WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonproliferation homeland security

  1. Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides an overview of EPA's homeland security roles and responsibilities, and links to specific homeland security issues: water security, research, emergency response, recovery, and waste management.

  2. Transforming Homeland Security [video

    OpenAIRE

    McIntyre, David; Center for Homeland Defense and Security Naval Postgraduate School

    2011-01-01

    A pioneer in homeland security, and homeland security education, David McIntyre discusses the complexities in transforming homeland security from a national program in its inception, to also include state and local agencies and other public and private parties.

  3. Department of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Official website of the Department of Homeland Security Contact Us Quick Links Site Map A-Z ... HP - 2016 CISRM HP - 2016 CISRM Critical Infrastructure Security HP - Surge Capacity Force HP - Surge Capacity Force ...

  4. Homeland Security and Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relyea, Harold C.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the development of two similar policy concepts, national security and internal security, before exploring the new phrase homeland security that has become popular since the September 11 terrorist attacks. Discusses the significance of each for information policy and practice. (Author/LRW)

  5. 75 FR 28672 - Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation; Lifting of Nonproliferation Measures...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation; Lifting of Nonproliferation Measures Against Two... measures on two Russian entities. DATES: Effective Date: May 21, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  6. Transatlantic Homeland Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard-Nielsen, Anja; Hamilton, Daniel

    This major new study presents both conceptual and practical guidance at a crucial time when intellectual and practical efforts to protect against the new terrorism should move beyond a purely domestic focus. Creating an effective and integrated national homeland security effort is a significant...... challenge. Europe and the United States have reacted differently to the emergence of mass casualty terrorism, but must work together to cope with the diverse issue areas, sectors, professions, and relevant actors involved in such a broad-based concept. The authors suggest that Europe and the US have a lot...

  7. 76 FR 67750 - Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Homeland Security... Applicants for Appointment to Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Secretary of Homeland Security has determined that the renewal of the Homeland Security Information...

  8. Homeland Security: A Selected Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    March 7, 2006. 19pp. (AD-A449- 850) http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA449850 Flynn, Stephen E., and Daniel B. Prieto . Neglected Defense: Mobilizing...R41250.pdf Flynn, Stephen E., and Daniel B. Prieto . Neglected Defense: Mobilizing the Private Sector to Support Homeland Security. New York: Council...ADA478240 Clarke, Richard Alan . Your Government Failed You: Breaking the Cycle of National Security Disasters. New York: Ecco, 2008. 408pp

  9. Robotic systems for homeland security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Brian; Miller, Jon; Huston, Dryver R.; Bourn, Phil

    2004-07-01

    This paper will present the concept of utilizing various mobile robotic platforms for homeland security. Highly specialized mobile robots equipped with the proper sensors and data processing capabilities have the ability to provide security and surveillance for a wide variety of applications. Large infrastructure components, such as bridges, pipelines, dams, and electrical power grids pose severe challenges for monitoring, surveillance, and protection against man-made and natural hazards. The structures are enormous, often with awkward and dangerous configurations that make it difficult, if not impossible, for continuous human surveillance. Properly outfitted robots have the potential to provide long-term surveillance without requiring continuous human supervision. Furthermore, these robotic platforms can have disaster mitigation capabilities such as evaluation of infrastructure integrity at the disaster site. The results presented will include proof-of-concept robotic platforms equipped with various sensor arrays, as well as discussion of design criteria for numerous homeland security applications.

  10. Measuring the foundation of Homeland Security

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew, David A.

    2007-01-01

    CHDS State/Local This thesis provides a self-assessment tool to compel discussion concerning Homeland Security teamwork. Building on the research of others who have focused on collaboration and teamwork as essential for Homeland Security, it is proclaimed that teamwork is the foundation on which Homeland Security capabilities must be built. The purpose of this thesis is to define the components of teamwork amongst the local multidiscipline organizations with a common Homeland Security ...

  11. Measuring the foundation of Homeland Security

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew, David A.

    2007-01-01

    CHDS State/Local This thesis provides a self-assessment tool to compel discussion concerning Homeland Security teamwork. Building on the research of others who have focused on collaboration and teamwork as essential for Homeland Security, it is proclaimed that teamwork is the foundation on which Homeland Security capabilities must be built. The purpose of this thesis is to define the components of teamwork amongst the local multidiscipline organizations with a common Homeland Security ...

  12. The National Homeland Security Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The National Homeland Security Research Center advances our nation's security by providing scientific products and expertise to improve the ability to respond to and...

  13. 76 FR 4123 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... homeland security, results of a cyber security exercise, sharing information with others, and Southwest... would be a road map to those who wish to attack our cyber security, and hence, would certainly frustrate... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Notice of partially...

  14. Homeland security intelligence : to what end?

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    CHDS State/Local Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In this thesis, I present potential solution sets to the question of why homeland security leaders and practitioners use intelligence to improve homeland security decisions. Specific roles and benefits of intelligence are identified, analyzed, and where applicable, extended to domestic security objectives across the homeland security community spectrum. This thesis purports and defends the theory that there are many...

  15. 76 FR 27642 - Department of Homeland Security; Transfer of Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    ... AGENCY Department of Homeland Security; Transfer of Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... of Homeland Security. The Department of Homeland Security will work with OPP pursuant to the Homeland Security Presidential Directives and the 2009 National Infrastructure Protection Plan. DATES:...

  16. The Proposed Homeland Security Budget for 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. CBO 6 THE PROPOSED HOMELAND SECURITY BUDGET FOR 2013 CBOFigure 2. Homeland Security Funding Requested by the...Marshals Service Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives Federal Bureau of Investigation Miscellaneousa Food and Drug Administration...Administration National Security Division Food and Drug Administration Federal Bureau of Investigation Firearms, and Explosives Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco

  17. 75 FR 28275 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Science and Technology...: On April 12, 2010, the Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee announced in the... supplements that original meeting notice. DATES: The Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory...

  18. 77 FR 55218 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... violent extremism domestically; the current threat environment; evolving threats in cyber security... receive a briefing on evolving threats in cyber security. This will include lessons learned and potential... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  19. 76 FR 81516 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ...) Frequent Traveler Program; examine evolving threats in cyber security; and provide information on the... (EMP) Threat--Lessons Learned and Areas of Vulnerability, and Evolving Threats in Cyber Security. Basis... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Closed...

  20. Security Guarantees and Nuclear Non-Proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno Tertrais

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the value of 'security guarantees', that is, positive security assurances that include a formal or informal defense commitment, in preventing nuclear proliferation. It demonstrates that such guarantees have proven to be a very effective instrument in preventing States from going nuclear. It would thus seem logical to reinforce or extend them. However, this path is fraught with obstacles and dilemmas

  1. Detection and intelligent systems for homeland security

    CERN Document Server

    Voeller, John G

    2014-01-01

    Detection and Intelligent Systems for Homeland Security features articles from the Wiley Handbook of Science and Technology for Homeland Security covering advanced technology for image and video interpretation systems used for surveillance, which help in solving such problems as identifying faces from live streaming or stored videos. Biometrics for human identification, including eye retinas and irises, and facial patterns are also presented. The book then provides information on sensors for detection of explosive and radioactive materials and methods for sensing chemical

  2. 75 FR 2880 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Advisory Council AGENCY: The Office of Policy, DHS. ACTION: Committee management... providing strategic, timely and actionable advice. ] The HSAC will meet publicly to swear in new Council members, receive observations and remarks from DHS senior leadership, and review and...

  3. Nuclear Theory for Astrophysics, Stockpile Stewardship, and Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Anna

    2004-10-01

    A large number of problems key to astrophysics, stockpile stewardship, and homeland defense rely on knowledge of nuclear physics in regimes inaccessible to experiment. In stellar and nuclear explosions unstable nuclei and nuclear isomers are produced in copious quantities and are used to diagnose the explosion. Similarly, analysis of the unstable nuclei from the debris will be key to attribution in the event of a terrorist domestic nuclear attack. In the case of nuclear non-proliferation a number of new schemes are being considered by the IAEA to address the ever greater needs, including neutrino monitoring of the plutonium content of reactors. For all of these problems detailed nuclear theory is required. In this talk I discuss the theoretical physics needs for the type of problems of overlapping interest to astrophysics and national security.

  4. U.S. Homeland Security R&D Budgets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halvorson, C S

    2009-03-30

    The FY09 budgets for homeland security research and development programs in the U.S. are summarized. Homeland security policy developments that can influence future efforts are discussed. Initial indications of the new administration direction on homeland security R&D are summarized. An overview of the Optics and Photonics in Global Homeland Security V conference is presented.

  5. Homeland Security Affairs Journal, Volume V - 2009: Issue 1, January

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Homeland Security Affairs is the peer-reviewed online journal of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS), providing a forum to propose and debate strategies, policies, and organizational arrangements to strengthen U.S. homeland security. The instructors, participants, alumni, and partners of CHDS represent the leading subject matter experts and practitioners in the field of homeland security. January 2009. In this issue of Homeland Security Affairs we ...

  6. Homeland Security Affairs Journal, Volume V - 2009: Issue 1, January

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Homeland Security Affairs is the peer-reviewed online journal of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS), providing a forum to propose and debate strategies, policies, and organizational arrangements to strengthen U.S. homeland security. The instructors, participants, alumni, and partners of CHDS represent the leading subject matter experts and practitioners in the field of homeland security. January 2009. In this issue of Homeland Security Affairs we ...

  7. Homeland Security Affairs Journal, Volume IV - 2008: Issue 3, October

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Homeland Security Affairs is the peer-reviewed online journal of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS), providing a forum to propose and debate strategies, policies, and organizational arrangements to strengthen U.S. homeland security. The instructors, participants, alumni, and partners of CHDS represent the leading subject matter experts and practitioners in the field of homeland security. October 2008. The articles in this issue of Homeland Securit...

  8. 5 CFR 9701.508 - Homeland Security Labor Relations Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Labor-Management Relations § 9701.508 Homeland Security Labor... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Homeland Security Labor Relations Board. 9701.508 Section 9701.508 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES...

  9. 75 FR 39955 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Science and Technology.... SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) will meet July 20-21... will be partially closed to the public. DATES: The Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory...

  10. 75 FR 2555 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Science and Technology...: The Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee will meet January 26-28, 2010, at the... public. DATES: The Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee will meet January 26, 2010...

  11. 75 FR 18516 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee AGENCY: Science and Technology...: The Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee will meet April 20-22, 2010 at the.... This meeting will be closed to the public. DATES: The Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory...

  12. 33 CFR 101.205 - Department of Homeland Security alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... alignment. 101.205 Section 101.205 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Department of Homeland Security alignment. The MARSEC Levels are aligned with the Department of Homeland... alignment. Table 101.205—Relation Between HSAS and MARSEC Levels Homeland security advisory system...

  13. Analytical Approaches to Address Homeland Security Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holter, Gregory M.; Young, Jonathan

    2003-11-01

    Homeland security concerns arising since September 11, 2001, have captured national attention and sparked a number of responses at all levels of government. As events have unfolded and the nature of the situation has become better understood within the United States, the need for effective planning and response has resulted in the identification of significant analytical challenges. These challenges relate to a number of different needs, including the following: (1) estimating the probability and the potential impact of various threats, (2) identifying the need for and effectiveness of specific counter-measures, and (3) assessing the combined results of interacting activities and events. Analytical approaches traditionally used for safety engineering and risk analysis, coupled with analytical approaches borrowed from other systems analysis disciplines, can be usefully adapted to help meet these challenges. This paper identifies and discusses several illustrative examples of the analytical challenges currently being faced with respect to homeland security. Linkages are then examined between these specific challenges and traditional analytical approaches from a variety of disciplines, including safety engineering and risk analysis. Since effective cooperation among responsible agencies and organizations has been identified as an issue of concern and is essential to achieve an effective homeland security strategy and response capability, issues relating to multiple interacting activities are specifically highlighted.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy for Homeland Security Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mogilevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique with vast applications in the homeland security and defense arenas. The Raman effect is defined by the inelastic interaction of the incident laser with the analyte molecule’s vibrational modes, which can be exploited to detect and identify chemicals in various environments and for the detection of hazards in the field, at checkpoints, or in a forensic laboratory with no contact with the substance. A major source of error that overwhelms the Raman signal is fluorescence caused by the background and the sample matrix. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the Raman signal’s sensitivity and to reduce the effects of fluorescence by altering how the hazard material interacts with its environment and the incident laser. Basic Raman techniques applicable to homeland security applications include conventional (off-resonance Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and spatially or temporally offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS and TORS. Additional emerging Raman techniques, including remote Raman detection, Raman imaging, and Heterodyne imaging, are being developed to further enhance the Raman signal, mitigate fluorescence effects, and monitor hazards at a distance for use in homeland security and defense applications.

  15. Homeland security in the USA: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Roger L

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the evolving and dynamic field of homeland security in the USA. Included in this analysis is the evolution of the creation of the Department of Homeland Security, an overview of the National Warning System, a summary of citizen support groups, and how the field of homeland security has had an impact on the location and architecture of public buildings and facilities. Also included are website directories of citizen support groups and federal agencies related to the field of homeland security.

  16. A value model for evaluating homeland security decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, Ralph L; von Winterfeldt, Detlof

    2011-09-01

    One of the most challenging tasks of homeland security policymakers is to allocate their limited resources to reduce terrorism risks cost effectively. To accomplish this task, it is useful to develop a comprehensive set of homeland security objectives, metrics to measure each objective, a utility function, and value tradeoffs relevant for making homeland security investments. Together, these elements form a homeland security value model. This article develops a homeland security value model based on literature reviews, a survey, and experience with building value models. The purposes of the article are to motivate the use of a value model for homeland security decision making and to illustrate its use to assess terrorism risks, assess the benefits of countermeasures, and develop a severity index for terrorism attacks. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  17. Muon Fluence Measurements for Homeland Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankney, Austin S.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Borgardt, James D.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2010-08-10

    This report focuses on work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to better characterize aspects of backgrounds in RPMs deployed for homeland security purposes. Two polyvinyl toluene scintillators were utilized with supporting NIM electronics to measure the muon coincidence rate. Muon spallation is one mechanism by which background neutrons are produced. The measurements performed concentrated on a broad investigation of the dependence of the muon flux on a) variations in solid angle subtended by the detector; b) the detector inclination with the horizontal; c) depth underground; and d) diurnal effects. These tests were conducted inside at Building 318/133, outdoors at Building 331G, and underground at Building 3425 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  18. 78 FR 7797 - Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC) AGENCY: OPS/OCIO, DHS. ACTION: Committee Management; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSIN AC) will meet on February 27th-28th, 2013 in Washington, DC....

  19. Collaborative Policy Making: Vertical Integration in The Homeland Security Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    National Preparedness: A Case Study in the Development of Public Policy,” Sam Clovis agrees that homeland security is a national issue but...recommends that state and local governments have maximum flexibility in implementing homeland security programs ( Clovis , 2006). He sees the federal...national preparedness ( Clovis , 2006). The author goes on to recommend a framework of “Collaborative Federalism” for homeland security. A review of

  20. 77 FR 1942 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... as new developments in systems engineering, cyber- security, knowledge management and how best to... SECURITY Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) AGENCY: Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T), Department of Homeland Security....

  1. People-First Homeland Security: Recalibrating for Community Collaboration and Engagement within a Homeland Security Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Exchange Commission (SEC), was a champion of plain language and realized how critical it is for financial documents. The SEC handbook remains an excellent...contagious back to the 1930s, as described in the Jacob Moreno sociograms. The language of contagion is part of pop culture today, and it is common to... contagion are also applicable to resiliency matters of homeland security. Fostering resilient behaviors in the community can have a contagious influence on

  2. Risk Unbound: Threat, Catastrophe, and the End of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    something different of homeland security professionals. B. PROBLEM STATEMENT Three dominant pillars of homeland security theory and practice...term is that in which the price of copper and the rate of interest twenty years hence, all the obsolescence of a new invention are uncertain. About

  3. 78 FR 71631 - Committee Name: Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... SECURITY Committee Name: Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC) AGENCY... Management; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Information Network... Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC) is an advisory body to the...

  4. 75 FR 44800 - Notice of Meeting of the Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee, Tuesday...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... SECURITY Notice of Meeting of the Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee, Tuesday, August... meeting. SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC) will meet from... Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee is to identify issues and provide to...

  5. International Relations and HRD Activities of the International Nuclear Nonproliferation and Security Academy of the ROK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan Kyoo Choe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to explain the HRD activities on nuclear nonproliferation and security area of the International Nuclear Nonproliferation and Security Academy (INSA of the Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC. The HRD activities on nuclear security in international society have moved gradually from military dimension to the aspect of social management of conflict and threat. The paper would be developed in the following ways; First, the main concept of nuclear security in the Republic of Korea(ROK will be touched, which could show us why and how the ROK has put its step forward into the HRD efforts. Second, the background in conjunction with international relations and its developing process how the Korea Center of Excellence (COE, named as INSA, had been set would be described. Third, the detailed efforts of the ROK to build a COE in Korea in connection with the 2nd Nuclear Security Summit (NSS will be touched with a detailed explanation on its main activities, direction and the perspective. Finally, the aspect of nuclear culture issues and lessons learned in the first year of the nuclear nonproliferation and security HRD activities of the INSA would be developed.

  6. Community Preparedness: Alternative Approaches to Citizen Engagement in Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    and largely ignores the social aspects that influence an individual’s beliefs, attitudes and, behaviors.53 Self-efficacy is defined by Albert Bandura ...master’s thesis Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA), 39–52 53 Ibid., 53. 54 Albert Bandura , “Self-efficacy: Toward a Unifying Theory of...Hometown Security: Advancing the Homeland Security Paradigm, Homeland Security Affairs V (2009). http://www.hsaj.org/?fullarticle=5.2.2. Bandura

  7. 75 FR 59278 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... enforcement agencies concerning transportation infrastructure. Members will also receive domestic and international intelligence briefings that are focused on threats against the homeland which require responsive... vulnerabilities identified in a cyber exercise and discuss potential methods to improve a federal response...

  8. Ultrafast fiber lasers for homeland security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhotnikov, O. G.

    2005-09-01

    Detecting weapons concealed underneath clothing, analyzing the contents of suspicious-looking envelopes, or even spotting the onset of cancer: these are just some of the exciting prospects that have been turning terahertz wave research into one of the most important topics in photonics. Most broadband pulsed THz sources are based on the excitation of different materials with ultrashort laser pulses. So far, generation of tunable narrow-band THz radiation has been demonstrated using ultrafast solid state lasers as a source of high-intensity optical pulses. The lack of a high-power, low-cost, portable room-temperature THz source is the most significant limitation of modern THz systems. Advances in fiber laser technology can be used to further the capabilities of the homeland security. Using semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors allows for reliable mode-locked operation with different values of cavity dispersion in a broad spectrum ranged from 900 to 1600 nm. Semiconductor saturable absorbers mirrors have been used successfully to initiate and to sustain mode-locking in a wide range of core-pumped fiber lasers. The main advantage of the semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors (SESAM) is the possibility to control important parameters such as absorption recovery time, saturation fluence and modulation depth through the device design, growth conditions and post-growth processing. The SESAM as a cavity mirror in the fiber laser results in compact size, environmentally stable and simple ultrashort pulse lasers that can cover wide wavelength range and generate optical pulses with durations from picoseconds to femtoseconds. Employing SESAM technology for mode-locking, the double-clad fiber laser promises superior pulse quality, high stability and pulse energy without need for power booster that eventually degrades the pulse quality due to nonlinear distortions in the amplifier fiber. We give an overview of recent achievements in ultrafast fiber lasers; discuss basic

  9. 78 FR 9768 - Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation Imposition of Missile Sanctions on Two...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... of International Security and Nonproliferation Imposition of Missile Sanctions on Two Chinese Foreign.... SUMMARY: A determination has been made that two foreign persons in China have engaged in activities that...) . Accordingly, the following sanctions are being imposed on these foreign persons for two years: (A) Denial of...

  10. Managing Materials and Wastes for Homeland Security Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    To provide information on waste management planning and preparedness before a homeland security incident, including preparing for the large amounts of waste that would need to be managed when an incident occurs, such as a large-scale natural disaster.

  11. 77 FR 37912 - Committee Name: Homeland Security Academic Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... community approach and preparedness culture within student and neighboring communities; how to strengthen... relating to student and recent graduate recruitment; international students; academic research; campus and... (Student and Recent Graduate Recruitment, Homeland Security Academic Programs, Academic Research and...

  12. Iran's Relations to the East: Nonproliferation and Regional Security in a Changing Southwest Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehsin, Muhammad [Quaid-I-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-11-01

    This study attempts to answer the following questions: would a successful JPOA result in nuclear nonproliferation and regional security in Southwest Asia; and could the Middle East and South Asia work together to contain the threat of Salafi jihadism?

  13. 77 FR 56662 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... Secretary for Science and Technology, such as new developments in systems engineering, cyber-security... SECURITY Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) AGENCY: Science and.... SUMMARY: The Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) will meet on...

  14. Solving homeland security's wicked problems: a design thinking approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wyckoff, Kristin L.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T) requires a consistent yet flexible approach to address wicked problems. A design-thinking methodology holds promise, as its tenets align with the diversity and complexity inherent within the homeland security environment. Design thinking emphasizes a human-centered and multidisciplinary approach to solution development. The research examined how design t...

  15. Homeland Security Department: FY2011 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    administers several programs, including the BioWatch program, the National Biosurveillance Integration System (NBIS), and the department’s...coordination activities are implemented); the National Biosurveillance Integration Center; and the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Detection System.104...Acquisition 20 61 78 Radiation Portal Monitoring Program — 8 20 Securing the Cities 20 — 20 Human Portable Radiation Detection Systems — 53 38

  16. Effective surveillance for homeland security balancing technology and social issues

    CERN Document Server

    Flammini, Francesco; Franceschetti, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Effective Surveillance for Homeland Security: Balancing Technology and Social Issues provides a comprehensive survey of state-of-the-art methods and tools for the surveillance and protection of citizens and critical infrastructures against natural and deliberate threats. Focusing on current technological challenges involving multi-disciplinary problem analysis and systems engineering approaches, it provides an overview of the most relevant aspects of surveillance systems in the framework of homeland security. Addressing both advanced surveillance technologies and the related socio-ethical issues, the book consists of 21 chapters written by international experts from the various sectors of homeland security. Part I, Surveillance and Society, focuses on the societal dimension of surveillance-stressing the importance of societal acceptability as a precondition to any surveillance system. Part II, Physical and Cyber Surveillance, presents advanced technologies for surveillance. It considers developing technologie...

  17. Homeland Security Department: FY2009 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-04

    programs throughout DHS, and administers several of them, including the BioWatch program, the National Biosurveillance Integration System (NBIS...increase of $68 million for procurement of Advanced Spectroscopic Portals (ASPs) was partly offset by a decrease of $10 million for the Securing the...Nuclear Forensics Center, and $15 million for the Radiation Portal Monitoring Program. The House continued the prohibition on full-scale procurement

  18. Homeland Security Department: FY2006 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-29

    continuing resolution.” e. P.L. 101-130, enacted after the Loma Prieta earthquake, appropriated $1.1 billion in supplemental funding for FY1990. In...cooperate with and assist DHS in any investigation or reinvestigation. The authorization would cease to be effective once the President has selected...that investigations for DHS security clearances are done in the most timely and efficient manner once the 9/11 Act reforms take effect .” (Congressional

  19. A Homeland Security Net Assessment Needed Now!

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    significant such historical comparisons are for today. One of the most important developments has been the establishment of a network of 78 state...mission of directing DOD cyber opera- tions and defending military information networks . The commander of USCYBERCOM also serves as director of the...to telecoms to aviation.”71 In recent years it seems as if just about everybody in the national security and intelligence communities has jumped on

  20. Homeland Security Affairs Journal, Volume VII - 2011, 10 Years After: The 9/11 Essays

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Homeland Security Affairs is the peer-reviewed online journal of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS), providing a forum to propose and debate strategies, policies, and organizational arrangements to strengthen U.S. homeland security. The instructors, participants, alumni, and partners of CHDS represent the leading subject matter experts and practitioners in the field of homeland security. 10 Years After: the 9/11 Essays. Homeland Security Affairs (...

  1. Optical Imaging Sensors and Systems for Homeland Security Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Javidi, Bahram

    2006-01-01

    Optical and photonic systems and devices have significant potential for homeland security. Optical Imaging Sensors and Systems for Homeland Security Applications presents original and significant technical contributions from leaders of industry, government, and academia in the field of optical and photonic sensors, systems and devices for detection, identification, prevention, sensing, security, verification and anti-counterfeiting. The chapters have recent and technically significant results, ample illustrations, figures, and key references. This book is intended for engineers and scientists in the relevant fields, graduate students, industry managers, university professors, government managers, and policy makers. Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications focuses on research monographs in the areas of -Recognition and identification (including optical imaging, biometrics, authentication, verification, and smart surveillance systems) -Biological and chemical threat detection (including bios...

  2. 76 FR 41274 - Committee Name: Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... as new developments in systems engineering, cyber-security, knowledge management and how best to... SECURITY Committee Name: Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) ACTION... Homeland Security has determined that the renewal of the charter of the Homeland Security Science...

  3. Homeland Security Research and Development Funding, Organization, and Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-22

    University of Southern California; agro-security at the University of Minnesota and at Texas A&M; on behavioral and sociological aspects of terrorism at the...computational challenges for homeland security. DHS also supports a university fellowship /training program, which plans to train 200 students in 2007, down from...300 in 2006, and up to 15 postdoctoral fellows. Regarding intramural R&D, DHS may use any federal laboratory and may establish a headquarters

  4. Modeling Homeland Security: A Value Focused Thinking Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    BIB -1 viii List of Figures Page Figure 2-1: Organization of the Department of Homeland Security...richard.deckro@afit.edu. BIB -1 Bibliography 1. Advisory Panel to Assess Domestic Response Capabilities For Terrorism Involving Weapons of...House, 2002. BIB -2 13. CERN: European Organization for Nuclear Resources. “Affinity Diagram.” Technical Support Division. November 2002

  5. 78 FR 69861 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency...: Department of Homeland Security, Privacy Office. ACTION: Notice of Privacy Act System of Records. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, the Department of Homeland Security proposes to update and reissue...

  6. The Role of the National Guard in Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    became the tool to militarily protect the westward expansion. In 1790, under Harmer , and in 1791 under St. Clair, forces which consisted of primarily...militia with additional regular units were defeated by Indians in the Northwest frontier. Both Harmer and St. Clair defended themselves by...and Charles W. Yost. Army Forces for Homeland Security. Santa Monica, CA: RAND Corporation, 2004. Davis, Lynn E., and Jeremy Shapiro, ed. The U.S

  7. Federal-Tribal Government Collaboration in Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    wide variety of national critical infrastructure. Dams, water impoundments and reservoirs, electrical generation plants, drinking water, and...Kalt and Singer point out, “did not and do not absorb the tribes into the United States; rather, the reverse is true. The treaties recognize and...identified as a point of need for effective homeland security actions, Kettl points out that without better collaboration between the state and local

  8. Creation of a Homeland Security Jail Information Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    In contrast, law enforcement officers at a jail have a better gestalt understanding of homeland security threats and trends in the same...and my personal familiarity with each model. In his book Beyond the Two Disciplines of Scientific Psychology , Lee Cronbach claims that...muhajir.background/index.html Cronbach, L. J. (1975). Beyond the two disciplines of scientific psychology . Washington, D.C.: American Psychologist

  9. The Homeland Security Enterprise: Where Do We Fit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    they are dependent upon the grant funding to help offset the burdens of establishing and maintaining a state of readiness. Samuel Clovis (2006...by Samuel H. Clovis , Jr., Chair of the Department of Business Administration and Economics at Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa. 15 Like...Secretary Chertoff (2006, p. 1), Clovis (2006, p. 1) asserts future homeland security challenges “Require solutions for which the existing structures

  10. State Defense Forces and Their Role in American Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    familysecuritymatters.org/publications/id.7744/pub_detail.asp. 2 Arthur Tulak, Robert Kraft, and Don Silbaugh, “State Defense Forces and Homeland Security...not part of an elite group of well-armed, well-trained military soldiers hardened by the trials of lethal combat—most were simply the undesirables of...Guard. Accessed September 15, 2014. http://www.tnmilitary.org/tennessee-state- guard.html. Tulak, Arthur , Robert Kraft, and Don Silbaugh. “State

  11. Role of Information Management in Advancing Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    understanding they need to make decisions. Many articles have addressed the tangled web of homeland security issues in terms of authorities, bud- gets , or...directly impact public safety. Despite significant strides since 9/11, decision makers at all levels still do not get the information they need when...Texas Law Review, Vol. 88, p. 1854. 7. Merrie Archer, “The Whole of Government Planning Process,” U.S. Department of State, Washington, D.C., 18

  12. The Fire Service’s Role in Maritime Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    homeland security partners, information sharing, planning and ferry/ cruise ship response. Leaders from other federal and local agencies that have a role...explosion on a cruise ship or ferryboat will require a fire boat, response vessels and specialized training. Currently, the ability of first...responders to work with cruise ships is at the discretion of the cruise ship operators as most of these vessels are foreign flagged and local governments

  13. Homeland security: sharing and managing critical incident information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, W. R., III

    2003-09-01

    Effective critical incident response for homeland security requires access to real-time information from many organizations. Command and control, as well as basic situational awareness, are all dependant on quickly communicating a dynamically changing picture to a variety of decision makers. For the most part, critical information management is not unfamiliar or new to the public safety community. However, new challenges present themselves when that information needs to be seamlessly shared across multiple organizations at the local, state and federal level in real-time. The homeland security problem does not lend itself to the traditional military joint forces planning model where activities shift from a deliberate planning process to a crisis action planning process. Rather, the homeland security problem is more similar to a traditional public safety model where the current activity state moves from complete inactivity or low-level attention to immediate crisis action planning. More often than not the escalation occurs with no warning or baseline information. This paper addresses the challenges of sharing critical incident information and the impacts new technologies will have on this problem. The value of current and proposed approaches will be critiqued for operational value and areas will be identified for further development.

  14. Non-proliferation, safeguards, and security for the fissile materials disposition program immobilization alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggan, R.A.; Jaeger, C.D.; Tolk, K.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy is analyzing long-term storage and disposition alternatives for surplus weapons-usable fissile materials. A number of different disposition alternatives are being considered. These include facilities for storage, conversion and stabilization of fissile materials, immobilization in glass or ceramic material, fabrication of fissile material into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for reactors, use of reactor based technologies to convert material into spent fuel, and disposal of fissile material using geologic alternatives. This paper will focus on how the objectives of reducing security and proliferation risks are being considered, and the possible facility impacts. Some of the areas discussed in this paper include: (1) domestic and international safeguards requirements, (2) non-proliferation criteria and measures, (3) the threats, and (4) potential proliferation, safeguards, and security issues and impacts on the facilities. Issues applicable to all of the possible disposition alternatives will be discussed in this paper. However, particular attention is given to the plutonium immobilization alternatives.

  15. Application of Near-Space Passive Radar for Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenqin

    2007-03-01

    To protect the homeland from terrorist attacks employing explosive devices, revolutionary advances across a wide range of technologies are required. Inspired by recent advances in near-space (defined as the region between 20 km and 100 km), this paper proposes a new passive radar system using opportunistic transmitter as an illuminator and near-space platform as a receiver. This concept differs substantially from current radars. This system can be operated as a passive bistatic or multistatic radar and hence largely immune to jamming. By placing the receiver in near-space platforms, many functions that are currently performed with satellites or airplanes could be performed much more cheaply and with much greater operational utility. These advantages make near-space passive attractive for a variety of applications, many of which fit well with the needs of homeland security. This paper details the role of near-space passive radar as sensor system that can support homeland security applications. The strengths and weakness of near-space passive radar, compared to current spaceborne and airborne radars, are detailed. The signal models and processing algorithms for near-space passive radar are provided. It is shown that the use of cost effective near-space platforms can provide the solutions that were previously thought to be out of reach to remote sensing and government customers.

  16. 76 FR 68809 - Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation; Termination of Chemical and Biological...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... Nonproliferation; Termination of Chemical and Biological Weapons (CBW) Proliferation Sanctions Against a Foreign... CONTACT: Pamela K. Durham, Office of Missile, Biological, and Chemical Nonproliferation, Bureau of... government, project, or entity in its efforts to acquire chemical or biological weapons capability:...

  17. 75 FR 7978 - Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security Transportation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-023 Workplace Violence... Security Administration-023 Workplace Violence Prevention Program System of Records and this proposed...-036, Transportation Security Administration, 601 South 12th Street, Arlington, VA 20598-6036....

  18. The Non-Proliferation Treaty increases security; Pysyvae ydinsulkusopimus lisaeae kansainvaelistae vakautta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahiluoto, K.

    1995-12-31

    Extension of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty indefinitely was a historic decision. The Treaty is the most extensive international agreement on security policy to date; now its obligations have become a permanent part of international justice. Moreover, the NPT represents a political and moral obligation. Through the NPT, the international community has made a permanent commitment to restrict the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Increasing pressures will be applied to the few countries still outside the NPT, making it more likely that these countries will eventually change their views. The likelihood of regional bans on nuclear weapons in the Middle East and in Asia, too, will increase. The Treaty promotes the establishment of new nuclear-free zones. The nuclear-free zone in Latin America - the countries covered by the Tlatelolco Treaty - is already very close to its full implementation. Finland is firmly committed to the obligations of the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The NPT Conference of 1995 was among the first international meetings in which Finland participated, and took an active role, as a Member State of the European Union. (orig.).

  19. National Nuclear Security Administration Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report in Brief: October 2007 - May 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.; Sandusky, Jessica A.

    2009-05-01

    This abbreviated Annual Report covers program activities of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) from October 2007 through May 2008--the timeframe between the last Annual Report (which covered activities through September 2007) and the next report (which will begin with June 2008 activities). In that timeframe, the NGFP continued building a solid foundation as the program began reaping the benefits of recently implemented changes. This report is organized by Fellowship class and the pertinent program activities for each, including: October 2007 Recruiting events and final applications (Class of 2008) Winter 2007 Selection and hiring (Class of 2008) Spring 2008 Career development roundtables (Class of 2007) Orientation planning (Class of 2008) Recruitment planning and university outreach (Class of 2009) May 2008 Closing ceremony (Class of 2007)

  20. Field-Capable Biodetection Devices for Homeland Security Missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougherty, G M; Clague, D S; Miles, R R

    2007-04-05

    Biodetection instrumentation that is capable of functioning effectively outside the controlled laboratory environment is critical for the detection of health threats, and is a crucial technology for Health Security. Experience in bringing technologies from the basic research laboratory to integrated fieldable instruments suggests lessons for the engineering of these systems. This overview will cover several classes of such devices, with examples from systems developed for homeland security missions by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Recent trends suggest that front-end sample processing is becoming a critical performance-determining factor for many classes of fieldable biodetection devices. This paper introduces some results of a recent study that was undertaken to assess the requirements and potential technologies for next-generation integrated sample processing.

  1. 78 FR 17219 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ..., such as new developments in systems engineering, cyber-security, ] knowledge management and how best to... SECURITY Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Science... Meeting for Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC). SUMMARY: The meeting...

  2. 78 FR 45255 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... engineering, cyber-security, knowledge management and how best to leverage related technologies funded by... SECURITY Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) ACTION: Notice of Federal Advisory Committee charter renewal. SUMMARY: The Secretary of Homeland Security has determined that...

  3. 78 FR 43890 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency-006...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... Management Agency--006 Citizen Corps Database'' and retitle it ``Department of Homeland Security/ Federal... System name: DHS/FEMA--006 Citizen Corps Program Security classification: Unclassified. System location... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, Federal...

  4. 78 FR 34665 - Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC); Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... SECURITY Homeland Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC); Meeting AGENCY: OPS/OCIO, DHS... Security Information Network Advisory Committee (HSINAC) will meet on Tuesday, June 25th, 2013 from 1 p.m...: http://www.dhs.gov/homeland-security-information-network-advisory-committee . There is a meeting...

  5. 19 CFR 111.34 - Undue influence upon Department of Homeland Security employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Undue influence upon Department of Homeland... Brokers § 111.34 Undue influence upon Department of Homeland Security employees. A broker must not influence or attempt to influence the conduct of any representative of the Department of Homeland Security...

  6. Test of radiation detectors used in homeland security applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pibida, L; Minniti, R; O'Brien, M; Unterweger, M

    2005-05-01

    This work was performed as part of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) program to support the development of the new American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards N42.32-2003 and N42.33-2003 for hand-held detectors, and personal electronic dosimeters, as well as to support the Office of Law Enforcement Standards (OLES) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in testing these types of detectors for their use by first responders. These instruments are required to operate over a photon energy range of 60 keV to 1.33 MeV and over a wide range of air-kerma rates. The performance and response of various radiation detectors, purchased by the NIST, was recorded when placed in 60Co, 137Cs, and x-ray beams at different air-kerma rates. The measurements described in this report were performed at the NIST x-ray and gamma-ray radiation calibration facilities. The instruments' response (exposure or dose rate readings) shows strong energy dependence but almost no dependence to different air-kerma rates. The data here reported provide a benchmark in support of current protocols that are being developed for radiation detection instrumentation used in homeland security applications. A future plan is to test these devices, plus other commercially available detectors, against ANSI standards N42.32-2003 and N42.33-2003.

  7. Pulse-shape discrimination scintillators for homeland security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Mark E.; Duroe, Kirk; Kendall, Paul A.

    2016-09-01

    An extensive programme of research has been conducted for scintillation liquids and plastics capable of neutron-gamma discrimination for deployment in future passive and active Homeland Security systems to provide protection against radiological and nuclear threats. The more established detection materials such as EJ-301 and EJ-309 are compared with novel materials such as EJ-299-33 and p-terphenyl. This research also explores the benefits that can be gained from improvements in the analogue-to-digital sampling rate and sample bit resolution. Results are presented on the Pulse Shape Discrimination performance of various detector and data acquisition combinations and how optimum configurations from these studies have been developed into field-ready detector arrays. Early results from application-specific experimental configurations of multi-element detector arrays are presented.

  8. The Impact of Organizational Culture on the Sharing of Homeland Security Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-04

    IMPACT OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE ON THE SHARING OF HOMELAND SECURITY INFORMATION By Jeffery E. Bradey GS-15, Department of Defense...information sharing tool. 15. SUBJECT TERMS organizational culture , Homeland Security Information Network, information sharing 16. SECURITY...41 Organizational Culture .................................................................................................. 41

  9. 77 FR 59407 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) AGENCY: Science and Technology Directorate, DHS..., 56662-56663 that the Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) would meet on... will be held at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Science and Technology Directorate, 1120...

  10. Remodeling: A Way to Strengthen the Department of Homeland Security Internal Management and Partnering Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    Future of Homeland Security,” FDCH Congressional Testimony (July 12, 2012): Military & Government Collection, EBSCOhost , 2, (accessed July 31, 2012...Government Collection, EBSCOhost , 1, (accessed July 31, 2012). 12 U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Department of Homeland Security Strategic Plan...Department’s Roles/Missions,” FDCH Political Transcripts (n.d.): Military & Government Collection, EBSCOhost , 8, (accessed July 31, 2012). 14 Don Harvey and

  11. Wearable high-tech gear for homeland security personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswarlu, Ronda; Hui Wei, Choo; Li Lian, Ngiam; Lim, E. T.; Zhu, Zijian; Yang, Mingjiang

    2006-05-01

    Recent homeland security problems in various countries indicate that fixed surveillance systems at important places are not adequate enough. As the security threats take new dimensions in future, mobile smart security personnel wearing high-tech gear will form the basic infrastructure. See first, listen first, detect first, track first, communicate first with peers, assess the threat and coordinate with security head-quarters are the functions of high-tech gear. This paper proposes a high-tech gear involving (i) hands-free and obtrusion-free textile-based wearable microphone array to capture users voice and interface with body-worn computer, (ii) microphone arrays embedded in textiles to listen and record others voices from a distance, (iii) miniature cameras embedded in the shirt to provide the user with omni vision (iv) wireless personal display as GUI hidden in textile or natural glasses, (v) GPS and body area network for positional awareness for information in the form of text or textile integrated, (vi) reconfigurable HW/SW for all the above functions configured in the form of a usual belt. The main focus of this paper is how to configure the high-tech gear with all these sophisticated functions to disappear into the natural wearables of the user giving him normal look in the public. This project is sponsored by Defence Science & Technology Agency, Ministry of Defence, Singapore. This paper covers multi-discipline technologies at system level, hence not possible to go into details of any subsystem. The main objective of this paper is to share our thoughts and get feedback. Progress and some critical design issues are discussed in this paper.

  12. 77 FR 70796 - Privacy Act of 1974; Retirement of Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... Administration-015 Registered Traveler Operations Files (November 8, 2005, 69 FR 67735), which was written to...)-015 Registered Traveler (RT) Operations File Files (November 8, 2005, 69 FR 67735), which was written... Transportation Security Administration System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office, Department of Homeland...

  13. Fire Stations - FIRE_STATIONS_HSIP_IDHS_IN: Fire Stations in Indiana as Developed for the Homeland Security Infrastructure Program (Indiana Department of Homeland Security, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — FIRE_STATIONS_HSIP_IDHS_IN is a point shapefile that contains locations of fire station, as developed for the Homeland Security Infrastructure Program (HSIP). The...

  14. Hospitals - HOSPITALS_HSIP_IDHS_IN: Hospitals in Indiana as Developed for the Homeland Security Infrastructure Program (Indiana Department of Homeland Security, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — HOSPITALS_HSIP_IDHS_IN is a point shapefile that contains hospital locations, as developed for the Homeland Security Infrastructure Program (HSIP). The data were...

  15. 78 FR 14101 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... systems engineering, cyber-security, knowledge management and how best to leverage related technologies... Security and the evolution of the Cyber Security Division of DHS S&T. The committee will review the... SECURITY Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) AGENCY: Science...

  16. Beyond Measure: New Approaches to Analyzing Congressional Oversight of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Constitution. From the requirement for Congress to appropriate money before the executive branch can spend it, to the advice and consent given by the...addressed and improve bills. a. Recommendation 14 The homeland security committees should take any parliamentary actions that will help them secure... parliamentary actions that will help them secure larger jurisdiction over homeland security topics. 101 APPENDIX B. HURRICANE KATRINA HEARINGS Date

  17. How Should Municipal Police Agencies Participate in America’s Homeland Security Strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    from a decidedly federal approach to a municipal orientation. After all, Thomas Ridge, former director of the department of Homeland Security, said...policy or operating procedures is 82 Remarks By Homeland Security Director Thomas Ridge to...R. Mauborgne. Blue Ocean Strategy. Massachusetts: Harvard Business School Press, 2005. Laqueur , Walter. The New Terrorism: Fanaticism and the Arms

  18. Defining the Role and Responsibility of the Fire Service Within Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    High Low Strategy Canvas : The Fire Service’s Approach to Homeland Security Eliminate Raise Reduce Create A Holistic Approach to Homeland Security Red...The starfish and the spider : The unstoppable power of leaderless organizations. London, England: Penguin Books Ltd. Bryson, J. (2004). Strategic

  19. What Type of State Homeland Security Strategy Should the State of New Jersey Develop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Rosell, Richard, “2007 Troop “C” Strategic Plan”. Hamilton: NJSP, 2007. Schwarzenegger , Arnold . California State Homeland Security Strategy...Strategy’s CMA do not contain goals. Arnold Schwartzenegger, The California Homeland Security Strategy. (Sacramento: Office of the Governor, 2005

  20. Homeland Security Education: Managerial versus Nonmanagerial Market Perspectives of an Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Daniel; Henley, Russ; McElreath, David; Lackey, Hilliard; Jones, Don; Gokaraju, Balakrishna; Sumrall, William

    2016-01-01

    The authors discuss the findings of a market study that preceded the offering of an academic program in homeland security. The university disseminated a mail survey to gain data for analysis of variance testing of several hypotheses regarding market perceptions of the intended homeland security program offering. Stratification involved segregating…

  1. 76 FR 19107 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency-011...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ...In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, the Department of Homeland Security proposes to establish a new Department of Homeland Security system of records titled, ``Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency--011 Training and Exercise Program Records System of Records.'' This system of records will allow the Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency to collect and maintain records on its training and exercise programs. This system of records will include the personally identifiable information of current and former Federal Emergency Management Agency employees and contractors, current and former members of the first responder and emergency management communities, and others who have applied or registered to participate in or who have assisted with Federal Emergency Management Agency's training and exercise programs. The Department of Homeland Security is issuing a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, to exempt this system of records from certain provisions of the Privacy Act, elsewhere in the Federal Register. In addition, in accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974 the Department of Homeland Security is giving notice that it proposes to consolidate the Privacy Act system of records notice titled, Department of Homeland Security/ Federal Emergency Management Agency/National Emergency Training Center--017 Student Application and Registration Records system of records (October 5, 2004, 69 FR 192) into this system of records. This newly established system will be included in the Department of Homeland Security's inventory of record systems.

  2. 75 FR 41097 - Homeland Security Acquisition Regulation; Lead System Integrators [HSAR Case 2009-003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ...The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is issuing an interim rule amending the Homeland Security Acquisition Regulation (HSAR) to implement section 6405 of the U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans' Care, Katrina Recovery, and Iraq Accountability Appropriations Act, 2007. This section of the Act and these implementing regulations restrict contractors from acting as lead system integrators in the......

  3. 75 FR 55335 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act of 1974: Department of Homeland Security/ALL-031 Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... private sector. Additionally, the Department of Homeland Security is issuing a Notice of Proposed... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act of 1974: Department of Homeland Security... the Privacy Act of 1974, the Department of Homeland Security proposes to establish a new Department...

  4. 75 FR 8088 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL-023 Personnel Security Management System...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Security Management System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office; DHS. ACTION: Notice of Privacy Act system of... to update and reissue Department of Homeland Security/ALL--023 Personnel Security Management System... routine uses of this system have been reviewed and updated to reflect the personnel security...

  5. Nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament and extended deterrence in the new security environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    With the end of the Cold War, in a dramatically changed security environment, the advances in nonnuclear strategic capabilities along with reduced numbers and roles for nuclear forces has altered the calculus of deterrence and defense, at least for the United States. For many, this opened up a realistic possibility of a nuclear-free world. It soon became clear that the initial post-Cold War hopes were exaggerated. The world did change fundamentally, but it did not become more secure and stable. In place of the old Soviet threat, there has been growing concern about proliferation and terrorism involving nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction (WMD), regional conflicts, global instability and increasingly serious new and emerging threats, including cyber attacks and attacks on satellites. For the United States at least, in this emerging environment, the political rationales for nuclear weapons, from deterrence to reassurance to alliance management, are changing and less central than during the Cold War to the security of the United States, its friends and allies. Nuclear weapons remain important for the US, but for a far more limited set of roles and missions. As the Perry-Schlesinger Commission report reveals, there is a domestic US consensus on nuclear policy and posture at the highest level and for the near term, including the continued role of nuclear arms in deterring WMD use and in reassuring allies. Although the value of nuclear weapons has declined for the United States, the value of these weapons for Russia, China and so-called 'rogue' states is seen to be rising. The nuclear logic of NATO during Cold War - the need for nuclear weapons to counter vastly superior conventional capabilities of the Soviet Union and the Warsaw Pact - is today heard from Russians and even some proliferants. Moreover, these weapons present a way for rogues to achieve regional hegemony and possibly to deter interventions by the United States or others. While the

  6. The National Guard and its Role in Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Mobilizing Against Terrorism," CQ Weekly 57, no. 10 (6 March 99) 522 [ database on-line]; available from EBSCOhost ; accessed 8 September 2001. 34 Alan Ferber...November 2001. 6 Ibid. ś Kevin Stringer, "A Homeland Defense Mission," Military Review 80 (May/June 2000) 98 [ database on-line]; available from UMI...Implications for Homeland Defense," Abstract from Air University Research Database ; available from http://au.af.mil/au/ database /research/ay2001/affp

  7. 19 CFR 0.2 - All other CBP regulations issued under the authority of the Department of Homeland Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... authority of the Department of Homeland Security. 0.2 Section 0.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TRANSFERRED OR DELEGATED AUTHORITY § 0.2 All other CBP regulations issued under the authority of the Department of Homeland Security. (a...

  8. 75 FR 8092 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL-027 The History of the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... and future leadership, employees, and the public about the history of the Department. DHS is... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL--027 The History..., Department of Homeland Security-2004- 0004 Oral History Program: The History of the Department of Homeland...

  9. 41 CFR 102-73.196 - What types of special purpose space may the Department of Homeland Security lease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... purpose space may the Department of Homeland Security lease? 102-73.196 Section 102-73.196 Public... Delegations § 102-73.196 What types of special purpose space may the Department of Homeland Security lease? The Department of Homeland Security is delegated authority to lease whatever space its...

  10. Solving Homeland Security’s Wicked Problems: A Design Thinking Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    business innovation research, futures and forecasting , prize authority, business accelerators, and engagement with industry, international...tackle homeland security’s complex problems. 14. SUBJECT TERMS design thinking, innovation , DHS S&T, Department of Homeland Security, science and...design thinking? .......................................................................................16 a. Innovation Labs

  11. An Exploratory Risk Perception Study of Attitudes Toward Homeland Security Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanquist, Thomas F.; Mahy, Heidi A.; Morris, Fred A.

    2008-08-01

    Understanding the issues surrounding public acceptance of homeland security systems is important for balancing security needs and potential civil liberties infringements. A psychometric survey was used to measure attitudes regarding homeland security systems. Psychometric rating data were obtained from 182 respondents on psychological attributes associated with 12 distinct types of homeland security systems. An inverse relationship was observed for the overall rating attributes of acceptability and risk of civil liberties infringement. Principal components analysis yielded a two factor solution, with the rating scale loading pattern suggesting factors of Perceived Effectiveness and Perceived Intrusiveness. These factors also showed an inverse relationship. The 12 different homeland security systems showed significantly different scores on the rating scales and PCA factors, which were used to rank the systems in terms of overall acceptability. Difference scores for the rating scales and PCA factors were used to compute a single acceptability value reflecting the relative weight of risks and benefits. Of the 12 systems studied, airport screening, canine detectors and radiation monitoring at borders were found to be relatively acceptable, i.e., the perceived benefits for homeland security outweighed the perceived risks to civil liberties. Students rated several systems as more effective than professionals, but the overall pattern of results for both types of subjects was similar. The data suggest that risk perception research and the psychometric paradigm are useful approaches for quantifying attitudes regarding homeland security systems and policies, and can be used to anticipate potentially significant public acceptance issues.

  12. Intelligence-Led Risk Management for Homeland Security: A Collaborative Approach for a Common Goal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    and how they will be disseminated. The intelligence analysis/production step and risk analysis/production step represent a codependent ...NEED FOR COLLABORATION IN RISK MANAGEMENT Risk management and intelligence within the homeland security context share a codependent relationship

  13. 76 FR 5603 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Office of Operations Coordination and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... terrorists, drug cartel leaders or other persons known to have been involved in major crimes or terror of... to Homeland Security; and Known terrorists, drug cartel leaders or other persons known to have...

  14. Groupthink: a significant threat to the homeland security of the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Ricciuti, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The groupthink psychological phenomenon prevalent in the homeland security enterprise is a significant threat to the United States. Homeland security is vulnerable to groupthink because its leaders frequently share similar backgrounds, work histories, and world-views. This similarity minimizes the chance of outside perspectives being introduced to the decision-making process, which insulates leadership from external ideas. This researc...

  15. Homeland Security Vulnerabilities Of The US National Capital Region’s Bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    THE HOMELAND SECURITY VULNERABILITIES OF THE US NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S BRIDGES A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S...AUG 2015 – JUNE 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Homeland Security Vulnerabilities of the US National Capital Region’s Bridges 5a. CONTRACT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The National Capital Region (NCR) is plagued by the same critical infrastructure vulnerabilities, disrepair, and

  16. Bureaucracies, communities and networks : interagency cooperation for Homeland Security In Monterey County

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Gerald R.

    2003-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The federal government has undertaken a massive reorganization in order to create the Department of Homeland Security, and a parallel debate over how to organize homeland security functions has arisen at the State and Local government levels. In a time of severe budget constraints and rapidly changing threats, governments at all levels recognize the need for multiple government agencies, the private sector and nongovernmental organiza...

  17. Integrating statewide research and education resources for homeland security: the State University System of Florida Consortium on Homeland Security (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, James E.; Olson, Peter J.

    2005-05-01

    The eleven universities of the State University System of Florida (SUS-FL) have established a consortium to address the full range of homeland security and domestic preparedness requirements for both Florida and the U.S. The Consortium has established the Florida Homeland Security Institute to provide an effective and efficient mechanism to coordinate, mobilize, combine, and form into teams the diverse, cross-disciplinary expertise, facilities, and established large base of technology development activities within the SUS-FL institutions and their established associates at industrial companies, governmental labs, and other universities. The Florida Consortium and Institute may provide a model for other state university systems for how to combine established resources effectively to address specific homeland security and domestic preparedness needs. This paper describes the Consortium and Institute goals, structure, and operations, with examples of how it has functioned in its brief existence as an effective mechanism for integrating the wide range of university, industry, and government capabilities within the state for addressing homeland security requirements.

  18. Curriculum Evaluation and Revision in a Nascent Field: The Utility of the Retrospective Pretest-Posttest Model in a Homeland Security Program of Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelfrey, William V., Sr.; Pelfrey, William V., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Although most academic disciplines evolve at a measured pace, the emerging field of homeland security must, for reasons of safety and security, evolve rapidly. The Department of Homeland Security sponsored the establishment of a graduate educational program for key officials holding homeland security roles. Because homeland security is a nascent…

  19. Ethernet-based integrated surveillance system for homeland security and homeland defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooley, Michael G.; Thompson, Dean

    2004-09-01

    This report documents the results of an internal DRS effort to develop an Ethernet based integrated defense system to improve defense of cities, harbors, airports, power production, energy supplies, bridges, monuments, dams and so forth. Results of the integration of multiple SCOUT LPI radars and multiple Electro-optical targeting systems will be provided, illustrating the benefits of interfacing surveillance radars with imaging sensors to confirm detection and provide visual recognition and identification. An analysis of the handover errors will be provided including errors due to; sensor platforms location and orientation uncertainty, target location measurement errors, data latency and motion prediction errors, which contribute to target handoff and the re-acquisition timeline. These predictions will be compared to measured results. The system architecture will be defined including; security, support for both stationary and moving sensor platforms, remote control of sensor systems and distribution of imagery through the network and remote diagnostics, maintenance and software upgrades. Growth capabilities include secure wireless communication to/from moving platforms, integration with sonar and seismic sensors, cooperative location of friendly forces and acoustic detection and triangulation of gunshots with automated cueing of sensors and security forces to the shooters most probable location. The use of ad hoc multi-hopping wireless networking supplements hardwire networks, augments disaster response capabilities, provides high-speed communications for moving platforms and supplements GPS outage areas.

  20. An exploratory risk perception study of attitudes toward homeland security systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanquist, Thomas F; Mahy, Heidi; Morris, Frederic

    2008-08-01

    Understanding the issues surrounding public acceptance of homeland security systems is important for balancing security needs and potential civil liberties infringements. A psychometric survey was used in an exploratory study of attitudes regarding homeland security systems. Psychometric rating data were obtained from 182 respondents on psychological attributes associated with 12 distinct types of homeland security systems. An inverse relationship was observed for the overall rating attributes of acceptability and risk of civil liberties infringement. Principal components analysis (PCA) yielded a two-factor solution with the rating scale loading pattern suggesting factors of perceived effectiveness and perceived intrusiveness. These factors also showed an inverse relationship. The 12 different homeland security systems showed significantly different scores on the rating scales and PCA factors. Of the 12 systems studied, airport screening, canine detectors, and radiation monitoring at borders were found to be the most acceptable, while email monitoring, data mining, and global positioning satellite (GPS) tracking were found to be least acceptable. Students rated several systems as more effective than professionals, but the overall pattern of results for both types of subjects was similar. The data suggest that risk perception research and the psychometric paradigm are useful approaches for quantifying attitudes regarding homeland security systems and policies and can be used to anticipate potentially significant public acceptance issues.

  1. 78 FR 35295 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Cybersecurity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... NICCS Portal is a national online resource for cybersecurity awareness, education, talent management... following Information Collection Request (ICR) to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and... Security Management Act of 2002 (FISMA), 44 U.S.C. 3546; Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD)...

  2. Assessing Grant Allocation Methods for Federal Homeland Security Urban Area Assistance Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    case study of the United Kingdom’s grant allocation approach provides a comparative analysis for DHS funding. Components of the UK’s allocation...the degree of MASTER OF ARTS IN SECURITY STUDIES (HOMELAND SECURITY AND DEFENSE) from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL December 2015...38 V. UNITED KINGDOM CASE STUDY ................................................................41 A. UNITED KINGDOM APPROACH

  3. Management of the Severely Mentally Ill and Its Effects on Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS IN SECURITY STUDIES (HOMELAND SECURITY AND DEFENSE) from...waiting. Gang and graffiti calls Public Intoxication calls, some of which may be a result of the mentally ill. The process the go through when dealing

  4. A Sustainable WMD Nonproliferation Strategy for East Africa: Connecting the WMD Nonproliferation Agenda with Local Border Security Needs to Achieve Mutually Beneficial Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    this light , it is clear that we need a wider discussion on WMD nonproliferation capacity building, which considers the higher priorities of emerging...Administration Police Service, Immigration, Kenya National Focal Point on Small Arms & Light Weapons, National Steering Committee on Peacebuilding & Conflict...consumer goods production, agriculture, horticulture , oil refining, metals, cement, commercial ship repair and tourism. Kenya’s main commodity exports are

  5. Integrating Local Public Health Agencies into the Homeland Security Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    public health needs that require attention (such as poor prenatal health, teen pregnancy , and sexually transmitted diseases) it is not difficult to...Security objectives. It also assumes that war and terrorism are the sole results of poor health, nutrition , and housing, while ignoring other

  6. Department of Defense Homeland Security Joint Operating Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    electronic warfare, physical attack and/or destruction, and special information operations, and could include computer network attack.”19 In 2015...electronic warfare, and special information operations. Defensive information operations ensure timely, accurate, and relevant information access while...security, counter-deception, counter- psychological operations, counter-intelligence, electronic warfare, and special information operations. Defensive

  7. Defense and Homeland Security Applications of Multi-Agent Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Monterey, CA 93943-5219, U.S.A. Felix Martinez Wargaming Department Centro de Estudios Superiores Navales Mexico, D.F. 04840, MEXICO Lisa R...critical asset, Petroleos Mexicano (PE- MEX) and the Mexican Navy maintain mutually supportive security strategies in the Campeche Sound. During a state of

  8. Achieving Homeland Security in a Time of Diminishing Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    Kristine L. Shelstad, “The Domestic Security Command–The Evolution of the U.S. Northern Command” (Master’s Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterrey , CA...through the use of economic, diplomatic, military, and political power. 59 BIBLIOGRAPHY Books Turabian, Kate L. A Manual for Writers of Term

  9. Homeland security R&D roadmapping : risk-based methodological options.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Larry D.

    2008-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories support the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in the development and execution of a research and development (R&D) strategy to improve the nation's preparedness against terrorist threats. Current approaches to planning and prioritization of DHS research decisions are informed by risk assessment tools and processes intended to allocate resources to programs that are likely to have the highest payoff. Early applications of such processes have faced challenges in several areas, including characterization of the intelligent adversary and linkage to strategic risk management decisions. The risk-based analysis initiatives at Sandia Laboratories could augment the methodologies currently being applied by the DHS and could support more credible R&D roadmapping for national homeland security programs. Implementation and execution issues facing homeland security R&D initiatives within the national laboratories emerged as a particular concern in this research.

  10. Interagency Collaboration Challenges Among Homeland Security Disciplines in Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Strategic National Stockpile SPD Seattle Police Department SPOC Seattle Police Operations Center SWAT Special Weapons and Tactics xix TCL Target...established a command post at their Seattle Police Operations Center ( SPOC ) and not at the incident site. The SPOC is a secure police facility and its choice...https://www.chds.us/public.php?met. Christopher Bellavita, online class forum discussion with the author, January, 2006, https://www.chds.us/ courses

  11. Homeland Security Collaboration: Catch Phrase or Preeminent Organizational Construct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Thesis Advisor Glen Woodbury Second Reader Harold A. Trinkunas, PhD Chairman, Department of National Security Affairs iv THIS PAGE...Barry Berman and Joel R. Evans define gap analysis as the tool that “Enables a company to compare its actual performance against its potential...Management: A Strategic Approach 7/E, Barry Berman and Joel R Evans,” Prentice Hall, http://www.prenhall.com/rm_student/html/start.html (accessed

  12. Beating the Red Gold Rush: Copper Theft and Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    services, energy, financial services, food and agriculture, government facilities, healthcare and public health, information technology, nuclear reactors ...magazine-feature-article-september-2014. pdf ?sfvrsn=2, 12. 2 “Copper Theft Threatens U.S. Critical Infrastructure,” Federal Bureau of Investigation...www.nerc.com/files/6_Dabdoub_10-20_v2. pdf . 10 Jasvir Gill, Continuous Monitoring: A New Approach to Secure Critical Infrastructure (Atlanta, GA: North

  13. Homeland Security: Implications for Information Policy and Practice--First Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Lotte E.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses information policy in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks. Topics include access to government records, including Freedom of Information Act issues; removing or expanding information on government Web sites; state actions; coordination versus secrecy in homeland security; and patterns and trends in federal and state…

  14. 75 FR 69604 - Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security Office of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... (OPS), including the National Operations Center (NOC), proposes to establish a new DHS system of... Fusion System of Records.'' This system of records will allow DHS/OPS, including the NOC, to collect... natural disasters. The NOC serves as the nation's homeland security center for information sharing...

  15. 75 FR 32723 - Revision of Department of Homeland Security Acquisition Regulation; Limitations on Subcontracting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... National Operations Center (NOC), through the National Response Coordination Center (NRCC), coordinates the... the National Operations Center (NOC). Requests include a summary of the situation, types and amount of..., the Secretary of Homeland Security issues an operations order to the NOC. The NOC, through the...

  16. Citizenship and Terrorism: The Significance of a Pathway to Citizenship on Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    question: How would providing a pathway to citizenship for the illegal immigrant population of the United States affect homeland security with respect to... illegal immigrant , and non- immigrating foreigner. An analysis of terrorism defined by the categories of citizenship status and estimated population...domestic terrorism. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Citizenship, terrorism, comprehensive immigration reform, illegal immigrant , pathway to citizenship

  17. Biosafety and biosecurity as essential pillars of international health security and cross-cutting elements of biological nonproliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perkins Dana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The critical aspects of biosafety, biosecurity, and biocontainment have been in the spotlight in recent years. There have also been increased international efforts to improve awareness of modern practices and concerns with regard to the safe pursuit of life sciences research, and to optimize current oversight frameworks, thereby resulting in decreased risk of terrorist/malevolent acquisition of deadly pathogens or accidental release of a biological agent, and increased safety of laboratory workers. Our purpose is to highlight how the World Health Organization’s (WHO revised International Health Regulations (IHR[2005], the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC, and the United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR 1540 overlap in their requirements with regard to biosafety and biosecurity in order to improve the understanding of practitioners and policymakers and maximize the use of national resources employed to comply with internationally-mandated requirements. The broad range of goals of these international instruments, which are linked by the common thread of biosafety and biosecurity, highlight their significance as essential pillars of international health security and cross-cutting elements of biological nonproliferation. The current efforts of the Republic of Georgia to enhance biosafety and biosecurity in accordance with these international instruments are summarized.

  18. 76 FR 27847 - Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security/U.S. Coast...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ....S. Coast Guard--008 Courts Martial Case Files System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office, DHS. ACTION..., ``Department of Homeland Security/U.S. Coast Guard--008 Courts Martial Case Files System of Records'' from... Homeland Security/U.S. Coast Guard--008 Courts Martial Case Files System of Records from one or...

  19. 76 FR 67621 - Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security U.S. Customs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... Protection-003 Credit/Debit Care Data System of Records'' and this proposed rulemaking. In this proposed...; ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary 6 CFR Part 5 Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security U.S. Customs and Border Protection DHS/CBP-003 Credit/Debit Care...

  20. The National Guard -- DOD’s Logical Homeland Security "First Responder" for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Virginia 22134-5068 FUTURE WAR PAPER TITLE: THE NATIONAL GUARD – DOD’S LOGICAL HOMELAND SECURITY “ FIRST RESPONDER ” FOR THE 21ST...INCLUDE THE FOREGOING STATEMENT. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY TITLE: THE NATIONAL GUARD – DOD’S LOGICAL HOMELAND SECURITY “ FIRST RESPONDER ” FOR THE 21ST

  1. 75 FR 18867 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-011...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Security Administration--011, Transportation Security Intelligence Service Operations Files Systems of... Administration--011 Transportation Security Intelligence Service Operations Files previously published on... Security Intelligence Service (TSIS) Operations Files System of Records (69 FR 71828, December 10,...

  2. Homeland security: safeguarding America's future with energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-08-01

    The State Energy Advisory Board (STEAB) presents this 10th annual report following the one-year anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. This event has had profound impacts on all segments of American society, not the least of which is this country’s energy sector. Long before September 11, a number of energy issues grabbed the nation’s attention, including opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil and natural gas exploration, the power crisis in California, nationwide natural gas and gasoline price increases, and the administration’s May 2001 National Energy Policy. However, the events of September 11 refocused attention on the prominent role energy plays in the country’s homeland security. For the most part, the energy aspects of homeland security have focused on the physical security of critical energy emergency planning and energy infrastructure, such as power plants, refineries, and power and fuel transmission systems. While STEAB recognizes the importance of protecting our existing energy infrastructure, this should not be the sole focus of homeland security as it relates to energy.

  3. Status Summary of 3He and Neutron Detection Alternatives for Homeland Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.

    2010-04-28

    This is a short summary whitepaper on results of our alternatives work: Neutron detection is an important aspect of interdiction of radiological threats for homeland security purposes since plutonium, a material used for nuclear weapons, is a significant source of fission neutrons [Kouzes 2005]. Because of the imminent shortage of 3He, which is used in the most commonly deployed neutron detectors, a replacement technology for neutron detection is required for most detection systems in the very near future [Kouzes 2009a]. For homeland security applications, neutron false alarms from a detector can result in significant impact. This puts a strong requirement on any neutron detection technology not to generate false neutron counts in the presence of a large gamma ray-only source [Kouzes et al. 2008].

  4. An Agent-Based Approach for Data Fusion in Homeland Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Solís Montes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an agent-based solution for data fusion in Homeland Security. Communication technology has been developed very fast in the last decades. We can get lots of data in milliseconds. Our current problem is to process such amounts of data in order to provide useful information. We have to focus our effort on developing intelligent information systems able to handle big amounts of data extracting or revealing relations among data and able to produce information easily understandable for the human user. That is the case of data fusion in tactical operations, especially in the field of defense and Homeland security. Our research is focused on obtaining a Multi-agent system able to inference future enemy’s actions or behaviors from data received from heterogeneous sensors.

  5. Measuring Preparedness: Assessing the Impact of the Homeland Security Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    effectively. One of the primary functions of the GRT is to provide DHS with an electronic database to query in the event of a Congressional data call. In...we need an easy to ready catalog/ database of what resources (physical and non-physical) are available at the federal, state, regional, and local...Local Performance Regimes for Homeland Security.” Review of Policy Research 23, no. 1 (2006). Business Source Complete, EBSCOhost (accessed December 30

  6. Mission Command: Retooling the Leadership Paradigm for Homeland Security Crisis Response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    can be implemented by a homeland security organization. Fatal fires, such as 344 Francis Fukuyama , “America in Decay: The Sources of Political...Dysfunction,” Foreign Affairs (September–October 2014), accessed February 7, 2015, http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/141729/ francis - fukuyama /america...Bismark to Hitler, The Von Moltke Family’s Impact on German History. New York, Harper Collins, 1995. Fukuyama , Francis . “America in Decay: The

  7. Hilbertian sine as an absolute measure of Bayesian inference in ISR, homeland security, medicine, and defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Wang, Wenjian; Hodelin, Juan; Forrester, Thomas; Romanov, Volodymyr; Kostrzewski, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, Bayesian Binary Sensing (BBS) is discussed as an effective tool for Bayesian Inference (BI) evaluation in interdisciplinary areas such as ISR (and, C3I), Homeland Security, QC, medicine, defense, and many others. In particular, Hilbertian Sine (HS) as an absolute measure of BI, is introduced, while avoiding relativity of decision threshold identification, as in the case of traditional measures of BI, related to false positives and false negatives.

  8. The United States Department of Homeland Security Concept of Regionalization - Will It Survive the Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    intergovernmental relations by using network theory means that the system should be based on linkages and interrelationships, rather than...terrorist attack. Didn’t New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg exhibit big city egoism over a reduction in homeland security funding? Some... theory tells us that every relay doubles the noise and cuts the message in half. Also, change leadership requires the willingness and ability to change

  9. Formal Critiques and After Action Reports from Conventional Emergencies: Tools for Homeland Security Training and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Exercise Evaluation Guide EMS Emergency Medical Services HSEEP Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program IAP Incident Action Plan IP...must not be dumped from the pedagogical learning model used primarily for childhood education into an andragorical model without orientation on how...reporting an explosion at a food processing plant is received. The initial responding companies confirm the report and identify the source of the

  10. The DoD Role in Homeland Security: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    specifically chartered to address homeland security was the Council of National Defense ( CND ). The CND was established as an emergency agency by...responsibilities to state governments. On April 9, 1917, the CND chairman requested all Governors establish councils of defense.9 The armistice of 1918 prompted...councils to disband and CND operations were suspended on June 30, 1921.10 A parallel pattern emerged during World War II. Most wartime

  11. Of Nasa and Neanderthals, Elephants and Machines: Metaphors and the Conceptualization of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    favor of the pursuit of knowledge. Charles Darwin , genius though he was, was not a sharp mathematician183 but had he been so, he would have realized...is crucial since, as Charles Darwin understood, selection as the instrument for evolution can only work if there are different characteristics from... Charles Darwin Can Teach Tom Ridge about Homeland Security,” Foreign Policy (September–October 2003): 69. 292. Johanson and Wong, Lucy’s Legacy, 248. 293

  12. Fast and Accurate CBR Defense for Homeland Security: Bringing HPC to the First Responder and Warfighter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Bringing HPC to the First Responder and Warfighter DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following...thru ADP023803 UNCLASSIFIED Fast and Accurate CBR Defense for Homeland Security: Bringing HPC to the First Responder and Warfighter Gopal Patnaik and...Urban AerodynamicsE1 3, these models are now the fidelity and accuracy of CFD to the first responder or commonly applied to predict contaminant

  13. Nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament and extended deterrence in the new security environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    With the end of the Cold War, in a dramatically changed security environment, the advances in nonnuclear strategic capabilities along with reduced numbers and roles for nuclear forces has altered the calculus of deterrence and defense, at least for the United States. For many, this opened up a realistic possibility of a nuclear-free world. It soon became clear that the initial post-Cold War hopes were exaggerated. The world did change fundamentally, but it did not become more secure and stable. In place of the old Soviet threat, there has been growing concern about proliferation and terrorism involving nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction (WMD), regional conflicts, global instability and increasingly serious new and emerging threats, including cyber attacks and attacks on satellites. For the United States at least, in this emerging environment, the political rationales for nuclear weapons, from deterrence to reassurance to alliance management, are changing and less central than during the Cold War to the security of the United States, its friends and allies. Nuclear weapons remain important for the US, but for a far more limited set of roles and missions. As the Perry-Schlesinger Commission report reveals, there is a domestic US consensus on nuclear policy and posture at the highest level and for the near term, including the continued role of nuclear arms in deterring WMD use and in reassuring allies. Although the value of nuclear weapons has declined for the United States, the value of these weapons for Russia, China and so-called 'rogue' states is seen to be rising. The nuclear logic of NATO during Cold War - the need for nuclear weapons to counter vastly superior conventional capabilities of the Soviet Union and the Warsaw Pact - is today heard from Russians and even some proliferants. Moreover, these weapons present a way for rogues to achieve regional hegemony and possibly to deter interventions by the United States or others. While the

  14. 75 FR 39266 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL-029 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... race, ethnicity, or religion, by employees and officials of the Department of Homeland Security. The.../ religion (CRCL does not solicit this information, it is tracked if individuals provide it);...

  15. Enabling private and public sector organizations as agents of homeland security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassco, David H. J.; Glassco, Jordan C.

    2006-05-01

    Homeland security and defense applications seek to reduce the risk of undesirable eventualities across physical space in real-time. With that functional requirement in mind, our work focused on the development of IP based agent telecommunication solutions for heterogeneous sensor / robotic intelligent "Things" that could be deployed across the internet. This paper explains how multi-organization information and device sharing alliances may be formed to enable organizations to act as agents of homeland security (in addition to other uses). Topics include: (i) using location-aware, agent based, real-time information sharing systems to integrate business systems, mobile devices, sensor and actuator based devices and embedded devices used in physical infrastructure assets, equipment and other man-made "Things"; (ii) organization-centric real-time information sharing spaces using on-demand XML schema formatted networks; (iii) object-oriented XML serialization as a methodology for heterogeneous device glue code; (iv) how complex requirements for inter / intra organization information and device ownership and sharing, security and access control, mobility and remote communication service, tailored solution life cycle management, service QoS, service and geographic scalability and the projection of remote physical presence (through sensing and robotics) and remote informational presence (knowledge of what is going elsewhere) can be more easily supported through feature inheritance with a rapid agent system development methodology; (v) how remote object identification and tracking can be supported across large areas; (vi) how agent synergy may be leveraged with analytics to complement heterogeneous device networks.

  16. The Department of Defense and Homeland Security relationship: Hurricane Katrina through Hurricane Irene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, John Michael

    2015-01-01

    This research explored federal intervention with the particular emphasis on examining how a collaborative relationship between Department of Defense (DOD) and Homeland Security (DHS) led to greater effectiveness between these two federal departments and their subordinates (United States Northern Command and Federal Emergency Management Agency, respectively) during the preparation and response phases of the disaster cycle regarding US continental-based hurricanes. Through the application of a two-phased, sequential mixed methods approach, this study determined how their relationship has led to longitudinal improvements in the years following Hurricane Katrina, focusing on hurricanes as the primary unit of analysis.

  17. Mobile, portable lightweight wireless video recording solutions for homeland security, defense, and law enforcement applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy, Matt; Goldburt, Tim; Carapezza, Edward M.

    2015-05-01

    It is desirable for executive officers of law enforcement agencies and other executive officers in homeland security and defense, as well as first responders, to have some basic information about the latest trend on mobile, portable lightweight wireless video recording solutions available on the market. This paper reviews and discusses a number of studies on the use and effectiveness of wireless video recording solutions. It provides insights into the features of wearable video recording devices that offer excellent applications for the category of security agencies listed in this paper. It also provides answers to key questions such as: how to determine the type of video recording solutions most suitable for the needs of your agency, the essential features to look for when selecting a device for your video needs, and the privacy issues involved with wearable video recording devices.

  18. Impact of Homeland Security Alert level on calls to a law enforcement peer support hotline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Saad B; Barnett, Daniel J; Castellano, Cherie; Wierzba, Rachel K; Hiremath, Girish S; Balicer, Ran D; Everly, George S

    2007-01-01

    The Homeland Security Advisory System (HSAS) was established by the Department of Homeland Security to communicate the risk of a terrorist event. In order to explore the potential psychological impacts of HSAS we analyzed the effects of terror alerts on the law enforcement community. We used data from the New Jersey Cop 2 Cop crisis intervention hotline. Incidence Rate Ratios--interpreted as average relative increases in the daily number of calls to the Cop 2 Cop hotline during an increased alert period--were computed from Poisson models. The hotline received a total of 4,145 initial calls during the study period. The mean daily number of calls was higher during alert level elevation compared to prior 7 days (7.68 vs. 8.00). In the Poisson regression analysis, the Incidence Rate Ratios of number of calls received during elevated alert levels compared to the reference period of seven days preceding each change in alert were close to 1, with confidence intervals crossing 1 (i.e. not statistically significant) for all lag periods evaluated. This investigation, in the context of New Jersey law enforcement personnel, does not support the concern that elevating the alert status places undue stress upon alert recipients.

  19. High-Resolution Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy used in Homeland Security and Forensic Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Vass, Arpad Alexander [ORNL; Martin, Rodger Carl [ORNL; Grissino-Mayer, Henri [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    The technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to detect elements for a variety of homeland security applications such as nuclear materials identification and inventory,and forensic applications has been demonstrated. For nuclear materials applications, we detected and profiled metals in coatings that were used to encapsulate nuclear fuel. Multivariate analysis has been successfully employed in the quantification of elements present in treated wood and engineered wood composites. These examples demonstrate that LIBS-based techniques are inherently well suited for diverse environmental applications related to homeland security. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) are sufficient; (2) samples can be analyzed by LIBS very rapidly, and (3) biological materials such as human and animal bones and wood can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation. For forensic applications they have used LIBS to determine differences in animal and human bones. They have also applied this technique in the determination of counterfeit and non-counterfeit currency. They recently applied LIBS in helping to solve a murder case.

  20. 75 FR 28042 - Privacy Act of 1974: System of Records; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... Transportation Security Administration. Information in this system also includes records related to the... occurred during passenger or property screening would be covered by this system. Portions of this system... information system of records has been compromised. Another routine use permits the release of information to...

  1. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  2. The Consequences to National Security of Jurisdictional Gray Areas Between Emergency Management and Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    outlines a holistic community preparedness approach to securing the nation. “The national preparedness system shall be designed to help guide the domestic...failed its first test.”40 As the horror of Hurricane Katrina was being witnessed globally, so too was the issue of leadership, specifically, who was in...have impacted multiple in-groups to include patriotic Bostonians, concerned Muslim-Americans, and those who felt the need to revisit the horror of 9

  3. DHS Workshop -- Homeland Security: New Challenges for Decision Making Under Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, R; Edmunds, T; Howarth, S

    2004-02-20

    A workshop addressing the decision-making challenges confronted by the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in the face of large uncertainties, complex value systems, and multiple stakeholders was held November 13-14, 2003, in Washington, D.C. Forty-six participants drawn from the DHS, other government agencies, universities, national laboratories, and the private sector attended the workshop. The goals were: (1) to develop a common understanding of the range of decisions DHS program elements must make; (2) to review selected examples of decision processes and approaches used by other organizations for similarly complex problems; and (3) to recommend steps DHS can take to ensure high quality decision making. The workshop brought together diverse perspectives on decision making in the context of complex risks. Participants included those who must make decisions affecting homeland security, those who have faced risky decisions in other domains, and those who have developed theoretical and practical approaches to high quality decision-making. The workshop was sponsored by the Science & Technology (S&T) Directorate, but was intended to address issues of concern to the three DHS operating directorates as well as S&T. The purpose of this breadth was to identify areas in which S&T capabilities and resources could be valuable to DHS as a whole. The workshop consisted of three main segments: (1) Presentations by managers from DHS Directorates, reflecting the diverse nature of decision making across DHS; (2) Presentations on four alternative approaches used to address problems in both government (counter-terrorism R&D investment; identification of critical capabilities in bioterrorism) and the private sector (corporate strategy development; terrorism insurance); and (3) Breakout groups chartered to identify barriers and propose actions to address them, in each of five decision classes: (1) Portfolio management; (2) Grant allocation; (3) Critical one

  4. Management Principles for Nonproliferation Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Hund, Gretchen

    2012-03-06

    This paper identifies business models and six management principles that can be applied by a nonproliferation organization to maximize the value and effectiveness of its products. The organizations responsible for reducing the nuclear proliferation threat have experienced a substantial growth in responsibility and visibility since the September 11 attacks. Since then, the international community has witnessed revelations of clandestine nuclear facilities, nuclear black markets, periodic nuclear tests, and a resurgence of interest by countries worldwide in developing nuclear capabilities. The security environment will likely continue to evolve in unexpected ways since most of the proliferation threats with which the world will be forced to contend remain unforeseen. To better prepare for and respond to this evolving security environment, many nonproliferation organizations are interested in finding new or better ways to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of their operations. Of course, all organizations, whether they are market driven or non-profit, must operate effectively and efficiently if they are to succeed. Indeed, as this study demonstrates, many of the management principles that this study recommends can help all organizations succeed. However, this study pays particular attention to nonproliferation organizations because of the mission they are responsible for fulfilling. Nonproliferation organizations, including nonproliferation programs that operate within a larger national security organization, are responsible for reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. These organizations have an enduring mandate from the public and the international community not to fail in the completion of their mission for failure could have detrimental impacts on international security, public health and the environment. Moreover, the public expects nonproliferation organizations and programs to fulfill their mission, even when resources are limited

  5. 76 FR 24901 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security United States Coast Guard-DHS/USCG-002...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Homeland Security's inventory of record system. DATES: Submit comments on or before on or before June 2... contain Department of Transportation-required Substance Abuse evaluations and USCG Sexual Abuse Prevention... software tools which ensure the protection of the confidential information by making reconstruction...

  6. 77 FR 32709 - Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/Department of Homeland Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... us. DHS will disclose two separate data files through a computer matching operation for our use in... ADMINISTRATION Privacy Act of 1974, as Amended; Computer Matching Program (SSA/ Department of Homeland Security... an existing computer matching program that will expire on July 18, 2012. SUMMARY: In accordance...

  7. 76 FR 10205 - Department of Homeland Security Implementation of OMB Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... unintended changes this action makes in DHS policies and procedures for drug-free workplaces. All comments or.... Adopting the OMB guidance in place of the common rule will not substantively change the drug-free workplace... Implementation of OMB Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace Requirements AGENCY: Department of Homeland Security (DHS...

  8. Introducing the Future Now: Using Memetics and Popular Culture to Identify the Post-9/11 Homeland Security Zeitgeist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    becoming an increasingly “ hieroglyphic civilization.”37 This characterization is even more appropriate today. Ann Marie Seward Barry argues that we live...original official purpose to become a hieroglyphic with rich cultural meaning. No other meme related to homeland security has permeated our popular

  9. Compact Dielectric Wall Accelerator Development For Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy And Homeland Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y -; Caporaso, G J; Guethlein, G; Sampayan, S; Akana, G; Anaya, R; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Gower, E; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Hickman, B; Holmes, C; Horner, A; Nelson, S; Paul, A; Pearson, D; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Sanders, D; Stanley, J; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J; Weir, J

    2009-06-17

    Compact dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator technology is being developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The DWA accelerator uses fast switched high voltage transmission lines to generate pulsed electric fields on the inside of a high gradient insulating (HGI) acceleration tube. Its high electric field gradients are achieved by the use of alternating insulators and conductors and short pulse times. The DWA concept can be applied to accelerate charge particle beams with any charge to mass ratio and energy. Based on the DWA system, a novel compact proton therapy accelerator is being developed. This proton therapy system will produce individual pulses that can be varied in intensity, energy and spot width. The system will be capable of being sited in a conventional linac vault and provide intensity modulated rotational therapy. The status of the developmental new technologies that make the compact system possible will be reviewed. These include, high gradient vacuum insulators, solid dielectric materials, SiC photoconductive switches and compact proton sources. Applications of the DWA accelerator to problems in homeland security will also be discussed.

  10. A Radiation Homeland Security Workshop Presented to the City of Berkeley Fire Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matis, Howard

    2005-04-01

    A radiation incident in a community, ranging from a transportation accident to a dirty bomb, is expected to be rare, but still can occur. First responders to such an incident must be prepared. City of Berkeley officials met with members of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory staff and agreed that the laboratory participants would create material and teach it to all of their fire fighting staff. To design such a course, nuclear physicists, biologists and health physicists merged some of their existing teaching material together with previous homeland security efforts to produce a course that lasted one full day. The material was designed to help alleviate the myths and fear of radiation experienced by many first responders. It included basic nuclear physics information, biological effects, and methods that health physicists use to detect and handle radiation. The curriculum included several hands on activities which involved working directly with the meters the Berkeley Fire Department possessed. In addition, I will discuss some observations from teaching this course material plus some unusual problems that we encountered, such as suddenly the whole class responding to a fire.

  11. System-on-chip-centric unattended embedded sensors in homeland security and defense applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Forrester, Thomas; Degrood, Kevin; Shih, Min-Yi; Walter, Kevin; Lee, Kang; Gans, Eric; Esterkin, Vladimir

    2009-05-01

    System-on-chip (SoC) single-die electronic integrated circuit (IC) integration has recently been attracting a great deal of attention, due to its high modularity, universality, and relatively low fabrication cost. The SoC also has low power consumption and it is naturally suited to being a base for integration of embedded sensors. Such sensors can run unattended, and can be either commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) electronic, COTS microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), or optical-COTS or produced in house (i.e., at Physical Optics Corporation, POC). In the version with the simplest electronic packaging, they can be integrated with low-power wireless RF that can communicate with a central processing unit (CPU) integrated in-house and installed on the specific platform of interest. Such a platform can be a human body (for e-clothing), unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), unmanned ground vehicle (UGV), or many others. In this paper we discuss SoC-centric embedded unattended sensors in Homeland Security and military applications, including specific application scenarios (or CONOPS). In one specific example, we analyze an embedded polarization optical sensor produced in house, including generalized Lambertian light-emitting diode (LED) sources and secondary nonimaging optics (NIO).

  12. Homeland security application of the Army Soft Target Exploitation and Fusion (STEF) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Richard T.; Karakowski, Joseph A.

    2010-04-01

    A fusion system that accommodates both text-based extracted information along with more conventional sensor-derived input has been developed and demonstrated in a terrorist attack scenario as part of the Empire Challenge (EC) 09 Exercise. Although the fusion system was developed to support Army military analysts, the system, based on a set of foundational fusion principles, has direct applicability to department of homeland security (DHS) & defense, law enforcement, and other applications. Several novel fusion technologies and applications were demonstrated in EC09. One such technology is location normalization that accommodates both fuzzy semantic expressions such as behind Library A, across the street from the market place, as well as traditional spatial representations. Additionally, the fusion system provides a range of fusion products not supported by traditional fusion algorithms. Many of these additional capabilities have direct applicability to DHS. A formal test of the fusion system was performed during the EC09 exercise. The system demonstrated that it was able to (1) automatically form tracks, (2) help analysts visualize behavior of individuals over time, (3) link key individuals based on both explicit message-based information as well as discovered (fusion-derived) implicit relationships, and (4) suggest possible individuals of interest based on their association with High Value Individuals (HVI) and user-defined key locations.

  13. Data Sciences Technology for Homeland Security Information Management and Knowledge Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolda, T; Brown, D; Corones, J; Critchlow, T; Eliassi-Rad, T; Getoor, L; Hendrickson, B; Kumar, V; Lambert, D; Matarazzo, C; McCurley, K; Merrill, M; Samatova, N; Speck, D; Srikant, R; Thomas, J; Wertheimer, M; Wong, P C

    2005-01-06

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has vast amounts of data available, but its ultimate value cannot be realized without powerful technologies for knowledge discovery to enable better decision making by analysts. Past evidence has shown that terrorist activities leave detectable footprints, but these footprints generally have not been discovered until the opportunity for maximum benefit has passed. The challenge faced by the DHS is to discover the money transfers, border crossings, and other activities in advance of an attack and use that information to identify potential threats and vulnerabilities. The data to be analyzed by DHS comes from many sources ranging from news feeds, to raw sensors, to intelligence reports, and more. The amount of data is staggering; some estimates place the number of entities to be processed at 1015. The uses for the data are varied as well, including entity tracking over space and time, identifying complex and evolving relationships between entities, and identifying organization structure, to name a few. Because they are ideal for representing relationship and linkage information, semantic graphs have emerged as a key technology for fusing and organizing DHS data. A semantic graph organizes relational data by using nodes to represent entities and edges to connect related entities. Hidden relationships in the data are then uncovered by examining the structure and properties of the semantic graph.

  14. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report: Class of 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2012-08-20

    Annual report for the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Features the Class of 2011. The NGFP is a NNSA program with a mission to cultivate future technical and policy leaders in nonproliferation and international security. Through the NGFP, outstanding graduate students with career interests in nonproliferation are appointed to program offices within the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN). During their one-year assignment, Fellows participate in programs designed to detect, prevent, and reverse the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

  15. Advanced shortwave infrared and Raman hyperspectral sensors for homeland security and law enforcement operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueva, Oksana; Nelson, Matthew P.; Gardner, Charles W.; Gomer, Nathaniel R.

    2015-05-01

    Proliferation of chemical and explosive threats as well as illicit drugs continues to be an escalating danger to civilian and military personnel. Conventional means of detecting and identifying hazardous materials often require the use of reagents and/or physical sampling, which is a time-consuming, costly and often dangerous process. Stand-off detection allows the operator to detect threat residues from a safer distance minimizing danger to people and equipment. Current fielded technologies for standoff detection of chemical and explosive threats are challenged by low area search rates, poor targeting efficiency, lack of sensitivity and specificity or use of costly and potentially unsafe equipment such as lasers. A demand exists for stand-off systems that are fast, safe, reliable and user-friendly. To address this need, ChemImage Sensor Systems™ (CISS) has developed reagent-less, non-contact, non-destructive sensors for the real-time detection of hazardous materials based on widefield shortwave infrared (SWIR) and Raman hyperspectral imaging (HSI). Hyperspectral imaging enables automated target detection displayed in the form of image making result analysis intuitive and user-friendly. Application of the CISS' SWIR-HSI and Raman sensing technologies to Homeland Security and Law Enforcement for standoff detection of homemade explosives and illicit drugs and their precursors in vehicle and personnel checkpoints is discussed. Sensing technologies include a portable, robot-mounted and standalone variants of the technology. Test data is shown that supports the use of SWIR and Raman HSI for explosive and drug screening at checkpoints as well as screening for explosives and drugs at suspected clandestine manufacturing facilities.

  16. An Examination of Four Successes in the Coast Guard’s Innovation Program and Implications for Innovation within Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Elixir guitar strings, and approximately 1,000 other products .32 Prior to founding Gore and Associates, Bill Gore spent seventeen years working for...and local government agencies, and private entities supporting government homeland security operations. The product of this research is an analysis...literature conveys when it calls innovation: The creation, development and implementation of a new product , process or service, with the aim of

  17. The Homeland Security Ecosystem: An Analysis of Hierarchical and Ecosystem Models and Their Influence on Decision Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Gail F. Thomas, and Erik Jansen , “Building Collaborative Capacity: An Innovative Strategy for Homeland Security Preparedness,” in Advances in...Intelligence Analysis (Washington DC: CQ Press, 2011), 123. 184 Ropert Bood and Theo Postma, “Scenario Analysis as a Strategic Management Tool” (Groningen...World Mirrors Life of Ecosystems.” Computer Reseller News (February 1996): 36. Bood, Ropert and Theo Postma. “Scenario Analysis as a Strategic

  18. Curriculum evaluation and revision in a nascent field: the utility of the retrospective pretest--posttest model in a homeland security program of study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelfrey, William V; Pelfrey, William V

    2009-02-01

    Although most academic disciplines evolve at a measured pace, the emerging field of homeland security must, for reasons of safety and security, evolve rapidly. The Department of Homeland Security sponsored the establishment of a graduate educational program for key officials holding homeland security roles. Because homeland security is a nascent field, the establishment of a program curriculum was forced to draw from a variety of disciplines. Curriculum evaluation was complicated by the rapid changes occurring in the emerging discipline, producing response shift bias, and interfering with the pre-post assessments. To compensate for the validity threat associated with response shift bias, a retrospective pretest-posttest evaluative methodology was used. Data indicate the program has evolved in a significant and orderly fashion and these data support the use of this innovative evaluation approach in the development of any discipline.

  19. 76 FR 55693 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... organizations; domestic security and emergency management officials; and private sector entities or individuals... governments and international organizations; domestic security and emergency management officials; and private... international officials; domestic security and emergency management officials; and private sector...

  20. 78 FR 55274 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/Transportation Security Administration-DHS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... security threat assessment of law enforcement, immigration, and intelligence databases, including a... agency to perform a security threat assessment. The security threat assessment will be used to identify... ] security threat assessment to identify individuals who present a low risk to transportation security....

  1. Federal Register: The President. Amendment of Executive Orders, and Other Actions, in Connection with the Transfer of Certain Functions to the Secretary of Homeland Security. Part 4

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bush, George

    2003-01-01

    Act of 2002 (Public Law 107 296) and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, and in order to reflect the transfer of certain functions to, and other responsibilities vested in, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the transfer...

  2. HOMELAND SECURITY: Management of First Responder Grants in the National Capital Region Reflects the Need for Coordinated Planning and Performance Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Office GAO May 2004 HOMELAND SECURITY Management of First Responder Grants in the National Capital Region Reflects the Need for Coordinated...Management of First Responder Grants in the National Capital Region Reflects the Need for Coordinated Planning and Performance Goals 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...2004 HOMELAND SECURITY Management of First Responder Grants in the National Capital Region Reflects the Need for Coordinated Planning and Performance

  3. World Nonproliferation Regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ouyang Liping; Wu Xingzuo

    2007-01-01

    2006 witnessed an intense struggle between nuclear proliferation and nonproliferation. Iran's nuclear issue and North Korea's nuclear test have cast a deep shadow over the current international nonproliferation regime. The international contest for civil nuclear development became especially fierce as global energy prices went up. Such a situation , to some extent, accelerated the pace of nuclear proliferation. Furthermore, the existing international nonproliferation regime, based upon the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), was affected by loopholes, and the U.S. failed in its ambition to unite other forces to mend fences. The international community needs to come up with a comprehensive and long-term strategy to meet the demand for an effective future nonproliferation regime in a healthy nuclear order.

  4. Development of neutron/gamma generators and a polymer semiconductor detector for homeland security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael Joseph

    Instrumentation development is essential to the advancement and success of homeland security systems. Active interrogation techniques that scan luggage and cargo containers for shielded special nuclear materials or explosives hold great potential in halting further terrorist attacks. The development of more economical, compact and efficient source and radiation detection devices will facilitate scanning of all containers and luggage while maintaining high-throughput and low-false alarms Innovative ion sources were developed for two novel, specialized neutron generating devices and initial generator tests were performed. In addition, a low-energy acceleration gamma generator was developed and its performance characterized. Finally, an organic semiconductor was investigated for direct fast neutron detection. A main part of the thesis work was the development of ion sources, crucial components of the neutron/gamma generator development. The use of an externally-driven radio-frequency antenna allows the ion source to generate high beam currents with high, mono-atomic species fractions while maintaining low operating pressures, advantageous parameters for neutron generators. A dual "S" shaped induction antenna was developed to satisfy the high current and large extraction area requirements of the high-intensity neutron generator. The dual antenna arrangement generated a suitable current density of 28 mA/cm2 at practical RF power levels. The stringent requirements of the Pulsed Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy neutron generator necessitated the development of a specialized ten window ion source of toroidal shape with a narrow neutron production target at its center. An innovative ten antenna arrangement with parallel capacitors was developed for driving the multi-antenna arrangement and uniform coupling of RF power to all ten antennas was achieved. To address the desire for low-impact, low-radiation dose active interrogation systems, research was performed on mono

  5. Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: The non-proliferation experiment. First quarter 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staehle, G.; Stull, S.; Talaber, C. [eds.

    1994-05-01

    In this issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies we present the initial findings of the recent Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), conducted by the Department of Energy at the Nevada Test Site. Through an introduction and pictorial walk-through, Marv Denny and Jay Zucca of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory describe the overall experiment. This is followed by scientific and technical abstracts of the complex suite of experiments and analyses, which were presented at the Symposium on Non-Proliferation Experiment Results and Implications for Test Ban Treaties, April 19--21, 1994. Questions regarding the ongoing analysis and conclusions from the NPE should be directed to Leslie Casey in the Office of Research and Development within the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security of DOE. Her phone number is 202-586-2151.

  6. Nuclear World Order and Nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joeck, N

    2007-02-05

    The decision by India and Pakistan in May 1998 to conduct nuclear weapon tests and declare themselves as nuclear weapon states challenged South Asian regional stability calculations, US nonproliferation policy, and prevailing assumptions about international security. A decade later, the effects of those tests are still being felt and policies are still adjusting to the changed global conditions. This paper will consider non- and counter-proliferation policy options for the United States and Pakistan as they work as partners to prevent the transfer of nuclear technology and further nuclear proliferation.

  7. Groupthink: A Significant Threat to the Homeland Security of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    news/blogs/ ken - walshs-washington/2012/10/31/a-tale-of-two-storms-comparing-bush-and-obamas-hurricane-response. 142 Morton, Next–Generation Homeland... Wilber , “Dress Code Relaxed for Air Marshals,” Washington Post, August 25, 2006, http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/24...Koresh had told him that he knew the raid was imminent.235 According to BATF Special Agent Ken King, no alternative plan for peacefully serving the

  8. 77 FR 12606 - Homeland Security Academic Advisory Council; Establishment and Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... recruitment; international students; ] academic research; campus and community resiliency, security and... time of appointment by Department ethics officials. Individuals appointed for their expertise would be... committee has completed its business. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Ronald Reagan...

  9. 76 FR 23810 - Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau; Federal Advisory Committee Act; Emergency Response...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    ..., Security and Authentication, and Network Evolution working groups. A more detailed agenda will be released... Commission will also provide audio and/or video coverage of the meeting over the Internet from the FCC's...

  10. Applying a Space-Based Security Recovery Scheme for Critical Homeland Security Cyberinfrastructure Utilizing the NASA Tracking and Data Relay (TDRS) Based Space Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Harry C.; McLaughlin, Brian; Stocklin, Frank; Fortin, Andre; Israel, David; Dissanayake, Asoka; Gilliand, Denise; LaFontaine, Richard; Broomandan, Richard; Hyunh, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Protection of the national infrastructure is a high priority for cybersecurity of the homeland. Critical infrastructure such as the national power grid, commercial financial networks, and communications networks have been successfully invaded and re-invaded from foreign and domestic attackers. The ability to re-establish authentication and confidentiality of the network participants via secure channels that have not been compromised would be an important countermeasure to compromise of our critical network infrastructure. This paper describes a concept of operations by which the NASA Tracking and Data Relay (TDRS) constellation of spacecraft in conjunction with the White Sands Complex (WSC) Ground Station host a security recovery system for re-establishing secure network communications in the event of a national or regional cyberattack. Users would perform security and network restoral functions via a Broadcast Satellite Service (BSS) from the TDRS constellation. The BSS enrollment only requires that each network location have a receive antenna and satellite receiver. This would be no more complex than setting up a DIRECTTV-like receiver at each network location with separate network connectivity. A GEO BSS would allow a mass re-enrollment of network nodes (up to nationwide) simultaneously depending upon downlink characteristics. This paper details the spectrum requirements, link budget, notional assets and communications requirements for the scheme. It describes the architecture of such a system and the manner in which it leverages off of the existing secure infrastructure which is already in place and managed by the NASAGSFC Space Network Project.

  11. U.S. Proliferation Policy and the Campaign Against Transnational Terror: Linking the U.S. Non-Proliferation Regime to Homeland Security Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Review, iv. 160 Ibid., vi–vii. 48 nuclear materials, and continuing to expand U.S. nuclear forensics efforts to improve the ability to identify the...allegedly received direct assistance from Russia (and formerly the Soviet Union), China, Iran, and North Korea in developing its WMD and ballistic ...Control Regime (MTCR) • Seeks to control transfers that could contribute to the spread of ballistic and cruise missiles capable of delivering weapons

  12. 78 FR 66949 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... public comment period may end before the time indicated, following the last call for comments. To... Science and Technology, such as new developments in systems engineering, cyber-security, knowledge.... The agenda on December 5 focuses solely on the interaction between DHS S&T and Customs and...

  13. 76 FR 63206 - Supplemental Standards of Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Department of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... (DAEO) to manage and coordinate the ethics programs within the Department's components and offices. B... by the DHS DAEO to manage and coordinate the ethics programs within the DHS components pursuant to... (FEMA); (2) Federal Law Enforcement Training Center; (3) Transportation Security Administration;...

  14. Homeland Security Department: FY2011 President’s Request for Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    program, the National Biosurveillance Integration System (NBIS), and the department’s occupational health and safety programs.87 Dr. Alexander G. Garza... Biosurveillance Integration Center; and the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Detection System.88 Issues for Congress BioWatch: Effectiveness and Deployment...20 23 Systems Acquisition 20 61 Radiation Portal Monitoring Program - 8 Securing the Cities 20 - Human Portable Radiation Detection

  15. 2010 Homeland Security Symposium and Exhibition Held in Arlington, Virginia on September 28-29, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    Animal Disease A dynamic disaster environment Got Security? More Public/Private Up-Front Interaction “Recommendation: That the President direct the...movement of materials We provide hope and help around the world. Earthquake in China © Matthew Marek , Red Cross © Matthew Marek , Red Cross © Matthew... Marek , Red Cross Phases of a Disaster • Rescue • Response • Recovery • Rebuilding Phases of a Disaster • Rescue • Response • Recovery • Rebuilding The

  16. Rethinking Merida’s Priorities: The Time is Now to Invest in Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    Development Assistance (DA) to support domestic poverty reduction and maximize economic benefit from NAFTA . Congress, for example, increased FY 2011 DA to...border with Canada , the Great Lakes region, or American cities like New York or Los Angeles, where drugs enter the United States. Sufficiently...investment and, more importantly, is in the collective security interests of North America. Mexican drug cartels profit off criminal trade in both Canada

  17. Measuring Boston’s Security Investment: Methods and Tools to Assess Homeland Security Initiatives. Policy Analysis Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-31

    recommendations for MOEP as they move forward in developing a performance management system: (1) Implement a Balanced Scorecard approach; (2) Focus on...performance management systems, particularly those measuring preparedness and security -- we determined that the Balanced Scorecard is the most practical, applicable, and sustainable solution for MOEP.

  18. Biological and Chemical Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitch, P J

    2002-12-19

    The LLNL Chemical & Biological National Security Program (CBNP) provides science, technology and integrated systems for chemical and biological security. Our approach is to develop and field advanced strategies that dramatically improve the nation's capabilities to prevent, prepare for, detect, and respond to terrorist use of chemical or biological weapons. Recent events show the importance of civilian defense against terrorism. The 1995 nerve gas attack in Tokyo's subway served to catalyze and focus the early LLNL program on civilian counter terrorism. In the same year, LLNL began CBNP using Laboratory-Directed R&D investments and a focus on biodetection. The Nunn-Lugar-Domenici Defense Against Weapons of Mass Destruction Act, passed in 1996, initiated a number of U.S. nonproliferation and counter-terrorism programs including the DOE (now NNSA) Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (also known as CBNP). In 2002, the Department of Homeland Security was formed. The NNSA CBNP and many of the LLNL CBNP activities are being transferred as the new Department becomes operational. LLNL has a long history in national security including nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction. In biology, LLNL had a key role in starting and implementing the Human Genome Project and, more recently, the Microbial Genome Program. LLNL has over 1,000 scientists and engineers with relevant expertise in biology, chemistry, decontamination, instrumentation, microtechnologies, atmospheric modeling, and field experimentation. Over 150 LLNL scientists and engineers work full time on chemical and biological national security projects.

  19. No Nation Is Home Alone: Understanding The International Dimension Of Homeland Security Through Global Transportation Security Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    security procedures, encouraging their followers to attack the global transportation system.15 The consequences of these attacks are not just the visual ...partnerships for DHS.31 Though this argument is sound , the author only reviews a few programs, and does not acknowledge the broader DHS capability nor its...Capacity Development,”2. 89 Neil A. Englehart, “State Capacity, State Failure, and Human Rights,” Journal of Peace Research 46, no. 2 (2009): 163

  20. Proposed New Accelerator Design for Homeland Security X-Ray Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, James [Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States). Imaging Lab.; Shedlock, Daniel [Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States). Imaging Lab.; Langeveld, Willem G.J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Bharadwaj, Vinod [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nosochkov, Yuri [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-07

    In the security and inspection market, there is a push towards highly mobile, reduced-dose active interrogation scanning and imaging systems to allow operation in urban environments. To achieve these goals, the accelerator system design needs to be smaller than existing systems. A smaller radiation exclusion zone may be accomplished through better beam collimation and an integrated, x-ray-source/detector-array assembly to allow feedback and control of an intensity-modulated x-ray source. A shaped low-Z target in the x-ray source can be used to generate a more forward peaked x-ray beam. Electron-beam steering can then be applied to direct the forward-peaked x rays toward areas in the cargo with high attenuation. This paper presents an exploratory study to identify components and upgrades that would be required to meet the desired specifications, as well as the best technical approach to design and build a prototype.

  1. I-WASTE: EPA’s Suite of Homeland Security Decision Support Tools for the Waste and Disaster Debris Management and Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the U.S., a single comprehensive approach to all-hazards domestic incident management has been established by the Department of Homeland Security through the National Response Framework. This helps prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from terrorist attacks, major di...

  2. I-WASTE: EPA’s Suite of Homeland Security Decision Support Tools for the Waste and Disaster Debris Management and Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the U.S., a single comprehensive approach to all-hazards domestic incident management has been established by the Department of Homeland Security through the National Response Framework. This helps prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from terrorist attacks, major di...

  3. XGraphticsCLUS: Web Mining Hyperlinks and Content of Terrorism websites for Homeland Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.S.K.Jayanthi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available World Wide Web has become one of the best and fast communication media and information could be distributed within few seconds to the world day by day. The evolution of social networking media increases it further more to transfer information in a rapid speed to common people. Terrorism organizations utilize these facets of the web in very efficient manner for their destructive plans. Understanding web data is a decisive task to assure the better perceptive of a website. This paper focuses on the content and link structure mining of the website which was suspicious through XGraphticsCLUS. This is done through viewing the web as graph and retrieving the various content of the website. This could help in terms of better understanding the motto and various other web connections in the suspicion. The navigational links offered in the particular website could leave with some informative evidence. This paper puts a step towards the national security and provides the user a good perception.

  4. Former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow Served at U.S. Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Cornelia P.

    2014-10-01

    Because of her training and professional experiences, Rosalyn Leitch, a Security Specialist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow with NIS (2012-2013) was able to transition into temporary assignment as UNVIE Acting Nuclear Security Attaché from November 2013 through February 2014.

  5. Sampling and mass spectrometry approaches for the detection of drugs and foreign contaminants in breath for homeland security applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Audrey Noreen [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Homeland security relies heavily on analytical chemistry to identify suspicious materials and persons. Traditionally this role has focused on attribution, determining the type and origin of an explosive, for example. But as technology advances, analytical chemistry can and will play an important role in the prevention and preemption of terrorist attacks. More sensitive and selective detection techniques can allow suspicious materials and persons to be identified even before a final destructive product is made. The work presented herein focuses on the use of commercial and novel detection techniques for application to the prevention of terrorist activities. Although drugs are not commonly thought of when discussing terrorism, narcoterrorism has become a significant threat in the 21st century. The role of the drug trade in the funding of terrorist groups is prevalent; thus, reducing the trafficking of illegal drugs can play a role in the prevention of terrorism by cutting off much needed funding. To do so, sensitive, specific, and robust analytical equipment is needed to quickly identify a suspected drug sample no matter what matrix it is in. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) is a novel technique that has previously been applied to biological and chemical detection. The current work applies SPAMS to drug analysis, identifying the active ingredients in single component, multi-component, and multi-tablet drug samples in a relatively non-destructive manner. In order to do so, a sampling apparatus was created to allow particle generation from drug tablets with on-line introduction to the SPAMS instrument. Rules trees were developed to automate the identification of drug samples on a single particle basis. A novel analytical scheme was also developed to identify suspect individuals based on chemical signatures in human breath. Human breath was sampled using an RTube{trademark} and the trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were preconcentrated using solid

  6. Using DOD ISR Capabilities in Support of Homeland Security and Defense; Policy Challenges and Considerations for Effective Incident Awareness and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    CONOPS) that gives a brief overview of active duty and National Guard capabilities and processes for responding to homeland security contingencies...fire and the worst oil pollution disaster in history (James, 2010). More than 205 million gallons of raw crude oil are estimated to have gushed into...pertain to the employment of DoD airborne assets for DSCA missions. The DSCA Air Support Handbook provides an overview of the full spectrum of DoD

  7. Changing Napoleonic Leadership In The Department Of Homeland Security: The Identification Of Toxic Leadership Behaviors And How To Facilitate Change To Those Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-06

    negative workforce behaviors, and how it correlates to practices within the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and US Customs and Border...aspects: sociability , self-control, well-being, and emotionality.”30 10 Table 1. Models of Emotional Intelligence31 As illustrated above, many of...program is designed to provide basic knowledge, practical skills, and tools needed to successfully manage supervisory responsibilities and challenges

  8. On the U.S. Post-Cold War Non-proliferation Policy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu; Zikui

    2014-01-01

    Since the end of the Cold War, the importance of non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction(WMD) has been enhanced constantly in the U.S. national security strategy and on the agenda of the U.S. foreign policy, and non-proliferation gradually has becomes one of its most important policy objectives. As the sole superpower, the U.S. non-proliferation policy has not only influenced and changed the international non-proliferation regime dramatically, but also greatly affected the non-proliferation effect of the international community. To prevent WMD proliferation, the United States has to abandon the practice of selective non-proliferation, group politics, prejudice on different ideologies and social systems, and maintenance of the U.S. hegemony. While pursuing its and allies interests, it must also attach great importance to other countries interests.

  9. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty: Regulating Nuclear Weapons around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Tiffany Willey

    2010-01-01

    In May 2010, scientists, national security experts, and state delegates from nations around the world will convene in New York for the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference. They will review current guidelines for nuclear testing and possession of nuclear weapons in accordance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1968,…

  10. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty: Regulating Nuclear Weapons around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Tiffany Willey

    2010-01-01

    In May 2010, scientists, national security experts, and state delegates from nations around the world will convene in New York for the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference. They will review current guidelines for nuclear testing and possession of nuclear weapons in accordance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1968,…

  11. Detection Technologies, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. Third/fourth quarters 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staehle, G; Stull, S; Talaber, C; Moulthrop, P [eds.

    1993-12-31

    This issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies is another in a series of issues about specific means for detecting and identifying proliferation and other suspect activities outside the realm of arms control treaties. All the projects discussed are funded by the Office of Research and Development of the Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

  12. Homeland Security Interagency Support. (Joint Center for Lessons Learned Quarterly Bulletin. Volume 4, Issue 2, March 2002)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    U.S. Capitol, the White House, and nuclear power facilities. In the United States and Europe, Disney amusement parks are likely targets. In Britain, the...appropriate when such attacks will involve small bands of individuals engaged in criminal acts within our homeland instead of stereotyped conventional

  13. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program, Annual Report, Class of 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2013-09-23

    This 32-pp annual report/brochure describes the accomplishments of the Class of 2012 of the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (the last class of this program), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The time period covers Sept 2011 through June 2013.

  14. An update on the OpenOrbiter I Mission and its paradigm's benefits for the defense, homeland security and intelligence communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2017-05-01

    The OpenOrbiter I spacecraft is the culmination of significant work on reducing the cost levels of a CubeSat-class spacecraft. By redesigning the spacecraft from the ground up, down to the component level, to use readily available electronic and physical components, the cost of CubeSat construction has been significantly reduced. This paper provides an overview of the OpenOrbiter I mission, to date. It then focuses on the benefits that can be provided by the lower-cost, low-risk spacecraft. The paper discusses the prospective utility of this mission paradigm for the defense, homeland security and intelligence communities.

  15. The role of the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate in the development of vaccines and diagnostics for Transboundary Animal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, M; Coats, M; Brake, D; Fine, J

    2013-01-01

    The development of countermeasures to support an effective response to Transboundary Animal Diseases (TAD) poses a challenge on a global scale and necessitates the coordinated involvement of scientists from government, industry and academia, as well as regulatory entities. The Agricultural Defense Branch under the Chemical and Biological Defense Division (CBD) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) supports this important mission within the United States. This article provides an overview of the Agricultural Defense Branch's vaccine and diagnostic TAD project.

  16. Robust Indicators of Nonproliferation Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Mara R.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.

    2014-02-13

    Understanding how the nuclear industry may benefit from self-regulation is closely linked with understanding how to report compliance activities for nonproliferation and export control objectives, as well as how to distinguish high and low compliance performance. Drawing on the corporate sustainability reporting model, nuclear and dual-use commodities industries can frame socially responsible self-regulatory activities to distinguish themselves as good nonproliferators.

  17. Broadening Industry Governance to Include Nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hund, Gretchen; Seward, Amy M.

    2008-11-11

    As industry is the first line of defense in detecting and thwarting illicit trade networks, the engagement of the private sector is critical to any government effort to strengthen existing mechanisms to protect goods and services throughout the supply chain. This study builds on previous PNNL work to continue to evaluate means for greater industry engagement to complement and strengthen existing governmental efforts to detect and stem the trade of illicit goods and to protect and secure goods that could be used in making a weapon of mass destruction. Specifically, the study evaluates the concept of Industry Self Regulation, defined as a systematic voluntary program undertaken by an industry or by individual companies to anticipate, implement, supplement, or substitute for regulatory requirements in a given field, generally through the adoption of best practices. Through a series of interviews with companies with a past history of non-compliance, trade associations and NGOs, the authors identify gaps in the existing regulatory infrastructure, drivers for a self regulation approach and the form such an approach might take, as well as obstacles to be overcome. The authors conclude that it is at the intersection of industry, government, and security that—through collaborative means—the effectiveness of the international nonproliferation system—can be most effectively strengthened to the mutual benefit of both government and the private sector. Industry has a critical stake in the success of this regime, and has the potential to act as an integrating force that brings together the existing mechanisms of the global nonproliferation regime: export controls, physical protection, and safeguards. The authors conclude that industry compliance is not enough; rather, nonproliferation must become a central tenant of a company’s corporate culture and be viewed as an integral component of corporate social responsibility (CSR).

  18. 76 FR 69749 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security United States Coast Guard-029 Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    .... eNOAD information includes complete name, date and place of birth, gender, country of citizenship... security, maritime law enforcement, marine environmental protection, and other related purposes....

  19. 6 CFR Appendix A to Part 5 - FOIA/Privacy Act Offices of the Department of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Security Administration, TSA-1, FOIA Division, 400 Seventh Street, SW., Washington, DC 20590 3. United... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FOIA/Privacy Act Offices of the Department of... follows: A. Former components of the Department of Agriculture: 1. Animal and Plant Health...

  20. 76 FR 39408 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL-030 Use of the Terrorist Screening...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    .../FBI-019 Terrorist Screening Records System of Records (August 22, 2007, 72 FR 47073) Exemptions... System of Records (August 22, 2007, 72 FR 47073) in order to automate and simplify the current method for... (May 19, 2010, 75 FR 28046); (2) TSA, Secure Flight Program: DHS/TSA-019 Secure Flight Records...

  1. 77 FR 47415 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... added two new sources of records: (1) Customer Profile Management System (CPMS) for biometric... Country of Issuance (COI) Visa number Social Security Number (in very limited circumstances using the Form...) Country of birth Class of admission code File control office code Social Security Number I-94 number...

  2. 76 FR 58525 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ..., Form G-845, if appropriate. Although SAVE may receive a Social Security Number (SSN) from its... Exchange Visitor Identification System (SEVIS) ID, foreign passport number, visa number, social security...), Customer Profile Management System (CPMS), Student and Exchange Visitor Identification System (SEVIS...

  3. Technical solutions to nonproliferation challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satkowiak, Lawrence

    2014-05-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism is real and poses a significant challenge to both U.S. and global security. For terrorists, the challenge is not so much the actual design of an improvised nuclear device (IND) but more the acquisition of the special nuclear material (SNM), either highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium, to make the fission weapon. This paper provides two examples of technical solutions that were developed in support of the nonproliferation objective of reducing the opportunity for acquisition of HEU. The first example reviews technologies used to monitor centrifuge enrichment plants to determine if there is any diversion of uranium materials or misuse of facilities to produce undeclared product. The discussion begins with a brief overview of the basics of uranium processing and enrichment. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its safeguard objectives and how the technology evolved to meet those objectives will be described. The second example focuses on technologies developed and deployed to monitor the blend down of 500 metric tons of HEU from Russia's dismantled nuclear weapons to reactor fuel or low enriched uranium (LEU) under the U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement. This reactor fuel was then purchased by U.S. fuel fabricators and provided about half the fuel for the domestic power reactors. The Department of Energy established the HEU Transparency Program to provide confidence that weapons usable HEU was being blended down and thus removed from any potential theft scenario. Two measurement technologies, an enrichment meter and a flow monitor, were combined into an automated blend down monitoring system (BDMS) and were deployed to four sites in Russia to provide 24/7 monitoring of the blend down. Data was downloaded and analyzed periodically by inspectors to provide the assurances required.

  4. Nuclear Deterrence in the Age of Nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, J

    2009-01-21

    The fallacy of zero nuclear weapons, even as a virtual goal, is discussed. Because the complete abolition of nuclear weapons is not verifiable, nuclear weapons will always play a role in the calculus of assure, dissuade, deter and defeat (ADDD). However, the relative contribution of nuclear weapons to international security has diminished. To reconstitute the Cold War nuclear capability, with respect to both the nuclear weapons capability and their associated delivery systems, is fiscally daunting and not warranted due to competing budgetary pressures and their relative contribution to international security and nonproliferation. A proposed pathway to a sustainable nuclear weapons capability end-state is suggested which provides enough ADDD; a Dyad composed of fewer delivery and weapon systems, with trickle production at the National Laboratories and private sector to maintain capability and guard against technological surprise.

  5. 78 FR 20680 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ...; Divorce Certificates; Explanatory Statements; Unsolicited information submitted voluntarily in support of...); Employment Information; Financial Information; Position and Relationship to an Organization; Family... security awareness training to all information system users (including managers, senior executives,...

  6. 76 FR 53921 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security ALL-034 Emergency Care Medical Records...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... will have rights to run ad hoc reports and query data as it relates to quality assurance tracking and... or fraud, or harm to the security or integrity of this system or other systems or programs (whether...

  7. The Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Kelsey

    2017-01-01

    The 1968 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) is the cornerstone of multilateral efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons and promote efforts toward complete disarmament. In the grand bargain of the NPT, states foreswore pursuit of nuclear weapons in exchange for access to nuclear technology and limited nuclear arsenals to the five states (China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States) that tested such weapons before the NPT's conception. Now in its seventh decade, the NPT regime is embraced by the vast majority of the world's nations and is viewed as a critical element of international security. However, despite past successes in halting efforts in several states to pursue nuclear weapons, near universal adherence, and only one withdrawal (North Korea), the NPT regime is at a critical crossroads. The treaty has proven unable to adapt to new challenges, such as emerging technologies that threaten operational strategic realities, the devolution of state authority to non-state actors and institutions, and growing dissatisfaction with slow pace of nuclear disarmament. Additionally, the treaty leaves open critical questions, including whether or not state parties have the `right' to pursue technologies that allow for domestic production of fuels for nuclear reactors and if modernization programs for nuclear warheads are inconsistent with the treaty. If these questions remain unresolved, the international community will find itself ill prepared to confront emerging proliferation challenges and the NPT, the linchpin of international nonproliferation and disarmament efforts, may begin to erode.

  8. 75 FR 5609 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL-024 Facility and Perimeter Access...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... Presidential Directive--12 program, directing the use of a common identification credential for both logical... a National Special Security Event; and record source categories has been updated to include records...Gate System; (4) Automated Continuing Evaluation System (ACES) Pilot; (5) Personal Identity...

  9. 76 FR 60070 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... news media and the public, with the approval of the Chief Privacy Officer in consultation with counsel..., address, organization, e-mail, phone number, relation, paid/unpaid). Signature (electronic or scanned..., debts, encumbrances, etc.). Social Security Number (SSN), if applicable. Supporting documentation...

  10. 76 FR 60063 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... Immigration Services-014 Electronic Immigration System- 1 Temporary Accounts and Draft Benefit Requests System....S. Citizenship and Immigration Services-014 Electronic Immigration System-1 Temporary Accounts and... Security/U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to collect and maintain records on an individual as...

  11. 78 FR 15889 - Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security U.S. Customs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... provided in the SCSP is a narrative description of the procedures the applicant business uses to adhere to each C-TPAT Security Criteria or Guideline articulated for their particular business type (importer... the subject of the inquiry could also permit the subject to avoid detection or apprehension....

  12. A Decade of Experience: Which Network Structures Maximize Fire Service Capacity for Homeland Security Incidents in Metropolitan Regions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    and a related abstract titled “Distributed preparedness: the spatial logic of domestic security in the United States” (Collier & Lakoff , 2008...hurricanes, earthquakes, and floods. The result of this evolution created a new field of expertise called “emergency management” (Collier & Lakoff , 2008...Collier and Lakoff examined two dimensions of distributed preparedness— emergency federalism and vulnerability mapping—to assess their

  13. 75 FR 38824 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL-029 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ...; violations of the confidentiality provisions of the Violence Against Women Act; conditions of detention... Transportation Security Administration (TSA) records and functions; and to the news media in the interest of the..., or other benefit. P. To the news media and the public, with the approval of the Chief Privacy...

  14. 78 FR 57402 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/U.S. Customs and Border Protection-019 Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    .... 1101, et seq., including 8 U.S.C. 1103, 1225, and 1324; the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant..., AMOSS has users from various DHS components including the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE... to know the information to carry out national security, law enforcement, immigration,...

  15. 75 FR 5487 - Privacy Act of 1974: Implementation of Exemptions; Department of Homeland Security/U.S. Customs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... and the intelligence landscape. However, the use of ATS is governed by a number of policy and... rules in ] ATS, which are based on current intelligence or past case experience. Travelers may also be... Identity Theft: A Strategic Plan'' at http://www.identitytheft.gov ) to address security breaches...

  16. 77 FR 70792 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL-004 General Information Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... resources; Date and time of access; Logs of activity of DHS IT resources; IP address of access; Logs of... to the Department that is derived from other sources to facilitate authorized access to DHS... General Information Technology Access Account Records system of records security protocols will...

  17. Rules And A Rubric Could Be Used To Assess The Openness Of A Homeland Security Enterprise Social Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Cybersecurity and Communication Integration Center NPOV neutral point of view I&A intelligence and analysis PCLOB Privacy and Civil Liberties...establish a culture of “need to share” securely while respecting civil rights and privacy. In February 2011, the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis ...I&A) issued its strategic plan designed to last through 2018. The plan consisted of four goals, to apply intelligence analysis to understand threats

  18. Suicide Terrorism in America?: The Complex Social Conditions of This Phenomenon and the Implications for Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-05

    AND ABBREVIATIONS CPOST Chicago Project on Security and Terrorism LTTE Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam PKK Kurdistan Workers’ Party SIT Social...Kurdistan Workers’ Party ( PKK -Partiy Karkeren Kurdistan) in order to understand whether there is a universal or location-dependent explanation for...where the PKK was “ideologically remote from large segments of the public it sought to represent” and is seen as having failed. The examination of

  19. Effective Selection: A Study of First-Line Supervisor Selection Processes in the Department of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    survive in a free market economy. Unlike the private sector, the federal government is not concerned about profits and loss and worries less about...all DHS agencies as a strategy to cut down costs associated with implementing best practices for first-line supervisor selection. Additionally, by...U.S. Coast Guard (CG) HSAD U.S. Secret Service (SS) HSBB Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) HSBC Transportation Security Administration (TSA

  20. Homeland calling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Kristine

    2007-01-01

    A great deal of those immigrants that settled in Denmark in the 1970s and 1980s have maintained strong bonds to their communities of origin. These bonds play an important role in shaping the identities and in maintaining relationships between migrants in the receiving communities. But while...... on the institutions and practices that act to transmit relations between country of origin and the new homeland. Focus is particularly on the efforts that the Yugoslav and Serbian states have made to maintain migrants political and economic loyalty and on the effects that this has had on migrants perceptions on key...

  1. The Level of Europium-154 Contaminating Samarium-153-EDTMP Activates the Radiation Alarm System at the US Homeland Security Checkpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Najeeb Al Hallak

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available 153Sm-EDTMP is a radiopharmaceutical composed of EDTMP (ethylenediamine-tetramethylenephosphonate and Samarium-153 [1]. 153Sm-EDTMP has an affinity for skeletal tissue and concentrates in areas with increased bone turnover; thus, it is successfully used in relieving pain related to diffuse bone metastases [1]. The manufacturing process of 153Sm-EDTMP leads to contamination with 154Eu (Europium-154 [2]. A previous study only alluded to the retention of 154Eu in the bones after receiving treatment with 153Sm-EDTMP [2]. Activation of the alarm at security checkpoints after 153Sm-EDTMP therapy has not been previously reported. Two out of 15 patients who received 153Sm-EDTMP at Roger Maris Cancer Center (Fargo, N. Dak., USA activated the radiation activity sensors while passing through checkpoints; one at a US airport and the other while crossing theAmerican-Canadian border. We assume that the 154Eu which remained in the patients’ bones activated the sensors. Methods: In order to investigate this hypothesis, we obtained the consent from 3 of our 15 patients who received 153Sm-EDTMP within the previous 4 months to 2 years, including the patient who had activated the radiation alarm at the airport. The patients were scanned with a handheld detector and a gamma camera for energies from 511 keV to 1.3 MeV. Results: All three patients exhibited identical spectral images, and further analysis showed that the observed spectra are the result of 154Eu emissions. Conclusion: Depending on the detection thresholds and windows used by local and federal authorities, the remaining activity of 154Eu retained in patients who received 153Sm-EDTMP could be sufficient enough to increase the count rates above background levels and activate the sensors. At Roger Maris Cancer Center, patients are now informed of the potential consequences of 153Sm-EDTMP therapy prior to initiating treatment. In addition, patients treated with 153Sm-EDTMP at Roger Maris Cancer Center

  2. A Digest of Nonproliferation Literature.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggan, Ruth A

    2006-04-01

    In preparation for the 2005 US/Russian Weapons Laboratories Directors Meeting, the six laboratories participating in the meeting endeavored to develop a strategy for nonproliferation technology research and development. A literature review was conducted to identify possible areas of technical collaboration and technology opportunities associated with improving nonproliferation associated with the civilian nuclear fuel cycle. The issue of multinationalization of the nuclear fuel cycle was also researched. This digest is the compilation of one-page summaries used by management of the three US nuclear weapons laboratories in preparation for strategy development. Where possible, the Web site address of the complete paper is referenced.3 AcknowledgementsThe author wishes to thank Jessica Ruyle, Nancy Orlando-Gay, and Barbara Dry for their research assistance and contributions.4

  3. Nonproliferation, Nuclear Security, and the Insider Threat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Galya I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duggan, Ruth [SNL

    2012-07-12

    Insider threat concept is evolving and getting more attention: (1) Domestically, internationally and in foreign countries, (2) At the government, academia, and industry levels, and (3) Public awareness and concerns are also growing. Negligence can be an insider's action. Technology advancements provide more opportunities, new tools for the insider. Our understanding of the insider is shaped by our cultural, social and ethnic perceptions and traditions. They also can limit our recognition of the issues and response actions.

  4. Workshop on nuclear power growth and nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    It is widely viewed that an expansion of nuclear power would have positive energy, economic and environmental benefits for the world. However, there are concerns about the economic competitiveness, safety and proliferation and terrorism risks of nuclear power. The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power will depend on the ability of governments and industry to address these concerns, including the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen nonproliferation, nuclear materials accountability and nuclear security. In his Prague speech, President Obama stated: 'we should build a new framework for civil nuclear cooperation, including an international fuel bank, so that countries can access peaceful power without increasing the risks of proliferation. That must be the right of every nation that renounces nuclear weapons, especially developing countries embarking on peaceful programs. And no approach will succeed if it's based on the denial of rights to nations that play by the rules. We must harness the power of nuclear energy on behalf of our efforts to combat climate change, and to advance peace opportunity for all people.' How can the President's vision, which will rekindle a vigorous public debate over the future of nuclear power and its relation to proliferation, be realized? What critical issues will frame the reemerging debate? What policies must be put into place to address these issues? Will US policy be marked more by continuity or change? To address these and other questions, the Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars will host a workshop on the future of nuclear power and nonproliferation.

  5. Development of Computer-Aided Learning Programs on Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Chul [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The fulfillment of international norms for nuclear nonproliferation is indispensable to the promotion of nuclear energy. The education and training for personnel and mangers related to the nuclear material are one of crucial factors to avoid unintended non-compliance to international norms. Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) has been providing education and training on nuclear control as its legal duty. One of the legally mandatory educations is 'nuclear control education' performed since 2006 for the observation of the international norms on nuclear nonproliferation and the spread of the nuclear control culture. The other is 'physical protection education' performed since 2010 for maintaining the national physical protection regime effectively and the spread of the nuclear security culture. The 2010 Nuclear Security Summit was held in Washington, DC to enhance international cooperation to prevent nuclear terrorism. During the Summit, the South Korea was chosen to host the second Nuclear Summit in 2012. South Korean President announced that South Korea would share its expertise and support the Summit's mission by setting up an international education and training center on nuclear security in 2014. KINAC is making a full effort to set up the center successfully. An important function of the center is education and training in the subjects of nuclear nonproliferation, nuclear safeguards, nuclear security, and nuclear export/import control. With increasing importance of education and training education on nuclear nonproliferation and control, KINAC has been developing computer-aided learning programs on nuclear nonproliferation and control to overcome the weaknesses in classroom educations. This paper shows two learning programs. One is an e-learning system on the nuclear nonproliferation and control and the other is a virtual reality program for training nuclear material accountancy inspection of light water

  6. Design Validation of a {sup 10}B{sub 4}C Coated RSP with Multi-layered structure for Homeland Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Su Hyun; Kim, Jong Yul; Lee, Joo Hyun; Moon, Mung Kook [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chang Hwy [Korea Research Institute of Ships and Ocean Engineering, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Ki Seo [Myongji University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is a national priority to prevent radiological threats including radiological terrorism and smuggling nuclear material and devices. For this purpose, many governments and relevant organizations have been exploiting radiation detection technology. Especially, radiation portal monitor (RPM) is a widely used type of radiation detectors when it comes to homeland security and commonly deployed at strategic sites like airports and ports. In the most cases, they could be divided into two types of primary screening and secondary screening. In the latter case, hand-held detectors are mainly used for a closer inspection. On the other hand, RPMs for the primary screening, our concern, are stationary mounted type and comprise gamma-ray detector and neutron detector in many cases. The expected performance of the design of a RSP(Radiation Sensor Panel) has been demonstrated. According to the results of the simulation, three RSPs should be needed to meet the criterion mentioned in subsection 2.1. The design still can be validated when taking into account that the geometrical acceptance will be increased since it has been planned that the RPM is going to installed with four RSPs.

  7. Federal technology transfer requirements :a focused study of principal agencies approaches with implications for the Department of Homeland Security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koker, Denise; Micheau, Jill M.

    2006-07-01

    This report provides relevant information and analysis to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that will assist DHS in determining how to meet the requirements of federal technology transfer legislation. These legal requirements are grouped into five categories: (1) establishing an Office of Research and Technology Applications, or providing the functions thereof; (2) information management; (3) enabling agreements with non-federal partners; (4) royalty sharing; and (5) invention ownership/obligations. These five categories provide the organizing framework for this study, which benchmarks other federal agencies/laboratories engaged in technology transfer/transition Four key agencies--the Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense (DoD)--and several of their laboratories have been surveyed. An analysis of DHS's mission needs for commercializing R&D compared to those agencies/laboratories is presented with implications and next steps for DHS's consideration. Federal technology transfer legislation, requirements, and practices have evolved over the decades as agencies and laboratories have grown more knowledgeable and sophisticated in their efforts to conduct technology transfer and as needs and opinions in the federal sector have changed with regards to what is appropriate. The need to address requirements in a fairly thorough manner has, therefore, resulted in a lengthy paper. There are two ways to find summary information. Each chapter concludes with a summary, and there is an overall ''Summary and Next Steps'' chapter on pages 57-60. For those readers who are unable to read the entire document, we recommend referring to these pages.

  8. Improved Meteorological Input for Atmospheric Release Decision support Systems and an Integrated LES Modeling System for Atmospheric Dispersion of Toxic Agents: Homeland Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, E; Simpson, M; Larsen, S; Gash, J; Aluzzi, F; Lundquist, J; Sugiyama, G

    2010-04-26

    When hazardous material is accidently or intentionally released into the atmosphere, emergency response organizations look to decision support systems (DSSs) to translate contaminant information provided by atmospheric models into effective decisions to protect the public and emergency responders and to mitigate subsequent consequences. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS)-led Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC) is one of the primary DSSs utilized by emergency management organizations. IMAAC is responsible for providing 'a single piont for the coordination and dissemination of Federal dispersion modeling and hazard prediction products that represent the Federal position' during actual or potential incidents under the National Response Plan. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), locatec at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), serves as the primary operations center of the IMAAC. A key component of atmospheric release decision support systems is meteorological information - models and data of winds, turbulence, and other atmospheric boundary-layer parameters. The accuracy of contaminant predictions is strongly dependent on the quality of this information. Therefore, the effectiveness of DSSs can be enhanced by improving the meteorological options available to drive atmospheric transport and fate models. The overall goal of this project was to develop and evaluate new meteorological modeling capabilities for DSSs based on the use of NASA Earth-science data sets in order to enhance the atmospheric-hazard information provided to emergency managers and responders. The final report describes the LLNL contributions to this multi-institutional effort. LLNL developed an approach to utilize NCAR meteorological predictions using NASA MODIS data for the New York City (NYC) region and demonstrated the potential impact of the use of different data sources and data

  9. 78 FR 66984 - International Security Advisory Board (ISAB); Meeting Notice; Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ..., nonproliferation, political- military affairs, international security, and related aspects of public diplomacy. The..., energy security, and diplomacy. For more information, contact Richard W. Hartman II, Executive Director...

  10. Handbook for nuclear non-proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Wook; Oh, Keun Bae; Lee, Kwang Seok; Lee, Dong Jin; Ko, Han Seok

    1997-05-01

    This book analyzed international non-proliferation regime preventing from spread of nuclear weapon. This book took review from the historical background of non-proliferation regime to the recent changes and status. The regime, here, is divided into multilateral and bilateral regime. First of all, this book reports four multilateral treaties concluded for non-proliferation such as NPT, NWFZ, CTBT and others. Secondly, international organization and regimes concerned with non-proliferation are analyzed with emphasis of UN, IAEA, ZC and NSG, Regional Safeguards System and international conference. Finally, this book report the current circumstances of nuclear cooperation agreement related with Korea which is an important means for bilateral regime. (author). 13 tabs., 2 figs.

  11. 76 FR 67751 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, DHS/CBP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Border Protection, DHS/CBP-009--Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Privacy Act system of records. SUMMARY: In accordance...

  12. Report on Department of Homeland Security Sponsored Research Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on Preparation for an Improvised Nuclear Device Event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A., B

    2008-07-31

    Following the events of September 11th, a litany of imaginable horribles was trotted out before an anxious and concerned public. To date, government agencies and academics are still grappling with how to best respond to such catastrophes, and as Senator Lieberman's quote says above, now is the time to plan and prepare for such events. One of the nation's worst fears is that terrorists might detonate an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an American city. With 9/11 serving as the catalyst, the government and many NGOs have invested money into research and development of response capabilities throughout the country. Yet, there is still much to learn about how to best respond to an IND event. My summer 2008 internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory afforded me the opportunity to look in depth at the preparedness process and the research that has been conducted on this issue. While at the laboratory I was tasked to collect, combine, and process research on how cities and the federal government can best prepare for the horrific prospect of an IND event. Specific projects that I was involved with were meeting reports, research reviews, and a full project report. Working directly with Brooke Buddemeier and his support team at the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, I was able to witness first hand, preparation for meetings with response planners to inform them of the challenges that an IND event would pose to the affected communities. In addition, I supported the Homeland Security Institute team (HSI), which was looking at IND preparation and preparing a Congressional report. I participated in meetings at which local responders expressed their concerns and contributed valuable information to the response plan. I specialized in the psycho-social aspects of an IND event and served as a technical advisor to some of the research groups. Alongside attending and supporting these meetings, I worked on an independent research project which collected

  13. Arms control and nonproliferation technologies. First quarter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staehle, G; Alonzo, G M; Sanford, N M [eds.

    1995-01-01

    This first quarter issue for 1995 highlights the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The SBIR program is managed by the DOE`s Basic Energy Sciences program within the Office of Energy Research. Each year, the SBIR program solicits research ideas of interest to the DOE. Articles contained in this issue include: The Small Business Innovation Research Program supported by the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security; Automated cueing to man-made objects via multispectral image; Security systems get smart with advanced processing and thermal imaging; A breakthrough in cooling system technology; The APSTNG neutron probe; Lithium-doped fullerene neutron detector; Miniature GC-MS for on-site chemical analysis; and Winner of Sandia President`s Quality Award.

  14. NATO and nonproliferation: A critical appraisal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembinski, M.; Kelle, A.; Mueller, H.

    1994-04-01

    This paper analyses NATO`s past, actual and potential impact on the nonproliferation regime. It starts by looking back at the useful function NATO has performed throughout its existence in discouraging motivations by its non-nuclear weapon member-states from going nuclear. It then asks whether that role is likely to continue. The study goes on to ask whether NATO`s doctrine and practice may also pose risks to the regime, and investigates what benefits and risks may emerge from future counterproliferation activities. In conclusion, the paper suggests a modest but useful contribution NATO could make to strengthen the nonproliferation regime, provided major flaws are avoided. (orig.)

  15. How Data Mining Threatens Student Privacy. Joint Hearing before the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies of the Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives Serial No. 113-76 and the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education of the Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives Serial No. 113-61, House of Representatives, One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, Second Session (June 25, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    US House of Representatives, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the first joint hearing of the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies of the Committee on Homeland Security and the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. The subcommittees met to examine data collection…

  16. DETERMINATION OF RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF NONPROLIFERATION FACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Metcalf

    2009-07-01

    Methodologies to determine the proliferation resistance (PR) of nuclear facilities often rely on either expert elicitation, a resource-intensive approach without easily reproducible results, or numeric evaluations, which can fail to take into account the institutional knowledge and expert experience of the nonproliferation community. In an attempt to bridge the gap and bring the institutional knowledge into numeric evaluations of PR, a survey was conducted of 33 individuals to find the relative importance of a set of 62 nonproliferation factors, subsectioned into groups under the headings of Diversion, Transportation, Transformation, and Weaponization. One third of the respondents were self-described nonproliferation professionals, and the remaining two thirds were from secondary professions related to nonproliferation, such as industrial engineers or policy analysts. The factors were taken from previous work which used multi-attribute utility analysis with uniform weighting of attributes and did not include institutional knowledge. In both expert and non-expert groups, all four headings and the majority of factors had different relative importance at a confidence of 95% (p=0.05). This analysis and survey demonstrates that institutional knowledge can be brought into numeric evaluations of PR, if there is a sufficient investment of resources made prior to the evaluation.

  17. Homeland Security and Homeland Defense: The Seam of Uncertainty Unstitched?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    problem still exists with the over-classification of intelligence. The Interagency lacks an overarching policy on Sensitive but Unclassified ( SBU ...documents, which doubled since 2001, and procedures that deal with the designation of these documents.61 The SBU documents are of “particular importance... SBU designations and applied them on information that did not warrant classification.63 This misuse of classification denies state and local fusion

  18. Transforming the U.S. Immigration System After 9/11: The Impact of Organizational Change and Collaboration in the Context of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    file), November 5, 1987, ProQuest Historical Newspapers (1851 - 2004), A1. 22 Roberto Suro , Special to The New York Times, “False Migrant Claims...and Border Security: The 9/11 Commission Staff Report on Terrorist Travel. March 14, 2005. Suro . Roberto. Special to The New York Times. “False

  19. 78 FR 15962 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection-DHS/CBP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    .... Social Security Numbers (as volunteered by sole proprietors as their tax identification number); Internal... of lading; audits--internal & external; proof of background checks; contractual obligations; via a... 44 U.S.C. 2904 and 2906. D. To an agency or organization for the purpose of performing audit...

  20. Systems resilience : a new analytical framework for nuclear nonproliferation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2011-12-01

    This paper introduces the concept of systems resilience as a new framework for thinking about the future of nonproliferation. Resilience refers to the ability of a system to maintain its vital functions in the face of continuous and unpredictable change. The nonproliferation regime can be viewed as a complex system, and key themes from the literature on systems resilience can be applied to the nonproliferation system. Most existing nonproliferation strategies are aimed at stability rather than resilience, and the current nonproliferation system may be over-constrained by the cumulative evolution of strategies, increasing its vulnerability to collapse. The resilience of the nonproliferation system can be enhanced by diversifying nonproliferation strategies to include general international capabilities to respond to proliferation and focusing more attention on reducing the motivation to acquire nuclear weapons in the first place. Ideas for future research, include understanding unintended consequences and feedbacks among nonproliferation strategies, developing methodologies for measuring the resilience of the nonproliferation system, and accounting for interactions of the nonproliferation system with other systems on larger and smaller scales.

  1. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VII. International perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this volume is to assess the proliferation vulnerabilities of the present deployment of civilian nuclear-power systems within the current nonproliferation regime and, in light of their prospective deployment, to consider technical and institutional measures and alternatives which may contribute to an improved regime in which nuclear power could play a significant part. An assessment of these measures must include consideration of their nonproliferation effectiveness as well as their bearing upon energy security, and their operational, economic, and political implications. The nature of these considerations can provide some measure of their likely acceptability to various nations.

  2. Homeland security planning: what victory gardens and Fidel Castro can teach us in preparing for food crises in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, A Bryan; Endres, Jody M

    2009-01-01

    Two historical examples provide important insight into how federal government policies can integrate regional and local food systems to achieve food security during a time of acute crisis. During World War II, American home gardeners, through the federal government's Victory Garden program, supplied 40 percent of the nation's fresh produce, while simultaneously maintaining pre-war commodity production policies favoring large agricultural interests. The recent food crisis in Cuba, precipitated by the collapse of Soviet-bloc trade in the early 1990s, is another historical example that could inform U.S. policymakers on how to achieve food self-sufficiency through reemphasis on small farmers using sustainable practices supplemented with urban gardening. This article aims to ignite government action to strengthen and integrate regional and local food systems into federal food security planning so that citizens can be best prepared for a food emergency. The article first examines laws, regulations and policies put in place during World War II that employed regional and local food networks to satisfy a significant amount of civilian food supply needs. The article also looks at more recent Cuban efforts to achieve forced food self-reliance when, after the end of the Cold War, Soviet subsidies and preferential trading of energy and food supplies ceased almost overnight.

  3. Cyber security

    CERN Document Server

    Voeller, John G

    2014-01-01

    Cyber Security features articles from the Wiley Handbook of Science and Technology for Homeland Security covering topics related to cyber security metrics and measure  and related technologies that meet security needs. Specific applications to web services, the banking and the finance sector, and industrial process control systems are discussed.

  4. Problems of the nuclear non-proliferation policy. Probleme der nuklearen Nichtverbreitungspolitik; Beitraege zur internationalen Diskussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blix, H.; Butler, P. von; Fischer, W.; Caccia Dominioni, F.; Frick, H.; Gmelin, W.; Haeckel, E.; Lauppe, W.D.; Mueller, H.; Richter, B.; Stein, G.

    1994-05-01

    The volume assembles a number of essays wherein basic problems of nonproliferation are identified and discussed in view of recent developments and future policy requirements. What is the role of multilateral institutions in the containment of nuclear proliferation How are Western Europe's security needs to be reconciled with the tenets of the global nonproliferation regime How can international safeguards be upgraded so as to increase confidence among states What kinds of disciplinary instruments are needed for the international community to prevent an unco-operative state from gaining access to nuclear weapons What kinds of obstacles stand in the way of smooth co-operation between the European Union and the United States in the nuclear field How does the demise of global bipolarity impinge on the need to pursue an international nuclear order The essays in this volume seek to combine structural analysis of conceptual issues with substantive policy recommendations. (orig./HP)

  5. Post-Cold War Effects on the Non-proliferation Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, Carol E.

    2006-03-31

    This journal article analyzes nuclear and security related events of the past 15 years to illustrate the changes in geopolitics and the shifting balance of power following the collapse of the Soviet Union. Reflection upon these events establishes the context for strengthening the nonproliferation regime. The author concludes that post Soviet communism hastened the movement towards a unipolar system with hegemonic power vested in the United States, and this geopolitical imbalance fostered insecurities and greater threats. Multilateral cooperation and commitment from the US would help this leader achieve its goal of security through increased global confidence in the international system.

  6. Special Reports; Homeland Security and Information Management; The Development of Electronic Government in the United States: The Federal Policy Experience; Digital Rights Management: Why Libraries Should Be Major Players; The Current State and Future Promise of Portal Applications; Recruitment and Retention: A Professional Concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relyea, Harold C.; Halchin, L. Elaine; Hogue, Henry B.; Agnew, Grace; Martin, Mairead; Schottlaender, Brian E. C.; Jackson, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Theses five reports address five special issues: the effects of the September 11 attacks on information management, including homeland security, Web site information removal, scientific and technical information, and privacy concerns; federal policy for electronic government information; digital rights management and libraries; library Web portal…

  7. Developing Effluent Analysis Technologies to Support Nonproliferation Initiatives, Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies, Third quarter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, S A; Staehle, G; Alonzo, G M [eds.

    1995-01-01

    This issue provides an overview of the Effluent Research Program of the DOE Office of Research and Development, highlighting a number of representative projects within this program in support of nonproliferation initiatives. Technologies reported include portable instruments for on-site inspections, standoff detectors, fieldable, real-time instruments, field collection techniques, and ultrasensitive laboratory techniques.

  8. Nuclear Nonproliferation Ontology Assessment Team Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strasburg, Jana D.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

    2012-01-01

    Final Report for the NA22 Simulations, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) Ontology Assessment Team's efforts from FY09-FY11. The Ontology Assessment Team began in May 2009 and concluded in September 2011. During this two-year time frame, the Ontology Assessment team had two objectives: (1) Assessing the utility of knowledge representation and semantic technologies for addressing nuclear nonproliferation challenges; and (2) Developing ontological support tools that would provide a framework for integrating across the Simulation, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) program. The SAM Program was going through a large assessment and strategic planning effort during this time and as a result, the relative importance of these two objectives changed, altering the focus of the Ontology Assessment Team. In the end, the team conducted an assessment of the state of art, created an annotated bibliography, and developed a series of ontological support tools, demonstrations and presentations. A total of more than 35 individuals from 12 different research institutions participated in the Ontology Assessment Team. These included subject matter experts in several nuclear nonproliferation-related domains as well as experts in semantic technologies. Despite the diverse backgrounds and perspectives, the Ontology Assessment team functioned very well together and aspects could serve as a model for future inter-laboratory collaborations and working groups. While the team encountered several challenges and learned many lessons along the way, the Ontology Assessment effort was ultimately a success that led to several multi-lab research projects and opened up a new area of scientific exploration within the Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Verification.

  9. Evolution and resilience of the nuclear nonproliferation regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pregenzer, Arian L. [Senior Scientist, Retired, Sandia National Laboratories, 13013 Arroyo de Vista NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States)

    2014-05-09

    This paper introduces the concept of systems resilience as a new framework for thinking about the future of the nonproliferation regime. Resilience refers to the ability of a system to maintain its vital functions in the face of continuous and unpredictable change. First, I make the case that the nonproliferation regime can be viewed as a complex system. Next, I discuss key themes from the literature on systems resilience and apply them to the nonproliferation system: the difference between resilience and stability; the need for evolution to maintain function; the importance of functional diversity; and the concept of the adaptive cycle. I show that most existing nonproliferation strategies are aimed at stability rather than resilience and that the current nonproliferation system may be over-constrained by the cumulative evolution of strategies. According to the literature on systems resilience, this increases its vulnerability to collapse. I argue that the resilience of the nonproliferation system can be enhanced by increasing international participation in setting the nonproliferation agenda, developing general international response capabilities, focusing on non-coercive approaches to decreasing demand, and applying systems thinking more rigorously to nonproliferation.

  10. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VII. International perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this volume is to assess the proliferation vulnerabilities of the present deployment of civilian nuclear-power systems within the current nonproliferation regime and, in light of their prospective deployment, to consider technical and institutional measures and alternatives which may contribute to an improved regime in which nuclear power could play a significant part. An assessment of these measures must include consideration of their nonproliferation effectiveness as well as their bearing upon energy security, and their operational, economic, and political implications. The nature of these considerations can provide some measure of their likely acceptability to various nations. While any final assessment of such measures and alternatives would have to examine the circumstances particular to each nation, it is hoped that the more generic assessments conducted here will be useful in suggesting guidelines for developing an improved nonproliferation regime which also helps to meet nuclear-energy needs. One chapter outlines the existing nonproliferation regime, including the Treaty for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards, bilateral and multilateral requirements for agreements of cooperation and transfers of technology, and existing provisons for sanctions for violation of nonproliferation commitments. The chapter then proceeds to an assessment of various alternatives for providing assurance of fuel supply in light of this current regime. Another chapter examines a set of technical and institutional measures and alternatives for various components of once-through and closed fuel cycles. The components of the once-through fuel cycle assessed are enrichment services and spent-fuel management; the components of closed fuel cycles assessed are reprocessing and plutonium management and fast-breeder reactor (FBR) deployment.

  11. Preparation for the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Extension Conference in 1995. Workshop summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, P.L.

    1993-05-07

    About 30 specialists in non-proliferation participated in a workshop to explore ideas for US Government preparatory steps leading to the 1995 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Extension Conference. To that end, workshop sessions were devoted to reviewing the lessons learned from previous Review Conferences, discussing the threats to the non-proliferation regime together with ways of preserving and strengthening it, and examining the management of international nuclear commerce. A fundamental premise shared by workshop participants was that extension of the NPT is immensely important to international security. The importance of stemming proliferation and, more specifically, extending the Treaty, is growing as a result of the significant changes in the world. If the conferees of the Extension Conference decide on no extension or extension for a short limited duration, some technically advanced states that have foregone development of nuclear weapons may begin to rethink their options. Also, other arms control measures, such as the Chemical Weapons Convention, could start to unravel. The US must provide strong international leadership to ensure that the Extension Conference is a success, resulting in Treaty extension, perhaps through successive terms, into the indefinite future. Workshop participants were struck by the urgent need for the US to take organizational steps so that it is highly effective in its advance preparations for the Extension Conference. Moreover, the Extension Conference provides both a challenge and an opportunity to mold a cohesive set of US policy actions to define the future role of nuclear weapons and combat their proliferation.

  12. Transportation Security Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... content Official website of the Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration A - Z Index What Can I Bring? ... form Search the Site Main menu Administrator Travel Security Screening Special Procedures TSA Pre✓® Passenger Support Travel ...

  13. Complacency: A Threat to Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    fascination with understanding how memes are passed on within cultures and become accepted as “common wisdom.” For the purpose of this thesis, the...terms their meaning. According to folk psychology, terms, such as “complacency,” develop and evolve within cultures, are passed on as memes , and...mind that ordinary people are inclined to endorse. It is the theory that mental state terms develop and evolve within cultures, are passed on as memes

  14. Intelligence Sharing, Fusion Centers, and Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    accurate and timely dissemination of crucial information. LCDR Christopher C. Thornlow in his Master’s Thesis , Fusing Intelligence with Law...networks. FCW, from http://www.fcw.com/print/13_16/news/102730-1.html Waterman, S (2008). Analysis: Einstein and U.S. Cybersecurity . UPI, from http...undergraduate studies at the University of Tennessee in Martin, Tennessee where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice

  15. European Approaches to Homeland Security and Counterterrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-24

    actual terrorist incident, a Cabinet-level emergency crisis management body — known as COBR (for the Cabinet Office briefing room in which it meets...is convened to coordinate the government’s immediate emergency response; COBR brings together the Prime Minister and other Cabinet ministers and... COBR , and the armed forces would have no jurisdiction outside of supporting the civil powers. The Ministry of Defense and the armed forces are also

  16. ETV - HOMELAND SECURITY EVALUATION OF CYANIDE DETECTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program was established in 1995 to objectively verify the performance of technologies that measure / monitor the quality of our environment, both for background or at suspected contamination site. The ETV program has established...

  17. Measuring the Foundation of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Force (also referred to as humanistic psychology) was a body of knowledge and theories separate from the behaviorist and Freudian movements...Eduardo Salas and Carolyn Prince, Team Performance Assessment and Measurement: Theory , Methods, and Applications (Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates...Team Theory in a Unified Command Environment at Catastrophic Incidents” (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA, 2005). 18 Andrea Saveri, Howard

  18. Ethical Decision-Making for Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    1947 by George Kennan that argued for a policy of containment of the Soviet Union. The strong emphasis on values in the Narrative underscores the...Service, Excellence  Kent , WA Fire Department: Be Safe, Do Your Best, Serve With Integrity, Take Care of Each Other  Hazardville, CT Fire

  19. A Balanced Approach to Funding Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Behavior ........................................68 2. Myth 2: Attitude Changes Behavior ..........................................69 3. Myth 3: People...verses another. Because DHS is assessing risk as a means to allocating resources to buy down risk, it is imperative, according to DHS, that its risk...economically healthy impulse .201 Crowdfunding is more than just money; it is facilitation, dedication, team building, and valuation. These are the

  20. The Submersible Threat to Maritime Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    this vessel was $490 million USD at the time of the incident and the parent company, Carnival Corporation, has insurance coverage in the amount of $510...million USD for the vessel with a deductable of approximately $30 million USD (Reuters UK Edition, 2012). The Carnival Corporation self-insures for...declined in the days and weeks after the incident (Reuters U.S. Edition, 2012). After this incident occurred, the stock price for Carnival

  1. Homeland Security Department: FY2007 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-05

    Explosive Detection Systems; ETD: Explosive Trace Detection equipment; IT: Information Technology; FFDO: Federal Flight Deck Officer program; TWIC...willing to place back under warranty should be refurbished. The committee, however, emphasized that it does not believe that explosive trace detection (ETD

  2. 76 FR 34088 - Homeland Security Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... participate in this HSAC teleconference via afore mentioned procedures. Each individual must provide his or... during the teleconference, contact Erika Nixon at the afore mentioned number (202) 447-3135. Dated:...

  3. An Interagency Command for Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    rule for many citizens during the initial hours of a large-scale CRBN [chemical, radiological, biological, or nuclear] incident” yet the “lack of an...official source of information on CRBN incidents has left the average citizen much less prepared, both intellectually and emotionally, than the

  4. Homeland Security Intelligence: To What End

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    author’s adaptive threat orientation model are derived spring from military strategist John Boyd’s (1995) “Observe-Orient-Decide-Act Loop” or “OODA...In his revolutionary presentation Organic Design for Command and Control (1995), military strategist John Boyd proposed the key to decisive combat...scholar Henry P. Monaghan (1970, p. 25) has proposed that contemporary Presidents have embraced the role of “Protector-in-Chief” and with “ever

  5. 2009 Homeland Security Symposium and Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-10

    benchmark in 2007. Page 46 http://charlestonharbourresort.com – Legitimate javascript applet used to detect flash player and has been injected with...transactions. • They install backdoors that " beacon " periodically to their command and control servers, allowing surreptitious access to the

  6. Homeland Security Planning for Urban Area Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Philip Zimbardo (New York: Oxford Press, 2007), 241. 58 Ibid., 228. 26 The attacks on 9/11 killed 3,063 people. Although there were multiple... Zimbardo purports that we are not born with tendencies towards good or evil but with mental templates to do either.76 Arie Kruglanski and Shire Fishman...they able to commit such heinous acts? Zimbardo claims that few people will engage in an “end game” final solution without first being prepared

  7. Homeland Security Behind the Redwood Curtain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    drink, then put it firmly down on the porch railing and turned toward me. “You wouldn’t believe how they talk to their mama ,” he said angrily. “They...a little boy who has cancer . Keep in touch!” she said with a friendly wave good-bye. Rugged is an appropriate adjective to describe this county

  8. Homeland Security Department: FY2008 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-17

    for carry-on bags; whole body imaging; explosive trace detection portal machines; cast and prosthetic device scanners; and bottled liquid scanners. The...transferred from the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T), and the National Biosurveillance Integration System (NBIS), which will be transferred from...transfer of the Biosurveillance program/project activity (PPA) to the new Office of Health Affairs. In addition, funding for the new Office of Emergency

  9. The State of Homeland Security 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    divisions. • The State of Biosecurity. The Department’s grade in this area is a B-. A robust biointelligence and biosurveillance capability must...critical DNDO methods to conduct Advanced Spectroscopic Portal Monitors (ASP) cost-benefit analysis. The Department must improve upon the...methodologies applied toward radiation portal monitors. The Department should also examine the possibilities and implications of aggressive deployment of

  10. Homeland Security Department: FY2010 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-14

    technology. While the TSA has abandoned the acquisition and operational utilization of trace detection portal (puffer) machines in favor WBI devices... Biosurveillance Integration System (NBIS), and the department’s occupational health and safety programs.160 Dr. Alexander G. Garza, President Obama’s...and $98 million is for biosurveillance , BioWatch, medical readiness planning, chemical response, and other activities

  11. 2006 Homeland Security Symposium and Exposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-31

    Geoeconomic Studies • Paul A. Volker Chair in International Economics, Council on Foreign Relations; most recently Director, Congressional Budget...its recommendations •Re-engineer ESF-8 capabilities and responsibilities in partnership with DHS and other strategic partners • Brand the HHS Mission in

  12. Data Mining and Homeland Security: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-27

    Senator Patrick Leahy, “Letter of Attorney General Alberto Gonzales to the Chairman and Ranking Member of the Senate Judiciary Committee ordered...documents/nsa_myth_v_ reality.pdf]. 107 The Honorable Alberto Gonzalez, Testimony before the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Wartime Executive Power

  13. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Policy of the Obama Administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jin Hyun; Hwang, Ji Hwan [Haesung International Problem Ethics Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    The objective of this study is to analyze and foresee trends of international nuclear non-proliferation regimes focused on the nuclear non-proliferation policy of the Obama administration, and suggest national policy directions which promote utilization and development of nuclear energy in Korea. For the effective and efficient implementation of the national nuclear use and development program in current international nuclear environment, many efforts should be made: to actively and positively participate in the international nuclear non-proliferation regime; to strengthen nuclear diplomacy in a more systematic manner; and to strengthen the international nuclear cooperation

  14. IAEA safeguards and non-proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry, R.J.S.

    1995-02-01

    An overview is given of efforts to contain the nuclear weapons proliferation during half a century of man-controlled nuclear fission. An initial policy of denial did not work, a following period of cooperation needed a gradual strengthening of international assurances on the peaceful character of the flourishing use of nuclear techniques for power generation and of other applications. The focus of the nuclear weapon proliferation concern changed from the highly developed states to developing states. The Non-Proliferation Treaty laid the basis for a unique system of voluntarily accepted international inspections to verify the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The IAEA got the task to implement this `Full Scope Safeguards` on all nuclear material and all nuclear activities in the non-nuclear weapon states. Thanks to the structure of the IAEA, in which both proponent and states with a critical attitude take part in the decision making process on the IAEA execution of its tasks, a balanced, and widely acceptable system emerged. International developments necessitated additional improvements of the non-proliferation system. The increase of strength of sub-national groups triggered international cooperation on physical protection, about a quarter of a century ago. More recently, it appeared that NPT states with assumed nuclear weapon ambitions operated in the margins between the interpretation of IAEA safeguards and the spirit and purpose of NPT. Improvements of the IAEA safeguards and a stronger cooperation between states, including the constraints which exporting states have imposed on nuclear supplies, strengthen the safeguards system. The important reductions in the two largest nuclear weapon arsenals lead, together with the delay in the fast breeder implementation, to large stockpiles of nuclear weapon usable materials. Also in this areas new internationally credible assurances have to be obtained, that these materials will never return to nuclear weapon applications.

  15. The Future of Nonproliferation in a Changed and Changing Environment: A Workshop Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreicer, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-30

    The Center for Global Security Research and Global Security Principal Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory convened a workshop in July 2016 to consider “The Future of Nonproliferation in a Changed and Changing Security Environment.” We took a broad view of nonproliferation, encompassing not just the treaty regime but also arms control, threat reduction, counter-­proliferation, and countering nuclear terrorism. We gathered a group of approximately 60 experts from the technical, academic, political, defense and think tank communities and asked them what—and how much—can reasonably be accomplished in each of these areas in the 5 to 10 years ahead. Discussion was on a not-­for-­attribution basis. This document provides a summary of key insights and lessons learned, and is provided to help stimulate broader public discussion of these issues. It is a collection of ideas as informally discussed and debated among a group of experts. The ideas reported here are the personal views of individual experts and should not be attributed to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  16. Atoms for peace and the nonproliferation treaty: unintended consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streeper, Charles Blamires [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In April 2009, President Obama revived nonproliferation and arms control efforts with a speech calling for the worldwide abolition of nuclear weapons. His speech correctly acknowledged the threat of nuclear terrorism and the vulnerabilities of the related unsecure nuclear materials. Unfortunately, the president did not mention and has not mentioned in any speech the threat posed by at-risk radiological materials. Nonproliferation efforts have a well documented history of focus on special nuclear materials (fissionable weapons usable materials or SNM), and other key materials (chemical and biological) and technologies for a Weapon of Mass Destruction (WMD). Such intense focus on WMD related materials/technologies is essential for international safety and security and merit continued attention and funding. However, the perception that radioactive sealed sources (sources) are of less concern than WMD is unfortunate. These perceptions are based solely on the potentially enormous and tragic consequences associated with their deliberate or accidental misuse and proliferation concerns. However, there is a documented history of overemphasis on the nuclear threat at the expense of ignoring the far more likely and also devastating chemical and biological threats. The radiological threat should not be minimized or excluded from policy discussions and decisions on these far ranging scopes of threat to the international community. Sources have a long history of use; and a wider distribution worldwide than fissile materials. Pair this with their broad ranges in isotopes/activities along with scant national and international attention and mechanisms for their safe and secure management and it is not difficult to envision a deadly threat. Arguments that minimize or divert attention away from sources may have the effect of distracting necessary policy attention on preventing/mitigating a radiological dispersal event. The terrorist attacks on 9/11 should be a clear reminder of the

  17. Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy Issues in the 103rd Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    North Korea Former Soviet Weapons President Clinton’s Address to the U.N. Federal Organization for Nonproliferation Counterproliferation Export ...Nonproliferation Policy Congress Weapon International North Korea Former Soviet Union Clinton Counterproliferation Export Control Short Long Term Issue Pages: 14...include: (1) proliferation efforts. These include the North Korea’s violation of its NPT obliga- agreement by Argentina and Brazil to allow tions; (2

  18. Modeling and Simulation for Safeguards and Nonproliferation Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilligan, Kimberly V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Modeling and Simulation for Safeguards and Nonproliferation Workshop was held December 15–18, 2014, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This workshop was made possible by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Human Capital Development (NGSI HCD) Program. The idea of the workshop was to move beyond the tried-and-true boot camp training of nonproliferation concepts to spend several days on the unique perspective of applying modeling and simulation (M&S) solutions to safeguards challenges.

  19. Finland and nuclear non-proliferation: The evolution and cultivation of a norm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dassen, L. van [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Peace and Conflict Research

    1998-03-01

    Finland``s entrance on the non-proliferation scene was in 1963 when President Kekkonen suggested a Nordic nuclear-weapons-free zone (NWFZ). This started a debate in and among the Nordic countries and it created a Finnish profile towards the Soviet Union. In most cases, the Soviets tried to bring Finland into a much closer relationship with the USSR. The mere prospect and debate on a Nordic NWFZ reduced the incentive for the Soviets to undermine Finnish neutrality or their desire to suggest consultations according to the Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance on military assistance in the case of a threat to Soviet and/or Finnish security. During the negotiations on the Non-Proliferation Treaty, 1965-1968, Finland played a very active role as a bridge-builder, first between the superpowers and later between the developed and the developing world. This activity gave Finland a name in the UN, strengthened its neutrality and established good relations with the West as well. In 1978, Kekkonen brought up the Nordic NWFZ once more, this time under influence of certain strategic challenges to Finland and general East-West developments. In this Kekkonen had much backing by the public in Finland whereas other states reacted very reluctantly. Politics in Finland has to a large extent been marked by the relations with Russia and later the Soviet Union. However, nuclear non-proliferation was used to ease the weight of this imposing neighbour; a strategy that certainly must be regarded as successful. While achieving this, it was also possible to increase contacts with western states and remain accepted as a neutral state. For Finland, non-proliferation policy was initially a suitable issue to solve other problems than those related exclusively to proliferation. But it was also a policy with a high degree of persistence, pragmatism and willingness to work with concrete issues that maybe do not reach the international limelight in the short run but that work in

  20. Report of a Workshop in Nuclear Forces and Nonproliferation held at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The workshop addressed evolving nuclear forces and their impacts on nonproliferation in the context of the new strategic environment, the Obama Administration's Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) Review and the 2010 Conference (RevCon) of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The issues discussed are at the heart of the debate on nuclear policy issues such asfuture nuclear weapons requirements and nonproliferation, but also the stockpile stewardship program and infrastructure modernization. The workshop discussions reflected the importance of the NPRfor defining the role of US nuclear forces in dealing with 21s1 century threats and providing guidance that will shape NNSA and DoD programs. They also highlighted its importancefor NPT diplomacy. The discussion noted the report of the bipartisan Congressional Commission on the Strategic Posture of the United States, and the expectation that the NPR would likely reflect its consensus to a large degree (although the Administration was not bound by the report). There was widespread support for developing thefoundationsfor a sustainable nuclear-weapon program that addresses nuclear weapons, infrastructure and expertise in the broader nonproliferation, disarmament and international security contexts. The discussion also revealed a convergence of views, but no consensus, on a number of important issues, including the diminished role but continued importance of nuclear weapons; the need to take action to ensure the sustainability of the stockpile, and the recapitalization of the infrastructure and expertise; and the need to take action to promote nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament objectives.

  1. Development of nonproliferation and assessment scenarios.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, Melissa; Barnett, Natalie Beth

    2005-10-01

    The overall objective of the Nonproliferation and Assessments Scenario Development project is to create and analyze potential and plausible scenarios that would lead to an adversary's ability to acquire and use a biological weapon. The initial three months of funding was intended to be used to develop a scenario to demonstrate the efficacy of this analysis methodology; however, it was determined that a substantial amount of preliminary data collection would be needed before a proof of concept scenario could be developed. We have dedicated substantial effort to determine the acquisition pathways for Foot and Mouth Disease Virus, and similar processes will be applied to all pathogens of interest. We have developed a biosecurity assessments database to capture information on adversary skill locales, available skill sets in specific regions, pathogen sources and regulations involved in pathogen acquisition from legitimate facilities. FY06 funding, once released, will be dedicated to data collection on acquisition, production and dissemination requirements on a pathogen basis. Once pathogen data has been collected, scenarios will be developed and scored.

  2. Critical Homeland Infrastructure Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    CIP Mr. Dan Mathis DPO-MA The National Innovative Technology and Ms. Elizabeth NITMAC Mission Assurance Center D’Andrea Current and Developing Issues...Vulnerabilities and COL Jeff Brown JTF-CNO Countermeasures Telecommunications Security and NSTAC Mr. Karl Rauscher NSTAC Anti-Terrorism/Force Protection LTC(P

  3. 77 FR 26641 - Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... 4, 2012 Part III Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration Aviation... Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) Meeting AGENCY: Transportation Security Administration, DHS... Security Administration (TSA) will hold a meeting of the Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) on May...

  4. 49 CFR 1540.203 - Security threat assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY: GENERAL RULES... Transportation Worker Identification Credential or Hazardous Materials Endorsement programs. (3) A...

  5. Transnationalism: Diaspora-Homeland Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Rubin

    2006-01-01

    Based on detected correlations between the strategic collaboration of U.S.-based diasporas and their respective ancestral homelands on the one hand and the socioeconomic and technological development of those homelands on the other, this paper, which provides a conceptual foundation of the correlation, attempts to ignite a new area of research on…

  6. Protecting the Homeland: The Importance of Counter-Illicit Trafficking to Prevent an Attack with Weapons of Mass Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Surveying the Security Risks,” Center for Nonproliferation Studies, Disarmament Forum, no. 2 (2003): 23- 24. http://www.peacepalacelibrary.nl/ ebooks ...www.peacepalacelibrary.nl/ ebooks /files/UNIDIR_pdf-art1909.pdf (accessed November 24, 2012) Fox News. “5 Men Found guilty of Plotting to Kill Fort Dix Soldiers

  7. Chemical and biological nonproliferation program. FY99 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This document is the first of what will become an annual report documenting the progress made by the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP). It is intended to be a summary of the program's activities that will be of interest to both policy and technical audiences. This report and the annual CBNP Summer Review Meeting are important vehicles for communication with the broader chemical and biological defense and nonproliferation communities. The Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program Strategic Plan is also available and provides additional detail on the program's context and goals. The body of the report consists of an overview of the program's philosophy, goals and recent progress in the major program areas. In addition, an appendix is provided with more detailed project summaries that will be of interest to the technical community.

  8. University-level Non-proliferation and Safeguards Education and Human Capital Development Activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachner K. M.; Pepper, S.; Gomera, J.; Einwechter, M.; Toler, L. T.

    2016-07-24

    BNL has offered Nuclear Nonproliferation, Safeguards and Security in the 21st Century,? referred to as NNSS, every year since 2009 for graduate students in technical and policy fields related to nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. The course focuses on relevant policy issues, in addition to technical components, and is part of a larger NGSI short course initiative that includes separate courses that are delivered at three other national laboratories and NNSA headquarters. [SCHOLZ and ROSENTHAL] The course includes lectures from esteemed nonproliferation experts, tours of various BNL facilities and laboratories, and in-field and table-top exercises on both technical and policy subjects. Topics include the history of the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and other relevant treaties, the history of and advances in international nuclear safeguards, current relevant political situations in countries such as Iran, Iraq, and the Democratic Peoples? Republic of Korea (DPRK), nuclear science and technology, instrumentation and techniques used for verification activities, and associated research and development. The students conduct a mock Design Information Verification (DIV) at BNL?s decommissioned Medical Research Reactor. The capstone of the course includes a series of student presentations in which students act as policy advisors and provide recommendations in response to scenarios involving a current nonproliferation related event that are prepared by the course organizers. ?The course is open to domestic and foreign students, and caters to students in, entering, or recently having completed graduate school. Interested students must complete an application and provide a resume and a statement describing their interest in the course. Eighteen to 22 students attend annually; 165 students have completed the course to date. A stipend helps to defray students? travel and subsistence expenses. In 2015, the course was shortened from three weeks to

  9. Changing Homeland Security: What Should Homeland Security Leaders Be Talking About?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    top of the nation’s policy agenda. The discussions will be based on a mix of research , experience, opinion, ideology, and bias. Participants in the... constructionism , middle-of-the-road moderation, and radical reconstructionism.14 BELLA VIT A, CH A NGI NG HOMELA ND SECU R ITY 6...nation by paying more attention to the social and economic conditions that give rise to and support “premeditated, politically motivated violence

  10. Homeland Security: What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Different Local Homeland Security Organizational Structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    FIGURES Figure 1.  Atlanta Police Department Organizational Chart ............................................32  Figure 2.  Atlanta Police Overall...40  Figure 4.  Hall County Fire Department Organizational Chart ........................................46...55  Figure 7.  Dekalb County Police Department Organizational Chart ................................62

  11. Homeland Security as a Stock Market: Antifragility as a Strategy for Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    pile eventually collapses. What interested Bak, was how big 73 Benjamin Franklin, Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin, Google ebook ...Google ebook ed. Vol. I. London: A.J. Valphy, 1818. Frontline, Money, Power and Wall Street, directed by Michael Kirk, Season 30, episode 10

  12. Leveraging U.S. nuclear weapons policy to advance U.S. nonproliferation goals : implications of major theories of international relations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Andrew

    2009-06-01

    National policymakers are currently considering a dilemma of critical importance to the continued security of the United States: how can U.S. nuclear weapons policies be leveraged to benefit U.S. nuclear nonproliferation goals in the near-term, without sacrificing U.S. national security? In its role supporting U.S. nuclear weapons policy, Sandia National Laboratories has a responsibility to provide objective technical advice to support policy deliberations on this question. However, to best fulfill this duty Sandia must have a broader understanding of the context of the problem. To help develop this understanding, this paper analyzes the two predominant analytical perspectives of international relations theory to explore their prescriptions for how nuclear weapons and nonproliferation policies interact. As lenses with which to view and make sense of the world, theories of international relations must play a crucial role in framing the trade-offs at the intersection of the nuclear weapons and nonproliferation policy domains. An analysis of what these theories suggest as courses of action to leverage nuclear weapons policies to benefit nonproliferation goals is then offered, with particular emphasis on where the policy prescriptions resulting from the respective theories align to offer near-term policy changes with broad theoretical support. These policy prescriptions are then compared to the 2001 Nuclear Posture Review to understand what the theories indicate policymakers may have gotten right in their dealing with the nuclear dilemma, and where they may have gone wrong. Finally, a brief international relations research agenda is proposed to help address the dilemma between nuclear deterrence and nuclear nonproliferation policies, with particular emphasis on how such an agenda can best support the needs of the policy community and a potential 'all things nuclear' policy deliberation and decision-support framework.

  13. Nonproliferation and safeguards aspects of the DUPIC fuel cycle concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persiani, P. K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of the study is to comment on the proliferation characteristic profiles of some of the proposed fuel cycle alternatives to help ensure that nonproliferation concerns are introduced into the early stages of a fuel cycle concept development program, and to perhaps aid in the more effective implementation of the international nonproliferation regime initiative and safeguards systems. Alternative recycle concepts proposed by several countries involve the recycle of spent fuel without the separation of plutonium from uranium and fission products. The concepts are alternatives to either the direct long-term storage deposition of or the purex reprocessing of the spent fuels. The alternate fuel cycle concepts reviewed include: the dry-recycle processes such as the direct use of reconfigured PWR spent fuel assemblies into CANDU reactors(DUPIC); low-decontamination, single-cycle co-extraction of fast reactor fuels in a wet-purex type of reprocessing; and on a limited scale the thorium-uranium fuel cycle. The nonproliferation advantages usually associated with the above non-separation processes are: the highly radioactive spent fuel presents a barrier to the physical diversion of the nuclear material; avoid the need to dissolve and chemically separate the plutonium from the uranium and fission products; and that the spent fuel isotopic quality of the plutonium vector is further degraded. Although the radiation levels and the need for reprocessing may be perceived as barriers to the terrorist or the subnational level of safeguards, the international level of nonproliferation concerns is addressed primarily by material accountancy and verification activities. On the international level of nonproliferation concerns, the non-separation fuel cycle concepts involved have to be evaluated on the bases of the impact the processes may have on nuclear materials accountancy. (author).

  14. Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology & Learning, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Anytime, anywhere, learning provides opportunities to create digital learning environments for new teaching styles and personalized learning. As part of making sure the program is effective, the safety and security of students and assets are essential--and mandated by law. The Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) addresses Internet content…

  15. South African Homelands as Frontiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book explores what happened to the homelands – in many ways the ultimate apartheid disgrace – after the fall of apartheid. The nine chapters contribute to understanding the multiple configurations that currently exist in areas formerly declared "homelands" or "Bantustans". Using the concept...... of frontier zones, the homelands emerge as areas in which the future of the South African postcolony is being renegotiated, contested and remade with hyper-real intensity. This is so because the many fault lines left over from apartheid (its loose ends, so to speak) – between white and black; between...... in these settings that the postcolonial promise of liberation and freedom must face its test. As such, the book offers highly nuanced and richly detailed analyses that go to the heart of the diverse dilemmas of post-apartheid South Africa as a whole, but simultaneously also provides in condensed form an extended...

  16. The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kusumi, R.; Daures, Pascal A.; Janssens, Willem; Dickman, Deborah A.

    2010-06-16

    The renaissance of efforts to expand the use of nuclear energy requires the parallel development of a renewed and more sophisticated work force. Growth in the nuclear sector with high standard of safety, safeguards and security requires skilled staff for design, operations, inspections etc. High-quality nuclear technology educational programs are diminished from past years, and the ability of universities to attract students and to meet future staffing requirements of the nuclear industry is becoming seriously compromised. Thus, education and training in nuclear engineering and sciences is one of the cornerstones for the nuclear sector. Teaching in the nuclear field still seems strongly influenced by national history but it is time to strengthen resources and collaborate. Moreover with the current nuclear security threats it becomes critical that nuclear technology experts master the basic principles not only of safety, but also of nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation and nuclear security. In Europe the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association has established the certificate 'European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE)' as the classic nuclear engineering program covering reactor operation and nuclear safety. However, it does not include courses on nonproliferation, safeguards, or dual-use technologies. The lack of education in nuclear safeguards was tackled by the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), through development and implementation of safeguards course modules. Since 2005 the ESARDA Working Group, called the Training and Knowledge Management Working Group, (TKMWG) has worked with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy to organize a Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation course. This five-day course is held each spring at the JRC, and continues to show increasing interest as evidenced by the positive responses of international lecturers and students. The standard set of lectures

  17. The Haptic Lines of Homeland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, P.; Takatsuka, M.

    2013-02-01

    This paper discusses the conceptual underpinnings, working processes and the tools used for preparing the scene files of a holographic art work which offers a subjective view point on the idea of homeland. The art work, Homeland, an optically formed fringe digital hologram, which is contextualized by the holographic maps used in situational awareness, indicates its subjectivity by strongly referencing the human body, particularly the lines of the palm of the hand. ... because the body belongs to the order of things as the world is universal flesh. Maurice Merleau-Ponty

  18. 49 CFR 1542.205 - Security of the security identification display area (SIDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security of the security identification display... (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRPORT SECURITY Operations § 1542.205 Security of the security identification display area (SIDA)....

  19. Latin America`s emerging non-proliferation consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redick, J.R.

    1994-03-01

    Latin America`s incorporation into the international nuclear non-proliferation regime is well advanced. The 1967 Tlatelolco Treaty, which established a regional nuclear-weapon-free zone (NWFZ), is nearing completion. A signal event occurred January 18, when Argentina and Chile deposited instruments of ratification to the treaty, leaving Brazil and Cuba the only major countries in Latin America that are not yet contracting parties. And after more than two decades of concern about the nuclear programs and policies in Argentina and Brazil, there is room for great optimism that Brazil may now be moving quickly on important non-proliferation issues. Even Cuba, the {open_quotes}bad boy of the neighborhood{close_quotes} in the eyes of many, which held aloof from the Tlatelolco process for three decades, has stated its willingness to join the zone in the future.

  20. An Introduction to Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haakansson, Ane; Jonter, Thomas

    2007-06-15

    The purpose of this project was to compile a course material that covers how the nuclear safeguards system has emerged and how it works today. The produced compendium is directed to both university students and people concerned by safeguards from the industry. The primary aim of the first part of this paper is to describe the historical development of this global non-proliferation system and its central tasks. A second purpose is to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of its current design in order to answer the following question: Can we today say that we have a functioning global non-proliferation system? Does it require further strengthening, and, if so, how can this be achieved? In the second section we review the verification regime within nuclear safeguards, i. e. describe the methods and techniques that are available to reassure the world community that concluded treaties are adhered to

  1. The international nuclear non-proliferation system: Challenges and choices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J.; McGrew, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    When a topic has been under discussion for almost 40 years there is a danger that the literature will become excessively esoteric and that, as Philip Grummett suggests, '...a new scholasticism will arise' (p.79). Originating in a November l982 seminar co-sponsored by the British International Studies Association and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, this volume is a refreshing, well conceived, and well written antidote to that trend. It is also well timed for the 1985 NPT Review Conference. The eight chapters of the volume are divided into three sections. Following an introduction by Anthony McGrew that touches on all the major themes of the volume, the first section deals with the existing non-proliferation system. In three chapters the historical, institutional and policy-making elements of the present system are outlined. There is a vignette on the Nuclear Suppliers Group in Wilmshurst's chapter one (pp. 28-33). Fischer's informative chapter on the IAEA is followed by Gummett's examination of policy options, including, for example, the linking of conventional weapons transfer to non-proliferation policies. The second section, also of three chapters, examines current issues: the state of the international nuclear industry, and the non-proliferation policies of the United States and Britain. Walker's chapter focuses chiefly on change in the industry-from monopoly to pluralism in suppliers, the effect of the economic recession, and the combined effect of these two factors on international politics. Devine's American non-proliferation chapter is a statement of the State Department view, whilst Keohane's chapter on Britain attempts to put the Trident procurement into a proliferation context. The British chapter is present because of ethnocentric considerations.

  2. INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

    2011-07-18

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  3. Report of a workshop on nuclear forces and nonproliferation Woodrow Wilson international center for scholars, Washington, DC October 28, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-08

    A workshop sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars was held at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC, on October 28, 2010. The workshop addressed evolving nuclear forces and their impacts on nonproliferation in the context of the new strategic environment, the Obama Administration's Nuclear Posture Review and the 2010 NPT Review Conference. The discussions reflected the importance of the NPR for defining the role of US nuclear forces in dealing with 21st century threats and providing guidance for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Department of Defense (DoD) programs and, for many but not all participants, highlighted its role in the successful outcome of the NPT RevCon. There was widespread support for the NPR and its role in developing the foundations for a sustainable nuclear-weapon program that addresses nuclear weapons, infrastructure and expertise in the broader nonproliferation, disarmament and international security contexts. However, some participants raised concerns about its implementation and its long-term effectiveness and sustainability.

  4. Software Assurance in Acquisition: Mitigating Risks to the Enterprise. A Reference Guide for Security-Enhanced Software Acquisition and Outsourcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    infrastructure protection, homeland security, cyber crime and terrorism, cyber law, biomet - rics, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) security...software assurance, critical infrastructure protection, homeland security, cyber crime and terrorism, cyber law, biomet - rics, supervisory control

  5. Nevada National Security Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2011 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2012-04-25

    This fiscal year 2011 annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development program, the 10th anniversary edition, recognizes a full decade of innovative R&D accomplishments in support of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Last year the NNSS itself was renamed to reflect a diversifying mission, and our R&D program has contributed significantly to shape emerging missions that will continue to evolve. New initiatives in stockpile stewardship science, nonproliferation, and treaty verification and monitoring have had substantial successes in FY 2011, and many more accomplishments are expected. SDRD is the cornerstone on which many of these initiatives rest. Historically supporting our main focus areas, SDRD is also building a solid foundation for new, and non-traditional, emerging national security missions. The program continues its charter to advance science and technology for a broad base of agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and many others.

  6. Considerations on nonproliferation regime meeting in a changing world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kikuchi, Masahiro [Nuclear Material Control Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    This paper summarizes the past history of worldwide nonproliferation regime, then proposes the future improvements on the regime. Present worldwide nonproliferation regime have been formulated during the cold war era. Therefore, the structure and measures of the regime were heavily influenced by the features of cold war era. Though the cold war was over, still new international order does not seem to be on the horizon, we need to review the present regime and to improve the regime compatible to new world situation. Generally speaking, the nonproliferation regime have gained moderate success so far. We could point out the following features as a kind of success: (1) No increase of overt Nuclear Weapon State (NWS), (2) All five NWSs have finally participated to the NPT, (3) South Africa has destroyed its nuclear weapons and became Non-Nuclear Weapon State (NNWS), (4) Successful conclusions of some regional arrangements, such as Tlatelolco, Ralotonga, and (5) Strengthening of export control on sensitive items. On the other hand, we recognize the following points as the failures of the regime. (6) India, Pakistan and Israel reject to join the NPT, (7) Existence of some violation against NPT regime, i.e. Iraqi case and DPRK case, (8) Insufficient effective measures against brain drain problem, (9) Risk exists for the long term extension of NPT, and (10) Insufficient flexibility to meet changing boundary conditions. We would propose the various measures for strengthening to meet changing boundary conditions, as follows: (11) Measures to be taken along with future civil use of Plutonium, (12) Strengthening and rationalizing international safeguards, (13) Countermeasures for emerging new types of nuclear proliferation, (14) Strengthening nuclear material control in NWS, (15) Measures to be taken for nuclear material from dismantled nuclear weapons, and (16) Nuclear disarmament. (author).

  7. Saving the NPT: past and future non-proliferation bargains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tertrais, B

    2005-07-01

    In this thorough study of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), the author looks at the origins of the NPT, its original bargains, and the current 'global crisis of compliance'. Then he looks to the 2005 NPT Review Conference for approaches 'to preserve the integrity and the credibility of the Treaty'. He suggests a new set of bargains centered around two issues: increase rewards for members in good standing of their obligations, but promote sanctions for those cheating; and recognize that nuclear disarmament is a distant goal, but satisfy the legitimate worries of NNWS (Non-Nuclear Weapon States)

  8. 75 FR 11223 - Lifting of Nonproliferation Measures Against One Russian Entity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... FR 42089). Dated: March 4, 2010. Vann H. Van Diepen, Acting Assistant Secretary of State for... of Nonproliferation Measures Against One Russian Entity AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Notice..., 1994, as amended, to remove nonproliferation measures on one Russian entity. DATES: Effective...

  9. 75 FR 5836 - Lifting of Nonproliferation Measures Against One Russian Entity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... July 30, 1998 (see 63 FR 42089). Dated: January 29, 2010. C.S. Eliot Kang, Acting Assistant Secretary... of Nonproliferation Measures Against One Russian Entity AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Notice..., 1994, as amended, to remove nonproliferation measures on one Russian entity. DATES: Effective...

  10. International and European Security Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Herbach

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Security law, or more comprehensively conflict and security law, on the international level represents the intersection of three distinct but interrelated fields: international humanitarian law (the law of armed conflict, jus in bello, the law of collective security (most identified with the United Nations (UN system, jus ad bellum and arms control law (including non-proliferation. Security in this sense is multifaceted - interest security, military security and, as is often referred to in the context of the EU, human security. As such, the law covers a wide range of specific topics with respect to conflict, encompassing the use of force, including choice of weapons and fighting techniques, extending to the rules applicable in peacekeeping and peace enforcement, and yet also dictating obligations outside the context of conflict, such as safeguarding and securing dual-use materials (those with both peaceful and military applications to prevent malicious use.

  11. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, the relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Thomas, Jr.

    2014-05-01

    The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is the most important international security arrangement that we have that is protecting the world community and this has been true for many years. But it did not happen by accident, it is a strategic bargain in which 184 states gave up the right forever to acquire the most powerful weapon ever created in exchange for a commitment from the five states allowed to keep nuclear weapons under the NPT (U.S., U.K., Russia, France and China), to share peaceful nuclear technology and to engage in disarmament negotiations aimed at the ultimate elimination of their nuclear stockpiles. The most important part of this is the comprehensive nuclear test ban (CTBT); the thinking by the 184 NPT non-nuclear weapon states was and is that they understand that the elimination of nuclear weapon stockpiles is a long way off, but at least the NPT nuclear weapon states could stop testing the weapons. The CTBT has been ratified by 161 states but by its terms it can only come into force if 44 nuclear potential states ratify; 36 have of the 44 have ratified it, the remaining eight include the United States and seven others, most of whom are in effect waiting for the United States. No state has tested a nuclear weapon-except for complete outlier North Korea-in 15 years. There appears to be no chance that the U.S. Senate will approve the CTBT for ratification in the foreseeable future, but the NPT may not survive without it. Perhaps it is time to consider an interim measure, for the UN Security Council to declare that any future nuclear weapon test any time, anywhere is a "threat to peace and security", in effect a violation of international law, which in today's world it clearly would be.

  12. Supporting the President's Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agenda: Transparency and Verification for Nuclear Arms Reductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meek, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The President's arms control and nonproliferation agenda is still evolving and the details of initiatives supporting it remain undefined. This means that DOE, NNSA, NA-20, NA-24 and the national laboratories can help define the agenda, and the policies and the initiatives to support it. This will require effective internal and interagency coordination. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda is broad and includes the path-breaking goal of creating conditions for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Responsibility for various elements of the agenda will be widely scattered across the interagency. Therefore an interagency mapping exercise should be performed to identify the key points of engagement within NNSA and other agencies for creating effective policy coordination mechanisms. These can include informal networks, working groups, coordinating committees, interagency task forces, etc. It will be important for NA-20 and NA-24 to get a seat at the table and a functional role in many of these coordinating bodies. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda comprises both mature and developing policy initiatives. The more mature elements such as CTBT ratification and a follow-on strategic nuclear arms treaty with Russia have defined milestones. However, recent press reports indicate that even the START follow-on strategic arms pact that is planned to be complete by the end of 2009 may take significantly longer and be more expansive in scope. The Russians called for proposals to count non-deployed as well as deployed warheads. Other elements of the agenda such as FMCT, future bilateral nuclear arms reductions following a START follow-on treaty, nuclear posture changes, preparations for an international nuclear security summit, strengthened international safeguards and multilateral verification are in much earlier stages of development. For this reason any survey of arms control capabilities within the USG should be structured to address potential needs

  13. A study on the development of nuclear policy to respond to international non-proliferation regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Wook; Oh, K. B.; Yang, M. H.; Lee, H. M.; Ko, H. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Jung, W. H.; Lim, C. Y

    2006-01-15

    This study analyzed the trends of the nonproliferation regimes in the following three aspects. First, this study analyzed the trends of the international nuclear non-proliferation regime, which includes the NPT, the IAEA safeguards system, the international nuclear export control regime and multilateral nuclear approach. Second, this study forecast the future trends of the nonproliferation systems with the reflection of current international situations. Third, this study also analyzed outstanding issues in nuclear control regimes and derived some factors to reflect national nuclear foreign policy.

  14. Sharing knowledge, shaping Europe US technological collaboration and nonproliferation

    CERN Document Server

    Krige, John

    2016-01-01

    In the 1950s and the 1960s, U.S. administrations were determined to prevent Western European countries from developing independent national nuclear weapons programs. To do so, the United States attempted to use its technological pre-eminence as a tool of “soft power” to steer Western European technological choices toward the peaceful uses of the atom and of space, encouraging options that fostered collaboration, promoted nonproliferation, and defused challenges to U.S. technological superiority. In Sharing Knowledge, Shaping Europe, John Krige describes these efforts and the varying degrees of success they achieved. Krige explains that the pursuit of scientific and technological leadership, galvanized by America’s Cold War competition with the Soviet Union, was also used for techno-political collaboration with major allies. He examines a series of multinational arrangements involving shared technological platforms and aimed at curbing nuclear proliferation, and he describes the roles of the Department ...

  15. Improving Capture-gamma Libraries for Nonproliferation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleaford, Brad W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hurst, Aaron M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the measurement, evaluation and incorporation of new -ray spectroscopic data into the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) for nonproliferation applications. Analysis and processing techniques are described along with key deliverables that have been met over the course of this project. A total of nine new ENDF libraries have been submitted to the National Nuclear Data Center at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and are now available in the ENDF/B-VIII.beta2 release. Furthermore, this project has led to more than ten peer-reviewed publications and provided theses for ve graduate students. This project is a component of the NA-22 venture collaboration on \\Correlated Nuclear Data in Fission Events" (LA14-V-CorrData-PD2Jb).

  16. Computer Language Choices in Arms Control and Nonproliferation Regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, G K

    2005-06-10

    The U.S. and Russian Federation continue to make substantive progress in the arms control and nonproliferation transparency regimes. We are moving toward an implementation choice for creating radiation measurement systems that are transparent in both their design and in their implementation. In particular, the choice of a programming language to write software for such regimes can decrease or significantly increase the costs of authentication. In this paper, we compare procedural languages with object-oriented languages. In particular, we examine the C and C++ languages; we compare language features, code generation, implementation details, and executable size and demonstrate how these attributes aid or hinder authentication and backdoor threats. We show that programs in lower level, procedural languages are more easily authenticated than are object-oriented ones. Potential tools and methods for authentication are covered. Possible mitigations are suggested for using object-oriented programming languages.

  17. The fight against international terrorism and changes in the U.S. nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Marrero Rocha

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how the the fight against international terrorism, as a new organising principle in U.S. foreign policy and security policy, has conditioned and modified the American conception of and strategy for combatting nuclear arms proliferation. On the one hand, it analyses the concepts of “axis of evil” or “rogue states” as instruments of automatic and forced connection between international terrorism and nuclear armsproliferating states. On the other hand, it also deals with the changes in American nonproliferation and disarmament strategy, characterised by a distrust towards international cooperation and a clear preference for using means of a unilateral nature, which challenge, and even scorn, international institutions and the rules of international law in this area.

  18. Energy systems security

    CERN Document Server

    Voeller, John G

    2014-01-01

    Energy Systems Security features articles from the Wiley Handbook of Science and Technology for Homeland Security covering topics related to electricity transmission grids and their protection, risk assessment of energy systems, analysis of interdependent energy networks. Methods to manage electricity transmission disturbances so as to avoid blackouts are discussed, and self-healing energy system and a nano-enabled power source are presented.

  19. Threats at Our Threshold: Homeland Defense and Homeland Security in the New Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-21

    what items were needed for collection. No one, for example, foresaw the immense need for diapers and baby formula. The diverse set of actors and...and large, is not. It does not do me any good to begin with a slide that talks about 9/11. I have quit talking about the global war on terrorism...modern world could unwrap —costing us friends, markets , and national power. Eventually what we could see is the loss of the character of the modern

  20. Enhancing Unity of Effort in Homeland Defense, Homeland Security, and Civil Support Through Interdisciplinary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) or the 18-item Interprofessional Education Perception Scale ( IEPS ) to measure students’ attitudes and perceptions of...multi-disciplinary teamwork and collaboration, professional identity, and roles and responsibilities. RIPLS and/or IEPS data is gathered and analyzed...changes in knowledge, skills, and attitudes via RIPLS or IEPS data could quantitatively identify the benefits of the CHDS model to building

  1. 6 CFR 37.41 - Security plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security plan. 37.41 Section 37.41 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY REAL ID DRIVER'S LICENSES AND IDENTIFICATION CARDS Security at DMVs and Driver's License and Identification Card Production Facilities §...

  2. 49 CFR 1542.107 - Changed conditions affecting security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Changed conditions affecting security. 1542.107... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRPORT SECURITY Airport Security Program § 1542.107 Changed conditions affecting security. (a) After approval of the...

  3. 78 FR 28237 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... SECURITY President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection... Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory... Telecommunications Advisory Committee, National Protection and Programs Directorate, Department of Homeland...

  4. 78 FR 29145 - President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection...'s National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC). The document contained...

  5. Application of INPRO Methodology in Evaluation of Nonproliferation Features of TWR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Through the once-through fuel cycle mode, the Traveling Wave Reactor (TWR) concept can utilize the uranium resources much effectively. The once-through fuel cycle has the inherent characteristics of the non-proliferation. In this project,

  6. Communications and information infrastructure security

    CERN Document Server

    Voeller, John G

    2014-01-01

    Communication and Information Systems Security features articles from the Wiley Handbook of Science and Technology for Homeland Security covering strategies for protecting the telecommunications sector, wireless security, advanced web based technology for emergency situations. Science and technology for critical infrastructure consequence mitigation are also discussed.

  7. Report of a workshop on nuclear power growth and nonproliferation held at the Woodrow Wilson international center for scholars, Washington, DC, April 21, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The workshop addressed the future of nuclear power and nonproliferation in light of global nuclear energy developments, changing US policy and growing concerns about nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The discussion reflected wide agreement on the need for nuclear power, the necessity of mitigating any proliferation and terrorism risks and support for international cooperation on solutions. There were considerable differences on the nature and extent of the risks of differing fuel cycle choices. There was some skepticism about the prospects for a global nuclear energy renaissance, but there was a recognition that nuclear power would expand somewhat in the decades ahead with some states expanding capacity dramatically (e.g., China) and at least a few new states developing nuclear power programs. It was also argued by some participants that under the right conditions, a genuine renaissance could occur some decades from now. The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power will depend on the ability of governments and industry to address these concerns, including the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen nonproliferation, nuclear materials accountability and nuclear security Several participants noted that the United States will not be able to continue to lead global nonproliferation efforts and to shape the growth of nuclear power as well as the global environment and energy debates without a robust US nuclear energy program. Some participants argued that fully integrating nuclear energy growth and nonproliferation, proliferation resistance and physical protection objectives was possible. The growing consensus on these objectives and the growing concern about the potential impact of further proliferation on the industry was one reason for optimism. The Blue Ribbon commission led by Scowcroft and Hamilton was seen as going far beyond the need to find an alternative to Yucca

  8. Deciding Who Lives: Considered Risk Casualty Decisions in Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    into a burning inferno . Where to draw the line between role-related professional responsibilities and undue risk is a question [we] ... did not...doing so in infernos and, therefore, failed to realize that the time for further rescue efforts had passed. This dichotomy of experience created at

  9. Department of Homeland Security: Assessments of Selected Complex Acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    known as Tucson-1 and Ajo -1. The program plans to complete testing before DHS approves deployment at additional Block 1 sites. Tucson-1, the...acceptance of the initial Block 1 systems at the Tucson-1 and Ajo -1 sites by March 2011. The Block 1 program baseline currently requires the

  10. Strengthening Homeland Security through Improved Foreign Language Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    sports, medicine, or poetry , for example. DTRA interpreters are sometimes assigned to support a ―civilian Executive Interpreter.‖ Defense Threat...about two pounds.‖ In addition, RACSPC students participate in memory -enhancing drills and games.172 In addition to completing RACSPC, linguists...original order from memory . Once the reversal is complete, students then translate the words, and again proceed in both orders. According to the

  11. 75 FR 55529 - Homeland Security Acquisition Regulation (HSAR); Revision Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... HSAR 3002.101 and usage conventions. Add a new HSAR subpart 3003.10, Contractor Code of Business Ethics... follows: Subpart 3003.10--Contractor Code of Business Ethics and Conduct Sec. 3003.1003 Requirements. 3003.1004 Contract clauses. Subpart 3003.10--Contractor Code of Business Ethics and Conduct 3003.1003...

  12. Monte Carlo Simulations for Homeland Security Using Anthropomorphic Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Kimberly A. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A radiological dispersion device (RDD) is a device which deliberately releases radioactive material for the purpose of causing terror or harm. In the event that a dirty bomb is detonated, there may be airborne radioactive material that can be inhaled as well as settle on an individuals leading to external contamination.

  13. Has the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Outlived Its Usefulness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    many sick, elderly , and bed-ridden people in hospitals and nursing homes who suffered a horrific fate as staff members chose not to evacuate patients...Plot,” International Centre For Political Violence and Terrorism Research, http://www.pvtr.org/pdf/GlobalAnalysis...due to either the lack of capability or the means to acquire it. This was the case at the St. Rita’s nursing home, where 40 of the 60 residents died

  14. Changing Homeland Security: The Year in Review - 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Pirates and their small boats have moved from Disney amusement to global menace. Thomas Jefferson wrote that a politician looks forward only to...firebombing attacks in Santa Cruz. Members of an animal rights group were the suspected perpetrators. This was a significant event for the area

  15. U.S. Biodefense & Homeland Security: Toward Detection & Attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    None of these contained the bacteria. A common source eluded investigators even though every item was traced back to its origin. The lettuce and...possessed or worked with Ames. As a result, efforts were taken to identify the different genomes linked to its use in these laboratories.192 Dugway...of events and to facilitate coordinated response.”301 The goal is to “collect, assemble , and analyze a wide range of relevant information and make

  16. Securing Nuclear and Radiological Material in the Homeland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    John Walker Lindh allegedly told interrogators that battlefield rumors suggested that a biological attack was expected to be a “second wave...al- Qa`ida attack. 10/3/2002 “American Taliban” John Walker Lindh , citing “battlefield rumors” “US biological attack imminent -- Taliban...iafrica.com, 12 December 2001; “Walker Lindh : Al Qaeda Planned More Attacks,” CNN, 3 October 2002 post-2001 Chemical/ Biological French Interior

  17. Quantitative Risk Analysis for Homeland Security Resource Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    156 A. Papoulis , Probability, Random Variables and Stochastic Processes, (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1965), chapters 5-7. 44 max ( ) D R D...Report. New York: W.W. Norton. Papoulis , A. 1965. Probability, Random Variables and Stochastic Processes. New York: McGraw-Hill. Pate-Cornell

  18. Nuclear and Solar Energy: Implications for Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Hirschman Index HVDC High-Voltage Direct Current IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate change NCEP National Commission on Energy Policy NRC...transmission lines will carry the load to the customers along high voltage direct current ( HVDC ) lines. HVDC lines lose 3% of

  19. Southwest Hispanic Community -- The Absence of Homeland Security Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    150 U.S. Navy, “9 - Foreign Language,” Navy Equal Opportunity (EO) Policy, OPNAVINST 5354.1F, 2007. 151 “Yo No Hablo Espanol : BUT I AM STILL LATINO...DAMN IT!!!!” Yahoo! Contributor Network, accessed September 27, 2012, http://voices.yahoo.com/yo-no-hablo- espanol -but-am-still-latino-damn-it- 73855

  20. Unmanned Aircraft Systems: A Logical Choice for Homeland Security Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    AIRSPACE Some have likened the airspace above the U.S. to a soap opera plot due to its complexity and elaborate structure.59 However, understanding its...applicable to define an ELOS for UAS.” 23 Fourth, there is a public education aspect to UAS integration that analysts claim requires attention. The

  1. HOMELAND SECURITY: Responsibility And Accountability For Achieving National Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Number Author(s) Project Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) General Accouting Office, PO Box 37050...budget. As GAO’s long term budget simulation notes, known demographic trends and rising health care costs will place unprecedented pressures on our...non-partisan, and non-ideological audits, investigations and evaluations. We currently have over 60 congressional requests to conduct reviews in

  2. Leveraging Social Media to Engage the Public in Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    date information. “Our team knew where we could buy gas, we knew what roads were open and most importantly, we knew who needed help and where they were...more complete warning messages and how the public utilizes social media as an emergency moves into an extended length of time—do their habits ...so that they can define their needs.  You need to get to “Robust Statement of Needs” 84 Enablers  New Generation (The Millennials ) are

  3. 78 FR 14102 - Committee Name: Homeland Security Academic Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ...). The HSAAC provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary and senior leadership on matters... Management Institute and the higher education community to support Presidential Policy Directive 8...

  4. Risk Management as Strategic Change in National Homeland Security Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    organizations. Similar to the previous discussion of conflict biguity in public policy implementation, these factors are the degree of agreement ree of...4. Networking and Collaboration Laurence O’Toole has written of the growing need for and the emergence of networks and collaboration in public...there is no unifying theory about networking in the public sector, Nancy Roberts c 242 Laurence O’Toole, Jr., “Treating Networks Seriously: Practical

  5. 7 CFR 2.32 - Director, Office of Homeland Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., disseminate and store USDA intelligence requirements and convey information to the intelligence community. (3...). (8) Administer a competitive grant program to support the development and expansion of advanced... veterinarians; administer a competitive grant and low-interest loan assistance program to assist States...

  6. Image-Based Vehicle Identification Technology for Homeland Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G A

    2002-10-08

    The threat of terrorist attacks against US civilian populations is a very real, near-term problem that must be addressed, especially in response to possible use of Weapons of Mass Destruction. Several programs are now being funded by the US Government to put into place means by which the effects of a terrorist attack could be averted or limited through the use of sensors and monitoring technology. Specialized systems that detect certain threat materials, while effective within certain performance limits, cannot generally be used efficiently to track a mobile threat such as a vehicle over a large urban area. The key elements of an effective system are an image feature-based vehicle identification technique and a networked sensor system. We have briefly examined current uses of image and feature recognition techniques to the urban tracking problem and set forth the outlines of a proposal for application of LLNL technologies to this critical problem. The primary contributions of the proposed work lie in filling important needs not addressed by the current program: (1) The ability to create vehicle ''fingerprints,'' or feature information from images to allow automatic identification of vehicles. Currently, the analysis task is done entirely by humans. The goal is to aid the analyst by reducing the amount of data he/she must analyze and reduce errors caused by inattention or lack of training. This capability has broad application to problems associated with extraction of useful features from large data sets. (2) Improvements in the effectiveness of LLNL's WATS (Wide Area Tracking System) by providing it accurate threat vehicle location and velocity. Model predictability is likely to be enhanced by use of more information related to different data sets. We believe that the LLNL can accomplish the proposed tasks and enhance the effectiveness of the system now under development.

  7. The Impact of Obesity on National and Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    elevated insulin levels are a telltale sign of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance creates significant fat accumulation around the abdomen . This...THE POLICIES AND POLITICS OF OBESITY: WHO MADE U.S. FAT ? .....45  A.  FRITZ HABER AND THE HABER BOSCH PROCESS .........................46  B...Compared to Percent Calories from Fat Among U.S. Adults. Screen shot provided by a Dr. Robert Lustig lecture ..................83  Figure 11.  Loss and

  8. War in the Atlantic: A Historical Case of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    costs . The staggering toll of the “unrestricted” campaign, amplified by rising numbers of neutral vessels that ceased to operate, given the risk, far...outweighed the expense of convoys. As shipping attrition began to foreclose Britain’s ability to fight the war, the costs of the convoy system became...sighting to attack.33 Initially, convoys were arranged for ships inbound to Great Britain only, as the most pressing need was for supplies from abroad

  9. Congressional Oversight of Homeland Security: Help or Hinderance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    gather the information required to conduct effective oversight many intelligence abuses ensued. The 1972 Watergate scandal was the event that...Political Science 28, no. 1 (1984): 166. 6 scandals or failures for its 65-year history. Although there have been instances where fire alarm...their findings. The Iran-Contra scandal occurred less than ten years later. Furthermore, the intelligence community’s slow adaptation to the post

  10. Department of Homeland Security Cyber Resilience Review (Case Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-23

    results CERT® Operational Resilience: Manage, Protect, and Sustain Twitter #CERTopRES © 2013 Carnegie Mellon University CRR Benefits Participating...Management CTRL Controls Management VM Vulnerability Management IM Incident Management SCM Service Continuity Management EXD External...established in Asset Management benefits the organization as it manages changes. CERT® Operational Resilience: Manage, Protect, and Sustain

  11. National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) Capabilities for Homeland Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J; Baskett, R; Simpson, M

    2010-03-08

    The Department of Energy's National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provides critical information during hazardous airborne releases as part of an integrated national preparedness and response strategy. Located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC provides 24/7 tools and expert services to map the spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC graphical products show affected areas and populations, potential casualties, and health effect or protective action guideline levels. LLNL experts produce quality-assured analyses based on field data to assist decision makers and responders. NARAC staff and collaborators conduct research and development into new science, tools, capabilities, and technologies in strategically important areas related to airborne transport and fate modeling and emergency response. This paper provides a brief overview of some of NARAC's activities, capabilities, and research and development.

  12. Expanding the Role of Emergency Medical Services in Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Medical Services FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation H1N1 Influenza a Virus HIPAA Health Information...Smyth, William G. Manley, Daniel E. Summers, Nels D. Sanddal, Teri L. Sanddal, et al. “Realities of Rural Emergency Medical Services Disaster

  13. Will Climate Change the Future of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Brookings-Bern Project on Internal Displacement, 2013), 9–18, http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/ research /files/ papers /2013/1/30-arctic-alaska-bronen...nuclear sources, and renewable energy resources (hydro, wind, biomass, geothermal , and solar power) are also used in the generation of... Research Program, 2014), 119, http://nca2014.globalchange.gov/ report/sectors/ energy . 57 According to Climate Change Impacts in the United States

  14. Resilient Communication: A New Crisis Communication Strategy for Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    hard way and his lack of crisis communication skills was a career ender for him during Hurricane Katrina (MSNBC, 2005). In contrast, former New...disruptions,” that is those game -changing events where your messages may no longer work. That leads into the final recommendation of having a contingency...Winning in the no-spin era by someone who knows the game . New York: Free Press. CNN. (2007, May 7). Greensburg focuses on rebuilding. Retrieved January

  15. Public Health Specializations and Education Needs to Support Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Hazmat 1/1 100 4 Health Consultant Interface with Law Enforcement 1/1 100 4 Hematology 1/1 100 4 Hospital Administrators 3/7 43 30 Hospital Safety...Forensics Experts 0/1 0 4 Grants Oversight 0/2 0 9 Hazmat 1/1 100 4 Health Consultant Interface with Law Enforcement 0/1 0 4 Hematology 0/1 0 4...Specializations Required Workforce Gaps (yes/no) Other Comments Veterinarians Yes Epidemiologists Yes Physicians No Plenty of physicians available but

  16. The National Guard: A Future Homeland Security Paradigm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Arabia (1995); bombing of a U.S. military complex “Khobar Towers” in Saudi Arabia (1996); U.S. Embassy bombings in Nairobi, Kenya and Dar Ex Salaam...on the U.S, its forces, and allies. The Triad continues to be the foundation of America’s national strategy of deterrence. The Triad consists of...ballistic missile submarines, land- based intercontinental ballistic missiles and long-range bombers. Each component, or leg, of the Triad provides a

  17. Homeland Security Organizations: Design Contingencies in Complex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    in Charge Cell OMT Organization and Management Theory OPERATIONS Section Los Angeles County Operational Area Unified Command- Operations Section...and management theory” ( OMT ). The OMT literature suggests that no single organizational design is optimal in all situations, nor do all designs...referred to as Organization and Management Theory ( OMT )—have been extensively examined in the literature, using at various times and by different

  18. Homeland Security: Federal Assistance Funding and Business Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-14

    for many states under the State Single Point of Contact ( SPOCs ) section available at [http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants/spoc.html]. A similar...government, employees and students at U.S. educational institutions, and other eligible members of the general public. Background information on the RaDiUS

  19. Japan as a Paradigm for U.S. Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    the dead cause the everyday problems of the living and emphasizes liberation from stress through meditation .118 In 1984, he and his wife started...www.jijigaho.or.jp/ app /0404/eng/iraq01.html (accessed December 6, 2005). 196 Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet, Japan’s Assistance for the...Defense Forces to assist in Reconstruction.” http://www.jijigaho.or.jp/ app /0404/eng/iraq01.html (accessed December 6, 2005). Kaplan, David E. and

  20. 77 FR 61421 - Committee Name: Homeland Security Academic Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ..., student veterans, and recent graduates to jobs at DHS; how to use social media and other means of..., and other Minority Serving Institutions know of and take advantage of DHS internship and job...

  1. Developing the Bench: Building An Effective Homeland Security Undergraduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    University Savannah State University Jacksonville State University AMERICAN PUBLIC UNIVERSITY University of Maryland University College...DATA University Courses American Public University - Charles Town, WV Emergency Planning Emergency Response to Terrorism Chemical...0195095707 AMERICAN PUBLIC UNIVERSITY 0195142632 University of Central Missouri 0195158342 Empire State College 0195332474 Virginia Commonwealth

  2. The Strategic Value of Humanitarian Immigration Policy Toward Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    E. Beutler, James N. Breckenridge, and Philip Zimbardo (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2007), 14-15. 6 Ibid., 16-17. 11 that is worth...ed. Bruce Bongar, Lisa M. Brown, Larry E. Beutler, James N. Breckenridge, and Philip Zimbardo . New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2007...the United States. In his recent book Winning the Right War, Philip Gordon writes: It is difficult today to imagine a world without the Islamist

  3. Homeland Security Department: FY2008 Request for Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-17

    body imaging; explosive trace detection portal machines; cast and prosthetic device scanners; and bottled liquid scanners. The effectiveness of these...BioWatch programs, which will be transferred from the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T), and the National Biosurveillance Integration System (NBIS...left in place following the reorganizations mentioned above. One notable exception was the transfer of the Biosurveillance sub-program to the new Office

  4. Quantifying a Negative: How Homeland Security Adds Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Many studies and publications examine fire spread of closely spaced buildings, including “On Radiant Heat Transfer from Turbulent Flames” by Cox.4...flame effects how much radiant heat is put out. This study was the foundation for modeling fire spread in urban and wildland environments. In 2002...Technical Note 1600) (Washington, DC: National Institute of Standards and Technology, 2006). 4 Gordon Cox, “On Radiant Heat Transfer from Turbulent

  5. 78 FR 39301 - Committee name: Homeland Security Academic Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... recommendations to the Secretary and senior leadership on matters relating to student and recent graduate... Centers of Academic Excellence cybersecurity programs to the higher education community; how to define...

  6. The Role of the Corps of Engineers in Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    companies and pipe line companies could be required in a TF dealing with a coastal area or a large sea or river port. A revised model for the engineer...Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Mass) ELEMENT UNIT STATE COMPONENT Engineer RTF 240th EN GRP Maine Army NG HQ’s (CONST) Construction...Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and D.C.) ELEMENT UNIT STATE COMPONENT Engineer RTF 11 1th EN GRP WV Army NG HQ’s (COST) Construction BN 1092nd

  7. Clarifying Resilience in the Context of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Coast of the United States in 2005. In January 2013, U.S. Senator Harry Reid compared Hurricane Sandy to Hurricane Katrina. His comments indicated...163 Bruce Alpert , “Reid Says Hurricane Katrina was ‘Nothing in Comparison’ to Sandy,” The Times- Picayne...PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 79 LIST OF REFERENCES Alpert , Bruce. “Reid Says Hurricane Katrina was ‘Nothing in Comparison’ to Sandy.” The Times

  8. Overview of Infrastructure Science and Analysis for Homeland Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backhaus, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-21

    This presentation offers an analysis of infrastructure science with goals to provide third-party independent science based input into complex problems of national concern and to use scientific analysis to "turn down the noise" around complex problems.

  9. The Affordable Care Act: A Prescription for Homeland Security Preparedness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Eddie Reed, Eduardo J. Simoes, and M. M. Engel . “When Chronic Conditions Become Acute: Prevention and Control of Chronic Diseases and Adverse...Fewer Insured and $8.4 Billion Less in Federal Payments.” Health Affairs 32, no. 6 (2013): 1030–1036. Ringel, Jeanne S., Federico Girosi, Amado

  10. Does Homeland Security Constitute an Emerging Academic Discipline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    disciplines that make it easy for them to find a job and receive good pay. 7. Entrepreneurs will enter and firms will expand in sectors that promise to be...publication 12. Percent female students 3. Percent faculty with grants 13. Percent international students 4. Awards per allocated faculty member 14...time to degree 7. Percent female faculty 17. Percent students with academic plans 8. Average GRE scores 18. Student work space 9. Percent 1st-yr

  11. Legislating Civil Service Reform: The Homeland Security Act of 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-22

    stage for future agency-specific chapters for NASA , the SEC, DOD and DHS. 4. The George W. Bush Administration The George W. Bush administration came...they are going to follow your line because you control their pay, their determination at will, their layoff .”97 There were also questions about whether

  12. U.S. Army Special Forces and Homeland Security Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    This force helped rescue people on the coast, but was soon diverted to help search for victims in New Orleans.96 Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger ...Governor, Arnold Schwarzenegger . September 1, 2005. 98 “Guard Adding 18 to Katrina Effort,” Deseret News (Salt Lake City, UT) September 14, 2005. 99...Governor, Arnold Schwarzenegger . September 1, 2005. 75 McGillis, Gay. “Organizing NORTHCOM for Success: A Theater Special Operations Command

  13. The Italian Army’s Role in Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-07

    Roma: Stato Maggiore dell’Esercito – Reparto Impiego delle Forze, Ottobre 2000), B/1-2. 6 Norme di principio sulla disciplina militare, Legge 382, art...contrastare la criminalita` organizzata in Sicilia. Decreto-legge 349 (25 Luglio 1992). Norme di principio sulla disciplina militare. Legge 382 (11 Luglio

  14. The Development and Recognition of Homeland Security Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    and I owe them a continuing debt of gratitude. Finally, and most importantly, I am eternally grateful to my wife, Annie; son, Jim; and daughter...at the state or federal level, is familiar with the requirements of Freedom of Information Acts or state sunshine laws. Judge Advocates have the

  15. Enhancing Public Helicopter Safety as a Component of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    the area to assist with neutralizing the threat, and they can also extract injured people for immediate medical care. Search and rescue is another...on scene reported the weather conditions as “very bad with strong winds, cold temperatures, snow or sleet, and...responders who run toward an active shooting scene while others are running away. This type of training cannot be applied to aviation since there is usually

  16. Homeland Security: Developing National Doctrine to Guide State Strategy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    James Monroe in 1823 ( Martin , n.d.). There is also political doctrine, such as egalitarianism a “political doctrine that holds that all people...be able to engage a larger stakeholder community and avoid the need for a huge new bureaucracy (Linde, O’Brien, Lindstrom , Spiegeleire, Vayrynen...Presentation, Osan Air Force Base, South Korea. 74 Linde, E., O’Brien, K., Lindstrom , G., Spiegeleire, S., Vayrynen, M., & de Vries, H. (2002

  17. 5 CFR 9701.313 - Homeland Security Compensation Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... special rate supplements. The Compensation Committee will consider factors such as turnover, recruitment... will serve as an ex officio member of the Compensation Committee. DHS will provide technical staff to...

  18. Beyond Boundaries: A Promising New Model for Security and Global Development. Carnegie Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, Karen

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, a team of international security experts and researchers at the Henry L. Stimson Center launched an initiative to build an effective model for sustainable nonproliferation of biological, chemical, and nuclear weapons. The project represented an exciting and innovative way of thinking about security: a dual-use approach that operated at…

  19. An Important Issue: Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Doc

    2001-03-01

    Historic Facts and Philosophy: In August, 1947, I participated in a secret meeting concerning the validity and use of a hydrogen bomb. I vigorously supported a ``Super Manhattan Project" to build an ``H" bomb. My philosophy at the time was `bigger and better,' to ensure that no nation attacked the U.S. Our retaliation with ``H" bombs vs. ``A" bombs would be too overwhelming for any nation to risk attacking us should they obtain their own ``A" bombs. Thus, all nations would be forced to use diplomacy. I am older and wiser, and am now convinced that World Test Ban Treaties, non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, and space free of any military weapons is the best policy for all nations and humanity. With current nuclear testing at nearby Yucca Flats, Nevada, Vandenberg AF/Missile site, Cal Tech, etc., I therefore propose that our new APS California Division form a three-person committee to tabulate all pertinent data and submit it to a qualified expert for review and further action. Comments and suggestions are invited.

  20. Information report on the behalf of the foreign affairs, defence and armed forces Commission on France security, nuclear disarmament and non proliferation; Rapport d'information fait au nom de la commission des affaires etrangeres, de la defense et des forces armees (1) sur le desarmement, la non-proliferation nucleaires et la securite de la France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This report first gives an overview of nuclear disarmament and non proliferation twenty years after the end of Cold War: evolution and status of Russia's and United States' nuclear weapon arsenals, France's and United Kingdom's trend to reduce their nuclear armament, reinforcement of China's nuclear armament, effects and limitations of the Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT). It notices that the new international context gave birth to some expectations and may lead to a lower nuclear pressure, notably with the influence of START negotiations between Russia and the United States, provided that the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty is ratified by more countries, and that negotiations promote a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty. The report also outlines the importance of the promotion of better controlled peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It discusses the relationship between maintaining the world nuclear order and the reduction of international and regional tensions, and the importance of struggle against all forms of proliferation. It analyses the French nuclear posture in terms of security requirements, and in front of the zero nuclear option, in a context of ballistic missile proliferation, and in relationship with the issue of tactical nuclear weapons in Europe

  1. TSA Security Checkpoint Wait Times – API (PMIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — TSA operational data including: Airport wait time (hourly) data Airport throughput (hourly) data Prohibited item (hourly) data Monthly Objectives Report (MOR) data...

  2. 78 FR 55089 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    ... via a web enabled interactive online format and teleconference line. To participate via teleconference... advice, consults with, and makes recommendations to the Secretary of Homeland Security, via...

  3. 78 FR 16699 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... web enabled interactive online format and teleconference line. To participate via teleconference, dial..., consults with, and makes recommendations to the Secretary of Homeland Security, via the Commandant of...

  4. Improved uncertainty quantification in nondestructive assay for nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, Tom; Croft, Stephen; Jarman, Ken; Nicholson, Andrew; Norman, Claude; Walsh, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    This paper illustrates methods to improve uncertainty quantification (UQ) for non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements used in nuclear nonproliferation. First, it is shown that current bottom-up UQ applied to calibration data is not always adequate, for three main reasons: (1) Because there are errors in both the predictors and the response, calibration involves a ratio of random quantities, and calibration data sets in NDA usually consist of only a modest number of samples (3–10); therefore, asymptotic approximations involving quantities needed for UQ such as means and variances are often not sufficiently accurate; (2) Common practice overlooks that calibration implies a partitioning of total error into random and systematic error, and (3) In many NDA applications, test items exhibit non-negligible departures in physical properties from calibration items, so model-based adjustments are used, but item-specific bias remains in some data. Therefore, improved bottom-up UQ using calibration data should predict the typical magnitude of item-specific bias, and the suggestion is to do so by including sources of item-specific bias in synthetic calibration data that is generated using a combination of modeling and real calibration data. Second, for measurements of the same nuclear material item by both the facility operator and international inspectors, current empirical (top-down) UQ is described for estimating operator and inspector systematic and random error variance components. A Bayesian alternative is introduced that easily accommodates constraints on variance components, and is more robust than current top-down methods to the underlying measurement error distributions.

  5. Impact of Monoenergetic Photon Sources on Nonproliferation Applications Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, Cameron [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Valentine, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Quiter, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Descalle, Marie-Anne [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Warren, Glen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kinlaw, Matt [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, Scott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chichester, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, Cameron [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pozzi, Sara [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Near-monoenergetic photon sources (MPSs) have the potential to improve sensitivity at greatly reduced dose in existing applications and enable new capabilities in other applications, particularly where passive signatures do not penetrate or are insufficiently accurate. MPS advantages include the ability to select energy, energy spread, flux, and pulse structures to deliver only the photons needed for the application, while suppressing extraneous dose and background. Some MPSs also offer narrow angular divergence photon beams which can target dose and/or mitigate scattering contributions to image contrast degradation. Current bremsstrahlung photon sources (e.g., linacs and betatrons) produce photons over a broad range of energies, thus delivering unnecessary dose that in some cases also interferes with the signature to be detected and/or restricts operations. Current sources must be collimated (reducing flux) to generate narrow divergence beams. While MPSs can in principle resolve these issues, they remain at relatively low TRL status. Candidate MPS technologies for nonproliferation applications are now being developed, each of which has different properties (e.g. broad vs. narrow angular divergence). Within each technology, source parameters trade off against one another (e.g. flux vs. energy spread), representing a large operation space. This report describes a broad survey of potential applications, identification of high priority applications, and detailed simulations addressing those priority applications. Requirements were derived for each application, and analysis and simulations were conducted to define MPS parameters that deliver benefit. The results can inform targeting of MPS development to deliver strong impact relative to current systems.

  6. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the issue of nonproliferation. Final study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-19

    NIF, the next step proposed by DOE in a progression of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) facilities, is expected to reach the goal of ICF capsule ignition in the laboratory. This report is in response to a request of a Congressman that DOE resolve the question of whether NIF will aid or hinder U.S. nonproliferation efforts. Both technical and policy aspects are addressed, and public participation was part of the decision process. Since the technical proliferation concerns at NIF are manageable and can be made acceptable, and NIF can contribute positively to U.S. arms control and nonproliferation policy goals, it is concluded that NIF supports the nuclear nonproliferation objectives of the United States.

  7. NNSA Program Develops the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Experts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Cornelia P.; Disney, Maren V.

    2015-09-02

    NNSA is fostering the next generation of nuclear security experts is through its successful NNSA Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP). NGFP offers its Fellows an exceptional career development opportunity through hands-on experience supporting NNSA mission areas across policy and technology disciplines. The one-year assignments give tomorrow’s leaders in global nuclear security and nonproliferation unparalleled exposure through assignments to Program Offices across NNSA.

  8. Cooperative Remote Monitoring, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: Fourth quarter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzo, G M [ed.

    1995-01-01

    The DOE`s Cooperative Remote Monitoring programs integrate elements from research and development and implementation to achieve DOE`s objectives in arms control and nonproliferation. The contents of this issue are: cooperative remote monitoring--trends in arms control and nonproliferation; Modular Integrated Monitoring System (MIMS); Authenticated Tracking and Monitoring Systems (ATMS); Tracking and Nuclear Materials by Wide-Area Nuclear Detection (WAND); Cooperative Monitoring Center; the International Remote Monitoring Project; international US and IAEA remote monitoring field trials; Project Dustcloud: monitoring the test stands in Iraq; bilateral remote monitoring: Kurchatov-Argonne-West Demonstration; INSENS Sensor System Project.

  9. Seven law concepts on nuclear non-proliferation suggested by the International Group of Legal Experts (ILG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, G. [Djursholm (Sweden); Wredberg, L. [ILG Consultant LTD, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-03-01

    The ILG has worked as an independent group under the Swedish Support Programme on Nuclear Non-Proliferation in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia. The ILG's mission is concluded with this report. When developing the seven Law Concepts on national nuclear legislation that are presented in this report, the ILG has applied certain basic principles, which are firmly established in modern Western legislation. A summary of these principles is made here. They are essential cornerstones in laws and regulations that apply both to the nuclear industry and to other high technology areas, characterised by advanced safety and security requirements. Of essential importance is that the Operator alone is responsible for the fulfilment of requirements stipulated in laws and authority directives. The technical complexity of the nuclear industry and the far-reaching requirements on safety and security necessitate a qualified and complete national system of legislation and regulations. As all legislation in general, the nuclear legislation should be clear, easy to understand and give little room for misunderstandings and loopholes. It should also present the legally established requirements on safety and security in a form that facilitates the application and implementation by both state authorities, facility operators and individuals. The investigations of the causes of the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents brought into focus the impact on nuclear safety from human failure. As a consequence, increased emphasis has since then been put on the development of an overall high safety culture in the nuclear field. It is recognised that a good safety culture also promotes the non-proliferation systems and safeguards measures and helps to reduce the risk of illicit trafficking. In a high safety culture environment, each individual facility employee has to be motivated and encouraged to carry out the assigned duties and responsibilities in accordance with rules and

  10. Active, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technologies for Homeland Defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James L. Jones

    2003-06-01

    Active, non-intrusive inspection or interrogation technologies have been used for 100 years - with the primary focus being radiographic imaging. During the last 50 years, various active interrogation systems have been investigated and most have revealed many unique and interesting capabilities and advantages that have already benefited the general public. Unfortunately, except for medical and specific industrial applications, these unique capabilities have not been widely adopted, largely due to the complexity of the technology, the overconfident reliance on passive detection systems to handle most challenges, and the unrealistic public concerns regarding radiation safety issues for a given active inspection deployment. The unique homeland security challenges facing the United States today are inviting more "out-of-the-box" solutions and are demanding the effective technological solutions that only active interrogation systems can provide. While revolutionary new solutions are always desired, these technology advancements are rare, and when found, usually take a long time to fully understand and implement for a given application. What's becoming more evident is that focusing on under-developed, but well-understood, active inspection technologies can provide many of the needed "out-of-the-box" solutions. This paper presents a brief historical overview of active interrogation. It identifies some of the major homeland defense challenges being confronted and the commercial and research technologies presently available and being pursued. Finally, the paper addresses the role of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and its partner, the Idaho Accelerator Center at Idaho State University, in promoting and developing active inspection technologies for homeland defense.

  11. 49 CFR 1580.105 - Reporting significant security concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Hazardous Materials Receivers, and Private Cars § 1580.105 Reporting significant security concerns. (a... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting significant security concerns. 1580.105... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME AND LAND TRANSPORTATION SECURITY...

  12. 49 CFR 1580.203 - Reporting significant security concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Scenic, Historic and Excursion Operators, and Private Cars § 1580.203 Reporting significant security... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting significant security concerns. 1580.203... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME AND LAND TRANSPORTATION SECURITY...

  13. 49 CFR 1552.23 - Security awareness training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... employee to identify— (i) Uniforms and other identification, if any are required at the flight school, for... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY FLIGHT SCHOOLS Flight School Security Awareness Training § 1552.23 Security awareness training programs. (a) General. A...

  14. 33 CFR 103.505 - Elements of the Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Security (AMS) Plan. 103.505 Section 103.505 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan § 103.505 Elements of the Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan. The AMS Plan should address...

  15. 33 CFR 103.510 - Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan review and approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan... HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan § 103.510 Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan review and approval. Each AMS Plan will be...

  16. Nuclear trade and non-proliferation: report by working group; Commerce nucleaire et non-proliferation: rapport du groupe de travail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerever, M.

    1995-12-31

    The paper is organized in three parts. The first one analyses the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) mentioning the arrangements and registered agreements between the IAEA and Member States. Also, the most important international legal instruments concerned the peaceful uses of nuclear energy are considered. In the second part, other international, regional or national legal instruments are discussed, particularly the London Club Guidelines, Treaty of Tlatelolco, the EURATOM and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) Treaties, besides the American law of 18 Mars, 1978 - Nuclear Non-proliferation Act (NNPA) about the exportation of materials and services or nuclear technology; An appreciation about the laws and treaties are presented in the third part. Special attention is given to reinforce the non-proliferation dispositives face the actions after Iraq`s event (1990): new installations and nuclear activities moratorium extension export controls extension established by the London Club Guidelines and full scope safeguards adoption to accomplish controls and protect of dual-use nuclear-related technologies. 3 refs.

  17. Perspectives on Security, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation: Views from the United States and South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    warmth  and  is  often  “edgy...the  International  Committee  of  the   Red  Cross   (ICRC).     There  was  a  sense  that  the  differences  on...Australia   or   New   Zealand.   In   reality,   however,   the   current   official   relationship   lacks   warmth ,  

  18. The Case for the Use of Active Social Media in Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schanfein, Mark J.

    2015-10-05

    A great amount of attention and consideration is being directed at possible applications of social media in many challenging areas. The use of social media has already shown its importance in the area of disaster response, where, each citizen is essentially acting as a sensor in reporting local conditions. In the aggregate, valuable information is obtained to enable a more effective response as well as provide timely information to those in the disaster area. No one needs to be trained to understand what constitutes a disaster, so a social media data stream from the public is literally always active and ready to engage. A similar but more focused approach is the use of crowdsourcing for science, where specific challenges in areas such as mathematics, astronomy, and biology are posted to social media and solved by the crowd.

  19. 78 FR 42584 - Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation: Report to Congress Pursuant to Section...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ..., military, or ballistic missile programs of Iran: aluminum; beryllium; boron; cobalt; copper; copper infiltrated tungsten; copper- beryllium; graphite; hastelloy; inconel; magnesium; molybdenum; nickel;...

  20. Law, Policy and Nonproliferation Project Events and Workshops: Key Themes, Results and Related Materials 2008 - 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Coast Guard Deborah Berman Monterey Institute James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies Chris Bidwell Defense Threat Reduction Agency James...ATTENDEES NAME ORGANIZATION Thomas Appel Booz Allen Hamilton Deborah Berman Monterey Institute for International Studies Chris Bidwell Defense...not credible and that preemptive selfdefense was true ground for action). 108. See generally Harold D. Lasswell & Myres S. McDougal, Jurisprudence

  1. 15 CFR Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 - Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Biological Weapons No. Supplement No. 1 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to...—Nonproliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Note: Exports and reexports of items in performance of...: (i) Equipment (for producing chemical weapon precursors and chemical warfare agents) described in...

  2. Miscalculated Ambiguity: The Effects of US Nuclear Declaratory Policy on Deterrence and Nonproliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    MIRVs) and anti-ballistic missile ( ABM ) technology began to re-invigorate thinking regarding nuclear warfighting explored under McNamara‘s counter...Nuclear Weapons and Nonproliferation: A Reference Handbook. Contemporary World Issues. ( ABC -CLIO, 2008), 6. policy proved deadly for this initial non

  3. China's Case Against the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty: Rationality and Morality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Geoffrey

    1986-01-01

    China and other major Third World nations have refused to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). While this position appears morally unjustified and even irrational, their claim that the treaty is discriminatory merits serious attention. Only if certain aspects of this claim are accepted by the nuclear weapons signatories, does a moral…

  4. 76 FR 818 - Bureau of Nonproliferation; Determination Under the Arms Export Control Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Bureau of Nonproliferation; Determination Under the Arms Export Control Act AGENCY: Department of State... determination pursuant to Section 73 of the Arms Export Control Act and has concluded that publication of...

  5. Back-end of the fuel cycle and non-proliferation strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chebeskov, A.N.; Oussanov, V.I.; Iougai, S.V.; Pshakin, G.M. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, State Scientific Center of Russian Federation, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The paper focuses on the problem of fissile materials proliferation risk estimation. Some methodological approaches to the solution of this task and results of their application for comparison of different nuclear fuel cycle strategies are discussed. The results of comparative assessment of non-proliferation aspects of plutonium utilization alternatives in Russia using system analysis approach are presented. (author)

  6. The Situation of International Arms Control and Non-proliferation in 2003

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou; Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    The international non-proliferation efforts have achieved some positive results. The Iran nuclear issue has taken the first step towards solution; the abolition of Syrian chemical weapon is going ahead according the plan and the UN has adopted the Arms Trade Treaty. However, the DPRK nuclear issue has made no progress yet.

  7. Fukushima Daiichi: implications for carbon-free energy, nuclear nonproliferation, and community resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Howard L

    2011-07-01

    Implications of the nuclear power plant accidents at Fukushima Daiichi are explored in this commentary. In addition to questions of nuclear reactor regulatory standards, broader implications on noncarbon-emitting energy production, nuclear nonproliferation objectives, and community resilience and emergency response against catastrophic events are explored. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  8. Organizational Culture for Safety, Security, and Safeguards in New Nuclear Power Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacic, Donald N [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This chapter will contain the following sections: Existing international norms and standards for developing the infrastructure to support new nuclear power programs The role of organizational culture and how it supports the safe, secure, and peaceful application of nuclear power Identifying effective and efficient strategies for implementing safety, security and safeguards in nuclear operations Challenges identified in the implementation of safety, security and safeguards Potential areas for future collaboration between countries in order to support nonproliferation culture

  9. Department of National Security Affairs [presentation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    A slide presentation. The Department of National Security Affairs (NSA) offers fully accredited programs leading to the Master of Arts in Security Studies, as well as a Ph.D. program in Security Studies. In addition to specializing in traditional security domains such as nuclear proliferation, arms control, maritime strategy, interstate wars, insurgency, terrorism and homeland security, the NSA department conducts cutting edge research and education in the areas of cyber warfare, space politi...

  10. Nuclear Threats and Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Jacobs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents highlights and insights from the International Conference on “Nuclear Threats and Security” organized by the World Academy of Art and Science in association with the European Leadership Network and the Dag Hammarskjöld University College of International Relations and Diplomacy and sponsored by NATO at the Inter-University Centre, Dubrovnik on September 14-16, 2012. The conference examined important issues related to nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament, the legality of nuclear weapons and their use, illicit trade in nuclear materials, the dangers of nuclear terrorism, nuclear- and cyber-security. Papers and video recordings of the major presentations and session summaries can be found here.

  11. HYPERSONIC THREATS TO THE HOMELAND STRATEGIC OPTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-28

    Fighter Squadron, Homestead Air Reserve Base Florida, Director of Operations 80th Fighter Squadron, 8 FW, Kunsan AB, Korea. Lt Col Jeffress...homeland, safeguards the decision space of our nation’s leaders and potentially strengthens military, diplomatic and economic instruments of power... leaders cannot default on their oath to support and defend the constitution against this emergent threat as they prioritize tasks for the administration

  12. Naval Mine Countermeasures: The Achilles Heel of U.S. Homeland Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    further credence to this claim, the same document quotes John Brennan, then Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism...SMCM), MH-53E airborne MCM (AMCM) helicopters, and explosive ordinance disposal (EOD) teams that operate remote MCM vehicles and employ marine mammal...result these new technology assets are not projected to enter initial operational test and evaluation ( IOT &E) until mid-2014 at the earliest. 21

  13. 76 FR 43696 - Nationwide Cyber Security Review (NCSR) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... government to complete a cyber network security assessment so that a full measure of gaps and capabilities... SECURITY Nationwide Cyber Security Review (NCSR) Assessment AGENCY: National Protection and Programs...: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD),...

  14. 76 FR 22409 - Nationwide Cyber Security Review (NCSR) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... a cyber network security assessment so that a full measure of gaps and capabilities can be completed... SECURITY Nationwide Cyber Security Review (NCSR) Assessment AGENCY: National Protection and Programs.... SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate...

  15. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2008 - May 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.

    2010-03-01

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 16th successful year in support of the NNSA’s mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. We provide this annual report to review program activities from June 2008 through May 2009 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2008. Contents include: Welcome Letter Introduction The NGFP Team Program Management Highlights Class of 2008 Incoming Fellows Orientation Travel Career Development Management of the Fellows Performance Highlights Closing Ceremony Encore Performance Where They Are Now Alumnus Career Highlights: Christine Buzzard Class of 2009 Applicant Database Upgrades Fall Recruitment Activities Interviews Hiring and Clearances Introducing the Class of 2009 Class of 2010 Recruitment Strategy On the Horizon Appendix A: Class of 2009 Fellows

  16. NNSA Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program Annual Report June 2009 - May 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkman, Clarissa O.; Fankhauser, Jana G.

    2011-04-01

    In 2009, the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) completed its 17th successful year in support of the NNSA’s mission by developing future leaders in nonproliferation and promoting awareness of career opportunities. This annual report to reviews program activities from June 2009 through May 2010 - the fellowship term for the Class of 2009. Contents include: Welcome Letter (Mission Driven: It’s all about results), Introduction, Structure of the NGFP, Program Management Highlights, Annual Lifecycle, Class of 2009 Incoming Fellows, Orientation, Global Support of the Mission, Career Development, Management of the Fellows, Performance Highlights, Closing Ceremony, Where They Are Now, Alumni Highlight - Mission Success: Exceptional Leaders from the NGFP, Class of 2009 Fall Recruitment Activities, Established Partnerships, Face-to-Face, Recruiting Results, Interviews, Hiring and Clearances, Introducing the Class of 2010, Class of 2011 Recruitment Strategy, On the Horizon, Appendix A: Class of 2010 Fellow Biographies

  17. The Physics and Nuclear Nonproliferation Goals of WATCHMAN: A WAter CHerenkov Monitor for ANtineutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Askins, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dye, S T; Handler, T; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hellfeld, D; Jaffke, P; Kamyshkov, Y; Land, B J; Learned, J G; Marleau, P; Mauger, C; Gann, G D Orebi; Roecker, C; Rountree, S D; Shokair, T M; Smy, M B; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Vagins, M R; van Bibber, K A; Vogelaar, R B; Wetstein, M J; Yeh, M

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the physics and nonproliferation goals of WATCHMAN, the WAter Cherenkov Monitor for ANtineutrinos. The baseline WATCHMAN design is a kiloton scale gadolinium-doped (Gd) light water Cherenkov detector, placed 13 kilometers from a civil nuclear reactor in the United States. In its first deployment phase, WATCHMAN will be used to remotely detect a change in the operational status of the reactor, providing a first- ever demonstration of the potential of large Gd-doped water detectors for remote reactor monitoring for future international nuclear nonproliferation applications. During its first phase, the detector will provide a critical large-scale test of the ability to tag neutrons and thus distinguish low energy electron neutrinos and antineutrinos. This would make WATCHMAN the only detector capable of providing both direction and flavor identification of supernova neutrinos. It would also be the third largest supernova detector, and the largest underground in the western hemisphere. In a...

  18. Cooperation in Nuclear Waste Management, Radiation Protection, Emergency Preparedness, Reactor Safety and Nuclear Non-Proliferation in Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dassen, Lars van; Delalic, Zlatan; Ekblad, Christer; Keyser, Peter; Turner, Roland; Rosengaard, Ulf; German, Olga; Grapengiesser, Sten; Andersson, Sarmite; Sandberg, Viviana; Olsson, Kjell; Stenberg, Tor

    2009-10-15

    foreseen by for instance the Global Partnership and the UNSC Resolution 1540. However, this is only partially true as there is a growing realisation that radiation protection as well as emergency preparedness is part and parcel of the objectives that the international community is striving towards. Some of the projects have a genuinely humanitarian or civilian nature in the sense that they aim at alleviating for instance natural radiation such as from radon. But on the other hand, certain activities that concern radiation protection in terms of reducing the emissions of radiation from radioactive materials also become a security component with regard to the physical protection measures that in most cases will have to be in place. The projects in this field are implemented in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. There are a total of 22 projects in the field of radiation protection and emergency preparedness. In the field of nuclear non-proliferation and security, the geographical scope of SSM's activities is broad and stretching beyond the nearest parts of Russia and other neighbouring states. This has to do with the fact that the spread of nuclear weapons, materials and technologies relies on human will and therefore an amount of irradiated nuclear fuel in Siberia may be just as dangerous as a similar or smaller amount much closer to Sweden. It all depends on the people involved and their intentions. Sweden cooperates with Russia, Ukraine, Georgia and Armenia in this particular field. The projects include the installation of physical protection at facilities with nuclear and radioactive materials; the application of safeguards or nuclear materials accountancy on nuclear materials; assistance to the improvement of national export control systems as well as education in the field of nuclear non-proliferation. SSM participates in a number of projects that are financed by the EU. The projects were initiated in the framework of TACIS and soon to be formulated in the framework of

  19. Framework for Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection for Nonproliferation Impact Assessments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bari,R.

    2008-03-01

    This report describes a framework for proliferation resistance and physical protection evaluation for the fuel cycle systems envisioned in the expansion of nuclear power for electricity generation. The methodology is based on an approach developed as part of the Generation IV technical evaluation framework and on a qualitative evaluation approach to policy factors similar to those that were introduced in previous Nonproliferation Impact Assessments performed by DOE.

  20. NSAIDs induce apoptosis in nonproliferating ovarian cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kristal; Uwimpuhwe, Henriette; Czibere, Akos; Sarkar, Devanand; Libermann, Towia A; Fisher, Paul B; Zerbini, Luiz F

    2012-07-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is one of the most lethal gynaecological cancers, which usually has a poor prognosis due to late diagnosis. A large percentage of the OC cell population is in a nonproliferating and quiescent stage, which poses a barrier to success when using most chemotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have shown that several nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are effective in the treatment of OC. Furthermore, we have previously described the molecular mechanisms of NSAIDs' induction of cancer apoptosis. In this report, we evaluated various structurally distinct NSAIDs for their efficacies in inducing apoptosis in nonproliferating OC cells. Although several NSAIDs-induced apoptosis, Flufenamic Acid, Flurbiprofen, Finasteride, Celocoxib, and Ibuprofen were the most potent NSAIDs inducing apoptosis. A combination of these agents resulted in an enhanced effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the combination of Flurbiprofen, which targets nonproliferative cells, and Sulindac Sulfide, that affects proliferative cells, strongly reduced tumor growth when compared with a single agent treatment. Our data strongly support the hypothesis that drug treatment regimens that target nonproliferating and proliferating cells may have significant efficacy against OC. These results also provide a rationale for employing compounds or even chemically modified NSAIDs, which selectively and efficiently induce apoptosis in cells during different stages of the cell cycle, to design more potent anticancer drugs.

  1. Swedish support programme on nuclear non-proliferation in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ek, P.; Andersson, Sarmite [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Wredberg, L. [ILG Consultant Ltd., Vienna (Austria)

    2000-06-15

    At the request of the Swedish Government, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate has established a support and co-operation programme in the area of nuclear non-proliferation with Russia and several of the republics of the former Soviet Union. The Programme was initiated in 1991 and an overall goal is to accomplish national means and measures for control and protection of nuclear material and facilities, in order to minimise the risk of proliferation of nuclear weapons and illicit trafficking of nuclear material and equipment. The objective of the Swedish Support Programme is to help each, so called, recipient State to be able to, independently and without help from outside, take the full responsibility for operating a national non-proliferation system and thereby fulfil the requirements imposed through the international legal instruments. This would include both the development and implementation of a modern nuclear legislation system, and the establishment of the components making up a national system for combating illicit trafficking. The support and co-operation projects are organised in five Project Groups (i.e. nuclear legislation, nuclear material control, physical protection, export/import control, and combating of illicit trafficking), which together cover the entire non-proliferation area. Up till June 2000, support and co-operation projects, completed and on-going, have been carried out in ten States, namely Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Russia and Ukraine. Furthermore, programmes have been initiated during the first part of 2000 with Estonia, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. In addition, assistance has been given to Poland on a specific nuclear material accountancy topic. All projects are done on request by and in co-operation with these States. The total number of projects initiated during the period 1991 to June 2000 is 109, thereof 77 have been completed and 32 are currently on-going. It is the

  2. 75 FR 8096 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-023...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... including: Evaluations or reports; Attendance at treatment or counseling programs; or Substance abuse... authorities to report, under state law, incidents of suspected child abuse or neglect to the extent described... or mental health counseling, treatment or evaluation. G. To the appropriate federal, state,...

  3. Domestic Security Cooperation: A Unified Approach to Homeland Security and Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    Principles in the Space and Information Age (New York: Frank Cass-Taylor & Francis , 2005), 36. 38 Andrew Krepinevich and Robert O. Work, A New US Global...Principles in the Space and Information Age. New York: Frank Cass-Taylor & Francis , 2005. Jeffreys-Jones, Rhodri. The FBI: A History. New Haven, CT... Bacon , 1971. Swain, Richard M. Lucky War: Third Army in Desert Storm. Washington, DC: U.S. Army Center of Military History, 1997. Turabian, Kate L. A

  4. Security and Prosperity: Reexamining the Connection Between Economic, Homeland and National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    difficult times. MLM , the “get done with that so you can visit more” mantra provided a lighthearted push to keep going. My Classmates Your varied...its down falls and should be used sparingly. Contracts between organizations provide the moral code by which they will interact. If policy makers

  5. Homeland Security is Hometown Security: Comparison and Case Studies of Vertically Synchronized Catastrophe Response Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    we live on two volcanic rocks where two tectonic plates meet, in a somewhat lonely stretch of windswept ocean just above the Roaring Forties. If you...Management and Business Continuity Programs NGO non-government organization NIMS National Incident Management System NMSZ New Madrid seismic ...the New Madrid seismic zone22 and the Cascadia subduction zone along the northwest Pacific coast.23 An earthquake along the Cascadia fault lines

  6. 75 FR 18860 - Privacy Act of 1974, Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-013...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... a description denoting the type and character of each system of records that the agency maintains... records prepared by TSA employees, and responses to and results of approved psychological assessments or similar tests administered by TSA; (f) Results of telephonic or in-person interviews with program...

  7. Domestic Security Cooperation: A Unified Approach to Homeland Security and Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Cartel, La Familia De Michoacan, the Juarez cartel, the Beltran Leyva Organization (BLO), and the Tijuana cartel. These organizations compete with each...to “expand operations into the territories of other cartels—and further challenge the sovereignty of the Mexican state.”35 The La Familia cartel...gains control of the populace and furthers its aims by infiltrating social, political, and religious organizations. La Familia uses religion to portray

  8. Visa Security Policy: Roles of the Departments of State and Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    India; Indonesia; Iraq; Jerusalem, Israel; Jordan; Kuala Lumpur , Malaysia; Kuwait; Lebanon; Mexico; Morocco; Nigeria; Pakistan...merely administer the visa process. They warn that consular officers are too concerned about facilitating tourism and trade to scrutinize visa...consular officers emphasize the promotion of tourism , commerce, and cultural exchange and are lax in screening foreign nationals who want to come

  9. 78 FR 73868 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-DHS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ...). Portions of the system pertaining to investigations or prosecutions of violations of criminal law are... prosecution of violations or potential violations of Federal, State, local, or international criminal law... information, indicates a violation or potential violation of law, which includes criminal, civil,...

  10. 75 FR 28046 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-002...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... other restrictions pertaining to airspace. (g) Other individuals who are connected to the transportation... indirect air carrier. (j) Aliens or other individuals designated by DHS/TSA who apply for flight training... and past citizenship information; immigration status; alien registration numbers; visa...

  11. The Economic Impact of the Homeland Security Advisory System: The Cost of Heightened Border Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    following individuals and their private sector companies: Mrs. Yvette Limon , Assistant Director City of Laredo Bridge Department; Mr. Skip McMahon, of...Mrs. Yvette Limon , Assistant Director City of Laredo Bridge Department, phone and e-mail interviews with the author, August 2008. 42 vehicles during

  12. Homeland Security Within State Departments of Agriculture: Success Factors and Barriers to an Effective Security Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    2010 Thesis Co-Advisors: Samuel H. Clovis Gail F. Thomas THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No...DEFENSE) from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL September 2010 Author: Matthew J. Blackwood, PhD Approved by: Samuel H. Clovis , PhD...that I can give my children the same gifts you gave me love, support, and the desire to learn. To my advisors, Dr. Sam Clovis and Dr. Gail Thomas

  13. 78 FR 55270 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-DHS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ... federal government's counter-terrorism efforts by assisting in the detection of individuals on federal... and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (IRTPA),\\2\\ Congress directed TSA and DHS to assume from aircraft... General to establish an organization to consolidate the Federal Government's approach to terrorism...

  14. 2007 Heartland Security Conference and Exhibition - Technology for Defense and Homeland Security Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-11

    Robotics: The Key to Immediate Assessment & Response to Hazardous Situations, Mr. Alan Bignall, CEO, ReconRobotics Using Modeling and Simulation for...Corporation 9:20 am Reconnaissance Robotics: The Key to Immediate Assessment & Response to Hazardous Situations • Mr. Alan Bignall, CEO...Department of Employment and Economic Development 3:25 pm Prevention of Terrorism & Industry’s Role • Mr. Sam Brinkley , Vice

  15. Leveraging Knowledge Management Tools to Support Security Risk Management in the Department of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Administration NEN NASA Engineering Network NISAC National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center NPIA National Policing Improvement... cognitive dimension,” “…of mental models, beliefs, and perspectives so ingrained that we take them for granted, and therefore cannot easily...tacit knowledge and experience through mentoring and apprenticeship on decades long projects. Time and budget pressures, along with an expanded array

  16. 75 FR 18863 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration-006...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... to the media when there exists a legitimate public interest in disclosing information. Release under... Handgun Violence Prevention Act. Both routine uses are duplicative. The retention and disposal section has... settlement negotiations or in connection with criminal law proceedings. R. To the news media and the...

  17. The current perspectives of nuclear energy and non-proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilinsky, Victor

    2012-07-01

    The main reason given nowadays for supporting nuclear plant construction around the world is that the plants do not produce CO{sub 2}. The negative aspects are costs so high as to require subsidies, the possible connection with proliferation, and since the Fukushima accident, a renewed concern about nuclear safety. To make a dent on global climate, we would need many power reactors, perhaps a thousand worldwide, perhaps more. Such a scale-up is not likely in view of nuclear power's high cost. Fukushima demonstrated that LWRs are capable of large accidental releases of radioactivity, roughly comparable to that at Chernobyl. While effective evacuation can protect people, the evacuates may never be able to return. The half- life of cesium 137, the main contaminant, is about 30 years, and it may take several half-lives to make an area acceptable for rehabilitation. In Fukushima about 100,000 persons were evacuated from an area of about 1000 square kilometer. When it comes to proliferation, there are strong arguments over whether we can have nuclear power without nuclear weapons. The 1946 US Acheson-Lilienthal Report argued that gaining nuclear energy's benefits without proliferation required strict international control. Inspection alone couldn't afford any reasonable security against the diversion of such materials to the purposes of war. The authors view is that the connection between technologies for nuclear power and nuclear weapons is still so close that you can't get the benefits of power without increasing the risks of weapons spread. Up to now we have allowed our interest in nuclear power to trump our bomb worries. It is time to rethink the proliferation risk of a large increase in nuclear power capacity.

  18. Afghanistan’s Security Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-05

    continue to depend on treacherous overland routes. Although sensitive equipment is flown in by plane, supply convoys moving overland from Pakistan...Lieberman Chair The Honorable Susan M. Collins Ranking Member Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs United States Senate

  19. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 105 - Facility Vulnerability and Security Measures Summary (Form CG-6025)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Security Measures Summary (Form CG-6025) A Appendix A to Part 105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES Pt. 105, App. A Appendix A to Part 105—Facility Vulnerability and Security Measures Summary (Form CG-6025)...

  20. 78 FR 46358 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Security Programs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under... against acts of criminal violence and air piracy, and the introduction of explosives, incendiaries,...

  1. Seven law concepts on nuclear non-proliferation suggested by the International Group of Legal Experts (ILG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, G. [Djursholm (Sweden); Wredberg, L. [ILG Consultant LTD, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-03-01

    The ILG has worked as an independent group under the Swedish Support Programme on Nuclear Non-Proliferation in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia. The ILG's mission is concluded with this report. When developing the seven Law Concepts on national nuclear legislation that are presented in this report, the ILG has applied certain basic principles, which are firmly established in modern Western legislation. A summary of these principles is made here. They are essential cornerstones in laws and regulations that apply both to the nuclear industry and to other high technology areas, characterised by advanced safety and security requirements. Of essential importance is that the Operator alone is responsible for the fulfilment of requirements stipulated in laws and authority directives. The technical complexity of the nuclear industry and the far-reaching requirements on safety and security necessitate a qualified and complete national system of legislation and regulations. As all legislation in general, the nuclear legislation should be clear, easy to understand and give little room for misunderstandings and loopholes. It should also present the legally established requirements on safety and security in a form that facilitates the application and implementation by both state authorities, facility operators and individuals. The investigations of the causes of the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents brought into focus the impact on nuclear safety from human failure. As a consequence, increased emphasis has since then been put on the development of an overall high safety culture in the nuclear field. It is recognised that a good safety culture also promotes the non-proliferation systems and safeguards measures and helps to reduce the risk of illicit trafficking. In a high safety culture environment, each individual facility employee has to be motivated and encouraged to carry out the assigned duties and responsibilities in accordance with rules and

  2. Homeland Defense: DOD Needs to Address Gaps in Homeland Defense and Civil Support Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    tornado, storm, high water , wind-driven water , tidal wave, tsunami, earthquake, volcanic eruption , landslide, mudslide, snowstorm, or drought), or...Secretary of Defense and the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy on homeland defense and civil support matters, among other things. The...Assistant Secretary of Defense for Global Strategic Affairs is the principal advisor to the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy and the Secretary

  3. Sweden and the making of nuclear non-proliferation: from indecision to assertiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dassen, L. van [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Peace and Conflict Research

    1998-03-01

    Swedish research on nuclear weapons started at a modest scale in 1945 but was soon expanded. By the early 1950s the research programme started to face some of the problems that were going to accompany it for the rest of its life: different priorities and cost-estimates were made by the sectors that wanted to develop nuclear energy and those working on the bomb. Moreover, an introduction of nuclear weapons would lead to a major redistribution of resources to the disadvantage of the navy and army. The public and political debates intensified during the 1950s and culminated in 1960. At first, pro-nuclear voices had been strongest but were soon challenged by interest groups, unions and peace movements. 1960, a committee within the government had established a compromise: Nuclear weapons research for production of weapons would be terminated, while research on the consequences of nuclear weapons would continue. It was a cosmetic decision that could cover for a continued research on weapons design. Nevertheless, there are some general qualities from the debates that indicate why the outcome was that Sweden signed the NPT in 1968. First, the number of interested persons, groups movements and party politicians engaged in the issue increased every time the issue came up. Secondly, the segments of society that supported the nuclear option remained roughly the same. No strong movements rallied to the defence of this position. On the other hand, the anti-nuclear wing received more and more followers. Third, there was a marked tendency by virtually all actors (except the military) to include every sign of progress in international disarmament and non-proliferation efforts as arguments against Swedish proliferation. Since 1968, the non-proliferation choice has ben manifested through Sweden``s adherence to the NPT and this has been accompanied by a strong commitment to other non-proliferation initiatives. Refs.

  4. Leo Szilard Lectureship Award: Science Matters - Technical Dimensions of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbie, James

    2017-01-01

    Agreements to reduce nuclear arms and prevent proliferation of nuclear weapons are technical as well as political documents. They must be both technically sound and politically acceptable. This presentation illustrates technical aspects of arms control and non-proliferation agreements, with examples from SALT I, INF, the HEU Agreement, START, and the Iran nuclear negotiations, drawing on 44 years of personal experience in the negotiation of these agreements. The lecture is designed to convey an appreciation of the role that individuals with technical training can play in diplomatic efforts to reduce nuclear forces and prevent nuclear proliferation.

  5. Selected Examples of LDRD Projects Supporting Test Ban Treaty Verification and Nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Al-Ayat, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walter, W. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-02-23

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at the DOE National Laboratories was established to ensure the scientific and technical vitality of these institutions and to enhance the their ability to respond to evolving missions and anticipate national needs. LDRD allows the Laboratory directors to invest a percentage of their total annual budget in cutting-edge research and development projects within their mission areas. We highlight a selected set of LDRD-funded projects, in chronological order, that have helped provide capabilities, people and infrastructure that contributed greatly to our ability to respond to technical challenges in support of test ban treaty verification and nonproliferation.

  6. Predicting linear and nonlinear time series with applications in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, T.L.

    1994-04-01

    This report is a primer on the analysis of both linear and nonlinear time series with applications in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. We analyze eight simulated and two real time series using both linear and nonlinear modeling techniques. The theoretical treatment is brief but references to pertinent theory are provided. Forecasting is our main goal. However, because our most common approach is to fit models to the data, we also emphasize checking model adequacy by analyzing forecast errors for serial correlation or nonconstant variance.

  7. Predicting linear and nonlinear time series with applications in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burr, T.L.

    1994-04-01

    This report is a primer on the analysis of both linear and nonlinear time series with applications in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. We analyze eight simulated and two real time series using both linear and nonlinear modeling techniques. The theoretical treatment is brief but references to pertinent theory are provided. Forecasting is our main goal. However, because our most common approach is to fit models to the data, we also emphasize checking model adequacy by analyzing forecast errors for serial correlation or nonconstant variance.

  8. Increasing Inspectability of Hardware and Software for Arms Control and Nonproliferation Regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, G

    2001-07-18

    As the U.S. and the Russian Federation get closer to deploying systems for monitoring nuclear material within arms control and nonproliferation transparency regimes, the level of inspectability of the system hardware and software must increase beyond the systems demonstrated to date. These systems include the Trilateral Initiative prototype, the Fissile Material Transparency Technology Demonstration (FMTTD) system, and the Trusted Radiation Attribute Demonstration System (TRADS). Toward this goal, several alternative technologies will be discussed along with ways in which they would increase inspectability. Some examples of such technologies include the use of microcontrollers instead of fully capable computers, open source operating systems, rantime environments, and compilers.

  9. 33 CFR 165.1407 - Security Zones; Oahu, HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zones; Oahu, HI. 165.1407 Section 165.1407 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1407 Security Zones; Oahu,...

  10. 19 CFR 122.181 - Definition of Customs security area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of Customs security area. 122.181 Section 122.181 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Access to Customs Security Areas § 122.181 Definition...

  11. 46 CFR 15.1113 - Vessel Security Officer (VSO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vessel Security Officer (VSO). 15.1113 Section 15.1113 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN MANNING REQUIREMENTS Vessels Subject to Requirements of STCW § 15.1113 Vessel Security Officer (VSO). After July...

  12. Small Combatants for the Homeland Defense Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    maritime related terrorism, weapons proliferation, transnational crime, piracy, environmental destruction, and illegal seaborne immigration.”35 But...humanitarian assistance, development assistance, environmental response operations, and security assistance. HA/DR missions can be both reactive and...Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas, and Offences against the Law of Nations.”70 Some of the first missions of the Navy were raids against

  13. The year 2000 examination conference of the non-proliferation treaty and the future of the nuclear non-proliferation regime; La conference d'examen 2000 du TNP et l'avenir du regime de non-proliferation nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grand, C. [Institut d' Etudes Politiques de Paris, 75 (France); Ecole Speciale Militaire de Saint-Cyr-Coetquidan (France)

    2001-07-01

    The nuclear weapons non-proliferation treaty (NPT), signed on July 1, 1968 and enforced on March 5, 1970, has been progressively considered as the headstone of the international non-proliferation and disarmament regime. The sixth NPT examination conference took place at New York (USA) in the year 2000, 5 years after the previous conference but also after the first nuclear weapon tests of India and Pakistan. This article recalls up the main non-proliferation events that took place between the 1995 and 2000 conferences and presents the progresses and results of the New York conference. Finally, it wonders about the ambiguities in the conclusions of this last conference. (J.S.)

  14. TCIA Secure Cyber Critical Infrastructure Modernization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keliiaa, Curtis M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia Labs) tribal cyber infrastructure assurance initiative was developed in response to growing national cybersecurity concerns in the the sixteen Department of Homeland Security (DHS) defined critical infrastructure sectors1. Technical assistance is provided for the secure modernization of critical infrastructure and key resources from a cyber-ecosystem perspective with an emphasis on enhanced security, resilience, and protection. Our purpose is to address national critical infrastructure challenges as a shared responsibility.

  15. Myeloid dendritic cells induce HIV-1 latency in non-proliferating CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Vanessa A; Kumar, Nitasha; Filali, Ali; Procopio, Francesco A; Yegorov, Oleg; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Saleh, Suha; Haddad, Elias K; da Fonseca Pereira, Candida; Ellenberg, Paula C; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Cameron, Paul U; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Latently infected resting CD4(+) T cells are a major barrier to HIV cure. Understanding how latency is established, maintained and reversed is critical to identifying novel strategies to eliminate latently infected cells. We demonstrate here that co-culture of resting CD4(+) T cells and syngeneic myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) can dramatically increase the frequency of HIV DNA integration and latent HIV infection in non-proliferating memory, but not naïve, CD4(+) T cells. Latency was eliminated when cell-to-cell contact was prevented in the mDC-T cell co-cultures and reduced when clustering was minimised in the mDC-T cell co-cultures. Supernatants from infected mDC-T cell co-cultures did not facilitate the establishment of latency, consistent with cell-cell contact and not a soluble factor being critical for mediating latent infection of resting CD4(+) T cells. Gene expression in non-proliferating CD4(+) T cells, enriched for latent infection, showed significant changes in the expression of genes involved in cellular activation and interferon regulated pathways, including the down-regulation of genes controlling both NF-κB and cell cycle. We conclude that mDC play a key role in the establishment of HIV latency in resting memory CD4(+) T cells, which is predominantly mediated through signalling during DC-T cell contact.

  16. Myeloid dendritic cells induce HIV-1 latency in non-proliferating CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa A Evans

    Full Text Available Latently infected resting CD4(+ T cells are a major barrier to HIV cure. Understanding how latency is established, maintained and reversed is critical to identifying novel strategies to eliminate latently infected cells. We demonstrate here that co-culture of resting CD4(+ T cells and syngeneic myeloid dendritic cells (mDC can dramatically increase the frequency of HIV DNA integration and latent HIV infection in non-proliferating memory, but not naïve, CD4(+ T cells. Latency was eliminated when cell-to-cell contact was prevented in the mDC-T cell co-cultures and reduced when clustering was minimised in the mDC-T cell co-cultures. Supernatants from infected mDC-T cell co-cultures did not facilitate the establishment of latency, consistent with cell-cell contact and not a soluble factor being critical for mediating latent infection of resting CD4(+ T cells. Gene expression in non-proliferating CD4(+ T cells, enriched for latent infection, showed significant changes in the expression of genes involved in cellular activation and interferon regulated pathways, including the down-regulation of genes controlling both NF-κB and cell cycle. We conclude that mDC play a key role in the establishment of HIV latency in resting memory CD4(+ T cells, which is predominantly mediated through signalling during DC-T cell contact.

  17. What Price Security?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald C. Masters

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a critique of the Copenhagen Consensus Center's(CCC exhaustive study on transnational terrorism, published in 2008.The implications of this study are controversial, yet highly relevant in today's economic environment. The Obama administration must come toterms with fiscal realities that will challenge budget priorities and invigorate what will undoubtedly prove to be tough negotiations on Capitol Hill for homeland security dollars. It is proposed here that standard economic tools such as benefit cost analysis, cost effectiveness criteria, and simulation models can help identify areas where security can be either extended or improved using fewer resources. Greater movement towards competitive procurement practices will also result in lower costs and higher returns on security investments.

  18. 76 FR 49503 - Intent To Request Renewal From OMB of One Current Public Collection of Information: Airport Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Intent To Request Renewal From OMB of One Current Public..., aircraft piracy, and the introduction of explosives, incendiaries, or weapons aboard an aircraft....

  19. 77 FR 63734 - Security Zone; James River, Kingsmill Resort, Williamsburg, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Security Zone; James River, Kingsmill Resort... establishing a temporary security zone on the James River in the vicinity of Kingsmill Resort...

  20. Nonproliferation impacts assessment for the management of the Savannah River Site aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    On May 13, 1996, the US established a new, 10-year policy to accept and manage foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the US. The goal of this policy is to reduce civilian commerce in weapons-usable highly enriched uranium (HEU), thereby reducing the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation. Two key disposition options under consideration for managing this fuel include conventional reprocessing and new treatment and packaging technologies. The Record of Decision specified that, while evaluating the reprocessing option, ``DOE will commission or conduct an independent study of the nonproliferation and other (e.g., cost and timing) implications of chemical separation of spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors.`` DOE`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation conducted this study consistent with the aforementioned Record of Decision. This report addresses the nonproliferation implications of the technologies under consideration for managing aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site. Because the same technology options are being considered for the foreign research reactor and the other aluminum-based spent nuclear fuels discussed in Section ES.1, this report addresses the nonproliferation implications of managing all the Savannah River Site aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel, not just the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. The combination of the environmental impact information contained in the draft EIS, public comment in response to the draft EIS, and the nonproliferation information contained in this report will enable the Department to make a sound decision regarding how to manage all aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site.

  1. Homeland defence: arguments for a network centric approach

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naudé, B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available interoperability issues. Several important factors that impact Homeland Defence are indicated in Figure 1. Threats and Characteristics The threats identified come in many guises and are categorised as follows for this discussion: a) Refugees b) Illegal...

  2. Nuclear disarmament. Options for the coming non-proliferation treaty surveillance cycle; Nukleare Abruestung. Optionen fuer den kommenden Ueberpruefungszyklus des NVV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Harald

    2011-07-01

    The report is aimed on the nuclear disarmament discussion with respect to the disagreement of nuclear weapon states and those without nuclear weapons, esp. the non-aligned movement (NAM) concerning the non-proliferation treaty. The report covers the following issues: The role of the non-proliferation treaty, nuclear disarmament in the last surveillance conference 2010, the different disarmament philosophies, the possibilities of bridging the disagreement, further disarmament options for the future non-proliferation treaty surveillance cycle, German options for the future surveillance cycle.

  3. Control Systems Security Test Center - FY 2004 Program Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert E. Polk; Alen M. Snyder

    2005-04-01

    In May 2004, the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) was established at Idaho National Laboratory to execute assessment activities to reduce the vulnerability of the nation’s critical infrastructure control systems to terrorist attack. The CSSC implements a program to accomplish the five goals presented in the US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security. This report summarizes the first year funding of startup activities and program achievements that took place in FY 2004 and early FY 2005. This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center of the National Cyber Security Division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs federal departments to identify and prioritize the critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the National Cyber Security Division to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems.

  4. Airborne Multisensor Pod System, Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: Second quarter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzo, G M; Sanford, N M [eds.

    1995-01-01

    This issue focuses on the Airborne Multisensor Pod System (AMPS) which is a collaboration of many of the DOE national laboratories to provide a scientific environment to research multiple sensors and the new information that can be derived from them. The bulk of the research has been directed at nonproliferation applications, but it has also proven useful in environmental monitoring and assessment, and land/water management. The contents of this issue are: using AMPS technology to detect proliferation and monitor resources; combining multisensor data to monitor facilities and natural resources; planning a AMPS mission; SAR pod produces images day or night, rain or shine; MSI pod combines data from multiple sensors; ESI pod will analyze emissions and effluents; and accessing AMPS information on the Internet.

  5. Stabilization and immobilization of military plutonium: A non-proliferation perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leventhal, P. [Nuclear Control Institute, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Nuclear Control Institute welcomes this DOE-sponsored technical workshop on stabilization and immobilization of weapons plutonium (W Pu) because of the significant contribution it can make toward the ultimate non-proliferation objective of eliminating weapons-usable nuclear material, plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU), from world commerce. The risk of theft or diversion of these materials warrants concern, as only a few kilograms in the hands of terrorists or threshold states would give them the capability to build nuclear weapons. Military plutonium disposition questions cannot be addressed in isolation from civilian plutonium issues. The National Academy of Sciences has urged that {open_quotes}further steps should be taken to reduce the proliferation risks posed by all of the world`s plutonium stocks, military and civilian, separated and unseparated...{close_quotes}. This report discusses vitrification and a mixed oxide fuels option, and the effects of disposition choices on civilian plutonium fuel cycles.

  6. Technical cooperation on nuclear security between the United States and China : review of the past and opportunities for the future.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2011-12-01

    The United States and China are committed to cooperation to address the challenges of the next century. Technical cooperation, building on a long tradition of technical exchange between the two countries, can play an important role. This paper focuses on technical cooperation between the United States and China in the areas of nonproliferation, arms control and other nuclear security topics. It reviews cooperation during the 1990s on nonproliferation and arms control under the U.S.-China Arms Control Exchange, discusses examples of ongoing activities under the Peaceful Uses of Technology Agreement to enhance security of nuclear and radiological material, and suggests opportunities for expanding technical cooperation between the defense nuclear laboratories of both countries to address a broader range of nuclear security topics.

  7. Restriction of Civilian Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Effectiveness of Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, JaeSoo; Lee, HanMyung; Ko, HanSuk; Yang, MaengHo; Oh, KunBae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Many efforts have been made to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons since the nuclear era. Recent revelation such as Dr. A.Q. Khan Network showed that some states had acquired sensitive nuclear technologies including uranium enrichment which could be used for making nuclear weapons. In addition, with the advancement of industrial technology, it has become easier to have access to those technologies. In this context, proliferation risks are being increased more and more. As a result, various proposals to respond to proliferation risks by sensitive technologies have been made: Multilateral Nuclear Approaches (MNAs) by IAEA Director General El Baradei, non-transfer of sensitive nuclear technologies by the U.S. President George W. Bush, international center for nuclear fuel cycle service by Russian President Vladimir V. Putin, Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) by Bush's administration and a concept for a multilateral mechanism for reliable access to nuclear fuel by 6 member states of the IAEA. Theses proposals all share the idea that the best way to reduce risk is to prevent certain states from having control over an indigenous civilian fuel cycle while still finding ways to confer the benefits of nuclear energy, and seem to imply that the current nonproliferation regime is fundamentally flawed and needs to be altered. However, these proposals are a center of controversy because they can restrict the inalienable right for the peaceful purposes of nuclear energy inscribed in Article IV of the NPT. Therefore, this paper analyzes the key challenges of these proposals and effectiveness of the goal of nuclear nonproliferation in practical term by restricting civilian nuclear fuel cycle.

  8. The Non-Proliferation Treaty of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and the insertion of the Brazilian State in its regime; O tratado sobre a nao proliferacao de armas nucleares (TNP) e a insercao do Estado brasileiro no regime dele decorrente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcos Valle Machado da

    2010-07-01

    The issue of nuclear weapons continues to appear as a focal point of International Relations. The efforts and concrete actions on disarmament, non-proliferation, and nuclear arms control are still issues that generate recurring tensions between States. However, in Brazil, there is little analysis of an academic nature about these issues and, with respect to current and prospective position of the Brazilian State in the Nuclear Weapons Non- Proliferation Regime, studies and analysis are even more scarce, or incipient. The present dissertation has as its object of study to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the Regime arisen from NPT, and the Brazilian State insertion process in this Regime. Therefore our research work is structured in three areas: the first one is about the role of nuclear weapons in States security perception, the second is about NPT and its Regime, the third runs over the insertion of the Brazilian state in this regime. So, in summary, the research performed included the reasons that make a State to develop nuclear weapons, the NPT genesis and evolution of the perception of the meaning of that Treaty by the States, and the process and the degree of insertion of Brazil in the Nuclear Weapons Non- Proliferation Regime. The inquiry sought to place this object of study in the broader debate on Foreign Relations, based on the approaches of the discipline devoted to the question of managing the security of States, id est, the two approaches that constitute the mainstream of the discipline: the perspective theoretical liberal (and neoliberal variants) and realistic thinking (and neo-realist). Thus, we have used different theoretical lenses, which we think necessary for understanding the specific parts and causal connections between these parts of a complex issue. (author)

  9. Considerations on Cyber Security Assessments of Korean Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Song, Jae-Gu; Han, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Cheol Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Mingyun [E-Gonggam Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control (KINAC) has prepared the regulatory standard RS-015 based on RG 5.71. RS-015 defines the elements of a cyber security program to be established in nuclear facilities and describes the security control items and relevant requirements. Cyber security assessments are important initial activities in a cyber security program for NPPs. Cyber security assessments can be performed in the following key steps: 1) Formation of a cyber security assessment team (CSAT); 2) Identification of critical systems and critical digital assets (CDAs); 3) Plant compliance checks with the security control requirements in RS-015. Through the assessments, the current status of security controls applied to NPPs can be found out. The assessments provide baseline data for remedial activities. Additional analyses with the results from the assessments should be performed before the implementation of remedial security controls. The cyber security team at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has studied how to perform cyber security assessments for NPPs based on the regulatory requirements. Recently, KAERI's cyber security team has performed pilot cyber security assessments of a Korean NPP. Based on this assessment experience, considerations and checkpoints which would be helpful for full-scale cyber security assessments of Korean NPPs and the implementation of remedial security controls are discussed in this paper. Cyber security assessment is one of important and immediate activities for NPP cyber security. The quality of the first assessment will be a barometer for NPP cyber security. Hence cyber security assessments of Korean NPPs should be performed elaborately.

  10. Security-by-design handbook.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, Mark Kamerer; Jaeger, Calvin Dell; Scharmer, Carol; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Tanuma, Koji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan; Ochiai, Kazuya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan; Iida, Toru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, Japan

    2013-01-01

    This document is a draft SecuritybyDesign (SeBD) handbook produced to support the Work Plan of the Nuclear Security Summit to share best practices for nuclear security in new facility design. The Work Plan calls on States to %E2%80%9Cencourage nuclear operators and architect/engineering firms to take into account and incorporate, where appropriate, effective measures of physical protection and security culture into the planning, construction, and operation of civilian nuclear facilities and provide technical assistance, upon request, to other States in doing so.%E2%80%9D The materials for this document were generated primarily as part of a bilateral project to produce a SeBD handbook as a collaboration between the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which represented the US Department Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) under a Project Action Sheet PASPP04. Input was also derived based on tours of the Savannah River Site (SRS) and Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) Rokkasho Mixed Oxide Fuel fabrication facilities and associated project lessonslearned. For the purposes of the handbook, SeBD will be described as the systemlevel incorporation of the physical protection system (PPS) into a new nuclear power plant or nuclear facility resulting in a PPS design that minimizes the risk of malicious acts leading to nuclear material theft; nuclear material sabotage; and facility sabotage as much as possible through features inherent in (or intrinsic to) the design of the facility. A fourelement strategy is presented to achieve a robust, durable, and responsive security system.

  11. Regional security assessments : a strategic approach to securing federal facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Consolini, Todd

    2009-01-01

    CHDS State/Local The 18 critical infrastructure sectors identified by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security form a vast and complex network of interdependent assets that supports the functioning of nearly every aspect of business, government, and commerce. The disruption of even one critical infrastructure sector by a terrorist attack or natural or manmade disaster is likely to have cascading effects on other sectors. As the Sector-Specific Agency for the Government Facilities Sector, t...

  12. Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

  13. The new role of non-proliferation surveillance; Safeguards - die neue Rolle der Nichtverbreitungsueberwachung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weh, R. [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Non-proliferation and nuclear safeguards are intimately connected with the peaceful development and use of nuclear power. The contractual obligation to forgo any misuse aimed at the construction of atom boms has been, and is, an important basis of all activities in the nuclear field. For the Federal Republic of Germany and the other participating states, subdivided into nuclear weapon states and non-nuclear-weapon states, the 1954 Brussels Treaty, which contains a fundamental clause waiving the production of nuclear weapons, the establishment of the European Atomic Energy Community, EURATOM, within the framework of the 1957 Treaties of Rome, and the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (Non-proliferation Treaty) within the framework of IAEA are the underlying basic legal instruments. These treaties, and the extended agreements based on them, operated on the basis of the 'old' system of surveillance of fissile material (nuclear safeguards). Both the inspection effort to be coped with by IAEA, which has kept rising steadily since the eighties and for which no additional budget funds were made available, and the violation by Iraq of the treaty as corroborated by a UN inspection team discovering a program for the production of weapons of mass destruction, boosted efforts in the early nineties to revise the existing system of treaties and controls. The International Atomic Energy Agency, among other measures, decided to improve nuclear safeguards by introducing immediate measures and optimization programs and upgrading inspection possibilities by a new model agreement. The model protocol, INFCIRC/153, adopted by the Board of Governors in September 1997 among other things serves to supplement the existing system of verification of the correctness of information received by another system verifying the completeness of such information. It incorporates an extended duty to supply information and extended rights of access. This includes activities not

  14. 77 FR 1076 - National Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-09

    ... 9, 2012. Additionally, this meeting will be broadcasted via a web enabled interactive online format... advice, consults with, and makes recommendations to the Secretary of Homeland Security, via the.... 109-347) NMSAC continues to be consulted in regards to the Global Supply Chain Security...

  15. International Nuclear Security Situation And China’s Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chong

    2016-01-01

    Since 2010,the three Nuclear Security Summits have made a number of achievements,but the international nuclear security situation is still not relaxed.The rapid development of China’s domestic nuclear facilities and a large amount of nuclear and radioactive materials related to nuclear power,active international nuclear black market in China’s surrounding regions,rather serious domestic and international terrorist threats as well as the emerging technology development bring about new challenges to nuclear security.Facing the complicated and long-term nuclear security situation,China from the perspective of monitoring mechanism,laws and regulations system,technical capability-building and nuclear emergency preparedness,takes a series of effective measures to build the national nuclear security capacity,and strictly fulfills its international obligations,actively participates in upgrading the international nuclear non-proliferation regime and relevant international rules,and actively takes part in the Nuclear Security Summit process,strengthens bilateral cooperation on nuclear security with major countries especially the United States of America,and jointly organizes various training with International Atomic Energy Agency,which has made great contributions to upgrading the global nuclear security level.At the end of the Nuclear Security Summit process,China should continue to strengthen its domestic nuclear security capacity building,and promote the international community to treat the root causes and symptoms,adopt a comprehensive strategy,and work together,effectively prevent and dissolve the nuclear terrorist threats.

  16. Assessment of Impact of Monoenergetic Photon Sources on Prioritized Nonproliferation Applications: Simulation Study Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, Cameron [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Valentine, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Quiter, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Descalle, Marie-Anne [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Warren, Glen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kinlaw, Matt [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thompson, Scott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chichester, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, Cameron [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pozzi, Sara [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-12-30

    Near-monoenergetic photon sources (MPSs) have the potential to improve sensitivity at greatly reduced dose in existing applications and enable new capabilities in other applications. MPS advantages include the ability to select energy, energy spread, flux, and pulse structures to deliver only the photons needed for the application, while suppressing extraneous dose and background. Some MPSs also offer narrow divergence photon beams which can target dose and/or mitigate scattering contributions to image contrast degradation. Current broad-band, bremsstrahlung photon sources (e.g., linacs and betatrons) deliver unnecessary dose that in some cases also interferes with the signature to be detected and/or restricts operations, and must be collimated (reducing flux) to generate narrow divergence beams. While MPSs can in principle resolve these issues, they are technically challenging to produce. Candidate MPS technologies for nonproliferation applications are now being developed, each of which have different properties (e.g. broad divergence vs. narrow). Within each technology, source parameters trade off against one another (e.g. flux vs. energy spread), representing a large operation space. To guide development, requirements for each application of interest must be defined and simulations conducted to define MPS parameters that deliver benefit relative to current systems. The present project conducted a broad assessment of potential nonproliferation applications where MPSs may provide new capabilities or significant performance enhancement (reported separately), which led to prioritization of several applications for detailed analysis. The applications prioritized were: cargo screening and interdiction of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), detection of hidden SNM, treaty/dismantlement verification, and spent fuel dry storage cask content verification. High resolution imaging for stockpile stewardship was considered as a sub-area of the treaty topic, as it is also of

  17. Germany and the nuclear non-proliferation; Current situation and prospects; Deutschland und die nukleare Nichtverbreitung; Zwischenbilanz und Ausblick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preisinger, J.

    1993-07-01

    A summary is given of the consequences, both positive and negative, of international non-proliferation policy. The numerous, complex branches and connections of national measures and inter-stake agreements for the peaceful, controlled uses of nuclear technology and related military technologies are expertly described, and assessed on their effectiveness. Weak aspects of the nuclear non-proliferation regime are pointed out and past reforms are illustrated and assessed in the light of recent developments. The interests of the German Federal Republic from the centre of this analysis. The author shows that, after a certain hesitary, German diplomacy has now become active in the establishment of an international non-proliferation regime. He concludes that Germany should take a strong initiative role in maintaining a peaceful international nuclear order. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wird ein Resuemee der bisherigen Erfolge und Misserfolge internationaler Nichtverbreitungspolitik gezogen. Die komplexen, vielfach veraestelten und verschachtelten nationalen Massnahmen und zwischenstaatlichen Vereinbarungen zur Ueberwachung und friedlichen Zweckbindung von Nukleartechnologie und militaerisch relevanten Anschlusstechnologien werden sachkundig erlaeutert und auf ihre Wirksamkeit ueberprueft. Schwachstellen des nuklearen Nichtverbreitungsregimes werden offengelegt, Reformschritte der vergangenen Jahre werden dargestellt und im Lichte der juengsten Entwicklungen bewertet. Dabei steht die Interessenlage der Bundesrepublik Deutschland im Zentrum der Analyse. Der Autor zeigt, dass die deutsche Diplomatie sich nach einer gewissen Zurueckhaltung schliesslich aktiv in die Gestaltung des internationalen Nichtverbreitungsregimes eingeschaltet hat. Er plaediert fuer eine kraftvolle Initiativrolle Deutschlands zur Erhaltung einer friedlichen internationalen Nuklearordnung. (orig.)

  18. Risk Assessment Using The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durling, R L; Price, D E; Spero, K K

    2005-06-06

    For over ten years, the Counterproliferation Analysis and Planning System (CAPS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a planning tool used by U.S. combatant commands for mission support planning against foreign programs engaged in the manufacture of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). CAPS is endorsed by the Secretary of Defense as the preferred counterproliferation tool to be used by the nation's armed services. A sister system, the Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS), is a new operational planning tool leveraging CAPS expertise designed to support the defense of the U.S. homeland. HOPS provides planners with a basis to make decisions to protect against acts of terrorism, focusing on the defense of facilities critical to U.S. infrastructure. Criticality of facilities, structures, and systems is evaluated on a composite matrix of specific projected casualty, economic, and sociopolitical impact bins. Based on these criteria, significant unidentified vulnerabilities are identified and secured. To provide insight into potential successes by malevolent actors, HOPS analysts strive to base their efforts mainly on unclassified open-source data. However, more cooperation is needed between HOPS analysts and facility representatives to provide an advantage to those whose task is to defend these facilities. Evaluated facilities include: refineries, major ports, nuclear power plants and other nuclear licensees, dams, government installations, convention centers, sports stadiums, tourist venues, and public and freight transportation systems. A generalized summary of analyses of U.S. infrastructure facilities will be presented.

  19. Use of the Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS) for Emergency Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durling, Jr., R L; Price, D E

    2005-12-16

    The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS), is a new operational planning tool leveraging Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's expertise in weapons systems and in sparse information analysis to support the defense of the U.S. homeland. HOPS provides planners with a basis to make decisions to protect against acts of terrorism, focusing on the defense of facilities critical to U.S. infrastructure. Criticality of facilities, structures, and systems is evaluated on a composite matrix of specific projected casualty, economic, and sociopolitical impact bins. Based on these criteria, significant unidentified vulnerabilities are identified and secured. To provide insight into potential successes by malevolent actors, HOPS analysts strive to base their efforts mainly on unclassified open-source data. However, more cooperation is needed between HOPS analysts and facility representatives to provide an advantage to those whose task is to defend these facilities. Evaluated facilities include: refineries, major ports, nuclear power plants and other nuclear licensees, dams, government installations, convention centers, sports stadiums, tourist venues, and public and freight transportation systems. A generalized summary of analyses of U.S. infrastructure facilities will be presented.

  20. Risk Assessment Using The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, D E; Durling, R L

    2005-10-10

    The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS), is a new operational planning tool leveraging Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's expertise in weapons systems and in sparse information analysis to support the defense of the U.S. homeland. HOPS provides planners with a basis to make decisions to protect against acts of terrorism, focusing on the defense of facilities critical to U.S. infrastructure. Criticality of facilities, structures, and systems is evaluated on a composite matrix of specific projected casualty, economic, and sociopolitical impact bins. Based on these criteria, significant unidentified vulnerabilities are identified and secured. To provide insight into potential successes by malevolent actors, HOPS analysts strive to base their efforts mainly on unclassified open-source data. However, more cooperation is needed between HOPS analysts and facility representatives to provide an advantage to those whose task is to defend these facilities. Evaluated facilities include: refineries, major ports, nuclear power plants and other nuclear licensees, dams, government installations, convention centers, sports stadiums, tourist venues, and public and freight transportation systems. A generalized summary of analyses of U.S. infrastructure facilities will be presented.