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Sample records for nonreciprocal photonic devices

  1. Nonreciprocal Electromagnetic Devices in Gyromagnetic Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Rong-Juan; Gan, Lin; Fu, Jin-Xin; Lian, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Gyromagnetic photonic crystal (GPC) offers a promising way to realize robust transport of electromagnetic waves against backscattering from various disorders, perturbations and obstacles due to existence of unique topological electromagnetic states. The dc magnetic field exerting upon the GPC brings about the time-reversal symmetry breaking, splits the band degeneracy and opens band gaps where the topological chiral edge states (CESs) arise. The band gap can originate either from long-range Bragg-scattering effect or from short-range localized magnetic surface plasmon resonance (MSP). These topological edge states can be explored to construct backscattering-immune one-way waveguide and other nonreciprocal electromagnetic devices. In this paper we review our recent theoretical and experimental studies of the unique electromagnetic properties of nonreciprocal devices built in GPCs. We will discuss various basic issues like experimental instrumental setup, sample preparations, numerical simulation methods, tunable properties against magnetic field, band degeneracy breaking and band gap opening and creation of topological CESs. We will investigate the unidirectional transport properties of one-way waveguide under the influence of waveguide geometries, interface morphologies, intruding obstacles, impedance mismatch, lattice disorders, and material dissipation loss. We will discuss the unique coupling properties between one-wave waveguide and resonant cavities and their application as novel one-way bandstop filter and one-way channel-drop filter. We will also compare the CESs created in the Bragg-scattering band gap and the MSP band gap under the influence of lattice disorders. These results can be helpful for designing and exploring novel nonreciprocal electromagnetic devices for optical integration and information processing.

  2. Magneto-optical non-reciprocal devices in silicon photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon waveguide optical non-reciprocal devices based on the magneto-optical effect are reviewed. The non-reciprocal phase shift caused by the first-order magneto-optical effect is effective in realizing optical non-reciprocal devices in silicon waveguide platforms. In a silicon-on-insulator waveguide, the low refractive index of the buried oxide layer enhances the magneto-optical phase shift, which reduces the device footprints. A surface activated direct bonding technique was developed to integrate a magneto-optical garnet crystal on the silicon waveguides. A silicon waveguide optical isolator based on the magneto-optical phase shift was demonstrated with an optical isolation of 30 dB and insertion loss of 13 dB at a wavelength of 1548 nm. Furthermore, a four port optical circulator was demonstrated with maximum isolations of 15.3 and 9.3 dB in cross and bar ports, respectively, at a wavelength of 1531 nm.

  3. Non-reciprocal few-photon devices based on chiral waveguide-emitter couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Ballestero, C; Vidal, F J Garcia; Gonzalez-Tudela, A

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of designing efficient, non reciprocal few-photon devices by exploiting the chiral coupling between two waveguide modes and a single quantum emitter. We show how this system can induce non-reciprocal photon transport at the single-photon level and act as an optical diode. Afterwards, we also show how the same system shows a transistor-like behaviour for a two-photon input. The efficiency in both cases is shown to be large for feasible experimental implementations. Our results illustrate the potential of chiral waveguide-emitter couplings for applications in quantum circuitry.

  4. On-chip non-reciprocal optical devices based on quantum inspired photonic lattices

    CERN Document Server

    El-Ganainy, Ramy; Eisfeld, Alexander; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel geometry for integrated photonic devices that can be used as isolators and polarization splitters based on engineered photonic lattices. Starting from optical waveguide arrays that mimic Fock space representation of a non-interacting two-site Bose Hubbard Hamiltonian, we show that introducing magneto-optic nonreciprocity to these structures leads to a superior optical isolation performance. In the forward propagation direction, an input TM polarized beam experiences a perfect state transfer between the input and output waveguide channels while surface Bloch oscillations block the backward transmission between the same ports. Our analysis indicates a large isolation ratio of 75 dB after a propagation distance of 8 mm inside seven coupled waveguides. Moreover, we demonstrate that, a judicious choice of the nonreciprocity in this same geometry can lead to perfect polarization splitting.

  5. Magneto-Optical Thin Films for On-Chip Monolithic Integration of Non-Reciprocal Photonic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Cengiz Onbasli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Achieving monolithic integration of nonreciprocal photonic devices on semiconductor substrates has been long sought by the photonics research society. One way to achieve this goal is to deposit high quality magneto-optical oxide thin films on a semiconductor substrate. In this paper, we review our recent research activity on magneto-optical oxide thin films toward the goal of monolithic integration of nonreciprocal photonic devices on silicon. We demonstrate high Faraday rotation at telecommunication wavelengths in several novel magnetooptical oxide thin films including Co substituted CeO2−δ, Co- or Fe-substituted SrTiO3−δ, as well as polycrystalline garnets on silicon. Figures of merit of 3~4 deg/dB and 21 deg/dB are achieved in epitaxial Sr(Ti0.2Ga0.4Fe0.4O3−δ and polycrystalline (CeY2Fe5O12 films, respectively. We also demonstrate an optical isolator on silicon, based on a racetrack resonator using polycrystalline (CeY2Fe5O12/silicon strip-loaded waveguides. Our work demonstrates that physical vapor deposited magneto-optical oxide thin films on silicon can achieve high Faraday rotation, low optical loss and high magneto-optical figure of merit, therefore enabling novel high-performance non-reciprocal photonic devices monolithically integrated on semiconductor substrates.

  6. Comment to "Nonreciprocal Light Propagation in a Silicon Photonic Circuit"

    CERN Document Server

    Baets, Roel; Melloni, Andrea; Popović, Miloš; Vanwolleghem, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    In the article "Nonreciprocal Light Propagation in a Silicon Photonic Circuit" (Science 333, 729-733 (2011) a nonreciprocal waveguide system based on a combination of silicon, dielectrics and metals is reported. In this Comment it is explained that the interpretation with respect to nonreciprocity in this paper is incorrect and conflicts with the fundamental Lorentz reciprocity theorem. It is further pointed out that a previous publication already introduced the device concept.

  7. Non-Reciprocal on Wafer Microwave Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-27

    Journal of Applied Physics , (02 2012): 7542. doi: Bijoy K. Kuanr, T. J. Fal, Z...Celinski, R. E. Camley. Iron based microstrip phase shifter; optimization of phase shift, Journal of Applied Physics , (02 2012): 7508. doi: T. J...Fal, R. E. Camley. Non-reciprocal devices using attenuated total reflection and thin filmmagnetic layered structures, Journal of Applied Physics ,

  8. Optical nonreciprocal transmission in an asymmetric silicon photonic crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zheng; Chen, Juguang; Ji, Mengxi; Huang, Qingzhong; Xia, Jinsong; Wang, Yi, E-mail: yingwu2@126.com, E-mail: ywangwnlo@mail.hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Wu, Ying, E-mail: yingwu2@126.com, E-mail: ywangwnlo@mail.hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2015-11-30

    An optical nonreciprocal transmission (ONT) is realized by employing the nonlinear effects in a compact asymmetric direct-coupled nanocavity-waveguide silicon photonic crystal structure with a high loaded quality factor (Q{sub L}) of 42 360 and large extinction ratio exceeding 30 dB. Applying a single step lithography and successive etching, the device can realize the ONT in an individual nanocavity, alleviating the requirement to accurately control the resonance of the cavities. A maximum nonreciprocal transmission ratio of 21.1 dB as well as a working bandwidth of 280 pm in the telecommunication band are obtained at a low input power of 76.7 μW. The calculated results by employing a nonlinear coupled-mode model are in good agreement with the experiment.

  9. Nonreciprocal transmission in a nonlinear photonic-crystal Fano structure with broken symmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Yi; Chen, Yaohui; Hu, Hao;

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructures that feature nonreciprocal light trans- mission are highly desirable building blocks for realizing photonic integrated circuits. Here, a simple and ultracompact photonic-crystal structure, where a waveguide is coupled to a single nanocavity, is proposed and experimentally demon- st...... tunability. The nonlinearity of the device relies on ultrafast carrier dynamics, rather than the thermal effects usually considered, allowing the demonstration of nonreciprocal operation at a bit-rate of 10 Gbit s − 1 with a low energy consumption of 4.5 fJ bit − 1...

  10. Nonreciprocal Photon Transmission and Amplification via Reservoir Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Metelmann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a general method for constructing nonreciprocal, cavity-based photonic devices, based on matching a given coherent interaction with its corresponding dissipative counterpart; our method generalizes the basic structure used in the theory of cascaded quantum systems and can render an extremely wide class of interactions directional. In contrast to standard interference-based schemes, our approach allows directional behavior over a wide bandwidth. We show how it can be used to devise isolators and directional, quantum-limited amplifiers. We discuss in detail how this general method allows the construction of a directional, noise-free phase-sensitive amplifier that is not limited by any fundamental gain-bandwidth constraint. Our approach is particularly well suited to implementations using superconducting microwave circuits and optomechanical systems.

  11. Nonreciprocal Coupling in Asymmetric Dual-Core Photonic Crystal Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lin; YANG Chang-Xi

    2004-01-01

    @@ The photonic crystal fibre with asymmetric dual cores is shown to attain strongly nonreciprocal coupling of the lightwave propagating along the fibre, for the first time to our knowledge. It is found that the coupling properties can be quite different when the incident position is changed. This kind of fibre could have potential for unidirectional coupler applications in fibre-optic local and metropolitan area networks. We also examine the polarization and wavelength dependence of the coupling nonreciprocity in the asymmetric dual-core photonic crystal fibres.

  12. Nonreciprocal transmission in a photonic-crystal Fano structure enabled by symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yi; Hu, Hao; Xue, Weiqi; Yvind, Kresten; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructures that feature nonreciprocal light transmission are highly desirable building blocks for realizing photonic integrated circuits. Here, a simple and ultra-compact photonic-crystal structure, where a waveguide is coupled to a single nanocavity, is proposed and experimentally demonstrated, showing very efficient optical diode functionality. The key novelty of the structure is the use of a Fano resonance in combination with spatial symmetry breaking and cavity enhanced material nonlinearities to realize non-reciprocal propagation effects at ultra-low power and with a good wavelength tunability. The nonlinearity of the device relies on ultrafast carrier dynamics, rather than the thermal effects usually considered, allowing the demonstration of nonreciprocal operation at a bit-rate of 10 Gbit/s with a low energy consumption of 4.5 fJ/bit.

  13. Nonreciprocal quantum interactions and devices via autonomous feedforward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelmann, A.; Clerk, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    In a recent work [A. Metelmann and A. A. Clerk, Phys. Rev. X 5, 021025 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.021025], a general reservoir engineering approach for generating nonreciprocal quantum interactions and devices was described. We show here how in many cases this general recipe can be viewed as an example of autonomous feedforward: the full dissipative evolution is identical to the unconditional evolution in a setup where an observer performs an ideal quantum measurement of one system, and then uses the results to drive a second system. We also extend the application of this approach to nonreciprocal quantum amplifiers, showing the added functionality possible when using two engineered reservoirs. In particular, we demonstrate how to construct an ideal phase-preserving cavity-based amplifier which is fully nonreciprocal, quantum limited, and free of any fundamental gain-bandwidth constraint.

  14. Nonreciprocal conversion between microwave and optical photons in electro-optomechanical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xun-Wei; Chen, Ai-Xi; Liu, Yu-xi

    2015-01-01

    We propose to demonstrate nonreciprocal conversion between microwave photons and optical photons in an electro-optomechanical system where a microwave mode and an optical mode are coupled indirectly via two non-degenerate mechanical modes. The nonreciprocal conversion is obtained in the broken time-reversal symmetry regime, where the conversion of photons from one frequency to the other is enhanced for constructive quantum interference while the conversion in the reversal direction is suppressed due to destructive quantum interference. It is interesting that the nonreciprocal response between the microwave and optical modes in the electro-optomechanical system appears at two different frequencies with opposite directions. The proposal can be used to realize nonreciprocal conversion between photons of any two distinctive modes with different frequencies. Moreover, the electro-optomechanical system can also be used to construct a three-port circulator for three optical modes with distinctively different frequen...

  15. Achieving nonreciprocal unidirectional single-photon quantum transport using the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Luqi; Xu, Shanshan; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-11-15

    We show that nonreciprocal unidirectional single-photon quantum transport can be achieved with the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect. The system consists of a 1D waveguide coupling to two three-level atoms of the V-type. The two atoms, in addition, are each driven by an external coherent field. We show that the phase of the external coherent field provides a gauge potential for the photon states. With a proper choice of the phase difference between the two coherent fields, the transport of a single photon can exhibit unity contrast in its transmissions for the two propagation directions.

  16. Scanning nonreciprocity spatial four-wave mixing process in moving photonic band gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Zhang, Yunzhe; Li, Mingyue; Ma, Danmeng; Guo, Ji; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2017-03-01

    We experimentally investigate the scanning nonreciprocity of four-wave mixing process induced by optical parametric amplification in moving photonic band gap, which is different from the propagation nonreciprocity in the optical diode. Meanwhile the frequency offset and the intensity difference are observed when we scan the frequency of the beams on two arm ramps of one round trip. Such scanning nonreciprocities can be controlled by changing the frequency detuning of the dressing beams. For the first time, we find that the intensity difference can cause the nonreciprocity in spatial image. In the nonreciprocity process, the focusing or defocusing is resulted from the feedback dressing self-phase modulation while shift and split is attributed to feedback dressing cross-phase modulation. Our study could have a potential application in the controllable optical diode.

  17. Asymmetric Band Diagrams in Photonic Crystals with a Spontaneous Nonreciprocal Response

    CERN Document Server

    Prudêncio, Filipa R; Paiva, Carlos R

    2015-01-01

    We study the propagation of electromagnetic waves in layered photonic crystals formed by materials with a spontaneous nonreciprocal response, such as Tellegen (axion) media or topological insulators. Surprisingly, it is proven that stratified Tellegen photonic crystals that break simultaneously the space inversion and time reversal symmetries have always symmetric dispersion diagrams. Interestingly, we show that by combining chiral and nonreciprocal materials the photonic band diagrams can exhibit a spectral asymmetry such that . Furthermore, it is demonstrated that in some conditions two juxtaposed Tellegen medium layers have an electromagnetic response analogous to that of a biased ferrite slab.

  18. Experimental demonstration of non-reciprocal transmission in a nonlinear photonic-crystal Fano structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Yi; Chen, Yaohui; Hu, Hao;

    2015-01-01

    We suggest and experimentally demonstrate a photonic-crystal structure with more than 30 dB difference between forward and backward transmission levels. The non-reciprocity relies on the combination of ultrafast carrier nonlinearities and spatial symmetry breaking in a Fano structure employing...

  19. Investigation of residual core ellipticity induced nonreciprocity in air-core photonic bandgap fiber optical gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zuchen; Zhang, Zhihao; Jin, Jing; Song, Ningfang

    2014-11-01

    Air-core photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) is an excellent choice for fiber optic gyroscope owing to its incomparable adaptability of environment. Strong and continuous polarization mode coupling is found in PBFs with an average intensity of ~-30 dB, but the coupling arrives at the limit when the maximum optical path difference between the primary waves and the polarization-mode-coupling-induced secondary waves reaches ~10mm, which is corresponding to the PBF length of ~110 m according to the birefringence in the PBF. Incident light with the low extinction ratio (ER) can suppress the birth of the polarization-mode-coupling-induced secondary waves, but the low-ER light obtained by the conventional Lyot depolarizers does not work here. Consequently, a large nonreciprocity and a bias error of ~13°/h are caused in the air-core photonic bandgap fiber optical gyroscope (PBFOG) with a PBF coil of ~268 m.

  20. Passive technologies for future large-scale photonic integrated circuits on silicon: polarization handling, light non-reciprocity and loss reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoxin Dai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon-based large-scale photonic integrated circuits are becoming important, due to the need for higher complexity and lower cost for optical transmitters, receivers and optical buffers. In this paper, passive technologies for large-scale photonic integrated circuits are described, including polarization handling, light non-reciprocity and loss reduction. The design rule for polarization beam splitters based on asymmetrical directional couplers is summarized and several novel designs for ultra-short polarization beam splitters are reviewed. A novel concept for realizing a polarization splitter–rotator is presented with a very simple fabrication process. Realization of silicon-based light non-reciprocity devices (e.g., optical isolator, which is very important for transmitters to avoid sensitivity to reflections, is also demonstrated with the help of magneto-optical material by the bonding technology. Low-loss waveguides are another important technology for large-scale photonic integrated circuits. Ultra-low loss optical waveguides are achieved by designing a Si3N4 core with a very high aspect ratio. The loss is reduced further to <0.1 dB m−1 with an improved fabrication process incorporating a high-quality thermal oxide upper cladding by means of wafer bonding. With the developed ultra-low loss Si3N4 optical waveguides, some devices are also demonstrated, including ultra-high-Q ring resonators, low-loss arrayed-waveguide grating (demultiplexers, and high-extinction-ratio polarizers.

  1. The use of semiconductors in nonreciprocal devices for submillimeter wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, R. E.; May, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of anisotropic effects in a passive semiconductor magnetoplasma for the development of submillimeter isolators and circulators. The emphasis is on two schemes that are applicable over the far infrared portion of the spectrum. The theory of transmission devices depending on Faraday rotation is described, and experiments are discussed. At far infrared wavelengths it is not necessary to cool the semiconductor in order to achieve low forward loss. Some experimental results are available in this frequency range, and a theoretical evaluation of device performance is given. Reflection devices in which the desired signal does not propagate through the semiconductor, but is reflected off of its surface, are also discussed. Experimental results show that these devices can have a low forward loss; a variety of novel geometrical arrangements are able to improve isolator performance. Theoretical results indicating satisfactory performance for a far infrared isolator using InSb at room temperature are presented.

  2. Physics of photonic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Shun Lien

    2009-01-01

    The most up-to-date book available on the physics of photonic devices This new edition of Physics of Photonic Devices incorporates significant advancements in the field of photonics that have occurred since publication of the first edition (Physics of Optoelectronic Devices). New topics covered include a brief history of the invention of semiconductor lasers, the Lorentz dipole method and metal plasmas, matrix optics, surface plasma waveguides, optical ring resonators, integrated electroabsorption modulator-lasers, and solar cells. It also introduces exciting new fields of research such as:

  3. Photonic crystal Fano resonances for realizing optical switches, lasers and non-reciprocal elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekele, Dagmawi Alemayehu; Yu, Yi; Hu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    structure in combination with cavity-enhanced nonlinearity can be used to realize non-reciprocal transmission at ultra-low power and with large bandwidth. A novel type of laser structure, denoted a Fano laser, is discussed in which one of the mirrors is based on a Fano resonance. Finally, the design...

  4. Nonreciprocal Nongyrotropic Magnetless Metasurface

    CERN Document Server

    Taravati, Sajjad; Gupta, Shulabh; Achouri, Karim; Caloz, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a nonreciprocal nongyrotropic magnetless metasurface. In contrast to previous nonreciprocal structures, this metasurface does not require a biasing magnet, and is therefore lightweight and amenable to integrated circuit fabrication. Moreover, it does not induce Faraday rotation, and hence does not alter the polarization of waves, which is a desirable feature in many nonreciprocal devices. The metasurface is designed according to a Surface-Circuit-Surface (SCS) architecture and leverages the inherent unidirectionality of transistors for breaking time reversal symmetry. Interesting features include transmission gain as well as broad operating bandwidth and angular sector operation. It is finally shown that the metasurface is bianisotropic in nature, with nonreciprocity due to the electric-magnetic coupling parameters, and structurally equivalent to a moving uniaxial metasurface.

  5. Silicon active photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitrios

    Active photonic devices utilizing the optical nonlinearities of silicon have emerged in the last 5 years and the effort for commercial photonic devices in the material that has been the workhorse of electronics has been building up since. This dissertation presents the theory for some of these devices. We are concerned herein with CW lasers, amplifiers and wavelength converters that are based on the Raman effect. There have already been cursory experimental demonstrations of these devices and some of their limitations are already apparent. Most of the limitations observed are because of the appearance of effects that are competing with stimulated Raman scattering. Under the high optical powers that are necessary for the Raman effect (tens to hundrends of mW's) the process of optical two-photon (TPA) absorption occurs. The absorption of optical power that it causes itself is weak but in the process electrons and holes are generated which can further absorb light through the free-carrier absorption effect (FCA). The effective "lifetime" that these carriers have determines the magnitude of the FCA loss. We present a model for the carrier lifetime in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) waveguides and numerical simulations to understand how this critical parameter varies and how it can be controlled. A p-i-n junction built along SOI waveguides can help achieve lifetime of the order of 20--100 ps but the price one has to pay is on-chip electrical power consumption on the order of 100's of mWs. We model CW Raman lasers and we find that the carrier lifetime reduces the output power. If the carrier lifetime exceeds a certain "critical" value optical losses become overwhelming and lasing is impossible. As we show, in amplifiers, the nonlinear loss does not only result in diminished gain, but also in a higher noise figure. Finally the effect of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is examined. The effect is important because with a pump frequency at 1434nm coherent power

  6. Nanoimprinted photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jayan; Gangopadhyay, Palash; Munoz, Ramon; Peyghambarian, N.

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a simple yet efficient approach for nanoimprinting sub-50 nm dimensions starting from a low molecular weight plasticized polymer melt. This technique enabled us to successfully imprint versatile large area nanopatterns with high degrees of fidelity and rational control over the residual layers. The key advantage is its reliability in printing versatile nanostructures and nanophotonic devices doped with organic dyes owing to its low processing temperature. Since nanopatterns can be fabricated easily at low costs, this approach offers an easy pathway for achieving excellent nanoimprinted structures for a variety of photonic, electronic and biological research and applications.

  7. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexis

    2005-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid-state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as a cage for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale thus paves the way to the realisation of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This should contribute toward meeting the demands for a greater miniaturisation that the processing of an ever increasing number of data requires. Photonic Crystals intends at providing students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background needed for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found applications. As such, it aims at building brid...

  8. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexei; Pagnoux, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as cages for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale paves the way to the realization of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This will contribute towards meeting the demands for greater miniaturization imposed by the processing of an ever increasing number of data. Photonic Crystals will provide students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background required for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, ranging from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found application. As such, it aims at building bridges between...

  9. Nonreciprocal Transverse Photonic Spin and Magnetization-Induced Electromagnetic Spin-Orbit Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    A study of nonreciprocal transverse-spin angular-momentum-density shifts for evanescent waves in magneto-optic waveguide media is presented. Their functional relation to electromagnetic spin- and orbital-momenta is presented and analyzed. It is shown that the magneto-optic gyrotropy can be re-interpreted as the nonreciprocal electromagnetic spin-density shift per unit energy flux, thus providing an interesting alternative physical picture for the magneto-optic gyrotropy. The transverse spin-density shift is found to be thickness-dependent in slab optical waveguides. This dependence is traceable to the admixture of minority helicity components in the transverse spin angular momentum. It is also shown that the transverse spin is magnetically tunable. A formulation of electromagnetic spin-orbit coupling in magneto-optic media is presented, and an alternative source of spin-orbit coupling to non-paraxial optics vortices is proposed. It is shown that magnetization-induced electromagnetic spin-orbit coupling is pos...

  10. Nonreciprocity and one-way topological transitions in hyperbolic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviyev, A.; Stein, B.; Christofi, A.; Galfsky, T.; Krishnamoorthy, H.; Kuskovsky, I. L.; Menon, V.; Khanikaev, A. B.

    2017-07-01

    Control of the electromagnetic waves in nano-scale structured materials is crucial to the development of next generation photonic circuits and devices. In this context, hyperbolic metamaterials, where elliptical isofrequency surfaces are morphed into surfaces with exotic hyperbolic topologies when the structure parameters are tuned, have shown unprecedented control over light propagation and interaction. Here we show that such topological transitions can be even more unusual when the hyperbolic metamaterial is endowed with nonreciprocity. Judicious design of metamaterials with reduced spatial symmetries, together with the breaking of time-reversal symmetry through magnetization, is shown to result in nonreciprocal dispersion and one-way topological phase transitions in hyperbolic metamaterials.

  11. Nonreciprocal Transverse Photonic Spin and Magnetization-Induced Electromagnetic Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Miguel; Karki, Dolendra

    2017-01-01

    We present a formulation of electromagnetic spin-orbit coupling in magneto-optic media, and propose an alternative source of spin-orbit coupling to non-paraxial optics vortices. Our treatment puts forth a formulation of nonreciprocal transverse-spin angular-momentum-density shifts for evanescent waves in magneto-optic waveguide media. It shows that magnetization-induced electromagnetic spin-orbit coupling is possible, and that it leads to unequal spin to orbital angular momentum conversion in magneto-optic media evanescent waves in opposite propagation-directions. Generation of free-space helicoidal beams based on this conversion is shown to be spin-helicity- and magnetization-dependent. We show that transverse-spin to orbital angular momentum coupling into magneto-optic waveguide media engenders spin-helicity-dependent unidirectional propagation. This unidirectional effect produces different orbital angular momenta in opposite directions upon excitation-spin-helicity reversals. PMID:28059120

  12. Nonreciprocal Transverse Photonic Spin and Magnetization-Induced Electromagnetic Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Miguel; Karki, Dolendra

    2017-01-01

    We present a formulation of electromagnetic spin-orbit coupling in magneto-optic media, and propose an alternative source of spin-orbit coupling to non-paraxial optics vortices. Our treatment puts forth a formulation of nonreciprocal transverse-spin angular-momentum-density shifts for evanescent waves in magneto-optic waveguide media. It shows that magnetization-induced electromagnetic spin-orbit coupling is possible, and that it leads to unequal spin to orbital angular momentum conversion in magneto-optic media evanescent waves in opposite propagation-directions. Generation of free-space helicoidal beams based on this conversion is shown to be spin-helicity- and magnetization-dependent. We show that transverse-spin to orbital angular momentum coupling into magneto-optic waveguide media engenders spin-helicity-dependent unidirectional propagation. This unidirectional effect produces different orbital angular momenta in opposite directions upon excitation-spin-helicity reversals.

  13. Silicon photonics fundamentals and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Deen, M Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The creation of affordable high speed optical communications using standard semiconductor manufacturing technology is a principal aim of silicon photonics research. This would involve replacing copper connections with optical fibres or waveguides, and electrons with photons. With applications such as telecommunications and information processing, light detection, spectroscopy, holography and robotics, silicon photonics has the potential to revolutionise electronic-only systems. Providing an overview of the physics, technology and device operation of photonic devices using exclusively silicon and related alloys, the book includes: * Basic Properties of Silicon * Quantum Wells, Wires, Dots and Superlattices * Absorption Processes in Semiconductors * Light Emitters in Silicon * Photodetectors , Photodiodes and Phototransistors * Raman Lasers including Raman Scattering * Guided Lightwaves * Planar Waveguide Devices * Fabrication Techniques and Material Systems Silicon Photonics: Fundamentals and Devices outlines ...

  14. Non-reciprocal nonlinear optic induced transparency and frequency conversion on a chip

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Xiang; Jung, Hojoong; Tang, Hong X

    2015-01-01

    Developments in photonic chips have spurred photon based classical and quantum information processing, attributing to the high stability and scalability of integrated photonic devices [1, 2]. Optical nonlinearity [3] is indispensable in these complex photonic circuits, because it allows for classical and quantum light sources, all-optical switch, modulation, and non-reciprocity in ambient environments. It is commonly known that nonlinear interactions are often greatly enhanced in the microcavities [4]. However, the manifestations of coherent photon-photon interaction in a cavity, analogous to the electromagnetically induced transparency [5], have never been reported on an integrated platform. Here, we present an experimental demonstration of the coherent photon-photon interaction induced by second order optical nonlinearity (\\chi^{(2)} ) on an aluminum nitride photonic chip. The non-reciprocal nonlinear optic induced transparency is demonstrated as a result of the coherent interference between photons with di...

  15. Fundamental limits and near-optimal design of graphene modulators and non-reciprocal devices

    CERN Document Server

    Tamagnone, Michele; Mosig, Juan R; Perruisseau-Carrier, Julien

    2013-01-01

    The potential of graphene for use in photonic applications was evidenced by recent demonstrations of modulators, polarisation rotators, and isolators. These promising yet preliminary results raise crucial questions: what is the optimal performance achievable by more complex designs using multilayer structures, graphene patterning, metal additions, or a combination of these approaches, and how can this optimum design be achieved in practice? Today, the complexity of the problem, which is magnified by the variability in graphene parameters, leaves the design of these new devices to time-consuming and suboptimal trial-and-error procedures. We address this issue by first demonstrating that the relevant figures of merit for the devices above are subject to absolute theoretical upper bounds. Strikingly these limits are related only to the conductivity tensor of graphene; thus, we can provide essential roadmap information such as the best possible device performance versus wavelength and graphene quality. Second, ba...

  16. Silicon Nano-Photonic Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao

    This thesis deals with the design, fabrication and characterization of nano-photonic devices including ridge waveguide components, microring resonators, and photonic crystal components, and explore the potential for these devices in dierent applications ranging from optical communication...... is achieved with small power variation. A widely tunable microwave notch lter is also experimentally demonstrated at 40 GHz. Other application such as pulse repetition rate multiplication by using microring resonator is also presented. Photonic crystal components are studied. Two dierent types of photonic...... crystal structures are analyzed concerning index sensitivity, dispersion engineering, and slow-light coupling. Several photonic crystal devices such as index sensor, slow-light coupler, and all-optical tunable cavity are presented....

  17. Integrated Ultrasonic-Photonic Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barretto, Elaine Cristina Saraiva

    This thesis deals with the modeling, design, fabrication and characterization of integrated ultrasonic-photonic devices, with particular focus on the use of standard semiconductor materials such as GaAs and silicon. The devices are based on the use of guided acoustic waves to modulate the light...... systems, all in search for paths to improve acousto-optic interaction. Some of the solutions proposed lead to enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude in the eciency of the device. The main aspects related to the design of the devices are discussed, including single-mode guidance, optical coupling......, integration and cost. The design proves to be robust towards fabrication and design tolerances. Several uses for this device are proposed, opening up a whole new group of applications for this class of integrated ultrasonic-photonic devices....

  18. Atomically thin nonreciprocal optical isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao; Wang, Zuojia; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Baile; Chen, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Optical isolators will play a critical role in next-generation photonic circuits, but their on-chip integration requires miniaturization with suitable nonreciprocal photonic materials. Here, we theoretically demonstrate the thinnest possible and polarization-selective nonreciprocal isolation for circularly polarized waves by using graphene monolayer under an external magnetic field. The underlying mechanism is that graphene electron velocity can be largely different for the incident wave propagating in opposite directions at cyclotron frequency, making graphene highly conductive and reflective in one propagation direction while transparent in the opposite propagation direction under an external magnetic field. When some practical loss is introduced, nonreciprocal isolation with graphene monolayer still possesses good performance in a broad bandwidth. Our work shows the first study on the extreme limit of thickness for optical isolation and provides theoretical guidance in future practical applications. PMID:24569672

  19. Optically Reconfigurable Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qian; Gholipour, Behrad; Wang, Chih-Ming; Yuan, Guanghui; Teng, Jinghua; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2015-01-01

    Optoelectronic components with adjustable parameters, from variable-focal-length lenses to spectral filters that can change functionality upon stimulation, have enormous technological importance. Tuning of such components is conventionally achieved by either micro- or nano-mechanical actuation of their consitutive parts, stretching or application of thermal stimuli. Here we report a new dielectric metasurface platform for reconfigurable optical components that are created with light in a non-volatile and reversible fashion. Such components are written, erased and re-written as two-dimensional binary or grey-scale patterns into a nanoscale film of phase change material by inducing a refractive-index-changing phase-transition with tailored trains of femtosecond pulses. We combine germanium-antimony-tellurium-based films optimized for high-optical-contrast ovonic switching with a sub-wavelength-resolution optical writing process to demonstrate technologically relevant devices: visible-range reconfigurable bi-chr...

  20. Non-Reciprocal Optical Antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Castro-Lopez, Marta; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics aims to interface photonics and electronics. Finding optical, near-field analogues of much used electro-technical components is crucial to the success of such a platform. Here we present the plasmonic analogue of a non-reciprocal antenna. For non-reciprocality in a plasmonic context, the optical excitation and emission resonances of the antenna need to be an orthogonal set. We show that nonlinear excitation of metal nanoantennas creates a sufficient shift between excitation and emission wavelengths that they can be interpreted as decoupled, allowing for independent tuning of excitation and emission properties along different spatial dimensions. This leads, for given excitation wavelength and polarization, to independent optimization of emission intensity, frequency spectrum, polarization and angular spectrum. Non-reciprocal optical antennas of both gold and aluminum are characterized and shown to be useful as e.g. nonlinear signal transducers or nanoscale sources of widely tunable light.

  1. Polarizabilities of nonreciprocal bianisotropic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Mirmoosa, M S; Asadchy, V S; Simovski, C R; Tretyakov, S A

    2014-01-01

    For two electrically small nonreciprocal scatterers an analytical electromagnetic model of polarizabilities is developed. Both particles are bianisotropic: the so-called Tellegen-omega particle and moving-chiral particle. Analytical results are compared to the full-wave numerical simulations. Both models satisfy to main physical restrictions and leave no doubts in the possibility to realize these particles experimentally. This paper is a necessary step towards applications of nonreciprocal bianisotropic particles such as perfect electromagnetic isolators, twist polarizers, thin-sheet phase shifters, and other devices.

  2. Semiconducting-polymer photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Peter; Tessler, Nir; Friend, Richard H.

    2001-10-01

    The last decade has seen tremendous advances in the field of semiconducting-polymer optoelectronics as a result of a concerted chemistry, physics and engineering effort. For example, ink-jet-printed full-color active-matrix thin-film display prototypes with semiconducting polymers as the active layers have already been demonstrated. The key advantages of this technology lie in its full-color capability, scalability to both large-area and micro- displays, as well as low-cost associated with simplicity and solution processability. In a number of related inorganic device technologies, the control of optical properties using photonic structures has ben crucial to the performance of the devices. In principle, polymer devices can also benefit from such control if appropriate polymer optical building blocks that retain the processing advantages can be found. Here we will show that the refractive index of poly(p- phenylenevinuylene) (PPV) can be tuned over remarkable ranges from 1.6 to 2.7 at 550-nm wavelength by dispersing 50-angstrom-diameter silica nanoparticles into its matrix. This is achieved without incurring significant optical scattering losses. Using these semiconducting-polymer composites, we have demonstrated efficient distributed Bragg reflectors in the green spectral region from relatively few periods of quarterwave stacks of the high- and low-index materials. Controlled chemical doping of these photonic structures fabricated polymer microcavity light-emitting diodes in which current is injected through the polymer DBR with adequate confinement of photons and electron-hole pairs. We have also fabricated photo pumped all-polymer microcavity structures.

  3. Nonreciprocal propagation of surface plasmon mode guided through graphene layer on magnetized semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagyaraj, C.; Mathew, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the nonreciprocal effect induced by magnetized semiconductor substrate on surface plasmon mode guided through monolayer graphene. Dispersion relation for the fundamental antisymmetric mode is derived analytically. Nonreciprocal propagation characteristics of fundamental mode is studied as a function of wavelength, graphene layer chemical potential and biasing magnetic field. Fundamental mode exhibits appreciable nonreciprocal dispersion for transversal magnetization of semiconductor substrate in midinfrared and terahertz frequencies. Cutoff wavelength for backward propagating mode is observed above 2.5 T of external biasing field. Cutoff wavelength is found to be decreasing with increase in the biasing magnetic field and cladding index, also identified to be independent of graphene layer chemical potential. Proposed waveguide structure suggests the possibility of realizing one way propagating plasmonic waveguides with widely tunable guiding characteristics and related functional devices such as isolators, modulators, phase shifters and switches for integrated photonic circuits.

  4. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Chunle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  5. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chunle; Bell, Bryn; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2016-09-01

    Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon) and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  6. Spin photonics and spin-photonic devices with dielectric metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yachao; Ke, Yougang; Zhou, Xinxing; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric metasurfaces with spatially varying birefringence and high transmission efficiency can exhibit exceptional abilities for controlling the photonic spin states. We present here some of our works on spin photonics and spin-photonic devices with metasurfaces. We develop a hybrid-order Poincare sphere to describe the evolution of spin states of wave propagation in the metasurface. Both the Berry curvature and the Pancharatnam-Berry phase on the hybrid-order Poincare sphere are demonstrated to be proportional to the variation of total angular momentum. Based on the spin-dependent property of Pancharatnam-Berry phase, we find that the photonic spin Hall effect can be observed when breaking the rotational symmetry of metasurfaces. Moreover, we show that the dielectric metasurfaces can provide great flexibility in the design of novel spin-photonic devices such as spin filter and spin-dependent beam splitter.

  7. Integrated optical devices for photonics instrumentation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWright, G.M.; Lafaw, D.A.; Lowry, M.; Tindall, W.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the design, fabrication, and evaluation of high speed integrated optical devices for application to photonics instrumentation systems. Specifically, we have demonstrated integrated optical devices with bandwidths in excess of 25 GHz and implemented these devices in single-shot, streak camera based recording schemes. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Nonreciprocal light transmission based on the thermal radiative effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2015-01-01

    Nonreciprocal light transmission is critical in building optical isolations and circulations in optical communication systems. Achieving high optical isolation and broad bandwidth with CMOS-compatibility are still difficult in silicon nano-photonics. Here we first experimentally demonstrate that ...

  9. Toward biomaterial-based implantable photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humar, Matjaž; Kwok, Sheldon J. J.; Choi, Myunghwan; Yetisen, Ali K.; Cho, Sangyeon; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2017-03-01

    Optical technologies are essential for the rapid and efficient delivery of health care to patients. Efforts have begun to implement these technologies in miniature devices that are implantable in patients for continuous or chronic uses. In this review, we discuss guidelines for biomaterials suitable for use in vivo. Basic optical functions such as focusing, reflection, and diffraction have been realized with biopolymers. Biocompatible optical fibers can deliver sensing or therapeutic-inducing light into tissues and enable optical communications with implanted photonic devices. Wirelessly powered, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and miniature lasers made of biocompatible materials may offer new approaches in optical sensing and therapy. Advances in biotechnologies, such as optogenetics, enable more sophisticated photonic devices with a high level of integration with neurological or physiological circuits. With further innovations and translational development, implantable photonic devices offer a pathway to improve health monitoring, diagnostics, and light-activated therapies.

  10. Nonreciprocity and magnetic-free isolation based on optomechanical interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ruesink, Freek; Alù, Andrea; Verhagen, Ewold

    2016-01-01

    Photonic nonreciprocal components, such as isolators and circulators, provide highly desirable functionalities for optical circuitry. This motivates the active investigation of mechanisms that break reciprocity, and pose alternatives to magneto-optic effects in on-chip systems. In this work, we use optomechanical interactions to strongly break reciprocity in a compact system. We derive minimal requirements to create nonreciprocity in a wide class of systems that couple two optical modes to a mechanical mode, highlighting the importance of optically biasing the modes at a controlled phase difference. We realize these principles in a silica microtoroid optomechanical resonator and use quantitative heterodyne spectroscopy to demonstrate up to 10 dB optical isolation at telecom wavelengths. We show that nonreciprocal transmission is preserved for nondegenerate modes, and demonstrate nonreciprocal parametric amplification. These results open a route to exploiting various nonreciprocal effects in optomechanical sys...

  11. Liquid crystal devices for photonics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2007-11-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) devices for Photonics applications is a hot topic of research. Such elements begin to appear in Photonics market. Passive elements for fiber optical communication systems (DWDM components) based on LC cells can successfully compete with the other elements used for the purpose, such as micro electromechanical (MEM), thermo-optical, opto-mechanical or acousto-optical devices. Application of nematic and ferroelectric LC for high speed communication systems, producing elements that are extremely fast, stable, durable, of low loss, operable over a wide temperature range, and that require small operating voltages and extremely low power consumption. The known LC applications in fiber optics enable to produce switches, filters, attenuators, equalizers, polarization controllers, phase emulators and other fiber optical components. Good robustness due to the absence of moving parts and compatibility with VLSI technology, excellent parameters in a large photonic wavelength range, whereas the complexity of the design and the cost of the device are equivalent to regular passive matrix LC displays makes LC fiber optical devices very attractive for mass production. We have already successfully fabricated certain prototypes of the optical switches based on ferroelectric and nematic LC materials. The electrooptical modes used for the purpose included the light polarization rotation, voltage controllable diffraction and fast switching of the LC refractive index. We used the powerful software to optimize the LC modulation characteristics. Use of photo-alignment technique pioneered by us makes it possible to develop new LC fiber components. Almost all the criteria of perfect LC alignment are met in case of azo-dye layers. We have already used azo-dye materials to align LC in superthin photonic holes, curved and 3D surfaces and as cladding layers in microring silicon based resonators. The prototypes of new LC efficient Photonics devices are envisaged. Controllable

  12. Flexible manufacturing for photonics device assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shin-Yee; Pocha, Michael D.; Strand, Oliver T.; Young, K. David

    1994-01-01

    The assembly of photonics devices such as laser diodes, optical modulators, and opto-electronics multi-chip modules (OEMCM), usually requires the placement of micron size devices such as laser diodes, and sub-micron precision attachment between optical fibers and diodes or waveguide modulators (usually referred to as pigtailing). This is a very labor intensive process. Studies done by the opto-electronics (OE) industry have shown that 95 percent of the cost of a pigtailed photonic device is due to the use of manual alignment and bonding techniques, which is the current practice in industry. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are working to reduce the cost of packaging OE devices through the use of automation. Our efforts are concentrated on several areas that are directly related to an automated process. This paper will focus on our progress in two of those areas, in particular, an automated fiber pigtailing machine and silicon micro-technology compatible with an automated process.

  13. Liquid Crystal photonic Bandgap Fiber Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei

    In this Ph.D. thesis, an experimental investigation of liquid crystal photonic bandgap (LCPBG) fiber devices and applications is presented. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) consist of a cladding microstructure with periodic index variations and a core defined by a defect of the structure....... The presence of liquid crystals (LCs) in the air-holes of the PCF transforms the fiber from a total internal reflection (TIR) guiding type into a photonic bandgap (PBG) guiding type. The light is confined to the silica core by coherent scattering from the LC-filled air-holes and the transmission spectrum...... of each LCPBG fiber. Finally, the applications for LCPBG fiber devices based on the on-chip platform design have been demonstrated in realizing microwave true-time delay and creating an electrically tunable fiber laser. Referatet mailes...

  14. Liquid Crystal photonic Bandgap Fiber Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei

    In this Ph.D. thesis, an experimental investigation of liquid crystal photonic bandgap (LCPBG) fiber devices and applications is presented. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) consist of a cladding microstructure with periodic index variations and a core defined by a defect of the structure....... The presence of liquid crystals (LCs) in the air-holes of the PCF transforms the fiber from a total internal reflection (TIR) guiding type into a photonic bandgap (PBG) guiding type. The light is confined to the silica core by coherent scattering from the LC-filled air-holes and the transmission spectrum...... of each LCPBG fiber. Finally, the applications for LCPBG fiber devices based on the on-chip platform design have been demonstrated in realizing microwave true-time delay and creating an electrically tunable fiber laser. Referatet mailes...

  15. Passive silicon photonic devices for microwave photonic signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiayang; Peng, Jizong; Liu, Boyu; Pan, Ting; Zhou, Huanying; Mao, Junming; Yang, Yuxing; Qiu, Ciyuan; Su, Yikai

    2016-08-01

    We present our recent progress on microwave signal processing (MSP) using on-chip passive silicon photonic devices, including tunable microwave notch filtering/millimeter-wave (MMW) signal generation based on self-coupled micro-resonators (SCMRs), and tunable radio-frequency (RF) phase shifting implemented by a micro-disk resonator (MDR). These schemes can provide improved flexibility and performances of MSP. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  16. Contactless heat flux control with photonic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control electric currents in solids using diodes and transistors is undoubtedly at the origin of the main developments in modern electronics which have revolutionized the daily life in the second half of 20th century. Surprisingly, until the year 2000 no thermal counterpart for such a control had been proposed. Since then, based on pioneering works on the control of phononic heat currents new devices were proposed which allow for the control of heat fluxes carried by photons rather than phonons or electrons. The goal of the present paper is to summarize the main advances achieved recently in the field of thermal energy control with photons.

  17. Device for Detecting highly energetic photons

    OpenAIRE

    Chemissani Road, Mokhtar; Álvarez Pastor, José; Sánchez Sánchez, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    A device (10) for detecting highly energetic photons, comprising one or more pixelated solid-state detectors (11) for detecting the highly energetic photons; means for providing a high voltage for polarizing said solid-state detectors; one or more pixelated readout elements (30), a readout element being connected to each of said one or more pixelated solid-state detectors (11); an input/output element (12) connected to said readout elements (30) for data input and output; and a base layer (13...

  18. All-photonic multifunctional molecular logic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréasson, Joakim; Pischel, Uwe; Straight, Stephen D; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, Devens

    2011-08-03

    Photochromes are photoswitchable, bistable chromophores which, like transistors, can implement binary logic operations. When several photochromes are combined in one molecule, interactions between them such as energy and electron transfer allow design of simple Boolean logic gates and more complex logic devices with all-photonic inputs and outputs. Selective isomerization of individual photochromes can be achieved using light of different wavelengths, and logic outputs can employ absorption and emission properties at different wavelengths, thus allowing a single molecular species to perform several different functions, even simultaneously. Here, we report a molecule consisting of three linked photochromes that can be configured as AND, XOR, INH, half-adder, half-subtractor, multiplexer, demultiplexer, encoder, decoder, keypad lock, and logically reversible transfer gate logic devices, all with a common initial state. The system demonstrates the advantages of light-responsive molecules as multifunctional, reconfigurable nanoscale logic devices that represent an approach to true molecular information processing units.

  19. Mid-infrared photonics devices in SOI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashanovich, G. Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Milošević, M. M.; Hu, Y.; Ben Masaud, T. M.; Jaberansary, E.; Chen, X.; Strain, M.; Sorel, M.; Peacock, A. C.; Chong, H. M. H.; Reed, G. T.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present silicon photonics devices designed for the 3-4μm wavelength region including waveguides, MMIs, ring resonators and Mach-Zehnder interferometers. The devices are based on silicon on insulator (SOI) platform. We show that 400-500 nm high silicon waveguides can have propagation losses as low as ~ 4 dB/cm at 3.8μm. We also demonstrate MMIs with insertion loss of 0.25 dB, high extinction ratio asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometers, and SOI ring resonators. This combined with our previous results reported at 3.4μm confirm that SOI is a viable platform for the 3-4 μm region and that low loss mid-infrared passive devices can be realized on it.

  20. Near optimal graphene terahertz non-reciprocal isolator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagnone, Michele; Moldovan, Clara; Poumirol, Jean-Marie; Kuzmenko, Alexey B.; Ionescu, Adrian M.; Mosig, Juan R.; Perruisseau-Carrier, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Isolators, or optical diodes, are devices enabling unidirectional light propagation by using non-reciprocal optical materials, namely materials able to break Lorentz reciprocity. The realization of isolators at terahertz frequencies is a very important open challenge made difficult by the intrinsically lossy propagation of terahertz radiation in current non-reciprocal materials. Here we report the design, fabrication and measurement of a terahertz non-reciprocal isolator for circularly polarized waves based on magnetostatically biased monolayer graphene, operating in reflection. The device exploits the non-reciprocal optical conductivity of graphene and, in spite of its simple design, it exhibits almost 20 dB of isolation and only 7.5 dB of insertion loss at 2.9 THz. Operation with linearly polarized light can be achieved using quarter-wave plates as polarization converters. These results demonstrate the superiority of graphene with respect to currently used terahertz non-reciprocal materials and pave the way to a novel class of optimal non-reciprocal devices.

  1. Current control of light by nonreciprocal magnetoplasmonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yongkang, E-mail: yongkang.gong@southwales.ac.uk; Li, Kang; Carver, Sara; Martinez, Juan Jose; Huang, Jungang; Copner, Nigel [Wireless and Optoelectronics Research and Innovation Centre (WORIC), Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Science, University of South Wales, Cardiff CF37 1DL (United Kingdom); Thueux, Yoann; Avlonitis, Nick [Airbus Group Innovations, Quadrant House, Celtic Springs, Coedkernew, NP10 8FZ Newport (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-11

    The ability to actively control light has long been a major scientific and technological goal. We proposed a scheme that allows for active control of light by utilizing the nonreciprocal magnetoplasmonic effect. As a proof of concept, we applied current signal through an ultrathin metallic film in a magneto-plasmonic multilayer and found that dynamic photonic nonreciprocity appears in magnetic-optical material layer due to the magnetic field being induced from current signal and modulates surface plasmon polaritons trapped in the metal surface and the light reflected. The proposed concept provides a possible way for the active control of light and could find potential applications such as ultrafast optoelectronic signal processing for plasmonic nanocircuit technology and ultrafast/large-aperture free-space electro-optic modulation platform for wireless laser communication technology.

  2. Nanoimprint Lithography of Topology Optimized Photonic Crystal Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Nielsen, Theodor

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate a nanoimprint process for fabrication of photonic crystal devices. The nanoimprint process, defining stamp patterns in a thin e-beam resist, yields improved pattern replication compared to direct e-beam writing of the devices....

  3. Special Polymer Optical Fibres and Devices for Photonic Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang-Ding Peng

    2003-01-01

    Remarkable progresses have been made in developing special polymer optical fibres and devices for photonic applications in recent years. This presentation will mainly report on the development of electro-optic, photosensitive and photorefractive polymer optical fibres and related devices.

  4. Demonstration of Efficient Nonreciprocity in a Microwave Optomechanical Circuit*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, G. A.; Lecocq, F.; Cicak, K.; Simmonds, R. W.; Aumentado, J.; Teufel, J. D.

    2017-07-01

    The ability to engineer nonreciprocal interactions is an essential tool in modern communication technology as well as a powerful resource for building quantum networks. Aside from large reverse isolation, a nonreciprocal device suitable for applications must also have high efficiency (low insertion loss) and low output noise. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have shown that nonreciprocal behavior can be achieved in optomechanical systems, but performance in these last two attributes has been limited. Here, we demonstrate an efficient, frequency-converting microwave isolator based on the optomechanical interactions between electromagnetic fields and a mechanically compliant vacuum-gap capacitor. We achieve simultaneous reverse isolation of more than 20 dB and insertion loss less than 1.5 dB. We characterize the nonreciprocal noise performance of the device, observing that the residual thermal noise from the mechanical environments is routed solely to the input of the isolator. Our measurements show quantitative agreement with a general coupled-mode theory. Unlike conventional isolators and circulators, these compact nonreciprocal devices do not require a static magnetic field, and they allow for dynamic control of the direction of isolation. With these advantages, similar devices could enable programmable, high-efficiency connections between disparate nodes of quantum networks, even efficiently bridging the microwave and optical domains.

  5. Experimental Characterization of Photonic Band Crystals for Tera Hertz Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Experimental Characterization of Photonic Band Crystals for Tera F49620-01-1-0484 Hertz Devices 6. AUTHOR(S) Dennis W...01-1-0484 REPORT TITLE: Experimental Characterization of Photonic Band Crystals for Tera Hertz Devices SUBMITTED FOR PUBLICATION TO (applicable only

  6. Photonic crystal fibers, devices, and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei JIN; Jian JU; Hoi Lut HO; Yeuk Lai HOO; Ailing ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews different types of air-silica photonic crystal fibers (PCFs), discusses their novel properties, and reports recent advances in PCF components and sensors as well as techniques for splicing PCFs to standard telecomm fibers.

  7. Biomedical photonics handbook fundamentals, devices, and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2012-01-01

    Photonics and Tissue OpticsOptical Properties of TissuesJoel Mobley, Tuan Vo-Dinh and Valery TuchinLight-Tissue InteractionsValery V. TuchinTheoretical Models and Algorithms in Optical Diffusion TomographyStephen J. Norton and Tuan Vo-DinhBasic InstrumentationBasic Instrumentation in PhotonicsTuan Vo-DinhOptical Fibers and Waveguides for Medical ApplicationsIsrael Gannot and Moshe Ben DavidFiberoptics Probe DesignUrs Ut

  8. Optical diode based on the chirality of guided photons

    CERN Document Server

    Sayrin, C; Mitsch, R; Albrecht, B; O'Shea, D; Schneeweiss, P; Volz, J; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2015-01-01

    Photons are nonchiral particles: their handedness can be both left and right. However, when light is transversely confined, it can locally exhibit a transverse spin whose orientation is fixed by the propagation direction of the photons. Confined photons thus have chiral character. Here, we employ this to demonstrate nonreciprocal transmission of light at the single-photon level through a silica nanofibre in two experimental schemes. We either use an ensemble of spin-polarised atoms that is weakly coupled to the nanofibre-guided mode or a single spin-polarised atom strongly coupled to the nanofibre via a whispering-gallery-mode resonator. We simultaneously achieve high optical isolation and high forward transmission. Both are controlled by the internal atomic state. The resulting optical diode is the first example of a new class of nonreciprocal nanophotonic devices which exploit the chirality of confined photons and which are, in principle, suitable for quantum information processing and future quantum optica...

  9. Parametric optimization of optical devices based on strong photonic localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Minmin; Yang, Xiangbo

    2017-07-01

    Symmetric two-segment-connected triangular defect waveguide networks (STSCTDWNs) can produce strong photonic localization, which is useful for designing highly efficient energy storage devices, high power superluminescent light emitting diodes, all-optical switches, and more. Although STSCTDWNs have been studied in previous works, in this paper we systematically optimize the parameters of STSCTDWNs to further enhance photonic localization so that the function of optical devices based on strong photonic localization can be improved. When optimizing the parameters, we find a linear relationship between the logarithm of photonic localization and the broken degree of networks. Furthermore, the slope and intercept of the linear relationship are larger than previous results. This means that the increasing speed of photonic localization is improved. The largest intensity of photonic localizations can reach 1036, which is 16 orders of magnitude larger than previous reported results. These optimized networks provide practical solutions for all optical devices based on strong photonic localization in the low frequency range, such as nanostructured devices.

  10. Silicon light-emitting diodes and lasers photon breeding devices using dressed photons

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on a novel phenomenon named photon breeding. It is applied to realizing light-emitting diodes and lasers made of indirect-transition-type silicon bulk crystals in which the light-emission principle is based on dressed photons. After presenting physical pictures of dressed photons and dressed-photon phonons, the principle of light emission by using dressed-photon phonons is reviewed. A novel phenomenon named photon breeding is also reviewed. Next, the fabrication and operation of light emitting diodes and lasers are described The role of coherent phonons in these devices is discussed. Finally, light-emitting diodes using other relevant crystals are described and other relevant devices are also reviewed.

  11. Progress in the research and development of photonic structure devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van Hoi; Bui, Huy; Van Nguyen, Thuy; Nguyen, The Anh; Son Pham, Thanh; Pham, Van Dai; Cham Tran, Thi; Trang Hoang, Thu; Ngo, Quang Minh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we review the results of the research and development of photonic structure devices performed in the Institute of Materials Science in the period from 2010-2015. We have developed a configuration of 1D photonic crystal (PC) microcavities based on porous silicon (PS) layers and applied them to optical sensing devices that can be used for the determination of organic content with a very low concentration in different liquid environments. Various important scientific and technological applications of photonic devices such as the ultralow power operation of microcavity lasers, the inhibition of spontaneous emissions and the manipulation of light amplification by combining the surface plasmonic effect and the microcavity are expected. We developed new kinds of photonic structures for optical filters based on guided-mode resonances in coupled slab waveguide gratings, which have great potential for application in fiber-optic communication and optical sensors.

  12. 2-Photon tandem device for water splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seger, Brian; Castelli, Ivano Eligio; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard;

    2014-01-01

    Within the field Of photocatalytic water splitting there are several strategies to achieve the goal of efficient and cheap photocatalytic water splitting. This work examines one particular strategy by focusing on monolithically stacked, two-photon photoelectrochemical cells. The overall aim of th...

  13. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Photons carry linear momentum and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, whereas transfer of angular momentum induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been used in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices, optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect have only been used in optical tweezers but remain unexplored in integrated photonics. We demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mechanical effect of photon's polarization degree of freedom and demonstrates its control in integrated photonic devices. Exploiting optical torque and optomechanical interaction with photon angular momentum can lead to torsional cavity optomechanics and optomechanical photon spin-orbit coupling, as well as applications such as optomechanical gyroscopes and torsional magnetometry.

  14. Silicon photonics design from devices to systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chrostowski, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    From design and simulation through to testing and fabrication, this hands-on introduction to silicon photonics engineering equips students with everything they need to begin creating foundry-ready designs. In-depth discussion of real-world issues and fabrication challenges ensures that students are fully equipped for careers in industry. Step-by-step tutorials, straightforward examples, and illustrative source code fragments guide students through every aspect of the design process, providing a practical framework for developing and refining key skills. Offering industry-ready expertise, the text supports existing PDKs for CMOS UV-lithography foundry services (OpSIS, ePIXfab, imec, LETI, IME and CMC) and the development of new kits for proprietary processes and clean-room based research. Accompanied by additional online resources to support students, this is the perfect learning package for senior undergraduate and graduate students studying silicon photonics design, and academic and industrial researchers in...

  15. Mid-infrared silicon photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Milosevic, Milan M.; Nedeljkovic, Milos; Owens, Nathan; Headley, William R.; Teo, Ee Jin; Xiong, Boqian; Yang, Pengyuan; Hu, Youfang

    2011-01-01

    The mid-infrared spectral region is interesting for bio-chemical sensing, environmental monitoring, free space communications, or military applications. Silicon is relatively low-loss from 1.2 to 8 μm and from 24 to 100 μm, and therefore silicon photonic circuits can be used in mid- and far- infrared wavelength ranges. In this paper we investigate several silicon based waveguide structures for mid-infrared wavelength region.

  16. Nonreciprocal propagation of surface acoustic wave in Ni/LiNbO 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, R.; Nii, Y.; Iguchi, Y.; Onose, Y.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated surface acoustic wave propagation in a Ni/LiNbO3 hybrid device. We found that the absorption and phase velocity are dependent on the sign of the wave vector, which indicates that the surface acoustic wave propagation has nonreciprocal characteristics induced by simultaneous breaking of time-reversal and spatial inversion symmetries. The nonreciprocity was reversed by 180∘ rotation of the magnetic field. The origin of the nonreciprocity is ascribed to interference of shear-type and longitudinal-type magnetoelastic couplings.

  17. Photonic Integration on the Hybrid Silicon Evanescent Device Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyundai Park

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the recent progress of hybrid silicon evanescent devices. The hybrid silicon evanescent device structure consists of III-V epitaxial layers transferred to silicon waveguides through a low-temperature wafer bonding process to achieve optical gain, absorption, and modulation efficiently on a silicon photonics platform. The low-temperature wafer bonding process enables fusion of two different material systems without degradation of material quality and is scalable to wafer-level bonding. Lasers, amplifiers, photodetectors, and modulators have been demonstrated with this hybrid structure and integration of these individual components for improved optical functionality is also presented. This approach provides a unique way to build photonic active devices on silicon and should allow application of silicon photonic integrated circuits to optical telecommunication and optical interconnects.

  18. Optoelectronic devices, plasmonics, and photonics with topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politano, Antonio; Viti, Leonardo; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2017-03-01

    Topological insulators are innovative materials with semiconducting bulk together with surface states forming a Dirac cone, which ensure metallic conduction in the surface plane. Therefore, topological insulators represent an ideal platform for optoelectronics and photonics. The recent progress of science and technology based on topological insulators enables the exploitation of their huge application capabilities. Here, we review the recent achievements of optoelectronics, photonics, and plasmonics with topological insulators. Plasmonic devices and photodetectors based on topological insulators in a wide energy range, from terahertz to the ultraviolet, promise outstanding impact. Furthermore, the peculiarities, the range of applications, and the challenges of the emerging fields of topological photonics and thermo-plasmonics are discussed.

  19. Static non-reciprocity in mechanical metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulais, Corentin; Sounas, Dimitrios; Alù, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Reciprocity is a general, fundamental principle governing various physical systems, which ensures that the transfer function—the transmission of a physical quantity, say light intensity—between any two points in space is identical, regardless of geometrical or material asymmetries. Breaking this transmission symmetry offers enhanced control over signal transport, isolation and source protection. So far, devices that break reciprocity (and therefore show non-reciprocity) have been mostly considered in dynamic systems involving electromagnetic, acoustic and mechanical wave propagation associated with fields varying in space and time. Here we show that it is possible to break reciprocity in static systems, realizing mechanical metamaterials that exhibit vastly different output displacements under excitation from different sides, as well as one-way displacement amplification. This is achieved by combining large nonlinearities with suitable geometrical asymmetries and/or topological features. In addition to extending non-reciprocity and isolation to statics, our work sheds light on energy propagation in nonlinear materials with asymmetric crystalline structures and topological properties. We anticipate that breaking reciprocity will open avenues for energy absorption, conversion and harvesting, soft robotics, prosthetics and optomechanics.

  20. Fabrication and Performance of a Photonic-Microfluidic Integrated Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R. Watts

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication and performance of a functional photonic-microfluidic flow cytometer is demonstrated. The devices are fabricated on a Pyrex substrate by photolithographically patterning the microchannels and optics in a SU-8 layer that is sealed via a poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS layer through a unique chemical bonding method. The resulting devices eliminate the free-space excitation optics through integration of microlenses onto the chip to mimic conventional cytometry excitation. Devices with beam waists of 6 μm and 12 μm in fluorescent detection and counting tests using 2.5 and 6 μm beads-show CVs of 9%–13% and 23% for the two devices, respectively. These results are within the expectations for a conventional cytometer (5%–15% and demonstrate the ability to integrate the photonic components for excitation onto the chip and the ability to maintain the level of reliable detection.

  1. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices

    CERN Document Server

    He, Li; Li, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Photons carry linear momentum, and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, while angular momentum transfer induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been utilized in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect remain unexplored in integrated photonics. Here, we demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mecha...

  2. Si light-emitting device in integrated photonic CMOS ICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaikai; Snyman, Lukas W.; Aharoni, Herzl

    2017-07-01

    The motivation for integrated Si optoelectronics is the creation of low-cost photonics for mass-market applications. Especially, the growing demand for sensitive biochemical sensors in the environmental control or medicine leads to the development of integrated high resolution sensors. Here CMOS-compatible Si light-emitting device structures are presented for investigating the effect of various depletion layer profiles and defect engineering on the photonic transition in the 1.4-2.8 eV. A novel Si device is proposed to realize both a two-terminal Si-diode light-emitting device and a three-terminal Si gate-controlled diode light-emitting device in the same device structure. In addition to the spectral analysis, differences between two-terminal and three-terminal devices are discussed, showing the light emission efficiency change. The proposed Si optical source may find potential applications in micro-photonic systems and micro-optoelectro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) in CMOS integrated circuitry.

  3. Liquid Crystal Photonic bandgap Fibers: Modeling and Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes

    In this PhD thesis an experimental and numerical investigation of liquid crystal infiltrated photonic bandgap fibers (LCPBGs) is presented. A simulation scheme for modeling LCPBG devices including electrical tunability is presented. New experimental techniques, boundary coating and the applicatio...

  4. Implantable photonic devices for improved medical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, Victor; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Toichuev, Rakhmanbek; Eshiev, Abdyrakhman; Abdullaeva, Svetlana; Egemkulov, Talantbek; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    An evolving area of biomedical research is related to the creation of implantable units that provide various possibilities for imaging, measurement, and the monitoring of a wide range of diseases and intrabody phototherapy. The units can be autonomic or built-in in some kind of clinically applicable implants. Because of specific working conditions in the live body, such implants must have a number of features requiring further development. This topic can cause wide interest among developers of optical, mechanical, and electronic solutions in biomedicine. We introduce preliminary clinical trials obtained with an implantable pill and devices that we have developed. The pill and devices are capable of applying in-body phototherapy, low-level laser therapy, blue light (450 nm) for sterilization, and controlled injection of chemicals. The pill is also capable of communicating with an external control box, including the transmission of images from inside the patient’s body. In this work, our pill was utilized for illumination of the sinus-carotid zone in dog and red light influence on arterial pressure and heart rate was demonstrated. Intrabody liver tissue laser ablation and nanoparticle-assisted laser ablation was investigated. Sterilization effect of intrabody blue light illumination was applied during a maxillofacial phlegmon treatment.

  5. Implantable photonic devices for improved medical treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, Victor; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Toichuev, Rakhmanbek; Eshiev, Abdyrakhman; Abdullaeva, Svetlana; Egemkulov, Talantbek; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-10-01

    An evolving area of biomedical research is related to the creation of implantable units that provide various possibilities for imaging, measurement, and the monitoring of a wide range of diseases and intrabody phototherapy. The units can be autonomic or built-in in some kind of clinically applicable implants. Because of specific working conditions in the live body, such implants must have a number of features requiring further development. This topic can cause wide interest among developers of optical, mechanical, and electronic solutions in biomedicine. We introduce preliminary clinical trials obtained with an implantable pill and devices that we have developed. The pill and devices are capable of applying in-body phototherapy, low-level laser therapy, blue light (450 nm) for sterilization, and controlled injection of chemicals. The pill is also capable of communicating with an external control box, including the transmission of images from inside the patient's body. In this work, our pill was utilized for illumination of the sinus-carotid zone in dog and red light influence on arterial pressure and heart rate was demonstrated. Intrabody liver tissue laser ablation and nanoparticle-assisted laser ablation was investigated. Sterilization effect of intrabody blue light illumination was applied during a maxillofacial phlegmon treatment.

  6. Photonic Integrated Devices for Nonlinear Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Caspani, Lucia; Dolgaleva, Ksenia; Wagner, Sean; Ferrera, Marcello; Razzari, Luca; Pasquazi, Alessia; Peccianti, Marco; Moss, David J; Aitchison, J Stewart; Morandotti, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    We review our recent progresses on frequency conversion in integrated devices, focusing primarily on experiments based on strip-loaded and quantum-well intermixed AlGaAs waveguides, and on CMOS-compatible high-index doped silica glass waveguides. The former includes both second- and third-order interactions, demonstrating wavelength conversion by tunable difference-frequency generation over a bandwidth of more than nm, as well as broadband self-phase modulation and tunable four-wave mixing. The latter includes four-wave mixing using low-power continuous-wave light in microring resonators as well as hyper-parametric oscillation in a high quality factor resonator, towards the realization of an integrated multiple wavelength source with important applications for telecommunications, spectroscopy, and metrology.

  7. Molecular detection via hybrid peptide-semiconductor photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estephan, E.; Saab, M.-b.; Martin, M.; Cloitre, T.; Larroque, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Gergely, C.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the possibilities to support device functionality that includes strongly confined and localized light emission and detection processes within nano/micro-structured semiconductors for biosensing applications. The interface between biological molecules and semiconductor surfaces, yet still under-explored is a key issue for improving biomolecular recognition in devices. We report on the use of adhesion peptides, elaborated via combinatorial phage-display libraries for controlled placement of biomolecules, leading to user-tailored hybrid photonic systems for molecular detection. An M13 bacteriophage library has been used to screen 1010 different peptides against various semiconductors to finally isolate specific peptides presenting a high binding capacity for the target surfaces. When used to functionalize porous silicon microcavities (PSiM) and GaAs/AlGaAs photonic crystals, we observe the formation of extremely thin (detection was monitored via both linear and nonlinear optical measurements. Our linear reflectance spectra demonstrate an enhanced detection resolution via PSiM devices, when functionalized with the Si-specific peptide. Molecular capture at even lower concentrations (femtomols) is possible via the second harmonic generation of GaAs/AlGaAs photonic crystals when functionalized with GaAs-specific peptides. Our work demonstrates the outstanding value of adhesion peptides as interface linkers between semiconductors and biological molecules. They assure an enhanced molecular detection via both linear and nonlinear answers of photonic crystals.

  8. Photonic devices based on black phosphorus and related hybrid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, M. S.; Viti, L.

    2016-08-01

    Artificial semiconductor heterostructures played a pivotal role in modern electronic and photonic technologies, providing a highly effective means for the manipulation and control of carriers, from the visible to the far-infrared, leading to the development of highly efficient devices like sources, detectors and modulators. The discovery of graphene and the related fascinating capabilities have triggered an unprecedented interest in devices based on inorganic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Amongst them, black phosphorus (BP) recently showed an extraordinary potential in a variety of applications across micro-electronics and photonics. With an energy gap between the gapless graphene and the larger gap transition metal dichalcogenides, BP can form the basis for a new generation of high-performance photonic devices that could be specifically engineered to comply with different applications, like transparent saturable absorbers, fast photocounductive switches and low noise photodetectors, exploiting its peculiar electrical, thermal and optical anisotropy. This paper will review the latest achievements in black-phosphorus-based THz photonics and discuss future perspectives of this rapidly developing research field.

  9. Silicon photonic integrated devices for datacenter optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Marco; Chen, Chin-Hui; Kurczveil, Géza; Liang, Di; Peng, Zhen; Beausoleil, Raymond

    2014-03-01

    The evolution of computing infrastructure and workloads has put an enormous pressure on datacenter networks. It is expected that bandwidth will scale without increases in the network power envelope and total cost of ownership. Networks based on silicon photonic devices promise to help alleviate these problems, but a viable development path for these technologies is not yet fully outlined. In this paper, we report our progress on developing components and strategies for datacenter silicon photonics networks. We will focus on recent progress on compact, low-threshold hybrid Si lasers and the CWDM transceivers based on these lasers as well as DWDM microring resonator-based transceivers.

  10. Nonreciprocal Multiferroic Superlattices with Broken Parity Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenghua; Zhang, Weiyi

    Multiferroic materials are characterized by the coexistence of ferroelectric and ferromagnetic (or antiferromagnetic) orders, the coupling to lattice vibration can be invoked either through piezoelectric or piezomagnetic effects. In this paper, the polaritonic band structures of multiferroic superlattices composed of oppositely polarized domains are investigated using the generalized transfer matrix method. For the primitive cell with broken parity symmetry, the polaritonic band structure is asymmetrical with respect to the forward and backward propagation directions (nonreciprocality). In particular, the band extreme points move away from the Brillouin zone center. This asymmetry in band-gap positions and widths can be used to design compact one-way optical isolators, while the extremely slow light velocities near the asymmetrical upper edges of lower bands includes the essential ingredients for designing slow light devices.

  11. Optofluidic devices and applications in photonics, sensing and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Lin; Chen, H Matthew; Freeman, Lindsay M; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2012-10-07

    Optofluidics integrates the fields of photonics and microfluidics, providing new freedom to both fields and permitting the realization of optical and fluidic property manipulations at the chip scale. Optofluidics was formed only after many breakthroughs in microfluidics, as understanding of fluid behaviour at the micron level enabled researchers to combine the advantages of optics and fluids. This review describes the progress of optofluidics from a photonics perspective, highlighting various optofluidic aspects ranging from the device's property manipulation to an interactive integration between optics and fluids. First, we describe photonic elements based on the functionalities that enable fluid manipulation. We then discuss the applications of optofluidic biodetection with an emphasis on nanosensing. Next, we discuss the progress of optofluidic lenses with an emphasis on its various architectures, and finally we conceptualize on where the field may lead.

  12. Implementing quantum Fourier transform with integrated photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabia, Gelo Noel

    2014-03-01

    Many quantum algorithms that exhibit exponential speedup over their classical counterparts employ the quantum Fourier transform, which is used to solve interesting problems such as prime factorization. Meanwhile, nonclassical interference of single photons achieved on integrated platforms holds the promise of achieving large-scale quantum computation with multiport devices. An optical multiport device can be built to realize any quantum circuit as a sequence of unitary operations performed by beam splitters and phase shifters on path-encoded qudits. In this talk, I will present a recursive scheme for implementing quantum Fourier transform with a multimode interference photonic integrated circuit. Research at Perimeter Institute is supported by the Government of Canada through Industry Canada and by the Province of Ontario through the Ministry of Research and Innovation.

  13. Tunable photonic devices and modules based on micro-optomechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Yoshitada

    2001-10-01

    Photonic devices with ultra-wide and precise controllability for lightwaves are essential for constructing flexible optical networks to serve versatile multimedia applications. However, conventional monolithically fabricated photonic devices suffer from their controllability being limited by the physical characteristics. Micro-optomechatronics based on precise positional control of optical elements is a promising method of meeting the above requirements. This paper presents typical examples, which include repetition- rate tunable optical pulse sources with a micro mechanically controllable cavity length and synchro-scanned tunable disk- shaped optical fiber modules. The operations of these modules were demonstrated to confirm the validity of micro- optomechatronics as the ultimate lightwave control scheme, which will be useful for future optical telecommunications systems.

  14. Femtosecond Laser Micromachining Photonic and Microfluidic Devices in Transparent Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Cerullo, Giulio; Ramponi, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Femtosecond laser micromachining of transparent material is a powerful and versatile technology. In fact, it can be applied to several materials. It is a maskless technology that allows rapid device prototyping, has intrinsic three-dimensional capabilities and can produce both photonic and microfluidic devices. For these reasons it is ideally suited for the fabrication of complex microsystems with unprecedented functionalities. The book is mainly focused on micromachining of transparent materials which, due to the nonlinear absorption mechanism of ultrashort pulses, allows unique three-dimensional capabilities and can be exploited for the fabrication of complex microsystems with unprecedented functionalities.This book presents an overview of the state of the art of this rapidly emerging topic with contributions from leading experts in the field, ranging from principles of nonlinear material modification to fabrication techniques and applications to photonics and optofluidics.

  15. Femtosecond laser fabrication of microfluidic channels for organic photonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya Vishnubhatla, Krishna; Clark, Jenny; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Virgili, Tersilla

    2009-11-01

    We report on innovative application of microchannels with access holes fabricated by femtosecond laser irradiation followed by chemical etching. This technique allows us to demonstrate a novel approach to the achievement of organic photonic devices in which the properties of a conjugated polymer in solution are exploited in a microfluidic configuration to produce an easy-to-integrate photonic device. Filling the microchannel with a diluted polyfluorene solution, we exploit the unique properties of isolated polymeric chains such as ultrafast gain switching (switching response time of 150 fs) with a 100% on-off ratio. In addition, by dispersing nanoparticles in the polymeric solution we are able to achieve random lasing in the microchannel.

  16. Frequency Conversion of Single Photons: Physics, Devices, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    above both CHAPTER 4. NOISE PROCESSES IN QFC DEVICES 41 5 5.5 6 6.5 7 7.5 0 2 4 6 8 Domain Width (µm) P ro ba bi lit y (% ) Figure 4.5: Histogram of...photons of different color. Optics Communications, 283(5):747–752, March 2010. BIBLIOGRAPHY 140 [20] Paul G. Kwiat, Klaus Mattle, Harald Weinfurter

  17. Photonic devices for next-generation broadband fiber access networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazovsky, Leonid G.; Yen, She-Hwa; Wong, Shing-Wa

    2011-01-01

    Next-generation optical access networks will deliver substantial benefits to consumers including a dedicated high-QoS access to bit rates of hundreds of Megabits per second. They must include the following features such as: reduced total cost of ownership, higher reliability, lower energy consumption, better flexibility and efficiency. This paper will describe recent progress and technology toward that goal using novel photonic devices

  18. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying the technology instrumentation of photonics This volume discusses photonics technology and instrumentation. The topics discussed in this volume are: Communication Networks; Data Buffers; Defense and Security Applications; Detectors; Fiber Optics and Amplifiers; Green Photonics; Instrumentation and Metrology; Interferometers; Light-Harvesting Materials; Logic Devices; Optical Communications; Remote Sensing; Solar Energy; Solid-State Lighting; Wavelength Conversion Comprehensive and accessible coverage of the whole of modern photonics Emphas

  19. Nonreciprocal Radio Frequency Transduction in a Parametric Mechanical Artificial Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pu; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Jingwei; Tian, Tian; Yin, Peiran; Duan, Changkui; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    Generating nonreciprocal radio frequency transduction plays important roles in a wide range of research and applications, and an aspiration is to integrate this functionality into microcircuits without introducing a magnetic field, which, however, remains challenging. By designing a 1D artificial lattice structure with a neighbor interaction engineered parametrically, we predicted a nonreciprocity transduction with a large unidirectionality. We then experimentally demonstrated the phenomenon on a nanoelectromechanical chip fabricated by conventional complementary metal-silicon processing. A unidirectionality with isolation as high as 24 dB is achieved, and several different transduction schemes are realized by programing the control voltage topology. Apart from being used as a radio frequency isolator, the system provides a way to build a practical on-chip programmable device for broad research and applications in the radio frequency domain.

  20. Thin Film Compound Semiconductor Devices for Photonic Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Kenneth Harold

    The research conducted for this doctoral dissertation involved the experimental investigation of thin film compound devices for use as photonic interconnection components in both external and direct modulated interconnection configurations. The devices were fabricated using a modified epitaxial liftoff procedure developed at Georgia Tech. This technique, by which single crystal semiconductor layers were separated from their growth substrate and subsequently deposited onto host substrates, allowed the development of novel photonic interconnection elements. It also facilitated the investigation of fundamental optical phenomena in compound semiconductors. Specifically, this work focused on an experimental study of the Franz-Keldysh electrorefractive effect in thin film semiconductor structures. This aspect of the research resulted in the first reported direct measurement of electrorefraction in GaAs at large electric fields (10 ^5 V/cm) and at photon energies within several meV of the band edge of GaAs. Related to this effort was the investigation of thin film, surface-normal optical modulators based on the bulk Franz-Keldysh effect. The novel modulators fabricated for this research demonstrated the largest contrast ratios ever reported for surface-normal Franz-Keldysh devices. Further investigation indicated that, with additional optimization, these thin film elements can achieve further improvements in performance. Such devices would present a low cost, easily manufactured alternative to conventional modulators, which are typically quite complex and expensive to fabricate. Finally, as an alternative to externally modulated interconnection schemes, a novel stacked wafer architecture was demonstrated. This configuration, which facilitated through-wafer optical communication, utilized thin film InP/InGaAsP emitters and detectors which were quasi-monolithically integrated onto silicon substrates using the modified epitaxial liftoff process. This through-wafer scheme is

  1. Analysis on optical bistability parameters in photonic switching devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafraz, Hossein; Sayeh, Mohammad R.

    2016-06-01

    An investigation has been done on the parameters of a hysteretic bistable optical Schmitt trigger device. From a design point of view, it is important to know the regions where this bistability occurs and is fully functional with respect to its subsystem parameters. Otherwise experimentally reaching such behavior will be very time-consuming and frustrating, especially with multiple devices employed in a single photonic circuit. A photonic Schmitt trigger consisting of two feedbacked inverting amplifiers, each characterized by -m (slope), A (y-intercept), and B (constant base) parameters is considered. This system is investigated dynamically with a varying input to find its stable and unstable states both mathematically and with simulation. In addition to a complete mathematical analysis of the system, we also describe how m, A, and B can be properly chosen in order to satisfy certain system conditions that result in bistability. More restrictions are also imposed to these absolute conditions by the system conditions as will be discussed. Finally, all results are verified in a more realistic photonic simulation.

  2. Micron-scale tunability in photonic devices using microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monat, Christelle; Domachuk, Peter; Jaouen, Vincent; Grillet, Christian; Littler, Ian; Croning-Golomb, Mark; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Mutzenich, Simon; Mahmud, Tanveer; Rosengarten, Gary; Mitchell, Arnan

    2006-08-01

    Optofluidics offers new functionalities that can be useful for a large range of applications. What microfluidics can bring to microphotonics is the ability to tune and reconfigure ultra-compact optical devices. This flexibility is essentially provided by three characteristics of fluids that are scalable at the micron-scale: fluid mobility, large ranges of index modulation, and adaptable interfaces. Several examples of optofluidic devices are presented to illustrate the achievement of new functionalities onto (semi)planar and compact platforms. First, we report an ultra-compact and tunable interferometer that exploits a sharp and mobile air/water interface. We describe then a novel class of optically controlled switches and routers that rely on the actuation of optically trapped lens microspheres within fluid environment. A tunable optical switch device can alternatively be built from a transversely probed photonic crystal fiber infused with mobile fluids. The last reported optofluidic device relies on strong fluid/ light interaction to produce either a sensitive index sensor or a tunable optical filter. The common feature of these various devices is their significant flexibility. Higher degrees of functionality could be achieved in the future with fully integrated optofluidic platforms that associate complex microfluidic delivery and mixing schemes with microphotonic devices.

  3. Optical isolator based on nonreciprocal coupling of two Tamm plasmon polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yun-Tuan; Zheng, Jing

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we have studied the one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) including a magneto-optical metal defect using the developed transfer matrix method for magnetic materials. Around the two interfaces between metal and one-dimensional PC, two nonsymmetric Tamm magneto-plasmon polaritons may be excited and coupled. The coupled states take on a clear nonreciprocal behavior and result in nonreciprocal transmission. The results are demonstrated through electromagnetic field distribution simulations based on finite element software. It provides a useful reference to realize optical isolator design.

  4. Two-photon polymerization for fabrication of biomedical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Doraiswamy, Anand; Narayan, R.; Chichkov, B. N.

    2007-01-01

    Two-photon polymerization (2PP) is a novel technology which allows the fabrication of complex three-dimensional (3D) microstructures and nanostructures. The number of applications of this technology is rapidly increasing; it includes the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals [1-4], medical devices, and tissue scaffolds [5-6]. In this contribution, we discuss current applications of 2PP for microstructuring of biomedical devices used in drug delivery. While in general this sector is still dominated by oral administration of drugs, precise dosing, safety, and convenience are being addressed by transdermal drug delivery systems. Currently, main limitations arise from low permeability of the skin. As a result, only few types of pharmacological substances can be delivered in this manner [7]. Application of microneedle arrays, whose function is to help overcome the barrier presented by the epidermis layer of the skin, provides a very promising solution. Using 2PP we have fabricated arrays of hollow microneedles with different geometries. The effect of microneedle geometry on skin penetration is examined. Our results indicate that microneedles created using 2PP technique are suitable for in vivo use, and for integration with the next generation of MEMS- and NEMS-based drug delivery devices.

  5. Photonomics: automation approaches yield economic aikido for photonics device manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Scott

    2002-09-01

    In the glory days of photonics, with exponentiating demand for photonics devices came exponentiating competition, with new ventures commencing deliveries seemingly weekly. Suddenly the industry was faced with a commodity marketplace well before a commodity cost structure was in place. Economic issues like cost, scalability, yield-call it all "Photonomics" -now drive the industry. Automation and throughput-optimization are obvious answers, but until now, suitable modular tools had not been introduced. Available solutions were barely compatible with typical transverse alignment tolerances and could not automate angular alignments of collimated devices and arrays. And settling physics served as the insoluble bottleneck to throughput and resolution advancement in packaging, characterization and fabrication processes. The industry has addressed these needs in several ways, ranging from special configurations of catalog motion devices to integrated microrobots based on a novel mini-hexapod configuration. This intriguing approach allows tip/tilt alignments to be automated about any point in space, such as a beam waist, a focal point, the cleaved face of a fiber, or the optical axis of a waveguide- ideal for MEMS packaging automation and array alignment. Meanwhile, patented new low-cost settling-enhancement technology has been applied in applications ranging from air-bearing long-travel stages to subnanometer-resolution piezo positioners to advance resolution and process cycle-times in sensitive applications such as optical coupling characterization and fiber Bragg grating generation. Background, examples and metrics are discussed, providing an up-to-date industry overview of available solutions.

  6. Few-photon Non-linearities in Nanophotonic Devices for Quantum Information Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nysteen, Anders

    In this thesis we investigate few-photon non-linearities in all-optical, on-chip circuits, and we discuss their possible applications in devices of interest for quantum information technology, such as conditional two-photon gates and single-photon sources. In order to propose efficient devices...

  7. Printed polymer photonic devices for optical interconnect systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Harish; Pan, Zeyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiaochu; Guo, L. J.; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-03-01

    Polymer photonic device fabrication usually relies on the utilization of clean-room processes, including photolithography, e-beam lithography, reactive ion etching (RIE) and lift-off methods etc, which are expensive and are limited to areas as large as a wafer. Utilizing a novel and a scalable printing process involving ink-jet printing and imprinting, we have fabricated polymer based photonic interconnect components, such as electro-optic polymer based modulators and ring resonator switches, and thermo-optic polymer switch based delay networks and demonstrated their operation. Specifically, a modulator operating at 15MHz and a 2-bit delay network providing up to 35.4ps are presented. In this paper, we also discuss the manufacturing challenges that need to be overcome in order to make roll-to-roll manufacturing practically viable. We discuss a few manufacturing challenges, such as inspection and quality control, registration, and web control, that need to be overcome in order to realize true implementation of roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible polymer photonic systems. We have overcome these challenges, and currently utilizing our inhouse developed hardware and software tools, communication, sensing, medicine, security, imaging, energy, lighting etc.

  8. Group IV photonic devices for the mid-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashanovich, G. Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Milosevic, M. M.; Hu, Y.; Gardes, F. Y.; Thomson, D. J.; Masaud, T.-B.; Jaberansary, E.; Chong, H. M. H.; Soref, R.; Reed, G. T.

    2012-06-01

    Group IV mid-infrared photonics is attracting more research interest lately. The main reason is a host of potential applications ranging from sensing, to medicine, to free space communications and infrared countermeasures. The field is, however, in its infancy and there are several serious challenges to be overcome before we see progress similar to that in the near-infrared silicon photonics. The first is to find suitable material platforms for the mid-infrared. In this paper we present experimental results for passive mid-infrared photonic devices realised in silicon-on-insulator, silicon-on-sapphire, and silicon on porous silicon. We also present relationships for the free-carrier induced electro-refraction and electro-absorption in silicon and germanium in the mid-infrared wavelength range. Electro-absorption modulation is calculated from impurity-doping spectra taken from the literature, and a Kramers-Kronig analysis of these spectra is used to predict electro-refraction modulation. We examine the wavelength dependence of electro-refraction and electro-absorption, finding that the predictions suggest longer-wave modulator designs will in many cases be different than those used in the telecom range.

  9. Mesoporous nanocomposite coatings for photonic devices: sol-gel approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Shumaila; Bidin, Noriah; Riaz, Saira; Suan, Lau Pik; Naseem, Shahzad; Sanagi, Mohd. Marsin

    2016-10-01

    Thermally stable, optically active inorganic nanocomposites, i.e., aluminum-silicate (AS) and silica-titania (ST), are synthesized via acid-catalyzed low-temperature sol-gel method in order to get stable, crack-free coating material for photonic devices. The samples are characterized by atomic force microscope, field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Brunauer-Emmett--Teller (BET) surface area, Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore size distribution surface analysis and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Microscopic results show good incorporation of ST and AS particles as composites with grain size within range of 12-17 and 62-109 nm, respectively. EDX analysis substantiated the stoichiometric formation of homogeneous nanocomposites. XRD of the films reveals primary polycrystalline anatase titania phase and mullite phase of ST and AS nanocomposites. FTIR confirms the heterogeneous bond linkage between titania, silica and alumina species. Furthermore, the fabricated samples have mesoporous nature with high surface area, large pore volume and diameter. The tunable refractive index of 1.33-1.35 with high transparency is obtained for synthesized nanocomposites. The experimental findings show that these physically modified and thermally stable alumina- and titania-doped silica-based composite coatings are promising for photonic devices modification.

  10. Reconfigurable nonreciprocity with nonlinear Fano diode

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yi; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a dynamically tunable nonreciprocal response for wave propagations by employing nonlinear Fano resonances. We demonstrate that transmission contrast of waves propagation in opposite directions can be controlled by excitation signal. In particular, the unidirectional transmission can be flipped at different times of a pulse, resembling a diode operation with {\\em dynamical reconfigurable nonreciprocity}. The key mechanism is the interaction between the linear and nonlinear Fano reso...

  11. Nonreciprocal Microwave Signal Processing with a Field-Programmable Josephson Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, F.; Ranzani, L.; Peterson, G. A.; Cicak, K.; Simmonds, R. W.; Teufel, J. D.; Aumentado, J.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the design and implementation of a field-programmable Josephson amplifier (FPJA)—a compact and lossless superconducting circuit that can be programmed in situ by a set of microwave drives to perform reciprocal and nonreciprocal frequency conversion and amplification. In this work, we demonstrate four modes of operation: frequency conversion (transmission of -0.5 dB, reflection of -30 dB), circulation (transmission of -0.5 dB, reflection of -30 dB, isolation of 30 dB), phase-preserving amplification (gain >20 dB , one photon of added noise) and directional phase-preserving amplification (reflection of -10 dB, forward gain of 18 dB, reverse isolation of 8 dB, one photon of added noise). The system exhibits quantitative agreement with the theoretical prediction. Based on a gradiometric superconducting quantum-interference device with Nb /Al -Al Ox/Nb Josephson junctions, the FPJA is first-order insensitive to flux noise and can be operated without magnetic shielding at low temperature. Owing to its flexible design and compatibility with existing superconducting fabrication techniques, the FPJA offers a straightforward route toward on-chip integration with superconducting quantum circuits such as qubits and microwave optomechanical systems.

  12. Magnetic-free non-reciprocity and isolation based on parametrically modulated coupled-resonator loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Nicholas A.; Sounas, Dimitrios L.; Soric, Jason; Alù, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Non-reciprocal components, which are essential to many modern communication systems, are almost exclusively based on magneto-optical materials, severely limiting their applicability. A practical and inexpensive route to magnetic-free non-reciprocity could revolutionize radio-frequency and nanophotonic communication networks. Angular-momentum biasing was recently proposed as a means of realizing isolation for sound waves travelling in a rotating medium, and envisaged as a path towards compact, linear integrated non-reciprocal electromagnetic components. Inspired by this concept, here we demonstrate a subwavelength, linear radio-frequency non-reciprocal circulator free from magnetic materials and bias. The scheme is based on the parametric modulation of three identical, strongly and symmetrically coupled resonators. Their resonant frequencies are modulated by external signals with the same amplitude and a relative phase difference of 120°, imparting an effective electronic angular momentum to the system. We observe giant non-reciprocity, with up to six orders of magnitude difference in transmission for opposite directions. Furthermore, the device topology is tunable in real time, and can be directly embedded in a conventional integrated circuit.

  13. Generating entangled quantum microwaves in a Josephson-photonics device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambach, Simon; Kubala, Björn; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    When connecting a voltage-biased Josephson junction in series to several microwave cavities, a Cooper-pair current across the junction gives rise to a continuous emission of strongly correlated photons into the cavity modes. Tuning the bias voltage to the resonance where a single Cooper pair provides the energy to create an additional photon in each of the cavities, we demonstrate the entangling nature of these creation processes by simple witnesses in terms of experimentally accessible observables. To characterize the entanglement properties of the such created quantum states of light to the fullest possible extent, we then proceed to more elaborate entanglement criteria based on the knowledge of the full density matrix and provide a detailed study of bi- and multipartite entanglement. In particular, we illustrate how due to the relatively simple design of these circuits changes of experimental parameters allow one to access a wide variety of entangled states differing, e.g., in the number of entangled parties or the dimension of state space. Such devices, besides their promising potential to act as a highly versatile source of entangled quantum microwaves, may thus represent an excellent natural testbed for classification and quantification schemes developed in quantum information theory.

  14. Insertion device operating experience at the Advanced Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmer, John; Ramanathan, Mohan; Smith, Martin; Merritt, Michael

    2002-03-01

    The Advanced Photon Source has 29 insertion devices (IDs) installed in the 7 GeV electron storage ring; 28 of these devices, most of which are 3.3 cm period undulators, use two horizontal permanent magnet structures positioned over a straight vacuum chamber. A support and drive mechanism allows the vertical gap between the magnet structures to be varied, thus changing the x-ray energy produced by the ID [J. Viccaro, Proc. SPIE 1345, 28 (1990); E. Gluskin, J. Synchrotron Radiat. 5, 189 (1998)]. Most of these IDs use a drive scheme with two stepper motors, one driving each end through a mechanism synchronizing the upper and lower magnet structures. Our experience in almost 5 yr of operating this system will be discussed. All of the IDs are in continuous operation for approximately 10 weeks at a time. Reliability of operation is of paramount importance, as access to the storage ring for servicing of a single ID inhibits operation for all users. Our experience in achieving highly reliable ID operation is reviewed. Accuracy of operation and repeatability over time are also vital. To this end, these devices use absolute optical linear encoders with submicron resolution for primary position feedback. Absolute rotary encoders are used as a backup to the linear encoders. The benefits and limitations of each type of encoder, and our experience dealing with radiation and electrical noise are reviewed. The insertion devices operate down to gaps as small as 8.5 mm, with clearance over the vacuum chamber as small as 200 μm. The vacuum chamber has a minimum wall thickness of only 1 mm. A number of levels of safeguards are used to prevent contact between the magnet structure and the vacuum chamber. These safeguards and their evolution after gaining operational experience are presented.

  15. Storage of electric and magnetic energy in passive nonreciprocal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. E.

    1969-01-01

    Examination of the relation of stored electric and magnetic energy within a system to the terminal behavior of nonreciprocal passive networks shows both similarities and important differences between wholly reciprocal systems and systems containing nonreciprocal elements.

  16. Photon management of GaN-based optoelectronic devices via nanoscaled phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Yu-Lin

    2016-09-06

    Photon management is essential in improving the performances of optoelectronic devices including light emitting diodes, solar cells and photo detectors. Beyond the advances in material growth and device structure design, photon management via nanoscaled phenomena have also been demonstrated as a promising way for further modifying/improving the device performance. The accomplishments achieved by photon management via nanoscaled phenomena include strain-induced polarization field management, crystal quality improvement, light extraction/harvesting enhancement, radiation pattern control, and spectrum management. In this review, we summarize recent development, challenges and underlying physics of photon management in GaN-based light emitting diodes and solar cells. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Photon management of GaN-based optoelectronic devices via nanoscaled phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Lin; Lai, Kun-Yu; Lee, Ming-Jui; Liao, Yu-Kuang; Ooi, Boon S.; Kuo, Hao-Chung; He-Hau, Jr.

    2016-09-01

    Photon management is essential in improving the performances of optoelectronic devices including light emitting diodes, solar cells and photo detectors. Beyond the advances in material growth and device structure design, photon management via nanoscaled phenomena have also been demonstrated as a promising way for further modifying/improving the device performance. The accomplishments achieved by photon management via nanoscaled phenomena include strain-induced polarization field management, crystal quality improvement, light extraction/harvesting enhancement, radiation pattern control, and spectrum management. In this review, we summarize recent development, challenges and underlying physics of photon management in GaN-based light emitting diodes and solar cells.

  18. Complete three photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interference at a three port device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mährlein, Simon; von Zanthier, Joachim; Agarwal, Girish S

    2015-06-15

    We report the possibility of completely destructive interference of three indistinguishable photons on a three port device providing a generalisation of the well known Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of two indistinguishable photons on a two port device. Our analysis is based on the underlying mathematical framework of SU(3) transformations rather than SU(2) transformations. We show the completely destructive three photon interference for a large range of parameters of the three port device and point out the physical origin of such interference in terms of the contributions from different quantum paths. As each output port can deliver zero to three photons the device generates higher dimensional entanglement. In particular, different forms of entangled states of qudits can be generated depending on the device parameters. Our system is different from a symmetric three port beam splitter which does not exhibit a three photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interference.

  19. Lumped modeling with circuit elements for nonreciprocal magnetoelectric tunable band-pass filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Zhou, Hao-Miao; Zhang, Qiu-shi; Hu, Wen-Wen

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a lumped equivalent circuit model of the nonreciprocal magnetoelectric tunable microwave band-pass filter. The reciprocal coupled-line circuit is based on the converse magnetoelectric effect of magnetoelectric composites, includes the electrical tunable equivalent factor of the piezoelectric layer, and is established by the introduced lumped elements, such as radiation capacitance, radiation inductance, and coupling inductance, according to the transmission characteristics of the electromagnetic wave and magnetostatic wave in an inverted-L-shaped microstrip line and ferrite slab. The nonreciprocal transmission property of the filter is described by the introduced T-shaped circuit containing controlled sources. Finally, the lumped equivalent circuit of a nonreciprocal magnetoelectric tunable microwave band-pass filter is given and the lumped parameters are also expressed. When the deviation angles of the ferrite slab are respectively 0° and 45°, the corresponding magnetoelectric devices are respectively a reciprocal device and a nonreciprocal device. The curves of S parameter obtained by the lumped equivalent circuit model and electromagnetic simulation are in good agreement with the experimental results. When the deviation angle is between 0° and 45°, the maximum value of the S parameter predicted by the lumped equivalent circuit model is in good agreement with the experimental result. The comparison results of the paper show that the lumped equivalent circuit model is valid. Further, the effect of some key material parameters on the performance of devices is predicted by the lumped equivalent circuit model. The research can provide the theoretical basis for the design and application of nonreciprocal magnetoelectric tunable devices. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11172285, 11472259, and 11302217) and the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. LR13A020002).

  20. In situ control and monitoring of photonic device intermixing during laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, C K; Suryana, M; Hopkinson, M

    2011-05-09

    Apparatus and method for the in situ control of photonic device intermixing processes are described. The setup utilises an optical fiber splitter which delivers photons to selectively anneal the photonic device and simultaneously measures the emission spectra from the device to monitor the intermixing process in real time. The in situ monitoring of a laser annealing process for the modification of a semiconductor laser diode facet is demonstrated using the instrumentation. A progressive blueshift in the emission wavelength of the device can clearly be observed in real time while high energy photons are delivered to anneal the device facet, hence enabling the control on the degree of intermixing required. This instrumentation is also ideal for broadening of emission spectra in quantum dot and quantum well based light emitting devices such as superluminescent diodes and broadband laser. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  1. Partial indistinguishability theory for multi-photon experiments in multiport devices

    CERN Document Server

    Shchesnovich, V S

    2014-01-01

    We develop a simple approach for description of multi-photon experiments with multi-port unitary linear optical devices for arbitrary (multi-photon) input and arbitrary photon detectors. The probabilities at the output of a multi-port device are expressed as a quadratic form with a non-negative definite Hermitian matrix describing partial indistinguishability of photons. In the case of input consisting of single photon or vacuum per input mode the output probabilities are expressed as an integral of the absolute value squared of the matrix permanent of a Hadamard product of network matrix and a matrix depending on spectral state of photons and spectral sensitivities of detectors. For example, zero coincidence probability condition for dissimilar detectors formulated in Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 113603 (2013) using the matrix immanants is given in a much simpler form. We analyze a model of the Boson-Sampling computer with only partially indistinguishable single photons having Gaussian spectral function and Gaussia...

  2. Electrochromic and photonic devices utilizing polymer colloidal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Goo Hwan

    Since polymer colloidal particles have small size and stable surface properties, these materials have characteristics such as the ability to self-assemble, the ease of functionalization, the flexible coupling with other materials, and the formation of the stable dispersion in a liquid that can be beneficial to the fabrication of the electro-optic and photonic devices to enhance the performance. The main objective of this research is the fabrication of electrochromic devices (ECDs) employing the intrinsically conducting polymer (ICP) colloidal particles as electroactive materials and the crystalline colloidal array (CCA)-based photonic devices using polystyrene (PS) colloidal particles as building blocks. The research reported here focuses on: (1) the fabrication of the patterned ECDs through the inkjet printing of the ICP colloidal particles; (2) the fabrication of the reflection-type ECDs employing the polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA) as a reflection mirror; (3) the dynamic tuning of a photoluminescence (PL) dye through the coupling of a PL dye to the CCA. In the first part, polyaniline (PANI)-silica and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-silica composite particles having a diameter of 200-300 nm were synthesized, then converted to the ICP-ink via solvent exchange. This ICP-ink could be inkjet-printed on various substrates such as ITO-PET film, commercial transparency film, and cotton fabric using a commercial desktop inkjet printer. ECDs could be fabricated employing an inkjet printed PANI-silica or PEDOT-silica layer on an ITO-PET film as an electrochromic layer. These devices exhibit various color changes corresponding to applied potentials between +1V and -1V. In the spectroelectrochemical analysis PANI-based ECD presents up to 50% transmittance contrast ratio and PEDOT-based one shows up to 40% at lambda max. The switching time of the PANI-based device was 30 seconds and that of PEDOT-based ECD was 5 seconds. The PANI-based ECD could be

  3. Enhancement of broadband optical absorption in photovoltaic devices by band-edge effect of photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshinori; Kawamoto, Yosuke; Fujita, Masayuki; Noda, Susumu

    2013-08-26

    We numerically investigate broadband optical absorption enhancement in thin, 400-nm thick microcrystalline silicon (µc-Si) photovoltaic devices by photonic crystals (PCs). We realize absorption enhancement by coupling the light from the free space to the large area resonant modes at the photonic band-edge induced by the photonic crystals. We show that multiple photonic band-edge modes can be produced by higher order modes in the vertical direction of the Si photovoltaic layer, which can enhance the absorption on multiple wavelengths. Moreover, we reveal that the photonic superlattice structure can produce more photonic band-edge modes that lead to further optical absorption. The absorption average in wavelengths of 500-1000 nm weighted to the solar spectrum (AM 1.5) increases almost twice: from 33% without photonic crystal to 58% with a 4 × 4 period superlattice photonic crystal; our result outperforms the Lambertian textured structure.

  4. Electrically tunable Yb-doped fiber laser based on a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate electrical tunability of a fiber laser using a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber. Tuning of the laser is achieved by combining the wavelength filtering effect of a tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device with an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. We fabricate...... an all-spliced laser cavity based on the liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber mounted on a silicon assembly, a pump/signal combiner with single-mode signal feed-through and an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. The laser cavity produces a single-mode output and is tuned in the range 1040-1065 nm...

  5. Efficient single-mode photon-coupling device utilizing a nanofiber tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonan, Sho; Kato, Shinya; Aoki, Takao

    2014-04-24

    Single-photon sources are important elements in quantum optics and quantum information science. It is crucial that such sources be able to couple photons emitted from a single quantum emitter to a single propagating mode, preferably to the guided mode of a single-mode optical fiber, with high efficiency. Various photonic devices have been successfully demonstrated to efficiently couple photons from an emitter to a single mode of a cavity or a waveguide. However, efficient coupling of these devices to optical fibers is sometimes challenging. Here we show that up to 38% of photons from an emitter can be directly coupled to a single-mode optical fiber by utilizing the flat tip of a silica nanofiber. With the aid of a metallic mirror, the efficiency can be increased to 76%. The use of a silicon waveguide further increases the efficiency to 87%. This simple device can be applied to various quantum emitters.

  6. Analysis of liquid crystal properties for photonic crystal fiber devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Wei, Lei;

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the bandgap structure of Liquid Crystal infiltrated Photonic Crystal Fibers depending on the parameters of the Liquid Crystals by means of finite element simulations. For a biased Liquid Crystal Photonic Crystal Fiber, we show how the tunability of the bandgap position depends on the L...

  7. Analysis of liquid crystal properties for photonic crystal fiber devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Wei, Lei

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the bandgap structure of Liquid Crystal infiltrated Photonic Crystal Fibers depending on the parameters of the Liquid Crystals by means of finite element simulations. For a biased Liquid Crystal Photonic Crystal Fiber, we show how the tunability of the bandgap position depends...... on the Liquid Crystal parameters....

  8. Photonic microsystems micro and nanotechnology applied to optical devices and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Solgaard, Olav

    2009-01-01

    ""Photonic Microsystems: Micro and Nanotechnology Applied to Optical Devices and Systems"", describes MEMS technology and demonstrates how MEMS allow miniaturization, parallel fabrication, and efficient packaging of optics, as well as integration of optics and electronics. It shows how the characteristics of MEMS enable practical implementations of a variety of applications, including projection displays, fiber switches, interferometers, spectrometers. The book describes the phenomenon of Photonic crystals (nanophotonics) and demonstrates how Photonic crystals enable synthesis of materials wit

  9. Nanostructured silicon for photonics from materials to devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gaburro, Z; Daldosso, N

    2006-01-01

    The use of light to channel signals around electronic chips could solve several current problems in microelectronic evolution including: power dissipation, interconnect bottlenecks, input/output from/to optical communication channels, poor signal bandwidth, etc. It is unfortunate that silicon is not a good photonic material: it has a poor light-emission efficiency and exhibits a negligible electro-optical effect. Silicon photonics is a field having the objective of improving the physical properties of silicon; thus turning it into a photonic material and permitting the full convergence of elec

  10. Characterizing heralded single-photon sources with imperfect measurement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavi, M; Soellner, I; Bocquillon, E; Couteau, C; Laflamme, R; Weihs, G [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)], E-mail: mrazavi@iqc.ca

    2009-06-14

    Any characterization of a single-photon source is not complete without specifying its second-order degree of coherence, i.e., its g{sup (2)} function. An accurate measurement of such coherence functions commonly requires high-precision single-photon detectors, in whose absence only time-averaged measurements are possible. It is not clear, however, how the resulting time-averaged quantities can be used to properly characterize the source. In this paper, we investigate this issue for a heralded source of single photons that relies on continuous-wave parametric down-conversion. By accounting for major shortcomings of the source and the detectors-i.e., the multiple-photon emissions of the source, the time resolution of photodetectors and our chosen width of coincidence window-our theory enables us to infer the true source properties from imperfect measurements. Our theoretical results are corroborated by an experimental demonstration using a PPKTP crystal pumped by a blue laser that results in a single-photon generation rate about 1.2 millions per second per milliwatt of pump power. This work takes an important step towards the standardization of such heralded single-photon sources.

  11. Optimizing performance of plasmonic devices for photonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenzveig, Tiberiu; Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating thermo-optic plasmonic devices for variable optical attenuation and/or low-frequency (kHz) signal modulation. Results of finite-element simulations and experimental characterization of prototype devices indicate that a plasmonic device can reach speci...

  12. Optimization and applications of planar silicon-based photonic crystal devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borel, Peter Ingo; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Burgos Leon, Juan;

    2005-01-01

    such as topology optimization. We have also investigated a new device concept for coarse wavelength division de-multiplexing based on planar photonic crystal waveguides. The filtering of the wavelength channels has been realized by shifting the cut-off frequency of the fundamental photonic band gap mode......Very low propagation losses in straight planar photonic crystal waveguides have previously been reported. A next natural step is to add functionality to the photonic crystal waveguides and create ultra compact optical components. We have designed and fabricated such structures in a silicon......-on-insulator material. The photonic crystal is defined by holes with diameter 250 nm arranged in a triangular lattice having lattice constant 400 nm. Leaving out single rows of holes creates the planar photonic crystal waveguides. Different types of couplers and splitters, aswell as 60. 90 and 120 degree bends have...

  13. Integrated Photonic Devices Incorporating Low-Loss Fluorinated Polymer Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Jong Lee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-loss polymer materials incorporating fluorinated compounds have been utilized for the investigation of various functional optical devices useful for optical communication and optical sensor systems. Since reliability issues concerning the polymer device have been resolved, polymeric waveguide devices have been gradually adopted for commercial application systems. The two most successfully commercialized polymeric integrated optic devices, variable optical attenuators and digital optical switches, are reviewed in this paper. Utilizing unique properties of optical polymers which are not available in other optical materials, novel polymeric optical devices are proposed including widely tunable external cavity lasers and integrated optical current sensors.

  14. On-chip tunable long-period grating devices based on liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Weirich, Johannes; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard;

    2009-01-01

    We design and fabricate an on-chip tunable long-period grating device by integrating a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber on silicon structures. The transmission axis of the device can be electrically rotated in steps of 45° as well as switched on and off with the response time in the millisec...

  15. Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Ptasinski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we explore the negative thermo-optic properties of liquid crystal claddings for passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic integrated circuits. Photonic circuits are playing an increasing role in communications and computing, but they suffer from temperature dependent performance variation. Most existing techniques aimed at compensation of thermal effects rely on power hungry Joule heating. We show that integrating a liquid crystal cladding helps to minimize the effects of a temperature dependent drift. The advantage of liquid crystals lies in their high negative thermo-optic coefficients in addition to low absorption at the infrared wavelengths.

  16. Deterministic multimode photonic device for quantum-information processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Ersbak Bang; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We propose the implementation of a light source that can deterministically generate a rich variety of multimode quantum states. The desired states are encoded in the collective population of different ground hyperfine states of an atomic ensemble and converted to multimode photonic states...... by excitation to optically excited levels followed by cooperative spontaneous emission. Among our examples of applications, we demonstrate how two-photon-entangled states can be prepared and implemented in a protocol for a reference-frame-free quantum key distribution and how one-dimensional as well as higher...

  17. Chip-scale Photonic Devices for Light-matter Interactions and Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie

    Chip-scale photonic devices such as microdisks, photonic crystal cavities and slow-light photonic crystal waveguides possess strong light localization and long photon lifetime, which will significantly enhance the light-matter interactions and can be used to implement new functionalities for both classical and quantum information processing, optical computation and optical communication in integrated nanophotonic circuits. This thesis will focus on three topics about light matter interactions and quantum information processing with chip-scale photonic devices, including 1) Design and characterization of asymmetric resonate cavity with radiation directionality and air-slot photonic crystal cavity with ultrasmall effective mode volume, 2) Exciton-photon interactions between quantum dots and photonic crystal devices and non-classical photon source from a single quantum dot, and 3) Quantum controlled phase gate and phase switching based on quantum dots and photonic crystal waveguide. The first topic is engineered control of radiation directionality and effective mode volume for optical mode in chip-scale silicon micro-/nano-cavities. High quality factor (Q), subwavelength mode volume ( V) and controllable radiation directionality are the major properties for optical cavities designs. In Chapter 2, asymmetric resonant cavities with rational caustics are proposed and interior whispering gallery modes in monolithic silicon mesoscopic microcavities are experimentally demonstrated. These microcavities possess unique robustness of cavity quality factor against roughness Rayleigh scattering. In Chapter 3, air-slot mode-gap photonic crystal cavities with quality factor of 104 and effective mode volume ˜ 0.02 cubic wavelengths are experimentally demonstrated. The origin of the high Q air-slot cavity mode is the mode-gap effect from the slotted photonic crystal waveguide mode with negative dispersion. The second topic is exciton-photon coupling between quantum dots and

  18. Broadband non-reciprocal transmission of sound with invariant frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Zhong-ming; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of "acoustic diode" (AD) capable of rectifying acoustic wave like electrical diodes do to electricity has been believed to be able to offer unconventional manipulation on sound, e.g., to isolate the wrong-way reflection, and therefore have great potential in various important scenarios such as medical ultrasound applications. However, the existing ADs have always been suffering from the problem that the transmitted wave must have either doubled frequency or deviated direction, lacking the most crucial features for achieving such expectations in practice. Here we design and experimentally demonstrate a broadband yet compact non-reciprocal device with hitherto inaccessible functionality of maintaining the original frequency and high forward transmission while virtually blocking the backscattered wave, which is close to what a perfect AD is expected to provide and is promising to play the essential role in realistic acoustic systems like electric diodes do in electrical circuits. Such an extreme ab...

  19. Emulating Nonreciprocity with Spatially Dispersive Metasurfaces Excited at Oblique Incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Carl; Grbic, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    Ultrathin metasurfaces supporting transverse surface currents provide extreme electromagnetic wave front and polarization control. Here, it is shown that adding longitudinal (normal) surface currents significantly expands the scope of electromagnetic phenomena that can be engineered with reciprocal materials. In particular, these metasurfaces are inherently spatially dispersive, which allows them to emulate nonreciprocal phenomena. It is analytically shown that spatially dispersive metasurfaces are effectively self-biased by the transverse momentum of the incident wave front. Long-standing notions of what makes a metasurface reciprocal are reinvestigated, and generalized reciprocity relations are derived. Several metasurfaces are designed that imitate Faraday rotation and optical isolation when illuminated with obliquely incident plane waves and normally incident vortex beams. These new surfaces break the inherent symmetry of previous metasurface designs, enabling low-profile devices with unprecedented functionality.

  20. Collective motion in non-reciprocal swarms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo LIU; Tianguang CHU; Long WANG

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies a non-reciprocal swarm model that consists of a group of mobile autonomous agents with an attraction-repulsion function governing the interaction of the agents. The function is chosen to have infinitely large values of repulsion for vanishing distance between two agents so as to avoid occurrence of collision. It is shown analytically that under the detailed balance condition in coupling weights, all the agents will aggregate and eventually form a cohesive cluster of finite size around the weighted center of the swarm in a finite time. Moreover, the swarm system is completely stable, namely, the motion of all agents converge to the set of equilibrium points. For the general case of non-reciprocal swarms without the detailed balance condition, numerical simulations show that more complex self-organized oscillations can emerge in the swarms. The effect of noise on collective dynamics of the swarm is also examined with a white Gaussian noise model.

  1. Nihility in non-reciprocal bianisotropic media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ra’di Younes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we consider electromagnetic response of non-reciprocal bianisotropic materials in some extreme regimes. The magneto-electric coupling is modeled by symmetric and antisymmetric uniaxial dyadics, which correspond to the so called artificial Tellegen media and moving media, respectively. Extreme electromagnetic properties of uniaxial non-reciprocal bianisotropic materials in the limiting case of nihility, when both permittivity and permeability of the media tend to zero, and only the magneto-electric parameters define the material response, are studied. Among other interesting effects, we show that the moving nihility materials provide the extreme asymmetry in the phase shift of transmitted waves propagating along the opposite directions. Furthermore, we reveal a possibility to create an angular filter with extreme sensitivity to the incidence angle, also using moving nihility slabs.

  2. A New Approach of Electronics and Photonics Convergence on Si CMOS Platform: How to Reduce Device Diversity of Photonics for Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumi Wada

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrated photonics via Si CMOS technology has been a strategic area since electronics and photonics convergence should be the next platform for information technology. The platform is recently referred to as “Si photonics” that attracts much interest of researchers in industries as well as academia in the world. The main goal of Si Photonics is currently to reduce material diversity of photonic devices to pursuing CMOS-compatibility. In contrast, the present paper proposes another route of Si Photonics, reducing diversity of photonic devices. The proposed device unifying functionality of photonics is a microresonator with a pin diode structure that enables the Purcell effect and Franz-Keldysh effect to emit and to modulate light from SiGe alloys.

  3. Latest electro-optic and photonic devices for security and military applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, A. R.

    2006-09-01

    This paper reveals performance capabilities of state-of-the-art electro-optic and photonic devices, which are best suited for security and defense system applications. These devices can be used in battlefield, space surveillance, medical diagnosis, and detection of terrorist activities. Performance capabilities of fiber optic components for possible applications in WDM and DWDM systems are summarized. Photonic devices for covert military and security communication applications are identified with particular emphasis on performance and reliability. Performance parameters of Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs), Erbium-doped waveguide amplifiers (EDWAs), and optical hybrid amplifiers (OHAs) comprising of EDFAs and Raman amplifiers are discussed with emphasis on bandwidth, gain-flatness, data handling capability, channel capacity and cost-effectiveness. Performance parameters of very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) detectors are summarized, which have potential applications in remote sensing and ballistic missile defense applications. Electro-optic and photonic devices best suited for security and defense applications are identified.

  4. Liquid crystal parameter analysis for tunable photonic bandgap fiber devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Wei, Lei;

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the tunability of splay-aligned liquid crystals for the use in solid core photonic crystal fibers. Finite element simulations are used to obtain the alignment of the liquid crystals subject to an external electric field. By means of the liquid crystal director field the optical per...

  5. Photon absorption models in nanostructured semiconductor solar cells and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended to be used by materials and device physicists and also solar cells researchers. It models the performance characteristics of nanostructured solar cells and resolves the dynamics of transitions between several levels of these devices. An outstanding insight into the physical behaviour of these devices is provided, which complements experimental work. This therefore allows a better understanding of the results, enabling the development of new experiments and optimization of new devices. It is intended to be accessible to researchers, but also to provide engineering tools w

  6. Tunable Ultrafast Photon Source and Imaging System for Studying Carrier Dynamics in Graphene Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-23

    Tunable ultrafast photon source and imaging system for studying carrier dynamics in graphene devices This project enabled the acquisition of a...and imaging system for studying carrier dynamics in graphene devices Report Title This project enabled the acquisition of a optical parametric...carrier dynamics in graphene devices As discussed below the focus of this DURIP project was on understanding the interaction between electrons, holes

  7. Optical devices based on liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2005-01-01

    In this ph.d. work, an experimental and theoretical study on Liquid Crystal (LC) infiltrated Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) has been carried out. PCFs usually, consists of an air/silica microstructure of air holes arranged in a triangular lattice surrounding a core defect defined by a missing air...... hole. The presence of a LC in the holes of the PCF transforms the fiber from a Total Internal Reflection (TIR) guiding type into a Photonic BandGap (PBG) guiding type, where light is confined to the silica core by coherent scattering from the LC-billed holes. The high dielectric and optical anisotropy...... of LCs combined with the unique waveguiding features of PBG fibers gives the LC filled PCFs unique tunable properties. PBG guidance has been demonstrated for different mesophases of LCs and various functional compact fibers has been demonstrated, which utilitzes the high thermo-optical and electro...

  8. Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Devices for Nonlinear Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Yi

    , membranization of InP/InGaAs structure and wet etching. Experimental investigation of the switching dynamics of InP photonic crystal nanocavity structures are carried out using short-pulse homodyne pump-probe techniques, both in the linear and nonlinear region where the cavity is perturbed by a relatively small......This thesis deals with the investigation of InP material based photonic crystal cavity membrane structures, both experimentally and theoretically. The work emphasizes on the understanding of the physics underlying the structures’ nonlinear properties and their applications for all-optical signal...... and large pump power. The experimental results are compared with coupled mode equations developed based on the first order perturbation theory, and carrier rate equations we established for the dynamics of the carrier density governing the cavity properties. The experimental observations show a good...

  9. Optical nonlinearity for few-photon pulses on a quantum dot-pillar cavity device

    CERN Document Server

    Loo, Vivien; Gazzano, Olivier; Lemaitre, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; Krebs, Olivier; Voisin, Paul; Senellart, Pascale; Lanco, Loïc

    2012-01-01

    Giant optical nonlinearity is observed under both continuous-wave and pulsed excitation in a deterministically-coupled quantum dot-micropillar system, in a pronounced strong-coupling regime. Using absolute reflectivity measurements we determine the critical intracavity photon number as well as the input and output coupling efficiencies of the device. Thanks to a near-unity input-coupling efficiency, we demonstrate a record nonlinearity threshold of only 8 incident photons per pulse. The output-coupling efficiency is found to strongly influence this nonlinearity threshold. We show how the fundamental limit of single-photon nonlinearity can be attained in realistic devices, which would provide an effective interaction between two coincident single photons.

  10. Tuneable photonic device including an array of metamaterial resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brener, Igal; Wanke, Michael; Benz, Alexander

    2017-03-14

    A photonic apparatus includes a metamaterial resonator array overlying and electromagnetically coupled to a vertically stacked plurality of quantum wells defined in a semiconductor body. An arrangement of electrical contact layers is provided for facilitating the application of a bias voltage across the quantum well stack. Those portions of the semiconductor body that lie between the electrical contact layers are conformed to provide an electrically conductive path between the contact layers and through the quantum well stack.

  11. III-V/silicon photonic integrated circuits for communication and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelkens, Gunther; Keyvaninia, Shahram; Stankovic, Stevan; De Koninck, Yannick; Tassaert, Martijn; Mechet, Pauline; Spuesens, Thijs; Hattasan, N.; Gassenq, A.; Muneeb, M.; Ryckeboer, E.; Ghosh, Samir; Van Thourhout, D.; Baets, R.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we review our work in the field of heterogeneous integration of III-V semiconductors and non-reciprocal optical materials on a silicon waveguide circuit. We elaborate on the heterogeneous integration technology based on adhesive DVS-BCB die-to-wafer bonding and discuss several device demonstrations. The presented devices are envisioned to be used in photonic integrated circuits for communication applications (telecommunications and optical interconnects) as well as in spectroscopic sensing systems operating in the short-wave infrared wavelength range.

  12. Lithography process for patterning HgI2 photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescher, Mark J.; James, Ralph B.; Hermon, Haim

    2004-11-23

    A photolithographic process forms patterns on HgI.sub.2 surfaces and defines metal sublimation masks and electrodes to substantially improve device performance by increasing the realizable design space. Techniques for smoothing HgI.sub.2 surfaces and for producing trenches in HgI.sub.2 are provided. A sublimation process is described which produces etched-trench devices with enhanced electron-transport-only behavior.

  13. Single photon superradiance and cooperative Lamb shift in an optoelectronic device

    CERN Document Server

    Frucci, Giulia; Vasanelli, Angela; Dailly, Baptiste; Todorov, Yanko; Sirtori, Carlo; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Sagnes, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Single photon superradiance is a strong enhancement of spontaneous emission appearing when a single excitation is shared between a large number of two-level systems. This enhanced rate can be accompanied by a shift of the emission frequency, the cooperative Lamb shift, issued from the exchange of virtual photons between the emitters. In this work we present a semiconductor optoelectronic device allowing the observation of these two phenomena at room temperature. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that plasma oscillations in spatially separated quantum wells interact through real and virtual photon exchange. This gives rise to a superradiant mode displaying a large cooperative Lamb shift.

  14. Nonreciprocal spin wave spectroscopy of thin Ni–Fe stripes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalili Amiri, P.K.; Rejaei, B.; Vroubel, M.; Zhuang, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report on the observation of nonreciprocal spin wave propagation in a thin ( ∼ 200 nm) patterned Ni–Fe stripe. The spin wave transmission spectrum is measured using a pair of microstrip lines as antennas. The nonreciprocity of surface wave dispersion brought about by an adjacent aluminum

  15. Ultra-Wide Band Non-reciprocity through Sequentially-Switched Delay Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedka, Mathew M.; Zhu, Rui; Xu, Qiang Mark; Wang, Yuanxun Ethan

    2017-01-01

    Achieving non-reciprocity through unconventional methods without the use of magnetic material has recently become a subject of great interest. Towards this goal a time switching strategy known as the Sequentially-Switched Delay Line (SSDL) is proposed. The essential SSDL configuration consists of six transmission lines of equal length, along with five switches. Each switch is turned on and off sequentially to distribute and route the propagating electromagnetic wave, allowing for simultaneous transmission and receiving of signals through the device. Preliminary experimental results with commercial off the shelf parts are presented which demonstrated non-reciprocal behavior with greater than 40 dB isolation from 200 KHz to 200 MHz. The theory and experimental results demonstrated that the SSDL concept may lead to future on-chip circulators over multi-octaves of frequency.

  16. Compact optically-fed microwave true-time delay using liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui

    2009-01-01

    Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device based optically-fed microwave true-time delay is demonstrated. A maximum ~60° phase shift and an averaged ~7.2ps true time delay are obtained over the modulation frequency range 1GHz-19GHz.......Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device based optically-fed microwave true-time delay is demonstrated. A maximum ~60° phase shift and an averaged ~7.2ps true time delay are obtained over the modulation frequency range 1GHz-19GHz....

  17. Compact optically-fed microwave true-time delay using liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui;

    2009-01-01

    Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device based optically-fed microwave true-time delay is demonstrated. A maximum ~60° phase shift and an averaged ~7.2ps true time delay are obtained over the modulation frequency range 1GHz-19GHz.......Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device based optically-fed microwave true-time delay is demonstrated. A maximum ~60° phase shift and an averaged ~7.2ps true time delay are obtained over the modulation frequency range 1GHz-19GHz....

  18. Nonreciprocity and magnetic-free isolation based on optomechanical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesink, Freek; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Alù, Andrea; Verhagen, Ewold

    2016-11-01

    Nonreciprocal components, such as isolators and circulators, provide highly desirable functionalities for optical circuitry. This motivates the active investigation of mechanisms that break reciprocity, and pose alternatives to magneto-optic effects in on-chip systems. In this work, we use optomechanical interactions to strongly break reciprocity in a compact system. We derive minimal requirements to create nonreciprocity in a wide class of systems that couple two optical modes to a mechanical mode, highlighting the importance of optically biasing the modes at a controlled phase difference. We realize these principles in a silica microtoroid optomechanical resonator and use quantitative heterodyne spectroscopy to demonstrate up to 10 dB optical isolation at telecom wavelengths. We show that nonreciprocal transmission is preserved for nondegenerate modes, and demonstrate nonreciprocal parametric amplification. These results open a route to exploiting various nonreciprocal effects in optomechanical systems in different electromagnetic and mechanical frequency regimes, including optomechanical metamaterials with topologically non-trivial properties.

  19. Quantum Dot/Liquid Crystal Nanocomposites in Photonic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L. Rodarte

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot/liquid crystal nano-composites are promising new materials for a variety of applications in energy harvesting, displays and photonics including the liquid crystal laser. To realize many applications, however, we need to control and stabilize nano-particle dispersion in different liquid crystal host phases and understand how the particles behave in an anisotropic fluid. An ideal system will allow for the controlled assembly of either well-defined nano-particle clusters or a uniform particle distribution. In this paper, we investigate mesogen-functionalized quantum dots for dispersion in cholesteric liquid crystal. These nanoparticles are known to assemble into dense stable packings in the nematic phase, and such structures, when localized in the liquid crystal defects, can potentially enhance the coupling between particles and a cholesteric cavity. Controlling the dispersion and assembly of quantum dots using mesogenic surface ligands, we demonstrate how resonant fluid photonic cavities can result from the co-assembly of luminescent nanoparticles in the presence of cholesteric liquid crystalline ordering.

  20. Photonic materials, structures and devices for Reststrahlen optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, K; Streyer, W; Zhong, Y; Hoffman, A J; Wasserman, D

    2015-11-30

    We present a review of existing and potential next-generation far-infrared (20-60 μm) optical materials and devices. The far-infrared is currently one of the few remaining frontiers on the optical spectrum, a space underdeveloped and lacking in many of the optical and optoelectronic materials and devices taken for granted in other, more technologically mature wavelength ranges. The challenges associated with developing optical materials, structures, and devices at these wavelengths are in part a result of the strong phonon absorption in the Reststrahlen bands of III-V semiconductors that collectively span the far-infrared. More than just an underexplored spectral band, the far-IR may also be of potential importance for a range of sensing applications in astrochemistry, biology, and industrial and geological processes. Additionally, with a suitable far-IR optical infrastructure, it is conceivable that even more applications could emerge. In this review, we will present recent progress on far-infrared materials and phenomena such as phononic surface modes, engineered composite materials, and optoelectronic devices that have the potential to serve as the next generation of components in a far-infrared optical tool-kit.

  1. U60 Undulator: An Insertion Device for the Siam Photon Source

    OpenAIRE

    Thananchai DASRI

    2011-01-01

    Properties of insertion device, undulators, for the synchrotron light source are reviewed. Undulators are magnetic devices installed in the storage ring to improve the properties of the synchrotron light. First, the ideal simulated undulator fields will be discussed. Later the simulated fields produced by a defective undulator will be shown. Last, their effects on the stored electron beam are presented. The U60 undulator of the Siam Photon Source is used as an example.

  2. U60 Undulator: An Insertion Device for the Siam Photon Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thananchai DASRI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of insertion device, undulators, for the synchrotron light source are reviewed. Undulators are magnetic devices installed in the storage ring to improve the properties of the synchrotron light. First, the ideal simulated undulator fields will be discussed. Later the simulated fields produced by a defective undulator will be shown. Last, their effects on the stored electron beam are presented. The U60 undulator of the Siam Photon Source is used as an example.

  3. Uterine doughnut by intrauterine device-induced photon attenuation on three-phase bone scintigraphy: artifact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Myung Hee; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Lim, Seok Tae [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    A 44-year-old female underwent three-phase bone scintigraphy for an evaluation of right hip joint pain. The blood-flow and blood-pool images show a pelvic blush with a photopenic center (doughnut) prior to bladder filling. On the three hour delayed image, the pelvic uptake disappeared. The scintigraphic findings indicated the possibility of an early pregnancy. However, plain radiography demonstrated an intrauterine device. A uterine doughnut developed as a result of photon attenuation of intrauterine device.

  4. DNA-Based Photonic Bandgap Structures and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-29

    Genes to Machines: DNA Nanomechanical Devices, Trends in Biochemical Sciences 30, 119-125 (2005). 4. N.C. Seeman. Structural DNA Nanotechnology: An... kpc ≥ ω , k becomes purely real.. If the dispersion relation just given is written as =++ 22)( kpkak 1ε 2)( c ω , it resembles that for modes in a...waveguide. By analogy, the frequency region for which 1ε 22)( kpc < ω will be referred to as cutoff. IV. APPLICATIONS The presence of molecules

  5. Temperature influence on electrically controlled liquid crystal filled photonic bandgap fiber devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the temperature influence on electrically controlled liquid crystal filled photonic bandgap fiber device. The phase shift in the wavelength range 1520nm-1600nm for realizing quarter and half wave plates at different temperatures by applying a certain voltage...

  6. Encapsulation of Conjugated Oligomers in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes : Towards Nanohybrids for Photonic Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loi, Maria Antonietta; Gao, Jia; Cordella, Fabrizio; Blondeau, Pascal; Menna, Enzo; Bartova, Barbora; Hebert, Cecile; Lazar, Sorin; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Milko, Matus; Ambrosch-Draxl, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Visible-light emitting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)/organic hybrids have been successfully synthesized and promise to be a photon source to be used in future optoelectronic devices. The nanohybrids are "peapods" having sexithiophene molecules inside the hollow space of SWNTs. High-resoluti

  7. Encapsulation of Conjugated Oligomers in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Towards Nanohybrids for Photonic Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loi, M.A.; Gao, Jia; Cordella, Fabrizio; Blondeau, Pascal; Menna, Enzo; Bartova, Barbora; Hebert, Cecile; Lazar, Sorin; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Milko, Matus; Ambrosch-Draxl, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    {Visible-light emitting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)/organic hybrids have been successfully synthesized and promise to be a photon source to be used in future optoelectronic devices. The nanohybrids are ``peapods{''} having sexithiophene molecules inside the hollow space of SWNTs. High-res

  8. Ultrafast laser inscribed integrated photonics: material science to device development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gross S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Detailed studies of intense light – material interactions has led to new insights into fs laser induced refractive index change in a range of glass types. This body of knowledge enables the development of advanced processing methodologies, resulting in novel planar and 3D guided wave devices. We will review the chemistry and morphology associated with fs laser induced refractive index change in multi-component glasses such as ZBLAN, phosphates and silicates, and discuss how these material changes inform our research programs developing a range of active and passive lightwave systems.

  9. A stable, single-photon emitter in a thin organic crystal for application to quantum-photonic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Polisseni, Claudio; Boissier, Sebastien; Grandi, Samuele; Clark, Alex S; Hinds, E A

    2016-01-01

    Single organic molecules offer great promise as bright, reliable sources of identical single photons on demand, capable of integration into solid-state devices. It has been proposed that such molecules in a crystalline organic matrix might be placed close to an optical waveguide for this purpose, but so far there have been no demonstrations of sufficiently thin crystals, with a controlled concentration of suitable dopant molecules. Here we present a method for growing very thin anthracene crystals from super-saturated vapour, which produces crystals of extreme flatness and controlled thickness. We show how this crystal can be doped with a widely adjustable concentration of dibenzoterrylene (DBT) molecules and we examine the optical properties of these molecules to demonstrate their suitability as quantum emitters in nanophotonic devices. Our measurements show that the molecules are available in the crystal as single quantum emitters, with a well-defined polarisation relative to the crystal axes, making them a...

  10. Radiation Testing, Characterization and Qualification Challenges for Modern Microelectronics and Photonics Devices and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2008-01-01

    At GOMAC 2007, we discussed a selection of the challenges for radiation testing of modern semiconductor devices focusing on state-of-the-art memory technologies. This included FLASH non-volatile memories (NVMs) and synchronous dynamic random access memories (SDRAMs). In this presentation, we extend this discussion in device packaging and complexity as well as single event upset (SEU) mechanisms using several technology areas as examples including: system-on-a-chip (SOC) devices and photonic or fiber optic systems. The underlying goal is intended to provoke thought for understanding the limitations and interpretation of radiation testing results.

  11. Versatile alignment layer method for new types of liquid crystal photonic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finnemeyer, V.; Bryant, D.; Lu, L.; Bos, P. [Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States); Reich, R.; Clark, H.; Berry, S.; Bozler, C. [MIT Lincoln Laboratory, 244 Wood St., Lexington, Massachusetts 02420 (United States); Yaroshchuk, O. [Institute of Physics, NAS of Ukraine, 44 Prospect Nauky, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine)

    2015-07-21

    Liquid crystal photonic devices are becoming increasingly popular. These devices often present a challenge when it comes to creating a robust alignment layer in pre-assembled cells. In this paper, we describe a method of infusing a dye into a microcavity to produce an effective photo-definable alignment layer. However, previous research on such alignment layers has shown that they have limited stability, particularly against subsequent light exposure. As such, we further describe a method of utilizing a pre-polymer, infused into the microcavity along with the liquid crystal, to provide photostability. We demonstrate that the polymer layer, formed under ultraviolet irradiation of liquid crystal cells, has been effectively localized to a thin region near the substrate surface and provides a significant improvement in the photostability of the liquid crystal alignment. This versatile alignment layer method, capable of being utilized in devices from the described microcavities to displays, offers significant promise for new photonics applications.

  12. Nonlinear Silicon Photonic Signal Processing Devices for Future Optical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Lacava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a review on silicon-based nonlinear devices for all optical nonlinear processing of complex telecommunication signals. We discuss some recent developments achieved by our research group, through extensive collaborations with academic partners across Europe, on optical signal processing using silicon-germanium and amorphous silicon based waveguides as well as novel materials such as silicon rich silicon nitride and tantalum pentoxide. We review the performance of four wave mixing wavelength conversion applied on complex signals such as Differential Phase Shift Keying (DPSK, Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK, 16-Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM and 64-QAM that dramatically enhance the telecom signal spectral efficiency, paving the way to next generation terabit all-optical networks.

  13. Generalized nonreciprocity in an optomechanical circuit via synthetic magnetism and reservoir engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Kejie; Metelmann, Anja; Matheny, Mathew H; Marquardt, Florian; Clerk, Aashish A; Painter, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic magnetism has been used to control charge neutral excitations for applications ranging from classical beam steering to quantum simulation. In optomechanics, radiation-pressure-induced parametric coupling between optical (photon) and mechanical (phonon) excitations may be used to break time-reversal symmetry, providing the prerequisite for synthetic magnetism. Here we design and fabricate a silicon optomechanical circuit with both optical and mechanical connectivity between two optomechanical cavities. Driving the two cavities with phase-correlated laser light results in a synthetic magnetic flux, which in combination with dissipative coupling to the mechanical bath, leads to nonreciprocal transport of photons with 35dB of isolation. Additionally, optical pumping with blue-detuned light manifests as a particle non-conserving interaction between photons and phonons, resulting in directional optical amplification of 12dB in the isolator through direction. These results indicate the feasibility of utili...

  14. Towards brilliant, compact x-ray sources: a new x-ray photonic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Brian; Mandal, Sudeep; Salisbury, Joshua; Edic, Peter; Hopkins, Forrest; Lee, Susanne M.

    2017-05-01

    General Electric has designed an innovative x-ray photonic device that concentrates a polychromatic beam of diverging x-rays into a less divergent, parallel, or focused x-ray beam. The device consists of multiple, thin film multilayer stacks. X-rays incident on a given multilayer stack propagate within a high refractive index transmission layer while undergoing multiple total internal reflections from a novel, engineered multilayer containing materials of lower refractive index. Development of this device could lead to order-of-magnitude flux density increases, over a large broadband energy range from below 20 keV to above 300 keV. In this paper, we give an overview of the device and present GE's progress towards fabricating prototype devices.

  15. Truly trapped rainbow by utilizing nonreciprocal waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kexin; He, Sailing

    2016-07-01

    The concept of a “trapped rainbow” has generated considerable interest for optical data storage and processing. It aims to trap different frequency components of the wave packet at different positions permanently. However, all the previously proposed structures cannot truly achieve this effect, due to the difficulties in suppressing the reflection caused by strong intermodal coupling and distinguishing different frequency components simultaneously. In this article, we found a physical mechanism to achieve a truly “trapped rainbow” storage of electromagnetic wave. We utilize nonreciprocal waveguides under a tapered magnetic field to achieve this and such a trapping effect is stable even under fabrication disorders. We also observe hot spots and relatively long duration time of the trapped wave around critical positions through frequency domain and time domain simulations. The physical mechanism we found has a variety of potential applications ranging from wave harvesting and storage to nonlinearity enhancement.

  16. Truly trapped rainbow by utilizing nonreciprocal waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Kexin

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a "trapped rainbow" has generated considerable interest for optical data storage and processing. It aims to trap different frequency components of the wave packet at different positions permanently. However, all the previously proposed structures cannot truly achieve this effect, due to the difficulties in suppressing the reflection caused by strong intermodal coupling and distinguishing different frequency components simultaneously. In this article, we found a physical mechanism to achieve a truly "trapped rainbow" storage of electromagnetic wave. We utilize nonreciprocal waveguides under a tapered magnetic field to achieve this and such a trapping effect is stable even under fabrication disorders. We also observe hot spots and relatively long duration time of the trapped wave around critical positions through frequency domain and time domain simulations. The physical mechanism we found has a variety of potential applications ranging from wave harvesting and storage to nonlinearity enhancement...

  17. Non-Reciprocal Brillouiin Scattering Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, JunHwan; Han, Kewen; Wang, Hailin; Bahl, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) [1, 2] provides a powerful mechanism for controlling light propagation in a dielectric medium, and for producing both slow and fast light. EIT traditionally arises from destructive interference induced by a nonradiative coherence in an atomic system. Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) of light from propagating hypersonic acoustic waves [3] has also been used successfully for the generation of slow and fast light [4-7]. However, EIT-type processes based on SBS were considered infeasible because of the short coherence lifetime of hypersonic phonons. Here, we demonstrate a new Brillouin scattering induced transparency (BSIT) phenomenon generated by acousto-optic interaction of light with long-lived propagating phonons [8, 9]. This transparency is intrinsically non-reciprocal due to the stringent phase-matching requirements. We demonstrate BSIT in a silica microresonator having a specific, naturally occurring, forward-SBS phase-matched modal configuration [8, 9]. ...

  18. Prospects of Wannier functions in investigating photonic crystal all-optical devices for signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradoglu, M S; Baghai-Wadji, A R; Ng, T W

    2010-04-01

    Wannier functions derived from Bloch functions have been identified as an efficient means of analyzing the properties of photonic crystals in which localized functions have now opened the door for 2D and 3D structures containing defects to be investigated. In this paper, based on the Maxwell equations in diagonalized form and utilizing Bloch waves we have obtained an equivalent system of algebraic equations in eigenform. By establishing and exploiting several distinct properties of the resulting eigenpairs, we demonstrate an ability to construct Wannier functions associated with the simplest one-dimensional photonic structure. More importantly, the numerical investigation of the inner- and intra-band orthonormality conditions as well as Hilbert space partitioning features shows a capability for multi-resolution analysis that will make all-optical signal processing devices with photonic crystal structures feasible.

  19. Nonreciprocal Bloch oscillations in magneto-optic waveguide arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Miguel; Kumar, Pradeep

    2010-09-15

    We show that nonreciprocal optical Bloch-like oscillations can emerge in transversely magnetized waveguide arrays in the presence of an effective index step between the waveguides. Normal modes of the system are shown to acquire different wavenumbers in opposite propagation directions. Significant differences in phase coherence and decoherence between these normal modes are presented and discussed. Nonreciprocity is established by imposing unequal vertical refractive index gradients at the substrate/core and core/cover interfaces in the presence of transverse magnetization.

  20. Properties of nonreciprocal light propagation in a nonlinear optical isolator

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Dibyendu

    2016-01-01

    Light propagation in a nonlinear optical medium is nonreciprocal for spatially asymmetric linear permittivity. We here examine physical mechanism and properties of such nonreciprocity (NR). For this, we calculate transmission of light through a two-level atom asymmetrically coupled to light inside open waveguides. We determine the critical intensity of incident light for maximum NR and a dependence of the corresponding NR on asymmetry in the coupling. Surprisingly, we find that it is mainly c...

  1. Single-photon superradiance and cooperative Lamb shift in an optoelectronic device (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirtori, Carlo

    2017-02-01

    Superradiance is one of the many fascinating phenomena predicted by quantum electrodynamics that have first been experimentally demonstrated in atomic systems and more recently in condensed matter systems like quantum dots, superconducting q-bits, cyclotron transitions and plasma oscillations in quantum wells (QWs). It occurs when a dense collection of N identical two-level emitters are phased via the exchange of photons, giving rise to enhanced light-matter interaction, hence to a faster emission rate. Of great interest is the regime where the ensemble interacts with one photon only and therefore all of the atoms, but one, are in the ground state. In this case the quantum superposition of all possible configurations produces a symmetric state that decays radiatively with a rate N times larger than that of the individual oscillators. This phenomenon, called single photon superradiance, results from the exchange of real photons among the N emitters. Yet, to single photon superradiance is also associated another collective effect that renormalizes the emission frequency, known as cooperative Lamb shift. In this work, we show that single photon superradiance and cooperative Lamb shift can be engineered in a semiconductor device by coupling spatially separated plasma resonances arising from the collective motion of confined electrons in QWs. These resonances hold a giant dipole along the growth direction z and have no mutual Coulomb coupling. They thus behave as a collection of macro-atoms on different positions along the z axis. Our device is therefore a test bench to simulate the low excitation regime of quantum electrodynamics.

  2. Active photonic devices based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals and organometallic halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez Alvarez, Isaac

    2016-10-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals have arisen as outstanding materials to develop a new generation of optoelectronic devices. Their fabrication under simple and low cost colloidal chemistry methods results in cheap nanostructures able to provide a wide range of optical functionalities. Their attractive optical properties include a high absorption cross section below the band gap, a high quantum yield emission at room temperature, or the capability of tuning the band-gap with the size or the base material. In addition, their solution process nature enables an easy integration on several substrates and photonic structures. As a consequence, these nanoparticles have been extensively proposed to develop several photonic applications, such as detection of light, optical gain, generation of light or sensing. This manuscript reviews the great effort undertaken by the scientific community to construct active photonic devices based on these nanoparticles. The conditions to demonstrate stimulated emission are carefully studied by comparing the dependence of the optical properties of the nanocrystals with their size, shape and composition. In addition, this paper describes the design of different photonic architectures (waveguides and cavities) to enhance the generation of photoluminescence, and hence to reduce the threshold of optical gain. Finally, semiconductor nanocrystals are compared to organometallic halide perovskites, as this novel material has emerged as an alternative to colloidal nanoparticles.

  3. Recent progress in organic electronics and photonics: A perspective on the future of organic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2016-02-25

    The fields of organic electronics and photonics have witnessed remarkable advances over the past few years. This progress bodes well for the increased utilization of organic materials as the active layers in devices for applications as diverse as light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, solar cells, or all-optical switches. In the present document, we choose to focus the discussion on organic all-optical switching applications. © 2015 The Japan Society of Applied Physics.

  4. The Role of Space Experiments in the Radiation Qualification of Electronic and Photonic Devices and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, S.; LaBel, K.; Barth, J.; Campbell, A.

    2005-01-01

    Space experiments are occasionally launched to study the effects of radiation on electronic and photonic devices. This begs the following questions: Are space experiments necessary? Do the costs justify the benefits? How does one judge success of space experiment? What have we learned from past space experiments? How does one design a space experiment? This viewgraph presentation provides information on the usefulness of space and ground tests for simulating radiation damage to spacecraft components.

  5. Time-Varying Metasurfaces and Lorentz Non-Reciprocity

    CERN Document Server

    Shaltout, Amr; Shalaev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    A cornerstone equation of optics, Snell's law, relates the angles of incidence and refraction for light passing through an interface between two media. It is built on two fundamental constrains: the conservation of tangential momentum and the conservation of energy. By relaxing the classical Snell law photon momentum conservation constrain when using space-gradient phase discontinuity, optical metasurfaces enabled an entirely new class of ultrathin optical devices. Here, we show that by eradicating the photon energy conservation constrain when introducing time-gradient phase discontinuity, we can further empower the area of flat photonics and obtain a new genus of optical devices. With this approach, classical Snell relations are developed into a more universal form not limited by Lorentz reciprocity, hence, meeting all the requirements for building magnetic-free optical isolators. Furthermore, photons experience inelastic interaction with time-gradient metasurfaces, which modifies photonic energy eigenstates...

  6. Unique properties of graphene quantum dots and their applications in photonic/electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Suk-Ho

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been recognized as an attractive building block for electronic, photonic, and bio-molecular device applications. This paper reports the current status of studies on the novel properties of GQDs and their hybrids with conventional and low-dimensional materials for device applications. In this review, more emphasis is placed on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of GQDs, and device structures based on the combination of GQDs with various semiconducting/insulating materials such as graphene, silicon dioxide, Si quantum dots, silica nanoparticles, organic materials, and so on. Because of GQDs’ unique properties, their hybrid structures are employed in high-efficiency devices, including photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes, flash memory, and sensors.

  7. Micro-/nanoscale multi-field coupling in nonlinear photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Wang, Yubo; Tang, Mingwei; Xu, Pengfei; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2017-08-01

    The coupling of mechanics/electronics/photonics may improve the performance of nanophotonic devices not only in the linear region but also in the nonlinear region. This review letter mainly presents the recent advances on multi-field coupling in nonlinear photonic devices. The nonlinear piezoelectric effect and piezo-phototronic effects in quantum wells and fibers show that large second-order nonlinear susceptibilities can be achieved, and second harmonic generation and electro-optic modulation can be enhanced and modulated. Strain engineering can tune the lattice structures and induce second order susceptibilities in central symmetry semiconductors. By combining the absorption-based photoacoustic effect and intensity-dependent photobleaching effect, subdiffraction imaging can be achieved. This review will also discuss possible future applications of these novel effects and the perspective of their research. The review can help us develop a deeper knowledge of the substance of photon-electron-phonon interaction in a micro-/nano- system. Moreover, it can benefit the design of nonlinear optical sensors and imaging devices with a faster response rate, higher efficiency, more sensitivity and higher spatial resolution which could be applied in environmental detection, bio-sensors, medical imaging and so on.

  8. Hybrid graphene/silicon integrated optical isolators with photonic spin-orbit interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Jingwen; Yu, Zejie; Sun, Xiankai

    2016-01-01

    Optical isolators are an important building block in photonic computation and communication. In traditional optics, isolators are realized with magneto-optical garnets. However, it remains challenging to incorporate such materials on an integrated platform because of the difficulty in material growth and bulky device footprint. Here, we propose an ultracompact integrated isolator by exploiting graphene's magneto-optical property on a silicon-on-insulator platform. The photonic nonreciprocity is achieved because the cyclotrons in graphene experiencing different optical spin exhibit different response to counterpropagating light. Taking advantage of cavity resonance effects, we have numerically optimized a device design, which shows excellent isolation performance with the extinction ratio over 45 dB and the insertion loss around 12 dB at a wavelength near 1.55 um. Featuring graphene's CMOS compatibility and substantially reduced device footprint, our proposal sheds light to monolithic integration of nonrecipro...

  9. Highly entangled photons from hybrid piezoelectric-semiconductor quantum dot devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Rinaldo; Wildmann, Johannes S; Zallo, Eugenio; Schmidt, Oliver G; Rastelli, Armando

    2014-06-11

    Entanglement resources are key ingredients of future quantum technologies. If they could be efficiently integrated into a semiconductor platform, a new generation of devices could be envisioned, whose quantum-mechanical functionalities are controlled via the mature semiconductor technology. Epitaxial quantum dots (QDs) embedded in diodes would embody such ideal quantum devices, but a fine-structure splitting (FSS) between the bright exciton states lowers dramatically the degree of entanglement of the sources and hampers severely their real exploitation in the foreseen applications. In this work, we overcome this hurdle using strain-tunable optoelectronic devices, where any QD can be tuned for the emission of photon pairs featuring the highest degree of entanglement ever reported for QDs, with concurrence as high as 0.75 ± 0.02. Furthermore, we study the evolution of Bell's parameters as a function of FSS and demonstrate for the first time that filtering-free violation of Bell's inequalities requires the FSS to be smaller than 1 μeV. This upper limit for the FSS also sets the tuning range of exciton energies (∼1 meV) over which our device operates as an energy-tunable source of highly entangled photons. A moderate temporal filtering further increases the concurrence and the tunability of exciton energies up to 0.82 and 2 meV, respectively, though at the expense of 60% reduction of count rate.

  10. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern photonics accessibly and discusses the basic physical principles underlying all the applications and technology of photonicsThis volume covers the basic physical principles underlying the technology and all applications of photonics from statistical optics to quantum optics. The topics discussed in this volume are: Photons in perspective; Coherence and Statistical Optics; Complex Light and Singular Optics; Electrodynamics of Dielectric Media; Fast and slow Light; Holography; Multiphoton Processes; Optical Angular Momentum; Optical Forces, Trapping and Manipulation; Pol

  11. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying Biomedical Photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy This volume discusses biomedical photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy, the basic physical principles underlying the technology and its applications. The topics discussed in this volume are: Biophotonics; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Medical Photonics; Microscopy; Nonlinear Optics; Ophthalmic Technology; Optical Tomography; Optofluidics; Photodynamic Therapy; Image Processing; Imaging Systems; Sensors; Single Molecule Detection; Futurology in Photonics. Comprehensive and accessible cov

  12. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying thescience and technology of nanophotonics, its materials andstructures This volume presents nanophotonic structures and Materials.Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizeslight/matter interactions on the nanoscale where researchers arediscovering new phenomena and developing techniques that go wellbeyond what is possible with conventional photonics andelectronics.The topics discussed in this volume are: CavityPhotonics; Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates; Displays;E-paper; Graphene; Integrated Photonics; Liquid Cry

  13. Light emitting devices based on Si nanoclusters: the integration with a photonic crystal and electroluminescence properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We present the properties and potentialities of light emitting devices based on amorphous Si nanoclusters. Amorphous nanostructures may constitute an interesting alternative to Si nanocrystals for the monolithic integration of optical and electrical functions in Si technology. In fact, they exhibit an intense room temperature electroluminescence (EL). The EL properties of these devices have been studied as a function of current and of temperature. Moreover, to improve the extraction efficiency of the light, we have integrated the emitting system with a 2D photonic crystal structure opportunely fabricated by using conventional optical lithography to reduce the total internal reflection of the emitted light. The extraction efficiency in such devices increases by a factor of 4 at a resonance wavelength.

  14. A survey on GaN- based devices for terahertz photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahi, Kiarash; Anwar, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    With fast growing of the photonics and power electronic systems, the need for high power- high frequency semiconductor devices is sensed tremendously. GaN provides the highest electron saturation velocity, breakdown voltage and operation temperature, and thus combined frequency-power performance among commonly used semiconductors. With achieving the first THz image in just two decades ago, generation and detection of terahertz (THz) radiation is one of the most emerging photonic areas. The industrial needs for compact, economical, high resolution and high power THz imaging and spectroscopy systems are fueling the utilization of GaN for the realizing of the next generation of THz systems. As it is reviewed in this paper, the mentioned characteristics of GaN together with its capabilities of providing high 2-dimentional election densities and large longitudinal-optical phonon of 90 meV, make it one of the most promising semiconductor materials for the future of the THz generation, detection, mixing, and frequency multiplication. GaN- based devices have shown capabilities of operating in the upper THz frequency band of 5- 12 THz with relatively high photon densities and in room temperature. As a result, THz imaging and spectroscopy systems with high resolutions and depths of penetrations can be realized via utilizing GaN- based devices. In this paper, a comprehensive review on the history and state of the art of the GaN- based electronic devices, including plasma HFETs, NDRs, HDSDs, IMPATTs, QCLs, HEMTs, Gunn diodes and TeraFETs together with their impact on the future of THz imaging and spectroscopy systems is provided.

  15. Multidimensional microstructured photonic device based on all-solid waveguide array fiber and magnetic fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Yinping

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An all-solid waveguide array fiber (WAF is one kind of special microstructured optical fiber in which the higher-index rods are periodically distributed in a low-index silica host to form the transverse two-dimensional photonic crystal. In this paper, one kind of multidimensional microstructured optical fiber photonic device is proposed by using electric arc discharge method to fabricate periodic tapers along the fiber axis. By tuning the applied magnetic field intensity, the propagation characteristics of the all-solid WAF integrated with magnetic fluid are periodically modulated in both radial and axial directions. Experimental results show that the wavelength changes little while the transmission loss increases for an applied magnetic field intensity range from 0 to 500 Oe. The magnetic field sensitivity is 0.055 dB/Oe within the linear range from 50 to 300 Oe. Meanwhile, the all-solid WAF has very similar thermal expansion coefficient for both high- and low-refractive index glasses, and thermal drifts have a little effect on the mode profile. The results show that the temperature-induced transmission loss is <0.3 dB from 26°C to 44°C. Further tuning coherent coupling of waveguides and controlling light propagation, the all-solid WAF would be found great potential applications to develop new micro-nano photonic devices for optical communications and optical sensing applications.

  16. Multidimensional microstructured photonic device based on all-solid waveguide array fiber and magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinping; Ma, Xixi; He, Yong; Zhang, Hongmin; Yang, Xiaoping; Yao, Jianquan

    2017-01-01

    An all-solid waveguide array fiber (WAF) is one kind of special microstructured optical fiber in which the higher-index rods are periodically distributed in a low-index silica host to form the transverse two-dimensional photonic crystal. In this paper, one kind of multidimensional microstructured optical fiber photonic device is proposed by using electric arc discharge method to fabricate periodic tapers along the fiber axis. By tuning the applied magnetic field intensity, the propagation characteristics of the all-solid WAF integrated with magnetic fluid are periodically modulated in both radial and axial directions. Experimental results show that the wavelength changes little while the transmission loss increases for an applied magnetic field intensity range from 0 to 500 Oe. The magnetic field sensitivity is 0.055 dB/Oe within the linear range from 50 to 300 Oe. Meanwhile, the all-solid WAF has very similar thermal expansion coefficient for both high- and low-refractive index glasses, and thermal drifts have a little effect on the mode profile. The results show that the temperature-induced transmission loss is <0.3 dB from 26°C to 44°C. Further tuning coherent coupling of waveguides and controlling light propagation, the all-solid WAF would be found great potential applications to develop new micro-nano photonic devices for optical communications and optical sensing applications.

  17. Ultrafast Photomodulation Spectroscopy: a device-level tool for characterizing the flow of light in integrated photonic circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Bruck, Roman; Thomson, David J; Gardes, Frederic Y; Hu, Youfang; Reed, Graham T; Muskens, Otto L

    2014-01-01

    Advances in silicon photonics have resulted in rapidly increasing complexity of integrated circuits. New methods are desirable that allow direct characterization of individual optical components in-situ, without the need for additional fabrication steps or test structures. Here, we present a new device-level method for characterization of photonic chips based on a highly localized modulation in the device using pulsed laser excitation. Optical pumping perturbs the refractive index of silicon, providing a spatially and temporally localized modulation in the transmitted light enabling time- and frequency-resolved imaging. We demonstrate the versatility of this all-optical modulation technique in imaging and in quantitative characterization of a variety of properties of silicon photonic devices, ranging from group indices in waveguides, quality factors of a ring resonator to the mode structure of a multimode interference device. Ultrafast photomodulation spectroscopy provides important information on devices of ...

  18. Aperiodic TiO2 nanotube photonic crystal: full-visible-spectrum solar light harvesting in photovoltaic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Xie, Keyu; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Limin; Huang, Haitao

    2014-09-23

    Bandgap engineering of a photonic crystal is highly desirable for photon management in photonic sensors and devices. Aperiodic photonic crystals (APCs) can provide unprecedented opportunities for much more versatile photon management, due to increased degrees of freedom in the design and the unique properties brought about by the aperiodic structures as compared to their periodic counterparts. However, many efforts still remain on conceptual approaches, practical achievements in APCs are rarely reported due to the difficulties in fabrication. Here, we report a simple but highly controllable current-pulse anodization process to design and fabricate TiO2 nanotube APCs. By coupling an APC into the photoanode of a dye-sensitized solar cell, we demonstrate the concept of using APC to achieve nearly full-visible-spectrum light harvesting, as evidenced by both experimental and simulated results. It is anticipated that this work will lead to more fruitful practical applications of APCs in high-efficiency photovoltaics, sensors and optoelectronic devices.

  19. Optical fiber loops and helices: tools for integrated photonic device characterization and microfluidic trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Ti, Chaoyang; Liu, Yuxiang

    2016-09-01

    Tapered optical fibers can deliver guided light into and carry light out of micro/nanoscale systems with low loss and high spatial resolution, which makes them ideal tools in integrated photonics and microfluidics. Special geometries of tapered fibers are desired for probing monolithic devices in plane as well as optical manipulation of micro particles in fluids. However, for many specially shaped tapered fibers, it remains a challenge to fabricate them in a straightforward, controllable, and repeatable way. In this work, we fabricated and characterized two special geometries of tapered optical fibers, namely fiber loops and helices, that could be switched between one and the other. The fiber loops in this work are distinct from previous ones in terms of their superior mechanical stability and high optical quality factors in air, thanks to a post-annealing process. We experimentally measured an intrinsic optical quality factor of 32,500 and a finesse of 137 from a fiber loop. A fiber helix was used to characterize a monolithic cavity optomechanical device. Moreover, a microfluidic "roller coaster" was demonstrated, where microscale particles in water were optically trapped and transported by a fiber helix. Tapered fiber loops and helices can find various applications ranging from on-the-fly characterization of integrated photonic devices to particle manipulation and sorting in microfluidics.

  20. Silicon Photonics Research in Hong Kong: Microresonator Devices and Optical Nonlinearities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Andrew W.; Zhou, Linjie; Xu, Fang; Li, Chao; Chen, Hui; Liang, Tak-Keung; Liu, Yang; Tsang, Hon K.

    In this review paper we showcase recent activities on silicon photonics science and technology research in Hong Kong regarding two important topical areas-microresonator devices and optical nonlinearities. Our work on silicon microresonator filters, switches and modulators have shown promise for the nascent development of on-chip optoelectronic signal processing systems, while our studies on optical nonlinearities have contributed to basic understanding of silicon-based optically-pumped light sources and helium-implanted detectors. Here, we review our various passive and electro-optic active microresonator devices including (i) cascaded microring resonator cross-connect filters, (ii) NRZ-to-PRZ data format converters using a microring resonator notch filter, (iii) GHz-speed carrier-injection-based microring resonator modulators and 0.5-GHz-speed carrier-injection-based microdisk resonator modulators, and (iv) electrically reconfigurable microring resonator add-drop filters and electro-optic logic switches using interferometric resonance control. On the nonlinear waveguide front, we review the main nonlinear optical effects in silicon, and show that even at fairly modest average powers two-photon absorption and the accompanied free-carrier linear absorption could lead to optical limiting and a dramatic reduction in the effective lengths of nonlinear devices.

  1. Criteria of backscattering in chiral one-way photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Optical isolators are important devices in photonic circuits. To reduce the unwanted reflection in a robust manner, several setups have been realized using nonreciprocal schemes. In this study, we show that the propagating modes in a strongly-guided chiral photonic crystal (no breaking of the reciprocity) are not backscattering-immune even though they are indeed insensitive to many types of scatters. Without the protection from the nonreciprocity, the backscattering occurs under certain circumstances. We present a perturbative method to calculate the backscattering of chiral photonic crystals in the presence of chiral/achiral scatters. The model is, essentially, a simplified analogy to the first-order Born approximation. Under reasonable assumptions based on the behaviors of chiral photonic modes, we obtained the expression of reflection coefficients which provides criteria for the prominent backscattering in such chiral structures. Numerical examinations using the finite-element method were also performed and the results agree well with the theoretical prediction. From both our theory and numerical calculations, we find that the amount of backscattering critically depends on the symmetry of scatter cross sections. Strong reflection takes place when the azimuthal Fourier components of scatter cross sections have an order l of 2. Chiral scatters without these Fourier components would not efficiently reflect the chiral photonic modes. In addition, for these chiral propagating modes, disturbances at the most significant parts of field profiles do not necessarily result in the most effective backscattering. The observation also reveals what types of scatters or defects should be avoided in one-way applications of chiral structures in order to minimize the backscattering.

  2. Amorphous-Si waveguide on a garnet magneto-optical isolator with a TE mode nonreciprocal phase shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Eiichi; Miura, Kengo; Shoji, Yuya; Yokoi, Hideki; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Arai, Shigehisa

    2017-01-09

    We fabricated a magneto-optical (MO) isolator with a TE mode nonreciprocal phase shift. The isolator is based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer composed of 3-dB directional couplers, a reciprocal phase shifter, and a nonreciprocal phase shifter. To realize TE mode operation in the optical isolator, we designed a novel waveguide structure composed of a hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguide with an asymmetric MO garnet lateral clad on a garnet substrate. The isolator operation is successfully demonstrated in a fabricated device showing the different transmittances between forward and backward directions. The maximum isolation of the fabricated isolator is 17.9 dB at a wavelength of 1561 nm for the TE mode.

  3. Waveguiding and bending modes in a plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Waveguiding and bending modes are investigated in a fully tunable plasma photonic crystal. The plasma device actively controls the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X band of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes form a square crystal lattice exhibiting a well-defined bandgap, with individual active switching of the plasma elements to allow for waveguiding and bending modes to be generated dynamically. We show, through simulations and experiments, the existence of transverse electric (TE mode waveguiding and bending modes.

  4. Siloxane-based photonic structures and their application in optic and optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudiš, Dušan; Šušlik, Łuboš; Jandura, Daniel; Goraus, Matej; Figurová, Mária; Martinček, Ivan; Gašo, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Polymer based photonics brings simple and cheap solutions often with interesting results. We present capabilities of some siloxanes focusing on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with unique mechanical and optical properties. In combination of laser lithography technologies with siloxane embossing we fabricate different grating structures with one- and two-dimensional symmetry. Concept of PDMS based thin membranes with patterned surface as an effective diffraction element for modification of radiation pattern diagram of light emitting diodes is here shown. Also the PDMS was used as an alternative material for fabrication of complicated waveguide with implemented Bragg grating. For lab-on-chip applications, we patterned PDMS microstructures for microfluidic and micro-optic devices.

  5. Photolithography of thick photoresist coating for electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Khomtchenko, Elena; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2009-01-01

    Thick photoresist coating for electrode patterning in an anisotropically etched V-groove is investigated for electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre devices. The photoresist step coverage at the convex corners is compared with and without soft baking after photoresist spin...... coating. Two-step UV exposure is applied to achieve a complete exposure for the thick photoresist layer at the bottom of the V-groove, and minimise the reduction in resolution and image distortion. The resolution reduction of the different open window width for electrode pattern transfer is also...

  6. Bio-Inspired Photon Absorption and Energy Transfer for Next Generation Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magsi, Komal

    Nature's solar energy harvesting system, photosynthesis, serves as a model for photon absorption, spectra broadening, and energy transfer. Photosynthesis harvests light far differently than photovoltaic cells. These differences offer both engineering opportunity and scientific challenges since not all of the natural photon absorption mechanisms have been understood. In return, solar cells can be a very sensitive probe for the absorption characteristics of molecules capable of transferring charge to a conductive interface. The objective of this scientific work is the advancement of next generation photovoltaics through the development and application of natural photo-energy transfer processes. Two scientific methods were used in the development and application of enhancing photon absorption and transfer. First, a detailed analysis of photovoltaic front surface fluorescent spectral modification and light scattering by hetero-structure was conducted. Phosphor based spectral down-conversion is a well-known laser technology. The theoretical calculations presented here indicate that parasitic losses and light scattering within the spectral range are large enough to offset any expected gains. The second approach for enhancing photon absorption is based on bio-inspired mechanisms. Key to the utilization of these natural processes is the development of a detailed scientific understanding and the application of these processes to cost effective systems and devices. In this work both aspects are investigated. Dye type solar cells were prepared and tested as a function of Chlorophyll (or Sodium-Copper Chlorophyllin) and accessory dyes. Forster has shown that the fluorescence ratio of Chlorophyll is modified and broadened by separate photon absorption (sensitized absorption) through interaction with nearby accessory pigments. This work used the dye type solar cell as a diagnostic tool by which to investigate photon absorption and photon energy transfer. These experiments shed

  7. Berry phase jumps and giant nonreciprocity in Dirac quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, Joaquin F.; Levitov, Leonid S.

    2016-12-01

    We predict that a strong nonreciprocity in the resonance spectra of Dirac quantum dots can be induced by the Berry phase. The nonreciprocity arises in relatively weak magnetic fields and is manifest in anomalously large field-induced splittings of quantum dot resonances which are degenerate at B =0 due to time-reversal symmetry. This exotic behavior, which is governed by field-induced jumps in the Berry phase of confined electronic states, is unique to quantum dots in Dirac materials and is absent in conventional quantum dots. The effect is strong for gapless Dirac particles and can overwhelm the B -induced orbital and Zeeman splittings. A finite Dirac mass suppresses the effect. The nonreciprocity, predicted for generic two-dimensional Dirac materials, is accessible through Faraday and Kerr optical rotation measurements and scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

  8. EDITORIAL: Semiconductor nanotechnology: novel materials and devices for electronics, photonics and renewable energy applications Semiconductor nanotechnology: novel materials and devices for electronics, photonics and renewable energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnick, Stephen; Korkin, Anatoli; Krstic, Predrag; Mascher, Peter; Preston, John; Zaslavsky, Alex

    2010-04-01

    Electronic and photonic information technology and renewable energy alternatives, such as solar energy, fuel cells and batteries, have now reached an advanced stage in their development. Cost-effective improvements to current technological approaches have made great progress, but certain challenges remain. As feature sizes of the latest generations of electronic devices are approaching atomic dimensions, circuit speeds are now being limited by interconnect bottlenecks. This has prompted innovations such as the introduction of new materials into microelectronics manufacturing at an unprecedented rate and alternative technologies to silicon CMOS architectures. Despite the environmental impact of conventional fossil fuel consumption, the low cost of these energy sources has been a long-standing economic barrier to the development of alternative and more efficient renewable energy sources, fuel cells and batteries. In the face of mounting environmental concerns, interest in such alternative energy sources has grown. It is now widely accepted that nanotechnology offers potential solutions for securing future progress in information and energy technologies. The Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC) forum was established 25 years ago in Ottawa as an important symbol of the intrinsic strength of the Canadian semiconductor research and development community, and the Canadian semiconductor industry as a whole. In 2007, the 13th CSTC was held in Montreal, moving for the first time outside the national capital region. The first three meetings in the series of 'Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics'— NGCM2002 in Moscow, NGCM2004 in Krakow, and NGC2007 in Phoenix— were focused on interdisciplinary research from the fundamentals of materials science to the development of new system architectures. In 2009 NGC2009 and the 14th Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC2009) were held as a joint event, hosted by McMaster University (10

  9. Highly indistinguishable on-demand resonance fluorescence photons from a deterministic quantum dot micropillar device with 74% extraction efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    device is a major challenge. Here, we report on the observation of bright single photon emission generated via pulsed, resonance fluorescence conditions from a single quantum dot (QD) deterministically centered in a micropillar cavity device via cryogenic optical lithography. The brightness of the QD...

  10. A Dual-Function All-in-Fiber Device Based on Negative Dielectric Liquid Crystal Photonic Bandgap Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Eskildsen, Lars; Weirich, Johannes;

    2008-01-01

    A dual-function all-in-fiber device based on negative dielectric liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers is presented. This device can work both as an electrically tunable waveplate in the range 1520nm-1580nm, and as a polarimeter at 1310nm....

  11. Three-dimensional photonic devices fabricated by ultrafast lasers for optical sensing in lab-on-a-chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez Vázquez, R.; Osellame, R.; Crespi, A.; Dongre, C.; Hoekstra, H.J.W.M.; Pollnau, M.; Vlekkert, van den H.; Weeghel, van R.; Watts, P.; Ramponi, R.; Cerullo, G.; Neev, Joseph; Nolte, Stefan; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Trebino, Rick P.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the use of femtosecond laser pulses to fabricate photonic devices (waveguides and interferometers) inside commercial CE chips without affecting the manufacturing procedure of the microfluidic part of the device. The fabrication of single waveguides intersecting the channels allows one t

  12. Photonic crystals principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Qihuang

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionPrimary Properties of Photonic CrystalsFabrication of Photonic CrystalsPhotonic Crystal All-Optical SwitchingTunable Photonic Crystal FilterPhotonic Crystal LaserPhotonic Crystal Logic DevicesPhotonic Crystal Sensors

  13. Dark and bright modes manipulation for plasmon-triggered photonic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Panaro, S.

    2014-09-10

    In the last decade, several efforts have been spent in the study of near-field coupled systems, in order to induce hybridization of plasmonic modes. Within this context, particular attention has been recently paid on the possibility to couple conventional bright and dark modes. As a result of such phenomenon, a Fano resonance appears as a characteristic sharp dip in the scattering spectra. Here we show how, gradually coupling a single rod-like nanostructure to an aligned nanoantenna dimer, it is possible to induce the near-field activation of an anti-bonding dark mode. The high polarization sensitivity presented by the far-field response of T-shape trimer, combined with the sharp Fano resonance sustained by this plasmonic device, opens interesting perspectives towards a new era of photonic devices. © (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  14. Paul Drude's prediction of nonreciprocal mutual inductance for Tesla transformers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart McGuyer

    Full Text Available Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed.

  15. Paul Drude's prediction of nonreciprocal mutual inductance for Tesla transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed.

  16. Paul Drude's Prediction of Nonreciprocal Mutual Inductance for Tesla Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed. PMID:25542040

  17. Nonreciprocal Scattering by PT-symmetric stack of the layers

    CERN Document Server

    Shramkova, Oksana

    2015-01-01

    The nonreciprocal wave propagation in PT-symmetric periodic stack of binary dielectric layers characterised by balances loss and gain is analysed. The main mechanisms and resonant properties of the scattered plane waves are illustrated by the simulation results, and the effects of the periodicity and individual layer parameters on the stack nonreciprocal response are discussed. Gaussian beam dynamics in this type of structure is examined. The beam splitting in PT-symmetric periodic structure is observed. It is demonstrated that for slant beam incidence the break of the symmetry of field distribution takes place.

  18. Fabrication of microscale medical devices by two-photon polymerization with multiple foci via a spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittard, Shaun D; Nguyen, Alexander; Obata, Kotaro; Koroleva, Anastasia; Narayan, Roger J; Chichkov, Boris N

    2011-11-01

    Two-photon polymerization is an appealing technique for producing microscale devices due to its flexibility in producing structures with a wide range of geometries as well as its compatibility with materials suitable for biomedical applications. The greatest limiting factor in widespread use of two-photon polymerization is the slow fabrication times associated with line-by-line, high-resolution structuring. In this study, a recently developed technology was used to produce microstructures by two-photon polymerization with multiple foci, which significantly reduces the production time. Computer generated hologram pattern technology was used to generate multiple laser beams in controlled positions from a single laser. These multiple beams were then used to simultaneously produce multiple microstructures by two-photon polymerization. Arrays of micro-Venus structures, tissue engineering scaffolds, and microneedle arrays were produced by multifocus two-photon polymerization. To our knowledge, this work is the first demonstration of multifocus two-photon polymerization technology for production of a functional medical device. Multibeam fabrication has the potential to greatly improve the efficiency of two-photon polymerization production of microscale devices such as tissue engineering scaffolds and microneedle arrays.

  19. Silicon Photonics: All-Optical Devices for Linear and Nonlinear Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Jeffrey B.

    Silicon photonics has grown rapidly since the first Si electro-optic switch was demonstrated in 1987, and the field has never grown more quickly than it has over the past decade, fueled by milestone achievements in semiconductor processing technologies for low loss waveguides, high-speed Si modulators, Si lasers, Si detectors, and an enormous toolbox of passive and active integrated devices. Silicon photonics is now on the verge of major commercialization breakthroughs, and optical communication links remain the force driving integrated and Si photonics towards the first commercial telecom and datacom transceivers; however other potential and future applications are becoming uncovered and refined as researchers reveal the benefits of manipulating photons on the nanoscale. This thesis documents an exploration into the unique guided-wave and nonlinear properties of deeply-scaled high-index-contrast sub-wavelength Si waveguides. It is found that the tight confinement inherent to single-mode channel waveguides on the silicon-on-insulator platform lead to a rich physics, which can be leveraged for new devices extending well beyond simple passive interconnects and electro-optic devices. The following chapters will concentrate, in detail, on a number of unique physical features of Si waveguides and extend these attributes towards new and interesting devices. Linear optical properties and nonlinear optical properties are investigated, both of which are strongly affected by tight optical confinement of the guided waveguide modes. As will be shown, tight optical confinement directly results in strongly vectoral modal components, where the electric and magnetic fields of the guided modes extend into all spatial dimensions, even along the axis of propagation. In fact, the longitudinal electric and magnetic field components can be just as strong as the transverse fields, directly affecting the modal group velocity and energy transport properties since the longitudinal fields

  20. GeSn/SiGeSn photonic devices for mid-infrared applications: experiments and calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Genquan; Zhang, Qingfang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chunfu; Hao, Yue

    2016-11-01

    In this work, a fully strained GeSn photodetector with Sn atom percent of 8% is fabricated on Ge buffer on Si(001) substrate. The wavelength λ of light signals with obvious optical response for Ge0.92Sn0.08 photodetector is extended to 2 μm. The impacts of compressive strain introduced during the epitaxial growth of GeSn on Ge/Si are studied by simulation. Besides, the tensile strain engineering of GeSn photonic devices is also investigated. Lattice-matched GeSn/SiGeSn double heterostructure light emitting diodes (LEDs) with Si3N4 tensile liner stressor are designed to promote the further mid-infrared applications of GeSn photonic devices. With the releasing of the residual stress in Si3N4 liner, a large biaxial tensile strain is induced in GeSn active layer. Under biaxial tensile strain, the spontaneous emission rate rsp and internal quantum efficiency ηIQE for GeSn/SiGeSn LED are significantly improved.

  1. Design of waveguide-integrated graphene devices for photonic gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhenzhou; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-12-01

    We present waveguide-integrated graphene devices for photonic gas sensing. In a gas environment, graphene’s conductivity is changed by adsorbed gas molecules which serve as charge-carrier donors or acceptors. To accurately probe gas-induced variations in the graphene’s conductivity, we optimize the graphene’s Fermi level and spectral region. Then, we propose graphene-on-silicon and graphene-on-germanium suspended membrane slot waveguides in which propagating light in the waveguide has a strong interaction with the top graphene layer. The gas concentration can be calculated by measuring the spectrum of the optical reflection from the waveguide Bragg grating. The maximum sensitivity of the waveguide-integrated gas sensor can reach one part per million for sensing gaseous nitrogen dioxide. Its sensitivity is about 20 times higher than that of the graphene-covered microfiber sensor and is comparable with that of a graphene plasmonic sensor. The fabrication of the proposed graphene device is CMOS compatible. Our results pave a way for chip-integrated sensitive photonic gas sensors.

  2. Variability analysis of device-level photonics using stochastic collocation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yufei; Spina, Domenico; Li, Ang; Dhaene, Tom; Bogaerts, Wim

    2016-05-01

    Abstract Integrated photonics, and especially silicon photonics, has been rapidly expanded its catalog of building blocks and functionalities. Now, it is maturing fast towards circuit-level integration to serve more complex applications in industry. However, performance variability due to the fabrication process and operational conditions can limit the yield of large-scale circuits. It is essential to assess this impact at the design level with an efficient variability analysis: how variations in geometrical, electrical and optical parameters propagate into components performance. In particular when implementing wavelength-selective filters, many primary functional parameters are affected by fabrication-induced variability. The key functional parameters that we assess in this paper are the waveguide propagation constant (the effective index, essential to define the exact length of a delay line) and the coupling coefficients in coupling structure (necessary to set the power distribution over different delay lines). The Monte Carlo (MC) method is the standard method for variability analysis, thanks to its accuracy and easy implementation. However, due to its slow convergence, it requires a large set of samples (simulations or measurements), making it computationally or experimentally expensive. More efficient methods to assess such variability can be used, such as generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion or stochastic collocation. In this paper, we demonstrate stochastic collocation (SC) as an efficient alternative to MC or gPC to characterize photonic devices under the effect of uncertainty. The idea of SC is to interpolate stochastic solutions in the random space by interpolation polynomials. After sampling the deterministic problem at a pre-defined set of nodes in random space, the interpolation is constructed. SC drastically reduces computation and measurement cost. Also, like MC method, sampling-based SC is easy to implement. Its computation cost can be

  3. Scattering detection using a photonic-microfluidic integrated device with on-chip collection capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Benjamin R; Zhang, Zhiyi; Xu, Chang Qing; Cao, Xudong; Lin, Min

    2014-02-01

    SU-8-based photonic-microfluidic integrated devices with on-chip beam shaping and collection capabilities were demonstrated in a scattering detection and counting application. Through the proper deployment of the tailored beam geometries via the on-chip excitation optics, excellent CV values were measured for 1, 2, and 5 μm blank beads, 16.4, 11.0, and 12.5%, respectively, coupled with a simple free-space optical detection scheme. The performance of these devices was found dependent on the combination of on-chip, lens-shaped beam geometry and bead size. While very low CVs were obtained when the combination was ideal, a nonideal combination could still result in acceptable CVs for flow cytometry; the reliability was confirmed via devices being able to resolve separate populations of 2.0 and 5.0 μm beads from their mixture with low CV values of 15.9 and 18.5%, respectively. On-chip collection using integrated on-chip optical waveguides was shown to be very reliable in comparison with a free-space collection scheme, yielding a coincident rate of 94.2%. A CV as low as 19.2% was obtained from the on-chip excitation and collection of 5 μm beads when the on-chip lens-shaped beam had a 6.0-μm beam waist.

  4. Realization of large-scale photonic crystal cavity-based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit Kumar; Dutta, Hemant Sankar; Singh, Sumitra; Kaur, Mandeep; Husale, Sudhir; Pal, Suchandan

    2016-07-01

    This paper demonstrates an approach for fabricating large-scale photonic crystal (PhC)-based devices using a combination of optical and focused ion beam (FIB) lithography techniques. Optical lithography along with reactive ion etching parameters is optimized to realize the layout of device structure and thereafter FIB milling is optimized to realize the designed PhC structure at those identified locations. At first, with the help of a specially designed mask and using optical lithography along with reactive ion etching, a number of rectangular areas of dimension of 10 μm×20 μm along with input and output waveguides of width ˜700 nm and thickness of ˜250 nm have been fabricated. Subsequently, use of FIB milling, a periodic PhC structure of lattice constant of 600 nm, having a hole diameter of ˜480 nm along with a defect hole diameter of ˜250 nm have been realized successfully on the selected areas. This method shows a promising application in fabricating PhC structure with device size >1 cm2 at large scale, eliminating the problems of standard nanolithography techniques.

  5. Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Optoelectronic materials and devices are examined. Optoelectronic devices, which generate, detect, modulate, or switch electromagnetic radiation are being developed for a variety of space applications. The program includes spatial light modulators, solid state lasers, optoelectronic integrated circuits, nonlinear optical materials and devices, fiber optics, and optical networking photovoltaic technology and optical processing.

  6. Research and education at the NASA Fisk University Center for Photonic Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Enrique

    1996-07-01

    In 1992, NASA awarded Fisk University a 5 year grant to establish a center for research and education on photonic materials are synthesized, characterized and, in some cases, developed into devices with applications in the fields of radiation detectors and nonlinear optical crystals, glasses and nanomaterials. The educational components include participation in the research by 3 types of students majoring in Physics, Chemistry and Biology: 1) Fisk undergraduates participating during the academic year. 2) Fisk graduates performing their Maser Thesis research. 3) Fisk and other HBCU's and Minority Institutions' undergraduates attending a 10 week summer workshop with a very rigorous program of study, research and progress reporting. Funds are available for supporting participating students. Prerequisite, schedules of activities, evaluation procedures and typical examples of the outcome are presented.

  7. Integrated RF photonic devices based on crystal ion sliced lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Vincent; Toney, James; Pollick, Andrea; Busch, James; Scholl, Jon; Pontius, Peter; Sriram, Sri

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the development of thin film lithium niobate (TFLN™) electro-optic devices at SRICO. TFLN™ is formed on various substrates using a layer transfer process called crystal ion slicing. In the ion slicing process, light ions such as helium and hydrogen are implanted at a depth in a bulk seed wafer as determined by the implant energy. After wafer bonding to a suitable handle substrate, the implanted seed wafer is separated (sliced) at the implant depth using a wet etching or thermal splitting step. After annealing and polishing of the slice surface, the transferred film is bulk quality, retaining all the favorable properties of the bulk seed crystal. Ion slicing technology opens up a vast design space to produce lithium niobate electro-optic devices that were not possible using bulk substrates or physically deposited films. For broadband electro-optic modulation, TFLN™ is formed on RF friendly substrates to achieve impedance matched operation at up to 100 GHz or more. For narrowband RF filtering functions, a quasi-phase matched modulator is presented that incorporates domain engineering to implement periodic inversion of electro-optic phase. The thinness of the ferroelectric films makes it possible to in situ program the domains, and thus the filter response, using only few tens of applied volts. A planar poled prism optical beam steering device is also presented that is suitable for optically switched true time delay architectures. Commercial applications of the TFLN™ device technologies include high bandwidth fiber optic links, cellular antenna remoting, photonic microwave signal processing, optical switching and phased arrayed radar.

  8. Nanopatterning by large block copolymers for application in photonic devices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokarian-Tabari, Parvaneh; Senthamaraikannan, Ramsankar; Collins, Timothy W.; Glynn, Colm; O'Dwyer, Colm; Morris, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The extensive benefits of the new generation of nanostructured surfaces is very promising for enhancing light absorption efficiency in photonic devices. However, the low throughput and the high cost of available technologies such as lithography for fabrication of nanostructures has proved to be a difficult technological hurdle for advanced manufacturing. In this research we present a solution based process based on high molecular weight block copolymer (BCP) nanolithography for fabrication of periodic structures on large areas of optical surfaces. Block copolymer self- assembly technique is a solution based process that offers an alternative route to produce highly ordered photonic crystal structures. BCPs forms nanodomains (5-10 nm) due to microphase separation of incompatible constitute blocks. The size and shape of the nanostructure can be customised by the molecular weight and volume fraction of the polymer blocks. However, the major challenge is BCPs do not phase separate into their signature ordered pattern above 100 nm, whereas for nanofeatures to be used as photonic gratings, they must be greater than 100 nm (typically ¼ wavelength). This is due to significant kinetic penalty arising from higher entanglement in high molecular weight polymers. In this work we present the results of exploiting commercially available block copolymers to phase separate into periodic domains greater than 100 nm. The process do not include any blending with homopolymers, or adding colloidal particles, and to our best knowledge, has not been yet achieved or reported in the literatures. We have pattern transferred the BCP mask to silicon substrate by reactive ion etch (ICP-RIE). The final product is black silicon, consists of hexagonally packed conic Si nanofeatures with diameter above 100nm and periodicity of 200 nm. The height of the Si nanopillars varies from 100 nm to 1 micron. We have characterized the angle dependent optical reflectance properties of the black silicon. The

  9. Nanoscale Potentiometry and Spectroscopy of Organic Electronic and Photonic Materials and Devices using Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersam, M. C.; Fabbroni, E. F.; Such, M. W.; Shull, K. R.; Veinot, J. G. C.; Marks, T. J.

    2002-03-01

    As organic devices approach the nanometer scale, spatial variations in the electronic and photonic properties of organic materials become increasingly significant. To this end, we have developed conductive atomic force microscopy techniques for measuring temporally and spatially dependent electronic and photonic signals. To test this general nanocharacterization technique, two model organic systems have been studied: (1) a polyethylene-co-maleic anhydride matrix filled with aggregates of carbon black particles and (2) organic light emitting diode (OLED) structures. In the first case, surface potentiometry measurements illustrate individual nanoscale agglomerates of highly conductive carbon black particles within the insulating matirx. In the OLED experiments, electron transport and photon emission are concurrently mapped with 10 nm spatial resolution. Ultimately, we correlate these nanoscale measurements with macroscopic device behavior.

  10. A heterogeneous III-V/silicon integration platform for on-chip quantum photonic circuits with single quantum dot devices

    CERN Document Server

    Davanco, Marcelo; Sapienza, Luca; Zhang, Chen-Zhao; Cardoso, Jose Vinicius De Miranda; Verma, Varun; Mirin, Richard; Nam, Sae Woo; Liu, Liu; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    Photonic integration is an enabling technology for photonic quantum science, offering greater scalability, stability, and functionality than traditional bulk optics. Here, we describe a scalable, heterogeneous III-V/silicon integration platform to produce Si$_3$N$_4$ photonic circuits incorporating GaAs-based nanophotonic devices containing self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots. We demonstrate pure singlephoton emission from individual quantum dots in GaAs waveguides and cavities - where strong control of spontaneous emission rate is observed - directly launched into Si$_3$N$_4$ waveguides with > 90 % efficiency through evanescent coupling. To date, InAs/GaAs quantum dots constitute the most promising solidstate triggered single-photon sources, offering bright, pure and indistinguishable emission that can be electrically and optically controlled. Si$_3$N$_4$ waveguides offer low-loss propagation, tailorable dispersion and high Kerr nonlinearities, desirable for linear and nonlinear optical signal processing d...

  11. Design and characterization of integrated photonic devices fabricated using selective-area epitaxy and distributed Bragg reflector surface gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Robert Morand

    Two of the main challenges involved with the fabrication of integrated photonic devices are the control of the in-plane band gap and the formation of integrable high-Q cavities. In-plane bandgap control is required to fabricate emitters, passive waveguides, detectors, and modulators all on a single wafer and all optimized for operation at a particular wavelength. The formation of integrable high-Q cavities is needed to integrate the laser source. Selective-area epitaxy (SAE) is a powerful technique which enables the tailoring of the in-plane band gap energy to fabricate numerous optimized photonic devices on a single wafer. In this dissertation, a three-step SAE process in the InGaAs-GaAs-AlGaAs material system is investigated. This process produced discrete Fabry-Perot lasers with threshold currents as low as 2.65 mA for an uncoated device and 0.97 mA for a coated device. Several integrated photonic devices that utilize the in-plane bandgap control of this SAE process are also investigated. These devices include lasers with nonabsorbing mirrors, dual-channel wavelength division multiplexing sources with integrated coupler, lasers with integrated photodiodes, lasers with integrated intracavity modulators, and lasers with integrated external cavity modulators. The second challenge involved with the fabricating of integrated photonic devices is the formation of integrable high-Q cavities. The optical feedback in most laser diodes is provided by cleaved facets. Unfortunately, cleaved facets are not an option when designing integrated photonic devices. However, optical feedback can be provided in integrated photonic devices using distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs). In this dissertation, ridge-waveguide DBR lasers with first-order surface gratings are investigated. These lasers exhibit low thresholds (6 mA), high slope efficiencies (0.46 W/A), and single-frequency operation with narrow linewidths (DBR grating, a wide wavelength range of 540 A (15.2 THz) is obtained

  12. A new generation of previously unrealizable photonic devices as enabled by a unique electro-optic waveguide architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Scott R.; Rommel, Scott D.; Farca, George; Anderson, Michael H.

    2008-08-01

    A new electro-optic waveguide platform, which provides unprecedented electro-optical phase delays (> 1mm), with very low loss (integrated photonic architecture has applications in a wide array of commercial and defense markets including: remote sensing, micro-LADAR, OCT, laser illumination, phased array radar, optical communications, etc. Performance attributes of several example devices are presented.

  13. Low-loss, high performance hybrid photonics devices enabled by ion-exchanged glass waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araci, Ismail Emre

    Robust ion-exchanged glass waveguides exhibit low optical losses in a broad spectral range and they allow integration of several devices on the same chip due to their planar structure. Consequently, they can be a low cost alternative to semiconductors for fabricating various integrated optical devices. Two high performance photonic devices were designed and realized, demonstrating the potential of glass waveguides. The well-controlled silver-film ion-exchange process allowed the fabrication of: i) a highly sensitive biosensor based on optical absorption and, ii) a low loss hybrid electro-optic (EO) polymer modulator with a narrow coplanar electrode gap. The single-mode, channel integrated optical ion-exchange waveguide on borosilicate glass (Corning 0211) is described for broad spectral band (400-650 nm) detection and analysis of heme-containing protein films at a glass/water interface. The evanescent wave interaction is improved significantly by fabricating ion-exchange waveguides with a step-like index profile. Silver nano-particle formation is reduced in order to achieve low loss in the Soret-band (˜400 nm). Unlike other surface-specific techniques (e.g. SPR, interferometry) that probe local refractive-index changes and therefore are susceptible to temperature fluctuations, the integrated optical waveguide absorption technique probes molecular-specific transition bands and is expected to be less vulnerable to environmental perturbations. The hybrid integration of phosphate glass (IOG-1) and EO polymer is realized for the first time. The critical alignment steps which are typically required for hybrid optoelectronic devices are eliminated with a simple alignment-free fabrication technique. The low loss adiabatic transition from glass to EO polymer waveguide is enabled by gray scale patterning of the novel EO polymer, AJLY. Total insertion loss of 5 dB and electrode gap of 8 mum is obtained for an optimized device design. EO polymer poling at 135 °C and 75 V

  14. Time-Varying Metasurfaces and Lorentz Non-Reciprocity

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A cornerstone equation of optics, Snell's law, relates the angles of incidence and refraction for light passing through an interface between two media. It is built on two fundamental constrains: the conservation of tangential momentum and the conservation of energy. By relaxing the classical Snell law photon momentum conservation constrain when using space-gradient phase discontinuity, optical metasurfaces enabled an entirely new class of ultrathin optical devices. Here, we show that by eradi...

  15. Nonreciprocal optical tunnelling through evanescently coupled Tamm states in magnetophotonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yun-Tuan [Jiangsu Univ., Zhenjiang (China). School of Computer Science and Telecommunication Engineering; Han, Ling [The Second Military Medical Univ., Shanghai (China). Dept. of Radiation Medicine; Gao, Yong-Feng [Jiangsu Univ., Zhenjiang (China). School of Mechanical Engineering

    2015-07-01

    Evanescently coupled Tamm states are achieved through two magnetophotonic crystals (MPCs) with a pair of coupling prisms. At the wavelengths of coupled Tamm states, a double of nonreciprocal optical tunnelling channels is found through the transmission spectra obtained from a developed transfer matrix method. The nonreciprocal tunnelling wavelength and the interval between two nonreciprocal channels can be adjusted depending on the width of the air gap between two MPCs or the scale invariant of a PC. The nonreciprocal tunnelling is demonstrated through electromagnetic field distribution simulations based on finite element software. Such theoretical results may provide a new method to design tunable optical isolators with a double of channels.

  16. Nonreciprocal wave scattering on nonlinear string-coupled oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepri, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.lepri@isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Pikovsky, Arkady [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str 24/25, Potsdam (Germany); Department of Control Theory, Nizhni Novgorod State University, Gagarin Av. 23, 606950, Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-01

    We study scattering of a periodic wave in a string on two lumped oscillators attached to it. The equations can be represented as a driven (by the incident wave) dissipative (due to radiation losses) system of delay differential equations of neutral type. Nonlinearity of oscillators makes the scattering non-reciprocal: The same wave is transmitted differently in two directions. Periodic regimes of scattering are analyzed approximately, using amplitude equation approach. We show that this setup can act as a nonreciprocal modulator via Hopf bifurcations of the steady solutions. Numerical simulations of the full system reveal nontrivial regimes of quasiperiodic and chaotic scattering. Moreover, a regime of a “chaotic diode,” where transmission is periodic in one direction and chaotic in the opposite one, is reported.

  17. Properties of nonreciprocal light propagation in a nonlinear optical isolator

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Dibyendu

    2016-01-01

    Light propagation in a nonlinear optical medium is nonreciprocal for spatially asymmetric linear permittivity. We here examine physical mechanism and properties of such nonreciprocity (NR). For this, we calculate transmission of light through a two-level atom asymmetrically coupled to light inside open waveguides. We determine the critical intensity of incident light for maximum NR and a dependence of the corresponding NR on asymmetry in the coupling. Surprisingly, we find that it is mainly coherent elastic scattering compared to incoherent scattering of incident light which causes maximum NR near the critical intensity. We also show a higher NR of an incident light in the presence of an additional weak light at the opposite port.

  18. Highly indistinguishable on-demand resonance fluorescence photons from a deterministic quantum dot micropillar device with 74% extraction efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The implementation and engineering of bright and coherent solid state quantum light sources is key for the realization of both on chip and remote quantum networks. Despite tremendous efforts for more than 15 years, the combination of these two key prerequisites in a single, potentially scalable...... device is a major challenge. Here, we report on the observation of bright single photon emission generated via pulsed, resonance fluorescence conditions from a single quantum dot (QD) deterministically centered in a micropillar cavity device via cryogenic optical lithography. The brightness of the QD...... fluorescence is greatly enhanced on resonance with the fundamental mode of the pillar, leading to an overall device efficiency of η = (74 ± 4) % for a single photon emission as pure as g (2) (0) = 0.0092 ± 0.0004. The combination of large Purcell enhancement and resonant pumping conditions allows us to observe...

  19. Distributed optical fibre devices based on liquid crystal infiltrated photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Broeng, Jes; Hermann, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a new class of hybrid photonic crystal fibers, which are liquid crystal infiltrated fibers. Using these fibers, we demonstrate 'distributed' tunable filter and switching functionalities operating by the photonic bandgap effect....

  20. Nonreciprocal spin wave elementary excitation in dislocated dimerized Heisenberg chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanguo; Shen, Yang; Fang, Guisheng; Jin, Chongjun

    2016-05-18

    A mechanism for realizing nonreciprocal elementary excitation of spin wave (SW) is proposed. We study a reference model which describes a magnonic crystal (MC) formed by two Heisenberg chains with a lateral displacement (dislocation) and a longitudinal spacer, and derive a criterion to judge whether the elementary excitation spectra are reciprocal in this ferromagnetic lattice. An analytical method based on the spin precession equation is used to solve the elementary excitation spectra. The solution is related to a key factor, the spatio-temporal structure factor [Formula: see text], which can be directly calculated through the structural parameters. When it keeps invariant under the reversions of the external magnetic field [Formula: see text] and the dislocation [Formula: see text], or one of them, the spectra are reciprocal. Otherwise, the SW possesses nonreciprocal spectra with direction-dependent band edges and exhibits a directional magnetoresistance effect. This criterion can be regarded as a necessary and sufficient condition for the (non)reciprocity in the spin lattice. Besides, this novel lattice provides a prototype for spin diodes and spin logic gates.

  1. Monolithic silicon photonics in a sub-100nm SOI CMOS microprocessor foundry: progress from devices to systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Miloš A.; Wade, Mark T.; Orcutt, Jason S.; Shainline, Jeffrey M.; Sun, Chen; Georgas, Michael; Moss, Benjamin; Kumar, Rajesh; Alloatti, Luca; Pavanello, Fabio; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Nammari, Kareem; Notaros, Jelena; Atabaki, Amir; Leu, Jonathan; Stojanović, Vladimir; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2015-02-01

    We review recent progress of an effort led by the Stojanović (UC Berkeley), Ram (MIT) and Popović (CU Boulder) research groups to enable the design of photonic devices, and complete on-chip electro-optic systems and interfaces, directly in standard microelectronics CMOS processes in a microprocessor foundry, with no in-foundry process modifications. This approach allows tight and large-scale monolithic integration of silicon photonics with state-of-the-art (sub-100nm-node) microelectronics, here a 45nm SOI CMOS process. It enables natural scale-up to manufacturing, and rapid advances in device design due to process repeatability. The initial driver application was addressing the processor-to-memory communication energy bottleneck. Device results include 5Gbps modulators based on an interleaved junction that take advantage of the high resolution of the sub-100nm CMOS process. We demonstrate operation at 5fJ/bit with 1.5dB insertion loss and 8dB extinction ratio. We also demonstrate the first infrared detectors in a zero-change CMOS process, using absorption in transistor source/drain SiGe stressors. Subsystems described include the first monolithically integrated electronic-photonic transmitter on chip (modulator+driver) with 20-70fJ/bit wall plug energy/bit (2-3.5Gbps), to our knowledge the lowest transmitter energy demonstrated to date. We also demonstrate native-process infrared receivers at 220fJ/bit (5Gbps). These are encouraging signs for the prospects of monolithic electronics-photonics integration. Beyond processor-to-memory interconnects, our approach to photonics as a "More-than- Moore" technology inside advanced CMOS promises to enable VLSI electronic-photonic chip platforms tailored to a vast array of emerging applications, from optical and acoustic sensing, high-speed signal processing, RF and optical metrology and clocks, through to analog computation and quantum technology.

  2. Heterogeneously-Grown Tunable Tensile Strained Germanium on Silicon for Photonic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Michael; Saladukha, Dzianis; Goley, Patrick S; Ochalski, Tomasz J; Murphy-Armando, Felipe; Bodnar, Robert J; Hudait, Mantu K

    2015-12-09

    The growth, structural and optical properties, and energy band alignments of tensile-strained germanium (ε-Ge) epilayers heterogeneously integrated on silicon (Si) were demonstrated for the first time. The tunable ε-Ge thin films were achieved using a composite linearly graded InxGa1-xAs/GaAs buffer architecture grown via solid source molecular beam epitaxy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis confirmed a pseudomorphic ε-Ge epitaxy whereby the degree of strain varied as a function of the In(x)Ga(1-x)As buffer indium alloy composition. Sharp heterointerfaces between each ε-Ge epilayer and the respective In(x)Ga(1-x)As strain template were confirmed by detailed strain analysis using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Low-temperature microphotoluminescence measurements confirmed both direct and indirect bandgap radiative recombination between the Γ and L valleys of Ge to the light-hole valence band, with L-lh bandgaps of 0.68 and 0.65 eV demonstrated for the 0.82 ± 0.06% and 1.11 ± 0.03% strained Ge on Si, respectively. Type-I band alignments and valence band offsets of 0.27 and 0.29 eV for the ε-Ge/In(0.11)Ga(0.89)As (0.82%) and ε-Ge/In(0.17)Ga(0.83)As (1.11%) heterointerfaces, respectively, show promise for ε-Ge carrier confinement in future nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Therefore, the successful heterogeneous integration of tunable tensile-strained Ge on Si paves the way for the design and implementation of novel Ge-based photonic devices on the Si technology platform.

  3. Revealing of photon-number splitting attack on quantum key distribution system by photon-number resolving devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidash, A. A.; Egorov, V. I.; Gleim, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum cryptography allows distributing secure keys between two users so that any performed eavesdropping attempt would be immediately discovered. However, in practice an eavesdropper can obtain key information from multi-photon states when attenuated laser radiation is used as a source of quantum states. In order to prevent actions of an eavesdropper, it is generally suggested to implement special cryptographic protocols, like decoy states or SARG04. In this paper, we describe an alternative method based on monitoring photon number statistics after detection. We provide a useful rule of thumb to estimate approximate order of difference of expected distribution and distribution in case of attack. Formula for calculating a minimum value of total pulses or time-gaps to resolve attack is shown. Also formulas for actual fraction of raw key known to Eve were derived. This method can therefore be used with any system and even combining with mentioned special protocols.

  4. Single-crystal charge transfer interfaces for efficient photonic devices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Helena; Pinto, Rui M.; Maçôas, Ermelinda M. S.; Baleizão, Carlos; Santos, Isabel C.

    2016-09-01

    Organic semiconductors have unique optical, mechanical and electronic properties that can be combined with customized chemical functionality. In the crystalline form, determinant features for electronic applications such as molecular purity, the charge mobility or the exciton diffusion length, reveal a superior performance when compared with materials in a more disordered form. Combining crystals of two different conjugated materials as even enable a new 2D electronic system. However, the use of organic single crystals in devices is still limited to a few applications, such as field-effect transistors. In 2013, we presented the first system composed of single-crystal charge transfer interfaces presenting photoconductivity behaviour. The system composed of rubrene and TCNQ has a responsivity reaching 1 A/W, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. A similar approach, with a hybrid structure of a PCBM film and rubrene single crystal also presents high responsivity and the possibility to extract excitons generated in acceptor materials. This strategy led to an extended action towards the near IR. By adequate material design and structural organisation of perylediimides, we demonstrate that is possible to improve exciton diffusion efficiency. More recently, we have successfully used the concept of charge transfer interfaces in phototransistors. These results open the possibility of using organic single-crystal interfaces in photonic applications.

  5. Design of tunable devices using one-dimensional Fibonacci photonic crystals incorporating graphene at terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Li-an; Liu, Peiguo; Li, Gaosheng

    2016-10-01

    For the one-dimensional generalized Fibonacci photonic crystals incorporating graphene, we present many valuable properties and design the tunable devices accordingly with the help of the transfer matrix method in the frequency range of terahertz. For the common structure, all of dielectric layers are cladded by graphene, we design the high-Q tunable filter with double peaks by changing the Fibonacci distribution and chemical potential. In order to reduce the crosstalk of signals through this filter, a heterostructure based on the current structure and the one without graphene is utilized to separate the two peaks. Also, we fabricate the tunable switch by altering the parity of periodic number. Besides, through cladding the graphene on the one of the dielectrics only, we obtain other two kinds of cells. Combining these cells arbitrarily as the supercell to develop the periodic structure, the number of forbidden bands is increased in accordance with certain rules so that this structure with supercell is suitable as the multi-stop filter. If the active medium is introduced, the imaginary part of the complex permittivity of the material would be negative, which means the energy amplification. For our quasi-periodic structures with active medium, the functions of chemical potential, damping constant and reference wavelength are investigated.

  6. Low-temperature optical processing of semiconductor devices using photon effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L.; Cudzinovic, M.; Symko, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    In an RTA process the primary purpose of the optical energy incident on the semiconductor sample is to increase its temperature rapidly. The activation of reactions involved in processes such as the formation of junctions, metal contacts, deposition of oxides or nitrides, takes place purely by the temperature effects. We describe the observation of a number of new photonic effects that take place within the bulk and at the interfaces of a semiconductor when a semiconductor device is illuminated with a spectrally broad-band light. Such effects include changes in the diffusion properties of impurities in the semiconductor, increased diffusivity of impurities across interfaces, and generation of electric fields that can alter physical and chemical properties of the interface. These phenomena lead to certain unique effects in an RTA process that do not occur during conventional furnace annealing under the same temperature conditions. Of particular interest are observations of low-temperature alloying of Si-Al interfaces, enhanced activation of phosphorus in Si during drive-in, low-temperature oxidation of Si, and gettering of impurities at low-temperatures under optical illumination. These optically induced effects, in general, diminish with an increase in the temperature, thus allowing thermally activated reaction rates to dominate at higher temperatures.

  7. Gold nanoparticle-embedded silk protein-ZnO nanorod hybrids for flexible bio-photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogurla, Narendar; Kundu, Subhas C.; Ray, Samit K.

    2017-04-01

    Silk protein has been used as a biopolymer substrate for flexible photonic devices. Here, we demonstrate ZnO nanorod array hybrid photodetectors on Au nanoparticle-embedded silk protein for flexible optoelectronics. Hybrid samples exhibit optical absorption at the band edge of ZnO as well as plasmonic energy due to Au nanoparticles, making them attractive for selective UV and visible wavelength detection. The device prepared on Au-silk protein shows a much lower dark current and a higher photo to dark-current ratio of ∼105 as compared to the control sample without Au nanoparticles. The hybrid device also exhibits a higher specific detectivity due to higher responsivity arising from the photo-generated hole trapping by Au nanoparticles. Sharp pulses in the transient photocurrent have been observed in devices prepared on glass and Au-silk protein substrates due to the light induced pyroelectric effect of ZnO, enabling the demonstration of self-powered photodetectors at zero bias. Flexible hybrid detectors have been demonstrated on Au-silk/polyethylene terephthalate substrates, exhibiting characteristics similar to those fabricated on rigid glass substrates. A study of the performance of photodetectors with different bending angles indicates very good mechanical stability of silk protein based flexible devices. This novel concept of ZnO nanorod array photodetectors on a natural silk protein platform provides an opportunity to realize integrated flexible and self-powered bio-photonic devices for medical applications in near future.

  8. Photonic Integrated Circuit (PIC) Device Structures: Background, Fabrication Ecosystem, Relevance to Space Systems Applications, and Discussion of Related Radiation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Electronic integrated circuits are considered one of the most significant technological advances of the 20th century, with demonstrated impact in their ability to incorporate successively higher numbers transistors and construct electronic devices onto a single CMOS chip. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) exist as the optical analog to integrated circuits; however, in place of transistors, PICs consist of numerous scaled optical components, including such "building-block" structures as waveguides, MMIs, lasers, and optical ring resonators. The ability to construct electronic and photonic components on a single microsystems platform offers transformative potential for the development of technologies in fields including communications, biomedical device development, autonomous navigation, and chemical and atmospheric sensing. Developing on-chip systems that provide new avenues for integration and replacement of bulk optical and electro-optic components also reduces size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) limitations, which are important in the selection of instrumentation for specific flight projects. The number of applications currently emerging for complex photonics systems-particularly in data communications-warrants additional investigations when considering reliability for space systems development. This Body of Knowledge document seeks to provide an overview of existing integrated photonics architectures; the current state of design, development, and fabrication ecosystems in the United States and Europe; and potential space applications, with emphasis given to associated radiation effects and reliability.

  9. Improving Light Extraction of Organic Light-Emitting Devices by Attaching Nanostructures with Self-Assembled Photonic Crystal Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Yu Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A single-monolayered hexagonal self-assembled photonic crystal (PC pattern fabricated onto polyethylene terephthalate (PET films by using simple nanosphere lithography (NSL method has been demonstrated in this research work. The patterned nanostructures acted as a scattering medium to extract the trapped photons from substrate mode of optical-electronic device for improving the overall external quantum efficiency of the organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs. With an optimum latex concentration, the distribution of self-assembled polystyrene (PS nanosphere patterns on PET films can be easily controlled by adjusting the rotation speed of spin-coater. After attaching the PS nanosphere array brightness enhancement film (BEF sheet as a photonic crystal pattern onto the device, the luminous intensity of OLEDs in the normal viewing direction is 161% higher than the one without any BEF attachment. The electroluminescent (EL spectrum of OLEDs with PS patterned BEF attachment also showed minor color offset and superior color stabilization characteristics, and thus it possessed the potential applications in all kinds of display technology and solid-state optical-electronic devices.

  10. Light trapping in thin film solar cells using photonic engineering device concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutitu, James Gichuhi

    In this era of uncertainty concerning future energy solutions, strong reservations have arisen over the continued use and pursuit of fossil fuels and other conventional sources of energy. Moreover, there is currently a strong and global push for the implementation of stringent measures, in order to reduce the amount of green house gases emitted by every nation. As a consequence, there has emerged a sudden and frantic rush for new renewable energy solutions. In this world of renewable energy technologies is where we find photovoltaic (PV) technology today. However, as is, there are still many issues that need to be addressed before solar energy technologies become economically viable and available to all people, in every part of the world. This renewed interest in the development of solar electricity, has led to the advancement of new avenues that address the issues of cost and efficiency associated with PV. To this end, one of the prominent approaches being explored is thin film solar cell (TFSC) technology, which offers prospects of lower material costs and enables larger units of manufacture than conventional wafer based technology. However, TFSC technologies suffer from one major problem; they have lower efficiencies than conventional wafer based solar cell technologies. This lesser efficiency is based on a number of reasons, one of which is that with less material, there is less volume for the absorption of incident photons. This shortcoming leads to the need for optical light trapping; which is concerned with admitting the maximum amount of light into the solar cell and keeping the light within the structure for as long as possible. In this thesis, I present the fundamental scientific ideas, practice and methodology behind the application of photonic engineering device concepts to increase the light trapping capacity of thin film solar cells. In the introductory chapters, I develop the basic ideas behind light trapping in a sequential manner, where the effects

  11. Unidirectional Invisibility and Nonreciprocal Transmission in Two and Three Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Loran, Farhang

    2016-01-01

    We explore the phenomenon of unidirectional invisibility in two dimensions, examine its optical realizations, and discuss its three-dimensional generalization. In particular we construct an infinite class of unidirectionally invisible optical potentials that describe the scattering of normally incident transverse electric waves by an infinite planar slab with refractive-index modulations along both the normal directions to the electric field. A by-product of this investigation is a demonstration of nonreciprocal transmission in two dimensions. To elucidate this phenomenon we state and prove a general reciprocity theorem that applies to quantum scattering theory of real and complex potentials in two and three dimensions.

  12. Energy exchange in systems of particles with nonreciprocal interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaulina, O. S.; Lisina, I. I., E-mail: Irina.Lisina@mail.ru; Lisin, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    A model is proposed to describe the sources of additional kinetic energy and its redistribution in systems of particles with a nonreciprocal interaction. The proposed model is shown to explain the qualitative specific features of the dust particle dynamics in the sheath region of an RF discharge. Prominence is given to the systems of particles with a quasi-dipole–dipole interaction, which is similar to the interaction induced by the ion focusing effects that occur in experiments on a laboratory dusty plasma, and with the shadow interaction caused by thermophoretic forces and Le Sage’s forces.

  13. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  14. Self-Assembly of Nanocomposite Nonlinear Optical Materials for Photonic Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program targets the development of new highly anisotropic nonlinear optical nanocomposite materials for NASA and non-NASA applications in advanced photonic and...

  15. Tunable and nonreciprocal Goos–Hänchen shifts on reflection from a graphene-coated gyroelectric slab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Guoding, E-mail: guodingxu@163.com [Department of Physics, Suzhou University of Science and Technology, Suzhou 215009 (China); Xu, Yaoxian [School of Oversea Education, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Sun, Jian; Pan, Tao [Department of Physics, Suzhou University of Science and Technology, Suzhou 215009 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • The GH shifts have higher light intensity in the proposed structure. • The GH shifts can be tuned by graphene's chemical potential and magnetic field. • At grazing incidence, the large and negative SGH shifts occur in the THz region. • The external magnetic field leads to nonreciprocal GH shifts. - Abstract: We study the Goos–Hänchen (GH) shifts of a reflected Gaussian beam from a graphene-coated gyroelectric slab. The reflection coefficient is derived by using the transfer-matrix method and the spatial Goos–Hänchen (SGH) shift and angular Goos–Hänchen (AGH) shift are determined in terms of stationary-phase approach. The effects of graphene's chemical potential, external magnetic field, the thickness of the slab and the frequency of incident beam on the SGH and AGH shifts are analyzed and discussed numerically. At grazing incidence, the large, tunable and nonreciprocal SGH shifts with higher light intensity are achieved in the terahertz region, which might be useful for the development of various tunable terahertz-wave devices.

  16. Thermal supercurrent in non-reciprocal many-body near field electromagnetic heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Linxiao

    2016-01-01

    We consider the consequence of non-reciprocity in near-field heat transfer by studying systems consisting of magneto-optical nanoparticles. We demonstrate that in thermal equilibrium, non-reciprocal many-body system can support a persistent directional heat current, i.e. thermal supercurrent, without violating the second law of thermodynamics. Such a thermal supercurrent can not occur in reciprocal systems, and can only arise in many-body systems. The use of non-reciprocity therefore points to a new regime of near-field heat transfer for the control of heat flow in the nanoscale.

  17. Persistent Directional Current at Equilibrium in Nonreciprocal Many-Body Near Field Electromagnetic Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-09-01

    We consider the consequence of nonreciprocity in near-field heat transfer by studying systems consisting of magneto-optical nanoparticles. We demonstrate that, in thermal equilibrium, a nonreciprocal many-body system in heat transfer can support a persistent directional heat current, without violating the second law of thermodynamics. Such a persistent directional heat current cannot occur in reciprocal systems, and can only arise in many-body systems in heat transfer. The use of nonreciprocity therefore points to a new regime of near-field heat transfer for the control of heat flow in the nanoscale.

  18. Optical diode action from axially asymmetric nonlinearity in an all-carbon solid-state device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Benoy; Podila, Ramakrishna; Lingam, Kiran; Krishnan, S R; Siva Sankara Sai, S; Philip, Reji; Rao, Apparao M

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured carbons are posited to offer an alternative to silicon and lead to further miniaturization of photonic and electronic devices. Here, we report the experimental realization of the first all-carbon solid-state optical diode that is based on axially asymmetric nonlinear absorption in a thin saturable absorber (graphene) and a thin reverse saturable absorber (C60) arranged in tandem. This all-optical diode action is polarization independent and has no phase-matching constraints. The nonreciprocity factor of the device can be tuned by varying the number of graphene layers and the concentration or thickness of the C60 coating. This ultracompact graphene/C60 based optical diode is versatile with an inherently large bandwidth, chemical and thermal stability, and is poised for cost-effective large-scale integration with existing fabrication technologies.

  19. Fabrication of micro- and nanometre-scale polymer structures in liquid crystal devices for next generation photonics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartan, Chloe C.; Salter, Patrick S.; Booth, Martin J.; Morris, Stephen M.; Elston, Steve J.

    2016-09-01

    Direct Laser Writing (DLW) by two-photon photopolymerization (TPP) enables the fabrication of micron-scale polymeric structures in soft matter systems. The technique has implications in a broad range of optics and photonics; in particular fast-switching liquid crystal (LC) modes for the development of next generation display technologies. In this paper, we report two different methodologies using our TPP-based fabrication technique. Two explicit examples are provided of voltage-dependent LC director profiles that are inherently unstable, but which appear to be promising candidates for fast-switching photonics applications. In the first instance, 1 μm-thick periodic walls of polymer network are written into a planar aligned (parallel rubbed) nematic pi-cell device containing a nematic LC-monomer mixture. The structures are fabricated when the device is electrically driven into a fast-switching nematic LC state and aberrations induced by the device substrates are corrected for by virtue of the adaptive optics elements included within the DLW setup. Optical polarizing microscopy images taken post-fabrication reveal that polymer walls oriented perpendicular to the rubbing direction promote the stability of the so-called optically compensated bend mode upon removal of the externally applied field. In the second case, polymer walls are written in a nematic LC-optically adhesive glue mixture. A polymer- LCs-polymer-slices or `POLICRYPS' template is formed by immersing the device in acetone post-fabrication to remove any remaining non-crosslinked material. Injecting the resultant series of polymer microchannels ( 1 μm-thick) with a short-pitch, chiral nematic LC mixture leads to the spontaneous alignment of a fast-switching chiral nematic mode, where the helical axis lies parallel to the glass substrates. Optimal contrast between the bright and dark states of the uniform lying helix alignment is achieved when the structures are spaced at the order of the device thickness

  20. Exploration of photonic crystal circulator based on gyromagnetic properties and scaling of ferrite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umamaheswari, C.; sundar, D. Shanmuga; Raja, A. Sivanantha

    2017-01-01

    Three port optical circulators are designed predicated on two dimensional triangular lattice photonic crystals and examined with different size of regular (circular) and irregular (triangular) ferrite posts, through the structure optimization and exploration of defect mode coupling. Ferrite, a special type of highly permeable and low-loss magnetic material, which is anisotropic when biased by a much larger static magnetic field is modeled and the gyromagnetic property of the same is investigated. According to theoretical analysis, the optimized geometry structure can make the non-reciprocal transmission of electromagnetic waves accompanying a high caliber isolation and low insertion loss with the avail of ferrite post inserted at the center of the joint. In order to minimize the reflections in the isolated port at the nominal frequencies, the scaling of ferrite post is implemented by defining S parameter. The structural optimization and the calculation of tensor elements of the anisotropic medium is executed by the finite element method. Moreover, the further study shows the importance of scaling the magneto-photonic material and the way it affects the transmission and isolation of the structured contrivance. Numerical simulations are performed to manifest the attainability and the characteristics of the designed circulators. Finally the triangular ferrite post with the scale of 0.518 makes the non-reciprocal transmission of electromagnetic waves with the minimum insertion loss at the normalized frequency range of 191.6 GHz which benefits from a broad operational bandwidth. This optimized device can realize the operations of splitting, routing and isolation and have good technological compatibility for chip level integration into Photonic Integrated Circuits.

  1. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Research results of hard photon technology have been summarized as a part of novel technology development highly utilizing the quantum nature of photon. Hard photon technology refers to photon beam technologies which use photon in the 0.1 to 200 nm wavelength region. Hard photon has not been used in industry due to the lack of suitable photon sources and optical devices. However, hard photon in this wavelength region is expected to bring about innovations in such areas as ultrafine processing and material synthesis due to its atom selective reaction, inner shell excitation reaction, and spatially high resolution. Then, technological themes and possibility have been surveyed. Although there are principle proposes and their verification of individual technologies for the technologies of hard photon generation, regulation and utilization, they are still far from the practical applications. For the photon source technology, the laser diode pumped driver laser technology, laser plasma photon source technology, synchrotron radiation photon source technology, and vacuum ultraviolet photon source technology are presented. For the optical device technology, the multi-layer film technology for beam mirrors and the non-spherical lens processing technology are introduced. Also are described the reduction lithography technology, hard photon excitation process, and methods of analysis and measurement. 430 refs., 165 figs., 23 tabs.

  2. Virtual Photon Contribution to Frictional Drag in Double-layer Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donarini, Andrea; Ferrari, R.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka;

    2003-01-01

    Frictional drag between coupled two-dimensional charge systems is commonly viewed as a second order effect arising either from screened Coulomb interaction, or phonon exchange. We point out that for single-photon exchange the first order contribution does not have to vanish even at T = 0, and eva......Frictional drag between coupled two-dimensional charge systems is commonly viewed as a second order effect arising either from screened Coulomb interaction, or phonon exchange. We point out that for single-photon exchange the first order contribution does not have to vanish even at T = 0...

  3. Graphene photonics for resonator-enhanced electro-optic devices and all-optical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, Dirk R.; Gan, Xuetao

    2017-03-21

    Techniques for coupling light into graphene using a planar photonic crystal having a resonant cavity characterized by a mode volume and a quality factor and at least one graphene layer positioned in proximity to the planar photonic crystal to at least partially overlap with an evanescent field of the resonant cavity. At least one mode of the resonant cavity can couple into the graphene layer via evanescent coupling. The optical properties of the graphene layer can be controlled, and characteristics of the graphene-cavity system can be detected. Coupling light into graphene can include electro-optic modulation of light, photodetection, saturable absorption, bistability, and autocorrelation.

  4. Graphene photonics for resonator-enhanced electro-optic devices and all-optical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englund, Dirk R.; Gan, Xuetao

    2017-03-21

    Techniques for coupling light into graphene using a planar photonic crystal having a resonant cavity characterized by a mode volume and a quality factor and at least one graphene layer positioned in proximity to the planar photonic crystal to at least partially overlap with an evanescent field of the resonant cavity. At least one mode of the resonant cavity can couple into the graphene layer via evanescent coupling. The optical properties of the graphene layer can be controlled, and characteristics of the graphene-cavity system can be detected. Coupling light into graphene can include electro-optic modulation of light, photodetection, saturable absorption, bistability, and autocorrelation.

  5. FY1995 study on high speed manipulation of photons and electrons by nanostructures for photonic devices of next generation; 1995 nendo handotai nano kozo ni yoru chokosoku hikari denshi seigyo to jisedai hikari device no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    In this project, we manipulate interaction between photons and electrons in semiconductor nanostructures to study fundamental understanding of electron-photon interaction in ultra-small space and Ultrafast time domain. In addition, on the basis of these results, we explore the optoelectronics nanostructure devices of the next generation. In this research project, we developed new techniques for fabricating quantum dot structures. First, quantum dots of 10nm were grown in two-dimensional V-grooved structures which were formed on SiO{sub 2} patterned substrates by MOCVD. In the same V-grooves, vertical quantum wires were also formed. As the second new technique, we developed self-assembling growth technique for the quantum dots utilizing Spinodal phase separation. In order to investigate the quantum dots using nano-scale characterization technique, we developed low-temperature scanning near-filed optical microscope. Luminescence from as single quantum dot and a single quantum wire were obtained. In addition, luminescence from a single quantum dot through tunneling current excitation by STM was also successfully obtained. Furthermore, micro-photoluminescence measurement achieved time and spatially resolved photoluminescence from a single quantum dot. This micro-photoluminescence also revealed electron dynamics in mesoscopic structures and point contact structures through carrier drag effect. Finally we have succeeded in fabricating vertical microcavity quantum dot lasers by MOCVD and obtained picosecond pulses form the devices. (NEDO)

  6. Nonreciprocity light propagation in coupled microcavities system beyond weak-excitation approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, A S; Chen, H; Mei, T; Liu, J

    2016-01-01

    We propose an alternative scheme for nonreciprocal light propagation in two coupled cavities system, in which a two-level quantum emitter is coupled to one of the optical microcavities. For the case of parity-time (\\textrm{PT}) system (i.e., active-passive coupled cavities system), the cavity gain can significantly enhance the optical nonlinearity induced by the interaction between a quantum emitter and cavity field beyond weak-excitation approximation. The giant optical nonlinearity results in the non-lossy nonreciprocal light propagation with high isolation ratio in proper parameters range. In addition, our calculations show that nonreciprocal light propagation will not be affected by the unstable output field intensity caused by optical bistability and we can even switch directions of nonreciprocal light propagation by appropriately adjusting the system parameters.

  7. A compact, integrated silicon device for the generation of spectrally filtered, pair-correlated photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, Momchil; Savona, Vincenzo

    2016-05-01

    The third-order nonlinearity of silicon gives rise to a spontaneous four-wave mixing process in which correlated photon pairs are generated. Sources based on this effect can be used for quantum computation and cryptography, and can in principle be integrated with standard CMOS fabrication technology and components. However, one of the major challenges is the on-chip demultiplexing of the photons, and in particular the filtering of the pump power, which is many orders of magnitude larger than that of the signal and idler photons. Here, we propose a photonic crystal coupled-cavity system designed so that the coupling of the pump mode to the output channel is strictly zero due to symmetry. We further analyze this effect in the presence of fabrication disorder and find that, even then, a pump suppression of close to 40 dB can be achieved in state-of-the-art systems. Due to the small mode volumes and high quality factors, our system is also expected to have a generation efficiency much higher than in standard micro-ring systems. Those two considerations make a strong case for the integration of our proposed design in future on-chip quantum technologies.

  8. A compact, integrated silicon device for the generation of spectrally-filtered, pair-correlated photons

    CERN Document Server

    Minkov, Momchil

    2016-01-01

    The third-order non-linearity of silicon gives rise to a spontaneous four-wave mixing process in which correlated photon pairs are generated. Sources based on this effect can be used for quantum computation and cryptography, and can in principle be integrated with standard CMOS fabrication technology and components. However, one of the major challenges is the on-chip demultiplexing of the photons, and in particular the filtering of the pump power, which is many orders of magnitude larger than that of the signal and idler photons. Here, we propose a photonic crystal coupled-cavity system designed so that the coupling of the pump mode to the output channel is strictly zero due to symmetry. We further analyze this effect in presence of fabrication disorder and find that, even then, a pump suppression of close to 40 dB can be achieved in state-of-the art systems. Due to the small mode volumes and high quality factors, our system is also expected to have a generation efficiency much higher than in standard micro-r...

  9. THz waveguides, devices and hybrid polymer-chalcogenide photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Hualong; Markos, Christos; Nielsen, Kristian;

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, we review our recent activities in the design, fabrication and characterization of polymer THz waveguides. Besides the THz waveguides, we finally will also briefly show some of our initial results on a novel hybrid polymer photonic crystal fiber with integrated chalcogenide...

  10. Integrated array of 2-mum antimonide-based single-photon counting devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diagne, M.A.; Greszik, M.; Duerr, E.K.; Zayhowski, J.J.; Manfra, M.J.; Bailey, R.J.; Donnelly, J.P.; Turner, G.W.

    2011-01-01

    A 32x32 Sb-based Geiger-mode (GM) avalanche photodiode array, operating at 2 mum with three-dimensional imaging capability, is presented. The array is interfaced with a ROIC (readout integrated circuit) in which each pixel can detect a photon and record the arrival time. The hybridized unit for the

  11. Integrated Magneto-Optical Devices for On-Chip Photonic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    at LL, is shown in Figure 3 upper panel. Device performance will be described below. Devices were designed for an optical wavelength of 1.3μm...Figure 5 shows a top view optical micrograph of the fabricated device. As can be seen from the figure, an oxide window is etched into the oxide cladding...reprints for Governmental purposes notwithstanding any copyright notation herein. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and

  12. Magnetoelectrical control of nonreciprocal microwave response in a multiferroic helimagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Y.; Nii, Y.; Onose, Y.

    2017-05-01

    The control of physical properties by external fields is essential in many contemporary technologies. For example, conductance can be controlled by a gate electric field in a field effect transistor, which is a main component of integrated circuits. Optical phenomena induced by an electric field such as electroluminescence and electrochromism are useful for display and other technologies. Control of microwave propagation is also important for future wireless communication technology. Microwave properties in solids are dominated mostly by magnetic excitations, which cannot be easily controlled by an electric field. One solution to this problem is to use magnetically induced ferroelectrics (multiferroics). Here we show that microwave nonreciprocity, that is, different refractive indices for microwaves propagating in opposite directions, could be reversed by an external electric field in a multiferroic helimagnet Ba2Mg2Fe12O22. This approach offers an avenue for the electrical control of microwave properties.

  13. Multipolar interference for non-reciprocal nonlinear generation

    CERN Document Server

    Poutrina, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    We show that nonlinear multipolar interference allows achieving not only unidirectional, but also non-reciprocal nonlinear generation from a nanoelement, with the direction of the nonlinearly produced light decoupled from that of at least one or several of the excitation beams. Alternatively, it may allow inhibiting the specified nonlinear response in a nanoelement or in its periodic arrangement by reversing the direction of one of the pumps. The described phenomena exploit the fact that, contrary to the linear response case, nonlinear magneto-electric interference stems from a combination of additive and multiplicative processes and includes an interference between various terms within the electric and magnetic partial waves themselves. We demonstrate the introduced concept numerically using an example of a plasmonic dimer geometry with realistic material parameters.

  14. THz Communications using Photonics and Electronic Devices: the Race to Data-Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducournau, Guillaume; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Pavanello, Fabio; Peytavit, Emilien; Zaknoune, Mohammed; Bacquet, Denis; Beck, Alexandre; Akalin, Tahsin; Lampin, Jean-François; Lampin, Jean-François

    2015-02-01

    With the mass development of mobile data transfers, wireless communications have recently entered a new area: the carrier frequency is now entering the THz region. After a brief overview of context and key features of THz communication, focus is given on photonic-based THz emitters based on quasi-optic UTC-PDs. A special design of wideband photomixer is presented and its applications for narrow bandwidth THz generation. Using this photomixer, communication links at 200, 400 and 600 GHz are presented.

  15. Single photon detection based devices and techniques for pulsed time-of-flight applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hallman, L. (Lauri)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this thesis, a new type of laser diode transmitter using enhanced gain-switching suitable for use with a single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detector was developed and tested in the pulsed time-of-flight laser range finding (lidar) application. Several laser diode versions were tested and the driving electronics were developed. The driving electronics improvements enabled a pulsing frequency of up to 1 MHz, while the maximum laser output power was about 5–40 W depending on...

  16. Growth and characterization of III-nitrides materials system for photonic and electronic devices by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dongwon

    A wide variety of group III-Nitride-based photonic and electronic devices have opened a new era in the field of semiconductor research in the past ten years. The direct and large bandgap nature, intrinsic high carrier mobility, and the capability of forming heterostructures allow them to dominate photonic and electronic device market such as light emitters, photodiodes, or high-speed/high-power electronic devices. Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) based on group III-Nitrides materials are of interest due to potential capabilities for low dark current densities, high sensitivities and high optical gains in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region. Wide-bandgap GaN-based APDs are excellent candidates for short-wavelength photodetectors because they have the capability for cut-off wavelengths in the UV spectral region (lambda operate in the solar-blind spectral regime of lambda 10,000 and 50, respectively. The large stable optical gains are attributed to the improved crystalline quality of epitaxial layers grown on low dislocation density bulk substrates. GaN p-i-n rectifiers have brought much research interest due to its superior physical properties. The AIN-free full-vertical GaN p-i-n rectifiers on n-type 6H-SiC substrates by employing a conducting AIGaN:Si buffer layer provides the advantages of the reduction of sidewall damage from plasma etching and lower forward resistance due to the reduction of current crowding at the bottom n-type layer. The AlGaN:Si nucleation layer was proven to provide excellent electrical properties while also acting as a good buffer role for subsequent GaN growth. The reverse breakdown voltage for a relatively thin 2.5 mum-thick i-region was found to be over -400V.

  17. Tunable and nonreciprocal Goos-Hänchen shifts on reflection from a graphene-coated gyroelectric slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoding; Xu, Yaoxian; Sun, Jian; Pan, Tao

    2016-07-01

    We study the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts of a reflected Gaussian beam from a graphene-coated gyroelectric slab. The reflection coefficient is derived by using the transfer-matrix method and the spatial Goos-Hänchen (SGH) shift and angular Goos-Hänchen (AGH) shift are determined in terms of stationary-phase approach. The effects of graphene's chemical potential, external magnetic field, the thickness of the slab and the frequency of incident beam on the SGH and AGH shifts are analyzed and discussed numerically. At grazing incidence, the large, tunable and nonreciprocal SGH shifts with higher light intensity are achieved in the terahertz region, which might be useful for the development of various tunable terahertz-wave devices.

  18. Integration of microcantilevers with photonic structures for mechano-optical wavelength selective devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakkalakkal Abdulla, Shahina Mumthaz

    2011-01-01

    This thesis deals with the fabrication technology and mechano-optical characterisation of compact integrated wavelength selective optical devices for use in telecommunication applications. Upon electrostatic actuation, a mechanical element perturbs the optical evanescent field of a guided wave provi

  19. Topology-optimized and dispersion-tailored photonic crystal slow-light devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Borel, Peter Ingo

    2007-01-01

    Within the last few years, photonic crystal waveguides (PhCWs) with low propagation losses and exotic dispersion properties have been realized and, presently, there is a strong movement towards the deployment of such structures in integrated circuits. Effective passive components such as bends...... sophisticated possibilities for realizing complex nanophotonic circuits. Potentially,PhCWs may facilitate delay lines for package synchronization, dispersion compensation, and enhanced light-matter interactions in nanophotonic circuits by exploiting slow-light phenomena. The practical utilization of ultra...

  20. Integrated array of 2-μm antimonide-based single-photon counting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diagne, M A; Greszik, M; Duerr, E K; Zayhowski, J J; Manfra, M J; Bailey, R J; Donnelly, J P; Turner, G W

    2011-02-28

    A 32x32 Sb-based Geiger-mode (GM) avalanche photodiode array, operating at 2 μm with three-dimensional imaging capability, is presented. The array is interfaced with a ROIC (readout integrated circuit) in which each pixel can detect a photon and record the arrival time. The hybridized unit for the 1000-element focal plane array, when operated at 77K with 1 V overbias range, shows an average dark count rate of 1.5 kHz. Three-dimensional range images of objects were acquired.

  1. Nanoboomerang-based inverse metasurfaces—A promising path towards ultrathin photonic devices for transmission operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisberger, Matthias; Schneidewind, Henrik; Huebner, Uwe; Popp, Juergen; Schmidt, Markus A.

    2017-03-01

    Metasurfaces have revolutionized photonics due to their ability to shape phase fronts as requested and to tune beam directionality using nanoscale metallic or dielectric scatterers. Here we reveal inverse metasurfaces showing superior properties compared to their positive counterparts if transmission mode operation is considered. The key advantage of such slot-type metasurfaces is the strong reduction of light in the parallel-polarization state, making the crossed-polarization, being essential for metasurface operation, dominant and highly visible. In the experiment, we show an up to four times improvement in polarization extinction for the individual metasurface element geometry consisting of deep subwavelength nanoboomerangs with feature sizes of the order of 100 nm. As confirmed by simulations, strong plasmonic hybridization yields two spectrally separated plasmonic resonances, ultimately allowing for the desired phase and scattering engineering in transmission. Due to the design flexibility of inverse metasurfaces, a large number of highly integrated ultra-flat photonic elements can be envisioned, examples of which include monolithic lenses for telecommunications and spectroscopy, beam shaper or generator for particle trapping or acceleration or sophisticated polarization control for microscopy.

  2. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for statistical analysis of RF photonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piels, Molly; Zibar, Darko

    2016-02-08

    The microwave reflection coefficient is commonly used to characterize the impedance of high-speed optoelectronic devices. Error and uncertainty in equivalent circuit parameters measured using this data are systematically evaluated. The commonly used nonlinear least-squares method for estimating uncertainty is shown to give unsatisfactory and incorrect results due to the nonlinear relationship between the circuit parameters and the measured data. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are shown to provide superior results, both for individual devices and for assessing within-die variation.

  3. Broadband and omnidirectional light harvesting enhancement in photovoltaic devices with aperiodic TiO2 nanotube photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Su, Haijun; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Lin; Fu, Nianqing; Yong, Zehui; Huang, Haitao; Xie, Keyu

    2017-03-01

    Design of more effective broadband light-trapping elements to improve the light harvesting efficiency under both normal and tilted light for solar cells and other photonic devices is highly desirable. Herein we present a theoretical analysis on the optical properties of a novel TiO2 nanotube aperiodic photonic crystal (NT APC) following an aperiodic sequences and its photocurrent enhancement effect for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) under various incidence angles. It is found that, compared to regular PC, the designed TiO2 NT APC owns broader reflection region and a desired omnidirectional reflection (ODR) bandgaps, leading to considerable and stable photocurrent enhancement under both normal and oblique light. The effects of the structural parameters of the TiO2 NT APC, including the average lattice constant and the common sequence difference, on the optical properties, ODR bandgaps and absorption magnification of the integrated DSSCs are investigated in detail. Moreover, the angular dependence of photocurrent enhancement and angular compensation effect of such TiO2 NT APCs are also provided to offer a guidance on the optimum structural parameters design under different engineering application conditions.

  4. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for statistical analysis of RF photonic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piels, Molly; Zibar, Darko

    2016-01-01

    The microwave reflection coefficient is commonly used to characterize the impedance of high-speed optoelectronic devices. Error and uncertainty in equivalent circuit parameters measured using this data are systematically evaluated. The commonly used nonlinear least-squares method for estimating u...

  5. Femtosecond laser micromachining for the realization of fully integrated photonic and microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, S. M.; Osellame, R.; Ramponi, R.

    2015-02-01

    Femtosecond laser microprocessing is a direct, maskless fabrication technique that has attracted much attention in the past 10 years due to its unprecedented versatility in the 3D patterning of transparent materials. Two common modalities of femtosecond laser microfabrication include buried optical waveguide writing and surface laser ablation, which have been applied to a wide range of transparent substrates including glasses, polymers and crystals. In two photon polymerization, a third modality of femtosecond laser fabrication, focused femtosecond laser pulses drive photopolymerization in photoresists, enabling the writing of complex 3D structures with submicrometer resolution. In this paper, we discuss several microdevices realized by these diverse modalities of femtosecond laser microfabrication, for applications in microfluidics, sensing and quantum information.

  6. Porous silicon photonic devices using pulsed anodic etching of lightly doped silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escorcia-Garcia, J; Sarracino MartInez, O; Agarwal, V [CIICAP-Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col Chamilpa, CP 62210, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Gracia-Jimenez, J M, E-mail: vagarwal@uaem.m [Instituto de Fisica, BUAP, Apdo. Postal J-48, San Manuel, 72570 Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2009-07-21

    The fabrication of porous silicon photonic structures using lightly doped, p-type, silicon wafers (resistivity: 14-22 OMEGA cm) by pulsed anodic etching is reported. The optical properties have been found to be strongly dependent on the duty cycle and frequency of the applied current. All the interfaces of the single layered samples were digitally analysed by calculating the mean interface roughness (R{sub m}). The interface roughness was found to be maximum for the sample with direct current. The use of a duty cycle above 50%, in a certain range of frequencies, is found to reduce the interface roughness. The optical properties of some microcavities and rugate filters are investigated from the optimized parameters of the duty cycle and frequency, using the current densities of 10, 90 and 150 mA cm{sup -2}.

  7. All-fiber photonic devices and system for advanced optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoyi; Qin, Zixiong; Ding, Lei; Yuan, Shuzhong; Kai, Guiyun; Liu, Zhiguo; Feng, Dejun; Zhao, Chunliu; Ma, Ning; Zhang, Ying; Ning, Ding

    2000-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to give an overview of the different studies we have performed at the research level regarding the design and implementation of a photonic wavelength division multiplexing layer providing transparent transport services to client layer. Such a network requires a number of enabling factors to be accessed in order to become a reality. Among these factors are the availability of high- capacity WDM transmission systems and efficient optical routing nodes based on mature technology, etc. In this paper, based on several key build blocks we developed such as fiber lasers, flattened EDFA's, and WADM's, an all-fiber WDM system was demonstrated. A cost effective alternative to OSA was proposed.

  8. Photonic devices on planar and curved substrates and methods for fabrication thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartl, Michael H.; Barhoum, Moussa; Riassetto, David

    2016-08-02

    A versatile and rapid sol-gel technique for the fabrication of high quality one-dimensional photonic bandgap materials. For example, silica/titania multi-layer materials may be fabricated by a sol-gel chemistry route combined with dip-coating onto planar or curved substrate. A shock-cooling step immediately following the thin film heat-treatment process is introduced. This step was found important in the prevention of film crack formation--especially in silica/titania alternating stack materials with a high number of layers. The versatility of this sol-gel method is demonstrated by the fabrication of various Bragg stack-type materials with fine-tuned optical properties by tailoring the number and sequence of alternating layers, the film thickness and the effective refractive index of the deposited thin films. Measured optical properties show good agreement with theoretical simulations confirming the high quality of these sol-gel fabricated optical materials.

  9. The Structural Engineering Strategy for Photonic Material Research and Device Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalin Lu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A new structural engineering strategy is introduced for optimizing the fabrication of arrayed nanorod materials, optimizing superlattice structures for realizing a strong coupling, and directly developing nanophotonic devices. The strategy can be regarded as “combinatorial” because of the high efficiency in optimizing structures. In this article, this strategy was applied to grow ZnO nanorod arrays, and to develop a new multifunctional photodetector using such nanorod arrays, which is able to simultaneously detect power, energy, and polarization of an incident ultraviolet radiation. The strategy was also used to study the extraordinary dielectric behavior of relaxor ferroelectric lead titanate doped lead magnesium niobate heterophase superlattices in the terahertz frequencies, in order to investigate their dielectric polariton physics and the potential to be integrated with tunable surface resonant plasmonics devices.

  10. Micro-and Nano-Optomechanical Devices for Sensors, Oscillators, and Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    top device layer which is released from the underlying substrate, and can be fabricated using conventional lithography and plasma etching...observation of Qi=1.1x104. Switching platforms to stressed silicon nitride or crystalline silicon should enable material quality factors of Qi=105–107...design that has been fabricated in silicon nitride (SiN), and integrated into an apparatus for delivering cold caesium atoms into the near field of the

  11. Nanocomposite Based Organic-Inorganic Cu3BiS3 High Sensitive Hybrid Photonic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Banavoth; Krupanidhi, S B

    2015-04-01

    We report the synthesis and application Cu3BiS3 nanorods in infrared photodectection. Cu3BiS3 nano rods were characterized structurally, optically and electrically. The detailed IR photodectection properties in terms of photo response were demonstrated with IR lamp and 1064 nm laser illuminations. The rapid photocurrent time constants followed by the slower components, resulting due to the defect states. The photo detecting properties for different concentrations of nanorods blended with the conjugate polymer devices were demonstrated. Further the photocurrent was enhanced to threefold increase from 3.47 x 10(-7) A to 2.37 x 10(-3) A at 1 V for 10 mg nanorods embedded in the polymer device. Responsivity of hybrid device was enhanced from 0.0158 A/W to 102 A/W. The detailed trap assisted space charge transport properties were studied considering the different regimes. Hence Cu3BiS3 can be a promising candidate in the nano switchable near IR photodetectors.

  12. Reply to Comment on ‘Energy conservation and the constitutive relations in chiral and non-reciprocal media’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Cameron, Robert P.

    2016-06-01

    We respond to the comment by Mackay and Lakhtakia on our paper. These authors have missed the simple point that our chirality and non-reciprocity parameters are real. The ‘inconsistency’ claimed by them emerges from their incorrect attempt to apply our results instead to complex chirality and non-reciprocity parameters.

  13. Biperiodic nanostructured waveguides for wavelength-selectivity of hybrid photonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talneau, A; Pommarède, X; Itawi, A; Pantzas, K; Lupu, A; Benisty, H

    2015-11-15

    A biperiodic nanostructuration consisting of a super-periodicity added to a nanohole lattice of subwavelength pitch is demonstrated to provide both modal confinement and wavelength selectivity within a hybrid III-V on a silicon waveguide. The wavelength-selective behavior stems from finely tuned larger holes. Such biperiodic hybrid waveguides have been fabricated by oxide-free bonding III-V material on silicon and display well-defined stop bands. Such nanostructured waveguides offer the versatility for designing advanced optical functions within hybrid devices. Moreover, keeping the silicon waveguide surface planar, such nanostructured waveguides are compatible with electrical operation across the oxide-free hybrid interface.

  14. CdTe:Ge/Si (100) thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) for photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neretina, S.; Hughes, R. A.; Preston, J. S.; Sochinskii, N. V.; Mascher, P.

    2005-09-01

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) is a well known photonic material in the fields of infrared imaging and solar cells. Its nonlinear optical properties also make it a promising candidate for novel telecom applications that would utilize its high Kerr coefficient to produce advanced logical devices such as switches, routers and wavelength converters. The large photorefractive effect observed in CdTe also makes possible high-speed devices suitable for optical data processing. In order to advance such photorefractive waveguide applications, we have deposited CdTe films on silicon substrates with a native oxide layer using the pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD). Silicon was chosen as the substrate material as it is suitable for the monolithic integration of logical devices. Maintaining an oxide layer was deemed necessary as a high refractive index mismatch is desirable for high-index contrast waveguide based applications and such an index mismatch could be provided by a reasonably thick layer of SiO2. Films exhibiting some structural deficiencies, but with high optical quality were deposited through the optimization of the growth parameters. X-ray diffraction data indicates that the films are [111] oriented with rocking curves of substantial width. Atomic force microscopy images confirm that the films have a smooth surface morphology as was suggested by their mirror-like appearance. Using the optimum growth conditions, CdTe films doped with germanium were also deposited as this dopant introduces deep donor levels that enhance the photorefractive effect. A comparison of the optical properties obtained from the doped and undoped films indicate that impurities can have a marked effect on the index of refraction and extinction coefficient. Such alterations to the optical constants must be considered in the design of waveguide structures.

  15. Mapping the broadband polarization properties of linear 2D SOI photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canning, John; Skivesen, Nina; Kristensen, Martin;

    2007-01-01

    cut-off. We also observe relatively broadband mixing between the two eigenstates to generate a complete photonic bandgap. By careful analysis of the output polarisation state we report on an inherent non-reciprocity between quasi TE and TM fundamental mode cross coupling. The nature of polarisation...

  16. Tunable all-optical devices based on liquid-filled photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosberg, Christian Romer; Bennet, Francis; Neshev, Dragomir N.;

    of discrete and nonlinear light propagation in extended two-dimensional periodic systems. We experimentally demonstrate strongly tunable beam diffraction in a triangular waveguide array created by infiltration of a high index liquid into the cladding holes of a standard PCF, and employ the thermal...... nonlinearity of the liquid to achieve beam self-defocusing at higher light intensity. Based on the observed effects we devise a compact all-optical power limiter device with tunable characteristics. The use of commercially available PCFs in combination with liquid infiltration avoids the need for specialized...... high-precision fabrication procedures, and provides high tunability and nonlinearity at moderate laser powers while taking advantage of a compact experimental setup. The increasingly broad range of PCF structures available could stimulate further efforts in applying them in discrete nonlinear optics...

  17. Conditions for the spin wave nonreciprocity in an array of dipolarly coupled magnetic nanopillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verba, Roman; Tiberkevich, Vasil; Bankowski, Elena; Meitzler, Thomas; Melkov, Gennadiy; Slavin, Andrei

    2013-08-01

    It is demonstrated that collective spin waves (SWs) propagating in complex periodic arrays of dipolarly coupled magnetic nanopillars existing in a saturated (single-domain) ground state in a zero bias magnetic field could be nonreciprocal. To guarantee the SW nonreciprocity, two conditions should be fulfilled: (i) existence of a nonzero out-of-plane component of the pillars' static magnetization and (ii) a complex periodicity of array's ground state with at least two elements per a primitive cell, if the elements are different, and at least three elements per a primitive cell, if the elements are identical.

  18. A nonreciprocal racetrack resonator based on vacuum-annealed magnetooptical cerium-substituted yttrium iron garnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Taichi; Onbasli, Mehmet C; Kim, Dong Hun; Singh, Vivek; Inoue, M; Kimerling, Lionel C; Ross, C A

    2014-08-11

    Vacuum annealed polycrystalline cerium substituted yttrium iron garnet (CeYIG) films deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering on non-garnet substrates were used in nonreciprocal racetrack resonators. CeYIG annealed at 800°C for 30 min provided a large Faraday rotation angle, close to the single crystal value. Crystallinity, magnetic properties, refractive indices and absorption coefficients were measured. The resonant transmission peak of the racetrack resonator covered with CeYIG was non-reciprocally shifted by applying an in-plane magnetic field.

  19. Nonreciprocity in giant Goos-H\\"anchen shift due to symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Kumari, Madhuri

    2011-01-01

    We study giant Goos-H\\"anchen (GH) shift in reflection from a near-symmetric coupled waveguide structure. We show that broken spatial symmetry can lead to GH shift with different signs for illumination from the opposite ends, a direct consequence of the nonreciprocity relations considered earlier (Opt. Lett. 27,1205 (2002)). Symmetry breaking by adding a few nm thick bio-layer to one of the guides is enough to observe the nonreciprocity. This may have far reaching implications for efficient biosensing.

  20. Tight control of light trapping in surface addressable photonic crystal membranes: application to spectrally and spatially selective optical devices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letartre, Xavier; Blanchard, Cédric; Grillet, Christian; Jamois, Cécile; Leclercq, Jean-Louis; Viktorovitch, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Surface addressable Photonic Crystal Membranes (PCM) are 1D or 2D photonic crystals formed in a slab waveguides where Bloch modes located above the light line are exploited. These modes are responsible for resonances in the reflection spectrum whose bandwidth can be adjusted at will. These resonances result from the coupling between a guided mode of the membrane and a free-space mode through the pattern of the photonic crystal. If broadband, these structures represent an ideal mirror to form compact vertical microcavity with 3D confinement of photons and polarization selectivity. Among numerous devices, low threshold VCSELs with remarkable and tunable modal properties have been demonstrated. Narrow band PCMs (or high Q resonators) have also been extensively used for surface addressable optoelectronic devices where an active material is embedded into the membrane, leading to the demonstration of low threshold surface emitting lasers, nonlinear bistables, optical traps... In this presentation, we will describe the main physical rules which govern the lifetime of photons in these resonant modes. More specifically, it will be emphasized that the Q factor of the PCM is determined, to the first order, by the integral overlap between the electromagnetic field distributions of the guided and free space modes and of the dielectric periodic perturbation which is applied to the homogeneous membrane to get the photonic crystal. It turns out that the symmetries of these distributions are of prime importance for the strength of the resonance. It will be shown that, by molding in-plane or vertical symmetries of Bloch modes, spectrally and spatially selective light absorbers or emitters can be designed. First proof of concept devices will be also presented.

  1. Surface trimming of silicon photonics devices using controlled reactive ion etching chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, S.; Das, B. K.

    2015-06-01

    Surface trimming of rib waveguides fabricated in 5-μm SOI substrate has been carried out successfully without any significant increase of propagation losses. A reactive ion etching chemistry has been optimized for trimming and an empirical model has been developed to obtain the resulting waveguide geometries. This technique has been used to demonstrate smaller footprint devices like multimode interference based power splitters and ring resonators after defining them photolithographically with relatively large cross-section rib waveguides. We have been also successful to fabricate 2D tapered spot-size converter useful for monolithic integration of waveguides with varying heights and widths. The taper length is again precisely controlled by photolithographic definition. Minimum insertion loss of such a spot-size converter integrated between waveguides with 3-μm height difference has been recorded to be ∼2 dB. It has been also shown that the overall fiber-to-chip coupling loss can be reduced by >3 dB by using such spot-size converters at the input/output side of the waveguides.

  2. Investigation on nonlinear optical and dielectric properties of L-arginine doped ZTC crystal to explore photonic device applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Mohd

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study is focused to explore the photonic device applications of L-arginine doped ZTC (LA-ZTC crystals using nonlinear optical (NLO and dielectric studies. The LA-ZTC crystals have been grown by slow evaporation solution technique. The chemical composition and surface of LA-ZTC crystal have been analyzed by means of energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS and surface scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. The Vicker’s microhardness study has been carried out to determine the hardness, work hardening index, yield strength and elastic stiffness of LA-ZTC crystal. The enhanced SHG efficiency of LA-ZTC crystal has been ascertained using the Kurtz-Perry powder SHG test. The closed-and-open aperture Z-scan technique has been employed to confirm the third order nonlinear optical nature of LA-ZTC crystal. The Z-scan transmittance data has been utilized to calculate the superior cubic susceptibility, nonlinear refractive index, nonlinear absorption coefficient and figure of merit of LA-ZTC crystal. The behavior of dielectric constant and dielectric loss of LA-ZTC crystal at different temperatures has been investigated using the dielectric analysis.

  3. Ultrafast photonic crystal optical switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Qi-huang; HU Xiao-yong

    2006-01-01

    Photonic crystal,a novel and artificial photonic material with periodic dielectric distribution,possesses photonic bandgap and can control the propagation states of photons.Photonic crystal has been considered to be a promising candidate for the future integrated photonic devices.The properties and the fabrication method of photonic crystal are expounded.The progresses of the study of ultrafast photonic crystal optical switching are discussed in detail.

  4. Robust edge states in amorphous gyromagnetic photonic lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansha, Shampy; Chong, Y. D.

    2017-09-01

    We numerically study amorphous analogs of a two-dimensional photonic Chern insulator. The amorphous lattices consist of gyromagnetic rods that break time-reversal symmetry, with the lattice sites generated by a close-packing algorithm. The level of short-range order is adjustable, and there is no long-range order. The topologically nontrivial gaps of the photonic Chern insulator are found to persist into the amorphous regime, so long as there is sufficient short-range order. Strongly nonreciprocal robust transmission occurs via edge states, which are shown to propagate ballistically despite the absence of long-range order, and to be exponentially localized along the lattice edge. Interestingly, there is an enhancement of nonreciprocal transmission even at very low levels of short-range order, where there are no discernible spectral gaps.

  5. Spin-Hall nano-oscillator with oblique magnetization and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction as generator of skyrmions and nonreciprocal spin-waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, A.; Verba, R.; Zivieri, R.; Laudani, A.; Puliafito, V.; Gubbiotti, G.; Tomasello, R.; Siracusano, G.; Azzerboni, B.; Carpentieri, M.; Slavin, A.; Finocchio, G.

    2016-01-01

    Spin-Hall oscillators (SHO) are promising sources of spin-wave signals for magnonics applications, and can serve as building blocks for magnonic logic in ultralow power computation devices. Thin magnetic layers used as “free” layers in SHO are in contact with heavy metals having large spin-orbital interaction, and, therefore, could be subject to the spin-Hall effect (SHE) and the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (i-DMI), which may lead to the nonreciprocity of the excited spin waves and other unusual effects. Here, we analytically and micromagnetically study magnetization dynamics excited in an SHO with oblique magnetization when the SHE and i-DMI act simultaneously. Our key results are: (i) excitation of nonreciprocal spin-waves propagating perpendicularly to the in-plane projection of the static magnetization; (ii) skyrmions generation by pure spin-current; (iii) excitation of a new spin-wave mode with a spiral spatial profile originating from a gyrotropic rotation of a dynamical skyrmion. These results demonstrate that SHOs can be used as generators of magnetic skyrmions and different types of propagating spin-waves for magnetic data storage and signal processing applications. PMID:27786261

  6. Spin-Hall nano-oscillator with oblique magnetization and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction as generator of skyrmions and nonreciprocal spin-waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, A.; Verba, R.; Zivieri, R.; Laudani, A.; Puliafito, V.; Gubbiotti, G.; Tomasello, R.; Siracusano, G.; Azzerboni, B.; Carpentieri, M.; Slavin, A.; Finocchio, G.

    2016-10-01

    Spin-Hall oscillators (SHO) are promising sources of spin-wave signals for magnonics applications, and can serve as building blocks for magnonic logic in ultralow power computation devices. Thin magnetic layers used as “free” layers in SHO are in contact with heavy metals having large spin-orbital interaction, and, therefore, could be subject to the spin-Hall effect (SHE) and the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (i-DMI), which may lead to the nonreciprocity of the excited spin waves and other unusual effects. Here, we analytically and micromagnetically study magnetization dynamics excited in an SHO with oblique magnetization when the SHE and i-DMI act simultaneously. Our key results are: (i) excitation of nonreciprocal spin-waves propagating perpendicularly to the in-plane projection of the static magnetization; (ii) skyrmions generation by pure spin-current; (iii) excitation of a new spin-wave mode with a spiral spatial profile originating from a gyrotropic rotation of a dynamical skyrmion. These results demonstrate that SHOs can be used as generators of magnetic skyrmions and different types of propagating spin-waves for magnetic data storage and signal processing applications.

  7. Nonreciprocal acoustics and dynamics in the in-plane oscillations of a geometrically nonlinear lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Koroleva, I.; Manevitch, L. I.; Bergman, L. A.; Vakakis, A. F.

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics and acoustics of a nonlinear lattice with fixed boundary conditions composed of a finite number of particles coupled by linear springs, undergoing in-plane oscillations. The source of the strongly nonlinearity of this lattice is geometric effects generated by the in-plane stretching of the coupling linear springs. It has been shown that in the limit of low energy the lattice gives rise to a strongly nonlinear acoustic vacuum, which is a medium with zero speed of sound as defined in classical acoustics. The acoustic vacuum possesses strongly nonlocal coupling effects and an orthogonal set of nonlinear standing waves [or nonlinear normal modes (NNMs)] with mode shapes identical to those of the corresponding linear lattice; in contrast to the linear case, however, all NNMs except the one with the highest wavelength are unstable. In addition, the lattice supports two types of waves, namely, nearly linear sound waves (termed "L waves") corresponding to predominantly axial oscillations of the particles and strongly nonlinear localized propagating pulses (termed "N L pulses") corresponding to predominantly transverse oscillating wave packets of the particles with localized envelopes. We show the existence of nonlinear nonreciprocity phenomena in the dynamics and acoustics of the lattice. Two opposite cases are examined in the limit of low energy. The first gives rise to nonreciprocal dynamics and corresponds to collective, spatially extended transverse loading of the lattice leading to the excitation of individual, predominantly transverse NNMs, whereas the second case gives rise to nonreciprocal acoutics by considering the response of the lattice to spatially localized, transverse impulse or displacement excitations. We demonstrate intense and recurring energy exchanges between a directly excited NNM and other NNMs with higher wave numbers, so that nonreciprocal energy exchanges from small-to-large wave numbers are established. Moreover, we show the

  8. Growth and optical properties of CMOS-compatible silicon nanowires for photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Alex Richard

    Silicon (Si) is the dominant semiconductor material in both the microelectronic and photovoltaic industries. Despite its poor optical properties, Si is simply too abundant and useful to be completely abandoned in either industry. Since the initial discovery of efficient room temperature photoluminescence (PL) from porous Si and the following discoveries of PL and time-resolved optical gain from Si nanocrystals (Si-nc) in SiO2, many groups have studied the feasibility of making Si-based, CMOS-compatible electroluminescent devices and electrically pumped lasers. These studies have shown that for Si-ne sizes below about 10 nm, PL can be attributed to radiative recombination of confined excitons and quantum efficiencies can reach 90%. PL peak energies are blue-shifted from the bulk Si band edge of 1.1 eV due to the quantum confinement effect and PL decay lifetimes are on mus timescales. However, many unanswered questions still exist about both the ease of carrier injection and various non-radiative and loss mechanisms that are present. A potential alternative material system to porous Si and Si-nc is Si nanowires (SiNWs). In this thesis, I examine the optical properties of SiNWs with diameters in the range of 3-30 nm fabricated by a number of compound metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible fabrication techniques including Chemical Vapor Deposition on metal nanoparticle coated substrates, catalytic wet etching of bulk Si and top-down electron-beam lithographic patterning. Using thermal oxidation and etching, we can increase the degree of confinement in the SiNWs. I demonstrate PL peaked in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelength ranges that is tunable by controlling the crystalline SiNW core diameter, which is measured with dark field and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. PL decay lifetimes of the SiNWs are on the order of 50 mus after proper surface passivation, which suggest that the PL is indeed from confined carriers in the SiNW cores

  9. Laser Welding Characterization of Kovar and Stainless Steel Alloys as Suitable Materials for Components of Photonic Devices Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhali, M. M. A.; Zainal, Saktioto J.; Munajat, Y.; Jalil, A.; Rahman, R.

    2010-03-01

    The weldability of Kovar and stainless steel alloys by Nd:YAG laser beam is studied through changing of some laser beam parameters. It has been found that there is a suitable interaction of the pulsed laser beam of low power laser pulse with both the two alloys. The change of thermophysical properties with absorbed energy from the laser pulse is discussed in this paper which reports the suitability of both Kovar and stainless steel 304 as the base materials for photonic devices packaging. We used laser weld system (LW4000S from Newport) which employs Nd:YAG laser system with two simultaneous beams output for packaging 980 nm high power laser module. Results of changing both laser spot weld width and penetration depth with changing both the pulse peak power density, pulse energy and pulse duration show that there are good linear relationships between laser pulse energy or peak power density and pulse duration with laser spot weld dimensions( both laser spot weld width and penetration depth). Therefore we concluded that there should be an optimization for both the pulse peak power and pulse duration to give a suitable aspect ratio (laser spot width to penetration depth) for achieving the desired welds with suitable penetration depth and small spot width. This is to reduce the heat affected zone (HAZ) which affects the sensitive optical components. An optimum value of the power density in the order of 105 w/cm2 found to be suitable to induce melting in the welded joints without vaporization. The desired ratio can also be optimized by changing the focus position on the target material as illustrated from our measurements. A theoretical model is developed to simulate the temperature distribution during the laser pulse heating and predict the penetration depth inside the material. Samples have been investigated using SEM with EDS. The metallographic measurements on the weld spot show a suitable weld yield with reasonable weld width to depth ratio.

  10. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave-mixing between photons and phonons and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong nonlocal effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a novel multi-cavity optomechanical device: a "photon see-saw", in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of the see-saw, are modulated anti-symmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other...

  11. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave mixing between photons and phonons, and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong non-local effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a multicavity optomechanical device in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of this 'photon see-saw', are modulated antisymmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation, which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other empty cavity during every oscillation cycle in a well-regulated fashion.

  12. Magnetic nanofiber composite materials and devices using same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xing; Zhou, Ziyao

    2017-04-11

    A nonreciprocal device is described. It includes a housing, a waveguide layer and at least one layer of magnetic nanofiber composite. The magnetic nanofiber composite layer is made up of a polymer base layer, a dielectric matrix comprising magnetic nanofibers. The nanofibers have a high aspect ratio and wherein said dielectric matrix is embedded in the polymer base layer.

  13. One-Step Fabrication of Stretchable Copper Nanowire Conductors by a Fast Photonic Sintering Technique and Its Application in Wearable Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Su; Jiu, Jinting; Gao, Yue; Tian, Yanhong; Araki, Teppei; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Nogi, Masaya; Koga, Hirotaka; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2016-03-09

    Copper nanowire (CuNW) conductors have been considered to have a promising perspective in the area of stretchable electronics due to the low price and high conductivity. However, the fabrication of CuNW conductors suffers from harsh conditions, such as high temperature, reducing atmosphere, and time-consuming transfer step. Here, a simple and rapid one-step photonic sintering technique was developed to fabricate stretchable CuNW conductors on polyurethane (PU) at room temperature in air environment. It was observed that CuNWs were instantaneously deoxidized, welded and simultaneously embedded into the soft surface of PU through the one-step photonic sintering technique, after which highly conductive network and strong adhesion between CuNWs and PU substrates were achieved. The CuNW/PU conductor with sheet resistance of 22.1 Ohm/sq and transmittance of 78% was achieved by the one-step photonic sintering technique within only 20 μs in air. Besides, the CuNW/PU conductor could remain a low sheet resistance even after 1000 cycles of stretching/releasing under 10% strain. Two flexible electronic devices, wearable sensor and glove-shaped heater, were fabricated using the stretchable CuNW/PU conductor, demonstrating that our CuNW/PU conductor could be integrated into various wearable electronic devices for applications in food, clothes, and medical supplies fields.

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Zinc oxide nanorod based photonic devices: recent progress in growth, light emitting diodes and lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willander, M.; Nur, O.; Zhao, Q. X.; Yang, L. L.; Lorenz, M.; Cao, B. Q.; Zúñiga Pérez, J.; Czekalla, C.; Zimmermann, G.; Grundmann, M.; Bakin, A.; Behrends, A.; Al-Suleiman, M.; El-Shaer, A.; Che Mofor, A.; Postels, B.; Waag, A.; Boukos, N.; Travlos, A.; Kwack, H. S.; Guinard, J.; LeSi Dang, D.

    2009-08-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO), with its excellent luminescent properties and the ease of growth of its nanostructures, holds promise for the development of photonic devices. The recent advances in growth of ZnO nanorods are discussed. Results from both low temperature and high temperature growth approaches are presented. The techniques which are presented include metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD), vapour phase epitaxy (VPE), pulse laser deposition (PLD), vapour-liquid-solid (VLS), aqueous chemical growth (ACG) and finally the electrodeposition technique as an example of a selective growth approach. Results from structural as well as optical properties of a variety of ZnO nanorods are shown and analysed using different techniques, including high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL), for both room temperature and for low temperature performance. These results indicate that the grown ZnO nanorods possess reproducible and interesting optical properties. Results on obtaining p-type doping in ZnO micro- and nanorods are also demonstrated using PLD. Three independent indications were found for p-type conducting, phosphorus-doped ZnO nanorods: first, acceptor-related CL peaks, second, opposite transfer characteristics of back-gate field effect transistors using undoped and phosphorus doped wire channels, and finally, rectifying I-V characteristics of ZnO:P nanowire/ZnO:Ga p-n junctions. Then light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on n-ZnO nanorods combined with different technologies (hybrid technologies) are suggested and the recent electrical, as well as electro-optical, characteristics of these LEDs are shown and discussed. The hybrid LEDs reviewed and discussed here are mainly presented for two groups: those based on n-ZnO nanorods and p-type crystalline substrates, and those based on n-ZnO nanorods and p-type amorphous substrates. Promising electroluminescence

  15. Investigation of non-reciprocal magnon propagation using lock-in thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wid, Olga; Bauer, Jan; Müller, Alexander; Breitenstein, Otwin; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Schmidt, Georg

    2017-04-01

    We have investigated the unidirectional spin wave heat conveyer effect in a 200 nm thin yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film using lock-in thermography (LIT). This originates from the non-reciprocal propagation of magnons, which leads to an asymmetric heat transport. To excite the spin waves we use two different respective antenna geometries: a coplanar waveguide (CPW) or a ‘microstrip’-like antenna on top of the YIG. By using the CPW and comparing the results for the Damon–Eshbach and the backward volume modes we are able to show that the origin of the asymmetric heat profile are indeed the non-reciprocal spin waves. Using the ‘microstrip’-like geometry we can confirm these results and we can even observe a distinct excitation profile along the antenna due to small field inhomogeneities.

  16. Non-reciprocal mu-near-zero mode in PT-symmetric magnetic domains

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jin; Ling, Chi Wai; Chan, C T; Fung, Kin Hung

    2014-01-01

    We find that a new type of non-reciprocal modes exist at an interface between two \\emph{parity-time} ($\\mathcal{PT}$) symmetric magnetic domains (MDs) near the frequency of zero effective permeability. The new mode is non-propagating and purely magnetic when the two MDs are semi-infinite while it becomes propagating in the finite case. In particular, two pronounced nonreciprocal responses could be observed via the excitation of this mode: one-way optical tunneling for oblique incidence and unidirectional beam shift at normal incidence. When the two MDs system becomes finite in size, it is found that perfect-transmission mode could be achieved if $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry is maintained. The unique properties of such an unusual mode are investigated by analytical modal calculation as well as numerical simulations. The results suggest a new approach to the design of compact optical isolator.

  17. Nonreciprocal μ -near-zero mode in PT -symmetric magnetic domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Dong, Hui Yuan; Ling, Chi Wai; Chan, C. T.; Fung, Kin Hung

    2015-06-01

    We find that a new type of nonreciprocal modes exists at an interface between two parity-time- (PT -) symmetric magnetic domains (MDs) near the frequency of zero effective permeability. This mode is nonpropagating and purely magnetic when the two MDs are semi-infinite, while it becomes propagating in the finite case. In particular, two pronounced nonreciprocal responses could be observed via the excitation of this mode: one-way optical tunneling for oblique incidence and unidirectional beam shift at normal incidence. When the two MDs system becomes finite in size, it is found that perfect-transmission mode could be achieved if PT symmetry is maintained. The unique properties of such an unusual mode are investigated by analytical modal calculation as well as numerical simulations. The results suggest a different approach to the design of compact optical isolator.

  18. A novel NOLM structure with nonreciprocal phase shift bias for power fluctuation reduction of pulse trains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liwei Guo; Xue Feng; Yue Liu; Xiaoming Liu

    2006-01-01

    @@ A novel nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) with a nonreciprocal phase shift bias (NPSB), called power equalization NOLM (PE-NOLM), is proposed for reducing the power fluctuation of pulse trains. NPSB provides part of the nonreciprocal phase difference so that the required input power is reduced, and nonsymmetrical coupling ratio of coupler can adjust the transmission curve to improve the equalization range. It has been shown theoretically that compared with earlier PE-NOLM, about 1.6 dB of equalization power reduction and about 2.2 dB of equalization range enhancement could be achieved. Experiments have demonstrated that the output power fluctuation is reduced to less than 0.4 dB, while the required input peak power range is 4.5 dBm (15.6-20.1 dBm).

  19. Design of non-reciprocal acoustic waveguides by indirect interband transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Tsuruta, Kenji

    2017-07-01

    We numerically demonstrate a non-reciprocal acoustic waveguide by utilizing the indirect interband transition between two guided modes. The waveguide, consisting of a water core sandwiched between parallel steel plates, is designed to support symmetric and asymmetric guided modes with different frequencies and wavevectors. Dynamic mode conversion is then achieved by applying spatio-temporal density modulation in the core of the waveguide to induce both frequency and wavevector shifts of the incident guided wave. Numerical simulations prove that the phase matching condition is satisfied only for the forward propagation, not for the backward one, thus realizing the non-reciprocal acoustic waveguide. Our approach based on a linear dynamic system may achieve wide-band tunable operation with a low-energy consumption, paving the way toward the sophisticated acoustic diode applications.

  20. Photonic lanterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Argyros, Alexander; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-12-01

    Multimode optical fibers have been primarily (and almost solely) used as "light pipes" in short distance telecommunications and in remote and astronomical spectroscopy. The modal properties of the multimode waveguides are rarely exploited and mostly discussed in the context of guiding light. Until recently, most photonic applications in the applied sciences have arisen from developments in telecommunications. However, the photonic lantern is one of several devices that arose to solve problems in astrophotonics and space photonics. Interestingly, these devices are now being explored for use in telecommunications and are likely to find commercial use in the next few years, particularly in the development of compact spectrographs. Photonic lanterns allow for a low-loss transformation of a multimode waveguide into a discrete number of single-mode waveguides and vice versa, thus enabling the use of single-mode photonic technologies in multimode systems. In this review, we will discuss the theory and function of the photonic lantern, along with several different variants of the technology. We will also discuss some of its applications in more detail. Furthermore, we foreshadow future applications of this technology to the field of nanophotonics.

  1. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the application of photon to industrial technologies, in particular, a hard photon technology was surveyed which uses photon beams of 0.1-200nm in wavelength. Its features such as selective atom reaction, dense inner shell excitation and spacial high resolution by quantum energy are expected to provide innovative techniques for various field such as fine machining, material synthesis and advanced inspection technology. This wavelength region has been hardly utilized for industrial fields because of poor development of suitable photon sources and optical devices. The developmental meaning, usable time and issue of a hard photon reduction lithography were surveyed as lithography in ultra-fine region below 0.1{mu}m. On hard photon analysis/evaluation technology, the industrial use of analysis, measurement and evaluation technologies by micro-beam was viewed, and optimum photon sources and optical systems were surveyed. Prediction of surface and surface layer modification by inner shell excitation, the future trend of this process and development of a vacuum ultraviolet light source were also surveyed. 383 refs., 153 figs., 17 tabs.

  2. Photonics: Technology project summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    Photonics involves the use of light (photons) in conjunction with electronics for applications in communications, computing, control, and sensing. Components used in photonic systems include lasers, optical detectors, optical wave guide devices, fiber optics, and traditional electronic devices. The goal of this program is to develop hybrid optoelectronic devices and systems for sensing, information processing, communications, and control. It is hoped that these new devices will yield at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance over existing technology. The objective of the program is to conduct research and development in the following areas: (1) materials and devices; (2) networking and computing; (3) optical processing/advanced pattern recognition; and (4) sensing.

  3. Photonics: Technology project summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    Photonics involves the use of light (photons) in conjunction with electronics for applications in communications, computing, control, and sensing. Components used in photonic systems include lasers, optical detectors, optical wave guide devices, fiber optics, and traditional electronic devices. The goal of this program is to develop hybrid optoelectronic devices and systems for sensing, information processing, communications, and control. It is hoped that these new devices will yield at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance over existing technology. The objective of the program is to conduct research and development in the following areas: (1) materials and devices; (2) networking and computing; (3) optical processing/advanced pattern recognition; and (4) sensing.

  4. Bulk-edge correspondence for topological photonic continua

    CERN Document Server

    Silveirinha, Mario G

    2016-01-01

    Here, building on our previous work [Phys. Rev. B, 92, 125153, (2015)], it is shown that the propagation of unidirectional gapless edge states at an interface of two topologically distinct electromagnetic continua with a well-behaved asymptotic electromagnetic response is rigorously predicted by the bulk-edge correspondence principle. We work out detailed examples demonstrating that when the spatial-cut off of the nonreciprocal part of the material response is considered self-consistently in the solution of the relevant electromagnetic problem, the number of unidirectional gapless edge modes is identical to the difference of the Chern numbers of the bulk materials. Furthermore, it is shown how the role of the spatial cut-off can be imitated in realistic systems using a tiny air gap with a specific thickness. This theory provides a practical roadmap for the application of topological concepts to photonic platforms formed by nonreciprocal electromagnetic continua.

  5. Cavity optomagnonics with spin-orbit coupled photons

    CERN Document Server

    Osada, A; Noguchi, A; Tabuchi, Y; Yamazaki, R; Usami, K; Sadgrove, M; Yalla, R; Nomura, M; Nakamura, Y

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally implement a system of cavity optomagnonics, where a sphere of ferromagnetic material supports whispering gallery modes (WGMs) for photons and the magnetostatic mode for magnons. We observe pronounced nonreciprocity and asymmetry in the sideband signals generated by the magnon-induced Brillouin scattering of light. The spin-orbit coupled nature of the WGM photons, their geometric birefringence and the time-reversal symmetry breaking in the magnon dynamics impose the angular-momentum selection rules in the scattering process and account for the observed phenomena. The unique features of the system may find interesting applications at the crossroad between quantum optics and spintronics.

  6. A first single-photon avalanche diode fabricated in standard SOI CMOS technology with a full characterization of the device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, M.J.; Sun, P.; Charbon, E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the first implementation of a single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) in standard silicon on insulator (SOI) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The SPAD is realized in a circular shape, and it is based on a P+/N-well junction along with a P-well guard-ring

  7. Combined atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence imaging to select single InAs/GaAs quantum dots for quantum photonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Luca; Liu, Jin; Song, Jin Dong; Fält, Stefan; Wegscheider, Werner; Badolato, Antonio; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2017-07-24

    We report on a combined photoluminescence imaging and atomic force microscopy study of single, isolated self-assembled InAs quantum dots. The motivation of this work is to determine an approach that allows to assess single quantum dots as candidates for quantum nanophotonic devices. By combining optical and scanning probe characterization techniques, we find that single quantum dots often appear in the vicinity of comparatively large topographic features. Despite this, the quantum dots generally do not exhibit significant differences in their non-resonantly pumped emission spectra in comparison to quantum dots appearing in defect-free regions, and this behavior is observed across multiple wafers produced in different growth chambers. Such large surface features are nevertheless a detriment to applications in which single quantum dots are embedded within nanofabricated photonic devices: they are likely to cause large spectral shifts in the wavelength of cavity modes designed to resonantly enhance the quantum dot emission, thereby resulting in a nominally perfectly-fabricated single quantum dot device failing to behave in accordance with design. We anticipate that the approach of screening quantum dots not only based on their optical properties, but also their surrounding surface topographies, will be necessary to improve the yield of single quantum dot nanophotonic devices.

  8. Down Converter Device Combining Rare-Earth Doped Thin Layer and Photonic Crystal for c-Si Based Solar Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Deschamps, Thierry; Peretti, Romain; Lalouat, Loïc; Fourmond, Erwann; Fave, Alain; Guille, Antoine; Pereira, António; Moine, Bernard; Seassal, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to develop ultra-compact structures enabling an efficient conversion of single high energy photon (UV) to two lower energy photons (IR). The proposed structure combines rare-earths doped thin layer allowing the down-conversion process with a photonic crystal (PhC), in order to control and enhance the down-conversion using optical resonances. On the top of the rare-earths doped layer, a silicon nitride (SiN) 2D planar PhC is synthesized. For that, SiN is first deposited by PECVD. After holographic lithography and reactive ion etching, a periodic square lattice of holes is generated on the SiN layer. The PhC topographical parameters as well as the layers thickness are optimized using Finite-Difference-Time-Domain simulations. The design and realization of such PhC-assisted down-converter structures is presented. Optical simulations demonstrate that the PhC leads to the establishment of resonant modes located in the underneath doped layer, allowing a drastic enhancement of the absorption ...

  9. Unidirectional invisibility and non-reciprocal transmission in two and three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loran, Farhang; Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2016-07-01

    We explore the phenomenon of unidirectional invisibility in two dimensions, examine its optical realizations and discuss its three-dimensional generalization. In particular, we construct an infinite class of unidirectionally invisible optical potentials that describe the scattering of normally incident transverse electric waves by an infinite planar slab with refractive-index modulations along both the normal directions to the electric field. A by-product of this investigation is a demonstration of non-reciprocal transmission in two dimensions. To elucidate this phenomenon, we state and prove a general reciprocity theorem that applies to quantum scattering theory of real and complex potentials in two and three dimensions.

  10. Unidirectional invisibility and non-reciprocal transmission in two and three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loran, Farhang; Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2016-07-01

    We explore the phenomenon of unidirectional invisibility in two dimensions, examine its optical realizations and discuss its three-dimensional generalization. In particular, we construct an infinite class of unidirectionally invisible optical potentials that describe the scattering of normally incident transverse electric waves by an infinite planar slab with refractive-index modulations along both the normal directions to the electric field. A by-product of this investigation is a demonstration of non-reciprocal transmission in two dimensions. To elucidate this phenomenon, we state and prove a general reciprocity theorem that applies to quantum scattering theory of real and complex potentials in two and three dimensions.

  11. Polarization nonreciprocity suppression of dual-polarization fiber-optic gyroscope under temperature variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Wang, Zinan; Luo, Rongya; Zhao, Dayu; Peng, Chao; Li, Zhengbin

    2015-04-15

    Polarization nonreciprocity (PN) is one of the most critical factors that degrades the performance of interferometric fiber-optic gyroscopes (IFOGs), particularly under varying temperature. We present an experimental investigation of PN error suppression in a dual-polarization IFOG. Both experimental results and theoretical analysis indicate that the PN errors of the two orthogonally polarized light waves always have opposite signs that can be effectively compensated despite the temperature variation. As a result, the long-term stability of the IFOG has been significantly improved. This study is promising for reducing the temperature fragility of IFOGs.

  12. Nanowires and nanoribbons as subwavelength optical waveguides and their use as components in photonic circuits and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Law, Matt; Sirbuly, Donald J.; Johnson, Justin C.; Saykally, Richard; Fan, Rong; Tao, Andrea

    2012-10-02

    Nanoribbons and nanowires having diameters less than the wavelength of light are used in the formation and operation of optical circuits and devices. Such nanostructures function as subwavelength optical waveguides which form a fundamental building block for optical integration. The extraordinary length, flexibility and strength of these structures enable their manipulation on surfaces, including the precise positioning and optical linking of nanoribbon/wire waveguides and other nanoribbon/wire elements to form optical networks and devices. In addition, such structures provide for waveguiding in liquids, enabling them to further be used in other applications such as optical probes and sensors.

  13. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, M.; Castellan, C.; Signorini, S.; Trenti, A.; Pavesi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photonics is a technology based on fabricating integrated optical circuits by using the same paradigms as the dominant electronics industry. After twenty years of fervid development, silicon photonics is entering the market with low cost, high performance and mass-manufacturable optical devices. Until now, most silicon photonic devices have been based on linear optical effects, despite the many phenomenologies associated with nonlinear optics in both bulk materials and integrated waveguides. Silicon and silicon-based materials have strong optical nonlinearities which are enhanced in integrated devices by the small cross-section of the high-index contrast silicon waveguides or photonic crystals. Here the photons are made to strongly interact with the medium where they propagate. This is the central argument of nonlinear silicon photonics. It is the aim of this review to describe the state-of-the-art in the field. Starting from the basic nonlinearities in a silicon waveguide or in optical resonator geometries, many phenomena and applications are described—including frequency generation, frequency conversion, frequency-comb generation, supercontinuum generation, soliton formation, temporal imaging and time lensing, Raman lasing, and comb spectroscopy. Emerging quantum photonics applications, such as entangled photon sources, heralded single-photon sources and integrated quantum photonic circuits are also addressed at the end of this review.

  14. Research progress in graphene use in photonic and optoelectronic devices%石墨烯光电子器件的应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李绍娟; 甘胜; 沐浩然; 徐庆阳; 乔虹; 李鹏飞; 薛运周; 鲍桥梁

    2014-01-01

    自2004年被发现以来,石墨烯因其卓越的光学和电学性能及其与硅基半导体工艺的兼容性,备受学术界和工业界的广泛关注。作为一种独特的二维原子晶体薄膜材料,石墨烯有着优异的机械性能、超高的热导率和载流子迁移率、超宽带的光学响应谱及极强的非线性光学特性,使其在新型光学和光电器件领域具有得天独厚的优势。一系列基于石墨烯的新型光电器件先后被研制出,已显示出优异的性能和良好的应用前景。此外,近期石墨烯表面等离子体激元的发现及太赫兹器件的研究进一步促进了石墨烯基光电器件的蓬勃发展。综述重点总结近年来石墨烯在超快脉冲激光器、光调制器、光探测器以及表面等离子体领域的应用研究进展,并进一步分析目前所面临的主要问题、挑战及其发展趋势。%Graphene has very significant optical and electronic properties, which attract enormous attention. As a unique two-di-mensional crystal with one atom thickness, it has high electron and thermal conductivities in addition to ? exibility, robustness and impermeability to gases. Its ultra-broad band optical response and excellent non-linear optical properties make it a wonderful material for developing next generation photonic and optoelectronic devices. The fabrication of graphene-based devices is compatible with the existing semiconductor process, which has stimulated lots of graphene-based hybrid silicon-CMOS ( Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor) applications. Here we review the latest progress in graphene-based photonic and optoelectronic devices, ranging from pulsed lasers, modulators and photodetectors to optical sensors. Other exciting topics such as graphene surface plas-mons and their terahertz applications are also discussed.

  15. Detection of urinary tract infections on lab-on-chip device by measuring photons emitted from ATP bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shilun; Dong, Tao; Yang, Zhaochu

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic Lab-on-chip (LOC) platform for in vitro detecting Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) for clinical diagnostic applications has been built. Based on one commercial adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) assay kit, one chip designed before was applied to detect UTI with the help of photomultiplier tube (PMT) and quantitative determination was made by measuring the photons of light emitted in the bioluminescent reaction of ATP with the enzyme luciferase. The chip had been tested and materials had been well prepared before testing the PMT detecting system. The data from PMT were visualized by the Labview™, appearing good linearity between voltage values and the concentration of the ATP ranging from 2×10(-12) M to 2×10(-8) M. Fresh urine sample with different amounts of Escherichia coli had been measured by the system, appearing good linearity trend between the voltage values and number of the E.coli. This study successfully expressed the concept of measuring ATP directly in the urine to quickly and accurately detect UTI on a microfluidic chip.

  16. Enhanced Axial Resolution of Wide-Field Two-Photon Excitation Microscopy by Line Scanning Using a Digital Micromirror Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Kang Park

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Temporal focusing multiphoton microscopy is a technique for performing highly parallelized multiphoton microscopy while still maintaining depth discrimination. While the conventional wide-field configuration for temporal focusing suffers from sub-optimal axial resolution, line scanning temporal focusing, implemented here using a digital micromirror device (DMD, can provide substantial improvement. The DMD-based line scanning temporal focusing technique dynamically trades off the degree of parallelization, and hence imaging speed, for axial resolution, allowing performance parameters to be adapted to the experimental requirements. We demonstrate this new instrument in calibration specimens and in biological specimens, including a mouse kidney slice.

  17. Boron, bismuth co-doping of gallium arsenide and other compounds for photonic and heterojunction bipolar transistor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2017-08-01

    Isoelectronic co-doping of semiconductor compounds and alloys with acceptors and deep donors is used to decrease bandgap, to increase concentration of the dopant constituents in the resulting alloys, and to increase carrier mobilities lifetimes. For example, Group III-V compounds and alloys, such as GaAs and GaP, are isoelectronically co-doped with, for example, B and Bi, to customize solar cells, and other semiconductor devices. Isoelectronically co-doped Group II-VI compounds and alloys are also included.

  18. Boron, bismuth co-doping of gallium arsenide and other compounds for photonic and heterojunction bipolar transistor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2015-07-07

    Isoelectronic co-doping of semiconductor compounds and alloys with acceptors and deep donors is sued to decrease bandgap, to increase concentration of the dopant constituents in the resulting alloys, and to increase carrier mobilities lifetimes. For example, Group III-V compounds and alloys, such as GaAs and GaP, are isoelectronically co-doped with, for example, B and Bi, to customize solar cells, and other semiconductor devices. Isoelectronically co-doped Group II-VI compounds and alloys are also included.

  19. Topological Photonic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cheng; Lin, Liang; Sun, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    As exotic phenomena in optics, topological states in photonic crystals have drawn much attention due to their fundamental significance and great potential applications. Because of the broken time-reversal symmetry under the influence of an external magnetic field, the photonic crystals composed of magneto-optical materials will lead to the degeneracy lifting and show particular topological characters of energy bands. The upper and lower bulk bands have nonzero integer topological numbers. The gapless edge states can be realized to connect two bulk states. This topological photonic states originated from the topological property can be analogous to the integer quantum Hall effect in an electronic system. The gapless edge state only possesses a single sign of gradient in the whole Brillouin zone, and thus the group velocity is only in one direction leading to the one-way energy flow, which is robust to disorder and impurity due to the nontrivial topological nature of the corresponding electromagnetic states. Furthermore, this one-way edge state would cross the Brillouin center with nonzero group velocity, where the negative-zero-positive phase velocity can be used to realize some interesting phenomena such as tunneling and backward phase propagation. On the other hand, under the protection of time-reversal symmetry, a pair of gapless edge states can also be constructed by using magnetic-electric coupling meta-materials, exhibiting Fermion-like spin helix topological edge states, which can be regarded as an optical counterpart of topological insulator originating from the spin-orbit coupling. The aim of this article is to have a comprehensive review of recent research literatures published in this emerging field of photonic topological phenomena. Photonic topological states and their related phenomena are presented and analyzed, including the chiral edge states, polarization dependent transportation, unidirectional waveguide and nonreciprocal optical transmission, all

  20. Linear array measurements of enhanced dynamic wedge and treatment planning system (TPS) calculation for 15 MV photon beam and comparison with electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Borislava; Grzadziel, Aleksandra; Rutonjski, Laza; Slosarek, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Enhanced dynamic wedges (EDW) are known to increase drastically the radiation therapy treatment efficiency. This paper has the aim to compare linear array measurements of EDW with the calculations of treatment planning system (TPS) and the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for 15 MV photon energy. Materials and methods. The range of different field sizes and wedge angles (for 15 MV photon beam) were measured by the linear chamber array CA 24 in Blue water phantom. The measurement conditions were applied to the calculations of the commercial treatment planning system XIO CMS v.4.2.0 using convolution algorithm. EPID measurements were done on EPID-focus distance of 100 cm, and beam parameters being the same as for CA24 measurements. Results Both depth doses and profiles were measured. EDW linear array measurements of profiles to XIO CMS TPS calculation differ around 0.5%. Profiles in non-wedged direction and open field profiles practically do not differ. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) for all EDW measurements show the difference of not more than 0.2%, while the open field PDD is almost the same as EDW PDD. Wedge factors for 60 deg wedge angle were also examined, and the difference is up to 4%. EPID to linear array differs up to 5%. Conclusions The implementation of EDW in radiation therapy treatments provides clinicians with an effective tool for the conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. If modelling of EDW beam in TPS is done correctly, a very good agreement between measurements and calculation is obtained, but EPID cannot be used for reference measurements. PMID:22933916

  1. Linear array measurements of enhanced dynamic wedge and treatment planning system (TPS) calculation for 15 MV photon beam and comparison with electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Borislava; Grzadziel, Aleksandra; Rutonjski, Laza; Slosarek, Krzysztof

    2010-09-01

    Enhanced dynamic wedges (EDW) are known to increase drastically the radiation therapy treatment efficiency. This paper has the aim to compare linear array measurements of EDW with the calculations of treatment planning system (TPS) and the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for 15 MV photon energy. The range of different field sizes and wedge angles (for 15 MV photon beam) were measured by the linear chamber array CA 24 in Blue water phantom. The measurement conditions were applied to the calculations of the commercial treatment planning system XIO CMS v.4.2.0 using convolution algorithm. EPID measurements were done on EPID-focus distance of 100 cm, and beam parameters being the same as for CA24 measurements. Both depth doses and profiles were measured. EDW linear array measurements of profiles to XIO CMS TPS calculation differ around 0.5%. Profiles in non-wedged direction and open field profiles practically do not differ. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) for all EDW measurements show the difference of not more than 0.2%, while the open field PDD is almost the same as EDW PDD. Wedge factors for 60 deg wedge angle were also examined, and the difference is up to 4%. EPID to linear array differs up to 5%. The implementation of EDW in radiation therapy treatments provides clinicians with an effective tool for the conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. If modelling of EDW beam in TPS is done correctly, a very good agreement between measurements and calculation is obtained, but EPID cannot be used for reference measurements.

  2. Longitudinal chirality, enhanced non-reciprocity, and nano-scale planar one-way guiding

    CERN Document Server

    Mazor, Yarden

    2012-01-01

    When a linear chain of plasmonic nano-particles is exposed to a transverse DC magnetic field, the chain modes are elliptically polarized, in a single plane parallel to the chain axis; hence, a novel longitudinal plasmon-rotation is created. If, in addition, the chain geometry possesses longitudinal rotation, e.g. by using ellipsoidal particles that rotate in the same plane as the plasmon rotation, strong non-reciprocity is created. The structure possesses a new kind of chirality--the longitudinal chirality--and supports one-way guiding. Since all particles rotate in the same plane, the geometry is planar and can be fabricated by printing leaf-like patches on a single plane. Furthermore, the magnetic field is significantly weaker than in previously reported one-way guiding structures. These properties are examined for ideal (lossless) and for lossy chains.

  3. The Symmetry Protected Piecewise Berry Phases, Enhanced Pumping and Non-reciprocity in Trimer Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xuele

    2016-01-01

    Finding new phase is a fundamental task in physics. Landau's theory explained the deep connection between symmetry breaking and phase transition commonly occurring in magnetic, superconducting and super uid systems. The discovery of the quantum Hall effect led to Z topological phases which could be different for same symmetry and are characterized by the discrete values of the Berry phases. By studying 1D trimer lattices we report new phases characterized by Berry phases which are piecewise continuous rather than discrete numbers. The phase transition occurs at the discontinuity point. With time-dependent changes, trimer lattices also give a 2D phases characterized by very specific 2D Berry phases of half period. These Berry phases change smoothly within a phase while change discontinuously at the transition point. We further demonstrate the existence of adiabatic pumping for each phase and gain assisted enhanced pumping. The non-reciprocity of the pumping process makes the system a good optical diode.

  4. Nonreciprocal phase shift caused by magnetic-thermal coupling of a polarization maintaining fiber optic gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dengwei; Zhao, Yuxiang; Fu, Wenlan; Zhou, Wenqing; Liu, Cheng; Shu, Xiaowu; Che, Shuangliang

    2014-03-15

    A theory for nonreciprocal phase shift caused by cross coupling generated in a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) under the combined action of magnetic and temperature fields is proposed. The magnetic-thermal coupling in the FOG originates from the interaction of the magnetic field, fiber twist, birefringence caused by thermal stress, and the intrinsic and bending birefringence of the fiber. The cross coupling changes with temperature. When the PM fiber has a diameter of 250 μm, beat length of 3 mm, length of 500 m, twist rate of 1  rad/m, and optical source wavelength of 1310 nm, the maximum degree of magnetic-thermal coupling generated by a 1 mT radial magnetic field within the temperature range of -20°C  to 60°C is -5.47%.

  5. Nonreciprocal optical transmission through a single conical air hole in an Ag film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Nan; Li, Xiaokang; She, Weilong

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we propose a simple metal micro-nano structure having the character of nonreciprocal optical zero-order transmission. The structure is a single conical air hole (CAH) in an Ag film whose optical absorption with geometric asymmetry breaks the time reversal symmetry of the electromagnetic field. By comparing the transmissions of Ag CAH with those of ideal conductor (IC) CAH, three effects of Ag CAH, including diffraction, Fabry-Perot-like (FPL) resonance and localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance, are analyzed and discussed. Under optimized conditions, we find that the ratio of forward transmission to backward one can be larger than 9 at a proper wavelength in visible range. This kind of Ag CAH is expected to have the potential served as all-optical diode.

  6. Nonreciprocal and Reciprocal Dating Violence and Injury Occurrence among Urban Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swahn, Monica H

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Dating violence is a significant health problem among youth that leads to adverse health outcomes, including injuries. Reciprocal violence (perpetrated by both partners is associated with increased injury in adults, but very little is known about the prevalence and context for reciprocal violence, as well as injury rates, among youth. We sought to determine the prevalence and scope of reciprocal dating violence and injury occurrence among urban youth in a high-risk community. Methods: Analyses were based on data from the Youth Violence Survey, conducted in 2004, and administered to over 80% of public school students in grades 7, 9, 11, and 12 (N=4,131 in a high-risk, urban school district. The current analyses were restricted to those who reported dating in the past year and who also reported any dating violence (n=1,158. Dating violence was categorized as reciprocal (the participant reported both violence perpetration and victimization and non-reciprocal (the participant report either violence perpetration or victimization, but not both. Results: Dating violence reciprocity varied by sex. Girls who reported any dating violence were more likely to report reciprocal dating violence (50.4% than were boys (38.9%. However, reciprocity did not vary by race/ethnicity or grade level. Reciprocal dating violence was more common among participants who reported more frequent violence experiences. Reciprocal violence was also associated with greater injury occurrences relative to non-reciprocal relationships (10.1% versus 1.2%. Conclusion: Reciprocal dating violence is common among adolescents and leads more often to injury outcomes. In particular, relationships in which boys report reciprocal violence against their partner appear to lead to more frequent injury occurrences. These findings underscore the importance of addressing dating violence and factors that increase risk for reciprocal violence and therefore exacerbate injury occurrence

  7. Investigations on nonlinear optical properties of electron beam treated Gd:ZnO thin films for photonic device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoorthi, K.; Pramodini, S.; Kityk, I. V.; Abd-Lefdil, M.; Sekkati, M.; El Fakir, A.; Rao, Ashok; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Poornesh, P.

    2017-06-01

    In this article, we report the third-order nonlinear optical properties of electron beam irradiated gadolinium-doped zinc oxide (GZO) thin films prepared using the spray pyrolysis deposition technique. GZO thin films were treated with an electron beam from a variable energy microtron accelerator at dose rates ranging from 1-5 kGy. Nonlinear optical measurements were conducted by employing the single beam Z-scan technique. A continuous wave He-Ne laser operating at 633 nm was used as the source of excitation. Closed aperture Z-scan results reveal that the films exhibit self-defocusing nonlinearity. Open aperture Z-scan results exhibit a switching over phenomena of reverse saturable absorption to saturable absorption for thin film irradiated at 3 kGy, indicating the influence of electron beams on optical nonlinearity. The significant change in third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χ (3) ranging from 2.14  ×  10-3 to 3.12  ×  10-3 esu is attributed to the effect of electron beam irradiation. The study shows that the nonlinear coefficients of GZO films can be tuned by electron beams for use in nonlinear optical device applications.

  8. Biomedical photonics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-01-01

    1.Biomedical Photonics: A Revolution at the Interface of Science and Technology, T. Vo-DinhPHOTONICS AND TISSUE OPTICS2.Optical Properties of Tissues, J. Mobley and T. Vo-Dinh3.Light-Tissue Interactions, V.V. Tuchin 4.Theoretical Models and Algorithms in Optical Diffusion Tomography, S.J. Norton and T. Vo-DinhPHOTONIC DEVICES5.Laser Light in Biomedicine and the Life Sciences: From the Present to the Future, V.S. Letokhov6.Basic Instrumentation in Photonics, T. Vo-Dinh7.Optical Fibers and Waveguides for Medical Applications, I. Gannot and

  9. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  10. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Selectively Transparent and Conducting Photonic Crystals and their Potential to Enhance the Performance of Thin-Film Silicon-Based Photovoltaics and Other Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Paul G.

    2011-12-01

    The byproducts of human engineered energy production are increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations well above their natural levels and accompanied continual decline in the natural reserves of fossil fuels necessitates the development of green energy alternatives. Solar energy is attractive because it is abundant, can be produced in remote locations and consumed on site. Specifically, thin-film silicon-based photovoltaic (PV) solar cells have numerous inherent advantages including their availability, non-toxicity, and they are relatively inexpensive. However, their low-cost and electrical performance depends on reducing their thickness to as great an extent as possible. This is problematic because their thickness is much less than their absorption length. Consequently, enhanced light trapping schemes must be incorporated into these devices. Herein, a transparent and conducting photonic crystal (PC) intermediate reflector (IR), integrated into the rear side of the cell and serving the dual function as a back-reflector and a spectral splitter, is identified as a promising method of boosting the performance of thin-film silicon-based PV. To this end a novel class of PCs, namely selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystals (STCPC), is invented. These STCPCs are a significant advance over existing 1D PCs because they combine intense wavelength selective broadband reflectance with the transmissive and conductive properties of sputtered ITO. For example, STCPCs are made to exhibit Bragg-reflectance peaks in the visible spectrum of 95% reflectivity and have a full width at half maximum that is greater than 200nm. At the same time, the average transmittance of these STCPCs is greater than 80% over the visible spectrum that is outside their stop-gap. Using wave-optics analysis, it is shown that STCPC intermediate reflectors increase the current generated in micromorph cells by 18%. In comparison, the more conventional IR comprised of a single homogeneous

  12. Nonreciprocal chromosomal translocations in renal cancer involve multiple DSBs and NHEJ associated with breakpoint inversion but not necessarily with transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hanif; Daser, Angelika; Dear, Paul; Wood, Henry; Rabbitts, Pamela; Rabbitts, Terence

    2013-04-01

    Chromosomal translocations and other abnormalities are central to the initiation of cancer in all cell types. Understanding the mechanism is therefore important to evaluate the evolution of cancer from the cancer initiating events to overt disease. Recent work has concentrated on model systems to develop an understanding of the molecular mechanisms of translocations but naturally occurring events are more ideal case studies since biological selection is absent from model systems. In solid tumours, nonreciprocal translocations are most commonly found, and accordingly we have investigated the recurrent nonreciprocal t(3;5) chromosomal translocations in renal carcinoma to better understand the mechanism of these naturally occurring translocations in cancer. Unexpectedly, the junctions of these translocations can be associated with site-specific, intrachromosomal inversion involving at least two double strand breaks (DSB) in cis and rejoining by nonhomologous end joining or micro-homology end joining. However, these translocations are not necessarily associated with transcribed regions questioning accessibility per se in controlling these events. In addition, intrachromosomal deletions also occur. We conclude these naturally occurring, nonreciprocal t(3;5) chromosomal translocations occur after complex and multiple unresolved intrachromosomal DSBs leading to aberrant joining with concurrent interstitial inversion and that clonal selection of cells is the critical element in cancer development emerging from a plethora of DSBs that may not always be pathogenic.

  13. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Stephen N.; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C.

    2013-01-22

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  14. The effect of output-input isolation on the scaling and energy consumption of all-spin logic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jiaxi; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J., E-mail: skoester@umn.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, 200 Union St. SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    All-spin logic (ASL) is a novel approach for digital logic applications wherein spin is used as the state variable instead of charge. One of the challenges in realizing a practical ASL system is the need to ensure non-reciprocity, meaning the information flows from input to output, not vice versa. One approach described previously, is to introduce an asymmetric ground contact, and while this approach was shown to be effective, it remains unclear as to the optimal approach for achieving non-reciprocity in ASL. In this study, we quantitatively analyze techniques to achieve non-reciprocity in ASL devices, and we specifically compare the effect of using asymmetric ground position and dipole-coupled output/input isolation. For this analysis, we simulate the switching dynamics of multiple-stage logic devices with FePt and FePd perpendicular magnetic anisotropy materials using a combination of a matrix-based spin circuit model coupled to the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. The dipole field is included in this model and can act as both a desirable means of coupling magnets and a source of noise. The dynamic energy consumption has been calculated for these schemes, as a function of input/output magnet separation, and the results show that using a scheme that electrically isolates logic stages produces superior non-reciprocity, thus allowing both improved scaling and reduced energy consumption.

  15. Nonreciprocal light transmission in parity-time-symmetric whispering-gallery microcavities

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Bo; Lei, Fuchuan; Monifi, Faraz; Gianfreda, Mariagiovanna; Long, Gui Lu; Fan, Shanhui; Nori, Franco; Bender, Carl M; Yang, Lan

    2013-01-01

    Optical systems combining balanced loss and gain profiles provide a unique platform to implement classical analogues of quantum systems described by non-Hermitian parity-time- (PT-) symmetric Hamiltonians and to originate new synthetic materials with novel properties. To date, experimental works on PT-symmetric optical systems have been limited to waveguides in which resonances do not play a role. Here we report the first demonstration of PT-symmetry breaking in optical resonator systems by using two directly coupled on-chip optical whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microtoroid silica resonators. Gain in one of the resonators is provided by optically pumping Erbium (Er3+) ions embedded in the silica matrix; the other resonator exhibits passive loss. The coupling strength between the resonators is adjusted by using nanopositioning stages to tune their distance. We have observed reciprocal behavior of the PT-symmetric system in the linear regime, as well as a transition to nonreciprocity in the PT symmetry-breaking...

  16. Enhancement of the transverse non-reciprocal magneto-optical effect

    CERN Document Server

    Zayets, V; Yuasa, S; Ando, K

    2011-01-01

    The origin and properties of the transverse non-reciprocal magneto-optical (nMO) effect were studied. The transverse nMO effect occurs in the case when light propagates perpendicularly to the magnetic field. It was demonstrated that light can experience the transverse nMO effect only when it propagates in the vicinity of a boundary between two materials and the optical field at least in one material is evanescent. The transverse nMO effect is pronounced in the cases of surface plasmons and waveguiding modes. The magnitude of the transverse nMO effect is comparable to or greater than the magnitude of the longitudinal nMO effect. In the case of surface plasmons propagating at a boundary between the transition metal and the dielectric it is possible to magnify the transverse nMO effect and the magneto-optical figure-of-merit may increase from a few percents to above 100%. The scalar dispersion relation, which describes the transverse MO effect in cases of waveguide modes and surface plasmons propagating in a mul...

  17. Photonic bandgap structures

    CERN Document Server

    Marco, Pisco; Antonello, Cutolo

    2012-01-01

    This E-Book covers the research and the development of a novel generation of photonic devices for sensing applications. Key features of this book include a brief review of basic PhCs related design and fabrication concepts, a selection of crossover topics for the development of novel technological platforms for physical, chemical and biological sensing and a description of the main PhCs sensors to date by representing many of the exciting sensing applications that utilize photonic crystal structures.

  18. Photonics in switching

    CERN Document Server

    Midwinter, John E; Kelley, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Photonics in Switching provides a broad, balanced overview of the use of optics or photonics in switching, from materials and devices to system architecture. The chapters, each written by an expert in the field, survey the key technologies, setting them in context and highlighting their benefits and possible applications. This book is a valuable resource for those working in the communications industry, either at the professional or student level, who do not have extensive background knowledge or the underlying physics of the technology.

  19. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  20. Recent Advances for High-Efficiency Sources of Single Photons Based on Photonic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerard, J. M.; Claudon, J.; Munsch, M.

    2012-01-01

    Photonic nanowires have recently been used to tailor the spontaneous emission of embedded quantum dots, and to develop record efficiency single-photon sources. We will present recent developments in this field mainly 1) the observation of a strong inhibition of the spontaneous emission of quantum...... dots in ultrathin photonic wires 2) the control of the linear polarization of the single photons by photonic wires with an elliptical section, 3) the joint observation (unlike-cavity-based devices) of a record high efficiency and pure single photon emission process in a photonic wire single photon...

  1. Reciprocal and nonreciprocal recombination at the glucocerebrosidase gene region: implications for complexity in Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebi, Nahid; Stubblefield, Barbara K; Park, Joseph K; Orvisky, Eduard; Walker, Jamie M; LaMarca, Mary E; Sidransky, Ellen

    2003-03-01

    Gaucher disease results from an autosomal recessive deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase. The glucocerebrosidase gene is located in a gene-rich region of 1q21 that contains six genes and two pseudogenes within 75 kb. The presence of contiguous, highly homologous pseudogenes for both glucocerebrosidase and metaxin at the locus increases the likelihood of DNA rearrangements in this region. These recombinations can complicate genotyping in patients with Gaucher disease and contribute to the difficulty in interpreting genotype-phenotype correlations in this disorder. In the present study, DNA samples from 240 patients with Gaucher disease were examined using several complementary approaches to identify and characterize recombinant alleles, including direct sequencing, long-template polymerase chain reaction, polymorphic microsatellite repeats, and Southern blots. Among the 480 alleles studied, 59 recombinant alleles were identified, including 34 gene conversions, 18 fusions, and 7 downstream duplications. Twenty-two percent of the patients evaluated had at least one recombinant allele. Twenty-six recombinant alleles were found among 310 alleles from patients with type 1 disease, 18 among 74 alleles from patients with type 2 disease, and 15 among 96 alleles from patients with type 3 disease. Several patients carried two recombinations or mutations on the same allele. Generally, alleles resulting from nonreciprocal recombination (gene conversion) could be distinguished from those arising by reciprocal recombination (crossover and exchange), and the length of the converted sequence was determined. Homozygosity for a recombinant allele was associated with early lethality. Ten different sites of crossover and a shared pentamer motif sequence (CACCA) that could be a hotspot for recombination were identified. These findings contribute to a better understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships in Gaucher disease and may provide insights into the mechanisms

  2. Group I nonreciprocal inhibition in restless legs syndrome secondary to chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Sara; Scaglione, Cesa; Pizza, Fabio; Rizzo, Giovanni; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Vetrugno, Roberto; La Manna, Gaetano; Campieri, Claudio; Stefoni, Sergio; Montagna, Pasquale; Martinelli, Paolo

    2012-05-01

    Neurophysiological investigations disclosed spinal cord hyperexcitability in primary restless legs syndrome (p-RLS). Uremic RLS (u-RLS) is the most common secondary form, but its pathophysiological mechanisms remain unsettled. Aim of this study was to explore spinal cord excitability by evaluating group I nonreciprocal (Ib) inhibition in u-RLS patients in comparison with p-RLS patients and healthy subjects. Eleven u-RLS patients undergoing long-term hemodialysis treatment, nine p-RLS patients and ten healthy subjects were studied. Soleus H reflex latency (HR-L), H(max)/M(max) ratio, and Ib inhibition were evaluated. Ib inhibition was tested measuring the amplitude changes in soleus H reflex following stimulation of the synergist gastrocnemius medialis (GM) nerve at rest. Nerve conduction studies were performed in the uremic patients. The H(max)/M(max) ratio did not differ in the three groups. The u-RLS patients showed a normal Ib inhibition comparable with the healthy group, whereas the p-RLS group had evidence of a reduced active inhibition compared with both u-RLS patients (P = 0.04) and controls (P = 0.007), prominently at 5 ms (P = 0.007) and at 6 ms (P = 0.02) of conditioning-test interval. Neurophysiological examination disclosed abnormalities ranging from higher HR-L to clear-cut polyneuropathy in most u-RLS patients. Unlike p-RLS patients, u-RLS patients had normal Ib inhibition, suggesting a regular supraspinal control of Ib spinal interneurons. Subclinical peripheral nerve abnormalities were detected in most uremic patients. Peripherally disrupted sensory modulation may represent the major pathophysiological determinant of uremic RLS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantum photonics with quantum dots in photonic wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munsch, Mathieu; Kuhlmann, Andreas; Cadeddu, Davide;

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the spectroscopy of a single quantum dot in a photonic wire. The device presents a high photon extraction efficiency, and strong hybrid coupling to mechanical modes. We use resonance fluorescence to probe the emitter’s properties with the highest sensitivity. Weperform...

  4. First-principles approach to the dynamic magnetoelectric couplings for the non-reciprocal directional dichroism in BiFeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hee; Kézsmáki, István; Fishman, Randy S.

    2016-04-01

    Due to the complicated magnetic and crystallographic structures of BiFeO3, its magnetoelectric (ME) couplings and microscopic model Hamiltonian remain poorly understood. By employing a first-principles approach, we uncover all possible ME couplings associated with the spin-current (SC) and exchange-striction (ES) polarizations, and construct an appropriate Hamiltonian for the long-range spin-cycloid in BiFeO3. First-principles calculations are used to understand the microscopic origins of the ME couplings. We find that inversion symmetries broken by ferroelectric and antiferroelectric distortions induce the SC and the ES polarizations, which cooperatively produce the dynamic ME effects in BiFeO3. A model motivated by first principles reproduces the absorption difference of counter-propagating light beams called non-reciprocal directional dichroism. The current paper focuses on the spin-driven (SD) polarizations produced by a dynamic electric field, i.e. the dynamic ME couplings. Due to the inertial properties of Fe, the dynamic SD polarizations differ significantly from the static SD polarizations. Our systematic approach can be generally applied to any multiferroic material, laying the foundation for revealing hidden ME couplings on the atomic scale and for exploiting optical ME effects in the next generation of technological devices such as optical diodes. This manuscript has been written by UT-Battelle, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. The Department of Energy will provide public access to these results of federally sponsored research in accordance with the DOE Public Access Plan.

  5. CERN manufactured hybrid photon detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    These hybrid photon detectors (HPDs) produce an electric signal from a single photon. An electron is liberated from a photocathode and accelerated to a silicon pixel array allowing the location of the photon on the cathode to be recorded. The electronics and optics for these devices have been developed in close collaboration with industry. HPDs have potential for further use in astrophysics and medical imaging.

  6. Novel Photonic RF Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging on recent breakthroughs in broadband photonic devices and components for RF and microwave applications, SML proposes a new type of broadband microwave...

  7. Mesoscopic photon heat transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojanen, T.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir-Wingreen-Landauer-typ......We show that the heat transport between two bodies, mediated by electromagnetic fluctuations, can be controlled with an intermediate quantum circuit-leading to the device concept of a mesoscopic photon heat transistor (MPHT). Our theoretical analysis is based on a novel Meir......-Wingreen-Landauer-type of conductance formula, which gives the photonic heat current through an arbitrary circuit element coupled to two dissipative reservoirs at finite temperatures. As an illustration we present an exact solution for the case when the intermediate circuit can be described as an electromagnetic resonator. We discuss...

  8. Principles of photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jia-Ming

    2016-01-01

    With this self-contained and comprehensive text, students will gain a detailed understanding of the fundamental concepts and major principles of photonics. Assuming only a basic background in optics, readers are guided through key topics such as the nature of optical fields, the properties of optical materials, and the principles of major photonic functions regarding the generation, propagation, coupling, interference, amplification, modulation, and detection of optical waves or signals. Numerous examples and problems are provided throughout to enhance understanding, and a solutions manual containing detailed solutions and explanations is available online for instructors. This is the ideal resource for electrical engineering and physics undergraduates taking introductory, single-semester or single-quarter courses in photonics, providing them with the knowledge and skills needed to progress to more advanced courses on photonic devices, systems and applications.

  9. Glasses for photonic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, K.; Krol, D.M.; Hirao, K.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the application of glassy materials in planar and fiber-based photonic structures have led to novel devices and components that go beyond the original thinking of the use of glass in the 1960s, when glass fibers were developed for low-loss, optical communication applications. Expl

  10. Continuously tunable all-in-fiber devices based on thermal and electrical control of negative dielectric anisotropy liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Eskildsen, Lars; Weirich, Johannes;

    2009-01-01

    We infiltrate photonic crystal fibers with a negative dielectric anisotropy liquid crystal. 396nm bandgap shift is obtained in the temperature range 22°C-80°C, and 67 nm shift of long-wavelength bandgap edge is achieved by applying a voltage of 200Vrms. The polarization sensitivity and correspond...

  11. Microwave Photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Seeds, A.J.; Liu, C. P.; T. Ismail; Fice, M. J.; Pozzi, F; Steed, R. J.; Rouvalis, E.; Renaud, C.C.

    2010-01-01

    Microwave photonics is the use of photonic techniques for the generation, transmission, processing and reception of signals having spectral components at microwave frequencies. This tutorial reviews the technologies used and gives applications examples.

  12. Polychromatic photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Ole

    2002-01-01

    A review is given of the space-time wave mechanics of single photons, a subject with an almost century long history. The Landau-Peierls photon wave function, which is related nonlocally to the electromagnetic field is first described, and thereafter the so-called energy wave function, based...... on the positive-frequency Riemann-Silberstein vectors, is discussed. Recent attempts to understand the birth process of a photon emerging from a single atom are summarized. The polychromatic photon concept is introduced, and it is indicated how the wave mechanics of polychromatic photons can be upgraded to wave...... train quantum electrodynamics. A brief description of particle (photon) position operators is given, and it is shown that photons usually are only algebraically confined in an emission process. Finally, it is demonstrated that the profile of the birth domain of a radio-frequency photon emitted...

  13. Generalized binomial distribution in photon statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyin, Aleksey

    2015-01-01

    The photon-number distribution between two parts of a given volume is found for an arbitrary photon statistics. This problem is related to the interaction of a light beam with a macroscopic device, for example a diaphragm, that separates the photon flux into two parts with known probabilities. To solve this problem, a Generalized Binomial Distribution (GBD) is derived that is applicable to an arbitrary photon statistics satisfying probability convolution equations. It is shown that if photons obey Poisson statistics then the GBD is reduced to the ordinary binomial distribution, whereas in the case of Bose- Einstein statistics the GBD is reduced to the Polya distribution. In this case, the photon spatial distribution depends on the phase-space volume occupied by the photons. This result involves a photon bunching effect, or collective behavior of photons that sharply differs from the behavior of classical particles. It is shown that the photon bunching effect looks similar to the quantum interference effect.

  14. Optical Isolation Can Occur in Linear and Passive Silicon Photonic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Chen

    2012-01-01

    On-chip optical isolators play a key role in optical communications and computing based on silicon integrated photonic structures. Recently there have raised great attentions and hot controversies upon isolation of light via linear and passive photonic structures. Here we analyze the optical isolation properties of a silicon photonic crystal slab heterojunction diode by comparing the forward transmissivity and round-trip reflectivity of in-plane infrared light across the structure. The round-trip reflectivity is much smaller than the forward transmissivity, justifying good isolation. The considerable effective nonreciprocal transport of in-plane signal light in the linear and passive silicon optical diode is attributed to the information dissipation and selective modal conversion in the multiple-channel structure and has no conflict with reciprocal principle.

  15. Polychromatic photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Ole

    2002-01-01

    on the positive-frequency Riemann-Silberstein vectors, is discussed. Recent attempts to understand the birth process of a photon emerging from a single atom are summarized. The polychromatic photon concept is introduced, and it is indicated how the wave mechanics of polychromatic photons can be upgraded to wave...

  16. Engineering photonic density of states using metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Z.; Kim, J.Y.; Naik, G.V.;

    2010-01-01

    The photonic density of states (PDOS), like its electronic counterpart, is one of the key physical quantities governing a variety of phenomena and hence PDOS manipulation is the route to new photonic devices. The PDOS is conventionally altered by exploiting the resonance within a device such as a......The photonic density of states (PDOS), like its electronic counterpart, is one of the key physical quantities governing a variety of phenomena and hence PDOS manipulation is the route to new photonic devices. The PDOS is conventionally altered by exploiting the resonance within a device...... such as a microcavity or a bandgap structure like a photonic crystal. Here we show that nanostructured metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion can dramatically enhance the photonic density of states paving the way for metamaterial-based PDOS engineering....

  17. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Theoretical analysis of enhanced light output from a GaN light emitting diode with an embedded photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wen; Deming, Liu; Lirong, Huang

    2010-10-01

    The enhancement of the light output of an embedded photonic crystal light emitting diode is investigated based on the finite-difference time-domain modeling. The embedded photonic crystal (PC) lattice type, multi-layer embedded PC, distance between the multiple quantum well and the embedded PC are studied. It is found that the embedded one dimensional PC can act as well as embedded two dimensional PCs. The emitted light flux in the up direction can be increased by a new kind of multi-layer embedded PC. Also, we show that the light output in the up direction for the LED with both surfaces and embedded PC could be as high as five times that of a conventional LED.

  18. Photonics for life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Bassi, Andrea; Comelli, Daniela; Cova, Sergio; Farina, Andrea; Ghioni, Massimo; Rech, Ivan; Pifferi, Antonio; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto; Valentini, Gianluca; Zappa, Franco

    2011-01-01

    Light is strictly connected with life, and its presence is fundamental for any living environment. Thus, many biological mechanisms are related to light interaction or can be evaluated through processes involving energy exchange with photons. Optics has always been a precious tool to evaluate molecular and cellular mechanisms, but the discovery of lasers opened new pathways of interactions of light with biological matter, pushing an impressive development for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications in biomedicine. The use of light in different fields has become so widespread that the word photonics has been utilized to identify all the applications related to processes where the light is involved. The photonics area covers a wide range of wavelengths spanning from soft X-rays to mid-infrared and includes all devices related to photons as light sources, optical fibers and light guides, detectors, and all the related electronic equipment. The recent use of photons in the field of telecommunications has pushed the technology toward low-cost, compact, and efficient devices, making them available for many other applications, including those related to biology and medicine where these requirements are of particular relevance. Moreover, basic sciences such as physics, chemistry, mathematics, and electronics have recognized the interdisciplinary need of biomedical science and are translating the most advanced researches into these fields. The Politecnico school has pioneered many of them,and this article reviews the state of the art of biomedical research at the Politecnico in the field internationally known as biophotonics.

  19. Nanoplasmonics advanced device applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, James W M

    2013-01-01

    Focusing on control and manipulation of plasmons at nanometer dimensions, nanoplasmonics combines the strength of electronics and photonics, and is predicted to replace existing integrated circuits and photonic devices. It is one of the fastest growing fields of science, with applications in telecommunication, consumer electronics, data storage, medical diagnostics, and energy.Nanoplasmonics: Advanced Device Applications provides a scientific and technological background of a particular nanoplasmonic application and outlines the progress and challenges of the application. It reviews the latest

  20. Photonic crystals in epitaxial semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    La Rue, R M de

    1998-01-01

    The title of the paper uses the expression "photonic crystals". By photonic crystals, we mean regular periodic structures with a substantial refractive index variation in one-, two- or three- dimensional space. Such crystals can $9 exist naturally, for example natural opal, but are more typically fabricated by people. Under sufficiently strong conditions, i.e., sufficiently large refractive index modulation, correct size of structural components, and $9 appropriate rotational and translational symmetry, these crystals exhibit the characteristics of a photonic bandgap (PBG) structure. In a full photonic bandgap structure there is a spectral stop band for electromagnetic waves $9 propagating in any direction through the structure and with an arbitrary state of polarization. This behavior is of interest both from a fundamental viewpoint and from the point of view of novel applications in photonic devices. The $9 paper gives an outline review of work on photonic crystals carried out by the Optoelectronics Researc...

  1. Quantum simulation with interacting photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    Enhancing optical nonlinearities so that they become appreciable on the single photon level and lead to nonclassical light fields has been a central objective in quantum optics for many years. After this has been achieved in individual micro-cavities representing an effectively zero-dimensional volume, this line of research has shifted its focus towards engineering devices where such strong optical nonlinearities simultaneously occur in extended volumes of multiple nodes of a network. Recent technological progress in several experimental platforms now opens the possibility to employ the systems of strongly interacting photons, these give rise to as quantum simulators. Here we review the recent development and current status of this research direction for theory and experiment. Addressing both, optical photons interacting with atoms and microwave photons in networks of superconducting circuits, we focus on analogue quantum simulations in scenarios where effective photon-photon interactions exceed dissipative processes in the considered platforms.

  2. Spin-photon entangling diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flindt, Christian; Sørensen, A. S.; Lukin, M. D.;

    2007-01-01

    We propose a semiconductor device that can electrically generate entangled electron spin-photon states, providing a building block for entanglement of distant spins. The device consists of a p-i-n diode structure that incorporates a coupled double quantum dot. We show that electronic control of t...

  3. Photonic Hypercrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenii E. Narimanov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new “universality class” of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  4. Photonic Lantern

    CERN Document Server

    Leon-Saval, Sergio; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2015-01-01

    Photonic lanterns allow for a low-loss transformation of a multimode waveguide into a discrete number of single-mode waveguides and vice versa, thus, enabling the use of single-mode photonic technologies in multimode systems. In this review, we will discuss the theory and function of the photonic lantern, along with several different variants of the technology. We will also discuss some of its applications in more detail.

  5. Microwave photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chi H

    2006-01-01

    Wireless, optical, and electronic networks continue to converge, prompting heavy research into the interface between microwave electronics, ultrafast optics, and photonic technologies. New developments arrive nearly as fast as the photons under investigation, and their commercial impact depends on the ability to stay abreast of new findings, techniques, and technologies. Presenting a broad yet in-depth survey, Microwave Photonics examines the major advances that are affecting new applications in this rapidly expanding field.This book reviews important achievements made in microwave photonics o

  6. Charging a Battery-Powered Device with a Fiber-Optically Connected Photonic Power System for Achieving High-Voltage Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizon, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gioria, Jack G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Snyder, Hans R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a system to provide isolated power to the cathode-subsystem electronics of an x-ray tube. These components are located at the cathode potential of several hundred kilovolts, requiring a supply of power isolated from this high voltage. In this design a fiber-optically connected photonic power system (PPS) is used to recharge a lithium-ion battery pack, which will subsequently supply power to the cathode-subsystem electronics. The suitability of the commercially available JDSU PPS for this application is evaluated. The output of the ppe converter is characterized. The technical aspects of its use for charging a variety of Li-Ion batteries are discussed. Battery charge protection requirements and safety concerns are also addressed.

  7. Surface nanoscale axial photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Sumetsky, M

    2011-01-01

    Dense photonic integration promises to revolutionize optical computing and communications. However, efforts towards this goal face unacceptable attenuation of light caused by surface roughness in microscopic devices. Here we address this problem by introducing Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP). The SNAP platform is based on whispering gallery modes circulating around the optical fiber surface and undergoing slow axial propagation readily described by the one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger equation. These modes can be steered with dramatically small nanoscale variation of the fiber radius, which is quite simple to introduce in practice. The extremely low loss of SNAP devices is achieved due to the fantastically low surface roughness inherent in a drawn fiber surface. In excellent agreement with the developed theory, we experimentally demonstrate localization of light in quantum wells, halting light by a point source, tunneling through potential barriers, dark states, etc. This demonstration, prototyping basi...

  8. Photonic crystal optical memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, A. Wirth; Sombra, A. S. B.

    2011-06-01

    After several decades pushing the technology and the development of the world, the electronics is giving space for technologies that use light. We propose and analyze an optical memory embedded in a nonlinear photonic crystal (PhC), whose system of writing and reading data is controlled by an external command signal. This optical memory is based on optical directional couplers connected to a shared optical ring. Such a device can work over the C-Band of ITU (International Telecommunication Union).

  9. Photonics and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    DARPA NNI/NNCO BRI (2D Materials & Devices Beyond Graphene – planning phase) LRIR PIs Szep – RY: PICS Quantum Information...vertically from plasmonic filters into Si CMOS image sensor diodes via PMMA dielectric and SiNx vertical light couplers - •Designed and implemented signal...model) gernot.pomrenke@afosr.af.mil Future: Metasurfaces/ Meta Photonics, Quantum Integrated Nanophotonics, Ultra Low Power, Graphene Optoelectronics

  10. Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaccorso, F.; Z. Sun; Hasan, T.; Ferrari, A. C.

    2010-01-01

    The richness of optical and electronic properties of graphene attracts enormous interest. Graphene has high mobility and optical transparency, in addition to flexibility, robustness and environmental stability. So far, the main focus has been on fundamental physics and electronic devices. However, we believe its true potential to be in photonics and optoelectronics, where the combination of its unique optical and electronic properties can be fully exploited, even in the absence of a bandgap, ...

  11. Engineering photonic density of states using metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Z.; Kim, J.Y.; Naik, G.V.

    2010-01-01

    The photonic density of states (PDOS), like its electronic counterpart, is one of the key physical quantities governing a variety of phenomena and hence PDOS manipulation is the route to new photonic devices. The PDOS is conventionally altered by exploiting the resonance within a device such as a...... such as a microcavity or a bandgap structure like a photonic crystal. Here we show that nanostructured metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion can dramatically enhance the photonic density of states paving the way for metamaterial-based PDOS engineering....

  12. A DISCUSSION ON UTILIZATION OF HEAT PIPE AND VAPOUR CHAMBER TECHNOLOGY AS A PRIMARY DEVICE FOR HEAT EXTRACTION FROM PHOTON ABSORBER SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suthar, K. J.; Lurie, Alexander M.; Den Hartog, P.

    2016-01-01

    Heat pipes and vapour chambers work on heat exchange phenomena of two-phase flow and are widely used for in-dustrial and commercial applications. These devices offer very high effective thermal conductivities (5,000-200,000 W/m/K) and are adaptable to various sizes, shapes, and ori-entations. Although they have been found to be an excel-lent thermal management solution for laptops, satellites, and many things in-between, heat pipes and vapour cham-bers have yet to be adopted for use at particle accelerator facilities where they offer the possibility of more compact and more efficient means to remove heat from unwanted synchrotron radiation. As with all technologies, there are inherent limitations. Foremost, they are limited by practi-cality to serve as local heat transfer devices; heat transfer over long distances is likely best provided by other means. Heat pipes also introduce unique failure modes which must be considered.

  13. The MOCVD challenge a survey of GaInAsp-InP and GaInAsp-GaAs for photonic and electronic device applications

    CERN Document Server

    Razeghi, Manijeh

    2010-01-01

    Introduction to Semiconductor Compounds III-V semiconductor alloys III-V semiconductor devices Technology of multilayer growth Growth Technology Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition New non-equilibrium growth techniques In situ Characterization during MOCVD Reflectance anisotropy and ellipsometry Optimization of the growth of III-V binaries by RDS RDS investigation of III-V lattice-matched heterojunctions RDS investigation of III-V lattice-mismatched structures Insights on the growt

  14. Quantum optics with quantum dots in photonic nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    We will review recent studies performed on InAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs photonic wires, which highlight the strong interest of the photonic wire geometry for quantum optics experiments and quantum optoelectronic devices.......We will review recent studies performed on InAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs photonic wires, which highlight the strong interest of the photonic wire geometry for quantum optics experiments and quantum optoelectronic devices....

  15. Quantum Optics with Quantum Dots in Photonic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gérard, J.-M.; Claudon, J.; Bleuse, J.;

    2011-01-01

    We review recent studies performed on InAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs photonic wires, which highlight the strong interest of the photonic wire geometry for quantum optics experiments and quantum optoelectronic devices.......We review recent studies performed on InAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs photonic wires, which highlight the strong interest of the photonic wire geometry for quantum optics experiments and quantum optoelectronic devices....

  16. Monolithically Integrated Ge-on-Si Active Photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Jifeng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Monolithically integrated, active photonic devices on Si are key components in Si-based large-scale electronic-photonic integration for future generations of high-performance, low-power computation and communication systems. Ge has become an interesting candidate for active photonic devices in Si photonics due to its pseudo-direct gap behavior and compatibility with Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) processing. In this paper, we present a review of the recent progress in Ge-on...

  17. Surface-wave photonic quasicrystal

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhen; Zhang, Youming; Xu, Hongyi; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    In developing strategies of manipulating surface electromagnetic waves, it has been recently recognized that a complete forbidden band gap can exist in a periodic surface-wave photonic crystal, which has subsequently produced various surface-wave photonic devices. However, it is not obvious whether such a concept can be extended to a non-periodic surface-wave system that lacks translational symmetry. Here we experimentally demonstrate that a surface-wave photonic quasicrystal that lacks periodicity can also exhibit a forbidden band gap for surface electromagnetic waves. The lower cutoff of this forbidden band gap is mainly determined by the maximum separation between nearest neighboring pillars. Point defects within this band gap show distinct properties compared to a periodic photonic crystal for the absence of translational symmetry. A line-defect waveguide, which is crafted out of this surface-wave photonic quasicrystal by shortening a random row of metallic rods, is also demonstrated to guide and bend sur...

  18. Quantum Simulation with Interacting Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    We review the theoretical and experimental developments in recent research on quantum simulators with interacting photons. Enhancing optical nonlinearities so that they become appreciable on the single photon level and lead to nonclassical light fields has been a central objective in quantum optics for many years. After this has been achieved in individual micro-cavities representing an effectively zero-dimensional volume, this line of research has now shifted its focus towards engineering devices where such strong optical nonlinearities simultaneously occur in extended volumes of multiple nodes of a network. Recent technological progress in several experimental platforms now opens the possibility to employ the systems of strongly interacting photons these give rise to as quantum simulators. Here we review the recent development and current status of this research direction for theory and experiment. Addressing both, optical photons interacting with atoms and microwave photons in networks of superconducting c...

  19. A test resonator for Kagome Hollow-core Photonic Crystal Fibers for resonant rotation sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fsaifes, Ihsan; Feugnet, Gilles; Ravaille, Alexia; Debord, Benoït; Gérôme, Frédéric; Baz, Assaad; Humbert, Georges; Benabid, Fetah; Schwartz, Sylvain; Bretenaker, Fabien

    2017-01-01

    We build ring resonators to assess the potentialities of Kagome Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibers for future applications to resonant rotation sensing. The large mode diameter of Kagome fibers permits to reduce the free space fiber-to-fiber coupling losses, leading to cavities with finesses of about 30 for a diameter equal to 15 cm. Resonance linewidths of 3.2 MHz with contrasts as large as 89% are obtained. Comparison with 7-cell photonic band gap (PBG) fiber leads to better finesse and contrast with Kagome fiber. Resonators based on such fibers are compatible with the angular random walk required for medium to high performance rotation sensing. The small amount of light propagating in silica should also permit to further reduce the Kerr-induced non-reciprocity by at least three orders of magnitudes in 7-cell Kagome fiber compared with 7-cell PBG fiber.

  20. Local tuning of photonic crystal cavities using chalcogenide glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraon, Andrei; Englund, Dirk; Bulla, Douglas; Luther-Davies, Barry; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Stoltz, Nick; Petroff, Pierre; Vučković, Jelena

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to locally change the refractive index in planar optical devices by photodarkening of a thin chalcogenide glass layer deposited on top of the device. The method is used to tune the resonance of GaAs-based photonic crystal cavities by up to 3nm at 940nm. The method has broad applications for postproduction tuning of photonic devices.

  1. Photonic Microresonator Research and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chremmos, Ioannis; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos

    2010-01-01

    Photonic Microresonator Research and Applications explores advances in the fabrication process that enable nanometer waveguide separations. The technology surrounding the design and fabrication of optical microresonators has matured to a point where there is a need for commercialization. Consequently, there is a need for device research involving more advanced architectures and more esoteric operating princples. This volume discusses these issues, while also: Showing a reader how to design and fabricate microresonators Discussing microresonators in photonic crystals, microsphere circuits, and sensors, and provides application oriented examples Covering the latest in microresonator research with contributions from the leading researchers Photonic Microresonator Research and Applications would appeal to researchers and academics working in the optical sciences.

  2. Finite element modeling methods for photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, B M Azizur

    2013-01-01

    The term photonics can be used loosely to refer to a vast array of components, devices, and technologies that in some way involve manipulation of light. One of the most powerful numerical approaches available to engineers developing photonic components and devices is the Finite Element Method (FEM), which can be used to model and simulate such components/devices and analyze how they will behave in response to various outside influences. This resource provides a comprehensive description of the formulation and applications of FEM in photonics applications ranging from telecommunications, astron

  3. Material platforms for integrated quantum photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Simeon; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir M

    2016-01-01

    On-chip integration of quantum optical systems could be a major factor enabling photonic quantum technologies. Unlike the case of electronics, where the essential device is a transistor and the dominant material is silicon, the toolbox of elementary devices required for both classical and quantum photonic integrated circuits is vast. Therefore, many material platforms are being examined to host the future quantum photonic computers and network nodes. We discuss the pros and cons of several platforms for realizing various elementary devices, compare the current degrees of integration achieved in each platform and review several composite platform approaches.

  4. Photonic analog-to-digital converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, George C.

    2007-03-01

    This paper reviews over 30 years of work on photonic analog-to-digital converters. The review is limited to systems in which the input is a radio-frequency (RF) signal in the electronic domain and the output is a digital version of that signal also in the electronic domain, and thus the review excludes photonic systems directed towards digitizing images or optical communication signals. The state of the art in electronic ADCs, basic properties of ADCs and properties of analog optical links, which are found in many photonic ADCs, are reviewed as background information for understanding photonic ADCs. Then four classes of photonic ADCs are reviewed: 1) photonic assisted ADC in which a photonic device is added to an electronic ADC to improve performance, 2) photonic sampling and electronic quantizing ADC, 3) electronic sampling and photonic quantizing ADC, and 4) photonic sampling and quantizing ADC. It is noted, however, that all 4 classes of “photonic ADC” require some electronic sampling and quantization. After reviewing all known photonic ADCs in the four classes, the review concludes with a discussion of the potential for photonic ADCs in the future.

  5. Recent results in silicon photonics at the University of Southampton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, G. T.; Mashanovich, G. Z.; Gardes, F. Y.; Thomson, D. J.; Hu, Y.; Soler-Penades, J.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thomas, P.; Littlejohns, C.; Ahmad, A.; Reynolds, S.; Topley, R.; Mitchell, C.; Stankovic, S.; Owens, N.; Chen, X.; Wilson, P. R.; Ke, L.; Ben Masaud, T. M.; Tarazona, A.; Chong, H.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we will discuss recent results in our work on Silicon Photonics. This will include active and passive devices for a range of applications. Specifically we will include work on modulators and drivers, deposited waveguides, multiplexers, device integration and Mid IR silicon photonics. These devices and technologies are important both for established applications such as integrated transceivers for short reach interconnect, as well as emerging applications such as disposable sensors and mass market photonics.

  6. Hallo photons calls photon; Allo photon appelle photon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-09-01

    When a pair of photons is created, it seems that these 2 photons are bound together by a mysterious link. This phenomenon has been discovered at the beginning of the seventies. In this new experiment the 2 photons are separated and have to follow different ways through optic cables until they face a quantum gate. At this point they have to chose between a short and a long itinerary. Statistically they have the same probability to take either. In all cases the 2 photons agree to do the same choice even if the 2 quantum gates are distant of about 10 kilometers. Some applications in ciphering and coding of messages are expected. (A.C.)

  7. Planar nanophotonic devices and integration technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Rue, Richard M.; Sorel, Marc; Samarelli, Antonio; Velha, Philippe; Strain, Michael; Johnson, Nigel P.; Sharp, Graham; Rahman, Faiz; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Macintyre, Douglas S.; McMeekin, Scott G.; Lahiri, Basudev

    2011-07-01

    Planar devices that can be categorised as having a nanophotonic dimension constitute an increasingly important area of photonics research. Device structures that come under the headings of photonic crystals, photonic wires and metamaterials are all of interest - and devices based on combinations of these conceptual approaches may also play an important role. Planar micro-/nano-photonic devices seem likely to be exploited across a wide spectrum of applications in optoelectronics and photonics. This spectrum includes the domains of display devices, biomedical sensing and sensing more generally, advanced fibre-optical communications systems - and even communications down to the local area network (LAN) level. This article will review both device concepts and the applications possibilities of the various different devices.

  8. Photon generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  9. Microwave photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chi H

    2013-01-01

    Microwave photonics continues to see rapid growth. The integration of optical fiber and wireless networks has become a commercial reality and is becoming increasingly pervasive. Such hybrid technology will lead to many innovative applications, including backhaul solutions for mobile networks and ultrabroadband wireless networks that can provide users with very high bandwidth services. Microwave Photonics, Second Edition systematically introduces important technologies and applications in this emerging field. It also reviews recent advances in micro- and millimeter-wavelength and terahertz-freq

  10. Slotted photonic crystal biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullion, Mark Gerard

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them result in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This thesis presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which engender higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the peak of optical mode within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. High sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than most competing devices in the literature. Initial tests with cellular material for real applications was also performed, and shown to be of promise. In addition, groundwork to make an integrated device that includes the spectrometer function was also carried out showing that slotted photonic crystals themselves can be used for on-chip wavelength specific filtering and spectroscopy, whilst gas-free microvalves for automation were also developed. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study.

  11. Silicon photonics manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zortman, William A; Trotter, Douglas C; Watts, Michael R

    2010-11-08

    Most demonstrations in silicon photonics are done with single devices that are targeted for use in future systems. One of the costs of operating multiple devices concurrently on a chip in a system application is the power needed to properly space resonant device frequencies on a system's frequency grid. We asses this power requirement by quantifying the source and impact of process induced resonant frequency variation for microdisk resonators across individual die, entire wafers and wafer lots for separate process runs. Additionally we introduce a new technique, utilizing the Transverse Electric (TE) and Transverse Magnetic (TM) modes in microdisks, to extract thickness and width variations across wafers and dice. Through our analysis we find that a standard six inch Silicon on Insulator (SOI) 0.35 μm process controls microdisk resonant frequencies for the TE fundamental resonances to within 1 THz across a wafer and 105 GHz within a single die. Based on demonstrated thermal tuner technology, a stable manufacturing process exhibiting this level of variation can limit the resonance trimming power per resonant device to 231 μW. Taken in conjunction with the power to compensate for thermal environmental variations, the expected power requirement to compensate for fabrication-induced non-uniformities is 17% of that total. This leads to the prediction that thermal tuning efficiency is likely to have the most dominant impact on the overall power budget of silicon photonics resonator technology.

  12. Photon counting with photon number resolution through superconducting nanowires coupled to a multi-channel TDC in FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusardi, N.; Los, J. W. N.; Gourgues, R. B. M.; Bulgarini, G.; Geraci, A.

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents a system for measuring photon statistics and photon timing in the few-photon regime down to the single-photon level. The measurement system is based on superconducting nanowire single photon detectors and a time-to-digital converter implemented into a programmable device. The combination of these devices gives high performance to the system in terms of resolution and adaptability to the actual experimental conditions. As a case of application, we present the measurement of photon statistics for coherent light states. In this measurement, we make use of 8th order single photon correlations to reconstruct with high fidelity the statistics of a coherent state with average photon number up to 4. The processing is performed by means of a tapped-delay-line time-to-digital converter architecture that also hosts an asynchronous-correlated-digital-counter implemented in a field programmable gate array device and specifically designed for performance optimization in multi-channel usage.

  13. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  14. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Di Falco

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study.

  15. Tests of a Compton imaging prototype in a monoenergetic 4.44 MeV photon field—a benchmark setup for prompt gamma-ray imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, C.; Bemmerer, D.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Hueso-González, F.; Pausch, G.; Römer, K.; Rohling, H.; Schöne, S.; Wagner, L.; Kormoll, T.

    2016-06-01

    The finite range of a proton beam in tissue opens new vistas for the delivery of a highly conformal dose distribution in radiotherapy. However, the actual particle range, and therefore the accurate dose deposition, is sensitive to the tissue composition in the proton path. Range uncertainties, resulting from limited knowledge of this tissue composition or positioning errors, are accounted for in the form of safety margins. Thus, the unverified particle range constrains the principle benefit of proton therapy. Detecting prompt γ-rays, a side product of proton-tissue interaction, aims at an on-line and non-invasive monitoring of the particle range, and therefore towards exploiting the potential of proton therapy. Compton imaging of the spatial prompt γ-ray emission is a promising measurement approach. Prompt γ-rays exhibit emission energies of several MeV. Hence, common radioactive sources cannot provide the energy range a prompt γ-ray imaging device must be designed for. In this work a benchmark measurement-setup for the production of a localized, monoenergetic 4.44 MeV γ-ray source is introduced. At the Tandetron accelerator at the HZDR, the proton-capture resonance reaction 15N(p,α γ4.439)12C is utilized. This reaction provides the same nuclear de-excitation (and γ-ray emission) occurrent as an intense prompt γ-ray line in proton therapy. The emission yield is quantitatively described. A two-stage Compton imaging device, dedicated for prompt γ-ray imaging, is tested at the setup exemplarily. Besides successful imaging tests, the detection efficiency of the prototype at 4.44 MeV is derived from the measured data. Combining this efficiency with the emission yield for prompt γ-rays, the number of valid Compton events, induced by γ-rays in the energy region around 4.44 MeV, is estimated for the prototype being implemented in a therapeutic treatment scenario. As a consequence, the detection efficiency turns out to be a key parameter for prompt

  16. Nonreciprocal lasing and polarization selectivity in silicon ring Raman lasers based on micro- and nano-scale waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, N.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper I present a generic model that describes the lasing characteristics of continuous-wave circular and racetrack-shaped ring Raman lasers based on micro- and nano-scale silicon waveguides, including their lasing directionality and polarization behavior. This model explicitly takes into account the effective Raman gain values for forward and backward lasing, the Raman amplification in the bus waveguide, and the spatial gain variations for different polarization states in the ring structure. I show numerically that ring lasers based on micro-scale waveguides generate unidirectional lasing in either the forward or backward direction because of an asymmetry in nonlinear losses at near-infrared telecommunication wavelengths, whereas those based on nanowires yield only backward lasing due to a non-reciprocity in effective gain. Furthermore, the model indicates that backward lasing can yield a significantly higher lasing output at the bus waveguide facets than lasing in the forward direction. Finally, considering a TE-polarized pump input for a (100) grown silicon ring Raman laser, I demonstrate numerically that the polarization state of the lasing radiation strongly depends on whether micro-scale or nano-scale waveguides are used.

  17. Waveguide photon-number-resolving detectors for quantum photonic integrated circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Sahin, D; Zhou, Z; Jahanmirinejad, S; Mattioli, F; Leoni, R; Beetz, J; Lermer, M; Kamp, M; Höfling, S; Fiore, A

    2013-01-01

    Quantum photonic integration circuits are a promising approach to scalable quantum processing with photons. Waveguide single-photon-detectors (WSPDs) based on superconducting nanowires have been recently shown to be compatible with single-photon sources for a monolithic integration. While standard WSPDs offer single-photon sensitivity, more complex superconducting nanowire structures can be configured to have photon-number-resolving capability. In this work, we present waveguide photon-number-resolving detectors (WPNRDs) on GaAs/Al0.75Ga0.25As ridge waveguides based on a series connection of nanowires. The detection of 0-4 photons has been demonstrated with a four-wire WPNRD, having a single electrical read-out. A device quantum efficiency ~24 % is reported at 1310 nm for the TE polarization.

  18. Photonic crystal fibers: fundamentals to emerging applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2005-01-01

    A review of the fundamental properties of photonic crystal fibers is presented. Special focus is held on the emerging fields of application within areas such as actively controlled fiber devices and high-power fiber lasers.......A review of the fundamental properties of photonic crystal fibers is presented. Special focus is held on the emerging fields of application within areas such as actively controlled fiber devices and high-power fiber lasers....

  19. Quantum photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pearsall, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    This textbook employs a pedagogical approach that facilitates access to the fundamentals of Quantum Photonics. It contains an introductory description of the quantum properties of photons through the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, introducing stimulated and spontaneous emission of photons at the quantum level. Schrödinger’s equation is used to describe the behavior of electrons in a one-dimensional potential. Tunneling through a barrier is used to introduce the concept of non­locality of an electron at the quantum level, which is closely-related to quantum confinement tunneling, resonant tunneling, and the origin of energy bands in both periodic (crystalline) and aperiodic (non-crystalline) materials. Introducing the concepts of reciprocal space, Brillouin zones, and Bloch’s theorem, the determination of electronic band structure using the pseudopotential method is presented, allowing direct computation of the band structures of most group IV, group III-V, and group II-VI semiconducto...

  20. Investigation of Microwave Monolithic Integrated Circuit (MMIC) non-reciprocal millimeterwave components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talisa, S. H.; Krishnaswamy, S. V.; Adam, J. D.; Yoo, K. C.; Doyle, N. J.

    1991-09-01

    Two ferrite film deposition techniques were investigated in this program for possible use in the monolithic integration of Gallium Arsenide electronic and magnetic millimeter-wave devices; (1) spin-spray plating (SSP) of nickel zinc ferrite films, and (2) sputtering of barium hexaferrites with C-axis oriented normally to the film plane. The SSP technique potential for this application was demonstrated. Film structural characteristics were studied, as well as their adhesions to other substrates and the conditions for growth of thicker films. Multilayers totalling 25 microns in thickness were grown on semiconducting substrates. The SSP process occurs at about 100 C and was experimentally demonstrated not to damage Gallium arsenide MMIC devices. The magnetic characteristics of these films were comparable to ceramic materials. A scheme for the monolithic integration of magnetic and Gallium arsenide electronic devices was proposed and its feasibility experimentally demonstrated. The films showed higher dielectric loss than was desirable, possibly owing to high water content. A better drying technique is required. Barium ferrite films with C-axis texture were reproducibly grown on sapphire. Magnetic measurements yielded acceptable saturation magnetization and anisotrophy field. Ferromagnetic resonance was not observed, possibly due to broad linewidths.

  1. Very Efficient Single-Photon Sources Based on Quantum Dots in Photonic Wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerard, Jean-Michel; Claudon, Julien; Bleuse, Joel

    2014-01-01

    We review the recent development of high efficiency single photon sources based on a single quantum dot in a photonic wire. Unlike cavity-based devices, very pure single photon emission and efficiencies exceeding 0.7 photon per pulse are jointly demonstrated under non-resonant pumping conditions....... By placing a tip-shaped or trumpet-like tapering at the output end of the wire, a highly directional Gaussian far-field emission pattern is obtained. More generally, a photonic wire containing a quantum dot appears as an attractive template to explore and exploit in a solid-state system the unique optical...

  2. Photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Busch, Kurt; Wehrspohn, Ralf B; Föll, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    The majority of the contributions in this topically edited book stems from the priority program SPP 1113 ""Photonische Kristalle"" run by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), resulting in a survey of the current state of photonic crystal research in Germany. The first part of the book describes methods for the theoretical analysis of their optical properties as well as the results. The main part is dedicated to the fabrication, characterization and modeling of two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals, while the final section presents a wide spectrum of applications: gas sensors, micr

  3. Green photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-02-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas.

  4. Photonic Landau levels on cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Using a digital micromirror device to control both amplitude and phase, we inject arbitrary optical modes into our resonator. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We show that there is a conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids.

  5. Photonic Bandgaps in Photonic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Gates, Amanda L.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.; Witherow, William K.; Paley, Mark S.; Frazier, Donald O.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk will focus on photonic bandgaps that arise due to nearly free photon and tight-binding effects in coupled microparticle and ring-resonator systems. The Mie formulation for homogeneous spheres is generalized to handle core/shell systems and multiple concentric layers in a manner that exploits an analogy with stratified planar systems, thereby allowing concentric multi-layered structures to be treated as photonic bandgap (PBG) materials. Representative results from a Mie code employing this analogy demonstrate that photonic bands arising from nearly free photon effects are easily observed in the backscattering, asymmetry parameter, and albedo for periodic quarter-wave concentric layers, though are not readily apparent in extinction spectra. Rather, the periodicity simply alters the scattering profile, enhancing the ratio of backscattering to forward scattering inside the bandgap, in direct analogy with planar quarter-wave multilayers. PBGs arising from tight-binding may also be observed when the layers (or rings) are designed such that the coupling between them is weak. We demonstrate that for a structure consisting of N coupled micro-resonators, the morphology dependent resonances split into N higher-Q modes, in direct analogy with other types of oscillators, and that this splitting ultimately results in PBGs which can lead to enhanced nonlinear optical effects.

  6. Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei;

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate electrical tunability of a fiber laser by using a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber. Tuning of the laser is achieved by combining the wavelength filtering effect of a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device with an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. We fabricate an al...

  7. Photonic crystal biosensors towards on-chip integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threm, Daniela; Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Gerken, Martina

    2012-08-01

    Photonic crystal technology has attracted large interest in the last years. The possibility to generate highly sensitive sensor elements with photonic crystal structures is very promising for medical or environmental applications. The low-cost fabrication on the mass scale is as advantageous as the compactness and reliability of photonic crystal biosensors. The possibility to integrate microfluidic channels together with photonic crystal structures allows for highly compact devices. This article reviews different types of photonic crystal sensors including 1D photonic crystal biosensors, biosensors with photonic crystal slabs, photonic crystal waveguide biosensors and biosensors with photonic crystal microcavities. Their applications in biomolecular and pathogen detection are highlighted. The sensitivities and the detection limits of the different biosensors are compared. The focus is on the possibilities to integrate photonic crystal biosensors on-chip.

  8. Nonreciprocal plasmonics enables giant enhancement of thin-film Faraday rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jessie Yao; Steinle, Tobias; Wehlus, Thomas; Dregely, Daniel; Weiss, Thomas; Belotelov, Vladimir I; Stritzker, Bernd; Giessen, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Light propagation is usually reciprocal. However, a static magnetic field along the propagation direction can break the time-reversal symmetry in the presence of magneto-optical materials. The Faraday effect in magneto-optical materials rotates the polarization plane of light, and when light travels backward the polarization is further rotated. This is applied in optical isolators, which are of crucial importance in optical systems. Faraday isolators are typically bulky due to the weak Faraday effect of available magneto-optical materials. The growing research endeavour in integrated optics demands thin-film Faraday rotators and enhancement of the Faraday effect. Here, we report significant enhancement of Faraday rotation by hybridizing plasmonics with magneto-optics. By fabricating plasmonic nanostructures on laser-deposited magneto-optical thin films, Faraday rotation is enhanced by one order of magnitude in our experiment, while high transparency is maintained. We elucidate the enhanced Faraday effect by the interplay between plasmons and different photonic waveguide modes in our system.

  9. Photon differentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Revall Frisvad, Jeppe; Erleben, Kenny;

    2007-01-01

    illumination features. This is often not desirable as these may lose clarity or vanish altogether. We present an accurate method for reconstruction of indirect illumination with photon mapping. Instead of reconstructing illumination using classic density estimation on finite points, we use the correlation...

  10. Photonic network-on-chip design

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Keren; Biberman, Aleksandr; Chan, Johnnie; Hendry, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive synthesis of the theory and practice of photonic devices for networks-on-chip. It outlines the issues in designing photonic network-on-chip architectures for future many-core high performance chip multiprocessors. The discussion is built from the bottom up: starting with the design and implementation of key photonic devices and building blocks, reviewing networking and network-on-chip theory and existing research, and finishing with describing various architectures, their characteristics, and the impact they will have on a computing system. After acquainting

  11. Highly efficient heralding of entangled single photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramelow, Sven; Mech, Alexandra; Giustina, Marissa; Gröblacher, Simon; Wieczorek, Witlef; Beyer, Jörn; Lita, Adriana; Calkins, Brice; Gerrits, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo; Zeilinger, Anton; Ursin, Rupert

    2013-03-25

    Single photons are an important prerequisite for a broad spectrum of quantum optical applications. We experimentally demonstrate a heralded single-photon source based on spontaneous parametric down-conversion in collinear bulk optics, and fiber-coupled bolometric transition-edge sensors. Without correcting for background, losses, or detection inefficiencies, we measure an overall heralding efficiency of 83%. By violating a Bell inequality, we confirm the single-photon character and high-quality entanglement of our heralded single photons which, in combination with the high heralding efficiency, are a necessary ingredient for advanced quantum communication protocols such as one-sided device-independent quantum key distribution.

  12. Detection of infrared photons with a superconductor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG LaBao; ZHONG YangYin; KANG Lin; CHEN Jian; JI ZhengMing; XU WeiWei; CAO ChunHai

    2009-01-01

    A superconductor single photon detector based on NbN nanowire was fabricated using electron beam lithography (EBL) and reactive ion etching (RIE) for infrared photon detection. When biased well below its critical current at 4.2 K, NbN nanowire is very sensitive to the incident photons. Typical telecommunication photons with a wavelength of 1550 nm were detected by this detector. Data analysis indicates the repeating rate of the device with 200 nm NbN nanowire may be up to 100 MHz, and the quantum efficiency is about 0.01% when biased at 0.95Ic.

  13. Photonic crystal slab quantum well infrared photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalchmair, S.; Detz, H.; Cole, G. D.; Andrews, A. M.; Klang, P.; Nobile, M.; Gansch, R.; Ostermaier, C.; Schrenk, W.; Strasser, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this letter we present a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), which is fabricated as a photonic crystal slab (PCS). With the PCS it is possible to enhance the absorption efficiency by increasing photon lifetime in the detector active region. To understand the optical properties of the device we simulate the PCS photonic band structure, which differs significantly from a real two-dimensional photonic crystal. By fabricating a PCS-QWIP with 100x less quantum well doping, compared to a standard QWIP, we are able to see strong absorption enhancement and sharp resonance peaks up to temperatures of 170 K.

  14. Hybrid Integrated Platforms for Silicon Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Bowers

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent progress in hybrid integrated platforms for silicon photonics is presented. Integration of III-V semiconductors onto silicon-on-insulator substrates based on two different bonding techniques is compared, one comprising only inorganic materials, the other technique using an organic bonding agent. Issues such as bonding process and mechanism, bonding strength, uniformity, wafer surface requirement, and stress distribution are studied in detail. The application in silicon photonics to realize high-performance active and passive photonic devices on low-cost silicon wafers is discussed. Hybrid integration is believed to be a promising technology in a variety of applications of silicon photonics.

  15. The effects of formalized and trained non-reciprocal peer teaching on psychosocial, behavioral, pedagogical, and motor learning outcomes in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R Whipp

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Peer teaching is recognized as a powerful instructional method; however, there is a paucity of studies that have evaluated the outcomes experienced by peer-teachers and their student recipients in the context of trained, non-reciprocal, high school physical education. Accordingly, the effectiveness of a formalized and trained non-reciprocal peer teaching (T-PT program upon psychosocial, behavioral, pedagogical and student learning outcomes within high school physical education classes was investigated. Students from eight intact classes (106 males, 94 females, Mage = 12.46, SD = 0.59 were randomly assigned to either a T-PT intervention group (taught by a volunteer peer-teacher who was trained in line with a tactical games approach or untrained group (U-PT; where volunteer peer-teachers received no formal training, but did receive guidance on the game concepts to teach. Data were collected over 10 lessons in a 5-week soccer unit. Mixed-model ANOVAs/MANOVAs revealed that, in comparison to U-PT, the T-PT program significantly enhanced in-game performance actions and academic learning time among student recipients. Those in the T-PT also provided greater levels of feedback and structured learning time, as well as reporting more positive feelings about peer teaching and fewer perceived barriers to accessing learning outcomes. These findings show that non-reciprocal peer-teachers who receive formalized support through training and tactical games approach-based teaching resources can enhance behavioral, pedagogical, and motor performance outcomes in physical education.

  16. Valley-dependent beam manipulators based on photonic graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fu-Sheng; Sun, Yong; Dong, Li-Juan; Liu, Yan-Hong; Shi, Yun-Long

    2017-02-01

    Trigonal warping distortion in energy band lifts the degeneracy of two valleys (K and K' points) of graphene. In this situation, electron transport becomes valley dependent, which can be used to design the valley beam splitter, collimator, or guiding device. Here, valley-dependent beam manipulators are designed based on artificial photonic graphene. In this scheme, the finite-size artificial photonic graphene is intentionally designed to realize the novel device functionalities. This kind of valley-dependent beam manipulators can work at an arbitrary range of electromagnetic waves from microwave to visible light. It potentially paves the way for the application of photonic graphene in future integrated photonic devices.

  17. Technology of Quantum Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Razeghi, Manijeh

    2010-01-01

    Technology of Quantum Devices offers a multi-disciplinary overview of solid state physics, photonics and semiconductor growth and fabrication. Readers will find up-to-date coverage of compound semiconductors, crystal growth techniques, silicon and compound semiconductor device technology, in addition to intersubband and semiconductor lasers. Recent findings in quantum tunneling transport, quantum well intersubband photodetectors (QWIP) and quantum dot photodetectors (QWDIP) are described, along with a thorough set of sample problems.

  18. Carbon photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konov, V I [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    The properties of new carbon materials (single-crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond films and wafers, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene) and the prospects of their use as optical elements and devices are discussed. (optical elements of laser devices)

  19. Quantum Optics with Quantum Dots in Photonic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gérard, J. M.; Claudon, J.; Bleuse, J.;

    2012-01-01

    We review recent experimental and theoretical results, which highlight the strong interest of the photonic wire geometry for solid-state quantum optics and quantum optoelectronic devices.......We review recent experimental and theoretical results, which highlight the strong interest of the photonic wire geometry for solid-state quantum optics and quantum optoelectronic devices....

  20. High-speed photodetectors in a photonic crystal platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottaviano, Luisa; Semenova, Elizaveta; Schubert, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a fast photodetector (f3dB > 40GHz) integrated into a high-index contrast photonic crystal platform. Device design, fabrication and characterization are presented.......We demonstrate a fast photodetector (f3dB > 40GHz) integrated into a high-index contrast photonic crystal platform. Device design, fabrication and characterization are presented....

  1. SLUG Microwave Amplifier as a Nonreciprocal Gain Element for Scalable Qubit Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorbeck, Ted; Leonard, Edward; Zhu, Shaojiang; McDermott, Robert

    Josephson parametric amplifiers for superconducting qubits require several stages of cryogenic isolation to protect the qubit from strong microwave pump tones and downstream noise. But isolators and circulators are large, expensive and magnetic, so they are an obstacle to scaling up a superconducting quantum computer. In contrast, the SLUG (Superconducting Low-inductance Undulatory Galvanometer) is a high gain, broadband, low noise microwave amplifier that provides built-in reverse isolation. Here, we describe the dependence of the SLUG reverse isolation on signal frequency and device operating point. We show that the reverse isolation of the SLUG can be as large as or larger than that of a bulk commercial isolator. Finally, we discuss the use of the SLUG to read out a transmon qubit without isolators or circulators.

  2. Photonic Quantum Noise Reduction with Low-Pump Parametric Amplifiers for Photonic Integrated Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Vatarescu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An approximation-free and fully quantum optic formalism for parametric processes is presented. Phase-dependent gain coefficients and related phase-pulling effects are identified for quantum Rayleigh emission and the electro-optic conversion of photons providing parametric amplification in small-scale integration of photonic devices. These mechanisms can be manipulated to deliver, simultaneously, sub-Poissonian distributions of photons as well as phase-dependent amplification in the same optical quadrature of a signal field.

  3. Integrated photonic quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Lebugle, Maxime; Guzman-Silva, Diego; Perez-Leija, Armando; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Over the last 20 years quantum walks (QWs) have gained increasing interest in the field of quantum information science and processing. In contrast to classical walkers, quantum objects exhibit intrinsic properties like non-locality and non-classical many-particle correlations, which renders QWs a versatile tool for quantum simulation and computation as well as for a deeper understanding of genuine quantum mechanics. Since they are highly controllable and hardly interact with their environment, photons seem to be ideally suited quantum walkers. In order to study and exploit photonic QWs, lattice structures that allow low loss coherent evolution of quantum states are demanded. Such requirements are perfectly met by integrated optical waveguide devices that additionally allow a substantial miniaturization of experimental settings. Moreover, by utilizing the femtosecond direct laser writing technique three-dimensional waveguide structures are capable of analyzing QWs also on higher dimensional geometries. In this context, advances and findings of photonic QWs are discussed in this review. Various concepts and experimental results are presented covering, such as different quantum transport regimes, the Boson sampling problem, and the discrete fractional quantum Fourier transform.

  4. Heterogeneous photonic integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Alexander W.; Fish, Gregory; Hall, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) have been dichotomized into circuits with high passive content (silica and silicon PLCs) and high active content (InP tunable lasers and transceivers) due to the trade-off in material characteristics used within these two classes. This has led to restrictions in the adoption of PICs to systems in which only one of the two classes of circuits are required to be made on a singular chip. Much work has been done to create convergence in these two classes by either engineering the materials to achieve the functionality of both device types on a single platform, or in epitaxial growth techniques to transfer one material to the next, but have yet to demonstrate performance equal to that of components fabricated in their native substrates. Advances in waferbonding techniques have led to a new class of heterogeneously integrated photonic circuits that allow for the concurrent use of active and passive materials within a photonic circuit, realizing components on a transferred substrate that have equivalent performance as their native substrate. In this talk, we review and compare advances made in heterogeneous integration along with demonstrations of components and circuits enabled by this technology.

  5. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Ma, Ji; Zhang, Si-Qi; Li, Hong; Wu, Xiang-Yao; Wu, Yi-Heng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied two-dimensional function photonic crystals, in which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates , that can become true easily by electro-optical effect and optical kerr effect. We calculated the band gap structures of TE and TM waves, and found the TE (TM) wave band gaps of function photonic crystals are wider (narrower) than the conventional photonic crystals. For the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, when the dielectric constant functions change, the band gaps numbers, width and position should be changed, and the band gap structures of two-dimensional function photonic crystals can be adjusted flexibly, the needed band gap structures can be designed by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, and it can be of help to design optical devices.

  6. Emitters of N-photon bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, C Sánchez; Del Valle, E; Tudela, A González; Müller, K; Lichtmannecker, S; Kaniber, M; Tejedor, C; Finley, J J; Laussy, F P

    2014-07-01

    Controlling the ouput of a light emitter is one of the basic tasks of photonics, with landmarks such as the laser and single-photon sources. The development of quantum applications makes it increasingly important to diversify the available quantum sources. Here, we propose a cavity QED scheme to realize emitters that release their energy in groups, or "bundles" of N photons, for integer N. Close to 100% of two-photon emission and 90% of three-photon emission is shown to be within reach of state of the art samples. The emission can be tuned with system parameters so that the device behaves as a laser or as a N-photon gun. The theoretical formalism to characterize such emitters is developed, with the bundle statistics arising as an extension of the fundamental correlation functions of quantum optics. These emitters will be useful for quantum information processing and for medical applications.

  7. Higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansch, Roman; Kalchmair, Stefan; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron M; Klang, Pavel; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2011-08-15

    We present a detailed investigation of higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs. In such structures the resonances exhibit a blue-shift compared to an ideal two-dimensional photonic crystal, which depends on the order of the slab mode and the polarization. By fabricating a series of photonic crystal slab photo detecting devices, with varying ratios of slab thickness to photonic crystal lattice constant, we are able to distinguish between 0th and 1st order slab modes as well as the polarization from the shift of resonances in the photocurrent spectra. This method complements the photonic band structure mapping technique for characterization of photonic crystal slabs. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  8. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  9. Photonic homeostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Timon C.; Li, Fan-Hui

    2010-11-01

    Photonic homeostatics is a discipline to study the establishment, maintenance, decay, upgrading and representation of function-specific homoestasis (FSH) by using photonics. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific fluctuations inside the biosystem so that the function is perfectly performed. A stress may increase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activities above FSH-specific SIRT1 activity to induce a function far from its FSH. On the one hand, low level laser irradiation or monochromatic light (LLL) can not modulate a function in its FSH or a stress in its stress-specific homeostasis (StSH), but modulate a function far from its FSH or a stress far from its StSH. On the other hand, the biophotons from a biosystem with its function in its FSH should be less than the one from the biosystem with its function far from its FSH. The non-resonant interaction of low intensity laser irradiation or monochromatic light (LIL) and a kind of membrane protein can be amplified by all the membrane proteins if the function is far from its FSH. This amplification might hold for biophoton emission of the membrane protein so that the photonic spectroscopy can be used to represent the function far from its FSH, which is called photonomics.

  10. Mapping the broadband polarization properties of linear 2D SOI photonic crystal waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, John; Skivesen, Nina; Kristensen, Martin; Frandsen, Lars H; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Martelli, Cicero; Tetu, A

    2007-11-12

    Both quasi-TE and TM polarisation spectra for a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide are recorded over (1100-1700)nm using a broadband supercontinuum source. By studying both the input and output polarisation eigenstates we observe narrowband resonant cross coupling near the lowest quasi-TE mode cut-off. We also observe relatively broadband mixing between the two eigenstates to generate a complete photonic bandgap. By careful analysis of the output polarisation state we report on an inherent non-reciprocity between quasi TE and TM fundamental mode cross coupling. The nature of polarisation distinction in such bandgap structures is discussed in the context of polarisation scattering at an interface.

  11. Generalized binomial distribution in photon statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyin Aleksey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The photon-number distribution between two parts of a given volume is found for an arbitrary photon statistics. This problem is related to the interaction of a light beam with a macroscopic device, for example a diaphragm, that separates the photon flux into two parts with known probabilities. To solve this problem, a Generalized Binomial Distribution (GBD is derived that is applicable to an arbitrary photon statistics satisfying probability convolution equations. It is shown that if photons obey Poisson statistics then the GBD is reduced to the ordinary binomial distribution, whereas in the case of Bose- Einstein statistics the GBD is reduced to the Polya distribution. In this case, the photon spatial distribution depends on the phase-space volume occupied by the photons. This result involves a photon bunching effect, or collective behavior of photons that sharply differs from the behavior of classical particles. It is shown that the photon bunching effect looks similar to the quantum interference effect.

  12. Materials for optoelectronic devices, OEICs and photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schloetterer, H.; Quillec, M.; Greene, P.D.; Bertolotti, M. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the contributors in this volume is to give a current overview on the basic properties of nonlinear optical materials for optoelectronics and integrated optics. They provide a cross-linkage between different materials (III-V, II-VI, Si-Ge, etc.), various sample dimensions (from bulk crystals to quantum dots), and a range of techniques from growth (LPE to MOMBE) and for processing from surface passivation to ion beams. Major growth techniques and materials are discussed, including the sophisticated technologies required to exploit the exciting properties of low dimensional semiconductors. These proceedings will prove an invaluable guide to the current state of optoelectronic materials development, as well as indicating the growth techniques that will be in use around the year 2000.

  13. Electrically Driven Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    annealed QDs exhibit a blueshift by about 80 nm and a reduction in room temperature emission by a factor of 10 (cryo- genic emission intensity is unchanged...undergo a rapid thermal annealing step at 850 ◦C which causes the QD ensemble emission to blueshift by 80 nm and decrease in inten- sity by tenfold

  14. Developments of Innovative DNA Photonic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    caproic acid CH2=CHCOO(CH2)5COOH (ACA), followed by the esterification of choline in the presence of condensation agents such as DCC...dicyclohexylcarbodimide) under mild conditions at ambient temperature. However, the esterification reaction did not successfully occur since the esterification

  15. Photonic crystal-adaptive optical devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buss, Thomas

    -doped liquid crystal gain medium for the realization of cheap and compact optically pumped, electrically tunable lasers. Finally, a transparent projection display is presented which uses sub-wavelength gratings for redirection of light guided inside a waveguide and facilitates electro-optic switching by means...

  16. Stability Improvements of DNA Photonic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-20

    concentration as 1g to 100ml TEMOS. The TEMO solution was spin- coated onto Teflon- coated glass plate to obtain films by irradiating UV light to cause...optical characteristics, such as refractive indices, absorbance and fluorescence intensity, and photochromic properties, of spiropyran-doped DNA...mixed solution of EtOH:CHCl3=1:4, together with optical dye compounds. Finally, the solution was poured onto a Teflon- coated dish, followed by

  17. Very High Performance Organic Photonic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-15

    warta,.w. Stehie, R.& Karl, N, Ultraput. high moability organic pluonocondluctors. Appi Phys. A36. cold weld. Finally, the strike layer between the...Roman, and 0. Inganas. J1. AppI . Phys. C. Silva. Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 247402 (2004). 86. 487 (1999). 36T Offermans, P. A. van Hal, S. C. J. Meskers. M... AppI . Phys. 97. 103706 093502( (2005). (2005). 38K. L. Mutolo. E. 1. Mayo, B. P. Rand, S. R. Forre%t. and M. E. 27 . Riedel. J. Parisi. V. Dyakonov. L

  18. Fresnel Lenses fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining on Polymer 1D Photonic Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guduru Surya S.K.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the fabrication of micro Fresnel lenses by femtosecond laser surface ablation on polymer 1D photonic crystals. This device is designed to focus the transmitted wavelength of the photonic crystal and filter the wavelengths corresponding to the photonic band gap region. Integration of such devices in a wavelength selective light harvesting and filtering microchip can be achieved.

  19. High-performance silicon photonics technology for telecommunications applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Koji; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Nishi, Hidetaka; Kou, Rai; Hiraki, Tatsurou; Takeda, Kotaro; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko; Wada, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2014-04-01

    By way of a brief review of Si photonics technology, we show that significant improvements in device performance are necessary for practical telecommunications applications. In order to improve device performance in Si photonics, we have developed a Si-Ge-silica monolithic integration platform, on which compact Si-Ge-based modulators/detectors and silica-based high-performance wavelength filters are monolithically integrated. The platform features low-temperature silica film deposition, which cannot damage Si-Ge-based active devices. Using this platform, we have developed various integrated photonic devices for broadband telecommunications applications.

  20. The research and progress of micro-fabrication technologies of two-dimensional photonic crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU XingSheng; ZHANG DaoZhong

    2007-01-01

    The novel material of photonic crystal makes it possible to control a photon, and the photonic integration will have breakthrough progress due to the application of photonic crystal. It is based on the photonic crystal device that the photonic crystal integration could be realized. Therefore, we should first investigate photonic crystal devices based on the active and the passive semiconductor materials,which may have great potential application in photonic integration. The most practical and important method to fabricate two-dimensional photonic crystal is the micro-manufacture method. In this paper,we summarize and evaluate the fabrication methods of two-dimensional photonic crystal in near-infrared region, including electron beam lithography, selection of mask, dry etching, and some works of ours. This will be beneficial to the study of the photonic crystal in China.

  1. Medical prototyping using two photon polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger J Narayan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Two photon polymerization involves nearly simultaneous absorption of ultrashort laser pulses for selective curing of photosensitive material. This process has recently been used to create small-scale medical devices out of several classes of photosensitive materials, such as acrylate-based polymers, organically-modified ceramic materials, zirconium sol-gels, and titanium-containing hybrid materials. In this review, the use of two photon polymerization for fabrication of several types of small-scale medical devices, including microneedles, artificial tissues, microfluidic devices, pumps, sensors, and valves, from computer models is described. Necessary steps in the development of two photon polymerization as a commercially viable medical device manufacturing method are also considered.

  2. Main Factors for Affecting Photonic Bandgap of Photonic Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xia; XUE Wei; JIANG Yu-rong; YU Zhi-nong; WANG Hua-qing

    2007-01-01

    The factors affecting one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) photonic crystals (PhCs) are systemically analyzed in this paper by numerical simulation.Transfer matrix method (TMM) is employed for 1D PCs, both finite difference time domain method (FDTD) and plane wave expansion method (PWE) are employed for 2D PCs.The result shows that the photonic bandgaps (PBG) are directly affected by crystal type, crystal lattice constant, modulation of refractive index and periodicity, and it is should be useful for design of different type photonic crystals with the required PBG and functional devices.Finally, as an example, a near-IR 1D PCs narrow filter was designed.

  3. Nanowire photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Pauzauskie

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of integrated electronic circuitry ranks among the most disruptive and transformative technologies of the 20th century. Even though integrated circuits are ubiquitous in modern life, both fundamental and technical constraints will eventually test the limits of Moore's law. Nanowire photonic circuitry constructed from myriad one-dimensional building blocks offers numerous opportunities for the development of next-generation optical information processors and spectroscopy. However, several challenges remain before the potential of nanowire building blocks is fully realized. We cover recent advances in nanowire synthesis, characterization, lasing, integration, and the eventual application to relevant technical and scientific questions.

  4. Quantum photonics hybrid integration platform

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, Eoin; Meany, Thomas; Flother, Frederick F; Lee, James P; Griffiths, Jonathan P; Jones, Geb A C; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A; Bennet, Anthony J; Shields, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental to integrated photonic quantum computing is an on-chip method for routing and modulating quantum light emission. We demonstrate a hybrid integration platform consisting of arbitrarily designed waveguide circuits and single photon sources. InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in GaAs are bonded to an SiON waveguide chip such that the QD emission is coupled to the waveguide mode. The waveguides are SiON core embedded in a SiO2 cladding. A tuneable Mach Zehnder modulates the emission between two output ports and can act as a path-encoded qubit preparation device. The single photon nature of the emission was veri?ed by an on-chip Hanbury Brown and Twiss measurement.

  5. Photonic quantum technologies (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2015-09-01

    The impact of quantum technology will be profound and far-reaching: secure communication networks for consumers, corporations and government; precision sensors for biomedical technology and environmental monitoring; quantum simulators for the design of new materials, pharmaceuticals and clean energy devices; and ultra-powerful quantum computers for addressing otherwise impossibly large datasets for machine learning and artificial intelligence applications. However, engineering quantum systems and controlling them is an immense technological challenge: they are inherently fragile; and information extracted from a quantum system necessarily disturbs the system itself. Of the various approaches to quantum technologies, photons are particularly appealing for their low-noise properties and ease of manipulation at the single qubit level. We have developed an integrated waveguide approach to photonic quantum circuits for high performance, miniaturization and scalability. We will described our latest progress in generating, manipulating and interacting single photons in waveguide circuits on silicon chips.

  6. Quantum photonics hybrid integration platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, E.; Floether, F. F. [Cambridge Research Laboratory, Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Ellis, D. J. P.; Meany, T.; Bennett, A. J., E-mail: anthony.bennet@crl.toshiba.co.uk; Shields, A. J. [Cambridge Research Laboratory, Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Lee, J. P. [Cambridge Research Laboratory, Toshiba Research Europe Limited, 208 Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, 9 J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Griffiths, J. P.; Jones, G. A. C.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-26

    Fundamental to integrated photonic quantum computing is an on-chip method for routing and modulating quantum light emission. We demonstrate a hybrid integration platform consisting of arbitrarily designed waveguide circuits and single-photon sources. InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in GaAs are bonded to a SiON waveguide chip such that the QD emission is coupled to the waveguide mode. The waveguides are SiON core embedded in a SiO{sub 2} cladding. A tuneable Mach Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulates the emission between two output ports and can act as a path-encoded qubit preparation device. The single-photon nature of the emission was verified using the on-chip MZI as a beamsplitter in a Hanbury Brown and Twiss measurement.

  7. Slow-light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, C; Monat, Christelle; Clark, Alex S; Grillet, Christian; Marshall, Graham D; Steel, M J; Li, Juntao; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas F; Rarity, John G; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2011-09-01

    We report the generation of correlated photon pairs in the telecom C-band at room temperature from a dispersion-engineered silicon photonic crystal waveguide. The spontaneous four-wave mixing process producing the photon pairs is enhanced by slow-light propagation enabling an active device length of less than 100 μm. With a coincidence to accidental ratio of 12.8 at a pair generation rate of 0.006 per pulse, this ultracompact photon pair source paves the way toward scalable quantum information processing realized on-chip.

  8. On-chip photonic-phononic emitter-receiver apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Jonathan Albert; Jarecki, Jr., Robert L.; Rakich, Peter Thomas; Wang, Zheng; Shin, Heedeuk; Siddiqui, Aleem; Starbuck, Andrew Lea

    2017-07-04

    A radio-frequency photonic devices employs photon-phonon coupling for information transfer. The device includes a membrane in which a two-dimensionally periodic phononic crystal (PnC) structure is patterned. The device also includes at least a first optical waveguide embedded in the membrane. At least a first line-defect region interrupts the PnC structure. The first optical waveguide is embedded within the line-defect region.

  9. Local tuning of photonic crystal cavities using chalcogenide glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Faraon, Andrei; Bulla, Douglas; Luther-Davies, Barry; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Stoltz, Nick; Petroff, Pierre; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to locally change the refractive index in planar optical devices by photodarkening of a thin chalcogenide glass layer deposited on top of the device. The method is used to tune the resonance of GaAs-based photonic crystal cavities by up to 3 nm at 940 nm, with only 5% deterioration in cavity quality factor. The method has broad applications for postproduction tuning of photonic devices.

  10. Photonic crystal nanocavity assisted rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yun; Xia, Jinsong; Zhang, Yong; Dong, Jianji; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand on handing microwave signals with compact device, low power consumption, high efficiency and high reliability, it is highly desired to generate, distribute, and process microwave signals using photonic integrated circuits. Silicon photonics offers a promising platform facilitating ultracompact microwave photonic signal processing assisted by silicon nanophotonic devices. In this paper, we propose, theoretically analyze and experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme to realize ultracompact rejection ratio tunable notch microwave photonic filter (MPF) based on a silicon photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity with fixed extinction ratio. Using a conventional modulation scheme with only a single phase modulator (PM), the rejection ratio of the presented MPF can be tuned from about 10 dB to beyond 60 dB. Moreover, the central frequency tunable operation in the high rejection ratio region is also demonstrated in the experiment.

  11. Review of photonic Hilbert transformers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaotan SIMA

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the demonstrations of photonic Hilbert transformers (PHTs), describing their progress and recent developments. The physical operating principles of PHTs including fractional Hilbert transformers are discussed, together with device applications in all-optical signal processing. Versatile approaches to realize PHTs are discussed, e.g., discrete free space optics, fiber-based schemes and integrated planar geometry. The numerical designs and experimental performances of these PHTs are analyzed in terms of spectral quality, operating bandwidth, system integration, and mechanical and thermal stability. Recent developments of the monolithically integrated photonic Hilbert transform (HT) devices include directional couplers and planar Bragg gratings which allow all-optical single-sideband (SSB) suppression and sideband switching.

  12. Microneedle Device Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Device Prototype Final Report iv | List of Figures List of Figures Figure 3-1. Print screen of the STL file of a hollow microneedle design in Alibre...created in the e-Shell 300 substrates to create a fluidic path between the hollow microneedles and the microfluidic chip. The bores were prepared by...100 mW. The laser’s beam was focused onto the sample with a 4× objective to increase the photon density and obtain two-photon polymerization of the

  13. Hybrid silicon evanescent devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W. Fang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Si photonics as an integration platform has recently been a focus of optoelectronics research because of the promise of low-cost manufacturing based on the ubiquitous electronics fabrication infrastructure. The key challenge for Si photonic systems is the realization of compact, electrically driven optical gain elements. We review our recent developments in hybrid Si evanescent devices. We have demonstrated electrically pumped lasers, amplifiers, and photodetectors that can provide a low-cost, scalable solution for hybrid integration on a Si platform by using a novel hybrid waveguide architecture, consisting of III-V quantum wells bonded to Si waveguides.

  14. Quantum-dot-tagged photonic crystal beads for multiplex detection of tumor markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Wang, Huan; Dong, Shujun; Zhu, Peizhi; Diao, Guowang; Yang, Zhanjun

    2014-12-04

    Novel quantum-dot-tagged photonic crystal beads were fabricated for multiplex detection of tumor markers via self-assembly of quantum dot-embedded polystyrene nanospheres into photonic crystal beads through a microfluidic device.

  15. Stabilizing Semiconductor Devices With Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overhauser, Albert W.; Maserjian, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Damage by radiation healed rapidly. Feature provides continuous, rapid recovery of devices from degradation caused by hot electrons, photons, and ionizing radiation. Several candidate sites for palladium film catalysts, inserted during manufacture as integral parts of devices. Paladium films made by evaporation, sputtering, or chemical-vapor deposition. If additional storage required, thick layer of palladium plated on inside of package surrounding device. Hydrogen stored by exposing palladium to hydrogen gas just before package sealed hermetically.

  16. FY 2006 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Ho, Nicolas; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

    2006-12-28

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics and optical fiber processing methods for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin-film deposition capabilities, direct laser writing techniques, infrared photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology—all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to quantum cascade laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.

  17. FY 2004 Infrared Photonics Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Keller, Paul E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Martin, Peter M.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Sundaram, S. K.; Riley, Brian J.; Martinez, James E.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Schultz, John F.

    2004-10-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at PNNL is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for the MWIR and LWIR by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin film deposition capabilities, direct-laser writing techniques, IR photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology - all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.

  18. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-04-08

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  19. Engineering the Photonic Density of States with metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob*, Z; Naik, G V; Boltasseva, A; Shalaev, E Narimanov V M

    2010-01-01

    The photonic density of states (PDOS), like its' electronic coun- terpart, is one of the key physical quantities governing a variety of phenom- ena and hence PDOS manipulation is the route to new photonic devices. The PDOS is conventionally altered by exploiting the resonance within a device such as a microcavity or a bandgap structure like a photonic crystal. Here we show that nanostructured metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion can dramatically enhance the photonic density of states paving the way for metamaterial based PDOS engineering.

  20. Near-space flight of a correlated photon system

    CERN Document Server

    Zhongkan, Tang; Sean, Yau Yong; Cheng, Cliff; Wildfeuer, Christoph; Ling, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We report the successful test flight of a device for generating and monitoring correlated photon pairs under near-space conditions up to 35.5km altitude. Data from ground based qualification tests and the high altitude experiment demonstrate that the device continues to operate even under harsh environmental conditions. The design of the rugged, compact and power-efficient photon pair system is presented. This design enables autonomous photon pair systems to be deployed on low-resource platforms such as nanosatellites hosting remote nodes of a quantum key distribution network. These results pave the way for tests of entangled photon technology in low earth orbit.

  1. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  2. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  3. Degenerate photon-pair generation in an ultracompact silicon photonic crystal waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiakun; Clark, Alex S; Collins, Matthew J; Li, Juntao; Krauss, Thomas F; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Xiong, Chunle

    2014-06-15

    We demonstrate degenerate, correlated photon-pair generation via slow-light-enhanced spontaneous four-wave mixing in a 96 μm long silicon photonic crystal waveguide. Our device represents a more than 50 times smaller footprint than silicon nanowires. We have achieved a coincidence-to-accidental ratio as high as 47 at a photon generation rate of 0.001 pairs per pulse and 14 at a photon generation rate of 0.023 pairs per pulse, which are both higher than the useful level of 10. This demonstration provides a path to generate indistinguishable photons in an ultracompact platform for future quantum photonic technologies.

  4. Metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Francesco; Alù, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    The field of metamaterials has opened landscapes of possibilities in basic science, and a paradigm shift in the way we think about and design emergent material properties. In many scenarios, metamaterial concepts have helped overcome long-held scientific challenges, such as the absence of optical magnetism and the limits imposed by diffraction in optical imaging. As the potential of metamaterials, as well as their limitations, become clearer, these advances in basic science have started to make an impact on several applications in different areas, with far-reaching implications for many scientific and engineering fields. At optical frequencies, the alliance of metamaterials with the fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics can further advance the possibility of controlling light propagation, radiation, localization and scattering in unprecedented ways. In this review article, we discuss the recent progress in the field of metamaterials, with particular focus on how fundamental advances in this field are enabling a new generation of metamaterial, plasmonic and nanophotonic devices. Relevant examples include optical nanocircuits and nanoantennas, invisibility cloaks, superscatterers and superabsorbers, metasurfaces for wavefront shaping and wave-based analog computing, as well as active, nonreciprocal and topological devices. Throughout the paper, we highlight the fundamental limitations and practical challenges associated with the realization of advanced functionalities, and we suggest potential directions to go beyond these limits. Over the next few years, as new scientific breakthroughs are translated into technological advances, the fields of metamaterials, plasmonics and nanophotonics are expected to have a broad impact on a variety of applications in areas of scientific, industrial and societal significance.

  5. Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin; Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate electrical tunability of a fiber laser by using a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber. Tuning of the laser is achieved by combining the wavelength filtering effect of a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device with an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. We fabricate an all......-spliced laser cavity based on a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber mounted on a silicon assembly, a pump/signal combiner with single-mode signal feed-through and an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. The laser cavity produces a single-mode output and is tuned in the range 1040-1065nm by applying...

  6. Fabrication of Metarodielectric Photonic Crystals for Microwave Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takinami, Yohei; Kirihara, Soshu, E-mail: y-takinami@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Smart Processing Reserch Center, Joining and Welding Reserch Institute, Osaka University (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Photonic crystals have inspired a great deal of interests as key platforms for effective control of electromagnetic wave. They can suppress incident waves at a certain frequency by Bragg diffraction and exhibit photonic band gap. Photonic band gap structures can be applied for effective and compact wave control equipments. In this investigation, metal photonic crystals were fabricated by stereolithography and heat treatment process. Furthermore, metal-dielectric crystal was created through impregnation process of dielectric media. This concept of metal-dielectric photonic crystal is expected to contribute for not only the downsizing of electromagnetic wave devices, but also thermal flow control.

  7. Recent Advances in Integrated Photonic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco De Leonardis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, optical devices and circuits are becoming fundamental components in several application fields such as medicine, biotechnology, automotive, aerospace, food quality control, chemistry, to name a few. In this context, we propose a complete review on integrated photonic sensors, with specific attention to materials, technologies, architectures and optical sensing principles. To this aim, sensing principles commonly used in optical detection are presented, focusing on sensor performance features such as sensitivity, selectivity and rangeability. Since photonic sensors provide substantial benefits regarding compatibility with CMOS technology and integration on chips characterized by micrometric footprints, design and optimization strategies of photonic devices are widely discussed for sensing applications. In addition, several numerical methods employed in photonic circuits and devices, simulations and design are presented, focusing on their advantages and drawbacks. Finally, recent developments in the field of photonic sensing are reviewed, considering advanced photonic sensor architectures based on linear and non-linear optical effects and to be employed in chemical/biochemical sensing, angular velocity and electric field detection.

  8. Silicon photonics for telecommunications and biomedicine

    CERN Document Server

    Fathpour, Sasan

    2011-01-01

    Given silicon's versatile material properties, use of low-cost silicon photonics continues to move beyond light-speed data transmission through fiber-optic cables and computer chips. Its application has also evolved from the device to the integrated-system level. A timely overview of this impressive growth, Silicon Photonics for Telecommunications and Biomedicine summarizes state-of-the-art developments in a wide range of areas, including optical communications, wireless technologies, and biomedical applications of silicon photonics. With contributions from world experts, this reference guides

  9. Plasmonic-photonic crystal coupled nanolaser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Taiping; Jamois, Cecile; Chevalier, Celine; Feng, Di; Belarouci, Ali

    2014-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a hybrid photonic-plasmonic nanolaser that combines the light harvesting features of a dielectric photonic crystal cavity with the extraordinary confining properties of an optical nano-antenna. In that purpose, we developed a novel fabrication method based on multi-step electron-beam lithography. We show that it enables the robust and reproducible production of hybrid structures, using fully top down approach to accurately position the antenna. Coherent coupling of the photonic and plasmonic modes is highlighted and opens up a broad range of new hybrid nanophotonic devices.

  10. Photonics a short course

    CERN Document Server

    Degiorgio, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    This book will serve as a concise, self-contained, up-to-date introduction to Photonics, to be used as a textbook for undergraduate students or as a reference book for researchers and professionals. Blending theory with technical descriptions, the book covers a wide range of topics, including the general mechanism of laser action, continuous and pulsed laser operation, optical propagation in isotropic and anisotropic media, operating principles and structure of passive optical components, electro-optical and acousto-optical modulation, solid-state lasers, semiconductor lasers and LEDs, nonlinear optics, and optical fiber components and devices.. The book concludes with an overview of applications, including optical communications, telemetry and sensing, industrial and biomedical applications, solid-state lighting, displays, and photovoltaics.

  11. Photonics a short course

    CERN Document Server

    Degiorgio, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    This extended and revised edition will serve as a concise, self-contained, up-to-date introduction to Photonics for undergraduate students. It can also be used as a primer by researchers and professionals who start working in the field. Blending theory with technical descriptions, the book covers a wide range of topics, including the general mechanism of laser action, continuous and pulsed laser operation, optical propagation in isotropic and anisotropic media, operating principles and structure of passive optical components, electro-optic and acousto-optic modulation, solid-state lasers, semiconductor lasers and LEDs, nonlinear optical phenomena, and optical fiber components and devices. The book concludes with an overview of applications, including optical communications, telemetry and sensing, industrial and biomedical applications, solid-state lighting, displays, and photovoltaics. This second edition includes a set of problems at the end of all but the last chapter. These problems deal with numerical c...

  12. Optical microscope using an interferometric source of two-color, two-beam entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dress, William B.; Kisner, Roger A.; Richards, Roger K.

    2004-07-13

    Systems and methods are described for an optical microscope using an interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons. A method includes: downconverting a beam of coherent energy to provide a beam of multi-color entangled photons; converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; transforming at least a portion of the converged multi-color entangled photon beam by interaction with a sample to generate an entangled photon specimen beam; and combining the entangled photon specimen beam with an entangled photon reference beam within a single beamsplitter. An apparatus includes: a multi-refringent device providing a beam of multi-color entangled photons; a condenser device optically coupled to the multi-refringent device, the condenser device converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; a beam probe director and specimen assembly optically coupled to the condenser device; and a beam splitter optically coupled to the beam probe director and specimen assembly, the beam splitter combining an entangled photon specimen beam from the beam probe director and specimen assembly with an entangled photon reference beam.

  13. Ion implantation in silicon to facilitate testing of photonic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Graham T.; Milosevic, Milan M.; Chen, Xia; Cao, Wei; Littlejohns, Callum G.; Wang, Hong; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Thomson, David J.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, we have presented results on the development of erasable gratings in silicon to facilitate wafer scale testing of photonics circuits via ion implantation of germanium. Similar technology can be employed to develop a range of optical devices that are reported in this paper. Ion implantation into silicon causes radiation damage resulting in a refractive index increase, and can therefore form the basis of multiple optical devices. We demonstrate the principle of a series of devices for wafers scale testing and have also implemented the ion implantation based refractive index change in integrated photonics devices for device trimming.

  14. Infrared detector device inspection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soehnel, Grant; Bender, Daniel A.

    2016-08-09

    Methods and apparatuses for identifying carrier lifetimes are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, a beam of light is sent to a group of locations on a material for an optical device. Photons emitted from the material are detected at each of the group of locations. A carrier lifetime is identified for each of the group of locations based on the photons detected from each of the group of locations.

  15. Use of different but overlapping determinants in a retrovirus receptor accounts for non-reciprocal interference between xenotropic and polytropic murine leukemia viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Hoeven Neal S

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrovirus infection depends on binding of the retroviral envelope (Env protein to specific cell-surface protein receptors. Interference, or superinfection resistance, is a frequent consequence of retroviral infection, and occurs when newly-synthesized Env binds to receptor proteins resulting in a block to entry by retroviruses that use the same receptors. Three groups of viruses demonstrate a non-reciprocal pattern of interference (NRI, which requires the existence of both a common receptor utilized by all viruses within the group, and a specific receptor that is used by a subset of viruses. In the case of amphotropic and 10A1 murine leukemia viruses (MLV, the common and specific receptors are the products of two related genes. In the case of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus types B, D, and E, the two receptors are distinct protein products of a single gene. NRI also occurs between xenotropic and polytropic MLV. The common receptor, Xpr1, has been identified, but a specific receptor has yet to be described. Results Using chimeric receptor proteins and interference studies, we have identified a region of Xpr1 that is uniquely utilized by xenotropic MLV and show that this receptor domain is required for non-reciprocal interference. Conclusion We propose a novel pattern of receptor usage by xenotropic and polytropic MLV to explain the NRI observed between these viruses. We propose that the specific and common receptor determinants for xenotropic and polytropic viruses are simultaneously present in discreet domains of a single Xpr1 protein.

  16. A solid-state single-photon filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santis, Lorenzo; Antón, Carlos; Reznychenko, Bogdan; Somaschi, Niccolo; Coppola, Guillaume; Senellart, Jean; Gómez, Carmen; Lemaître, Aristide; Sagnes, Isabelle; White, Andrew G.; Lanco, Loïc; Auffèves, Alexia; Senellart, Pascale

    2017-07-01

    A strong limitation of linear optical quantum computing is the probabilistic operation of two-quantum-bit gates based on the coalescence of indistinguishable photons. A route to deterministic operation is to exploit the single-photon nonlinearity of an atomic transition. Through engineering of the atom-photon interaction, phase shifters, photon filters and photon-photon gates have been demonstrated with natural atoms. Proofs of concept have been reported with semiconductor quantum dots, yet limited by inefficient atom-photon interfaces and dephasing. Here, we report a highly efficient single-photon filter based on a large optical nonlinearity at the single-photon level, in a near-optimal quantum-dot cavity interface. When probed with coherent light wavepackets, the device shows a record nonlinearity threshold around 0.3 ± 0.1 incident photons. We demonstrate that 80% of the directly reflected light intensity consists of a single-photon Fock state and that the two- and three-photon components are strongly suppressed compared with the single-photon one.

  17. Electrospinning for nano- to mesoscale photonic structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skinner Jack L.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of photonic and electronic structures and devices has directed the manufacturing industry for the last 50 years. Currently, the majority of small-scale photonic devices are created by traditional microfabrication techniques that create features by processes such as lithography and electron or ion beam direct writing. Microfabrication techniques are often expensive and slow. In contrast, the use of electrospinning (ES in the fabrication of micro- and nano-scale devices for the manipulation of photons and electrons provides a relatively simple and economic viable alternative. ES involves the delivery of a polymer solution to a capillary held at a high voltage relative to the fiber deposition surface. Electrostatic force developed between the collection plate and the polymer promotes fiber deposition onto the collection plate. Issues with ES fabrication exist primarily due to an instability region that exists between the capillary and collection plate and is characterized by chaotic motion of the depositing polymer fiber. Material limitations to ES also exist; not all polymers of interest are amenable to the ES process due to process dependencies on molecular weight and chain entanglement or incompatibility with other polymers and overall process compatibility. Passive and active electronic and photonic fibers fabricated through the ES have great potential for use in light generation and collection in optical and electronic structures/devices. ES produces fiber devices that can be combined with inorganic, metallic, biological, or organic materials for novel device design. Synergistic material selection and post-processing techniques are also utilized for broad-ranging applications of organic nanofibers that span from biological to electronic, photovoltaic, or photonic. As the ability to electrospin optically and/or electronically active materials in a controlled manner continues to improve, the complexity and diversity of devices

  18. Multifunctional optomechanical dynamics in integrated silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan

    Light can generate forces on matter. The nature of these forces is electromagnetic force, or Lorentz force. The emergence and rapid progress of nanotechnology provided an unprecedented platform where the very feeble optical forces began to play significant roles. The interactions between light and matter in nanoscale has been the focus of almost a decade of active theoretical and experimental investigations, which are still ongoing and constitute a whole new burgeoning branch of nanotechnology, nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS). In such context, the general goal of my research is to generate, enhance and control optical forces on silicon photonics platforms, with a focus on developing new functionalities and demonstrating novel effects, which will potentially lead to a new class of silicon photonic devices for a broad spectrum of applications. In this dissertation, the concept of optical force and the general background of the NOMS research area are first introduced. The general goal of the silicon photonics research area and the research presented in this dissertation is then described. Subsequently, the fundamental theory for optical force is summarized. The different methods to calculate optical forces are enumerated and briefly reviewed. Integrated hybrid plasmonic waveguide (HPWG) devices have been successfully fabricated and the enhanced optical forces experimentally measured for the first time. All-optical amplification of RF signals has been successfully demonstrated. The optical force generated by one laser is used to mechanically change the optical path and hence the output power of another laser. In addition, completely optically tunable mechanical nonlinear behavior has been demonstrated for the first time and systematically studied. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities has been demonstrated with a "photon see-saw" device. This photon see-saw is a novel multicavity optomechanical device which consists of two photonic crystal

  19. Strongly interacting photons in one-dimensional continuum

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Dibyendu; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    The photon-photon scattering in vacuum is extremely weak. However, strong effective interactions between single photons can be realized by employing strong light-matter coupling. These interactions are a fundamental building block for quantum optics, bringing many-body physics to the photonic world and providing important resources for quantum photonic devices and for optical metrology. In this Colloquium, we review the physics of strongly-interacting photons in one-dimensional systems with no optical confinement along the propagation direction. We focus on two recently-demonstrated experimental realizations: (i) superconducting qubits coupled to open transmission lines, and (ii) interacting Rydberg atoms in a cold gas. Advancements in the theoretical understanding of these systems are presented in complementary formalisms and compared to experimental results. The experimental achievements are summarized alongside of a systematic description of the quantum optical effects and quantum devices emerging from the...

  20. A Bright Single Photon Source Based on a Diamond Nanowire

    CERN Document Server

    Babinec, T; Khan, M; Zhang, Y; Maze, J; Hemmer, P R; Loncar, M

    2009-01-01

    The development of a robust light source that emits one photon at a time is an outstanding challenge in quantum science and technology. Here, at the transition from many to single photon optical communication systems, fully quantum mechanical effects may be utilized to achieve new capabilities, most notably perfectly secure communication via quantum cryptography. Practical implementations place stringent requirements on the device properties, including fast and stable photon generation, efficient collection of photons, and room temperature operation. Single photon light emitting devices based on fluorescent dye molecules, quantum dots, nanowires, and carbon nanotube material systems have all been explored, but none have simultaneously demonstrated all criteria. Here, we describe the design, fabrication, and characterization of a bright source of single photons consisting of an individual Nitrogen-vacancy color center (NV center) in a diamond nanowire operating in ambient conditions. The nanowire plays a posit...