologous loci on M. truncatula chromosomes. Clustering simulation analysis of the differentially expressed genes suggested co

  8. Transcript profiling of two alfalfa genotypes with contrasting cell wall composition in stems using a cross-species platform: optimizing analysis by masking biased probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hans-Joachim G

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array, developed for Medicago truncatula, is a suitable platform for transcript profiling in tetraploid alfalfa [Medicago sativa (L. subsp. sativa]. However, previous research involving cross-species hybridization (CSH has shown that sequence variation between two species can bias transcript profiling by decreasing sensitivity (number of expressed genes detected and the accuracy of measuring fold-differences in gene expression. Results Transcript profiling using the Medicago GeneChip® was conducted with elongating stem (ES and post-elongation stem (PES internodes from alfalfa genotypes 252 and 1283 that differ in stem cell wall concentrations of cellulose and lignin. A protocol was developed that masked probes targeting inter-species variable (ISV regions of alfalfa transcripts. A probe signal intensity threshold was selected that optimized both sensitivity and accuracy. After masking for both ISV regions and previously identified single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs, the number of differentially expressed genes between the two genotypes in both ES and PES internodes was approximately 2-fold greater than the number detected prior to masking. Regulatory genes, including transcription factor and receptor kinase genes that may play a role in development of secondary xylem, were significantly over-represented among genes up-regulated in 252 PES internodes compared to 1283 PES internodes. Several cell wall-related genes were also up-regulated in genotype 252 PES internodes. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR of differentially expressed regulatory and cell wall-related genes demonstrated increased sensitivity and accuracy after masking for both ISV regions and SFPs. Over 1,000 genes that were differentially expressed in ES and PES internodes of genotypes 252 and 1283 were mapped onto putative orthologous loci on M. truncatula chromosomes. Clustering simulation analysis of the differentially expressed genes

  9. Assessing Bias in Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowshowitz, Abbe; Kawaguchi, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the measurement of bias in search engines on the Web, defining bias as the balance and representation of items in a collection retrieved from a database for a set of queries. Assesses bias by measuring the deviation from the ideal of the distribution produced by a particular search engine. (Author/LRW)

  10. Analysis of an influence of the bias correction method on the projected changes of flood indices in the selected catchments in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuch, Marzena; Lawrence, Deborah; Meresa, Hadush K.; Napiórkowski, Jaroslaw J.; Romanowicz, Renata J.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study is an estimation of the uncertainty in flood indices introduced by bias correction of climate model variables in ten catchments in Poland. A simulation approach is used to obtain daily flows in catchments under changing climatic conditions, following the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission scenarios. Climate projections were obtained from the EURO-CORDEX initiative, and time series of precipitation and air temperature from different RCM/GCMs for the periods: 1971-2000, 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 were used. The climate model outputs in the Poland area are highly biased; therefore, additional post processing in the form of bias correction of precipitation and temperature is needed. In this work we used four versions of the quantile mapping method (empirical quantile mapping, and three distribution based mappings: double gamma, single gamma and Birnbaum-Sanders) for correction of the precipitation time series and one method for air temperature correction (empirical quantile method). The HBV rainfall-runoff catchment-based model is used to estimate future flow time series. The models are calibrated using the available precipitation, air temperature, and flow observations for the period 1971-2000. Model performance is evaluated using observed data for the period 2001-2010. We also verify performance using the EURO-CORDEX simulations for the reference period (1971-2000), both with and without bias correction of the RCM/GCM outputs. Finally, the models are run for the future climate simulated by the RCM/GCM models for the years: 2021-2050 and 2071-2100. Changes in the mean annual flood and in flood quantiles are analysed and the effect of bias correction on the estimated changes is also considered. The results indicate substantial differences between climate models and catchments. The regional variability has a close relationship with the flood regime type. Catchments where high flows are expected to increase have a rainfall-dominated flood regime in the current

  11. DATA COLLECTION, QUALITY ASSURANCE, AND ANALYSIS PLAN FOR THE 2008/2009 HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELLS KNOWLEDGE AND OPINIONS SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Truett, Lorena Faith [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL

    2008-09-01

    The 2008/2009 Knowledge and Opinions Survey, conducted for the Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program will measure the levels of awareness and understanding of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies within five target populations: (1) the general public, (2) students, (3) personnel in state and local governments, (4) potential end users of hydrogen fuel and fuel cell technologies in business and industry, and (5) safety and code officials. The ultimate goal of the surveys is a statistically valid, nationally based assessment. Distinct information collections are required for each of the target populations. Each instrument for assessing baseline knowledge is targeted to the corresponding population group. While many questions are identical across all populations, some questions are unique to each respondent group. The biggest data quality limitation of the hydrogen survey data (at least of the general public and student components) will be nonresponse bias. To ensure as high a response rate as possible, various measures will be taken to minimize nonresponse, including automated callbacks, cycling callbacks throughout the weekdays, and availability of Spanish speaking interviewers. Statistical adjustments (i.e., sampling weights) will also be used to account for nonresponse and noncoverage. The primary objective of the data analysis is to estimate the proportions of target population individuals who would respond to the questions in the various possible ways. Data analysis will incorporate necessary adjustments for the sampling design and sampling weights (i.e., probability sampling). Otherwise, however, the analysis will involve standard estimates of proportions of the interviewees responding in various ways to the questions. Sample-weight-adjusted contingency table chi-square tests will also be computed to identify differences between demographic groups The first round of Knowledge and Opinions Surveys was conducted in 2004. Analysis of these surveys produced a

  12. Eliminating Aggregation Bias in Experimental Research: Random Coefficient Analysis as an Alternative to Performing a ‘by-subjects’ and/or ‘by-items’ ANOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn L. Thompson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Experimental psychologists routinely simplify the structure of their data by computing means for each experimental condition so that the basic assumptions of regression/ANOVA are satisfied. Typically, these means represent the performance (e.g. reaction time or RT of a participant over several items that share some target characteristic (e.g. Mean RT for high-frequency words. Regrettably, analyses based on such aggregated data are biased toward rejection of the null hypothesis, inflating Type-I error beyond the nominal level. A preferable strategy for analyzing such data is random coefficient analysis (RCA, which can be performed using a simple method proposed by Lorch and Myers (1990. An easy to use SPSS implementation of this method is presented using a concrete example. In addition, a technique for evaluating the magnitude of potential aggregation bias in a dataset is demonstrated. Finally, suggestions are offered concerning the reporting of RCA results in empirical articles.

  13. Bias aware Kalman filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drecourt, J.-P.; Madsen, H.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2006-01-01

    . The colored noise filter formulation is extended to correct both time correlated and uncorrelated model error components. A more stable version of the separate filter without feedback is presented. The filters are implemented in an ensemble framework using Latin hypercube sampling. The techniques...... are illustrated on a simple one-dimensional groundwater problem. The results show that the presented filters outperform the standard Kalman filter and that the implementations with bias feedback work in more general conditions than the implementations without feedback. 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  14. Bias Analysis of Single Equation Based on Econometric Model%基于单方程计量经济模型的贝叶斯分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周俊梅; 蒋文江

    2013-01-01

    The Bias problem of statistical inference about the single equation econometric model is studied,According to the prior distribution structure of sample likelihood function of the unknown parameters,normal and Gamma distribution is selected as the prior distribution.The posterior distribution of statistical inference.Finally deduced Bias unknown parameters in two under quadratic loss function estimation.%研究了关于单方程计量经济模型的贝叶斯统计推断问题,即根据样本似然函数的形式构造出未知参数的先验分布,选取正态-Gamma分布为先验分布,对后验分布进行统计推断.最后推导了未知参数在二次损失函数下的贝叶斯估计.

  15. Do technical and commercial biases contribute to the pharmaceutical industry's productivity problems? An analysis of how reordering priorities can improve productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryburg, David A

    2010-09-01

    Of the many issues that contribute to the pharmaceutical industry's productivity problems, biases in the drug discovery and development (DDD) process should be included on the list. The dominant bias pervading the early DDD process is the requirement to identify and develop a commercializable molecule, long before the importance of the target in human disease is understood. That requirement filters out many potentially valuable projects. By changing the emphasis from identifying a commercializable molecule to using molecular tools to test the relevance of the mechanism in humans, the projected number of proofs of concept and subsequent launches could increase up to fivefold. Because this tool paradigm requires resources, one consideration is to form a consortium to share the burden, benefiting both the industry and patients in need.

  16. Volunteer Bias in Recruitment, Retention, and Blood Sample Donation in a Randomised Controlled Trial Involving Mothers and Their Children at Six Months and Two Years: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Sue; Watkins, Alan; Storey, Mel; Allen, Steven J.; Brooks, Caroline J.; Garaiova, Iveta; Heaven, Martin L.; Jones, Ruth; Plummer, Sue F.; Russell, Ian T.; Thornton, Catherine A.; Morgan, Gareth

    2013-01-01

    Background The vulnerability of clinical trials to volunteer bias is under-reported. Volunteer bias is systematic error due to differences between those who choose to participate in studies and those who do not. Methods and Results This paper extends the applications of the concept of volunteer bias by using data from a trial of probiotic supplementation for childhood atopy in healthy dyads to explore 1) differences between a) trial participants and aggregated data from publicly available databases b) participants and non-participants as the trial progressed 2) impact on trial findings of weighting data according to deprivation (Townsend) fifths in the sample and target populations. 1) a) Recruits (n = 454) were less deprived than the target population, matched for area of residence and delivery dates (n = 6,893) (mean [SD] deprivation scores 0.09[4.21] and 0.79[4.08], t = 3.44, df = 511, pprobiotics or research or reporting infants’ adverse events or rashes were more likely to attend research clinics and consent to skin-prick testing. Mothers participating to help children were more likely to consent to infant blood sample donation. 2) In one trial outcome, atopic eczema, the intervention had a positive effect only in the over-represented, least deprived group. Here, data weighting attenuated risk reduction from 6.9%(0.9–13.1%) to 4.6%(−1.4–+10.5%), and OR from 0.40(0.18–0.91) to 0.56(0.26–1.21). Other findings were unchanged. Conclusions Potential for volunteer bias intensified during the trial, due to non-participation of the most deprived and smokers. However, these were not the only predictors of non-participation. Data weighting quantified volunteer bias and modified one important trial outcome. Trial Registration This randomised, double blind, parallel group, placebo controlled trial is registered with the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials Register, Number (ISRCTN) 26287422. Registered title: Probiotics in the

  17. Bias properties of extragalactic distance indicators. 3: Analysis of Tully-Fisher distances for the Mathewson-Ford-Buchhorn sample of 1355 galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspiel, Martin; Sandage, Allan; Tammann, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    The observational selection bias properties of the large Mathewson-Ford-Buchhorn (MFB) sample of axies are demonstrated by showing that the apparent Hubble constant incorrectly increases outward when determined using Tully-Fisher (TF) photometric distances that are uncorreted for bias. It is further shown that the value of H(sub 0) so determined is also multivlaued at a given redshift when it is calculated by the TF method using galaxies with differenct line widths. The method of removing this unphysical contradiction is developed following the model of the bias set out in Paper II. The model developed further here shows that the appropriate TF magnitude of a galaxy that is drawn from a flux-limited catalog not only is a function of line width but, even in the most idealistic cases, requires a triple-entry correction depending on line width, apparent magnitude, and catalog limit. Using the distance-limited subset of the data, it is shown that the mean intrinsic dispersion of a bias-free TF relation is high. The dispersion depends on line width, decreasing from sigma(M) = 0.7 mag for galaxies with rotational velocities less than 100 km s(exp-1) to sigma(M) = 0.4 mag for galaxies with rotational velocities greater than 250 km s(exp-1). These dispersions are so large that the random errors of the bias-free TF distances are too gross to detect any peculiar motions of individual galaxies, but taken together the data show again the offset of 500 km s(exp-1) fond both by Dressler & Faber and by MFB for galaxies in the direction of the putative Great Attractor but described now in a different way. The maximum amplitude of the bulk streaming motion at the Local Group is approximately 500 km s(exp-1) but the perturbation dies out, approaching the Machian frame defined by the CMB at a distance of approximately 80 Mpc (v is approximately 4000 km s(exp -1)). This decay to zero perturbation at v is approximately 4000 km s(exp -1) argues against existing models with a single

  18. Size bias for one and all

    OpenAIRE

    Arratia, Richard; Goldstein, Larry; Kochman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Size bias occurs famously in waiting-time paradoxes, undesirably in sampling schemes, and unexpectedly in connection with Stein's method, tightness, analysis of the lognormal distribution, Skorohod embedding, infinite divisibility, and number theory. In this paper we review the basics and survey some of these unexpected connections.

  19. Forecasts: uncertain, inaccurate and biased?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Morten Skou; Ambrasaite, Inga; Salling, Kim Bang

    2012-01-01

    Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) is the dominating methodology for appraisal of transport infrastructure projects across the globe. In order to adequately assess the costs and benefits of such projects two types of forecasts are crucial to the validity of the appraisal. First are the forecasts...... accuracy of project benefits. This paper presents results from an on-going research project on uncertainties in transport project evaluation (UNITE) that find forecasts of demand to be not only uncertain, but at times also highly inaccurate and often displaying a concerning degree of bias. Demand for road...... projects appear to be systematically underestimated, while demand for rail projects appears to be systematically overestimated. We compare the findings in the present study with those of previous studies and discuss the implications for the validity of project appraisal in the form of CBA...

  20. Forecasts: uncertain, inaccurate and biased?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Morten Skou; Ambrasaite, Inga; Salling, Kim Bang

    2012-01-01

    Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) is the dominating methodology for appraisal of transport infrastructure projects across the globe. In order to adequately assess the costs and benefits of such projects two types of forecasts are crucial to the validity of the appraisal. First are the forecasts...... of construction costs, which account for the majority of total project costs. Second are the forecasts of travel time savings, which account for the majority of total project benefits. The latter of these is, inter alia, determined by forecasts of travel demand, which we shall use as a proxy for the forecasting...... accuracy of project benefits. This paper presents results from an on-going research project on uncertainties in transport project evaluation (UNITE) that find forecasts of demand to be not only uncertain, but at times also highly inaccurate and often displaying a concerning degree of bias. Demand for road...

  1. Confounding and bias in the attributable fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Lyndsey A; Steenland, N Kyle

    2011-01-01

    Inappropriate methods are frequently used to calculate the population attributable fraction (AF) for a given exposure of interest. This commonly occurs when authors use adjusted relative risks (RRs) reported in the literature (the "source" data), without access to the original data. In this analysis, we examine the relationship between the direction and magnitude of confounding in the source data and resulting bias in the attributable fraction when incorrect methods are used. We assess confounding by the confounding risk ratio, which is the ratio of the crude RR to the adjusted RR. We assess bias in the AF by the ratio of the incorrectly calculated AF to the correctly calculated AF. Using generated data, we examine the relationship between confounding and AF bias under various scenarios of population prevalence of exposure and strength of the exposure-disease association. For confounding risk ratios greater than 1.0 (ie, crude RR >adjusted RR), the AF is underestimated; for confounding risk ratios less than 1.0 (ie, crude RR confounding increases, and is dependent on the prevalence of exposure in the total population, with bias greatest at the lowest prevalence of exposure. Bias in the AF is also higher when the exposure-disease association is weaker. Results of these analyses can assist interpretation of incorrectly calculated attributable fraction estimates commonly reported in the epidemiologic literature.

  2. Application Analysis of Arc-suppression Coil with Magnetic Bias of a Wind Farm%风电场偏磁式消弧线圈的应用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亮

    2013-01-01

    电力系统运行经验表明,单相接地故障绝大多数都是瞬间性的,特别是架空线路.本文说明了偏磁式消弧线圈的工作原理及技术参数,并结合风电场的实际情况,对安装偏磁式消弧线圈前后运行状况进行对比分析,表明偏磁式消弧线圈可以进一步提高供电的可靠性.%Power system operation experience shows that single-phase grounding fault in the vast majority are transient, especially the overhead line. This paper illustrated the working principle and technical parameters of the arc -suppression coil with magnetic bias, combined with actual circumstance of a wind farm, made the contrast analysis on the running status of installation of arc-suppression coil with magnetic bias before and after, which shows that the arc-suppression coil with magnetic bias can further improve the reliability of power supply.

  3. Recursive bias estimation for high dimensional smoothers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengartner, Nicolas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matzner-lober, Eric [UHB, FRANCE; Cornillon, Pierre - Andre [INRA

    2008-01-01

    In multivariate nonparametric analysis, sparseness of the covariates also called curse of dimensionality, forces one to use large smoothing parameters. This leads to biased smoothers. Instead of focusing on optimally selecting the smoothing parameter, we fix it to some reasonably large value to ensure an over-smoothing of the data. The resulting smoother has a small variance but a substantial bias. In this paper, we propose to iteratively correct the bias initial estimator by an estimate of the latter obtained by smoothing the residuals. We examine in detail the convergence of the iterated procedure for classical smoothers and relate our procedure to L{sub 2}-Boosting. We apply our method to simulated and real data and show that our method compares favorably with existing procedures.

  4. Outcome predictability biases learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Oren; Mitchell, Chris J; Bethmont, Anna; Lovibond, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Much of contemporary associative learning research is focused on understanding how and when the associative history of cues affects later learning about those cues. Very little work has investigated the effects of the associative history of outcomes on human learning. Three experiments extended the "learned irrelevance" paradigm from the animal conditioning literature to examine the influence of an outcome's prior predictability on subsequent learning of relationships between cues and that outcome. All 3 experiments found evidence for the idea that learning is biased by the prior predictability of the outcome. Previously predictable outcomes were readily associated with novel predictive cues, whereas previously unpredictable outcomes were more readily associated with novel nonpredictive cues. This finding highlights the importance of considering the associative history of outcomes, as well as cues, when interpreting multistage designs. Associative and cognitive explanations of this certainty matching effect are discussed.

  5. Theoretical investigation of exchange bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Zhi-Jie; Wang Huai-Yu; Ding Ze-Jun

    2007-01-01

    The exchange bias of bilayer magnetic films consisting of ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) layers in an uncompensated case is studied by use of the many-body Green's function method of quantum statistical theory.The effects of the layer thickness and temperature and the interfacial coupling strength on the exchange bias HE are investigated. The dependence of the exchange bias HE on the FM layer thickness and temperature is qualitatively in agreement with experimental results. When temperature varies, both the coercivity HC and HE decrease with the temperature increasing. For each FM thickness, there exists a least AFM thickness in which the exchange bias occurs,which is called pinning thickness.

  6. Volunteer bias in recruitment, retention, and blood sample donation in a randomised controlled trial involving mothers and their children at six months and two years: a longitudinal analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Jordan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The vulnerability of clinical trials to volunteer bias is under-reported. Volunteer bias is systematic error due to differences between those who choose to participate in studies and those who do not. METHODS AND RESULTS: This paper extends the applications of the concept of volunteer bias by using data from a trial of probiotic supplementation for childhood atopy in healthy dyads to explore 1 differences between a trial participants and aggregated data from publicly available databases b participants and non-participants as the trial progressed 2 impact on trial findings of weighting data according to deprivation (Townsend fifths in the sample and target populations. 1 a Recruits (n = 454 were less deprived than the target population, matched for area of residence and delivery dates (n = 6,893 (mean [SD] deprivation scores 0.09[4.21] and 0.79[4.08], t = 3.44, df = 511, p<0.001. b i As the trial progressed, representation of the most deprived decreased. These participants and smokers were less likely to be retained at 6 months (n = 430[95%] (OR 0.29,0.13-0.67 and 0.20,0.09-0.46, and 2 years (n = 380[84%] (aOR 0.68,0.50-0.93 and 0.55,0.28-1.09, and consent to infant blood sample donation (n = 220[48%] (aOR 0.72,0.57-0.92 and 0.43,0.22-0.83. ii Mothers interested in probiotics or research or reporting infants' adverse events or rashes were more likely to attend research clinics and consent to skin-prick testing. Mothers participating to help children were more likely to consent to infant blood sample donation. 2 In one trial outcome, atopic eczema, the intervention had a positive effect only in the over-represented, least deprived group. Here, data weighting attenuated risk reduction from 6.9%(0.9-13.1% to 4.6%(-1.4-+10.5%, and OR from 0.40(0.18-0.91 to 0.56(0.26-1.21. Other findings were unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: Potential for volunteer bias intensified during the trial, due to non-participation of the most

  7. Analysis of OTR Codon Bias and Cluster in 13 Mammal Species%13种哺乳动物OTR密码子使用偏性及其聚类分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张之一; 陈蕾; 薛慧良; 徐金会; 徐来祥

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the codon bias of oxytocin receptor (OTR) gene in 13 mammal species, to explore its impacting factors and the phylogenetic relationships by clustering the codon bias. Methods Bias indexes of RSCU, CBI and ENC were calculated and the relevant analysis of several potential impacting factors was performed. SPASS 15.0 software was used for the clustering analysis of the codon bias, in which the relative synonymous eodon usage was taken as the variable. Results and Conclusion 1 ) CUG, GUG, GCC, UUC, AUC, CGC were found to be the frequently used codon;2)The number of GC located on the third of codon is the main factor that affects the eodon bias of OTR gene in mammalians, the number of GC in genes is the secondary factor, and aromatic amino acid content and hydrophobic protein level have little effect on the codon bias;3 ) For the genes with the same functions, the codon bias indexes are similar among species with close genetic relationship except for some special species.%目的研究13种哺乳动物催产素受体基因(OTR)密码子使用偏性,并探讨其影响因素;通过对偏性情况进行聚类分析,研究其与系统发育的关系.方法计算RSCU,CBI,ENC等密码子偏性指标,与可能的几种影响因素做相关性分析,采用SPASS15.0软件,以相对同义密码子使用度为变量对偏性情况进行聚类分析.结果与结论1)CUG,GUG,GCC,UUC,AUC,CGC为哺乳动物OTR使用频率较高的密码子;2)密码子第3位碱基的GC含量是影响哺乳动物OTR密码子偏性的主要因素,基因的GC含量次之,而芳香族氨基酸的含量和蛋白疏水水平对其密码子使用偏性的影响不大;3)对于功能相同的基因,亲缘关系相近的物种密码子使用偏性指标较接近,但某些物种仍有一定差异.

  8. Analysis of bias in measurements of potassium, sodium and hemoglobin by an emergency department-based blood gas analyzer relative to hospital laboratory autoanalyzer results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Bo Zhang

    Full Text Available The emergency departments (EDs of Chinese hospitals are gradually being equipped with blood gas machines. These machines, along with the measurement of biochemical markers by the hospital laboratory, facilitate the care of patients with severe conditions who present to the ED. However, discrepancies have been noted between the Arterial Blood Gas (ABG analyzers in the ED and the hospital laboratory autoanalyzer in relation to electrolyte and hemoglobin measurements. The present study was performed to determine whether the ABG and laboratory measurements of potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels are equivalent, and whether ABG analyzer results can be used to guide clinical care before the laboratory results become available.Study power analyses revealed that 200 consecutive patients who presented to our ED would allow this prospective single-center cohort study to detect significant differences between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels. Paired arterial and venous blood samples were collected within 30 minutes. Arterial blood samples were measured in the ED by an ABL 90 FLEX blood gas analyzer. The biochemistry and blood cell counts of the venous samples were measured in the hospital laboratory. The potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin concentrations obtained by both methods were compared by using paired Student's t-test, Spearman's correlation, Bland-Altman plots, and Deming regression.The mean ABG and laboratory potassium values were 3.77±0.44 and 4.2±0.55, respectively (P<0.0001. The mean ABG and laboratory sodium values were 137.89±5.44 and 140.93±5.50, respectively (P<0.0001. The mean ABG and laboratory Hemoglobin values were 12.28±2.62 and 12.35±2.60, respectively (P = 0.24.Although there are the statistical difference and acceptable biases between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium and sodium, the biases do not exceed USCLIA-determined limits. In parallel, there are no statistical differences and

  9. An analysis of the uncertainty and bias in DCE-MRI measurements using the spoiled gradient-recalled echo pulse sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subashi, Ergys [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Choudhury, Kingshuk R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Johnson, G. Allan, E-mail: gjohnson@duke.edu [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI have been used in more than 100 phase I trials and investigator led studies. A comparison of the absolute values of these quantities requires an estimation of their respective probability distribution function (PDF). The statistical variation of the DCE-MRI measurement is analyzed by considering the fundamental sources of error in the MR signal intensity acquired with the spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) pulse sequence. Methods: The variance in the SPGR signal intensity arises from quadrature detection and excitation flip angle inconsistency. The noise power was measured in 11 phantoms of contrast agent concentration in the range [0–1] mM (in steps of 0.1 mM) and in onein vivo acquisition of a tumor-bearing mouse. The distribution of the flip angle was determined in a uniform 10 mM CuSO{sub 4} phantom using the spin echo double angle method. The PDF of a wide range of T1 values measured with the varying flip angle (VFA) technique was estimated through numerical simulations of the SPGR equation. The resultant uncertainty in contrast agent concentration was incorporated in the most common model of tracer exchange kinetics and the PDF of the derived pharmacokinetic parameters was studied numerically. Results: The VFA method is an unbiased technique for measuringT1 only in the absence of bias in excitation flip angle. The time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent measured in vivo is within the theoretically predicted uncertainty. The uncertainty in measuring K{sup trans} with SPGR pulse sequences is of the same order, but always higher than, the uncertainty in measuring the pre-injection longitudinal relaxation time (T1{sub 0}). The lowest achievable bias/uncertainty in estimating this parameter is approximately 20%–70% higher than the bias/uncertainty in the measurement of the pre-injection T1 map. The fractional volume parameters derived from the extended Tofts model

  10. Analysis of bias in measurements of potassium, sodium and hemoglobin by an emergency department-based blood gas analyzer relative to hospital laboratory autoanalyzer results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian Bo; Lin, Ji; Zhao, Xiao Dong

    2015-01-01

    The emergency departments (EDs) of Chinese hospitals are gradually being equipped with blood gas machines. These machines, along with the measurement of biochemical markers by the hospital laboratory, facilitate the care of patients with severe conditions who present to the ED. However, discrepancies have been noted between the Arterial Blood Gas (ABG) analyzers in the ED and the hospital laboratory autoanalyzer in relation to electrolyte and hemoglobin measurements. The present study was performed to determine whether the ABG and laboratory measurements of potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels are equivalent, and whether ABG analyzer results can be used to guide clinical care before the laboratory results become available. Study power analyses revealed that 200 consecutive patients who presented to our ED would allow this prospective single-center cohort study to detect significant differences between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels. Paired arterial and venous blood samples were collected within 30 minutes. Arterial blood samples were measured in the ED by an ABL 90 FLEX blood gas analyzer. The biochemistry and blood cell counts of the venous samples were measured in the hospital laboratory. The potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin concentrations obtained by both methods were compared by using paired Student's t-test, Spearman's correlation, Bland-Altman plots, and Deming regression. The mean ABG and laboratory potassium values were 3.77±0.44 and 4.2±0.55, respectively (P<0.0001). The mean ABG and laboratory sodium values were 137.89±5.44 and 140.93±5.50, respectively (P<0.0001). The mean ABG and laboratory Hemoglobin values were 12.28±2.62 and 12.35±2.60, respectively (P = 0.24). Although there are the statistical difference and acceptable biases between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium and sodium, the biases do not exceed USCLIA-determined limits. In parallel, there are no statistical differences and biases

  11. Application and investigation of a bound for outcome reporting bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamble Carrol

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct empirical evidence for the existence of outcome reporting bias is accumulating and this source of bias is recognised as a potential threat to the validity of meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials. Methods A method for calculating the maximum bias in a meta-analysis due to publication bias is adapted for the setting where within-study selective non-reporting of outcomes is suspected, and compared to the alternative approach of missing data imputation. The properties of both methods are investigated in realistic small sample situations. Results The results suggest that the adapted Copas and Jackson approach is the preferred method for reviewers to apply as an initial assessment of robustness to within-study selective non-reporting. Conclusion The Copas and Jackson approach is a useful method for systematic reviewers to apply to assess robustness to outcome reporting bias.

  12. Context effects and observer bias--implications for forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Mark; Taylor, Jane; Blenkin, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Psychologists have long recognized the effects of contextual and extraneous information on decision making. Such information renders the subject susceptible to both motivational and cognitive bias; yet, it is difficult to assess the extent to which these influence forensic odontologists opinions as there have been no studies to date on this subject. This article explores the various types of contextual effects and biasing influences that potentially impact on the analysis of bitemarks in forensic odontology. It appears that the current practice of bitemark analysis is rich in sources of potentially biasing influences. In addition to the fundamental recognition that some form of bias is likely to exist, ways in which these should be minimized include: separation of the collection and analysis phases; limiting the amount of contextual information available to the odontologist responsible for the analysis; and ensuring that evidence that is ambiguous or of poor quality is identified as such prior to analysis.

  13. The Princess and the Poor Self-Image: An Analysis of Newbery Medal Winners for Gender Bias and Female Underrepresentation Leading into the Twenty-First Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A. McCleary

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes how 12 recent (2000-2011 Newbery Medal-winning books represent gender. The study counts how many of the books’ characters represent progressive or traditional gender roles, how many male and female characters represent each character category (protagonist, antagonist, major, and minor, how many strong female characters are accepted or rejected by their peers, how many characters hold stereotypical gender beliefs about themselves or their peers, and how many works contain balanced feminist perspectives. The study finds equitable female representation, but the study also finds a bias toward traditional male stereotypes. The results indicate a general acceptance of strong female characters and a balanced representation of females, regardless of a historical fiction classification. These results suggest that characters in Newbery Medal-winning books represent gender more equally and less stereotypically compared to characters in works of earlier decades.

  14. Publication bias and the failure of replication in experimental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Gregory

    2012-12-01

    Replication of empirical findings plays a fundamental role in science. Among experimental psychologists, successful replication enhances belief in a finding, while a failure to replicate is often interpreted to mean that one of the experiments is flawed. This view is wrong. Because experimental psychology uses statistics, empirical findings should appear with predictable probabilities. In a misguided effort to demonstrate successful replication of empirical findings and avoid failures to replicate, experimental psychologists sometimes report too many positive results. Rather than strengthen confidence in an effect, too much successful replication actually indicates publication bias, which invalidates entire sets of experimental findings. Researchers cannot judge the validity of a set of biased experiments because the experiment set may consist entirely of type I errors. This article shows how an investigation of the effect sizes from reported experiments can test for publication bias by looking for too much successful replication. Simulated experiments demonstrate that the publication bias test is able to discriminate biased experiment sets from unbiased experiment sets, but it is conservative about reporting bias. The test is then applied to several studies of prominent phenomena that highlight how publication bias contaminates some findings in experimental psychology. Additional simulated experiments demonstrate that using Bayesian methods of data analysis can reduce (and in some cases, eliminate) the occurrence of publication bias. Such methods should be part of a systematic process to remove publication bias from experimental psychology and reinstate the important role of replication as a final arbiter of scientific findings.

  15. Bias in clinical intervention research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2006-01-01

    Research on bias in clinical trials may help identify some of the reasons why investigators sometimes reach the wrong conclusions about intervention effects. Several quality components for the assessment of bias control have been suggested, but although they seem intrinsically valid, empirical...

  16. Bias in the Mass Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirino, Robert

    Non-language elements of bias in mass media--such as images, sounds, tones of voices, inflection, and facial expressions--are invariably integrated with the choice of language. Further, they have an emotional impact that is often greater than that of language. It is essential that the teacher of English deal with this non-language bias since it is…

  17. Pooled patient-level meta-analysis of children and adults completing a computer-based anxiety intervention targeting attentional bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Rebecca B; Wallace, Meredith; Kuckertz, Jennie M; Amir, Nader; Graur, Simona; Cummings, Logan; Popa, Paul; Carlbring, Per; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2016-12-01

    Computer-based approaches, such as Attention Bias Modification (ABM), could help improve access to care for anxiety. Study-level meta-analyses of ABM have produced conflicting findings and leave critical questions unresolved regarding ABM's mechanisms of action and clinical potential. We pooled patient-level datasets from randomized controlled trials of children and adults with high-anxiety. Attentional bias (AB) towards threat, the target mechanism of ABM, was tested as an outcome and a mechanistic mediator and moderator of anxiety reduction. Diagnostic remission and Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) were clinical outcomes available in enough studies to enable pooling. Per-patient data were obtained on at least one outcome from 13/16 eligible studies [86% of eligible participants; n=778]. Significant main effects of ABM on diagnostic remission (ABM-22.6%, control-10.8%; OR=2.57; p=0.006) and AB (β* (95%CI)=-0.63 (-0.83, -0.42); p<0.00005) were observed. There was no main effect of ABM on LSAS. However, moderator analyses suggested ABM was effective for patients who were younger (≤37y), trained in the lab, and/or assessed by clinicians. Under the same conditions where ABM was effective, mechanistic links between AB and anxiety reduction were supported. Under these specific circumstances, ABM reduces anxiety and acts through its target mechanism, supporting ABM's theoretical basis while simultaneously suggesting clinical indications and refinements to improve its currently limited clinical potential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Large-Scale Galaxy Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Desjacques, Vincent; Schmidt, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive overview of galaxy bias, that is, the statistical relation between the distribution of galaxies and matter. We focus on large scales where cosmic density fields are quasi-linear. On these scales, the clustering of galaxies can be described by a perturbative bias expansion, and the complicated physics of galaxy formation is absorbed by a finite set of coefficients of the expansion, called bias parameters. The review begins with a pedagogical proof of this very important result, which forms the basis of the rigorous perturbative description of galaxy clustering, under the assumptions of General Relativity and Gaussian, adiabatic initial conditions. Key components of the bias expansion are all leading local gravitational observables, which includes the matter density but also tidal fields and their time derivatives. We hence expand the definition of local bias to encompass all these contributions. This derivation is followed by a presentation of the peak-background split in i...

  19. Publication bias in epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Nazish

    2011-06-01

    Communication of research findings is the utmost responsibility of all scientists. Publication bias occurs if scientific studies with negative or null results fail to get published. This can happen due to bias in submitting, reviewing, accepting, publishing or aggregating scientific literature that fails to show positive results on a particular topic. Publication bias can make scientific literature unrepresentative of the actual research studies. This can give the reader a false impression about the beneficial effects of a particular treatment or intervention and can influence clinical decision making. Publication bias is more common than it is actually considered to be, but there are ways to detect and prevent it. This paper comments on the occurrence, types and consequences of publication bias and the strategies employed to detect and control it.

  20. The potential for social contextual and group biases in team decision-making: biases, conditions and psychological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P E; Roelofsma, P H

    2000-08-01

    This paper provides a critical review of social contextual and group biases that are relevant to team decision-making in command and control situations. Motivated by the insufficient level of attention this area has received, the purpose of the paper is to provide an insight into the potential that these types of biases have to affect the decision-making of such teams. The biases considered are: false consensus, groupthink, group polarization and group escalation of commitment. For each bias the following four questions are addressed. What is the descriptive nature of the bias? What factors induce the bias? What psychological mechanisms underlie the bias? What is the relevance of the bias to command and control teams? The analysis suggests that these biases have a strong potential to affect team decisions. Consistent with the nature of team decision-making in command and control situations, all of the biases considered tend to be associated with those decisions that are important or novel and are promoted by time pressure and high levels of uncertainty. A concept unifying these biases is that of the shared mental model, but whereas false consensus emanates from social projection tendencies, the rest emanate from social influence factors. The authors also discuss the 'tricky' distinction between teams and groups and propose a revised definition for command and control team. Finally, the authors emphasize the need for future empirical research in this area to pay additional attention to the social side of cognition and the potential that social biases have to affect team decision-making.

  1. Challenges of guarantee-time bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Gelber, Richard D; Regan, Meredith M

    2013-08-10

    The potential for guarantee-time bias (GTB), also known as immortal time bias, exists whenever an analysis that is timed from enrollment or random assignment, such as disease-free or overall survival, is compared across groups defined by a classifying event occurring sometime during follow-up. The types of events associated with GTB are varied and may include the occurrence of objective disease response, onset of toxicity, or seroconversion. However, comparative analyses using these types of events as predictors are different from analyses using baseline characteristics that are specified completely before the occurrence of any outcome event. Recognizing the potential for GTB is not always straightforward, and it can be challenging to know when GTB is influencing the results of an analysis. This article defines GTB, provides examples of GTB from several published articles, and discusses three analytic techniques that can be used to remove the bias: conditional landmark analysis, extended Cox model, and inverse probability weighting. The strengths and limitations of each technique are presented. As an example, we explore the effect of bisphosphonate use on disease-free survival (DFS) using data from the BIG (Breast International Group) 1-98 randomized clinical trial. An analysis using a naive approach showed substantial benefit for patients who received bisphosphonate therapy. In contrast, analyses using the three methods known to remove GTB showed no statistical evidence of a reduction in risk of a DFS event with bisphosphonate therapy.

  2. Racial bias shapes social reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Björn; Selbing, Ida; Molapour, Tanaz; Olsson, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Both emotional facial expressions and markers of racial-group belonging are ubiquitous signals in social interaction, but little is known about how these signals together affect future behavior through learning. To address this issue, we investigated how emotional (threatening or friendly) in-group and out-group faces reinforced behavior in a reinforcement-learning task. We asked whether reinforcement learning would be modulated by intergroup attitudes (i.e., racial bias). The results showed that individual differences in racial bias critically modulated reinforcement learning. As predicted, racial bias was associated with more efficiently learned avoidance of threatening out-group individuals. We used computational modeling analysis to quantitatively delimit the underlying processes affected by social reinforcement. These analyses showed that racial bias modulates the rate at which exposure to threatening out-group individuals is transformed into future avoidance behavior. In concert, these results shed new light on the learning processes underlying social interaction with racial-in-group and out-group individuals.

  3. Implications of CO Bias for Ozone and Methane Lifetime in a CCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strode, Sarah; Duncan, Bryan Neal; Yegorova, Elena; Douglass, Anne

    2013-01-01

    A low bias in carbon monoxide compared to observations at high latitudes is a common feature of chemistry climate models. CO bias can both indicate and contribute to a bias in modeled OH and methane lifetime. This study examines possible causes of CO bias in the ACCMIP simulation of the GEOSCCM, and considers how attributing the CO bias to uncertainty in CO emissions versus biases in other constituents impacts the relationship between CO bias and methane lifetime. We use a simplified model of CO tagged by source with specified OH to quantify the sensitivity of the CO bias to changes in CO emissions or OH concentration, comparing the modeled CO to surface and MOPITT observations. The simplified model shows that decreasing OH in the northern hemisphere removes most of the global mean and inter-hemispheric bias in surface CO. We then use results from this analysis to explore how adjusting CO sources in the CCM impacts the concentrations of ozone, OH and methane. The CCM simulation also exhibits biases in ozone and water vapor compared to observations. We use a parameterized CO-OH-CH4 model that takes ozone and water vapor as inputs to the parameterization to examine whether correcting water and ozone biases can alter OH enough to remove the CO bias. Through this analysis, we aim to better quantify the relationship between CO bias and model biases in ozone concentrations and methane lifetime.

  4. Mechanisms and direction of allocation bias in randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Müller, Asger Sand; Laursen, David R. T.; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2016-01-01

    clinical trials. METHODS: Two systematic reviews and a theoretical analysis. We conducted one systematic review of empirical studies of motives/methods for deciphering patient allocation sequences; and another review of methods publications commenting on allocation bias. We theoretically analysed...

  5. Sex bias in psychoactive drug advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E

    1980-05-01

    A recent concern has been the possible effect of sex-role stereotypes upon physicians' prescription patterns. In an attempt to examine the part played by drug advertisements, this paper will present a content analysis of psychoactive (mood-modifying) drug ads appearing in the American Journal of Psychiatry over a 17-year period; and a study of subjects' perceptions of the patients depicted in these drug ads across eight dimensions emerging from the content analysis. An initial perusal of psychoactive drug ads in professional medical journals suggested the existence of a sex bias: Females appeared to be presented as patients more often than males, and in a much more demeaning manner. The present analyses were done in an attempt to discover if a sex bias does exist in drug advertisements, which may influence the physician's perception of his or her patients, and subsequently, his or her prescription patterns.

  6. Administrative bias in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Nwauche

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the interpretation of section 6(2(aii of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act which makes an administrator “biased or reasonably suspected of bias” a ground of judicial review. In this regard, the paper reviews the determination of administrative bias in South Africa especially highlighting the concept of institutional bias. The paper notes that inspite of the formulation of the bias ground of review the test for administrative bias is the reasonable apprehension test laid down in the case of President of South Africa v South African Rugby Football Union(2 which on close examination is not the same thing. Accordingly the paper urges an alternative interpretation that is based on the reasonable suspicion test enunciated in BTR Industries South Africa (Pty Ltd v Metal and Allied Workers Union and R v Roberts. Within this context, the paper constructs a model for interpreting the bias ground of review that combines the reasonable suspicion test as interpreted in BTR Industries and R v Roberts, the possibility of the waiver of administrative bias, the curative mechanism of administrative appeal as well as some level of judicial review exemplified by the jurisprudence of article 6(1 of the European Convention of Human Rights, especially in the light of the contemplation of the South African Magistrate Court as a jurisdictional route of judicial review.

  7. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  8. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  9. Publication bias in dermatology systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atakpo, Paul; Vassar, Matt

    2016-05-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses in dermatology provide high-level evidence for clinicians and policy makers that influence clinical decision making and treatment guidelines. One methodological problem with systematic reviews is the under representation of unpublished studies. This problem is due in part to publication bias. Omission of statistically non-significant data from meta-analyses may result in overestimation of treatment effect sizes which may lead to clinical consequences. Our goal was to assess whether systematic reviewers in dermatology evaluate and report publication bias. Further, we wanted to conduct our own evaluation of publication bias on meta-analyses that failed to do so. Our study considered systematic reviews and meta-analyses from ten dermatology journals from 2006 to 2016. A PubMed search was conducted, and all full-text articles that met our inclusion criteria were retrieved and coded by the primary author. 293 articles were included in our analysis. Additionally, we formally evaluated publication bias in meta-analyses that failed to do so using trim and fill and cumulative meta-analysis by precision methods. Publication bias was mentioned in 107 articles (36.5%) and was formally evaluated in 64 articles (21.8%). Visual inspection of a funnel plot was the most common method of evaluating publication bias. Publication bias was present in 45 articles (15.3%), not present in 57 articles (19.5%) and not determined in 191 articles (65.2%). Using the trim and fill method, 7 meta-analyses (33.33%) showed evidence of publication bias. Although the trim and fill method only found evidence of publication bias in 7 meta-analyses, the cumulative meta-analysis by precision method found evidence of publication bias in 15 meta-analyses (71.4%). Many of the reviews in our study did not mention or evaluate publication bias. Further, of the 42 articles that stated following PRISMA reporting guidelines, 19 (45.2%) evaluated for publication bias. In

  10. Biases from neutrino bias: to worry or not to worry?

    OpenAIRE

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Verde, Licia; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The relation between the halo field and the matter fluctuations (halo bias), in the presence of massive neutrinos depends on the total neutrino mass, massive neutrinos introduce an additional scale-dependence of the bias which is usually neglected in cosmological analyses. We investigate the magnitude of the systematic effect on interesting cosmological parameters induced by neglecting this scale dependence, finding that while it is not a problem for current surveys, it is non-negligible for ...

  11. Excess success for three related papers on racial bias

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Three related articles reported that racial bias altered perceptual experience and influenced decision-making. These findings have been applied to training programs for law enforcement, and elsewhere, to mitigate racial bias. However, a statistical analysis of each of the three articles finds that the reported experimental results should be rare, even if the theoretical ideas were correct. The analysis estimates that the probability of the reported experimental success for the articles is 0.0...

  12. Modulating the field-effect passivation at the SiO2/c-Si interface: Analysis and verification of the photoluminescence imaging under applied bias method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Halvard; Olibet, Sara; Nordseth, Ørnulf; Stensrud Marstein, Erik

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we study the surface passivation properties of thermally oxidized silicon wafers with controlled surface band bending, using a recently developed characterization technique combining calibrated photoluminescence imaging with the application of an external voltage over the rear side passivation layer. Various aspects of the technique and possible errors in the determination of the effective surface recombination velocity are discussed, including lateral carrier diffusion, leakage currents, and optical effects related to the presence of metal electrodes on the investigated samples. In order to quantitatively describe the recombination activity at the SiO2/c-Si interface and the effect of fixed charges in the oxide layer, the measured effective carrier lifetime vs. voltage curves have been analyzed in the framework of an extended Shockley-Read Hall recombination model. Furthermore, the results have been compared with corresponding results from microwave detected photoconductance decay measurements after depositing corona charges. We find an excellent agreement between the two techniques and between complementary measurements of the oxide charge density. Photoluminescence imaging under applied bias gives fast and repeatable measurements and allows for simultaneous data collection from multiple areas on the sample, and has thus been proven to be powerful tool for quantitative characterization of surface passivation layers.

  13. Analysis of Impact of Transformer DC Bias Harmonic on Shunt Capacitors%变压器直流偏磁谐波对并联电容器的影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘同同; 刘连光

    2012-01-01

    基于变压器直流偏磁下的谐波特性,采用等值电路法分析了并联电容器支路对直流偏磁下谐波的谐振机理.对惠州电网某变电站500kV变压器低压侧电容器组损坏事件进行了分析,通过对直流偏磁下低压侧各奇次和偶次谐波阻抗的计算,得出了在现有电容器支路参数下可能发生4次谐波放大现象的结论.通过将第2组和第3组电容器电抗率提高到12%,并进一步对低压侧各次谐波阻抗进行计算分析,结果证明增大串联电抗器电抗率的方法能够很好地抑制4次谐波放大,从而为变电站并联电容器组在直流偏磁谐波下的参数选择和安全运行提供参考.%The resonance mechanism of harmonics of transformer DC bias caused by shunt capacitor bank is analyzed by the method of equivalent circuit based on the characteristics of harmonics of transformer DC bias. The analysis of capacitor bank failure incidents for 500kV transfromer in Huizhou power Grid shows that the fourth harmonic can be enlarged on the condition of existing parameters of capacitor branch through the calculation of odd and even harmonic impedance in low voltage side under transformer DC bias. The harmonic impedances in low voltage side are calculated again when the reactance ratio of capacitors in Group 2 and 3 is increased to 12%. The results demonstrate that the fourth harmonic enlargement can be well restrained by increasing reactance ratio of series reactor, which provides references for parameter selection and secure operation of shunt capacitor bank in substation under harmonics of transformer DC bias.

  14. Bias correction for magnetic resonance images via joint entropy regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Xia, Yong; Dong, Pei; Luo, Jianhua; Huang, Qiu; Feng, Dagan; Li, Yuanxiang

    2014-01-01

    Due to the imperfections of the radio frequency (RF) coil or object-dependent electrodynamic interactions, magnetic resonance (MR) images often suffer from a smooth and biologically meaningless bias field, which causes severe troubles for subsequent processing and quantitative analysis. To effectively restore the original signal, this paper simultaneously exploits the spatial and gradient features of the corrupted MR images for bias correction via the joint entropy regularization. With both isotropic and anisotropic total variation (TV) considered, two nonparametric bias correction algorithms have been proposed, namely IsoTVBiasC and AniTVBiasC. These two methods have been applied to simulated images under various noise levels and bias field corruption and also tested on real MR data. The test results show that the proposed two methods can effectively remove the bias field and also present comparable performance compared to the state-of-the-art methods.

  15. Heterogeneous individuals' behavioral biases model and numerical simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Da-yong; LIANG Guo-wei

    2010-01-01

    A model of the relationships between individual cognitive biases and individual decision-making based on the analysis of cognitive biases of bonded rationality individual,has been established in this paper by introducing a set of new variables callod overconfidence coefficient and attribution bias coefficient to the sentiment model.The irrational expectation and irrational risk aversion as two inseparable aspects of bonded rationality are expressed in an unified model,and a method of measuring individual cognitive biases is proposed,which overcomes the shortcomings of traditional normative models that can not describe the differences of behaviors among heterogeneous individuals.As a result,numerical simulations show that individual cognitive risk is a positive interaction with overconfidence coefficient,and a negative interaction with attribution bias coefficient.

  16. No bias of ignored bilaterality when analysing the revision risk of knee prostheses: Analysis of a population based sample of 44,590 patients with 55,298 knee prostheses from the national Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranstam Jonas

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current practice of the Swedish Knee Register is not to take into consideration if one or both knees in a patient are subject to surgery when evaluating risk of revision after arthroplasty. Risk calculations are typically done by statistical methods, such as Kaplan-Meier analyses and Cox's proportional hazards models, that are based on the assumption that observed events are independent, and this is rarely appreciated. The purpose of this study was to investigate if ignoring bilateral operations when using these methods biases the results. Methods The bias of not taking bilateral operations into account was investigated by statistically analysing 55 298 prostheses in 44 590 patients, undergoing knee arthroplasty surgery in Sweden during 1985–1999, using traditional proportional hazards analysis, which assumes that all observations are independent, and a shared gamma frailty model, which allows patients to contribute repeated observations. Results The effect of neglecting bilateral prostheses is minute, possibly because bilateral prosthesis failure is a rare event. Conclusion We conclude that the revision risk of knee prostheses in general can be analysed without consideration for subject dependency, at least in study populations with a relatively low proportion of subjects having experienced bilateral revisions.

  17. 基于代表性偏差的行为投资组合模型及实证%Optimal portfolio choice model and empirical analysis based on representation bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐绪松; 宋奇; 马莉莉

    2012-01-01

    代表性偏差这一心理特征分为横向代表性偏差和纵向代表性偏差,将其分别引入投资组合模型,研究了它们对投资者投资组合决策的影响.提出了代表性收益概念,从期望效用最大化的原则出发,把投资者的效用表示为期末收益和超额代表性收益的函数,建立了基于纵向代表性偏差的最优投资组合模型(横向类似),实证分析表明这一模型能够得到投资组合的有效前沿.%As a mental characteristic, vertical representation bias is introduced to portfolio choice model, to research its influence to investors' portfolio decision. This paper proposes Representation Return concept, and gives an investors' utility function of two variables -final return and Excess Representation Return, from the principle of expected utility maximization. Then establishes optimal portfolio model based on vertical representation bias, and give an empirical analysis showing that the model can obtain efficient frontier of investment portfolio.

  18. Participation bias in postal surveys among older adults: the role played by self-reported health, physical functional decline and frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Philipe de Souto

    2012-01-01

    Postal survey is a simple and efficient way to collect information in large study samples. The purpose of this study was to find out differences between older adults who responded to a postal survey on health outcomes and those who did not, and to examine the importance of frailty, physical functional decline and poor self-reported health in determining non-response. We mailed out a questionnaire on general health twice at a year's interval to 1000 individuals ≥60 years, and members of the medical insurance scheme of the French national education system. At Year1, 535 persons responded to the questionnaire (65% women, 70.9 ± 8.4 years). A year later (Year2), we obtained 384 responses (63.3% women, 70.5 ± 7.8 years). Compared to respondents, non-respondents at Year2 were more frequently categorized as frail, reported more often to be in bad health, and had more physical functional declines. Frailty, physical functional decline and poor self-reported health increased the likelihood of not responding to Year2 questionnaire, with poor self-reported health weakening the association of physical functional decline and non-response. Respondents of this postal survey are fitter and healthier than non-respondents. This participation bias precludes the generalization of postal surveys results.

  19. Magnetic bearings with zero bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic bearing operating without a bias field has supported a shaft rotating at speeds up to 12,000 rpm with the usual four power supplies and with only two. A magnetic bearing is commonly operated with a bias current equal to half of the maximum current allowable in its coils. This linearizes the relation between net force and control current and improves the force slewing rate and hence the band width. The steady bias current dissipates power, even when no force is required from the bearing. The power wasted is equal to two-thirds of the power at maximum force output. Examined here is the zero bias idea. The advantages and disadvantages are noted.

  20. MLE's bias pathology motivates MCMLE

    OpenAIRE

    Yatracos, Yannis G.

    2013-01-01

    Maximum likelihood estimates are often biased. It is shown that this pathology is inherent to the traditional ML estimation method for two or more parameters, thus motivating from a different angle the use of MCMLE.

  1. Cognitive biases and language universals

    CERN Document Server

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Puglisi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Language universals have been longly attributed to an innate Universal Grammar. An alternative explanation states that linguistic universals emerged independently in every language in response to shared cognitive, though non language-specific, biases. A computational model has recently shown how this could be the case, focusing on the paradigmatic example of the universal properties of color naming patterns, and producing results in accurate agreement with the experimental data. Here we investigate thoroughly the role of a cognitive bias in the framework of this model. We study how, and to what extent, the structure of the bias can influence the corresponding linguistic universal patterns. We show also that the cultural history of a group of speakers introduces population-specific constraints that act against the uniforming pressure of the cognitive bias, and we clarify the interplay between these two forces. We believe that our simulations can help to shed light on the possible mechanisms at work in the evol...

  2. Preferences, country bias, and international trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Roy (Santanu); J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAnalyzes international trade where consumer preferences exhibit country bias. Why country biases arise; How trade can occur in the presence of country bias; Implication for the pattern of trade and specialization.

  3. Preferences, country bias, and international trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Roy (Santanu); J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAnalyzes international trade where consumer preferences exhibit country bias. Why country biases arise; How trade can occur in the presence of country bias; Implication for the pattern of trade and specialization.

  4. A Qualitative and Quantitative Comparative Analysis of Commercial and Independent Online Information for Hip Surgery: A Bias in Online Information Targeting Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martin J; Feeley, Iain H; O'Byrne, John M

    2016-10-01

    Direct to consumer (DTC) advertising, targeting the public over the physician, is an increasingly pervasive presence in medical clinics. It is trending toward a format of online interaction rather than that of traditional print and television advertising. We analyze patient-focused Web pages from the top 5 companies supplying prostheses for total hip arthroplasties, comparing them to the top 10 independent medical websites. Quantitative comparison is performed using the Journal of American Medical Association benchmark and DISCERN criteria, and for comparative readability, we use the Flesch-Kincaid grade level, the Flesch reading ease, and the Gunning fog index. Content is analyzed for information on type of surgery and surgical approach. There is a statistically significant difference between the independent and DTC websites in both the mean DISCERN score (independent 74.6, standard deviation [SD] = 4.77; DTC 32.2, SD = 10.28; P = .0022) and the mean Journal of American Medical Association score (Independent 3.45, SD = 0.49; DTC 1.9, SD = 0.74; P = .004). The difference between the readability scores is not statistically significantly. The commercial content is found to be heavily biased in favor of the direct anterior approach and minimally invasive surgical techniques. We demonstrate that the quality of information on commercial websites is inferior to that of the independent sites. The advocacy of surgical approaches by industry to the patient group is a concern. This study underlines the importance of future regulation of commercial patient education Web pages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of risk of bias in randomized clinical trials in surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurusamy, K S; Gluud, C; Nikolova, D;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) with low risk of bias is considered the highest level of evidence available for evaluating an intervention. Bias in RCTs may overestimate or underestimate the true effectiveness of an intervention. METHODS: The causes of bias...

  6. The North Atlantic Cold Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greatbatch, Richard; Drews, Annika; Ding, Hui; Latif, Mojib; Park, Wonsun

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic cold bias, associated with a too zonal path of the North Atlantic Current and a missing "northwest corner", is a common problem in coupled climate and forecast models. The bias affects the North Atlantic and European climate mean state, variability and predictability. We investigate the use of a flow field correction to adjust the path of the North Atlantic Current as well as additional corrections to the surface heat and freshwater fluxes. Results using the Kiel Climate Model show that the flow field correction allows a northward flow into the northwest corner, largely eliminating the bias below the surface layer. A surface cold bias remains but can be eliminated by additionally correcting the surface freshwater flux, without adjusting the surface heat flux seen by the ocean model. A model version in which only the surface fluxes of heat and freshwater are corrected continues to exhibit the incorrect path of the North Atlantic Current and a strong subsurface bias. Removing the bias impacts the multi-decadal time scale variability in the model and leads to a better representation of the SST pattern associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability than the uncorrected model.

  7. The estimation method of GPS instrumental biases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A model of estimating the global positioning system (GPS) instrumental biases and the methods to calculate the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver are presented. The calculated results of GPS instrumental biases, the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver, and total electron content (TEC) are also shown. Finally, the stability of GPS instrumental biases as well as that of satellite and receiver instrumental biases are evaluated, indicating that they are very stable during a period of two months and a half.

  8. Shear calibration biases in weak lensing surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Hirata, C M; Hirata, Christopher M.; Seljak, Uros

    2003-01-01

    We investigate biases induced by the conversion between the observed image shape to shear distortion in current weak lensing analysis methods. Such overall calibration biases cannot be detected by the standard tests such as E/B decomposition or calibration with stars. We find that the non-Gaussianity of point spread function has a significant effect and can lead to up to 15 per cent error on the linear amplitude of fluctuations sigma_8 depending on the method of analysis. This could explain some of the discrepancies seen in recent amplitude determinations from weak lensing. Using an elliptical Laguerre expansion method we develop a re-Gaussianization method which reduces the error to calibration error of order 1 per cent even for poorly resolved galaxies. We also discuss a new type of shear selection bias which results in up to roughly 8 percent underestimation of the signal. It is expected to scale with redshift, inducing errors in the growth factor extraction if not properly corrected for. Understanding and...

  9. Reducing bias in survival under non-random temporary emigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaloza, Claudia L.; Kendall, William L.; Langtimm, Catherine Ann

    2014-01-01

    Despite intensive monitoring, temporary emigration from the sampling area can induce bias severe enough for managers to discard life-history parameter estimates toward the terminus of the times series (terminal bias). Under random temporary emigration unbiased parameters can be estimated with CJS models. However, unmodeled Markovian temporary emigration causes bias in parameter estimates and an unobservable state is required to model this type of emigration. The robust design is most flexible when modeling temporary emigration, and partial solutions to mitigate bias have been identified, nonetheless there are conditions were terminal bias prevails. Long-lived species with high adult survival and highly variable non-random temporary emigration present terminal bias in survival estimates, despite being modeled with the robust design and suggested constraints. Because this bias is due to uncertainty about the fate of individuals that are undetected toward the end of the time series, solutions should involve using additional information on survival status or location of these individuals at that time. Using simulation, we evaluated the performance of models that jointly analyze robust design data and an additional source of ancillary data (predictive covariate on temporary emigration, telemetry, dead recovery, or auxiliary resightings) in reducing terminal bias in survival estimates. The auxiliary resighting and predictive covariate models reduced terminal bias the most. Additional telemetry data was effective at reducing terminal bias only when individuals were tracked for a minimum of two years. High adult survival of long-lived species made the joint model with recovery data ineffective at reducing terminal bias because of small-sample bias. The naïve constraint model (last and penultimate temporary emigration parameters made equal), was the least efficient, though still able to reduce terminal bias when compared to an unconstrained model. Joint analysis of several

  10. Abundance of female-biased and paucity of male-biased somatically expressed genes on the mouse X-chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinius, Björn; Johansson, Martin M; Radomska, Katarzyna J; Morrow, Edward H; Pandey, Gaurav K; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar; Sandberg, Rickard; Williams, Robert W; Jazin, Elena

    2012-11-10

    Empirical evaluations of sexually dimorphic expression of genes on the mammalian X-chromosome are needed to understand the evolutionary forces and the gene-regulatory mechanisms controlling this chromosome. We performed a large-scale sex-bias expression analysis of genes on the X-chromosome in six different somatic tissues from mouse. Our results show that the mouse X-chromosome is enriched with female-biased genes and depleted of male-biased genes. This suggests that feminisation as well as de-masculinisation of the X-chromosome has occurred in terms of gene expression in non-reproductive tissues. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the control of female-biased expression on chromosome X, and escape from X-inactivation is a main candidate. We confirmed escape in case of Tmem29 using RNA-FISH analysis. In addition, we identified novel female-biased non-coding transcripts located in the same female-biased cluster as the well-known coding X-inactivation escapee Kdm5c, likely transcribed from the transition-region between active and silenced domains. We also found that previously known escapees only partially explained the overrepresentation of female-biased X-genes, particularly for tissue-specific female-biased genes. Therefore, the gene set we have identified contains tissue-specific escapees and/or genes controlled by other sexually skewed regulatory mechanisms. Analysis of gene age showed that evolutionarily old X-genes (>100 myr, preceding the radiation of placental mammals) are more frequently female-biased than younger genes. Altogether, our results have implications for understanding both gene regulation and gene evolution of mammalian X-chromosomes, and suggest that the final result in terms of the X-gene composition (masculinisation versus feminisation) is a compromise between different evolutionary forces acting on reproductive and somatic tissues.

  11. Tratamiento estadístico de la falta de respuesta en estudios epidemiológicos transversales Statistical processing of non-response in transversal epidemiological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Carracedo-Martínez

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available En los estudios epidemiológicos, la falta de respuestas constituye una gran limitación por la pérdida de validez y el poder estadístico que implica, sea que se produzca en forma de participación parcial (el sujeto deja alguna pregunta sin contestar o como ausencia de participación (el individuo no contesta ninguna pregunta. En este trabajo se realiza una revisión de la bibliografía científica sobre los distintos métodos para realizar un tratamiento estadístico de los datos cuando no se obtienen respuestas; la finalidad es contrarrestar las limitaciones de la información, siempre en el caso de estudios epidemiológicos no longitudinales. La mayor parte de los métodos estadísticos se centra en el tratamiento de la participación parcial (datos faltantes y puede clasificarse en dos grandes grupos: de asignación y de datos completos. La elección correcta del método para un estudio requiere un análisis previo de la matriz de los datos, en relación con el mecanismo de generación de datos faltantes y el porcentaje del total de los datos que representa.In epidemiological surveys, non-response constitutes a great limitation due to the loss of validity and statistical power it represents, whether such a loss occurs due to partial participation (the individual fails to answer certain variables or due to total lack of participation (the individual does not answer any variable. This paper reviews the scientific literature on the different methods to process statistic data when non-response has occurred in non-longitudinal studies, so as to counteract their effect in such studies. Most statistical methods focus on dealing with partial participation (missing data. These methods, of which there is a great variety, can be classified into two large groups: imputation and complete data. For accurate selection of the study method, it is necessary to study the data matrix beforehand, observing the missing data generation mechanism, as well as the

  12. Obesity, the endocannabinoid system, and bias arising from pharmaceutical sponsorship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M McPartland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous research has shown that academic physicians conflicted by funding from the pharmaceutical industry have corrupted evidence based medicine and helped enlarge the market for drugs. Physicians made pharmaceutical-friendly statements, engaged in disease mongering, and signed biased review articles ghost-authored by corporate employees. This paper tested the hypothesis that bias affects review articles regarding rimonabant, an anti-obesity drug that blocks the central cannabinoid receptor. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A MEDLINE search was performed for rimonabant review articles, limited to articles authored by USA physicians who served as consultants for the company that manufactures rimonabant. Extracted articles were examined for industry-friendly bias, identified by three methods: analysis with a validated instrument for monitoring bias in continuing medical education (CME; analysis for bias defined as statements that ran contrary to external evidence; and a tally of misrepresentations about the endocannabinoid system. Eight review articles were identified, but only three disclosed authors' financial conflicts of interest, despite easily accessible information to the contrary. The Takhar CME bias instrument demonstrated statistically significant bias in all the review articles. Biased statements that were nearly identical reappeared in the articles, including disease mongering, exaggerating rimonabant's efficacy and safety, lack of criticisms regarding rimonabant clinical trials, and speculations about surrogate markers stated as facts. Distinctive and identical misrepresentations regarding the endocannabinoid system also reappeared in articles by different authors. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are characteristic of bias that arises from financial conflicts of interest, and suggestive of ghostwriting by a common author. Resolutions for this scenario are proposed.

  13. Multiple imputation of missing blood pressure covariates in survival analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buuren, S. van; Boshuizen, H.C.; Knook, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies a non-response problem in survival analysis where the occurrence of missing data in the risk factor is related to mortality. In a study to determine the influence of blood pressure on survival in the very old (85+ years), blood pressure measurements are missing in about 12.5 per c

  14. The optimal encodings for biased association in linear associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yee; Dong, Tian Xin; Xu, Zong Ben

    1998-07-01

    In this paper, optimal encoding schemes for linear associative memories are derived for biased association under both the white-noise and colored-noise situations. Analysis and simulation results all show that the biased encodings thus derived are optimal and superior to existing models in their performance. Together with the Wee-Kohonen unbiased encoding, the study settles the optimality issue of linear associative memories and enhances their practicalities.

  15. Indian Ocean SST Biases in a Flexible Regional Ocean Atmosphere Land System (FROALS) Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Zhen-Yu; ZHOU Tian-Jun; ZOU Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The authors examine the Indian Ocean sea surface temperature (SST) biases simulated by a Flexible Regional Ocean Atmosphere Land System (FROALS) model. The regional coupled model exhibits pronounced cold SST biases in a large portion of the Indian Ocean warm pool. Negative biases in the net surface heat fluxes are evident in the model, leading to the cold biases of the SST. Further analysis indicates that the negative biases in the net surface heat fluxes are mainly contributed by the biases of sensible heat and latent heat flux. Near-surface meteorological variables that could contribute to the SST biases are also examined. It is found that the biases of sensible heat and latent heat flux are caused by the colder and dryer near-surface air in the model.

  16. Gender bias in academic recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abramo, Giovanni; D’Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea; Rosati, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that women are underrepresented in the academic systems of many countries. Gender discrimination is one of the factors that could contribute to this phenomenon. This study considers a recent national academic recruitment campaign in Italy, examining whether women are subject...... to more or less bias than men. The findings show that no gender-related differences occur among the candidates who benefit from positive bias, while among those candidates affected by negative bias, the incidence of women is lower than that of men. Among the factors that determine success in a competition...... for an academic position, the number of the applicant’s career years in the same university as the committee members assumes greater weight for male candidates than for females. Being of the same gender as the committee president is also a factor that assumes greater weight for male applicants. On the other hand...

  17. Anchoring Bias in Online Voting

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Zimo; Zhou, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Voting online with explicit ratings could largely reflect people's preferences and objects' qualities, but ratings are always irrational, because they may be affected by many unpredictable factors like mood, weather, as well as other people's votes. By analyzing two real systems, this paper reveals a systematic bias embedding in the individual decision-making processes, namely people tend to give a low rating after a low rating, as well as a high rating following a high rating. This so-called \\emph{anchoring bias} is validated via extensive comparisons with null models, and numerically speaking, the extent of bias decays with interval voting number in a logarithmic form. Our findings could be applied in the design of recommender systems and considered as important complementary materials to previous knowledge about anchoring effects on financial trades, performance judgements, auctions, and so on.

  18. Reversed item bias: an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijters, Bert; Baumgartner, Hans; Schillewaert, Niels

    2013-09-01

    In the recent methodological literature, various models have been proposed to account for the phenomenon that reversed items (defined as items for which respondents' scores have to be recoded in order to make the direction of keying consistent across all items) tend to lead to problematic responses. In this article we propose an integrative conceptualization of three important sources of reversed item method bias (acquiescence, careless responding, and confirmation bias) and specify a multisample confirmatory factor analysis model with 2 method factors to empirically test the hypothesized mechanisms, using explicit measures of acquiescence and carelessness and experimentally manipulated versions of a questionnaire that varies 3 item arrangements and the keying direction of the first item measuring the focal construct. We explain the mechanisms, review prior attempts to model reversed item bias, present our new model, and apply it to responses to a 4-item self-esteem scale (N = 306) and the 6-item Revised Life Orientation Test (N = 595). Based on the literature review and the empirical results, we formulate recommendations on how to use reversed items in questionnaires.

  19. Regional Bias of Satellite Precipitation Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrick, T. M.; Georgakakos, K. P.; Spencer, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite-based estimates of precipitation have improved the spatial availability of precipitation data particularly for regions with limited gauge networks due to limited accessibility or infrastructure. Understanding the quality and reliability of satellite precipitation estimates is important, especially when the estimates are utilitized for real-time hydrologic forecasting and for fast-responding phenomena. In partnership with the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the U.S. Agency of International Development (USAID) and the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Hydrologic Research Center has begun implementation of real-time flash flood warning systems for diverse regions around the world. As part of this effort, bias characteristics of satellite precipitation have been examined in these various regions, such includes portions of Southeastern Asia, Southeastern Europe, the Middle East, Central America, and the southern half of the African continent. The work has focused on the Global Hydro-Estimator (GHE) precipitation product from NOAA/NESDIS. These real-time systems utilize the GHE given low latency times of this product. This presentation focuses on the characterization of precipitation bias as compared to in-situ gauge records, and the regional variations or similarities. Additional analysis is currently underway considering regional bias for other satellite precipitation products (e.g., CMORPH) for comparison with the GHE results.

  20. Generation of future potential scenarios in an Alpine Catchment by applying bias-correction techniques, delta-change approaches and stochastic Weather Generators at different spatial scale. Analysis of their influence on basic and drought statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collados-Lara, Antonio-Juan; Pulido-Velazquez, David; Pardo-Iguzquiza, Eulogio

    2017-04-01

    and drought statistic of the historical data. A multi-objective analysis using basic statistics (mean, standard deviation and asymmetry coefficient) and droughts statistics (duration, magnitude and intensity) has been performed to identify which models are better in terms of goodness of fit to reproduce the historical series. The drought statistics have been obtained from the Standard Precipitation index (SPI) series using the Theory of Runs. This analysis allows discriminate the best RCM and the best combination of model and correction technique in the bias-correction method. We have also analyzed the possibilities of using different Stochastic Weather Generators to approximate the basic and droughts statistics of the historical series. These analyses have been performed in our case study in a lumped and in a distributed way in order to assess its sensibility to the spatial scale. The statistic of the future temperature series obtained with different ensemble options are quite homogeneous, but the precipitation shows a higher sensibility to the adopted method and spatial scale. The global increment in the mean temperature values are 31.79 %, 31.79 %, 31.03 % and 31.74 % for the distributed bias-correction, distributed delta-change, lumped bias-correction and lumped delta-change ensembles respectively and in the precipitation they are -25.48 %, -28.49 %, -26.42 % and -27.35% respectively. Acknowledgments: This research work has been partially supported by the GESINHIMPADAPT project (CGL2013-48424-C2-2-R) with Spanish MINECO funds. We would also like to thank Spain02 and CORDEX projects for the data provided for this study and the R package qmap.

  1. Without Bias: A Guidebook for Nondiscriminatory Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Judy E., Ed.; And Others

    This guidebook discusses ways to eliminate various types of discrimination from business communications. Separately authored chapters discuss eliminating racial and ethnic bias; eliminating sexual bias; achieving communication sensitive about handicaps of disabled persons; eliminating bias from visual media; eliminating bias from meetings,…

  2. The Truth and Bias Model of Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Tessa V.; Kenny, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the general study of how the truth and biases affect human judgment. In the truth and bias model, judgments about the world are pulled by 2 primary forces, the truth force and the bias force, and these 2 forces are interrelated. The truth and bias model differentiates force and value, where the force is the strength of…

  3. The Truth and Bias Model of Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Tessa V.; Kenny, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the general study of how the truth and biases affect human judgment. In the truth and bias model, judgments about the world are pulled by 2 primary forces, the truth force and the bias force, and these 2 forces are interrelated. The truth and bias model differentiates force and value, where the force is the strength of…

  4. Unpacking the Evidence of Gender Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Connie L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gender bias in pre-service principals using the Gender-Leader Implicit Association Test. Analyses of student-learning narratives revealed how students made sense of gender bias (biased or not-biased) and how each reacted to evidence (surprised or not-surprised). Two implications were: (1) the need for…

  5. The Threshold of Embedded M Collider Bias and Confounding Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelcey, Benjamin; Carlisle, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Of particular import to this study, is collider bias originating from stratification on retreatment variables forming an embedded M or bowtie structural design. That is, rather than assume an M structural design which suggests that "X" is a collider but not a confounder, the authors adopt what they consider to be a more reasonable…

  6. Presence of bias in radiographer plain film reading performance studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brealey, S.; Scally, A.J.; Thomas, N.B

    2002-11-01

    Purpose To raise awareness of the frequency of bias that can affect the quality of radiographer plain film reading performance studies. Methods Studies that assessed radiographer(s) plain film reading performance were located by searching electronic databases and grey literature, hand-searching journals, personal communication and scanning reference lists. Thirty studies were judged eligible from all data sources. Results A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrates no statistically significant difference (P=0.25) in the mean proportion of biases present from diagnostic accuracy (0.37), performance (0.42) and outcome (0.44) study designs. Pearson's correlation coefficient showed no statistically significant linear association between the proportion of biases present for the three different study designs and the year that the study was performed. The frequency of biases in film and observer selection and application of the reference standard was quite low. In contrast, many biases were present concerning independence of film reporting and comparison of reports for concordance. Conclusions The findings indicate variation in the presence of bias in radiographer plain film reading performance studies. The careful consideration of bias is an essential component of study quality and hence the validity of the evidence-base used to underpin radiographic reporting policy.

  7. FractBias: a graphical tool for assessing fractionation bias following polyploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Blake L; Haug-Baltzell, Asher; Davey, Sean; Bomhoff, Matthew; Schnable, James C; Lyons, Eric

    2017-02-15

    Following polyploidy events, genomes undergo massive reduction in gene content through a process known as fractionation. Importantly, the fractionation process is not always random, and a bias as to which homeologous chromosome retains or loses more genes can be observed in some species. The process of characterizing whole genome fractionation requires identifying syntenic regions across genomes followed by post-processing of those syntenic datasets to identify and plot gene retention patterns. We have developed a tool, FractBias, to calculate and visualize gene retention and fractionation patterns across whole genomes. Through integration with SynMap and its parent platform CoGe, assembled genomes are pre-loaded and available for analysis, as well as letting researchers integrate their own data with security options to keep them private or make them publicly available. FractBias is freely available as a web application at https://genomevolution.org/CoGe/SynMap.pl . The software is open source (MIT license) and executable with Python 2.7 or iPython notebook, and available on GitHub ( https://goo.gl/PaAtqy ). Documentation for FractBias is available on CoGepedia ( https://goo.gl/ou9dt6 ). ericlyons@email.arizona.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. Low testosterone in non-responsive coeliac disease: A case series, case-control study with comparisons to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurada, Satya; Veeraraghavan, Gopal; Kaswala, Dharmesh; Hansen, Josh; Cohen, David; Kelly, Ciaran; Leffler, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Adults with coeliac disease (CD) often report persistent fatigue, even when CD appears well controlled for unknown reasons. To evaluate common indications for testosterone panel (TP) testing and prevalence of low testosterone (T) in CD. In our case series, we determined common indications for checking TP in CD. Next, we conducted a case-control study to compare TP in CD vs. healthy controls (HC). We compared mean total T (TT), free T (FT) based on serologic, histologic disease activity. Finally, we assessed TT in tissue transglutaminase (tTG)+ vs. tTG- subjects and CD vs. HC obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). 53 coeliac males had TP tested. Common indications included osteoporosis and fatigue. Low FT was observed in 7/13 men with osteoporosis and 5/6 with fatigue. In our case-control study (n=26 each), there was no difference in mean TT or FT between CD vs. HC, tTG+ vs tTG- or Marsh 0 vs. Marsh 3 groups. NHANES data showed no difference in mean TT between tTG+ vs tTG- (n=16 each) or CD vs. HC subjects (n=5 each). Low T occurs in CD patients at a similar rate as the general population. Common presentations of low T may mimic non-responsive CD symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A comparison between augmentation with olanzapine and increased risperidone dose in acute schizophrenia patients showing early non-response to risperidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Kotaro; Otachi, Taro; Sudo, Yasuhiko; Kuga, Hironori; Takebayashi, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hideaki; Ishii, Ryusuke; Kasuya, Masataka; Hayakawa, Tatsuro; Morikawa, Fumiyoshi; Hata, Kazuya; Nakamura, Mitsuru; Usui, Chie; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Toyoaki; Sawa, Yutaka

    2012-07-30

    We examined whether augmentation with olanzapine would be superior to increased risperidone dose among acute schizophrenia patients showing early non-response to risperidone. We performed a rater-blinded, randomized controlled trial at psychiatric emergency sites. Eligible patients were newly admitted patients with acute schizophrenia. Early response was defined as Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement Scale score ≤3 following 2 weeks of treatment. Early non-responders were allocated to receive either augmentation with olanzapine (RIS+OLZ group) or increased risperidone dose (RIS+RIS group). The 78 patients who completed 2 weeks of treatment were divided into 52 early responders to risperidone and 26 early non-responders to risperidone (RIS+OLZ group, n=13; RIS+RIS group, n=13). No difference in the achievement of ≥50% improvement in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score was observed between RIS+OLZ and RIS+RIS groups. Although time to treatment discontinuation for any cause was significantly shorter in the RIS+RIS group (6.8 weeks [95% confidence interval, 5.2-8.4]) than in early responders to risperidone (8.6 weeks [7.9-9.3]; P=0.018), there was no significant difference between the RIS+OLZ group (7.9 weeks [6.3-9.5]) and early responders to risperidone. Secondary outcomes justify the inclusion of augmentation arms in additional, larger studies comparing strategies for early non-responders.

  10. Adjuvant pegylated liposomal doxorubicin for older women with endocrine nonresponsive breast cancer who are NOT suitable for a "standard chemotherapy regimen": the CASA randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivellari, Diana; Gray, Kathryn P; Dellapasqua, Silvia; Puglisi, Fabio; Ribi, Karin; Price, Karen N; Láng, István; Gianni, Lorenzo; Spazzapan, Simon; Pinotti, Graziella; Lüthi, Jean-Marc; Gelber, Richard D; Regan, Meredith M; Colleoni, Marco; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Maibach, Rudolf; Rabaglio, Manuela; Coates, Alan S; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2013-04-01

    There is no optimal treatment for breast cancers lacking estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PgR) receptors in elderly women with co-morbidities that prevent use of "standard chemotherapy regimens" such as AC or CMF. The CASA trial studied pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and low dose, metronomic cyclophosphamide + methotrexate (CM) for older (>65), vulnerable women with operable, ER and PgR-negative breast cancer. After two years the trial closed early, due to slow and inadequate accrual, with 77 patients (38:PLD, 36:CM, 3:nil). Sixty-eight percent completed PLD; 83% completed CM (both 16 weeks). Patients on PLD reported worse quality of life, cognitive and physical functioning than non-PLD regimens (primarily CM). At a median follow-up of 42 months, 81% of randomized patients remained free of any breast cancer recurrence. Based on our limited experience, PLD and CM may be reasonable options for further study for elderly vulnerable patients with endocrine nonresponsive breast cancer.

  11. Inpatient schema therapy for nonresponsive patients with personality pathology: Changes in symptomatic distress, schemas, schema modes, coping styles, experienced parenting styles, and mental well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Grietje M; Chakhssi, Farid; Westerhof, Gerben J

    2016-12-01

    This study provides an evaluation of group schema therapy (ST) for inpatient treatment of patients with personality pathology who did not respond to previous psychotherapeutic interventions. Forty-two patients were assessed pre- and posttreatment, and 35 patients were evaluated at follow-up 6 months later. The results showed a dropout rate of 35%. Those who dropped out did not differ from those who completed treatment with regard to demographic and clinical variables; the only exception was that those who dropped out showed a lower prevalence of mood disorders. Furthermore, intention-to-treat analyses showed a significant improvement in maladaptive schemas, schema modes, maladaptive coping styles, mental well-being, and psychological distress after treatment, and these improvements were maintained at follow-up. On the other hand, there was no significant change in experienced parenting style as self-reported by patients. Changes in schemas and schema modes measured from pre- to posttreatment were predictive of general psychological distress at follow-up. Overall, these preliminary findings suggest that positive treatment results can be obtained with group ST-based inpatient treatment for patients who did not respond to previous psychotherapeutic interventions. Moreover, these findings are comparable with treatment results for patients without such a nonresponsive treatment history. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Non-Responsive Feeding Practices, Unhealthy Eating Behaviors, and Risk of Child Overweight and Obesity in Southeast Asia: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Ana Cristina; Sitthisongkram, Somporn; Greaney, Mary L; Wallington, Sherrie F; Ruengdej, Praewrapee

    2017-04-19

    Childhood obesity is increasing dramatically in many Southeast Asian countries, and becoming a significant public health concern. This review summarizes the evidence on associations between parental feeding practices, child eating behaviors, and the risk of overweight and obesity in Southeast Asian children 2-12 years old. We systematically searched five electronic academic/research (PubMed, PsycINFO, ProQuest Nursing, Medline, and CINAHL) databases using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement for peer-reviewed studies published in English between January 2000 and December 2016. Fourteen observational studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Reviewed studies were examined separately for preschool- and school-aged children and revealed that non-responsive parental feeding practices and unhealthy child eating behaviors were associated with a risk of child overweight and obesity in several Southeast Asian countries. Nonetheless, due to the small number of identified studies (n = 14) and because only about half of the Southeast Asian countries (Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore, the Philippines, and Malaysia) were represented (5/11) in the examined studies, additional research is needed to further understand the factors associated with childhood obesity among children in Southeast Asia to develop interventions that are tailored to the specific needs of Southeast Asian countries and designed to address practices and behaviors that may promote childhood obesity.

  13. Bias in Dynamic Monte Carlo Alpha Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweezy, Jeremy Ed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nolen, Steven Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Adams, Terry R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trahan, Travis John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-06

    A 1/N bias in the estimate of the neutron time-constant (commonly denoted as α) has been seen in dynamic neutronic calculations performed with MCATK. In this paper we show that the bias is most likely caused by taking the logarithm of a stochastic quantity. We also investigate the known bias due to the particle population control method used in MCATK. We conclude that this bias due to the particle population control method is negligible compared to other sources of bias.

  14. Artificial bias typically neglected in comparisons of uncertain atmospheric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Mikko R. A.; Mikkonen, Santtu; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Arola, Antti

    2016-04-01

    Researchers in atmospheric sciences frequently disregard data uncertainty in their choice of methods for data analysis and visualisation. Such methods include the widely used standard least squares line fitting in combination with some variations of scatter plots when comparing two different data sets of the same physical quantity. When using these methods, random data uncertainty (eg. measurement uncertainty) causes artificial systematic bias in the comparison between the extreme values of the data sets, which is then often interpreted falsely as a consequence of some true physical phenomenon or instrument misbehavior. This artificial bias is recognized as regression to the mean (RTM), that is a known effect in the field of statistics, but mostly disregarded in atmospheric sciences and not acknowledged at all in the vast majority of publications in our field. All kinds of data comparisons are subject to the bias, as long as uncertainty is present in the data. This work introduces the concept of RTM bias and demonstrates the necessity of considering the RTM effect in comparisons of data with uncertainties. We not only visualize the RTM effect with synthetic data but also use simulations based on real atmospheric data to estimate the magnitude of RTM bias in data comparisons common in our field. Typically, RTM bias is greater when the reference data (often on the x-axis) has greater uncertainty. For example, mid-visible aerosol optical thickness determined using a sun photometer may have a fairly low uncertainty of +-0.01 and, thus the RTM effect is small when using it as reference data. On the other hand UV index measurements with a broadband instrument may have an uncertainty of 10 % and higher, and the bias caused by RTM becomes larger. The bias caused by RTM is typically greatest for the extreme values of the data sets, emphasizing the need to account for RTM bias when comparing and interpreting these cases.

  15. Ratio Bias and Policy Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2016-01-01

    Numbers permeate modern political communication. While current scholarship on framing effects has focused on the persuasive effects of words and arguments, this article shows that framing of numbers can also substantially affect policy preferences. Such effects are caused by ratio bias, which is ...

  16. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against

  17. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against non-

  18. Attentional bias in math anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsten, Orly; Eidlin, Hili; Wohl, Hadas; Akibli, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theory from the field of general anxiety suggests that the tendency to display attentional bias toward negative information results in anxiety. Accordingly, the current study aims to investigate whether attentional bias is involved in math anxiety (MA) as well (i.e., a persistent negative reaction to math). Twenty seven participants (14 with high levels of MA and 13 with low levels of MA) were presented with a novel computerized numerical version of the well established dot probe task. One of six types of prime stimuli, either math related or typically neutral, was presented on one side of a computer screen. The prime was preceded by a probe (either one or two asterisks) that appeared in either the prime or the opposite location. Participants had to discriminate probe identity (one or two asterisks). Math anxious individuals reacted faster when the probe was at the location of the numerical related stimuli. This suggests the existence of attentional bias in MA. That is, for math anxious individuals, the cognitive system selectively favored the processing of emotionally negative information (i.e., math related words). These findings suggest that attentional bias is linked to unduly intense MA symptoms. PMID:26528208

  19. Attentional Bias in Math Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orly eRubinsten

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive theory from the field of general anxiety suggests that the tendency to display attentional bias toward negative information results in anxiety. Accordingly, the current study aims to investigate whether attentional bias is involved in math anxiety as well (i.e., a persistent negative reaction to math. Twenty seven participants (14 with high levels of math anxiety and 13 with low levels of math anxiety were presented with a novel computerized numerical version of the well established dot probe task. One of 6 types of prime stimuli, either math related or typically neutral, were presented on one side of a computer screen. The prime was preceded by a probe (either one or two asterisks that appeared in either the prime or the opposite location. Participants had to discriminate probe identity (one or two asterisks. Math anxious individuals reacted faster when the probe was at the location of the numerical related stimuli. This suggests the existence of attentional bias in math anxiety. That is, for math anxious individuals, the cognitive system selectively favored the processing of emotionally negative information (i.e., math related words. These findings suggest that attentional bias is linked to unduly intense math anxiety symptoms.

  20. Stereotype Formation : Biased by Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Pelley, Mike E.; Reimers, Stian J.; Calvini, Guglielmo; Spears, Russell; Beesley, Tom; Murphy, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    We propose that biases in attitude and stereotype formation might arise as a result of learned differences ill the extent its which social groups have previously been predictive elf behavioral or physical properties Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that differences in the experienced predictiveness o

  1. Sex Bias in Counseling Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harway, Michele

    1977-01-01

    This article reviews findings of bias in counseling materials and presents results of three original studies. Indications are that textbooks used by practitioners present the sexes in stereotypical fashion, and a greater proportion of college catalog context is devoted to men than to women. (Author)

  2. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, J.D.; Thomas, T.; Berkum, van E.C.; Arem, van B.

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against non-

  3. Attentional bias in math anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsten, Orly; Eidlin, Hili; Wohl, Hadas; Akibli, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theory from the field of general anxiety suggests that the tendency to display attentional bias toward negative information results in anxiety. Accordingly, the current study aims to investigate whether attentional bias is involved in math anxiety (MA) as well (i.e., a persistent negative reaction to math). Twenty seven participants (14 with high levels of MA and 13 with low levels of MA) were presented with a novel computerized numerical version of the well established dot probe task. One of six types of prime stimuli, either math related or typically neutral, was presented on one side of a computer screen. The prime was preceded by a probe (either one or two asterisks) that appeared in either the prime or the opposite location. Participants had to discriminate probe identity (one or two asterisks). Math anxious individuals reacted faster when the probe was at the location of the numerical related stimuli. This suggests the existence of attentional bias in MA. That is, for math anxious individuals, the cognitive system selectively favored the processing of emotionally negative information (i.e., math related words). These findings suggest that attentional bias is linked to unduly intense MA symptoms.

  4. Longitudinal impact of sleep on overweight and obesity in children and adolescents: a systematic review and bias-adjusted meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Y; Doi, S A R; Mamun, A A

    2015-02-01

    Short sleep duration is considered a potential risk for overweight/obesity in childhood and adolescence. However, most of the evidence on this topic is obtained from cross-sectional studies; therefore, the nature and extent of the longitudinal associations are unclear. This study explores the prospective association between short sleep and overweight/obesity in young subjects. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, Pubmed, and CINAHL databases were searched for English-language articles, published until May 2014, reporting longitudinal association between sleep and body mass index (BMI) in children and adolescents. Recommendations of the Sleep Health Foundation were used to standardize reference sleep duration. Sleep category, with sleep duration less than the reference sleep, was considered as the short sleep category. Meta-analysis was conducted to explore the association between short sleep and overweight/obesity. A review of 22 longitudinal studies, with subjects from diverse backgrounds, suggested an inverse association between sleep duration and BMI. Meta-analysis of 11 longitudinal studies, comprising 24,821 participants, revealed that subjects sleeping for short duration had twice the risk of being overweight/obese, compared with subjects sleeping for long duration (odds ratio 2.15; 95% confidence interval: 1.64-2.81). This study provides evidence that short sleep duration in young subjects is significantly associated with future overweight/obesity.

  5. Does the prior application of the field kit bullet hole testing kit 3 on a suspected bullet hole bias the analysis of atomic absorption spectrophotometry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltenhammer, Monika H; Fitzl, Christine; Wieser, Ingo; Binder, Reinhard; Paula, Pia; Risser, Daniele U

    2014-09-01

    Forensic ballistics is the study of bullet trajectory and consists of determining gunshot residue (GSR) to identify bullet holes. Among several highly sensitive methods, atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) is employed to analyze GSR in the laboratory. However, it is sometimes necessary to identify bullet holes immediately at a crime scene. The purpose of this examination was to determine whether the use of the field test Bullet Hole Testing Kit 3 (BTK3) on a suspected bullet hole would influence the outcome of AAS-analysis: Three commonly encountered firearms (Glock17, Tokarev, and Colt) were fired at skin, wood, and cloth. AAS-analysis was performed with and without previous BTK3 application. The results clearly indicate that there is no significant interaction on the grounds of BTK3 use (BTK3 vs. no-BTK3 [kit_nokit] [Pb: p = 0.1309; Sb: p = 0.9111], material*kit_nokit [Pb: p = 0.5960; Sb: p = 0.9930], distance*kit_nokit [Pb: p = 0.4014; Sb: p = 0.9184], and firearm type*kit_nokit [Pb: p = 0.9662; Sb: p = 0.9885]); hence, applying this field kit does not falsify later AAS outcomes.

  6. Bias Adjusted Precipitation Threat Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mesinger

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the wide variety of performance measures available for the assessment of skill of deterministic precipitation forecasts, the equitable threat score (ETS might well be the one used most frequently. It is typically used in conjunction with the bias score. However, apart from its mathematical definition the meaning of the ETS is not clear. It has been pointed out (Mason, 1989; Hamill, 1999 that forecasts with a larger bias tend to have a higher ETS. Even so, the present author has not seen this having been accounted for in any of numerous papers that in recent years have used the ETS along with bias "as a measure of forecast accuracy".

    A method to adjust the threat score (TS or the ETS so as to arrive at their values that correspond to unit bias in order to show the model's or forecaster's accuracy in extit{placing} precipitation has been proposed earlier by the present author (Mesinger and Brill, the so-called dH/dF method. A serious deficiency however has since been noted with the dH/dF method in that the hypothetical function that it arrives at to interpolate or extrapolate the observed value of hits to unit bias can have values of hits greater than forecast when the forecast area tends to zero. Another method is proposed here based on the assumption that the increase in hits per unit increase in false alarms is proportional to the yet unhit area. This new method removes the deficiency of the dH/dF method. Examples of its performance for 12 months of forecasts by three NCEP operational models are given.

  7. Reporting Bias Leading to Discordant Venous Thromboembolism Rates in the United States Versus Non-US Countries Following Radical Cystectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantony, Joseph J; Gopalakrishna, Ajay; Noord, Megan Van; Inman, Brant A

    2016-06-01

    Postcystectomy bladder cancer (BCa) patients are at high risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). The literature varies widely in the reporting of VTE in this population. To determine the VTE rate in subjects undergoing radical cystectomy (RC) and highlight specific factors affecting this rate. This meta-analysis was registered with the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO) database, registration number: CRD42015016776. We queried MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Web of Science. Search terms captured BCa, RC, and VTE. Per the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines, abstracts were reviewed for inclusion/exclusion criteria by two reviewers, and disagreements were resolved by a third reviewer. A search of the gray literature and references of pertinent articles was also performed. The date of our last search was December 15, 2014. For unreported data, authors were contacted. Data were abstracted in duplicate and pooled using a random effects (RE) model. Subgroup analyses and meta-regression were performed to determine risk factors for VTE. We identified 2927 publications, of which 223 met inclusion criteria for this review. A total of 1 115 634 surgeries were performed on patient population (80% men) with a total of 51 908 VTEs. The VTE rate estimated by the RE model was 3.7%. Due to significant heterogeneity, subgroup and meta-regression analyses were undertaken. These revealed a higher rate of VTE in US studies at 4.49% compared with "westernized" non-US studies at 3.43% and "nonwesternized" non-US based studies at 2.50%. Other important modifiers included minimally invasive surgery at 5.54% versus open surgery at 3.55%, and age. The case-fatality rate of pulmonary emboli was 44%. VTE is common in patients undergoing RC. Reporting of VTE is heterogeneous and the rate varies according to study

  8. Information environment, behavioral biases, and home bias in analysts’ recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Omar; Taouss, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    ’ recommendations. Using a large data of analysts’ recommendations from Asian emerging markets, we show that local analysts issue more optimistic recommendations than their foreign counterparts. However, optimism difference between the two groups is greater for firms with poor information environment. Our results......Can information environment of a firm explain home bias in analysts’ recommendations? Can the extent of agency problems explain optimism difference between foreign and local analysts? This paper answers these questions by documenting the effect of information environment on home bias in analysts...... show that optimism difference between the two groups is more than twice as much in firms with poor information environment than in firms with better information environment. We argue that poor information environment pose greater information asymmetries to foreign analysts regarding local firms...

  9. The evolution of social learning rules: payoff-biased and frequency-dependent biased transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendal, Jeremy; Giraldeau, Luc-Alain; Laland, Kevin

    2009-09-21

    Humans and other animals do not use social learning indiscriminately, rather, natural selection has favoured the evolution of social learning rules that make selective use of social learning to acquire relevant information in a changing environment. We present a gene-culture coevolutionary analysis of a small selection of such rules (unbiased social learning, payoff-biased social learning and frequency-dependent biased social learning, including conformism and anti-conformism) in a population of asocial learners where the environment is subject to a constant probability of change to a novel state. We define conditions under which each rule evolves to a genetically polymorphic equilibrium. We find that payoff-biased social learning may evolve under high levels of environmental variation if the fitness benefit associated with the acquired behaviour is either high or low but not of intermediate value. In contrast, both conformist and anti-conformist biases can become fixed when environment variation is low, whereupon the mean fitness in the population is higher than for a population of asocial learners. Our examination of the population dynamics reveals stable limit cycles under conformist and anti-conformist biases and some highly complex dynamics including chaos. Anti-conformists can out-compete conformists when conditions favour a low equilibrium frequency of the learned behaviour. We conclude that evolution, punctuated by the repeated successful invasion of different social learning rules, should continuously favour a reduction in the equilibrium frequency of asocial learning, and propose that, among competing social learning rules, the dominant rule will be the one that can persist with the lowest frequency of asocial learning.

  10. Genetic Association Analysis under Complex Survey Sampling: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dan-Yu; Tao, Ran; Kalsbeek, William D.; Zeng, Donglin; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Fernández-Rhodes, Lindsay; Graff, Mariaelisa; Koch, Gary G.; North, Kari E.; Heiss, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    The cohort design allows investigators to explore the genetic basis of a variety of diseases and traits in a single study while avoiding major weaknesses of the case-control design. Most cohort studies employ multistage cluster sampling with unequal probabilities to conveniently select participants with desired characteristics, and participants from different clusters might be genetically related. Analysis that ignores the complex sampling design can yield biased estimation of the genetic association and inflation of the type I error. Herein, we develop weighted estimators that reflect unequal selection probabilities and differential nonresponse rates, and we derive variance estimators that properly account for the sampling design and the potential relatedness of participants in different sampling units. We compare, both analytically and numerically, the performance of the proposed weighted estimators with unweighted estimators that disregard the sampling design. We demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed methods through analysis of MetaboChip data in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, which is the largest health study of the Hispanic/Latino population in the United States aimed at identifying risk factors for various diseases and determining the role of genes and environment in the occurrence of diseases. We provide guidelines on the use of weighted and unweighted estimators, as well as the relevant software. PMID:25480034

  11. Overcoming the heterologous bias: An in vivo functional analysis of multidrug efflux transporter, CgCdr1p in matched pair clinical isolates of Candida glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puri, Nidhi; Manoharlal, Raman; Sharma, Monika [Membrane Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Sanglard, Dominique [Institut de Microbiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Prasad, Rajendra, E-mail: rp47jnu@gmail.com [Membrane Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} First report to demonstrate an in vivo expression system of an ABC multidrug transporter CgCdr1p of C. glabrata. {yields} First report on the structure and functional characterization of CgCdr1p. {yields} Functional conservation of divergent but typical residues of CgCdr1p. {yields} CgCdr1p elicits promiscuity towards substrates and has a large drug binding pocket with overlapping specificities. -- Abstract: We have taken advantage of the natural milieu of matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and azole resistant (AR) clinical isolates of Candida glabrata for expressing its major ABC multidrug transporter, CgCdr1p for structure and functional analysis. This was accomplished by tagging a green fluorescent protein (GFP) downstream of ORF of CgCDR1 and integrating the resultant fusion protein at its native chromosomal locus in AS and AR backgrounds. The characterization confirmed that in comparison to AS isolate, CgCdr1p-GFP was over-expressed in AR isolates due to its hyperactive native promoter and the GFP tag did not affect its functionality in either construct. We observed that in addition to Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) and Fluconazole (FLC), a recently identified fluorescent substrate of multidrug transporters Nile Red (NR) could also be expelled by CgCdr1p. Competition assays with these substrates revealed the presence of overlapping multiple drug binding sites in CgCdr1p. Point mutations employing site directed mutagenesis confirmed that the role played by unique amino acid residues critical to ATP catalysis and localization of ABC drug transporter proteins are well conserved in C. glabrata as in other yeasts. This study demonstrates a first in vivo novel system where over-expression of GFP tagged MDR transporter protein can be driven by its own hyperactive promoter of AR isolates. Taken together, this in vivo system can be exploited for the structure and functional analysis of CgCdr1p and similar proteins wherein the arte-factual concerns

  12. Analytical Techniques and the Air Force Logistics Readiness Officer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    organizations that had made a commitment to quantitative, fact-based analysis including Amazon, Netflix and the Boston Red Sox. Three common traits of...Terry S. Overton. “Estimating Nonresponse Bias in Mail Surveys,” Journal of Marketing Research, 396-402 (August 1977). 2. Banks, Jerry, John S...Western, 2007. 17. Armstrong, J. Scott and Terry S. Overton. “Estimating Nonresponse Bias in Mail Surveys,” Journal of Marketing Research, 396

  13. Types of Research Bias Encountered in IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Ahmed; Kallini, Joseph Ralph; Desai, Kush; Hickey, Ryan; Thornburg, Bartley; Kulik, Laura; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2016-04-01

    Bias is a systemic error in studies that leads to inaccurate deductions. Relevant biases in the field of IR and interventional oncology were identified after reviewing articles published in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology. Biases cited in these articles were divided into three categories: preinterventional (health care access, participation, referral, and sample biases), periinterventional (contamination, investigator, and operator biases), and postinterventional (guarantee-time, lead time, loss to follow-up, recall, and reporting biases). Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Probability biases as Bayesian inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre; C. R. Martins

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I will show how several observed biases in human probabilistic reasoning can be partially explained as good heuristics for making inferences in an environment where probabilities have uncertainties associated to them. Previous results show that the weight functions and the observed violations of coalescing and stochastic dominance can be understood from a Bayesian point of view. We will review those results and see that Bayesian methods should also be used as part of the explanation behind other known biases. That means that, although the observed errors are still errors under the be understood as adaptations to the solution of real life problems. Heuristics that allow fast evaluations and mimic a Bayesian inference would be an evolutionary advantage, since they would give us an efficient way of making decisions. %XX In that sense, it should be no surprise that humans reason with % probability as it has been observed.

  15. Belief bias and relational reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Maxwell J; Sykes, Elizabeth D A

    2003-01-01

    When people evaluate categorical syllogisms, they tend to reject unbelievable conclusions and accept believable ones irrespective of their validity. Typically, this effect is particularly marked for invalid conclusions that are possible, but do not necessarily follow, given the premises. However, smaller believability effects can also be detected for other types of conclusion. Three experiments are reported here, in which an attempt was made to determine whether belief bias effects can manifest themselves on the relational inference task. Subjects evaluated the validity of conclusions such as William the Conqueror was king after the Pyramids were built (temporal task) or Manchester is north of Bournemouth (spatial task) with respect to their premises. All of the major findings for equivalent categorical syllogism tasks were replicated. However, the overall size of the main effect of believability appears to be related to task presentation, a phenomenon not previously identified for categorical syllogisms and which current theories of belief bias have difficulty explaining.

  16. Mindfulness reduces the correspondence bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopthrow, Tim; Hooper, Nic; Mahmood, Lynsey; Meier, Brian P; Weger, Ulrich

    2017-03-01

    The correspondence bias (CB) refers to the idea that people sometimes give undue weight to dispositional rather than situational factors when explaining behaviours and attitudes. Three experiments examined whether mindfulness, a non-judgmental focus on the present moment, could reduce the CB. Participants engaged in a brief mindfulness exercise (the raisin task), a control task, or an attention to detail task before completing a typical CB measure involving an attitude-attribution paradigm. The results indicated that participants in the mindfulness condition experienced a significant reduction in the CB compared to participants in the control or attention to detail conditions. These results suggest that mindfulness training can play a unique role in reducing social biases related to person perception.

  17. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Allahverdyan, A E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings: We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect|when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preferenc...

  18. Are temperature reconstructions regionally biased?

    CERN Document Server

    Bothe, O

    2012-01-01

    Are temperature reconstructions possibly biased due to regionally differing density of utilized proxy-networks? This question is assessed utilizing a simple process-based forward model of tree growth in the virtual reality of two simulations of the climate of the last millennium with different amplitude of solar forcing variations. The pseudo-tree ring series cluster in high latitudes of the northern hemisphere and east Asia. Only weak biases are found for the full network. However, for a strong solar forcing amplitude the high latitudes indicate a warmer first half of the last millennium while mid-latitudes and Asia were slightly colder than the extratropical hemispheric average. Reconstruction skill is weak or non-existent for two simple reconstruction schemes, and comparison of virtual reality target and reconstructions reveals strong deficiencies. The temporal resolution of the proxies has an influence on the reconstruction task and results are sensitive to the construction of the proxy-network. Existing ...

  19. Biased evaluation and persistence in gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilovich, T

    1983-06-01

    Perhaps the most striking aspect of gambling behavior is that people continue to gamble despite persistent failure. One reason for this persistence may be that gamblers evaluate outcomes in a biased manner. Specifically, gamblers may tend to accept wins at face value but explain away or discount losses. Experiment 1 tested this hypothesis by recording subjects' explanations of the outcomes of their bets on professional football games. The results supported the hypothesis: Subjects spent more time explaining their losses than their wins. A content analysis of these explanations revealed that subjects tended to discount their losses but "bolster" their wins Finally, subjects remembered their losses better during a recall test 3 weeks later. Experiments 2 and 3 extended this analysis by demonstrating that a manipulation of the salience or existence of a critical "fluke" play in a sporting event had a greater impact on the subsequent expectations of those who had bet on the losing team than of those who had bet on the winning team. Both the implications and the possible mechanisms underlying these biases are discussed.

  20. BEHAVIORAL BIASES IN TRADING SECURITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turcan Ciprian Sebastian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main thesis of this paper represents the importance and the effects that human behavior has over capital markets. It is important to see the link between the asset valuation and investor sentiment that motivate to pay for an asset a certain prices over/below the intrinsic value. The main behavioral aspects discussed are emotional factors such as: fear of regret, overconfidence, perseverance, loss aversion ,heuristic biases, misinformation and thinking errors, herding and their consequences.

  1. Measuring bias from unbiased observable

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seokcheon

    2014-01-01

    Since Kaiser introduced galaxies as a biased tracer of the underlying total mass field, the linear galaxies bias, b(z) appears ubiquitously both in theoretical calculations and in observational measurements related to galaxy surveys. However, the generic approaches to the galaxy density is a non-local and stochastic function of the underlying dark matter density and it becomes difficult to make the analytic form of b(z). Due to this fact, b(z) is known as a nuisance parameter and the effort has been made to measure bias free observable quantities. We provide the exact and analytic function of b(z) which also can be measured from galaxy surveys using the redshift space distortions parameters, more accurately unbiased observable \\beta \\sigma_{\\rm{gal}} = f \\sigma_8. We also introduce approximate solutions for b(z) for different gravity theories. One can generalize these approximate solutions to be exact when one solves the exact evolutions for the dark matter density fluctuation of given gravity theories. These...

  2. Response bias in plaintiffs' histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees-Haley, P R; Williams, C W; Zasler, N D; Marguilies, S; English, L T; Stevens, K B

    1997-11-01

    This study investigated response bias in self-reported history of factors relevant to the assessment of traumatic brain injury, toxic brain injury and related emotional distress. Response bias refers to systematic error in self-report data. A total of 446 subjects (comprising 131 litigating and 315 non-litigating adults from five locations in the United States) completed a symptom questionnaire. Data were obtained from university faculty and students, from patients in clinics specializing in physiatry neurology, and family medicine, and from plaintiffs undergoing forensic neuropsychological evaluations. Comparisons were made for litigant and non litigant ratings of their past and current cognitive and emotional functioning, including life in general, ability to concentrate, memory, depression, anxiety, alcohol, drugs, ability to work or attend school, irritability, headaches, confusion, self-esteem, and fatigue. Although there is no basis for hypothesizing plaintiffs to be healthier than the general population, plaintiffs rated their pre-injury functioning superior to non-plaintiffs. These findings suggest that response biases need to be taken into account by forensic examiners when relying on litigants' self-reports of pre-injury status.

  3. Opinion dynamics with confirmation bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect-when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency) or the first opinion (primacy) -and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties. The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development.

  4. Opinion dynamics with confirmation bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen E Allahverdyan

    Full Text Available Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science.We formulate a (non-Bayesian model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect-when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency or the first opinion (primacy -and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties.The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development.

  5. Evaluation of P2-C2 bias estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M. C.; van der Bree, R.; van der Marel, H.; Verhagen, S.; Garcia, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    The availability of the second civilian code C2 created a new issue to be considered: the bias relating P2 and C2 signals. Such an issue is important when merging C2-capable and legacy receivers and when processing data collected by a C2-capable receiver with satellite clock values generated using a legacy receiver network. The P2-C2 bias is essentially a consequence from the fact that receiver and satellite hardware delays for C2 measurements may not be necessarily the same of those for P2. Knowing this bias makes possible the use of C2 as an observable for positioning using IGS clock products. We are using the PPP-based approach for P2-C2 bias estimation developed at the University of New Brunswick. For that purpose, we use GAPS, the GPS Analysis and Positioning Software. We also determine P2-C2 bias directly from the code observations. This poster presents and discusses the evaluation of P2-C2 values estimated from a sub-set of the IGS L2C Test Network. The values are applied to observations collected by C2-capable receivers in the point positioning mode. Coordinate repeatability indicate an improvement of up to 50% when using the P2-C2 bias.

  6. Working with Missing Data: Imputation of Nonresponse Items in Categorical Survey Data with a Non-Monotone Missing Pattern

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Machelle D; Kerstin Lueck

    2014-01-01

    The imputation of missing data is often a crucial step in the analysis of survey data. This study reviews typical problems with missing data and discusses a method for the imputation of missing survey data with a large number of categorical variables which do not have a monotone missing pattern. We develop a method for constructing a monotone missing pattern that allows for imputation of categorical data in data sets with a large number of variables using a model-based MCMC approach. We repor...

  7. Investigating the effect of externalizing perspectives on cognitives biases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Fredrik Huitfeldt; Hicks, David L., David

    2007-01-01

    the number of attacks that “get through”. There are many subproblems of this main problem, one of which is that relative quality of the intelligence analysis is too low [39, We observe that the analysts suffer from cognitive biases, and we assume that this is one of the reasons behind “low” quality...... of intelligence analysis. We propose that complexity of maintaining multiple different perspectives the same data is one of the reasons for this. We further propose that a tool that facillitates the externalization multiple perspectives would reduce these biases and hence increase the overall quality...

  8. Reduction of noise and bias in randomly sampled power spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika

    2015-01-01

    We consider the origin of noise and distortion in power spectral estimates of randomly sampled data, specifically velocity data measured with a burst-mode laser Doppler anemometer. The analysis guides us to new ways of reducing noise and removing spectral bias, e.g., distortions caused by modific......We consider the origin of noise and distortion in power spectral estimates of randomly sampled data, specifically velocity data measured with a burst-mode laser Doppler anemometer. The analysis guides us to new ways of reducing noise and removing spectral bias, e.g., distortions caused...

  9. Trace gluten contamination may play a role in mucosal and clinical recovery in a subgroup of diet-adherent non-responsive celiac disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with persistent symptoms and/or villous atrophy despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) have non-responsive celiac disease (NRCD). A subset of these patients has refractory celiac disease (RCD), yet some NRCD patients may simply be reacting to gluten cross-contamination. Here we describe the effects of a 3-6 month diet of whole, unprocessed foods, termed the Gluten Contamination Elimination Diet (GCED), on NRCD. We aim to demonstrate that this diet reclassifies the majority of patients thought to have RCD type 1 (RCD1). Methods We reviewed the records of all GFD-adherent NRCD patients cared for in our celiac center from 2005-2011 who were documented to have started the GCED. Response to the GCED was defined as being asymptomatic after the diet, with normal villous architecture on repeat biopsy, if performed. Results Prior to the GCED, all patients were interviewed by an experienced dietitian and no sources of hidden gluten ingestion were identified. 17 patients completed the GCED; 15 were female (88%). Median age at start of the GCED was 42 years (range 6-73). Fourteen patients (82%) responded to the GCED. Six patients met criteria for RCD prior to the GCED; 5 (83%) were asymptomatic after the GCED and no longer meet RCD criteria. Of the 14 patients who responded to the GCED, 11 (79%) successfully returned to a traditional GFD without resurgence of symptoms. Conclusions The GCED may be an effective therapeutic option for GFD-adherent NRCD patients. Response to this diet identifies a subgroup of patients, previously classified as RCD1, that is not truly refractory to dietary treatment. Preventing an inaccurate diagnosis of RCD1 avoids immunotherapy. Most patients are able to return to a traditional GFD without return of symptoms. PMID:23448408

  10. Humoral and Cellular Responses to a Single Dose of Fendrix in Renal Transplant Recipients with Non-response to Previous Hepatitis B Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, M; Zaslavskaya, M; Fiedler, M; Wilde, B; Heinemann, F M; Heinold, A; Horn, P A; Witzke, O

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 70% of kidney transplant recipients are non-responders to conventional hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccines. We examined whether Fendrix™, an HBV vaccine containing 3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) as adjuvant, could induce HBV immunity in these patients and compared their vaccination efficacy with healthy controls tested previously by the same assays. We selected 35 kidney transplant recipients who had been vaccinated at least thrice against HBV but had never displayed anti-HBs antibodies. We re-assessed their anti-HBs antibody titres and further determined cellular HBV immunity by proliferation assay and interferon (IFN)-γ ELISpot. Seventeen recipients did neither display humoral nor cellular immunity and could be tested prior to and at month 1 after vaccination. Of note, HLA antigens associated with non-response to HBV vaccination (HLA-DRB1*03 and HLA-DQB1*02) were over-represented in these 17 recipients. At month 1 after a single vaccination with Fendrix™, we observed a significant increase in anti-HBs antibodies (P = 0.02). In seven of 17 recipients, we detected anti-HBs antibodies ≥10 IU/l (10-264), in four HBV-specific lymphocyte proliferation (stimulation index of 2.6-8.7) and in one specific IFN-γ responses (12 spots increment). The vaccination response to Fendrix™ was significantly higher (P = 0.035) than the response to HBVaxPro™ in young healthy controls. In summary, the results show that a single vaccination with Fendrix(™) could already induce HBV-specific humoral and/or cellular responses in ten of 17 kidney transplant patients. Thus, Fendrix™ appears as an efficient vaccine in this patient cohort. © 2016 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  11. Matrilateral Bias in Human Grandmothering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Daly

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Children receive more care and resources from their maternal grandmothers than from their paternal grandmothers. This asymmetry is the “matrilateral bias” in grandmaternal investment. Here, we synopsize the evolutionary theories that predict such a bias, and review evidence of its cross-cultural generality and magnitude. Evolutionists have long maintained that investing in a daughter’s child yields greater fitness returns, on average, than investing in a son’s child because of paternity uncertainty: the son’s putative progeny may have been sired by someone else. Recent theoretical work has identified an additional natural selective basis for the matrilateral bias that may be no less important: supporting grandchildren lightens the load on their mother, increasing her capacity to pursue her fitness in other ways, and if she invests those gains either in her natal relatives or in children of a former or future partner, fitness returns accrue to the maternal, but not the paternal, grandmother. In modern democracies, where kinship is reckoned bilaterally and no postmarital residence norms restrict grandmaternal access to grandchildren, many studies have found large matrilateral biases in contact, childcare, and emotional closeness. In other societies, patrilineal ideology and postmarital residence with the husband’s kin (virilocality might be expected to have produced a patrilateral bias instead, but the available evidence refutes this hypothesis. In hunter-gatherers, regardless of professed norms concerning kinship and residence, mothers get needed help at and after childbirth from their mothers, not their mothers-in-law. In traditional agricultural and pastoral societies, patrilineal and virilocal norms are common, but young mothers still turn to their natal families for crucial help, and several studies have documented benefits, including reduced child mortality, associated with access to maternal, but not paternal, grandmothers. Even

  12. Working with Missing Data: Imputation of Nonresponse Items in Categorical Survey Data with a Non-Monotone Missing Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machelle D. Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The imputation of missing data is often a crucial step in the analysis of survey data. This study reviews typical problems with missing data and discusses a method for the imputation of missing survey data with a large number of categorical variables which do not have a monotone missing pattern. We develop a method for constructing a monotone missing pattern that allows for imputation of categorical data in data sets with a large number of variables using a model-based MCMC approach. We report the results of imputing the missing data from a case study, using educational, sociopsychological, and socioeconomic data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS. We report the results of multiply imputed data on a substantive logistic regression analysis predicting socioeconomic success from several educational, sociopsychological, and familial variables. We compare the results of conducting inference using a single imputed data set to those using a combined test over several imputations. Findings indicate that, for all variables in the model, all of the single tests were consistent with the combined test.

  13. Bias-correction in vector autoregressive models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the properties of various methods for bias-correcting parameter estimates in both stationary and non-stationary vector autoregressive models. First, we show that two analytical bias formulas from the existing literature are in fact identical. Next, based on a detailed simulation study......, we show that when the model is stationary this simple bias formula compares very favorably to bootstrap bias-correction, both in terms of bias and mean squared error. In non-stationary models, the analytical bias formula performs noticeably worse than bootstrapping. Both methods yield a notable...... improvement over ordinary least squares. We pay special attention to the risk of pushing an otherwise stationary model into the non-stationary region of the parameter space when correcting for bias. Finally, we consider a recently proposed reduced-bias weighted least squares estimator, and we find...

  14. The Probability Distribution for a Biased Spinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Colin

    2012-01-01

    This article advocates biased spinners as an engaging context for statistics students. Calculating the probability of a biased spinner landing on a particular side makes valuable connections between probability and other areas of mathematics. (Contains 2 figures and 1 table.)

  15. The Probability Distribution for a Biased Spinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Colin

    2012-01-01

    This article advocates biased spinners as an engaging context for statistics students. Calculating the probability of a biased spinner landing on a particular side makes valuable connections between probability and other areas of mathematics. (Contains 2 figures and 1 table.)

  16. Detecting Bias in Meta-Analyses of Distance Education Research: Big Pictures We Can Rely On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Robert M.; Borokhovski, Eugene; Tamim, Rana M.

    2014-01-01

    This article has two interrelated purposes. The first is to explain how various forms of bias, if introduced during any stage of a meta-analysis, can provide the consumer with a misimpression of the state of a research literature. Five of the most important bias-producing aspects of a meta-analysis are presented and discussed. Second, armed with…

  17. A Pharmacological Primer of Biased Agonism

    OpenAIRE

    Andresen, Bradley T.

    2011-01-01

    Biased agonism is one of the fastest growing topics in G protein-coupled receptor pharmacology; moreover, biased agonists are used in the clinic today: carvedilol (Coreg®) is a biased agonist of beta-adrenergic receptors. However, there is a general lack of understanding of biased agonism when compared to traditional pharmacological terminology. Therefore, this review is designed to provide a basic introduction to classical pharmacology as well as G protein-coupled receptor signal transductio...

  18. Phenotypic and gene expression changes between low (glucose-responsive) and High (glucose non-responsive) MIN-6 beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O´Driscoll, L.; Gammell, p.; McKierman, E.

    2006-01-01

    that the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) phenotype is relatively unstable, in long-term culture. This study aimed to investigate phenotypic and gene expression changes associated with this loss of GSIS, using the MIN-6 cell line as model. Phenotypic differences between MIN-6(L, low passage) and MIN-6(H......, high passage) were determined by ELISA (assessing GSIS and cellular (pro)insulin content), proliferation assays, phase contrast light microscopy and analysis of alkaline phosphatase expression. Differential mRNA expression was investigated using microarray, bioinformatics and real-time PCR technologies....... Long-term culture was found to be associated with many phenotypic changes, including changes in growth rate and cellular morphology, as well as loss of GSIS. Microarray analyses indicate expression of many mRNAs, including many involved in regulated secretion, adhesion and proliferation...

  19. Alleviating Media Bias Through Intelligent Agent Blogging

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Aviles, Ernesto

    2009-01-01

    Consumers of mass media must have a comprehensive, balanced and plural selection of news to get an unbiased perspective; but achieving this goal can be very challenging, laborious and time consuming. News stories development over time, its (in)consistency, and different level of coverage across the media outlets are challenges that a conscientious reader has to overcome in order to alleviate bias. In this paper we present an intelligent agent framework currently facilitating analysis of the main sources of on-line news in El Salvador. We show how prior tools of text analysis and Web 2.0 technologies can be combined with minimal manual intervention to help individuals on their rational decision process, while holding media outlets accountable for their work.

  20. Attentional bias predicts heroin relapse following treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.E. Marissen; I.H.A. Franken; A.J. Waters; P. Blanken; W. van den Brink; V.M. Hendriks

    2006-01-01

    Aims Previous studies have shown that abstinent heroin addicts exhibit an attentional bias to heroin-related stimuli. It has been suggested that attentional bias may represent a vulnerability to relapse into drug use. In the present study, the predictive value of pre-treatment attentional bias on re

  1. Using Newspapers to Study Media Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, Joseph M.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that students can learn to recognize media bias by studying media reports of current events or historical topics. Describes a study unit using media coverage of the second anniversary of the Palestinian uprising against Israel. Discusses lesson objectives, planning, defining bias teaching procedures, and criteria for determining bias. (DK)

  2. Culturally Biased Assumptions in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Paul B.

    2003-01-01

    Eight clusters of culturally biased assumptions are identified for further discussion from Leong and Ponterotto's (2003) article. The presence of cultural bias demonstrates that cultural bias is so robust and pervasive that is permeates the profession of counseling psychology, even including those articles that effectively attack cultural bias…

  3. Semi-supervised Eigenvectors for Locally-biased Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Toke Jansen; Mahoney, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    of this sort are particularly challenging for popular eigenvector-based machine learning and data analysis tools. At root, the reason is that eigenvectors are inherently global quantities. In this paper, we address this issue by providing a methodology to construct semi-supervised eigenvectors of a graph......In many applications, one has side information, e.g., labels that are provided in a semi-supervised manner, about a specific target region of a large data set, and one wants to perform machine learning and data analysis tasks "nearby" that pre-specified target region. Locally-biased problems...... Laplacian, and we illustrate how these locally-biased eigenvectors can be used to perform locally-biased machine learning. These semi-supervised eigenvectors capture successively-orthogonalized directions of maximum variance, conditioned on being well-correlated with an input seed set of nodes...

  4. Excess success for three related papers on racial bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Three related articles reported that racial bias altered perceptual experience and influenced decision-making. These findings have been applied to training programs for law enforcement, and elsewhere, to mitigate racial bias. However, a statistical analysis of each of the three articles finds that the reported experimental results should be rare, even if the theoretical ideas were correct. The analysis estimates that the probability of the reported experimental success for the articles is 0.003, 0.048, and 0.070, respectively. These low probabilities suggest that similar future work is unlikely to produce as successful outcomes and indicates that readers should be skeptical about the validity of the reported findings and their theoretical implications. The reported findings should not be used to guide policies related to racial bias, and new experimental work is needed to judge the merit of the theoretical ideas.

  5. Excess success for three related papers on racial bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory eFrancis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Three related articles reported that racial bias altered perceptual experience and influenced decision-making. These findings have been applied to training programs for law enforcement, and elsewhere, to mitigate racial bias. However, a statistical analysis of each of the three articles finds that the reported experimental results should be rare, even if the theoretical ideas were correct. The analysis estimates that the probability of the reported experimental success for the articles is 0.003, 0.048, and 0.070, respectively. These low probabilities suggest that similar future work is unlikely to produce as successful outcomes and indicates that readers should be skeptical about the validity of the reported findings and their theoretical implications. The reported findings should not be used to guide policies related to racial bias, and new experimental work is needed to judge the merit of the theoretical ideas.

  6. Analysis of Neuronal Sequences Using Pairwise Biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    Structure of the Nervous System of the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans”. In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences...oenalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR...data, and (2) it has no simple, realistic biological interpretation. In this chapter, we describe a new representation of sequences that addresses

  7. Metabolic effects of resistance or high-intensity interval training among glycemic control-nonresponsive children with insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, C; Ramírez-Campillo, R; Ramírez-Vélez, R; Martínez, C; Castro-Sepúlveda, M; Alonso-Martínez, A; Izquierdo, M

    2017-07-31

    Little evidence exists on which variables of body composition or muscular strength mediates more glucose control improvements taking into account inter-individual metabolic variability to different modes of exercise training. We examined 'mediators' to the effects of 6-weeks of resistance training (RT) or high-intensity interval training (HIT) on glucose control parameters in physically inactive schoolchildren with insulin resistance (IR). Second, we also determined both training-induce changes and the prevalence of responders (R) and non-responders (NR) to decrease the IR level. Fifty-six physically inactive children diagnosed with IR followed a RT or supervised HIT program for 6 weeks. Participants were classified based on ΔHOMA-IR into glycemic control R (decrease in homeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR) training-induced changes to glucose control parameters; and third the report of R and NR to improve body composition, cardiovascular, metabolic and performance variables. Mediation analysis revealed that improvements (decreases) in abdominal fat by the waist circumference can explain more the effects (decreases) of HOMA-IR in physically inactive schoolchildren under RT or HIT regimes. The same analysis showed that increased one-maximum repetition leg-extension was correlated with the change in HOMA-IR (β=-0.058; P=0.049). Furthermore, a change in the waist circumference fully mediated the dose-response relationship between changes in the leg-extension strength and HOMA-IR (β'=-0.004; P=0.178). RT or HIT were associated with significant improvements in body composition, muscular strength, blood pressure and cardiometabolic parameters irrespective of improvement in glycemic control response. Both glucose control RT-R and HIT-R (respectively), had significant improvements in mean HOMA-IR, mean muscular strength leg-extension and mean measures of adiposity. The improvements in the lower body strength and the decreases in waist circumference can explain more

  8. Electronic properties of a biased graphene bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Eduardo V; Lopes dos Santos, J M B [CFP and Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias Universidade do Porto, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Novoselov, K S; Morozov, S V; Geim, A K [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Peres, N M R [Centre of Physics and Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, P-4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Nilsson, Johan; Castro Neto, A H [Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Guinea, F [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-05

    We study, within the tight-binding approximation, the electronic properties of a graphene bilayer in the presence of an external electric field applied perpendicular to the system-a biased bilayer. The effect of the perpendicular electric field is included through a parallel plate capacitor model, with screening correction at the Hartree level. The full tight-binding description is compared with its four-band and two-band continuum approximations, and the four-band model is shown to always be a suitable approximation for the conditions realized in experiments. The model is applied to real biased bilayer devices, made out of either SiC or exfoliated graphene, and good agreement with experimental results is found, indicating that the model is capturing the key ingredients, and that a finite gap is effectively being controlled externally. Analysis of experimental results regarding the electrical noise and cyclotron resonance further suggests that the model can be seen as a good starting point for understanding the electronic properties of graphene bilayer. Also, we study the effect of electron-hole asymmetry terms, such as the second-nearest-neighbour hopping energies t' (in-plane) and {gamma}{sub 4} (inter-layer), and the on-site energy {Delta}.

  9. Electronic properties of a biased graphene bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Eduardo V; Novoselov, K S; Morozov, S V; Peres, N M R; Lopes dos Santos, J M B; Nilsson, Johan; Guinea, F; Geim, A K; Castro Neto, A H

    2010-05-01

    We study, within the tight-binding approximation, the electronic properties of a graphene bilayer in the presence of an external electric field applied perpendicular to the system-a biased bilayer. The effect of the perpendicular electric field is included through a parallel plate capacitor model, with screening correction at the Hartree level. The full tight-binding description is compared with its four-band and two-band continuum approximations, and the four-band model is shown to always be a suitable approximation for the conditions realized in experiments. The model is applied to real biased bilayer devices, made out of either SiC or exfoliated graphene, and good agreement with experimental results is found, indicating that the model is capturing the key ingredients, and that a finite gap is effectively being controlled externally. Analysis of experimental results regarding the electrical noise and cyclotron resonance further suggests that the model can be seen as a good starting point for understanding the electronic properties of graphene bilayer. Also, we study the effect of electron-hole asymmetry terms, such as the second-nearest-neighbour hopping energies t' (in-plane) and γ(4) (inter-layer), and the on-site energy Δ.

  10. Proactive inhibitory control: A general biasing account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchlepp, Heike; Lavric, Aureliu; Chambers, Christopher D; Verbruggen, Frederick

    2016-05-01

    Flexible behavior requires a control system that can inhibit actions in response to changes in the environment. Recent studies suggest that people proactively adjust response parameters in anticipation of a stop signal. In three experiments, we tested the hypothesis that proactive inhibitory control involves adjusting both attentional and response settings, and we explored the relationship with other forms of proactive and anticipatory control. Subjects responded to the color of a stimulus. On some trials, an extra signal occurred. The response to this signal depended on the task context subjects were in: in the 'ignore' context, they ignored it; in the 'stop' context, they had to withhold their response; and in the 'double-response' context, they had to execute a secondary response. An analysis of event-related brain potentials for no-signal trials in the stop context revealed that proactive inhibitory control works by biasing the settings of lower-level systems that are involved in stimulus detection, action selection, and action execution. Furthermore, subjects made similar adjustments in the double-response and stop-signal contexts, indicating an overlap between various forms of proactive action control. The results of Experiment 1 also suggest an overlap between proactive inhibitory control and preparatory control in task-switching studies: both require reconfiguration of task-set parameters to bias or alter subordinate processes. We conclude that much of the top-down control in response inhibition tasks takes place before the inhibition signal is presented.

  11. Using decision models to decompose anxiety-related bias in threat classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Corey N; Skokin, Kimberly; Carlos, Brandon; Weaver, Alexandria

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with high levels of anxiety show preferential processing of threatening information, and this cognitive bias is thought to be an integral component of anxiety disorders. In threat classification tasks, this bias manifests as high-anxiety participants being more likely to classify stimuli as threatening than their low-anxiety counterparts. However, it is unclear which cognitive mechanisms drive this bias in threat classification. To better understand this phenomenon, threat classification data were analyzed with 2 decision models: a signal detection model and a drift-diffusion model. Signal detection models can dissociate measures of discriminability and bias, and diffusion models can further dissociate bias due to response preparation from bias due to stimulus evaluation. Individuals in the study completed a trait anxiety measure and classified threatening and neutral words based on whether they deemed them threatening. Signal detection analysis showed that high-anxiety participants had a bias driven by a weaker threat criterion than low-anxiety participants, but no differences in discriminability. Drift-diffusion analysis further decomposed the threat bias to show that it is driven by both an expectation bias that the threat response was more likely to be correct, and a stimulus bias driven by a weaker criterion for evaluating the stimuli under consideration. These model-based analyses provide valuable insight and show that multiple cognitive mechanisms underlie differential threat processing in anxiety. Implications for theories of anxiety are discussed.

  12. A Review of Studies on Media Bias at Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛一丹

    2015-01-01

    Bias is widely existed nowadays.Domestic scholars have done a lot of research on the bias,especially the media bias.They studied the media bias from different perspectives,such as the bias on China image,the bias of a certain media FOX,the bias on the venerable group,the bias on women and so on.The author plans to give a review of the studies on media bias at home in this paper.

  13. A Review of Studies on Media Bias at Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛一丹

    2015-01-01

    Bias is widely existed nowadays. Domestic scholars have done a lot of research on the bias, especially the media bias. They studied the media bias from different perspectives, such as the bias on China image,the bias of a certain media FOX, the bias on the venerable group, the bias on women and so on. The author plans to give a review of the studies on media bias at home in this paper.

  14. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Background Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect–when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency) or the first opinion (primacy) –and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties. Conclusions The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development. PMID:25007078

  15. Bias in Peripheral Depression Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, André F; Köhler, Cristiano A; Brunoni, André R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To aid in the differentiation of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) from healthy controls, numerous peripheral biomarkers have been proposed. To date, no comprehensive evaluation of the existence of bias favoring the publication of significant results or inflating effect...... sizes has been conducted. METHODS: Here, we performed a comprehensive review of meta-analyses of peripheral nongenetic biomarkers that could discriminate individuals with MDD from nondepressed controls. PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched through April 10, 2015. RESULTS: From 15...

  16. Ratio Bias and Policy Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2016-01-01

    Numbers permeate modern political communication. While current scholarship on framing effects has focused on the persuasive effects of words and arguments, this article shows that framing of numbers can also substantially affect policy preferences. Such effects are caused by ratio bias, which...... is a general tendency to focus on numerators and pay insufficient attention to denominators in ratios. Using a population-based survey experiment, I demonstrate how differently framed but logically equivalent representations of the exact same numerical value can have large effects on citizens’ preferences...

  17. Magnetoelectric switching of exchange bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, Pavel; Hochstrat, Andreas; Chen, Xi; Kleemann, Wolfgang; Binek, Christian

    2005-03-25

    The perpendicular exchange bias field, H(EB), of the magnetoelectric heterostructure Cr2O3(111)/(Co/Pt)(3) changes sign after field cooling to below the Néel temperature of Cr2O3 in either parallel or antiparallel axial magnetic and electric freezing fields. The switching of H(EB) is explained by magnetoelectrically induced antiferromagnetic single domains which extend to the interface, where the direction of their end spins controls the sign of H(EB). Novel applications in magnetoelectronic devices seem possible.

  18. A Simulation Platform for Quantifying Survival Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayeda, Elizabeth Rose; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Power, Melinda C

    2016-01-01

    Bias due to selective mortality is a potential concern in many studies and is especially relevant in cognitive aging research because cognitive impairment strongly predicts subsequent mortality. Biased estimation of the effect of an exposure on rate of cognitive decline can occur when mortality i......-mortality situations. This simulation platform provides a flexible tool for evaluating biases in studies with high mortality, as is common in cognitive aging research.......Bias due to selective mortality is a potential concern in many studies and is especially relevant in cognitive aging research because cognitive impairment strongly predicts subsequent mortality. Biased estimation of the effect of an exposure on rate of cognitive decline can occur when mortality...... platform with which to quantify the expected bias in longitudinal studies of determinants of cognitive decline. We evaluated potential survival bias in naive analyses under several selective survival scenarios, assuming that exposure had no effect on cognitive decline for anyone in the population. Compared...

  19. Numeracy and framing bias in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunmi; Wong, John B; Mendiratta, Anil; Heiman, Gary A; Hamberger, Marla J

    2011-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy are frequently confronted with complex treatment decisions. Communicating treatment risks is often difficult because patients may have difficulty with basic statistical concepts (i.e., low numeracy) or might misconceive the statistical information based on the way information is presented, a phenomenon known as "framing bias." We assessed numeracy and framing bias in 95 adults with chronic epilepsy and explored cognitive correlates of framing bias. Compared with normal controls, patients with epilepsy had significantly poorer performance on the Numeracy scale (P=0.02), despite a higher level of education than normal controls (Pframing bias. Abstract problem solving performance correlated with the degree of framing bias (r=0.631, Pframing bias. Poor numeracy and susceptibility framing bias place patients with epilepsy at risk for uninformed decisions.

  20. An Examination of Culture Bias in the Wonderlic Personnel Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Arthur R.

    Internal evidence of cultural bias, in terms of various types of item analysis, was sought in the Wonderlic Personnel Test results in large, representative samples of whites and Negroes totalling some 1,500 subjects. Essentially, the lack of any appreciable Race X Items interaction and the high interracial similarity in rank order of item…