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Sample records for nonpolar algan quantum

  1. Efficiency droop in nonpolar InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Lukas; Schwarz, Ulrich [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Angewandte Festkoerperphysik (IAF), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Institut fuer Mikrosystemtechnik (IMTEK), Universitaet Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Wernicke, Tim; Rass, Jens; Ploch, Simon [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut (FBH), Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut (FBH), Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    InGaN quantum wells (QWs) exhibit a decline of the internal efficiency at high charge carrier excitation. This has been observed for polar as well as for semipolar and nonpolar oriented QWs. Polar stands for the (0001) growth direction with strong piezoelectric fields. Due to the vanishing fields, the orthogonal growth directions (a or m) are called nonpolar, while all directions between are merged as semipolar orientations. In contrast to the polar and many semipolar QWs, nonpolar InGaN QWs provide a special property: optical polarization of the radiative transitions, which is a result of the anisotropic strain within pseudomorphic grown nonpolar QWs. Using this property, the broadened effective emission can be resolved into two fundamental transitions. They are spectrally separated by a defined energy which corresponds to the energy distance of the valence subbands. We studied nonpolar InGaN/InGaN Multi-QWs grown on low defect density GaN substrates with a setup for confocal microscopy. To reach high excitation densities of charge carriers, we use either a combination of an UV laser and highly focusing objectives or an electric pulse generator. The emission is spectrally analysed and compared to established models.

  2. Photoluminescence efficiency in AlGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamulaitis, G.; Mickevičius, J. [Institute of Applied Research and Semiconductor Physics Department, Vilnius University, Sauletekio av. 9-III, Vilnius LT-10222 (Lithuania); Jurkevičius, J., E-mail: jonas.jurkevicius@ff.vu.lt [Institute of Applied Research and Semiconductor Physics Department, Vilnius University, Sauletekio av. 9-III, Vilnius LT-10222 (Lithuania); Shur, M.S. [Department of ECE and CIE, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (United States); Shatalov, M.; Yang, J.; Gaska, R. [Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc. (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy of AlGaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells under quasi-steady-state conditions in the temperature range from 8 to 300 K revealed a strong dependence of droop onset threshold on temperature that was explained by the influence of carrier delocalization. The delocalization at room temperature results predominantly in enhancement of bimolecular radiative recombination, while being favorable for enhancement of nonradiative recombination at low temperatures. Studies of stimulated emission confirmed the strong influence of carrier localization on droop.

  3. Efficient charge carrier injection into sub-250 nm AlGaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehnke, Frank, E-mail: mehnke@physik.tu-berlin.de; Kuhn, Christian; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Kolbe, Tim; Rass, Jens; Wernicke, Tim [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Festkörperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, EW 6-1, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Kueller, Viola; Knauer, Arne; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Festkörperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, EW 6-1, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-08-04

    The design and Mg-doping profile of AlN/Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N electron blocking heterostructures (EBH) for AlGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting below 250 nm was investigated. By inserting an AlN electron blocking layer (EBL) into the EBH, we were able to increase the quantum well emission power and significantly reduce long wavelength parasitic luminescence. Furthermore, electron leakage was suppressed by optimizing the thickness of the AlN EBL while still maintaining sufficient hole injection. Ultraviolet (UV)-C LEDs with very low parasitic luminescence (7% of total emission power) and external quantum efficiencies of 0.19% at 246 nm have been realized. This concept was applied to AlGaN MQW LEDs emitting between 235 nm and 263 nm with external quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.002% to 0.93%. After processing, we were able to demonstrate an UV-C LED emitting at 234 nm with 14.5 μW integrated optical output power and an external quantum efficiency of 0.012% at 18.2 A/cm{sup 2}.

  4. Efficient charge carrier injection into sub-250 nm AlGaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehnke, Frank; Kuhn, Christian; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Kolbe, Tim; Rass, Jens; Wernicke, Tim; Kueller, Viola; Knauer, Arne; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus; Kneissl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The design and Mg-doping profile of AlN/Al 0.7 Ga 0.3 N electron blocking heterostructures (EBH) for AlGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting below 250 nm was investigated. By inserting an AlN electron blocking layer (EBL) into the EBH, we were able to increase the quantum well emission power and significantly reduce long wavelength parasitic luminescence. Furthermore, electron leakage was suppressed by optimizing the thickness of the AlN EBL while still maintaining sufficient hole injection. Ultraviolet (UV)-C LEDs with very low parasitic luminescence (7% of total emission power) and external quantum efficiencies of 0.19% at 246 nm have been realized. This concept was applied to AlGaN MQW LEDs emitting between 235 nm and 263 nm with external quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.002% to 0.93%. After processing, we were able to demonstrate an UV-C LED emitting at 234 nm with 14.5 μW integrated optical output power and an external quantum efficiency of 0.012% at 18.2 A/cm 2

  5. Onset of surface stimulated emission at 260 nm from AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaohang; Xie, Hongen; Ponce, Fernando A.; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated onset of deep-ultraviolet (DUV) surface stimulated emission (SE) from c-plane AlGaN multiple-quantum well (MQW) heterostructures grown on a sapphire substrate by optical pumping at room temperature. The onset of SE became observable at a pumping power density of 630 kW/cm 2 . Spectral deconvolution revealed superposition of a linearly amplified spontaneous emission peak at λ ∼ 257.0 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ∼12 nm and a superlinearly amplified SE peak at λ ∼ 260 nm with a narrow FWHM of less than 2 nm. In particular, the wavelength of ∼260 nm is the shortest wavelength of surface SE from III-nitride MQW heterostructures to date. Atomic force microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements were employed to investigate the material and structural quality of the AlGaN heterostructures, showing smooth surface and sharp layer interfaces. This study offers promising results for AlGaN heterostructures grown on sapphire substrates for the development of DUV vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs)

  6. Polarisation of the spontaneous emission from nonpolar and semipolar InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Lukas; Schwarz, Ulrich [Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg (IMTEK) (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (IAF) (Germany); Ploch, Simon; Wernicke, Tim [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Knauer, Arne; Hoffmann, Veit; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institute (FBH) (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institute (FBH) (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Spontaneously emitted light stemming from semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells is polarized. This property is a consequence of the broken in-plane symmetry of non c-plane wurtzite quantum wells. We studied the polarized photoluminescence of semipolar and nonpolar InGaN/InGaN multi quantum wells grown on low defect density GaN substrates with a setup for confocal microscopy. For excitation of charge carriers we use a 375 nm diode laser. The photoluminescence is collected with an objective of small NA, to avoid polarisation scrambling, and analyzed with a broadband polarizer and a spectrometer. The experimental results are compared to k.p band structure calculations for semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells. These simulations provide the polarisation degree of the confined states of the valence band and their energetic splitting. Next, from the thermal occupation the polarized spectra are calculated. The comparison with experimental results allows the determination of the valence subband splitting. Our experiments show a splitting of the two topmost valence subbands in nonpolar direction which is larger than predicted.

  7. Deformation potentials in AlGaN and InGaN alloys and their impact on optical polarization properties of nitride quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Łepkowski, S. P.; Gorczyca, I.; Stefańska-Skrobas, K.

    2013-01-01

    The deformation potentials acz−D1, act−D2, D3, D4, and D5 are determined for random AlGaN and InGaN alloys using electronic band structure calculations based on the density functional theory. A sublinear composition dependence is obtained for acz−D1 and D3 in AlGaN, and D3 in InGaN, whereas...... superlinear behavior on composition is found foract−D2, D4, and D5 in AlGaN, and act−D2and D5 in InGaN. The optical polarization properties of nitride quantum wells are very well described by the k·p method when the obtained deformation potentials are included. In m-plane AlGaN/AlN and InGaN/GaN quantum wells...

  8. On the increased efficiency in InGaN-based multiple quantum wells emitting at 530–590 nm with AlGaN interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koleske, D. D. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fischer, A. J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryant, B. N. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for High Technology Materials; Kotula, P. G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wierer, J. J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-07

    InGaN/AlGaN/GaN-based multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with AlGaN interlayers (ILs) are investigated, specifically to examine the fundamental mechanisms behind their increased radiative efficiency at wavelengths of 530–590 nm. The AlzGa1-zN (z~0.38) IL is ~1–2 nm thick, and is grown after and at the same growth temperature as the ~3 nm thick InGaN quantum well (QW). This is followed by an increase in temperature for the growth of a ~10 nm thick GaN barrier layer. The insertion of the AlGaN IL within the MQW provides various benefits. First, the AlGaN IL allows for growth of the InxGa1-xN QW well below typical growth temperatures to achieve higher x (up to~0.25). Second, annealing the IL capped QW prior to the GaN barrier growth improves the AlGaN IL smoothness as determined by atomic force microscopy, improves the InGaN/AlGaN/GaN interface quality as determined from scanning transmission electron microscope images and x-ray diffraction, and increases the radiative efficiency by reducing non-radiative defects as determined by time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. Finally, the AlGaN IL increases the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization induced electric fields acting on the InGaN QW, providing an additional red-shift to the emission wavelength as determined by Schrodinger-Poisson modeling and fitting to the experimental data. The relative impact of increased indium concentration and polarization fields on the radiative efficiency of MQWs with AlGaN ILs is also explored, along with implications to conventional longer wavelength emitters.

  9. Observations of Rabi oscillations in a non-polar InGaN quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Benjamin P. L.; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Taylor, Robert A.; Kocher, Claudius; Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Emery, Robert; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental observation of Rabi rotations between an exciton excited state and the crystal ground state in a single non-polar InGaN quantum dot is presented. The exciton excited state energy is determined by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy using two-photon excitation from a pulsed laser. The population of the exciton excited state is seen to undergo power dependent damped Rabi oscillations.

  10. Observations of Rabi oscillations in a non-polar InGaN quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Benjamin P. L., E-mail: benjamin.reid@physics.ox.ac.uk; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Taylor, Robert A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kocher, Claudius [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Konstanz University, Konstanz (Germany); Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Emery, Robert; Oliver, Rachel A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-30

    Experimental observation of Rabi rotations between an exciton excited state and the crystal ground state in a single non-polar InGaN quantum dot is presented. The exciton excited state energy is determined by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy using two-photon excitation from a pulsed laser. The population of the exciton excited state is seen to undergo power dependent damped Rabi oscillations.

  11. Polarization-dependent photoluminescence studies of semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Lukas; Schwarz, Ulrich [IAF, Freiburg (Germany); Wernicke, Tim; Weyers, Markus [FBH, Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [FBH, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Solid State Physics, TU Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Light emitted from optical devices based on semi- and nonpolar GaN quantum well (QW) structures is partially or totally polarized, as a consequence of crystal symmetry and band structure. This can be an additional advantage over polar (0001)GaN in specific applications, e.g. in LED backlighting. Fundamentally, the polarized emission stems from breaking the isotropic symmetry of the hexagonal c-plane, resulting in two discrete semi- and nonpolar directions (parallel and normal to the projection of (0001)). We use the k.p method to simulate the crystal-direction dependent emission. The resulting transition matrix elements assign a specific (partial) polarization for each subband. The thermal occupation of the subbands results in a temperature dependent effective polarization of the light emission. We study MOVPE grown homoepitactical polar, semi- and nonpolar samples, measuring the polarization properties of the resonantly excited photoluminescence from the QW. With the complete polarization of the subbands for nonpolar devices it is possible to measure the energetic difference of the first two valence band levels. In contrast to our calculations we find a higher degree of polarization also in semipolar directions. A possible explanation could be a higher energetic subband difference than computed.

  12. Strongly transverse-electric-polarized emission from deep ultraviolet AlGaN quantum well light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, Christoph, E-mail: Christoph.Reich@tu-berlin.de; Guttmann, Martin; Wernicke, Tim; Mehnke, Frank; Kuhn, Christian [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, Berlin 10623 (Germany); Feneberg, Martin; Goldhahn, Rüdiger [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, Otto-von-Guericke-Universität, Universitätsplatz 2, Magdeburg 39106 (Germany); Rass, Jens; Kneissl, Michael [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, Berlin 10623 (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, Berlin 12489 (Germany); Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Knauer, Arne; Kueller, Viola; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, Berlin 12489 (Germany)

    2015-10-05

    The optical polarization of emission from ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) based on (0001)-oriented Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N multiple quantum wells (MQWs) has been studied by simulations and electroluminescence measurements. With increasing aluminum mole fraction in the quantum well x, the in-plane intensity of transverse-electric (TE) polarized light decreases relative to that of the transverse-magnetic polarized light, attributed to a reordering of the valence bands in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N. Using k ⋅ p theoretical model calculations, the AlGaN MQW active region design has been optimized, yielding increased TE polarization and thus higher extraction efficiency for bottom-emitting LEDs in the deep UV spectral range. Using (i) narrow quantum wells, (ii) barriers with high aluminum mole fractions, and (iii) compressive growth on patterned aluminum nitride sapphire templates, strongly TE-polarized emission was observed at wavelengths as short as 239 nm.

  13. The atomic structure of polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells and the green gap problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, C.J., E-mail: colin.humphreys@msm.cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Griffiths, J.T., E-mail: jg641@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Tang, F., E-mail: ft274@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Oehler, F., E-mail: fabrice.oehler@lpn.cnrs.fr [CNRS/C2N, Paris Sud University, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott.findlay@monash.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Zheng, C., E-mail: changlin.zheng@monash.edu [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Etheridge, J., E-mail: joanne.etheridge@mcem.monash.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Martin, T.L., E-mail: tomas.martin@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Bagot, P.A.J., E-mail: paul.bagot@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Moody, M.P., E-mail: michael.moody@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Sutherland, D., E-mail: danny.sutherland@manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dawson, P., E-mail: philip.dawson@manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Schulz, S., E-mail: stefan.schulz@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings Complex, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); and others

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • We have studied the atomic structure of polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells. • The non-polar (11-20) InGaN quantum wells contain indium-rich clusters, unlike the polar (0001) quantum wells. • The electrons and holes in the quantum wells are localised by different mechanisms. - Abstract: We have used high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), aberration-corrected quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy (Q-STEM), atom probe tomography (APT) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to study the atomic structure of (0001) polar and (11-20) non-polar InGaN quantum wells (QWs). This paper provides an overview of the results. Polar (0001) InGaN in QWs is a random alloy, with In replacing Ga randomly. The InGaN QWs have atomic height interface steps, resulting in QW width fluctuations. The electrons are localised at the top QW interface by the built-in electric field and the well-width fluctuations, with a localisation energy of typically 20 meV. The holes are localised near the bottom QW interface, by indium fluctuations in the random alloy, with a localisation energy of typically 60 meV. On the other hand, the non-polar (11-20) InGaN QWs contain nanometre-scale indium-rich clusters which we suggest localise the carriers and produce longer wavelength (lower energy) emission than from random alloy non-polar InGaN QWs of the same average composition. The reason for the indium-rich clusters in non-polar (11-20) InGaN QWs is not yet clear, but may be connected to the lower QW growth temperature for the (11-20) InGaN QWs compared to the (0001) polar InGaN QWs.

  14. Impact of light polarization on photoluminescence intensity and quantum efficiency in AlGaN and AlInGaN layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzel, C.; Knauer, A.; Weyers, M.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed emission intensity, quantum efficiency, and emitted light polarization of c-plane AlGaN and AlInGaN layers (λ = 320-350 nm) by temperature dependent photoluminescence. Low indium content in AlInGaN structures causes a significant intensity increase by change of the polarization of the emitted light. Polarization changes from E ⊥ c to E ‖ c with increasing aluminum content. It switches back to E ⊥ c with the incorporation of indium. The polarization degree decreases with temperature. This temperature dependence can corrupt internal quantum efficiency determination by temperature dependent photoluminescence.

  15. Strain compensation in InGaN-based multiple quantum wells using AlGaN interlayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ahmed Al Muyeed

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Data are presented on strain compensation in InGaN-based multiple quantum wells (MQW using AlGaN interlayers (ILs. The MQWs consist of five periods of InxGa1-xN/AlyGa1-yN/GaN emitting in the green (λ ∼ 535 nm ± 15 nm, and the AlyGa1-yN IL has an Al composition of y = 0.42. The IL is varied from 0 - 2.1 nm, and the relaxation of the MQW with respect to the GaN template layer varies with IL thickness as determined by reciprocal space mapping about the (202¯5 reflection. The minimum in the relaxation occurs at an interlayer thickness of 1 nm, and the MQW is nearly pseudomorphic to GaN. Both thinner and thicker ILs display increased relaxation. Photoluminescence data shows enhanced spectral intensity and narrower full width at half maximum for the MQW with 1 nm thick ILs, which is a product of pseudomorphic layers with lower defect density and non-radiative recombination.

  16. Indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride quantum wells grown on polar and nonpolar gallium nitride substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kun-Yu

    Nonpolar (m-plane or a-plane) gallium nitride (GaN) is predicted to be a potential substrate material to improve luminous efficiencies of nitride-based quantum wells (QWs). Numerical calculations indicated that the spontaneous emission rate in a single In0.15Ga0.85N/GaN QW could be improved by ˜2.2 times if the polarization-induced internal field was avoided by epitaxial deposition on nonpolar substrates. A challenge for nonpolar GaN is the limited size (less than 10x10 mm2) of substrates, which was addressed by expansion during the regrowth by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE). Subsurface damage in GaN substrates were reduced by annealing with NH3 and N2 at 950°C for 60 minutes. It was additionally found that the variation of m-plane QWs' emission properties was significantly increased when the substrate miscut toward a-axis was increased from 0° to 0.1°. InGaN/GaN QWs were grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane and m-plane GaN substrates. The QWs were studied by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy with different incident electron beam probe currents (0.1 nA ˜ 1000 nA). Lower emission intensities and longer peak wavelengths from c-plane QWs were attributed to the Quantum-confined Stark Effect (QCSE). The emission intensity ratios of m-plane QWs to c-plane QWs decreased from 3.04 at 1 nA to 1.53 at 1000 nA. This was identified as the stronger screening effects of QCSE at higher current densities in c-plane QWs. To further investigate these effects in a fabricated structure, biased photoluminescence measurements were performed on m-plane InGaN/GaN QWs. The purpose was to detect the possible internal fields induced by the dot-like structure in the InGaN layer through the response of these internal fields under externally applied fields. No energy shifts of the QWs were observed, which was attributed to strong surface leakage currents.

  17. Comparative studies of efficiency droop in polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, M. J.; Dawson, P.; Hammersley, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Oliver, R. A. [Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-20

    We report on a comparative study of efficiency droop in polar and non-polar InGaN quantum well structures at T = 10 K. To ensure that the experiments were carried out with identical carrier densities for any particular excitation power density, we used laser pulses of duration ∼100 fs at a repetition rate of 400 kHz. For both types of structures, efficiency droop was observed to occur for carrier densities of above 7 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2 }pulse{sup −1} per quantum well; also both structures exhibited similar spectral broadening in the droop regime. These results show that efficiency droop is intrinsic in InGaN quantum wells, whether polar or non-polar, and is a function, specifically, of carrier density.

  18. Comparative studies of efficiency droop in polar and non-polar InGaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, M. J.; Dawson, P.; Hammersley, S.; Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Oliver, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a comparative study of efficiency droop in polar and non-polar InGaN quantum well structures at T = 10 K. To ensure that the experiments were carried out with identical carrier densities for any particular excitation power density, we used laser pulses of duration ∼100 fs at a repetition rate of 400 kHz. For both types of structures, efficiency droop was observed to occur for carrier densities of above 7 × 10 11  cm −2  pulse −1 per quantum well; also both structures exhibited similar spectral broadening in the droop regime. These results show that efficiency droop is intrinsic in InGaN quantum wells, whether polar or non-polar, and is a function, specifically, of carrier density.

  19. The nature of carrier localisation in polar and nonpolar InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, P., E-mail: philip.dawson@manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Photon Science Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Schulz, S. [Photonics Theory Group, Tyndall National Institute, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); Oliver, R. A.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Material Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-14

    In this paper, we compare and contrast the experimental data and the theoretical predictions of the low temperature optical properties of polar and nonpolar InGaN/GaN quantum well structures. In both types of structure, the optical properties at low temperatures are governed by the effects of carrier localisation. In polar structures, the effect of the in-built electric field leads to electrons being mainly localised at well width fluctuations, whereas holes are localised at regions within the quantum wells, where the random In distribution leads to local minima in potential energy. This leads to a system of independently localised electrons and holes. In nonpolar quantum wells, the nature of the hole localisation is essentially the same as the polar case but the electrons are now coulombically bound to the holes forming localised excitons. These localisation mechanisms are compatible with the large photoluminescence linewidths of the polar and nonpolar quantum wells as well as the different time scales and form of the radiative recombination decay curves.

  20. Localized surface plasmon enhanced deep UV-emitting of AlGaN based multi-quantum wells by Al nanoparticles on SiO2 dielectric interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ju; Wang, Shuai; Chen, Jingwen; Wu, Feng; Dai, Jiangnan; Long, Hanling; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Zhang, Jun; Du, Shida; Ye, Lei; Chen, Changqing

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we report a 2.6-fold deep ultraviolet emission enhancement of integrated photoluminescence (PL) intensity in AlGaN-based multi-quantum wells (MQWs) by introducing the coupling of local surface plasmons from Al nanoparticles (NPs) on a SiO2 dielectric interlayer with excitons and photons in MQWs at room temperature. In comparison to bare AlGaN MQWs, a significant 2.3-fold enhancement of the internal quantum efficiency, from 16% to 37%, as well as a 13% enhancement of photon extraction efficiency have been observed in the MQWs decorated with Al NPs on SiO2 dielectric interlayer. Polarization-dependent PL measurement showed that both the transverse electric and transverse magnetic mode were stronger than the original intensity in bare AlGaN MQWs, indicating a strong LSPs coupling process and vigorous scattering ability of the Al/SiO2 composite structure. These results were confirmed by the activation energy of non-radiative recombination from temperature-dependent PL measurement and the theoretical three dimensional finite difference time domain calculations.

  1. Non-polar InGaN quantum dot emission with crystal-axis oriented linear polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Benjamin P. L., E-mail: benjamin.reid@physics.ox.ac.uk; Chan, Christopher C. S.; Taylor, Robert A. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kocher, Claudius [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, Konstanz 78457 (Germany); Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Oliver, Rachel A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-27

    Polarization sensitive photoluminescence is performed on single non-polar InGaN quantum dots. The studied InGaN quantum dots are found to have linearly polarized emission with a common polarization direction defined by the [0001] crystal axis. Around half of ∼40 studied dots have a polarization degree of 1. For those lines with a polarization degree less than 1, we can resolve fine structure splittings between −800 μeV and +800 μeV, with no clear correlation between fine structure splitting and emission energy.

  2. Highly uniform ultraviolet-A quantum-confined AlGaN nanowire LEDs on metal/silicon with a TaN interlayer

    KAUST Repository

    Priante, Davide; Janjua, Bilal; Prabaswara, Aditya; Subedi, Ram Chandra; Elafandy, Rami T.; Lopatin, Sergei; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Zhao, Chao; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we describe ultraviolet-A (UV-A) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting at 325 nm based on a highly uniform structure of quantum-confined AlGaN quantum-disk nanowires (NWs). By incorporating a 20 nm TaN interlayer between a Ti pre-orienting layer and the silicon substrate, we eliminated the potential barrier for carrier injection and phonon transport, and inhibited the formation of interfacial silicide that led to device failure. Compared to previous reports on metal substrate, we achieved a 16 × reduction in root-mean-square (RMS) roughness, from 24 nm to 1.6 nm, for the samples with the Ti/TaN metal-bilayer, owing to the effective diffusion barrier characteristic of TaN. This was confirmed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We achieved a considerable increase in the injection current density (up to 90 A/cm2) compared to our previous studies, and an optical power of 1.9 μW for the 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 NWs-LED. This work provides a feasible pathway for both a reliable and stable UV-A device operation at elevated current injection, and eventually towards low-cost production of UV devices, leveraging on the scalability of silicon substrates.

  3. Highly uniform ultraviolet-A quantum-confined AlGaN nanowire LEDs on metal/silicon with a TaN interlayer

    KAUST Repository

    Priante, Davide

    2017-11-02

    In this paper, we describe ultraviolet-A (UV-A) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting at 325 nm based on a highly uniform structure of quantum-confined AlGaN quantum-disk nanowires (NWs). By incorporating a 20 nm TaN interlayer between a Ti pre-orienting layer and the silicon substrate, we eliminated the potential barrier for carrier injection and phonon transport, and inhibited the formation of interfacial silicide that led to device failure. Compared to previous reports on metal substrate, we achieved a 16 × reduction in root-mean-square (RMS) roughness, from 24 nm to 1.6 nm, for the samples with the Ti/TaN metal-bilayer, owing to the effective diffusion barrier characteristic of TaN. This was confirmed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We achieved a considerable increase in the injection current density (up to 90 A/cm2) compared to our previous studies, and an optical power of 1.9 μW for the 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 NWs-LED. This work provides a feasible pathway for both a reliable and stable UV-A device operation at elevated current injection, and eventually towards low-cost production of UV devices, leveraging on the scalability of silicon substrates.

  4. Impact of band structure and transition matrix elements on polarization properties of the photoluminescence of semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, L.; Schwarz, U.T. [Department of Microsystems Engineering, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (IAF), Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Wernicke, T. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Strasse 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Strasse 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Partial or full linear polarization is characteristic for the spontaneous emission of light from semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells. This property is an implication of the crystalline anisotropy as a basic property of the wurtzite structure. The influence of this anisotropy on the band structure and the transition matrix elements was calculated by a k.p-method for arbitrary quantum well orientations with respect to the c-axis; results are shown here in detail. Optical polarization is a direct consequence of a broken symmetry, mainly affecting the transition matrix elements from the conduction to the valence bands. Furthermore, the strain of the InGaN quantum well strongly depends on the crystal orientation of the substrate, resulting in a valence band mixing. The composition of the eigenfunctions has emerged to be most important for the polarization dependence of strained semipolar and nonpolar InGaN QW. The matrix elements, in combination with the thermal occupation of the bands, determine the polarization of the spontaneously emitted light. Our photoluminescence measurements of nonpolar QW match well with this model. However, in contrast to calculations with standard band parameters, the two topmost subbands show a larger separation in the emitted energy. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Luminescence of highly excited nonpolar a-plane GaN and AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jursenas, S.; Kuokstis, E.; Miasojedovas, S.; Kurilcik, G.; Zukauskas, A.; Chen, C.Q.; Yang, J.W.; Adivarahan, V.; Asif Khan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Carrier recombination dynamics in polar and nonpolar GaN epilayers and GaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells grown over sapphire substrates with a various crystallographic orientation were studied under high photoexcitation by 20 ps laser pulses. The transient luminescence featured a significant enhancement on nonradiative recombination of free carriers for nonpolar a-plane GaN epilayers compared to conventional c-plane samples. The epitaxial layer overgrowth technique was demonstrated to significantly improve the quality of nonpolar a-plane films. This was proved by more than 40-fold increase in luminescence decay time (430 ps compared to ≤ 10 ps in the ordinary a-plane epilayer). Under high-excitation regime, a complete screening of built-in electric field by free carriers in multiple quantum wells grown on c-plane and r-plane sapphire substrates was achieved. Under such high excitation, luminescence efficiency and carrier lifetime of multiple quantum wells were shown to be determined by the substrate quality. (author)

  6. Excitonic recombination dynamics in non-polar GaN/AlGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales, D.; Gil, B.; Bretagnon, T.; Guizal, B. [CNRS, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR 5221, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Université Montpellier 2, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR 5221, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Zhang, F.; Okur, S.; Monavarian, M.; Izyumskaya, N.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23238 (United States); Leach, J. H. [Kyma Technologies, Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States)

    2014-02-21

    The optical properties of GaN/Al{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}N multiple quantum wells are examined in 8 K–300 K temperature range. Both polarized CW and time resolved temperature-dependent photoluminescence experiment are performed so that we can deduce the relative contributions of the non-radiative and radiative recombination processes. From the calculation of the proportion of the excitonic population having wave vector in the light cone, we can deduce the variation of the radiative decay time with temperature. We find part of the excitonic population to be localized in concert with the report of Corfdir et al. (Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 2 52, 08JC01 (2013)) in case of a-plane quantum wells.

  7. Excitonic recombination dynamics in non-polar GaN/AlGaN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, D.; Gil, B.; Bretagnon, T.; Guizal, B.; Zhang, F.; Okur, S.; Monavarian, M.; Izyumskaya, N.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.; Leach, J. H.

    2014-02-01

    The optical properties of GaN/Al0.15Ga0.85N multiple quantum wells are examined in 8 K-300 K temperature range. Both polarized CW and time resolved temperature-dependent photoluminescence experiment are performed so that we can deduce the relative contributions of the non-radiative and radiative recombination processes. From the calculation of the proportion of the excitonic population having wave vector in the light cone, we can deduce the variation of the radiative decay time with temperature. We find part of the excitonic population to be localized in concert with the report of Corfdir et al. (Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 2 52, 08JC01 (2013)) in case of a-plane quantum wells.

  8. Excitonic recombination dynamics in non-polar GaN/AlGaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales, D.; Gil, B.; Bretagnon, T.; Guizal, B.; Zhang, F.; Okur, S.; Monavarian, M.; Izyumskaya, N.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.; Leach, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    The optical properties of GaN/Al 0.15 Ga 0.85 N multiple quantum wells are examined in 8 K–300 K temperature range. Both polarized CW and time resolved temperature-dependent photoluminescence experiment are performed so that we can deduce the relative contributions of the non-radiative and radiative recombination processes. From the calculation of the proportion of the excitonic population having wave vector in the light cone, we can deduce the variation of the radiative decay time with temperature. We find part of the excitonic population to be localized in concert with the report of Corfdir et al. (Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 2 52, 08JC01 (2013)) in case of a-plane quantum wells

  9. Onset of surface stimulated emission at 260 nm from AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Xiaohang; Xie, Hongen; Ponce, Fernando A.; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated onset of deep-ultraviolet (DUV) surface stimulated emission (SE) from c-plane AlGaNmultiple-quantum well(MQW)heterostructuresgrown on a sapphire substrate by optical pumping at room temperature. The onset of SE became observable at a

  10. Onset of surface stimulated emission at 260 nm from AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Xiaohang

    2015-12-14

    We demonstrated onset of deep-ultraviolet (DUV) surface stimulated emission (SE) from c-plane AlGaNmultiple-quantum well(MQW)heterostructuresgrown on a sapphire substrate by optical pumping at room temperature. The onset of SE became observable at a pumping power density of 630 kW/cm2. Spectral deconvolution revealed superposition of a linearly amplified spontaneous emission peak at λ ∼ 257.0 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ∼12 nm and a superlinearly amplified SE peak at λ ∼ 260 nm with a narrow FWHM of less than 2 nm. In particular, the wavelength of ∼260 nm is the shortest wavelength of surface SE from III-nitride MQWheterostructures to date. Atomic force microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements were employed to investigate the material and structural quality of the AlGaNheterostructures, showing smooth surface and sharp layer interfaces. This study offers promising results for AlGaNheterostructuresgrown on sapphire substrates for the development of DUV vertical cavity surface emitting lasers(VCSELs).

  11. High power AlGaN ultraviolet light emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatalov, Max; Sun, Wenhong; Jain, Rakesh; Lunev, Alex; Hu, Xuhong; Dobrinsky, Alex; Bilenko, Yuri; Yang, Jinwei; Gaska, Remis; Garrett, Gregory A; Rodak, Lee E; Wraback, Michael; Shur, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We present the analysis of the external quantum efficiency in AlGaN deep ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on sapphire substrates and discuss factors affecting the output power of DUV LEDs. Performance of the LED is related to optimization of the device structure design and improvements of the epitaxial material quality. (invited article)

  12. High power AlGaN ultraviolet light emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatalov, Max; Sun, Wenhong; Jain, Rakesh; Lunev, Alex; Hu, Xuhong; Dobrinsky, Alex; Bilenko, Yuri; Yang, Jinwei; Garrett, Gregory A.; Rodak, Lee E.; Wraback, Michael; Shur, Michael; Gaska, Remis

    2014-06-01

    We present the analysis of the external quantum efficiency in AlGaN deep ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on sapphire substrates and discuss factors affecting the output power of DUV LEDs. Performance of the LED is related to optimization of the device structure design and improvements of the epitaxial material quality.

  13. Broadband biphoton generation and statistics of quantum light in the UV-visible range in an AlGaN microring resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leonardis, Francesco; Soref, Richard A; Soltani, Mohammad; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2017-09-12

    We present a physical investigation on the generation of correlated photon pairs that are broadly spaced in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible spectrum on a AlGaN/AlN integrated photonic platform which is optically transparent at these wavelengths. Using spontaneous four wave mixing (SFWM) in an AlGaN microring resonator, we show design techniques to satisfy the phase matching condition between the optical pump, the signal, and idler photon pairs, a condition which is essential and is a key hurdle when operating at short wavelength due to the strong normal dispersion of the material. Such UV-visible photon pairs are quite beneficial for interaction with qubit ions that are mostly in this wavelength range, and will enable heralding the photon-ion interaction. As a target application example, we present the systematic AlGaN microresonator design for generating signal and idler photon pairs using a blue wavelength pump, while the signal appears at the transition of ytterbium ion ( 171 Yb + , 369.5 nm) and the idler appears in the far blue or green range. The photon pairs have minimal crosstalk to the pump power due to their broad spacing in spectral wavelength, thereby relaxing the design of on-chip integrated filters for separating pump, signal and idler.

  14. InGaN nanoinclusions in an AlGaN matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizov, V. S.; Tsatsul'nikov, A. F.; Lundin, V. V.

    2008-01-01

    GaN-based structures with InGaN quantum dots in the active region emitting in the near-ultraviolet region are studied. In this study, two types of structures, namely, with InGaN quantum dots in a GaN or AlGaN matrix, are compared. Photoluminescence spectra are obtained for both types of structures in a temperature range of 80-300 K and at various pumping densities, and electroluminescence spectra are obtained for light-emitting (LED) structures with various types of active region. It is shown that the structures with quantum dots in the AlGaN matrix are more stable thermally due to the larger localization energy compared with quantum dots in the GaN matrix. Due to this, the LED structures with quantum dots in an AlGaN matrix are more effective.

  15. Reduction of basal plane defects in (11-22) semipolar InGaN/GaN MQWs fabricated on patterned (113) Si substrates by introducing AlGaN barrier layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesugi, Kenjiro; Hikosaka, Toshiki; Ono, Hiroshi; Sakano, Tatsunori; Nunoue, Shinya [Corporate Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki (Japan)

    2017-08-15

    GaN grown on nonpolar or semipolar faces have been widely developed as a promising material for the next generation optical and electronic devices. In this work, (11-22) semipolar InGaN/GaN MQWs were grown on patterned (113) Si substrates and fabricated into thin-film-type flip-chip LEDs. From CL and TEM measurement, generation of basal plane defects (BPDs) around MQWs and Strain-relaxation layers (SRLs) has been observed. The relationship between MQW structures and formation of BPDs has been investigated. By optimizing MQW structures, light output power and external quantum efficiency have been improved with thick InGaN well layers and GaN barrier layers. Introducing AlGaN barrier layers has enabled further reduction of BPDs in MQWs and, as a result, an enhancement of EQE has been achieved. The maximum EQE value of the sample with AlGaN barrier layers was 12.9%.This result indicates that the reduction of BPDs is an effective approach for obtaining the high-efficiency semipolar LEDs on Si substrates. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Quantified Hole Concentration in AlGaN Nanowires for High-Performance Ultraviolet Emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao; Ebaid, Mohamed; Zhang, Huafan; Priante, Davide; Janjua, Bilal; Zhang, Daliang; Wei, Nini; Alhamoud, Abdullah; Shakfa, M. Khaled; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2018-01-01

    P-type doping in wide bandgap and new classes of ultra-wide bandgap materials has long been a scientific and engineering problem. The challenges arise from the large activation energy of dopants and high densities of dislocations in materials. We report here, a significantly enhanced p-type conduction using high-quality AlGaN nanowires. For the first time, the hole concentration in Mg-doped AlGaN nanowires is quantified. The incorporation of Mg into AlGaN was verified by correlation with photoluminescence and Raman measurements. The open-circuit potential measurements further confirmed the p-type conductivity; while Mott-Schottky experiments measured a hole concentration of 1.3×1019 cm-3. These results from photoelectrochemical measurements allow us to design prototype ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) incorporating the AlGaN quantum-disks-in-nanowire and optimized p-type AlGaN contact layer for UV-transparency. The ~335-nm LEDs exhibited a low turn-on voltage of 5 V with a series resistance of 32 Ω, due to the efficient p-type doping of the AlGaN nanowires. The bias-dependent Raman measurements further revealed the negligible self-heating of devices. This study provides an attractive solution to evaluate electrical properties of AlGaN, which is applicable to other wide bandgap nanostructures. Our results are expected to open doors to new applications for wide and ultra-wide bandgap materials.

  17. Quantified Hole Concentration in AlGaN Nanowires for High-Performance Ultraviolet Emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2018-05-29

    P-type doping in wide bandgap and new classes of ultra-wide bandgap materials has long been a scientific and engineering problem. The challenges arise from the large activation energy of dopants and high densities of dislocations in materials. We report here, a significantly enhanced p-type conduction using high-quality AlGaN nanowires. For the first time, the hole concentration in Mg-doped AlGaN nanowires is quantified. The incorporation of Mg into AlGaN was verified by correlation with photoluminescence and Raman measurements. The open-circuit potential measurements further confirmed the p-type conductivity; while Mott-Schottky experiments measured a hole concentration of 1.3×1019 cm-3. These results from photoelectrochemical measurements allow us to design prototype ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) incorporating the AlGaN quantum-disks-in-nanowire and optimized p-type AlGaN contact layer for UV-transparency. The ~335-nm LEDs exhibited a low turn-on voltage of 5 V with a series resistance of 32 Ω, due to the efficient p-type doping of the AlGaN nanowires. The bias-dependent Raman measurements further revealed the negligible self-heating of devices. This study provides an attractive solution to evaluate electrical properties of AlGaN, which is applicable to other wide bandgap nanostructures. Our results are expected to open doors to new applications for wide and ultra-wide bandgap materials.

  18. Low threshold for optical damage in AlGaN epilayers and heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Tanuj [Department of ECSE, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Tamulaitis, Gintautas [Institute of Applied Research and Semiconductor Physics Department, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 9-III, Vilnius, LT-10222 (Lithuania); Shatalov, Max; Yang, Jinwei; Gaska, Remis [Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc., 1195 Atlas Road, Columbia, South Carolina 29209 (United States); Shur, Michael S. [Department of ECSE, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Department of PAPA, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2013-11-28

    Laser pulses with duration much shorter than the effective carrier lifetime cause permanent photoluminescence (PL) quenching and enhancement of PL decay rate in bare-faceted and capped AlGaN epilayers and multiple quantum wells at pulse energies about an order of magnitude lower than those causing the surface to melt and degrade. In contrast, GaN epilayers exhibit no photomodification in the same excitation intensity range. PL spectra and decay kinetics show that lattice heating is not responsible for the observed changes in AlGaN, which result from the formation of nonradiative recombination centers via recombination-enhanced defect reactions occurring at high nonequilibrium carrier densities.

  19. Frequency up-conversion in nonpolar a-plane GaN/AlGaN based multiple quantum wells optimized for applications with silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radosavljević, S.; Radovanović, J., E-mail: radovanovic@etf.bg.ac.rs; Milanović, V. [School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar kralja Aleksandra 73, 11200 Belgrade (Serbia); Tomić, S. [Joule Physics Laboratory, School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Manchester M5 4WT (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-21

    We have described a method for structural parameters optimization of GaN/AlGaN multiple quantum well based up-converter for silicon solar cells. It involves a systematic tuning of individual step quantum wells by use of the genetic algorithm for global optimization. In quantum well structures, the up-conversion process can be achieved by utilizing nonlinear optical effects based on intersubband transitions. Both single and double step quantum wells have been tested in order to maximize the second order susceptibility derived from the density matrix formalism. The results obtained for single step wells proved slightly better and have been further pursued to obtain a more complex design, optimized for conversion of an entire range of incident photon energies.

  20. EDITORIAL: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung; Kneissl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Throughout the history of group-III-nitride materials and devices, scientific breakthroughs and technological advances have gone hand-in-hand. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the discovery of the nucleation of smooth (0001) GaN films on c-plane sapphire and the activation of p-dopants in GaN led very quickly to the realization of high-brightness blue and green LEDs, followed by the first demonstration of GaN-based violet laser diodes in the mid 1990s. Today, blue InGaN LEDs boast record external quantum efficiencies exceeding 80% and the emission wavelength of the InGaN-based laser diode has been pushed into the green spectral range. Although these tremenduous advances have already spurred multi-billion dollar industries, there are still a number of scientific questions and technological issues that are unanswered. One key challenge is related to the polar nature of the III-nitride wurtzite crystal. Until a decade ago all research activities had almost exclusively concentrated on (0001)-oriented polar GaN layers and heterostructures. Although the device characteristics seem excellent, the strong polarization fields at GaN heterointerfaces can lead to a significant deterioration of the device performance. Triggered by the first demonstration non-polar GaN quantum wells grown on LiAlO2 by Waltereit and colleagues in 2000, impressive advances in the area of non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors and devices have been achieved. Today, a large variety of heterostructures free of polarization fields and exhibiting exceptional electronic and optical properties have been demonstrated, and the fundamental understanding of polar, semipolar and non-polar nitrides has made significant leaps forward. The contributions in this Semiconductor Science and Technology special issue on non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors provide an impressive and up-to-date cross-section of all areas of research and device physics in this field. The articles cover a wide range of

  1. Hydrogen Generation using non-polar coaxial InGaN/GaN Multiple Quantum Well Structure Formed on Hollow n-GaN Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Hyeon; Mandal, Arjun; Kang, San; Chatterjee, Uddipta; Kim, Jin Soo; Park, Byung-Guon; Kim, Moon-Deock; Jeong, Kwang-Un; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2016-08-24

    This article demonstrates for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the merits of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown on hollow n-GaN nanowires (NWs) as a plausible alternative for stable photoelectrochemical water splitting and efficient hydrogen generation. These hollow nanowires are achieved by a growth method rather not by conventional etching process. Therefore this approach becomes simplistic yet most effective. We believe relatively low Ga flux during the selective area growth (SAG) aids the hollow nanowire to grow. To compare the optoelectronic properties, simultaneously solid nanowires are also studied. In this present communication, we exhibit that lower thermal conductivity of hollow n-GaN NWs affects the material quality of InGaN/GaN MQWs by limiting In diffusion. As a result of this improvement in material quality and structural properties, photocurrent and photosensitivity are enhanced compared to the structures grown on solid n-GaN NWs. An incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) of around ~33.3% is recorded at 365 nm wavelength for hollow NWs. We believe that multiple reflections of incident light inside the hollow n-GaN NWs assists in producing a larger amount of electron hole pairs in the active region. As a result the rate of hydrogen generation is also increased.

  2. Nonpolar solvation dynamics for a nonpolar solute in room ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandipa Indra

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... Keywords. Solvation dynamics; nonpolar solvation; ionic liquid; molecular dynamics; linear response theory. 1. ... J. Chem. Sci. (2018) 130:3 spectrum of the excited probe molecule for imida- .... Therefore, the solute and the RTIL ions interact only ... interval of 30 ps from a long equilibrium trajectory of dura-.

  3. Enhancement of Hole Confinement by Monolayer Insertion in Asymmetric Quantum-Barrier UVB Light Emitting Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; El-Desouki, M. M.; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2014-01-01

    We study the enhanced hole confinement by having a large bandgap AlGaN monolayer insertion (MLI) between the quantum well (QW) and the quantum barrier (QB). The numerical analysis examines the energy band alignment diagrams, using a self

  4. Enhancing the Light-Extraction Efficiency of AlGaN Nanowires Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diode by using Nitride/Air Distributed Bragg Reflector Nanogratings

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal; Janjua, Bilal; Zhao, Chao; Priante, Davide; Alhamoud, Abdullah A.; Tangi, Malleswararao; Alanazi, Lafi M.; Alatawi, Abdullah A.; Albadri, Abdulrahman M.; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    The performance and efficiency of AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes have been limited by the extremely low light-extraction efficiency (LEE) due to the intrinsic material properties of AlGaN. Here, to enhance the LEE of the device, we demonstrate an AlGaN nanowires light-emitting diode (NWs-LED) integrated with nitride/air Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) nanogratings. Compared to a control device (only mesa), the AlGaN NWs-LED with the nitride/air DBR nanogratings exhibit enhancement in the light output power and external quantum efficiency (EQE) by a factor of ∼1.67. The higher light output power and EQE are attributed mainly to the multiple reflectances laterally for the transverse magnetic (TM)-polarized light and scattering introduced by the nanogratings. To further understand the LEE enhancement, the electrical field distribution, extraction ratio and polar pattern of the AlGaN NWs-LED with and without the nitride/air DBR nanogratings were analyzed using the finite-difference-time-domain method. It was observed that the TM-field emission was confined and scattered upward whereas the polar pattern was intensified for the AlGaN NWs-LED with the nanogratings. Our approach to enhance the LEE via the nitride/air DBR nanogratings can provide a promising route for increasing the efficiency of AlGaN-based LEDs, also, to functioning as facet mirror for AlGaN-based laser diodes.

  5. Enhancing the Light-Extraction Efficiency of AlGaN Nanowires Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diode by using Nitride/Air Distributed Bragg Reflector Nanogratings

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2017-09-11

    The performance and efficiency of AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes have been limited by the extremely low light-extraction efficiency (LEE) due to the intrinsic material properties of AlGaN. Here, to enhance the LEE of the device, we demonstrate an AlGaN nanowires light-emitting diode (NWs-LED) integrated with nitride/air Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) nanogratings. Compared to a control device (only mesa), the AlGaN NWs-LED with the nitride/air DBR nanogratings exhibit enhancement in the light output power and external quantum efficiency (EQE) by a factor of ∼1.67. The higher light output power and EQE are attributed mainly to the multiple reflectances laterally for the transverse magnetic (TM)-polarized light and scattering introduced by the nanogratings. To further understand the LEE enhancement, the electrical field distribution, extraction ratio and polar pattern of the AlGaN NWs-LED with and without the nitride/air DBR nanogratings were analyzed using the finite-difference-time-domain method. It was observed that the TM-field emission was confined and scattered upward whereas the polar pattern was intensified for the AlGaN NWs-LED with the nanogratings. Our approach to enhance the LEE via the nitride/air DBR nanogratings can provide a promising route for increasing the efficiency of AlGaN-based LEDs, also, to functioning as facet mirror for AlGaN-based laser diodes.

  6. Status of backthinned AlGaN based focal plane arrays for deep-UV imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverchon, J.-L.; Lehoucq, G.; Truffer, J.-P.; Costard, E.; Frayssinet, E.; Semond, F.; Duboz, J.-Y.; Giuliani, A.; Réfrégiers, M.; Idir, M.

    2017-11-01

    The achievement of deep ultraviolet (UV) focal plane arrays (FPA) is required for both solar physics [1] and micro electronics industry. The success of solar mission (SOHO, STEREO [2], SDO [3]…), has shown the accuracy of imaging at wavelengths from 10 nm to 140 nm to reveal effects occurring in the sun corona. Deep UV steppers at 13 nm are another demanding imaging technology for the microelectronic industry in terms of uniformity and stability. A third application concerns beam shaping of Synchrotron lines [4]. Consequently, such wavelengths are of prime importance whereas the vacuum UV wavelengths are very difficult to detect due to the dramatic interaction of light with materials. The fast development of nitrides has given the opportunity to investigate AlGaN as a material for UV detection. Camera based on AlGaN present an intrinsic spectral selectivity and an extremely low dark current at room temperature. We have previously presented several FPA dedicated to deep UV based on 320 x 256 pixels of Schottky photodiodes with a pitch of 30 μm [4, 5]. AlGaN is grown on a silicon substrate instead of sapphire substrate only transparent down to 200 nm. After a flip-chip hybridization, silicon substrate and AlGaN basal layer was removed by dry etching. Then, the spectral responsivity of the FPA presented a quantum efficiency (QE) from 5% to 20% from 50 nm to 290 nm when removing the highly doped contact layer via a selective wet etching. This FPA suffered from a low uniformity incompatible with imaging, and a long time response due to variations of conductivity in the honeycomb. We also observed a low rejection of visible. It is probably due to the same honeycomb conductivity enhancement for wavelength shorter than 360 nm, i.e., the band gap of GaN. We will show hereafter an improved uniformity due to the use of a precisely ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma) controlled process. The final membrane thickness is limited to the desertion layer. Neither access resistance

  7. Heavy Mg-doping of (Al,Ga)N films for potential applications in deep ultraviolet light-emitting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y. H.; Towe, E.

    2018-03-01

    Doping of high aluminum-containing (Al,Ga)N thin films has remained a challenging problem that has hindered progress in the development of deep ultraviolet light-emitters. This paper reports on the synthesis and use of heavily doped (Al,Ga)N films in deep ultraviolet (˜274 nm) light-emitting structures; these structures were synthesized by molecular beam epitaxy under liquid-metal growth conditions that facilitate the incorporation of extremely high density of Mg dopant impurities (up to 5 × 1019 cm-3) into aluminum-rich (Al,Ga)N thin films. Prototypical light-emitting diode structures incorporating Al0.7Ga0.3N films doped with Mg impurities that ionize to give free hole carrier concentrations of up to 6 × 1017 cm-3 exhibit external quantum efficiencies of up 0.56%; this is an improvement from previous devices made from molecular beam epitaxy-grown materials. This improvement is believed to be due to the high hole carrier concentration enabled by the relatively low activation energy of 220 meV compared to the expected values of 408-507 meV for Al0.7Ga0.3N films.

  8. Growth of (20 anti 21)AlGaN, GaN and InGaN by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploch, S.; Wernicke, T.; Rass, J.; Pristovsek, M. [TU Berlin, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [TU Berlin, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Green InGaN-based laser diodes on (20 anti 21)GaN substrates have recently demonstrated performances exceeding those of conventional (0001) oriented devices. However little is known regarding the growth parameters. We have investigated growth of AlGaN, GaN and InGaN on (20 anti 21)GaN substrates by MOVPE. Smooth GaN layers with a rms roughness <0.5 nm were obtained by low growth temperatures and reactor pressures. The layers exhibit undulations along [10 anti 14] similar to the GaN substrate. AlGaN and InGaN layers exhibit an increased surface roughness. Undulation bunching was observed and attributed to reduced adatom surface mobility due to the binding energy of Al and the low growth temperature for InGaN respectively or strain relaxation. AlGaN and InGaN heterostructures on (20 anti 21)GaN relax by layer tilt accompanied by formation of misfit dislocations, due to shear strain of the unit cell. This relaxation mechanism leads to a reduced critical layer thickness of (20 anti 21)AlGaN layers and InGaN multi quantum wells (MQW) in comparison to (0001). PL spectral broadening of 230 meV of (20 anti 21)InGaN single QWs emitting at 415 nm can be reduced by increased growth temperature or increased number of QWs with reduced thickness.

  9. AlGaN nanocolumns and AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristic, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.A.; Ulloa, J.M.; Calleja, E. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Paramo, J.; Calleja, J.M. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Jahn, U.; Trampert, A.; Ploog, K.H. [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    This work reports on the characterization of hexagonal, single crystal AlGaN nanocolumns with diameters in the range of 30 to 100 nm grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates. The change of the flux ratio between the Al and the total III-element controls the alloy composition. The Al composition trend versus the Al flux is consistent both with the E{sub 2} phonon energy values measured by inelastic light scattering and the luminescence emission peaks position. High quality low dimensional AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN heterostructures with five GaN quantum discs, 2 and 4 nm thick, embedded into the AlGaN columns, were designed in order to study the quantum confinement effects. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Colloidosomes formed by nonpolar/polar/nonpolar nanoball amphiphiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hung-Yu; Sheng, Yu-Jane, E-mail: yjsheng@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: hktsao@cc.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tu, Sheng-Hung [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong, E-mail: yjsheng@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: hktsao@cc.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering and Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-07

    Fullerene-based amphiphiles are able to form bilayer vesicles in aqueous solution. In this study, the self-assembly behavior of polymer-tethered nanoballs (NBs) with nonpolar/polar/nonpolar (n-p-n{sup ′}) motif in a selective solvent is investigated by dissipative particle dynamics. A model NB bears two hydrophobic polymeric arms (n{sup ′}-part) tethered on an extremely hydrophobic NB (n-part) with hydrophilic patch (p-part) patterned on its surface. Dependent on the hydrophobicity and length of tethered arms, three types of aggregates are exhibited, including NB vesicle, core-shell micelle, and segmented-worm. NB vesicles are developed for a wide range of hydrophobic arm lengths. The presence of tethered arms perturbs the bilayer structure formed by NBs. The structural properties including the order parameter, membrane thickness, and area density of the inner leaflet decrease with increasing the arm length. These results indicate that for NBs with longer arms, the extent of interdigitation in the membrane rises so that the overcrowded arms in the inner corona are relaxed. The transport and mechanical properties are evaluated as well. As the arm length grows, the permeability increases significantly because the steric bulk of tethered arms loosens the packing of NBs. By contrast, the membrane tension decreases owing to the reduction of NB/solvent contacts by the polymer corona. Although fusion can reduce membrane tension, NB vesicles show strong resistance to fusion. Moreover, the size-dependent behavior observed in small liposomes is not significant for NB vesicles due to isotropic geometry of NB. Our simulation results are consistent with the experimental findings.

  11. Photophysical properties of coumarin-120: Unusual behavior in nonpolar solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Haridas; Nad, Sanjukta; Kumbhakar, Manoj

    2003-01-01

    Photophysical properties of coumarin-120 (C120; 7-amino-4-methyl-1,2-benzopyrone) dye have been investigated in different solvents using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and picosecond laser flash photolysis (LFP) and nanosecond pulse radiolysis (PR) techniques. C120 shows unusual photophysical properties in nonpolar solvents compared to those in other solvents of moderate to higher polarities. Where the Stokes shifts (Δν-bar=ν-bar abs -ν-bar fl ), fluorescence quantum yields (Φ f ), and fluorescence lifetimes (τ f ) show more or less linear correlation with the solvent polarity function Δf={(ε-1)/(2ε+1)-(n 2 -1)/(2n 2 +1)}, all these parameters are unusually lower in nonpolar solvents. Unlike in other solvents, both Φ f and τ f in nonpolar solvents are also strongly temperature dependent. It is indicated that the excited singlet (S 1 ) state of C120 undergoes a fast activation-controlled nonradiative deexcitation in nonpolar solvents, which is absent in all other solvents. LFP and PR studies indicate that the intersystem crossing process is negligible for the present dye in all the solvents studied. Photophysical behavior of C120 in nonpolar solvent has been rationalized assuming that in these solvents the dye exists in a nonpolar structure, with its 7-NH 2 group in a pyramidal configuration. In this structure, since the 7-NH 2 group is bonded to the 1,2-benzopyrone moiety by a single bond, the former group can undergo a fast flip-flop motion, which in effect causes the fast nonradiative deexcitation of the dye excited state. In moderate to higher polarity solvents, it is indicated that the dye exists in an intramolecular charge-transfer structure, where the bond between 7-NH 2 group and the 1,2-benzopyrone moiety attains substantial double bond character. In this structure, the flip-flop motion of the 7-NH 2 group is highly restricted and thus there is no fast nonradiative deexcitation process for the excited dye

  12. Thermodynamic photoinduced disorder in AlGaN nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Alfaraj, Nasir; Muhammed, Mufasila Mumthaz; Li, Kuang-Hui; Janjua, Bilal; Aljefri, Renad A.; Sun, Haiding; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.; Roqan, Iman S.; Li, Xiaohang

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we examine thermodynamic photoinduced disorder in AlGaN nanowires through their steady-state and transient photoluminescence properties. We correlate the energy exchange during the photoexcitation and photoemission processes of the light–solid reaction and the generation of photoinduced entropy of the nanowires using temperature-dependent (6 K to 290 K) photoluminescence. We observed an oscillatory trend in the generated entropy of the system below 200 K, with an oscillation frequency that was significantly lower than what we have previously observed in InGaN/GaN nanowires. In contrast to the sharp increase in generated entropy at temperatures close to room temperature in InGaN/GaN nanowires, an insignificant increase was observed in AlGaN nanowires, indicating lower degrees of disorder-induced uncertainty in the wider bandgap semiconductor. We conjecture that the enhanced atomic ordering in AlGaN caused lower degrees of disorder-induced uncertainty related to the energy of states involved in thermionic transitions; in keeping with this conjecture, we observed lower oscillation frequency below 200 K and a stable behavior in the generated entropy at temperatures close to room temperature.

  13. Thermodynamic photoinduced disorder in AlGaN nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Alfaraj, Nasir

    2017-12-13

    In this study, we examine thermodynamic photoinduced disorder in AlGaN nanowires through their steady-state and transient photoluminescence properties. We correlate the energy exchange during the photoexcitation and photoemission processes of the light–solid reaction and the generation of photoinduced entropy of the nanowires using temperature-dependent (6 K to 290 K) photoluminescence. We observed an oscillatory trend in the generated entropy of the system below 200 K, with an oscillation frequency that was significantly lower than what we have previously observed in InGaN/GaN nanowires. In contrast to the sharp increase in generated entropy at temperatures close to room temperature in InGaN/GaN nanowires, an insignificant increase was observed in AlGaN nanowires, indicating lower degrees of disorder-induced uncertainty in the wider bandgap semiconductor. We conjecture that the enhanced atomic ordering in AlGaN caused lower degrees of disorder-induced uncertainty related to the energy of states involved in thermionic transitions; in keeping with this conjecture, we observed lower oscillation frequency below 200 K and a stable behavior in the generated entropy at temperatures close to room temperature.

  14. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solution based upon a mixed quantum-classical approximation. II. Proton transfer reaction in non-polar solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, H.; Yamada, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2015-05-01

    The intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in neon solvent has been investigated by mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations and fully classical molecular dynamics (FCMD) calculations. Comparing these calculated results with those for malonaldehyde in water reported in Part I [A. Yamada, H. Kojima, and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 084509 (2014)], the solvent dependence of the reaction rate, the reaction mechanism involved, and the quantum effect therein have been investigated. With FCMD, the reaction rate in weakly interacting neon is lower than that in strongly interacting water. However, with QCMD, the order of the reaction rates is reversed. To investigate the mechanisms in detail, the reactions were categorized into three mechanisms: tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing. Then, the quantum and solvent effects were analyzed from the viewpoint of the reaction mechanism focusing on the shape of potential energy curve and its fluctuations. The higher reaction rate that was found for neon in QCMD compared with that found for water solvent arises from the tunneling reactions because of the nearly symmetric double-well shape of the potential curve in neon. The thermal activation and barrier vanishing reactions were also accelerated by the zero-point energy. The number of reactions based on these two mechanisms in water was greater than that in neon in both QCMD and FCMD because these reactions are dominated by the strength of solute-solvent interactions.

  15. Molecular design for nonpolar chiral-axial quadratic nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggers, Gregory A.

    In this thesis the hyperpolarizability of various multi-dimensional molecules is studied theoretically/computationally, with particular focus on the second-rank Kleinman-disallowed (KD) component of the hyperpolarizability. This component, which transforms as a second-rank traceless symmetric tensor, could be utilized in certain chiral-axial molecular alignment schemes to produce a bulk response. Nonpolar chiral-axial systems have been proposed in contrast to polar media, which utilize the vector component of the molecular hyperpolarizability and require parallel alignment of the molecular dipoles. Such parallel alignment of dipoles must be "frozen in" in order to overcome the natural tendency for dipoles to align anti-parallel. This limits the density of chromophores that can be loaded into a polar material. Nonpolar materials do not have such limits in theory. The two geometric classes of molecules that can most easily be incorporated into nonpolar chiral-uniaxial materials are propeller-shaped (C3 or D3 symmetry) and Λ-shaped (C2v symmetry). This work describes efforts to design molecules within these classes that would be suitable for bulk NLO materials. The sum-over-states (SOS) expression is used to model the molecular hyperpolarizability, and quantum chemical calculations, along with linear absorption data (when available) provide the necessary parameters to evaluate truncated forms of the SOS expression. A host of chemical and geometric modifications will be considered in order to elucidate important structure/function relationships. Also, the SOS model will be tested in some cases when experimental measurements (via Kleinman-disallowed hyper-Rayleigh scattering) are available. While a majority of this work focuses on multi-dimensional molecules, a small section deals with the question of optimizing the hyperpolarizability of a one-dimensional system. It is suggested that the recently-proposed idea of "modulated conjugation" as a means for improving

  16. Algan/Gan Hemt By Magnetron Sputtering System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Perez, Roman

    In this thesis, the growth of the semiconductor materials AlGaN and GaN is achieved by magnetron sputtering for the fabrication of High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). The study of the deposited nitrides is conducted by spectroscopy, diffraction, and submicron scale microscope methods. The preparation of the materials is performed using different parameters in terms of power, pressure, temperature, gas, and time. Silicon (Si) and Sapphire (Al2O3) wafers are used as substrates. The chemical composition and surface topography of the samples are analyzed to calculate the materials atomic percentages and to observe the devices surface. The instruments used for the semiconductors characterization are X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The project focused its attention on the reduction of impurities during the deposition, the controlled thicknesses of the thin-films, the atomic configuration of the alloy AlxGa1-xN, and the uniformity of the surfaces.

  17. Low temperature p-type doping of (Al)GaN layers using ammonia molecular beam epitaxy for InGaN laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverni, M.; Lamy, J.-M.; Martin, D.; Feltin, E.; Dorsaz, J.; Castiglia, A.; Rossetti, M.; Duelk, M.; Vélez, C.; Grandjean, N.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate state-of-the-art p-type (Al)GaN layers deposited at low temperature (740 °C) by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) to be used as top cladding of laser diodes (LDs) with the aim of further reducing the thermal budget on the InGaN quantum well active region. Typical p-type GaN resistivities and contact resistances are 0.4 Ω cm and 5 × 10-4 Ω cm2, respectively. As a test bed, we fabricated a hybrid laser structure emitting at 400 nm combining n-type AlGaN cladding and InGaN active region grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, with the p-doped waveguide and cladding layers grown by NH3-MBE. Single-mode ridge-waveguide LD exhibits a threshold voltage as low as 4.3 V for an 800 × 2 μm2 ridge dimension and a threshold current density of ˜5 kA cm-2 in continuous wave operation. The series resistance of the device is 6 Ω and the resistivity is 1.5 Ω cm, confirming thereby the excellent electrical properties of p-type Al0.06Ga0.94N:Mg despite the low growth temperature.

  18. Alloy scattering dependence of electron transport in AlGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarar, Z.; Ozdemir, M.

    2010-01-01

    The electron transport and velocity characteristics in AlGaN are examined using an ensemble Monte Carlo simulation method. A three valley band structure model where nonparabolicity effects are considered in all valleys is used for Monte Carlo calculations. All of the major electron scattering interactions like acoustic and optical phonon, intervaley, ionized impurity and alloy disorder scatterings are included in the calculations. The velocity-applied electric field characteristics are analyzed as a function of Al molar fraction and temperature in the ranges of x=0.1 to x=0.5 and 77 K to 500 K, respectively. The velocity overshoot is clearly observed and the population of valleys seems well-matched with the occupancy of valleys in AlGaN. The results of electron steady state velocity-field curves are found that the alloy disorder scattering has important effects on the electron transport characteristics of AlGaN.

  19. Botulinum toxin detection using AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Lin; Chu, B. H.; Chen, K. H.; Chang, C. Y.; Lele, T. P.; Tseng, Y.; Pearton, S. J.; Ramage, J.; Hooten, D.; Dabiran, A.; Chow, P. P.; Ren, F.

    2008-12-01

    Antibody-functionalized, Au-gated AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect botulinum toxin. The antibody was anchored to the gate area through immobilized thioglycolic acid. The AlGaN /GaN HEMT drain-source current showed a rapid response of less than 5s when the target toxin in a buffer was added to the antibody-immobilized surface. We could detect a range of concentrations from 1to10ng/ml. These results clearly demonstrate the promise of field-deployable electronic biological sensors based on AlGaN /GaN HEMTs for botulinum toxin detection.

  20. Charge transport in non-polar and semi-polar III-V nitride heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konar, Aniruddha; Verma, Amit; Fang, Tian; Zhao, Pei; Jana, Raj; Jena, Debdeep

    2012-01-01

    Compared to the intense research focus on the optical properties, the transport properties in non-polar and semi-polar III-nitride semiconductors remain relatively unexplored to date. The purpose of this paper is to discuss charge-transport properties in non-polar and semi-polar orientations of GaN in a comparative fashion to what is known for transport in polar orientations. A comprehensive approach is adopted, starting from an investigation of the differences in the electronic bandstructure along different polar orientations of GaN. The polarization fields along various orientations are then discussed, followed by the low-field electron and hole mobilities. A number of scattering mechanisms that are specific to non-polar and semi-polar GaN heterostructures are identified, and their effects are evaluated. Many of these scattering mechanisms originate due to the coupling of polarization with disorder and defects in various incarnations depending on the crystal orientation. The effect of polarization orientation on carrier injection into quantum-well light-emitting diodes is discussed. This paper ends with a discussion of orientation-dependent high-field charge-transport properties including velocity saturation, instabilities and tunneling transport. Possible open problems and opportunities are also discussed. (paper)

  1. AlGaN Channel Transistors for Power Management and Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanHove, James M.

    1996-01-01

    Contained within is the Final report of a Phase 1 SBIR program to develop AlGaN channel junction field effect transistors (JFET). The report summarizes our work to design, deposit, and fabricate JFETS using molecular beam epitaxy growth AlGaN. Nitride growth is described using a RF atomic nitrogen plasma source. Processing steps needed to fabricate the device such as ohmic source-drain contacts, reactive ion etching, gate formation, and air bride fabrication are documented. SEM photographs of fabricated power FETS are shown. Recommendations are made to continue the effort in a Phase 2 Program.

  2. Surface topology caused by dislocations in polar, semipolar, and nonpolar InGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, L.; Schwarz, U.T. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF, Freiburg (Germany); Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg (Germany); Wernicke, T.; Rass, J.; Ploch, S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, TU Berlin (Germany); Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, TU Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    The impact of dislocations on surface topology as well as on quantum well emission in c-plane, semipolar, and nonpolar InGaN/GaN heterostructures is being analyzed by micro-photoluminescence and white-light-interferometry. V-pits with (10 anti 11) and (10 anti 1 anti 4) side facets are identified in a (10 anti 12) semipolar heterostructure. Hillocks formed by spiral growth around screw dislocations change from hexagonal to triangular to rectangular shape in polar, semipolar, and nonpolar heterostructures, respectively, reflecting the symmetry of the individual surface. The emission in semipolar quantum wells, grown homoepitaxially on bulk GaN substrates, show dark stripes aligned with misfit dislocations. For (11 anti 22) and (20 anti 21) orientation, these dark stripes are perpendicular and parallel, respectively, to surface striation. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Surface-Passivated AlGaN Nanowires for Enhanced Luminescence of Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Haiding; Shakfa, Mohammad Khaled; Muhammed, Mufasila; Janjua, Bilal; Li, Kuang-Hui; Lin, Ronghui; Ng, Tien Khee; Roqan, Iman S.; Ooi, Boon S.; Li, Xiaohang

    2017-01-01

    investigation on the samples reveals almost intact nanowire structures after the passivation process. We demonstrated an approximately 49.7% enhancement in the ultraviolet light output power after 30-s KOH treatment on AlGaN nanowires grown on titanium

  4. Optical, structural, and nuclear scientific studies of AlGaN with high Al composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tse Yang; Chung, Yee Ling; Li, Lin; Yao, Shude; Lee, Y. C.; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Ferguson, Ian T.; Lu, Weijie

    2010-08-01

    AlGaN epilayers with higher Al-compositions were grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on (0001) sapphire. Trimethylgallium (TMGa), trimethylaluminium (TMAl) and NH3 were used as the source precursors for Ga, Al, and N, respectively. A 25 nm AlN nucleation layer was first grown at low-temperature of 590 °C at 300 Torr. Followed, AlxGa1-xN layers were grown at 1080 °C on low-temperature AlN nucleation layers. The heterostructures were characterized by a series of techniques, including x-ray diffraction (XRD), Rutherford backscattering (RBS), photoluminescence (PL), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman scattering. Precise Al compositions were determined through XRD, RBS, and SEM combined measurements. Room Temperature Raman Scattering spectra shows three major bands from AlGaN alloys, which are AlN-like, A1 longitudinal optical (LO) phonon modes, and E2 transverse optical (TO) band, respectively, plus several peak comes from the substrate. Raman spectral line shape analysis lead to an optical determination of the electrical property free carrier concentration of AlGaN. The optical properties of AlGaN with high Al composition were presented here.

  5. Influence of AlGaN Buffer Growth Temperature on GaN Epilayer based on Si(lll) Substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Meng; Wang Xiaoliang; Pan Xu; Xiao Hongling; Wang Cuimei; Zhang Minglan; Wang Zhanguo

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigated the influence of AlGaN buffer growth temperature on strain status and crystal quality of the GaN film on Si(111) sbustrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. It was demonstrated by the optical microscopy that AlGaN buffer gorwth temperature had a remarkable effect on compensating tensil stress in top GaN layer and preventing the formation of cracks. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy analysis showed crystal quality and surface morphology of the GaN epilayer could be improved through increasing AlGaN buffer growth temperature. 1μm crack-free GaN epilayer on Si (111) substrates was obtained with graded AlGaN buffer layer at optimized temperature of 1050 deg. C. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that a significant reduction in threading dislocations was achieved in GaN epilayer.

  6. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of Al(Ga)N nanowire deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mi, Z; Zhao, S; Djavid, M; Liu, X; Kang, J; Woo, S Y; Bugnet, M; Botton, G A; Kong, X; Guo, H; Ji, W; Liu, Z

    2016-01-01

    We report on the detailed molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of Al(Ga)N nanowire heterostructures on Si and their applications for deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lasers. The nanowires are formed under nitrogen-rich conditions without using any metal catalyst. Compared to conventional epilayers, Mg-dopant incorporation is significantly enhanced in nearly strain- and defect-free Al(Ga)N nanowire structures, leading to efficient p -type conduction. The resulting Al(Ga)N nanowire LEDs exhibit excellent performance, including a turn-on voltage of ∼5.5 V for an AlN nanowire LED operating at 207 nm. The design, fabrication, and performance of an electrically injected AlGaN nanowire laser operating in the UV-B band is also presented. (paper)

  7. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  8. Influence of substrate miscut angle on surface morphology and luminescence properties of AlGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusch, Gunnar; Edwards, Paul R.; Bruckbauer, Jochen; Martin, Robert W.; Li, Haoning; Parbrook, Peter J.; Sadler, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of substrate miscut on Al 0.5 Ga 0.5  N layers was investigated using cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging and secondary electron imaging in an environmental scanning electron microscope. The samples were also characterized using atomic force microscopy and high resolution X-ray diffraction. It was found that small changes in substrate miscut have a strong influence on the morphology and luminescence properties of the AlGaN layers. Two different types are resolved. For low miscut angle, a crack-free morphology consisting of randomly sized domains is observed, between which there are notable shifts in the AlGaN near band edge emission energy. For high miscut angle, a morphology with step bunches and compositional inhomogeneities along the step bunches, evidenced by an additional CL peak along the step bunches, are observed

  9. Low temperature p-type doping of (Al)GaN layers using ammonia molecular beam epitaxy for InGaN laser diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinverni, M., E-mail: marco.malinverni@epfl.ch; Lamy, J.-M.; Martin, D.; Grandjean, N. [ICMP, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Feltin, E.; Dorsaz, J. [NOVAGAN AG, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Castiglia, A.; Rossetti, M.; Duelk, M.; Vélez, C. [EXALOS AG, CH-8952 Schlieren (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate state-of-the-art p-type (Al)GaN layers deposited at low temperature (740 °C) by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy (NH{sub 3}-MBE) to be used as top cladding of laser diodes (LDs) with the aim of further reducing the thermal budget on the InGaN quantum well active region. Typical p-type GaN resistivities and contact resistances are 0.4 Ω cm and 5 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm{sup 2}, respectively. As a test bed, we fabricated a hybrid laser structure emitting at 400 nm combining n-type AlGaN cladding and InGaN active region grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy, with the p-doped waveguide and cladding layers grown by NH{sub 3}-MBE. Single-mode ridge-waveguide LD exhibits a threshold voltage as low as 4.3 V for an 800 × 2 μm{sup 2} ridge dimension and a threshold current density of ∼5 kA cm{sup −2} in continuous wave operation. The series resistance of the device is 6 Ω and the resistivity is 1.5 Ω cm, confirming thereby the excellent electrical properties of p-type Al{sub 0.06}Ga{sub 0.94}N:Mg despite the low growth temperature.

  10. Surface-Passivated AlGaN Nanowires for Enhanced Luminescence of Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Haiding

    2017-12-19

    Spontaneously-grown, self-aligned AlGaN nanowire ultraviolet light emitting diodes still suffer from low efficiency partially because of the strong surface recombination caused by surface states, i.e., oxidized surface and high density surface states. Several surface passivation methods have been introduced to reduce surface non-radiative recombination by using complex and toxic chemicals. Here, we present an effective method to suppress such undesirable surface recombination of the AlGaN nanowires via diluted potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution; a commonly used chemical process in semiconductor fabrication which is barely used as surface passivation solution in self-assembled nitride-based nanowires. The transmission electron microscopy investigation on the samples reveals almost intact nanowire structures after the passivation process. We demonstrated an approximately 49.7% enhancement in the ultraviolet light output power after 30-s KOH treatment on AlGaN nanowires grown on titanium-coated silicon substrates. We attribute such a remarkable enhancement to the removal of the surface dangling bonds and oxidized nitrides (Ga-O or Al-O bonds) at the surface as we observe the change of the carrier lifetime before and after the passivation. Thus, our results highlight the possibility of employing this process for the realization of high performance nanowire UV emitters.

  11. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers incorporating an ion implanted aperture

    KAUST Repository

    Leonard, J. T.; Cohen, D. A.; Yonkee, B. P.; Farrell, R. M.; Margalith, T.; Lee, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. We report on our recent progress in improving the performance of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) by using an Al ion implanted aperture and employing a multi-layer electron-beam evaporated ITO intracavity contact. The use of an ion implanted aperture improves the lateral confinement over SiNx apertures by enabling a planar ITO design, while the multi-layer ITO contact minimizes scattering losses due to its epitaxially smooth morphology. The reported VCSEL has 10 QWs, with a 3nm quantum well width, 1nm barriers, a 5nm electron-blocking layer, and a 6.95- λ total cavity thickness. These advances yield a single longitudinal mode 406nm nonpolar VCSEL with a low threshold current density (∼16kA/cm2), a peak output power of ∼12μW, and a 100% polarization ratio. The lasing in the current aperture is observed to be spatially non-uniform, which is likely a result of filamentation caused by non-uniform current spreading, lateral optical confinement, contact resistance, and absorption loss.

  12. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers incorporating an ion implanted aperture

    KAUST Repository

    Leonard, J. T.

    2015-07-06

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. We report on our recent progress in improving the performance of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) by using an Al ion implanted aperture and employing a multi-layer electron-beam evaporated ITO intracavity contact. The use of an ion implanted aperture improves the lateral confinement over SiNx apertures by enabling a planar ITO design, while the multi-layer ITO contact minimizes scattering losses due to its epitaxially smooth morphology. The reported VCSEL has 10 QWs, with a 3nm quantum well width, 1nm barriers, a 5nm electron-blocking layer, and a 6.95- λ total cavity thickness. These advances yield a single longitudinal mode 406nm nonpolar VCSEL with a low threshold current density (∼16kA/cm2), a peak output power of ∼12μW, and a 100% polarization ratio. The lasing in the current aperture is observed to be spatially non-uniform, which is likely a result of filamentation caused by non-uniform current spreading, lateral optical confinement, contact resistance, and absorption loss.

  13. Study of excess carrier dynamics in polar, semi-polar, and non-polar (In,Ga)N epilayers and QWs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksiejunas, R. [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Laser Research Center, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 10, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Lubys, L.; Jarasiunas, K. [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Vengris, M. [Laser Research Center, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 10, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Wernicke, T.; Hoffmann, V.; Netzel, C.; Knauer, A.; Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12498 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12498 Berlin (Germany); Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    We studied carrier recombination and diffusion in GaN/sapphire templates, (In,Ga)N layers, and (In,Ga)N quantum well structures oriented along the polar [0001], semi-polar [11-22], and non-polar [11-20] orientations by means of light induced transient grating, differential transmission, and photoluminescence optical techniques. We show that the lifetime of excess carriers drops by orders of magnitude when changing the orientation from polar to non-polar, both in GaN templates and (In,Ga)N layers. We attribute the shorter lifetime to carrier trapping by extended structural defects that are more abundant in non-polar grown samples. In addition, we observe pronounced carrier localization effects in the semi- and non-polar layers. We show that thick (In,Ga)N layers inherit the properties of the GaN templates. However, the thin quantum well structures show a lower carrier trapping activity. So, a better electrical quality can be assumed as compared to the thick (In,Ga)N layers. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Material and device studies for the development of ultra-violet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) along polar, non-polar and semi-polar directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Ramya

    Over the past few years, significant effort was dedicated to the development of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) for a variety of applications. Such applications include chemical and biological detection, water purification and solid-state lighting. III-Nitride LEDs based on multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown along the conventional [0001] (polar) direction suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), due to the existence of strong electric fields that arise from spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization. Thus, there is strong motivation to develop MQW-based III-nitride LED structures grown along non-polar and semi-polar directions. The goal of this dissertation is to develop UV-LEDs along the [0001] polar and [11 2¯ 0] non-polar directions by the method of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). The polar and non-polar LEDs were grown on the C-plane and R-plane sapphire substrates respectively. This work is a combination of materials science studies related to the nucleation, growth and n- and p-type doping of III-nitride films on these two substrates, as well as device studies related to fabrication and characterization of UV-LEDs. It was observed that the crystallographic orientation of the III-nitride films grown on R-plane sapphire depends strongly on the kinetic conditions of growth of the Aluminum Nitride (AIN) buffer. Specifically, growth of the AIN buffer under group III-rich conditions leads to nitride films having the (11 2¯ 0) non polar planes parallel to the sapphire surface, while growth of the buffer under nitrogen rich conditions leads to nitride films with the (11 2¯ 6) semi-polar planes parallel to the sapphire surface. The electron concentration and mobility for the films grown along the polar, non-polar and semi-polar directions were investigated. P-type doping of Gallium Nitride (GaN) films grown on the nonpolar (11 2¯ 0) plane do not suffer from polarity inversion and thus the material was doped p-type with a hole concentration

  15. Growth and optical characteristics of Tm-doped AlGaN layer grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu, J.; Fuji, R.; Tatebayashi, J.; Timmerman, D.; Lesage, A.; Gregorkiewicz, T.; Fujiwara, Y.

    2018-04-01

    We report on the growth and optical properties of Tm-doped AlGaN layers by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The morphological and optical properties of Tm-doped GaN (GaN:Tm) and Tm-doped AlGaN (AlGaN:Tm) were investigated by Nomarski differential interference contrast microscopy and photoluminescence (PL) characterization. Nomarski images reveal an increase of surface roughness upon doping Tm into both GaN and AlGaN layers. The PL characterization of GaN:Tm shows emission in the near-infrared range originating from intra-4f shell transitions of Tm3+ ions. In contrast, AlGaN:Tm also exhibits blue light emission from Tm3+ ions. In that case, the wider band gap of the AlGaN host allows energy transfer to higher states of the Tm3+ ions. With time-resolved PL measurements, we could distinguish three types of luminescent sites of Tm3+ in the AlGaN:Tm layer, having different decay times. Our results confirm that Tm ions can be doped into GaN and AlGaN by OMVPE, and show potential for the fabrication of novel high-color-purity blue light emitting diodes.

  16. Structural, morphological and magnetic properties of AlGaN thin films co-implanted with Cr and Sm ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xingguo [School of Science, Shandong Polytechnic University, Jinan 250353 (China); College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Liu, Chao, E-mail: cliu@semi.ac.cn [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Yin, Chunhai; Sun, Lili; Tao, Dongyan [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Yang, Cheng [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Man, Baoyuan, E-mail: byman@sdnu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Cr and Sm co-implanted AlGaN (AlGaN:Cr:Sm) films have been fabricated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, ion implantation and annealing. No secondary phase and metal-related peak can be detected within the detection limit of X-ray diffraction measurement. The Raman analysis demonstrated that the peak of E{sub 2} (H) phonon mode of sample B is much more narrow and sharp than that of sample A. The atomic force microscopy measurements indicated that the root mean square roughness for sample A and sample B were 2.26 and 1.07 nm, respectively. According to superconducting quantum interference device analysis, the AlGaN:Cr:Sm films exhibit room-temperature ferromagnetism and colossal magnetic moment effect. Moreover, the saturation magnetization of sample B is 9.75 μ{sub B}/atom, which is much higher than that of sample A (1.86 μ{sub B}/atom). Finally, the possible origin of the room-temperature ferromagnetism in AlGaN:Cr:Sm films was discussed. - Highlights: • Post-implantation annealing is helpful to recover the crystal quality of the samples. • The samples exhibit room-temperature ferromagnetism and colossal magnetic moment. • The origin of the ferromagnetism in our samples can be explained by BMP theory. • Colossal magnetic moment may come from 3d and 4f coupling between Cr{sup 3+} and Sm{sup 3+} ions. • The interaction between BMPs may also contribute to the colossal magnetic moment.

  17. Long-Wavelength Phonon Scattering in Nonpolar Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawætz, Peter

    1969-01-01

    The long-wavelength acoustic- and optical-phonon scattering of carriers in nonpolar semiconductors is considered from a general point of view. The deformation-potential approximation is defined and it is shown that long-range electrostatic forces give a nontrivial correction to the scattering...... of the very-short-range nature of interactions in a covalent semiconductor....

  18. Extreme Radiation Hardness and Space Qualification of AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Ke-Xun; MacNeil, Lawrence; Balakrishnan, Kathik; Hultgren, Eric; Goebel, John; Bilenko, Yuri; Yang, Jinwei; Sun, Wenhong; Shatalov, Max; Hu, Xuhong; Gaska, Remis

    2010-01-01

    Unprecedented radiation hardness and environment robustness are required in the new generation of high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments and deep space exploration. National Ignition Facility (NIF) break-even shots will have a neutron yield of 10 15 or higher. The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) mission instruments will be irradiated with a total fluence of 10 12 protons/cm 2 during the space journey. In addition, large temperature variations and mechanical shocks are expected in these applications under extreme conditions. Hefty radiation and thermal shields are required for Si and GaAs based electronics and optoelectronics devices. However, for direct illumination and imaging applications, shielding is not a viable option. It is an urgent task to search for new semiconductor technologies and to develop radiation hard and environmentally robust optoelectronic devices. We will report on our latest systematic experimental studies on radiation hardness and space qualifications of AlGaN optoelectronic devices: Deep UV Light Emitting Diodes (DUV LEDs) and solarblind UV Photodiodes (PDs). For custom designed AlGaN DUV LEDs with a central emission wavelength of 255 nm, we have demonstrated its extreme radiation hardness up to 2 x 10 12 protons/cm 2 with 63.9 MeV proton beams. We have demonstrated an operation lifetime of over 26,000 hours in a nitrogen rich environment, and 23,000 hours of operation in vacuum without significant power drop and spectral shift. The DUV LEDs with multiple packaging styles have passed stringent space qualifications with 14 g random vibrations, and 21 cycles of 100K temperature cycles. The driving voltage, current, emission spectra and optical power (V-I-P) operation characteristics exhibited no significant changes after the space environmental tests. The DUV LEDs will be used for photoelectric charge management in space flights. For custom designed AlGaN UV photodiodes with a central response wavelength of 255 nm, we have

  19. Charging and Screening in Nonpolar Solutions of Nonionizable Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Sven

    2010-03-01

    Nonpolar liquids do not easily accommodate electric charges, but surfactant additives are often found to dramatically increase the solution conductivity and promote surface charging of suspended colloid particles. Such surfactant-mediated electrostatic effects have been associated with equilibrium charge fluctuations among reverse surfactant micelles and in some cases with the statistically rare ionization of individual surfactant molecules. Here we present experimental evidence that even surfactants without any ionizable group can mediate charging and charge screening in nonpolar oils, and that they can do so at surfactant concentrations well below the critical micelle concentration (cmc). Precision conductometry, light scattering, and Karl-Fischer titration of sorbitan oleate solutions in hexane, paired with electrophoretic mobility measurements on suspended polymer particles, reveal a distinctly electrostatic action of the surfactant. We interpret our observations in terms of a charge fluctuation model and argue that the observed charging processes are likely facilitated, but not limited, by the presence of ionizable impurities.

  20. Nanoencapsulation of Fullerenes in Organic Structures with Nonpolar Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, C. N.

    2005-01-01

    The formation of supramolecular structures, assemblies, and arrays held together by weak intermolecular interactions and non-covalent binding mimicking natural processes has been used in applications being anticipated in nanotechnology, biotechnology and the emerging field of nanomedicine. Encapsulation of C 60 fullerene by cyclic molecules like cyclodextrins and calixarenes has potential for a number of applications. Similarly, biomolecules like lysozyme also have been shown to encapsulate C 60 fullerene. This poster article reports the recent trends and the results obtained in the nanoencapsulation of fullerenes by biomolecules containing nonpolar cavities. Lysozyme was chosen as the model biomolecule and it was observed that there is no covalent bond formed between the bimolecule and the C 60 fullerene. This was confirmed from fluorescence energy transfer studies. UV-Vis studies further supported this observation that it is possible to selectively remove the C 60 fullerene from the nonpolar cavity. This behavior has potential in biomedical applications

  1. Photonic Crystal Polarizing and Non-Polarizing Beam Splitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun-Ying, Guan; Jin-Hui, Shi; Li-Boo, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    A polarizing beam splitter (PBS) and a non-polarizing beam splitter (NPBS) based on a photonic crystal (PC) directional coupler are demonstrated. The photonic crystal directional coupler consists of a hexagonal lattice of dielectric pillars in air and has a complete photonic band gap. The photonic band structure and the band gap map are calculated using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method. The splitting properties of the splitter are investigated numerically using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method

  2. Semipolar MOVPE AlGaN on (10 anti 10) m-plane sapphire; MOVPE von semipolarem AlGaN auf (10 anti 10) m-plane Saphir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehnke, Frank; Stellmach, Joachim; Frentrup, Martin; Kusch, Gunnar; Wernicke, Tim; Pristovsek, Markus; Kneissl, Michael [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The energy gap of AlGaN varies between 3.4 eV and 6.2 eV and allows light emitting diodes (LED) in the ultraviolet spectral region. The authors studied semipolar (11 anti 22) AlGaN layers that were deposited on (10 anti 10) m-plane sapphire using MOVPE (metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy) without nucleation layer with a substrate temperature below 1100 C in H2 atmosphere. The layers are preferably (11 anti 22) oriented. The sample show a surface roughness between 15 and 2 nm. The Al content of the smoothest samples is about 60% determined by transmission experiments. Below 60% Al content a triangular morphology was observed, the opening angle increased with decreasing Al content. The absorption edge was 0.05 eV (GaN) to 0.35 eV (AlN) below the band edge of (0001) oriented AlGaN layers. Further investigations of semipolar AlGaN layers to study the applicability for UV LEDs are under preparation.

  3. Assembly of phosphonic acids on GaN and AlGaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, B S; Stine, R; Theodore, N D; Pehrsson, P E [Chemistry Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC (United States); Hong, S [Thomas Jefferson High School, McClean, VA (United States); Maekinen, A J [Optical Sciences Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Mastro, M A; Eddy, C R Jr [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-01-13

    Self-assembled monolayers of octadecylphosphonic acid and 16-phosphonohexadecanoic acid (PHDA) were formed on the semiconductor substrates gallium nitride (GaN) and aluminium gallium nitride (AlGaN). The presence of the molecular layers was verified through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Structural information was acquired with infrared spectroscopy which verified the bonding orientation of the carboxyl-containing PHDA. The impact of the molecular layers on the channel conductivity and the surface electronic structure of an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure was measured. Our results indicate that pinning of the surface Fermi level prohibits modification of the channel conductivity by the layer. However, a surface dipole of {approx}0.8 eV is present and associated with both phosphonic acid layers. These results are of direct relevance to field-effect-based biochemical sensors and metal-semiconductor contact formation for this system and provide a fundamental basis for further applications of GaN and AlGaN technology in the fields of biosensing and microelectronics.

  4. Simulation for spectral response of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shiwei; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we introduced how to build a physical model of refer to the device structure and parameters. Simulations for solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes spectral characteristics were conducted in use of Silvaco TCAD, where device structure and parameters are comprehensively considered. In simulation, the effects of polarization, Urbach tail, mobility, saturated velocities and lifetime in AlGaN device was considered. Especially, we focused on how the concentration-dependent Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination model affects simulation results. By simulating, we analyzed the effects in spectral response caused by TAUN0 and TAUP0, and got the values of TAUN0 and TAUP0 which can bring a result coincides with test results. After that, we changed their values and made the simulation results especially the part under 255 nm performed better. In conclusion, the spectral response between 200 nm and 320 nm of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes were simulated and compared with test results. We also found that TAUN0 and TAUP0 have a large impact on spectral response of AlGaN material.

  5. Radiation damage resistance of AlGaN detectors for applications in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkusky, Frank; Peth, Christian; Bayer, Armin; Mann, Klaus [Laser-Laboratorium-Goettingen e.V., Hans-Adolf-Krebs-Weg 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); John, Joachim; Malinowski, Pawel E. [Interuniversity MicroElectronic Center (IMEC), Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2009-09-15

    We report on the fabrication of aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) Schottky-photodiode-based detectors. AlGaN layers were grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Si(111) wafers. The diodes were characterized at a wavelength of 13.5 nm using a table-top extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation source, consisting of a laser-produced xenon plasma and a Schwarzschild objective. The responsivity of the diodes was tested between EUV energies ranging from 320 nJ down to several picojoules. For low fluences, a linear responsivity of 7.14 mAs/J could be determined. Saturation starts at approximately 1 nJ, merging into a linear response of 0.113 mAs/J, which could be attributed to the photoeffect on the Au electrodes on top of the diode. Furthermore, degradation tests were performed up to an absolute dose of 3.3x10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}. AlGaN photodiodes were compared to commercially available silicon-based photodetectors. For AlGaN diodes, responsivity does not change even for the highest EUV dose, whereas the response of the Si diode decreases linearly to {approx}93% after 2x10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}.

  6. From Schottky to Ohmic graphene contacts to AlGaN/GaN heterostructures: Role of the AlGaN layer microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisichella, G.; Greco, G.; Roccaforte, F.; Giannazzo, F.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical behaviour of graphene (Gr) contacts to Al x Ga 1−x N/GaN heterostructures has been investigated, focusing, in particular, on the impact of the AlGaN microstructure on the current transport at Gr/AlGaN interface. Two Al 0.25 Ga 0.75 N/GaN heterostructures with very different quality in terms of surface roughness and defectivity, as evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy, were compared in this study, i.e., a uniform and defect-free sample and a sample with a high density of typical V-defects, which locally cause a reduction of the AlGaN thickness. Nanoscale resolution current voltage (I-V) measurements by an Au coated conductive AFM tip were carried out at several positions both on the bare and Gr-coated AlGaN surfaces. Rectifying contacts were found onto both bare AlGaN surfaces, but with a more inhomogeneous and lower Schottky barrier height (Φ B  ≈ 0.6 eV) for AlGaN with V-defects, with respect to the case of the uniform AlGaN (Φ B  ≈ 0.9 eV). Instead, very different electrical behaviours were observed in the presence of the Gr interlayer between the Au tip and AlGaN, i.e., a Schottky contact with reduced barrier height (Φ B ≈ 0.4 eV) for the uniform AlGaN and an Ohmic contact for the AlGaN with V-defects. Interestingly, excellent lateral uniformity of the local I-V characteristics was found in both cases and can be ascribed to an averaging effect of the Gr electrode over the AlGaN interfacial inhomogeneities. Due to the locally reduced AlGaN layer thickness, V defect act as preferential current paths from Gr to the 2DEG and can account for the peculiar Ohmic behaviour of Gr contacts on defective AlGaN

  7. Gate less-FET pH Sensor Fabricated on Undoped AlGaN/ GaN HEMT Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maneea Eizadi Sharifabad; Mastura Shafinaz Zainal Abidin; Shaharin Fadzli Abd Rahman; Abdul Manaf Hashim; Abdul Rahim Abdul Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Gallium nitride with wurtzite crystal structure is a chemically stable semiconductor with high internal spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization, which make it highly suitable materials to create very sensitive and robust sensors for the detection of ions, gases and liquids. Sensing characteristics of an open-gate liquid-phase sensor fabricated on undoped-AlGaN/ GaN high-electron-mobility-transistor (HEMT) structure in aqueous solution was investigated. In ambient atmosphere, the open-gate undoped AlGaN/ GaN HEMT clearly showed only the presence of linear region of currents while Si-doped AlGaN/ GaN showed the linear and saturation regions of currents, very similar to those of gated devices. This seems to show that very low Fermi level pinning by surface states exists in undoped AlGaN/ GaN sample. In aqueous solution, the typical current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of HEMTs with good gate controllability were observed. The potential of the AlGaN surface at the open-gate area is effectively controlled via aqueous solution by Ag/ AgCl reference gate electrode. The open-gate undoped AlGaN/ GaN HEMT structure is capable of stable operation in aqueous electrolytes and exhibit linear sensitivity, and high sensitivity of 1.9 mA/ pH or 3.88 mA/ mm/ pH at drain-source voltage, VDS = 5 V was obtained. Due to large leakage current where it increases with the negative reference gate voltage, the Nernstians like sensitivity cannot be determined. Suppression of current leakage is likely to improve the device performance. The open-gate undoped-AlGaN/ GaN structure is expected to be suitable for pH sensing application. (author)

  8. Characterization of GaN quantum discs embedded in AlxGa1-xN nanocolumns grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristic, J.; Calleja, E.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.A.; Ulloa, J.M.; Sanchez-Paramo, J.; Calleja, J.M.; Jahn, U.; Trampert, A.; Ploog, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    GaN quantum discs embedded in AlGaN nanocolumns with outstanding crystal quality and very high luminescence efficiency were grown on Si(111) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under highly N-rich conditions. Nanocolumns with diameters in the range of 30-150 nm, with no traces of any extended defects, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, were obtained. GaN quantum discs, 2 and 4 nm thick, were grown embedded in AlGaN nanocolumns by switching on and off the Al flux during variable time spans. Strong optical emissions from GaN quantum discs, observed by photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence measurements, reveal quantum confinement effects. While Raman data indicate that the nanocolumns are fully relaxed, the quantum discs appear to be fully strained. These nanostructures have a high potential for application in efficient vertical cavity emitters

  9. Luminescence dynamics in AlGaN with AlN content of 20%

    KAUST Repository

    Soltani, Sonia; Bouzidi, Mouhamed; Touré , Alhousseynou; Gerhard, Marina; Halidou, Ibrahim; Chine, Zied; El Jani, Belgacem; Shakfa, Mohammad Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Optical properties and carrier dynamics of an AlGaN layer with an AlN content of 20% have been studied using time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL). Despite the high density of defects due to the relatively high AlN content, an intense PL emission from the sample has been detected. Low-temperature PL spectra exhibit several features, accompanied by a strong emission-wavelength dependence of the PL decay time. A significant red-shift of more than 200 meV from the band edge is recorded for the PL emission from localized states. Temperature-dependent PL spectra of the sample are dominated by the emission from localized states and, furthermore, show a relatively slight decrease by almost an order of magnitude with increasing temperature from 45 to 300 K. Our observations indicate strong, spatial localization effects of carriers, resulting in an increase in the radiative recombination rate.

  10. Luminescence dynamics in AlGaN with AlN content of 20%

    KAUST Repository

    Soltani, Sonia

    2016-12-15

    Optical properties and carrier dynamics of an AlGaN layer with an AlN content of 20% have been studied using time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL). Despite the high density of defects due to the relatively high AlN content, an intense PL emission from the sample has been detected. Low-temperature PL spectra exhibit several features, accompanied by a strong emission-wavelength dependence of the PL decay time. A significant red-shift of more than 200 meV from the band edge is recorded for the PL emission from localized states. Temperature-dependent PL spectra of the sample are dominated by the emission from localized states and, furthermore, show a relatively slight decrease by almost an order of magnitude with increasing temperature from 45 to 300 K. Our observations indicate strong, spatial localization effects of carriers, resulting in an increase in the radiative recombination rate.

  11. Electrophoretic Retardation of Colloidal Particles in Nonpolar Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Strubbe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We have measured the electrophoretic mobility of single, optically trapped colloidal particles, while gradually depleting the co-ions and counterions in the liquid around the particle by applying a dc voltage. This is achieved in a nonpolar liquid, where charged reverse micelles act as co-ions and counterions. By increasing the dc voltage, the mobility first increases when the concentrations of co-ions and counterions near the particle start to decrease. At sufficiently high dc voltage (around 2 V, the mobility reaches a saturation value when the co-ions and counterions are fully separated. The increase in mobility is larger when the equilibrium ionic strength is higher. The dependence of the experimental data on the equilibrium ionic strength and on the applied voltage is in good agreement with the standard theory of electrophoretic retardation, assuming that the bare particle charge remains constant. This method is useful for studying the electrophoretic retardation effect and charging mechanisms for nonpolar colloids, and it sheds light on previously unexplained particle acceleration in electronic ink devices.

  12. Enhanced UV luminescence from InAlN quantum well structures using two temperature growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubialevich, Vitaly Z.; Sadler, Thomas C.; Dinh, Duc V.; Alam, Shahab N.; Li, Haoning; Pampili, Pietro; Parbrook, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    InAlN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) emitting between 300 and 350 nm have been prepared by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on planar AlN templates. To obtain strong room temperature luminescence from InAlN QWs a two temperature approach was required. The intensity decayed weakly as the temperature was increased to 300 K, with ratios I PL (300 K)/I PL (T) max up to 70%. This high apparent internal quantum efficiency is attributed to the exceptionally strong carrier localization in this material, which is also manifested by a high Stokes shift (0.52 eV) of the luminescence. Based on these results InAlN is proposed as a robust alternative to AlGaN for ultraviolet emitting devices. - Highlights: • InAlN quantum wells with AlGaN barriers emitting in near UV successfully grown using quasi-2T approach. • 1 nm AlGaN capping of InAlN quantum wells used to avoid In desorption during temperature ramp to barrier growth conditions. • Strong, thermally resilient luminescence obtained as a result of growth optimization. • Promise of InAlN as an alternative active region for UV emitters demonstrated

  13. High mobility two-dimensional electron gases in nitride heterostructures with high Al composition AlGaN alloy barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guowang; Cao Yu; Xing Huili Grace; Jena, Debdeep

    2010-01-01

    We report high-electron mobility nitride heterostructures with >70% Al composition AlGaN alloy barriers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Direct growth of such AlGaN layers on GaN resulted in hexagonal trenches and a low mobility polarization-induced charge. By applying growth interruption at the heterojunction, the surface morphology improved dramatically and the room temperature two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) mobility increased by an order of magnitude, exceeding 1300 cm 2 /V s. The 2DEG density was tunable at 0.4-3.7x10 13 /cm 2 by varying the total barrier thickness (t). Surface barrier heights of the heterostructures were extracted and exhibited dependence on t.

  14. An improved design for AlGaN solar-blind avalanche photodiodes with enhanced avalanche ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yin; Cai Qing; Chen Dun-Jun; Lu Hai; Zhang Rong; Zheng You-Dou; Yang Lian-Hong; Dong Ke-Xiu

    2017-01-01

    To enhance the avalanche ionization, we designed a new separate absorption and multiplication AlGaN solar-blind avalanche photodiode (APD) by using a high/low-Al-content AlGaN heterostructure as the multiplication region instead of the conventional AlGaN homogeneous layer. The calculated results show that the designed APD with Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 N/Al 0.45 Ga 0.55 N heterostructure multiplication region exhibits a 60% higher gain than the conventional APD and a smaller avalanche breakdown voltage due to the use of the low-Al-content Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 N which has about a six times higher hole ionization coefficient than the high-Al-content Al 0.45 Ga 0.55 N. Meanwhile, the designed APD still remains a good solar-blind characteristic by introducing a quarter-wave AlGaN/AlN distributed Bragg reflectors structure at the bottom of the device. (paper)

  15. Chemical and electrical characteristics of annealed Ni/Au and Ni/Ir/Au contacts on AlGaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngoepe, P.N.M., E-mail: phuti.ngoepe@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Meyer, W.E.; Auret, F.D.; Omotoso, E.; Diale, M. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Swart, H.C.; Duvenhage, M.M.; Coetsee, E. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa)

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of Ni/Au and Ni/Ir/Au metal contacts deposited on AlGaN was investigated at different annealing temperatures. The samples were studied with electrical and chemical composition techniques. I–V characteristics of the Schottky diodes were optimum after 500 and 600 °C annealing for Ni/Au and Ni/Ir/Au based diodes, respectively. The depth profiles of the contacts were measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. These chemical composition techniques were used to examine the evolution of the metal contacts in order to verify the influence the metals have on the electrical properties of the diodes. The insertion of Ir as a diffusion barrier between Ni and Au effected the electrical properties, improving the stability of the contacts at high temperatures. Gold diffused into the AlGaN film, degrading the electrical properties of the Ni/Au diode. At 500 °C, the insertion of Ir, however, prevented the in-diffusion of Au into the AlGaN substrate.

  16. Pressure effects on electron reactions and mobility in nonpolar liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holroyd, R.A.; Nishikawa, Masaru

    2002-01-01

    High pressure studies have elucidated the mechanisms of both electron reactions and electron transport in nonpolar liquids and provided information about the partial molar volumes of ions and electrons. The very large volume changes associated with electron attachment reactions have been explained as due to electrostriction by the ions, calculated with a continuum model, but modified to include the formation of a glassy shell of solvent molecules around the ion. The mobilities of electrons in cases where the electron is trapped can now be understood by comparing the trap cavity volume with the volume of electrostriction of the solvent around the cavity. In cases where the electron is quasi-free the compressibility dependent potential fluctuations are shown to be important. The isothermal compressibility is concluded to be the single most important parameter determining the behavior of excess electrons in liquids

  17. Dielectric constant of polarizable, nonpolar fluids and suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichocki, B.; Felderhof, B.U.

    1988-01-01

    We study the dielectric constant of a polarizable, nonpolar fluid or suspension of spherical particles by use of a renormalized cluster expansion.The particles may have induced multipole moments of any order. We show that the Clausius-Mossotti formula results from a virtual overlap contribution. The corrections to the Clausius-Mossotti formula are expressed with the aid of a cluster expansion. The integrands of the cluster integrals are expressed in terms of two-body nodal connectors which incorporate all reflections between a pair of particles. We study the two- and three-body cluster integrals in some detail and show how these are related to the dielectric virial expansion and to the first term of the Kirkwood-Yvon expansion

  18. The Thermodynamics of Anion Complexation to Nonpolar Pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Matthew R; Yao, Wei; Tang, Du; Ashbaugh, Henry S; Gibb, Bruce C

    2018-02-08

    The interactions between nonpolar surfaces and polarizable anions lie in a gray area between the hydrophobic and Hofmeister effects. To assess the affinity of these interactions, NMR and ITC were used to probe the thermodynamics of eight anions binding to four different hosts whose pockets each consist primarily of hydrocarbon. Two classes of host were examined: cavitands and cyclodextrins. For all hosts, anion affinity was found to follow the Hofmeister series, with associations ranging from 1.6-5.7 kcal mol -1 . Despite the fact that cavitand hosts 1 and 2 possess intrinsic negative electrostatic fields, it was determined that these more enveloping hosts generally bound anions more strongly. The observation that the four hosts each possess specific anion affinities that cannot be readily explained by their structures, points to the importance of counter cations and the solvation of the "empty" hosts, free guests, and host-guest complexes, in defining the affinity.

  19. Breaking the polar-nonpolar division in solvation free energy prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Wang, Chengzhang; Wu, Kedi; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2018-02-05

    Implicit solvent models divide solvation free energies into polar and nonpolar additive contributions, whereas polar and nonpolar interactions are inseparable and nonadditive. We present a feature functional theory (FFT) framework to break this ad hoc division. The essential ideas of FFT are as follows: (i) representability assumption: there exists a microscopic feature vector that can uniquely characterize and distinguish one molecule from another; (ii) feature-function relationship assumption: the macroscopic features, including solvation free energy, of a molecule is a functional of microscopic feature vectors; and (iii) similarity assumption: molecules with similar microscopic features have similar macroscopic properties, such as solvation free energies. Based on these assumptions, solvation free energy prediction is carried out in the following protocol. First, we construct a molecular microscopic feature vector that is efficient in characterizing the solvation process using quantum mechanics and Poisson-Boltzmann theory. Microscopic feature vectors are combined with macroscopic features, that is, physical observable, to form extended feature vectors. Additionally, we partition a solvation dataset into queries according to molecular compositions. Moreover, for each target molecule, we adopt a machine learning algorithm for its nearest neighbor search, based on the selected microscopic feature vectors. Finally, from the extended feature vectors of obtained nearest neighbors, we construct a functional of solvation free energy, which is employed to predict the solvation free energy of the target molecule. The proposed FFT model has been extensively validated via a large dataset of 668 molecules. The leave-one-out test gives an optimal root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 1.05 kcal/mol. FFT predictions of SAMPL0, SAMPL1, SAMPL2, SAMPL3, and SAMPL4 challenge sets deliver the RMSEs of 0.61, 1.86, 1.64, 0.86, and 1.14 kcal/mol, respectively. Using a test set of 94

  20. Fabrication of Very High Efficiency 5.8 GHz Power Amplifiers using AlGaN HFETs on SiC Substrates for Wireless Power Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Gerry

    2001-01-01

    For wireless power transmission using microwave energy, very efficient conversion of the DC power into microwave power is extremely important. Class E amplifiers have the attractive feature that they can, in theory, be 100% efficient at converting, DC power to RF power. Aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) semiconductor material has many advantageous properties, relative to silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and silicon carbide (SiC), such as a much larger bandgap, and the ability to form AlGaN/GaN heterojunctions. The large bandgap of AlGaN also allows for device operation at higher temperatures than could be tolerated by a smaller bandgap transistor. This could reduce the cooling requirements. While it is unlikely that the AlGaN transistors in a 5.8 GHz class E amplifier can operate efficiently at temperatures in excess of 300 or 400 C, AlGaN based amplifiers could operate at temperatures that are higher than a GaAs or Si based amplifier could tolerate. Under this program, AlGaN microwave power HFETs have been fabricated and characterized. Hybrid class E amplifiers were designed and modeled. Unfortunately, within the time frame of this program, good quality HFETs were not available from either the RSC laboratories or commercially, and so the class E amplifiers were not constructed.

  1. Kinetic instability of AlGaN alloys during MBE growth under metal-rich conditions on m-plane GaN miscut towards the -c axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi-HD, M.; Diaz, R. E.; Nguyen, T.; Jian, J.; Gardner, G. C.; Wang, H.; Manfra, M. J.; Malis, O.

    2018-04-01

    AlxGa1-xN layers with Al-composition above 0.6 (0.6 < x < 0.9) grown under metal-rich conditions by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on m-plane GaN miscut towards the -c axis are kinetically unstable. Even under excess Ga flux, the effective growth rate of AlGaN is drastically reduced, likely due to suppression of Ga-N dimer incorporation. The defect structure generated during these growth conditions is studied with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy scanning transmission electron microscopy as a function of Al flux. The AlGaN growth results in the formation of thin Al(Ga)N layers with Al-composition higher than expected and lower Al-composition AlGaN islands. The AlGaN islands have a flat top and are elongated along the c-axis (i.e., stripe-like shape). Possible mechanisms for the observed experimental results are discussed. Our data are consistent with a model in which Al-N dimers promote release of Ga-N dimers from the m-plane surface.

  2. AlGaN channel field effect transistors with graded heterostructure ohmic contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Akyol, Fatih; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Zhang, Yuewei; Rajan, Siddharth

    2016-09-01

    We report on ultra-wide bandgap (UWBG) Al0.75Ga0.25N channel metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MISFETs) with heterostructure engineered low-resistance ohmic contacts. The low intrinsic electron affinity of AlN (0.6 eV) leads to large Schottky barriers at the metal-AlGaN interface, resulting in highly resistive ohmic contacts. In this work, we use a reverse compositional graded n++ AlGaN contact layer to achieve upward electron affinity grading, leading to a low specific contact resistance (ρsp) of 1.9 × 10-6 Ω cm2 to n-Al0.75Ga0.25N channels (bandgap ˜5.3 eV) with non-alloyed contacts. We also demonstrate UWBG Al0.75Ga0.25N channel MISFET device operation employing the compositional graded n++ ohmic contact layer and 20 nm atomic layer deposited Al2O3 as the gate-dielectric.

  3. Dislocations in AlGaN: Core Structure, Atom Segregation, and Optical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massabuau, Fabien C-P; Rhode, Sneha L; Horton, Matthew K; O'Hanlon, Thomas J; Kovács, András; Zielinski, Marcin S; Kappers, Menno J; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Humphreys, Colin J; Oliver, Rachel A

    2017-08-09

    We conducted a comprehensive investigation of dislocations in Al 0.46 Ga 0.54 N. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the atomic structure and atom distribution at the dislocation core have been examined. We report that the core configuration of dislocations in AlGaN is consistent with that of other materials in the III-Nitride system. However, we observed that the dissociation of mixed-type dislocations is impeded by alloying GaN with AlN, which is confirmed by our experimental observation of Ga and Al atom segregation in the tensile and compressive parts of the dislocations, respectively. Investigation of the optical properties of the dislocations shows that the atom segregation at dislocations has no significant effect on the intensity recorded by cathodoluminescence in the vicinity of the dislocations. These results are in contrast with the case of dislocations in In 0.09 Ga 0.91 N where segregation of In and Ga atoms also occurs but results in carrier localization limiting non-radiative recombination at the dislocation. This study therefore sheds light on why InGaN-based devices are generally more resilient to dislocations than their AlGaN-based counterparts.

  4. Noise characterization of enhancement-mode AlGaN graded barrier MIS-HEMT devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanbabu, A.; Saravana Kumar, R.; Mohankumar, N.

    2017-12-01

    This paper reports a systematic theoretical study on the microwave noise performance of graded AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator semiconductor high-electron mobility transistors (MIS-HEMTs) built on an Al2O3 substrate. The HfAlOx/AlGaN/GaN MIS-HEMT devices designed for this study show an outstanding small signal analog/RF and noise performance. The results on 1 μm gate length device show an enhancement mode operation with threshold voltage, VT = + 5.3 V, low drain leakage current, Ids,LL in the order of 1 × 10-9 A/mm along with high current gain cut-off frequency, fT of 17 GHz and maximum oscillation frequency fmax of 47 GHz at Vds = 10 V. The device Isbnd V and low-frequency noise estimation of the gate and drain noise spectral density and their correlation are evaluated using a Green's function method under different biasing conditions. The devices show a minimum noise figure (NFmin) of 1.053 dB in combination with equivalent noise resistance (Rn) of 23 Ω at 17 GHz, at Vgs = 6 V and Vds = 5 V which is relatively low and is suitable for broad-band low-noise amplifiers. This study shows that the graded AlGaN MIS-HEMT with HfAlOX gate insulator is appropriate for application requiring high-power and low-noise.

  5. Activation characteristics of ion-implanted Si+ in AlGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irokawa, Y.; Fujishima, O.; Kachi, T.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.

    2005-01-01

    Multiple-energy Si + implantation in the range 30-360 keV into Al 0.13 Ga 0.87 N for n-type doping was carried out at room temperature, followed by annealing at 1150-1375 deg. C for 5 min. Activation efficiencies close to 100% were obtained for ion doses of 1.0x10 15 cm -2 after annealing at 1375 deg. C, with a resulting sheet resistance of 74 Ω/square. By sharp contrast, the activation efficiency at 1150 deg. C was only 4% for this dose, with a sheet resistance of 1.63x10 4 Ω/square. The activation efficiency was also a function of dose, with a maximum activation percentage of only 55% for lower doses of 1.0x10 14 cm -2 annealed at 1375 deg. C. This is due to the comparatively larger effect of compensating acceptors at the lower dose and is also lower than the corresponding activation of Si in pure GaN under these conditions (78%). The measurement temperature dependence of sheet carrier density showed an activation energy of 23 meV, consistent with the ionization energy of Si in AlGaN

  6. Degradation of AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors with Different AlGaN Layer Thicknesses under Strong Electric Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Yang; Yue, Hao; Xiao-Hua, Ma; Jing-Jing, Ma; Cheng, Zhu

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) has a close relationship with a model of traps in AlGaN barriers as a result of high electric field. We mainly discuss the impacts of strong electrical field on the AlGaN barrier thickness of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. It is found that the device with a thin AlGaN barrier layer is more easily degraded. We study the degradation of four parameters, i.e. the gate series resistance R Gate , channel resistance R channel , gate current I G,off at V GS = −5 and V DS = 0.1 V, and drain current I D,max at V GS = 2 and V DS = 5 V. In addition, the degradation mechanisms of the device electrical parameters are also investigated in detail. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  7. Ginzburg-Landau-type theory of nonpolarized spin superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Peng; Bao, Zhi-qiang; Guo, Ai-Min; Xie, X. C.; Sun, Qing-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Since the concept of spin superconductor was proposed, all the related studies concentrate on the spin-polarized case. Here, we generalize the study to the spin-non-polarized case. The free energy of nonpolarized spin superconductor is obtained, and Ginzburg-Landau-type equations are derived by using the variational method. These Ginzburg-Landau-type equations can be reduced to the spin-polarized case when the spin direction is fixed. Moreover, the expressions of super linear and angular spin currents inside the superconductor are derived. We demonstrate that the electric field induced by the super spin current is equal to the one induced by an equivalent charge obtained from the second Ginzburg-Landau-type equation, which shows self-consistency of our theory. By applying these Ginzburg-Landau-type equations, the effect of electric field on the superconductor is also studied. These results will help us get a better understanding of the spin superconductor and related topics such as the Bose-Einstein condensate of magnons and spin superfluidity.

  8. Density and Phase State of a Confined Nonpolar Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Daniel F.; Kuhl, Tonya L.

    2016-07-01

    Measurements of the mean refractive index of a spherelike nonpolar fluid, octamethytetracylclosiloxane (OMCTS), confined between mica sheets, demonstrate direct and conclusive experimental evidence of the absence of a first-order liquid-to-solid phase transition in the fluid when confined, which has been suggested to occur from previous experimental and simulation results. The results also show that the density remains constant throughout confinement, and that the fluid is incompressible. This, along with the observation of very large increases (many orders of magnitude) in viscosity during confinement from the literature, demonstrate that the molecular motion is limited by the confining wall and not the molecular packing. In addition, the recently developed refractive index profile correction method, which enables the structural perturbation inherent at a solid-liquid interface and that of a liquid in confinement to be determined independently, was used to show that there was no measurable excess or depleted mass of OMCTS near the mica surface in bulk films or confined films of only two molecular layers.

  9. Phosphorene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnoi, Pratap; Mazumder, Madhulika; Barua, Manaswee; Pati, Swapan K.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2018-05-01

    Phosphorene, a two-dimensional material, has been a subject of recent investigations. In the present study, we have prepared blue fluorescent phosphorene quantum dots (PQDs) by liquid phase exfoliation of black phosphorus in two non-polar solvents, toluene and mesitylene. The average particle sizes of PQDs decrease from 5.0 to 1.0 nm on increasing the sonicator power from 150 to 225 W. The photoluminescence spectrum of the PQDs is red-shifted in the 395-470 nm range on increasing the excitation-wavelength from 300 to 480 nm. Electron donor and acceptor molecules quench the photoluminescence, with the acceptors showing more marked effects.

  10. Adsorption of polar, nonpolar, and substituted aromatics to colloidal graphene oxide nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Fang; Haftka, Joris J H; Sinnige, Theo L.; Hermens, Joop L M; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We conducted batch adsorption experiments to understand the adsorptive properties of colloidal graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) for a range of environmentally relevant aromatics and substituted aromatics, including model nonpolar compounds (pyrene, phenanthrene, naphthalene, and

  11. Design technique for all-dielectric non-polarizing beam splitter plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizea, A.

    2012-03-01

    There are many situations when, for the proper working, an opto-electronic device requiring optical components does not change the polarization state of light after a reflection, splitting or filtering. In this paper, a design for a non-polarizing beam splitter plate is proposed. Based on certain optical properties of homogeneous dielectric materials we will establish a reliable thin film package formula, excellent for the start of optimization to obtain a 20-nm bandwidth non-polarizing beam splitter.

  12. Growth of AlGaN under the conditions of significant gallium evaporation: phase separation and enhanced lateral growth

    OpenAIRE

    Mayboroda, I. O.; Knizhnik, A. A.; Grishchenko, Yu. V.; Ezubchenko, I. S.; Zanaveskin, Maxim L.; Presniakov, M. Yu.; Potapkin, B. V.; Ilyin, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Growth kinetics of AlGaN in NH3 MBE under significant Ga desorption was studied. It was found that the addition of gallium stimulates 2D growth and provides better morphology of films compared to pure AlN. The effect was experimentally observed at up to 98% desorption of the impinging gallium. We found that, under the conditions of significant thermal desorption, larger amounts of gallium were retained at lateral boundaries of 3D surface features than at flat terraces because of the higher bi...

  13. The influence of non-polar lipids on tear film dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, M.

    2014-04-04

    © 2014 Cambridge University Press. In this paper we examine the effect that physiological non-polar lipids, residing on the surface of an aqueous tear film, have on the film evolution. In our model we track the evolution of the thickness of the non-polar lipid layer, the thickness of the aqueous layer and the concentration of polar lipids which reside at the interface between the two. We also utilise a force balance in the non-polar lipid layer in order to determine its velocity. We show how to obtain previous models in the literature from our model by making particular choices of the parameters. We see the formation of boundary layers in some of these submodels, across which the concentration of polar lipid and the non-polar lipid velocity and film thickness vary. We solve our model numerically for physically realistic parameter values, and we find that the evolution of the aqueous layer and the polar lipid layer are similar to that described by previous authors. However, there are interesting dynamics for the non-polar lipid layer. The effects of altering the key parameters are highlighted and discussed. In particular, we see that the Marangoni number plays a key role in determining how far over the eye the non-polar lipid spreads.

  14. Effects of the strain relaxation of an AlGaN barrier layer induced by various cap layers on the transport properties in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zi-Yang; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Duan Huan-Tao; Xue Jun-Shuai; Lin Zhi-Yu; Ma Jun-Cai; Xue Xiao-Yong; Hao Yue

    2011-01-01

    The strain relaxation of an AlGaN barrier layer may be influenced by a thin cap layer above, and affects the transport properties of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. Compared with the slight strain relaxation found in AlGaN barrier layer without cap layer, it is found that a thin cap layer can induce considerable changes of strain state in the AlGaN barrier layer. The degree of relaxation of the AlGaN layer significantly influences the transport properties of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. It is observed that electron mobility decreases with the increasing degree of relaxation of the AlGaN barrier, which is believed to be the main cause of the deterioration of crystalline quality and morphology on the AlGaN/GaN interface. On the other hand, both GaN and AlN cap layers lead to a decrease in 2DEG density. The reduction of 2DEG caused by the GaN cap layer may be attributed to the additional negative polarization charges formed at the interface between GaN and AlGaN, while the reduction of the piezoelectric effect in the AlGaN layer results in the decrease of 2DEG density in the case of AlN cap layer. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  15. Magnetic and structural properties of manganese doped (Al,Ga)N studied with emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Gallium nitride (GaN) and related compounds form a unique class of semiconductors with extraordinary qualities in terms of their crystal structure, optical properties, and electrical properties. These novel properties have made them useful in a wide range of applications in optoelectronic and high-frequency devices such as light emitting diodes, laser diodes and high power field effect transistors. When doped with a few percents of Mn and in the presence of free holes, GaN has been predicted to be a magnetic semiconductor with Curie temperature above room temperature. Mixed semiconductors of Al$_{x}$Ga$_{1-x}$N (AlGaN) composition, give rise to unexpected and critical magnetic and photonic functionalities when doped with magnetic ion species. Here we propose an experiment on very thoroughly characterised AlGaN doped with Mn utilising extremely dilute $^{57}$Mn (T$_{1/2}$=1.5 min), $^{57}$Co (T$_{1/2}$ = 272 d) and $^{119}$In (T$_{1/2}$=2.1 min) implantations, in order to perform $^{57}$Fe and $^{119}$Sn emiss...

  16. Control of short-channel effects in InAlN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors using graded AlGaN buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tiecheng; Zhao, Hongdong; Peng, Xiaocan; Li, Yuhai

    2018-04-01

    A graded AlGaN buffer is designed to realize the p-type buffer by inducing polarization-doping holes. Based on the two-dimensional device simulator, the effect of the graded AlGaN buffer on the direct-current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) performance of short-gate InAlN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) are investigated, theoretically. Compared to standard HEMT, an enhancement of electron confinement and a good control of short-channel effect (SCEs) are demonstrated in the graded AlGaN buffer HEMT. Accordingly, the pinched-off behavior and the ability of gate modulation are significantly improved. And, no serious SCEs are observed in the graded AlGaN buffer HEMT with an aspect ratio (LG/tch) of about 6.7, much lower than that of the standard HEMT (LG/tch = 13). In addition, for a 70-nm gate length, a peak current gain cutoff frequency (fT) of 171 GHz and power gain cutoff frequency (fmax) of 191 GHz are obtained in the grade buffer HEMT, which are higher than those of the standard one with the same gate length.

  17. Metal organic vapor phase epitaxy growth of (Al)GaN heterostructures on SiC/Si(111) templates synthesized by topochemical method of atoms substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozhavskaya, Mariia M.; Kukushkin, Sergey A.; Osipov, Andrey V.

    2017-01-01

    We report a novel approach for metal organic vapor phase epitaxy of (Al)GaN heterostructures on Si substrates. An approximately 90–100 nm thick SiC buffer layer is synthesized using the reaction between Si substrate and CO gas. Highresolution transmission electron microscopy reveals sharp...

  18. Physical and electrical characterizations of AlGaN/GaN MOS gate stacks with AlGaN surface oxidation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Watanabe, Kenta; Nozaki, Mikito; Shih, Hong-An; Nakazawa, Satoshi; Anda, Yoshiharu; Ueda, Tetsuzo; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2018-06-01

    The impacts of inserting ultrathin oxides into insulator/AlGaN interfaces on their electrical properties were investigated to develop advanced AlGaN/GaN metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) gate stacks. For this purpose, the initial thermal oxidation of AlGaN surfaces in oxygen ambient was systematically studied by synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our physical characterizations revealed that, when compared with GaN surfaces, aluminum addition promotes the initial oxidation of AlGaN surfaces at temperatures of around 400 °C, followed by smaller grain growth above 850 °C. Electrical measurements of AlGaN/GaN MOS capacitors also showed that, although excessive oxidation treatment of AlGaN surfaces over around 700 °C has an adverse effect, interface passivation with the initial oxidation of the AlGaN surfaces at temperatures ranging from 400 to 500 °C was proven to be beneficial for fabricating high-quality AlGaN/GaN MOS gate stacks.

  19. Experimental evidences for reducing Mg activation energy in high Al-content AlGaN alloy by MgGa δ doping in (AlN)m/(GaN)n superlattice

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao Wang; Wei Wang; Jingli Wang; Hao Wu; Chang Liu

    2017-01-01

    P-type doping in high Al-content AlGaN alloys is a main challenge for realizing AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet optoelectronics devices. According to the first-principles calculations, Mg activation energy may be reduced so that a high hole concentration can be obtained by introducing nanoscale (AlN)5/(GaN)1 superlattice (SL) in Al0.83Ga0.17N disorder alloy. In this work, experimental evidences were achieved by analyzing Mg doped high Al-content AlGaN alloys and Mg doped AlGaN SLs as well as MgG...

  20. Determination of Temperature-Dependent Stress State in Thin AlGaN Layer of AlGaN/GaN HEMT Heterostructures by Near-Resonant Raman Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Yanli Liu; Xifeng Yang; Dunjun Chen; Hai Lu; Rong Zhang; Youdou Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The temperature-dependent stress state in the AlGaN barrier layer of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure grown on sapphire substrate was investigated by ultraviolet (UV) near-resonant Raman scattering. Strong scattering peak resulting from the A1(LO) phonon mode of AlGaN is observed under near-resonance condition, which allows for the accurate measurement of Raman shifts with temperature. The temperature-dependent stress in the AlGaN layer determined by the resonance Raman spectra is consistent with th...

  1. Synchrotron-based XPS studies of AlGaN and GaN surface chemistry and its relationship to ion sensor behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khir, Farah Liyana Muhammad, E-mail: 21001899@student.uwa.edu.au [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Myers, Matthew, E-mail: Matt.Myers@csiro.au [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering, Kensington, Western Australia 6151 (Australia); Podolska, Anna [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Exploration Geophysics, Curtin University of Technology, 26 Dick Perry Avenue, ARRC, Kensington, Western Australia 6151 (Australia); Sanders, Tarun Maruthi [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Baker, Murray V., E-mail: murray.baker@uwa.edu.au [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Nener, Brett D., E-mail: brett.nener@uwa.edu.au [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Parish, Giacinta, E-mail: giacinta.parish@uwa.edu.au [School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy., Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Soft X-ray was used to study the surface chemistry of GaN and AlGaN. • The surface chemistry and sensor behaviour were investigated. • The oxide of aluminum is significantly more reactive than gallium. • The Cl{sup −} ions are greater in GaN samples compared to AlGaN samples. - Abstract: Soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the fundamental surface chemistry of both AlGaN and GaN surfaces in the context of understanding the behaviour of AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as chemical field-effect transistor (CHEMFET) ion sensors. AlGaN and GaN samples were subjected to different methods of oxide growth (native oxide and thermally grown oxide) and chemical treatment conditions. Our investigations indicate that the etching of the oxide layer is more pronounced with AlGaN compared to GaN. Also, we observed that chloride ions have a greater tendency to attach to the GaN surface relative to the AlGaN surface. Furthermore, chloride ions are comparatively more prevalent on surfaces treated with 5% HCl acid solution. The concentration of chloride ions is even higher on the HCl treated native oxide surface resulting in a very clear deconvolution of the Cl 2p{sub 1/2} and Cl 2p{sub 3/2} peaks. For GaN and AlGaN surfaces, a linear response (e.g. source-drain current) is typically seen with variation in pH of buffered solutions with constant reference electrode voltage at the surface gate; however, an inverted bath-tub type response (e.g. a maximum at neutral pH and lower values at pH values away from neutral) and a general tendency to negative charge selectivity has been also widely reported. We have shown that our XPS investigations are consistent with the different sensor response reported in the literature for these CHEMFET devices and may help to explain the differing response of these materials.

  2. Influence of thermal stress on the relative permittivity of the AlGaN barrier layer in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure Schottky contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lü Yuan-Jie; Lin Zhao-Jun; Zhang Yu; Meng Ling-Guo; Cao Zhi-Fang; Luan Chong-Biao; Chen Hong; Wang Zhan-Guo

    2011-01-01

    Ni Schottky contacts on AlGaN/GaN heterostructures were fabricated. Some samples were thermally treated in a furnace with N 2 ambience at 600 °C for different times (0.5 h, 4.5 h, 10.5 h, 18 h, 33 h, 48 h, and 72 h), the others were thermally treated for 0.5 h at different temperatures (500 °C, 600 °C, 700 °C, and 800 °C). With the measured current—voltage (I—V) and capacitance—voltage (C—V) curves and by self-consistently solving Schrodinger's and Poisson's equations, we found that the relative permittivity of the AlGaN barrier layer was related to the piezoelectric and the spontaneous polarization of the AlGaN barrier layer. The relative permittivity was in proportion to the strain of the AlGaN barrier layer. The relative permittivity and the strain reduced with the increased thermal stress time until the AlGaN barrier totally relaxed (after 18 h at 600 °C in the current study), and then the relative permittivity was almost a constant with the increased thermal stress time. When the sample was treated at 800 °C for 0.5 h, the relative permittivity was less than the constant due to the huge diffusion of the contact metal atoms. Considering the relation between the relative permittivity of the AlGaN barrier layer and the converse piezoelectric effect, the conclusion can be made that a moderate thermal stress can restrain the converse piezoelectric effect and can improve the stability of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure devices. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  3. Determination of Temperature-Dependent Stress State in Thin AlGaN Layer of AlGaN/GaN HEMT Heterostructures by Near-Resonant Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-dependent stress state in the AlGaN barrier layer of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure grown on sapphire substrate was investigated by ultraviolet (UV near-resonant Raman scattering. Strong scattering peak resulting from the A1(LO phonon mode of AlGaN is observed under near-resonance condition, which allows for the accurate measurement of Raman shifts with temperature. The temperature-dependent stress in the AlGaN layer determined by the resonance Raman spectra is consistent with the theoretical calculation result, taking lattice mismatch and thermal mismatch into account together. This good agreement indicates that the UV near-resonant Raman scattering can be a direct and effective method to characterize the stress state in thin AlGaN barrier layer of AlGaN/GaN HEMT heterostructures.

  4. Exciplex fluorescence emission from simple organic intramolecular constructs in non-polar and highly polar media as model systems for DNA-assembled exciplex detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichenkova, Elena V; Sardarian, Ali R; Wilton, Amanda N; Bonnet, Pascal; Bryce, Richard A; Douglas, Kenneth T

    2006-01-21

    Organic intramolecular exciplexes, N-(4-dimethylaminobenzyl)-N-(1-pyrenemethyl)amine (1) and N'-4-dimethylaminonaphthyl-N-(1-pyrenemethyl)amine (2), were used as model systems to reveal major factors affecting their exciplex fluorescence, and thus lay the basis for developing emissive target-assembled exciplexes for DNA-mounted systems in solution. These models with an aromatic pyrenyl hydrocarbon moiety as an electron acceptor appropriately connected to an aromatic dimethylamino electron donor component (N,N-dimethylaminophenyl or N,N-dimethylaminonaphthyl) showed strong intramolecular exciplex emission in both non-polar and highly polar solvents. The effect of dielectric constant on the maximum wavelength for exciplex emission was studied, and emission was observed for 1 and 2 over the full range of solvent from non-polar hydrocarbons up to N-methylformamide with a dielectric constant of 182. Quantum yields were determined for these intramolecular exciplexes in a range of solvents relative to that for Hoechst 33,258. Conformational analysis of 1 was performed both computationally and via qualitative 2D NMR using (1)H-NOESY experiments. The results obtained indicated the contribution of pre-folded conformation(s) to the ground state of 1 conducive to exciplex emission. This research provides the initial background for design of self-assembled, DNA-mounted exciplexes and underpins further development of exciplex-based hybridisation bioassays.

  5. Conversion of proteins from a non-polarized to an apical secretory pattern in MDCK cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, Lotte K.; Larsen, Jakob E.; Hansen, Martin; Truffer, Renato

    2005-01-01

    Previously it was shown that fusion proteins containing the amino terminus of an apical targeted member of the serpin family fused to the corresponding carboxyl terminus of the non-polarized secreted serpin, antithrombin, are secreted mainly to the apical side of MDCK cells. The present study shows that this is neither due to the transfer of an apical sorting signal from the apically expressed proteins, since a sequence of random amino acids acts the same, nor is it due to the deletion of a conserved signal for correct targeting from the non-polarized secreted protein. Our results suggest that the polarity of secretion is determined by conformational sensitive sorting signals

  6. Designs of infrared nonpolarizing beam splitters with a Ag layer in a glass cube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jin Hui; Wang, Zheng Ping

    2008-05-10

    A novel design of a nonpolarizing beam splitter with a Ag layer in a cube was proposed and optimized, based on the needle optimization. The digital simulations of the reflectance and reflection-induced retardance were presented. The simulation results showed that both the amplitude and the phase characteristics of the nonpolarizing beam splitter could realize the design targets. The difference between the simulated and the target reflectance of 50% is less than 0.4% and the simulated and the reflection-induced retardance is less than 0.62 degrees in the 1260 -1360 nm range for both p and s components.

  7. Nonpolarizing beam splitter designed by frustrated total internal reflection inside a glass cube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xueke; Shao, Jianda; Fan, Zhengxiu

    2006-06-20

    A method for the design of an all-dielectric nonpolarizing prism beam splitter utilizing the principle of frustrated total internal reflection is reported. The nonpolarizing condition for a prism beam splitter is discussed, and some single layer design examples are elaborated. The concept can be applied to a wide range of wavelengths and arbitrary transmittance values, and with the help of a computer design program examples of 400-700 nm, T(p)=T(s)=0.5+/-0.01, with incident angles of 45 degrees and 62 degrees are given. In addition, the sensitivity and application of the design are also discussed.

  8. Design and analysis of metal-dielectric nonpolarizing beam splitters in a glass cube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jin Hui; Guan, Chun Ying; Wang, Zheng Ping

    2009-06-20

    A novel design of a 25-layer metal-dielectric nonpolarizing beam splitter in a cube is proposed by use of the optimization method and is theoretically investigated. The simulations of the reflectance and differential phases induced by reflection and transmission are presented. The simulation results reveal that both the amplitude and the phase characteristics of the nonpolarizing beam splitter could realize the design targets, the differences between the simulated and the target reflectance of 50% are less than 2%, and the differential phases are less than 3 degrees in the range of 530 nm-570 nm for both p and s components.

  9. Design and analysis of all-dielectric broadband nonpolarizing parallel-plate beam splitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenliang; Xiong, Shengming; Zhang, Yundong

    2007-06-01

    Past research on the all-dielectric nonpolarizing beam splitter is reviewed. With the aid of the needle thin-film synthesis method and the conjugate graduate refine method, three different split ratio nonpolarizing parallel-plate beam splitters over a 200 nm spectral range centered at 550 nm with incidence angles of 45 degrees are designed. The chosen materials component and the initial stack are based on the Costich and Thelen theories. The results of design and analysis show that the designs maintain a very low polarization ratio in the working range of the spectrum and has a reasonable angular field.

  10. Optical Interference Coatings Design Contest 2007: triple bandpass filter and nonpolarizing beam splitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilsch, Markus; Hendrix, Karen

    2008-05-01

    A triple bandpass filter (28 solutions received) and a nonpolarizing beam splitter (23 solutions received) were the subjects of the design contest held in conjunction with the 2007 Optical Interference Coatings topical meeting of the Optical Society of America. Fifteen designers participated using a wide spectrum of design approaches and optimization strategies to create the submissions. The results differ significantly, but all meet the contest requirements. Fabien Lemarchand wins both contests by submitting the thinnest (6254 nm) triple bandpass design and the widest (61.7 nm) nonpolarizing beam-splitter design. Michael Trubetskov is in second place, followed by Vladimir Pervak in both contests. The submitted designs are described and evaluated.

  11. Temporal evolution of multi-carrier complexes in single GaN/AlGaN quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surowiecka, K.; Wysmolek, A.; Stepniewski, R.; Bozek, R.; Pakula, K.; Baranowski, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Micro photoluminescence of low-density GaN/Al x Ga 1-x N quantum dots grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy using in situ etching of AlGaN is presented. The narrow lines in the micro photoluminescence spectra due to the single quantum dots are observed. Both energy and intensity of these lines show temporal fluctuations. Statistical analysis based on the correlation matrix allowed us to identify objects, which are affected by photo-induced electric field fluctuations. Relations between emission lines participating in the spectrum are discussed. (author)

  12. Passive sampling in regulatory chemical monitoring of nonpolar organic compounds in the aquatic environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, K.; Robinson, C.D.; Burgess, R.M.; Mayer, P.; Roberts, C.A.; Ahrens, L.; Allan, I.J.; Brant, J.; Jones, L.; Kraus, U.R.; Larsen, M.M.; Lepom, P.; Petersen, J.; Pröfrock, D.; Roose, P.; Schäfer, S.; Smedes, F.; Tixier, C.; Vorkamp, K.; Whitehouse, P.

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the EuropeanUnion, the United States, and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of themarine environment of the North-East Atlantic, and evaluated if these are met bypassive sampling methods for nonpolar compounds. The strengths

  13. Role of the electronegativity for the interface properties of non-polar heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar; Singh, Nirpendra; Kahaly, M. Upadhyay; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    Density functional theory is used to investigate the interfaces in the non-polar ATiO 3/SrTiO 3 (A=Pb, Ca, Ba) heterostructures. All TiO 2-terminated interfaces show an insulating behavior. By reduction of the O content in the AO, SrO, and TiO 2

  14. Temperature programmed retention indices : calculation from isothermal data Part 2: Results with nonpolar columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curvers, J.M.P.M.; Rijks, J.A.; Cramers, C.A.M.G.; Knauss, K.; Larson, P.

    1985-01-01

    The procedure for calculating linear temperature programmed indices as described in part 1 has been evaluated using five different nonpolar columns, with OV-1 as the stationary phase. For fourty-three different solutes covering five different classes of components, including n-alkanes and

  15. The influence of non-polar lipids on tear film dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, M.; Breward, C.  J.  W.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Cambridge University Press. In this paper we examine the effect that physiological non-polar lipids, residing on the surface of an aqueous tear film, have on the film evolution. In our model we track the evolution of the thickness of the non

  16. Surface chemistry and electronic structure of nonpolar and polar GaN films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Monu; Krishna, T.C. Shibin; Aggarwal, Neha; Gupta, Govind, E-mail: govind@nplindia.org

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Surface chemistry and electronic structure of polar and nonpolar GaN is reported. • Influence of polarization on electron affinity of p & np GaN films is investigated. • Correlation between surface morphology and polarity has been deduced. - Abstract: Photoemission and microscopic analysis of nonpolar (a-GaN/r-Sapphire) and polar (c-GaN/c-Sapphire) epitaxial gallium nitride (GaN) films grown via RF-Molecular Beam Epitaxy is reported. The effect of polarization on surface properties like surface states, electronic structure, chemical bonding and morphology has been investigated and correlated. It was observed that polarization lead to shifts in core level (CL) as well as valence band (VB) spectra. Angle dependent X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic analysis revealed higher surface oxide in polar GaN film compared to nonpolar GaN film. On varying the take off angle (TOA) from 0° to 60°, the Ga−O/Ga−N ratio varied from 0.11–0.23 for nonpolar and 0.17–0.36 for polar GaN film. The nonpolar film exhibited N-face polarity while Ga-face polarity was perceived in polar GaN film due to the inherent polarization effect. Polarization charge compensated surface states were observed on the polar GaN film and resulted in downward band bending. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic measurements revealed electron affinity and ionization energy of 3.4 ± 0.1 eV and 6.8 ± 0.1 eV for nonpolar GaN film and 3.8 ± 0.1 eV and 7.2 ± 0.1 eV for polar GaN film respectively. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy measurements divulged smooth morphology with pits on polar GaN film. The nonpolar film on the other hand showed pyramidal structures having facets all over the surface.

  17. Effects of fluorine-based plasma treatment and thermal annealing on high-Al content AlGaN Schottky contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fang; Qin Zhixin

    2016-01-01

    Fluorine plasma treatment was used prior to the Schottky metal deposition on the undoped Al 0.45 Ga 0.55 N, which aimed at the solar-blind wavelength. After fluorine plasma treatment and before depositing the Ni/Au Schottky, the samples were thermal annealed in the N 2 gas at 400 °C. The reverse leakage current density of Al 0.45 Ga 0.55 N Schottky diode was reduced by 2 orders of magnitude at −10 V. The reverse leakage current density was reduced by 3 orders of magnitude after thermal annealing. Further capacitance–frequency analysis revealed that the fluorine-based plasma treatment reduces the surface states of AlGaN by one order of magnitude at different surface state energies. The capacitance–frequency analysis also proved that the concentration of carriers in AlGaN top is reduced through fluorine plasma treatment. (paper)

  18. Effects of NH3 Flow Rate During AlGaN Barrier Layer Growth on the Material Properties of AlGaN/GaN HEMT Heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbantoruan, Franky J.; Wong, Yuen-Yee; Huang, Wei-Ching; Yu, Hung-Wei; Chang, Edward-Yi

    2017-10-01

    NH3 flow rate during AlGaN barrier layer growth not only affects the growth efficiency and surface morphology as a result of parasitic reactions but also influences the concentration of carbon impurity in the AlGaN barrier. Carbon, which decomposes from metal precursors, plays a role in electron compensation for AlGaN/GaN HEMT. No 2-dimensional electron gas (2-DEG) was detected in the AlGaN/GaN structure if grown with 0.5 slm of NH3 due to the presence of higher carbon impurity (2.6 × 1019 cm-2). When the NH3 flow rate increased to 6.0 slm, the carbon impurity reduced to 2.10 × 1018 atom cm-3 and the 2 DEG electron density recovered to 9.57 × 1012 cm-2.

  19. Ti/TaN Bilayer for Efficient Injection and Reliable AlGaN Nanowires LEDs

    KAUST Repository

    Priante, Davide

    2018-05-07

    Reliable operation of UV AlGaN-based nanowires-LED at high injection current was realized by incorporating a Ti-pre-orienting/TaN-diffusion-barrier bilayer, thus enhancing external quantum efficiency, and resolving the existing device degradation issue in group-III-nanowires-on-silicon devices.

  20. Ti/TaN Bilayer for Efficient Injection and Reliable AlGaN Nanowires LEDs

    KAUST Repository

    Priante, Davide; Janjua, Bilal; Prabaswara, Aditya; Subedi, Ram Chandra; Elafandy, Rami T.; Lopatin, Sergei; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Zhao, Chao; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2018-01-01

    Reliable operation of UV AlGaN-based nanowires-LED at high injection current was realized by incorporating a Ti-pre-orienting/TaN-diffusion-barrier bilayer, thus enhancing external quantum efficiency, and resolving the existing device degradation

  1. Impact of post-deposition annealing on interfacial chemical bonding states between AlGaN and ZrO2 grown by atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Ng, Serene Lay Geok; Ji, Rong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of post-deposition annealing on chemical bonding states at interface between Al 0.5 Ga 0.5 N and ZrO 2 grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is studied by angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It has been found that both of Al-O/Al 2p and Ga-O/Ga 3d area ratio decrease at annealing temperatures lower than 500 °C, which could be attributed to “clean up” effect of ALD-ZrO 2 on AlGaN. Compared to Ga spectra, a much larger decrease in Al-O/Al 2p ratio at a smaller take-off angle θ is observed, which indicates higher effectiveness of the passivation of Al-O bond than Ga-O bond through “clean up” effect near the interface. However, degradation of ZrO 2 /AlGaN interface quality due to re-oxidation at higher annealing temperature (>500 °C) is also found. The XPS spectra clearly reveal that Al atoms at ZrO 2 /AlGaN interface are easier to get oxidized as compared with Ga atoms

  2. Effect of surface pretreatment on interfacial chemical bonding states of atomic layer deposited ZrO2 on AlGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Gang; Arulkumaran, Subramaniam; Ng, Geok Ing; Li, Yang; Ang, Kian Siong; Wang, Hong; Ng, Serene Lay Geok; Ji, Rong; Liu, Zhi Hong

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZrO 2 on native oxide covered (untreated) and buffered oxide etchant (BOE) treated AlGaN surface was analyzed by utilizing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Evidenced by Ga–O and Al–O chemical bonds by XPS, parasitic oxidation during deposition is largely enhanced on BOE treated AlGaN surface. Due to the high reactivity of Al atoms, more prominent oxidation of Al atoms is observed, which leads to thicker interfacial layer formed on BOE treated surface. The results suggest that native oxide on AlGaN surface may serve as a protecting layer to inhibit the surface from further parasitic oxidation during ALD. The findings provide important process guidelines for the use of ALD ZrO 2 and its pre-ALD surface treatments for high-k AlGaN/GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor high electron mobility transistors and other related device applications

  3. Effects of low charge carrier wave function overlap on internal quantum efficiency in GaInN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netzel, Carsten; Hoffmann, Veit; Wernicke, Tim; Knauer, Arne; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Strasse 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Strasse 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    To determine relevant processes affecting the internal quantum efficiency in GaInN quantum well structures, we have studied the temperature and excitation power dependent photoluminescence intensity for quantum wells with different well widths on (0001) c-plane GaN and for quantum wells on nonpolar (11-20) a-plane GaN. In thick polar quantum wells, the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) causes a stronger intensity decrease with increasing temperature as long as the radiative recombination dominates. At higher temperatures, when the nonradiative recombination becomes more important, thick polar quantum wells feature a lower relative intensity decrease than thinner polar or nonpolar quantum wells. Excitation power dependent photoluminescence points to a transition from a recombination of excitons to a bimolecular recombination of uncorrelated charge carriers for thick polar quantum wells in the same temperature range. This transition might contribute to the limitation of nonradiative recombination by a reduced diffusivity of charge carriers. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. High temperature and low pressure chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride on AlGaN: Band offsets and passivation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Pramod; Washiyama, Shun; Kaess, Felix; Hernandez-Balderrama, Luis H.; Haidet, Brian B.; Alden, Dorian; Franke, Alexander; Sarkar, Biplab; Kohn, Erhard; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7919 (United States); Hayden Breckenridge, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7919 (United States); REU, Physics Department at Wofford College, Spartanburg, South Carolina 29303 (United States)

    2016-04-14

    In this work, we employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the band offsets and interface Fermi level at the heterojunction formed by stoichiometric silicon nitride deposited on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (of varying Al composition “x”) via low pressure chemical vapor deposition. Silicon nitride is found to form a type II staggered band alignment with AlGaN for all Al compositions (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) and present an electron barrier into AlGaN even at higher Al compositions, where E{sub g}(AlGaN) > E{sub g}(Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). Further, no band bending is observed in AlGaN for x ≤ 0.6 and a reduced band bending (by ∼1 eV in comparison to that at free surface) is observed for x > 0.6. The Fermi level in silicon nitride is found to be at 3 eV with respect to its valence band, which is likely due to silicon (≡Si{sup 0/−1}) dangling bonds. The presence of band bending for x > 0.6 is seen as a likely consequence of Fermi level alignment at Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/AlGaN hetero-interface and not due to interface states. Photoelectron spectroscopy results are corroborated by current-voltage-temperature and capacitance-voltage measurements. A shift in the interface Fermi level (before band bending at equilibrium) from the conduction band in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/n-GaN to the valence band in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/p-GaN is observed, which strongly indicates a reduction in mid-gap interface states. Hence, stoichiometric silicon nitride is found to be a feasible passivation and dielectric insulation material for AlGaN at any composition.

  5. Quantum optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agarwal, G. S

    2013-01-01

    .... Focusing on applications of quantum optics, the textbook covers recent developments such as engineering of quantum states, quantum optics on a chip, nano-mechanical mirrors, quantum entanglement...

  6. Passive Sampling in Regulatory Chemical Monitoring of Nonpolar Organic Compounds in the Aquatic Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booij, Kees; Robinson, Craig D; Burgess, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the European Union, the United States, and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of the marine environment of the North-East Atlantic, and evaluated if these are met by passive sampling methods for nonpolar compounds. The strengths...... is the best available technology for chemical monitoring of nonpolar organic compounds. Key issues to be addressed by scientists and environmental managers are outlined....... and shortcomings of passive sampling are assessed for water, sediments, and biota. Passive water sampling is a suitable technique for measuring concentrations of freely dissolved compounds. This method yields results that are incompatible with the EU's quality standard definition in terms of total concentrations...

  7. Broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitters with variable split ratio

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Minggui

    2017-08-15

    Seeking effective terahertz functional devices has always aroused extensive attention. Of particular interest is the terahertz beam splitter. Here, we have proposed, designed, manufactured, and tested a broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitter with a variable split ratio based on an all-dielectric metasurface. The metasurface was created by patterning a dielectric surface of the N-step phase gradient and etching to a few hundred micrometers. The conversion efficiency as high as 81% under the normal incidence at 0.7 THz was achieved. Meanwhile, such a splitter works well over a broad frequency range. The split ratio of the proposed design can be continuously tuned by simply shifting the metasurface, and the angle of emergences can also be easily adjusted by choosing the step of phase gradients. The proposed design is non-polarizing, and its performance is kept under different polarizations.

  8. Broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitters with variable split ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Minggui; Xu, Quan; Wang, Qiu; Zhang, Xueqian; Li, Yanfeng; Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Xixiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2017-08-01

    Seeking effective terahertz functional devices has always aroused extensive attention. Of particular interest is the terahertz beam splitter. Here, we have proposed, designed, manufactured, and tested a broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitter with a variable split ratio based on an all-dielectric metasurface. The metasurface was created by patterning a dielectric surface of the N-step phase gradient and etching to a few hundred micrometers. The conversion efficiency as high as 81% under the normal incidence at 0.7 THz was achieved. Meanwhile, such a splitter works well over a broad frequency range. The split ratio of the proposed design can be continuously tuned by simply shifting the metasurface, and the angle of emergences can also be easily adjusted by choosing the step of phase gradients. The proposed design is non-polarizing, and its performance is kept under different polarizations.

  9. Multi-wavelength metal-dielectric nonpolarizing beam splitters in the near-infrared range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui Shi, Jin; Ping Wang, Zheng; Ying Guan, Chun; Yang, Jun; Shu Fu, Tian

    2011-04-01

    A 21-layer multi-wavelength metal-dielectric nonpolarizing cube beam splitter was designed by use of an optimization method and theoretically investigated in the near-infrared range. The angular dependence of the reflectance and differential phases induced by reflection and transmission were presented. The simulation results revealed that the non-polarizing effect could be achieved for both the amplitude and phase characteristics at 1310 and 1550 nm. The differences between the simulated and the target reflectance of 50% are less than 2% and differential phases are less than 5°in the range 1300-1320 nm and 1540-1550 nm for both p- and s-components.

  10. Broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitters with variable split ratio

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Minggui; Xu, Quan; Wang, Qiu; Zhang, Xueqian; Li, Yanfeng; Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; Zhang, Xixiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2017-01-01

    Seeking effective terahertz functional devices has always aroused extensive attention. Of particular interest is the terahertz beam splitter. Here, we have proposed, designed, manufactured, and tested a broadband non-polarizing terahertz beam splitter with a variable split ratio based on an all-dielectric metasurface. The metasurface was created by patterning a dielectric surface of the N-step phase gradient and etching to a few hundred micrometers. The conversion efficiency as high as 81% under the normal incidence at 0.7 THz was achieved. Meanwhile, such a splitter works well over a broad frequency range. The split ratio of the proposed design can be continuously tuned by simply shifting the metasurface, and the angle of emergences can also be easily adjusted by choosing the step of phase gradients. The proposed design is non-polarizing, and its performance is kept under different polarizations.

  11. Experimental evidences for reducing Mg activation energy in high Al-content AlGaN alloy by MgGa δ doping in (AlN)m/(GaN)n superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jingli; Wu, Hao; Liu, Chang

    2017-03-01

    P-type doping in high Al-content AlGaN alloys is a main challenge for realizing AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet optoelectronics devices. According to the first-principles calculations, Mg activation energy may be reduced so that a high hole concentration can be obtained by introducing nanoscale (AlN)5/(GaN)1 superlattice (SL) in Al0.83Ga0.17N disorder alloy. In this work, experimental evidences were achieved by analyzing Mg doped high Al-content AlGaN alloys and Mg doped AlGaN SLs as well as MgGa δ doped AlGaN SLs. Mg acceptor activation energy was significantly reduced from 0.378 to 0.331 eV by using MgGa δ doping in SLs instead of traditional doping in alloys. This new process was confirmed to be able to realize high p-type doping in high Al-content AlGaN.

  12. Critical thickness for the formation of misfit dislocations originating from prismatic slip in semipolar and nonpolar III-nitride heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Smirnov, A. M.; Young, E. C.; Bougrov, V. E.; Speck, J. S.; Romanov, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the critical thickness for misfit dislocation (MD) formation in lattice mismatched semipolar and nonpolar III-nitride wurtzite semiconductor layers for the case of MDs originated from prismatic slip (PSMDs). It has been shown

  13. NMR-Based Identification of Metabolites in Polar and Non-Polar Extracts of Avian Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Fariba; Brun, Antonio; Rott, Katherine H; Falco Cobra, Paulo; Tonelli, Marco; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique; Karasov, William H; Markley, John L

    2017-11-16

    Metabolites present in liver provide important clues regarding the physiological state of an organism. The aim of this work was to evaluate a protocol for high-throughput NMR-based analysis of polar and non-polar metabolites from a small quantity of liver tissue. We extracted the tissue with a methanol/chloroform/water mixture and isolated the polar metabolites from the methanol/water layer and the non-polar metabolites from the chloroform layer. Following drying, we re-solubilized the fractions for analysis with a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer equipped with a 1.7 mm cryogenic probe. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this protocol for metabolomics studies, we analyzed the metabolic profile of livers from house sparrow ( Passer domesticus ) nestlings raised on two different diets: livers from 10 nestlings raised on a high protein diet (HP) for 4 d and livers from 12 nestlings raised on the HP diet for 3 d and then switched to a high carbohydrate diet (HC) for 1 d. The protocol enabled the detection of 52 polar and nine non-polar metabolites in ¹H NMR spectra of the extracts. We analyzed the lipophilic metabolites by one-way ANOVA to assess statistically significant concentration differences between the two groups. The results of our studies demonstrate that the protocol described here can be exploited for high-throughput screening of small quantities of liver tissue (approx. 100 mg wet mass) obtainable from small animals.

  14. Design of reproducible polarized and non-polarized edge filters using genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejigu, Efrem Kebede; Lacquet, B M

    2010-01-01

    Recent advancement in optical fibre communications technology is partly due to the advancement of optical thin film technology. The advancement of optical thin film technology includes the development of new and existing optical filter design methods. The genetic algorithm is one of the new design methods that show promising results in designing a number of complicated design specifications. It is the finding of this study that the genetic algorithm design method, through its optimization capability, can give more reliable and reproducible designs of any specifications. The design method in this study optimizes the thickness of each layer to get to the best possible solution. Its capability and unavoidable limitations in designing polarized and non-polarized edge filters from absorptive and dispersive materials is well demonstrated. It is also demonstrated that polarized and non-polarized designs from the genetic algorithm are reproducible with great success. This research has accomplished the great task of formulating a computer program using the genetic algorithm in a Matlab environment for the design of a reproducible polarized and non-polarized filters of any sort from any kind of materials

  15. Electric Charge Accumulation in Polar and Non-Polar Polymers under Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Kenichiro; Honjoh, Masato; Takada, Tatsuo; Miyake, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Yasuhiro

    The electric charge accumulation under an electron beam irradiation (40 keV and 60 keV) was measured by using the pressure wave propagation (PWP) method in the dielectric insulation materials, such as polar polymeric films (polycarbonate (PC), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN), polyimide (PI), and polyethylene-terephthalate (PET)) and non-polar polymeric films (polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)). The PE and PTFE (non-polar polymers) showed the properties of large amount of electric charge accumulation over 50 C/m3 and long saturation time over 80 minutes. The PP and PS (non-polar polymer) showed the properties of middle amount of charge accumulation about 20 C/m3 and middle saturation time about 1 to 20 minutes. The PC, PEN, PI and PET (polar polymers) showed the properties of small amount of charge accumulation about 5 to 20 C/m3 and within short saturation time about 1.0 minutes. This paper summarizes the relationship between the properties of charge accumulation and chemical structural formula, and compares between the electro static potential distribution with negative charged polymer and its chemical structural formula.

  16. Electric charge accumulation in polar and non-polar polymers under electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Kenichiro; Honjoh, Masato; Takada, Tatsuo; Miyake, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The electric charge accumulation under an electron beam irradiation (40 keV and 60 keV) was measured by using the pressure wave propagation (PWP) method in the dielectric insulation materials, such as polar polymeric films (polycarbonate (PC), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN), polyimide (PI), and polyethylene-terephthalate (PET)) and non-polar polymeric films (polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)). The PE and PTFE (non-polar polymers) showed the properties of large amount of electric charge accumulation over 50 C/m 3 and long saturation time over 80 minutes. The PP and PS (non-polar polymer) showed the properties of middle amount of charge accumulation about 20 C/m 3 and middle saturation time about 1 to 20 minutes. The PC, PEN, PI and PET (polar polymers) showed the properties of small amount of charge accumulation about 5 to 20 C/m 3 and within short saturation time about 1.0 minutes. This paper summarizes the relationship between the properties of charge accumulation and chemical structural formula, and compares between the electro static potential distribution with negative charged polymer and its chemical structural formula. (author)

  17. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a photoelectrochemically etched air-gap aperture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, J. T., E-mail: jtleona01@gmail.com; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Megalini, L.; Speck, J. S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Lee, S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2016-01-18

    We demonstrate a III-nitride nonpolar vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a photoelectrochemically (PEC) etched aperture. The PEC lateral undercut etch is used to selectively remove the multi-quantum well (MQW) region outside the aperture area, defined by an opaque metal mask. This PEC aperture (PECA) creates an air-gap in the passive area of the device, allowing one to achieve efficient electrical confinement within the aperture, while simultaneously achieving a large index contrast between core of the device (the MQW within the aperture) and the lateral cladding of the device (the air-gap formed by the PEC etch), leading to strong lateral confinement. Scanning electron microscopy and focused ion-beam analysis is used to investigate the precision of the PEC etch technique in defining the aperture. The fabricated single mode PECA VCSEL shows a threshold current density of ∼22 kA/cm{sup 2} (25 mA), with a peak output power of ∼180 μW, at an emission wavelength of 417 nm. The near-field emission profile shows a clearly defined single linearly polarized (LP) mode profile (LP{sub 12,1}), which is in contrast to the filamentary lasing that is often observed in III-nitride VCSELs. 2D mode profile simulations, carried out using COMSOL, give insight into the different mode profiles that one would expect to be displayed in such a device. The experimentally observed single mode operation is proposed to be predominantly a result of poor current spreading in the device. This non-uniform current spreading results in a higher injected current at the periphery of the aperture, which favors LP modes with high intensities near the edge of the aperture.

  18. Quantum Erasure: Quantum Interference Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Walborn, Stephen P.; Cunha, Marcelo O. Terra; Pádua, Sebastião; Monken, Carlos H.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments in quantum optics have shed light on the foundations of quantum physics. Quantum erasers - modified quantum interference experiments - show that quantum entanglement is responsible for the complementarity principle.

  19. Sorption of polar and nonpolar organic contaminants by oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Yaobin

    2008-12-01

    Sorption of nonpolar (phenanthrene and butylate) and polar (atrazine and diuron) organic chemicals to oil-contaminated soil was examined to investigate oil effects on sorption of organic chemicals and to derive oil-water distribution coefficients (K(oil)). The resulting oil-contaminated soil-water distribution coefficients (K(d)) for phenanthrene demonstrated sorption-enhancing effects at both lower and higher oil concentrations (C(oil)) but sorption-reducing (competitive) effects at intermediate C(oil) (approximately 1 g kg(-1)). Rationalization of the different dominant effects was attempted in terms of the relative aliphatic carbon content which determines the accessibility of the aromatic cores to phenanthrene. Little or no competitive effect occurred for butylate because its sorption was dominated by partitioning. For atrazine and diuron, the changes in K(d) at C(oil) above approximately 1 g kg(-1) were negligible, indicating that the presently investigated oil has little or no effect on the two tested compounds even though the polarity of the oil is much less than soil organic matter (SOM). Therefore, specific interactions with the active groups (aromatic and polar domains) are dominantly responsible for the sorption of polar sorbates, and thus their sorption is controlled by available sorption sites. This study showed that the oil has the potential to be a dominant sorptive phase for nonpolar pollutants when compared to SOM, but hardly so for polar compounds. The results may aid in a better understanding of the role of the aliphatic and aromatic domains in sorption of nonpolar and polar organic pollutants.

  20. In Vitro Anticancer Activity of a Nonpolar Fraction from Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb. Makino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yantao Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb. Makino (GpM has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. Most previous studies have focused primarily on polar fractions of GpM for anticancer activities. In this study, a nonpolar fraction EA1.3A from GpM showed potent growth inhibitory activities against four cancer cell lines with IC50 ranging from 31.62 μg/mL to 38.02 μg/mL. Furthermore, EA1.3A also inhibited the growth of breast cancer cell MDA-MB-453 time-dependently, as well as its colony formation ability. EA1.3A induced apoptosis on MDA-MB-453 cells both dose-dependently and time-dependently as analyzed by flow cytometry and verified by western blotting analysis of apoptosis marker cleaved nuclear poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (cPARP. Additionally, EA1.3A induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Chemical components analysis of EA1.3A by GC-MS revealed that this nonpolar fraction from GpM contains 10 compounds including four alkaloids, three organic esters, two terpenes, and one catechol substance, and all these compounds have not been reported in GpM. In summary, the nonpolar fraction EA1.3A from GpM inhibited cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and regulation of cell cycle progression. Our study shed light on new chemical bases for the anticancer activities of GpM and feasibilities to develop new anticancer agents from this widely used medicinal plant.

  1. Structural anisotropy of nonpolar and semipolar InN epitaxial layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darakchieva, V.; Xie, M.-Y.; Franco, N.; Giuliani, F.; Nunes, B.; Alves, E.; Hsiao, C. L.; Chen, L. C.; Yamaguchi, T.; Takagi, Y.; Kawashima, K.; Nanishi, Y.

    2010-10-01

    We present a detailed study of the structural characteristics of molecular beam epitaxy grown nonpolar InN films with a- and m-plane surface orientations on r-plane sapphire and (100) γ-LiAlO2, respectively, and semipolar (101¯1) InN grown on r-plane sapphire. The on-axis rocking curve (RC) widths were found to exhibit anisotropic dependence on the azimuth angle with minima at InN [0001] for the a-plane films, and maxima at InN [0001] for the m-plane and semipolar films. The different contributions to the RC broadening are analyzed and discussed. The finite size of the crystallites and extended defects are suggested to be the dominant factors determining the RC anisotropy in a-plane InN, while surface roughness and curvature could not play a major role. Furthermore, strategy to reduce the anisotropy and magnitude of the tilt and minimize defect densities in a-plane InN films is suggested. In contrast to the nonpolar films, the semipolar InN was found to contain two domains nucleating on zinc-blende InN(111)A and InN(111)B faces. These two wurtzite domains develop with different growth rates, which was suggested to be a consequence of their different polarity. Both, a- and m-plane InN films have basal stacking fault densities similar or even lower compared to nonpolar InN grown on free-standing GaN substrates, indicating good prospects of heteroepitaxy on foreign substrates for the growth of InN-based devices.

  2. Structural anisotropy of nonpolar and semipolar InN epitaxial layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darakchieva, V.; Xie, M.-Y.; Franco, N.; Alves, E.; Giuliani, F.; Nunes, B.; Hsiao, C. L.; Chen, L. C.; Yamaguchi, T.; Takagi, Y.; Kawashima, K.; Nanishi, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the structural characteristics of molecular beam epitaxy grown nonpolar InN films with a- and m-plane surface orientations on r-plane sapphire and (100) γ-LiAlO 2 , respectively, and semipolar (1011) InN grown on r-plane sapphire. The on-axis rocking curve (RC) widths were found to exhibit anisotropic dependence on the azimuth angle with minima at InN [0001] for the a-plane films, and maxima at InN [0001] for the m-plane and semipolar films. The different contributions to the RC broadening are analyzed and discussed. The finite size of the crystallites and extended defects are suggested to be the dominant factors determining the RC anisotropy in a-plane InN, while surface roughness and curvature could not play a major role. Furthermore, strategy to reduce the anisotropy and magnitude of the tilt and minimize defect densities in a-plane InN films is suggested. In contrast to the nonpolar films, the semipolar InN was found to contain two domains nucleating on zinc-blende InN(111)A and InN(111)B faces. These two wurtzite domains develop with different growth rates, which was suggested to be a consequence of their different polarity. Both, a- and m-plane InN films have basal stacking fault densities similar or even lower compared to nonpolar InN grown on free-standing GaN substrates, indicating good prospects of heteroepitaxy on foreign substrates for the growth of InN-based devices.

  3. Far field photoluminescence imaging of single AlGaN nanowire in the sub-wavelength scale using confinement of polarized light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivadasan, A.K.; Dhara, Sandip [Nanomaterials and Sensors Section, Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Homi Bhabha National Institute, Kalpakkam (India); Sardar, Manas [Theoretical Studies Section, Materials Physics Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2017-03-15

    Till now the nanoscale focusing and imaging in the sub-diffraction limit is achieved mainly with the help of plasmonic field enhancement by confining the light assisted with noble metal nanostructures. Using far field imaging technique, we have recorded polarized spectroscopic photoluminescence (PL) imaging of a single AlGaN nanowire (NW) of diameter ∝100 nm using confinement of polarized light. It is found that the PL from a single NW is influenced by the proximity to other NWs. The PL intensity is proportional to 1/(l x d), where l and d are the average NW length and separation between the NWs, respectively. We suggest that the proximity induced PL intensity enhancement can be understood by assuming the existence of reasonably long lived photons in the intervening space between the NWs. A nonzero non-equilibrium population of such photons may cause stimulated emission leading to the enhancement of PL emission with the intensity proportional to 1/(l x d). The enhancement of PL emission facilitates far field spectroscopic imaging of a single semiconductor AlGaN NW of sub-wavelength dimension. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Persistent photoconductivity in AlGaN/GaN heterojunction channels caused by the ionization of deep levels in the AlGaN barrier layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, H.; Akiyama, Y.; Niwa, R.; Sakashita, H.; Sakaki, H.; Kachi, T.; Sugimoto, M.

    2013-01-01

    Time-dependent responses of drain current (I d ) in an AlGaN/GaN HEMT under UV (3.3 eV) and red (2.0 eV) light illumination have been studied at 300 K and 250 K. UV illumination enhances I d by about 10 %, indicating that the density of two-dimensional electrons is raised by about 10 12 cm −2 . When UV light is turned off at 300 K, a part of increased I d decays quickly but the other part of increment is persistent, showing a slow decay. At 250 K, the majority of increment remains persistent. It is found that such a persistent increase of I d at 250 K can be partially erased by the illumination of red light. These photo-responses are explained by a simple band-bending model in which deep levels in the AlGaN barrier get positively charged by the UV light, resulting in a parabolic band bending in the AlGaN layer, while some potion of those deep levels are neutralized by the red light

  5. Dispersing surface-modified imogolite nanotubes in polar and non-polar solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Brant, Jonathan A.

    2018-02-01

    Furthering the development of nanocomposite structures, namely membranes for water treatment applications, requires that methods be developed to ensure nanoparticle dispersion in polar and non-polar solvents, as both are widely used in associated synthesis techniques. Here, we report on a two-step method to graft polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and a one-step method for octadecylphosphonic acid (OPA), onto the outer surfaces of imogolite nanotubes. The goal of these approaches was to improve and maintain nanotube dispersion in polymer compatible polar and non-polar solvents. The PVP coating modified the imogolite surface charge from positive to weakly negative at pH ≤ 9; the OPA made it weakly positive at acidic pH values to negative at pH ≥ 7. The PVP surface coating stabilized the nanotubes through steric hindrance in polar protic, dipolar aprotic, and chloroform. In difference to the PVP, the OPA surface coating allowed the nanotubes to be dispersed in n-hexane and chloroform, but not in the polar solvents. The lack of miscibility in the polar solvents, as well as the better dispersion in n-hexane, was attributed to the stronger hydrophobicity of the OPA polymer relative to the PVP. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Polarization of eigenmodes in laser diode waveguides on semipolar and nonpolar GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rass, Jens; Vogt, Patrick [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Wernicke, Tim; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Scheibenzuber, Wolfgang G.; Schwarz, Ulrich T. [Department of Physics, Regensburg University (Germany); Kupec, Jan [Integrated Systems Laboratory, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Witzigmann, Bernd [Computational Electronics and Photonics Group, University of Kassel (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Recent calculations of the eigenmodes in waveguides grown on semipolar GaN suggest that the optical polarization of the emitted light as well as the optical gain depends on the orientation of the resonator. Our measurements on separate confinement heterostructures on semipolar (11 anti 22) and (10 anti 12) GaN show that for laser resonators along the semipolar [11 anti 2 anti 3 ] and [0 anti 111] directions (i.e. the projection of the c-axis onto the plane of growth) the threshold for amplified spontaneous emission is lower than for the nonpolar direction and that the stimulated emission is linearly polarized as TE mode. For the waveguide structures along the nonpolar [1 anti 100] or [11 anti 20] direction on the other hand, birefringence and anisotropy of the optical gain in the plane of growth leads not only to a higher threshold but also to a rotation of the optical polarization which is not any more TE- or TM-polarized but influenced by the ordinary and extraordinary refractive index of the material. We observe stimulated emission into a mode which is linearly polarized in extraordinarydirection nearly parallel to the c-axis. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Growth on nonpolar and semipolar GaN: The substrate dilemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernicke, T.; Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institute, Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institute, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Solid State Physics, TU Berlin (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Growth of nonpolar and semipolar GaN is very promising for achieving green laser diodes (LDs). However, the choice of the substrate is a difficult one: Heteroepitaxial growth on sapphire, SiC, LiAlO{sub 2} yields GaN films with a poor surface quality and high defect densities. On the other hand non- and semipolar bulk GaN substrates provide excellent crystal quality, but are so far only available in very small sizes. In this paper hetero- and homoepitaxial growth is compared. For all heteroepitaxially grown semi- and nonpolar GaN layers threading dislocations (TD) and basal plane stacking faults (BSF) can be found. There are four possible mechanisms for the generation of BSF: Growth of the N-polar basal plane, formation during nucleation at substrate steps, formation at the coalescence front of differently stacked nucleation islands, and generation at planar defects occurring in m-plane GaN on LiAlO{sub 2}. BSF induce surface roughening and are associated with partial dislocations causing nonradiative recombination. Thus they affect the performance of devices. We show that BSFs and TDs can be reduced by epitaxial lateral overgrowth resulting in several micrometer wide defect free areas. However, for LEDs larger defect-free areas are required. GaN layers grown on bulk GaN substrates exhibit a high crystal quality, but show in many cases long-range surface structures with a height of {approx}1{mu}m.

  8. Investigation of blue luminescence in Mg-doped nonpolar a-plane GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hogyoung; Song, Keun Man

    2014-01-01

    The temperature-dependent optical characteristics of blue luminescence (BL) band in Mg-doped nonpolar a-plane GaN films were investigated using photoluminescence (PL) measurements. For the sample with the highest Cp 2 Mg/TMGa ([Mg]/[Ga]) molar ratio, the BL band was shown to have two distinct peaks, one at about 2.95 eV and the other at about 2.75 eV, which were associated with the donor–acceptor pair (DAP) transitions between the one shallow Mg acceptor level and the two different deep donor levels. In contrast, a single broad BL band was observed for all other samples. Strong potential fluctuations caused by high compensation level in the sample with the highest [Mg]/[Ga] molar ratio might localize the carriers related to the 2.75 eV band, leading to the different emission characteristics in BL band as compared to other samples. -- Highlights: • The temperature-dependent optical characteristics of blue luminescence (BL) in Mg-doped nonpolar a-plane GaN were investigated using photoluminescence (PL) measurements. • At the highest [Mg]/[Ga] molar ratio, the BL was observed to have two distinct peaks at low temperatures. • The BL was associated with the one shallow Mg acceptor level and the two different Mg-related deep donor levels. • Strong potential fluctuations caused by high compensation level might localize the carriers

  9. Investigation of blue luminescence in Mg-doped nonpolar a-plane GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hogyoung [Department of Optometry, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Keun Man, E-mail: skmmec@gmail.com [Korea Advanced Nano Fab Center, Suwon, Gyeonggi 443-770 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    The temperature-dependent optical characteristics of blue luminescence (BL) band in Mg-doped nonpolar a-plane GaN films were investigated using photoluminescence (PL) measurements. For the sample with the highest Cp{sub 2}Mg/TMGa ([Mg]/[Ga]) molar ratio, the BL band was shown to have two distinct peaks, one at about 2.95 eV and the other at about 2.75 eV, which were associated with the donor–acceptor pair (DAP) transitions between the one shallow Mg acceptor level and the two different deep donor levels. In contrast, a single broad BL band was observed for all other samples. Strong potential fluctuations caused by high compensation level in the sample with the highest [Mg]/[Ga] molar ratio might localize the carriers related to the 2.75 eV band, leading to the different emission characteristics in BL band as compared to other samples. -- Highlights: • The temperature-dependent optical characteristics of blue luminescence (BL) in Mg-doped nonpolar a-plane GaN were investigated using photoluminescence (PL) measurements. • At the highest [Mg]/[Ga] molar ratio, the BL was observed to have two distinct peaks at low temperatures. • The BL was associated with the one shallow Mg acceptor level and the two different Mg-related deep donor levels. • Strong potential fluctuations caused by high compensation level might localize the carriers.

  10. Broadband non-polarizing beam splitter based on guided mode resonance effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jian-Yong; Xu Cheng; Qiang Ying-Huai; Zhu Ya-Bo

    2011-01-01

    A broadband non-polarizing beam splitter (NPBS) operating in the telecommunication C+L band is designed by using the guided mode resonance effect of periodic silicon-on-insulator (SOI) elements. It is shown that this double layer SOI structure can provide ∼50/50 beam ratio with the maximum divergences between reflection and transmission being less than 8% over the spectrum of 1.4 μm∼1.7 μm and 1% in the telecommunication band for both TE and TM polarizations. The physical basis of this broadband non-polarizing property is on the simultaneous excitation of the TE and TM strong modulation waveguide modes near the designed spectrum band. Meanwhile, the electric field distributions for both TE and TM polarizations verify the resonant origin of spectrum in the periodic SOI structure. Furthermore, it is demonstrated with our calculations that the beam splitter proposed here is tolerant to the deviations of incident angle and structure parameters, which make it very easy to be fabricated with current IC technology. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  11. Detection of electrically neutral and nonpolar molecules in ionic solutions using silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Pin; Chu, Chia-Jung; Tsai, Li-Chu; Su, Ya-Wen; Chen, Pei-Hua; Moodley, Mathew K.; Huang, Ding; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Yang, Ying-Jay; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2017-04-01

    We report on a technique that can extend the use of nanowire sensors to the detection of interactions involving nonpolar and neutral molecules in an ionic solution environment. This technique makes use of the fact that molecular interactions result in a change in the permittivity of the molecules involved. For the interactions taking place at the surface of nanowires, this permittivity change can be determined from the analysis of the measured complex impedance of the nanowire. To demonstrate this technique, histidine was detected using different charge polarities controlled by the pH value of the solution. This included the detection of electrically neutral histidine at a sensitivity of 1 pM. Furthermore, it is shown that nonpolar molecules, such as hexane, can also be detected. The technique is applicable to the use of nanowires with and without a surface-insulating oxide. We show that information about the changes in amplitude and the phase of the complex impedance reveals the fundamental characteristics of the molecular interactions, including the molecular field and the permittivity.

  12. Non-Polar Natural Products from Bromelia laciniosa, Neoglaziovia variegata and Encholirium spectabile (Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Johan Juvik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Extensive regional droughts are already a major problem on all inhabited continents and severe regional droughts are expected to become an increasing and extended problem in the future. Consequently, extended use of available drought resistant food plants should be encouraged. Bromelia laciniosa, Neoglaziovia variegata and Encholirium spectabile are excellent candidates in that respect because they are established drought resistant edible plants from the semi-arid Caatinga region. From a food safety perspective, increased utilization of these plants would necessitate detailed knowledge about their chemical constituents. However, their chemical compositions have previously not been determined. For the first time, the non-polar constituents of B. laciniosa, N. variegata and E. spectabile have been identified. This is the first thorough report on natural products from N. variegata, E. spectabile, and B. laciniosa. Altogether, 20 non-polar natural products were characterized. The identifications were based on hyphenated gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS and supported by 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR plant metabolomics.

  13. Broadband non-polarizing beam splitter based on guided mode resonance effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian-Yong; Xu, Cheng; Qiang, Ying-Huai; Zhu, Ya-Bo

    2011-10-01

    A broadband non-polarizing beam splitter (NPBS) operating in the telecommunication C+L band is designed by using the guided mode resonance effect of periodic silicon-on-insulator (SOI) elements. It is shown that this double layer SOI structure can provide ~50/50 beam ratio with the maximum divergences between reflection and transmission being less than 8% over the spectrum of 1.4 μm~1.7 μm and 1% in the telecommunication band for both TE and TM polarizations. The physical basis of this broadband non-polarizing property is on the simultaneous excitation of the TE and TM strong modulation waveguide modes near the designed spectrum band. Meanwhile, the electric field distributions for both TE and TM polarizations verify the resonant origin of spectrum in the periodic SOI structure. Furthermore, it is demonstrated with our calculations that the beam splitter proposed here is tolerant to the deviations of incident angle and structure parameters, which make it very easy to be fabricated with current IC technology.

  14. A polarity-induced defect mechanism for conductivity and magnetism at polar-nonpolar oxide interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liping; Zunger, Alex

    2014-10-13

    The discovery of conductivity and magnetism at the polar-nonpolar interfaces of insulating nonmagnetic oxides such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 has raised prospects for attaining interfacial functionalities absent in the component materials. Yet, the microscopic origin of such emergent phenomena remains unclear, posing obstacles to design of improved functionalities. Here we present first principles calculations of electronic and defect properties of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces and reveal a unifying mechanism for the origins of both conductivity and magnetism. We demonstrate that the polar discontinuity across the interface triggers thermodynamically the spontaneous formation of certain defects that in turn cancel the polar field induced by the polar discontinuity. The ionization of the spontaneously formed surface oxygen vacancy defects leads to interface conductivity, whereas the unionized Ti-on-Al antisite defects lead to interface magnetism. The proposed mechanism suggests practical design principles for inducing and controlling both conductivity and magnetism at general polar-nonpolar interfaces.

  15. Quantum optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agarwal, G. S

    2013-01-01

    ..., quantum metrology, spin squeezing, control of decoherence and many other key topics. Readers are guided through the principles of quantum optics and their uses in a wide variety of areas including quantum information science and quantum mechanics...

  16. Quantum Instantons and Quantum Chaos

    OpenAIRE

    Jirari, H.; Kröger, H.; Luo, X. Q.; Moriarty, K. J. M.; Rubin, S. G.

    1999-01-01

    Based on a closed form expression for the path integral of quantum transition amplitudes, we suggest rigorous definitions of both, quantum instantons and quantum chaos. As an example we compute the quantum instanton of the double well potential.

  17. Predicted bond length variation in wurtzite and zinc-blende InGaN and AlGaN alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, T.; Zunger, A.

    1999-01-01

    Valence force field simulations utilizing large supercells are used to investigate the bond lengths in wurtzite and zinc-blende In x Ga 1-x N and Al x Ga 1-x N random alloys. We find that (i) while the first-neighbor cation endash anion shell is split into two distinct values in both wurtzite and zinc-blende alloys (R Ga-N 1 ≠R In-N 1 ), the second-neighbor cation endash anion bonds are equal (R Ga-N 2 =R In-N 2 ). (ii) The second-neighbor cation endash anion bonds exhibit a crucial difference between wurtzite and zinc-blende binary structures: in wurtzite we find two bond distances which differ in length by 13% while in the zinc-blende structure there is only one bond length. This splitting is preserved in the alloy, and acts as a fingerprint, distinguishing the wurtzite from the zinc-blende structure. (iii) The small splitting of the first-neighbor cation endash anion bonds in the wurtzite structure due to nonideal c/a ratio is preserved in the alloy, but is obscured by the bond length broadening. (iv) The cation endash cation bond lengths exhibit three distinct values in the alloy (Ga endash Ga, Ga endash In, and In endash In), while the anion endash anion bonds are split into two values corresponding to N endash Ga endash N and N endash In endash N. (v) The cation endash related splitting of the bonds and alloy broadening are considerably larger in InGaN alloy than in AlGaN alloy due to larger mismatch between the binary compounds. (vi) The calculated first-neighbor cation endash anion and cation endash cation bond lengths in In x Ga 1-x N alloy are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The remaining bond lengths are provided as predictions. In particular, the predicted splitting for the second-neighbor cation endash anion bonds in the wurtzite structure awaits experimental testing. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  18. Quantum metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Guo-Yong; Guo Guang-Can

    2013-01-01

    The statistical error is ineluctable in any measurement. Quantum techniques, especially with the development of quantum information, can help us squeeze the statistical error and enhance the precision of measurement. In a quantum system, there are some quantum parameters, such as the quantum state, quantum operator, and quantum dimension, which have no classical counterparts. So quantum metrology deals with not only the traditional parameters, but also the quantum parameters. Quantum metrology includes two important parts: measuring the physical parameters with a precision beating the classical physics limit and measuring the quantum parameters precisely. In this review, we will introduce how quantum characters (e.g., squeezed state and quantum entanglement) yield a higher precision, what the research areas are scientists most interesting in, and what the development status of quantum metrology and its perspectives are. (topical review - quantum information)

  19. Internal quantum efficiency in yellow-amber light emitting AlGaN-InGaN-GaN heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, Thi Huong; Gil, Bernard; Valvin, Pierre [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb – UMR 5221, CNRS and University Montpellier, Case courier 074, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Damilano, Benjamin; Lekhal, Kaddour; De Mierry, Philippe [CRHEA-CNRS Centre de Recherche sur l' Hétéro-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France)

    2015-09-21

    We determine the internal quantum efficiency of strain-balanced AlGaN-InGaN-GaN hetero-structures designed for yellow-amber light emission, by using a recent model based on the kinetics of the photoluminescence decay initiated by Iwata et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 117, 075701 (2015)]. Our results indicate that low temperature internal quantum efficiencies sit in the 50% range and we measure that adding an AlGaN layer increases the internal quantum efficiency from 50% up to 57% with respect to the GaN-InGaN case. More dramatic, it almost doubles from 2.5% up to 4.3% at room temperature.

  20. Quantum Distinction: Quantum Distinctiones!

    OpenAIRE

    Zeps, Dainis

    2009-01-01

    10 pages; How many distinctions, in Latin, quantum distinctiones. We suggest approach of anthropic principle based on anthropic reference system which should be applied equally both in theoretical physics and in mathematics. We come to principle that within reference system of life subject of mathematics (that of thinking) should be equated with subject of physics (that of nature). For this reason we enter notions of series of distinctions, quantum distinction, and argue that quantum distinct...

  1. Spectral properties of polarized light from semipolar grown InGaN quantum wells at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, L.; Schwarz, U.T. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF, Freiburg (Germany); Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg (Germany); Wernicke, T.; Ploch, S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, TU Berlin (Germany); Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, TU Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The polarization dependent photoluminescence at low temperatures of strained semipolar and nonpolar InGaN quantum wells was studied as a function of the emission wavelength. We found for semipolar QWs that the maximum of the spectral resolved optical polarization is either red- or blue-shifted with respect to the maximum of the emission. In contrast, the nonpolar emission exhibits no clear maximum. We assign all effects to an inhomogeneous broadening of the emission caused by indium fluctuations and explain this behavior here in the light of the optical polarization switching. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Band offsets of non-polar A-plane GaN/AlN and AlN/GaN heterostructures measured by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Ling; Zhu, Qin Sheng; Yang, Shao Yan; Liu, Gui Peng; Li, Hui Jie; Wei, Hong Yuan; Jiao, Chun Mei; Liu, Shu Man; Wang, Zhan Guo; Zhou, Xiao Wei; Mao, Wei; Hao, Yue; Shen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    The band offsets of non-polar A-plane GaN/AlN and AlN/GaN heterojunctions are measured by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. A large forward-backward asymmetry is observed in the non-polar GaN/AlN and AlN/GaN heterojunctions. The valence-band offsets in the non-polar A-plane GaN/AlN and AlN/GaN heterojunctions are determined to be 1.33 ± 0.16 and 0.73 ± 0.16 eV, respectively. The large valence-band offset difference of 0.6 eV between the non-polar GaN/AlN and AlN/GaN heterojunctions is considered to be due to piezoelectric strain effect in the non-polar heterojunction overlayers.

  3. Non-polarized cytokine profile of a long-term non-progressor HIV infected patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Ana Flávia; Matos, Vanessa Terezinha Gubert de; Bonin, Camila Mareti; Dal Fabbro, Márcia Maria Ferrairo Janini; Tozetti, Inês Aparecida

    The HIV-1 initial viral infection may present diverse clinical and laboratory course and lead to rapid, intermediate, or long-term progression. Among the group of non-progressors, the elite controllers are those who control the infection most effectively, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART). In this paper, the TH1, TH2 and TH17 cytokines profiles are described, as well as clinical and laboratory aspects of an HIV-infected patient with undetectable viral load without antiretroviral therapy. Production of IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-17 was detected; in contrast IL-4 was identified. Host-related factors could help explain such a level of infection control, namely the differentiated modulation of the cellular immune response and a non-polarized cytokine response of the TH1 and TH2 profiles. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Relation between the characteristic molecular volume and hydrophobicity of nonpolar molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedov, Igor A., E-mail: igor_sedov@inbox.ru; Solomonov, Boris N., E-mail: boris.solomonov@ksu.r

    2010-09-15

    Experimental values of the Gibbs free energies of hydration for a set of nonpolar or very slightly polar compounds are analyzed in order to investigate how does the hydrophobic effect depend on molecular structure and shape. The contribution due to the hydrophobic effect is evaluated using a method we suggested previously. A number of values of the Gibbs free energies of solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide and in hexadecane, which are required for calculation, were determined by gas chromatographic headspace analysis. It is found that the Gibbs hydrophobic effect energy is linearly dependent on characteristic molecular volume for a large variety of solutes with branched and unbranched carbon chains, different functional groups and atomic composition. Molecular structure and shape do not significantly affect the hydrophobicity of chemical species, and molecular volume is a main factor determining it.

  5. Equilibrium structures and flows of polar and nonpolar liquids in different carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramyan, Andrey K.; Bessonov, Nick M.; Mirantsev, Leonid V.; Chevrychkina, Anastasiia A.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of equilibrium structures and flows of polar water and nonpolar methane confined by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with circular and square cross sections and bounding walls with regular graphene structure and random (amorphous) distribution of carbon atoms have been performed. The results of these simulations show that equilibrium structures of both confined liquids depend strongly on the shape of the cross section of SWCNTs, whereas the structure of their bounding walls has a minor influence on these structures. On contrary, the external pressure driven water and methane flows through above mentioned SWCNTs depend significantly on both the shape of their cross sections and the structure of their bounding walls.

  6. Tridodecylamine, an efficient charge control agent in non-polar media for electrophoretic inks application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Amélie; Mirbel, Déborah; Cloutet, Eric; Fleury, Guillaume; Schatz, Christophe; Navarro, Christophe; Hadziioannou, Georges; CyrilBrochon

    2018-01-01

    In order to obtain efficient electrophoretic inks, Tridodecylamine (Dod3N), has been studied as charge control agent (CCA) in a non-polar paraffin solvent (Isopar G) for various inorganic pigments (TiO2 and Fe2O3). All hydrophobic mineral oxides, i.e. treated with octyltrimethoxysilane (C8) or dodecyltrimethoxysilane (C12), were found to be negatively charged in presence of Dod3N. The electrophoretic mobilities of inorganic pigments seemed to be strongly dependent of their isoelectric point (IEP) and also of the concentration of dod3N with an optimum range between 10 and 20 mM depending on the pigments. Finally, an electrophoretic ink constituted of hydrophobic mineral oxides in presence of Dod3N was tested in a device. Its efficiency as charge control agent to negatively charge hydrophobic particles was confirmed through good optical properties and fast response time (220 ms at 200 kV m-1).

  7. Role of the electronegativity for the interface properties of non-polar heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2012-04-01

    Density functional theory is used to investigate the interfaces in the non-polar ATiO 3/SrTiO 3 (A=Pb, Ca, Ba) heterostructures. All TiO 2-terminated interfaces show an insulating behavior. By reduction of the O content in the AO, SrO, and TiO 2 layers, metallic interface states develop, due to the occupation of the Ti 3d orbitals. For PbTiO 3/SrTiO 3, the Pb 6p states cross the Fermi energy. O vacancy formation energies depend strictly on the electronegativity and the effective volume of the A ion, while the main characteristics of the interface electronic states are maintained. © Europhysics Letters Association, 2012.

  8. Evaluation of Extraction Protocols for Simultaneous Polar and Non-Polar Yeast Metabolite Analysis Using Multivariate Projection Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas P. Tambellini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomic and lipidomic approaches aim to measure metabolites or lipids in the cell. Metabolite extraction is a key step in obtaining useful and reliable data for successful metabolite studies. Significant efforts have been made to identify the optimal extraction protocol for various platforms and biological systems, for both polar and non-polar metabolites. Here we report an approach utilizing chemoinformatics for systematic comparison of protocols to extract both from a single sample of the model yeast organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Three chloroform/methanol/water partitioning based extraction protocols found in literature were evaluated for their effectiveness at reproducibly extracting both polar and non-polar metabolites. Fatty acid methyl esters and methoxyamine/trimethylsilyl derivatized aqueous compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to evaluate non-polar or polar metabolite analysis. The comparative breadth and amount of recovered metabolites was evaluated using multivariate projection methods. This approach identified an optimal protocol consisting of 64 identified polar metabolites from 105 ion hits and 12 fatty acids recovered, and will potentially attenuate the error and variation associated with combining metabolite profiles from different samples for untargeted analysis with both polar and non-polar analytes. It also confirmed the value of using multivariate projection methods to compare established extraction protocols.

  9. Technetium-99m labelled N,N-ethyldithiocarbamate, a non-polar complex with slow hepatic clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pojer, P.M.; Baldas, J.

    1980-05-01

    A sup(99m)Tc-N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) complex was prepared using formamidine sulphinic acid as the reducing agent for pertechnetate sup(99m) Tc. The complex was found to be non-polar. In mice the complex localised in the liver and intestines. Urinary excretion was very low and hepatic clearance relatively slow

  10. Homogeneous solutions of hydrophilic enzymes in nonpolar organic solvents. New systems for fundamental studies and biocatalytic transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozhaev, V V; Poltevsky, K G; Slepnev, V I; Badun, G A; Levashov, A V

    1991-11-04

    A typical hydrophilic enzyme, CT, can be dissolved in nonpolar organic solvents (n-octane, cyclohexane and toluene) up to microM concentrations. In the homogeneous solution obtained, the enzyme possesses catalytic activity and enormously high thermostability. It does not lose this activity even after several hours refluxing in octane (126 degrees C) or cyclohexane (81 degrees C).

  11. Creation of High Mobility Two-Dimensional Electron Gases via Strain Induced Polarization at an Otherwise Nonpolar Complex Oxide Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Trier, Felix; Kasama, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in SrTiO3-based heterostructures provides new opportunities for nanoelectronics. Herein, we create a new type of oxide 2DEG by the epitaxial-strain-induced polarization at an otherwise nonpolar perovskite-type interface of CaZrO3/SrTiO3. Rem...

  12. Origins of protein denatured state compactness and hydrophobic clustering in aqueous urea: inferences from nonpolar potentials of mean force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Seishi; Chan, Hue Sun

    2002-12-01

    Free energies of pairwise hydrophobic association are simulated in aqueous solutions of urea at concentrations ranging from 0-8 M. Consistent with the expectation that hydrophobic interactions are weakened by urea, the association of relatively large nonpolar solutes is destabilized by urea. However, the association of two small methane-sized nonpolar solutes in water has the opposite tendency of being slightly strengthened by the addition of urea. Such size effects and the dependence of urea-induced stability changes on the configuration of nonpolar solutes are not predicted by solvent accessible surface area approaches based on energetic parameters derived from bulk-phase solubilities of model compounds. Thus, to understand hydrophobic interactions in proteins, it is not sufficient to rely solely on transfer experiment data that effectively characterize a single nonpolar solute in an aqueous environment but not the solvent-mediated interactions among two or more nonpolar solutes. We find that the m-values for the rate of change of two-methane association free energy with respect to urea concentration is a dramatically nonmonotonic function of the spatial separation between the two methanes, with a distance-dependent profile similar to the corresponding two-methane heat capacity of association in pure water. Our results rationalize the persistence of residual hydrophobic contacts in some proteins at high urea concentrations and explain why the heat capacity signature (DeltaC(P)) of a compact denatured state can be similar to DeltaC(P) values calculated by assuming an open random-coil-like unfolded state. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Quantum walks, quantum gates, and quantum computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, Andrew P.; Stamp, P. C. E.

    2007-01-01

    The physics of quantum walks on graphs is formulated in Hamiltonian language, both for simple quantum walks and for composite walks, where extra discrete degrees of freedom live at each node of the graph. It is shown how to map between quantum walk Hamiltonians and Hamiltonians for qubit systems and quantum circuits; this is done for both single-excitation and multiexcitation encodings. Specific examples of spin chains, as well as static and dynamic systems of qubits, are mapped to quantum walks, and walks on hyperlattices and hypercubes are mapped to various gate systems. We also show how to map a quantum circuit performing the quantum Fourier transform, the key element of Shor's algorithm, to a quantum walk system doing the same. The results herein are an essential preliminary to a Hamiltonian formulation of quantum walks in which coupling to a dynamic quantum environment is included

  14. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The

  15. Quantum stochastics

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Mou-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    The classical probability theory initiated by Kolmogorov and its quantum counterpart, pioneered by von Neumann, were created at about the same time in the 1930s, but development of the quantum theory has trailed far behind. Although highly appealing, the quantum theory has a steep learning curve, requiring tools from both probability and analysis and a facility for combining the two viewpoints. This book is a systematic, self-contained account of the core of quantum probability and quantum stochastic processes for graduate students and researchers. The only assumed background is knowledge of the basic theory of Hilbert spaces, bounded linear operators, and classical Markov processes. From there, the book introduces additional tools from analysis, and then builds the quantum probability framework needed to support applications to quantum control and quantum information and communication. These include quantum noise, quantum stochastic calculus, stochastic quantum differential equations, quantum Markov semigrou...

  16. Quantum Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Scarani, Valerio

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to explain what quantum computing is. The information for the thesis was gathered from books, scientific publications, and news articles. The analysis of the information revealed that quantum computing can be broken down to three areas: theories behind quantum computing explaining the structure of a quantum computer, known quantum algorithms, and the actual physical realizations of a quantum computer. The thesis reveals that moving from classical memor...

  17. Quantum Malware

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    When quantum communication networks proliferate they will likely be subject to a new type of attack: by hackers, virus makers, and other malicious intruders. Here we introduce the concept of "quantum malware" to describe such human-made intrusions. We offer a simple solution for storage of quantum information in a manner which protects quantum networks from quantum malware. This solution involves swapping the quantum information at random times between the network and isolated, distributed an...

  18. Quantumness beyond quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz, Ángel S

    2012-01-01

    Bohmian mechanics allows us to understand quantum systems in the light of other quantum traits than the well-known ones (coherence, diffraction, interference, tunnelling, discreteness, entanglement, etc.). Here the discussion focusses precisely on two of these interesting aspects, which arise when quantum mechanics is thought within this theoretical framework: the non-crossing property, which allows for distinguishability without erasing interference patterns, and the possibility to define quantum probability tubes, along which the probability remains constant all the way. Furthermore, taking into account this hydrodynamic-like description as a link, it is also shown how this knowledge (concepts and ideas) can be straightforwardly transferred to other fields of physics (for example, the transmission of light along waveguides).

  19. Nonlinear Dynamics In Quantum Physics -- Quantum Chaos and Quantum Instantons

    OpenAIRE

    Kröger, H.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the recently proposed quantum action - its interpretation, its motivation, its mathematical properties and its use in physics: quantum mechanical tunneling, quantum instantons and quantum chaos.

  20. Heme and non-heme iron transporters in non-polarized and polarized cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui Yumiko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heme and non-heme iron from diet, and recycled iron from hemoglobin are important products of the synthesis of iron-containing molecules. In excess, iron is potentially toxic because it can produce reactive oxygen species through the Fenton reaction. Humans can absorb, transport, store, and recycle iron without an excretory system to remove excess iron. Two candidate heme transporters and two iron transporters have been reported thus far. Heme incorporated into cells is degraded by heme oxygenases (HOs, and the iron product is reutilized by the body. To specify the processes of heme uptake and degradation, and the reutilization of iron, we determined the subcellular localizations of these transporters and HOs. Results In this study, we analyzed the subcellular localizations of 2 isoenzymes of HOs, 4 isoforms of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1, and 2 candidate heme transporters--heme carrier protein 1 (HCP1 and heme responsive gene-1 (HRG-1--in non-polarized and polarized cells. In non-polarized cells, HCP1, HRG-1, and DMT1A-I are located in the plasma membrane. In polarized cells, they show distinct localizations: HCP1 and DMT1A-I are located in the apical membrane, whereas HRG-1 is located in the basolateral membrane and lysosome. 16Leu at DMT1A-I N-terminal cytosolic domain was found to be crucial for plasma membrane localization. HOs are located in smooth endoplasmic reticulum and colocalize with NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. Conclusions HCP1 and DMT1A-I are localized to the apical membrane, and HRG-1 to the basolateral membrane and lysosome. These findings suggest that HCP1 and DMT1A-I have functions in the uptake of dietary heme and non-heme iron. HRG-1 can transport endocytosed heme from the lysosome into the cytosol. These localization studies support a model in which cytosolic heme can be degraded by HOs, and the resulting iron is exported into tissue fluids via the iron transporter ferroportin 1, which is

  1. Performance improvement of AlGaN-based deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes via Al-composition graded quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Fujun; Ding, Gege; Liu, Yuhang

    2018-06-01

    Characteristics of AlGaN-based deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (DUV-LEDs) with step-like and Al-composition graded quantum wells have been investigated. The simulation results show that compared to DUV-LEDs with the conventional AlGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) structure, the light output power (LOP) and efficiency droop of DUV-LEDs with the Al-composition graded wells were remarkably improved. The key factor accounting for the improved performance is ascribed to the better modulation of carrier distribution in the quantum wells to increase the overlap between electron and hole wavefunctions, which contributes to more efficient recombination of electrons and holes, and thereby a significant enhancement in the LOP.

  2. Homoepitaxial nonpolar (10-10) ZnO/ZnMgO monolithic microcavities: Towards reduced photonic disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga-Perez, J.; Kappei, L.; Deparis, C.; Chenot, S.; Leroux, M.; Reveret, F.; Jamadi, O.; Leymarie, J.; Grundmann, M.; Prado, E. de

    2016-01-01

    Nonpolar ZnO/ZnMgO-based optical microcavities have been grown on (10-10) m-plane ZnO substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Reflectivity measurements indicate an exponential increase of the cavity quality factor with the number of layers in the distributed Bragg reflectors. Most importantly, microreflectivity spectra recorded with a spot size in the order of 2 μm show a negligible photonic disorder (well below 1 meV), leading to local quality factors equivalent to those obtained by macroreflectivity. The anisotropic character of the nonpolar heterostructures manifests itself both in the surface features, elongated parallel to the in-plane c direction, and in the optical spectra, with two cavity modes being observed at different energies for orthogonal polarizations.

  3. Homoepitaxial nonpolar (10-10) ZnO/ZnMgO monolithic microcavities: Towards reduced photonic disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Perez, J., E-mail: jzp@crhea.cnrs.fr; Kappei, L.; Deparis, C.; Chenot, S.; Leroux, M. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France); Reveret, F.; Jamadi, O.; Leymarie, J. [Clermont Université, Institut Pascal (IP), BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6602, IP, F-63171 Aubière (France); Grundmann, M. [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France); Institut für Experimentelle Physik II, Fakultät für Physik und Geowissenschaften, Universität Leipzig, Linnestr. 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Prado, E. de [CRHEA-CNRS, Rue Bernard Gregory, 06560 Valbonne (France); Departamento de Física Aplicada y Electromagnetismo, Universitat de Valencia, c/Dr Moliner 50, Burjassot, Valencia 46100 (Spain)

    2016-06-20

    Nonpolar ZnO/ZnMgO-based optical microcavities have been grown on (10-10) m-plane ZnO substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Reflectivity measurements indicate an exponential increase of the cavity quality factor with the number of layers in the distributed Bragg reflectors. Most importantly, microreflectivity spectra recorded with a spot size in the order of 2 μm show a negligible photonic disorder (well below 1 meV), leading to local quality factors equivalent to those obtained by macroreflectivity. The anisotropic character of the nonpolar heterostructures manifests itself both in the surface features, elongated parallel to the in-plane c direction, and in the optical spectra, with two cavity modes being observed at different energies for orthogonal polarizations.

  4. AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with an AlGaN layer grown directly on reactive-ion-etched GaN showing a high electron mobility (>1300 cm2 V-1 s-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Akio; Makino, Shinya; Kanatani, Keito; Kuzuhara, Masaaki

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the metal-organic-vapor-phase-epitaxial growth behavior and electrical properties of AlGaN/GaN structures prepared by the growth of an AlGaN layer on a reactive-ion-etched (RIE) GaN surface without regrown GaN layers were investigated. The annealing of RIE-GaN surfaces in NH3 + H2 atmosphere, employed immediately before AlGaN growth, was a key process in obtaining a clean GaN surface for AlGaN growth, that is, in obtaining an electron mobility as high as 1350 cm2 V-1 s-1 in a fabricated AlGaN/RIE-GaN structure. High-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) were successfully fabricated with AlGaN/RIE-GaN wafers. With decreasing density of dotlike defects observed on the surfaces of AlGaN/RIE-GaN wafers, both two-dimensional electron gas properties of AlGaN/RIE-GaN structures and DC characteristics of HEMTs were markedly improved. Since dotlike defect density was markedly dependent on RIE lot, rather than on growth lot, surface contaminations of GaN during RIE were believed to be responsible for the formation of dotlike defects and, therefore, for the inferior electrical properties.

  5. Piezoelectricity and rotostriction through polar and non-polar coupled instabilities in bismuth-based piezoceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Matias; Schmitt, Ljubomira A; Cazorla, Claudio; Studer, Andrew; Zintler, Alexander; Glaum, Julia; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Donner, Wolfgang; Hoffman, Mark; Rödel, Jürgen; Hinterstein, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Coupling of order parameters provides a means to tune functionality in advanced materials including multiferroics, superconductors, and ionic conductors. We demonstrate that the response of a frustrated ferroelectric state leads to coupling between order parameters under electric field depending on grain orientation. The strain of grains oriented along a specific crystallographic direction, 〈h00〉, is caused by converse piezoelectricity originating from a ferrodistortive tetragonal phase. For 〈hhh〉 oriented grains, the strain results from converse piezoelectricity and rotostriction, as indicated by an antiferrodistortive instability that promotes octahedral tilting in a rhombohedral phase. Both strain mechanisms combined lead to a colossal local strain of (2.4 ± 0.1) % and indicate coupling between oxygen octahedral tilting and polarization, here termed "rotopolarization". These findings were confirmed with electromechanical experiments, in situ neutron diffraction, and in situ transmission electron microscopy in 0.75Bi1/2Na1/2TiO3-0.25SrTiO3. This work demonstrates that polar and non-polar instabilities can cooperate to provide colossal functional responses.

  6. Defects of polar, semipolar and nonpolar (In)GaN - a comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Lukas; Schwarz, Ulrich [Department of Microsystems Engeneering, IMTEK, University Freiburg (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (Germany); Wernicke, Tim; Rass, Jens; Ploch, Simon [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Forghani, Kamran [Institute for Optoelectronics, University Ulm (Germany); University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Kirste, Lutz [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (Germany); Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Scholz, Ferdinand [Institute for Optoelectronics, University Ulm (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The GaN/InGaN material system is used to realize light emitting diodes from UV-A to the green-yellow spectral region. However, even on quasi bulk GaN substrates threading dislocations (TDs) are present with a density of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -2}. Here, we examine the influence of TDs on the luminescence intensity and transition energy. The impact caused by nonradiative recombination centers and strain fields is analyzed by micro photoluminescence and white light interferometry. We compare TDs in differently oriented GaN layers and InGaN QWs. Three types of burgers vectors are typically observed in GaN: a, c and a+c. When the surface orientation is changed from (0001) c-plane to (10 anti 10) m-plane, their character changes from edge to screw type and vice versa. We studied TDs and V-defects associated to them in polar, semipolar and nonpolar GaN and InGaN QWs. Additionally, we will present the effect of Si doping onto the strain field in (0001) GaN edge dislocations. In undoped GaN, the strain around such a dislocation forms a symmetric dipole. With Si doping, the strain dipole becomes asymmetric.

  7. Nanoporous distributed Bragg reflectors on free-standing nonpolar m-plane GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkat-Ul-Masabih, Saadat; Luk, Ting Shan; Rishinaramangalam, Ashwin; Monavarian, Morteza; Nami, Mohsen; Feezell, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    We report the fabrication of m-plane nanoporous distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) on free-standing GaN substrates. The DBRs consist of 15 pairs of alternating undoped and highly doped n-type ([Si] = ˜3.7 × 1019 cm-3) GaN. Electrochemical (EC) etching was performed to convert the highly doped regions into a porous material, consequently reducing the effective refractive index of the layers. We demonstrate a DBR with peak reflectance greater than 98% at 450 nm with a stopband width of ˜72 nm. The polarization ratio of an incident polarized light source remains identical after reflection from the DBR, verifying that there is no drop in the polarization ratio due to the interfaces between the porous layers. We also quantify the porosity under various EC bias conditions for layers with different doping concentrations. The bias voltage controls the average pore diameter, while the pore density is primarily determined by the doping concentration. The results show that nanoporous DBRs on nonpolar free-standing GaN are promising candidates for high-reflectance, lattice-matched DBR mirrors for GaN-based resonant cavity devices.

  8. Thin film epitaxy and structure property correlations for non-polar ZnO films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, P.; Budai, J.D.; Aggarwal, R.; Narayan, Roger J.; Narayan, J.

    2009-01-01

    Heteroepitaxial growth and strain relaxation were investigated in non-polar a-plane (1 1 -2 0)ZnO films grown on r-plane (1 0 -1 2)sapphire substrates in the temperature range 200-700 deg. C by pulsed laser deposition. The lattice misfit in the plane of the film for this orientation varied from -1.26% in [0 0 0 1] to -18.52% in the [-1 1 0 0] direction. The alignment of (1 1 -2 0)ZnO planes parallel to (1 0 -1 2)sapphire planes was confirmed by X-ray diffraction θ-2θ scans over the entire temperature range. X-ray φ-scans revealed the epitaxial relationship:[0 0 0 1]ZnO-parallel [-1 1 0 1]sap; [-1 1 0 0]ZnO-parallel [-1 -1 2 0]sap. Depending on the growth temperature, variations in the structural, optical and electrical properties were observed in the grown films. Room temperature photoluminescence for films grown at 700 deg. C shows a strong band-edge emission. The ratio of the band-edge emission to green band emission is 135:1, indicating reduced defects and excellent optical quality of the films. The resistivity data for the films grown at 700 deg. C shows semiconducting behavior with room temperature resistivity of 2.2 x 10 -3 Ω-cm.

  9. On the spallation of a polarized photon on a nonpolarized electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozrikov, P.V.; Kopytov, G.F.

    1978-01-01

    Considered is the process of the spallation of a polarized photon of the plane electromagnet wave into two polarized photons on a nonpolarized electron. One of these photons is considered as an emitted one, another as a photon of a plane wave. The degrees of circular and linear polarization of the emitted photon are studied in detail. It is shown that the degree of linear polarization does not depend on the type of circular polarization of the initial plane wave photon. At a relativistic electron moving in the direction of the plane wave, totally linearly polarized radiation appears. The analogy between the following two processes is made: (1) γ 1 +e - → γ 2 + γ tilde +e' - (where γ 1 , γ 2 are photons of the plane wave, and γ tilde is an emitted photon) and (2) γ 1 +e - → γ 2 +γ 3 +e' - . From the correspondence between the processes it follows that the results of the investigation may be applied to the double Compton effect. Besides, it appears to be possible to study the correlation between polarization states of all three photons participating in the double Compton scattering

  10. A Fast Chromatographic Method for Estimating Lipophilicity and Ionization in Nonpolar Membrane-Like Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Giulia; Vallaro, Maura; Ermondi, Giuseppe; Goetz, Gilles H; Abramov, Yuriy A; Philippe, Laurence; Shalaeva, Marina

    2016-03-07

    This study describes the design and implementation of a new chromatographic descriptor called log k'80 PLRP-S that provides information about the lipophilicity of drug molecules in the nonpolar environment, both in their neutral and ionized form. The log k'80 PLRP-S obtained on a polymeric column with acetonitrile/water mobile phase is shown to closely relate to log Ptoluene (toluene dielectric constant ε ∼ 2). The main intermolecular interactions governing log k'80 PLRP-S were deconvoluted using the Block Relevance (BR) analysis. The information provided by this descriptor was compared to ElogD and calclog Ptol, and the differences are highlighted. The "charge-flush" concept is introduced to describe the sensitivity of log k'80 PLRP-S to the ionization state of compounds in the pH range 2 to 12. The ability of log k'80 PLRP-S to indicate the propensity of neutral molecules and monoanions to form Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds (IMHBs) is proven through a number of examples.

  11. Nanospikes functionalization as a universal strategy to disperse hydrophilic particles in non-polar media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Tian; Chen, Hui-Jiuan; Wang, Ji; Lin, Di-an; Wu, Jiangming; Liu, Di; Cao, Yuhong; Yang, Chengduan; Liu, Chenglin; Xiao, Shuai; Gu, Meilin; Pan, Shuolin; Wu, Mei X.; Xie, Xi

    2018-05-01

    Dispersion of hydrophilic particles in non-polar media has many important applications yet remains difficult. Surfactant or amphiphilic functionalization was conventionally applied to disperse particles but is highly dependent on the particle/solvent system and may induce unfavorable effects and impact particle hydrophilic nature. Recently 2 μm size polystyrene microbeads coated with ZnO nanospikes have been reported to display anomalous dispersity in phobic media without using surfactant or amphiphilic functionalization. However, due to the lack of understanding whether this phenomenon was applicable to a wider range of conditions, little application has been derived from it. Here the anomalous dispersity phenomenons of hydrophilic microparticles covered with nanospikes were systematically assessed at various conditions including different particle sizes, material compositions, particle morphologies, solvent hydrophobicities, and surface polar groups. Microparticles were functionalized with nanospikes through hydrothermal route, followed by dispersity test in hydrophobic media. The results suggest nanospikes consistently prevent particle aggregation in various particle or solvent conditions, indicating the universal applicability of the anomalous dispersion phenomenons. This work provides insight on the anomalous dispersity of hydrophilic particles in various systems and offers potential application to use this method for surfactant-free dispersions.

  12. Single charging events on colloidal particles in a nonpolar liquid with surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuer, Caspar; Vandewiele, Stijn; Brans, Toon; Strubbe, Filip; Neyts, Kristiaan; Beunis, Filip

    2018-01-01

    Electrical charging of colloidal particles in nonpolar liquids due to surfactant additives is investigated intensively, motivated by its importance in a variety of applications. Most methods rely on average electrophoretic mobility measurements of many particles, which provide only indirect information on the charging mechanism. In the present work, we present a method that allows us to obtain direct information on the charging mechanism, by measuring the charge fluctuations on individual particles with a precision higher than the elementary charge using optical trapping electrophoresis. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method by studying the influence of added surfactant OLOA 11000 on the charging of single colloidal PMMA particles in dodecane. The particle charge and the frequency of charging events are investigated both below and above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and with or without applying a DC offset voltage. It is found that at least two separate charging mechanisms are present below the critical micelle concentration. One mechanism is a process where the particle is stripped from negatively charged ionic molecules. An increase in the charging frequency with increased surfactant concentration suggests a second mechanism that involves single surfactant molecules. Above the CMC, neutral inverse micelles can also be involved in the charging process.

  13. Structural investigation of diglycerol monolaurate reverse micelles in nonpolar oils cyclohexane and octane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Aramaki, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Structure of diglycerol monolaurate (abbreviated as C 12 G 2 ) micelles in nonpolar oils cyclohexane and n-octane as a function of compositions, temperatures, and surfactant chain length has been investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The SAXS data were evaluated by the generalized indirect Fourier transformation (GIFT) method and real-space structural information of particles was achieved. Conventional poly(oxyethylene) type nonionic surfactants do not form reverse micelles in oils unless a trace water is added. However, present surfactant C 12 G 2 formed reverse micelle (RM) in cyclohexane and n-octane without addition of water at normal room temperature. A clear signature of one dimensional (1-D) micellar growth was found with increasing C 12 G 2 concentration. On the other hand, increasing temperature or hydrocarbon chain length of surfactant shorten the length of RM, which is essentially a cylinder-to-sphere type transition in the aggregate structure. Drastic changes in the structure of RM, namely, transition of ellipsoidal prolate to long rod-like micelles was observed upon changing oil from cyclohexane to octane. All the microstructural transitions were explained in terms of critical packing parameter. (author)

  14. Composition of the non-polar extracts and antimicrobial activity of Chorisia insignis HBK. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Ahmed Mahmoud El Sawi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the chemical constituents of the petroleum ether extract and the ether fraction of the 70% ethanol extract of Chorisia insignis HBK. leaves, as well as screen its antimicrobial activity. Methods: Different chromatographic methods were applied to investigate the non-polar extracts and the diffusion assay method was applied to study the antimicrobial activity. Results: A total of 50 compounds from the unsaponifiable matter and 20 fatty acid methyl esters were identified from the petroleum ether extract by GC/MS analysis. n-Hentriacontane, n-tritriacontane, stigmastanol, 3-methoxy-5, 6-dihydrostigmasterol, 7,8-dihydroergosterol, 4-methylcholesterol, cholestanol, multiflorenol, cholest-5-en-3-one, cholest-6-one, 5,6- dihydroergosterol, stigmasterol, dihydroalbigenin and 11-methyl-Δ5,7,9,15,17,23-triacont-hex-ene were isolated from the petroleum ether extract. Methyl heptacosanoate and quinic acid ester of rhamnose were isolated from the ether fraction of the 70% ethanol extract. Antimicrobial activity of the total alcohol extract and the successive fractions showed that the ether and the ethyl acetate fractions have potent antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus. Conclusions: The ether and the ethyl acetate fractions could be used in pharmaceutical formulations as antibacterial agents against Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus, and further clinical trials should be performed in order to support the above investigations.

  15. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The book is on quantum mechanics. The emphasis is on the basic concepts and the methodology. The chapters include: Breakdown of classical concepts; Quantum mechanical concepts; Basic postulates of quantum mechanics; solution of problems in quantum mechanics; Simple harmonic oscillator; and Angular Momentum

  16. Quantum matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechler, Hans Peter; Calcarco, Tommaso; Dressel, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Artificial atoms and molecules, tailored from solids, fractional flux quanta, molecular magnets, controlled interaction in quantum gases, the theory of quantum correlations in mott matter, cold gases, and mesoscopic systems, Bose-Einstein condensates on the chip, on the route to the quantum computer, a quantum computer in diamond. (HSI)

  17. Quantum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, S.; Giacobino, S.; Zinn-Justin, J.

    1997-01-01

    This course is dedicated to present in a pedagogical manner the recent developments in peculiar fields concerned by quantum fluctuations: quantum noise in optics, light propagation through dielectric media, sub-Poissonian light generated by lasers and masers, quantum non-demolition measurements, quantum electrodynamics applied to cavities and electrical circuits involving superconducting tunnel junctions. (A.C.)

  18. Preparation of a novel bioavailable curcuminoid formulation (Cureit™) using Polar-Nonpolar-Sandwich (PNS) technology and its characterization and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amalraj, Augustine; Jude, Shintu; Varma, Karthik; Jacob, Joby; Gopi, Sreeraj; Oluwafemi, Oluwatobi S.; Thomas, Sabu

    2017-01-01

    Health benefits of curcuminoid are highly limited due to their poor aqueous solubility, very low systemic bioavailability, fast metabolic alterations and rapid elimination. In this study, a novel bioavailable curcuminoid formulation Cureit™ was prepared by using Polar-Nonpolar-Sandwich (PNS) technology with complete natural turmeric matrix (CNTM). The synthesized bioavailable curcuminoid formulation Cureit™ was characterizations by Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (IR), current-voltage (I-V) study, Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (Q-TOF), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). NMR study showed the presence of hydrogen bonding interactions with curcuminoids, polar and non-polar compounds in the PNS technology. SEM images indicated that Cureit™ was almost spherical and well dispersed with rough morphology, and separated with three layers of PNS formulation. The chemical profile of Cureit™ was analyzed by Q-TOF confirmed the presence of curcuminoids (curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bismethoxycurcumin), lactones, sesquiterpenes and their derivatives derived from polar layer, aromatic turmerone, dihydroturmerone, turmeronol, curdione and bisacurone derived from non-polar layer. IR, XRD, DSC and TGA also confirmed the presence of curcuminoids with high stability in the PNS formulation. Various biological activities of Cureit™ were also discussed. - Highlights: • A novel bioavailable curcuminoid formulation Cureit™ was prepared. • Polar-Nonpolar-Sandwich technology is used with complete natural turmeric matrix. • Cureit™ was analyzed and predicted by NMR, SEM, XRD, IR, I-V, Q-TOF, DSC and TGA. • Cureit™ exhibited 10 fold higher bioavailable curcuminoid than pure curcuminoid.

  19. Direct Evidence of Mg Incorporation Pathway in Vapor-Liquid-Solid Grown p-type Nonpolar GaN Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Patsha, Avinash; Amirthapandian, S.; Pandian, Ramanathaswamy; Bera, S.; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Dhara, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    Doping of III-nitride based compound semiconductor nanowires is still a challenging issue to have a control over the dopant distribution in precise locations of the nanowire optoelectronic devices. Knowledge of the dopant incorporation and its pathways in nanowires for such devices is limited by the growth methods. We report the direct evidence of incorporation pathway for Mg dopants in p-type nonpolar GaN nanowires grown via vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) method in a chemical vapour deposition te...

  20. Preparation of a novel bioavailable curcuminoid formulation (Cureit™) using Polar-Nonpolar-Sandwich (PNS) technology and its characterization and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amalraj, Augustine; Jude, Shintu; Varma, Karthik; Jacob, Joby [R& D Centre, Aurea Biolabs (P) Ltd, Kolenchery, Cochin, 682 311, Kerala (India); Gopi, Sreeraj, E-mail: sreeraj.gopi@plantlipids.com [R& D Centre, Aurea Biolabs (P) Ltd, Kolenchery, Cochin, 682 311, Kerala (India); Oluwafemi, Oluwatobi S. [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, Doornfontein Campus, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein, 2028 Johannesburg (South Africa); Centre for Nanomaterials Science Research, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa); Thomas, Sabu [School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam (India)

    2017-06-01

    Health benefits of curcuminoid are highly limited due to their poor aqueous solubility, very low systemic bioavailability, fast metabolic alterations and rapid elimination. In this study, a novel bioavailable curcuminoid formulation Cureit™ was prepared by using Polar-Nonpolar-Sandwich (PNS) technology with complete natural turmeric matrix (CNTM). The synthesized bioavailable curcuminoid formulation Cureit™ was characterizations by Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (IR), current-voltage (I-V) study, Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (Q-TOF), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). NMR study showed the presence of hydrogen bonding interactions with curcuminoids, polar and non-polar compounds in the PNS technology. SEM images indicated that Cureit™ was almost spherical and well dispersed with rough morphology, and separated with three layers of PNS formulation. The chemical profile of Cureit™ was analyzed by Q-TOF confirmed the presence of curcuminoids (curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bismethoxycurcumin), lactones, sesquiterpenes and their derivatives derived from polar layer, aromatic turmerone, dihydroturmerone, turmeronol, curdione and bisacurone derived from non-polar layer. IR, XRD, DSC and TGA also confirmed the presence of curcuminoids with high stability in the PNS formulation. Various biological activities of Cureit™ were also discussed. - Highlights: • A novel bioavailable curcuminoid formulation Cureit™ was prepared. • Polar-Nonpolar-Sandwich technology is used with complete natural turmeric matrix. • Cureit™ was analyzed and predicted by NMR, SEM, XRD, IR, I-V, Q-TOF, DSC and TGA. • Cureit™ exhibited 10 fold higher bioavailable curcuminoid than pure curcuminoid.

  1. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  2. Wetting behavior of nonpolar nanotubes in simple dipolar liquids for varying nanotube diameter and solute-solvent interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, Malay Kumar; Chandra, Amalendu, E-mail: amalen@iitk.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2015-01-21

    Atomistic simulations of model nonpolar nanotubes in a Stockmayer liquid are carried out for varying nanotube diameter and nanotube-solvent interactions to investigate solvophobic interactions in generic dipolar solvents. We have considered model armchair type single-walled nonpolar nanotubes with increasing radii from (5,5) to (12,12). The interactions between solute and solvent molecules are modeled by the well-known Lennard-Jones and repulsive Weeks-Chandler-Andersen potentials. We have investigated the density profiles and microscopic arrangement of Stockmayer molecules, orientational profiles of their dipole vectors, time dependence of their occupation, and also the translational and rotational motion of solvent molecules in confined environments of the cylindrical nanopores and also in their external peripheral regions. The present results of structural and dynamical properties of Stockmayer molecules inside and near atomistically rough nonpolar surfaces including their wetting and dewetting behavior for varying interactions provide a more generic picture of solvophobic effects experienced by simple dipolar liquids without any specific interactions such as hydrogen bonds.

  3. studies dielectric behaviour of some long chain alcohols and their mixtures with a non-polar solvent at various concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaqub, M.; Ahmed, S.S.; Hussain, A.

    2006-01-01

    Dielectric constant, refractive index and the Kirkwood linear correlation factor of 1-propanol, 1-butanol and 1-pentanol in mixtures with carbon tetrachloride at various concentration have been measured at fixed frequency (100 KHz) at 303.15 K. For the study of dielectric properties of polar molecules in a non-polar solvent at different concentrations, polarization per unit volume and excess free-energy of mixing were evaluated at this temperature. In order to study the association of polar molecules in such a non-polar solvent, the Kirkwood correlation factor (g) between molecular pairs, which exists due to the hydrogen bond association suggesting the presence of some dimension in the liquid phase with a number of dimmers, was determined. The refractive index and dielectric constant measurements are expected to shed some light on the configuration of molecules in various mixtures, and give some idea about the specific interactions between components, which decrese with the increase in the concentration of alcohol. All the three mixtures showed different behaviour for the value of correlation factor (g) as a function of concentration. The response of 1-pentanol was broadly identical to that of small chain alcohols. The different behaviour of the correlation factor (g) was interpreted in terms of the Kirkwood-Frohlich theory, as it takes into account, explicitly, such type of short and long range interactions of a mixture of polar molecules with non-polar solvents. (author)

  4. Growth and characterization of polar and nonpolar ZnO film grown on sapphire substrates by using atomic layer deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki-Wook; Son, Hyo-Soo; Choi, Nak-Jung; Kim, Jihoon; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the electrical and the optical properties of polar and nonpolar ZnO films grown on sapphire substrates with different crystallographic planes. High resolution X-ray results revealed that polar c-plane (0001), nonpolar m-plane (10-10) and a-plane (11-20) ZnO thin films were grown on c-plane, m- and r-sapphire substrates by atomic layer deposition, respectively. Compared with the c-plane ZnO film, nonpolar m-plane and a-plane ZnO films showed smaller surface roughness and anisotropic surface structures. Regardless of ZnO crystal planes, room temperature photoluminescence spectra represented two emissions which consisted of the near bandedge (∼ 380 nm) and the deep level emission (∼ 500 nm). The a-plane ZnO films represented better optical and electrical properties than c-plane ZnO, while m-plane ZnO films exhibited poorer optical and electrical properties than c-plane ZnO. - Highlights: • Growth and characterization of a-, c- and m-plane ZnO film by atomic layer deposition. • The a-plane ZnO represented better optical and electrical properties than c-plane ZnO. • The m-plane ZnO exhibited poorer optical and electrical properties than c-plane ZnO

  5. Quantum information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilin, Sergei Ya

    1999-01-01

    A new research direction known as quantum information is a multidisciplinary subject which involves quantum mechanics, optics, information theory, programming, discrete mathematics, laser physics and spectroscopy, and depends heavily on contributions from such areas as quantum computing, quantum teleportation and quantum cryptography, decoherence studies, and single-molecule and impurity spectroscopy. Some new results achieved in this rapidly growing field are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  6. Quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilin, Sergei Ya [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    1999-05-31

    A new research direction known as quantum information is a multidisciplinary subject which involves quantum mechanics, optics, information theory, programming, discrete mathematics, laser physics and spectroscopy, and depends heavily on contributions from such areas as quantum computing, quantum teleportation and quantum cryptography, decoherence studies, and single-molecule and impurity spectroscopy. Some new results achieved in this rapidly growing field are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  7. Quantum ontologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-12-01

    Quantum ontologies are conceptions of the constitution of the universe that are compatible with quantum theory. The ontological orientation is contrasted to the pragmatic orientation of science, and reasons are given for considering quantum ontologies both within science, and in broader contexts. The principal quantum ontologies are described and evaluated. Invited paper at conference: Bell's Theorem, Quantum Theory, and Conceptions of the Universe, George Mason University, October 20-21, 1988. 16 refs

  8. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  9. Nitrobenzene anti-parallel dimer formation in non-polar solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Shikata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the dielectric and depolarized Rayleigh scattering behaviors of nitrobenzene (NO2-Bz, which is a benzene mono-substituted with a planar molecular frame bearing the large electric dipole moment 4.0 D, in non-polar solvents solutions, such as tetrachloromethane and benzene, at up to 3 THz for the dielectric measurements and 8 THz for the scattering experiments at 20 °C. The dielectric relaxation strength of the system was substantially smaller than the proportionality to the concentration in a concentrated regime and showed a Kirkwood correlation factor markedly lower than unity; gK ∼ 0.65. This observation revealed that NO2-Bz has a tendency to form dimers, (NO2-Bz2, in anti-parallel configurations for the dipole moment with increasing concentration of the two solvents. Both the dielectric and scattering data exhibited fast and slow Debye-type relaxation modes with the characteristic time constants ∼7 and ∼50 ps in a concentrated regime (∼15 and ∼30 ps in a dilute regime, respectively. The fast mode was simply attributed to the rotational motion of the (monomeric NO2-Bz. However, the magnitude of the slow mode was proportional to the square of the concentration in the dilute regime; thus, the mode was assigned to the anti-parallel dimer, (NO2-Bz2, dissociation process, and the slow relaxation time was attributed to the anti-parallel dimer lifetime. The concentration dependencies of both the dielectric and scattering data show that the NO2-Bz molecular processes are controlled through a chemical equilibrium between monomers and anti-parallel dimers, 2NO2-Bz ↔ (NO2-Bz2, due to a strong dipole-dipole interaction between nitro groups.

  10. Effect of polar and non-polar surfaces of ZnO nanostructures on photocatalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jinghai; Wang Jian; Li Xiuyan; Lang Jihui; Liu Fuzhu; Yang Lili; Zhai Hongju; Gao Ming; Zhao Xiaoting

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Large-scale arrayed ZnO nanocrystals including ZnO hexagonal platforms and hamburger-like samples have been successfully fabricated by a simple hydrothermal method. ► ZnO with hexagonal platform-like morphology exhibited higher photocatalytic activity compared with that of the hamburger-like ZnO nanostructures. ► The theories of expose surfaces and oxygen vacancies were utilized to explain the photocatalytic mechanism. - Abstract: Large-scale arrayed ZnO nanocrystals with two different expose surfaces, including ZnO hexagonal nanoplatforms with the major expose plane of (0 0 0 1) and hamburger-like samples with the nonpolar planes of {101 ¯ 0} mainly exposed, were successfully fabricated by a simple hydrothermal method. Mechanisms for compare the photocatalytic activity of two typical ZnO nanostructures were systematic explained as the key point in the paper. Compared with the hamburger-like ZnO nanostructures, the ZnO with hexagonal platform-like morphology exhibited improved ability on the photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) in aqueous solution under UV radiation. The relative higher photocatalytic activity of the ZnO hexagonal nanoplatforms was attributed to the exposed polar surfaces and the content of oxygen vacancy on the nanostructures surface. The Zn-terminated (0 0 0 1) polar face and the surface defects are facile to adsorb O 2− and OH − ions, resulting in a greater production rate of O 2 · − and OH· − , hence promoting the photocatalysis reaction.

  11. Evidence of micropore filling for sorption of nonpolar organic contaminants by condensed organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yong; Yang, Yu; Xing, Baoshan; Pignatello, Joseph J; Kwon, Seokjoo; Su, Wei; Zhou, Li

    2013-01-01

    Although microporosity and surface area of natural organic matter (NOM) are crucial for mechanistic evaluation of the sorption process for nonpolar organic contaminants (NOCs), they have been underestimated by the N adsorption technique. We investigated the CO-derived internal hydrophobic microporosity () and specific surface area (SSA) obtained on dry samples and related them to sorption behaviors of NOCs in water for a wide range of condensed NOM samples. The is obtained from the total CO-derived microporosity by subtracting out the contribution of the outer surfaces of minerals and NOM using N adsorption-derived parameters. The correlation between or CO-SSA and fractional organic carbon content () is very significant, demonstrating that much of the microporosity is associated with internal NOM matrices. The average and CO-SSA are, respectively, 75.1 μL g organic carbon (OC) and 185 m g OC from the correlation analysis. The rigid aliphatic carbon significantly contributes to the microporosity of the Pahokee peat. A strong linear correlation is demonstrated between / and the OC-normalized sorption capacity at the liquid or subcooled liquid-state water solubility calculated via the Freundlich equation for each of four NOCs (phenanthrene, naphthalene, 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene, and 1,2-dichlorobenzene). We concluded that micropore filling ("adsorption") contributes to NOC sorption by condensed NOM, but the exact contribution requires knowing the relationship between the dry-state, CO-determined microporosity and the wet-state, NOC-available microporosity of the organic matter. The findings offer new clues for explaining the nonideal sorption behaviors of NOCs. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  12. Na+ -K+ -2Cl- Cotransporter (NKCC) Physiological Function in Nonpolarized Cells and Transporting Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpire, Eric; Gagnon, Kenneth B

    2018-03-25

    Two genes encode the Na + -K + -2Cl - cotransporters, NKCC1 and NKCC2, that mediate the tightly coupled movement of 1Na + , 1K + , and 2Cl - across the plasma membrane of cells. Na + -K + -2Cl - cotransport is driven by the chemical gradient of the three ionic species across the membrane, two of them maintained by the action of the Na + /K + pump. In many cells, NKCC1 accumulates Cl - above its electrochemical potential equilibrium, thereby facilitating Cl - channel-mediated membrane depolarization. In smooth muscle cells, this depolarization facilitates the opening of voltage-sensitive Ca 2+ channels, leading to Ca 2+ influx, and cell contraction. In immature neurons, the depolarization due to a GABA-mediated Cl - conductance produces an excitatory rather than inhibitory response. In many cell types that have lost water, NKCC is activated to help the cells recover their volume. This is specially the case if the cells have also lost Cl - . In combination with the Na + /K + pump, the NKCC's move ions across various specialized epithelia. NKCC1 is involved in Cl - -driven fluid secretion in many exocrine glands, such as sweat, lacrimal, salivary, stomach, pancreas, and intestine. NKCC1 is also involved in K + -driven fluid secretion in inner ear, and possibly in Na + -driven fluid secretion in choroid plexus. In the thick ascending limb of Henle, NKCC2 activity in combination with the Na + /K + pump participates in reabsorbing 30% of the glomerular-filtered Na + . Overall, many critical physiological functions are maintained by the activity of the two Na + -K + -2Cl - cotransporters. In this overview article, we focus on the functional roles of the cotransporters in nonpolarized cells and in epithelia. © 2018 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 8:871-901, 2018. Copyright © 2018 American Physiological Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Interfacial behavior of polar, weakly polar, and nonpolar compounds bound to activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gun'ko, V M; Turov, V V; Zarko, V I; Goncharuk, O V; Nychiporuk, Yu M; Kozynchenko, O P; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J; Leboda, R; Charmas, B; Balakin, D Yu; Ptushinskii, Yu G

    2013-08-15

    Detailed analysis of the interfacial behavior of water and weakly polar or nonpolar organics adsorbed alone or co-adsorbed onto activated carbons (AC) at different temperatures is a complex problem important for practical applications of adsorbents. Interaction of water, 1-decanol, and n-decane with AC possessing highly developed porosity (pore volume Vp≈1.4-2.3 cm(3)/g, specific surface area S(BET)≈1500-3500 m(2)/g) was studied over a broad temperature range using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermoporometry, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, cryoporometry, and temperature-programmed desorption with mass-spectrometry control methods. Comparison of the pore size distributions (PSD) calculated using the DSC thermoporometry, NMR cryoporometry, and nitrogen adsorption isotherms allows us to determine localization of adsorbates in different pores, as well as changes in the PSD of AC due to freezing of adsorbates in pores. Theoretical calculations (using ab initio HF/6-31G(d,p), DFT B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), and PM7 methods) explain certain aspects of the interfacial behavior of water, decane, and decanol adsorbed onto AC that appear in the experimental data. Obtained results show strong temperature dependence (above and below the freezing point, Tf, of bulk liquids) of the interfacial behavior of adsorbates on the textural characteristics and hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties of AC and the adsorbate amounts that affect the distributions of adsorbates unfrozen at T

  14. Nonpolar ZnO film growth and mechanism for anisotropic in-plane strain relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, P.; Budai, J.D.; Narayan, J.

    2010-01-01

    Using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction, we investigated the strain relaxation mechanisms for nonpolar (1 1 -2 0) a-plane ZnO epitaxy on (1 -1 0 2) r-plane sapphire, where the in-plane misfit ranges from -1.5% for the [0 0 0 1]ZnO-parallel [1 -1 0 -1]sapphire to -18.3% for the [-1 1 0 0]ZnO-parallel [-1 -1 2 0]sapphire direction. For the large misfit [-1 1 0 0]ZnO direction the misfit strains are fully relaxed at the growth temperature, and only thermal misfit and defect strains, which cannot be relaxed fully by slip dislocations, remain on cooling. For the small misfit direction, lattice misfit is not fully relaxed at the growth temperature. As a result, additive unrelaxed lattice and thermal misfit and defect strains contribute to the measured strain. Our X-ray diffraction measurements of lattice parameters show that the anisotropic in-plane biaxial strain leads to a distortion of the hexagonal symmetry of the ZnO basal plane. Based on the anisotropic strain relaxation observed along the orthogonal in-plane [-1 1 0 0] and [0 0 0 1]ZnO stress directions and our HRTEM investigations of the interface, we show that the plastic relaxation occurring in the small misfit direction [0 0 0 1]ZnO by dislocation nucleation is incomplete. These results are consistent with the domain-matching paradigm of a complete strain relaxation for large misfits and a difficulty in relaxing the film strain for small misfits.

  15. Quantum optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, P D [University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD (Australia).Physics Department

    1999-07-01

    Full text: Quantum optics in Australia has been an active research field for some years. I shall focus on recent developments in quantum and atom optics. Generally, the field as a whole is becoming more and more diverse, as technological developments drive experiments into new areas, and theorists either attempt to explain the new features, or else develop models for even more exotic ideas. The recent developments include quantum solitons, quantum computing, Bose-Einstein condensation, atom lasers, quantum cryptography, and novel tests of quantum mechanics. The talk will briefly cover current progress and outstanding problems in each of these areas. Copyright (1999) Australian Optical Society.

  16. Quantum entanglement and quantum teleportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Y.H.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most surprising consequences of quantum mechanics is the entanglement of two or more distance particles. The ''ghost'' interference and the ''ghost'' image experiments demonstrated the astonishing nonlocal behavior of an entangled photon pair. Even though we still have questions in regard to fundamental issues of the entangled quantum systems, quantum entanglement has started to play important roles in quantum information and quantum computation. Quantum teleportation is one of the hot topics. We have demonstrated a quantum teleportation experiment recently. The experimental results proved the working principle of irreversibly teleporting an unknown arbitrary quantum state from one system to another distant system by disassembling into and then later reconstructing from purely classical information and nonclassical EPR correlations. The distinct feature of this experiment is that the complete set of Bell states can be distinguished in the Bell state measurement. Teleportation of a quantum state can thus occur with certainty in principle. (orig.)

  17. Effect of self-heating on electrical characteristics of AlGaN/ GaN HEMT on Si (111) substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Adarsh; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N.; Rajamani, Saravanan; Dolmanan, Surani Bin; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Kumar, Mahesh

    2017-08-01

    In order to study the effect of self-heating of AlGaN/ GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) characteristics fabricated on Si(111) substrate, simulations of 2DEG temperature on different drain voltages have been carried out by Sentaurus TCAD simulator tool. Prior to the electrical direct-current (DC) characteristics studies, structural properties of the HEMT structures were examined by scanning transmission electron microscopy. The comparative analysis of simulation and experimental data provided sheet carrier concentration, mobility, surface traps, electron density at 2DEG by considering factors such as high field saturation, tunneling and recombination models. Mobility, surface trap concentration and contact resistance were obtained by TCAD simulation and found out to be ˜1270cm2/Vs, ˜2×1013 cm-2 and ˜0.2 Ω.mm, respectively, which are in agreement with the experimental results. Consequently, simulated current-voltage characteristics of HEMTs are in good agreement with experimental results. The present simulator tool can be used to design new device structures for III-nitride technology.

  18. Effect of self-heating on electrical characteristics of AlGaN/ GaN HEMT on Si (111 substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adarsh Nigam

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effect of self-heating of AlGaN/ GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs characteristics fabricated on Si(111 substrate, simulations of 2DEG temperature on different drain voltages have been carried out by Sentaurus TCAD simulator tool. Prior to the electrical direct-current (DC characteristics studies, structural properties of the HEMT structures were examined by scanning transmission electron microscopy. The comparative analysis of simulation and experimental data provided sheet carrier concentration, mobility, surface traps, electron density at 2DEG by considering factors such as high field saturation, tunneling and recombination models. Mobility, surface trap concentration and contact resistance were obtained by TCAD simulation and found out to be ∼1270cm2/Vs, ∼2×1013 cm-2 and ∼0.2 Ω.mm, respectively, which are in agreement with the experimental results. Consequently, simulated current-voltage characteristics of HEMTs are in good agreement with experimental results. The present simulator tool can be used to design new device structures for III-nitride technology.

  19. Bipolar characteristics of AlGaN/AlN/GaN/AlGaN double heterojunction structure with AlGaN as buffer layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Enchao; Wang, Xiaoliang; Xiao, Hongling; Wang, Cuimei; Yin, Haibo; Chen, Hong; Feng, Chun; Jiang, Lijuan; Hou, Xun; Wang, Zhanguo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •2DEG and 2DHG coexist in the AlGaN/AlN/GaN/AlGaN DH-structure. •The sheet densities of 2DEG and 2DHG vary with buffer Al content and GaN thickness. •The conditions for the disappearance of 2DHG are discussed. •Increasing buffer Al content provides better electron confinement. •Dislocation scattering is reduced in the DH-structure. -- Abstract: This is a theoretical study of AlGaN/AlN/GaN/AlGaN double heterojunction (DH) structure with AlGaN as buffer layer. Our calculation shows that as the buffer Al content increases, though two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) sheet density decreases, the channel back-barrier caused by polarization-induced electric field in GaN provides better electron confinement. And under certain conditions the DH-structure shows bipolar characteristics, with an additional two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) formed at GaN/AlGaN interface. The influence of the buffer Al content and GaN channel thickness on the 2DEG and 2DHG sheet densities are investigated, and the conditions for the disappearance of 2DHG are discussed. Also, the mobility inhibited by dislocation scattering is enhanced in DH-structure due to the enhancement of screening effect of the 2DEG

  20. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  1. Quantum computers and quantum computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiev, Kamil' A

    2005-01-01

    This review outlines the principles of operation of quantum computers and their elements. The theory of ideal computers that do not interact with the environment and are immune to quantum decohering processes is presented. Decohering processes in quantum computers are investigated. The review considers methods for correcting quantum computing errors arising from the decoherence of the state of the quantum computer, as well as possible methods for the suppression of the decohering processes. A brief enumeration of proposed quantum computer realizations concludes the review. (reviews of topical problems)

  2. Quantum mystery

    CERN Document Server

    Chanda, Rajat

    1997-01-01

    The book discusses the laws of quantum mechanics, several amazing quantum phenomena and some recent progress in understanding the connection between the quantum and the classical worlds. We show how paradoxes arise and how to resolve them. The significance of Bell's theorem and the remarkable experimental results on particle correlations are described in some detail. Finally, the current status of our understanding of quantum theory is summerised.

  3. Quantum criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Piers; Schofield, Andrew J

    2005-01-20

    As we mark the centenary of Albert Einstein's seminal contribution to both quantum mechanics and special relativity, we approach another anniversary--that of Einstein's foundation of the quantum theory of solids. But 100 years on, the same experimental measurement that puzzled Einstein and his contemporaries is forcing us to question our understanding of how quantum matter transforms at ultra-low temperatures.

  4. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the first part of this article, we had looked at how quantum physics can be harnessed to make the building blocks of a quantum computer. In this concluding part, we look at algorithms which can exploit the power of this computational device, and some practical difficulties in building such a device. Quantum Algorithms.

  5. I, Quantum Robot: Quantum Mind control on a Quantum Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Zizzi, Paola

    2008-01-01

    The logic which describes quantum robots is not orthodox quantum logic, but a deductive calculus which reproduces the quantum tasks (computational processes, and actions) taking into account quantum superposition and quantum entanglement. A way toward the realization of intelligent quantum robots is to adopt a quantum metalanguage to control quantum robots. A physical implementation of a quantum metalanguage might be the use of coherent states in brain signals.

  6. Two complementary reversed-phase separations for comprehensive coverage of the semipolar and nonpolar metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Fuad J; Mahieu, Nathaniel G; Wang, Lingjue; Spalding, Jonathan L; Johnson, Stephen L; Patti, Gary J

    2018-02-01

    Although it is common in untargeted metabolomics to apply reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) methods that have been systematically optimized for lipids and central carbon metabolites, here we show that these established protocols provide poor coverage of semipolar metabolites because of inadequate retention. Our objective was to develop an RPLC approach that improved detection of these metabolites without sacrificing lipid coverage. We initially evaluated columns recently released by Waters under the CORTECS line by analyzing 47 small-molecule standards that evenly span the nonpolar and semipolar ranges. An RPLC method commonly used in untargeted metabolomics was considered a benchmarking reference. We found that highly nonpolar and semipolar metabolites cannot be reliably profiled with any single method because of retention and solubility limitations of the injection solvent. Instead, we optimized a multiplexed approach using the CORTECS T3 column to analyze semipolar compounds and the CORTECS C 8 column to analyze lipids. Strikingly, we determined that combining these methods allowed detection of 41 of the total 47 standards, whereas our reference RPLC method detected only 10 of the 47 standards. We then applied credentialing to compare method performance at the comprehensive scale. The tandem method showed more than a fivefold increase in credentialing coverage relative to our RPLC benchmark. Our results demonstrate that comprehensive coverage of metabolites amenable to reversed-phase separation necessitates two reconstitution solvents and chromatographic methods. Thus, we suggest complementing HILIC methods with a dual T3 and C 8 RPLC approach to increase coverage of semipolar metabolites and lipids for untargeted metabolomics. Graphical abstract Analysis of semipolar and nonpolar metabolites necessitates two reversed-phase chromatography (RPLC) methods, which extend metabolome coverage more

  7. Characterization and growth mechanism of nonpolar and semipolar GaN layers grown on patterned sapphire substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Narihito; Tadatomo, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Nonpolar and semipolar GaN layers with markedly improved crystalline quality can be obtained by selective-area growth from the sapphire sidewalls of patterned sapphire substrates (PSSs). In this paper, we review the crystalline qualities of GaN layers grown on PSSs and their growth mechanism. We grew semipolar {1 1 −2 2} and {1 0 −1 1} GaN layers on r- and n-PSSs. The crystalline qualities of the GaN layers grown on the PSSs were higher than those of GaN layers grown directly on heteroepitaxial substrates. To reveal the growth mechanism of GaN layers grown on PSSs, we also grew various nonpolar and semipolar GaN layers such as m-GaN on a-PSS, {1 1 −2 2} GaN on r-PSS, {1 0 − 1  1} GaN on n-PSS, m-GaN on c-PSS and a-GaN on m-PSS. It was found that the nucleation of GaN on the c-plane-like sapphire sidewall results in selective growth from the sapphire sidewall, and nonpolar or semipolar GaN can be obtained. Finally, we demonstrated a light-emitting diode fabricated on a {1 1 −2 2} GaN layer grown on an r-PSS. (paper)

  8. Quantum Logic and Quantum Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Stairs, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Quantum logic understood as a reconstruction program had real successes and genuine limitations. This paper offers a synopsis of both and suggests a way of seeing quantum logic in a larger, still thriving context.

  9. Quantum dynamics of quantum bits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha

    2011-01-01

    The theory of coherent oscillations of the matrix elements of the density matrix of the two-state system as a quantum bit is presented. Different calculation methods are elaborated in the case of a free quantum bit. Then the most appropriate methods are applied to the study of the density matrices of the quantum bits interacting with a classical pumping radiation field as well as with the quantum electromagnetic field in a single-mode microcavity. The theory of decoherence of a quantum bit in Markovian approximation is presented. The decoherence of a quantum bit interacting with monoenergetic photons in a microcavity is also discussed. The content of the present work can be considered as an introduction to the study of the quantum dynamics of quantum bits. (review)

  10. Polar and nonpolar organic polymer-based monolithic columns for capillary electrochromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnasekara, Renuka; Khadka, Shantipriya; Jonnada, Murthy; El Rassi, Ziad

    2017-01-01

    This review article is a continuation of the previous reviews on the area of monolithic columns covering the progress made in the field over the last couple of years from the beginning of the second half of 2014 until the end of the first half of 2016. It summarizes and evaluates the evolvement of both polar and nonpolar organic monolithic columns and their use in hydrophilic interaction LC and CEC and reversed-phase chromatography and RP-CEC. The review article discusses the results reported in a total of 62 references. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. M-CARS and EFISHG study of the influence of a static electric field on a non-polar molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitaine, E.; Louot, C.; Ould-Moussa, N.; Lefort, C.; Kaneyasu, J. F.; Kano, H.; Pagnoux, D.; Couderc, V.; Leproux, P.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of a static electric field on a non-polar molecule has been studied by means of multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (M-CARS). A parallel measurement of electric field induced second harmonic generation (EFISHG) has also been led. Both techniques suggest a reorientation of the molecule due to the presence of an electric field. This phenomenon can be used to increase the chemical selectivity and the signal to non-resonant background ratio, namely, the sensitivity of the M-CARS spectroscopy.

  12. The flotation of Roşia Poieni copper ore in column machine, with non-polar oils addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciocani V.

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The most important natural resource of copper in Romania is the ore deposit of Roşia Poieni. At present, the utilization of Roşia Poieni poorphyry copper ore is possible by extraction in quarry of the mass ore and mineral processing into a technological flux with modest results for the value of metal recovery in concentrate 70-72 % and an average contents of 16,5 % Cu. Our researches were directed to studies regarding test and utilisation of special procedure of flotation – addition of the non-polar oil – applied to advanced grinding ore with column type machines.

  13. Quantum frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew J.

    2014-02-01

    The framework of quantum frames can help unravel some of the interpretive difficulties i the foundation of quantum mechanics. In this paper, I begin by tracing the origins of this concept in Bohr's discussion of quantum theory and his theory of complementarity. Engaging with various interpreters and followers of Bohr, I argue that the correct account of quantum frames must be extended beyond literal space-time reference frames to frames defined by relations between a quantum system and the exosystem or external physical frame, of which measurement contexts are a particularly important example. This approach provides superior solutions to key EPR-type measurement and locality paradoxes.

  14. Quantum Darwinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism describes the proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of a quantum system. It explains how the quantum fragility of a state of a single quantum system can lead to the classical robustness of states in their correlated multitude; shows how effective `wave-packet collapse' arises as a result of the proliferation throughout the environment of imprints of the state of the system; and provides a framework for the derivation of Born's rule, which relates the probabilities of detecting states to their amplitudes. Taken together, these three advances mark considerable progress towards settling the quantum measurement problem.

  15. Direct generation of linearly polarized single photons with a deterministic axis in quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the direct generation of linearly polarized single photons with a deterministic polarization axis in self-assembled quantum dots (QDs, achieved by the use of non-polar InGaN without complex device geometry engineering. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of the polarization properties of these QDs and their origin with statistically significant experimental data and rigorous k·p modeling. The experimental study of 180 individual QDs allows us to compute an average polarization degree of 0.90, with a standard deviation of only 0.08. When coupled with theoretical insights, we show that these QDs are highly insensitive to size differences, shape anisotropies, and material content variations. Furthermore, 91% of the studied QDs exhibit a polarization axis along the crystal [1–100] axis, with the other 9% polarized orthogonal to this direction. These features give non-polar InGaN QDs unique advantages in polarization control over other materials, such as conventional polar nitride, InAs, or CdSe QDs. Hence, the ability to generate single photons with polarization control makes non-polar InGaN QDs highly attractive for quantum cryptography protocols.

  16. Direct generation of linearly polarized single photons with a deterministic axis in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Puchtler, Tim J.; Patra, Saroj K.; Zhu, Tongtong; Ali, Muhammad; Badcock, Tom J.; Ding, Tao; Oliver, Rachel A.; Schulz, Stefan; Taylor, Robert A.

    2017-07-01

    We report the direct generation of linearly polarized single photons with a deterministic polarization axis in self-assembled quantum dots (QDs), achieved by the use of non-polar InGaN without complex device geometry engineering. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of the polarization properties of these QDs and their origin with statistically significant experimental data and rigorous k·p modeling. The experimental study of 180 individual QDs allows us to compute an average polarization degree of 0.90, with a standard deviation of only 0.08. When coupled with theoretical insights, we show that these QDs are highly insensitive to size differences, shape anisotropies, and material content variations. Furthermore, 91% of the studied QDs exhibit a polarization axis along the crystal [1-100] axis, with the other 9% polarized orthogonal to this direction. These features give non-polar InGaN QDs unique advantages in polarization control over other materials, such as conventional polar nitride, InAs, or CdSe QDs. Hence, the ability to generate single photons with polarization control makes non-polar InGaN QDs highly attractive for quantum cryptography protocols.

  17. High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons as pure model substances and in motor oil samples can be ionized without fragmentation by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourani, Nadim; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-10-15

    High molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons are still difficult to detect by mass spectrometry. Although several studies have targeted this problem, lack of good self-ionization has limited the ability of mass spectrometry to examine these hydrocarbons. Failure to control ion generation in the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source hampers the detection of intact stable gas-phase ions of non-polar hydrocarbon in mass spectrometry. Seventeen non-volatile non-polar hydrocarbons, reported to be difficult to ionize, were examined by an optimized APCI methodology using nitrogen as the reagent gas. All these analytes were successfully ionized as abundant and intact stable [M-H](+) ions without the use of any derivatization or adduct chemistry and without significant fragmentation. Application of the method to real-life hydrocarbon mixtures like light shredder waste and car motor oil was demonstrated. Despite numerous reports to the contrary, it is possible to ionize high molecular weight non-polar hydrocarbons by APCI, omitting the use of additives. This finding represents a significant step towards extending the applicability of mass spectrometry to non-polar hydrocarbon analyses in crude oil, petrochemical products, waste or food. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouwenhoven, L.; Marcus, C.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum dots are man-made ''droplets'' of charge that can contain anything from a single electron to a collection of several thousand. Their typical dimensions range from nanometres to a few microns, and their size, shape and interactions can be precisely controlled through the use of advanced nanofabrication technology. The physics of quantum dots shows many parallels with the behaviour of naturally occurring quantum systems in atomic and nuclear physics. Indeed, quantum dots exemplify an important trend in condensed-matter physics in which researchers study man-made objects rather than real atoms or nuclei. As in an atom, the energy levels in a quantum dot become quantized due to the confinement of electrons. With quantum dots, however, an experimentalist can scan through the entire periodic table by simply changing a voltage. In this article the authors describe how quantum dots make it possible to explore new physics in regimes that cannot otherwise be accessed in the laboratory. (UK)

  19. Quantum information. Teleporation - cryptography - quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test house, quantum teleportation, 100 years of quantum theory, the reality of quanta, interactionless quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view into the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  20. Quantum symmetry in quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schomerus, V.

    1993-02-01

    Symmetry concepts have always been of great importance for physical problems like explicit calculations, classification or model building. More recently, new 'quantum symmetries' ((quasi) quantum groups) attracted much interest in quantum theory. It is shown that all these quantum symmetries permit a conventional formulation as symmetry in quantum mechanics. Symmetry transformations can act on the Hilbert space H of physical states such that the ground state is invariant and field operators transform covariantly. Models show that one must allow for 'truncation' in the tensor product of representations of a quantum symmetry. This means that the dimension of the tensor product of two representations of dimension σ 1 and σ 2 may be strictly smaller than σ 1 σ 2 . Consistency of the transformation law of field operators local braid relations leads us to expect, that (weak) quasi quantum groups are the most general symmetries in local quantum theory. The elements of the R-matrix which appears in these local braid relations turn out to be operators on H in general. It will be explained in detail how examples of field algebras with weak quasi quantum group symmetry can be obtained. Given a set of observable field with a finite number of superselection sectors, a quantum symmetry together with a complete set of covariant field operators which obey local braid relations are constructed. A covariant transformation law for adjoint fields is not automatic but will follow when the existence of an appropriate antipode is assumed. At the example of the chiral critical Ising model, non-uniqueness of the quantum symmetry will be demonstrated. Generalized quantum symmetries yield examples of gauge symmetries in non-commutative geometry. Quasi-quantum planes are introduced as the simplest examples of quasi-associative differential geometry. (Weak) quasi quantum groups can act on them by generalized derivations much as quantum groups do in non-commutative (differential-) geometry

  1. Functionalization of Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots with Poly(ethylene glycol): Ligand Exchange, Surface Coverage, and Dispersion Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Whitney Nowak; Bates, Frank S; Aydil, Eray S

    2017-08-22

    Semiconductor quantum dots synthesized using rapid mixing of precursors by injection into a hot solution of solvents and surfactants have surface ligands that sterically stabilize the dispersions in nonpolar solvents. Often, these ligands are exchanged to disperse the quantum dots in polar solvents, but quantitative studies of quantum dot surfaces before and after ligand exchange are scarce. We studied exchanging trioctylphosphine (TOP) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) ligands on as-synthesized CdSe quantum dots dispersed in hexane with a 2000 g/mol thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymer. Using infrared spectroscopy we quantify the absolute surface concentration of TOP/TOPO and PEG ligands per unit area before and after ligand exchange. While 50-85% of the TOP/TOPO ligands are removed upon ligand exchange, only a few are replaced with PEG. Surprisingly, the remaining TOP/TOPO ligands outnumber the PEG ligands, but these few PEG ligands are sufficient to disperse the quantum dots in polar solvents such as chloroform, tetrahydrofuran, and water. Moreover, as-synthesized quantum dots once easily dispersed in hexane are no longer dispersible in nonpolar solvents after ligand exchange. A subtle coverage-dependent balance between attractive PEG-solvent interactions and repulsive TOP/TOPO-solvent interactions determines the dispersion stability.

  2. Influence of the solvent environments on the spectral features of CdSe quantum dots with and without ZnS shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibnaouf, K.H., E-mail: kheo90@gmail.com [Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University (IMSIU), Physics Department, College of Science, P.O. Box 90905, Riyadh 11623 (Saudi Arabia); Prasad, Saradh; Al Salhi, M.S.; Hamdan, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Research Chair for Laser Diagnosis of Cancer, King Saud University (Saudi Arabia); Zaman, M.B. [CEREM, College of Engineering, King Saud University (Saudi Arabia); Advanced Medical Research Institute of Canada, Sudbury (Canada); El Mir, L. [Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University (IMSIU), Physics Department, College of Science, P.O. Box 90905, Riyadh 11623 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-05-01

    The spectral properties of 5 nm size of bare CdSe and (CdSe)ZnS core–shell quantum dots (QDs) have been recorded and investigated under different solvent environments with different polarities and different concentrations. The results showed that the spectral profile of absorption did not change for both quantum dots in different solvents under a wide range of concentrations. On the other hand, the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of (CdSe)ZnS core–shell quantum dots in non-polar solvents showed two bands; the primary around 420 nm and the secondary around 620 nm. In contrast, the PL spectra of bare CdSe in non-polar solvents, showed a very strong band around 590 nm, with a total absence of the primary wavelength band at 420 nm. Under high polar solvent environments, bare CdSe showed a new peak around 420 nm, which was totally absent in non-polar solvent. Therefore, the solvent plays an important role in the PL spectra of bare CdSe and (CdSe)ZnS core–shell quantum dots.

  3. On the interplay of point defects and Cd in non-polar ZnCdO films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubiaga, A.; Reurings, F.; Tuomisto, F.; Plazaola, F.; García, J. A.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Egger, W.; Zúñiga-Pérez, J.; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V.

    2013-01-01

    Non-polar ZnCdO films, grown over m- and r-sapphire with a Cd concentration ranging between 0.8% and 5%, have been studied by means of slow positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with chemical depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Rutherford back-scattering. Vacancy clusters and Zn vacancies with concentrations up to 10 17 cm −3 and 10 18 cm −3 , respectively, have been measured inside the films. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results show that most Cd stays inside the ZnCdO film but the diffused atoms can penetrate up to 1.3 μm inside the ZnO buffer. PAS results give an insight to the structure of the meta-stable ZnCdO above the thermodynamical solubility limit of 2%. A correlation between the concentration of vacancy clusters and Cd has been measured. The concentration of Zn vacancies is one order of magnitude larger than in as-grown non-polar ZnO films and the vacancy cluster are, at least partly, created by the aggregation of smaller Zn vacancy related defects. The Zn vacancy related defects and the vacancy clusters accumulate around the Cd atoms as a way to release the strain induced by the substitutional Cd Zn in the ZnO crystal.

  4. On the interplay of point defects and Cd in non-polar ZnCdO films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubiaga, A.; Reurings, F.; Tuomisto, F. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, P.O. Box 11100, 00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Plazaola, F. [Elektrizitatea eta Elektronika/Fisika Aplikatua II Sailak, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Posta Kutxatila 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Garcia, J. A. [Fisika Aplikatua II Saila, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Posta Kutxatila 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Kuznetsov, A. Yu. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo (Norway); Egger, W. [Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik, Univ. der Bundeswehr Muenchen, 87755 Neubiberg (Germany); Zuniga-Perez, J. [CRHEA CNRS, F-06560 Valbonne (France); Munoz-Sanjose, V. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada i Electromagnetisme, c/ Doctor Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2013-01-14

    Non-polar ZnCdO films, grown over m- and r-sapphire with a Cd concentration ranging between 0.8% and 5%, have been studied by means of slow positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with chemical depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Rutherford back-scattering. Vacancy clusters and Zn vacancies with concentrations up to 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, respectively, have been measured inside the films. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results show that most Cd stays inside the ZnCdO film but the diffused atoms can penetrate up to 1.3 {mu}m inside the ZnO buffer. PAS results give an insight to the structure of the meta-stable ZnCdO above the thermodynamical solubility limit of 2%. A correlation between the concentration of vacancy clusters and Cd has been measured. The concentration of Zn vacancies is one order of magnitude larger than in as-grown non-polar ZnO films and the vacancy cluster are, at least partly, created by the aggregation of smaller Zn vacancy related defects. The Zn vacancy related defects and the vacancy clusters accumulate around the Cd atoms as a way to release the strain induced by the substitutional Cd{sub Zn} in the ZnO crystal.

  5. On the interplay of point defects and Cd in non-polar ZnCdO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubiaga, A.; Reurings, F.; Tuomisto, F.; Plazaola, F.; García, J. A.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Egger, W.; Zúñiga-Pérez, J.; Muñoz-Sanjosé, V.

    2013-01-01

    Non-polar ZnCdO films, grown over m- and r-sapphire with a Cd concentration ranging between 0.8% and 5%, have been studied by means of slow positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with chemical depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Rutherford back-scattering. Vacancy clusters and Zn vacancies with concentrations up to 1017 cm-3 and 1018 cm-3, respectively, have been measured inside the films. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results show that most Cd stays inside the ZnCdO film but the diffused atoms can penetrate up to 1.3 μm inside the ZnO buffer. PAS results give an insight to the structure of the meta-stable ZnCdO above the thermodynamical solubility limit of 2%. A correlation between the concentration of vacancy clusters and Cd has been measured. The concentration of Zn vacancies is one order of magnitude larger than in as-grown non-polar ZnO films and the vacancy cluster are, at least partly, created by the aggregation of smaller Zn vacancy related defects. The Zn vacancy related defects and the vacancy clusters accumulate around the Cd atoms as a way to release the strain induced by the substitutional CdZn in the ZnO crystal.

  6. A qualitative semi-classical treatment of an isolated semi-polar quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Toby D

    2011-01-01

    To qualitatively determine the behaviour of micro-macro properties of a quantum dot grown in a non-polar direction, we propose a simple semi-classical model based on well established ideas. We take into account the following empirical phenomena: (i) The displacement and induced strain at heterojunctions; (ii) The electrostatic potential arising from piezoelectric and spontaneous polarisation; and (iii) The localisation of excitons (particle-hole pairs) arising from quantum confinement. After some algebraic manipulation used to cast the formalism into an arbitrarily rotated frame, a numerical model is developed for the case of a semi-polar wurtzite GaN quantum dot buried in a wurtzite AlN matrix. This scheme is found to provide a satisfying qualitative description of an isolated semi-polar quantum dot in a way that is accessible to further physical interpretation and quantification.

  7. Quantum games as quantum types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbecque, Yannick

    In this thesis, we present a new model for higher-order quantum programming languages. The proposed model is an adaptation of the probabilistic game semantics developed by Danos and Harmer [DH02]: we expand it with quantum strategies which enable one to represent quantum states and quantum operations. Some of the basic properties of these strategies are established and then used to construct denotational semantics for three quantum programming languages. The first of these languages is a formalisation of the measurement calculus proposed by Danos et al. [DKP07]. The other two are new: they are higher-order quantum programming languages. Previous attempts to define a denotational semantics for higher-order quantum programming languages have failed. We identify some of the key reasons for this and base the design of our higher-order languages on these observations. The game semantics proposed in this thesis is the first denotational semantics for a lambda-calculus equipped with quantum types and with extra operations which allow one to program quantum algorithms. The results presented validate the two different approaches used in the design of these two new higher-order languages: a first one where quantum states are used through references and a second one where they are introduced as constants in the language. The quantum strategies presented in this thesis allow one to understand the constraints that must be imposed on quantum type systems with higher-order types. The most significant constraint is the fact that abstraction over part of the tensor product of many unknown quantum states must not be allowed. Quantum strategies are a new mathematical model which describes the interaction between classical and quantum data using system-environment dialogues. The interactions between the different parts of a quantum system are described using the rich structure generated by composition of strategies. This approach has enough generality to be put in relation with other

  8. Structural, surface potential and optical studies of AlGaN based double heterostructures irradiated by 120 MeV Si{sup 9+} swift heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arivazhagan, P., E-mail: arivazhaganau2008@gmail.com [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai, 600 025 (India); Ramesh, R.; Balaji, M. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai, 600 025 (India); Asokan, K. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi (India); Baskar, K. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai, 600 025 (India)

    2016-09-15

    The Al{sub 0.33}Ga{sub 0.77}N/Al{sub 0.14}Ga{sub 0.86}N based double heterostructure was irradiated using Si{sup 9+} ion at room temperature (RT) and liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) with four dissimilar ion fluence. The effect of Si{sup 9+} ion irradiation in dislocation densities and in-plane strain of GaN layer were discussed. The in-plane strain values of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N layers were calculated from asymmetric reciprocal space mapping (RSM). The surface modification and the variation in phase shift on Al{sub 0.33}Ga{sub 0.77}N surfaces due to the irradiation were measured by Electrostatic Force Microscopy (EFM). The capacitance of the tip-sample system was determined from EFM. The band edge emissions of heterostructures were measured by the room temperature phototluminescence (PL) and the shift in the Al{sub 0.14}Ga{sub 0.86}N active layer emission peaks towards the low energy side at low fluence ion irradiation has been noted. - Highlights: • Effects of Si{sup 9+} ion irradiation on AlGaN double heterostructures were investigated. • Dislocation densities of GaN reduced at liquid nitrogen temperature irradiation. • Variation in phase shift on Al{sub 0.33}Ga{sub 0.77}N surfaces was measured by EFM. • Capacitance per unit area values of AFM tip-sample surface system were calculated. • Si{sup 9+} irradiations play an important role to tune the energy gap in Al{sub 0.14}Ga{sub 0.86}N.

  9. Quantum measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Busch, Paul; Pellonpää, Juha-Pekka; Ylinen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    This is a book about the Hilbert space formulation of quantum mechanics and its measurement theory. It contains a synopsis of what became of the Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics since von Neumann’s classic treatise with this title. Fundamental non-classical features of quantum mechanics—indeterminacy and incompatibility of observables, unavoidable measurement disturbance, entanglement, nonlocality—are explicated and analysed using the tools of operational quantum theory. The book is divided into four parts: 1. Mathematics provides a systematic exposition of the Hilbert space and operator theoretic tools and relevant measure and integration theory leading to the Naimark and Stinespring dilation theorems; 2. Elements develops the basic concepts of quantum mechanics and measurement theory with a focus on the notion of approximate joint measurability; 3. Realisations offers in-depth studies of the fundamental observables of quantum mechanics and some of their measurement implementations; and 4....

  10. Quantum Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Walls, D F

    2007-01-01

    Quantum Optics gives a comprehensive coverage of developments in quantum optics over the past years. In the early chapters the formalism of quantum optics is elucidated and the main techniques are introduced. These are applied in the later chapters to problems such as squeezed states of light, resonance fluorescence, laser theory, quantum theory of four-wave mixing, quantum non-demolition measurements, Bell's inequalities, and atom optics. Experimental results are used to illustrate the theory throughout. This yields the most comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of experiment and theory in quantum optics in any textbook. More than 40 exercises helps readers test their understanding and provide practice in quantitative problem solving.

  11. Quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, M.A.; West, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the state of the art of quantum gravity, quantum effects in cosmology, quantum black-hole physics, recent developments in supergravity, and quantum gauge theories. Topics considered include the problems of general relativity, pregeometry, complete cosmological theories, quantum fluctuations in cosmology and galaxy formation, a new inflationary universe scenario, grand unified phase transitions and the early Universe, the generalized second law of thermodynamics, vacuum polarization near black holes, the relativity of vacuum, black hole evaporations and their cosmological consequences, currents in supersymmetric theories, the Kaluza-Klein theories, gauge algebra and quantization, and twistor theory. This volume constitutes the proceedings of the Second Seminar on Quantum Gravity held in Moscow in 1981

  12. Quantum Locality?

    OpenAIRE

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2011-01-01

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a 'consistent quantum theory' that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues that the putative proofs of this property that involve hidden variables include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. O...

  13. Quantum ratchets

    OpenAIRE

    Grifoni, Milena

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, ratchet systems operating in the quantum regime are investigated. Ratchet systems, also known as Brownian motors, are periodic systems presenting an intrinsic asymmetry which can be exploited to extract work out of unbiased forces. As a model for ratchet systems, we consider the motion of a particle in a one-dimensional periodic and asymmetric potential, interacting with a thermal environment, and subject to an unbiased driving force. In quantum ratchets, intrinsic quantum flu...

  14. Quantum space and quantum completeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurić, Tajron

    2018-05-01

    Motivated by the question whether quantum gravity can "smear out" the classical singularity we analyze a certain quantum space and its quantum-mechanical completeness. Classical singularity is understood as a geodesic incompleteness, while quantum completeness requires a unique unitary time evolution for test fields propagating on an underlying background. Here the crucial point is that quantum completeness renders the Hamiltonian (or spatial part of the wave operator) to be essentially self-adjoint in order to generate a unique time evolution. We examine a model of quantum space which consists of a noncommutative BTZ black hole probed by a test scalar field. We show that the quantum gravity (noncommutative) effect is to enlarge the domain of BTZ parameters for which the relevant wave operator is essentially self-adjoint. This means that the corresponding quantum space is quantum complete for a larger range of BTZ parameters rendering the conclusion that in the quantum space one observes the effect of "smearing out" the singularity.

  15. Microsolvation of the acetanilide cation (AA(+)) in a nonpolar solvent: IR spectra of AA(+)-L(n) clusters (L = He, Ar, N2; n ≤ 10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmies, Matthias; Patzer, Alexander; Schütz, Markus; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki; Dopfer, Otto

    2014-05-07

    Infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra of mass-selected cluster ions of acetanilide (N-phenylacetamide), AA(+)-Ln, with the ligands L = He (n = 1-2), Ar (n = 1-7), and N2 (n = 1-10) are recorded in the hydride stretch (amide A, νNH, νCH) and fingerprint (amide I-III) ranges of AA(+) in its (2)A'' ground electronic state. Cold AA(+)-Ln clusters are generated in an electron impact ion source, which predominantly produces the most stable isomer of a given cluster ion. Systematic vibrational frequency shifts of the N-H stretch fundamentals (νNH) provide detailed information about the sequential microsolvation process of AA(+) in a nonpolar (L = He and Ar) and quadrupolar (L = N2) solvent. In the most stable AA(+)-Ln clusters, the first ligand forms a hydrogen bond (H-bond) with the N-H proton of trans-AA(+) (t-AA(+)), whereas further ligands bind weakly to the aromatic ring (π-stacking). There is no experimental evidence for complexes with the less stable cis-AA(+) isomer. Quantum chemical calculations at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level confirm the cluster growth sequence derived from the IR spectra. The calculated binding energies of De(H) = 720 and 1227 cm(-1) for H-bonded and De(π) = 585 and 715 cm(-1) for π-bonded Ar and N2 ligands in t-AA(+)-L are consistent with the observed photofragmentation branching ratios of AA(+)-Ln. Comparison between charged and neutral AA((+))-L dimers indicates that ionization switches the preferred ion-ligand binding motif from π-stacking to H-bonding. Electron removal from the HOMO of AA(+) delocalized over both the aromatic ring and the amide group significantly strengthens the C[double bond, length as m-dash]O bond and weakens the N-H bond of the amide group.

  16. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdevant, J.L.; Dalibard, J.; Joffre, M.

    2008-01-01

    All physics is quantum from elementary particles to stars and to the big-bang via semi-conductors and chemistry. This theory is very subtle and we are not able to explain it without the help of mathematic tools. This book presents the principles of quantum mechanics and describes its mathematical formalism (wave function, Schroedinger equation, quantum operators, spin, Hamiltonians, collisions,..). We find numerous applications in the fields of new technologies (maser, quantum computer, cryptography,..) and in astrophysics. A series of about 90 exercises with their answers is included. This book is based on a physics course at a graduate level. (A.C.)

  17. Quantum information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, P.

    1998-01-01

    There is more to information than a string of ones and zeroes the ability of ''quantum bits'' to be in two states at the same time could revolutionize information technology. In the mid-1930s two influential but seemingly unrelated papers were published. In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen proposed the famous EPR paradox that has come to symbolize the mysteries of quantum mechanics. Two years later, Alan Turing introduced the universal Turing machine in an enigmatically titled paper, On computable numbers, and laid the foundations of the computer industry one of the biggest industries in the world today. Although quantum physics is essential to understand the operation of transistors and other solid-state devices in computers, computation itself has remained a resolutely classical process. Indeed it seems only natural that computation and quantum theory should be kept as far apart as possible surely the uncertainty associated with quantum theory is anathema to the reliability expected from computers? Wrong. In 1985 David Deutsch introduced the universal quantum computer and showed that quantum theory can actually allow computers to do more rather than less. The ability of particles to be in a superposition of more than one quantum state naturally introduces a form of parallelism that can, in principle, perform some traditional computing tasks faster than is possible with classical computers. Moreover, quantum computers are capable of other tasks that are not conceivable with their classical counterparts. Similar breakthroughs in cryptography and communication followed. (author)

  18. Quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, P

    1998-03-01

    There is more to information than a string of ones and zeroes the ability of ''quantum bits'' to be in two states at the same time could revolutionize information technology. In the mid-1930s two influential but seemingly unrelated papers were published. In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen proposed the famous EPR paradox that has come to symbolize the mysteries of quantum mechanics. Two years later, Alan Turing introduced the universal Turing machine in an enigmatically titled paper, On computable numbers, and laid the foundations of the computer industry one of the biggest industries in the world today. Although quantum physics is essential to understand the operation of transistors and other solid-state devices in computers, computation itself has remained a resolutely classical process. Indeed it seems only natural that computation and quantum theory should be kept as far apart as possible surely the uncertainty associated with quantum theory is anathema to the reliability expected from computers? Wrong. In 1985 David Deutsch introduced the universal quantum computer and showed that quantum theory can actually allow computers to do more rather than less. The ability of particles to be in a superposition of more than one quantum state naturally introduces a form of parallelism that can, in principle, perform some traditional computing tasks faster than is possible with classical computers. Moreover, quantum computers are capable of other tasks that are not conceivable with their classical counterparts. Similar breakthroughs in cryptography and communication followed. (author)

  19. Quantum Integers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei; Klein, Moshe; Mor, Tal

    2010-01-01

    In number theory, a partition of a positive integer n is a way of writing n as a sum of positive integers. The number of partitions of n is given by the partition function p(n). Inspired by quantum information processing, we extend the concept of partitions in number theory as follows: for an integer n, we treat each partition as a basis state of a quantum system representing that number n, so that the Hilbert-space that corresponds to that integer n is of dimension p(n); the 'classical integer' n can thus be generalized into a (pure) quantum state ||ψ(n) > which is a superposition of the partitions of n, in the same way that a quantum bit (qubit) is a generalization of a classical bit. More generally, ρ(n) is a density matrix in that same Hilbert-space (a probability distribution over pure states). Inspired by the notion of quantum numbers in quantum theory (such as in Bohr's model of the atom), we then try to go beyond the partitions, by defining (via recursion) the notion of 'sub-partitions' in number theory. Combining the two notions mentioned above, sub-partitions and quantum integers, we finally provide an alternative definition of the quantum integers [the pure-state |ψ'(n)> and the mixed-state ρ'(n),] this time using the sub-partitions as the basis states instead of the partitions, for describing the quantum number that corresponds to the integer n.

  20. Quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, D.

    1992-01-01

    As computers become ever more complex, they inevitably become smaller. This leads to a need for components which are fabricated and operate on increasingly smaller size scales. Quantum theory is already taken into account in microelectronics design. This article explores how quantum theory will need to be incorporated into computers in future in order to give them their components functionality. Computation tasks which depend on quantum effects will become possible. Physicists may have to reconsider their perspective on computation in the light of understanding developed in connection with universal quantum computers. (UK)

  1. Quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, P

    1998-03-01

    There is more to information than a string of ones and zeroes the ability of ''quantum bits'' to be in two states at the same time could revolutionize information technology. In the mid-1930s two influential but seemingly unrelated papers were published. In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen proposed the famous EPR paradox that has come to symbolize the mysteries of quantum mechanics. Two years later, Alan Turing introduced the universal Turing machine in an enigmatically titled paper, On computable numbers, and laid the foundations of the computer industry one of the biggest industries in the world today. Although quantum physics is essential to understand the operation of transistors and other solid-state devices in computers, computation itself has remained a resolutely classical process. Indeed it seems only natural that computation and quantum theory should be kept as far apart as possible surely the uncertainty associated with quantum theory is anathema to the reliability expected from computers? Wrong. In 1985 David Deutsch introduced the universal quantum computer and showed that quantum theory can actually allow computers to do more rather than less. The ability of particles to be in a superposition of more than one quantum state naturally introduces a form of parallelism that can, in principle, perform some traditional computing tasks faster than is possible with classical computers. Moreover, quantum computers are capable of other tasks that are not conceivable with their classical counterparts. Similar breakthroughs in cryptography and communication followed. (author)

  2. Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  3. Quantum group and quantum symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Zhe.

    1994-05-01

    This is a self-contained review on the theory of quantum group and its applications to modern physics. A brief introduction is given to the Yang-Baxter equation in integrable quantum field theory and lattice statistical physics. The quantum group is primarily introduced as a systematic method for solving the Yang-Baxter equation. Quantum group theory is presented within the framework of quantum double through quantizing Lie bi-algebra. Both the highest weight and the cyclic representations are investigated for the quantum group and emphasis is laid on the new features of representations for q being a root of unity. Quantum symmetries are explored in selected topics of modern physics. For a Hamiltonian system the quantum symmetry is an enlarged symmetry that maintains invariance of equations of motion and allows a deformation of the Hamiltonian and symplectic form. The configuration space of the integrable lattice model is analyzed in terms of the representation theory of quantum group. By means of constructing the Young operators of quantum group, the Schroedinger equation of the model is transformed to be a set of coupled linear equations that can be solved by the standard method. Quantum symmetry of the minimal model and the WZNW model in conformal field theory is a hidden symmetry expressed in terms of screened vertex operators, and has a deep interplay with the Virasoro algebra. In quantum group approach a complete description for vibrating and rotating diatomic molecules is given. The exact selection rules and wave functions are obtained. The Taylor expansion of the analytic formulas of the approach reproduces the famous Dunham expansion. (author). 133 refs, 20 figs

  4. Use of polar and nonpolar fractions as additional information sources for studying thermoxidized virgin olive oils by FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tena, N.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy has been proposed to study the degradation of virgin olive oils (VOO in samples undergoing thermoxidation. The polar and nonpolar fractions of oxidized oils have been analyzed by FTIR to provide further information on the minor spectral changes taking place during thermoxidation. This information assists in the interpretation of the spectra of the samples. For this purpose polar and nonpolar fractions of 47 VOO samples thermoxidized (190 °C in a fryer were analyzed by FTIR. The time-course change of the band area assigned to single cis double bonds was explained by their correlation with the decrease in oleic acid (adjusted-R2=0.93. The bands assigned to the hydroxyl groups and the first overtone of ester groups was better studied in the spectra collected for the polar and nonpolar fractions, respectively. The bands assigned to peroxide, epoxy, tertiary alcohols and fatty acids were clearly observed in the spectra of the polar fraction while they are not noticeable in the spectra of the oils.La espectroscopía de infrarrojos por transformada de Fourier (FTIR se ha propuesto para estudiar la degradación de los aceites de oliva vírgenes (AOV sujetas a termoxidación. Las fracciones polares y no polares de aceites oxidados se analizaron mediante FTIR para obtener más información sobre los cambios espectrales menores que tienen lugar durante la termoxidación. Esa información ayuda en la interpretación de los espectros de las muestras puras. Con este objetivo, fracciones polares y no polares de 47 AOV termoxidados (190 °C en una freidora se analizaron mediante FTIR. La banda asignada a dobles enlaces cis se explica por su correlación con la disminución de ácido oleico (R2-ajustado=0,93. Las bandas asignadas a los grupos hidroxilos y del primer sobretono de los grupos éster se estudió mejor en los espectros recogidos para la fracción polar y no polar, respectivamente. Grupos asignados a per

  5. Quantum information. Teleportation - cryptography - quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenneker, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Reality in the test facility, quantum teleportation, the reality of quanta, interaction-free quantum measurement, rules for quantum computers, quantum computers with ions, spintronics with diamond, the limits of the quantum computers, a view in the future of quantum optics. (HSI)

  6. Creating Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in Nonpolar/Nonpolar Oxide Interface via Polarization Discontinuity: First-Principles Analysis of CaZrO3/SrTiO3 Heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Safdar; Cheng, Jianli; Yang, Kesong

    2016-01-13

    We studied strain-induced polarization and resulting conductivity in the nonpolar/nonpolar CaZrO3/SrTiO3 (CZO/STO) heterostructure (HS) system by means of first-principles electronic structure calculations. By modeling four types of CZO/STO HS-based slab systems, i.e., TiO2/CaO and SrO/ZrO2 interface models with CaO and ZrO2 surface terminations in each model separately, we found that the lattice-mismatch-induced compressive strain leads to a strong polarization in the CZO film and that as the CZO film thickness increases there exists an insulator-to-metal transition. The polarization direction and critical thickness of the CZO film for forming interfacial metallic states depend on the surface termination of CZO film in both types of interface models. In the TiO2/CaO and SrO/ZrO2 interface models with CaO surface termination, the strong polarization drives the charge transfer from the CZO film to the first few TiO2 layers in the STO substrate, leading to the formation of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) at the interface. In the HS models with ZrO2 surface termination, two polarization domains with opposite directions are in the CZO film, which results in the charge transfer from the middle CZO layer to the interface and surface, respectively, leading to the coexistence of the 2DEG on the interface and the two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) at the middle CZO layer. These findings open a new avenue to achieve 2DEG (2DHG) in perovskite-based HS systems via polarization discontinuity.

  7. Quantum ensembles of quantum classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuld, Maria; Petruccione, Francesco

    2018-02-09

    Quantum machine learning witnesses an increasing amount of quantum algorithms for data-driven decision making, a problem with potential applications ranging from automated image recognition to medical diagnosis. Many of those algorithms are implementations of quantum classifiers, or models for the classification of data inputs with a quantum computer. Following the success of collective decision making with ensembles in classical machine learning, this paper introduces the concept of quantum ensembles of quantum classifiers. Creating the ensemble corresponds to a state preparation routine, after which the quantum classifiers are evaluated in parallel and their combined decision is accessed by a single-qubit measurement. This framework naturally allows for exponentially large ensembles in which - similar to Bayesian learning - the individual classifiers do not have to be trained. As an example, we analyse an exponentially large quantum ensemble in which each classifier is weighed according to its performance in classifying the training data, leading to new results for quantum as well as classical machine learning.

  8. Quantum computer games: quantum minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-07-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical minesweeper the goal of the game is to discover all the mines laid out on a board without triggering them, in the quantum version there are several classical boards in superposition. The goal is to know the exact quantum state, i.e. the precise layout of all the mines in all the superposed classical boards. The player can perform three types of measurement: a classical measurement that probabilistically collapses the superposition; a quantum interaction-free measurement that can detect a mine without triggering it; and an entanglement measurement that provides non-local information. The application of the concepts taught by quantum minesweeper to one-way quantum computing are also presented.

  9. Quantum Physics Without Quantum Philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Dürr, Detlef; Zanghì, Nino

    2013-01-01

    It has often been claimed that without drastic conceptual innovations a genuine explanation of quantum interference effects and quantum randomness is impossible. This book concerns Bohmian mechanics, a simple particle theory that is a counterexample to such claims. The gentle introduction and other contributions collected here show how the phenomena of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle to non-commuting observables, emerge from the Bohmian motion of particles, the natural particle motion associated with Schrödinger's equation. This book will be of value to all students and researchers in physics with an interest in the meaning of quantum theory as well as to philosophers of science.

  10. Quantum measurement in quantum optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimble, H.J.

    1993-01-01

    Recent progress in the generation and application of manifestly quantum or nonclassical states of the electromagnetic field is reviewed with emphasis on the research of the Quantum Optics Group at Caltech. In particular, the possibilities for spectroscopy with non-classical light are discussed both in terms of improved quantitative measurement capabilities and for the fundamental alteration of atomic radiative processes. Quantum correlations for spatially extended systems are investigated in a variety of experiments which utilize nondegenerate parametric down conversion. Finally, the prospects for measurement of the position of a free mass with precision beyond the standard quantum limit are briefly considered. (author). 38 refs., 1 fig

  11. Breakdown voltage analysis of Al0.25Ga0.75N/GaN high electron mobility transistors with partial silicon doping in the AlGaN layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Bao-Xing; Yang Yin-Tang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) regions in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) are realized by doping partial silicon into the AlGaN layer for the first time. A new electric field peak is introduced along the interface between the AlGaN and GaN buffer by the electric field modulation effect due to partial silicon positive charge. The high electric field near the gate for the complete silicon doping structure is effectively decreased, which makes the surface electric field uniform. The high electric field peak near the drain results from the potential difference between the surface and the depletion regions. Simulated breakdown curves that are the same as the test results are obtained for the first time by introducing an acceptor-like trap into the N-type GaN buffer. The proposed structure with partial silicon doping is better than the structure with complete silicon doping and conventional structures with the electric field plate near the drain. The breakdown voltage is improved from 296 V for the conventional structure to 400 V for the proposed one resulting from the uniform surface electric field. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  12. Fixed interface charges between AlGaN barrier and gate stack composed of in situ grown SiN and Al2O3 in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with normally off capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capriotti, M.; Alexewicz, A.; Fleury, C.; Gavagnin, M.; Bethge, O.; Wanzenböck, H. D.; Bertagnolli, E.; Pogany, D.; Strasser, G.; Visalli, D.; Derluyn, J.

    2014-01-01

    Using a generalized extraction method, the fixed charge density N int at the interface between in situ deposited SiN and 5 nm thick AlGaN barrier is evaluated by measurements of threshold voltage V th of an AlGaN/GaN metal insulator semiconductor high electron mobility transistor as a function of SiN thickness. The thickness of the originally deposited 50 nm thick SiN layer is reduced by dry etching. The extracted N int is in the order of the AlGaN polarization charge density. The total removal of the in situ SiN cap leads to a complete depletion of the channel region resulting in V th  = +1 V. Fabrication of a gate stack with Al 2 O 3 as a second cap layer, deposited on top of the in situ SiN, is not introducing additional fixed charges at the SiN/Al 2 O 3 interface

  13. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 9. Quantum Computing - Building Blocks of a Quantum Computer. C S Vijay Vishal Gupta. General Article Volume 5 Issue 9 September 2000 pp 69-81. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Quantum spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doplicher, S.

    1996-01-01

    We review some recent result and work in progress on the quantum structure of spacetime at scales comparable with the Planck length; the models discussed here are operationally motivated by the limitations in the accuracy of localization of events in spacetime imposed by the interplay between quantum mechanics and classical general relativity. (orig.)

  15. Quantum photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pearsall, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    This textbook employs a pedagogical approach that facilitates access to the fundamentals of Quantum Photonics. It contains an introductory description of the quantum properties of photons through the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, introducing stimulated and spontaneous emission of photons at the quantum level. Schrödinger’s equation is used to describe the behavior of electrons in a one-dimensional potential. Tunneling through a barrier is used to introduce the concept of non­locality of an electron at the quantum level, which is closely-related to quantum confinement tunneling, resonant tunneling, and the origin of energy bands in both periodic (crystalline) and aperiodic (non-crystalline) materials. Introducing the concepts of reciprocal space, Brillouin zones, and Bloch’s theorem, the determination of electronic band structure using the pseudopotential method is presented, allowing direct computation of the band structures of most group IV, group III-V, and group II-VI semiconducto...

  16. Quantum cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawking, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    The subject of these lectures is quantum effects in cosmology. The author deals first with situations in which the gravitational field can be treated as a classical, unquantized background on which the quantum matter fields propagate. This is the case with inflation at the GUT era. Nevertheless the curvature of spacetime can have important effects on the behaviour of the quantum fields and on the development of long-range correlations. He then turns to the question of the quantization of the gravitational field itself. The plan of these lectures is as follows: Euclidean approach to quantum field theory in flat space; the extension of techniques to quantum fields on a curved background with the four-sphere, the Euclidean version of De Sitter space as a particular example; the GUT era; quantization of the gravitational field by Euclidean path integrals; mini superspace model. (Auth.)

  17. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Alastair I M

    2016-01-01

    A Thorough Update of One of the Most Highly Regarded Textbooks on Quantum Mechanics Continuing to offer an exceptionally clear, up-to-date treatment of the subject, Quantum Mechanics, Sixth Edition explains the concepts of quantum mechanics for undergraduate students in physics and related disciplines and provides the foundation necessary for other specialized courses. This sixth edition builds on its highly praised predecessors to make the text even more accessible to a wider audience. It is now divided into five parts that separately cover broad topics suitable for any general course on quantum mechanics. New to the Sixth Edition * Three chapters that review prerequisite physics and mathematics, laying out the notation, formalism, and physical basis necessary for the rest of the book * Short descriptions of numerous applications relevant to the physics discussed, giving students a brief look at what quantum mechanics has made possible industrially and scientifically * Additional end-of-chapter problems with...

  18. Quantum magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Johannes; Farnell, Damian; Bishop, Raymod

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of magnetic systems where quantum effects play a dominant role has become a very active branch of solid-state-physics research in its own right. The first three chapters of the "Quantum Magnetism" survey conceptual problems and provide insights into the classes of systems considered, namely one-dimensional, two-dimensional and molecular magnets. The following chapters introduce the methods used in the field of quantum magnetism, including spin wave analysis, exact diagonalization, quantum field theory, coupled cluster methods and the Bethe ansatz. The book closes with a chapter on quantum phase transitions and a contribution that puts the wealth of phenomena into the context of experimental solid-state physics. Closing a gap in the literature, this volume is intended both as an introductory text at postgraduate level and as a modern, comprehensive reference for researchers in the field.

  19. Quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    The subject of quantum computing brings together ideas from classical information theory, computer science, and quantum physics. This review aims to summarize not just quantum computing, but the whole subject of quantum information theory. Information can be identified as the most general thing which must propagate from a cause to an effect. It therefore has a fundamentally important role in the science of physics. However, the mathematical treatment of information, especially information processing, is quite recent, dating from the mid-20th century. This has meant that the full significance of information as a basic concept in physics is only now being discovered. This is especially true in quantum mechanics. The theory of quantum information and computing puts this significance on a firm footing, and has led to some profound and exciting new insights into the natural world. Among these are the use of quantum states to permit the secure transmission of classical information (quantum cryptography), the use of quantum entanglement to permit reliable transmission of quantum states (teleportation), the possibility of preserving quantum coherence in the presence of irreversible noise processes (quantum error correction), and the use of controlled quantum evolution for efficient computation (quantum computation). The common theme of all these insights is the use of quantum entanglement as a computational resource. It turns out that information theory and quantum mechanics fit together very well. In order to explain their relationship, this review begins with an introduction to classical information theory and computer science, including Shannon's theorem, error correcting codes, Turing machines and computational complexity. The principles of quantum mechanics are then outlined, and the Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) experiment described. The EPR-Bell correlations, and quantum entanglement in general, form the essential new ingredient which distinguishes quantum from

  20. Quantum computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steane, Andrew [Department of Atomic and Laser Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1998-02-01

    The subject of quantum computing brings together ideas from classical information theory, computer science, and quantum physics. This review aims to summarize not just quantum computing, but the whole subject of quantum information theory. Information can be identified as the most general thing which must propagate from a cause to an effect. It therefore has a fundamentally important role in the science of physics. However, the mathematical treatment of information, especially information processing, is quite recent, dating from the mid-20th century. This has meant that the full significance of information as a basic concept in physics is only now being discovered. This is especially true in quantum mechanics. The theory of quantum information and computing puts this significance on a firm footing, and has led to some profound and exciting new insights into the natural world. Among these are the use of quantum states to permit the secure transmission of classical information (quantum cryptography), the use of quantum entanglement to permit reliable transmission of quantum states (teleportation), the possibility of preserving quantum coherence in the presence of irreversible noise processes (quantum error correction), and the use of controlled quantum evolution for efficient computation (quantum computation). The common theme of all these insights is the use of quantum entanglement as a computational resource. It turns out that information theory and quantum mechanics fit together very well. In order to explain their relationship, this review begins with an introduction to classical information theory and computer science, including Shannon's theorem, error correcting codes, Turing machines and computational complexity. The principles of quantum mechanics are then outlined, and the Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) experiment described. The EPR-Bell correlations, and quantum entanglement in general, form the essential new ingredient which distinguishes quantum from

  1. Prediction of non-polar gas solubilities in water, alcohols and aqueous alcohol solutions by the modified ASOG method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochigi, K.; Kojima, K.

    1982-07-01

    This study evaluated a technique for predicting gas solubilities based on a modified ASOG group-contribution method, considering water, alcohols, and aqueous alcohol solutions as the solvents. The nonpolar gaseous solutes considered were oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, methane, ethane, ethylene, propane, and butane. Gas solubilities were correlated and predicted for a partial gas pressure of 1 atm and a temperature range of 50/sup 0/-100/sup 0/F (10/sup 0/-40/sup 0/C) in pure solvents, and then predicted for the same pressure and temperature range in mixed solvents using only the solubility data for the pure solvents. The deviations between the observed and predicted solubilities averaged 6.0% in pure systems and 10.2% in mixed solvents.

  2. Critical thickness for the formation of misfit dislocations originating from prismatic slip in semipolar and nonpolar III-nitride heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Smirnov, A. M.

    2016-01-20

    We calculate the critical thickness for misfit dislocation (MD) formation in lattice mismatched semipolar and nonpolar III-nitride wurtzite semiconductor layers for the case of MDs originated from prismatic slip (PSMDs). It has been shown that there is a switch of stress relaxation modes from generation of basal slip originated MDs to PSMDs after the angle between c-axis in wurtzite crystal structure and the direction of semipolar growth reaches a particular value, e.g., ∼70° for Al0.13Ga0.87N/GaN (h0h̄ 1) semipolar heterostructures. This means that for some semipolar growth orientations of III-nitride heterostructures biaxial relaxation of misfit stress can be realized. The results of modeling are compared to experimental data on the onset of plastic relaxation in AlxGa1−xN/GaN heterostructures.

  3. Determination of basicity of neutral organic phosphorus extractants in nonpolar solvents by the 31P NMR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakshin, V.V.; Meshcheryakov, N.M.; Il'in, E.G.; Ignatov, M.E.; Laskorin, B.N.

    1984-01-01

    The variant of the NMR method application is developed for quantitative description of acidic-basic properties of neutral organic phosphorus extractants, R 3 P--O (NPE), in non-polar organic solvents. For the NPE basicity determination the dependence of the chemical shift value in NMR 31 P spectra of 0.1 M NPE solutions in the dodecane on sulfuric acid acitivity in aqueous phase at 0-12 M acidity is studied. The linear equation relating NPE basicity and electronic structure of these compounds expressed through the sum: of Kabachnik reaction constants is derived. Linear dependences between the NPE basicity value in dodecane and NPE basicity in nitromethane as well as enthalpies of complexes formation with charge transport with standard acid-iodine in heptane, enthalpies of hydrogen complexes formation with phenol and water have been found

  4. Basal-plane stacking faults in non-polar GaN studied by off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lewis Z-Y; Rao, D V Sridhara; Kappers, M J; Humphreys, C J [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Geiger, D, E-mail: ZL249@cam.ac.u [Triebenberg Laboratory, Institute for Structure Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-02-01

    We have studied basal-plane stacking faults in a non-polar (11-20) GaN epilayer using high-resolution electron microscopy and off-axis electron holography. The microstructure of the basal-plane stacking faults (BSFs) has been determined to be I{sub 1} type from high-resolution TEM images. High-resolution holograms along the [11-20] zone axis were obtained by off-axis electron holography on a Cs-corrected TEM, providing {approx}2 A spatial resolution in the reconstructed amplitude and phase images. Phase fluctuations across the stacking faults were detected, suggesting the presence of a built-in electric field. The uncertainties in the experiments and their interpretation are discussed.

  5. Measuring polarization dependent dispersion of non-polarizing beam splitter cubes with spectrally resolved white light interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csonti, K.; Hanyecz, V.; Mészáros, G.; Kovács, A. P.

    2017-06-01

    In this work we have measured the group-delay dispersion of an empty Michelson interferometer for s- and p-polarized light beams applying two different non-polarizing beam splitter cubes. The interference pattern appearing at the output of the interferometer was resolved with two different spectrometers. It was found that the group-delay dispersion of the empty interferometer depended on the polarization directions in case of both beam splitter cubes. The results were checked by inserting a glass plate in the sample arm of the interferometer and similar difference was obtained for the two polarization directions. These results show that to reach high precision, linearly polarized white light beam should be used and the residual dispersion of the empty interferometer should be measured at both polarization directions.

  6. Effect of asymmetrical transfer coefficients of a non-polarizing beam splitter on the nonlinear error of the polarization interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen-Guang; Tan, Jiu-Bin; Liu, Tao

    2010-09-01

    The mechanism of a non-polarizing beam splitter (NPBS) with asymmetrical transfer coefficients causing the rotation of polarization direction is explained in principle, and the measurement nonlinear error caused by NPBS is analyzed based on Jones matrix theory. Theoretical calculations show that the nonlinear error changes periodically, and the error period and peak values increase with the deviation between transmissivities of p-polarization and s-polarization states. When the transmissivity of p-polarization is 53% and that of s-polarization is 48%, the maximum error reaches 2.7 nm. The imperfection of NPBS is one of the main error sources in simultaneous phase-shifting polarization interferometer, and its influence can not be neglected in the nanoscale ultra-precision measurement.

  7. Direct Detection of the Ion Pair to Free Ions Transformation upon Complexation with an Ion Receptor in Non-Polar Solvents by using Conductometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseda, Kazuya; Kokado, Kenta; Sada, Kazuki

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we performed conductometry in various organic solvents to directly detect the transformation from tetrabutylammonium chloride ( TBACl ) ion-pair salt to the free ions through complexation with meso -octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole ( CP ), which is a well-known receptor for chloride anions. In the presence of CP , the conductivity of TBACl increases in various non-polar solvents, indicating that complexation with CP enhances the ionic dissociation of TBACl in such non-polar solvents. In other words, CP recognizes chloride as an ion-paired salt as well as a free anion in non-polar solvents. Additionally, the TBA(CP - Cl ) complex exhibited a considerably lower ion-pairing constant ( K ip ) than TBACl in non-polar solvents, resulting in enhanced conductivity. Based on these findings, we can conclude that complexation of an anion with a hydrophobic anion receptor will be useful for creating functional and stimuli-responsive soft materials in organic solvents using coulombic forces.

  8. Determination of inorganic arsenic in algae using bromine halogenation and on-line nonpolar solid phase extraction followed by hydride generation atomic flourescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurate, stable and fast analysis of toxic inorganic arsenic (iAs) in complicated and arsenosugar-rich algae matrix is always a challenge. Herein, a novel analytical method for iAs in algae was reported, using bromine halogenation and on-line nonpolar solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by hydrid...

  9. Ab initio density functional theory study of non-polar (10-10), (11-20) and semipolar {20-21} GaN surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mutombo, Pingo; Romanyuk, Olexandr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 20 (2014), "203508-1"-"203508-5" ISSN 0021-8979 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101201 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : non-polar GaN * semipolar GaN * surface reconstructions * DFT Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2014

  10. An on-line normal-phase high performance liquid chromatography method for the rapid detection of radical scavengers in non-polar food matrixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Klift, van der E.J.C.; Janssen, H.G.; Beek, van T.A.

    2009-01-01

    An on-line method for the rapid pinpointing of radical scavengers in non-polar mixtures like vegetable oils was developed. To avoid problems with dissolving the sample, normal-phase chromatography on bare silica gel was used with mixtures of hexane and methyl tert-butyl ether as the eluent. The high

  11. Quantum mechanics with quantum time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapuscik, E.

    1984-01-01

    Using a non-canonical Lie structure of classical mechanics a new algebra of quantum mechanical observables is constructed. The new algebra, in addition to the notion of classical time, makes it possible to introduce the notion of quantum time. A new type of uncertainty relation is derived. (author)

  12. Proceedings of quantum field theory, quantum mechanics, and quantum optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonov, V.V.; Man; ko, V.I.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at the XVIII International Colloquium on Group Theoretical Methods in Physics held in Moscow on June 4-9, 1990. Topics covered include; applications of algebraic methods in quantum field theory, quantum mechanics, quantum optics, spectrum generating groups, quantum algebras, symmetries of equations, quantum physics, coherent states, group representations and space groups

  13. Quantum physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basdevant, J.L.; Dalibart, J.

    1997-01-01

    This pedagogical book gives an initiation to the principles and practice of quantum mechanics. A large part is devoted to experimental facts and to their analysis: concrete facts, phenomena and applications related to fundamental physics, elementary particles, astrophysics, high-technology, semi-conductors, micro-electronics and lasers. The book is divided in 22 chapters dealing with: quantum phenomena, wave function and Schroedinger equation, physical units and measurements, energy quantification of some simple systems, Hilbert space, Dirac formalism and quantum mechanics postulates, two-state systems and ammonia Maser principle, bands theory and crystals conductibility, commutation of observables, Stern and Gerlach experiment, approximation methods, kinetic momentum in quantum mechanics, first description of atoms, 1/2 spin formalism and magnetic resonance, Lagrangian, Hamiltonian and Lorentz force in quantum mechanics, addition of kinetic momenta and fine and hyper-fine structure of atomic lines, identical particle systems and Pauli principle, qualitative physics and scale of size of some microscopic and macroscopic phenomena, systems evolution, collisions and cross sections, invariance and conservation laws, quantum mechanics and astrophysics, and historical aspects of quantum mechanics. (J.S.)

  14. Quantum communications

    CERN Document Server

    Cariolaro, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    This book demonstrates that a quantum communication system using the coherent light of a laser can achieve performance orders of magnitude superior to classical optical communications Quantum Communications provides the Masters and PhD signals or communications student with a complete basics-to-applications course in using the principles of quantum mechanics to provide cutting-edge telecommunications. Assuming only knowledge of elementary probability, complex analysis and optics, the book guides its reader through the fundamentals of vector and Hilbert spaces and the necessary quantum-mechanical ideas, simply formulated in four postulates. A turn to practical matters begins with and is then developed by: ·         development of the concept of quantum decision, emphasizing the optimization of measurements to extract useful information from a quantum system; ·         general formulation of a transmitter–receiver system ·         particular treatment of the most popular quantum co...

  15. Quantum Criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, P. D.; Chaturvedi, S.; Dechoum, K.; Comey, J.

    2001-02-01

    We investigate the theory of quantum fluctuations in non-equilibrium systems having large crit­ical fluctuations. This allows us to treat the limits imposed by nonlinearities to quantum squeezing and noise reduction, and also to envisage future tests of quantum theory in regions of macroscopic quantum fluctuations. A long-term objective of this research is to identify suitable physical sys­tems in which macroscopic 'Schrödinger cat'-like behaviour may be observed. We investigate two systems in particular of much current experimental interest, namely the degenerate parametric oscillator near threshold, and the evaporatively cooled (BEC). We compare the results obtained in the positive-P representation, as a fully quantum mechanical calculation, with the truncated Wigner phase space equation, also known as semi-classical theory. We show when these results agree and differ in calculations taken beyond the linearized approximation. In the region where the largest quantum fluctuations and Schrödinger cat-like behaviour might be expected, we find that the quantum predictions correspond very closely to the semi-classical theory. Nature abhors observing a Schrödinger cat. -Pacs: 03.65.Bz

  16. Growth and characterization of nonpolar (10-10) ZnO transparent conductive oxide on semipolar (11–22) GaN-based light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki-Wook; Choi, Nak-Jung [Department of Nano-Optical Engineering, Korea Polytechnic University, Siheung, Gyeonggi-do, 429-839 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Bo [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Inha Technical College, Incheon, 402-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moojin [Department of Renewable Energy, Jungwon University, 85, Munmu-ro, Goesan-eup, Goesan-gun, Chungbuk, 367-805 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung-Nam, E-mail: snlee@kpu.ac.kr [Department of Nano-Optical Engineering, Korea Polytechnic University, Siheung, Gyeonggi-do, 429-839 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-05

    We have grown thin films of nonpolar m-plane (10-10) ZnO on a semipolar (11–22) GaN template by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at low growth temperatures (<200 °C). The surface morphology of the ZnO film is found to be an arrowhead-like structure, which is a typical surface structure of the semipolar (11–22) GaN films. On increasing the growth temperature of the ZnO films, the concentration and mobility of the charge carriers in the ZnO film are increased. However, the optical transmittance decreases with an increase in the growth temperature. Based on these results, we have fabricated semipolar (11–22) GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with nonpolar m-plane ZnO film as a transparent conductive oxide (TCO) to improve the light extraction efficiency. In spite of a decrease in the optical transmittance, the operation voltage of semipolar (11–22) GaN-based LEDs is found to decrease with an increase in the growth temperature, which might be due to the improvements in the electrical properties and current spreading effect, resulting in an increase in the optical output power. - Highlights: • Polarity control of ZnO film grown in m-/c-sapphire and semipolar GaN template. • Achievement of high quality nonpolar m-plane ZnO flims on semipolar (11–22) GaN template. • The simultaneous improvements of carrier concentration and mobility in the nonpolar ZnO TCO flims. • Nonpolar ZnO TCO increases current spreading length and light output power of semipolar GaN-LED.

  17. Influence of Nonpolar Substances on the Extraction Efficiency of Six Alkaloids in Zoagumhwan Investigated by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography and Photodiode Array Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijing Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A reverse phase ultra performance liquid chromatography and photodiode array (UPLC-PDA detection method was established for the determination of six alkaloids in Zoagumhwan (ZGW, and further for investigating the influence of nonpolar substances on the extraction efficiency of these alkaloids. The method was based on a BEH C18 (50 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm column and mobile phase of aqueous phosphoric acid and acetonitrile including 0.05% buffer solution under gradient elution. ZGW samples of ZGW I, II, III and IV were obtained and prepared by pre-processing the crude materials of Coptidis rhizoma and Evodiae fructus using four technologies, namely direct water decoction, removal of nonpolar substances in Evodiae fructus by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE, removal of nonpolar substances in ZGW by SFE and removal of nonpolar substances in ZGW by steam distillation. The developed and validated UPLC-PDA method was precise, accurate and sensitive enough based on the facts that the six alkaloids showed good regression (r > 0.9998, the limit of detections and quantifications for six alkaloids were less than 28.8 and 94.5 ng/mL, respectively, and the recovery was in the range of 98.56%–103.24%. The sequence of the total contents of six alkaloids in these samples was ZGW II > ZGW IV > ZGW III > ZGW I. ZGW II, in which nonpolar substances, including essential oils, were firstly removed from Evodiae fructus by SFE, had the highest content of the total alkaloids, indicating that extraction efficiency of the total alkaloids could be remarkably increased after Evodiae fructus being extracted by SFE.

  18. Ultraviolet-A LED Based on Quantum-disks-in-AlGaN-nanowires - Optimization and Device Reliability

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2018-03-16

    Group-III nitride-based ultraviolet (UV) quantum-disks (Qdisks) nanowires (NWs) light-emitting diodes grown on silicon substrates offer a scalable, environment-friendly, compact, and low-cost solution for numerous applications such as solid-state lighting, spectroscopy, and biomedical. However, the internal quantum efficiency, injection efficiency, and extraction efficiency need to be further improved. The focus of this paper encompasses investigations based on structural optimization, device simulation, and device reliability. To optimize a UV-A (320-400 nm) device structure we utilize the self-assembled quantum-disk-NWs with varying quantum-disks thickness to study carrier separation in active-region and implement an improved p-contact-layer to increase output power. By simulation, we found a 100° improvement in the direct recombination rate for samples with thicker Qdisks thickness of 1.2 nm compared to the sample with 0.6 nm-thick Qdisks. Moreover, the sample with graded top Mg-doped AlGaN layer in conjunction with thin Mg-doped GaN layer shows 10° improvement in the output power compared to the samples with thicker top Mg-doped GaN absorbing contact layer. A fitting with ABC model revealed the increase in non-radiative recombination centers in the active region after a soft stress-test. This work aims to shed light on the research efforts required for furthering the UV NWs LED research for practical applications.

  19. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C Language

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  20. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  1. Cascade quantum teleportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Nan-run; GONG Li-hua; LIU Ye

    2006-01-01

    In this letter a cascade quantum teleportation scheme is proposed. The proposed scheme needs less local quantum operations than those of quantum multi-teleportation. A quantum teleportation scheme based on entanglement swapping is presented and compared with the cascade quantum teleportation scheme. Those two schemes can effectively teleport quantum information and extend the distance of quantum communication.

  2. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, John L

    2015-01-01

    Suitable for advanced undergraduates, this thorough text focuses on the role of symmetry operations and the essentially algebraic structure of quantum-mechanical theory. Based on courses in quantum mechanics taught by the authors, the treatment provides numerous problems that require applications of theory and serve to supplement the textual material.Starting with a historical introduction to the origins of quantum theory, the book advances to discussions of the foundations of wave mechanics, wave packets and the uncertainty principle, and an examination of the Schrödinger equation that includ

  3. Quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, A.I.M.

    1981-01-01

    This book, based on a thirty lecture course given to students at the beginning of their second year, covers the quantum mechanics required by physics undergraduates. Early chapters deal with wave mechanics, including a discussion of the energy states of the hydrogen atom. These are followed by a more formal development of the theory, leading to a discussion of some advanced applications and an introduction to the conceptual problems associated with quantum measurement theory. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of quantum mechanics. Problems are included at the end of each chapter. (U.K.)

  4. Quantum chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, F.

    1994-01-01

    A short historical overview is given on the development of our knowledge of complex dynamical systems with special emphasis on ergodicity and chaos, and on the semiclassical quantization of integrable and chaotic systems. The general trace formular is discussed as a sound mathematical basis for the semiclassical quantization of chaos. Two conjectures are presented on the basis of which it is argued that there are unique fluctuation properties in quantum mechanics which are universal and, in a well defined sense, maximally random if the corresponding classical system is strongly chaotic. These properties constitute the quantum mechanical analogue of the phenomenon of chaos in classical mechanics. Thus quantum chaos has been found. (orig.)

  5. Quantum thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beretta, G.P.; Gyftopoulos, E.P.; Park, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    A novel nonlinear equation of motion is proposed for a general quantum system consisting of more than one distinguishable elementary constituent of matter. In the domain of idempotent quantum-mechanical state operators, it is satisfied by all unitary evolutions generated by the Schroedinger equation. But in the broader domain of nonidempotent state operators not contemplated by conventional quantum mechanics, it generates a generally nonunitary evolution, it keeps the energy invariant and causes the entropy to increase with time until the system reaches a state of equilibrium or a limit cycle

  6. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    1993-01-01

    Praised for its appealing writing style and clear pedagogy, Lowe's Quantum Chemistry is now available in its Second Edition as a text for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level chemistry students. The book assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry, thus enabling students to comprehend much of the current chemical literature in which quantum chemical methods or concepts are used as tools. The book begins with a six-chapter introduction of standard one-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom,

  7. Quantum Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beenakker, C W J

    2005-01-01

    Quantum Noise is advertised as a handbook, and this is indeed how it functions for me these days: it is a book that I keep within hand's reach, ready to be consulted on the proper use of quantum stochastic methods in the course of my research on quantum dots. I should point out that quantum optics, the target field for this book, is not my field by training. So I have much to learn, and find this handbook to be a reliable and helpful guide. Crispin Gardiner previously wrote the Handbook of Stochastic Methods (also published by Springer), which provides an overview of methods in classical statistical physics. Quantum Noise, written jointly with Peter Zoller, is the counterpart for quantum statistical physics, and indeed the two books rely on each other by frequent cross referencing. The fundamental problem addressed by Quantum Noise is how the quantum dynamics of an open system can be described statistically by treating the environment as a source of noise. This is a general problem in condensed matter physics (in particular in the context of Josephson junctions) and in quantum optics. The emphasis in this book in on the optical applications (for condensed matter applications one could consult Quantum Dissipative Systems by Ulrich Weiss, published by World Scientific). The optical applications centre around the interaction of light with atoms, where the atoms represent the open system and the light is the noisy environment. A complete description of the production and detection of non-classical states of radiation (such as squeezed states) can be obtained using one of the equivalent quantum stochastic formulations: the quantum Langevin equation for the field operators (in either the Ito or the Stratonovich form), the Master equation for the density matrix, or the stochastic Schroedinger equation for the wave functions. Each formulation is fully developed here (as one would expect from a handbook), with detailed instructions on how to go from one to the other. The

  8. Quantum exam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Ba An

    2006-01-01

    Absolutely and asymptotically secure protocols for organizing an exam in a quantum way are proposed basing judiciously on multipartite entanglement. The protocols are shown to stand against common types of eavesdropping attack

  9. Quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tittel, W.; Brendel, J.; Gissin, N.; Ribordy, G.; Zbinden, H.

    1999-01-01

    The principles of quantum cryptography based on non-local correlations of entanglement photons are outlined. The method of coding and decoding of information and experiments is also described. The prospects of the technique are briefly discussed. (Z.J.)

  10. Quantum chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cejnar, P.

    2007-01-01

    Chaos is a name given in physics to a branch which, within classical mechanics, studies the consequences of sensitive dependences of the behavior of physical systems on the starting conditions, i.e., the 'butterfly wing effect'. However, how to describe chaotic behavior in the world of quantum particles? It appears that quantum mechanics does not admit the sensitive dependence on the starting conditions, and moreover, predicts a substantial suppression of chaos also at the macroscopic level. Still, the quantum properties of systems that are chaotic in terms of classical mechanics differ basically from the properties of classically arranged systems. This topic is studied by a field of physics referred to as quantum chaos. (author)

  11. Quantum transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, A.E.; Matone, M.

    1998-01-01

    We show that the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation can be written in the classical form with the spatial derivative ∂ q replaced by ∂ q with dq = dq/√1-β 2 (q), where β 2 (q) is strictly related to the quantum potential. This can be seen as the opposite of the problem of finding the wave function representation of classical mechanics as formulated by Schiller and Rosen. The structure of the above open-quotes quantum transformationclose quotes, related to the recently formulated equivalence principle, indicates that the potential deforms space geometry. In particular, a result by Flanders implies that both W(q) = V(q) - E and the quantum potential Q are proportional to the curvatures κ W and κ Q which arise as natural invariants in an equivalence problem for curves in the projective line. In this formulation the Schroedinger equation takes the geometrical form (∂ q 2 + κ W )ψ = 0

  12. Quantum Correlations Evolution Asymmetry in Quantum Channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Meng; Huang Yun-Feng; Guo Guang-Can

    2017-01-01

    It was demonstrated that the entanglement evolution of a specially designed quantum state in the bistochastic channel is asymmetric. In this work, we generalize the study of the quantum correlations, including entanglement and quantum discord, evolution asymmetry to various quantum channels. We found that the asymmetry of entanglement and quantum discord only occurs in some special quantum channels, and the behavior of the entanglement evolution may be quite different from the behavior of the quantum discord evolution. To quantum entanglement, in some channels it decreases monotonously with the increase of the quantum channel intensity. In some other channels, when we increase the intensity of the quantum channel, it decreases at first, then keeps zero for some time, and then rises up. To quantum discord, the evolution becomes more complex and you may find that it evolutes unsmoothly at some points. These results illustrate the strong dependence of the quantum correlations evolution on the property of the quantum channels. (paper)

  13. Duality Quantum Information and Duality Quantum Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C. Y.; Wang, W. Y.; Wang, C.; Song, S. Y.; Long, G. L.

    2011-01-01

    Quantum mechanical systems exhibit particle wave duality property. This duality property has been exploited for information processing. A duality quantum computer is a quantum computer on the move and passing through a multi-slits. It offers quantum wave divider and quantum wave combiner operations in addition to those allowed in an ordinary quantum computer. It has been shown that all linear bounded operators can be realized in a duality quantum computer, and a duality quantum computer with n qubits and d-slits can be realized in an ordinary quantum computer with n qubits and a qudit in the so-called duality quantum computing mode. The quantum particle-wave duality can be used in providing secure communication. In this paper, we will review duality quantum computing and duality quantum key distribution.

  14. Quantum correlations and distinguishability of quantum states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spehner, Dominique [Université Grenoble Alpes and CNRS, Institut Fourier, F-38000 Grenoble, France and Laboratoire de Physique et Modélisation des Milieux Condensés, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2014-07-15

    A survey of various concepts in quantum information is given, with a main emphasis on the distinguishability of quantum states and quantum correlations. Covered topics include generalized and least square measurements, state discrimination, quantum relative entropies, the Bures distance on the set of quantum states, the quantum Fisher information, the quantum Chernoff bound, bipartite entanglement, the quantum discord, and geometrical measures of quantum correlations. The article is intended both for physicists interested not only by collections of results but also by the mathematical methods justifying them, and for mathematicians looking for an up-to-date introductory course on these subjects, which are mainly developed in the physics literature.

  15. Quantum correlations and distinguishability of quantum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spehner, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    A survey of various concepts in quantum information is given, with a main emphasis on the distinguishability of quantum states and quantum correlations. Covered topics include generalized and least square measurements, state discrimination, quantum relative entropies, the Bures distance on the set of quantum states, the quantum Fisher information, the quantum Chernoff bound, bipartite entanglement, the quantum discord, and geometrical measures of quantum correlations. The article is intended both for physicists interested not only by collections of results but also by the mathematical methods justifying them, and for mathematicians looking for an up-to-date introductory course on these subjects, which are mainly developed in the physics literature

  16. Quantum Locality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2012-05-01

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a `consistent quantum theory' that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues that the putative proofs of this property that involve hidden variables include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are not entailed by the precepts of quantum mechanics. Thus whatever is proved is not a feature of quantum mechanics, but is a property of a theory that tries to combine quantum theory with quasi-classical features that go beyond what is entailed by quantum theory itself. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by establishing, instead, properties of a system modified by adding properties alien to the original system. Hence Griffiths' rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his `consistent quantum theory' shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive version of quantum theory. An added section responds to Griffiths' reply, which cites general possibilities of ambiguities that might make what is to be proved ill-defined, and hence render the pertinent `consistent framework' ill defined. But the vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question, which, both by its physical formulation and by explicit identification, specify the framework to be used. Griffiths confirms the validity of the proof insofar as that pertinent framework is used. The section also shows

  17. Quantum lottery

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    On April Fools' Day, CERN Quantum Diaries blogger Pauline Gagnon held a giveaway of microscopic proportion. Up for grabs? Ten Higgs bosons, courtesy of CERN. Pauline announced the winners last week; let's see what they'll really be getting in the mail...   Custom-made Particle Zoo Higgs bosons were sent out to the winners. Read more about the prize in the Quantum Diaries post "Higgs boson lottery: when CERN plays April Fools' jokes".

  18. Quantum optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2013-01-01

    Further sensitivity improvements are required before advanced optical interferometers will be able to measure gravitational waves. A team has now shown that introducing quantum squeezing of light may help to detect these elusive waves.......Further sensitivity improvements are required before advanced optical interferometers will be able to measure gravitational waves. A team has now shown that introducing quantum squeezing of light may help to detect these elusive waves....

  19. Quantum torsors

    OpenAIRE

    Grunspan, C.

    2003-01-01

    This text gives some results about quantum torsors. Our starting point is an old reformulation of torsors recalled recently by Kontsevich. We propose an unification of the definitions of torsors in algebraic geometry and in Poisson geometry. Any quantum torsor is equipped with two comodule-algebra structures over Hopf algebras and these structures commute with each other. In the finite dimensional case, these two Hopf algebras share the same finite dimension. We show that any Galois extension...

  20. Quantum conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Mazilu, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ICOAM 2015 The electromagnetic momentum transferred transferred to scattering particles is proportional to the intensity of the incident fields, however, the momentum of single photons ℏk does not naturally appear in these classical expressions. Here, we discuss an alternative to Maxwell's stress tensor that renders the classical electromagnetic field momentum compatible to the quantum mechanical one. This is achieved through the introduction of the quantum conversion which allows the tran...

  1. Stabilization of the Electron-Nuclear Spin Orientation in Quantum Dots by the Nuclear Quadrupole Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhioev, R. I.; Korenev, V. L.

    2007-07-01

    The nuclear quadrupole interaction eliminates the restrictions imposed by hyperfine interaction on the spin coherence of an electron and nuclei in a quantum dot. The strain-induced nuclear quadrupole interaction suppresses the nuclear spin flip and makes possible the zero-field dynamic nuclear polarization in self-organized InP/InGaP quantum dots. The direction of the effective nuclear magnetic field is fixed in space, thus quenching the magnetic depolarization of the electron spin in the quantum dot. The quadrupole interaction suppresses the zero-field electron spin decoherence also for the case of nonpolarized nuclei. These results provide a new vision of the role of the nuclear quadrupole interaction in nanostructures: it elongates the spin memory of the electron-nuclear system.

  2. Quantum entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjiivanov, L.; Todorov, I.

    2015-01-01

    Expository paper providing a historical survey of the gradual transformation of the 'philosophical discussions' between Bohr, Einstein and Schrödinger on foundational issues in quantum mechanics into a quantitative prediction of a new quantum effect, its experimental verification and its proposed (and loudly advertised) applications. The basic idea of the 1935 paper of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) was reformulated by David Bohm for a finite dimensional spin system. This allowed John Bell to derive his inequalities that separate the prediction of quantum entanglement from its possible classical interpretation. We reproduce here their later (1971) version, reviewing on the way the generalization (and mathematical derivation) of Heisenberg's uncertainty relations (due to Weyl and Schrödinger) needed for the passage from EPR to Bell. We also provide an improved derivation of the quantum theoretic violation of Bell's inequalities. Soon after the experimental confirmation of the quantum entanglement (culminating with the work of Alain Aspect) it was Feynman who made public the idea of a quantum computer based on the observed effect

  3. Quantum Computation and Quantum Spin Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Michielsen, Kristel; Hams, Anthony; Miyashita, Seiji; Saito, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the stability of quantum computations on physically realizable quantum computers by simulating quantum spin models representing quantum computer hardware. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation are used to demonstrate that the results of a quantum

  4. Polar and Nonpolar Gallium Nitride and Zinc Oxide based thin film heterostructures Integrated with Sapphire and Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pranav

    This dissertation work explores the understanding of the relaxation and integration of polar and non-polar of GaN and ZnO thin films with Sapphire and silicon substrates. Strain management and epitaxial analysis has been performed on wurtzitic GaN(0001) thin films grown on c-Sapphire and wurtzitic non-polar a-plane GaN(11-20) thin films grown on r-plane Sapphire (10-12) by remote plasma atomic nitrogen source assisted UHV Pulsed Laser Deposition process. It has been established that high-quality 2-dimensional c-axis GaN(0001) nucleation layers can be grown on c-Sapphire by PLD process at growth temperatures as low as ˜650°C. Whereas the c-axis GaN on c-sapphire has biaxially negative misfit, the crystalline anisotropy of the a-plane GaN films on r-Sapphire results in compressive and tensile misfits in the two major orthogonal directions. The measured strains have been analyzed in detail by X-ray, Raman spectroscopy and TEM. Strain relaxation in GaN(0001)/Sapphire thin film heterostructure has been explained by the principle of domain matched epitaxial growth in large planar misfit system and has been demonstrated by TEM study. An attempt has been made to qualitatively understand the minimization of free energy of the system from the strain perspective. Analysis has been presented to quantify the strain components responsible for the compressive strain observed in the GaN(0001) thin films on c-axis Sapphire substrates. It was also observed that gallium rich deposition conditions in PLD process lead to smoother nucleation layers because of higher ad-atom mobility of gallium. We demonstrate near strain relaxed epitaxial (0001) GaN thin films grown on (111) Si substrates using TiN as intermediate buffer layer by remote nitrogen plasma assisted UHV pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Because of large misfits between the TiN/GaN and TiN/Si systems the TIN buffer layer growth occurs via nucleation of interfacial dislocations under domain matching epitaxy paradigm. X-ray and

  5. Quantum computing: Quantum advantage deferred

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Andrew M.

    2017-12-01

    A type of optics experiment called a boson sampler could be among the easiest routes to demonstrating the power of quantum computers. But recent work shows that super-classical boson sampling may be a long way off.

  6. Electroreflectance investigations of quantum confined Stark effect in GaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabinska, A; Pakula, K; Baranowski, J M; Wysmolek, A

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present room temperature electroreflectance studies of GaN quantum wells (QWs) with different well width. The electroreflectance measurements were performed with external voltage applied to the structure therefore it was possible to tune the electric field inside QW up to its completely screening and furthermore even reversing it. The analysis of QW spectral lines showed the Stark shift dependence on applied voltage and well width reaching about 35 meV for highest voltage and widest well width. It was possible to obtain the condition of zero electric field in QW. Both broadening and amplitude of QW lines are minimal for zero electric field and increases for increasing electric field in QW. The energy transition is maximum for zero electric field and for increasing electric field it decreases due to Stark effect. Neither amplitude and broadening parameter nor energy transition does not depend on the direction of electric field. Only parameter that depends on the direction of electric field in QW is phase of the signal. The analysis of Franz-Keldysh oscillations (FKOs) from AlGaN barriers allowed to calculate the real electric field dependence on applied voltage and therefore to obtain the Stark shift dependence on electric field. The Stark shift reached from -12 meV to -35 meV for 450 kV/cm depending on the well width. This conditions were established for highest forward voltages therefore this is the value of electric field and Stark shift caused only by the intrinsic polarization of nitrides.

  7. Nitride-based Quantum-Confined Structures for Ultraviolet-Visible Optical Devices on Silicon Substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2017-04-01

    III–V nitride quantum-confined structures embedded in nanowires (NWs), also known as quantum-disks-in-nanowires (Qdisks-in-NWs), have recently emerged as a new class of nanoscale materials exhibiting outstanding properties for optoelectronic devices and systems. It is promising for circumventing the technology limitation of existing planar epitaxy devices, which are bounded by the lattice-, crystal-structure-, and thermal- matching conditions. This work presents significant advances in the growth of good quality GaN, InGaN and AlGaN Qdisks-in-NWs based on careful optimization of the growth parameters, coupled with a meticulous layer structure and active region design. The NWs were grown, catalyst-free, using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) on silicon (Si) substrates. A 2-step growth scheme was developed to achieve high areal density, dislocation free and vertically aligned NWs on Ti/Si substrates. Numerical modeling of the NWs structures, using the nextnano3 software, showed reduced polarization fields, and, in the presence of Qdisks, exhibited improved quantum-confinement; thus contributing to high carrier radiative-recombination rates. As a result, based on the growth and device structure optimization, the technologically challenging orange and yellow NWs light emitting devices (LEDs) targeting the ‘green-yellow’ gap were demonstrated on scalable, foundry compatible, and low-cost Ti coated Si substrates. The NWs work was also extended to LEDs emitting in the ultraviolet (UV) range with niche applications in environmental cleaning, UV-curing, medicine, and lighting. In this work, we used a Ti (100 nm) interlayer and Qdisks to achieve good quality AlGaN based UV-A (320 - 400 nm) device. To address the issue of UV-absorbing polymer, used in the planarization process, we developed a pendeo-epitaxy technique, for achieving an ultra-thin coalescence of the top p-GaN contact layer, for a self-planarized Qdisks-in-NWs UV-B (280 – 320 nm) LED grown

  8. Quantum Physics for Beginners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests a new approach for teaching secondary school quantum physics. Reviews traditional approaches and presents some characteristics of the three-part "Quantum Physics for Beginners" project, including: quantum physics, quantum mechanics, and a short historical survey. (SK)

  9. Quantum Transmemetic Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Edward W.; Sładkowski, Jan

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * A Quantum Model of Free Will * Quantum Acquisition of Knowledge * Thinking as a Quantum Algorithm * Counterfactual Measurement as a Model of Intuition * Quantum Modification of Freud's Model of Consciousness * Conclusion * Acknowledgements * References

  10. Quantum correlations in multipartite quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarizadeh, M. A.; Heshmati, A.; Karimi, N.; Yahyavi, M.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum entanglement is the most famous type of quantum correlation between elements of a quantum system that has a basic role in quantum communication protocols like quantum cryptography, teleportation and Bell inequality detection. However, it has already been shown that various applications in quantum information theory do not require entanglement. Quantum discord as a new kind of quantum correlations beyond entanglement, is the most popular candidate for general quantum correlations. In this paper, first we find the entanglement witness in a particular multipartite quantum system which consists of a N-partite system in 2 n -dimensional space. Then we give an exact analytical formula for the quantum discord of this system. At the end of the paper, we investigate the additivity relation of the quantum correlation and show that this relation is satisfied for a N-partite system with 2 n -dimensional space.

  11. Strain-compensated (Ga,In)N/(Al,Ga)N/GaN multiple quantum wells for improved yellow/amber light emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lekhal, K.; Damilano, B., E-mail: bd@crhea.cnrs.fr; De Mierry, P.; Vennéguès, P. [CRHEA-CNRS, Centre de Recherche sur l' Hétéro-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Valbonne 06560 (France); Ngo, H. T.; Rosales, D.; Gil, B. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, CNRS-INP-UMR 5221, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Hussain, S. [CRHEA-CNRS, Centre de Recherche sur l' Hétéro-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Valbonne 06560 (France); Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, 28 av. Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 2 (France)

    2015-04-06

    Yellow/amber (570–600 nm) emitting In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}N/GaN multiple quantum wells (QWs) have been grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on GaN-on- sapphire templates. When the (Al,Ga)N thickness of the barrier increases, the room temperature photoluminescence is red-shifted while its yield increases. This is attributed to an increase of the QW internal electric field and an improvement of the material quality due to the compensation of the compressive strain of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N QWs by the Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}N layers, respectively.

  12. Lattice-matched double dip-shaped BAlGaN/AlN quantum well structures for ultraviolet light emission devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seoung-Hwan; Ahn, Doyeol

    2018-05-01

    Ultraviolet light emission characteristics of lattice-matched BxAlyGa1-x-y N/AlN quantum well (QW) structures with double AlGaN delta layers were investigated theoretically. In contrast to conventional single dip-shaped QW structure where the reduction effect of the spatial separation between electron and hole wave functions is negligible, proposed double dip-shaped QW shows significant enhancement of the ultraviolet light emission intensity from a BAlGaN/AlN QW structure due to the reduced spatial separation between electron and hole wave functions. The emission peak of the double dip-shaped QW structure is expected to be about three times larger than that of the conventional rectangular AlGaN/AlN QW structure.

  13. InGaN multiple-quantum-well epifilms on GaN-sillicon substrates for microcavities and surface-emitting lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, June Key; Cho, Hoon; Kim, Bok Hee; Park, Si Hyun; Gu, Erdan; Watson, Ian; Dawson, Martin

    2006-01-01

    We report the processing of InGaN/GaN epifilms on GaN-silicon substrates. High-quality InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) were grown on GaN-silicon substrates, and their membranes were successfully fabricated using a selective wet etching of silicon followed by a dry etching of the AlGaN buffer layer. With atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements and photoluminescence (PL) measurements, we investigated the physical and the optical properties of the InGaN/GaN MQWs membranes. On the InGaN/GaN MQW membranes, dielectric distributed Bragg reflector (DBRs) were successfully deposited, which give, new possibilities for use in GaN microcavity and surface-emitting laser fabrication.

  14. Study on ECR dry etching and selective MBE growth of AlGaN/GaN for fabrication of quantum nanostructures on GaN (0001) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Sato, Taketomo; Hashizume, Tamotsu; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    This paper attempts to form AlGaN/GaN quantum wire (QWR) network structures on patterned GaN (0001) substrates by selective molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth. Substrate patterns were prepared along - and -directions by electron cyclotron resonance assisted reactive-ion beam etching (ECR-RIBE) process. Selective growth was possible for both directions in the case of GaN growth, but only in the -direction in the case of AlGaN growth. A hexagonal QWR network was successfully grown on a hexagonal mesa pattern by combining the -direction and two other equivalent directions. AFM observation confirmed excellent surface morphology of the grown network. A clear cathodoluminescence (CL) peak coming from the embedded AlGaN/GaN QWR structure was clearly identified

  15. Long distance quantum teleportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiu-Xiu; Sun, Qi-Chao; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2018-01-01

    Quantum teleportation is a core protocol in quantum information science. Besides revealing the fascinating feature of quantum entanglement, quantum teleportation provides an ultimate way to distribute quantum state over extremely long distance, which is crucial for global quantum communication and future quantum networks. In this review, we focus on the long distance quantum teleportation experiments, especially those employing photonic qubits. From the viewpoint of real-world application, both the technical advantages and disadvantages of these experiments are discussed.

  16. Electron quantum optics as quantum signal processing

    OpenAIRE

    Roussel, B.; Cabart, C.; Fève, G.; Thibierge, E.; Degiovanni, P.

    2016-01-01

    The recent developments of electron quantum optics in quantum Hall edge channels have given us new ways to probe the behavior of electrons in quantum conductors. It has brought new quantities called electronic coherences under the spotlight. In this paper, we explore the relations between electron quantum optics and signal processing through a global review of the various methods for accessing single- and two-electron coherences in electron quantum optics. We interpret electron quantum optics...

  17. Quantum Confined Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    scattering mechanisms ( acoustic , piezoelectric, polar and non-polar optical) and the ionized impurity scattering. Since InAs and GaSb are binary... pyrometer referenced at GaSb oxide desorption temperature of 530 C. Figure 6a plots the 10 K carrier densities as a function of Tg. The SLs grown

  18. Quantum solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abram, I [Centre National d' Etudes des Telecommunications (CNET), 196 Avenue Henri Ravera, F-92220 Bagneux (France)

    1999-02-01

    Two of the most remarkable properties of light - squeezing and solitons - are being combined in a new generation of experiments that could revolutionize optics and communications. One area of application concerns the transmission and processing of classical (binary) information, in which the presence or absence of a soliton in a time-window corresponds to a ''1'' or ''0'', as in traditional optical-fibre communications. However, since solitons occur at fixed power levels, we do not have the luxury of being able to crank up the input power to improve the signal-to-noise ratio at the receiving end. Nevertheless, the exploitation of quantum effects such as squeezing could help to reduce noise and improve fidelity. In long-distance communications, where the signal is amplified every 50-100 kilometres or so, the soliton pulse is strongest just after the amplifier. Luckily this is where the bulk of the nonlinear interaction needed to maintain the soliton shape occurs. However, the pulse gets weaker as it propagates along the fibre, so the nonlinear interaction also becomes weakerand weaker. This means that dispersive effects become dominant until the next stage of amplification, where the nonlinearity takes over again. One problem is that quantum fluctuations in the amplifiers lead to random jumps in the central wavelength of the individual solitons, and this results in a random variation of the speed of individual solitons in the fibre. Several schemes have been devised to remove this excess noise and bring the train of solitons back to the orderly behaviour characteristic of a stable coherent state (e.g. the solitons could be passed through a spectral filter). Photon-number squeezing could also play a key role in solving this problem. For example, if the solitons are number-squeezed immediately after amplification, there will be a smaller uncertainty in the nonlinearity that keeps the soliton in shape and, therefore, there will also be less noise in the soliton. This

  19. Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bellac, Michel

    2006-03-01

    Quantum physics allows us to understand the nature of the physical phenomena which govern the behavior of solids, semi-conductors, lasers, atoms, nuclei, subnuclear particles and light. In Quantum Physics, Le Bellac provides a thoroughly modern approach to this fundamental theory. Throughout the book, Le Bellac teaches the fundamentals of quantum physics using an original approach which relies primarily on an algebraic treatment and on the systematic use of symmetry principles. In addition to the standard topics such as one-dimensional potentials, angular momentum and scattering theory, the reader is introduced to more recent developments at an early stage. These include a detailed account of entangled states and their applications, the optical Bloch equations, the theory of laser cooling and of magneto-optical traps, vacuum Rabi oscillations, and an introduction to open quantum systems. This is a textbook for a modern course on quantum physics, written for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. Completely original and contemporary approach, using algebra and symmetry principles Introduces recent developments at an early stage, including many topics that cannot be found in standard textbooks. Contains 130 physically relevant exercises

  20. Quantum minigolf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhard, Friedemann [Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany). 3. Physikalisches Institut

    2010-07-01

    Quantum minigolf is a virtual-reality computer game visualizing quantum mechanics. The rules are the same as for the classical game minigolf, the goal being to kick a ball such that it crosses an obstacle course and runs into a hole. The ball, however, follows the laws of quantum mechanics: It can be at several places at once or tunnel through obstacles. To know whether the ball has reached the goal, the player has to perform a position measurement, which converts the ball into a classical object and fixes its position. But quantum mechanics is indeterministic: There is always a chance to lose, even for Tiger Woods. Technically, the obstacle course and the ball are projected onto the floor by a video projector. The position of the club is tracked by an infrared marker, similar as in Nintendo's Wii console. The whole setup is portable and the software has been published under the GPL license on www.quantum-minigolf.org.

  1. Quantum walk computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-01-01

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer

  2. Quantum group gauge theory on quantum spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzezinski, T.; Majid, S.

    1993-01-01

    We construct quantum group-valued canonical connections on quantum homogeneous spaces, including a q-deformed Dirac monopole on the quantum sphere of Podles quantum differential coming from the 3-D calculus of Woronowicz on SU q (2). The construction is presented within the setting of a general theory of quantum principal bundles with quantum group (Hopf algebra) fiber, associated quantum vector bundles and connection one-forms. Both the base space (spacetime) and the total space are non-commutative algebras (quantum spaces). (orig.)

  3. Efficient quantum circuit implementation of quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, B. L.; Wang, J. B.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum walks, being the quantum analog of classical random walks, are expected to provide a fruitful source of quantum algorithms. A few such algorithms have already been developed, including the 'glued trees' algorithm, which provides an exponential speedup over classical methods, relative to a particular quantum oracle. Here, we discuss the possibility of a quantum walk algorithm yielding such an exponential speedup over possible classical algorithms, without the use of an oracle. We provide examples of some highly symmetric graphs on which efficient quantum circuits implementing quantum walks can be constructed and discuss potential applications to quantum search for marked vertices along these graphs.

  4. Renormalisation in Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Instantons and Quantum Chaos

    OpenAIRE

    Jirari, H.; Kröger, H.; Luo, X. Q.; Moriarty, K. J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We suggest how to construct non-perturbatively a renormalized action in quantum mechanics. We discuss similarties and differences with the standard effective action. We propose that the new quantum action is suitable to define and compute quantum instantons and quantum chaos.

  5. Chemical characterization by GC-MS and phytotoxic potential of non-polar and polar fractions of seeds of Dioteryx odorata (Aubl. Willd. from Venezuelan regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto de J. Oliveros-Bastidas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dipteryx odorata (Aubl. Willd. is a tall arboreal species native to Central and Northern South America. This paper describes the chemical characterization and phytotoxic potential of polar and non-polar extracts from D. odorata seeds. Structural determinations were accomplished by chemical derivatization and analyzed by GC/MS. The chemical composition of the non-polar fraction (hexane and dichloromethane presented fatty acids as major constituent. Medium polar and polar fractions (ethyl acetate and ethanol: water contained carboxylic acid and high 6,7-Dyhidroxycoumarin-β-D-glucopyranoside content, not previously reported for seeds of D. odorata. Extracts showed a significant level of phytotoxic activity, correlated to the content of coumarin derivatives, predominantly in the polar fraction.

  6. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics was developed during the first few decades of the twentieth century via a series of inspired guesses made by various physicists, including Planck, Einstein, Bohr, Schroedinger, Heisenberg, Pauli, and Dirac. All these scientists were trying to construct a self-consistent theory of microscopic dynamics that was compatible with experimental observations. The purpose of this book is to present quantum mechanics in a clear, concise, and systematic fashion, starting from the fundamental postulates, and developing the theory in as logical manner as possible. Topics covered in the book include the fundamental postulates of quantum mechanics, angular momentum, time-dependent and time-dependent perturbation theory, scattering theory, identical particles, and relativistic electron theory.

  7. Quantum Worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A. Barrett

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1808-1711.2016v20n1p45 Because of the conceptual difficulties it faces, quantum mechanics provides a salient example of how alternative metaphysical commitments may clarify our understanding of a physical theory and the explanations it provides. Here we will consider how postulating alternative quantum worlds in the context of Hugh Everett III’s pure wave mechanics may serve to explain determinate measurement records and the standard quantum statistics. We will focus on the properties of such worlds, then briefly consider other metaphysical options available for interpreting pure wave mechanics. These reflections will serve to illustrate both the nature and the limits of naturalized metaphysics.

  8. Quantum weirdness

    CERN Document Server

    Mullin, William J

    2017-01-01

    Quantum mechanics allows a remarkably accurate description of nature and powerful predictive capabilities. The analyses of quantum systems and their interpretation lead to many surprises, for example, the ability to detect the characteristics of an object without ever touching it in any way, via "interaction-free measurement," or the teleportation of an atomic state over large distances. The results can become downright bizarre. Quantum mechanics is a subtle subject that usually involves complicated mathematics -- calculus, partial differential equations, etc., for complete understanding. Most texts for general audiences avoid all mathematics. The result is that the reader misses almost all deep understanding of the subject, much of which can be probed with just high-school level algebra and trigonometry. Thus, readers with that level of mathematics can learn so much more about this fundamental science. The book starts with a discussion of the basic physics of waves (an appendix reviews some necessary class...

  9. Quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isham, C.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational effects are seen as arising from a curvature in spacetime. This must be reconciled with gravity's apparently passive role in quantum theory to achieve a satisfactory quantum theory of gravity. The development of grand unified theories has spurred the search, with forces being of equal strength at a unification energy of 10 15 - 10 18 GeV, with the ''Plank length'', Lp ≅ 10 -35 m. Fundamental principles of general relativity and quantum mechanics are outlined. Gravitons are shown to have spin-0, as mediators of gravitation force in the classical sense or spin-2 which are related to the quantisation of general relativity. Applying the ideas of supersymmetry to gravitation implies partners for the graviton, especially the massless spin 3/2 fermion called a gravitino. The concept of supersymmetric strings is introduced and discussed. (U.K.)

  10. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, P K

    2014-01-01

    Quantum mechanics, designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of physics, mathematics and chemistry, provides a concise yet self-contained introduction to the formal framework of quantum mechanics, its application to physical problems and the interpretation of the theory. Starting with a review of some of the necessary mathematics, the basic concepts are carefully developed in the text. After building a general formalism, detailed treatment of the standard material - the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, angular momentum theory, symmetry transformations, approximation methods, identical particle and many-particle systems, and scattering theory - is presented. The concluding chapter discusses the interpretation of quantum mechanics. Some of the important topics discussed in the book are the rigged Hilbert space, deformation quantization, path integrals, coherent states, geometric phases, decoherene, etc. This book is characterized by clarity and coherence of presentation.

  11. Quantum waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Exner, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    This monograph explains the theory of quantum waveguides, that is, dynamics of quantum particles confined to regions in the form of tubes, layers, networks, etc. The focus is on relations between the confinement geometry on the one hand and the spectral and scattering properties of the corresponding quantum Hamiltonians on the other. Perturbations of such operators, in particular, by external fields are also considered. The volume provides a unique summary of twenty five years of research activity in this area and indicates ways in which the theory can develop further. The book is fairly self-contained. While it requires some broader mathematical physics background, all the basic concepts are properly explained and proofs of most theorems are given in detail, so there is no need for additional sources. Without a parallel in the literature, the monograph by Exner and Kovarik guides the reader through this new and exciting field.

  12. Resolving the false-negative issues of the nonpolar organic amendment in whole-sediment toxicity identification evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, W Tyler; Keough, Michael J; Pettigrove, Vincent

    2018-04-01

    Three common false-negative scenarios have been encountered with amendment addition in whole-sediment toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs): dilution of toxicity by amendment addition (i.e., not toxic enough), not enough amendment present to reduce toxicity (i.e., too toxic), and the amendment itself elicits a toxic response (i.e., secondary amendment effect). One such amendment in which all 3 types of false-negatives have been observed is with the nonpolar organic amendment (activated carbon or powdered coconut charcoal). The objective of the present study was to reduce the likelihood of encountering false-negatives with this amendment and to increase the value of the whole-sediment TIE bioassay. To do this, the present study evaluated the effects of various activated carbon additions to survival, growth, emergence, and mean development rate of Chironomus tepperi. Using this information, an alternative method for this amendment was developed which utilized a combination of multiple amendment addition ratios based on wet weight (1%, lower likelihood of the secondary amendment effect; 5%, higher reduction of contaminant) and nonconventional endpoints (emergence, mean development rate). This alternative method was then validated in the laboratory (using spiked sediments) and with contaminated field sediments. Using these multiple activated carbon ratios in combination with additional endpoints (namely, emergence) reduced the likelihood of all 3 types of false-negatives and provided a more sensitive evaluation of risk. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:1219-1230. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  13. Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Form Dysfunctional Immune Synapses with B Cells Characterized by Non-Polarized Lytic Granule Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kabanova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of the cytotoxic T cell (CTL immune response has been proposed as one mechanism for immune evasion in cancer. In this study, we have explored the underlying basis for CTL suppression in the context of B cell malignancies. We document that human B cells have an intrinsic ability to resist killing by freshly isolated cytotoxic T cells (CTLs, but are susceptible to lysis by IL-2 activated CTL blasts and CTLs isolated from immunotherapy-treated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Impaired killing was associated with the formation of dysfunctional non-lytic immune synapses characterized by the presence of defective linker for activation of T cells (LAT signaling and non-polarized release of the lytic granules transported by ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 8 (Arl8. We propose that non-lytic degranulation of CTLs are a key regulatory mechanism of evasion through which B cells may interfere with the formation of functional immune synapses by CTLs.

  14. Tip-induced domain growth on the non-polar cuts of lithium niobate single-crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikin, D. O.; Ievlev, A. V.; Turygin, A. P.; Lobov, A. I.; Kalinin, S. V.; Shur, V. Ya.

    2015-05-01

    Currently, ferroelectric materials with designed domain structures are considered as a perspective material for new generation of photonic, data storage, and data processing devices. Application of external electric field is the most convenient way of the domain structure formation. Lots of papers are devoted to the investigation of domain kinetics on polar surface of crystals while the forward growth remains one of the most mysterious stages due to lack of experimental methods allowing to study it. Here, we performed tip-induced polarization reversal on X- and Y-non-polar cuts in single-crystal of congruent lithium niobate which allows us to study the forward growth with high spatial resolution. The revealed difference in the shape and length of domains induced on X- and Y-cuts is beyond previously developed theoretical approaches used for the theoretical consideration of the domains growth at non-polar ferroelectric surfaces. To explain experimental results, we used kinetic approach with anisotropy of screening efficiency along different crystallographic directions.

  15. On flotation separation of oxo-anions of transition metals by the use of fine-emulsified solutions of cationic collector in non-polar liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrylev, L.D.; Purich, A.N.; Babinets, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Experimentally shown is a principle possibility of flotation separation of oxo-anions of transition metals by the use of fine-emulsified solutions of cationic collector in non-polar liquids. Ammonium vanadate and sodium tuno.state solutions have been the objects of study. Hexadezilamine has been used as collector. The collector has been introduced in the form of hexadecylamine emulsions in n-decane, in tetrachloromethane or alcohol. Optimum pH value ranges are determined for separation processes

  16. Influence of dislocation density on internal quantum efficiency of GaN-based semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiadong Yu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available By considering the effects of stress fields coming from lattice distortion as well as charge fields coming from line charges at edge dislocation cores on radiative recombination of exciton, a model of carriers’ radiative and non-radiative recombination has been established in GaN-based semiconductors with certain dislocation density. Using vector average of the stress fields and the charge fields, the relationship between dislocation density and the internal quantum efficiency (IQE is deduced. Combined with related experimental results, this relationship is fitted well to the trend of IQEs of bulk GaN changing with screw and edge dislocation density, meanwhile its simplified form is fitted well to the IQEs of AlGaN multiple quantum well LEDs with varied threading dislocation densities but the same light emission wavelength. It is believed that this model, suitable for different epitaxy platforms such as MOCVD and MBE, can be used to predict to what extent the luminous efficiency of GaN-based semiconductors can still maintain when the dislocation density increases, so as to provide a reasonable rule of thumb for optimizing the epitaxial growth of GaN-based devices.

  17. Enhancement of Hole Confinement by Monolayer Insertion in Asymmetric Quantum-Barrier UVB Light Emitting Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2014-04-01

    We study the enhanced hole confinement by having a large bandgap AlGaN monolayer insertion (MLI) between the quantum well (QW) and the quantum barrier (QB). The numerical analysis examines the energy band alignment diagrams, using a self-consistent 6 × 6 k ·p method and, considering carrier distribution, recombination rates (Shockley-Reed-Hall, Auger, and radiative recombination rates), under equilibrium and forward bias conditions. The active region is based on AlaGa1-aN (barrier)/AlbGa1-bN (MLI)/AlcGa1-cN (well)/AldGa1-dN (barrier), where b > d > a > c. A large bandgap AlbGa1-bN mono layer, inserted between the QW and QB, was found to be effective in providing stronger hole confinement. With the proposed band engineering scheme, an increase of more than 30% in spatial overlap of carrier wavefunction was obtained, with a considerable increase in carrier density and direct radiative recombination rates. The single-QW-based UV-LED was designed to emit at 280 nm, which is an effective wavelength for water disinfection.

  18. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Alastair I M

    2007-01-01

    PREFACESINTRODUCTION The Photoelectric Effect The Compton Effect Line Spectra and Atomic Structure De Broglie Waves Wave-Particle Duality The Rest of This Book THE ONE-DIMENSIONAL SCHRÖDINGER EQUATIONS The Time-Dependent Schrödinger Equation The Time-Independent Schrödinger Equation Boundary ConditionsThe Infinite Square Well The Finite Square Well Quantum Mechanical Tunneling The Harmonic Oscillator THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL SCHRÖDINGER EQUATIONS The Wave Equations Separation in Cartesian Coordinates Separation in Spherical Polar Coordinates The Hydrogenic Atom THE BASIC POSTULATES OF QUANTUM MEC

  19. Quantum Chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohigas, Oriol [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, Orsay (France)

    2005-04-18

    Are there quantum signatures, for instance in the spectral properties, of the underlying regular or chaotic nature of the corresponding classical motion? Are there universality classes? Within this framework the merging of two at first sight seemingly disconnected fields, namely random matrix theories (RMT) and quantum chaos (QC), is briefly described. Periodic orbit theory (POT) plays a prominent role. Emphasis is given to compound nucleus resonances and binding energies, whose shell effects are examined from this perspective. Several aspects are illustrated with Riemann's {zeta}-function, which has become a testing ground for RMT, QC, POT, and their relationship.

  20. Quantum Chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohigas, Oriol

    2005-01-01

    Are there quantum signatures, for instance in the spectral properties, of the underlying regular or chaotic nature of the corresponding classical motion? Are there universality classes? Within this framework the merging of two at first sight seemingly disconnected fields, namely random matrix theories (RMT) and quantum chaos (QC), is briefly described. Periodic orbit theory (POT) plays a prominent role. Emphasis is given to compound nucleus resonances and binding energies, whose shell effects are examined from this perspective. Several aspects are illustrated with Riemann's ζ-function, which has become a testing ground for RMT, QC, POT, and their relationship

  1. Quantum Cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Don N.

    2006-01-01

    A complete model of the universe needs at least three parts: (1) a complete set of physical variables and dynamical laws for them, (2) the correct solution of the dynamical laws, and (3) the connection with conscious experience. In quantum cosmology, item (2) is the quantum state of the cosmos. Hartle and Hawking have made the `no-boundary' proposal, that the wavefunction of the universe is given by a path integral over all compact Euclidean 4-dimensional geometries and matter fields that hav...

  2. Quantum diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, S.

    1994-01-01

    We consider a simple quantum system subjected to a classical random force. Under certain conditions it is shown that the noise-averaged Wigner function of the system follows an integro-differential stochastic Liouville equation. In the simple case of polynomial noise-couplings this equation reduces to a generalized Fokker-Planck form. With nonlinear noise injection new ''quantum diffusion'' terms rise that have no counterpart in the classical case. Two special examples that are not of a Fokker-Planck form are discussed: the first with a localized noise source and the other with a spatially modulated noise source

  3. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  4. Quantum control limited by quantum decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Fei; Sun, C. P.; Yu, S. X.

    2006-01-01

    We describe quantum controllability under the influences of the quantum decoherence induced by the quantum control itself. It is shown that, when the controller is considered as a quantum system, it will entangle with its controlled system and then cause quantum decoherence in the controlled system. In competition with this induced decoherence, the controllability will be limited by some uncertainty relation in a well-armed quantum control process. In association with the phase uncertainty and the standard quantum limit, a general model is studied to demonstrate the possibility of realizing a decoherence-free quantum control with a finite energy within a finite time. It is also shown that if the operations of quantum control are to be determined by the initial state of the controller, then due to the decoherence which results from the quantum control itself, there exists a low bound for quantum controllability

  5. Quantum memory for images: A quantum hologram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilyev, Denis V.; Sokolov, Ivan V.; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2008-01-01

    Matter-light quantum interface and quantum memory for light are important ingredients of quantum information protocols, such as quantum networks, distributed quantum computation, etc. [P. Zoller et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 36, 203 (2005)]. In this paper we present a spatially multimode scheme for quantum memory for light, which we call a quantum hologram. Our approach uses a multiatom ensemble which has been shown to be efficient for a single spatial mode quantum memory. Due to the multiatom nature of the ensemble and to the optical parallelism it is capable of storing many spatial modes, a feature critical for the present proposal. A quantum hologram with the fidelity exceeding that of classical hologram will be able to store quantum features of an image, such as multimode superposition and entangled quantum states, something that a standard hologram is unable to achieve

  6. Quantum machine learning for quantum anomaly detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nana; Rebentrost, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Anomaly detection is used for identifying data that deviate from "normal" data patterns. Its usage on classical data finds diverse applications in many important areas such as finance, fraud detection, medical diagnoses, data cleaning, and surveillance. With the advent of quantum technologies, anomaly detection of quantum data, in the form of quantum states, may become an important component of quantum applications. Machine-learning algorithms are playing pivotal roles in anomaly detection using classical data. Two widely used algorithms are the kernel principal component analysis and the one-class support vector machine. We find corresponding quantum algorithms to detect anomalies in quantum states. We show that these two quantum algorithms can be performed using resources that are logarithmic in the dimensionality of quantum states. For pure quantum states, these resources can also be logarithmic in the number of quantum states used for training the machine-learning algorithm. This makes these algorithms potentially applicable to big quantum data applications.

  7. Conversion of polar and non-polar algae oil lipids to fatty acid methyl esters with solid acid catalysts--A model compound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Martta; Munter, Tony; Linnekoski, Juha

    2015-09-01

    Bio-based fuels are becoming more and more important due to the depleting fossil resources. The production of biodiesel from algae oil is challenging compared to terrestrial vegetable oils, as algae oil consists of polar fatty acids, such as phospholipids and glycolipids, as well as non-polar triglycerides and free fatty acids common in vegetable oils. It is shown that a single sulphonated solid acid catalyst can perform the esterification and transesterification reactions of both polar and non-polar lipids. In mild reaction conditions (60-70 °C) Nafion NR50 catalyst produces methyl palmitate (FAME) from the palmitic acid derivatives of di-, and tri-glyceride, free fatty acid, and phospholipid with over 80% yields, with the glycolipid derivative giving nearly 40% yields of FAME. These results demonstrate how the polar and non-polar lipid derivatives of algal oil can be utilised as feedstocks for biodiesel production with a single catalyst in one reaction step. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantum gravity and quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Papantonopoulos, Lefteris; Siopsis, George; Tsamis, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Quantum gravity has developed into a fast-growing subject in physics and it is expected that probing the high-energy and high-curvature regimes of gravitating systems will shed some light on how to eventually achieve an ultraviolet complete quantum theory of gravity. Such a theory would provide the much needed information about fundamental problems of classical gravity, such as the initial big-bang singularity, the cosmological constant problem, Planck scale physics and the early-time inflationary evolution of our Universe.   While in the first part of this book concepts of quantum gravity are introduced and approached from different angles, the second part discusses these theories in connection with cosmological models and observations, thereby exploring which types of signatures of modern and mathematically rigorous frameworks can be detected by experiments. The third and final part briefly reviews the observational status of dark matter and dark energy, and introduces alternative cosmological models.   ...

  9. Quantum biological information theory

    CERN Document Server

    Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2016-01-01

    This book is a self-contained, tutorial-based introduction to quantum information theory and quantum biology. It serves as a single-source reference to the topic for researchers in bioengineering, communications engineering, electrical engineering, applied mathematics, biology, computer science, and physics. The book provides all the essential principles of the quantum biological information theory required to describe the quantum information transfer from DNA to proteins, the sources of genetic noise and genetic errors as well as their effects. Integrates quantum information and quantum biology concepts; Assumes only knowledge of basic concepts of vector algebra at undergraduate level; Provides a thorough introduction to basic concepts of quantum information processing, quantum information theory, and quantum biology; Includes in-depth discussion of the quantum biological channel modelling, quantum biological channel capacity calculation, quantum models of aging, quantum models of evolution, quantum models o...

  10. Quantum Computation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 9. Quantum Computation - Particle and Wave Aspects of Algorithms. Apoorva Patel. General Article Volume 16 Issue 9 September 2011 pp 821-835. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. Quantum Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    performance driven optimization ofVLSI ... start-up company at lIT. Mumbai. ... 1 The best known algorithms for factorization ... make a measurement the quantum state continues to be ... cally in this way: if there is a source producing identical.

  12. Quantum Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical assessment of the recent developmentsof molecular biology is presented.The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptualunderstanding of life and biological systems is defended.Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketchedand its logical circularity avoided by postulatingthe existence of underlying living processes,entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale,with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other.Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces,is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretationof quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so onas quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of includinglong-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them incondensed matter theories of biological processes.Some quantum effects in biology are reviewedand quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since withoutit most (if not all of the biological structuresand signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-rangequantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization,may be invoked to explain signal amplificationprocess in biological systems in general.

  13. Quantum logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittelstaedt, P.

    1979-01-01

    The subspaces of Hilbert space constitute an orthocomplemented quasimodular lattice Lsub(q) for which neither a two-valued function nor generalized truth function exist. A generalisation of the dialogic method can be used as an interpretation of a lattice Lsub(qi), which may be considered as the intuitionistic part of Lsub(q). Some obvious modifications of the dialogic method are introduced which come from the possible incommensurability of propositions about quantum mechanical systems. With the aid of this generalized dialogic method a propositional calculus Qsub(eff) is derived which is similar to the calculus of effective (intuitionistic) logic, but contains a few restrictions which are based on the incommensurability of quantum mechanical propositions. It can be shown within the framework of the calculus Qsub(eff) that the value-definiteness of the elementary propositions which are proved by quantum mechanical propositions is inherited by all finite compund propositions. In this way one arrives at the calculus Q of full quantum logic which incorporates the principle of excluded middle for all propositions and which is a model for the lattice Lsub(q). (Auth.)

  14. Quantum computing

    OpenAIRE

    Burba, M.; Lapitskaya, T.

    2017-01-01

    This article gives an elementary introduction to quantum computing. It is a draft for a book chapter of the "Handbook of Nature-Inspired and Innovative Computing", Eds. A. Zomaya, G.J. Milburn, J. Dongarra, D. Bader, R. Brent, M. Eshaghian-Wilner, F. Seredynski (Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, 2006).

  15. Quantum Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Binder, K; Ciccotti, G

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this set of lectures is to introduce the general concepts that are at the basis of the computer simulation algorithms that are used to study the behavior of condensed matter quantum systems. The emphasis is on the underlying concepts rather than on specific applications. Topics

  16. Quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, A.

    1980-01-01

    The symposium included lectures covering both the elements and the experimental tests of the theory of quantum chromdynamics. A three day topical conference was included which included the first results from PETRA as well as the latest reports from CERN, Fermilab, and SPEAR experiments. Twenty-one items from the symposium were prepared separately for the data base

  17. Quantum Statistical Mechanics on a Quantum Computer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, H. De; Hams, A.H.; Michielsen, K.; Miyashita, S.; Saito, K.; Saito, E.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a simulation method for a quantum spin model of a generic, general purpose quantum computer. The use of this quantum computer simulator is illustrated through several implementations of Grover’s database search algorithm. Some preliminary results on the stability of quantum algorithms

  18. Quantum arithmetic with the Quantum Fourier Transform

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Perez, Lidia; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The Quantum Fourier Transform offers an interesting way to perform arithmetic operations on a quantum computer. We review existing Quantum Fourier Transform adders and multipliers and propose some modifications that extend their capabilities. Among the new circuits, we propose a quantum method to compute the weighted average of a series of inputs in the transform domain.

  19. Quantum Chaos via the Quantum Action

    OpenAIRE

    Kröger, H.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the concept of the quantum action with the purpose to characterize and quantitatively compute quantum chaos. As an example we consider in quantum mechanics a 2-D Hamiltonian system - harmonic oscillators with anharmonic coupling - which is classically a chaotic system. We compare Poincar\\'e sections obtained from the quantum action with those from the classical action.

  20. Quantum optics and fundamentals of quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusek, M.

    1997-01-01

    Quantum optics has opened up new opportunities for experimental verification of the basic principles of quantum mechanics, particularly in the field of quantum interference and so-called non-local phenomena. The results of the experiments described provide unambiguous support to quantum mechanics. (Z.J.)

  1. Quantum cryptography beyond quantum key distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broadbent, A.; Schaffner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is the art and science of exploiting quantum mechanical effects in order to perform cryptographic tasks. While the most well-known example of this discipline is quantum key distribution (QKD), there exist many other applications such as quantum money, randomness generation,

  2. Quantum Computing: a Quantum Group Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhenghan

    2013-01-01

    There is compelling theoretical evidence that quantum physics will change the face of information science. Exciting progress has been made during the last two decades towards the building of a large scale quantum computer. A quantum group approach stands out as a promising route to this holy grail, and provides hope that we may have quantum computers in our future.

  3. Quantum net dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, D.

    1989-01-01

    The quantum net unifies the basic principles of quantum theory and relativity in a quantum spacetime having no ultraviolet infinities, supporting the Dirac equation, and having the usual vacuum as a quantum condensation. A correspondence principle connects nets to Schwinger sources and further unifies the vertical structure of the theory, so that the functions of the many hierarchic levels of quantum field theory (predicate algebra, set theory, topology,hor-ellipsis, quantum dynamics) are served by one in quantum net dynamics

  4. Quantum Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giribet, G E

    2005-01-01

    Claus Kiefer presents his book, Quantum Gravity, with his hope that '[the] book will convince readers of [the] outstanding problem [of unification and quantum gravity] and encourage them to work on its solution'. With this aim, the author presents a clear exposition of the fundamental concepts of gravity and the steps towards the understanding of its quantum aspects. The main part of the text is dedicated to the analysis of standard topics in the formulation of general relativity. An analysis of the Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity and the canonical quantization of gravity is performed in detail. Chapters four, five and eight provide a pedagogical introduction to the basic concepts of gravitational physics. In particular, aspects such as the quantization of constrained systems, the role played by the quadratic constraint, the ADM decomposition, the Wheeler-de Witt equation and the problem of time are treated in an expert and concise way. Moreover, other specific topics, such as the minisuperspace approach and the feasibility of defining extrinsic times for certain models, are discussed as well. The ninth chapter of the book is dedicated to the quantum gravitational aspects of string theory. Here, a minimalistic but clear introduction to string theory is presented, and this is actually done with emphasis on gravity. It is worth mentioning that no hard (nor explicit) computations are presented, even though the exposition covers the main features of the topic. For instance, black hole statistical physics (within the framework of string theory) is developed in a pedagogical and concise way by means of heuristical arguments. As the author asserts in the epilogue, the hope of the book is to give 'some impressions from progress' made in the study of quantum gravity since its beginning, i.e., since the end of 1920s. In my opinion, Kiefer's book does actually achieve this goal and gives an extensive review of the subject. (book review)

  5. Quantum optics with single quantum dot devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwiller, Valery; Aichele, Thomas; Benson, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    A single radiative transition in a single-quantum emitter results in the emission of a single photon. Single quantum dots are single-quantum emitters with all the requirements to generate single photons at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. It is also possible to generate more than single photons with single quantum dots. In this paper we show that single quantum dots can be used to generate non-classical states of light, from single photons to photon triplets. Advanced solid state structures can be fabricated with single quantum dots as their active region. We also show results obtained on devices based on single quantum dots

  6. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor. PMID:27146471

  7. Quantum Secure Dialogue with Quantum Encryption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Tian-Yu

    2014-01-01

    How to solve the information leakage problem has become the research focus of quantum dialogue. In this paper, in order to overcome the information leakage problem in quantum dialogue, a novel approach for sharing the initial quantum state privately between communicators, i.e., quantum encryption sharing, is proposed by utilizing the idea of quantum encryption. The proposed protocol uses EPR pairs as the private quantum key to encrypt and decrypt the traveling photons, which can be repeatedly used after rotation. Due to quantum encryption sharing, the public announcement on the state of the initial quantum state is omitted, thus the information leakage problem is overcome. The information-theoretical efficiency of the proposed protocol is nearly 100%, much higher than previous information leakage resistant quantum dialogue protocols. Moreover, the proposed protocol only needs single-photon measurements and nearly uses single photons as quantum resource so that it is convenient to implement in practice. (general)

  8. Quantum key distribution via quantum encryption

    CERN Document Server

    Yong Sheng Zhang; Guang Can Guo

    2001-01-01

    A quantum key distribution protocol based on quantum encryption is presented in this Brief Report. In this protocol, the previously shared Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen pairs act as the quantum key to encode and decode the classical cryptography key. The quantum key is reusable and the eavesdropper cannot elicit any information from the particle Alice sends to Bob. The concept of quantum encryption is also discussed. (21 refs).

  9. Quantum random walks using quantum accelerator modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Z.-Y.; Burnett, K.; D'Arcy, M. B.; Gardiner, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the use of high-order quantum accelerator modes to achieve an atom optical realization of a biased quantum random walk. We first discuss how one can create coexistent quantum accelerator modes, and hence how momentum transfer that depends on the atoms' internal state can be achieved. When combined with microwave driving of the transition between the states, a different type of atomic beam splitter results. This permits the realization of a biased quantum random walk through quantum accelerator modes

  10. Quantum chemistry on a superconducting quantum processor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaicher, Michael P.; Wilhelm, Frank K. [Theoretical Physics, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Love, Peter J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Quantum chemistry is the most promising civilian application for quantum processors to date. We study its adaptation to superconducting (sc) quantum systems, computing the ground state energy of LiH through a variational hybrid quantum classical algorithm. We demonstrate how interactions native to sc qubits further reduce the amount of quantum resources needed, pushing sc architectures as a near-term candidate for simulations of more complex atoms/molecules.

  11. Polar and non-polar heterocyclic amines in cooked fish and meat products and their corresponding pan residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skog, K; Augustsson, K; Steineck, G; Stenberg, M; Jägerstad, M

    1997-06-01

    Fourteen cooked dishes with their corresponding pan residues were analysed for polar and non-polar heterocyclic amines using HPLC. The choice of foods, including beef, pork, poultry, game, fish, egg and sausages, was based on an investigation of an elderly population in Stockholm participating in an analytical epidemiological case-control study on cancer risks after intake of heterocyclic amines. The food items were prepared using normal household cooking practices, and to reflect the wide range of surface browning of the cooked dishes that would be encountered in this population, four cooking temperatures were used in the range 150-225 degrees C. For all food samples, the total amount of heterocyclic amines formed at 150 degrees C was less than 1 ng/g cooked product, and at 175 degrees C less than 2 ng/g. The highest concentrations of heterocyclic amines were detected in fillet of pork, reindeer meat and chicken breast fried at 200 and 225 degrees C and their corresponding pan residues. The total sum of 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine was about 1 microgram per 100 g portion (including pan residues) for reindeer meat and chicken breast, and between 1.9 and 6.3 micrograms per 100-g portion for fillet of pork. PhIP was the most abundant heterocyclic amine, identified in 73 of 84 samples, and the highest concentration of PhIP, 32.0 ng/g, was found in the pan residue from fillet of pork cooked at 225 degrees C. The non-polar heterocyclic amines 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole and 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole were detected in the range of 0.5-7.4 ng/g in most foods cooked at 225 degrees C, and also in meat sauce prepared at 200 and 175 degrees C. The other heterocyclic amines tested for: 2-amino-3-methylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoline, 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline, 2-amino-6-methyl-pyrido-[1,2-a:3',2'-d]-imidazole and 2

  12. Non-polar organic compounds in marine aerosols over the northern South China Sea: Influence of continental outflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Yingyi; Fu, Pingqing; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Ho, Kin Fai; Liu, Fobang; Zou, Shichun; Wang, Shan; Lai, Senchao

    2016-06-01

    Filter samples of total suspended particle (TSP) collected during a cruise campaign over the northern South China Sea (SCS) from September to October 2013 were analyzed for non-polar organic compounds (NPOCs) as well as organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and water-soluble ions. A total of 115 NPOCs species in groups of n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), iso-/antiso-alkanes, hopanes, steranes, methylalkanes, branched alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes and phthalates were detected. The characteristics of NPOCs in marine TSP samples were investigated to understand the sources from the Asian continent and other regions. The concentrations of total NPOCs ranged from 19.8 to 288.2 ng/m(3) with an average of 87.9 ng/m(3), which accounted for 0.8-1.7% (average 1.0%) of organic matter (OM). n-Alkanes was the predominant group, accounting for 43.1-79.5%, followed by PAHs (5.5-44.4%) and hopanes (1.6-11.4%). We found that primary combustion (biomass burning/fossil fuel combustion) was the dominant source for the majority of NPOCs (89.1%). Biomass burning in southern/southeastern China via long-range transport was proposed to be a major contributor of NPOCs in marine aerosols over the northern SCS, suggested by the significant correlations between nss-K(+) and NPOCs groups as well as the analysis of air mass back-trajectory and fire spots. For the samples with strong continental influence, the strong enhancement in concentrations of n-alkanes, PAHs, hopanes and steranes were attributed to fossil fuel (coal/petroleum) combustion. In addition, terrestrial plants waxes were another contributor to NPOCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Smooth perfluorinated surfaces with different chemical and physical natures: their unusual dynamic dewetting behavior toward polar and nonpolar liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dalton F; Masheder, Benjamin; Urata, Chihiro; Hozumi, Atsushi

    2013-09-10

    The effects of surface chemistry and the mobility of surface-tethered functional groups of various perfluorinated surfaces on their dewetting behavior toward polar (water) and nonpolar (n-hexadecane, n-dodecane, and n-decane) liquids were investigated. In this study, three types of common smooth perfluorinated surfaces, that is, a perfluoroalkylsilane (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyl-dimethylchlorosilane, FAS17) monomeric layer, an amorphous fluoropolymer film (Teflon AF 1600), and a perfluorinated polyether (PFPE)-terminated polymer brush film (Optool DSX), were prepared and their static/dynamic dewetting characteristics were compared. Although the apparent static contact angles (CAs) of these surfaces with all probe liquids were almost identical to each other, the ease of movement of liquid drops critically depended on the physical (solidlike or liquidlike) natures of the substrate surface. CA hysteresis and substrate tilt angles (TAs) of all probe liquids on the Optool DSX surface were found to be much lower than those of Teflon AF1600 and FAS17 surfaces due to its physical polymer chain mobility at room temperature and the resulting liquidlike nature. Only 6.0° of substrate incline was required to initiate movement for a small drop (5 μL) of n-decane, which was comparable to the reported substrate TA value (5.3°) for a superoleophobic surface (θ(S) > 160°, textured perfluorinated surface). Such unusual dynamic dewetting behavior of the Optool DSX surface was also markedly enhanced due to the significant increase in the chain mobility of PFPE by moderate heating (70 °C) of the surface, with substrate TA reducing to 3.0°. CA hysteresis and substrate TAs rather than static CAs were therefore determined to be of greater consequence for the estimation of the actual dynamic dewetting behavior of alkane probe liquids on these smooth perfluorinated surfaces. Their dynamic dewettability toward alkane liquids is in the order of Optool DSX > Teflon AF1600

  14. Antidiabetic, cytotoxic, antioxidant and antitrematodal medicinal efficacy of polar and non-polar phytochemicals of Balanites aegyptiaca Del.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Abd Al-Hay Saied Al-Ashaal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the biological activities of polar and non-polar extracts of Balanites aegyptiaca fruits. Methods: Antihyperglycemic activity using alloxan induced diabetic rats was evaluated. In vitro cytotoxicity against human carcinoma cell lines activity in addition to antioxidant and antitrematodal effects were investigated. Phytochemicals were determined using chromatographic and spectral analyses including TLC, GC and LC/MS/MS methods. Results: The reduction in blood glucose level reached 64.13%, 69.07% and 77.01% for hexane, chloroform and methanol extract, respectively. Isolated organs and histopathological examination illustrated improvement in treated animal's pancreas which is the master gland in controlling glucose level. The highest in vitro free radical scavenging capacity was achieved by chloroform extract (75.72%. Meanwhile, hexane and methanol extracts exhibited 44.01% and 41.77% scavenging capacity, respectively. Cytotoxic activity against human carcinoma cell lines illustrated efficacious influence against brain, liver, lung, breast and lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. Brain cell line was the most susceptible cell line by both chloroform and methanol extracts. In vitro antitrematodal effectiveness showed that 100% mortality of Schistosoma worms was induced at the 3rd and 5th days for methanol and chloroform extracts. Meanwhile, both extracts exhibited antifasciolosis activity with LC50 of 63.19 and 55.15 mg/L, respectively. Conclusions: The current results illustrated that Balanites aegyptiaca phytochemicals induced potent hypoglycemic activity and potent to moderate antioxidant and cytotoxic effects. Chloroform and methanol extracts were found to have antitrematodal efficacy against Schistosoma mansoni and Fasciola gigantica hepatic worms.

  15. Comparison of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with tunnel junction and ITO intracavity contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Leonard, J. T.

    2016-03-01

    We report on the lasing of III-nitride nonpolar, violet, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with III-nitride tunnel-junction (TJ) intracavity contacts and ion implanted apertures (IIAs). The TJ VCSELs are compared to similar VCSELs with tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contacts. Prior to analyzing device results, we consider the relative advantages of III-nitride TJs for blue and green emitting VCSELs. The TJs are shown to be most advantageous for violet and UV VCSELs, operating near or above the absorption edge for ITO, as they significantly reduce the total internal loss in the cavity. However, for longer wavelength III-nitride VCSELs, TJs primarily offer the advantage of improved cavity design flexibility, allowing one to make the p-side thicker using a thick n-type III-nitride TJ intracavity contact. This offers improved lateral current spreading and lower loss, compare to using ITO and p-GaN, respectively. These aspects are particularly important for achieving high-power CW VCSELs, making TJs the ideal intracavity contact for any III-nitride VCSEL. A brief overview of III-nitride TJ growth methods is also given, highlighting the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) technique used here. Following this overview, we compare 12 mu m aperture diameter, violet emitting, TJ and ITO VCSEL experimental results, which demonstrate the significant improvement in differential efficiency and peak power resulting from the reduced loss in the TJ design. Specifically, the TJ VCSEL shows a peak power of similar to 550 mu W with a threshold current density of similar to 3.5 kA/cm(2), while the ITO VCSELs show peak powers of similar to 80 mu W and threshold current densities of similar to 7 kA/cm

  16. A nonpolar, nonamphiphilic molecule can accelerate adsorption of phospholipids and lower their surface tension at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuc Nghia; Trinh Dang, Thuan Thao; Waton, Gilles; Vandamme, Thierry; Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2011-10-04

    The adsorption dynamics of a series of phospholipids (PLs) at the interface between an aqueous solution or dispersion of the PL and a gas phase containing the nonpolar, nonamphiphilic linear perfluorocarbon perfluorohexane (PFH) was studied by bubble profile analysis tensiometry. The PLs investigated were dioctanoylphosphatidylcholine (DiC(8)-PC), dilaurylphosphatidylcholine, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. The gas phase consisted of air or air saturated with PFH. The perfluorocarbon gas was found to have an unexpected, strong effect on both the adsorption rate and the equilibrium interfacial tension (γ(eq)) of the PLs. First, for all of the PLs, and at all concentrations investigated, the γ(eq) values were significantly lower (by up to 10 mN m(-1)) when PFH was present in the gas phase. The efficacy of PFH in decreasing γ(eq) depends on the ability of PLs to form micelles or vesicles in water. For vesicles, it also depends on the gel or fluid state of the membranes. Second, the adsorption rates of all the PLs at the interface (as assessed by the time required for the initial interfacial tension to be reduced by 30%) are significantly accelerated (by up to fivefold) by the presence of PFH for the lower PL concentrations. Both the surface-tension reducing effect and the adsorption rate increasing effect establish that PFH has a strong interaction with the PL monolayer and acts as a cosurfactant at the interface, despite the absence of any amphiphilic character. Fitting the adsorption profiles of DiC(8)-PC at the PFH-saturated air/aqueous solution interface with the modified Frumkin model indicated that the PFH molecule lay horizontally at the interface. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Comparison of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with tunnel junction and ITO intracavity contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Leonard, J. T.; Young, E. C.; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Shen, Chao; Margalith, T.; Ng, Tien Khee; Denbaars, S. P.; Ooi, Boon S.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the lasing of III-nitride nonpolar, violet, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with III-nitride tunnel-junction (TJ) intracavity contacts and ion implanted apertures (IIAs). The TJ VCSELs are compared to similar VCSELs with tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contacts. Prior to analyzing device results, we consider the relative advantages of III-nitride TJs for blue and green emitting VCSELs. The TJs are shown to be most advantageous for violet and UV VCSELs, operating near or above the absorption edge for ITO, as they significantly reduce the total internal loss in the cavity. However, for longer wavelength III-nitride VCSELs, TJs primarily offer the advantage of improved cavity design flexibility, allowing one to make the p-side thicker using a thick n-type III-nitride TJ intracavity contact. This offers improved lateral current spreading and lower loss, compare to using ITO and p-GaN, respectively. These aspects are particularly important for achieving high-power CW VCSELs, making TJs the ideal intracavity contact for any III-nitride VCSEL. A brief overview of III-nitride TJ growth methods is also given, highlighting the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) technique used here. Following this overview, we compare 12 mu m aperture diameter, violet emitting, TJ and ITO VCSEL experimental results, which demonstrate the significant improvement in differential efficiency and peak power resulting from the reduced loss in the TJ design. Specifically, the TJ VCSEL shows a peak power of similar to 550 mu W with a threshold current density of similar to 3.5 kA/cm(2), while the ITO VCSELs show peak powers of similar to 80 mu W and threshold current densities of similar to 7 kA/cm

  18. Unconventional Quantum Computing Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Seth

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates a variety of unconventional quantum computation devices, including fermionic quantum computers and computers that exploit nonlinear quantum mechanics. It is shown that unconventional quantum computing devices can in principle compute some quantities more rapidly than `conventional' quantum computers.

  19. Physics of quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belokurov, V.V.; Khrustalev, O.A.; Sadovnichij, V.A.; Timofeevskaya, O.D.

    2003-01-01

    In the paper, the modern status of the theory of quantum computation is considered. The fundamental principles of quantum computers and their basic notions such as quantum processors and computational basis states of the quantum Turing machine as well as the quantum Fourier transform are discussed. Some possible experimental realizations on the basis of NMR methods are given

  20. Quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhiezer, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    Basic ideas of quantum electrodynamics history of its origination and its importance are outlined. It is shown low the notion of the field for each kind of particles and the notion of vacuum for such field had originated and been affirmed how a new language of the Feynman diagrams had appeared without which it is quite impossible to described complex processes of particle scattering and mutual transformation. The main problem of the quantum electrodynamics is to find a scattering matrix, which solution comes to the determination of the Green electrodynamic functions. A review is given of papers on clarifying the asymptotic behaviour of the Green electrodynamic functions in the range of high pulses, on studying the Compton effect, bremsstrahlung irradiation Raman light scattering elastic scattering during channeling of charged particles in a crystal

  1. Quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, Walter

    2009-01-01

    This textbook on Quantum Electrodynamics is a thorough introductory text providing all necessary mathematical tools together with many examples and worked problems. In their presentation of the subject the authors adopt a heuristic approach based on the propagator formalism. The latter is introduced in the first two chapters in both its nonrelativistic and relativistic versions. Subsequently, a large number of scattering and radiation processes involving electrons, positrons, and photons are introduced and their theoretical treatment is presented in great detail. Higher order processes and renormalization are also included. The book concludes with a discussion of two-particle states and the interaction of spinless bosons. This completely revised and corrected new edition provides several additions to enable deeper insight in formalism and application of quantum electrodynamics.

  2. Quantum psyche

    CERN Document Server

    Baaquie, Belal E; Demongeot, J; Galli-Carminati, Giuliana; Martin, F; Teodorani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    At the end of the 19th century Sigmund Freud discovered that our acts and choices are not only decisions of our consciousness, but that they are also deeply determined by our unconscious (the so-called "Freudian unconscious"). During a long correspondence between them (1932-1958) Wolfgang Pauli and Carl Gustav Jung speculated that the unconscious could be a quantum system. This book is addressed both to all those interested in the new developments of the age-old enquiry in the relations between mind and matter, and also to the experts in quantum physics that are interested in a formalisation of this new approach. The description of the "Bilbao experiment" adds a very interesting experimental inquiry into the synchronicity effect in a group situation, linking theory to a quantifiable verification of these subtle effects. Cover design: "Entangled Minds". Riccardo Carminati Galli, 2014.

  3. Quantum Squeezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubairy, Suhail

    2005-01-01

    Quantum squeezed states are a consequence of uncertainty relations; a state is squeezed when the noise in one variable is reduced below the symmetric limit at the expense of the increased noise in the conjugate variable such that the Heisenberg uncertainty relation is not violated. Such states have been known since the earliest days of quantum mechanics. The realization in the early 80's that quantum squeezed states of the radiation field can have important applications in high precision Michelson interferometry for detecting gravitational waves led to a tremendous amount of activity, both in theoretical and experimental quantum optics. The present volume, edited by two eminent scientists, is a collection of papers by leading experts in the field of squeezed states on different aspects of the field as it stands today. The book is divided into three parts. In the first part, there are three articles that review the fundamentals. The first paper by Knight and Buzek presents an introductory account of squeezed states and their properties. The chapter, which opens with the quantization of the radiation field, goes on to discuss the quantum optical properties of single mode and multimode squeezed states. The second article by Hillery provides a detailed description of field quantization in the presence of a nonlinear dielectric medium, thus providing a rigorous treatment of squeezing in nonlinear media. The third article by Yurke presents a comprehensive discussion of the input-output theory of the squeezed radiation at the dielectric boundaries. The second part of the book, comprising of three articles, deals with the generation of squeezed states. In the first article, Drummond reviews the squeezing properties of light in nonlinear systems such as parametric oscillators. He also discusses squeezed light propagation through waveguides and optical fibers. In the second article, Ralph concentrates on active laser sources of squeezing and presents an analysis based on the

  4. Quantum hadrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serot, B.D.

    1992-01-01

    It is therefore essential to develop reliable nuclear models that go beyond the traditional non-relativistic many-body framework. The arguments for renormalizable models based on hadronic degrees of freedom (quantum hadrodynamics) are presented, and the assumptions underlying this framework are discussed. The Walecka model, which contains neutrons, protons, and neutral scalar and vector mesons, is considered first as a simple example. The development is based on the relativistic mean-field and Hartree approximations, and their application to infinite matter and atomic nuclei. Some successes of this model are discussed, such as the nuclear equation of state, the derivation of the shell model, the prediction of nuclear properties throughout the periodic table, and the inclusion of zero-point vacuum corrections. The important concepts of Lorentz covariance and self-consistency are emphasized and the new dynamical features that arise in a relativistic many-body framework are highlighted. The computation of isoscalar magnetic moments is presented as an illustrative example. Calculations beyond the relativistic mean-field and Hartree approximations (for example, Dirac-Hartree-Fock and Dirac-Brueckner) are considered next, as well as recent efforts to incorporate the full role of the quantum vacuum in a consistent fashion. An extended model containing isovector pi and rho mesons is then developed; the dynamics is based on the chirally invariant linear sigma model. The difficulties in constructing realistic chiral descriptions of nuclear matter and nuclei are analysed, and the connection between the sigma model and the Walecka model is established. Finally, the relationship between quantum hadrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics is briefly addressed. (Author)

  5. Quantum Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Haroche, Serge

    2013-01-01

    From the infinitely small to the infinitely big, covering over 60 spatial orders of magnitude, quantum theory is used as much to describe the still largely mysterious vibrations of the microscopic strings that could be the basic constituents of the Universe, as to explain the fluctuations of the microwave radiation reaching us from the depths of outer space. Serge Haroche tells us about the scientific theory that revolutionised our understanding of nature and made an extraordinary contributio...

  6. Quantum Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Schaden

    2002-01-01

    Quantum theory is used to model secondary financial markets. Contrary to stochastic descriptions, the formalism emphasizes the importance of trading in determining the value of a security. All possible realizations of investors holding securities and cash is taken as the basis of the Hilbert space of market states. The temporal evolution of an isolated market is unitary in this space. Linear operators representing basic financial transactions such as cash transfer and the buying or selling of...

  7. Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Quantum Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Sheng, Yu-Bo; Zhou, Lan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-06-02

    Quantum communication provides an absolute security advantage, and it has been widely developed over the past 30 years. As an important branch of quantum communication, quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) promotes high security and instantaneousness in communication through directly transmitting messages over a quantum channel. The full implementation of a quantum protocol always requires the ability to control the transfer of a message effectively in the time domain; thus, it is essential to combine QSDC with quantum memory to accomplish the communication task. In this Letter, we report the experimental demonstration of QSDC with state-of-the-art atomic quantum memory for the first time in principle. We use the polarization degrees of freedom of photons as the information carrier, and the fidelity of entanglement decoding is verified as approximately 90%. Our work completes a fundamental step toward practical QSDC and demonstrates a potential application for long-distance quantum communication in a quantum network.

  8. Optical properties of a-plane (Al, Ga)N/GaN multiple quantum wells grown on strain engineered Zn1-xMgxO layers by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Y.; Vinter, B.; Chauveau, J.-M.; Brault, J.; Nemoz, M.; Teisseire, M.; Leroux, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nonpolar (1120) Al 0.2 Ga 0.8 N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (1120) Zn 0.74 Mg 0.26 O templates on r-plane sapphire substrates. The quantum wells exhibit well-resolved photoluminescence peaks in the ultra-violet region, and no sign of quantum confined Stark effect is observed in the complete multiple quantum well series. The results agree well with flat band quantum well calculations. Furthermore, we show that the MQW structures are strongly polarized along the [0001] direction. The origin of the polarization is discussed in terms of the strain anisotropy dependence of the exciton optical oscillator strengths.

  9. Quantum Locality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a ‘consistent quantum theory’ (CQT) that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues, on the basis of his examination of certain arguments that claim to demonstrate the existence of such nonlocal influences, that such influences do not exist. However, his examination was restricted mainly to hidden-variable-based arguments that include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by attributing to the system properties alien to that system. Hence Griffiths’ rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his ‘consistent quantum theory’ shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive framework. This necessary existence, within the ‘consistent’ framework, of long range essentially instantaneous influences refutes the claim made by Griffiths that his ‘consistent’ framework is superior to the orthodox quantum theory of von Neumann because it does not entail instantaneous influences. An added section responds to Griffiths’ reply, which cites a litany of ambiguities that seem to restrict, devastatingly, the scope of his CQT formalism, apparently to buttress his claim that my use of that formalism to validate the nonlocality theorem is flawed. But the

  10. Quantum Monte Carlo tunneling from quantum chemistry to quantum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Guglielmo; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    Quantum tunneling is ubiquitous across different fields, from quantum chemical reactions and magnetic materials to quantum simulators and quantum computers. While simulating the real-time quantum dynamics of tunneling is infeasible for high-dimensional systems, quantum tunneling also shows up in quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations, which aim to simulate quantum statistics with resources growing only polynomially with the system size. Here we extend the recent results obtained for quantum spin models [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 180402 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.180402], and we study continuous-variable models for proton transfer reactions. We demonstrate that QMC simulations efficiently recover the scaling of ground-state tunneling rates due to the existence of an instanton path, which always connects the reactant state with the product. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of quantum chemical reactions and quantum annealing, where quantum tunneling is expected to be a valuable resource for solving combinatorial optimization problems.

  11. Quantum Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermin, N. David

    2007-08-01

    Preface; 1. Cbits and Qbits; 2. General features and some simple examples; 3. Breaking RSA encryption with a quantum computer; 4. Searching with a quantum computer; 5. Quantum error correction; 6. Protocols that use just a few Qbits; Appendices; Index.

  12. Quantum isometry groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotishman Bhowmick

    2015-11-07

    Nov 7, 2015 ... Classical. Quantum. Background. Compact Hausdorff space. Unital C∗ algebra. Gelfand-Naimark. Compact Group. Compact Quantum Group. Woronowicz. Group Action. Coaction. Woronowicz. Riemannian manifold. Spectral triple. Connes. Isometry group. Quantum Isometry Group. To be discussed.

  13. Elementary quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Pilar, Frank L

    2003-01-01

    Useful introductory course and reference covers origins of quantum theory, Schrödinger wave equation, quantum mechanics of simple systems, electron spin, quantum states of atoms, Hartree-Fock self-consistent field method, more. 1990 edition.

  14. On quantum statistical inference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, O.E.; Gill, R.D.; Jupp, P.E.

    2003-01-01

    Interest in problems of statistical inference connected to measurements of quantum systems has recently increased substantially, in step with dramatic new developments in experimental techniques for studying small quantum systems. Furthermore, developments in the theory of quantum measurements have

  15. Optical quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lvovsky, Alexander I.; Sanders, Barry C.; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Quantum memory is essential for the development of many devices in quantum information processing, including a synchronization tool that matches various processes within a quantum computer, an identity quantum gate that leaves any state unchanged, and a mechanism to convert heralded photons to on-demand photons. In addition to quantum computing, quantum memory will be instrumental for implementing long-distance quantum communication using quantum repeaters. The importance of this basic quantum gate is exemplified by the multitude of optical quantum memory mechanisms being studied, such as optical delay lines, cavities and electromagnetically induced transparency, as well as schemes that rely on photon echoes and the off-resonant Faraday interaction. Here, we report on state-of-the-art developments in the field of optical quantum memory, establish criteria for successful quantum memory and detail current performance levels.

  16. Quantum coherence and correlations in quantum system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhengjun; Li, Yongming; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Criteria of measure quantifying quantum coherence, a unique property of quantum system, are proposed recently. In this paper, we first give an uncertainty-like expression relating the coherence and the entropy of quantum system. This finding allows us to discuss the relations between the entanglement and the coherence. Further, we discuss in detail the relations among the coherence, the discord and the deficit in the bipartite quantum system. We show that, the one-way quantum deficit is equal to the sum between quantum discord and the relative entropy of coherence of measured subsystem. PMID:26094795

  17. Quantum conductance in silicon quantum wires

    CERN Document Server

    Bagraev, N T; Klyachkin, L E; Malyarenko, A M; Gehlhoff, W; Ivanov, V K; Shelykh, I A

    2002-01-01

    The results of investigations of electron and hole quantum conductance staircase in silicon quantum wires are presented. The characteristics of self-ordering quantum wells of n- and p-types, which from on the silicon (100) surface in the nonequilibrium boron diffusion process, are analyzed. The results of investigations of the quantum conductance as the function of temperature, carrier concentration and modulation degree of silicon quantum wires are given. It is found out, that the quantum conductance of the one-dimensional channels is observed, for the first time, at an elevated temperature (T >= 77 K)

  18. Quantum probability and quantum decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukalov, V I; Sornette, D

    2016-01-13

    A rigorous general definition of quantum probability is given, which is valid not only for elementary events but also for composite events, for operationally testable measurements as well as for inconclusive measurements, and also for non-commuting observables in addition to commutative observables. Our proposed definition of quantum probability makes it possible to describe quantum measurements and quantum decision-making on the same common mathematical footing. Conditions are formulated for the case when quantum decision theory reduces to its classical counterpart and for the situation where the use of quantum decision theory is necessary. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. Interpreting quantum discord through quantum state merging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhok, Vaibhav; Datta, Animesh

    2011-01-01

    We present an operational interpretation of quantum discord based on the quantum state merging protocol. Quantum discord is the markup in the cost of quantum communication in the process of quantum state merging, if one discards relevant prior information. Our interpretation has an intuitive explanation based on the strong subadditivity of von Neumann entropy. We use our result to provide operational interpretations of other quantities like the local purity and quantum deficit. Finally, we discuss in brief some instances where our interpretation is valid in the single-copy scenario.

  20. Characterization of quantum logics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahti, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    The quantum logic approach to axiomatic quantum mechanics is used to analyze the conceptual foundations of the traditional quantum theory. The universal quantum of action h>0 is incorporated into the theory by introducing the uncertainty principle, the complementarity principle, and the superposition principle into the framework. A characterization of those quantum logics (L,S) which may provide quantum descriptions is then given. (author)

  1. Quantum theory. 3. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, C.

    2004-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Particles and waves, the superposition principle and probability interpretation, the uncertainty relation, spin, the Schroedinger equation, wave functions, symmetries, the hydrogen atom, atoms with many electrons, Schroedinger's cat and the Einstein-podolsky-Rosen problem, the Bell inequalities, the classical limit, quantum systems in the electromagnetic field, solids and quantum liquids, quantum information, quantum field theory, quantum theory and gravitation, the mathematical formalism of quantum theory. (HSI)

  2. Defining Quantum Control Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Ying, Mingsheng; Yu, Nengkun; Feng, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    A remarkable difference between quantum and classical programs is that the control flow of the former can be either classical or quantum. One of the key issues in the theory of quantum programming languages is defining and understanding quantum control flow. A functional language with quantum control flow was defined by Altenkirch and Grattage [\\textit{Proc. LICS'05}, pp. 249-258]. This paper extends their work, and we introduce a general quantum control structure by defining three new quantu...

  3. Relativistic quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    A new protocol of quantum key distribution is proposed to transmit keys through free space. Along with quantum-mechanical restrictions on the discernibility of nonorthogonal quantum states, the protocol uses additional restrictions imposed by special relativity theory. Unlike all existing quantum key distribution protocols, this protocol ensures key secrecy for a not strictly one-photon source of quantum states and an arbitrary length of a quantum communication channel.

  4. From quantum coherence to quantum correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Mao, Yuanyuan; Luo, Shunlong

    2017-06-01

    In quantum mechanics, quantum coherence of a state relative to a quantum measurement can be identified with the quantumness that has to be destroyed by the measurement. In particular, quantum coherence of a bipartite state relative to a local quantum measurement encodes quantum correlations in the state. If one takes minimization with respect to the local measurements, then one is led to quantifiers which capture quantum correlations from the perspective of coherence. In this vein, quantum discord, which quantifies the minimal correlations that have to be destroyed by quantum measurements, can be identified as the minimal coherence, with the coherence measured by the relative entropy of coherence. To advocate and formulate this idea in a general context, we first review coherence relative to Lüders measurements which extends the notion of coherence relative to von Neumann measurements (or equivalently, orthonomal bases), and highlight the observation that quantum discord arises as minimal coherence through two prototypical examples. Then, we introduce some novel measures of quantum correlations in terms of coherence, illustrate them through examples, investigate their fundamental properties and implications, and indicate their applications to quantum metrology.

  5. Quantum signature scheme for known quantum messages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taewan; Lee, Hyang-Sook

    2015-01-01

    When we want to sign a quantum message that we create, we can use arbitrated quantum signature schemes which are possible to sign for not only known quantum messages but also unknown quantum messages. However, since the arbitrated quantum signature schemes need the help of a trusted arbitrator in each verification of the signature, it is known that the schemes are not convenient in practical use. If we consider only known quantum messages such as the above situation, there can exist a quantum signature scheme with more efficient structure. In this paper, we present a new quantum signature scheme for known quantum messages without the help of an arbitrator. Differing from arbitrated quantum signature schemes based on the quantum one-time pad with the symmetric key, since our scheme is based on quantum public-key cryptosystems, the validity of the signature can be verified by a receiver without the help of an arbitrator. Moreover, we show that our scheme provides the functions of quantum message integrity, user authentication and non-repudiation of the origin as in digital signature schemes. (paper)

  6. Fluctuations in quantum chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casati, G.; Chirikov, B.V.

    1996-01-01

    Various fluctuations in quantum systems with discrete spectrum are discussed, including recent unpublished results. Open questions and unexplained peculiarities of quantum fluctuations are formulated [ru

  7. Quantum potential theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schürmann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This volume contains the revised and completed notes of lectures given at the school "Quantum Potential Theory: Structure and Applications to Physics," held at the Alfried-Krupp-Wissenschaftskolleg in Greifswald from February 26 to March 10, 2007. Quantum potential theory studies noncommutative (or quantum) analogs of classical potential theory. These lectures provide an introduction to this theory, concentrating on probabilistic potential theory and it quantum analogs, i.e. quantum Markov processes and semigroups, quantum random walks, Dirichlet forms on C* and von Neumann algebras, and boundary theory. Applications to quantum physics, in particular the filtering problem in quantum optics, are also presented.

  8. Polar and non-polar organic aerosols from large-scale agricultural-waste burning emissions in Northern India: Implications to organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Prashant; Sarin, M M

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on characteristics of organic aerosols (polar and non-polar) and total organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio (OM/OC) from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy- and wheat-residue) burning emissions in Northern India. Aerosol samples from an upwind location (Patiala: 30.2°N, 76.3°E) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain were analyzed for non-polar and polar fractions of organic carbon (OC1 and OC2) and their respective mass (OM1 and OM2). On average, polar organic aerosols (OM2) contribute nearly 85% of the total organic mass (OM) from the paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. The water-soluble-OC (WSOC) to OC2 ratio, within the analytical uncertainty, is close to 1 from both paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. However, temporal variability and relatively low WSOC/OC2 ratio (Av: 0.67±0.06) is attributed to high moisture content and poor combustion efficiency during paddy-residue burning, indicating significant contribution (∼30%) of aromatic carbon to OC2. The OM/OC ratio for non-polar (OM1/OC1∼1.2) and polar organic aerosols (OM2/OC2∼2.2), hitherto unknown for open agricultural-waste burning emissions, is documented in this study. The total OM/OC ratio is nearly identical, 1.9±0.2 and 1.8±0.2, from paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Behavioral and electroencephalographic evaluation of the anticonvulsive activity of Moringa oleifera leaf non-polar extracts and one metabolite in PTZ-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Trujano, María Eva; Martínez-González, Claudia Lizbeth; Flores-Carrillo, Maricela; Luna-Nophal, Sara Ibeth; Contreras-Murillo, Gerardo; Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel

    2018-01-15

    Moringa oleifera Lamarck is a species that has long been used in high demand in folk medicine, including for the treatment of epilepsy. Nevertheless, scientific studies demonstrating its anticonvulsant properties and the nature of the bioactive constituents are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anticonvulsant activities of the Moringa oleifera leaves in non-polar vs. polar extracts using behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) analyses in rodents. First, PTZ (80 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced tonic-clonic seizures were assayed via a dose-response (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg, i.p.) evaluation in mice. Then, a dosage of the extracts (100 or 300 mg/kg) and one metabolite (30 mg/kg, i.p.) was selected to evaluate its effect on PTZ (35 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced EEG paroxystic activities in rats compared to the effects of ethosuximide (reference anticonvulsant drug, 100 mg/kg, i.p.). Latent onset of the first paroxystic spike, first seizure and frequency as well as seizure severity, were determined using Racine's scale. Moringa oleifera ethanol and hexane extracts produced a delay in the seizure latency in mice and rats; this effect was improved in the presence of the hexane extract containing the active metabolite hexadecanoic acid. The anticonvulsant effects were corroborated in the spectral analysis by the potency of the EEG due to a reduction in the spike frequency and amplitude, as well as in the duration and severity of the seizures. The effects of the hexane extract resembled those observed in the reference antiepileptic drug ethosuximide. Moringa oleifera leaves possess anticonvulsant activities due to the complementary of the non-polar and polar constituents. However, the non-polar constituents appear to exert an important influence via the partial participation of fatty acids, providing evidence of the effects of this plant in epilepsy therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  10. Thermal properties of some small peptides (N-acetyl-amino acid-N′-methylamides) with non-polar side groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badea, Elena; Della Gatta, Giuseppe; Pałecz, Bartłomiej

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • T fus and Δ fus H m of methylamides of N-acetyl substituted non-polar amino acids were measured. • T fus and Δ fus H m increased as a function of the molar mass of the alkyl side chains. • DL racemates showed T fus of about 40 °C lower than those of the corresponding pure L enantiomers. • Ideal solubility of solids at T = 298.15 K was estimated based on their T fus and Δ fus S m . - Abstract: Temperatures and molar enthalpies of fusion of a series of uncharged small peptides, namely the methylamides of N-acetyl substituted glycine, α-amino-butyric acid, alanine, valine, norvaline, leucine, isoleucine, norleucine, and proline, were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (d.s.c.), and molar entropies of fusion were derived. Both L- and DL-compunds were taken into account for the chiral molecules. No solid-to-solid transitions were detected from room temperature to fusion except for N-acetyl-N′-methyl alaninamide. Comparisons were made with the values for the N-acetyl amides of the corresponding amino acids previously reported. Both L enantiomers and DL racemates of α-aminobutyric acid, alanine, valine and isoleucine methylamides displayed temperatures of fusion sharply increasing as a function of molar mass, whereas much lower values, in countertendency with their molar mass increase, were found for proline and leucine methylamides. The racemic DL crystals showed temperatures of fusion of about 40 °C lower than those of the corresponding pure L enantiomers, except for proline and leucine derivatives. The enthalpies and entropies of fusion also varied as a function of molar mass following a similar trend with that of temperatures of fusion, except for alanine derivatives which showed lower values than expected. The values of ideal solubility of solids at T = 298.15 K were estimated based on their temperatures and molar entropies of fusion. Results were discussed with reference to the packing patterns based on hydrogen bonding and

  11. Soft ionization of saturated hydrocarbons, alcohols and nonpolar compounds by negative-ion direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Robert B; Dane, A John

    2013-03-01

    Large polarizable n-alkanes (approximately C18 and larger), alcohols, and other nonpolar compounds can be detected as negative ions when sample solutions are injected directly into the sampling orifice of the atmospheric pressure interface of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer with the direct analysis in real time (DART) ion source operating in negative-ion mode. The mass spectra are dominated by peaks corresponding to [M + O2]‾(•). No fragmentation is observed, making this a very soft ionization technique for samples that are otherwise difficult to analyze by DART. Detection limits for cholesterol were determined to be in the low nanogram range.

  12. Comparison of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 growth in polarized genital epithelial cells grown in three-dimensional culture with non-polarized cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dessus-Babus, Sophie; Moore, Cheryl G.; Whittimore, Judy D.; Wyrick, Priscilla B.

    2008-01-01

    A common model for studying Chlamydia trachomatis and growing chlamydial stocks uses Lymphogranuloma venereum serovar L2 and non-polarized HeLa cells. However, recent publications indicate that the growth rate and progeny yields can vary considerably for a particular strain depending on the cell line/type used, and seem to be partially related to cell tropism. In the present study, the growth of invasive serovar L2 was compared in endometrial HEC-1B and endocervical HeLa cells polarized on co...

  13. Quantum chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Neubert, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the fundamental theory of the strong interactions. It is local, non-abelian gauge theory descripting the interactions between quarks and gluons, the constituents of hadrons. In these lectures, the basic concepts and ph will be introduced in a pedagogical way. Topics will include : asymptotically free partons, colour and confinement ; non-abelian gauge invariance and quantization ; the running coupling constant ; deep-inelastic scattering and scaling violations ; th chiral and heavy-quark symmetries. Some elementary knowledge of field theory, abelian gauge invariance and Feynman diagrams will be helpful in following the course.

  14. Quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    Quantum electrodynamics is an essential building block and an integral part of the gauge theory of unified electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions, the so-called standard model. Its failure or breakdown at some level would have a most profound impact on the theoretical foundations of elementary particle physics as a whole. Thus the validity of QED has been the subject of intense experimental tests over more than 40 years of its history. This volume presents an up-to-date review of high precision experimental tests of QED together with comprehensive discussion of required theoretical wor

  15. Quantum safari

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratel, H.

    1999-01-01

    A new stage in non-destructive quantum measurements has been reached by a French team, it is now possible to measure photons without disturbing them. The photon beam goes through a non-linear transparent medium, this medium is modified by the passing of the beam, a second photon beam is sent through the same medium, this beam whose energy is weaker can read the modifications of the transparent crystal left by the first beam. The study of these modifications gives information on the photons of the first beam. (A.C.)

  16. Quantum optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flytzanis, C.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Quantum Optics laboratory (Polytechnic School, France) is presented. The research program is focused on the behavior of dense and dilute materials submitted to short and high-intensity light radiation fields. Nonlinear optics techniques, with time and spatial resolution, are developed. An important research activity concerns the investigations on the interactions between the photon beams and the inhomogeneous or composite materials, as well as the artificial microstructures. In the processes involving molecular beams and surfaces, the research works on the photophysics of surfaces and the molecule-surface interactions, are included [fr

  17. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mandl, Franz

    1992-01-01

    The Manchester Physics Series General Editors: D. J. Sandiford; F. Mandl; A. C. Phillips Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester Properties of Matter B. H. Flowers and E. Mendoza Optics Second Edition F. G. Smith and J. H. Thomson Statistical Physics Second Edition F. Mandl Electromagnetism Second Edition I. S. Grant and W. R. Phillips Statistics R. J. Barlow Solid State Physics Second Edition J. R. Hook and H. E. Hall Quantum Mechanics F. Mandl Particle Physics Second Edition B. R. Martin and G. Shaw The Physics of Stars Second Edition A. C. Phillips Computing for Scient

  18. Manin's quantum spaces and standard quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floratos, E.G.

    1990-01-01

    Manin's non-commutative coordinate algebra of quantum groups is shown to be identical, for unitary coordinates, with the conventional operator algebras of quantum mechanics. The deformation parameter q is a pure phase for unitary coordinates. When q is a root of unity. Manin's algebra becomes the matrix algebra of quantum mechanics for a discretized and finite phase space. Implications for quantum groups and the associated non-commutative differential calculus of Wess and Zumino are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Quantum groups and quantum homogeneous spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulish, P.P.

    1994-01-01

    The usefulness of the R-matrix formalism and the reflection equations is demonstrated on examples of the quantum group covariant algebras (quantum homogeneous spaces): quantum Minkowski space-time, quantum sphere and super-sphere. The irreducible representations of some covariant algebras are constructed. The generalization of the reflection equation to super case is given and the existence of the quasiclassical limits is pointed out. (orig.)

  20. Flexible deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes for significant improvement of quantum efficiencies by external bending

    KAUST Repository

    Shervin, Shahab; Oh, Seung Kyu; Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Keon Hwa; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Kim, Seung Hwan; Kim, Jeomoh; Pouladi, Sara; Lee, Sung-Nam; Li, Xiaohang; Kwak, Joon-Seop; Ryou, Jae-Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) light at the wavelength range of 250‒280 nm (UVC spectrum) is essential for numerous applications such as sterilization, purification, sensing, and communication. III-nitride-based DUV light-emitting diodes (DUV LEDs), like other solid-state lighting sources, offer a great potential to replace the conventional gas-discharged lamps with short lifetimes and toxic-element-bearing nature. However, unlike visible LEDs, the DUV LEDs are still suffering from low quantum efficiencies (QEs) and low optical output powers. In this work, reported is a new route to improve QEs of AlGaN-based DUV LEDs using mechanical flexibility of recently developed bendable thin-film structures. Numerical studies show that electronic band structures of AlGaN heterostructures and resulting optical and electrical characteristics of the devices can be significantly modified by external bending through active control of piezoelectric polarization. Internal quantum efficiency (IQE) is enhanced higher than three times, when the DUV LEDs are moderately bent to induce in-plane compressive strain in the heterostructure. Furthermore, efficiency droop at high injection currents is mitigated and turn-on voltage of diodes decreases with the same bending condition. The concept of bendable DUV LEDs with a controlled external strain can provide a new path for high-output-power and high-efficiency devices.

  1. Flexible deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes for significant improvement of quantum efficiencies by external bending

    KAUST Repository

    Shervin, Shahab

    2018-01-26

    Deep ultraviolet (DUV) light at the wavelength range of 250‒280 nm (UVC spectrum) is essential for numerous applications such as sterilization, purification, sensing, and communication. III-nitride-based DUV light-emitting diodes (DUV LEDs), like other solid-state lighting sources, offer a great potential to replace the conventional gas-discharged lamps with short lifetimes and toxic-element-bearing nature. However, unlike visible LEDs, the DUV LEDs are still suffering from low quantum efficiencies (QEs) and low optical output powers. In this work, reported is a new route to improve QEs of AlGaN-based DUV LEDs using mechanical flexibility of recently developed bendable thin-film structures. Numerical studies show that electronic band structures of AlGaN heterostructures and resulting optical and electrical characteristics of the devices can be significantly modified by external bending through active control of piezoelectric polarization. Internal quantum efficiency (IQE) is enhanced higher than three times, when the DUV LEDs are moderately bent to induce in-plane compressive strain in the heterostructure. Furthermore, efficiency droop at high injection currents is mitigated and turn-on voltage of diodes decreases with the same bending condition. The concept of bendable DUV LEDs with a controlled external strain can provide a new path for high-output-power and high-efficiency devices.

  2. Quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penin, Alexander A.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics and find a deviation from the quantum-mechanical prediction for the Hall conductivity due to radiative antiscreening of electric charge in an external magnetic field. A weak dependence of the universal von Klitzing constant on the magnetic field strength, which can possibly be observed in a dedicated experiment, is predicted

  3. Characterizing and quantifying quantum chaos with quantum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We explore quantum signatures of classical chaos by studying the rate of information gain in quantum tomography. The tomographic record consists of a time series of expectation values of a Hermitian operator evolving under the application of the Floquet operator of a quantum map that possesses (or lacks) time-reversal ...

  4. Quantum Statistical Mechanics on a Quantum Computer

    OpenAIRE

    De Raedt, H.; Hams, A. H.; Michielsen, K.; Miyashita, S.; Saito, K.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a quantum algorithm to compute the density of states and thermal equilibrium properties of quantum many-body systems. We present results obtained by running this algorithm on a software implementation of a 21-qubit quantum computer for the case of an antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on triangular lattices of different size.

  5. Quantumness-generating capability of quantum dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Luo, Shunlong; Mao, Yuanyuan

    2018-04-01

    We study quantumness-generating capability of quantum dynamics, where quantumness refers to the noncommutativity between the initial state and the evolving state. In terms of the commutator of the square roots of the initial state and the evolving state, we define a measure to quantify the quantumness-generating capability of quantum dynamics with respect to initial states. Quantumness-generating capability is absent in classical dynamics and hence is a fundamental characteristic of quantum dynamics. For qubit systems, we present an analytical form for this measure, by virtue of which we analyze several prototypical dynamics such as unitary dynamics, phase damping dynamics, amplitude damping dynamics, and random unitary dynamics (Pauli channels). Necessary and sufficient conditions for the monotonicity of quantumness-generating capability are also identified. Finally, we compare these conditions for the monotonicity of quantumness-generating capability with those for various Markovianities and illustrate that quantumness-generating capability and quantum Markovianity are closely related, although they capture different aspects of quantum dynamics.

  6. Quantum entanglement and quantum computational algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The existence of entangled quantum states gives extra power to quantum computers over their classical counterparts. Quantum entanglement shows up qualitatively at the level of two qubits. We demonstrate that the one- and the two-bit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm does not require entanglement and can be mapped ...

  7. What is quantum in quantum randomness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangier, P; Auffèves, A

    2018-07-13

    It is often said that quantum and classical randomness are of different nature, the former being ontological and the latter epistemological. However, so far the question of 'What is quantum in quantum randomness?', i.e. what is the impact of quantization and discreteness on the nature of randomness, remains to be answered. In a first part, we make explicit the differences between quantum and classical randomness within a recently proposed ontology for quantum mechanics based on contextual objectivity. In this view, quantum randomness is the result of contextuality and quantization. We show that this approach strongly impacts the purposes of quantum theory as well as its areas of application. In particular, it challenges current programmes inspired by classical reductionism, aiming at the emergence of the classical world from a large number of quantum systems. In a second part, we analyse quantum physics and thermodynamics as theories of randomness, unveiling their mutual influences. We finally consider new technological applications of quantum randomness that have opened up in the emerging field of quantum thermodynamics.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'Foundations of quantum mechanics and their impact on contemporary society'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  8. Quantum Cybernetics and Complex Quantum Systems Science - A Quantum Connectionist Exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Carlos Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Quantum cybernetics and its connections to complex quantum systems science is addressed from the perspective of complex quantum computing systems. In this way, the notion of an autonomous quantum computing system is introduced in regards to quantum artificial intelligence, and applied to quantum artificial neural networks, considered as autonomous quantum computing systems, which leads to a quantum connectionist framework within quantum cybernetics for complex quantum computing systems. Sever...

  9. Design and analysis of 30 nm T-gate InAlN/GaN HEMT with AlGaN back-barrier for high power microwave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugapandiyan, P.; Ravimaran, S.; William, J.; Meenakshi Sundaram, K.

    2017-11-01

    In this article, we present the DC and microwave characteristics of a novel 30 nm T-gate InAlN/AlN/GaN HEMT with AlGaN back-barrier. The device structure is simulated by using Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD Drift-Diffusion transport model at room temperature. The device features are heavily doped (n++ GaN) source/drain regions with Si3N4 passivated device surface for reducing the contact resistances and gate capacitances of the device, which uplift the microwave characteristics of the HEMTs. 30 nm gate length D-mode (E-mode) HEMT exhibited a peak drain current density Idmax of 2.3 (2.42) A/mm, transconductance gm of 1.24(1.65) S/mm, current gain cut-off frequency ft of 262 (246) GHz, power gain cut-off frequency fmax of 246(290) GHz and the three terminal off-state breakdown voltage VBR of 40(38) V. The preeminent microwave characteristics with the higher breakdown voltage of the proposed GaN-based HEMT are the expected to be the most optimistic applicant for future high power millimeter wave applications.

  10. Static and dynamic characteristics of Lg 50 nm InAlN/AlN/GaN HEMT with AlGaN back-barrier for high power millimeter wave applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Murugapandiyan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel 50 nm recessed T-gate AlN spacer based InAlN/GaN HEMT with AlGaN back-barrier is designed. The static and dynamic characteristics of the proposed device structure are investigated using Synopsys TCAD tool. The remarkable potential device features such as heavily doped source/drain region, Al2O3 passivated device surface helped the device to suppress the parasitic resistances and capacitances of the transistor for enhancing the microwave characteristics. The designed InAlN/GaN HEMT exhibits the sheet carrier density (ns of 1.9 × 1013 cm−2, the drain current density (Ids of 2.1 A/mm, the transconductance (gm of 800 mS/mm, the breakdown voltage (VBR of 40 V, the current gain cut-off frequency (ft of 221 GHz and the power gain cut-off frequency (fmax of 290 GHz. The superior static and dynamic characteristics of obtained InAlN/GaN HEMTs undoubtedly placed the device at the forefront for high power millimeter wave applications.

  11. Quantum teleportation for continuous variables and related quantum information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Akira; Takei, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Quantum teleportation is one of the most important subjects in quantum information science. This is because quantum teleportation can be regarded as not only quantum information transfer but also a building block for universal quantum information processing. Furthermore, deterministic quantum information processing is very important for efficient processing and it can be realized with continuous-variable quantum information processing. In this review, quantum teleportation for continuous variables and related quantum information processing are reviewed from these points of view

  12. Quantum reference frames and quantum transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toller, M.

    1997-01-01

    A quantum frame is defined by a material object following the laws of quantum mechanics. The present paper studies the relations between quantum frames, which are described by some generalization of the Poincare' group. The possibility of using a suitable quantum group is examined, but some arguments are given which show that a different mathematical structure is necessary. Some simple examples in lower-dimensional space-times are treated. They indicate the necessity of taking into account some ''internal'' degrees of freedom of the quantum frames, that can be disregarded in a classical treatment

  13. Equivariant quantum Schubert calculus

    OpenAIRE

    Mihalcea, Leonardo Constantin

    2006-01-01

    We study the T-equivariant quantum cohomology of the Grassmannian. We prove the vanishing of a certain class of equivariant quantum Littlewood-Richardson coefficients, which implies an equivariant quantum Pieri rule. As in the equivariant case, this implies an algorithm to compute the equivariant quantum Littlewood-Richardson coefficients.

  14. Introduction to quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudbery, A.

    1996-01-01

    These pedagogical lectures contain some motivation for the study of quantum groups; a definition of ''quasi triangular Hopf algebra'' with explanations of all the concepts required to build it up; descriptions of quantised universal enveloping algebras and the quantum double; and an account of quantised function algebras and the action of quantum groups on quantum spaces. (author)

  15. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  16. Protein Thermostability Is Owing to Their Preferences to Non-Polar Smaller Volume Amino Acids, Variations in Residual Physico-Chemical Properties and More Salt-Bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panja, Anindya Sundar; Bandopadhyay, Bidyut; Maiti, Smarajit

    2015-01-01

    Protein thermostability is an important field for its evolutionary perspective of mesophilic versus thermophilic relationship and for its industrial/ therapeutic applications. Presently, a total 400 (200 thermophilic and 200 mesophilic homologue) proteins were studied utilizing several software/databases to evaluate their amino acid preferences. Randomly selected 50 homologous proteins with available PDB-structure of each group were explored for the understanding of the protein charges, isoelectric-points, hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity, tyrosine phosphorylation and salt-bridge occurrences. These 100 proteins were further probed to generate Ramachandran plot/data for the gross secondary structure prediction in and comparison between the thermophilic and mesophilic proteins. Present results strongly suggest that nonpolar smaller volume amino acids Ala (χ2 = 238.54, psalt bridges in this study. The average percentage of salt-bridge of thermophiles is found to be higher by 20% than their mesophilic homologue. The GLU-HIS and GLU-LYS salt-bridge dyads are calculated to be significantly higher (psalt-bridges and smaller volume nonpolar residues (Gly, Ala and Val) and lesser occurrence of bulky polar residues in the thermophilic proteins. A more stoichiometric relationship amongst these factors minimized the hindrance due to side chain burial and increased compactness and secondary structural stability in thermophilic proteins.

  17. Comparison of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 growth in polarized genital epithelial cells grown in three-dimensional culture with non-polarized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessus-Babus, Sophie; Moore, Cheryl G; Whittimore, Judy D; Wyrick, Priscilla B

    2008-04-01

    A common model for studying Chlamydia trachomatis and growing chlamydial stocks uses Lymphogranuloma venereum serovar L2 and non-polarized HeLa cells. However, recent publications indicate that the growth rate and progeny yields can vary considerably for a particular strain depending on the cell line/type used, and seem to be partially related to cell tropism. In the present study, the growth of invasive serovar L2 was compared in endometrial HEC-1B and endocervical HeLa cells polarized on collagen-coated microcarrier beads, as well as in HeLa cells grown in tissue culture flasks. Microscopy analysis revealed no difference in chlamydial attachment/entry patterns or in inclusion development throughout the developmental cycle between cell lines. Very comparable growth curves in both cell lines were also found using real-time PCR analysis, with increases in chlamydial DNA content of 400-500-fold between 2 and 36 h post-inoculation. Similar progeny yields with comparable infectivity were recovered from HEC-1B and HeLa cell bead cultures, and no difference in chlamydial growth was found in polarized vs. non-polarized HeLa cells. In conclusion, unlike other C. trachomatis strains such as urogenital serovar E, invasive serovar L2 grows equally well in physiologically different endometrial and endocervical environments, regardless of the host cell polarization state.

  18. Large third-order nonlinearity of nonpolar A-plane GaN film at 800 nm determined by Z-scan technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Han, Xiangyun

    2014-09-01

    We report an investigation on the optical third-order nonlinear property of the nonpolar A-plane GaN film. The film sample with a thickness of ~2 μm was grown on an r-plane sapphire substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition system. By performing the Z-scan method combined with a mode-locked femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (800 nm, 50 fs), the optical nonlinearity of the nonpolar A-plane GaN film was measured with the electric vector E of the laser beam being polarized parallel (//) and perpendicular (⊥) to the c axis of the film. The results show that both the third-order nonlinear absorption coefficient β and the nonlinear refractive index n2 of the sample film possess negative and large values, i.e. β// = -135 ± 29 cm/GW, n2// = -(4.0 ± 0.3) × 10-3 cm2/GW and β⊥ = -234 ± 29 cm/GW, n2⊥ = -(4.9 ± 0.4) × 10-3 cm2/GW, which are much larger than those of conventional C-plane GaN film, GaN bulk, and even the other oxide semiconductors.

  19. Ultrafast, superhigh gain visible-blind UV detector and optical logic gates based on nonpolar a-axial GaN nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingfu; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Xinman; He, Miao; Liu, Chao; Yin, Yian; Zou, Xianshao; Li, Shuti

    2014-09-01

    Nonpolar a-axial GaN nanowire (NW) was first used to construct the MSM (metal-semiconductor-metal) symmetrical Schottky contact device for application as visible-blind ultraviolet (UV) detector. Without any surface or composition modifications, the fabricated device demonstrated a superior performance through a combination of its high sensitivity (up to 104 A W-1) and EQE value (up to 105), as well as ultrafast (memory storage.Nonpolar a-axial GaN nanowire (NW) was first used to construct the MSM (metal-semiconductor-metal) symmetrical Schottky contact device for application as visible-blind ultraviolet (UV) detector. Without any surface or composition modifications, the fabricated device demonstrated a superior performance through a combination of its high sensitivity (up to 104 A W-1) and EQE value (up to 105), as well as ultrafast (memory storage. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the EDS and SAED data, supplementary results of the UV detector, and the discussion of the transport properties of the MSM Schottky contact devices. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03581j

  20. Interfacial B-site atomic configuration in polar (111) and non-polar (001) SrIrO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. J.; Zhou, H.; Xie, L.; Podkaminer, J. P.; Patzner, J. J.; Ryu, S.; Pan, X. Q.; Eom, C. B.

    2017-09-01

    The precise control of interfacial atomic arrangement in ABO3 perovskite heterostructures is paramount, particularly in cases where the subsequent electronic properties of the material exhibit geometrical preferences along polar crystallographic directions that feature inevitably complex surface reconstructions. Here, we present the B-site interfacial structure in polar (111) and non-polar (001) SrIrO3/SrTiO3 interfaces. The heterostructures were examined using scanning transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron-based coherent Bragg rod analysis. Our results reveal the preference of B-site intermixing across the (111) interface due to the polarity-compensated SrTiO3 substrate surface prior to growth. By comparison, the intermixing at the non-polar (001) interface is negligible. This finding suggests that the intermixing may be necessary to mitigate epitaxy along heavily reconstructed and non-stoichiometric (111) perovskite surfaces. Furthermore, this preferential B-site configuration could allow the geometric design of the interfacial perovskite structure and chemistry to selectively engineer the correlated electronic states of the B-site d-orbital.

  1. Interfacial B-site atomic configuration in polar (111 and non-polar (001 SrIrO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Anderson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The precise control of interfacial atomic arrangement in ABO3 perovskite heterostructures is paramount, particularly in cases where the subsequent electronic properties of the material exhibit geometrical preferences along polar crystallographic directions that feature inevitably complex surface reconstructions. Here, we present the B-site interfacial structure in polar (111 and non-polar (001 SrIrO3/SrTiO3 interfaces. The heterostructures were examined using scanning transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron-based coherent Bragg rod analysis. Our results reveal the preference of B-site intermixing across the (111 interface due to the polarity-compensated SrTiO3 substrate surface prior to growth. By comparison, the intermixing at the non-polar (001 interface is negligible. This finding suggests that the intermixing may be necessary to mitigate epitaxy along heavily reconstructed and non-stoichiometric (111 perovskite surfaces. Furthermore, this preferential B-site configuration could allow the geometric design of the interfacial perovskite structure and chemistry to selectively engineer the correlated electronic states of the B-site d-orbital.

  2. Self-planarized quantum-disks nanowires ultraviolet-B emitter utilizing pendeo-epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2017-03-03

    The growth of self-assembled, vertically oriented and uniform nanowires (NWs) has remained a challenge for efficient light-emitting devices. Here, we demonstrate dislocation-free AlGaN NWs with spontaneous coalescence, which are grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on an n-type doped silicon (100) substrate. A high density of NWs (filling factor > 95%) was achieved under optimized growth conditions, enabling device fabrication without planarization using ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing polymer materials. UV-B (280-320 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which emit at ~303 nm with a narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM) (~20 nm) of the emission spectrum, are demonstrated using a large active region (“active region/NW length-ratio” ~ 50%) embedded with 15 stacks of AlxGa1-xN/AlyGa1-yN quantum-disks (Qdisks). To improve the carrier injection, a graded layer is introduced at the AlGaN/GaN interfaces on both p- and n-type regions. This work demonstrates a viable approach to easily fabricate ultra-thin, efficient UV optoelectronic devices on low-cost and scalable silicon substrates.

  3. Relativistic quantum logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittelstaedt, P.

    1983-01-01

    on the basis of the well-known quantum logic and quantum probability a formal language of relativistic quantum physics is developed. This language incorporates quantum logical as well as relativistic restrictions. It is shown that relativity imposes serious restrictions on the validity regions of propositions in space-time. By an additional postulate this relativistic quantum logic can be made consistent. The results of this paper are derived exclusively within the formal quantum language; they are, however, in accordance with well-known facts of relativistic quantum physics in Hilbert space. (author)

  4. Quaternionic quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the author describes a new kind of quantum mechanics or quantum field theory based on quaternions. Quaternionic quantum mechanics has a Schrodinger equation, a Dirac transformation theory, and a functional integral. Quaternionic quantum mechanics does not seem to have (except in the complex quantum mechanics specialization): A correspondence principle, and beyond this a commuting tensor product, asymptotic states, an S-matrix, a canonical formalism, coherent states or a Euclidean continuation. A new kind of quantum mechanics exists. There are many interesting formal questions to study, which should enable one to decide whether quaternionic quantum field theory is relevant for particle physics

  5. Coherent quantum logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, D.

    1987-01-01

    The von Neumann quantum logic lacks two basic symmetries of classical logic, that between sets and classes, and that between lower and higher order predicates. Similarly, the structural parallel between the set algebra and linear algebra of Grassmann and Peano was left incomplete by them in two respects. In this work a linear algebra is constructed that completes this correspondence and is interpreted as a new quantum logic that restores these invariances, and as a quantum set theory. It applies to experiments with coherent quantum phase relations between the quantum and the apparatus. The quantum set theory is applied to model a Lorentz-invariant quantum time-space complex

  6. Quantum Information Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Leuchs, Gerd

    2005-01-01

    Quantum processing and communication is emerging as a challenging technique at the beginning of the new millennium. This is an up-to-date insight into the current research of quantum superposition, entanglement, and the quantum measurement process - the key ingredients of quantum information processing. The authors further address quantum protocols and algorithms. Complementary to similar programmes in other countries and at the European level, the German Research Foundation (DFG) started a focused research program on quantum information in 1999. The contributions - written by leading experts - bring together the latest results in quantum information as well as addressing all the relevant questions

  7. Intrinsic quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crutchfield, James P.; Wiesner, Karoline

    2008-01-01

    We introduce ways to measure information storage in quantum systems, using a recently introduced computation-theoretic model that accounts for measurement effects. The first, the quantum excess entropy, quantifies the shared information between a quantum process's past and its future. The second, the quantum transient information, determines the difficulty with which an observer comes to know the internal state of a quantum process through measurements. We contrast these with von Neumann entropy and quantum entropy rate and provide a closed-form expression for the latter for the class of deterministic quantum processes

  8. Quantum Chess: Making Quantum Phenomena Accessible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Christopher

    Quantum phenomena have remained largely inaccessible to the general public. There tends to be a scare factor associated with the word ``Quantum''. This is in large part due to the alien nature of phenomena such as superposition and entanglement. However, Quantum Computing is a very active area of research and one day we will have games that run on those quantum computers. Quantum phenomena such as superposition and entanglement will seem as normal as gravity. Is it possible to create such games today? Can we make games that are built on top of a realistic quantum simulation and introduce players of any background to quantum concepts in a fun and mentally stimulating way? One of the difficulties with any quantum simulation run on a classical computer is that the Hilbert space grows exponentially, making simulations of an appreciable size physically impossible due largely to memory restrictions. Here we will discuss the conception and development of Quantum Chess, and how to overcome some of the difficulties faced. We can then ask the question, ``What's next?'' What are some of the difficulties Quantum Chess still faces, and what is the future of quantum games?

  9. Efficient quantum circuits for Szegedy quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loke, T.; Wang, J.B.

    2017-01-01

    A major advantage in using Szegedy’s formalism over discrete-time and continuous-time quantum walks lies in its ability to define a unitary quantum walk by quantizing a Markov chain on a directed or weighted graph. In this paper, we present a general scheme to construct efficient quantum circuits for Szegedy quantum walks that correspond to classical Markov chains possessing transformational symmetry in the columns of the transition matrix. In particular, the transformational symmetry criteria do not necessarily depend on the sparsity of the transition matrix, so this scheme can be applied to non-sparse Markov chains. Two classes of Markov chains that are amenable to this construction are cyclic permutations and complete bipartite graphs, for which we provide explicit efficient quantum circuit implementations. We also prove that our scheme can be applied to Markov chains formed by a tensor product. We also briefly discuss the implementation of Markov chains based on weighted interdependent networks. In addition, we apply this scheme to construct efficient quantum circuits simulating the Szegedy walks used in the quantum Pagerank algorithm for some classes of non-trivial graphs, providing a necessary tool for experimental demonstration of the quantum Pagerank algorithm. - Highlights: • A general theoretical framework for implementing Szegedy walks using quantum circuits. • Explicit efficient quantum circuit implementation of the Szegedy walk for several classes of graphs. • Efficient implementation of Szegedy walks for quantum page-ranking of a certain class of graphs.

  10. Introduction to topological quantum matter & quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Stanescu, Tudor D

    2017-01-01

    What is -topological- about topological quantum states? How many types of topological quantum phases are there? What is a zero-energy Majorana mode, how can it be realized in a solid state system, and how can it be used as a platform for topological quantum computation? What is quantum computation and what makes it different from classical computation? Addressing these and other related questions, Introduction to Topological Quantum Matter & Quantum Computation provides an introduction to and a synthesis of a fascinating and rapidly expanding research field emerging at the crossroads of condensed matter physics, mathematics, and computer science. Providing the big picture, this book is ideal for graduate students and researchers entering this field as it allows for the fruitful transfer of paradigms and ideas amongst different areas, and includes many specific examples to help the reader understand abstract and sometimes challenging concepts. It explores the topological quantum world beyond the well-know...

  11. Universal quantum computation by discontinuous quantum walk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, Michael S.; Feder, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum walks are the quantum-mechanical analog of random walks, in which a quantum ''walker'' evolves between initial and final states by traversing the edges of a graph, either in discrete steps from node to node or via continuous evolution under the Hamiltonian furnished by the adjacency matrix of the graph. We present a hybrid scheme for universal quantum computation in which a quantum walker takes discrete steps of continuous evolution. This ''discontinuous'' quantum walk employs perfect quantum-state transfer between two nodes of specific subgraphs chosen to implement a universal gate set, thereby ensuring unitary evolution without requiring the introduction of an ancillary coin space. The run time is linear in the number of simulated qubits and gates. The scheme allows multiple runs of the algorithm to be executed almost simultaneously by starting walkers one time step apart.

  12. Quantum quincunx in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, Barry C.; Bartlett, Stephen D.; Tregenna, Ben; Knight, Peter L.

    2003-01-01

    We introduce the quantum quincunx, which physically demonstrates the quantum walk and is analogous to Galton's quincunx for demonstrating the random walk by employing gravity to draw pellets through pegs on a board, thereby yielding a binomial distribution of final peg locations. In contradistinction to the theoretical studies of quantum walks over orthogonal lattice states, we introduce quantum walks over nonorthogonal lattice states (specifically, coherent states on a circle) to demonstrate that the key features of a quantum walk are observable albeit for strict parameter ranges. A quantum quincunx may be realized with current cavity quantum electrodynamics capabilities, and precise control over decoherence in such experiments allows a remarkable decrease in the position noise, or spread, with increasing decoherence

  13. Quantum engineering of continuous variable quantum states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabuncu, Metin

    2009-01-01

    Quantum information with continuous variables is a field attracting increasing attention recently. In continuous variable quantum information one makes use of the continuous information encoded into the quadrature of a quantized light field instead of binary quantities such as the polarization state of a single photon. This brand new research area is witnessing exciting theoretical and experimental achievements such as teleportation, quantum computation and quantum error correction. The rapid development of the field is mainly due higher optical data rates and the availability of simple and efficient manipulation tools in continuous-variable quantum information processing. We in this thesis extend the work in continuous variable quantum information processing and report on novel experiments on amplification, cloning, minimal disturbance and noise erasure protocols. The promising results we obtain in these pioneering experiments indicate that the future of continuous variable quantum information is bright and many advances can be foreseen. (orig.)

  14. Quantum signatures of chaos or quantum chaos?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunakov, V. E., E-mail: bunakov@VB13190.spb.edu [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    A critical analysis of the present-day concept of chaos in quantum systems as nothing but a “quantum signature” of chaos in classical mechanics is given. In contrast to the existing semi-intuitive guesses, a definition of classical and quantum chaos is proposed on the basis of the Liouville–Arnold theorem: a quantum chaotic system featuring N degrees of freedom should have M < N independent first integrals of motion (good quantum numbers) specified by the symmetry of the Hamiltonian of the system. Quantitative measures of quantum chaos that, in the classical limit, go over to the Lyapunov exponent and the classical stability parameter are proposed. The proposed criteria of quantum chaos are applied to solving standard problems of modern dynamical chaos theory.

  15. Quantum engineering of continuous variable quantum states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabuncu, Metin

    2009-10-29

    Quantum information with continuous variables is a field attracting increasing attention recently. In continuous variable quantum information one makes use of the continuous information encoded into the quadrature of a quantized light field instead of binary quantities such as the polarization state of a single photon. This brand new research area is witnessing exciting theoretical and experimental achievements such as teleportation, quantum computation and quantum error correction. The rapid development of the field is mainly due higher optical data rates and the availability of simple and efficient manipulation tools in continuous-variable quantum information processing. We in this thesis extend the work in continuous variable quantum information processing and report on novel experiments on amplification, cloning, minimal disturbance and noise erasure protocols. The promising results we obtain in these pioneering experiments indicate that the future of continuous variable quantum information is bright and many advances can be foreseen. (orig.)

  16. Quantum signatures of chaos or quantum chaos?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunakov, V. E.

    2016-01-01

    A critical analysis of the present-day concept of chaos in quantum systems as nothing but a “quantum signature” of chaos in classical mechanics is given. In contrast to the existing semi-intuitive guesses, a definition of classical and quantum chaos is proposed on the basis of the Liouville–Arnold theorem: a quantum chaotic system featuring N degrees of freedom should have M < N independent first integrals of motion (good quantum numbers) specified by the symmetry of the Hamiltonian of the system. Quantitative measures of quantum chaos that, in the classical limit, go over to the Lyapunov exponent and the classical stability parameter are proposed. The proposed criteria of quantum chaos are applied to solving standard problems of modern dynamical chaos theory.

  17. Quantum mechanics symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, Walter

    1989-01-01

    "Quantum Dynamics" is a major survey of quantum theory based on Walter Greiner's long-running and highly successful courses at the University of Frankfurt. The key to understanding in quantum theory is to reinforce lecture attendance and textual study by working through plenty of representative and detailed examples. Firm belief in this principle led Greiner to develop his unique course and to transform it into a remarkable and comprehensive text. The text features a large number of examples and exercises involving many of the most advanced topics in quantum theory. These examples give practical and precise demonstrations of how to use the often subtle mathematics behind quantum theory. The text is divided into five volumes: Quantum Mechanics I - An Introduction, Quantum Mechanics II - Symmetries, Relativistic Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Electrodynamics, Gauge Theory of Weak Interactions. These five volumes take the reader from the fundamental postulates of quantum mechanics up to the latest research in partic...

  18. Quantum chimera states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viennot, David, E-mail: david.viennot@utinam.cnrs.fr; Aubourg, Lucile

    2016-02-15

    We study a theoretical model of closed quasi-hermitian chain of spins which exhibits quantum analogues of chimera states, i.e. long life classical states for which a part of an oscillator chain presents an ordered dynamics whereas another part presents a disordered dynamics. For the quantum analogue, the chimera behaviour deals with the entanglement between the spins of the chain. We discuss the entanglement properties, quantum chaos, quantum disorder and semi-classical similarity of our quantum chimera system. The quantum chimera concept is novel and induces new perspectives concerning the entanglement of multipartite systems. - Highlights: • We propose a spin chain model with long range couplings having purely quantum states similar to the classical chimera states. • The quantum chimera states are characterized by the coexistence of strongly entangled and non-entangled spins in the same chain. • The quantum chimera states present some characteristics of quantum chaos.

  19. Quantum chimera states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viennot, David; Aubourg, Lucile

    2016-01-01

    We study a theoretical model of closed quasi-hermitian chain of spins which exhibits quantum analogues of chimera states, i.e. long life classical states for which a part of an oscillator chain presents an ordered dynamics whereas another part presents a disordered dynamics. For the quantum analogue, the chimera behaviour deals with the entanglement between the spins of the chain. We discuss the entanglement properties, quantum chaos, quantum disorder and semi-classical similarity of our quantum chimera system. The quantum chimera concept is novel and induces new perspectives concerning the entanglement of multipartite systems. - Highlights: • We propose a spin chain model with long range couplings having purely quantum states similar to the classical chimera states. • The quantum chimera states are characterized by the coexistence of strongly entangled and non-entangled spins in the same chain. • The quantum chimera states present some characteristics of quantum chaos.

  20. Quantum key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard John; Thrasher, James Thomas; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth

    2016-11-29

    Innovations for quantum key management harness quantum communications to form a cryptography system within a public key infrastructure framework. In example implementations, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a Merkle signature scheme (using Winternitz one-time digital signatures or other one-time digital signatures, and Merkle hash trees) to constitute a cryptography system. More generally, the quantum key management innovations combine quantum key distribution and a quantum identification protocol with a hash-based signature scheme. This provides a secure way to identify, authenticate, verify, and exchange secret cryptographic keys. Features of the quantum key management innovations further include secure enrollment of users with a registration authority, as well as credential checking and revocation with a certificate authority, where the registration authority and/or certificate authority can be part of the same system as a trusted authority for quantum key distribution.