WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonpetroleum based fuels

  1. Green Aerospace Fuels from Nonpetroleum Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Kulis, Michael J.; DeLaRee, Ana B.; Zubrin, Robert; Berggren, Mark; Hensel, Joseph D.; Kimble, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to produce green aerospace propellants from nonpetroleum sources are outlined. The paper begins with an overview of feedstock processing and relevant small molecule or C1 chemistry. Gas-to-liquid technologies, notably Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processing of synthesis gas (CO and H2), are being optimized to enhance the fraction of product stream relevant to aviation (and other transportation) fuels at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Efforts to produce optimized catalysts are described. Given the high cost of space launch, the recycling of human metabolic and plastic wastes to reduce the need to transport consumables to orbit to support the crew of a space station has long been recognized as a high priority. If the much larger costs of transporting consumables to the Moon or beyond are taken into account, the importance of developing waste recycling systems becomes still more imperative. One promising way to transform organic waste products into useful gases is steam reformation; this well-known technology is currently being optimized by a Colorado company for exploration and planetary surface operations. Reduction of terrestrial waste streams while producing energy and/or valuable raw materials is an opportunity being realized by a new generation of visionary entrepreneurs. A technology that has successfully demonstrated production of fuels and related chemicals from waste plastics developed in Northeast Ohio is described. Technologies being developed by a Massachusetts company to remove sulfur impurities are highlighted. Common issues and concerns for nonpetroleum fuel production are emphasized. Energy utilization is a concern for production of fuels whether a terrestrial operation or on the lunar (or Martian) surface; the term green relates to not only mitigating excess carbon release but also to the efficiency of grid-energy usage. For space exploration, energy efficiency can be an essential concern. Other issues of great concern include minimizing

  2. Aerospace Fuels From Nonpetroleum Raw Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Kulis, Michael J.; Jaworske, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Recycling human metabolic and plastic wastes minimizes cost and increases efficiency by reducing the need to transport consumables and return trash, respectively, from orbit to support a space station crew. If the much larger costs of transporting consumables to the Moon and beyond are taken into account, developing waste recycling technologies becomes imperative and possibly mission enabling. Reduction of terrestrial waste streams while producing energy and/or valuable raw materials is an opportunity being realized by a new generation of visionary entrepreneurs; several relevant technologies are briefly compared, contrasted and assessed for space applications. A two-step approach to nonpetroleum raw materials utilization is presented; the first step involves production of supply or producer gas. This is akin to synthesis gas containing carbon oxides, hydrogen, and simple hydrocarbons. The second step involves production of fuel via the Sabatier process, a methanation reaction, or another gas-to-liquid technology, typically Fischer-Tropsch processing. Optimization to enhance the fraction of product stream relevant to transportation fuels via catalytic (process) development at NASA Glenn Research Center is described. Energy utilization is a concern for production of fuels whether for operation on the lunar or Martian surface, or beyond. The term green relates to not only mitigating excess carbon release but also to the efficiency of energy usage. For space, energy usage can be an essential concern. Another issue of great concern is minimizing impurities in the product stream(s), especially those that are potential health risks and/or could degrade operations through catalyst poisoning or equipment damage; technologies being developed to remove heteroatom impurities are discussed. Alternative technologies to utilize waste fluids, such as a propulsion option called the resistojet, are discussed. The resistojet is an electric propulsion technology with a powered

  3. Impact of non-petroleum vehicle fuel economy on GHG mitigation potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, Jason M; Saville, Bradley A; MacLean, Heather L

    2016-01-01

    The fuel economy of gasoline vehicles will increase to meet 2025 corporate average fuel economy standards (CAFE). However, dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) and battery electric vehicles (BEV) already exceed future CAFE fuel economy targets because only 15% of non-petroleum energy use is accounted for when determining compliance. This study aims to inform stakeholders about the potential impact of CAFE on life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, should non-petroleum fuel vehicles displace increasingly fuel efficient petroleum vehicles. The well-to-wheel GHG emissions of a set of hypothetical model year 2025 light-duty vehicles are estimated. A reference gasoline vehicle is designed to meet the 2025 fuel economy target within CAFE, and is compared to a set of dedicated CNG vehicles and BEVs with different fuel economy ratings, but all vehicles meet or exceed the fuel economy target due to the policy’s dedicated non-petroleum fuel vehicle incentives. Ownership costs and BEV driving ranges are estimated to provide context, as these can influence automaker and consumer decisions. The results show that CNG vehicles that have lower ownership costs than gasoline vehicles and BEVs with long distance driving ranges can exceed the 2025 CAFE fuel economy target. However, this could lead to lower efficiency CNG vehicles and heavier BEVs that have higher well-to-wheel GHG emissions than gasoline vehicles on a per km basis, even if the non-petroleum energy source is less carbon intensive on an energy equivalent basis. These changes could influence the effectiveness of low carbon fuel standards and are not precluded by the light-duty vehicle GHG emissions standards, which regulate tailpipe but not fuel production emissions. (letter)

  4. Non-Petroleum Oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    These include synthetics such as silicone fluids and tung oils, wood-derivative oils such as resin/rosin, animal fats/oil, and seed oils. Many have similar physical properties to petroleum-based, such as water insolubility and formation of slicks.

  5. Multi-scale sustainability assessments for biomass-based and coal-based fuels in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yi; Xiao, Honghua; Cai, Wei; Yang, Siyu

    2017-12-01

    Transportation liquid fuels production is heavily depend on oil. In recent years, developing biomass based and coal based fuels are regarded as promising alternatives for non-petroleum based fuels in China. With the rapid growth of constructing and planning b biomass based and coal based fuels production projects, sustainability assessments are needed to simultaneously consider the resource, the economic, and the environmental factors. This paper performs multi-scale analyses on the biomass based and coal based fuels in China. The production cost, life cycle cost, and ecological life cycle cost (ELCC) of these synfuels are investigated to compare their pros to cons and reveal the sustainability. The results show that BTL fuels has high production cost. It lacks of economic attractiveness. However, insignificant resource cost and environmental cost lead to a substantially lower ELCC, which may indicate better ecological sustainability. CTL fuels, on the contrary, is lower in production cost and reliable for economic benefit. But its coal consumption and pollutant emissions are both serious, leading to overwhelming resource cost and environmental cost. A shifting from petroleum to CTL fuels could double the ELCC, posing great threat to the sustainability of the entire fuels industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Alternative Fuels in Transportation : Workforce needs and opportunities in support of reducing reliance on petroleum fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    An overreliance on foreign oil and the negative impacts of using petroleum fuels on the worlds climate have prompted energy policies that support the diversification of transport fuels and aggressive work to transition to non-petroleum options. Th...

  7. Analysis of petroleum company investments in nonpetroleum energy sources. Book I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, P. Jr.; Ryan, T.C.

    1979-12-12

    The purpose of this report is to analyze the investment strategies of US oil companies and the depth of their present and future investments in nonpetroleum energy sources. For purposes of this study, the nonpetroleum energy sources to be discussed are coal, uranium/nuclear, synthetics from coal, oil shale, geothermal, and solar. To gather necessary subjective data, the authors interviewed the managements of more than forty companies, the majority of which are directly involved in the production of various forms of energy. Others are substantial energy users. Interviews were also held with various federal and state regulatory agencies, with federal legislative groups, and with representatives of industry associations. These interviews were not intended to be a survey; their purpose was rather to explore the perceptions of petroleum company managements concerning nonpetroleum energy sources and the reasons for their company's participation, or lack of participation, in the development of these resources. Quantitative data came from reports prepared by federal investigative and regulatory agencies, from testimony given before investigative and regulatory bodies, from public company reports (annual reports, quarterly reports, 10-K's, 8-K's, registration statements, press releases, etc.), from industry, research and investment organizations, from universities, and from a variety of publications.

  8. Fuel cycle based safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Montmollin, J.M.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Gupta, D.

    1985-07-01

    In NPT safeguards the same model approach and absolute-quantity inspection goals are applied at present to all similar facilities, irrespective of the State's fuel cycle. There is a continuing interest and activity on the part of the IAEA in new NPT safeguards approaches that more directly address a State's nuclear activities as a whole. This fuel cycle based safeguards system is expected to a) provide a statement of findings for the entire State rather than only for individual facilities; b) allocate inspection efforts so as to reflect more realistically the different categories of nuclear materials in the different parts of the fuel cycle and c) provide more timely and better coordinated information on the inputs, outputs and inventories of nuclear materials in a State. (orig./RF) [de

  9. Developing fossil fuel based technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzoori, A.R.; Lindner, E.R.

    1991-01-01

    Some of the undesirable effects of burning fossil fuels in the conventional power generating systems have resulted in increasing demand for alternative technologies for power generation. This paper describes a number of new technologies and their potential to reduce the level of atmospheric emissions associated with coal based power generation, such as atmospheric and pressurized fluid bed combustion systems and fuel cells. The status of their development is given and their efficiency is compared with that of conventional pc fired power plants. 1 tab., 7 figs

  10. Carbon-based Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven S. C. Chuang

    2005-08-31

    The direct use of coal in the solid oxide fuel cell to generate electricity is an innovative concept for power generation. The C-fuel cell (carbon-based fuel cell) could offer significant advantages: (1) minimization of NOx emissions due to its operating temperature range of 700-1000 C, (2) high overall efficiency because of the direct conversion of coal to CO{sub 2}, and (3) the production of a nearly pure CO{sub 2} exhaust stream for the direct CO{sub 2} sequestration. The objective of this project is to determine the technical feasibility of using a highly active anode catalyst in a solid oxide fuel for the direct electrochemical oxidation of coal to produce electricity. Results of this study showed that the electric power generation from Ohio No 5 coal (Lower Kittanning) Seam, Mahoning County, is higher than those of coal gas and pure methane on a solid oxide fuel cell assembly with a promoted metal anode catalyst at 950 C. Further study is needed to test the long term activity, selectivity, and stability of anode catalysts.

  11. Energy conservation in ethanol production from renewable resources and non-petroleum energy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    The dry milling process for the conversion of grain to fuel ethanol is reviewed for the application of energy conservation technology, which will reduce the energy consumption to 70,000 Btu per gallon, a reduction of 42% from a distilled spirits process. Specific energy conservation technology applications are outlined and guidelines for the owner/engineer for fuel ethanol plants to consider in the selection on the basis of energy conservation economics of processing steps and equipment are provided. The process was divided into 5 sections and the energy consumed in each step was determined based on 3 sets of conditions; a conventional distilled spirits process; a modern process incorporating commercially proven energy conservation; and a second generation process incorporating advanced conservation technologies which have not yet been proven. Steps discussed are mash preparation and cooking, fermentation, distillation, and distillers dried grains processing. The economics of cogeneration of electricity on fuel ethanol plants is also studied. (MCW)

  12. Isoprenoid based alternative diesel fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek Soon; Peralta-Yahya, Pamela; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-08-18

    Fuel compositions are provided comprising a hydrogenation product of a monocyclic sesquiterpene (e.g., hydrogenated bisabolene) and a fuel additive. Methods of making and using the fuel compositions are also disclosed. ##STR00001##

  13. 40 CFR 79.55 - Base fuel specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Base fuel specifications. 79.55... (CONTINUED) REGISTRATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Testing Requirements for Registration § 79.55 Base fuel specifications. (a) General Characteristics. (1) The base fuel(s) in each fuel family shall serve as the group...

  14. Innovative nuclear system based on liquid fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpech, S.; Jaskierowicz, S.; Picard, G.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Heuer, D.; Doligez, X.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the physical properties and characteristics of the innovative concept of Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) developed by CNRS (France) and the corresponding fuel salt reprocessing proposed to clean up the fuel salt based on an analytical approach of lanthanides and actinides extraction. (author)

  15. Characterization and supply of coal based fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    Studies and data applicable for fuel markets and coal resource assessments were reviewed and evaluated to provide both guidelines and specifications for premium quality coal-based fuels. The fuels supplied under this contract were provided for testing of advanced combustors being developed under Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) sponsorship for use in the residential, commercial and light industrial (RCLI) market sectors. The requirements of the combustor development contractors were surveyed and periodically updated to satisfy the evolving needs based on design and test experience. Available coals were screened and candidate coals were selected for further detailed characterization and preparation for delivery. A team of participants was assembled to provide fuels in both coal-water fuel (CWF) and dry ultrafine coal (DUC) forms. Information about major US coal fields was correlated with market needs analysis. Coal fields with major reserves of low sulfur coal that could be potentially amenable to premium coal-based fuels specifications were identified. The fuels requirements were focused in terms of market, equipment and resource constraints. With this basis, the coals selected for developmental testing satisfy the most stringent fuel requirements and utilize available current deep-cleaning capabilities.

  16. Review of alternative fuels data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsha, P. T.; Edelman, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    Based on an analysis of the interaction of fuel physical and chemical properties with combustion characteristics and indicators, a ranking of the importance of various fuel properties with respect to the combustion process was established. This ranking was used to define a suite of specific experiments whose objective is the development of an alternative fuels design data base. Combustion characteristics and indicators examined include droplet and spray formation, droplet vaporization and burning, ignition and flame stabilization, flame temperature, laminar flame speed, combustion completion, soot emissions, NOx and SOx emissions, and the fuels' thermal and oxidative stability and fouling and corrosion characteristics. Key fuel property data is found to include composition, thermochemical data, chemical kinetic rate information, and certain physical properties.

  17. Nitride fuels irradiation performance data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brozak, D.E.; Thomas, J.K.; Peddicord, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    An irradiation performance data base for nitride fuels has been developed from an extensive literature search and review that emphasized uranium nitride, but also included performance data for mixed nitrides [(U,Pu)N] and carbonitrides [(U,Pu)C,N] to increase the quantity and depth of pin data available. This work represents a very extensive effort to systematically collect and organize irradiation data for nitride-based fuels. The data base has many potential applications. First, it can facilitate parametric studies of nitride-based fuels to be performed using a wide range of pin designs and operating conditions. This should aid in the identification of important parameters and design requirements for multimegawatt and SP-100 fuel systems. Secondly, the data base can be used to evaluate fuel performance models. For detailed studies, it can serve as a guide to selecting a small group of pin specimens for extensive characterization. Finally, the data base will serve as an easily accessible and expandable source of irradiation performance information for nitride fuels

  18. Novel Fuel Cells for Coal Based Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Tao

    2011-12-31

    The goal of this project was to acquire experimental data required to assess the feasibility of a Direct Coal power plant based upon an Electrochemical Looping (ECL) of Liquid Tin Anode Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LTA-SOFC). The objective of Phase 1 was to experimentally characterize the interaction between the tin anode, coal fuel and cell component electrolyte, the fate of coal contaminants in a molten tin reactor (via chemistry) and their impact upon the YSZ electrolyte (via electrochemistry). The results of this work will provided the basis for further study in Phase 2. The objective of Phase 2 was to extend the study of coal impurities impact on fuel cell components other than electrolyte, more specifically to the anode current collector which is made of an electrically conducting ceramic jacket and broad based coal tin reduction. This work provided a basic proof-of-concept feasibility demonstration of the direct coal concept.

  19. Feasibility study on AFR-100 fuel conversion from uranium-based fuel to thorium-based fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidet, F.; Kim, T.; Grandy, C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-07-30

    Although thorium has long been considered as an alternative to uranium-based fuels, most of the reactors built to-date have been fueled with uranium-based fuel with the exception of a few reactors. The decision to use uranium-based fuels was initially made based on the technology maturity compared to thorium-based fuels. As a result of this experience, lot of knowledge and data have been accumulated for uranium-based fuels that made it the predominant nuclear fuel type for extant nuclear power. However, following the recent concerns about the extent and availability of uranium resources, thorium-based fuels have regained significant interest worldwide. Thorium is more abundant than uranium and can be readily exploited in many countries and thus is now seen as a possible alternative. As thorium-based fuel technologies mature, fuel conversion from uranium to thorium is expected to become a major interest in both thermal and fast reactors. In this study the feasibility of fuel conversion in a fast reactor is assessed and several possible approaches are proposed. The analyses are performed using the Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR-100) design, a fast reactor core concept recently developed by ANL. The AFR-100 is a small 100 MW{sub e} reactor developed under the US-DOE program relying on innovative fast reactor technologies and advanced structural and cladding materials. It was designed to be inherently safe and offers sufficient margins with respect to the fuel melting temperature and the fuel-cladding eutectic temperature when using U-10Zr binary metal fuel. Thorium-based metal fuel was preferred to other thorium fuel forms because of its higher heavy metal density and it does not need to be alloyed with zirconium to reduce its radiation swelling. The various approaches explored cover the use of pure thorium fuel as well as the use of thorium mixed with transuranics (TRU). Sensitivity studies were performed for the different scenarios envisioned in order to determine the

  20. Triacylglycerol-based fuels: An evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variety of feedstocks exist and several processes have been developed to produce alternative diesel fuels from triacylglycerol-based materials, such as plant and algal oils as well as animal fats and used cooking oils. Biodiesel is obtained by transesterifying a triacylglycerol feedstock with an a...

  1. Evaluation of thorium based nuclear fuel. Chemical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konings, R.J.M.; Blankenvoorde, P.J.A.M.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.; Bakker, K.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes the chemical aspects of a thorium-based fuel cycle. It is part of a series devoted to the study of thorium-based fuel as a means to achieve a considerable reduction of the radiotoxicity of the waste from nuclear power production. Therefore special emphasis is placed on fuel (re-)fabrication and fuel reprocessing in the present work. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of thorium based nuclear fuel. Chemical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konings, R.J.M.; Blankenvoorde, P.J.A.M.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.; Bakker, K.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes the chemical aspects of a thorium-based fuel cycle. It is part of a series devoted to the study of thorium-based fuel as a means to achieve a considerable reduction of the radiotoxicity of the waste from nuclear power production. Therefore special emphasis is placed on fuel (re-)fabrication and fuel reprocessing in the present work. (orig.).

  3. Silicon Based Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jackie Vincent

    The purpose of this project has been to investigate and fabricate small scale Micro Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (μDMFC). They are investigated as a possible alternative for Zinc-air batteries in small size consumer devices such as hearing aids. In such devices the conventional rechargeable batteries...... such as lithium-ion batteries have insufficiently low energy density. Methanol is a promising fuel for such devices due to the high energy density and ease of refueling compared to charging batteries, making μDMFC a suitable replacement energy source. In this Ph.D. dissertation, silicon micro fabrication...... techniques where utilized to build μDMFCs with the purpose of engineering the structures, both on the micro and nano scales in order to realize a high level of control over the membrane and catalyst components. The work presents four different monolithic fuel cell designs. The primary design is based...

  4. Carbon-based Fuel Cell. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steven S. C. Chuang

    2005-01-01

    The direct use of coal in the solid oxide fuel cell to generate electricity is an innovative concept for power generation. The C-fuel cell (carbon-based fuel cell) could offer significant advantages: (1) minimization of NOx emissions due to its operating temperature range of 700-1000 C, (2) high overall efficiency because of the direct conversion of coal to CO 2 , and (3) the production of a nearly pure CO 2 exhaust stream for the direct CO 2 sequestration. The objective of this project is to determine the technical feasibility of using a highly active anode catalyst in a solid oxide fuel for the direct electrochemical oxidation of coal to produce electricity. Results of this study showed that the electric power generation from Ohio No 5 coal (Lower Kittanning) Seam, Mahoning County, is higher than those of coal gas and pure methane on a solid oxide fuel cell assembly with a promoted metal anode catalyst at 950 C. Further study is needed to test the long term activity, selectivity, and stability of anode catalysts

  5. Device with pivoting base for the storage of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    A storage rack for nuclear fuel assemblies comprising lower and upper bearers to support and hold fuel assemblies in their vertical position is described. The feature of this rack is the lower supporting device which comprises a pivoting base on which rests each fuel assembly, thereby enabling the fuel assembly not be subjected to any fatigue during storage [fr

  6. Jet Fuel Based High Pressure Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummalla, Mallika (Inventor); Yamanis, Jean (Inventor); Olsommer, Benoit (Inventor); Dardas, Zissis (Inventor); Bayt, Robert (Inventor); Srinivasan, Hari (Inventor); Dasgupta, Arindam (Inventor); Hardin, Larry (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A power system for an aircraft includes a solid oxide fuel cell system which generates electric power for the aircraft and an exhaust stream; and a heat exchanger for transferring heat from the exhaust stream of the solid oxide fuel cell to a heat requiring system or component of the aircraft. The heat can be transferred to fuel for the primary engine of the aircraft. Further, the same fuel can be used to power both the primary engine and the SOFC. A heat exchanger is positioned to cool reformate before feeding to the fuel cell. SOFC exhaust is treated and used as inerting gas. Finally, oxidant to the SOFC can be obtained from the aircraft cabin, or exterior, or both.

  7. MEMS-based fuel cells with integrated catalytic fuel processor and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Alan F [Livermore, CA; Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Havstad, Mark A [Davis, CA

    2011-08-09

    Described herein is a means to incorporate catalytic materials into the fuel flow field structures of MEMS-based fuel cells, which enable catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbon based fuel, such as methane, methanol, or butane. Methods of fabrication are also disclosed.

  8. Effects of Fuel Quantity on Soot Formation Process for Biomass-Based Renewable Diesel Fuel Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei; Wu, Zengyang; Roberts, William L.; Fang, Tiegang

    2016-01-01

    Soot formation process was investigated for biomass-based renewable diesel fuel, such as biomass to liquid (BTL), and conventional diesel combustion under varied fuel quantities injected into a constant volume combustion chamber. Soot measurement

  9. Fuel saver based on electromagnetic induction for automotive engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, Houtman P.; Sibarani, Maradu

    2007-12-01

    In the considered research is designed and analyzed the performance of the fuel saver which is based on electromagnetic induction for automotive diesel engine. The fuel saver which is based on permanent magnet has sold in market and its performance has tested. In comparison to the former fuel saver, in the proposed work is produced fuel saver which is based on electromagnetic induction. The considered research is the continuation of my former work. Performance of the produced fuel saver which is installed in the fuel line of internal combustion engine rig is compared to the performance of the standard internal combustion engine rig Speed of the engine, wire diameter of coil, and number of coil which is coiled in the winding of the the fuel saver are chosen as the testing variables. The considered research has succeeded to design the fuel saver which is based on electromagnetic induction for saving the automotive fuel consumption. Results of the research show that the addition of the fuel saver which is based on electromagnetic induction to the flow of the diesel fuel can significantly save the automative fuel consumption. In addition the designed fuel saver can reduce the opacity of the emission gas.

  10. Characterization and supply of coal-based fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-06-01

    Contract objectives are as follows: Develop fuel specifications to serve combustor requirements. Select coals having appropriate compositional and quality characteristics as well as an economically attractive reserve base; Provide quality assurance for both the parent coals and the fuel forms; and deliver premium coal-based fuels to combustor developers as needed for their contract work. Progress is discussed, particulary in slurry fuel preparation and particle size distribution.

  11. Neutronics assessment of thorium-based fuel assembly in SCWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shichang; Cai, Jiejin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel thorium-based fuel assembly for SCWR has been introduced and investigated. • Neutronic properties of three thorium fuels have been studied, compared with UO 2 fuel. • The thorium-based fuel has advantages on fuel utilization and lower MAs generation. -- Abstract: Aiming to take advantage of neutron spectrum of SCWR, a novel thorium-based fuel assembly for SCWR is introduced in this paper. The neutronic characteristics of the introduced fuel assembly with three different thorium fuel types have been investigated using the “dragon” codes. The parameters in different working conditions, such as infinite multiplication factors, radial power peaking factor, temperature coefficient of reactivity and their relation with the operation period have been assessed by comparing with conventional uranium assembly. Moreover, the moderator-to-fuel ratio (MFR) was changed in order to investigate its influence on the neutronic characteristics of fuel assembly. Results show that the thorium-based fuel has advantages on both efficient fuel utilization and lower minor actinide generation, with some similar neutronic properties to the uranium fuel

  12. Development of fuel cell systems for aircraft applications based on synthetic fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasel, J.; Samsun, R.C.; Doell, C.; Peters, R.; Stolten, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    At present, in the aviation sector considerable scientific project work deals with the development of fuel cell systems based on synthetic fuels to be integrated in future aircraft. The benefits of fuel cell systems in aircraft are various. They offer the possibility to simplify the aircraft layout. Important systems, i.e. the gas turbine powered auxiliary power unit (APU) for electricity supply, the fuel tank inserting system and the water tank, can be substituted by one single system, the fuel cell system. Additionally, the energy demand for ice protection can be covered assisted by fuel cell systems. These measures reduce the consumption of jet fuel, increase aircraft efficiency and allow the operation at low emissions. Additionally, the costs for aircraft related investments, for aircraft maintenance and operation can be reduced. On the background of regular discussions about environmental concerns (global warming) of kerosene Jet A-1 and its availability, which might be restricted in a few years, the aircraft industry is keen to employ synthetic, sulfur-free fuels such as Fischer-Tropsch fuels. These comprise Bio-To-Liquid and Gas-To-Liquid fuels. Within this field of research the Institute of Energy Research (IEF-3) in Juelich develops complete and compact fuel cell systems based on the autothermal reforming of these kinds of fuels in cooperation with industry. This paper reports about this work. (orig.)

  13. A Raman-Based Portable Fuel Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Stuart

    2010-08-01

    Fuel is the single most import supply during war. Consider that the US Military is employing over 25,000 vehicles in Iraq and Afghanistan. Most fuel is obtained locally, and must be characterized to ensure proper operation of these vehicles. Fuel properties are currently determined using a deployed chemical laboratory. Unfortunately, each sample requires in excess of 6 hours to characterize. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a portable fuel analyzer capable of determine 7 fuel properties that allow determining fuel usage. The analyzer uses Raman spectroscopy to measure the fuel samples without preparation in 2 minutes. The challenge, however, is that as distilled fractions of crude oil, all fuels are composed of hundreds of hydrocarbon components that boil at similar temperatures, and performance properties can not be simply correlated to a single component, and certainly not to specific Raman peaks. To meet this challenge, we measured over 800 diesel and jet fuels from around the world and used chemometrics to correlate the Raman spectra to fuel properties. Critical to the success of this approach is laser excitation at 1064 nm to avoid fluorescence interference (many fuels fluoresce) and a rugged interferometer that provides 0.1 cm-1 wavenumber (x-axis) accuracy to guarantee accurate correlations. Here we describe the portable fuel analyzer, the chemometric models, and the successful determination of these 7 fuel properties for over 100 unknown samples provided by the US Marine Corps, US Navy, and US Army.

  14. Application of game theory in decision making strategy: Does gas fuel industry need to kill oil based fuel industry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Abdul Luky Shofi'ul; Prabandari, Dyah Lusiana; Hakim, Muhammad Lintang Islami

    2017-03-01

    Even though conversion of oil based fuel (Bahan Bakar Minyak) into gas fuel (Bahan Bakar Gas) for transportation (both land and sea) is one of the priority programs of the government of Indonesia, rules that have been established merely basic rules of gas fuel usage license for transportation, without discussing position of gas fuel related to oil based fuel in detail. This paper focus on possible strategic behavior of the key players in the oil-gas fuel conversion game, who will be impacted by the position of gas fuel as complement or substitution of oil based fuel. These players include industry of oil based fuel, industry of gas fuel, and the government. Modeling is made based on two different conditions: government plays a passive role and government plays an active role in legislating additional rules that may benefit industry of gas fuel. Results obtained under a passive government is that industry of oil based fuel need to accommodate the presence of industry of gas fuel, and industry of gas fuel does not kill/ eliminate the oil based fuel, or gas fuel serves as a complement. While in an active government, the industry of oil based fuel need to increase its negotiation spending in the first phase so that the additional rule that benefitting industry of gas fuel would not be legislated, while industry of gas fuel chooses to indifferent; however, in the last stage, gas fuel turned to be competitive or choose its role to be substitution.

  15. Alternative fossil-based transportation fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    "Alternative fuels derived from oil sands and from coal liquefaction can cost-effectively diversify fuel supplies, but neither type significantly reduces U.S. carbon-dioxide emissions enough to arrest long-term climate change".

  16. Electrometallurgical treatment of aluminum-based fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willit, J. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated aluminum electrorefining from a U-Al-Si alloy that simulates spent aluminum-based reactor fuel. The aluminum product contains less than 200 ppm uranium. All the results obtained have been in agreement with predictions based on equilibrium thermodynamics. We have also demonstrated the need for adequate stirring to achieve a low-uranium product. Most of the other process steps have been demonstrated in other programs. These include uranium electrorefining, transuranic fission product scrubbing, fission product oxidation, and product consolidation by melting. Future work will focus on the extraction of active metal and rare earth fission products by a molten flux salt and scale-up of the aluminum electrorefining

  17. Thorium-based nuclear fuel: current status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    Until the present time considerable efforts have already been made in the area of fabrication, utilization and reprocessing of Th-based fuels for different types of reactors, namely: by FRG and USA - for HTRs; FRG and Brazil, Italy - for LWRs; India - for HWRs and FBRs. Basic research of thorium fuels and thorium fuel cycles are also being undertaken by Australia, Canada, China, France, FRG, Romania, USSR and other countries. Main emphasis has been given to the utilization of thorium fuels in once-through nuclear fuel cycles, but in some projects closed thorium-uranium or thorium-plutonium fuel cycles are also considered. The purpose of the Technical Committee on the Utilization of Thorium-Based Nuclear Fuel: Current Status and Perspective was to review the world thorium resources, incentives for further exploration, obtained experience in the utilization of Th-based fuels in different types of reactors, basic research, fabrication and reprocessing of Th-based fuels. As a result of the panel discussion the recommendations on future Agency activities and list of major worldwide activities in the area of Th-based fuel were developed. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 9 papers in this proceedings series

  18. ORIGEN-based Nuclear Fuel Inventory Module for Fuel Cycle Assessment: Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skutnik, Steven E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-06-19

    The goal of this project, “ORIGEN-based Nuclear Fuel Depletion Module for Fuel Cycle Assessment" is to create a physics-based reactor depletion and decay module for the Cyclus nuclear fuel cycle simulator in order to assess nuclear fuel inventories over a broad space of reactor operating conditions. The overall goal of this approach is to facilitate evaluations of nuclear fuel inventories for a broad space of scenarios, including extended used nuclear fuel storage and cascading impacts on fuel cycle options such as actinide recovery in used nuclear fuel, particularly for multiple recycle scenarios. The advantages of a physics-based approach (compared to a recipe-based approach which has been typically employed for fuel cycle simulators) is in its inherent flexibility; such an approach can more readily accommodate the broad space of potential isotopic vectors that may be encountered under advanced fuel cycle options. In order to develop this flexible reactor analysis capability, we are leveraging the Origen nuclear fuel depletion and decay module from SCALE to produce a standalone “depletion engine” which will serve as the kernel of a Cyclus-based reactor analysis module. The ORIGEN depletion module is a rigorously benchmarked and extensively validated tool for nuclear fuel analysis and thus its incorporation into the Cyclus framework can bring these capabilities to bear on the problem of evaluating long-term impacts of fuel cycle option choices on relevant metrics of interest, including materials inventories and availability (for multiple recycle scenarios), long-term waste management and repository impacts, etc. Developing this Origen-based analysis capability for Cyclus requires the refinement of the Origen analysis sequence to the point where it can reasonably be compiled as a standalone sequence outside of SCALE; i.e., wherein all of the computational aspects of Origen (including reactor cross-section library processing and interpolation, input and output

  19. FFTF fuel pin design bases and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, C.M.; Hanson, J.E.; Roake, W.E.; Slember, R.J.; Weber, C.E.; Millunzi, A.C.

    1975-04-01

    The FFTF fuel pin was conservatively designed to meet thermal and structural performance requirements in the categories normal operation, upset events, emergency events, and hypothetical, faulted events. The fuel pin operating limits consistent with these requirements were developed from a strong fuel pin irradiation testing program scoped to define the performance capability under relevant steady state and transient conditions. Comparison of the results of the irradiation testing program with design requirements indicates that the FFTF fuel pin can exceed its goal burnup of 80,000 MWd/MTM. (U.S.)

  20. Fuel cycles of WWER-1000 based on assemblies with increased fuel mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosourov, E.; Pavlovichev, A.; Shcherenko, A.

    2011-01-01

    Modern WWER-1000 fuel cycles are based on FAs with the fuel column height of 3680 mm, diameters of the fuel pellet and its central hole of 7.6 and 1.2 mm respectively. The highest possible fuel enrichment has reached its license limit that is 4.95 %. Research in the field of modernization, safety justification and licensing of equipment for fuel manufacture, storage and transportation are required for further fuel enrichment increase (above 5 %). So in the nearest future an improvement of technical and economic characteristics of fuel cycles is possible if assembly fuel mass is increased. The available technology of the cladding thinning makes it possible. If the fuel rod outer diameter is constant and the clad inner diameter is increased to 7.93 mm, the diameter of the fuel pellet can be increased to 7.8 mm. So the suppression of the pellet central hole allows increasing assembly fuel weight by about 8 %. In this paper we analyze how technical and economic characteristics of WWER-1000 fuel cycle change when an advanced FA is applied instead of standard one. Comparison is made between FAs with equal time interval between refueling. This method of comparison makes it possible to eliminate the parameters that constitute the operation component of electricity generation cost, taking into account only the following technical and economic characteristics: 1)cycle length; 2) average burnup of spent FAs; 3) specific natural uranium consumption; 4)specific quantity of separative work units; 5) specific enriched uranium consumption; 6) specific assembly consumption. Collected data allow estimating the efficiency of assembly fuel weight increase and verifying fuel cycle characteristics that may be obtained in the advanced FAs. (authors)

  1. Effects of Fuel Quantity on Soot Formation Process for Biomass-Based Renewable Diesel Fuel Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Soot formation process was investigated for biomass-based renewable diesel fuel, such as biomass to liquid (BTL), and conventional diesel combustion under varied fuel quantities injected into a constant volume combustion chamber. Soot measurement was implemented by two-color pyrometry under quiescent type diesel engine conditions (1000 K and 21% O2 concentration). Different fuel quantities, which correspond to different injection widths from 0.5 ms to 2 ms under constant injection pressure (1000 bar), were used to simulate different loads in engines. For a given fuel, soot temperature and KL factor show a different trend at initial stage for different fuel quantities, where a higher soot temperature can be found in a small fuel quantity case but a higher KL factor is observed in a large fuel quantity case generally. Another difference occurs at the end of combustion due to the termination of fuel injection. Additionally, BTL flame has a lower soot temperature, especially under a larger fuel quantity (2 ms injection width). Meanwhile, average soot level is lower for BTL flame, especially under a lower fuel quantity (0.5 ms injection width). BTL shows an overall low sooting behavior with low soot temperature compared to diesel, however, trade-off between soot level and soot temperature needs to be carefully selected when different loads are used.

  2. Molybdenum-base cermet fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurwell, W.E.; Moss, R.W.; Pilger, J.P.; White, G.D.

    1987-07-01

    Development of a multimegawatt (MMW) space nuclear power system requires identification and resolution of several technical feasibility issues before selecting one or more promising system concepts. Demonstration of reactor fuel fabrication technology is required for cermet-fueled reactor concepts. MMW reactor fuel development activity at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is focused on producing a molybdenum-matrix uranium-nitride (UN) fueled cermet. This cermet is to have a high matrix density (≥95%) for high strength and high thermal conductance coupled with a high particle (UN) porosity (∼25%) for retention of released fission gas at high burnup. Fabrication process development involves the use of porous TiN microspheres as surrogate fuel material until porous UN microspheres become available. Process development has been conducted in the areas of microsphere synthesis, particle sealing/coating, and high-energy-rate forming (HERF) and vacuum hot press consolidation techniques. This paper summarizes the status of these activities

  3. International cooperation on methanol-based fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    An international agreement on co-operation to study the use of cars powered by methanol-based fuel cells was signed in September 2000. This indicates that gas will have to compete on the future fuel market. According to the agreement, measures will be taken to ease the introduction of such cars when they are commercialized. Methanol represents a fuel that can be distributed throughout most of the world within realistic economical bounds by means of the existing infrastructure. A global market analysis based on the assumption that there will be a billion cars in the world by 2020 shows the great potential for the use of fuel cells. In addition, they are environmentally sound. Technological developments of fuel cells during the latest decade may render traditional combustion engines obsolete. Methanol is a liquid at room temperature and can be stored in the fuel tank just like ordinary fuels. Petrol, liquefied petroleum gas, natural gas, ethanol and methanol can all be used in a fuel cell engine, but since the technology is based on chemical energy conversion, the most suitable fuel is one that is hydrogen-rich and easily stored. Many experts favour liquid hydrogen. However, liquid hydrogen has many problems in common with liquefied natural gas or cooled liquid natural gas: about 25% of the energy is used in keeping the fuel in the liquid state

  4. Integrated data base for spent fuel and radwaste: inventories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Carter, W.L.; Kibbey, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) program provides and maintains current, integrated data on spent reactor fuel and radwaste, including historical data, current inventories, projected inventories, and material characteristics. The IDB program collects, organizes, integrates, and - where necessary - reconciles inventory and projection (I/P) and characteristics information to provide a coherent, self-consistent data base on spent fuel and radwaste

  5. Evaluation of thorium based nuclear fuel. Extended summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franken, W.M.P.; Bultman, J.H.; Konings, R.J.M.; Wichers, V.A.

    1995-04-01

    Application of thorium based nuclear fuels has been evaluated with emphasis on possible reduction of the actinide waste. As a result three ECN-reports are published, discussing in detail: - The reactor physics aspects, by comparing the operation characteristics of the cores of Pressurized Water Reactors and Heavy Water Reactors with different fuel types, including equilibrium thorium/uranium free, once-through uranium fuel and equilibrium uranium/plutonium fuel, - the chemical aspects of thorium based fuel cycles with emphasis on fuel (re)fabrication and fuel reprocessing, - the possible reduction in actinide waste as analysed for Heavy Water Reactors with various types of thorium based fuels in once-through operation and with reprocessing. These results are summarized in this report together with a short discussion on non-proliferation and uranium resource utilization. It has been concluded that a substantial reduction of actinide radiotoxicity of the disposed waste may be achieved by using thorium based fuels, if very efficient partitioning and multiple recycling of uranium and thorium can be realized. This will, however, require large efforts to develop the technology to the necessary industrial scale of operation. (orig.)

  6. State of art in FE-based fuel performance codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Fuel performance codes approximate this complex behavior using an axisymmetric, axially-stacked, one-dimensional radial representation to save computation cost. However, the need for improved modeling of PCMI and, particularly, the importance of multidimensional capability for accurate fuel performance simulation has been identified as safety margin decreases. Finite element (FE) method that is reliable and proven solution in mechanical field has been introduced into fuel performance codes for multidimensional analysis. The present state of the art in numerical simulation of FE-based fuel performance predominantly involves 2-D axisymmetric model and 3-D volumetric model. The FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN own 1.5-D and 2-D FE model to simulate PCMI and cladding ballooning. In 2-D simulation, the FALCON code, developed by EPRI, is a 2-D (R-Z and R-θ) fully thermal-mechanically coupled steady-state and transient FE-based fuel behavior code. The French codes TOUTATIS and ALCYONE which are 3-D, and typically used to investigate localized behavior. In 2008, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing multidimensional (2-D and 3-D) nuclear fuel performance code called BISON. In this paper, the current state of FE-based fuel performance code and their models are presented. Based on investigation into the codes, requirements and direction of development for new FE-based fuel performance code can be discussed. Based on comparison of models in FE-based fuel performance code, status of art in the codes can be discussed. A new FE-based fuel performance code should include typical pellet and cladding models which all codes own. In particular, specified pellet and cladding model such as gaseous swelling and high burnup structure (HBS) model should be developed to improve accuracy of code as well as consider AC condition. To reduce computation cost, the approximated gap and the optimized contact model should be also developed

  7. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel.

  8. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel

  9. Carbon-Based Nanomaterials in Biomass-Based Fuel-Fed Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Quynh Hoa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental and sustainable economical concerns are generating a growing interest in biofuels predominantly produced from biomass. It would be ideal if an energy conversion device could directly extract energy from a sustainable energy resource such as biomass. Unfortunately, up to now, such a direct conversion device produces insufficient power to meet the demand of practical applications. To realize the future of biofuel-fed fuel cells as a green energy conversion device, efforts have been devoted to the development of carbon-based nanomaterials with tunable electronic and surface characteristics to act as efficient metal-free electrocatalysts and/or as supporting matrix for metal-based electrocatalysts. We present here a mini review on the recent advances in carbon-based catalysts for each type of biofuel-fed/biofuel cells that directly/indirectly extract energy from biomass resources, and discuss the challenges and perspectives in this developing field.

  10. Ground measurements of fuel and fuel consumption from experimental and operational prescribed fires at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Ottmar; Robert E. Vihnanek; Clinton S. Wright; Andrew T. Hudak

    2014-01-01

    Ground-level measurements of fuel loading, fuel consumption, and fuel moisture content were collected on nine research burns conducted at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida in November, 2012. A grass or grass-shrub fuelbed dominated eight of the research blocks; the ninth was a managed longleaf pine (Pinus palustrus) forest. Fuel loading ranged from 1.7 Mg ha-1 on a...

  11. Fuel type characterization based on coarse resolution MODIS satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanorte A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel types is one of the most important factors that should be taken into consideration for computing spatial fire hazard and risk and simulating fire growth and intensity across a landscape. In the present study, forest fuel mapping is considered from a remote sensing perspective. The purpose is to delineate forest types by exploring the use of coarse resolution satellite remote sensing MODIS imagery. In order to ascertain how well MODIS data can provide an exhaustive classification of fuel properties a sample area characterized by mixed vegetation covers and complex topography was analysed. The study area is located in the South of Italy. Fieldwork fuel type recognitions, performed before, after and during the acquisition of remote sensing MODIS data, were used as ground-truth dataset to assess the obtained results. The method comprised the following three steps: (I adaptation of Prometheus fuel types for obtaining a standardization system useful for remotely sensed classification of fuel types and properties in the considered Mediterranean ecosystems; (II model construction for the spectral characterization and mapping of fuel types based on two different approach, maximum likelihood (ML classification algorithm and spectral Mixture Analysis (MTMF; (III accuracy assessment for the performance evaluation based on the comparison of MODIS-based results with ground-truth. Results from our analyses showed that the use of remotely sensed MODIS data provided a valuable characterization and mapping of fuel types being that the achieved classification accuracy was higher than 73% for ML classifier and higher than 83% for MTMF.

  12. State of art in FE-based fuel performance codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Finite element (FE) method that is reliable and proven solution in mechanical field has been introduced into fuel performance codes for multidimensional analysis. The present state of the art in numerical simulation of FE-based fuel performance predominantly involves 2-D axisymmetric model and 3-D volumetric model. The FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN own 1.5-D and 2-D FE model to simulate PCMI and cladding ballooning. In 2-D simulation, the FALCON code, developed by EPRI, is a 2-D (R-Z and R-θ) fully thermal-mechanically coupled steady-state and transient FE-based fuel behavior code. The French codes TOUTATIS and ALCYONE which are 3-D, and typically used to investigate localized behavior. In 2008, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing multidimensional (2-D and 3-D) nuclear fuel performance code called BISON. In this paper, the current state of FE-based fuel performance code and their models are presented. Based on investigation into the codes, requirements and direction of development for new FE-based fuel performance code can be discussed. Based on comparison of models in FE-based fuel performance code, status of art in the codes can be discussed. A new FE-based fuel performance code should include typical pellet and cladding models which all codes own. In particular, specified pellet and cladding model such as gaseous swelling and high burnup structure (HBS) model should be developed to improve accuracy of code as well as consider AC condition. To reduce computation cost, the approximated gap and the optimized contact model should be also developed. Nuclear fuel operates in an extreme environment that induces complex multiphysics phenomena, occurring over distances ranging from inter-atomic spacing to meters, and times scales ranging from microseconds to years. This multiphysics behavior is often tightly coupled, a well known example being the thermomechanical behavior. Adding to this complexity, important aspects of fuel behavior are inherently

  13. Concept for fuel-cycle based safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deMontmollin, J.M.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Gupta, D.

    1985-01-01

    Although the guidelines for NPT safeguards specify that the State's fuel cycle and degree of international independence are to be taken into account, the same model approach and absolute-quantity inspection goals are applied to all similar facilities, irrespective of the State's fuel cycle, and the findings are reported in those terms. A concept whereby safeguards might more effectively and efficiently accomplish the purposes of NPT safeguards is explored. The principal features are: (1) division of the fuel cycle into three zones, each containing material having a different degree of significance for safeguards; (2) closing a verified material balance around each zone, supplementing the present MBA balances for more sensitive facilities and replacing them for others; (3) maintenance by the IAEA of a current book inventory for each facility by means of immediate, abbreviated reporting of interfacility transfers; (4) near real-time analysis of material flow patterns through the fuel cycle; and (5) a periodic statement of the findings for the entire State that takes the form that there is assurance that all nuclear materials under safeguards are accounted for to some stated degree of uncertainty

  14. Disposal criticality analysis for aluminum-based DOE fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.W.; Gottlieb, P.

    1997-11-01

    This paper describes the disposal criticality analysis for canisters containing aluminum-based Department of Energy fuels from research reactors. Different canisters were designed for disposal of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and medium enriched uranium (MEU) fuel. In addition to the standard criticality concerns in storage and transportation, such as flooding, the disposal criticality analysis must consider the degradation of the fuel and components within the waste package. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) U-Al fuel with 93.5% enriched uranium and Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) U-Si-Al fuel with 21% enriched uranium are representative of the HEU and MEU fuel inventories, respectively. Conceptual canister designs with 64 MIT assemblies (16/layer, 4 layers) or 40 ORR assemblies (10/layer, 4 layers) were developed for these fuel types. Borated stainless steel plates were incorporated into a stainless steel internal basket structure within a 439 mm OD, 15 mm thick XM-19 canister shell. The Codisposal waste package contains 5 HLW canisters (represented by 5 Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters from the Savannah River Site) with the fuel canister placed in the center. It is concluded that without the presence of a fairly insoluble neutron absorber, the long-term action of infiltrating water can lead to a small, but significant, probability of criticality for both the HEU and MEU fuels. The use of 1.5kg of Gd distributed throughout the MIT fuel and the use of carbon steels for the structural basket or 1.1 kg of Gd distributed in the ORR fuel will reduce the probability of criticality to virtually zero for both fuels

  15. Evolution of PHWR fuel transfer system based on operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvatikar, R.S.; Singh, Jaipal; Chaturvedi, P.C.; Bhambra, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    Fuel Transfer System facilitates loading of new fuel into Fuelling Machine, receipt of spent fuel from Fuelling Machine and its further transportation to Storage Bay. To overcome the limitations of transferring a pair of bundles in the single tube Airlock and Transfer Arm in RAPS-1 and 2/MAPS, a new concept of six tube Transfer Magazine was introduced in NAPS. This resulted in simultaneous loading of new fuel from Transfer Magazine into the Fuelling Machine and unloading of spent fuel from the Fuelling Machine through the exchange mode. It further facilitated the parallel/simultaneous operation of refuelling by Fuelling Machines on the reactor and transferring of spent fuel bundles from the Transfer Magazine to the bay. This new design of Fuel Transfer System was adopted for all standardised 220 MWe PHWRs. Based on the experience gained in 220 MWe PHWRs in the area of operation and maintenance, a number of improvements have been carried out over the years. These aspects have been further strengthened and refined in the Fuel Transfer System of 540 MWe units. The operating experience of the system indicates that the presence of heavy water in the Transfer Magazine poses limitations in its maintenance in the Fuel Transfer room. Further, Surveillance and maintenance of large number of under water equipment and associated valves, rams and underwater sensors is putting extra burden on the O and M efforts. A new concept of mobile light water filled Transfer Machine has been evolved for proposed 700 MWe PHWR units to simplify Fuel Transfer System. This has been made possible by adopting snout level control in the Fuelling Machine, elimination of Shuttle Transport System and locating the Storage Bay adjacent to the Reactor Building. This paper describes the evolution of Fuel Transfer System concepts and various improvements based on the experience gained in the operation and maintenance of the system. (author)

  16. Engine control system having fuel-based adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willi, Martin L [Dunlap, IL; Fiveland, Scott B [Metamora, IL; Montgomery, David T [Edelstein, IL; Gong, Weidong [Dunlap, IL

    2011-03-15

    A control system for an engine having a cylinder is disclosed having an engine valve configured to affect a fluid flow of the cylinder, an actuator configured to move the engine valve, and an in-cylinder sensor configured to generate a signal indicative of a characteristic of fuel entering the cylinder. The control system also has a controller in communication with the actuator and the sensor. The controller is configured to determine the characteristic of the fuel based on the signal and selectively regulate the actuator to adjust a timing of the engine valve based on the characteristic of the fuel.

  17. Reforming petroleum-based fuels for fuel cell vehicles : composition-performance relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopasz, J. P.; Miller, L. E.; Ahmed, S.; Devlin, P. R.; Pacheco, M.

    2001-01-01

    Onboard reforming of petroleum-based fuels, such as gasoline, may help ease the introduction of fuel cell vehicles to the marketplace. Although gasoline can be reformed, it is optimized to meet the demands of ICEs. This optimization includes blending to increase the octane number and addition of oxygenates and detergents to control emissions. The requirements for a fuel for onboard reforming to hydrogen are quite different than those for combustion. Factors such as octane number and flame speed are not important; however, factors such as hydrogen density, catalyst-fuel interactions, and possible catalyst poisoning become paramount. In order to identify what factors are important in a hydrocarbon fuel for reforming to hydrogen and what factors are detrimental, we have begun a program to test various components of gasoline and blends of components under autothermal reforming conditions. The results indicate that fuel composition can have a large effect on reforming behavior. Components which may be beneficial for ICEs for their octane enhancing value were detrimental to reforming. Fuels with high aromatic and naphthenic content were more difficult to reform. Aromatics were also found to have an impact on the kinetics for reforming of paraffins. The effects of sulfur impurities were dependent on the catalyst. Sulfur was detrimental for Ni, Co, and Ru catalysts. Sulfur was beneficial for reforming with Pt catalysts, however, the effect was dependent on the sulfur concentration

  18. Cyanoborohydride-based ionic liquids as green aerospace bipropellant fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Yin, Ping; Zhang, Jiaheng; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2014-06-02

    In propellant systems, the most common bipropellants are composed of two chemicals, a fuel (or reducer) and an oxidizer. Currently, the choices for propellant fuels rely mainly on hydrazine and its methylated derivatives, even though they are extremely toxic, highly volatile, sensitive to adiabatic compression (risk of detonation), and, therefore, difficult to handle. With this background, the search for alternative green propellant fuels has been an urgent goal of space science. In this study, a new family of cyanoborohydride-based ionic liquids (ILs) with properties and performances comparable to hydrazine derivatives were designed and synthesized. These new ILs as bipropellant fuels, have some unique advantages including negligible vapor pressure, ultra-short ignition delay (ID) time, and reduced synthetic and storage costs, thereby showing great application potential as environmentally friendly fuels in bipropellant formulations. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Thorium-based fuel cycles: Reassessment of fuel economics and proliferation risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serfontein, Dawid E., E-mail: Dawid.Serfontein@nwu.ac.za [Senior Lecturer at the School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North West University (PUK-Campus), PRIVATE BAG X6001, Internal Post Box 360, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Mulder, Eben J. [Professor at the School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North West University (South Africa)

    2014-05-01

    At current consumption and current prices, the proven reserves for natural uranium will last only about 100 years. However, the more abundant thorium, burned in breeder reactors, such as large High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors, and followed by chemical reprocessing of the spent fuel, could stretch the 100 years for uranium supply to 15,000 years. Thorium-based fuel cycles are also viewed as more proliferation resistant compared to uranium. However, several barriers to entry caused all countries, except India and Russia, to abandon their short term plans for thorium reactor projects, in favour of uranium/plutonium fuel cycles. In this article, based on the theory of resonance integrals and original analysis of fast fission cross sections, the breeding potential of {sup 232}Th is compared to that of {sup 238}U. From a review of the literature, the fuel economy of thorium-based fuel cycles is compared to that of natural uranium-based cycles. This is combined with a technical assessment of the proliferation resistance of thorium-based fuel cycles, based on a review of the literature. Natural uranium is currently so cheap that it contributes only about 10% of the cost of nuclear electricity. Chemical reprocessing is also very expensive. Therefore conservation of natural uranium by means of the introduction of thorium into the fuel is not yet cost effective and will only break even once the price of natural uranium were to increase from the current level of about $70/pound yellow cake to above about $200/pound. However, since fuel costs constitutes only a small fraction of the total cost of nuclear electricity, employing reprocessing in a thorium cycle, for the sake of its strategic benefits, may still be a financially viable option. The most important source of the proliferation resistance of {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U fuel cycles is denaturisation of the {sup 233}U in the spent fuel by {sup 232}U, for which the highly radioactive decay chain potentially poses a large

  20. A method for the preparation of a fuel, by the addition of one or more components to a base fuel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for the preparation of a fuel, by the addition of one or more components to a base fuel, wherein the method comprises the following steps: i) providing a base fuel; ii) withdrawing aromatic components from a styrene / propylene ox ide production plant; iii)

  1. NAPL migration and ecotoxicity of conventional and renewable fuels in accidental spill scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malk, Vuokko; Barreto Tejera, Eduardo; Simpanen, Suvi; Dahl, Mari; Mäkelä, Riikka; Häkkinen, Jani; Kiiski, Anna; Penttinen, Olli-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Fuels derived from non-petroleum renewable resources have raised interest due to their potential in replacing petroleum-based fuels, but information on their fate and effects in the terrestrial and aquatic environments in accidental spill scenario is limited. In this study, migration of four fuels (conventional diesel, conventional gasoline, renewable diesel NExBTL, and ethanol-blended gasoline RE85 containing maximum 85% ethanol) as non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in soil was demonstrated in a laboratory-scale experiment. Ecotoxicity data was produced for the same fuels. There was no significant difference in migration of conventional and renewable diesel, but gasoline migrated 1.5 times deeper and 7-9 times faster in sand than diesel. RE85 spread horizontally wider but not as deep (p gasoline. Conventional gasoline was the most toxic (lethal concentration [LC50] 20 mg/kg total hydrocarbon content [THC]) among the studied fuels in soil toxicity test with earthworm Eisenia fetida followed by ethanol-blended gasoline (LC50 1,643 mg/kg THC) and conventional diesel (LC50 2,432 mg/kg THC), although gasoline evaporated fast from soil. For comparison, the toxicity of the water-accommodated fractions (WAF) of the fuels was tested with water flea Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri, also demonstrating groundwater toxicity. The WAF of conventional gasoline and RE85 showed almost similar toxicity to both the aquatic test species. EC50 values of 1:10 (by volume) WAF were 9.9 %WAF (gasoline) and 9.3 %WAF (RE85) to D. magna and 9.3 %WAF (gasoline) and 12.3 %WAF (RE85) to V. fischeri. Low solubility decreased toxicity potential of conventional diesel in aquatic environment, but direct physical effects of oil phase pose a threat to organisms in nature. Renewable diesel NExBTL did not show clear toxicity to any test species.

  2. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, O.K.; Levasseur, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the U.S. Department of Energy is sponsoring the development of advanced coal-cleaning technologies aimed at expanding the use of the nation`s vast coal reserves in an environmentally and economically acceptable manner. Because of the lack of practical experience with deeply beneficiated coal-based fuels, PETC has contracted Combustion Engineering, Inc. to perform a multi-year project on `Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.` The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels (BCs) influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs.

  3. Direct electron transfer based enzymatic fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Magnus; Blum, Zoltan; Shleev, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    In this mini-review we briefly describe some historical developments made in the field of enzymatic fuel cells (FCs), discussing important design considerations taken when constructing mediator-, cofactor-, and membrane-less biological FCs (BFCs). Since the topic is rather extensive, only BFCs utilizing direct electron transfer (DET) reactions on both the anodic and cathodic sides are considered. Moreover, the performance of mostly glucose/oxygen biodevices is analyzed and compared. We also present some unpublished results on mediator-, cofactor-, and membrane-less glucose/oxygen BFCs recently designed in our group and tested in different human physiological fluids, such as blood, plasma, saliva, and tears. Finally, further perspectives for BFC applications are highlighted.

  4. Pt -based anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, Bibian; Sanchez, Carlos; Gonzalez, Javier

    2007-01-01

    In this work it is studied the electro-catalytic behavior of pure platinum and platinum-based alloys with Ru, Sn, Ir, and Os supported on carbon to the ethanol electro-oxidation in aims to develop anodic catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells, additionally, porous electrodes and membrane electrode assemblies were built for proton exchange membrane fuel cells in which the electrodes were tested. Catalysts characterization was made by cyclic voltammetry whereas the fuel cells behavior tests were made by current-potential polarization curves. in general, all alloys show a lower on-set reaction potential and a higher catalytic activity than pure platinum. However, in the high over potential zone, pure platinum has higher catalytic activity than the alloys. In agreement with these results, the alloys studied here could be useful in fuel cells operating on moderated and low current

  5. Fabrication routes for Thorium and Uranium233 based AHWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danny, K.M.; Saraswat, Anupam; Chakraborty, S.; Somayajulu, P.S.; Kumar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    India's economic growth is on a fast growth track. The growth in population and economy is creating huge demand for energy which has to be met with environmentally benign technologies. Nuclear Energy is best suited to meet this demand without causing undue environmental impact. Considering the large thorium reserves in India, the future nuclear power program will be based on Thorium- Uranium 233 fuel cycle. The major characteristic of thorium as the fuel of future comes from its superior fuel utilization. 233 U produced in a reactor is always contaminated with 232 U. This 232 U undergoes a decay to produce 228 Th and it is followed by decay chain including 212 Bi and 208 Tl. Both 212 Bi and 208 Tl are hard gamma emitters ranging from 0.6 MeV-1.6 MeV and 2.6 MeV respectively, which necessitates its handling in hot cell. The average concentration of 232 U is expected to exceed 1000 ppm after a burn-up of 24,000 MWD/t. Work related to developing the fuel fabrication technology including automation and remotization needed for 233 U based fuels is in progress. Various process for fuel fabrication have been developed i.e. Coated Agglomerate Pelletisation (CAP), impregnation technique (Pellet/Gel), Sol Gel Micro-sphere Pelletisation (SGMP) apart from Powder to Pellet (POP) route. This paper describes each process with respect to its advantages, disadvantages and its amenability to automation and remotisation. (author)

  6. MEMS-Based Fuel Reformer with Suspended Membrane Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuei-Sung; Tanaka, Shuji; Esashi, Masayoshi

    We report a MEMS-based fuel reformer for supplying hydrogen to micro-fuel cells for portable applications. A combustor and a reforming chamber are fabricated at either side of a suspended membrane structure. This design is used to improve the overall thermal efficiency, which is a critical issue to realize a micro-fuel reformer. The suspended membrane structure design provided good thermal isolation. The micro-heaters consumed 0.97W to maintain the reaction zone of the MEMS-based fuel reformer at 200°C, but further power saving is necessary by improving design and fabrication. The conversion rate of methanol to hydrogen was about 19% at 180°C by using evaporated copper as a reforming catalyst. The catalytic combustion of hydrogen started without any assistance of micro-heaters. By feeding the fuel mixture of an equivalence ratio of 0.35, the temperature of the suspended membrane structure was maintained stable at 100°C with a combustion efficiency of 30%. In future works, we will test a micro-fuel reformer by using a micro-combustor to supply heat.

  7. Removal of sulphur-containing odorants from fuel gases for fuel cell-based combined heat and power applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, de P.J.; Nyqvist, R.G.; Bruijn, de F.A.; Stobbe, E.R.

    2006-01-01

    Natural gas (NG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are important potential feedstocks for the production of hydrogen for fuel cell-based(e.g. proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) or solid oxide fuel Cells (SOFC) combined heat and power (CHP) applications. To preventdetrimental effects on the

  8. Economics analysis of fuel cycle cost of fusion–fission hybrid reactors based on different fuel cycle strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zu, Tiejun, E-mail: tiejun@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wu, Hongchun; Zheng, Youqi; Cao, Liangzhi

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Economics analysis of fuel cycle cost of FFHRs is carried out. • The mass flows of different fuel cycle strategies are established based on the equilibrium fuel cycle model. • The levelized fuel cycle costs of different fuel cycle strategies are calculated, and compared with current once-through fuel cycle. - Abstract: The economics analysis of fuel cycle cost of fusion–fission hybrid reactors has been performed to compare four fuel cycle strategies: light water cooled blanket burning natural uranium (Strategy A) or spent nuclear fuel (Strategy B), sodium cooled blanket burning transuranics (Strategy C) or minor actinides (Strategy D). The levelized fuel cycle costs (LFCC) which does not include the capital cost, operation and maintenance cost have been calculated based on the equilibrium mass flows. The current once-through (OT) cycle strategy has also been analyzed to serve as the reference fuel cycle for comparisons. It is found that Strategy A and Strategy B have lower LFCCs than OT cycle; although the LFCC of Strategy C is higher than that of OT cycle when the uranium price is at its nominal value, it would become comparable to that of OT cycle when the uranium price reaches its historical peak value level; Strategy D shows the highest LFCC, because it needs to reprocess huge mass of spent nuclear fuel; LFCC is sensitive to the discharge burnup of the nuclear fuel.

  9. The choice of the fuel assembly for VVER-1000 in a closed fuel cycle based on REMIX-technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrov, E.; Alekseev, P.; Chibinyaev, A.; Teplov, P.; Dudnikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    REMIX (Regenerated Mixture) fuel is produced directly from a non-separated mix of recycled uranium and plutonium from reprocessed used fuel and the fabrication technology of such fuel is called REMIX-technology. This paper shows basic features of different fuel assembly (FA) application for VVER-1000 in a closed fuel cycle based on REMIX-technology. This investigation shows how the change in the water-fuel ratio in the VVER FA affects the fuel characteristics produced by REMIX technology during multiple recycling. It is shown that for for the traditional REMIX-fuel it does not make sense to change anything in the design of VVER FA, because there are no advantages in the fuel feed consumption. The natural uranium economy by the fifth cycle reached about 29%. In the case of the REMIX fuel based on uranium-plutonium from SNF MOX fuel, it would be appropriate to use fuel assemblies with a water-fuel ratio of 1.5

  10. Burnup simulations and spent fuel characteristics of ZrO{sub 2} based inert matrix fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, E.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Deinert, M.R. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)]. E-mail: mrd6@cornell.edu; Herring, S.T. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cady, K.B. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2007-03-31

    Reducing the inventory of long lived isotopes that are contained in spent nuclear fuel is essential for maximizing repository capacity and extending the lifetime of related storage. Because of their non-fertile matrices, inert matrix fuels (IMF's) could be an ideal vehicle for using light-water reactors to help decrease the inventory of plutonium and other transuranics (neptunium, americium, curium) that are contained within spent uranium oxide fuel (UOX). Quantifying the characteristics of spent IMF is therefore of fundamental importance to determining its effect on repository design and capacity. We consider six ZrO{sub 2} based IMF formulations with different transuranic loadings in a 1-8 IMF to UOX pin-cell arrangement. Burnup calculations are performed using a collision probability model where transport of neutrons through space is modeled using fuel to moderator transport and escape probabilities. The lethargy dependent neutron flux is treated with a high resolution multigroup thermalization method. The results of the reactor physics model are compared to a benchmark case performed with Montebruns and indicate that the approach yields reliable results applicable to high-level analyses of spent fuel isotopics. The data generated show that a fourfold reduction in the radiological and integrated thermal output is achievable in single recycle using IMF, as compared to direct disposal of an energy equivalent spent UOX.

  11. Dissolution performance of plutonium nitride based fuel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aneheim, E.; Hedberg, M. [Nuclear Chemistry, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 4, Gothenburg, SE41296 (Sweden)

    2016-07-01

    Nitride fuels have been regarded as one viable fuel option for Generation IV reactors due to their positive features compared to oxides. To be able to close the fuel cycle and follow the Generation IV concept, nitrides must, however, demonstrate their ability to be reprocessed. This means that the dissolution performance of actinide based nitrides has to be thoroughly investigated and assessed. As the zirconium stabilized nitrides show even better potential as fuel material than does the pure actinide containing nitrides, investigations on the dissolution behavior of both PuN and (Pu,Zr)N has been undertaken. If possible it is desirable to perform the fuel dissolutions using nitric acid. This, as most reprocessing strategies using solvent-solvent extraction are based on a nitride containing aqueous matrix. (Pu,Zr)N/C microspheres were produced using internal gelation. The spheres dissolution performance was investigated using nitric acid with and without additions of HF and Ag(II). In addition PuN fuel pellets were produced from powder and their dissolution performance were also assessed in a nitric acid based setting. It appears that both PuN and (Pu,Zr)N/C fuel material can be completely dissolved in nitric acid of high concentration with the use of catalytic amounts of HF. The amount of HF added strongly affects dissolution kinetics of (Pu, Zr)N and the presence of HF affects the 2 solutes differently, possibly due to inhomogeneity o the initial material. Large additions of Ag(II) can also be used to facilitate the dissolution of (Pu,Zr)N in nitric acid. PuN can be dissolved by pure nitric acid of high concentration at room temperature while (Pu, Zr)N is unaffected under similar conditions. At elevated temperature (reflux), (Pu,Zr)N can, however, also be dissolved by concentrated pure nitric acid.

  12. Bases for extrapolating materials durability in fuel storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    A major body of evidence indicates that zirconium alloys have the most consistent and reliable durability in wet storage, justifying projections of safe wet storage greater than 50 y. Aluminum alloys have the widest range of durabilities in wet storage; systematic control and monitoring of water chemistry have resulted in low corrosion rates for more than two decades on some fuels and components. However, cladding failures have occurred in a few months when important parameters were not controlled. Stainless steel is extremely durable when stress, metallurgical and water chemistry factors are controlled. LWR SS cladding has survived for 25 y in wet storage. However, sensitized, stressed SS fuels and components have seriously degraded in fuel storage pools (FSPs) at ∼ 30 C. Satisfactory durability of fuel assembly and FSP component materials in extended wet storage requires investments in water quality management and surveillance, including chemical and biological factors. The key aspect of the study is to provide storage facility operators and other decision makers a basis to judge the durability of a given fuel type in wet storage as a prelude to basing other fuel management plans (e.g. dry storage) if wet storage will not be satisfactory through the expected period of interim storage

  13. Conversion of highly enriched uranium in thorium-232 based oxide fuel for light water reactors: MOX-T fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vapirev, E; Jordanov, T; Khristoskov, I [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Fizicheski Fakultet

    1996-12-31

    The possibility of using highly enriched uranium available from military inventories for production of mixed oxide fuel (MOX) has been proposed. The fuel is based on U-235 dioxide as fissile isotope and Th-232 dioxide as a non-fissile isotope. It is shown that although the fuel conversion coefficient to U-233 is expected to be less than 1, the proposed fuel has several important advantages resulting in cost reduction of the nuclear fuel cycle. The expected properties of MOX fuel (cross-sections, generated chains, delayed neutrons) are estimated. Due to fuel generation the initial enrichment is expected to be 1% less for production of the same energy. In contrast to traditional fuel no long living actinides are generated which reduces the disposal and reprocessing cost. 7 refs.

  14. High temperature fuel cell with ceria-based solid electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, H.; Eguchi, K.; Yahiro, H.; Baba, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Cation-doped ceria is investigated as an electrolyte for the solid oxide fuel cell. As for application to the fuel cells, the electrolyte are desired to have high ionic conductivity in deriving a large electrical power. A series of cation-doped ceria has higher ionic conductivity than zirconia-based oxides. In the present study, the basic electrochemical properties of cation-doped ceria were studied in relation to the application of fuel cells. The performance of fuel cell with yttria-doped ceria electrolyte was evaluated. Ceria-based oxides were prepared by calcination of oxide mixtures of the components or calcination of co-precipitated hydroxide mixtures from the metal nitrate solution. The oxide mixtures thus obtained were sintered at 1650 0 C for 15 hr in air into disks. Ionic transference number, t/sub i/, was estimated from emf of oxygen concentration cell. Electrical conductivities were measured by dc-4 probe method by varying the oxygen partial pressure. The fuel cell was operated by oxygen and hydrogen

  15. Polybenzimidazoles based on high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares Leon, Jose Joaquin; Camargo, Ana Paula M.; Ashino, Natalia M.; Morgado, Daniella L.; Frollini, Elisabeth; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Gonzalez, Ernesto Rafael [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Bajo, Justo Lobato [University of Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This work presents an interesting approach in order to enhance the performance of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) by means of an increase in the operational temperature. For this, two polymeric materials, Poly(2,5-bibenzimidazole) (ABPBI) and Poly[2,2'-(m-phenyl en)-5,5' bib enzimidazol] (PBI), impregnated with phosphoric acid have been utilized. These have shown excellent properties, such as thermal stability above 500 deg C, reasonably high conductivity when impregnated with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and a low permeability to alcohols compared to Nafion. Preliminary fuel cells measurements on hydrogen based Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) displayed an interestingly reasonable good fuel cell performance, a quite reduced loss when the hydrogen stream was polluted with carbon monoxide, and finally, when the system was tested with an ethanol/water (E/W) fuel, it displayed quite promising results that allows placing this system as an attractive option in order to increase the cell performance and deal with the typical limitations of low temperature Nafion-based PEMFC. (author)

  16. Artificial Leaf Based on Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    collect light energy and separate charge for developing new types of nanobiodevices to construct ”artificial leaf” from solar to fuel. or Concept of...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0054 Artificial Leaf Based on Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuel Production Mamoru Nango NAGOYA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY...display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ORGANIZATION. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY)      30-06-2017 2

  17. Graphene-Based Flexible Micrometer-Sized Microbial Fuel Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2013-10-23

    Microbial fuel cells harvest electrical energy produced by bacteria during the natural decomposition of organic matter. We report a micrometer-sized microbial fuel cell that is able to generate nanowatt-scale power from microliters of liquids. The sustainable design is comprised of a graphene anode, an air cathode, and a polymer-based substrate platform for flexibility. The graphene layer was grown on a nickel thin film by using chemical vapor deposition at atmospheric pressure. Our demonstration provides a low-cost option to generate useful power for lab-on-chip applications and could be promising to rapidly screen and scale up microbial fuel cells for water purification without consuming excessive power (unlike other water treatment technologies).

  18. Characterisation of a fuel cell based uninteruptable power supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aklil, D.; Gazey, R.; McGrath, D.

    2004-07-01

    This report presents the findings of tests carried out to determine if a fuel cell (FC) could be used instead of external batteries in UPS systems. Details are given of the configuration of the 1kW fuel cell based test UPS system (FC-UPS), fuel cell suitability for UPS, the start-up conditions, the on-load dynamic response, comparative weight/space savings of FC-UPS, lifetime costs compared to battery installations, and market readiness of FC systems for UPS deployment. The importance of the collaboration between the FC manufacturers and system integrator for the implementation of the project and of the testing and characterisation of FC products is stressed.

  19. Zirconia based inert matrix fuel: fabrication concepts and feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingold, F.; Burghartz, M.; Ledergerber, G.

    1999-01-01

    The internal gelation process has traditionally been applied to fabricate standard fuel based on uranium, typically UO2 and MOX. To meet the recent aim to destroy plutonium in the most effective way, a uranium free fuel was evaluated. The fuel development programme at PSI has been redirected toward a fuel based on zirconium oxide or a mixture of zirconia and a conducting material to form ceramic/metal (CERMET) or ceramic/ceramic (CERCER) combinations. A feasibility study was carried out to demonstrate that microspheres based on zirconia and spinel can be fabricated with the required properties. The gelation parameters were investigated to optimise compositions of the starting solutions. Studies to fabricate a composite material (from zirconia and spinel) are ongoing. If the zirconia/spinel ratio is chosen appropriately, the low thermal conductivity of pure zirconia can be compensated by the higher thermal conductivity of spinel. Another solution to offset the low thermal conductivity of zirconia is the development of a CERMET, which consists of fine particles bearing plutonium in a cubic zirconia lattice dispersed in a metallic matrix. The fabrication of such a CERMET is also being studied. (author)

  20. Study of fuel properties of rubber seed oil based biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Junaid; Yusup, Suzana; Bokhari, Awais; Kamil, Ruzaimah Nik Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • This article presents the comparative studies of the fuel properties of rubber seed oil based biodiesel. • The design expert has been adopted for the optimization of the process variables. • The FTIR, cold flow properties and oxidation stability are the findings of present study. • All the fuel properties met the standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. • Present study reveals that rubber seed oil as a non-edible source potentially contributes for esters production. - Abstract: The scarcity of the fossil fuel, environmental pollution and food crisis are the world’s major issues in current era. Biodiesel is an alternative to diesel fuel, environment friendly and biodegradable and is produced from either edible or non-edible oils. In this study, a non-edible rubber seed oil (RSO) with high free fatty acid (FFA) content of 45% were used for the production of biodiesel. The process comprises of two steps. The first step is the acid esterification to reduce the FFA value and the second step is the base transesterification. The response surface methodology (RSM) was used for parametric optimization of the two stage processes i.e. acid esterification and base transesterification. The yield of biodiesel was analyzed using gas chromatography. The FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra-Red) spectrum was also determined to confirm the conversion of fatty acid to methyl esters. The fuel properties were analyzed according to the ASTM D6751 and EN14214 and were compared with the previous finding of researchers. All analyzed properties fulfilled the biodiesel standard criteria

  1. Model-based fault diagnosis in PEM fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobet, T; de Lira, S; Puig, V; Quevedo, J [Automatic Control Department (ESAII), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Rambla Sant Nebridi 10, 08222 Terrassa (Spain); Feroldi, D; Riera, J; Serra, M [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial (IRI), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC) Parc Tecnologic de Barcelona, Edifici U, Carrer Llorens i Artigas, 4-6, Planta 2, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    In this work, a model-based fault diagnosis methodology for PEM fuel cell systems is presented. The methodology is based on computing residuals, indicators that are obtained comparing measured inputs and outputs with analytical relationships, which are obtained by system modelling. The innovation of this methodology is based on the characterization of the relative residual fault sensitivity. To illustrate the results, a non-linear fuel cell simulator proposed in the literature is used, with modifications, to include a set of fault scenarios proposed in this work. Finally, it is presented the diagnosis results corresponding to these fault scenarios. It is remarkable that with this methodology it is possible to diagnose and isolate all the faults in the proposed set in contrast with other well known methodologies which use the binary signature matrix of analytical residuals and faults. (author)

  2. Novel Blend Membranes Based on Acid-Base Interactions for Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongzhu Fu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fuel cells hold great promise for wide applications in portable, residential, and large-scale power supplies. For low temperature fuel cells, such as the proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs, proton-exchange membranes (PEMs are a key component determining the fuel cells performance. PEMs with high proton conductivity under anhydrous conditions can allow PEMFCs to be operated above 100 °C, enabling use of hydrogen fuels with high-CO contents and improving the electrocatalytic activity. PEMs with high proton conductivity and low methanol crossover are critical for lowering catalyst loadings at the cathode and improving the performance and long-term stability of DMFCs. This review provides a summary of a number of novel acid-base blend membranes consisting of an acidic polymer and a basic compound containing N-heterocycle groups, which are promising for PEMFCs and DMFCs.

  3. Prolonging fuel cell stack lifetime based on Pontryagin's Minimum Principle in fuel cell hybrid vehicles and its economic influence evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, C. H.; Xu, G. Q.; Park, Y. I.; Lim, W. S.; Cha, S. W.

    2014-02-01

    The lifetime of fuel cell stacks is a major issue currently, especially for automotive applications. In order to take into account the lifetime of fuel cell stacks while considering the fuel consumption minimization in fuel cell hybrid vehicles (FCHVs), a Pontryagin's Minimum Principle (PMP)-based power management strategy is proposed in this research. This strategy has the effect of prolonging the lifetime of fuel cell stacks. However, there is a tradeoff between the fuel cell stack lifetime and the fuel consumption when this strategy is applied to an FCHV. Verifying the positive economic influence of this strategy is necessary in order to demonstrate its superiority. In this research, the economic influence of the proposed strategy is assessed according to an evaluating cost which is dependent on the fuel cell stack cost, the hydrogen cost, the fuel cell stack lifetime, and the lifetime prolonging impact on the fuel cell stack. Simulation results derived from the proposed power management strategy are also used to evaluate the economic influence. As a result, the positive economic influence of the proposed PMP-based power management strategy is proved for both current and future FCHVs.

  4. Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-31

    distribution unlimited Hydrocarbon Fuel Thermal Performance Modeling based on Systematic Measurement and Comprehensive Chromatographic Analysis Matthew...vital importance for hydrocarbon -fueled propulsion systems: fuel thermal performance as indicated by physical and chemical effects of cooling passage... analysis . The selection and acquisition of a set of chemically diverse fuels is pivotal for a successful outcome since test method validation and

  5. Development of base technology for high burnup PWR fuel improvement Volume 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yang Eun; Lee, Sang Hee; Bae, Seong Man [Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Research Center; Chung, Jin Gon; Chung, Sun Kyo; Kim, Sun Du [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Won; Chung, Sun Kyo; Kim, Sun Du [Korea Nuclear Fuel Development Inst., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-31

    Development of base technology for high burnup nuclear fuel -Development of UO{sub 2} pellet manufacturing technology -Improvement of fuel rod performance code -Improvement of plenum spring design -Study on the mechanical characteristics of fuel cladding -Organization of fuel failure mechanism Establishment of next stage R and D program (author). 226 refs., 100 figs.

  6. Issues for Storing Plant-Based Alternative Fuels in Marine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-09

    of aerobic metabolites that exacerbated subsequent corrosion processes. 15. SUBJECT TERMS biodiesel , alternative fuel, seawater, corrosion, carbon...2013 Accepted 17 December 2013 Available online 24 December 2013 Keywords: Biodiesel Alternative fuel Seawater Corrosion Carbon steel...high energy density transportation fuels 13). The feasibility of producing large quantities of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and lipid-based fuels

  7. Evaluation of thorium based nuclear fuel. Actinide waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichers, V.A.

    1995-06-01

    Use of thorium based fuel has recently been proposed as a possible way to reduce the amount of actinide waste from nuclear power. To examine this possibility, burnup calculations were done of five once-through Thorium Heavy Water Reactor (THWR) systems, and three THWR systems with uranium recycle. The natural uranium once-through system was adopted as reference. The studied THWR fuel systems differed in the choice of fissile makeup fuel and exit burnup. The HWR was chosen because of its good neutron economy. Actinide waste production (in mass per GW e a) and radiotoxicity (in ALI per GW e a) for storage times up to 10 6 a were calculated for each system. The study shows that the THWR system with uranium recycle and High Enriched Uranium (U-235) makeup fuel performed best, producing both the lowest amount of plutonium and actinide waste with the lowest radiotoxicity. Relative to the natural uranium in HWR once-through system, radiotoxicity is reduced by a factor varying between 2 and 50 for the full range of storage times up to 10 6 a. (orig.)

  8. 77 FR 59458 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: 2013 Biomass-Based Diesel Renewable Fuel Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... gasoline and diesel fuel or renewable fuels such as ethanol and biodiesel. Potentially regulated categories... of Biodiesel 1. Grease and Rendered Fats 2. Corn Oil 3. Soybean Oil 4. Effects on Food Prices 5.... Deliverability and Transport Costs of Materials, Goods, and Products Other Than Renewable Fuel 6. Wetlands...

  9. Study on Thermal Degradation Characteristics and Regression Rate Measurement of Paraffin-Based Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songqi Hu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paraffin fuel has been found to have a regression rate that is higher than conventional HTPB (hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene fuel and, thus, presents itself as an ideal energy source for a hybrid rocket engine. The energy characteristics of paraffin-based fuel and HTPB fuel have been calculated by the method of minimum free energy. The thermal degradation characteristics were measured for paraffin, pretreated paraffin, HTPB and paraffin-based fuel in different working conditions by the using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA. The regression rates of paraffin-based fuel and HTPB fuel were tested by a rectangular solid-gas hybrid engine. The research findings showed that: the specific impulse of paraffin-based fuel is almost the same as that of HTPB fuel; the decomposition temperature of pretreated paraffin is higher than that of the unprocessed paraffin, but lower than that of HTPB; with the increase of paraffin, the initial reaction exothermic peak of paraffin-based fuel is reached in advance, and the initial reaction heat release also increases; the regression rate of paraffin-based fuel is higher than the common HTPB fuel under the same conditions; with the increase of oxidizer mass flow rate, the regression rate of solid fuel increases accordingly for the same fuel formulation.

  10. Ceramic membrane fuel cells based on solid proton electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Guangyao; Ma, Qianli; Peng, Ranran; Liu, Xingqin [USTC Lab. for Solid State Chemistry and Inorganic Membranes, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Ma, Guilin [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2007-04-15

    The development of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) has reached its new stage characterized with thin electrolytes on porous electrode support, and the most important fabrication techniques developed in which almost all are concerned with inorganic membranes, and so can be named as ceramic membrane fuel cells (CMFCs). CMFCs based on proton electrolytes (CMFC-H) may exhibit more advantages than CMFCs based on oxygen-ion electrolytes (CMFC-O) in many respects, such as energy efficiency and avoiding carbon deposit. Ammonia fuelled CMFC with proton-conducting BaCe{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2.9} (BCGO) electrolyte (50 {mu}m in thickness) is reported in this works, which showed the open current voltage (OCV) values close to theoretical ones and rather high power density. And also, we have found that the well known super oxide ion conductor, La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{alpha}} (LSGM), is a pure proton conductor in H{sub 2} and mixed proton and oxide ion conductor in wet air, while it is a pure oxide ion conductor in oxygen or dry air. To demonstrate the CMFC-H concept to get high performance fuel cells the techniques for thin membranes, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), particularly novel CVD techniques, should be given more attention because of their many advantages. (author)

  11. Applications of polymer coatings for the fabrication of copper-based containers for the ultimate disposal of Canada's spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortley, Aba

    Oxygen-free, phosphorous doped copper containers have been proposed for the storage of the used nuclear fuel bundles as a part of Canada's multi-barrier, adaptive phased management procedure for long term storage of spent nuclear fuel bundles. The spent nuclear fuel disposal system proposed for Canada has been engineered based on the multi-barrier approach intended to minimize the risk that the radioactive materials enter the biosphere. Copper is known to be susceptible to corrosion and it is thought that the simultaneous exposure to aggressive ionizing radiation field and residual heat produced by the spent nuclear fuel and the surrounding groundwater would all challenge the container's integrity. The goal of the present work is to reduce the impact of corrosion in the early stages of emplacement with the addition of a protective coating. Specifically, castor oil based polyurethanes were assessed as coatings and their ability to act as an additional physical barrier in the multi-barrier system mentioned previously. The novelty of this work stems from the use of a naturally derived non-petroleum based material in the form of castor oil as the polyol component. Two types of castor oil polyurethanes were investigated, one based on an aliphatic hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI), and the other based on an aromatic 2,4-toluene diisocyanate (TDI). Radiation and saturation tests were conducted using varying conditions. Mixed field ionizing radiation was provided by a SLOWPOKE-2 pool-type nuclear research reactor, up to accumulated doses of 6 MGy at dose rates of 37 kGy h-1 and 55.5 kGy h-1. Weight gain immersion studies, at temperatures of 25° C, 50° C, 70° C, were used to determine the mass uptake of several different solutions. The solutions utilized in the present work included hydrochloric acids of varying pHs, distilled water, and buffered solutions, which simulated chloride and sulphide rich calcium-sodium bicarbonate waters. After being exposed to radiation and

  12. Recent Advances in Carbon Nanotube-Based Enzymatic Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosnier, Serge, E-mail: serge.cosnier@ujf-grenoble.fr; Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan [Département de Chimie Moléculaire (DCM) UMR 5250, Université Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble (France); Département de Chimie Moléculaire (DCM) UMR 5250, CNRS, Grenoble (France)

    2014-10-24

    This review summarizes recent trends in the field of enzymatic fuel cells. Thanks to the high specificity of enzymes, biofuel cells can generate electrical energy by oxidation of a targeted fuel (sugars, alcohols, or hydrogen) at the anode and reduction of oxidants (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at the cathode in complex media. The combination of carbon nanotubes (CNT), enzymes and redox mediators was widely exploited to develop biofuel cells since the electrons involved in the bio-electrocatalytic processes can be efficiently transferred from or to an external circuit. Original approaches to construct electron transfer based CNT-bioelectrodes and impressive biofuel cell performances are reported as well as biomedical applications.

  13. The use of niobium based catalysts for liquid fuel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reguera Frank Martin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic properties of niobium based catalysts were investigated in the conversion of oleic acid to liquid fuels at atmospheric pressure and at 623 K. The catalytic tests were performed in a fixed bed and continuous flow reactor using an acid to catalyst ratio equal to 4 and N2 as carrier gas. The reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography and acidity measurements. NH3 temperature programmed desorption, N2 adsorption-desorption (BET method and Xray diffraction were also performed in order to determine the structural and acidic properties of the catalysts. From the catalytic tests, it was detected the formation of compounds in the range of gasoline, diesel and lubricant oils. Higher catalytic activity and selectivity for diesel fuel were observed for the catalysts NbOPO4 and H3PO4/Nb2O5 that possesses higher acidities and surface areas.

  14. Operation of Nuclear Fuel Based on Reprocessed Uranium for VVER-type Reactors in Competitive Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyanov, V.; Molchanov, V.; Tuzov, A. [TVEL Corporation, 49 Kashirskoe shosse, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Semchenkov, Yu.; Lizorkin, M. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Vasilchenko, I.; Lushin, V. [OKB ' Gidropress' (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    Current nuclear fuel cycle of Russian nuclear power involves reprocessed low-enriched uranium in nuclear fuel production for some NPP units with VVER-type LWR. This paper discusses design and performance characteristics of commercial nuclear fuel based on natural and reprocessed uranium. It presents the review of results of commercial operation of nuclear fuel based on reprocessed uranium on Russian NPPs-unit No.2 of Kola NPP and unit No.2 of Kalinin NPP. The results of calculation and experimental validation of safe fuel operation including necessary isotope composition conformed to regulation requirements and results of pilot fuel operation are also considered. Meeting the customer requirements the possibility of high burn-up achieving was demonstrated. In addition the paper compares the characteristics of nuclear fuel cycles with maximum length based on reprocessed and natural uranium considering relevant 5% enrichment limitation and necessity of {sup 236}U compensation. The expedience of uranium-235 enrichment increasing over 5% is discussed with the aim to implement longer fuel cycles. (authors)

  15. EPRI fuel performance data base: user's manual. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.; Lee, S.; Rumble, E.

    1980-10-01

    This user's manual provides instructions for accessing the data in the EPRI fuel performance data base (FPDB) and manipulating that data to solve specific problems that the user wishes to specify. The user interacts with the FPDB through the Relational Information Management System (RIMS) computer program. The structure and format of the FPDB and the general syntax of the data base commands are described. Instructions follow for the use of each command. Appendixes provide more detailed information about the FPDB and its software. The FPDB currently resides on a PRIME-750 computer

  16. New ETFE-based membrane for direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarinen, V.; Kallio, T.; Paronen, M.; Tikkanen, P.; Rauhala, E.; Kontturi, K.

    2005-01-01

    The investigated membranes are based on 35-bar μ m thick commercial poly(ethylene-alt-tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE) films. The films were made proton conductive by means of irradiation treatment followed by sulfonation. These membranes have exceptionally low water uptake and excellent dimensional stability. The new membranes are investigated widely in a laboratory-scale direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The temperature range used in the fuel cell tests was 30-85-bar o C and the measurement results were compared to those of the Nafion ( R)115 membrane. Also methanol permeability through the ETFE-based membrane was measured as a function of temperature, resulting in values less than 10% of the corresponding values for Nafion ( R)115, which was considerably thicker than the experimental membrane. Methanol crossover was reported to decrease when the thickness of the membrane increases, so the ETFE-based membrane compares favourably to Nafion ( R) membranes. The maximum power densities achieved with the experimental ETFE-based membrane were about 40-65% lower than the corresponding values of the Nafion ( R)115 membrane, because of the lower conductivity and noticeably higher IR-losses. Chemical and mechanical stability of the ETFE-based membrane appeared to be promising since it was tested over 2000-bar h in the DMFC without any performance loss

  17. SECA Coal-Based Systems - FuelCell Energy, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayagh, Hossein [Fuelcell Energy, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

    2014-01-31

    The overall goal of this U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project is the development of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cell and stack technology suitable for use in highly-efficient, economically-competitive central generation power plant facilities fueled by coal synthesis gas (syngas). This program incorporates the following supporting objectives: • Reduce SOFC-based electrical power generation system cost to $700 or less (2007 dollars) for a greater than 100 MW Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) power plant, exclusive of coal gasification and CO2 separation subsystem costs. • Achieve an overall IGFC power plant efficiency of at least 50%, from coal (higher heating value or HHV) to AC power (exclusive of CO2 compression power requirement). • Reduce the release of CO2 to the environment in an IGFC power plant to no more than 10% of the carbon in the syngas. • Increase SOFC stack reliability to achieve a design life of greater than 40,000 hours. At the inception of the project, the efforts were focused on research, design and testing of prototype planar SOFC power generators for stationary applications. FuelCell Energy, Inc. successfully completed the initial stage of the project by meeting the program metrics, culminating in delivery and testing of a 3 kW system at National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Subsequently, the project was re-aligned into a three phase effort with the main goal to develop SOFC technology for application in coal-fueled power plants with >90% carbon capture. Phase I of the Coal-based efforts focused on cell and stack size scale-up with concurrent enhancement of performance, life, cost, and manufacturing characteristics. Also in Phase I, design and analysis of the baseline (greater than 100 MW) power plant system—including concept identification, system definition, and cost analysis—was conducted. Phase II efforts focused on development of a ≥25 kW SOFC stack tower incorporating

  18. [Characterization and supply of coal based fuels]. Quarterly technical report, February 1, 1988--April 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-31

    Contract objectives are as follows: Develop fuel specifications to serve combustor requirements; Select coals having appropriate compositional and quality characteristics as well as an economically attractive reserve base; Provide quality assurance for both the parent coals and the fuel forms; and deliver premium coal-based fuels to combustor developers as needed for their contract work. Progress is described.

  19. Carbon deposition thresholds on nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell anodes I. Fuel utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, J.; Kesler, O.

    2015-03-01

    In the first of a two part publication, the effect of fuel utilization (Uf) on carbon deposition rates in solid oxide fuel cell nickel-based anodes was studied. Representative 5-component CH4 reformate compositions (CH4, H2, CO, H2O, & CO2) were selected graphically by plotting the solutions to a system of mass-balance constraint equations. The centroid of the solution space was chosen to represent a typical anode gas mixture for each nominal Uf value. Selected 5-component and 3-component gas mixtures were then delivered to anode-supported cells for 10 h, followed by determination of the resulting deposited carbon mass. The empirical carbon deposition thresholds were affected by atomic carbon (C), hydrogen (H), and oxygen (O) fractions of the delivered gas mixtures and temperature. It was also found that CH4-rich gas mixtures caused irreversible damage, whereas atomically equivalent CO-rich compositions did not. The coking threshold predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations employing graphite for the solid carbon phase agreed well with empirical thresholds at 700 °C (Uf ≈ 32%); however, at 600 °C, poor agreement was observed with the empirical threshold of ∼36%. Finally, cell operating temperatures correlated well with the difference in enthalpy between the supplied anode gas mixtures and their resulting thermodynamic equilibrium gas mixtures.

  20. Preliminary Report: Bases for Containment Analysis for Transportation of Aluminum-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinson, D.W.

    1998-01-01

    Aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (Al-SNF) from foreign and domestic research reactors (FRR/DRR) is being shipped to SRS under the site FRR/DRR Receipts Program. Shipment of the FRR/DRR assemblies required that the cask with loaded fuel be certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for US-owned casks) or the US Department of Transportation (for foreign-owned casks) to comply with the requirements in 10CFR71

  1. An experimental assessment on the influence of high octane fuels on biofuel based dual fuel engine performance, emission, and combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masimalai Senthilkumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study on the effect of different high octane fuels (such as eucalyptus oil, ethanol, and methanol on engine’s performance behaviour of a biofuel based dual fuel engine. A single cylinder Diesel engine was modified and tested under dual fuel mode of operation. Initially the engine was run using neat diesel, neat mahua oil as fuels. In the second phase, the engine was operated in dual fuel mode by using a specially designed variable jet carburettor to supply the high octane fuels. Engine trials were made at 100% and 40% loads (power outputs with varying amounts of high octane fuels up-to the maximum possible limit. The performance and emission characteristics of the engine were obtained and analysed. Results indicated significant improvement in brake thermal efficiency simultaneous reduction in smoke and NO emissions in dual fuel operation with all the inducted fuels. At 100% load the brake thermal efficiency increased from 25.6% to a maximum of 32.3, 30.5, and 28.4%, respectively, with eucalyptus oil, ethanol, and methanol as primary fuels. Smoke was reduced drastically from 78% with neat mahua oil a minimum of 41, 48, and 53%, respectively, with eucalyptus oil, ethanol, and methanol at the maximum efficiency point. The optimal energy share for the best engine behaviour was found to be 44.6, 27.3, and 23.2%, respectively, for eucalyptus oil, ethanol, and methanol at 100% load. Among the primary fuels tested, eucalyptus oil showed the maximum brake thermal efficiency, minimum smoke and NO emissions and maximum energy replacement for the optimal operation of the engine.

  2. Engine control system having fuel-based timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willi, Martin L [Dunlap, IL; Fiveland, Scott B [Metamora, IL; Montgomery, David T [Edelstein, IL; Gong, Weidong [Dunlap, IL

    2012-04-03

    A control system for an engine having a cylinder is disclosed having an engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the cylinder and an actuator associated with the engine valve. The control system also has a sensor configured to generate a signal indicative of an amount of an air/fuel mixture remaining within the cylinder after completion of a first combustion event and a controller in communication with the actuator and the sensor. The controller may be configured to compare the amount with a desired amount, and to selectively regulate the actuator to adjust a timing of the engine valve associated with a subsequent combustion event based on the comparison.

  3. Characterization and supply of coal-based fuels. Quarterly report, February 1, 1989--April 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-06-01

    Contract objectives are as follows: Develop fuel specifications to serve combustor requirements. Select coals having appropriate compositional and quality characteristics as well as an economically attractive reserve base; Provide quality assurance for both the parent coals and the fuel forms; and deliver premium coal-based fuels to combustor developers as needed for their contract work. Progress is discussed, particulary in slurry fuel preparation and particle size distribution.

  4. Microbial fuel cell based on electroactive sulfate-reducing biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelov, Anatoliy; Bratkova, Svetlana; Loukanov, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Regulation and management of electricity generation by variation of residence time. ► Design of microbial fuel cell based on electroactive biofilm on zeolite. ► Engineering solution for removing of the obtained elemental sulfur. - abstract: A two chambered laboratory scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been developed, based on natural sulfate-reducing bacterium consortium in electroactive biofilm on zeolite. The MFC utilizes potassium ferricyanide in the cathode chamber as an electron acceptor that derives electrons from the obtained in anode chamber H 2 S. The molecular oxygen is finally used as a terminal electron acceptor at cathode compartment. The generated power density was 0.68 W m −2 with current density of 3.2 A m −2 at 150 Ω electrode resistivity. The hydrogen sulfide itself is produced by microbial dissimilative sulfate reduction process by utilizing various organic substrates. Finally, elemental sulfur was identified as the predominant final oxidation product in the anode chamber. It was removed from MFC through medium circulation and gathering in an external tank. This report reveals dependence relationship between the progress of general electrochemical parameters and bacterial sulfate-reduction rate. The presented MFC design can be used for simultaneous sulfate purification of mining drainage wastewater and generation of renewable electricity

  5. Simulation on reactor TRIGA Puspati core kinetics fueled with thorium (Th) based fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, Abdul Aziz, E-mail: azizM@uniten.edu.my; Rahman, Shaik Mohmmed Haikhal Abdul [Universiti Tenaga Nasional. Jalan Ikram-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Pauzi, Anas Muhamad, E-mail: anas@uniten.edu.my; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Muhammad; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Idris, Faridah Mohamad [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    In confronting global energy requirement and the search for better technologies, there is a real case for widening the range of potential variations in the design of nuclear power plants. Smaller and simpler reactors are attractive, provided they can meet safety and security standards and non-proliferation issues. On fuel cycle aspect, thorium fuel cycles produce much less plutonium and other radioactive transuranic elements than uranium fuel cycles. Although not fissile itself, Th-232 will absorb slow neutrons to produce uranium-233 ({sup 233}U), which is fissile. By introducing Thorium, the numbers of highly enriched uranium fuel element can be reduced while maintaining the core neutronic performance. This paper describes the core kinetic of a small research reactor core like TRIGA fueled with a Th filled fuel element matrix using a general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code.

  6. Fuel cells based on the use of Pd foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabot, P. L.; Guezala, E. [Laboratori de Ciencia i Tecnologia Electroquimica de Materials, Barcelona (Spain); Casado, J. [Departamento de Investigacion, Carburos Metalicos, Barcelona (Spain)

    1999-10-01

    Fuel cells with hydrogen diffusion lead anodes are of particular interest because the ability of lead to filter hydrogen with 100 per cent selectively, thus making it possible to take impure hydrogen from industrial flue gases and use it as feedstock to produce clean energy. In this investigation an alkaline fuel cell with a Pd-based hydrogen diffusion anode combined with a carbon-PFTE oxygen diffusion cathode was built up and tested at low temperatures. The fuel cell was operated by feeding pure hydrogen and pure oxygen at atmospheric pressures and closing the circuit by means of different external loads. Quasi-stationary currents were obtained for each load when the Pd foils were assembled using elastic joints to allow the anode creasing. Experiments with different sections indicated that the anode was the limiting electrode. Results showed that the slowest reactions in the overall anodic process depend on the anode preparation. When Pd black was present only at the Pd/electrolyte interface, the slowest reaction occurred on the gas/Pd interface. For anodes with Pd black on both sides of the foil, the maximum anode power densities were 11 and 18 mW cm{sup 2} at 25 and 50 degrees C, respectively; the corresponding anode current densities were 30 and 65 mA cm{sup 2}. Significant improvements in the anode current and power densities were achieved via surface modification by cathodically charging Pd pieces with atomic hydrogen, and Pd foils with electrodeposited Pd+Pt blacks, obtaining roughly double the power and current density. 31 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Robust Platinum-Based Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Eric James

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEMFCs) are energy conversion devices that exploit the energetics of the reaction between hydrogen fuel and O 2 to generate electricity with water as the only byproduct. PEMFCs have attracted substantial attention due to their high conversion efficiency, high energy density, and low carbon footprint. However, PEMFC performance is hindered by the high activation barrier and slow reaction rates at the cathode where O2 undergoes an overall 4-electron reduction to water. The most efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst materials to date are Pt group metals due to their high catalytic activity and stability in a wide range of operating conditions. Before fuel cells can become economically viable, efforts must be taken to decrease Pt content while maintaining a high level of ORR activity. This work describes the design and synthesis of a Pt-Cu electrocatalyst with ORR activity exceeding that of polycrystalline Pt. Production of this novel catalyst is quite simple and begins with synthesis of a porous Cu substrate, formed by etching Al from a Cu-Al alloy. The porous Cu substrate is then coated with a Pt layer via a spontaneous electrochemical process known as galvanic replacement. The Pt layer enhances the ORR activity (as measured by a rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE)) and acts as a barrier towards corrosion of the Cu understructure. Growth of the Pt layer can be manipulated by time, temperature, concentration of Pt precursor, and convection rate during galvanic replacement. Data from analytical and electrochemical techniques confirm multiple Pt loadings have been achieved via the galvanic replacement process. The boost in ORR activity for the PtCu catalyst was determined to be a result of its lower affinity towards (site-blocking) OH adsorption. A unique catalyst degradation study explains the mechanism of initial catalyst ORR deactivation for both monometallic and bimetallic Pt-based catalysts. Finally, a rigorous and

  8. Graphene-Based Flexible Micrometer-Sized Microbial Fuel Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.; Qaisi, Ramy M.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells harvest electrical energy produced by bacteria during the natural decomposition of organic matter. We report a micrometer-sized microbial fuel cell that is able to generate nanowatt-scale power from microliters of liquids

  9. A Modified Nitride-Based Fuel for Long Core Life and Proliferation Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbinghaus, B; Choi, J; Meier, T

    2003-01-01

    A modified nitride-based uranium fuel to support the small, secured, transportable, and autonomous reactor (SSTAR) concept is initiated at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL). This project centers on the evaluation of modified uranium nitride fuels imbedded with other inert (e.g. ZrN), neutron-absorbing (e.g. HfN) , or breeding (e.g. ThN) nitrides to enhance the fuel properties to achieve long core life with a compact reactor design. A long-life fuel could minimize the need for on-site refueling and spent-fuel storage. As a result, it could significantly improve the proliferation resistance of the reactor/fuel systems. This paper discusses the potential benefits and detriments of modified nitride-based fuels using the criteria of compactness, long-life, proliferation resistance, fuel safety, and waste management. Benefits and detriments are then considered in recommending a select set of compositions for further study

  10. Scratch Behaviors of Cr-Coated Zr-Based Fuel Claddings for Accident-Tolerant Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Il-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    As the progression of Fukushima accident is worsened by the runaway reaction at a high temperature above 1200 .deg. C, it is essential to ensure the stabilities of coating layers on conventional Zr-based alloys during normal operations as well as severe accident conditions. This is because the failures of coating layer result in galvanic corrosion phenomenon by potential difference between coating layer and Zr alloy. Also, it is possible to damage the coating layer during handling and manufacturing process by contacting structural components of a fuel assembly. So, adhesion strength is one of the key factors determining the reliability of the coating layer on conventional Zr-based alloy. In this study, two kinds of Cr-coated Zr-based claddings were prepared using arc ion plating (AIP) and direct laser (DL) coating methods. The objective is to evaluate the scratch deformation behaviors of each coating layers on Zr alloys. Large area spallation below normal load of about 15 N appeared to be the predominant mode of failure in the AIP coating during scratch test. However, no tensile crack were found in entire stroke length. In DL coating, small plastic deformation and grooving behavior are more dominant scratching results. It was observed that the change of the slope of the COF curve did not coincide with the failure of coating layer.

  11. Experimental Fuels Facility Re-categorization Based on Facility Segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiss, Troy P.; Andrus, Jason

    2016-07-01

    The Experimental Fuels Facility (EFF) (MFC-794) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site was originally constructed to provide controlled-access, indoor storage for radiological contaminated equipment. Use of the facility was expanded to provide a controlled environment for repairing contaminated equipment and characterizing, repackaging, and treating waste. The EFF facility is also used for research and development services, including fuel fabrication. EFF was originally categorized as a LTHC-3 radiological facility based on facility operations and facility radiological inventories. Newly planned program activities identified the need to receive quantities of fissionable materials in excess of the single parameter subcritical limit in ANSI/ANS-8.1, “Nuclear Criticality Safety in Operations with Fissionable Materials Outside Reactors” (identified as “criticality list” quantities in DOE-STD-1027-92, “Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports,” Attachment 1, Table A.1). Since the proposed inventory of fissionable materials inside EFF may be greater than the single parameter sub-critical limit of 700 g of U-235 equivalent, the initial re-categorization is Hazard Category (HC) 2 based upon a potential criticality hazard. This paper details the facility hazard categorization performed for the EFF. The categorization was necessary to determine (a) the need for further safety analysis in accordance with LWP-10802, “INL Facility Categorization,” and (b) compliance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 830, Subpart B, “Safety Basis Requirements.” Based on the segmentation argument presented in this paper, the final hazard categorization for the facility is LTHC-3. Department of Energy Idaho (DOE-ID) approval of the final hazard categorization determined by this hazard assessment document (HAD) was required per the

  12. Incorporation of new tables into the preliminary structure of BDCN - nuclear fuel data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pombo, J.B.S.; Andrade, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The structure of the new tables related to fuel elements, fuel rods and fuel pellets have been incorporated into the developing structure of BDCN - nuclear fuel data base, are described. The list of all 44 tables structured up to now, with identification of its primary keys, as well as the reduced set of data has been entered to run the simulations are also presented. The simulation tests have been ran using a microcomputer.(M.I.)

  13. Calculation for Primary Combustion Characteristics of Boron-Based Fuel-Rich Propellant Based on BP Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    Wan'e, Wu; Zuoming, Zhu

    2012-01-01

    A practical scheme for selecting characterization parameters of boron-based fuel-rich propellant formulation was put forward; a calculation model for primary combustion characteristics of boron-based fuel-rich propellant based on backpropagation neural network was established, validated, and then was used to predict primary combustion characteristics of boron-based fuel-rich propellant. The results show that the calculation error of burning rate is less than ± 7 . 3 %; in the formulation rang...

  14. Basic properties of a zirconia based fuel material for LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.; Paratte, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of zirconia cubic solid solutions doped with yttria, erbia and ceria or thoria are investigated with emphasis on the potential use of this material as inert matrix fuel for plutonium incineration in a light water reactor (LWR). The material is selected on the basis of its neutronic properties. Zr and Y are not neutron absorbers. Among the rare earth elements, Er was identified as a suitable burnable poison. The high density cubic solid solution is stable for a rather large range of compositions and from room temperature up to about 3000 K. Samples irradiated under low and high energy Xe ion irradiation up to a fluence of 1.8.10 16 Xe.cm -2 were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Low energy (60 keV) Xe ions did not produce amorphization. From the observed bubble formation, swelling values during irradiation at room temperature or at high temperature (925 K) were estimated to be 0.1-0.72% by volume. Furthermore, no amorphization was obtained by Xe irradiation under extreme conditions such as high energy (1.5 MeV) Xe ion irradiation and low temperature (20 K). This confirms the robustness of this material and argues in favour of the selection of a zirconia based material as an advanced nuclear fuel for plutonium incineration. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab., 17 refs

  15. Thermophysical properties of composite fuel based on T grade coal (Alardinskoe deposit) and timber industry wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovsky, S. A.; Tolokolnikov, A. A.; Gubin, V. E.; Slyusarskiy, K. V.; Zenkov, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    Results of experimental studies of composite fuel thermal decomposition processes based on T grade coal (Alardinskoe deposit) and timber industry wastes (fine wood) are presented. C, H, N, S weight percentage of each component of composite fuel was determined experimentally. It has been established that with an increase in wood concentration up to 50% in composite fuel, its energy characteristics decrease by less than 3.6%, while the yield of fly ash is 39.7%. An effective composite fuel composition has been defined as 50%/50%. Results of performed experimental studies suggest that it is possible to use composite fuels based on coal and wood at thermal power plants.

  16. Recent advances and challenges of fuel cell based power system architectures and control – A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Vipin; Sanjeevikumar, Padmanaban; Venkitusamy, Karthikeyan

    2017-01-01

    by bit with expansion in current because of losses associated with fuel cell. It is difficult in handling large rated fuel cell based power system without regulating mechanism. The issue connected with fuel based structural planning and the arrangements are widely investigated for all sorts......Renewable energy generation is rapidly growing in the power sector industry and widely used for two categories: grid connected and standalone system. This paper gives the insights about fuel cell operation and application of various power electronics systems. The fuel cell voltage decreases bit...

  17. Minimization of the fission product waste by using thorium based fuel instead of uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galahom, A. Abdelghafar, E-mail: Agalahom@yahoo.com

    2017-04-01

    This research discusses the neutronic characteristics of VVER-1200 assembly fueled with five different fuel types based on thorium. These types of fuel based on mixing thorium as a fertile material with different fissile materials. The neutronic characteristics of these fuels are investigated by comparing their neutronic characteristics with the conventional uranium dioxide fuel using the MCNPX code. The objective of this study is to reduce the production of long-lived actinides, get rid of plutonium component and to improve the fuel cycle economy while maintaining acceptable values of the neutronic safety parameters such as moderator temperature coefficient, Doppler coefficient and effective delayed neutrons (β). The thorium based fuel has a more negative Doppler coefficient than uranium dioxide fuel. The moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) has been calculated for the different proposed fuels. Also, the fissile inventory ratio has been calculated at different burnup step. The use of Th-232 as a fertile material instead of U-238 in a nuclear fuel is the most promising fuel in VVER-1200 as it is the ideal solution to avoid the production of more plutonium components and long-lived minor actinides. The reactor grade plutonium accumulated in light water reactor with burnup can be recycled by mixing it with Th-232 to fuel the VVER-1200 assembly. The concentrations of Xe-135 and Sm-151 have been investigated, due to their high thermal neutron absorption cross section.

  18. Fuel performance-REP, Seminars on nuclear fuel performance based on basic underlining phenomena, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Description: The need for further improving the understanding of basic phenomena underlying nuclear fuel behaviour has been recognised both by fuel vendors, experts in fuel research in the different laboratories and committees and working groups coordinating international activities. The OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee has established an Experts Group addressing this issue. This has led to establishing an International Fuel Performance Experiments Database (IFPE) that should help model evaluation and validation. Many years ago the IAEA established an International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) that led to the FUMEX-I and FUMEX-II (Fuel Modelling Exercise) which has had an important impact on code improvements. Both international organisations, with the support of national organisations, co-operate in establishing and maintaining the Database and to build confidence in the predictive power of the models through international comparison exercises. But above all the different parties have agreed that seminars focussed on specific phenomena would be beneficial to exchange current knowledge, identify outstanding problems and agree on common action that would lead to improved understanding of the phenomena. A series of three seminars has been initiated by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), Electricite de France (EdF), Framatome and Cogema under the aegis of the OECD/NEA and the IAEA. 1. Thermal Performance of High Burn-Up LWR Fuel at Cadarache, France, from 3 to 6 of March 1998. Thermal performance occupies the most important aspect of the fuel performance modelling. Not only is it extremely important from a safety point of view, but also many of the material properties of interest and behaviour, such as transport properties like fuel creep and fission gas release are thermally activated processes. Thus, in order to model these processes correctly, it is critical to calculate temperatures and their distribution as accurately as

  19. Laser-based analytical monitoring in nuclear-fuel processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1978-09-01

    The use of laser-based analytical methods in nuclear-fuel processing plants is considered. The species and locations for accountability, process control, and effluent control measurements in the Coprocessing, Thorex, and reference Purex fuel processing operations are identified and the conventional analytical methods used for these measurements are summarized. The laser analytical methods based upon Raman, absorption, fluorescence, and nonlinear spectroscopy are reviewed and evaluated for their use in fuel processing plants. After a comparison of the capabilities of the laser-based and conventional analytical methods, the promising areas of application of the laser-based methods in fuel processing plants are identified

  20. 76 FR 82320 - Ethyl Alcohol for Fuel Use: Determination of the Base Quantity of Imports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 332-288] Ethyl Alcohol for Fuel Use: Determination of the Base Quantity of Imports AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. [[Page 82321

  1. Pt based anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Weijiang; Zhou, Zhenhua; Song, Shuqin; Li, Wenzhen; Sun, Gongquan; Xin, Qin [Direct Alcohol Fuel Cell Laboratory, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, CAS, P.O. Box 110, Dalian 116023 (China); Tsiakaras, Panagiotis [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Thessalia, Pedion Areos, GR 38334 Volos (Greece) 7

    2003-11-10

    In the present work several Pt-based anode catalysts supported on carbon XC-72R were prepared with a novel method and characterized by means of XRD, TEM and XPS analysis. It was found that all these catalysts are consisted of uniform nanosized particles with sharp distribution and Pt lattice parameter decreases with the addition of Ru or Pd and increases with the addition of Sn or W. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements and single direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) tests jointly showed that the presence of Sn, Ru and W enhances the activity of Pt towards ethanol electro-oxidation in the following order: Pt{sub 1}Sn{sub 1}/C>Pt{sub 1}Ru{sub 1}/C>Pt{sub 1}W{sub 1}/C>Pt{sub 1}Pd{sub 1}/C>Pt/C. Moreover, Pt{sub 1}Ru{sub 1}/C further modified by W and Mo showed improved ethanol electro-oxidation activity, but its DEFC performance was found to be inferior to that measured for Pt{sub 1}Sn{sub 1}/C. Under this respect, several PtSn/C catalysts with different Pt/Sn atomic ratio were also identically prepared and characterized and their direct ethanol fuel cell performances were evaluated. It was found that the single direct ethanol fuel cell having Pt{sub 1}Sn{sub 1}/C or Pt{sub 3}Sn{sub 2}/C or Pt{sub 2}Sn{sub 1}/C as anode catalyst showed better performances than those with Pt{sub 3}Sn{sub 1}/C or Pt{sub 4}Sn{sub 1}/C. It was also found that the latter two cells exhibited higher performances than the single cell using Pt{sub 1}Ru{sub 1}/C, which is exclusively used in PEMFC as anode catalyst for both methanol electro-oxidation and CO-tolerance. This distinct difference in DEFC performance between the catalysts examined here would be attributed to the so-called bifunctional mechanism and to the electronic interaction between Pt and additives. It is thought that an amount of -OH{sub ads}, an amount of surface Pt active sites and the conductivity effect of PtSn/C catalysts would determine the activity of PtSn/C with different Pt/Sn ratios. At lower temperature values or at low

  2. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB; Carmack, Jon [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R & D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

  3. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, Cetin; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal; Carmack, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R and D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

  4. Method of forming a package for MEMS-based fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D; Jankowski, Alan F

    2013-05-21

    A MEMS-based fuel cell package and method thereof is disclosed. The fuel cell package comprises seven layers: (1) a sub-package fuel reservoir interface layer, (2) an anode manifold support layer, (3) a fuel/anode manifold and resistive heater layer, (4) a Thick Film Microporous Flow Host Structure layer containing a fuel cell, (5) an air manifold layer, (6) a cathode manifold support structure layer, and (7) a cap. Fuel cell packages with more than one fuel cell are formed by positioning stacks of these layers in series and/or parallel. The fuel cell package materials such as a molded plastic or a ceramic green tape material can be patterned, aligned and stacked to form three dimensional microfluidic channels that provide electrical feedthroughs from various layers which are bonded together and mechanically support a MEMS-based miniature fuel cell. The package incorporates resistive heating elements to control the temperature of the fuel cell stack. The package is fired to form a bond between the layers and one or more microporous flow host structures containing fuel cells are inserted within the Thick Film Microporous Flow Host Structure layer of the package.

  5. Design and construction of wireless personal computer based fuel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results of the different fuel levels obtained through wireless medium are graphical represented on the PC display for monitoring and prompt actions. The PC interface was made possible using C++ programming language. Keywords: Monitoring system, fuel level, floater, transceiver and Radio frequency. Nigerian Journal of ...

  6. The promise of fuel cell-based automobiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    hybrid system or with a fuel cell–supercapacitor hybrid system (figure 4). In a clear demonstration of its commitment to have fuel-cell cars in series production by 2004, .... Toyota plans to launch a commercial FCV in 2003. Exxon and Toyota are working together on technology to extract hydrogen from gasoline. Toyota keeps ...

  7. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis Of Thorium-Based Annular Fuel Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kyu Hyun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Thermal hydraulic characteristics of thorium-based fuel assemblies loaded with annular seed pins have been analyzed using AMAP combined with MATRA, and compared with those of the existing thorium-based assemblies. MATRA and AMAP showed good agreements for the pressure drops at the internal sub-channels. The pressure drop generally increased in the cases of the assemblies loaded with annular seed pins due to the larger wetted perimeter, but an exception existed. In the inner sub-channels of the seed pins, mass fluxes were high due to the grid form losses in the outer sub-channels. About 43% of the heat generated from the seed pin flowed into the inner sub-channel and the rest into the outer sub-channel, which implies the inner to outer wall heat flux ratio was approximately 1.2. The maximum temperatures of the annular seed pins were slightly above 500 deg. C. The MDNBRs of the assemblies loaded with annular seed pins were higher than those of the existing assemblies. Due to the fact that inter-channel mixing cannot occur in the inner sub-channels, temperatures and enthalpies were higher in the inner sub-channels. (author)

  8. A review on the status of development in thorium-based nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Woo; Na, S. H.; Lee, Y. W.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, S. H.; Joung, C.Y.

    2000-02-01

    Thorium as an alternative nuclear energy source had been widely investigated in the 1950s-1960s because it is more abundant than uranium, but the studies of thorium nuclear fuel cycle were discontinued by political and economic reasons in the 1970s. Recently, however, renewed interest was vested in thorium-based nuclear fuel cycle because it may generate less long-lived minor actinides and has a lower radiotoxicity of high level wastes after reprocessing compared with the thorium fuel cycle. In this state-of the art report, thorium-based nuclear cycle. In this state-of the art report, thorium-based nuclear fuel cycle and fuel fabrication processes developed so far with different reactor types are reviewed and analyzed to establish basic technologies of thorium fuel fabrication which could meet our situation. (author)

  9. Influence of metallic based fuel additives on performance and exhaust emissions of diesel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskin, Ali [Tarsus Technical Education Faculty, Mersin University, 33500 Mersin (Turkey); Guerue, Metin, E-mail: mguru@gazi.edu.t [Engineering and Architectural Faculty, Gazi University, 06570 Maltepe, Ankara (Turkey); Altiparmak, Duran [Technical Education Faculty, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-01-15

    In this experimental study, influence of the metallic-based additives on fuel consumption and exhaust emissions of diesel engine were investigated. The metallic-based additives were produced by synthesizing of resin acid (abietic acid) with MnO{sub 2} or MgO. These additives were doped into diesel fuel at the rate of 8 {mu}mol/l and 16 {mu}mol/l for preparing test fuels. Both additives improved the properties of diesel fuel such as viscosity, flash point, cloud point and pour point. The fuels with and without additives were tested in a direct injection diesel engine at full load condition. Maximum reduction of specific fuel consumption was recorded as 4.16%. CO emission and smoke opacity decreased by 16.35% and by 29.82%, respectively. NO{sub x} emission was measured higher and CO{sub 2} emission was not changed considerably with the metallic-based additives.

  10. 40 CFR 600.208-12 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission values...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-based fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission values for a model type. 600.208-12 Section 600... ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later...-based and HFET-based fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission values for a model type. (a) Fuel...

  11. Neutronic calculations of AFPR-100 reactor based on Spherical Cermet Fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchrif, A.; Chetaine, A.; Amsil, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • AFPR-100 reactor considered as a small nuclear reactor without on-site refueling originally based on TRISO micro-fuel element. • The AFPR-100 reactor was re-designed using the new Spherical Cermet fuel element. • The adoption of the Cermet fuel instead of TRISO fuel reduces the core lifetime operation by 3.1 equivalent full power years. • We discussed the new micro-fuel element candidate for small and medium sized reactors. - Abstract: The Atoms For Peace Reactor (AFPR-100), as a 100 MW(e) without the need of on-site refueling, was originally based on UO2 TRISO fuel coated particles embedded in a carbon matrix directly cooled by light water. AFPR-100 is considered as a small nuclear reactor without open-vessel refueling which is proposed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). An account of significant irradiation swelling in the silicon carbide fission product barrier coating layer of TRISO fuel element, a Spherical Cermet Fuel element has been proposed. Indeed, the new fuel concept, which was developed by PNNL, consists of changing the pyro-carbon and ceramic coatings that are incompatible with low temperature by Zirconium. The latter was chosen to avoid any potential Wigner energy effect issues in the TRISO fuel element. Actually, the purpose of this study is to assess the goal of AFPR-100 concept using the Cermet fuel; undeniably, the fuel core lifetime prediction may be extended for reasonably long period without on-site refueling. In fact, we investigated some neutronic parameters of reactor core by the calculation code SRAC95. The results suggest that the core fuel lifetime beyond 12 equivalent full power years (EFPYs) is possible. Hence, the adoption of Cermet fuel concept shows a core lifetime decrease of about 3.1 EFPY

  12. Thorium-Based Fuels Preliminary Lattice Cell Studies for Candu Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, C.A.; Rizoiu, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The choice of nuclear power as a major contributor to the future global energy needs must take into account acceptable risks of nuclear weapon proliferation, in addition to economic competitiveness, acceptable safety standards, and acceptable waste disposal options. Candu reactors offer a proven technology, safe and reliable reactor technology, with an interesting evolutionary potential for proliferation resistance, their versatility for various fuel cycles creating premises for a better utilization of global fuel resources. Candu reactors impressive degree of fuel cycle flexibility is a consequence of its channel design, excellent neutron economy, on-power refueling, and simple fuel bundle. These features facilitate the introduction and exploitation of various fuel cycles in Candu reactors in an evolutionary fashion. The main reasons for our interest in Thorium-based fuel cycles have been, globally, to extend the energy obtainable from natural Uranium and, locally, to provide a greater degree of energy self-reliance. Applying the once through Thorium (OTT) cycle in existing and advanced Candu reactors might be seen as an evaluative concept for the sustainable development both from the economic and waste management points of view. Two Candu fuel bundles project will be used for the proposed analysis, namely the Candu standard fuel bundle with 37 fuel elements and the CANFLEX fuel bundle with 43 fuel elements. Using the Canadian proposed scheme - loading mixed ThO 2 -SEU CANFLEX bundles in Candu 6 reactors - simulated at lattice cell level led to promising conclusions on operation at higher fuel burnups, reduction of the fissile content to the end of the cycle, minor actinide content reduction in the spent fuel, reduction of the spent fuel radiotoxicity, presence of radionuclides emitting strong gamma radiation for proliferation resistance benefit. The calculations were performed using the lattice codes WIMS and Dragon (together with the corresponding nuclear data

  13. Subtask 3.11 - Production of CBTL-Based Jet Fuels from Biomass-Based Feedstocks and Montana Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ramesh

    2014-06-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Accelergy Corporation, an advanced fuels developer with technologies exclusively licensed from Exxon Mobil, undertook Subtask 3.11 to use a recently installed bench-scale direct coal liquefaction (DCL) system capable of converting 45 pounds/hour of pulverized, dried coal to a liquid suitable for upgrading to fuels and/or chemicals. The process involves liquefaction of Rosebud mine coal (Montana coal) coupled with an upgrading scheme to produce a naphthenic fuel. The upgrading comprises catalytic hydrotreating and saturation to produce naphthenic fuel. A synthetic jet fuel was prepared by blending equal volumes of naphthenic fuel with similar aliphatic fuel derived from biomass and 11 volume % of aromatic hydrocarbons. The synthetic fuel was tested using standard ASTM International techniques to determine compliance with JP-8 fuel. The composite fuel thus produced not only meets but exceeds the military aviation fuel-screening criteria. A 500-milliliter synthetic jet fuel sample which met internal screening criteria was submitted to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright–Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, for evaluation. The sample was confirmed by AFRL to be in compliance with U.S. Air Force-prescribed alternative aviation fuel initial screening criteria. The results show that this fuel meets or exceeds the key specification parameters for JP-8, a petroleum-based jet fuel widely used by the U.S. military. JP-8 specifications include parameters such as freeze point, density, flash point, and others; all of which were met by the EERC fuel sample. The fuel also exceeds the thermal stability specification of JP-8 fuel as determined by the quartz crystalline microbalance (QCM) test also performed at an independent laboratory as well as AFRL. This means that the EERC fuel looks and acts identically to petroleum-derived jet fuel and can be used

  14. Simulations of Lithium-Based Neutron Coincidence Counter for Gd-Loaded Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowles, Christian C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Siciliano, Edward R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Lithium-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology Coincidence Counting for Gd-loaded Fuels at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the development of a lithium-based neutron coincidence counter for nondestructively assaying Gd loaded nuclear fuel. This report provides results from MCNP simulations of a lithium-based coincidence counter for the possible measurement of Gd-loaded nuclear fuel. A comparison of lithium-based simulations and UNCL-II simulations with and without Gd loaded fuel is provided. A lithium-based model, referred to as PLNS3A-R1, showed strong promise for assaying Gd loaded fuel.

  15. Life-cycle analysis of bio-based aviation fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeongwoo; Elgowainy, Amgad; Cai, Hao; Wang, Michael Q

    2013-12-01

    Well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of bio-based aviation fuels, including hydroprocessed renewable jet (HRJ) from various oil seeds, Fischer-Tropsch jet (FTJ) from corn-stover and co-feeding of coal and corn-stover, and pyrolysis jet from corn stover, is conducted and compared with petroleum jet. WTWa GHG emission reductions relative to petroleum jet can be 41-63% for HRJ, 68-76% for pyrolysis jet and 89% for FTJ from corn stover. The HRJ production stage dominates WTWa GHG emissions from HRJ pathways. The differences in GHG emissions from HRJ production stage among considered feedstocks are much smaller than those from fertilizer use and N2O emissions related to feedstock collection stage. Sensitivity analyses on FTJ production from coal and corn-stover are also conducted, showing the importance of biomass share in the feedstock, carbon capture and sequestration options, and overall efficiency. For both HRJ and FTJ, co-product handling methods have significant impacts on WTWa results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Terminology used for renewable liquid and gaseous fuels based on the conversion of electricity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridjan, Iva; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Connolly, David

    2016-01-01

    fuels produced with coal-, gas- and biomass-to-liquid (xTL) technologies. However, a number of articles use the term beyond this definition. Results for the term electrofuel gave a similar outcome, as it was not clear which processes were used for the fuel production. In some cases, both synthetic...... of this article is to identify and review these terms to avoid any potential misuse. An integrative review of terminology has been made. This review did not differentiate the articles in terms of the methodologies applied, but had the main objective to identify the terminology used and its definition. The results...... confirm that the term synthetic fuel is used generically in the majority of articles, without providing information about the production process of the fuel or differentiating between fossil-based and renewable-based synthetic fuels. The majority of the articles use the term synthetic fuel to describe...

  17. Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst for Aviation Fuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaRee, Ana B.; Best, Lauren M.; Bradford, Robyn L.; Gonzalez-Arroyo, Richard; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    As the oil supply declines, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to nonpetroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. The Fischer-Tropsch process uses a gas mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen which is converted into various liquid hydrocarbons; this versatile gas-to-liquid technology produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fischer-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur and aromatic compounds. It is most commonly catalyzed by cobalt supported on alumina, silica, or titania or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Cobalt is typically used more often than iron, in that cobalt is a longer-active catalyst, has lower water-gas shift activity, and lower yield of modified products. Promoters are valuable in improving Fischer-Tropsch catalyst as they can increase cobalt oxide dispersion, enhance the reduction of cobalt oxide to the active metal phase, stabilize a high metal surface area, and improve mechanical properties. Our goal is to build up the specificity of the Fischer-Tropsch catalyst while adding less-costly transition metals as promoters; the more common promoters used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are rhenium, platinum, and ruthenium. In this report we will describe our preliminary efforts to design and produce catalyst materials to achieve our goal of preferentially producing C8 to C18 paraffin compounds in the NASA Glenn Research Center Gas-To-Liquid processing plant. Efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center for producing green fuels using non-petroleum feedstocks support both the Sub-sonic Fixed Wing program of Fundamental Aeronautics and the In Situ Resource Utilization program of the Exploration Technology Development and Demonstration program.

  18. Market-Based and System-Wide Fuel Cycle Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Paul Philip Hood [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Scopatz, Anthony [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Gidden, Matthew [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Carlsen, Robert [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Mouginot, Baptiste [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Flanagan, Robert [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2017-06-13

    This work introduces automated optimization into fuel cycle simulations in the Cyclus platform. This includes system-level optimizations, seeking a deployment plan that optimizes the performance over the entire transition, and market-level optimization, seeking an optimal set of material trades at each time step. These concepts were introduced in a way that preserves the flexibility of the Cyclus fuel cycle framework, one of its most important design principles.

  19. Market-Based and System-Wide Fuel Cycle Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Paul Philip Hood; Scopatz, Anthony; Gidden, Matthew; Carlsen, Robert; Mouginot, Baptiste; Flanagan, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This work introduces automated optimization into fuel cycle simulations in the Cyclus platform. This includes system-level optimizations, seeking a deployment plan that optimizes the performance over the entire transition, and market-level optimization, seeking an optimal set of material trades at each time step. These concepts were introduced in a way that preserves the flexibility of the Cyclus fuel cycle framework, one of its most important design principles.

  20. Contemporary and prospective fuel cycles for WWER-440 based on new assemblies with higher uranium capacity and higher average fuel enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagarinskiy, A.A.; Saprykin, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' has performed an extensive cycle of calculations intended to validate the opportunities of improving different fuel cycles for WWER-440 reactors. Works were performed to upgrade and improve WWER-440 fuel cycles on the basis of second-generation fuel assemblies allowing core thermal power to be uprated to 107 108 % of its nominal value (1375 MW), while maintaining the same fuel operation lifetime. Currently intensive work is underway to develop fuel cycles based on second-generation assemblies with higher fuel capacity and average fuel enrichment per assembly increased up to 4.87 % of U-235. Fuel capacity of second-generation assemblies was increased by means of eliminated central apertures of fuel pellets, and pellet diameter extended due to reduced fuel cladding thickness. This paper intends to summarize the results of works performed in the field of WWER-440 fuel cycle modernization, and to present yet unemployed opportunities and prospects of further improvement of WWER-440 neutronic and operating parameters by means of additional optimization of fuel assembly designs and fuel element arrangements applied. (Authors)

  1. Removal of sulphur-containing odorants from fuel gases for fuel cell-based combined heat and power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Wild, P.J.; Nyqvist, R.G.; De Bruijn, F.A.; Stobbe, E.R. [ECN Hydrogen and Clean Fossil Fuels, Petten (Netherlands)

    2006-02-15

    Natural gas (NG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are important potential feedstocks for the production of hydrogen for fuel cell-based (e.g. proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC)) or solid oxide fuel Cells (SOFC) combined heat and power (CHP) applications. To prevent detrimental effects on the (electro)catalysts in fuel cell-based combined heat and power installations (FC-CHP), sulphur removal from the feedstock is mandatory. An experimental bench-marking study of adsorbents has identified several candidates for the removal of sulphur containing odorants at low temperature. Among these adsorbents a new material has been discovered that offers an economically attractive means to remove TetraHydroThiophene (THT), the main European odorant, from natural gas at ambient temperature. The material is environmentally benign, easy to use and possesses good activity (residual sulphur levels below 20 ppbv) and capacity for the common odorant THT in natural gas. When compared to state-of-the-art metal-promoted active carbon the new material has a THT uptake capacity that is up to 10 times larger, depending on temperature and pressure. Promoted versions of the new material have shown potential for the removal of THT at higher temperatures and/or for the removal of other odorants such as mercaptans from natural gas or from LPG.

  2. Removal of sulphur-containing odorants from fuel gases for fuel cell-based combined heat and power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Wild, P.J.; Nyqvist, R.G.; de Bruijn, F.A.; Stobbe, E.R. [Energy Research Centre of The Netherlands ECN, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2006-09-22

    Natural gas (NG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are important potential feedstocks for the production of hydrogen for fuel cell-based (e.g. proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) or solid oxide fuel Cells (SOFC) combined heat and power (CHP) applications. To prevent detrimental effects on the (electro)catalysts in fuel cell-based combined heat and power installations (FC-CHP), sulphur removal from the feedstock is mandatory. An experimental bench-marking study of adsorbents has identified several candidates for the removal of sulphur containing odorants at low temperature. Among these adsorbents a new material has been discovered that offers an economically attractive means to remove TetraHydroThiophene (THT), the main European odorant, from natural gas at ambient temperature. The material is environmentally benign, easy to use and possesses good activity (residual sulphur levels below 20ppbv) and capacity for the common odorant THT in natural gas. When compared to state-of-the-art metal-promoted active carbon the new material has a THT uptake capacity that is up to 10 times larger, depending on temperature and pressure. Promoted versions of the new material have shown potential for the removal of THT at higher temperatures and/or for the removal of other odorants such as mercaptans from natural gas or from LPG. (author)

  3. Neutronics Studies Of Uranium-Based Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel For PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, G. Ivan; Gehin, Jess C.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the core neutronics and fuel cycle characteristics that result from employing uranium-based fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Specific PWR bundle designs with FCM fuel have been developed, which by virtue of their TRISO particle based elements, are expected to safely reach higher fuel burnups while also increasing the tolerance to fuel failures. The SCALE 6.1 code package, developed and maintained at ORNL, was the primary software employed to model these designs. Analysis was performed using the SCALE double-heterogeneous (DH) fuel modeling capabilities. For cases evaluated with the NESTLE full-core three-dimensional nodal simulator, because the feature to perform DH lattice physics branches with the SCALE/TRITON sequence is not yet available, the Reactivity-Equivalent Physical Transformation (RPT) method was used as workaround to support the full core analyses. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a color-set array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In addition, a parametric study was performed by varying the various TRISO particle design features; such as kernel diameter, coating layer thicknesses, and packing fractions. Also, other features such as the selection of matrix material (SiC, Zirconium) and fuel rod dimensions were perturbed. After evaluating different uranium-based fuels, the higher physical density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, as the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design will need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. Neutronically, the FCM fuel designs evaluated maintain acceptable design features in the areas of fuel lifetime, temperature

  4. Method for investigating the applicability of thorium-based fuels in existing BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerk, Klara Insulander; Fhager, Valentin; Demaziere, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a methodology for investigating the applicability of thorium based fuels in existing Boiling Water Reactors is described. The same tools and methods as those used in this study are also used for design of new fuel batches for existing reactors. As an illustration of the proposed methodology and for the purpose of comparing different fissile components for thorium-based fuel, three different thorium-based fuel designs were developed, and a low enriched uranium fuel design was created in parallel as a reference. The different fuel assemblies, which are based on the mechanical fuel design GE14, were analyzed with the Studsvik Scandpower CASMO-4E code. The linear reactivity model was used to decide a suitable initial fissile content for meeting the burnup goal of 55 MWd/kgHM and the designs were optimized for attaining an even power distribution and for keeping boiling transition factors low. Such optimizations facilitate core designs that would meet prevalent demands on Linear Heat Generation Rate (LHGR) and Critical Power Ratio (CPR). The hence created fuel designs were then analyzed with regards to thermal performance, reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fractions and control rod worths. An equilibrium core loading pattern was also developed with each one of the thus created fuel designs and analyzed with the three dimensional reactor analysis code SIMULATE-3, also developed by Studsvik Scandpower. The results of the two simulations were compared and found to be coherent, and no major obstacles were met using the given tools and methods. The analysis of the performances of the fuel assemblies and the corresponding loaded cores is reported in a companion paper (K. Insulander Bjoerk, V. Fhager, and C. Demaziere, 'Comparison of Thorium-Based Fuels with Different Fissile Components in Existing BWRs'). (author)

  5. Preliminary neutronic assessment for ATF (Accident Tolerant Fuel) based on iron alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Alfredo; Carluccio, Thiago; Piovezan, Pamela; Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo R.

    2015-01-01

    After Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in 2011, the nuclear fuel performance under accident condition became a very important issue and currently different research and development program are in progress toward to reliability and withstand under accident condition. These initiatives are known as ATF (Accident Tolerant Fuel) R and D program, which many countries with different research institutes, fuel vendors and others are nowadays involved. Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) can be defined as enhanced fuel which can tolerate loss of active cooling system capability for a considerably longer time period and the fuel/cladding system can be maintained without significant degradation and can also improve the fuel performance during normal operations and transients, as well as design-basis accident (DBA) and beyond design-basis (BDBA) accident. Different materials have being proposed as fuel cladding candidates considering thermo-mechanical properties and lower reaction kinetic with steam and slower hydrogen production. The aim of this work is to perform a neutronic assessment for several cladding candidates based on iron alloy considering a standard PWR fuel rod (fuel pellet and dimension). The purpose of the assessment is to address different parameters that might contribute for possible neutronic reactivity gain in order to overcome the penalty due to increase of neutron absorption in the cladding materials. All the neutronic assessment is performed using MCNP, Monte Carlo code. (author)

  6. The microstructure of fuel pellets as object of quality characterization on base of FMEA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, U.V.; Matveev, A.A.; Strucov, A.V.; Loktev, I.I.

    2012-01-01

    It is difficult to find new effective reserves in nuclear fuel production as its experience of production and operation become more and more. FMEA method can help it on base of the system analysis. The state corporation Rosatom, consistently pursuing a policy of economical manufacture, make all efforts for identification of deep dependences between conditions of manufacture, characteristics of fuel materials and features of their operational behaviour. This report continues earlier discussion of the important feature of produced nuclear fuel pellets grain size distribution. This distribution defines gas release in reactor and has not appropriate method of characterization. There are descriptions of optimal microstructure of fuel pellets with large grain size literature

  7. ORIGEN2 libraries based on JENDL-3.2 for LWR-MOX fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, Kenya; Katakura, Jun-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Onoue, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Hideki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Sasahara, Akihiro [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    A set of ORIGEN2 libraries for LWR MOX fuels was developed based on JENDL-3.2. The libraries were compiled with SWAT using the specification of MOX fuels that will be used in nuclear power reactors in Japan. The verification of the libraries were performed by the analyses of post irradiation examinations for the fuels from European PWR. By the analysis of PIE data from PWR in United States, the comparison was made between calculation and experimental results in the case of that parameters for making the libraries are different from irradiation conditions. These new libraries for LWR MOX fuels are packaged in ORLIBJ32, the libraries released in 1999. (author)

  8. A quasi-direct methanol fuel cell system based on blend polymer membrane electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Hjuler, Hans Aage; Hasiotis, C.

    2002-01-01

    , compared to less than 100 ppm CO for the Nafion-based technology at 80degrees C. The high CO tolerance makes it possible to use the reformed hydrogen directly from a simple methanol reformer without further CO removal. That both the fuel cell and the methanol reformer operate at temperatures around 200......On the basis of blend polymer electrolytes of polybenzimidazole and sulfonated polysulfone, a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell was developed with an operational temperature up to 200degrees C. Due to the high operational temperature, the fuel cell can tolerate 1.0-3.0 vol % CO in the fuel...

  9. Creep Analysis of Aluminum-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel in Repository Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, C.; Lam, P.S.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    Aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuels (Al SNF) from foreign and domestic research reactors are being consolidated at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These fuels are planned to be put into dry storage followed by disposal in the federal repository. Temperature conditions in storage and disposal systems due to nuclear decay heat sources will promote creep information of the fuel elements. Excessive deformation of the Al SNF will cause gross distortion (slump) of the fuels and may cause gross cladding rupture

  10. Dissolution rates of aluminum-based spent fuels relevant to geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickalonis, J.I.

    2000-01-01

    The Department of Energy is pursuing the option of direct disposal of a wide variety of spent nuclear fuels under its jurisdiction. Characterization of the various types of spent fuel is required prior to licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and acceptance of the fuel at a repository site. One category of required data is the expected rate of radionuclide and fissile release to the environment as a result of exposure to groundwater after closure of the repository. To provide this type of data for four different aluminum-based spent fuels, tests were conducted using a flow through method that allows the dissolution rate of the spent fuel matrix to be measured without interference by secondary precipitation reactions that would muddle interpretation of the results. Similar tests had been conducted earlier with light water reactor spent fuel, thereby allowing direct comparisons

  11. Performance Degradation Tests of Phosphoric Acid Doped PBI Membrane Based High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela

    2014-01-01

    Degradation tests of two phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI membrane based HT-PEM fuel cells were reported in this paper to investigate the effects of start/stop and the presence of methanol in the fuel to the performance degradation. Continuous tests with H2 and simulated reformate which was composed...... of H2, water steam and methanol as the fuel were performed on both single cells. 12-h-startup/12-h-shutdown dynamic tests were performed on the first single cell with pure dry H2 as the fuel and on the second single cell with simulated reformate as the fuel. Along with the tests electrochemical...... techniques such as polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to study the degradation mechanisms of the fuel cells. Both single cells showed an increase in the performance in the H2 continuous tests, because of a decrease in the ORR kinetic resistance probably due...

  12. The nuclear fuel rod character recognition system based on neural network technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woong-Ki; Park, Soon-Yong; Lee, Yong-Bum; Kim, Seung-Ho; Lee, Jong-Min; Chien, Sung-Il.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear fuel rods should be discriminated and managed systematically by numeric characters which are printed at the end part of each rod in the process of producing fuel assembly. The characters are used to examine manufacturing process of the fuel rods in the inspection process of irradiated fuel rod. Therefore automatic character recognition is one of the most important technologies to establish automatic manufacturing process of fuel assembly. In the developed character recognition system, mesh feature set extracted from each character written in the fuel rod is employed to train a neural network based on back-propagation algorithm as a classifier for character recognition system. Performance evaluation has been achieved on a test set which is not included in a training character set. (author)

  13. Energy management strategy based on fuzzy logic for a fuel cell hybrid bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dawei; Jin, Zhenhua; Lu, Qingchun

    Fuel cell vehicles, as a substitute for internal-combustion-engine vehicles, have become a research hotspot for most automobile manufacturers all over the world. Fuel cell systems have disadvantages, such as high cost, slow response and no regenerative energy recovery during braking; hybridization can be a solution to these drawbacks. This paper presents a fuel cell hybrid bus which is equipped with a fuel cell system and two energy storage devices, i.e., a battery and an ultracapacitor. An energy management strategy based on fuzzy logic, which is employed to control the power flow of the vehicular power train, is described. This strategy is capable of determining the desired output power of the fuel cell system, battery and ultracapacitor according to the propulsion power and recuperated braking power. Some tests to verify the strategy were developed, and the results of the tests show the effectiveness of the proposed energy management strategy and the good performance of the fuel cell hybrid bus.

  14. Data base and postirradiation examination results of spent WWER-1000 fuel elements and assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanashov, B.A.; Polenok, V.S.; Smirnov, A.V.; Zhitelev, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    The report presents the results of the postirradiation shape change examination of standard fuel elements and fuel assemblies irradiated in standard conditions in Russian power reactors of the WWER-1000 type. The information is based on the results obtained at the Fuel Research Department of the Federal Scientific Centre Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (FSC RIAR, Dimitrovgrad, Russian Federation) within the period from 1987 to 1994. Emphasis is placed on such experimental and calculational data as: length, cross-section dimensions and shape of FAs with wrapper; change of standard FA skeleton members dimensions; fuel bundle elongation; change of the fuel cladding outer diameter; and elongation and change of the fuel stack outer diameter. (author)

  15. Fuel Exhaling Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Varhade, Swapnil; Gautam, Manu; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-01-18

    State-of-the-art proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) anodically inhale H 2 fuel and cathodically expel water molecules. We show an unprecedented fuel cell concept exhibiting cathodic fuel exhalation capability of anodically inhaled fuel, driven by the neutralization energy on decoupling the direct acid-base chemistry. The fuel exhaling fuel cell delivered a peak power density of 70 mW/cm 2 at a peak current density of 160 mA/cm 2 with a cathodic H 2 output of ∼80 mL in 1 h. We illustrate that the energy benefits from the same fuel stream can at least be doubled by directing it through proposed neutralization electrochemical cell prior to PEMFC in a tandem configuration.

  16. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Fuel Cell Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Fuel cell research focused on proton exchange membranes (PEM), solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Specific technologies included aircraft fuel cell reformers, new and improved electrodes, electrolytes, interconnect, and seals, modeling of fuel cells including CFD coupled with impedance spectroscopy. Research was conducted on new materials and designs for fuel cells, along with using embedded sensors with power management electronics to improve the power density delivered by fuel cells. Fuel cell applications considered were in-space operations, aviation, and ground-based fuel cells such as; powering auxiliary power units (APUs) in aircraft; high power density, long duration power supplies for interplanetary missions (space science probes and planetary rovers); regenerative capabilities for high altitude aircraft; and power supplies for reusable launch vehicles.

  17. Towards a reference architecture of fuel-based carbon management systems in the logistics industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iacob, Maria Eugenia; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Steenwijk, M.; Verkroost, P.

    2013-01-01

    The current practice in the logistics industry is to calculate the carbon footprint of transportation activities based on the distance covered, using long-term fuel consumption averages per kilometer. However, fuel consumption may actually vary over time, because of differences in road

  18. The improvement of technology for high-uranium-density Al-base dispersion fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shouhui, Dai; Rongxian, Sun; Hejian, Mao; Baosheng, Zhao; Changgen, Yin

    1987-01-01

    An improved rolling process was developed for manufacturing Al-base dispersion fuel plates. When the fuel content in the meat increased up to 50 vol%, the non-uniformity of uranium is not more than ± 7.2%, and the minimum cladding thickness is not less than 0.32 mm. (Author)

  19. On the use of spinel-based nuclear fuels for the transmutation of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konings, R.J.M.; Bakker, K.; Boshoven, J.G.; Hein, H.; Huntelaar, M.E.; Zhang, H.; Meeldijk, J.D.; Woensdregt, C.F.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of spinel-based nuclear fuels for the transmutation of actinides are investigated. The results of laboratory experiments, thermodynamic calculations and irradiations in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten are presented, and allow us to evaluate the potential of spinel as an inert matrix for fuels and targets for transmutation. (author)

  20. Supply Chain-based Solution to Prevent Fuel Tax Evasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Daugherty, Michael [United States Department of Transportation (USDOT), Federal Highway Administration (FHWA); Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Barker, Alan M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    The primary source of funding for the United States transportation system is derived from motor fuel and other highway use taxes. Loss of revenue attributed to fuel-tax evasion has been assessed to be somewhere between $1 billion per year, or approximately 25% of the total tax collected. Any solution that addresses this problem needs to include not only the tax-collection agencies and auditors, but also the carriers transporting oil products and the carriers customers. This paper presents a system developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Federal Highway Administration which has the potential to reduce or eliminate many fuel-tax evasion schemes. The solution balances the needs of tax-auditors and those of the fuel-hauling companies and their customers. The technology was deployed and successfully tested during an eight-month period on a real-world fuel-hauling fleet. Day-to-day operations of the fleet were minimally affected by their interaction with this system. The results of that test are discussed in this paper.

  1. Porous silicon-based direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhafarov, T D; Yuksel, S Aydin

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, the use of Au/porous silicon/Silicon Schottky type structure, as a direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cell is demonstrated. The porous silicon filled with hydrochlorid acid was developed as a proton conduction membrane. The Au/Porous Silicon/Silicon cells were fabricated by first creating the porous silicon layer in single-crystalline Si using the anodic etching under illumination and then deposition Au catalyst layer onto the porous silicon. Using 80 mM H2S solution as fuel the open circuit voltage of 0.4 V was obtained and maximum power density of 30 W/m2 at room temperature was achieved. These results demonstrate that the Au/Porous Silicon/Silicon direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cell which uses H2S:dH2O solution as fuel and operates at room temperature can be considered as the most promising type of low cost fuel cell for small power-supply units.

  2. Techno-Economic Analysis of Scalable Coal-Based Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Steven S. C. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States)

    2014-08-31

    Researchers at The University of Akron (UA) have demonstrated the technical feasibility of a laboratory coal fuel cell that can economically convert high sulfur coal into electricity with near zero negative environmental impact. Scaling up this coal fuel cell technology to the megawatt scale for the nation’s electric power supply requires two key elements: (i) developing the manufacturing technology for the components of the coal-based fuel cell, and (ii) long term testing of a kW scale fuel cell pilot plant. This project was expected to develop a scalable coal fuel cell manufacturing process through testing, demonstrating the feasibility of building a large-scale coal fuel cell power plant. We have developed a reproducible tape casting technique for the mass production of the planner fuel cells. Low cost interconnect and cathode current collector material was identified and current collection was improved. In addition, this study has demonstrated that electrochemical oxidation of carbon can take place on the Ni anode surface and the CO and CO2 product produced can further react with carbon to initiate the secondary reactions. One important secondary reaction is the reaction of carbon with CO2 to produce CO. We found CO and carbon can be electrochemically oxidized simultaneously inside of the anode porous structure and on the surface of anode for producing electricity. Since CH4 produced from coal during high temperature injection of coal into the anode chamber can cause severe deactivation of Ni-anode, we have studied how CH4 can interact with CO2 to produce in the anode chamber. CO produced was found able to inhibit coking and allow the rate of anode deactivation to be decreased. An injection system was developed to inject the solid carbon and coal fuels without bringing air into the anode chamber. Five planner fuel cells connected in a series configuration and tested. Extensive studies on the planner fuels

  3. Hot fuel gas dedusting after sorbent-based gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Advanced power generation technologies, such as Air Blown Gasification Cycle (ABGC), require gas cleaning at high temperatures in order to meet environmental standards and to achieve high thermal efficiencies. The primary hot gas filtration process, which removes particulates from the cooled raw fuel gas at up to 600{degree}C is the first stage of gas cleaning prior to desulphurization and ammonia removal processes. The dust concentration in the fuel gas downstream of the sorbent processes would be much lower than for the hot gas filtration stage and would have a lower sulphur content and possibly reduced chlorine concentration. The main aim of this project is to define the requirements for a hot gas filter for dedusting fuel gas under these conditions, and to identify a substantially simpler and more cost effective solution using ceramic or metal barrier filters.

  4. Fueling our future: Four steps to a new, reliable, cleaner, decentralized energy supply based on hydrogen and fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evers, A. A. [Arno A. Evers FAIR-PR, Starnberg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The necessary preconditions and the driving forces operating to move hydrogen and fuel cells to world-wide commercialization are examined, focusing on trends that impacted the progress of new technologies in the past. The consensus is that consumers have played a vital role in the past, and will continue to play an even more vital role in the future as drivers in the mass market evolution of technological progress. The automobile, aircraft and cell phone industries are examined as examples of consumer influence on technology development. One such scenario, specific to the hydrogen economy is the potential dual role played by fuel cell-powered personal automobiles which may not only provide transportation but also supply electricity and heat to residential and commercial buildings while in a stationary mode. It is suggested that given the size of the population and the current level of economic development in the Peoples' Republic of China, conditions there are most favourable to accelerate the development of a hydrogen and fuel cell-based economy. Details of developments in China and how the hydrogen-fuel cells scenario may develop there, are discussed. 11 figs.

  5. Development of four-year fuel cycle based on the advanced fuel assembly with uranium-gadolinium fuel and its implementation to the operating WWER-440 units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunin, G.; Novikov, A.; Pavlov, V.; Pavlovichev, P.; Filimonov, P.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past few years in Russia the investigations aimed at the increase of the reliability, safety and efficiency of operation of the WWER-1000 reactors as well as of its competitiveness in the world market were carried out. In the frame of these investigations the four-year fuel cycle, based on advanced fuel assemblies with zirconium alloy spacer grids and guide tubes and with fuel pellet having a reduced diameter of the central hole (1,5 mm), has been developed. For the compensation of a part of excess reactivity, Gd 2 O 3 integrated burnable absorbers are used. CPS absorbing rods contain a combine absorber (B 4 C + Dy 2 O 3 *TiO 2 ). A part of depleted fuel is located on the core periphery. The algorithms controlling the reactor power and power distribution have been updated. For checking of the solutions adopted and for verification of code package developed at the RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' the wide-scale experimental operation of advanced FA and its individual components is carried out. (Authors)

  6. Availability and use of wood-based fuels in Finland in 2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerhae, K.; Raesaenen, T.; Pajuoja, H. (Metsaeteho Oy, Helsinki (Finland)), Email: kalle.karha@metsateho.fi, Email: tapio.rasanen@metsateho.fi, Email: heikki.pajuoja@metsateho.fi; Elo, J.; Lahtinen, P. (Poeyry Energy Oy, Espoo (Finland)), Email: juha.elo@poyry.com, Email: perttu.lahtinen@poyry.com

    2009-07-01

    In Finland the overall usage target set for forest chips is 12 million m3, i.e. around 24 TWh by the year 2020. The objective of the research carried out by Metsaeteho Oy and Poeyry Energy Oy was to produce a total analysis as realistic as possible of the possibilities of increasing the use of wood-based fuels in Finland by 2020. The research shows that the growth objective set in the long-term Climate and Energy Strategy can be attained through the supply and demand for wood-based fuels. However, realizing this potential would require major investments in the entire forest chip production system, because the competitiveness of wood-based fuels in energy generation is currently not at a sufficient level. The emission trading has a strong influence on the competitiveness of wood-based fuels and the use of such fuels in energy plants. Increasing the proportion of wood-based fuels is very difficult at the current price level of the EU emission allowances (10 euro/t CO{sub 2}). A strong increase in the use of wood-based fuels would require a price level of over 25 euro/t CO{sub 2} of emission allowances. Considering the huge resources required by the forest chip production system and the current low competitiveness of forest chips, it is estimated that the use of forest chips in Finland will reach the level of 20 TWh at the earliest by the year 2020. (orig.)

  7. Fuel qualification issues and strategies for reactor-based surplus plutonium disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowell, B.S.; Copeland, G.L.; Moses, D.L.

    1997-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed irradiation of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing commercial reactors as a disposition method for surplus plutonium from the weapons program. The burning of MOX fuel in reactors is supported by an extensive technology base; however, the infrastructure required to implement reactor-based plutonium disposition does not exist domestically. This report identifies and examines the actions required to qualify and license weapons-grade (WG) plutonium-based MOX fuels for use in domestic commercial light-water reactors (LWRs)

  8. Feasibility of Technologies to Produce Coal-Based Fuels with Equal or Lower Greenhouse Gas Emissions than Petroleum Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-22

    in operating pipeline compressors), and a negligible amount from coal; just under five percent was produced from biomass—mostly in the form of corn ...as is commonly reported for soy- and corn -based biofuels), and/or if biofuel production results in land use change causing deforestation (as has...produced via F-T synthesis are already approved for incorporation into commercial and military fuels, but other pathways (e.g., pyrolysis ) would

  9. Characterization and supply of coal based fuels. Volume 1, Final report and appendix A (Topical report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    Studies and data applicable for fuel markets and coal resource assessments were reviewed and evaluated to provide both guidelines and specifications for premium quality coal-based fuels. The fuels supplied under this contract were provided for testing of advanced combustors being developed under Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) sponsorship for use in the residential, commercial and light industrial (RCLI) market sectors. The requirements of the combustor development contractors were surveyed and periodically updated to satisfy the evolving needs based on design and test experience. Available coals were screened and candidate coals were selected for further detailed characterization and preparation for delivery. A team of participants was assembled to provide fuels in both coal-water fuel (CWF) and dry ultrafine coal (DUC) forms. Information about major US coal fields was correlated with market needs analysis. Coal fields with major reserves of low sulfur coal that could be potentially amenable to premium coal-based fuels specifications were identified. The fuels requirements were focused in terms of market, equipment and resource constraints. With this basis, the coals selected for developmental testing satisfy the most stringent fuel requirements and utilize available current deep-cleaning capabilities.

  10. Thoria-based nuclear fuels thermophysical and thermodynamic properties, fabrication, reprocessing, and waste management

    CERN Document Server

    Bharadwaj, S R

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the state of the art on thermophysical and thermochemical properties, fabrication methodologies, irradiation behaviours, fuel reprocessing procedures, and aspects of waste management for oxide fuels in general and for thoria-based fuels in particular. The book covers all the essential features involved in the development of and working with nuclear technology. With the help of key databases, many of which were created by the authors, information is presented in the form of tables, figures, schematic diagrams and flow sheets, and photographs. This information will be useful for scientists and engineers working in the nuclear field, particularly for design and simulation, and for establishing the technology. One special feature is the inclusion of the latest information on thoria-based fuels, especially on the use of thorium in power generation, as it has less proliferation potential for nuclear weapons. Given its natural abundance, thorium offers a future alternative to uranium fuels in nuc...

  11. Systems Analysis of an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on a Modified UREX+3c Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. R. Johnson; R. E. Best

    2009-12-28

    The research described in this report was performed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe and compare the merits of two advanced alternative nuclear fuel cycles -- named by this study as the “UREX+3c fuel cycle” and the “Alternative Fuel Cycle” (AFC). Both fuel cycles were assumed to support 100 1,000 MWe light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants operating over the period 2020 through 2100, and the fast reactors (FRs) necessary to burn the plutonium and minor actinides generated by the LWRs. Reprocessing in both fuel cycles is assumed to be based on the UREX+3c process reported in earlier work by the DOE. Conceptually, the UREX+3c process provides nearly complete separation of the various components of spent nuclear fuel in order to enable recycle of reusable nuclear materials, and the storage, conversion, transmutation and/or disposal of other recovered components. Output of the process contains substantially all of the plutonium, which is recovered as a 5:1 uranium/plutonium mixture, in order to discourage plutonium diversion. Mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for recycle in LWRs is made using this 5:1 U/Pu mixture plus appropriate makeup uranium. A second process output contains all of the recovered uranium except the uranium in the 5:1 U/Pu mixture. The several other process outputs are various waste streams, including a stream of minor actinides that are stored until they are consumed in future FRs. For this study, the UREX+3c fuel cycle is assumed to recycle only the 5:1 U/Pu mixture to be used in LWR MOX fuel and to use depleted uranium (tails) for the makeup uranium. This fuel cycle is assumed not to use the recovered uranium output stream but to discard it instead. On the other hand, the AFC is assumed to recycle both the 5:1 U/Pu mixture and all of the recovered uranium. In this case, the recovered uranium is reenriched with the level of enrichment being determined by the amount of recovered plutonium and the combined amount

  12. Systems Analysis of an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on a Modified UREX+3c Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.R.; Best, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The research described in this report was performed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe and compare the merits of two advanced alternative nuclear fuel cycles -- named by this study as the 'UREX+3c fuel cycle' and the 'Alternative Fuel Cycle' (AFC). Both fuel cycles were assumed to support 100 1,000 MWe light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants operating over the period 2020 through 2100, and the fast reactors (FRs) necessary to burn the plutonium and minor actinides generated by the LWRs. Reprocessing in both fuel cycles is assumed to be based on the UREX+3c process reported in earlier work by the DOE. Conceptually, the UREX+3c process provides nearly complete separation of the various components of spent nuclear fuel in order to enable recycle of reusable nuclear materials, and the storage, conversion, transmutation and/or disposal of other recovered components. Output of the process contains substantially all of the plutonium, which is recovered as a 5:1 uranium/plutonium mixture, in order to discourage plutonium diversion. Mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for recycle in LWRs is made using this 5:1 U/Pu mixture plus appropriate makeup uranium. A second process output contains all of the recovered uranium except the uranium in the 5:1 U/Pu mixture. The several other process outputs are various waste streams, including a stream of minor actinides that are stored until they are consumed in future FRs. For this study, the UREX+3c fuel cycle is assumed to recycle only the 5:1 U/Pu mixture to be used in LWR MOX fuel and to use depleted uranium (tails) for the makeup uranium. This fuel cycle is assumed not to use the recovered uranium output stream but to discard it instead. On the other hand, the AFC is assumed to recycle both the 5:1 U/Pu mixture and all of the recovered uranium. In this case, the recovered uranium is reenriched with the level of enrichment being determined by the amount of recovered plutonium and the combined amount of the

  13. Technoeconomy of different solid oxide fuel cell based hybrid cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Gas turbine, steam turbine and heat engine (Stirling engine) is used as bottoming cycle for a solid oxide fuel cell plant to compare different plants efficiencies, CO2 emissionsand plants cost in terms of $/kW. Each plant is then integrated with biomass gasification and finally six plants...

  14. Renewable energy based catalytic CH4 conversion to fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Jansen, I.; Schuttlefield, J.D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Natural gas is envisioned as a primary source of hydrocarbons in the foreseeable future. With the abundance of shale gas, the main concerns have shifted from the limited hydrocarbon availability to the sustainable methods of CH4 conversion to fuels. This is necessitated by high costs of natural gas

  15. Dual-fuel engine with cylinder pressure based control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritscher, Bert [Caterpillar Motoren GmbH und Co. KG, Kiel (Germany). Large Power Systems Div.

    2013-10-15

    Cylinder pressure sensors were initially used to detect knocking and misfiring on spark ignited gas engines. On its latest MaK brand dual-fuel engine, Caterpillar Motoren is harnessing the deep insights into combustion and engine condition that can be derived direct from the origin of engine power in sophisticated control, monitoring and diagnostic systems. (orig.)

  16. Science-based strategic planning for hazardous fuel treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.L. Peterson; M.C. Johnson

    2007-01-01

    A scientific foundation coupled with technical support is needed to develop long-term strategic plans for fuel and vegetation treatments on public lands. These plans are developed at several spatial scales and are typically a component of fire management plans and other types of resource management plans. Such plans need to be compatible with national, regional, and...

  17. Durability Issues and Status of PBI-Based Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mark Tonny Dalsgaard; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2016-01-01

    This chapter briefly reviews durability and stability issues with key materials and components for HT-PEMFCs, including the polymer membrane, the doping acid, the electrocatalyst, the catalyst support and bipolar plates. Degradation mechanisms and their dependence on fuel cell operating condition...

  18. A fuel-based approach to estimating motor vehicle exhaust emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Brett Craig

    Motor vehicles contribute significantly to air pollution problems; accurate motor vehicle emission inventories are therefore essential to air quality planning. Current travel-based inventory models use emission factors measured from potentially biased vehicle samples and predict fleet-average emissions which are often inconsistent with on-road measurements. This thesis presents a fuel-based inventory approach which uses emission factors derived from remote sensing or tunnel-based measurements of on-road vehicles. Vehicle activity is quantified by statewide monthly fuel sales data resolved to the air basin level. Development of the fuel-based approach includes (1) a method for estimating cold start emission factors, (2) an analysis showing that fuel-normalized emission factors are consistent over a range of positive vehicle loads and that most fuel use occurs during loaded-mode driving, (3) scaling factors relating infrared hydrocarbon measurements to total exhaust volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations, and (4) an analysis showing that economic factors should be considered when selecting on-road sampling sites. The fuel-based approach was applied to estimate carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from warmed-up vehicles in the Los Angeles area in 1991, and CO and VOC exhaust emissions for Los Angeles in 1997. The fuel-based CO estimate for 1991 was higher by a factor of 2.3 +/- 0.5 than emissions predicted by California's MVEI 7F model. Fuel-based inventory estimates for 1997 were higher than those of California's updated MVEI 7G model by factors of 2.4 +/- 0.2 for CO and 3.5 +/- 0.6 for VOC. Fuel-based estimates indicate a 20% decrease in the mass of CO emitted, despite an 8% increase in fuel use between 1991 and 1997; official inventory models predict a 50% decrease in CO mass emissions during the same period. Cold start CO and VOC emission factors derived from parking garage measurements were lower than those predicted by the MVEI 7G model. Current inventories

  19. A Monte Carlo based spent fuel analysis safeguards strategy assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fensin, Michael L.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Sandoval, Nathan P.

    2009-01-01

    Safeguarding nuclear material involves the detection of diversions of significant quantities of nuclear materials, and the deterrence of such diversions by the risk of early detection. There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium in spent fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthening the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies ability to safeguards nuclear facilities, shipper/receiver difference, input accountability at reprocessing facilities and burnup credit at repositories. Many NDA techniques exist for measuring signatures from spent fuel; however, no single NDA technique can, in isolation, quantify elemental plutonium and other actinides of interest in spent fuel. A study has been undertaken to determine the best integrated combination of cost effective techniques for quantifying plutonium mass in spent fuel for nuclear safeguards. A standardized assessment process was developed to compare the effective merits and faults of 12 different detection techniques in order to integrate a few techniques and to down-select among the techniques in preparation for experiments. The process involves generating a basis burnup/enrichment/cooling time dependent spent fuel assembly library, creating diversion scenarios, developing detector models and quantifying the capability of each NDA technique. Because hundreds of input and output files must be managed in the couplings of data transitions for the different facets of the assessment process, a graphical user interface (GUI) was development that automates the process. This GUI allows users to visually create diversion scenarios with varied replacement materials, and generate a MCNPX fixed source detector assessment input file. The end result of the assembly library assessment is to select a set of common source terms and diversion scenarios for quantifying the capability of each of the 12 NDA techniques. We present here the generalized

  20. A Monte Carlo Based Spent Fuel Analysis Safeguards Strategy Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fensin, Michael L.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Sandoval, Nathan P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, E540, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Safeguarding nuclear material involves the detection of diversions of significant quantities of nuclear materials, and the deterrence of such diversions by the risk of early detection. There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium in spent fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthening the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies ability to safeguards nuclear facilities, shipper/receiver difference, input accountability at reprocessing facilities and burnup credit at repositories. Many NDA techniques exist for measuring signatures from spent fuel; however, no single NDA technique can, in isolation, quantify elemental plutonium and other actinides of interest in spent fuel. A study has been undertaken to determine the best integrated combination of cost effective techniques for characterizing Pu mass in spent fuel for nuclear safeguards. A standardized assessment process was developed to compare the effective merits and faults of 12 different detection techniques in order to integrate a few techniques and to down-select among the techniques in preparation for experiments. The process involves generating a basis burnup/enrichment/cooling time dependent spent fuel assembly library, determining and identifying limiting diversion scenarios, developing detector models and quantifying the capability of each NDA technique. Because hundreds of input and output files must be managed in the couplings of data transitions for the different facets of the assessment process, a graphical user interface (GUI) was development that automates the process. This GUI allows users to visually create diversion scenarios with varied replacement materials, and generate a MCNPX fixed source detector assessment input file. The end result of the assembly library assessment is to select a set of common source terms and diversion scenarios for quantifying the capability of each of the 12 NDA techniques. We present here

  1. Self-sustained cabinet based on fuel cell technology and solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Rafael Augusto de Oliveira; Valentim, Rafael Bertier; Glir, Joao Raphael Zanlorensi; Stall, Alexandre; Sommer, Elise Meister; Sanches, Luciana Schimidilin; Dias, Fernando Gallego; Korndorfer, Heitor Medeiros de Albuquerque; Vargas, Jose Viriato Coelho [Universidade Federal do Parana (DEMEC/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica], Email: rafaelcorrea123@hotmail.com; Ordonez, Juan Carlos [Florida State University, Tallahasse, Florida (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. Center for Advanced Power Systems

    2010-07-01

    Along the past few years, there has been intensive research on clean and renewable energy production. Two main reasons have been pointed out: pollution caused by oil based fuels consumption and their availability diminution, which increases their production costs. Fuel Cells have shown to be a clean and renewable energy source, which reveals them as a promising solution, although their technology needs further development. Fuel Cells produce electricity, water and heat consuming hydrogen and oxygen, this provided pure or from a natural air source. Present research has combined different equipment to compose a self-sustaining fuel cells technology based cabinet for energy production, which is a Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFC). This system contains: fuel cells stack, electrolyzer, photovoltaic panel, batteries, current inverter and a charge controller. Photovoltaic panel charges the batteries, while charge controller controls the batteries loading. Batteries are connected to an inverter which converts direct current into alternating current. Inverter is connected to an electrolyzer (Hogen GC 600) which splits the water molecule into hydrogen and oxygen molecules. Produced hydrogen supplies the fuel cell stack and the oxygen is released directly to the atmosphere. Fuel cell stacks power production is transformed into mechanical energy by a fan. Electrical power generated by Ballard stack is 5.124 W, with a voltage of 36.6 V and current of 0.14 A. The system proved to have a great efficiency and to be capable to assemble two renewable energy sources (solar and fuel cell technology) in a self-sustainable cabinet. It has also been shown that equipment such as Electrolyzer, Fuel Cell Stack and Photovoltaic panel can be fit together in the order to produce energy. Therefore, research on Fuel Cells Regenerative System reveals great importance for developing a new, clean, renewable and regenerative energy production system. (author)

  2. Copper based anodes for bio-ethanol fueled low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondakindi, R.R.; Karan, K. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Laboratory studies have been conducted to develop a low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) fueled by bio-ethanol. SOFCs are considered to be a potential source for clean and efficient electricity. The use of bio-ethanol to power the SOFC contributes even further to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. The main barrier towards the development of the proposed SOFC is the identification of a suitable anode catalyst that prevents coking during electro-oxidation of ethanol while yielding good electrical performance. Copper was selected as the catalyst for this study. Composite anodes consisting of copper catalysts and gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) electrolytes were prepared using screen printing of GDC and copper oxide on dense GDC electrolytes and by wet impregnation of copper nitrate in porous GDC electrolytes followed by calcination and sintering. The electrical conductivity of the prepared anodes was characterized to determine the percolation threshold. Temperature-programmed reduction and the Brunner Emmett Teller (BET) methods were used to quantify the catalyst dispersion and surface area. Electrochemical performance of the single-cell SOFC with a hydrogen-air system was used to assess the catalytic activities. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy was used to probe the electrode kinetics.

  3. A study on coated particle fuel properties and performances and phase-I data base establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Soo; Lee, Hyo Cheol; Im, Byeong Ju; Yun, Sang Pil; Son, Seung Beom; Lee, Gyeong Hui; Jang, Jeong Nam

    2006-03-01

    For the successful development of the high temperature gas cooled reactor acquisition and generation of the high temperature properties of reactor materials, especially temperature and burn-up dependent properties of coated particle fuel and fuel element, are crucially essential. Recently national project for HTGR for hydrogen production has been kicked off. However, we have had little experience on this new challenges. Therefore, it became necessary to build up the materials properties and fuel performance data base. In this study, a primitive properties and performance DB for coated particle fuel was developed. This database report consists two sections: materials properties and fuel performance. The materials properties has three parts: kernel materials, carbide coating materials, and fuel elements and graphite matrix. UO 2 and UCO belong to kernel materials while PyC, SiC, and ZrC comprises the coating materials section. Thermal, mechanical and physical properties of these materials were collected, reviewed, and summarized. Additionally, the property change induced by manufacture process and irradiation were collected and summarized. Performance data were also collected, reviewed, and analyzed based on the key phenomena and failure mechanism. All of these data will be accessible in the on-line system. These results will be directly used for HTGR fuel design and fabrication and preliminary fuel performance analysis under irradiation

  4. Configuring a fuel cell based residential combined heat and power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Papadias, Dionissios D.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    2013-11-01

    The design and performance of a fuel cell based residential combined heat and power (CHP) system operating on natural gas has been analyzed. The natural gas is first converted to a hydrogen-rich reformate in a steam reformer based fuel processor, and the hydrogen is then electrochemically oxidized in a low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell to generate electric power. The heat generated in the fuel cell and the available heat in the exhaust gas is recovered to meet residential needs for hot water and space heating. Two fuel processor configurations have been studied. One of the configurations was explored to quantify the effects of design and operating parameters, which include pressure, temperature, and steam-to-carbon ratio in the fuel processor, and fuel utilization in the fuel cell. The second configuration applied the lessons from the study of the first configuration to increase the CHP efficiency. Results from the two configurations allow a quantitative comparison of the design alternatives. The analyses showed that these systems can operate at electrical efficiencies of ∼46% and combined heat and power efficiencies of ∼90%.

  5. A knowledge-based system for optimization of fuel reload configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.; Kimhi, S.; Segev, M.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss a knowledge-based production system developed for generating optimal fuel reload configurations. The system was based on a heuristic search method and implemented in Common Lisp programming language. The knowledge base embodied the reactor physics, reactor operations, and a general approach to fuel management strategy. The data base included a description of the physical system involved, i.e., the core geometry and fuel storage. The fifth cycle of the Three Mile Island Unit 1 pressurized water reactor was chosen as a test case. Application of the system to the test case revealed a self-learning process by which a relatively large number of near-optimal configurations were discovered. Several selected solutions were subjected to detailed analysis and demonstrated excellent performance. To summarize, applicability of the proposed heuristic search method in the domain of nuclear fuel management was proved unequivocally

  6. Effects of accelerated degradation on metal supported thin film-based solid oxide fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reolon, R. P.; Sanna, S.; Xu, Yu

    2018-01-01

    A thin film-based solid oxide fuel cell is deposited on a Ni-based metal porous support by pulsed laser deposition with a multi-scale-graded microstructure design. The fuel cell, around 1 μm in thickness, is composed of a stabilized-zirconia/doped-ceria bi-layered dense electrolyte and nanostruct......A thin film-based solid oxide fuel cell is deposited on a Ni-based metal porous support by pulsed laser deposition with a multi-scale-graded microstructure design. The fuel cell, around 1 μm in thickness, is composed of a stabilized-zirconia/doped-ceria bi-layered dense electrolyte......, electrochemical performances are steady, indicating the stability of the cell. Under electrical load, a progressive degradation is activated. Post-test analysis reveals both mechanical and chemical degradation of the cell. Cracks and delamination of the thin films promote a significant nickel diffusion and new...

  7. Non-Proliferative, Thorium-Based, Core and Fuel Cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todosow, M.; Raitses, G.; Galperin, A.

    2009-01-01

    Two of the major barriers to the expansion of worldwide adoption of nuclear power are related to proliferation potential of the nuclear fuel cycle and issues associated with the final disposal of spent fuel. The Radkowsky Thorium Fuel (RTF) concept proposed by Professor A. Radkowsky offers a partial solution to these problems. The main idea of the concept is the utilization of the seed-blanket unit (SBU) fuel assembly geometry which is a direct replacement for a 'conventional' assembly in either a Russian pressurized water reactor (VVER-1000) or a Western pressurized water reactor (PWR). The seed-blanket fuel assembly consists of a fissile (U) zone, known as seed, and a fertile (Th) zone known as blanket. The separation of fissile and fertile allows separate fuel management schemes for the thorium part of the fuel (a subcritical 'blanket') and the 'driving' part of the core (a supercritical 'seed'). The design objective for the blanket is an efficient generation and in-situ fissioning of the U233 isotope, while the design objective for the seed is to supply neutrons to the blanket in a most economic way, i.e. with minimal investment of natural uranium. The introduction of thorium as a fertile component in the nuclear fuel cycle significantly reduces the quantity of plutonium production and modifies its isotopic composition, reducing the overall proliferation potential of the fuel cycle. Thorium based spent fuel also contains fewer higher actinides, hence reducing the long-term radioactivity of the spent fuel. The analyses show that the RTF core can satisfy the requirements of fuel cycle length, and the safety margins of conventional pressurized water reactors. The coefficients of reactivity are comparable to currently operating VVER's/PWR's. The major feature of the RTF cycle is related to the total amount of spent fuel discharged for each cycle from the reactor core. The fuel management scheme adopted for RTF core designs allows a significant decrease in the

  8. Formulation and Testing of Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels Containing Energetic Additives for Hybrid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Daniel B.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs,Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Story, George

    2012-01-01

    Many approaches have been considered in an effort to improve the regression rate of solid fuels for hybrid rocket applications. One promising method is to use a fuel with a fast burning rate such as paraffin wax; however, additional performance increases to the fuel regression rate are necessary to make the fuel a viable candidate to replace current launch propulsion systems. The addition of energetic and/or nano-sized particles is one way to increase mass-burning rates of the solid fuels and increase the overall performance of the hybrid rocket motor.1,2 Several paraffin-based fuel grains with various energetic additives (e.g., lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH4) have been cast in an attempt to improve regression rates. There are two major advantages to introducing LiAlH4 additive into the solid fuel matrix: 1) the increased characteristic velocity, 2) decreased dependency of Isp on oxidizer-to-fuel ratio. The testing and characterization of these solid-fuel grains have shown that continued work is necessary to eliminate unburned/unreacted fuel in downstream sections of the test apparatus.3 Changes to the fuel matrix include higher melting point wax and smaller energetic additive particles. The reduction in particle size through various methods can result in more homogeneous grain structure. The higher melting point wax can serve to reduce the melt-layer thickness, allowing the LiAlH4 particles to react closer to the burning surface, thus increasing the heat feedback rate and fuel regression rate. In addition to the formulation of LiAlH4 and paraffin wax solid-fuel grains, liquid additives of triethylaluminum and diisobutylaluminum hydride will be included in this study. Another promising fuel formulation consideration is to incorporate a small percentage of RDX as an additive to paraffin. A novel casting technique will be used by dissolving RDX in a solvent to crystallize the energetic additive. After dissolving the RDX in a solvent chosen for its compatibility

  9. Alloy catalysts for fuel cell-based alcohol sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavidel, Mohammadreza Zamanzad

    Direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) are attractive from both economic and environmental standpoints for generating renewable energy and powering vehicles and portable electronic devices. There is a great interest recently in developing DEFC systems. The cost and performance of the DEFCs are mainly controlled by the Pt-base catalysts used at each electrode. In addition to energy conversion, DEFC technology is commonly employed in the fuel-cell based breath alcohol sensors (BrAS). BrAS is a device commonly used to measure blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and enforce drinking and driving laws. The BrAS is non-invasive and has a fast respond time. However, one of the most important drawback of the commercially available BrAS is the very high loading of Pt employed. One well-known and cost effective method to reduce the Pt loading is developing Pt-alloy catalysts. Recent studies have shown that Pt-transition metal alloy catalysts enhanced the electroactivity while decreasing the required loadings of the Pt catalysts. In this thesis, carbon supported Pt-Mn and Pt-Cu electrocatalysts were synthesized by different methods and the effects of heat treatment and structural modification on the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) activity, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and durability of these samples were thoroughly studied. Finally, the selected Pt-Mn and Pt-Cu samples with the highest EOR activity were examined in a prototype BrAS system and compared to the Pt/C and Pt 3Sn/C commercial electrocatalysts. Studies on the Pt-Mn catalysts produced with and without additives indicate that adding trisodium citrate (SC) to the impregnation solution improved the particle dispersion, decreased particle sizes and reduced the time required for heat treatment. Further studies show that the optimum weight ratio of SC to the metal loading in the impregnation solution was 2:1 and optimum results achieved at pH lower than 4. In addition, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicate

  10. Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cell Using Gypsum Based Electrolyte And Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Nagai, Masayuki; Katagiri, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    The proton conductive electrolyte membrane and the electrodes for intermediate temperature fuel cell were made from the phosphoric acid treated gypsum as a proton conductor. The membrane and the electrodes were built into single cell and tested at intermediate temperature region. The power density of the fuel cell was 0.56 mW/cm -2 at 150 deg. C without any humidification and 1.38 mW/cm -2 at 150 deg. C, 5% relative humidity. The open circuit voltage of the cell was increased higher than 0.7 V when the electrodes were annealed at 150 deg. C, 5%R.H., however the reasons for this are still to be further investigated. The results show that the potential of the phosphoric acid treated gypsum for the intermediate temperature proton conductor.

  11. Pilot-scale equipment development for lithium-based reduction of spent oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, S. D.

    1998-01-01

    An integral function of the electrometallurgical conditioning of DOE spent nuclear fuel is the standardization of waste forms. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed and is presently demonstrating the electrometallurgical conditioning of sodium-bonded metal fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor II, resulting in uranium, ceramic waste, and metal waste forms. Engineering studies are underway at ANL in support of pilot-scale equipment development, which would precondition irradiated oxide fuel and likewise demonstrate the application of electrometallurgical conditioning to such non-metallic fuels. This paper highlights the integration of proposed spent oxide fuel conditioning with existing electrometallurgical processes. Additionally, technical bases for engineering activities to support a scale up of an oxide reduction process are described

  12. Development of Accident Scenario for Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility Based on Fukushima Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dongjin; Choi, Kwangsoon; Yoon, Hyungjoon; Park, Jungsu [KEPCO-E and C, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    700 MTU of spent nuclear fuel is discharged from nuclear fleet every year and spent fuel storage is currently 70.9% full. The on-site wet type spent fuel storage pool of each NPP(nuclear power plants) in Korea will shortly exceed its storage limit. Backdrop, the Korean government has rolled out a plan to construct an interim spent fuel storage facility by 2024. However, the type of interim spent fuel storage facility has not been decided yet in detail. The Fukushima accident has resulted in more stringent requirements for nuclear facilities in case of beyond design basis accidents. Therefore, there has been growing demand for developing scenario on interim storage facility to prepare for beyond design basis accidents and conducting dose assessment based on the scenario to verify the safety of each type of storage.

  13. Evaluation of methods for decladding LWR fuel for a pyroprocessing-based reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, W.D.; Mailen, J.C.; Michaels, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    The first step in reprocessing disassembled light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel is to separate the zirconium-based cladding from the UO 2 fuel. A survey of decladding technologies has been performed to identify candidate decladding processes suitable for LWR fuel and compatible with downstream pyropr for separation of actinides and fission products. Technologies for the primary separation of Zircaloy cladding from oxide fuel and for secondary separations (in most cases, a further decontamination of the cladding) were reviewed. Because cutting of the fuel cladding is a necessary step in all flowsheet options, metal cutting technologies were also briefly evaluated. The assessment of decladding processes resulted in the identification of the three or four potentially attractive options that may warrant additional near-term evaluation. These options are summarized, and major strengths and issues of each option are discussed

  14. Evaluation of methods for decladding LWR fuel for a pyroprocessing-based reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, W.D.; Mailen, J.C.; Michaels, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    The first step in reprocessing disassembled light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel is to separate the zirconium-based cladding from the UO[sub 2] fuel. A survey of decladding technologies has been performed to identify candidate decladding processes suitable for LWR fuel and compatible with downstream pyropr for separation of actinides and fission products. Technologies for the primary separation of Zircaloy cladding from oxide fuel and for secondary separations (in most cases, a further decontamination of the cladding) were reviewed. Because cutting of the fuel cladding is a necessary step in all flowsheet options, metal cutting technologies were also briefly evaluated. The assessment of decladding processes resulted in the identification of the three or four potentially attractive options that may warrant additional near-term evaluation. These options are summarized, and major strengths and issues of each option are discussed.

  15. Evaluation of methods for decladding LWR fuel for a pyroprocessing-based reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, W.D.; Mailen, J.C.; Michaels, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    The first step in reprocessing disassembled light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel is to separate the zirconium-based cladding from the UO{sub 2} fuel. A survey of decladding technologies has been performed to identify candidate decladding processes suitable for LWR fuel and compatible with downstream pyropr for separation of actinides and fission products. Technologies for the primary separation of Zircaloy cladding from oxide fuel and for secondary separations (in most cases, a further decontamination of the cladding) were reviewed. Because cutting of the fuel cladding is a necessary step in all flowsheet options, metal cutting technologies were also briefly evaluated. The assessment of decladding processes resulted in the identification of the three or four potentially attractive options that may warrant additional near-term evaluation. These options are summarized, and major strengths and issues of each option are discussed.

  16. Analysis of DC/DC Converter Efficiency for Energy Storage System Based on Bidirectional Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pittini, Riccardo; Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2013-01-01

    interface to the grid. In power electronics, the converter efficiency is characterized at fixed operating voltage for various output power. This type of characterization is not suitable for fuel cells, since as the power from the fuel cell increases, the cell voltage decreases. This paper analyses how......Renewable energy sources are fluctuating depending on the availability of the energy source. For this reason, energy storage is becoming more important and bidirectional fuel cells represent an attractive technology. Fuel cells require highcurrent low-voltage dc-dc or dc-ac converters as power...... the fuel cell I-V characteristics influences the power electronics converter efficiency and their consequence on the overall system. A loaddependent efficiency curve is presented based on experimental results from a 6 kW dc-dc converter prototype including the most suitable control strategy which maximizes...

  17. Improved Accelerated Stress Tests Based on Fuel Cell Vehicle Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Timothy [Research Engineer; Motupally, Sathya [Research Engineer

    2012-06-01

    UTC will led a top-tier team of industry and national laboratory participants to update and improve DOE’s Accelerated Stress Tests (AST’s) for hydrogen fuel cells. This in-depth investigation will focused on critical fuel cell components (e.g. membrane electrode assemblies - MEA) whose durability represented barriers for widespread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technology. UTC had access to MEA materials that had accrued significant load time under real-world conditions in PureMotion® 120 power plant used in transit buses. These materials are referred to as end-of-life (EOL) components in the rest of this document. Advanced characterization techniques were used to evaluate degradation mode progress using these critical cell components extracted from both bus power plants and corresponding materials tested using the DOE AST’s. These techniques were applied to samples at beginning-of-life (BOL) to serve as a baseline. These comparisons advised the progress of the various failure modes that these critical components were subjected to, such as membrane degradation, catalyst support corrosion, platinum group metal dissolution, and others. Gaps in the existing ASTs predicted the degradation observed in the field in terms of these modes were outlined. Using the gaps, new AST’s were recommended and tested to better reflect the degradation modes seen in field operation. Also, BOL components were degraded in a test vehicle at UTC designed to accelerate the bus field operation.

  18. Understanding Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in paraffin-based hybrid rocket fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrarolo, Anna; Kobald, Mario; Schlechtriem, Stefan

    2018-04-01

    Liquefying fuels show higher regression rates than the classical polymeric ones. They are able to form, along their burning surface, a low viscosity and surface tension liquid layer, which can become unstable (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) due to the high velocity gas flow in the fuel port. This causes entrainment of liquid droplets from the fuel surface into the oxidizer gas flow. To better understand the droplets entrainment mechanism, optical investigations on the combustion behaviour of paraffin-based hybrid rocket fuels in combination with gaseous oxygen have been conducted in the framework of this research. Combustion tests were performed in a 2D single-slab burner at atmospheric conditions. High speed videos were recorded and analysed with two decomposition techniques. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and independent component analysis (ICA) were applied to the scalar field of the flame luminosity. The most excited frequencies and wavelengths of the wave-like structures characterizing the liquid melt layer were computed. The fuel slab viscosity and the oxidizer mass flow were varied to study their influence on the liquid layer instability process. The combustion is dominated by periodic, wave-like structures for all the analysed fuels. Frequencies and wavelengths characterizing the liquid melt layer depend on the fuel viscosity and oxidizer mass flow. Moreover, for very low mass flows, no wavelength peaks are detected for the higher viscosity fuels. This is important to better understand and predict the onset and development of the entrainment process, which is connected to the amplification of the longitudinal waves.

  19. Safety analysis of thorium-based fuels in the General Electric Standard BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colby, M.J.; Townsend, D.B.; Kunz, C.L.

    1980-06-01

    A denatured (U-233/Th)O 2 fuel assembly has been designed which is energy equivalent to and hardware interchangeable with a modern boiling water reactor (BWR) reference reload assembly. Relative to the reference UO 2 fuel, the thorium fuel design shows better performance during normal and transient reactor operation for the BWR/6 product line and will meet or exceed current safety and licensing criteria. Power distributions are flattened and thermal operating margins are increased by reduced steam void reactivity coefficients caused by U-233. However, a (U-233/Th)O 2 -fueled BWR will likely have reduced operating flexibility. A (U-235/Th)O 2 -fueled BWR should perform similar to a UO 2 -fueled BWR under all operating conditions. A (Pu/Th)O 2 -fueled BWR may have reduced thermal margins and similar accident response and be less stable than a UO 2 -fueled BWR. The assessment is based on comparisions of point model and infinite lattice predictions of various nuclear reactivity parameters, including void reactivity coefficients, Doppler reactivity coefficients, and control blade worths

  20. Fueling our future: four steps to a new, reliable, cleaner, decentralized energy supply based on hydrogen and fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evers, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' This manuscript demonstrates the possible driving factors and necessary elements needed to move Hydrogen and Fuel Cells (H2/FC) to worldwide commercialisation. Focusing not only on the technology itself, we look at the 'bigger picture' explaining how certain trends have impacted the progress of new technologies developments in the past. In this process, the consumer has played and will continue to play the key and leading role. We also examine different Distributed Generation scenarios including distributed generation via fuel cells for automotive applications which may be the catalyst to the Hydrogen Economy. One possible step could be the use of Personal Power Cars equipped with Fuel Cells which not only drive on Hydrogen, but also supply (while standing) electricity /heat to residential and commercial buildings. With 1.3 billion potential customers, P.R. China is one country where such a scenario may fit. The up-and-coming Chinese H2/FC industry deals with applied fundamental research such as advances in Hydrogen production from Natural Gas, Methanol and Gasoline. The current activities in P.R. China certain to further accelerate the trend towards the coming Hydrogen Economy, together with the steps necessary to achieve a new reliable, cleaner and decentralized Energy Supply based on H2/FC are examined. (author)

  1. Modification of fuel performance code to evaluate iron-based alloy behavior under LOCA scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo Ramos, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br, E-mail: mrmartin@usp.br [Laboratorio de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco (LabRisco/POLI/USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Abe, Alfredo; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e, E-mail: ayabe@ipen.br, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixiera@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Accident tolerant fuels (ATF) has been studied since the Fukushima Daiichi accident in the research efforts to develop new materials which under accident scenarios could maintain the fuel rod integrity for a longer period compared to the cladding and fuel system usually utilized in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The efforts have been focused on new materials applied as cladding, then iron-base alloys appear as a possible candidate. The aim of this paper is to implement modifications in a fuel performance code to evaluate the behavior of iron based alloys under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario. For this, initially the properties related to the thermal and mechanical behavior of iron-based alloys were obtained from the literature, appropriately adapted and introduced in the fuel performance code subroutines. The adopted approach was step by step modifications, where different versions of the code were created. The assessment of the implemented modification was carried out simulating an experiment available in the open literature (IFA-650.5) related to zirconium-based alloy fuel rods submitted to LOCA conditions. The obtained results for the iron-based alloy were compared to those obtained using the regular version of the fuel performance code for zircaloy-4. The obtained results have shown that the most important properties to be changed are those from the subroutines related to the mechanical properties of the cladding. The results obtained have shown that the burst is observed at a longer time for fuel rods with iron-based alloy, indicating the potentiality of this material to be used as cladding with ATF purposes. (author)

  2. Modification of fuel performance code to evaluate iron-based alloy behavior under LOCA scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo Ramos; Abe, Alfredo; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e

    2017-01-01

    Accident tolerant fuels (ATF) has been studied since the Fukushima Daiichi accident in the research efforts to develop new materials which under accident scenarios could maintain the fuel rod integrity for a longer period compared to the cladding and fuel system usually utilized in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The efforts have been focused on new materials applied as cladding, then iron-base alloys appear as a possible candidate. The aim of this paper is to implement modifications in a fuel performance code to evaluate the behavior of iron based alloys under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario. For this, initially the properties related to the thermal and mechanical behavior of iron-based alloys were obtained from the literature, appropriately adapted and introduced in the fuel performance code subroutines. The adopted approach was step by step modifications, where different versions of the code were created. The assessment of the implemented modification was carried out simulating an experiment available in the open literature (IFA-650.5) related to zirconium-based alloy fuel rods submitted to LOCA conditions. The obtained results for the iron-based alloy were compared to those obtained using the regular version of the fuel performance code for zircaloy-4. The obtained results have shown that the most important properties to be changed are those from the subroutines related to the mechanical properties of the cladding. The results obtained have shown that the burst is observed at a longer time for fuel rods with iron-based alloy, indicating the potentiality of this material to be used as cladding with ATF purposes. (author)

  3. Fueling our future: four steps to a new reliable, cleaner, decentralized energy supply based on Hydrogen and fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evers, A.

    2005-01-01

    In examining various market strategies, this presentation demonstrates the possible driving factors and necessary elements needed to move Hydrogen and Fuel Cells (H2/FC) to worldwide commercialisation. Focusing not only on the technology itself, this presentation looks at the 'bigger picture' explaining how certain trends have impacted the progress of new technologies developments in the past. The presentation demonstrates how these models can be applied to our present day situation. In this process, the consumer has played and will continue to play the key and leading role. Due to such strong influence, the consumer will ultimately fuel the future of H2/FC commercialisation by a desire for new and not yet discovered products and services. Examining different Distributed Generation scenarios, the catalyst to the Hydrogen Economy may be found through distributed generation via fuel cells. One possible step could be the use of Personal Power Cars equipped with Fuel Cells which not only drive on Hydrogen, but also supply (while standing) electricity /heat to residential and commercial buildings. The incentive for car owners driving and using these vehicles is twofold: either save (at his own home) or earn (at his office) money while their cars are parked and plugged into buildings via smart docking stations available at key parking sites. Cars parked at home in the garage will supply electricity to the homes and additionally, replace the function of the existing boiler. Car owners can earn money by selling the electricity generated (but not needed at that time) to the utilities and feed it into the existing electricity grid. The inter-dependability between supply and consumer-driven demand (or better, demand and supply) and other examples are explained. The steps necessary to achieve a new, reliable, cleaner and decentralized Energy Supply based on H2/FC are also presented and examined. (author)

  4. Comparison of fuel cycles characteristics for nuclear energy systems based on WWER-TOI and BN-1200 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagramanyan, V.S.; Kalashnikov, A.G.; Kapranova, Eh.N.; Puzakov, A.Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Authors determine the characteristics of the fuel cycle (FC) based on stationary nuclear power system based on WWER-TOI and BN-1200 reactors with fuel of different composition. Characteristics of reactor systems with partial or complete spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and recycling of plutonium are compared to those of the reference system consisting only of WWER-TOI with uranium oxide fuel, operating in an open FC [ru

  5. Fundamental characterization of alternate fuel effects in continuous combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazowski, W.S.; Edelman, R.B.; Harsha, P.T.

    1978-09-11

    The overall objective of this contract is to assist in the development of fuel-flexible combustion systems for gas turbines as well as Rankine and Stirling cycle engines. The primary emphasis of the program is on liquid hydrocarbons produced from non-petroleum resouces. Fuel-flexible combustion systems will provide for more rapid transition of these alternate fuels into important future energy utilization centers (especially utility power generation with the combined cycle gas turbine). The specific technical objectives of the program are to develop an improved understanding of relationships between alternate fuel properties and continuous combustion system effects, and to provide analytical modeling/correlation capabilities to be used as design aids for development of fuel-tolerant combustion systems. Efforts this past year have been to evaluate experimental procedures for studying alternate fuel combustion effects and to determine current analytical capabilities for prediction of these effects. Jet Stirred Combustor studies during this period have produced new insights into soot formation in strongly backmixed systems and have provided much information for comparison with analytical predictions. The analytical effort included new applications of quasi-global modeling techniques as well as comparison of prediction with the experimental results generated.

  6. Comparison of thorium-based fuels with different fissile components in existing BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerk, Klara Insulander; Fhager, Valentin; Demaziere, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Three different types of thorium based BWR fuel have been developed, in each of which thorium was combined with a different fissile component, the three components being reactor grade plutonium, uranium enriched to 20% in uranium 235 and pure uranium 233. A BWR nuclear bundle design, based on the geometrical fuel assembly design GE14, was developed for each of these fissile components. The properties and performance of the corresponding fuel assemblies were investigated via full core calculations carried out for an existing BWR and compared with the ones of an ordinary Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel, which was developed for reference. The fuel assemblies and cores were designed to meet existing fuel design criteria, and were then analyzed with regards to reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fractions, control rod worths and shutdown margins. The results show that all three alternatives seem to be feasible, although some difficulties remain with complying with the thermal limits, and with the moderator temperature and coolant void coefficients of the U-233 containing fuel being positive under some circumstances. (author)

  7. Lanthanum Manganate Based Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette Juhl

    Composite cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The aim was to study the oxygen reduction process in the electrode in order to minimise the voltage drop in the cathode. The electrodes contained...... five processes were found to affect the impedance of LSM/YSZ composite electrodes. Two high frequency processes were ascribed to transport of oxide ions/oxygen intermediates across LSM/YSZ interfaces and through YSZ in the composite. Several competitive elementary reaction steps, which appear as one...

  8. Fuel management optimization based on generalized perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.R.; Chapman, D.M.; Biswas, D.

    1986-01-01

    A general methodology for optimization of assembly shuffling and burnable poison (BP) loadings for LWR reload design has been developed. The uniqueness of this approach lies in the coupling of Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) methods and standard Integer Programming (IP) techniques. An IP algorithm can simulate the discrete nature of the fuel shuffling and BP loading problems, and the use of GPT sensitivity data provides an efficient means for modeling the behavior of the important core performance parameters. The method is extremely flexible since the choice of objective function and the number and mix of constraints depend only on the ability of GPT to determine the appropriate sensitivity functions

  9. Fuel failure assessments based on radiochemistry. Experience feedback and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, C.; Ziabletsev, D.; Zeh, P.

    2015-01-01

    Significant improvements have been observed in LWR nuclear fuel reliability over the past years. As a result, the number of fuel failures in PWRs and BWRs has recently dramatically decreased. Nevertheless, a few remaining challenges still exist. One of them is that the industry has recently started seeing a relatively new type of fuel failure, so-called 'weak leak failures', which could be characterized by a very small release of gaseous fission products and essentially almost zero release of iodines or any other soluble fission products in the reactor coolant. Correspondingly, the behavior of these weak leakers does not follow typical behavior of a conventional leaker characterized by a proportionality of the amount of released Xe 133 related to the failed rod power. Instead, for a weak leaker, the activity of Xe 133 is directly correlated to the size of the cladding defects of the leaker. The presence of undetected weak leaker in the core may lead to carryover of a leaker into the subsequent cycle. Even if the presence of weak leaker in the core is suspected, it typically requires more effort to identify the leaker which could result in extended duration of the outage and ultimately to economic losses to the utility operating the reactor. To effectively deal with this issue the industry has been facing, several changes have been recently realized, which are different from the methodology of dealing with conventional leaker. These changes include new assessment methods, the need for improved sipping techniques to better identify low release leakers, and correspondingly better equipment to be able to locate small clad defects associated with weak leaker, such as sensitive localization device of failed rods, sensitive eddy current coil for the failed rod, ultra high definition cameras for the failed rod examination and experienced fuel reliability engineers performing cause of failure and rood cause research and analyses. Ultimately, the destructive

  10. Nafion-based nanocomposite membranes for fuel cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cele, NP

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available . Zhang, J. Wang and F. Sheu, Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry, 577 (2005) 295 J. James, T.Z. McMaster, J.M. Newton, M.J. Miles, Polymer 41 (2000) 4223 M. Ludvigsson, J. Lindgren, J. Tegenfeldt, Electrochim. Acta (2000) 2267 Shoibal Banerjee..., Dennis E. Curtin Journal of Fluorine Chemistry 125 (2004) 1211–1216 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. CPO-0023 By incorporating multi walled carbon nanotubes onto proton exchange membranes (PEM), its thermal stability is increased, making PEM fuel cells ideal...

  11. Canopy Fuel Load Mapping of Mediterranean Pine Sites Based on Individual Tree-Crown Delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgos Mallinis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an individual tree-crown-based approach for canopy fuel load estimation and mapping in two Mediterranean pine stands. Based on destructive sampling, an allometric equation was developed for the estimation of crown fuel weight considering only pine crown width, a tree characteristic that can be estimated from passive imagery. Two high resolution images were used originally for discriminating Aleppo and Calabrian pines crown regions through a geographic object based image analysis approach. Subsequently, the crown region images were segmented using a watershed segmentation algorithm and crown width was extracted. The overall accuracy of the tree crown isolation expressed through a perfect match between the reference and the delineated crowns was 34.00% for the Kassandra site and 48.11% for the Thessaloniki site, while the coefficient of determination between the ground measured and the satellite extracted crown width was 0.5. Canopy fuel load values estimated in the current study presented mean values from 1.29 ± 0.6 to 1.65 ± 0.7 kg/m2 similar to other conifers worldwide. Despite the modest accuracies attained in this first study of individual tree crown fuel load mapping, the combination of the allometric equations with satellite-based extracted crown width information, can contribute to the spatially explicit mapping of canopy fuel load in Mediterranean areas. These maps can be used among others in fire behavior prediction, in fuel reduction treatments prioritization and during active fire suppression.

  12. Green hypergolic combination: Diethylenetriamine-based fuel and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongjae; Kwon, Sejin

    2017-08-01

    The present research dealt with the concept of green hypergolic combination to replace the toxic hypergolic combinations. Hydrogen peroxide was selected as a green oxidizer. A novel recipe for the non-toxic hypergolic fuel (Stock 3) was suggested. Sodium borohydride was blended into the mixture of energetic hydrocarbon solvents as an ignition source for hypergolic ignition. The main ingredient of the mixture was diethylenetriamine. By mixing some amount of tetrahydrofuran with diethylenetriamine, the mixture became more flammable and volatile. The mixture of Stock 3 fuel remained stable for four months in the lab scale storability test. Through a simple drop test, the hypergolicity of the green hypergolic combination was verified. Comparing to the toxic hypergolic combination MMH/NTO as the reference, the theoretical performance of the green hypergolic combination would be achieved about 96.7% of the equilibrium specific impulse and about 105.7% of the density specific impulse. The applicability of the green hypergolic combination was successfully confirmed through the static hot-fire tests using 500 N scale hypergolic thruster.

  13. Time-resolved fuel injector flow characterisation based on 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Crua, Cyril; Heikal, Morgan R.

    2015-01-01

    In order to enable investigations of the fuel flow inside unmodified injectors, we have developed a new experimental approach to measure time-resolved vibration spectra of diesel nozzles using a three dimensional laser vibrometer. The technique we propose is based on the triangulation of the vibrometer and fuel pressure transducer signals, and enables the quantitative characterisation of quasi-cyclic internal flows without requiring modifications to the injector, the working fluid, or limitin...

  14. NEUTRONICS STUDIES OF URANIUM-BASED FULLY CERAMIC MICRO-ENCAPSULATED FUEL FOR PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Nathan M [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the core neutronics and fuel cycle characteristics that result from employing uranium-based fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Specific PWR bundle designs with FCM fuel have been developed, which by virtue of their TRISO particle based elements, are expected to safely reach higher fuel burnups while also increasing the tolerance to fuel failures. The SCALE 6.1 code package, developed and maintained at ORNL, was the primary software employed to model these designs. Analysis was performed using the SCALE double-heterogeneous (DH) fuel modeling capabilities. For cases evaluated with the NESTLE full-core three-dimensional nodal simulator, because the feature to perform DH lattice physics branches with the SCALE/TRITON sequence is not yet available, the Reactivity-Equivalent Physical Transformation (RPT) method was used as workaround to support the full core analyses. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a color-set array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In addition, a parametric study was performed by varying the various TRISO particle design features; such as kernel diameter, coating layer thicknesses, and packing fractions. Also, other features such as the selection of matrix material (SiC, Zirconium) and fuel rod dimensions were perturbed. After evaluating different uranium-based fuels, the higher physical density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, as the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design will need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. Neutronically, the FCM fuel designs evaluated maintain acceptable design features in the areas of fuel lifetime, temperature

  15. The analysis on energy and environmental impacts of microalgae-based fuel methanol in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jing; Ma Xiaoqian

    2009-01-01

    The whole life of methanol fuel, produced by microalgae biomass which is a kind of renewable energy, is evaluated by using a method of life cycle assessment (LCA). LCA has been used to identify and quantify the environment emissions and energy efficiency of the system throughout the whole life cycle, including microalgae cultivation, methanol conversion, transport, and end-use. Energy efficiency, defined as the ratio of the energy of methanol produced to the total required energy, is 1.24, the results indicate that it is plausible as an energy producing process. The environmental impact loading of microalgae-based fuel methanol is 0.187mPET 2000 in contrast to 0.828mPET 2000 for gasoline. The effect of photochemical ozone formation is the highest of all the calculated categorization impacts of the two fuels. Utilization of microalgae an raw material of producing methanol fuel is beneficial to both production of renewable fuels and improvement of the ecological environment. This Fuel methanol is friendly to the environment, which should take an important role in automobile industry development and gasoline fuel substitute

  16. Expedient Prediction of the Fuel Properties of Carbonized Woody Biomass Based on Hue Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta Saito

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Woody biomass co-firing-based power generation can reduce CO2 emissions from pulverized coal boilers. Carbonization of woody biomass increases its calorific value and grindability, thereby improving the co-firing ratio. Carbonized biomass fuel properties depend on moisture, size and shape of feedstock, and carbonization conditions. To produce carbonized biomass with stable fuel properties, the carbonization conditions should be set according to the desired fuel properties. Therefore, we examined color changes accompanying woody biomass carbonization and proposed using them for rapid evaluation of fuel properties. Three types of woody biomasses were carbonized at a test facility with a capacity of 4 tons/day, and the fuel properties of the obtained materials were correlated with their color defined by the L*a*b* model. When fixed carbon, an important fuel property for carbonization, was 25 wt % or less, we observed a strong negative correlation, regardless of the tree species, between the hue angle, hab, and fixed carbon. The hab and fixed carbon were correlated even when the fixed carbon exceeded 25 wt %; however, this correlation was specific to the tree species. These results indicate that carbonized biomass fuel properties such as fixed carbon can be estimated rapidly and easily by measuring hab.

  17. Retrieval of spent fuel from the Lepse floating base in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, G.; De la Bassetiere, H.; Watson, C.J.H.; Ruksha, V.V.

    1998-01-01

    The LEPSE is a service vessel in the fleet operated by the Murmansk Shipping Company located in the Murmansk harbour in the north west of Russia. The ship is currently used to store spent nuclear fuel from icebreakers. In 1967, fuel elements which had been damaged during an accident, were transferred and stored into the LEPSE vessel. The condition of the ship, the damaged spent fuel and other radioactive waste it contains is a matter of significant concern for both Russia and international community. The Murmansk Shipping Company could rot remove the damaged fuel with their existing equipment and technology. Consequently the European Commission, under Tacis program, funded a preliminary study for the benefit of the Murmansk Shipping Company to address the feasibility of safely retrieving the spent fuel from the LEPSE. The study demonstrates the feasibility of the safe retrieval of the damaged fuel. The approach is based upon retrieval of the fuel together with the storage channel inside which it is presently stored, and its enclosure in a tight and clean canister for subsequent transfer and transportation. Following this study an international committee was established to find ways and means to actually implement the project. The organisation of the project has been further detailed and agreements prepared in the frame of a complementary contract funded by EC and Norway. (author)

  18. Risk-based approach for bioremediation of fuel hydrocarbons at a major airport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemeier, T.H.; Guest, P.R.; Blicker, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a risk-based approach for bioremediation of fuel-hydrocarbon-contaminated soil and ground water at a major airport in Colorado. In situ bioremediation pilot testing, natural attenuation modeling, and full-scale remedial action planning and implementation for soil and ground water contamination has conducted at four airport fuel farms. The sources of fuel contamination were leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) or pipelines transporting Jet A fuel and aviation gasoline. Continuing sources of contamination were present in several small cells of free-phase product and in fuel residuals trapped within the capillary fringe at depths 15 to 20 feet below ground surface. Bioventing pilot tests were conducted to assess the feasibility of using this technology to remediate contaminated soils. The pilot tests included measurement of initial soil gas chemistry at the site, determination of subsurface permeability, and in situ respiration tests to determine fuel biodegradation rates. A product recovery test was also conducted. ES designed and installed four full-scale bioventing systems to remediate the long-term sources of continuing fuel contamination. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were detected in ground water at concentrations slightly above regulatory guidelines

  19. Drop-in capsule testing of plutonium-based fuels in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Terry, W.K.; Ambrosek, R.G.; Palmer, A.J.; Roesener, R.A.

    1996-09-01

    The most attractive way to dispose of weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) is to use it as fuel in existing light water reactors (LWRs) in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel - i.e., plutonia (PuO[sub 2]) mixed with urania (UO[sub 2]). Before U.S. reactors could be used for this purpose, their operating licenses would have to be amended. Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. The proposed weapons-grade MOX fuel is unusual, even relative to ongoing foreign experience with reactor-grade MOX power reactor fuel. Some demonstration of the in- reactor thermal, mechanical, and fission gas release behavior of the prototype fuel will most likely be required in a limited number of test reactor irradiations. The application to license operation with MOX fuel must be amply supported by experimental data. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is capable of playing a key role in the irradiation, development, and licensing of these new fuel types. The ATR is a 250- MW (thermal) LWR designed to study the effects of intense radiation on reactor fuels and materials. For 25 years, the primary role of the ATR has been to serve in experimental investigations for the development of advanced nuclear fuels. Both large- and small-volume test positions in the ATR could be used for MOX fuel irradiation. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. Furthermore, these data can be obtained more quickly by using ATR instead of testing in a commercial LWR. Our previous work in this area has demonstrated that it is technically feasible to perform MOX fuel testing in the ATR. This report documents our analyses of sealed drop-in capsules containing plutonium-based test specimens placed in various ATR positions

  20. FSI-based Overflow Assessment of the Seismically-Isolated SFP with Fuel Racks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Gil Y.; Park, Hyun T.; Chang, Soo-Hyuk [Korea Maintenance Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Hoon [KEPCO E-C, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To date, effectiveness of the seismic isolation systems for reducing seismic force effectively has been well demonstrated. In this context, practical application of the technology in nuclear engineering fields has become an important issue more and more. This is because fluid motion can be rather amplified due to the increased relative displacement between the base and superstructures by a long-period shift. Therefore, overflow assessment and prediction of the seismically-isolated SFP have to be conducted in design phase. For performing sloshing-induced overflow of the seismically-isolated SFP, a fluid-structure interaction(FSI) approach making a two-way coupling process between structural and fluid solvers is herein employed. In this study, fuel racks inside the SFP are included in FSI modeling to investigate effect of fuel-cell assemblies on SFP overflow. Accordingly, three different assembly sets of fuel cells are assumed to be inserted in fuel racks. In addition, floor acceleration time-histories produced from three different amplitudes of peak ground acceleration (PGA) are applied to the SFP base to investigate load effect on liquid overflow. An approach for the liquid overflow assessment of the seismically-isolated nuclear SFP with fuel storage racks based on FSI analysis was addressed. From the results of the identified cases, the following conclusions are drawn: (i) FSI technique can be effectively used to assess the seismically-isolated SFP overflow, (ii) In a conservative way, the isolated SFP without fuel racks can be used to assess its sloshing-induced overflow under earthquake since effect of fuel-cell assemblies on the SFP overflow is not significant, (iii) for given same conditions (e.g., constant design free surface, same fuel-cell assembly) except seismic loading, the higher PGA is, the more liquid overflow increases.

  1. Characterisation and final disposal behaviour of theoria-based fuel kernels in aqueous phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titov, M.

    2005-08-01

    Two high-temperature reactors (AVR and THTR) operated in Germany have produced about 1 million spent fuel elements. The nuclear fuel in these reactors consists mainly of thorium-uranium mixed oxides, but also pure uranium dioxide and carbide fuels were tested. One of the possible solutions of utilising spent HTR fuel is the direct disposal in deep geological formations. Under such circumstances, the properties of fuel kernels, and especially their leaching behaviour in aqueous phases, have to be investigated for safety assessments of the final repository. In the present work, unirradiated ThO 2 , (Th 0.906 ,U 0.094 )O 2 , (Th 0.834 ,U 0.166 )O 2 and UO 2 fuel kernels were investigated. The composition, crystal structure and surface of the kernels were investigated by traditional methods. Furthermore, a new method was developed for testing the mechanical properties of ceramic kernels. The method was successfully used for the examination of mechanical properties of oxide kernels and for monitoring their evolution during contact with aqueous phases. The leaching behaviour of thoria-based oxide kernels and powders was investigated in repository-relevant salt solutions, as well as in artificial leachates. The influence of different experimental parameters on the kernel leaching stability was investigated. It was shown that thoria-based fuel kernels possess high chemical stability and are indifferent to presence of oxidative and radiolytic species in solution. The dissolution rate of thoria-based materials is typically several orders of magnitude lower than of conventional UO 2 fuel kernels. The life time of a single intact (Th,U)O 2 kernel under aggressive conditions of salt repository was estimated as about hundred thousand years. The importance of grain boundary quality on the leaching stability was demonstrated. Numerical Monte Carlo simulations were performed in order to explain the results of leaching experiments. (orig.)

  2. Advanced Materials for PEM-Based Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. McGrath

    2005-10-26

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are quickly becoming attractive alternative energy sources for transportation, stationary power, and small electronics due to the increasing cost and environmental hazards of traditional fossil fuels. Two main classes of PEMFCs include hydrogen/air or hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The current benchmark membrane for both types of PEMFCs is Nafion, a perfluorinated sulfonated copolymer made by DuPont. Nafion copolymers exhibit good thermal and chemical stability, as well as very high proton conductivity under hydrated conditions at temperatures below 80 °C. However, application of these membranes is limited due to their high methanol permeability and loss of conductivity at high temperatures and low relative humidities. These deficiencies have led to the search for improved materials for proton exchange membranes. Potential PEMs should have good thermal, hydrolytic, and oxidative stability, high proton conductivity, selective permeability, and mechanical durability over long periods of time. Poly(arylene ether)s, polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes are among the most widely investigated candidates for PEMs. Poly(arylene ether)s are a promising class of proton exchange membranes due to their excellent thermal and chemical stability and high glass transition temperatures. High proton conductivity can be achieved through post-sulfonation of poly(arylene ether) materials, but this most often results in very high water sorption or even water solubility. Our research has shown that directly polymerized poly(arylene ether) copolymers show important advantages over traditional post-sulfonated systems and also address the concerns with Nafion membranes. These properties were evaluated and correlated with morphology, structure-property relationships, and

  3. Advanced Materials for PEM-Based Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. McGrath; Donald G. Baird; Michael von Spakovsky

    2005-10-26

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are quickly becoming attractive alternative energy sources for transportation, stationary power, and small electronics due to the increasing cost and environmental hazards of traditional fossil fuels. Two main classes of PEMFCs include hydrogen/air or hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The current benchmark membrane for both types of PEMFCs is Nafion, a perfluorinated sulfonated copolymer made by DuPont. Nafion copolymers exhibit good thermal and chemical stability, as well as very high proton conductivity under hydrated conditions at temperatures below 80 degrees C. However, application of these membranes is limited due to their high methanol permeability and loss of conductivity at high temperatures and low relative humidities. These deficiencies have led to the search for improved materials for proton exchange membranes. Potential PEMs should have good thermal, hydrolytic, and oxidative stability, high proton conductivity, selective permeability, and mechanical durability over long periods of time. Poly(arylene ether)s, polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes are among the most widely investigated candidates for PEMs. Poly(arylene ether)s are a promising class of proton exchange membranes due to their excellent thermal and chemical stability and high glass transition temperatures. High proton conductivity can be achieved through post-sulfonation of poly(arylene ether) materials, but this most often results in very high water sorption or even water solubility. Our research has shown that directly polymerized poly(arylene ether) copolymers show important advantages over traditional post-sulfonated systems and also address the concerns with Nafion membranes. These properties were evaluated and correlated with morphology, structure-property relationships, and states of water in the membranes. Further improvements in properties were achieved through incorporation of inorganic

  4. Fuel lattice design in a boiling water reactor using a knowledge-based automation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Wu-Hsiung, E-mail: wstong@iner.gov.tw; Lee, Tien-Tso; Kuo, Weng-Sheng; Yaur, Shung-Jung

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • An automation system was developed for the fuel lattice radial design of BWRs. • An enrichment group peaking equalizing method is applied to optimize the design. • Several heuristic rules and restrictions are incorporated to facilitate the design. • The CPU time for the system to design a 10x10 lattice was less than 1.2 h. • The beginning-of-life LPF was improved from 1.319 to 1.272 for one of the cases. - Abstract: A knowledge-based fuel lattice design automation system for BWRs is developed and applied to the design of 10 × 10 fuel lattices. The knowledge implemented in this fuel lattice design automation system includes the determination of gadolinium fuel pin location, the determination of fuel pin enrichment and enrichment distribution. The optimization process starts by determining the gadolinium distribution based on the pin power distribution of a flat enrichment lattice and some heuristic rules. Next, a pin power distribution flattening and an enrichment grouping process are introduced to determine the enrichment of each fuel pin enrichment type and the initial enrichment distribution of a fuel lattice design. Finally, enrichment group peaking equalizing processes are performed to achieve lower lattice peaking. Several fuel lattice design constraints are also incorporated in the automation system such that the system can accomplish a design which meets the requirements of practical use. Depending on the axial position of the lattice, a different method is applied in the design of the fuel lattice. Two typical fuel lattices with U{sup 235} enrichment of 4.471% and 4.386% were taken as references. Application of the method demonstrates that improved lattice designs can be achieved through the enrichment grouping and the enrichment group peaking equalizing method. It takes about 11 min and 1 h 11 min of CPU time for the automation system to accomplish two design cases on an HP-8000 workstation, including the execution of CASMO-4

  5. Fuel lattice design in a boiling water reactor using a knowledge-based automation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung, Wu-Hsiung; Lee, Tien-Tso; Kuo, Weng-Sheng; Yaur, Shung-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An automation system was developed for the fuel lattice radial design of BWRs. • An enrichment group peaking equalizing method is applied to optimize the design. • Several heuristic rules and restrictions are incorporated to facilitate the design. • The CPU time for the system to design a 10x10 lattice was less than 1.2 h. • The beginning-of-life LPF was improved from 1.319 to 1.272 for one of the cases. - Abstract: A knowledge-based fuel lattice design automation system for BWRs is developed and applied to the design of 10 × 10 fuel lattices. The knowledge implemented in this fuel lattice design automation system includes the determination of gadolinium fuel pin location, the determination of fuel pin enrichment and enrichment distribution. The optimization process starts by determining the gadolinium distribution based on the pin power distribution of a flat enrichment lattice and some heuristic rules. Next, a pin power distribution flattening and an enrichment grouping process are introduced to determine the enrichment of each fuel pin enrichment type and the initial enrichment distribution of a fuel lattice design. Finally, enrichment group peaking equalizing processes are performed to achieve lower lattice peaking. Several fuel lattice design constraints are also incorporated in the automation system such that the system can accomplish a design which meets the requirements of practical use. Depending on the axial position of the lattice, a different method is applied in the design of the fuel lattice. Two typical fuel lattices with U"2"3"5 enrichment of 4.471% and 4.386% were taken as references. Application of the method demonstrates that improved lattice designs can be achieved through the enrichment grouping and the enrichment group peaking equalizing method. It takes about 11 min and 1 h 11 min of CPU time for the automation system to accomplish two design cases on an HP-8000 workstation, including the execution of CASMO-4 lattice

  6. Physics-based modeling of live wildland fuel ignition experiments in the Forced Ignition and Flame Spread Test apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Anand; B. Shotorban; S. Mahalingam; S. McAllister; D. R. Weise

    2017-01-01

    A computational study was performed to improve our understanding of the ignition of live fuel in the forced ignition and flame spread test apparatus, a setup where the impact of the heating mode is investigated by subjecting the fuel to forced convection and radiation. An improvement was first made in the physics-based model WFDS where the fuel is treated as fixed...

  7. State of the VVER-1000 spent U-Gd fuel rods based on the results of post-irradiation examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevlyakov, G.; Zvir, E.; Strozhuk, A.; Polenok, V.; Sidorenko, O.; Volkova, I.; Nikitin, O.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to post-irradiation examinations (PIE) of U-Gd fuel rods with different geometry of the fuel pellets irradiated as part of the VVER-1000 fuel assembly. As evidenced by their PIE data, they did not exhaust their service life based on the main parameters (geometrical dimensions, corrosion state, and release of fission product gases). (author)

  8. Performance Degradation Tests of Phosphoric Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membrane Based High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela

    2015-01-01

    Degradation tests of two phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI membrane based HT-PEM fuel cells were reported in this paper to investigate the effects of start/stop and the presence of methanol in the fuel to the performance degradation of the HT-PEM fuel cell. Continuous tests with pure dry H2 and meth...

  9. Smart Energy Management and Control for Fuel Cell Based Micro-Grid Connected Neighborhoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Mohammad S. Alam

    2006-03-15

    Fuel cell power generation promises to be an efficient, pollution-free, reliable power source in both large scale and small scale, remote applications. DOE formed the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance with the intention of breaking one of the last barriers remaining for cost effective fuel cell power generation. The Alliance’s goal is to produce a core solid-state fuel cell module at a cost of no more than $400 per kilowatt and ready for commercial application by 2010. With their inherently high, 60-70% conversion efficiencies, significantly reduced carbon dioxide emissions, and negligible emissions of other pollutants, fuel cells will be the obvious choice for a broad variety of commercial and residential applications when their cost effectiveness is improved. In a research program funded by the Department of Energy, the research team has been investigating smart fuel cell-operated residential micro-grid communities. This research has focused on using smart control systems in conjunction with fuel cell power plants, with the goal to reduce energy consumption, reduce demand peaks and still meet the energy requirements of any household in a micro-grid community environment. In Phases I and II, a SEMaC was developed and extended to a micro-grid community. In addition, an optimal configuration was determined for a single fuel cell power plant supplying power to a ten-home micro-grid community. In Phase III, the plan is to expand this work to fuel cell based micro-grid connected neighborhoods (mini-grid). The economic implications of hydrogen cogeneration will be investigated. These efforts are consistent with DOE’s mission to decentralize domestic electric power generation and to accelerate the onset of the hydrogen economy. A major challenge facing the routine implementation and use of a fuel cell based mini-grid is the varying electrical demand of the individual micro-grids, and, therefore, analyzing these issues is vital. Efforts are needed to determine

  10. Seismic testing of the base-isolated PWR spent-fuel storage rack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Katsuhisa; Tanaka, Mamoru; Nakamura, Masaaki; Tsujikura, Yonezo.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper aims to verify the seismic safety of the base-isolated spent-fuel storage rack. A series of seismic tests has been conducted using a three-dimensional shaking table. A sliding-type base-isolation system was employed for the prototype rack considering environmental conditions in an actual plant. A non linear seismic response analysis was also performed, and it is verified that the prototype of a base-isolated spent-fuel storage rack has a sufficient seismic safety margin for design seismic conditions from the viewpoint of seismic response. (author)

  11. Hydrogen storage systems based on magnesium hydride: from laboratory tests to fuel cell integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rango, P.; Marty, P.; Fruchart, D.

    2016-02-01

    The paper reviews the state of the art of hydrogen storage systems based on magnesium hydride, emphasizing the role of thermal management, whose effectiveness depends on the effective thermal conductivity of the hydride, but also depends of other limiting factors such as wall contact resistance and convective exchanges with the heat transfer fluid. For daily cycles, the use of phase change material to store the heat of reaction appears to be the most effective solution. The integration with fuel cells (1 kWe proton exchange membrane fuel cell and solid oxide fuel cell) highlights the dynamic behaviour of these systems, which is related to the thermodynamic properties of MgH2. This allows for "self-adaptive" systems that do not require control of the hydrogen flow rate at the inlet of the fuel cell.

  12. Retrofitting of homes for people in fuel poverty: Approach based on household thermal comfort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilches, Alberto; Barrios Padura, Ángela; Molina Huelva, Marta

    2017-01-01

    In a context of fuel poverty, the application of cost-effective methodology for energy retrofitting of buildings is ineffective. In these situations, there is no energy consumption reduction and thermal comfort is hardly achieved. This paper introduces a methodology to choose the most appropriate retrofit measure in a context of fuel poverty. This methodology is based on thermal comfort as the main criterion, and secondarily, it is based on the budget for paying monthly energy bills and initial costs. This study demonstrates how thermal comfort and monthly available income of households must be the first criterion for decision-making process. The methodology has been applied in four buildings. Results demonstrate why active retrofit measures are ineffective when monthly budget to pay energy bills is reduced. In conclusion, recommendations are made to promote efficient public policies in energy retrofit. The study was supported by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and carried out within the research project ‘{Re} Programa. (Re)habitation +(Re)generation +(Re)programming’ during 2013–2015. - Highlights: • A methodology is proposed for energy retrofit in a fuel poverty context. • Householder's monthly budget determines the energy retrofit effectiveness. • The cost-effective methodology is not applicable in a fuel poverty context. • Energy retrofit does not reduce energy consumption in a fuel poverty context. • Energy retrofit does not produce monthly monetary savings in a fuel poverty context.

  13. Calculation for Primary Combustion Characteristics of Boron-Based Fuel-Rich Propellant Based on BP Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wan'e

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A practical scheme for selecting characterization parameters of boron-based fuel-rich propellant formulation was put forward; a calculation model for primary combustion characteristics of boron-based fuel-rich propellant based on backpropagation neural network was established, validated, and then was used to predict primary combustion characteristics of boron-based fuel-rich propellant. The results show that the calculation error of burning rate is less than ±7.3%; in the formulation range (hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene 28%–32%, ammonium perchlorate 30%–35%, magnalium alloy 4%–8%, catocene 0%–5%, and boron 30%, the variation of the calculation data is consistent with the experimental results.

  14. Multi-objective component sizing based on optimal energy management strategy of fuel cell electric vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Liangfei; Mueller, Clemens David; Li, Jianqiu; Ouyang, Minggao; Hu, Zunyan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A non-linear model regarding fuel economy and system durability of FCEV. • A two-step algorithm for a quasi-optimal solution to a multi-objective problem. • Optimal parameters for DP algorithm considering accuracy and calculating time. • Influences of FC power and battery capacity on system performance. - Abstract: A typical topology of a proton electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell electric vehicle contains at least two power sources, a fuel cell system (FCS) and a lithium battery package. The FCS provides stationary power, and the battery delivers dynamic power. In this paper, we report on the multi-objective optimization problem of powertrain parameters for a pre-defined driving cycle regarding fuel economy and system durability. We introduce the dynamic model for the FCEV. We take into consideration equations not only for fuel economy but also for system durability. In addition, we define a multi-objective optimization problem, and find a quasi-optimal solution using a two-loop framework. In the inside loop, for each group of powertrain parameters, a global optimal energy management strategy based on dynamic programming (DP) is exploited. We optimize coefficients for the DP algorithm to reduce calculating time as well as to maintain accuracy. For the outside loop, we compare the results of all the groups with each other, and choose the Pareto optimal solution based on a compromise of fuel economy and system durability. Simulation results show that for a “China city bus typical cycle,” a battery capacity of 150 Ah and an FCS maximal net output power of 40 kW are optimal for the fuel economy and system durability of a fuel cell city bus.

  15. From fuel taxes to mileage-based user fees : rationale, technology, and transitional issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Two national commissions established by the U.S. Congress recommend replacing the current system of funding : transportation based on fuel taxes with a new distance-based system of user fees. The State of Oregon has done a : pilot project demonstrati...

  16. Model-based fault detection for proton exchange membrane fuel cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, an intelligent model-based fault detection (FD) is developed for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) dynamic systems using an independent radial basis function (RBF) networks. The novelty is that this RBF networks is used to model the PEMFC dynamic systems and residuals are generated based ...

  17. Performance Analyses of Renewable and Fuel Power Supply Systems for Different Base Station Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Lorincz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Base station sites (BSSs powered with renewable energy sources have gained the attention of cellular operators during the last few years. This is because such “green” BSSs impose significant reductions in the operational expenditures (OPEX of telecom operators due to the possibility of on-site renewable energy harvesting. In this paper, the green BSSs power supply system parameters detected through remote and centralized real time sensing are presented. An implemented sensing system based on a wireless sensor network enables reliable collection and post-processing analyses of many parameters, such as: total charging/discharging current of power supply system, battery voltage and temperature, wind speed, etc. As an example, yearly sensing results for three different BSS configurations powered by solar and/or wind energy are discussed in terms of renewable energy supply (RES system performance. In the case of powering those BSS with standalone systems based on a fuel generator, the fuel consumption models expressing interdependence among the generator load and fuel consumption are proposed. This has allowed energy-efficiency comparison of the fuel powered and RES systems, which is presented in terms of the OPEX and carbon dioxide (CO2 reductions. Additionally, approaches based on different BSS air-conditioning systems and the on/off regulation of a daily fuel generator activity are proposed and validated in terms of energy and capital expenditure (CAPEX savings.

  18. A relative risk comparison of criticality control strategies based on fresh fuel and burnup credit design bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.L.

    1989-01-01

    The fresh fuel design basis provides some margin of safety, i.e., criticality safety is almost independent of loading operations if fuel designs do not change significantly over the next 40 years. However, the design basis enrichment for future nuclear fuel will most likely vary with time. As a result, it cannot be guaranteed that the perceived passivity of the concept will be maintained over the life cycle of a future cask system. Several options are available to ensure that the reliability of a burnup credit system is comparable to or greater than that of a system based on a fresh fuel assumption. Criticality safety and control reliability could increase with burnup credit implementation. The safety of a burnup credit system could be comparable to that for a system based on the fresh fuel assumption. A burnup credit philosophy could be implemented without any cost-benefit tradeoff. A burnup credit design basis could result in a significant reduction in total system risk as well as economic benefits. These reductions occur primarily as a result of increased cask capacities and, thus, fewer shipments. Fewer shipments also result in fewer operations over the useful life of a cask, and opportunities for error decrease. The system concept can be designed such that only benefits occur. These benefits could include enhanced criticality safety and the overall reliability of cask operations, as well as system risk and economic benefits. Thus, burnup credit should be available as an alternative for the criticality design of spent fuel shipping casks

  19. Application of a personal computer relational data base management system to fuel cycle economic scoping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, J.P.; Dooley, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    A personal computer (PC) relational data base management system (RDBMS) permits large quantities of data to be maintained in a data base composed of structured data sets or files and provides data access through a software environment, procedure, or program language. The features of an RDBMS-based system create an environment on a PC that can provide significant benefits to any fuel cycle economics analysis. The ability to maintain a separate data set for each fuel cycle parameter group and the ability to manipulate the data through a series of independent calculation modules combine to provide the fuel cycle analyst with more time to examine and use the data, because less time is required to manipulate it

  20. The data-base of properties of actinides for metal fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tadashi; Kurata, Masateru

    1989-01-01

    It is developed the technology that transuranium elements (TRUs) to be recovered from high active wastes transmute into relatively short lived nuclides by burning them within metallic fuel alloys. In this paper, we collect published data of properties of TRUs and U-Pu(-Zr) alloys and make up the data base for the design study of alloys with TRUs. In addition, the data base possesses a function of statistic analysis in order to facilitate the comparison of data and can afford to estimate properties. This data base collects (1) properties affecting fuel temperature and microstructure, (2) mechanical properties and (3) fundamental properties such as hardness and density, and furthermore, (1) fission gas release, (2) swelling and (3) fuel-cladding interaction and eutectic property as irradiation behavior. (author)

  1. A comprehensive review of PBI-based high temperature PEM fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon Araya, Samuel; Zhou, Fan; Liso, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    of their design and characterization techniques at single cell, stack and system levels is given. The state-of-the-art concepts of different degradation mechanisms and methods of their mitigation are also discussed. Moreover, accelerated stress testing (AST) procedures for HT-PEMFCs available in literature...... fuel cell faults for targeted interventions based on the observed conditions to prevent sudden failures and to prolong the fuel cell's lifetime. However, the technology is still under development and robust on-line diagnostics tools are hardly available. Currently, mitigation is mainly done based......The current status on the understanding of the various operational aspects of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFC) has been summarized. The paper focuses on phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based HT-PEMFCs and an overview of the common practices...

  2. Reprocessability of molybdenum and magnesia based inert matrix fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebert Elena L.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the reprocessability of metallic 92Mo and ceramic MgO, which is under investigation for (Pu,MA-oxide (MA = minor actinide fuel within a metallic 92Mo matrix (CERMET and a ceramic MgO matrix (CERCER. Magnesium oxide and molybdenum reference samples have been fabricated by powder metallurgy. The dissolution of the matrices was studied as a function of HNO3 concentration (1-7 mol/L and temperature (25-90°C. The rate of dissolution of magnesium oxide and metallic molybdenum increased with temperature. While the MgO rate was independent of the acid concentration (1-7 mol/L, the rate of dissolution of Mo increased with acid concentration. However, the dissolution of Mo at high temperatures and nitric acid concentrations was accompanied by precipitation of MoO3. The extraction of uranium, americium, and europium in the presence of macro amounts of Mo and Mg was studied by three different extraction agents: tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP, N,Nʹ-dimethyl-N,Nʹ-dioctylhexylethoxymalonamide (DMDOHEMA, and N,N,N’,N’- -tetraoctyldiglycolamide (TODGA. With TBP no extraction of Mo and Mg occurred. Both matrix materials are partly extracted by DMDOHEMA. Magnesium is not extracted by TODGA (D < 0.1, but a weak extraction of Mo is observed at low Mo concentration.

  3. Carbon nanotubes based methanol sensor for fuel cells application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D W; Lee, J S; Lee, G S; Overzet, L; Kozlov, M; Aliev, A E; Park, Y W; Yang, D J

    2006-11-01

    An electrochemical sensor is built using vertically grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) micro-array to detect methanol concentration in water. This study is done for the potential use of the array as methanol sensor for portable units of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Platinum (Pt) nanoparticles electro-deposited CNTs (Pt/CNTs) electrode shows high sensitivity in the measurement of methanol concentration in water with cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurement at room temperature. Further investigation has also been undertaken to measure the concentration by changing the amount of the mixture of methanol and formic acid in water. We compared the performance of our micro array sensor built with Pt/CNTs electrodes versus that of Pt wire electrode using CV measurement. We found that our Pt/CNTs array sensor shows high sensitivity and detects methanol concentrations in the range of 0.04 M to 0.10 M. In addition, we found that co-use of formic acid as electrolyte enables us to measure up to 1.0 M methanol concentration.

  4. Analysis of the equalizing holes resistance in fuel assembly spike for lead-based reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guangyu; Jin, Ming; Wang, Jianye; Song, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A RELAP5 model for a 10 MWth lead-based reactor was built to study the hydrodynamic characteristics between the equalizing holes in the fuel assembly spike. • Different fuel assembly total blockage scenarios and different resistances for different fuel assemblies were examined. • The inherent safety characteristics of the lead-based reactor was improved by optimizing the configuration of equalizing holes in the fuel assembly spike. - Abstract: To avoid the damage of the fuel rod cladding when a fuel assembly (FA) is totally blocked, a special configuration of the fuel assembly spike was designed with some equalizing holes in the center region which can let the coolant to flow during the totally blockage scenarios of FA. To study the hydrodynamic characteristics between the equalizing holes and an appropriate resistance, a RELAP5 model was developed for a 10 MWth lead-based reactor which used lead-bismuth as coolant. Several FA total blockage and partial core blockage scenarios were selected. The simulation results indicated that when all the FA spike equalizing holes had the same hydraulic resistance, only a narrow range of suitable equalizing holes resistances could be chosen when a FA was blocked. However, in the two or more FA blockage scenarios, there were no appropriate resistances to meet the requirement. In addition, with different FA spike equalizing holes with different resistances, a large range of suitable equalizing hole resistances could be chosen. Especially a series of suitable resistances were selected when the small power FA resistance was 1/2, 1/4, 1/8 of the large one. Under these circumstances, one, two or three FA blockages would not damage the core. These demonstrated that selecting a series of suitable hydraulic resistances for the equalizing holes could improve the safety characteristics of the reactor effectively.

  5. Impact of Alternative Jet Fuels on Engine Exhaust Composition During the 2015 ECLIF Ground-Based Measurements Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schripp, Tobias; Anderson, Bruce; Crosbie, Ewan C; Moore, Richard H; Herrmann, Friederike; Oßwald, Patrick; Wahl, Claus; Kapernaum, Manfred; Köhler, Markus; Le Clercq, Patrick; Rauch, Bastian; Eichler, Philipp; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2018-04-17

    The application of fuels from renewable sources ("alternative fuels") in aviation is important for the reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, but may also attribute to reduced release of particles from jet engines. The present experiment describes ground-based measurements in the framework of the ECLIF (Emission and Climate Impact of Alternative Fuels) campaign using an Airbus A320 (V2527-A5 engines) burning six fuels of chemically different composition. Two reference Jet A-1 with slightly different chemical parameters were applied and further used in combination with a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic paraffinic kerosene (FT-SPK) to prepare three semi synthetic jet fuels (SSJF) of different aromatic content. In addition, one commercially available fully synthetic jet fuel (FSJF) featured the lowest aromatic content of the fuel selection. Neither the release of nitrogen oxide or carbon monoxide was significantly affected by the different fuel composition. The measured particle emission indices showed a reduction up to 50% (number) and 70% (mass) for two alternative jet fuels (FSJF, SSJF2) at low power settings in comparison to the reference fuels. The reduction is less pronounced at higher operating conditions but the release of particle number and particle mass is still significantly lower for the alternative fuels than for both reference fuels. The observed correlation between emitted particle mass and fuel aromatics is not strict. Here, the H/C ratio is a better indicator for soot emission.

  6. A disposition strategy for highly enriched, aluminum-based fuel from research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J.M.; Gould, T.H.; McDonell, W.R.; Bickford, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    The strategy proposed in this paper offers the Department of Energy an approach for disposing of aluminum-based, highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuels from foreign and domestic research reactors. The proposal is technically, socially, and economically sound. If implemented, it would advance US non-proliferation goals while also disposing of the spent fuel's waste by timely and proven methods using existing technologies and facilities at SRS without prolonged and controversial storage of the spent fuel. The fuel would be processed through 221-H. The radioactive fission products (waste) would be treated along with existing SRS high level waste by vitrifying it as borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for disposal in the national geological repository. The HEU would be isotopically diluted, during processing, to low-enriched uranium (LEU) which can not be used to make weapons, thus eliminating proliferation concerns. The LEU can be sold to fabricators of either research reactor fuel or commercial power fuel. This proposed processing-LEU recycle approach has several important advantages over other alternatives, including: Lowest capital investment; lowest net total cost; quickest route to acceptable waste form and final geologic disposal; and likely lowest safety, health, and environmental impacts

  7. Continuous energy Monte Carlo calculations for randomly distributed spherical fuels based on statistical geometry model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Isao [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan); Mori, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Itakura, Hirofumi

    1996-03-01

    The method to calculate neutronics parameters of a core composed of randomly distributed spherical fuels has been developed based on a statistical geometry model with a continuous energy Monte Carlo method. This method was implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP, and a new code MCNP-CFP had been developed. This paper describes the model and method how to use it and the validation results. In the Monte Carlo calculation, the location of a spherical fuel is sampled probabilistically along the particle flight path from the spatial probability distribution of spherical fuels, called nearest neighbor distribution (NND). This sampling method was validated through the following two comparisons: (1) Calculations of inventory of coated fuel particles (CFPs) in a fuel compact by both track length estimator and direct evaluation method, and (2) Criticality calculations for ordered packed geometries. This method was also confined by applying to an analysis of the critical assembly experiment at VHTRC. The method established in the present study is quite unique so as to a probabilistic model of the geometry with a great number of spherical fuels distributed randomly. Realizing the speed-up by vector or parallel computations in future, it is expected to be widely used in calculation of a nuclear reactor core, especially HTGR cores. (author).

  8. Energy management strategy based on fuzzy logic for a fuel cell hybrid bus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Dawei; Jin, Zhenhua; Lu, Qingchun [State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2008-10-15

    Fuel cell vehicles, as a substitute for internal-combustion-engine vehicles, have become a research hotspot for most automobile manufacturers all over the world. Fuel cell systems have disadvantages, such as high cost, slow response and no regenerative energy recovery during braking; hybridization can be a solution to these drawbacks. This paper presents a fuel cell hybrid bus which is equipped with a fuel cell system and two energy storage devices, i.e., a battery and an ultracapacitor. An energy management strategy based on fuzzy logic, which is employed to control the power flow of the vehicular power train, is described. This strategy is capable of determining the desired output power of the fuel cell system, battery and ultracapacitor according to the propulsion power and recuperated braking power. Some tests to verify the strategy were developed, and the results of the tests show the effectiveness of the proposed energy management strategy and the good performance of the fuel cell hybrid bus. (author)

  9. Calculation of effect of burnup history on spent fuel reactivity based on CASMO5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaobo; Xia Zhaodong; Zhu Qingfu

    2015-01-01

    Based on the burnup credit of actinides + fission products (APU-2) which are usually considered in spent fuel package, the effect of power density and operating history on k_∞ was studied. All the burnup calculations are based on the two-dimensional fuel assembly burnup program CASMO5. The results show that taking the core average power density of specified power plus a bounding margin of 0.0023 to k_∞, and taking the operating history of specified power without shutdown during cycle and between cycles plus a bounding margin of 0.0045 to k_∞ can meet the bounding principle of burnup credit. (authors)

  10. Feasibility of Producing and Using Biomass-Based Diesel and Jet Fuel in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kinchin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McCormick, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The study summarizes the best available public data on the production, capacity, cost, market demand, and feedstock availability for the production of biomass-based diesel and jet fuel. It includes an overview of the current conversion processes and current state-of-development for the production of biomass-based jet and diesel fuel, as well as the key companies pursuing this effort. Thediscussion analyzes all this information in the context of meeting the RFS mandate, highlights uncertainties for the future industry development, and key business opportunities.

  11. Upward revision of global fossil fuel methane emissions based on isotope database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwietzke, Stefan; Sherwood, Owen A; Bruhwiler, Lori M P; Miller, John B; Etiope, Giuseppe; Dlugokencky, Edward J; Michel, Sylvia Englund; Arling, Victoria A; Vaughn, Bruce H; White, James W C; Tans, Pieter P

    2016-10-06

    Methane has the second-largest global radiative forcing impact of anthropogenic greenhouse gases after carbon dioxide, but our understanding of the global atmospheric methane budget is incomplete. The global fossil fuel industry (production and usage of natural gas, oil and coal) is thought to contribute 15 to 22 per cent of methane emissions to the total atmospheric methane budget. However, questions remain regarding methane emission trends as a result of fossil fuel industrial activity and the contribution to total methane emissions of sources from the fossil fuel industry and from natural geological seepage, which are often co-located. Here we re-evaluate the global methane budget and the contribution of the fossil fuel industry to methane emissions based on long-term global methane and methane carbon isotope records. We compile the largest isotopic methane source signature database so far, including fossil fuel, microbial and biomass-burning methane emission sources. We find that total fossil fuel methane emissions (fossil fuel industry plus natural geological seepage) are not increasing over time, but are 60 to 110 per cent greater than current estimates owing to large revisions in isotope source signatures. We show that this is consistent with the observed global latitudinal methane gradient. After accounting for natural geological methane seepage, we find that methane emissions from natural gas, oil and coal production and their usage are 20 to 60 per cent greater than inventories. Our findings imply a greater potential for the fossil fuel industry to mitigate anthropogenic climate forcing, but we also find that methane emissions from natural gas as a fraction of production have declined from approximately 8 per cent to approximately 2 per cent over the past three decades.

  12. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for inhalation of jet fuels in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sheppard A; Campbell, Jerry L; Tremblay, Raphael T; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic behavior of the majority of jet fuel constituents has not been previously described in the framework of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for inhalation exposure. Toxic effects have been reported in multiple organ systems, though exposure methods varied across studies, utilizing either vaporized or aerosolized fuels. The purpose of this work was to assess the pharmacokinetics of aerosolized and vaporized fuels, and develop a PBPK model capable of describing both types of exposures. To support model development, n-tetradecane and n-octane exposures were conducted at 89 mg/m(3) aerosol+vapor and 1000-5000 ppm vapor, respectively. Exposures to JP-8 and S-8 were conducted at ~900-1000 mg/m(3), and ~200 mg/m(3) to a 50:50 blend of both fuels. Sub-models were developed to assess the behavior of representative constituents and grouped unquantified constituents, termed "lumps", accounting for the remaining fuel mass. The sub-models were combined into the first PBPK model for petroleum and synthetic jet fuels. Inhalation of hydrocarbon vapors was described with simple gas-exchange assumptions for uptake and exhalation. For aerosol droplets systemic uptake occurred in the thoracic region. Visceral tissues were described using perfusion and diffusion-limited equations. The model described kinetics at multiple fuel concentrations, utilizing a chemical "lumping" strategy to estimate parameters for fractions of speciated and unspeciated hydrocarbons and gauge metabolic interactions. The model more accurately simulated aromatic and lower molecular weight (MW) n-alkanes than some higher MW chemicals. Metabolic interactions were more pronounced at high (~2700-1000 mg/m(3)) concentrations. This research represents the most detailed assessment of fuel pharmacokinetics to date.

  13. Lanthanum manganate based cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhl Joergensen, M.

    2001-07-01

    Composite cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The aim was to study the oxygen reduction process in the electrode in order to minimise the voltage drop in the cathode. The electrodes contained a composite layer made from lanthanum strontium manganate (LSM) and yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) and a layer of pure LSM aimed for current collection. The performance of the composite electrodes was sensitive to microstructure and thickness. Further, the interface between the composite and the current collecting layer proved to affect the performance. In a durability study severe deg-radation of the composite electrodes was found when passing current through the electrode for 2000 hours at 1000 deg. C. This was ascribed to pore formation along the composite interfaces and densification of the composite and current collector microstructure. An evaluation of the measurement approach indicated that impedance spectroscopy is a very sensitive method. This affects the reproducibility, as small undesirable variations in for instance the microstructure from electrode to electrode may change the impedance. At least five processes were found to affect the impedance of LSM/YSZ composite electrodes. Two high frequency processes were ascribed to transport of oxide ions/oxygen intermediates across LSM/YSZ interfaces and through YSZ in the composite. Several competitive elementary reaction steps, which appear as one medium frequency process in the impedance spectra, were observed. A low frequency arc related to gas diffusion limitation in a stagnant gas layer above the composite structure was detected. Finally, an inductive process, assumed to be connected to an activation process involving segregates at the triple phase boundary between electrode, electrolyte and gas phase, was found. (au)

  14. Development of nuclear fuel cycle technologies - bases of long-term provision of fuel and environmental safety of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solonin, M.I.; Polyakov, A.S.; Zakharkin, B.S.; Smelov, V.S.; Nenarokomov, E.A.; Mukhin, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    To-day nuclear power is one of the options, however, to-morrow it may become the main source of the energy, thus, providing for the stable economic development for the long time to come. The availability of the large-scale nuclear power in the foreseeable future is governed by not only the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPP) but also by the environmentally safe management of spent nuclear fuel, radioactive waste conditioning and long-term storage. More emphasis is to be placed to the closing of the fuel cycle in view of substantial quantities of spent nuclear fuel arisings. The once-through fuel cycle that is cost effective at the moment cannot be considered to be environmentally safe even for the middle term since the substantial build-up of spent nuclear fuel containing thousands of tons Pu will require the resolution of the safe management problem in the nearest future and is absolutely unjustified in terms of moral ethics as a transfer of the responsibility to future generations. The minimization of radioactive waste arisings and its radioactivity is only feasible with the closed fuel cycle put into practice and some actinides and long-lived fission radionuclides burnt out. The key issues in providing the environmentally safe fuel cycle are efficient processes of producing fuel for NPP, radionuclide after-burning included, a long-term spent nuclear fuel storage and reprocessing as well as radioactive waste management. The paper deals with the problems inherent in producing fuel for NPP with a view for the closed fuel cycle. Also discussed are options of the fuel cycle, its effectiveness and environmental safety with improvements in technologies of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and long-lived radionuclide partitioning. (authors)

  15. Development of nuclear fuel cycle technologies - bases of long-term provision of fuel and environmental safety of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solonin, M I; Polyakov, A S; Zakharkin, B S; Smelov, V S; Nenarokomov, E A; Mukhin, I V [SSC, RF, A.A. Bochvar ALL-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    To-day nuclear power is one of the options, however, to-morrow it may become the main source of the energy, thus, providing for the stable economic development for the long time to come. The availability of the large-scale nuclear power in the foreseeable future is governed by not only the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPP) but also by the environmentally safe management of spent nuclear fuel, radioactive waste conditioning and long-term storage. More emphasis is to be placed to the closing of the fuel cycle in view of substantial quantities of spent nuclear fuel arisings. The once-through fuel cycle that is cost effective at the moment cannot be considered to be environmentally safe even for the middle term since the substantial build-up of spent nuclear fuel containing thousands of tons Pu will require the resolution of the safe management problem in the nearest future and is absolutely unjustified in terms of moral ethics as a transfer of the responsibility to future generations. The minimization of radioactive waste arisings and its radioactivity is only feasible with the closed fuel cycle put into practice and some actinides and long-lived fission radionuclides burnt out. The key issues in providing the environmentally safe fuel cycle are efficient processes of producing fuel for NPP, radionuclide after-burning included, a long-term spent nuclear fuel storage and reprocessing as well as radioactive waste management. The paper deals with the problems inherent in producing fuel for NPP with a view for the closed fuel cycle. Also discussed are options of the fuel cycle, its effectiveness and environmental safety with improvements in technologies of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and long-lived radionuclide partitioning. (authors)

  16. Estimation of the development possibility of the ABC/ATW fuel cycle based on LiF-BeF2 fuel salt. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.V.; Naumov, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the first chapter was generalization of data on solubility and equilibrium states of fission product and actinide fluorides in fluoride salt melts-solvents and fuel composition melts based on LiF-BeF 2 mixture which was proposed as fuel basis for ABC/ATW facility. The second chapter is devoted to description of processes proposed for the chemical-technological complex of the ABC/ATW facility and their physico-chemical peculiarities. The complex is responsible for the removal of fission products and actinides from irradiated fuel salt

  17. Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

    2013-06-01

    This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

  18. Study of visualized simulation and analysis of nuclear fuel cycle system based on multilevel flow model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jingquan; Yoshikawa, H.; Zhou Yangping

    2005-01-01

    Complex energy and environment system, especially nuclear fuel cycle system recently raised social concerns about the issues of economic competitiveness, environmental effect and nuclear proliferation. Only under the condition that those conflicting issues are gotten a consensus between stakeholders with different knowledge background, can nuclear power industry be continuingly developed. In this paper, a new analysis platform has been developed to help stakeholders to recognize and analyze various socio-technical issues in the nuclear fuel cycle sys- tem based on the functional modeling method named Multilevel Flow Models (MFM) according to the cognition theory of human being, Its character is that MFM models define a set of mass, energy and information flow structures on multiple levels of abstraction to describe the functional structure of a process system and its graphical symbol representation and the means-end and part-whole hierarchical flow structure to make the represented process easy to be understood. Based upon this methodology, a micro-process and a macro-process of nuclear fuel cycle system were selected to be simulated and some analysis processes such as economics analysis, environmental analysis and energy balance analysis related to those flows were also integrated to help stakeholders to understand the process of decision-making with the introduction of some new functions for the improved Multilevel Flow Models Studio, and finally the simple simulation such as spent fuel management process simulation and money flow of nuclear fuel cycle and its levelised cost analysis will be represented as feasible examples. (authors)

  19. Study of visualized simulation and analysis of nuclear fuel cycle system based on multilevel flow model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jing-Quan; YOSHIKAWA Hidekazu; ZHOU Yang-Ping

    2005-01-01

    Complex energy and environment system, especially nuclear fuel cycle system recently raised social concerns about the issues of economic competitiveness, environmental effect and nuclear proliferation. Only under the condition that those conflicting issues are gotten a consensus between stakeholders with different knowledge background, can nuclear power industry be continuingly developed. In this paper, a new analysis platform has been developed to help stakeholders to recognize and analyze various socio-technical issues in the nuclear fuel cycle system based on the functional modeling method named Multilevel Flow Models (MFM) according to the cognition theory of human being. Its character is that MFM models define a set of mass, energy and information flow structures on multiple levels of abstraction to describe the functional structure of a process system and its graphical symbol representation and the means-end and part-whole hierarchical flow structure to make the represented process easy to be understood. Based upon this methodology, a micro-process and a macro-process of nuclear fuel cycle system were selected to be simulated and some analysis processes such as economics analysis, environmental analysis and energy balance analysis related to those flows were also integrated to help stakeholders to understand the process of decision-making with the introduction of some new functions for the improved Multilevel Flow Models Studio, and finally the simple simulation such as spent fuel management process simulation and money flow of nuclear fuel cycle and its levelised cost analysis will be represented as feasible examples.

  20. A risk-based monitoring framework for the long term management of used fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, N.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization has a mandate from the Government of Canada to consult with the public and to recommend an approach for managing Canada's used nuclear fuel. Three main fuel management methods are being explored and evaluated by the Nuclear Waste Management Organization: disposal in a Deep Geological Repository (DGR); reactor-site extended storage (RES); and centralized extended storage (CES), either above ground or below ground. The used nuclear fuel management system, whether a DGR or an extended storage system will require monitoring. In this study, a risk-based monitoring framework was developed for the used fuel management program. The proposed approach addresses the unique challenges of used fuel management being implemented in a multi-stakeholder process, including: (i) the complexity of the facilities; (ii) the need to consider both science-based risk and perceived risk in the monitoring plans; and (iii) the difficulty in conducting 'invasive' measurements of sealed systems, particularly over a very long time frame. (author)

  1. Metal hydride and pyrophoric fuel additives for dicyclopentadiene based hybrid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shark, Steven C.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of reactive energetic fuel additives that have the potential to increase the combustion performance of hybrid rocket propellants in terms of solid fuel regression rate and combustion efficiency. Additives that can augment the combustion flame zone in a hybrid rocket motor by means of increased energy feedback to the fuel grain surface are of great interest. Metal hydrides have large volumetric hydrogen densities, which gives these materials high performance potential as fuel additives in terms of specifc impulse. The excess hydrogen and corresponding base metal may also cause an increase in the hybrid rocket solid fuel regression rate. Pyrophoric additives also have potential to increase the solid fuel regression rate by reacting more readily near the burning fuel surface providing rapid energy feedback. An experimental performance evaluation of metal hydride fuel additives for hybrid rocket motor propulsion systems is examined in this study. Hypergolic ignition droplet tests and an accelerated aging study revealed the protection capabilities of Dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) as a fuel binder, and the ability for unaided ignition. Static hybrid rocket motor experiments were conducted using DCPD as the fuel. Sodium borohydride (NabH4) and aluminum hydride (AlH3) were examined as fuel additives. Ninety percent rocket grade hydrogen peroxide (RGHP) was used as the oxidizer. In this study, the sensitivity of solid fuel regression rate and characteristic velocity (C*) efficiency to total fuel grain port mass flux and particle loading is examined. These results were compared to HTPB combustion performance as a baseline. Chamber pressure histories revealed steady motor operation in most tests, with reduced ignition delays when using NabH4 as a fuel additive. The addition of NabH4 and AlH3 produced up to a 47% and 85% increase in regression rate over neat DCPD, respectively. For all test conditions examined C* efficiency ranges

  2. Characterization of Catalyst Materials for Production of Aerospace Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Lauren M.; De La Ree, Ana B.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Due to environmental, economic, and security issues, there is a greater need for cleaner alternative fuels. There will undoubtedly be a shift from crude oil to non-petroleum sources as a feedstock for aviation (and other transportation) fuels. Additionally, efforts are concentrated on reducing costs coupled with fuel production from non-conventional sources. One solution to this issue is Fischer-Tropsch gas-to-liquid technology. Fischer-Tropsch processing of synthesis gas (CO/H2) produces a complex product stream of paraffins, olefins, and oxygenated compounds such as alcohols and aldehydes. The Fisher-Tropsch process can produce a cleaner diesel oil fraction with a high cetane number (typically above 70) without any sulfur or aromatic compounds. This process is most commonly catalyzed by heterogeneous (in this case, silver and platinum) catalysts composed of cobalt supported on alumina or unsupported alloyed iron powders. Physisorption, chemisorptions, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) are described to better understand the potential performance of Fischer-Tropsch cobalt on alumina catalysts promoted with silver and platinum. The overall goal is to preferentially produce C8 to C18 paraffin compounds for use as aerospace fuels. Progress towards this goal will eventually be updated and achieved by a more thorough understanding of the characterization of catalyst materials. This work was supported by NASA s Subsonic Fixed Wing and In-situ Resource Utilization projects.

  3. Judgement on the data for fuel assembly outlet temperatures of WWER fuel assemblies in power reactors based on measurements with experimental fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, F.

    1986-01-01

    In the period from 1980 to 1985, in the Rheinsberg nuclear power plant experimental fuel assemblies were used on lattices at the periphery of the core. These particular fuel assemblies dispose of an extensive in-core instrumentation with different sensors. Besides this, they are fit out with a device to systematically thottle the coolant flow. The large power gradient present at the core position of the experimental fuel assembly causes a temperature profile along the fuel assemblies which is well provable at the measuring points of the outlet temperature. Along the direction of flow this temperature profile in the coolant degrades only slowly. This effect is to be taken into account when measuring the fuel assembly outlet temperature of WWER fuel assemblies. Besides this, the results of the measurements hinted both at a γ-heating of the temperature measuring points and at tolerances in the calculation of the micro power density distribution. (author)

  4. Fuel cell membrane preparation: effects of base polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brack, H P; Scherer, G G [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Radiation grafted films and membranes prepared from the partially fluorinated base copolymer poly(ethylene-alt-tetrafluoroethylene) or ETFE have better mechanical properties than those prepared from poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-hexafluoropropylene) or FEP. The influence of the base copolymer film type on the grafting rate and yields is reported in the present investigation. An understanding of the effects of these parameters is important so that the grafting process can be carried out reproducibly in as short a time as possible. The grafting rate and yield as a function of the irradiation dose has been found to be much higher for the partially fluorinated base copolymer ETFE. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 5 refs.

  5. Observer-Based Fuel Control Using Oxygen Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Palle; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Mortensen, Jan Henrik

    is constructed and validated against data obtained at the plant. A Kalman filter based on measurements of combustion air flow led into the furnace and oxygen concentration in the flue gas is designed to estimate the actual coal flow. With this estimate, it becomes possible to close an inner loop around the coal......This report describes an attempt to improve the existing control af coal mills used at the Danish power plant Nordjyllandsværket Unit 3. The coal mills are not equipped with coal flow sensors; thus an observer-based approach is investigated. A nonlinear differential equation model of the boiler...

  6. Irradiation Performance of U-Mo Alloy Based ‘Monolithic’ Plate-Type Fuel – Design Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. B. Robinson; G. S. Chang; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; D. M. Wachs; D. L. Porter

    2009-08-01

    A down-selection process has been applied to the U-Mo fuel alloy based monolithic plate fuel design, supported by irradiation testing of small fuel plates containing various design parameters. The irradiation testing provided data on fuel performance issues such as swelling, fuel-cladding interaction (interdiffusion), blister formation at elevated temperatures, and fuel/cladding bond quality and effectiveness. U-10Mo (wt%) was selected as the fuel alloy of choice, accepting a somewhat lower uranium density for the benefits of phase stability. U-7Mo could be used, with a barrier, where the trade-off for uranium density is critical to nuclear performance. A zirconium foil barrier between fuel and cladding was chosen to provide a predictable, well-bonded, fuel-cladding interface, allowing little or no fuel-cladding interaction. The fuel plate testing conducted to inform this selection was based on the use of U-10Mo foils fabricated by hot co-rolling with a Zr foil. The foils were subsequently bonded to Al-6061 cladding by hot isostatic pressing or friction stir bonding.

  7. Imidazolium-Based Polymeric Materials as Alkaline Anion-Exchange Fuel Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sri R.; Yen, Shiao-Ping S.; Reddy, Prakash V.; Nair, Nanditha

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes that conduct hydroxide ions have potential use in fuel cells. A variety of polystyrene-based quaternary ammonium hydroxides have been reported as anion exchange fuel cell membranes. However, the hydrolytic stability and conductivity of the commercially available membranes are not adequate to meet the requirements of fuel cell applications. When compared with commercially available membranes, polystyrene-imidazolium alkaline membrane electrolytes are more stable and more highly conducting. At the time of this reporting, this has been the first such usage for imidazolium-based polymeric materials for fuel cells. Imidazolium salts are known to be electrochemically stable over wide potential ranges. By controlling the relative ratio of imidazolium groups in polystyrene-imidazolium salts, their physiochemical properties could be modulated. Alkaline anion exchange membranes based on polystyrene-imidazolium hydroxide materials have been developed. The first step was to synthesize the poly(styrene-co-(1-((4-vinyl)methyl)-3- methylimidazolium) chloride through a free-radical polymerization. Casting of this material followed by in situ treatment of the membranes with sodium hydroxide solutions provided the corresponding hydroxide salts. Various ratios of the monomers 4-chloromoethylvinylbenzine (CMVB) and vinylbenzine (VB) provided various compositions of the polymer. The preferred material, due to the relative ease of casting the film, and its relatively low hygroscopic nature, was a 2:1 ratio of CMVB to VB. Testing confirmed that at room temperature, the new membranes outperformed commercially available membranes by a large margin. With fuel cells now in use at NASA and in transportation, and with defense potential, any improvement to fuel cell efficiency is a significant development.

  8. Assessment of full ceramic solid oxide fuel cells based on modified strontium titanates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtappels, Peter; Ramos, Tania; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy

    2014-01-01

    stimulated the development for full ceramic anodes based on strontium titanates. Furthermore, the Ni-cermet is primarily a hydrogen oxidation electrode and efficiency losses might occur when operating on carbon containing fuels. In the European project SCOTAS-SOFC full ceramic cells comprising CGO...

  9. 78 FR 9938 - Ethyl Alcohol for Fuel Use: Determination of the Base Quantity of Imports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 332-288] Ethyl Alcohol for Fuel Use: Determination of the Base Quantity of Imports AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... the statutory requirement that the Commission make such determinations. Section 423(c) of the Tax...

  10. 75 FR 82069 - Ethyl Alcohol for Fuel Use: Determination of the Base Quantity of Imports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 332-288] Ethyl Alcohol for Fuel Use: Determination of the Base Quantity of Imports AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice of determination. SUMMARY: Section 423(c) of the Tax Reform Act of 1986, as amended (19 U.S.C...

  11. Radioactive Release from Aluminum-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel in Basin Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    1999-10-21

    The report provides an evaluation of: (1) the release rate of radionuclides through minor cladding penetrations (breaches) on aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (AL SNF), and (2) the consequences of direct storage of breached AL SNF relative to the authorization basis for SRS basin operation.

  12. Novel crosslinked membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanqin; Zieren, Shelley; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2011-07-14

    Novel covalently crosslinked membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and carboxylated polysulfone exhibit much lower methanol crossover and better performance in direct methanol fuel cells at 65 °C in 1 and 2 M methanol solutions compared to Nafion 115 membranes.

  13. Investigation of Ruthenium Dissolution in Advanced Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cells Stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Firdosy, S.; Koel, B. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a detailed review of the Direct Methanol Based Fuel Cell (DMFC) stack and investigates the Ruthenium that was found at the exit of the stack. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) Pathways for Cell Degradation; 3) Cell Duration Testing; 4) Duration Testing, MEA Analysis; and 5) Stack Degradation Analysis.

  14. A Theme-Based Course: Hydrogen as the Fuel of the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Kelly, Matthew; Paritsky, Leonid; Wagner, Julia

    2009-01-01

    A theme-based course focusing on the potential role of hydrogen as a future fuel is described. Numerous topics included in typical introductory courses can be directly related to the issue of hydrogen energy. Beginning topics include Avogadro's number, the mole, atomic mass, gas laws, and the role of electrons in chemical transformations. Reaction…

  15. Radioactive Release from Aluminum-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel in Basin Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    The report provides an evaluation of: (1) the release rate of radionuclides through minor cladding penetrations (breaches) on aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (AL SNF), and (2) the consequences of direct storage of breached AL SNF relative to the authorization basis for SRS basin operation

  16. A SOFC-based integrated gasification fuel cell cycle with CO2 capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spallina, V.; Romano, M.C.; Campanari, S.; Lozza, G.

    2011-01-01

    The application of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) in gasification-based power plants would represent a turning point in the power generation sector, allowing to considerably increase the electric efficiency of coal-fired power stations. Pollutant emissions would also be significantly reduced in

  17. Production of Fischer–Tropsch fuels and electricity from bituminous coal based on steam hydrogasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xiaoming; Norbeck, Joseph M.; Park, Chan S.

    2012-01-01

    A new thermochemical process for (Fischer–Tropsch) FT fuels and electricity coproduction based on steam hydrogasification is addressed and evaluated in this study. The core parts include (Steam Hydrogasification Reactor) SHR, (Steam Methane Reformer) SMR and (Fisher–Tropsch Reactor) FTR. A key feature of SHR is the enhanced conversion of carbon into methane at high steam environment with hydrogen and no need for catalyst or the use of oxygen. Facilities utilizing bituminous coal for coproduction of FT fuels and electricity with carbon dioxide sequestration are designed in detail. Cases with design capacity of either 400 or 4000 TPD (Tonne Per Day) (dry basis) are investigated with process modeling and cost estimation. A cash flow analysis is performed to determine the fuels (Production Cost) PC. The analysis shows that the 400 TPD case due to a FT fuels PC of 5.99 $/gallon diesel equivalent results in a plant design that is totally uneconomic. The 4000 TPD plant design is expected to produce 7143 bbl/day FT liquids with PC of 2.02 $/gallon and 2.27 $/gallon diesel equivalent at overall carbon capture ratio of 65% and 90%, respectively. Prospective commercial economics benefits with increasing plant size and improvements from large-scale demonstration efforts on steam hydrogasification. -- Highlights: ► We develop a new thermochemical method for synthetic fuels production. ► Detailed plant design and process modeling for the Coal-to-Liquid facilities are performed. ► Economic analysis has been carried out in determining the fuel production cost and IRR. ► The fuels produced in this study can compete with petroleum when crude oil price is 100 $/bbl. ► Further economic benefit comes with plant scale-up and process commercial demonstration efforts.

  18. Soot modeling of counterflow diffusion flames of ethylene-based binary mixture fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    A soot model was developed based on the recently proposed PAH growth mechanism for C1-C4 gaseous fuels (KAUST PAH Mechanism 2, KM2) that included molecular growth up to coronene (A7) to simulate soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of ethylene and its binary mixtures with methane, ethane and propane based on the method of moments. The soot model has 36 soot nucleation reactions from 8 PAH molecules including pyrene and larger PAHs. Soot surface growth reactions were based on a modified hydrogen-abstraction-acetylene-addition (HACA) mechanism in which CH3, C3H3 and C2H radicals were included in the hydrogen abstraction reactions in addition to H atoms. PAH condensation on soot particles was also considered. The experimentally measured profiles of soot volume fraction, number density, and particle size were well captured by the model for the baseline case of ethylene along with the cases involving mixtures of fuels. The simulation results, which were in qualitative agreement with the experimental data in the effects of binary fuel mixing on the sooting structures of the measured flames, showed in particular that 5% addition of propane (ethane) led to an increase in the soot volume fraction of the ethylene flame by 32% (6%), despite the fact that propane and ethane are less sooting fuels than is ethylene, which is in reasonable agreement with experiments of 37% (14%). The model revealed that with 5% addition of methane, there was an increase of 6% in the soot volume fraction. The average soot particle sizes were only minimally influenced while the soot number densities were increased by the fuel mixing. Further analysis of the numerical data indicated that the chemical cross-linking effect between ethylene and the dopant fuels resulted in an increase in PAH formation, which led to higher soot nucleation rates and therefore higher soot number densities. On the other hand, the rates of soot surface growth per unit surface area through the HACA mechanism were

  19. Microcontroller based automation system for end plug welding of test fuel pins in solgel facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhakar Rao, J.; Srinivas, K.C.; Prabhu, T.V.; Ravi, N.

    2010-01-01

    A microcontroller based stepper motor control and driver Unit for 'XY' positioning system is designed and developed to perform the 'pick-place' of fuel tube to pre-determined coordinates. This Unit provides a fine movement of the fuel tube to get perfect position for welding. The Graphical User Interface software running on PC displays the absolute position of the XY system and provides all the required control buttons to achieve the accurate positioning. The welding of clad tube with end plug is carried out in a high precision welding fixture by operating it remotely. This paper discusses about the Hardware and Software features and implementation of the instrumentation. (author)

  20. Economic, energy and environmental evaluations of biomass-based fuel ethanol projects based on life cycle assessment and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Suiran; Tao Jing

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the research of Monte Carlo simulation-based Economic, Energy and Environmental (3E) Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of the three Biomass-based Fuel Ethanol (BFE) projects in China. Our research includes both theoretical study and case study. In the theoretical study part, 3E LCA models are structured, 3E Index Functions are defined and the Monte Carlo simulation is introduced to address uncertainties in BFE life cycle analysis. In the case study part, projects of Wheat-based Fuel Ethanol (WFE) in Central China, Corn-based Fuel Ethanol (CFE) in Northeast China, and Cassava-based Fuel Ethanol (CFE) in Southwest China are evaluated from the aspects of economic viability and investment risks, energy efficiency and airborne emissions. The life cycle economy assessment shows that KFE project in Guangxi is viable, while CFE and WFE projects are not without government's subsidies. Energy efficiency assessment results show that WFE, CFE and KFE projects all have positive Net Energy Values. Emissions results show that the corn-based E10 (a blend of 10% gasoline and 90% ethanol by volume), wheat-based E10 and cassava-base E10 have less CO 2 and VOC life cycle emissions than conventional gasoline, but wheat-based E10 and cassava-based E10 can generate more emissions of CO, CH 4 , N 2 O, NO x , SO 2 , PM 10 and corn-based E10 can has more emissions of CH 4 , N 2 O, NO x , SO, PM 10 .

  1. Bioelectrochemical fuel cell and sensor based on quinoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G; Hill, H A.O.; Aston, W J; Higgins, I J; Turner, A P.F.

    1983-09-01

    A biofuel cell, yielding a stable and continuous low-power output, based on the enzymatic oxidation of methanol to formic acid has been designed and investigated. The homogeneous kinetics of the electrochemically-coupled enzymatic oxidation reaction were investigated and optimized. The biofuel cell also functioned as a sensitive method for the detection of primary alcohols. A method for medium-scale preparation of the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol: (acceptor) oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.99.8) is described. (Refs. 14).

  2. Performance evaluation and comparison of fuel processors integrated with PEM fuel cell based on steam or autothermal reforming and on CO preferential oxidation or selective methanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ercolino, Giuliana; Ashraf, Muhammad A.; Specchia, Vito; Specchia, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Modeling of different fuel processors integrated with PEM fuel cell stack. • Steam or autothermal reforming + CO selective methanation or preferential oxidation. • Reforming of different hydrocarbons: gasoline, light diesel oil, natural gas. • 5 kW e net systems comparison via energy efficiency and primary fuel rate consumed. • Highest net efficiency: steam reformer + CO selective methanation based system. - Abstract: The performances of four different auxiliary power unit (APU) schemes, based on a 5 kW e net proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM-FC) stack, are evaluated and compared. The fuel processor section of each APU is characterized by a reformer (autothermal ATR or steam SR), a non-isothermal water gas shift (NI-WGS) reactor and a final syngas catalytic clean-up step: the CO preferential oxidation (PROX) reactor or the CO selective methanation (SMET) one. Furthermore, three hydrocarbon fuels, the most commonly found in service stations (gasoline, light diesel oil and natural gas) are considered as primary fuels. The comparison is carried out examining the results obtained by a series of steady-state system simulations in Aspen Plus® of the four different APU schemes by varying the fed fuel. From the calculated data, the performance of CO-PROX is not very different compared to that of the CO-SMET, but the performance of the SR based APUs is higher than the scheme of the ATR based APUs. The most promising APU scheme with respect to an overall performance target is the scheme fed with natural gas and characterized by a fuel processor chain consisting of SR, NI-WGS and CO-SMET reactors. This processing reactors scheme together with the fuel cell section, notwithstanding having practically the same energy efficiency of the scheme with SR, NI-WGS and CO-PROX reactors, ensures a less complex scheme, higher hydrogen concentration in the syngas, lower air mass rate consumption, the absence of nitrogen in the syngas and higher potential

  3. Optimization of PWR fuel assembly radial enrichment and burnable poison location based on adaptive simulated annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Timothy; Ragusa, Jean; Schultz, Stephen; St Clair, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to present a concurrent optimization scheme for the radial pin enrichment and burnable poison location in PWR fuel assemblies. The methodology is based on the Adaptive Simulated Annealing (ASA) technique, coupled with a neutron lattice physics code to update the cost function values. In this work, the variations in the pin U-235 enrichment are variables to be optimized radially, i.e., pin by pin. We consider the optimization of two categories of fuel assemblies, with and without Gadolinium burnable poison pins. When burnable poisons are present, both the radial distribution of enrichment and the poison locations are variables in the optimization process. Results for 15 x 15 PWR fuel assembly designs are provided.

  4. Lanthanide based conversion coatings for long term wet storage of aluminium-clad spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, S.M.C.; Correa, O.V.; De Souza, J.A.; Ramanathan, L.V.

    2010-01-01

    Spent fuels from research reactors are stored in basins with water of less than desirable quality at many facilities around the world and instances of cladding failure caused by pitting corrosion have been reported. Conversion coatings have been used in many industries to protect different metals, including aluminium alloys. This paper presents the results of an ongoing investigation in which the corrosion resistance of lanthanide (cerium, lanthanum and praseodymium) based conversion coated RR fuel cladding alloys has been studied. Electrochemical tests in the laboratory revealed higher corrosion resistance of CeO 2 , La 2 O 3 and Pr 2 O 3 coated AA 1100 and AA 6061 alloys in NaCl solutions. Uncoated and CeO 2 coated coupons of these alloys exposed for 50 days to the spent fuel basin of the IEA-R1 research reactor in IPEN, Brazil, revealed marked reductions in the extent of pitting corrosion. (author)

  5. High Temperature Corrosion Problem of Boiler Components in presence of Sulfur and Alkali based Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mitra, Swapan Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Material degradation and ageing is of particular concern for fossil fuel fired power plant components. New techniques/approaches have been explored in recent years for Residual Life assessment of aged components and material degradation due to different damage mechanism like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion etc. Apart from the creep, the high temperature corrosion problem in a fossil fuel fired boiler is a matter of great concern if the fuel contains sulfur, chlorine sodium, potassium and vanadium etc. This paper discusses the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion in different critical components of boiler like water wall, superheater and reheater tubes and also remedial measures to avoid the premature failure. This paper also high lights the Residual Life Assessment (RLA) methodology of the components based on high temperature fireside corrosion. of different critical components of boiler.

  6. Fuel economy improvement based on a many-gear shifting strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashadi, B. [School of Automotive Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Baghaei Lakeh, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Considering the engine operating condition in terms of engine load and engine speed, a fuzzy decision making system has been developed. The objective was to controlling the engine operating point in the engine torque-rpm map, in order to enhance fuel economy. The main idea stems from the approach of tracking the defined target curve in the engine map similar to the CVT control criteria. To provide resemblance between a traditional geared transmission and a CVT, a many-gear transmission concept was introduced. A Fuzzy control was utilized by defining proper membership functions for the inputs and output. The efficient fuel consumption curve in the engine map was taken as the target of controller. The effect of engine output power on fuel consumption has also been taken into consideration. Making use of ADVISOR software, vehicle simulations was performed for the many-gear base case and a very good consistency was found with the CVT case. As a result the fuel consumption was found to become considerably less than existing values. The developed strategy was then applied to other cases including conventional manual and automatic transmissions and improvements in the fuel economy was observed.

  7. Project development laboratories energy fuels and oils based on NRU “MPEI”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakov, I. A.; Burakov, A. Y.; Nikitina, I. S.; Khomenkov, A. M.; Paramonova, A. O.; Khtoo Naing, Aung

    2017-11-01

    In the process of improving the efficiency of power plants a hot topic is the use of high-quality fuels and lubricants. In the process of transportation, preparation for use, storage and maintenance of the properties of fuels and lubricants may deteriorate, which entails a reduction in the efficiency of power plants. One of the ways to prevent the deterioration of the properties is a timely analysis of the relevant laboratories. In this day, the existence of laboratories of energy fuels and energy laboratory oil at thermal power stations is satisfactory character. However, the training of qualified personnel to work in these laboratories is a serious problem, as the lack of opportunities in these laboratories a complete list of required tests. The solution to this problem is to explore the possibility of application of methods of analysis of the properties of fuels and lubricants in the stage of training and re-training of qualified personnel. In this regard, on the basis of MPEI developed laboratory projects of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, power and energy oils and lubricants. Projects allow for a complete list of tests required for the timely control of properties and prevent the deterioration of these properties. Assess the financial component of the implementation of the developed projects based on the use of modern equipment used for tests. Projects allow for a complete list of tests required for the timely control of properties and prevent the deterioration of these properties.

  8. Accelerating parameter identification of proton exchange membrane fuel cell model with ranking-based differential evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Wenyin; Cai, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Parameter identification of PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell model is a very active area of research. Generally, it can be treated as a numerical optimization problem with complex nonlinear and multi-variable features. DE (differential evolution), which has been successfully used in various fields, is a simple yet efficient evolutionary algorithm for global numerical optimization. In this paper, with the objective of accelerating the process of parameter identification of PEM fuel cell models and reducing the necessary computational efforts, we firstly present a generic and simple ranking-based mutation operator for the DE algorithm. Then, the ranking-based mutation operator is incorporated into five highly-competitive DE variants to solve the PEM fuel cell model parameter identification problems. The main contributions of this work are the proposed ranking-based DE variants and their application to the parameter identification problems of PEM fuel cell models. Experiments have been conducted by using both the simulated voltage–current data and the data obtained from the literature to validate the performance of our approach. The results indicate that the ranking-based DE methods provide better results with respect to the solution quality, the convergence rate, and the success rate compared with their corresponding original DE methods. In addition, the voltage–current characteristics obtained by our approach are in good agreement with the original voltage–current curves in all cases. - Highlights: • A simple and generic ranking-based mutation operator is presented in this paper. • Several DE (differential evolution) variants are used to solve the parameter identification of PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cells) model. • Results show that our method accelerates the process of parameter identification. • The V–I characteristics are in very good agreement with experimental data

  9. Integrated data base report - 1994: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Except for transuranic wastes, inventories of these materials are reported as of December 31, 1994. Transuranic waste inventories are reported as of December 31, 1993. All spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions

  10. Design study of Thorium-232 and Protactinium-231 based fuel for long life BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trianti, N.; Su' ud, Z.; Riyana, E. S. [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division Department of Physics - Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) Jalan Ganeca 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2012-06-06

    A preliminary design study for the utilization of thorium added with {sup 231}Pa based fuel on BWR type reactor has been performed. In the previous research utilization of fuel based Thorium-232 and Uranium-233 show 10 years operation time with maximum excess-reactivity about 4.075% dk/k. To increase reactor operation time and reduce excess-reactivity below 1% dk/k, Protactinium (Pa-231) is used as Burnable Poison. Protactinium-231 has very interesting neutronic properties, which enable the core to reduce initial excess-reactivity and simultaneously increase production of {sup 233}U to {sup 231}Pa in burn-up process. Optimizations of the content of {sup 231}Pa in the core enables the BWR core to sustain long period of operation time with reasonable burn-up reactivity swing. Based on the optimization of fuel element composition (Th and Pa) in various moderation ratio we can get reactor core with longer operation time, 20 {approx} 30 years operation without fuel shuffling or refuelling, with average power densities maximum of about 35 watt/cc, and maximum excess-reactivity 0.56% dk/k.

  11. Estimating potentials of solid wood-based fuels in Finland in 2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaerhae, Kalle; Raesaenen, Tapio; Pajuoja, Heikki (Metsaeteho Oy, Helsinki (Finland)), e-mail: kalle.karha@metsateho.fi; Elo, Juha; Lahtinen, Perttu (Poeyry Energy Oy, Espoo (Finland))

    2010-07-15

    In the context of the Long-term Climate and Energy Strategy, it is estimated that the primary use of woodbased fuels in Finland will be 93 to 97 TWh by the year 2020. The overall target set for forest chips is 12 million m3, i.e. around 24 TWh. The objective of the research carried out by Metsaeteho Oy and Poeyry Energy Oy was to produce as realistic as possible a total analysis of the possibilities of increasing the usage of wood-based fuels in Finland by 2020. The research showed that the growth objective set in the Long-term Climate and Energy Strategy can be attained through the supply and demand of wood-based fuels. However, realizing this potential would require major investments in the entire forest chip production system, because the competitiveness of wood-based fuels in energy generation is currently not at a sufficient level. Considering the huge resources required by the forest chip production system and the current low competitiveness of forest chips, it is estimated that the use of forest chips in Finland will reach the level of 20 TWh at the earliest by the year 2020

  12. Integrated Data Base for 1989: Spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1988. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The current projections of future waste and spent fuel to be generated through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected defense-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, remedial action waste, commercial reactor and fuel cycle facility decommissioning waste, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous, highly radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 45 figs., 119 tabs

  13. Integrated data base report - 1994: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Integrated Data Base Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel and commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes. Except for transuranic wastes, inventories of these materials are reported as of December 31, 1994. Transuranic waste inventories are reported as of December 31, 1993. All spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste data reported are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, DOE Environmental Restoration Program contaminated environmental media, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions.

  14. An Agent-Based Modeling Framework and Application for the Generic Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidden, Matthew J.

    Key components of a novel methodology and implementation of an agent-based, dynamic nuclear fuel cycle simulator, Cyclus , are presented. The nuclear fuel cycle is a complex, physics-dependent supply chain. To date, existing dynamic simulators have not treated constrained fuel supply, time-dependent, isotopic-quality based demand, or fuel fungibility particularly well. Utilizing an agent-based methodology that incorporates sophisticated graph theory and operations research techniques can overcome these deficiencies. This work describes a simulation kernel and agents that interact with it, highlighting the Dynamic Resource Exchange (DRE), the supply-demand framework at the heart of the kernel. The key agent-DRE interaction mechanisms are described, which enable complex entity interaction through the use of physics and socio-economic models. The translation of an exchange instance to a variant of the Multicommodity Transportation Problem, which can be solved feasibly or optimally, follows. An extensive investigation of solution performance and fidelity is then presented. Finally, recommendations for future users of Cyclus and the DRE are provided.

  15. Integrated data base for 1990: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1989. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The current projections of future waste and spent fuel to be generated through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 22 refs., 48 figs., 109 tabs

  16. Integrated Data Base for 1991: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1990. These data are based on the most reliable information available form government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The current projections of future waste and spent fuel to be generated generally through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered are spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 160 refs., 61 figs., 142 tabs

  17. Spent fuel isotopic composition data base system on WWW. SFCOMPO on W3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Spent Fuel Composition Data Base System `SFCOMPO` has been developed on IBM compatible PC. This data base system is not widely used, since users must purchase the data base software by themselves. `SFCOMPO on W3` is a system to overcome this problem. User can search and visualize the data in the data base by accessing WWW server through the Internet from local machine. Only a browsing software to access WWW should be prepared. It enables us to easily search data of spent fuel composition if we can access the Internet. This system can be operated on WWW server machine which supports use of Common Gateway Interface (CGI). This report describes the background of the development of SFCOMPO on W3 and is it`s user`s manual. (author)

  18. Spent fuel isotopic composition data base system on WWW. SFCOMPO on W3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Kenya

    1997-11-01

    Spent Fuel Composition Data Base System 'SFCOMPO' has been developed on IBM compatible PC. This data base system is not widely used, since users must purchase the data base software by themselves. 'SFCOMPO on W3' is a system to overcome this problem. User can search and visualize the data in the data base by accessing WWW server through the Internet from local machine. Only a browsing software to access WWW should be prepared. It enables us to easily search data of spent fuel composition if we can access the Internet. This system can be operated on WWW server machine which supports use of Common Gateway Interface (CGI). This report describes the background of the development of SFCOMPO on W3 and is it's user's manual. (author)

  19. Designing and optimization of a micro CHP system based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell with different fuel processing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    are the possibility to partially reform hydrocarbon in the fuel cell anode compartment and the possibility to use high quality heat for cogeneration. In this work, different configurations of solid oxide fuel cell system for decentralized electricity production are examined. The Balance of Plant (BoP) components...

  20. Characterizing Gaseous Fuels for Their Knock Resistance based on the Chemical and Physical Properties of the Fuel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levinsky, Howard; Gersen, Sander; van Essen, Martijn; van Dijk, Gerco

    2016-01-01

    A method is described to characterize the effects of changes in the composition of gaseous fuels on engine knock by computing the autoignition process during the compression and burn periods of the engine cycle. To account for the effects of fuel composition on the in-cylinder pressure and

  1. Market-Based and System-Wide Fuel Cycle Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The Dynamic Resource Exchange (DRE) gives agency to consumer facilities to determine the preference of any particular trade that is offered by suppliers to satisfy its requests. This provides a natural balance of power in the relationship between consumers and suppliers. However, in situations in which suppliers have flexibility surrounding the way that they respond to individual requests, they have no mechanism to assess how different bids will be received by the consumer. Theoretically, a supplier can offer multiple bids to respond to a given request in an attempt to cover their bases, but this introduces more arcs into the underlying network flow problem, increasing the cost to solve the problem. In the extreme, when a supplier can continuously vary the characteristics of the bid, this can represent a large number of additional arcs and have real performance consequences. To remedy this inefficiency in the implementation of the market-level optimization, the definition of a request has been extended to include a function that can be used by the supplier to query the preference that would be assigned by a consumer for a potential bid. The supplier is then free to implement arbitrarily complex algorithms to revise/optimize its bid based on responses to this function. A supplier can chose to not invoke the function at all, mimicking the original DRE behavior, can use it to select among a small set of discrete choices, or can implement an internal algorithm to seek an optimum bid on a continuous parameter space. This capability was demonstrated with a storage facility that preferred material with a specific decay heat that was as close as possible to the maximum allowable decay heat, while requiring the specific decay heat to fall between a minimum and maximum level. This archetype was used to fill multiple storage roles in a simulation that also included a standard recipe reactor: wet storage with no maximum allowable specific decay heat, dry storage with a modest

  2. Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denia Djokic; Steven J. Piet; Layne F. Pincock; Nick R. Soelberg

    2013-02-01

    This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system , and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity.

  3. Thermally induced dispersion mechanisms for aluminum-based plate-type fuels under rapid transient energy deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgevich, V.; Taleyarkham, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Kim, S.H.

    1995-01-01

    A thermally induced dispersion model was developed to analyze for dispersive potential and determine onset of fuel plate dispersion for Al-based research and test reactor fuels. Effect of rapid energy deposition in a fuel plate was simulated. Several data types for Al-based fuels tested in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor in Japan and in the Transient Reactor Test in Idaho were reviewed. Analyses of experiments show that onset of fuel dispersion is linked to a sharp rise in predicted strain rate, which futher coincides with onset of Al vaporization. Analysis also shows that Al oxidation and exothermal chemical reaction between the fuel and Al can significantly affect the energy deposition characteristics, and therefore dispersion onset connected with Al vaporization, and affect onset of vaporization

  4. Sizing for fuel cell/supercapacitor hybrid vehicles based on stochastic driving cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feroldi, Diego; Carignano, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A sizing procedure based on the fulfilment of real driving conditions is proposed. • A methodology to generate long-term stochastic driving cycles is proposed. • A parametric optimization of the real-time EMS is conducted. • A trade-off design is adopted from a Pareto front. • A comparison with optimal consumption via Dynamic Programming is performed. - Abstract: In this article, a methodology for the sizing and analysis of fuel cell/supercapacitor hybrid vehicles is presented. The proposed sizing methodology is based on the fulfilment of power requirements, including sustained speed tests and stochastic driving cycles. The procedure to generate driving cycles is also presented in this paper. The sizing algorithm explicitly accounts for the Equivalent Consumption Minimization Strategy (ECMS). The performance is compared with optimal consumption, which is found using an off-line strategy via Dynamic Programming. The sizing methodology provides guidance for sizing the fuel cell and the supercapacitor number. The results also include analysis on oversizing the fuel cell and varying the parameters of the energy management strategy. The simulation results highlight the importance of integrating sizing and energy management into fuel cell hybrid vehicles.

  5. Energy Management Strategies based on efficiency map for Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feroldi, Diego; Serra, Maria; Riera, Jordi [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial (CSIC-UPC), C. Llorens i Artigas 4, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    The addition of a fast auxiliary power source like a supercapacitor bank in fuel cell-based vehicles has a great potential because permits a significant reduction of the hydrogen consumption and an improvement of the vehicle efficiency. The Energy Management Strategies, commanding the power split between the power sources in the hybrid arrangement to fulfil the power requirement, perform a fundamental role to achieve this objective. In this work, three strategies based on the knowledge of the fuel cell efficiency map are proposed. These strategies are attractive due to the relative simplicity of the real time implementation and the good performance. The strategies are tested both in a simulation environment and in an experimental setup using a 1.2-kW PEM fuel cell. The results, in terms of hydrogen consumption, are compared with an optimal case, which is assessed trough an advantageous technique also introduced in this work and with a pure fuel cell vehicle as well. This comparative reveals high efficiency and good performance, allowing to save up to 26% of hydrogen in urban scenarios. (author)

  6. An energetic-exergetic analysis of a residential CHP system based on PEM fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barelli, L.; Bidini, G.; Gallorini, F.; Ottaviano, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A zero-dimensional of a micro cogenerative (CHP) energy system based on a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has been developed. → The electrochemical model has been validated with experimental data. → The performances of this CHP system have been evaluated through a series of simulations. → An energy/exergy analysis of the simulation results has allowed to define the PEMFC optimal operating conditions. → The PEMFC optimal operating conditions detected are: 1 atm, 353.15 K and 100% RH. -- Abstract: The use of fuel cell systems for distributed residential power generation represents an interesting alternative to traditional thermoelectric plants due to their high efficiency and the potential recovering of the heat generated by the internal electrochemical reactions. In this paper the study of a micro cogenerative (CHP) energy system based on a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is reported. With the aim to evaluate the performance and then the feasibility of this non-conventional energy system, in consideration of thermal and electrical basic demand of a multifamily apartment blocks, a zero-dimensional PEMFC model in Aspen Plus environment has been developed. A simulations sequence has been carried out at different operating conditions of the fuel cell (varying temperature, pressure and relative humidity). Subsequently, on the basis of the obtained results, an energy/exergy analysis has been conducted to define the optimal operating conditions of the PEMFC that ensures the most efficient use of the energy and exergy inputs.

  7. PEM fuel cell model and simulation in Matlab–Simulink based on physical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdin, Z.; Webb, C.J.; Gray, E.MacA.

    2016-01-01

    An advanced PEM fuel cell mathematical model is described and realised in four ancillaries in the Matlab–Simulink environment. Where possible, the model is based on parameters with direct physical meaning, with the aim of going beyond empirically describing the characteristics of the fuel cell. The model can therefore be used to predict enhanced performance owing to, for instance, improved electrode materials, and to relate changes in the measured performance to internal changes affecting influential physical parameters. Some simplifying assumptions make the model fairly light in computational demand and therefore amenable to extension to simulate an entire fuel-cell stack as part of an energy system. Despite these assumptions, the model emulates experimental data well, especially at high current density. The influences of pressure, temperature, humidification and reactant partial pressure on cell performance are explored. The dominating effect of membrane hydration is clearly revealed. - Highlights: • Model based on physical parameters where possible. • Effective binary diffusion modelled in detail on an atomistic basis. • The dominating effect of membrane hydration is clearly revealed. • Documented Simulink model so others can use it. • Conceived as a research tool for exploring enhanced fuel cell performance and diagnosing problems.

  8. Market-Based and System-Wide Fuel Cycle Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Paul [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-02

    The Dynamic Resource Exchange (DRE) gives agency to consumer facilities to determine the preference of any particular trade that is offered by suppliers to satisfy its requests. This provides a natural balance of power in the relationship between consumers and suppliers. However, in situations in which suppliers have flexibility surrounding the way that they respond to individual requests, they have no mechanism to assess how different bids will be received by the consumer. Theoretically, a supplier can offer multiple bids to respond to a given request in an attempt to “cover their bases”, but this introduces more arcs into the underlying network flow problem, increasing the cost to solve the problem. In the extreme, when a supplier can continuously vary the characteristics of the bid, this can represent a large number of additional arcs and have real performance consequences. To remedy this inefficiency in the implementation of the market-level optimization, the definition of a request has been extended to include a function that can be used by the supplier to query the preference that would be assigned by a consumer for a potential bid. The supplier is then free to implement arbitrarily complex algorithms to revise/optimize its bid based on responses to this function. A supplier can chose to not invoke the function at all, mimicking the original DRE behavior, can use it to select among a small set of discrete choices, or can implement an internal algorithm to seek an optimum bid on a continuous parameter space. This capability was demonstrated with a storage facility that preferred material with a specific decay heat that was as close as possible to the maximum allowable decay heat, while requiring the specific decay heat to fall between a minimum and maximum level. This archetype was used to fill multiple storage roles in a simulation that also included a standard recipe reactor: wet storage with no maximum allowable specific decay heat, dry storage with a

  9. Nanostructure-based proton exchange membrane for fuel cell applications at high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junsheng; Wang, Zhengbang; Li, Junrui; Pan, Mu; Tang, Haolin

    2014-02-01

    As a clean and highly efficient energy source, the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has been considered an ideal alternative to traditional fossil energy sources. Great efforts have been devoted to realizing the commercialization of the PEMFC in the past decade. To eliminate some technical problems that are associated with the low-temperature operation (such as catalyst poisoning and poor water management), PEMFCs are usually operated at elevated temperatures (e.g., > 100 degrees C). However, traditional proton exchange membrane (PEM) shows poor performance at elevated temperature. To achieve a high-performance PEM for high temperature fuel cell applications, novel PEMs, which are based on nanostructures, have been developed recently. In this review, we discuss and summarize the methods for fabricating the nanostructure-based PEMs for PEMFC operated at elevated temperatures and the high temperature performance of these PEMs. We also give an outlook on the rational design and development of the nanostructure-based PEMs.

  10. Cost of Equity Estimation in Fuel and Energy Sector Companies Based on CAPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozieł, Diana; Pawłowski, Stanisław; Kustra, Arkadiusz

    2018-03-01

    The article presents cost of equity estimation of capital groups from the fuel and energy sector, listed at the Warsaw Stock Exchange, based on the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM). The objective of the article was to perform a valuation of equity with the application of CAPM, based on actual financial data and stock exchange data and to carry out a sensitivity analysis of such cost, depending on the financing structure of the entity. The objective of the article formulated in this manner has determined its' structure. It focuses on presentation of substantive analyses related to the core of equity and methods of estimating its' costs, with special attention given to the CAPM. In the practical section, estimation of cost was performed according to the CAPM methodology, based on the example of leading fuel and energy companies, such as Tauron GE and PGE. Simultaneously, sensitivity analysis of such cost was performed depending on the structure of financing the company's operation.

  11. Data processing in the integrated data base for spent fuel and radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Morrison, G.W.; Notz, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) produces for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) the official spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories and projections for the United States through the year 2020. Inventory data are collected and checked for consistency, projection data are calculated based on specified assumptions, and both are converted to a standard format. Spent fuel and waste radionclides are decayed as a function of time. The resulting information constitutes the core data files called the Past/Present/Future (P/P/F) data base. A data file management system, SAS /sup R/, is used to retrieve the data and create several types of output: an annual report, an electronic summary data file designed for IBM-PC /sup R/ -compatible computers, and special-request reports

  12. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    , Bubbles and precipitates, Modeling fuel behavior); Modeling defects and fission products in UO 2 ceramic by ab initio computation (Ab initio computation, Point defects in uranium dioxide, Fission products in uranium dioxide, The indispensable coupling of modeling and experiment); Cladding and assembly materials (What is the purpose of cladding?, Zirconium alloys, Claddings: required to exhibit good mechanical strength, Mechanical behavior of irradiated Zr alloys, Claddings: required to prove corrosion resistant); Pellet-cladding interaction (The phenomena involved in pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), Experimental simulation of PCI and the lessons to be drawn from it, The requirement for an experimental basis, Numerical simulation of PCI, Towards a lifting of PCI-related operating constraints); Advanced UO 2 and MOX ceramics (Chromium oxide-doped UO 2 fuel, Novel MOX microstructures); Mechanical behavior of fuel assemblies (Assembly mechanical behavior in normal operating conditions, Assembly mechanical behavior in accident situations, Fuel in a loss of primary coolant accident (LOCA)); Introduction to LOCA-type accident transients (Overview of thermal-hydraulic and fuel-related aspects, Incidence of LOCA transients on the thermal-metallurgical-mechanical behavior of zirconium-base alloy cladding); Fuel in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA) (Safety criteria); Fuel in a severe accident (The VERCORS analytical program, The Phebus-FP global tests, Control of severe accidents in the EPR reactor); In-core fuel management (Relationships between cycle length, maximum burnup, and batch fraction Enrichment and burnable poisons, The impact of the nature of the fuel used, and its evolution, on the major parameters of core physics, and management Prospects for future trends in core management); Fuel cycle material balances (In-core evolution of materials, Decay heat and potential radiotoxicity, Plutonium management); Long-term behavior of spent fuel (The nature of spent nuclear

  13. Nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    irradiation, Bubbles and precipitates, Modeling fuel behavior); Modeling defects and fission products in UO{sub 2} ceramic by ab initio computation (Ab initio computation, Point defects in uranium dioxide, Fission products in uranium dioxide, The indispensable coupling of modeling and experiment); Cladding and assembly materials (What is the purpose of cladding?, Zirconium alloys, Claddings: required to exhibit good mechanical strength, Mechanical behavior of irradiated Zr alloys, Claddings: required to prove corrosion resistant); Pellet-cladding interaction (The phenomena involved in pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), Experimental simulation of PCI and the lessons to be drawn from it, The requirement for an experimental basis, Numerical simulation of PCI, Towards a lifting of PCI-related operating constraints); Advanced UO{sub 2} and MOX ceramics (Chromium oxide-doped UO{sub 2} fuel, Novel MOX microstructures); Mechanical behavior of fuel assemblies (Assembly mechanical behavior in normal operating conditions, Assembly mechanical behavior in accident situations, Fuel in a loss of primary coolant accident (LOCA)); Introduction to LOCA-type accident transients (Overview of thermal-hydraulic and fuel-related aspects, Incidence of LOCA transients on the thermal-metallurgical-mechanical behavior of zirconium-base alloy cladding); Fuel in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA) (Safety criteria); Fuel in a severe accident (The VERCORS analytical program, The Phebus-FP global tests, Control of severe accidents in the EPR reactor); In-core fuel management (Relationships between cycle length, maximum burnup, and batch fraction Enrichment and burnable poisons, The impact of the nature of the fuel used, and its evolution, on the major parameters of core physics, and management Prospects for future trends in core management); Fuel cycle material balances (In-core evolution of materials, Decay heat and potential radiotoxicity, Plutonium management); Long-term behavior of spent fuel (The

  14. Conversion of highly enriched uranium in thorium-232 based oxide fuel for light water reactors: MOX-T fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vapirev, E I; Jordanov, T; Christoskov, I [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Fizicheski Fakultet

    1994-12-31

    The idea of conversion of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from warheads without mixing it with natural uranium as well as the utilization of plutonium as fuel component is discussed. A nuclear fuel which is a mixture of 4% {sup 235}U (HEU) as a fissile isotope and 96 % {sup 232}Th (ThO{sub 2}) as a non-fissile isotope in a mixed oxide with thorium fuel is proposed. It is assumed that plutonium can also be used in the proposed fuel in a mixture with {sup 235}U. The following advantages of the use of HEU in LWRs in mixed {sup 235}U - Th fuel are pointed out: (1) No generation of long-living plutonium and americium isotopes (in case of reprocessing the high level radioactive wastes will contain only fission fragments and uranium); (2) The high conversion ratio of Th extends the expected burnup by approximately 1/3 without higher initial enrichment (the same initial enrichment simplifies the problem for compensation of the excess reactivity in the beginning with burnable poison and boric acid); (3) The high conversion ratio of Th allows the fuel utilization with less initial enrichment (by approx. 1/3) for the same burnup; thus less excess reactivity has to be compensated after reloading; in case of fuel reprocessing all fissile materials ({sup 235}U + {sup 233}U) could be chemically extracted. Irrespectively to the optimistic expectations outlined, further work including data on optimal loading and reloading schemes, theoretical calculations of thermal properties of {sup 235}U + Th fuel rods, manufacturing of several test fuel assemblies and investigations of their operational behaviour in a reactor core is still needed. 1 fig., 7 refs.

  15. Life cycle assessment of residual lignocellulosic biomass-based jet fuel with activated carbon and lignosulfonate as co-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierobon, Francesca; Eastin, Ivan L; Ganguly, Indroneil

    2018-01-01

    Bio-jet fuels are emerging as a valuable alternative to petroleum-based fuels for their potential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuel dependence. In this study, residual woody biomass from slash piles in the U.S. Pacific Northwest is used as a feedstock to produce iso-paraffinic kerosene, through the production of sugar and subsequent patented proprietary fermentation and upgrading. To enhance the economic viability and reduce the environmental impacts of iso-paraffinic kerosene, two co-products, activated carbon and lignosulfonate, are simultaneously produced within the same bio-refinery. A cradle-to-grave life cycle assessment (LCA) is performed for the residual woody biomass-based bio-jet fuel and compared against the cradle-to-grave LCA of petroleum-based jet fuel. This paper also discusses the differences in the environmental impacts of the residual biomass-based bio-jet fuel using two different approaches, mass allocation and system expansion, to partition the impacts between the bio-fuel and the co-products, which are produced in the bio-refinery. The environmental assessment of biomass-based bio-jet fuel reveals an improvement along most critical environmental criteria, as compared to its petroleum-based counterpart. However, the results present significant differences in the environmental impact of biomass-based bio-jet fuel, based on the partitioning method adopted. The mass allocation approach shows a greater improvement along most of the environmental criteria, as compared to the system expansion approach. However, independent of the partitioning approach, the results of this study reveal that more than the EISA mandated 60% reduction in the global warming potential could be achieved by substituting petroleum-based jet fuel with residual woody biomass-based jet fuel. Converting residual woody biomass from slash piles into bio-jet fuel presents the additional benefit of avoiding the impacts of slash pile burning in the forest, which

  16. Costs and Benefits of Using Fuel Cells for Stationary Power Generation at Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstow Maintenance Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schendler, Phillip

    2002-01-01

    We compare the costs and benefits of using two types of fuel cell power generation systems versus Southern California Edison to provide the base electricity load for the Marine Corps Logistics Base...

  17. Controlling fuel crossover and hydration in ultrathin proton exchange membrane-based fuel cells using Pt-nanosheet catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Rujie; Zhang, Wenjing (Angela); He, Gaohong

    2014-01-01

    and provided in situ hydration inside Nafion membranes to maintain their proton conductivity level. Furthermore, LDH nanosheets reinforced the Nafion membranes, with 181% improvement in tensile modulus and 166% improvement in yield strength. In a hydrogen fuel cell running with dry fuel, the membrane......An ultra-thin proton exchange membrane with Pt-nanosheet catalysts was designed for a self-humidifying fuel cell running on H2 and O2. In this design, an ultra-thin Nafion membrane was used to reduce ohmic resistance. Pt nanocatalysts were uniformly anchored on exfoliated, layered double hydroxide...

  18. Development of a data base system for quality control of MOX fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kuniaki; Yamaguchi, Toshihiro; Mishima, Takeshi

    1988-01-01

    For the purpose of improvement and speed up of work concerning quality control for mixed oxide fuel fabrication, we have been developing a data base system having a data base consisting of data as to fabrication conditions and inspects, We have aimed to develop a data base system having capability of analysis and function giving informations as to quality control. The data base system is full interactive system on real time basis, consequently it makes analyzing and editing data easy. It has capability of relational research, numerical analysis, correlation analysis, drawing control charts, histograms, and other figures, and expressing status of fabrication processes using control charts. (author)

  19. Effect of compression ratio, equivalence ratio and engine speed on the performance and emission characteristics of a spark ignition engine using hydrogen as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadiq Al-Baghdadi, M.A.R. [University of Babylon (Iraq). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-12-01

    The present energy situation has stimulated active research interest in non-petroleum and non-polluting fuels, particularly for transportation, power generation, and agricultural sectors. Researchers have found that hydrogen presents the best and an unprecedented solution to the energy crises and pollution problems, due to its superior combustion qualities and availability. This paper discusses analytically and provides data on the effect of compression ratio, equivalence ratio and engine speed on the engine performance, emissions and pre-ignition limits of a spark ignition engine operating on hydrogen fuel. These data are important in order to understand the interaction between engine performance and emission parameters, which will help engine designers when designing for hydrogen. (author)

  20. A fuel thermal conductivity correlation based on the latest experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sontheimer, F.; Landskron, H.; Billaux, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    A new fuel thermal conductivity (ftc) correlation for UO 2 and (U,Gd)O 2 is presented, which is based on the relaxation-time theory of Klemens. The correlation is chosen because of its validity in a wide range of defect concentrations as for instance encountered in fuel with a wide range of burnup and gadolinia additions, as has been shown by Ishimoto. The phonon term of the new correlation has the form 1/x·arctan(x) , where x is a measure of the defect concentration introduced by burnup and gadolinia additions. For low defect concentrations, this term is identical with the classical form for the phonon term 1/(A+B.T). At high defect concentrations, however, when phonon-point defect scattering starts dominating over phonon-phonon scattering, the new correlation deviates from the classical formulation and has a distinctly weaker dependence on temperature and defect concentration than the classical form. The new arctan correlation in combination with an appropriate electronic ftc term is fitted to the Halden data base of fuel centre-line temperature measurements (represented by the ''Halden ftc correlation recommendation''). Agreement is very good up to a burnup of about 60 MWd/kgU; beyond, the arctan form has a saturating burnup degradation. The new arctan correlation in combination with an appropriate electronic ftc term is also shown to describe very well our latest ftc measurements on unirradiated gadolinia fuel up to 9% gadolinia content. Application to Halden measurements up to very high burnup is successful, when combined with the so-called ''rim-effect'', which counteracts the saturation tendency of the new correlation at high burnup. Latest laser thermal diffusivity measurements on irradiated gadolinia fuel in the frame of the NFIR program, although not yet open for literature and not discussed in the paper, indicate very good agreement with the new arctan correlation. (author)

  1. The history, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity of carbon-based fuels and their emissions. Part 2: solid fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, Larry D

    2014-01-01

    The combustion of solid fuels (like wood, animal dung, and coal) usually involves elevated temperatures and altered pressures and genotoxicants (e.g., PAHs) are likely to form. These substances are carcinogenic in experimental animals, and epidemiological studies implicate these fuels (especially their emissions) as carcinogens in man. Globally, ∼50% of all households and ∼90% of all rural households use solid fuels for cooking or heating and these fuels often are burnt in simple stoves with very incomplete combustion. Exposed women and children often exhibit low birth weight, increased infant and perinatal mortality, head and neck cancer, and lung cancer although few studies have measured exposure directly. Today, households that cannot meet the expense of fuels like kerosene, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity resort to collecting wood, agricultural residue, and animal dung to use as household fuels. In the more developed countries, solid fuels are often used for electric power generation providing more than half of the electricity generated in the United States. The world's coal reserves, which equal approximately one exagram, equal ∼1 trillion barrels of crude oil (comparable to all the world's known oil reserves) and could last for 600 years. Studies show that the PAHs that are identified in solid fuel emissions react with NO2 to form direct-acting mutagens. In summary, many of the measured genotoxicants found in both the indoor and electricity-generating combustors are the same; therefore, the severity of the health effects vary with exposure and with the health status of the exposed population. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Future perspective of thorium based nuclear fuels and thorium potential of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unak, T.; Yildirim, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Today's nuclear technology has principally been based on the use of fissile U-235 and Pu-239. he existence of thorium in the nature and its potential use in the nuclear technology were not unfortunately into account with a sufficient importance. The global distributions of thorium and uranium reserves indicate that in general some developed countries such as the USA, Canada, Australia, France have considerable uranium reserves, and contrarily only some developing countries such as Turkey, Brazil, India, Egypt have considerable thorium reserves. The studies carried out on the thorium during the last 50 years have clearly showed that the thorium based nuclear fuels have the potential easily use in most of reactor types actually operated with the classical uranium based nuclear fuels without any considerable modification. In the case of the use of thorium based nuclear fuels in future nuclear energy production systems, the serious problems such as the excess of Pu-239, the proliferation potential of nuclear weapons, and also the anxious of nuclear terrorism will probably be resolved, and sustainable nuclear energy production will be realized in the next new century. (authors)

  3. Future perspective of thorium based nuclear fuels and thorium potential of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unak, T.; Yildirim, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Today's nuclear technology has principally been based on the use of fissile U-235 and Pu-239. The existence of thorium in the nature and its potential use in the nuclear technology were not unfortunately into account with a sufficient importance. The global distributions of thorium and uranium reserves indicate that in general some developed countries such as the USA, Canada, Australia, France have considerable uranium reserves, and contrarily only some developing countries such as Turkey, Brazil, India, Egypt have considerable thorium reserves. The studies carried out on the thorium during the last 50 years have clearly showed that the thorium based nuclear fuels have the potential easily use in most of reactor types actually operated with the classical uranium based nuclear fuels without any considerable modification. In the case of the use of thorium based nuclear fuels in future nuclear energy production systems, the serious problems such as the excess of Pu-239, the proliferation potential of nuclear weapons, and also the anxious of nuclear terrorism will probably be resolved, and sustainable nuclear energy production will be realized in the next new century. (authors)

  4. Total fuel-cycle analysis of heavy-duty vehicles using biofuels and natural gas-based alternative fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Patrick E; Green, Erin H; Corbett, James J; Mas, Carl; Winebrake, James J

    2011-03-01

    Heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) present a growing energy and environmental concern worldwide. These vehicles rely almost entirely on diesel fuel for propulsion and create problems associated with local pollution, climate change, and energy security. Given these problems and the expected global expansion of HDVs in transportation sectors, industry and governments are pursuing biofuels and natural gas as potential alternative fuels for HDVs. Using recent lifecycle datasets, this paper evaluates the energy and emissions impacts of these fuels in the HDV sector by conducting a total fuel-cycle (TFC) analysis for Class 8 HDVs for six fuel pathways: (1) petroleum to ultra low sulfur diesel; (2) petroleum and soyoil to biodiesel (methyl soy ester); (3) petroleum, ethanol, and oxygenate to e-diesel; (4) petroleum and natural gas to Fischer-Tropsch diesel; (5) natural gas to compressed natural gas; and (6) natural gas to liquefied natural gas. TFC emissions are evaluated for three greenhouse gases (GHGs) (carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane) and five other pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, and sulfur oxides), along with estimates of total energy and petroleum consumption associated with each of the six fuel pathways. Results show definite advantages with biodiesel and compressed natural gas for most pollutants, negligible benefits for e-diesel, and increased GHG emissions for liquefied natural gas and Fischer-Tropsch diesel (from natural gas).

  5. Examination of the Properties of a Spent Fuel based Electricity Generation System - Scintillator Performance Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Man-Sung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Gammavoltaic was proposed by Karl Scharf in 1960. The low efficiency resulted in gammavoltaic being used as a radiation detector. In the 1990s the efficiency of gammavoltaic increased by the use of a scintillator. Gammavoltaic was further studied as a power source for spent fuel transportation and a nuclear battery in the 2000s Haneol Lee and Man-Sung Yim also suggested electricity generation system based on spent fuel stored inside the fuel pool of a nuclear power plant. This study proposed the systematic design of an electricity conversion system using CsI(Tl) scintillator and a-Si photovoltaic cell. As such, this study is selected to be a reference paper. The results of this paper indicate a self-absorption effect from the reference model. This effect is negligible while the irradiation degradation has to be considered. Two main ways to reduce radiation induced degradation are scintillator shielding and replacing scintillator material with a material having higher radiation resistance. The analysis of the scintillator used in the 'electricity generation system using gamma radiation from spent fuel' was performed to evaluate the ideal electricity generation in the reference research.

  6. INR Recent Contributions to Thorium-Based Fuel Using in CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodea, I.; Mărgeanu, C. A.; Rizoiu, A.; Olteanu, G.

    2014-01-01

    The paper summarizes INR Pitesti contributions and latest developments to the Thorium-based fuel (TF) using in present CANDU nuclear reactors. Earlier studies performed in INR Pitesti revealed the CANDU design potential to use Recovered Uranium (RU) and Slightly Enriched Uranium (SEU) as alternative fuels in PHWRs. In this paper, we performed both lattice and CANDU core calculations using TF, revealing the main neutron physics parameters of interest: k-infinity, coolant void reactivity (CVR), channel and bundle power distributions over a CANDU 6 reactor core similar to that of Cernavoda, Unit 1. We modelled the so called Once Through Thorium (OTT) fuel cycle, using the 3D finite-differences DIREN code, developed in INR. The INR flexible SEU-43 bundle design was the candidate for TF carrying. Preliminary analysis regarding TF burning in CANDU reactors has been performed using the finite differences 3D code DIREN. TFs showed safety features improvement regarding lower CVRs in the case of fresh fuel use. Improvements added to the INR ELESIMTORIU- 1 computer code give the possibility to fairly simulate irradiation experiments in INR TRIGA research reactor. Efforts are still needed in order to get better accuracy and agreement of simulations to the experimental results. (author)

  7. APPLIED OF IMPRESSED CURRENT CATHODIC PROTECTION DESIGN FOR FUEL PIPELINE NETWORK AT NAVAL BASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    k. Susilo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian Navy (TNI AL is the main component for Maritime Security and Defence. Because of that, TNI AL needs Indonesian Warship (KRI to covered Maritime area. The main requirement from KRI is fulfilled by demand. To pock of fuel demand from KRI at Naval Base, it needs a new pipeline of fuel distribution network system. The pipeline network system used for maximum lifetime must be protected from corrosion. Basically, there are five methods of corrosion control such as change to a more suitable material, modification to the environment, use of protective coating, design modification to the system or component, and the application of cathodic or anodic protection. Cathodic protection for pipeline available in two kinds, namely Sacrifice Anode and Impressed Current Cathodic Protection (ICCP. This paper makes analysis from design of Impressed Current Cathodic Protection and total current requirement in the method. This paper showed both experimental from speciment test and theoritical calculation. The result showed that design of Impressed Current Cathodic Protection on fuel distribution pipeline network system requires voltage 33,759 V(DC, protection current 6,6035 A(DC by theoritical calculation and 6,544 A(DC from pipeline specimen test, with 0,25 mpy for corrosion rate. Transformer Rectifier design needs requirements 45 V with 10 A for current. This research result can be made as literature and standardization for Indonesian Navy in designing the Impressed Current Cathodic Protection for fuel distribution pipeline network system.

  8. OVERVIEW OF ADVANCED PETROLEUM-BASED FUELS-DIESEL EMISSIONS CONTROL PROGRAM (APBF-DEC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverdrup, George M.

    2000-08-20

    The Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels-Diesel Emissions Control Program (APBF-DEC) began in February 2000 and is supported by government agencies and industry. The purpose of the APBF-DEC program is to identify and evaluate the optimal combinations of fuels, lubricants, diesel engines, and emission control systems to meet the projected emission standards for the 2000 to 2010 time period. APBF-DEC is an outgrowth of the earlier Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects Program (DECSE), whose objective is to determine the impact of the sulfur levels in fuel on emission control systems that could lower the emissions of NOx and particulate matter (PM) from diesel powered vehicles in the 2002 to 2004 period. Results from the DECSE studies of two emission control technologies-diesel particle filter (DPF) and NOx adsorber-will be used in the APBF-DEC program. These data are expected to provide initial information on emission control technology options and the effects of fuel properties (including additives) on the performance of emission control systems.

  9. Examination of the Properties of a Spent Fuel based Electricity Generation System - Scintillator Performance Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Man-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Gammavoltaic was proposed by Karl Scharf in 1960. The low efficiency resulted in gammavoltaic being used as a radiation detector. In the 1990s the efficiency of gammavoltaic increased by the use of a scintillator. Gammavoltaic was further studied as a power source for spent fuel transportation and a nuclear battery in the 2000s Haneol Lee and Man-Sung Yim also suggested electricity generation system based on spent fuel stored inside the fuel pool of a nuclear power plant. This study proposed the systematic design of an electricity conversion system using CsI(Tl) scintillator and a-Si photovoltaic cell. As such, this study is selected to be a reference paper. The results of this paper indicate a self-absorption effect from the reference model. This effect is negligible while the irradiation degradation has to be considered. Two main ways to reduce radiation induced degradation are scintillator shielding and replacing scintillator material with a material having higher radiation resistance. The analysis of the scintillator used in the 'electricity generation system using gamma radiation from spent fuel' was performed to evaluate the ideal electricity generation in the reference research

  10. Conceptual design study of small long-life PWR based on thorium cycle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subkhi, M. Nurul; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik

    2014-01-01

    A neutronic performance of small long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium cycle based fuel has been investigated. Thorium cycle which has higher conversion ratio in thermal region compared to uranium cycle produce some significant of 233 U during burn up time. The cell-burn up calculations were performed by PIJ SRAC code using nuclear data library based on JENDL 3.3, while the multi-energy-group diffusion calculations were optimized in whole core cylindrical two-dimension R-Z geometry by SRAC-CITATION. this study would be introduced thorium nitride fuel system which ZIRLO is the cladding material. The optimization of 350 MWt small long life PWR result small excess reactivity and reduced power peaking during its operation

  11. Solid oxide fuel cell anode image segmentation based on a novel quantum-inspired fuzzy clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaowei; Xiang, Yuhan; Chen, Li; Xu, Xin; Li, Xi

    2015-12-01

    High quality microstructure modeling can optimize the design of fuel cells. For three-phase accurate identification of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) microstructure, this paper proposes a novel image segmentation method on YSZ/Ni anode Optical Microscopic (OM) images. According to Quantum Signal Processing (QSP), the proposed approach exploits a quantum-inspired adaptive fuzziness factor to adaptively estimate the energy function in the fuzzy system based on Markov Random Filed (MRF). Before defuzzification, a quantum-inspired probability distribution based on distance and gray correction is proposed, which can adaptively adjust the inaccurate probability estimation of uncertain points caused by noises and edge points. In this study, the proposed method improves accuracy and effectiveness of three-phase identification on the micro-investigation. It provides firm foundation to investigate the microstructural evolution and its related properties.

  12. Novel Processing of Unique Ceramic-Based Nuclear Materials and Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hui; Singh, Raman P.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These include refractory alloys base on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as those based on silicon carbide (SiCf-SiC); carbon-carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the materials used in nuclear fuels and other temperature critical components can lower the center-line fuel temperature and thereby enhance durability and reduce the risk of premature failure.

  13. Application of a long-period fibre grating-based transducer in the fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possetti, G R C; De Arruda, L V R; Muller, M; Fabris, J L; Côcco, L C; Yamamoto, C I; Falate, R

    2009-01-01

    This work shows prospects of long-period fibre grating applications as transducers for fuel conformity analysis. The proposed long-period grating transducer was employed to assess the gasoline conformity in commercial gas stations. Grating responses were used to train and validate a radial base function topology of an artificial neural network. The obtained results show that fibre optic sensors supervised by artificial neural networks can integrate systems for smart sensing with high applicability in the petrochemical field. The radial base function had reached a correct classification probability of approximately 94%. The device applicability in the analysis of hydrated ethanol fuel was also investigated by measuring the concentration of ethanol in ethanol–water mixtures. The results showed that the developed transducer can be used to infer the ethanol–water concentration with a resolution of up to 0.23%

  14. Novel Processing of Unique Ceramic-Based Nuclear Materials and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Zhang; Raman P. Singh

    2008-11-30

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These include refractory alloys base on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as those based on silicon carbide (SiCf-SiC); carbon-carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor componets is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the materials used in nuclear fuels and other temperature critical components can lower the center-line fuel temperature and thereby enhance durability and reduce the risk of premature failure.

  15. Viscoelastic response of HTPB based solid fuel to horizontal and vertical storage slumping conditions and it's affect on service life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, Q.; Nizam, F.

    2011-01-01

    Frequent use of solid fuels as thrust generating energy source in modern day space vehicle systems has created a need to assess their serviceability for long term storage under various conditions. Solid fuel grain, the most important part of any solid fuel system, responds visco elastically to any loading condition. For the assessment of the service life of any solid fuel system, the solid fuel grain has to be structurally evaluated in applied storage conditions. Structural integrity of the grain is exceptionally significant to guarantee the successful operation of the solid fuel system. In this work, numerical simulations have been performed to assess the mechanical stresses and strains induced in an HTPB based solid fuel grain during service life employing ABAQUS standard FEA software using 4-node bilinear quadrilateral elements. For finite element analysis (FEA), typical 2-D and p/nth axisymmetric section of 5-point (n) star grain geometry is considered. Mechanical loads include the horizontal or vertical 1-g (solid fuel weight) storage condition. The simulation results are compared with the analytical results for the same grain geometry. Analytically measured slump deflections in grain segment at various storage times have been found in good relation with the FEA based simulation results. This proves the validity of the procedure adopted and is helpful in assessment of the service life of solid fuel systems. (author)

  16. Potential of thorium-based fuel cycle for PWR core to reduce plutonium and long-term toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Kim, Taek Kyum; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    The cross section libraries and calculation methods of the participants were inter-compared through the first stage benchmark calculation. The multiplication factor of unit cell benchmark are in good agreement, but there is significant discrepancies of 2.3 to 3.5 %k at BOC and at EOC between the calculated infinite multiplication factors of each participants for the assembly benchmark. Our results with HELIOS show a reasonable agreement with the others except the MTC value at EOC. To verify the potential of the thorium-based fuel to consume the plutonium and to reduce the radioactivity from the spent fuel, the conceptual core with ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} or MOX fuel were constructed. The composition and quantity of plutonium isotopes and the radioactivity level of spent fuel for conceptual cores were analyzed, and the neutronic characteristics of conceptual cores were also calculated. The nuclear characteristics for ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium fueled core was similar to MOX fueled core, mainly due to the same seed fuel material, plutonium. For the capability of plutonium consumption, ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium fuel can consume plutonium 2.1-2.4 times MOX fuel. The fraction of fissile plutonium in the spent ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium fuel is more favorable in view of plutonium consumption and non-proliferation than MOX fuel. The radioactivity of spent ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium and MOX fuel batches were calculated. Since plutonium isotopes are dominant for the long-term radioactivity, ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} thorium has almost the same level of radioactivity as in MOX fuel for a long-term perspective. (author). 22 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Second interim report of the Interagency Commission on Alternative Motor Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report describes progress the commission and government agencies have made in implementing the provisions of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988, assessing the role of alternative motor fuels in the US transportation sector, and developing policies to promote the use of alternative fuels. The alternative motor-fuels policies proposed in the National Energy Strategy (NES) are described and shows how they compose an effective long-term plan to encourage the widespread use of alternative motor fuels. The progress to date of the Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies in implementing the programs required by the AMFA is reported. A detailed scenario of future alternative-fuel use that displaces 2.5 million barrels per day (MMBD) of petroleum and a feasible path of vehicle production and fuel supply leading to that goal is described. An analytical tool for exploring and quantifying the energy market impacts of alternative fuels, the Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM), is described. The AFTM provides a means of investigating the impacts of alternative fuels in interrelated world energy markets for petroleum and natural gas. Several major initiatives have recently been enacted that have important ramifications for alternative-fuels policy. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 contain provisions mandating the use of nonpetroleum oxygenates in reformulated gasoline. Other provisions for much more stringent emissions standards may affect the ability of manufacturers to make and sell conventional-fuel vehicles or, at the very least, affect their cost-effectiveness in comparison to cleaner alternative-fuel vehicles (AFV's). Finally, the key areas in which technological advances could substantially improve the competitiveness of AFV technologies in the marketplace are reviewed

  18. Simulation-based Investigation of Electric Power Generation by Using Gamma Radiation from Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Mansung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    This study investigates the feasibility of using gamma radiation energy from spent nuclear fuels to produce electricity as emergency power source. The proposed electric power system includes electricity generation and storage. Electricity generation was based on conversion of gamma energy to light energy using a scintillator and then to electric energy using a solar cell. Generated electricity was to be stored in a battery as a power source. The efficiency of energy conversion and the extent of the resulting electric power source capability were examined by computer model-based simulation. Main factors which affect to total electric power generated include thermal power of nuclear power plant, average burn-up period for fuel rod, battery charging time, and scintillator thickness. The estimated total power generation and its possible application is discussed. Although the output power increases as scintillator becomes thicker, thick scintillator can be problem because of its high price. There are two ways to solve this problem. The first one is to use thin scintillator to whole fuel assembly area. The second one is to use thick scintillator to limited region. But the current per fuel assembly for the first case for 4000MWth, 72 month burnup is about several to tens of microampere scale, which is too small to charge. Because of this the system is supposed to have thick scintillator system with limited region. Based on the results, the generated electricity is expected to be insufficient to operate the safety injection pumps even at the maximum power output. This may be important for security purposes. Based on the current design, the solar cell efficiency is estimated to be around 1.5-4%. As the efficiency is a strong function of scintillation wavelength, improving the efficiency may be possible by broadening the wavelength through the use of multiple scintillators. Future work will also include validation of the results through experiments, and material reliability

  19. Simulation-based Investigation of Electric Power Generation by Using Gamma Radiation from Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Mansung

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using gamma radiation energy from spent nuclear fuels to produce electricity as emergency power source. The proposed electric power system includes electricity generation and storage. Electricity generation was based on conversion of gamma energy to light energy using a scintillator and then to electric energy using a solar cell. Generated electricity was to be stored in a battery as a power source. The efficiency of energy conversion and the extent of the resulting electric power source capability were examined by computer model-based simulation. Main factors which affect to total electric power generated include thermal power of nuclear power plant, average burn-up period for fuel rod, battery charging time, and scintillator thickness. The estimated total power generation and its possible application is discussed. Although the output power increases as scintillator becomes thicker, thick scintillator can be problem because of its high price. There are two ways to solve this problem. The first one is to use thin scintillator to whole fuel assembly area. The second one is to use thick scintillator to limited region. But the current per fuel assembly for the first case for 4000MWth, 72 month burnup is about several to tens of microampere scale, which is too small to charge. Because of this the system is supposed to have thick scintillator system with limited region. Based on the results, the generated electricity is expected to be insufficient to operate the safety injection pumps even at the maximum power output. This may be important for security purposes. Based on the current design, the solar cell efficiency is estimated to be around 1.5-4%. As the efficiency is a strong function of scintillation wavelength, improving the efficiency may be possible by broadening the wavelength through the use of multiple scintillators. Future work will also include validation of the results through experiments, and material reliability

  20. Poly-electrolyte fuel cell membrane based on crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene by radiation-grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichizuri, Shogo; Asano, Saneto; Li, Jingye

    2004-01-01

    Poly-electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) membranes based on crosslinked Polytetrafluoroethylene (RX-PTFE) have been fabricated by radiation-grafting with reactive styrene monomers using γ-ray irradiation in air at room temperature / electron beam irradiation under N 2 gas atmosphere at room temperature. The characteristic properties of obtained materials have been measured by DSC, TGA and FT-IR spectroscopy, and so on. Ion exchange capacity of sulfonated crosslinked PTFE has been achieved 2.8meq/g. (author)

  1. Development of Monte Carlo-based pebble bed reactor fuel management code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiadipura, Topan; Obara, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new Monte Carlo-based fuel management code for OTTO cycle pebble bed reactor was developed. • The double-heterogeneity was modeled using statistical method in MVP-BURN code. • The code can perform analysis of equilibrium and non-equilibrium phase. • Code-to-code comparisons for Once-Through-Then-Out case were investigated. • Ability of the code to accommodate the void cavity was confirmed. - Abstract: A fuel management code for pebble bed reactors (PBRs) based on the Monte Carlo method has been developed in this study. The code, named Monte Carlo burnup analysis code for PBR (MCPBR), enables a simulation of the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle of a PBR from the running-in phase to the equilibrium condition. In MCPBR, a burnup calculation based on a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, MVP-BURN, is coupled with an additional utility code to be able to simulate the OTTO cycle of PBR. MCPBR has several advantages in modeling PBRs, namely its Monte Carlo neutron transport modeling, its capability of explicitly modeling the double heterogeneity of the PBR core, and its ability to model different axial fuel speeds in the PBR core. Analysis at the equilibrium condition of the simplified PBR was used as the validation test of MCPBR. The calculation results of the code were compared with the results of diffusion-based fuel management PBR codes, namely the VSOP and PEBBED codes. Using JENDL-4.0 nuclide library, MCPBR gave a 4.15% and 3.32% lower k eff value compared to VSOP and PEBBED, respectively. While using JENDL-3.3, MCPBR gave a 2.22% and 3.11% higher k eff value compared to VSOP and PEBBED, respectively. The ability of MCPBR to analyze neutron transport in the top void of the PBR core and its effects was also confirmed

  2. ORIGEN-2 libraries based on JENDL-3.2 for PWR-MOX fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Hideki; Onoue, Masaaki; Tahara, Yoshihisa [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    A set of ORIGEN-2 libraries for PWR MOX fuel was developed based on JENDL-3.2 in the Working Group on Evaluation of Nuclide Production, Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The calculational model generating ORIGEN-2 libraries of PWR MOX is explained here in detail. The ORIGEN-2 calculation with the new ORIGEN-2 MOX library can predict the nuclides contents within 10% for U and Pu isotopes and 20% for both minor actinides and main FPs. (author)

  3. Development of Demonstrably Predictive Models for Emissions from Alternative Fuels Based Aircraft Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Engineering Chemistry Fundamentals, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1966, pp. 356–363. [14] Burns, R. A., Development of scalar and velocity imaging diagnostics...in an Aero- Engine Model Combustor at Elevated Pressure Using URANS and Finite- Rate Chemistry ,” 50th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference...FINAL REPORT Development of Demonstrably Predictive Models for Emissions from Alternative Fuels Based Aircraft Engines SERDP Project WP-2151

  4. Wood fuel use in Tanzania rural-based industries. Brick kiln studies in Tanzania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiwele, P.M.; Mbise, H.A.; Mwihava, N.C.X.; Svenningsson, P.J.

    1999-07-01

    About 90% of the annual total energy consumed in Tanzania is biomass-based, mainly in the form of wood fuel. Small-scale brick-making is one of the major consumers of wood fuel, with Arusha, Iringa and Mbeya being the main areas where brick-making activities take place. In 1993, the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) in collaboration with the Ministry of Energy and Minerals (MEM) proposed a project to undertake studies on fuelwood in small rural industries of Tanzania, particularly brick-making. The study on wood fuel utilisation involved field measurements and analyses with the aim of establishing major sources of energy losses and to recommend measures regarding fuel switching, kiln thermal efficiency improvements, and the yield and quality of bricks. The positive feedback would mean reduced demand for fuelwood and hence reduced deforestation rate and therefore environmental protection. The implementation of the project, which commenced in 1994, involved field measurements in order to establish kiln performances as well as laboratory tests to determine the qualities of the fired bricks. At a later stage of implementation, efforts were made to consider other potential fuels (sawdust and coal) for firing the kilns. The main indicators of kiln performance include thermal efficiency, specific energy consumption (SEC), which is sometimes referred to as specific fuel consumption (SFC; yield; and quality. The average SEC for Mbeya region was found to vary from 1.11 to 1.54 while for Iringa region the range was from 1.21 to 1.84 MJ/kg fired brick. The data for Arusha was in the range of 0.76 to 3.3 MJ/kg of fired brick. The low SEC may not necessarily give a reasonable indication of the kiln performance because kiln operators in Mbeya mould larger size bricks which are unloaded from incomplete firing conditions. The fired bricks at Babati (Arusha), though of work-size, are of low quality and consume very little wood fuel. Findings obtained under the SADC project four

  5. Assessment Of Possible Cycle Lengths For Fully-Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel-Based Light Water Reactor Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, R. Sonat; Pope, Michael A.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal; Venneri, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The use of TRISO-particle-based dispersion fuel within SiC matrix and cladding materials has the potential to allow the design of extremely safe LWRs with failure-proof fuel. This paper examines the feasibility of LWR-like cycle length for such a low enriched uranium fuel with the imposed constraint of strictly retaining the original geometry of the fuel pins and assemblies. The motivation for retaining the original geometry is to provide the ability to incorporate the fuel 'as-is' into existing LWRs while retaining their thermal-hydraulic characteristics. The feasibility of using this fuel is assessed by looking at cycle lengths and fuel failure rates. Other considerations (e.g., safety parameters, etc.) were not considered at this stage of the study. The study includes the examination of different TRISO kernel diameters without changing the coating layer thicknesses. The study shows that a naive use of UO 2 results in cycle lengths too short to be practical for existing LWR designs and operational demands. Increasing fissile inventory within the fuel compacts shows that acceptable cycle lengths can be achieved. In this study, starting with the recognized highest packing fraction practically achievable (44%), higher enrichment, larger fuel kernel sizes, and the use of higher density fuels have been evaluated. The models demonstrate cycle lengths comparable to those of ordinary LWRs. As expected, TRISO particles with extremely large kernels are shown to fail under all considered scenarios. In contrast, the designs that do not depart too drastically from those of the nominal NGNP HTR fuel TRISO particles are shown to perform satisfactorily and display a high rates of survival under all considered scenarios. Finally, it is recognized that relaxing the geometry constraint will result in satisfactory cycle lengths even using UO 2 -loaded TRISO particles-based fuel with enrichment at or below 20 w/o.

  6. Online energy management strategy of fuel cell hybrid electric vehicles based on data fusion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daming; Al-Durra, Ahmed; Gao, Fei; Ravey, Alexandre; Matraji, Imad; Godoy Simões, Marcelo

    2017-10-01

    Energy management strategy plays a key role for Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicles (FCHEVs), it directly affects the efficiency and performance of energy storages in FCHEVs. For example, by using a suitable energy distribution controller, the fuel cell system can be maintained in a high efficiency region and thus saving hydrogen consumption. In this paper, an energy management strategy for online driving cycles is proposed based on a combination of the parameters from three offline optimized fuzzy logic controllers using data fusion approach. The fuzzy logic controllers are respectively optimized for three typical driving scenarios: highway, suburban and city in offline. To classify patterns of online driving cycles, a Probabilistic Support Vector Machine (PSVM) is used to provide probabilistic classification results. Based on the classification results of the online driving cycle, the parameters of each offline optimized fuzzy logic controllers are then fused using Dempster-Shafer (DS) evidence theory, in order to calculate the final parameters for the online fuzzy logic controller. Three experimental validations using Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) platform with different-sized FCHEVs have been performed. Experimental comparison results show that, the proposed PSVM-DS based online controller can achieve a relatively stable operation and a higher efficiency of fuel cell system in real driving cycles.

  7. Integrated data base for 1988: Spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1987. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The current projections of future waste and spent fuel to be generated through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected defense-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis are: spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, remedial action waste, and decommissioning waste. For each category, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reportd for miscellaneous, highly radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal. 89 refs., 46 figs., 104 tabs

  8. Integrated data base for 1986: spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive wastes through December 31, 1985, based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. Current projections of future waste and spent fuel to be generated through the year 2020 and characteristics of these materials are also presented. The information forecasted is consistent with the expected defense-related and private industrial and institutional activities and the latest DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth. The materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are: spent fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, remedial action waste, and decommissioning waste. For each category, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2020, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or calculated isotopic compositions

  9. Feasibility study of palm-based fuels for hybrid rocket motor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarmizi Ahmad, M.; Abidin, Razali; Taha, A. Latif; Anudip, Amzaryi

    2018-02-01

    This paper describes the combined analysis done in pure palm-based wax that can be used as solid fuel in a hybrid rocket engine. The measurement of pure palm wax calorific value was performed using a bomb calorimeter. An experimental rocket engine and static test stand facility were established. After initial measurement and calibration, repeated procedures were performed. Instrumentation supplies carried out allow fuel regression rate measurements, oxidizer mass flow rates and stearic acid rocket motors measurements. Similar tests are also carried out with stearate acid (from palm oil by-products) dissolved with nitrocellulose and bee solution. Calculated data and experiments show that rates and regression thrust can be achieved even in pure-tested palm-based wax. Additionally, palm-based wax is mixed with beeswax characterized by higher nominal melting temperatures to increase moisturizing points to higher temperatures without affecting regression rate values. Calorie measurements and ballistic experiments were performed on this new fuel formulation. This new formulation promises driving applications in a wide range of temperatures.

  10. Integrated data base for 1993: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.A.; Storch, S.N.; Ashline, R.C.

    1994-03-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled historic data on inventories and characteristics of both commercial and DOE spent fuel; also, commercial and U.S. government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1992. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest U.S. Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of U.S. commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste (HLW), transuranic (TRU), waste, low-level waste (LLW), commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel-cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) LLW. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the calendar-year (CY) 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal

  11. Integrated Data Base for 1992: US spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program has compiled current data on inventories and characteristics of commercial spent fuel and both commercial and US government-owned radioactive wastes through December 31, 1991. These data are based on the most reliable information available from government sources, the open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The information forecasted is consistent with the latest US Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (DOE/EIA) projections of US commercial nuclear power growth and the expected DOE-related and private industrial and institutional (I/I) activities. The radioactive materials considered, on a chapter-by-chapter basis, are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, commercial reactor and fuel cycle facility decommissioning wastes, and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) low-level waste. For most of these categories, current and projected inventories are given through the year 2030, and the radioactivity and thermal power are calculated based on reported or estimated isotopic compositions. In addition, characteristics and current inventories are reported for miscellaneous radioactive materials that may require geologic disposal

  12. Development of CFD analysis method based on droplet tracking model for BWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Yoichi; Minato, Akihiko; Ichikawa, Ryoko; Mashara, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the minimum critical power ratio (MCPR) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assembly depends on the spacer grid type. Recently, improvement of the critical power is being studied by using a spacer grid with mixing devices attaching various types of flow deflectors. In order to predict the critical power of the improved BWR fuel assembly, we have developed an analysis method based on the consideration of detailed thermal-hydraulic mechanism of annular mist flow regime in the subchannels for an arbitrary spacer type. The proposed method is based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with a droplet tracking model for analyzing the vapor-phase turbulent flow in which droplets are transported in the subchannels of the BWR fuel assembly. We adopted the general-purpose CFD software Advance/FrontFlow/red (AFFr) as the base code, which is a commercial software package created as a part of Japanese national project. AFFr employs a three-dimensional (3D) unstructured grid system for application to complex geometries. First, AFFr was applied to single-phase flows of gas in the present paper. The calculated results were compared with experiments using a round cellular spacer in one subchannel to investigate the influence of the choice of turbulence model. The analyses using the large eddy simulation (LES) and re-normalisation group (RNG) k-ε models were carried out. The results of both the LES and RNG k-ε models show that calculations of velocity distribution and velocity fluctuation distribution in the spacer downstream reproduce the experimental results qualitatively. However, the velocity distribution analyzed by the LES model is better than that by the RNG k-ε model. The velocity fluctuation near the fuel rod, which is important for droplet deposition to the rod, is also simulated well by the LES model. Then, to examine the effect of the spacer shape on the analytical result, the gas flow analyses with the RNG k-ε model were performed

  13. The history, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of carbon-based fuels and their emissions: part 4 - alternative fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, Larry D

    2015-01-01

    Much progress has been made in reducing the pollutants emitted from various combustors (including diesel engines and power plants) by the use of alternative fuels; however, much more progress is needed. Not only must researchers improve fuels and combustors, but also there is a need to improve the toxicology testing and analytical chemistry methods associated with these complex mixtures. Emissions from many alternative carbonaceous fuels are mutagenic and carcinogenic. Depending on their source and derivation, alternative carbonaceous fuels before combustion may or may not be genotoxic; however, in order to know their genotoxicity, appropriate chemical analysis and/or bioassay must be performed. Newly developed fuels and combustors must be tested to determine if they provide a public health advantage over existing technologies - including what tradeoffs can be expected (e.g., decreasing levels of PAHs versus increasing levels of NOx and possibly nitroarenes in ambient air). Another need is to improve exposure estimations which presently are a weak link in doing risk analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A high-temperature, short-duration method of fabricating surrogate fuel microkernels for carbide-based TRISO nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevamurthy, G.; Radecka, A.; Massey, C.

    2015-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology is a frontrunner among generation IV nuclear reactor designs. Among the advanced nuclear fuel forms proposed for these reactors, dispersion-type fuel consisting of microencapsulated uranium di-oxide kernels, popularly known as tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel, has emerged as the fuel form of choice. Generation IV gas-cooled fast reactors offer the benefit of recycling nuclear waste with increased burn-ups in addition to producing the required power and hydrogen. Uranium carbide has shown great potential to replace uranium di-oxide for use in these fast spectrum reactors. Uranium carbide microkernels for fast reactor TRISO fuel have traditionally been fabricated by long-duration carbothermic reduction and sintering of precursor uranium dioxide microkernels produced using sol-gel techniques. These long-duration conversion processes are often plagued by issues such as final product purity and process parameters that are detrimental to minor actinide retention. In this context a relatively simple, high-temperature but relatively quick-rotating electrode arc melting method to fabricate microkernels directly from a feedstock electrode was investigated. The process was demonstrated using surrogate tungsten carbide on account of its easy availability, accessibility and the similarity of its melting point relative to uranium carbide and uranium di-oxide.

  15. A high-temperature, short-duration method of fabricating surrogate fuel microkernels for carbide-based TRISO nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevamurthy, G.; Radecka, A.; Massey, C. [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States). High Temperature Materials Lab.

    2015-07-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology is a frontrunner among generation IV nuclear reactor designs. Among the advanced nuclear fuel forms proposed for these reactors, dispersion-type fuel consisting of microencapsulated uranium di-oxide kernels, popularly known as tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel, has emerged as the fuel form of choice. Generation IV gas-cooled fast reactors offer the benefit of recycling nuclear waste with increased burn-ups in addition to producing the required power and hydrogen. Uranium carbide has shown great potential to replace uranium di-oxide for use in these fast spectrum reactors. Uranium carbide microkernels for fast reactor TRISO fuel have traditionally been fabricated by long-duration carbothermic reduction and sintering of precursor uranium dioxide microkernels produced using sol-gel techniques. These long-duration conversion processes are often plagued by issues such as final product purity and process parameters that are detrimental to minor actinide retention. In this context a relatively simple, high-temperature but relatively quick-rotating electrode arc melting method to fabricate microkernels directly from a feedstock electrode was investigated. The process was demonstrated using surrogate tungsten carbide on account of its easy availability, accessibility and the similarity of its melting point relative to uranium carbide and uranium di-oxide.

  16. The Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels Program DECSE and APBF Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    The following topics are summarized: Role of fuel blends in controlling engine-out emissions; Effect of fuels and lubricants on emission control devices; and Effect of fuels and lubricants on vehicle emissions and operations

  17. The Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels Program DECSE and APBF Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-04-11

    The following topics are summarized: Role of fuel blends in controlling engine-out emissions; Effect of fuels and lubricants on emission control devices; and Effect of fuels and lubricants on vehicle emissions and operations.

  18. The deformation analysis of the KALIMER breakeven core driver fuel pin based on the axial power profile during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Uk; Lee, Byoung Oon; Kim, Young Kyun; Hong, Ser Gi; Chang, Jin Wook; Lee, Ki Bok; Kim, Young Il

    2003-03-01

    In this study, material properties such as coolant specific heat, film heat transfer coefficient, cladding thermal conductivity, surface diffusion coefficient of the multi-bubble are improved in MACSIS-Mod1. The axial power and flux profile module was also incorporated with irradiation history. The performance and feasibility of the driver fuel pin have been analyzed for nominal parameters based on the conceptual design for the KALIMER breakeven core by MACSIS-MOD1 code. The fuel slug centerline temperature takes the maximum at 700mm from the bottom of the slug in spite of the nearly symmetric axial power distribution. The cladding mid-wall and coolant temperatures take the maximum at the top of the pin. Temperature of the fuel slug surface over the entire irradiation life is much lower than the fuel-clad eutectic reaction temperature. The fission gas release of the driver fuel pin at the End Of Life(EOL) is predicted to be 68.61% and plenum pressure is too low to cause cladding yielding. The probability that the fuel pin would fail is estimated to be much less than that allowed in the design criteria. The maximum radial deformation of the fuel pin is 1.928%, satisfying the preliminary design criterion (3%) for fuel pin deformation. Therefore the conceptual design parameters of the driver fuel pin for the KALIMER breakeven core are expected to satisfy the preliminary criteria on temperature, fluence limit, deformation limit etc.

  19. The deformation analysis of the KALIMER breakeven core driver fuel pin based on the axial power profile during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Uk; Lee, Byoung Oon; Kim, Young Kyun; Hong, Ser Gi; Chang, Jin Wook; Lee, Ki Bok; Kim, Young Il

    2003-03-01

    In this study, material properties such as coolant specific heat, film heat transfer coefficient, cladding thermal conductivity, surface diffusion coefficient of the multi-bubble are improved in MACSIS-Mod1. The axial power and flux profile module was also incorporated with irradiation history. The performance and feasibility of the driver fuel pin have been analyzed for nominal parameters based on the conceptual design for the KALIMER breakeven core by MACSIS-MOD1 code. The fuel slug centerline temperature takes the maximum at 700mm from the bottom of the slug in spite of the nearly symmetric axial power distribution. The cladding mid-wall and coolant temperatures take the maximum at the top of the pin. Temperature of the fuel slug surface over the entire irradiation life is much lower than the fuel-clad eutectic reaction temperature. The fission gas release of the driver fuel pin at the End Of Life(EOL) is predicted to be 68.61% and plenum pressure is too low to cause cladding yielding. The probability that the fuel pin would fail is estimated to be much less than that allowed in the design criteria. The maximum radial deformation of the fuel pin is 1.928%, satisfying the preliminary design criterion (3%) for fuel pin deformation. Therefore the conceptual design parameters of the driver fuel pin for the KALIMER breakeven core are expected to satisfy the preliminary criteria on temperature, fluence limit, deformation limit etc

  20. Discussion on effective utilization of nuclear fuel based on peculiar property of the fifth unstable nuclide series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiahua

    2000-01-01

    Based on a peculiar property of the Fifth Unstable Nuclide Series (FUNS) in developing stage, namely the transformation rate of parent fuel- 238 U consumption to fission production being increased with the fuel's reactor core life, it was shown that the used fuel taken out from the reactor core of PWR could be used again as PWR fuel, and the post processing for the used fuel needed only to de-contaminate the fission products from the used fuel and then to rebuild it into its normal form. Scheme A discussed the condition of using such rebuilt used fuel in PWR. Another peculiar property of FUNS is characterized by the fact that the equilibrium saturate concentrations of the derived nuclides in FUNS are different for different types of reactor. It is well known that the saturate concentration of 239 Pu in PWR is much larger than that in HWR. Scheme B i.e. a method of using the rebuilt used fuel from PWR to replace the natural uranium fuel for HWR was discussed

  1. Experimental Investigation of the Use of Waste Mineral Oils as a Fuel with Organic-Based Mn Additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Özdalyan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The heat values of waste mineral oils are equal to the heat value of the fuel oil. However, heat value alone is not sufficient for the use of waste minerals oils as fuel. However, the critical physical properties of fuels such as density and viscosity need to be adapted to the system in order to be used. In this study, the engine oils used in the first 10,000 km of the vehicles were used as waste mineral oil. An organic-based Mn additive was synthesized to improve the properties of the waste mineral oil. It was observed that mixing the Mn additive with the waste mineral oil at different doses (4, 8, 12, and 16 ppm improves the viscosity of the waste oil and the flash point. The resulting fuel was evaluated for emission using different loads in a 5 kW capacity generator to compare the fuel with standard diesel fuel and to determine the effect of Mn addition. In the experimental study, it was observed that the emission characteristics of the fuel obtained from waste mineral oil were worse than diesel fuel, but some improvement was observed with Mn addition. As a result, we found that the use of waste mineral oils in engines in fuel standards was not appropriate, but may be improved with additives.

  2. Demonstration of high efficiency intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell based on lanthanum gallate electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Toru; Nishiwaki, Futoshi; Kanou, Jirou; Yamasaki, Satoru; Hosoi, Kei; Miyazawa, Takashi; Yamada, Masaharu; Komada, Norikazu

    2006-01-01

    The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. (KEPCO) and Mitsubishi Materials Corporation (MMC) have been jointly developing intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The operation temperatures between 600 and 800 o C were set as the target, which enable SOFC to use less expensive metallic separators for cell-stacking and to carry out internal reforming of hydrocarbon fuels. The electrolyte-supported planar-type cells were fabricated using highly conductive lanthanum gallate-based electrolyte, La(Sr)Ga(Mg,Co)O 3-δ , Ni-(CeO 2 ) 1-x (SmO 1.5 ) x cermet anode, and Sm(Sr)CoO 3-δ cathode. The 1 kW-class power generation modules were fabricated using a seal-less stack of the cells and metallic separators. The 1 kW-class prototype power generation system with the module was developed with the high performance cell, which showed the thermally self-sustainability. The system included an SOFC module, a dc-ac inverter, a desulfurizer, and a heat recovery unit. It provided stable ac power output of 1 kW with the electrical efficiency of 45% LHV based on ac output by using city gas as a fuel, which was considered to be excellent for such a small power generation system. And the hot water of 90 o C was obtained using high temperature off-gas from SOFC

  3. Demonstration of high efficiency intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell based on lanthanum gallate electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, Toru [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Energy Use R and D Center, 11-20 Nakoji 3-chome, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-0974 (Japan)]. E-mail: inagaki@rdd.kepco.co.jp; Nishiwaki, Futoshi [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Energy Use R and D Center, 11-20 Nakoji 3-chome, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-0974 (Japan); Kanou, Jirou [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Energy Use R and D Center, 11-20 Nakoji 3-chome, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-0974 (Japan); Yamasaki, Satoru [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Energy Use R and D Center, 11-20 Nakoji 3-chome, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-0974 (Japan); Hosoi, Kei [Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, Central Research Institute, 1002-14 Mukohyama, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan); Miyazawa, Takashi [Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, Central Research Institute, 1002-14 Mukohyama, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan); Yamada, Masaharu [Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, Central Research Institute, 1002-14 Mukohyama, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan); Komada, Norikazu [Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, Central Research Institute, 1002-14 Mukohyama, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan)

    2006-02-09

    The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. (KEPCO) and Mitsubishi Materials Corporation (MMC) have been jointly developing intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The operation temperatures between 600 and 800 {sup o}C were set as the target, which enable SOFC to use less expensive metallic separators for cell-stacking and to carry out internal reforming of hydrocarbon fuels. The electrolyte-supported planar-type cells were fabricated using highly conductive lanthanum gallate-based electrolyte, La(Sr)Ga(Mg,Co)O{sub 3-{delta}}, Ni-(CeO{sub 2}){sub 1-x}(SmO{sub 1.5}) {sub x} cermet anode, and Sm(Sr)CoO{sub 3-{delta}} cathode. The 1 kW-class power generation modules were fabricated using a seal-less stack of the cells and metallic separators. The 1 kW-class prototype power generation system with the module was developed with the high performance cell, which showed the thermally self-sustainability. The system included an SOFC module, a dc-ac inverter, a desulfurizer, and a heat recovery unit. It provided stable ac power output of 1 kW with the electrical efficiency of 45% LHV based on ac output by using city gas as a fuel, which was considered to be excellent for such a small power generation system. And the hot water of 90 {sup o}C was obtained using high temperature off-gas from SOFC.

  4. Thorium-Based Fuel Cycles in the Modular High Temperature Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Hong; YANG Yongwei; JING Xingqing; XU Yunlin

    2006-01-01

    Large stockpiles of civil-grade as well as weapons-grade plutonium have been accumulated in the world from nuclear power or other programs of different countries. One alternative for the management of the plutonium is to incinerate it in the high temperature reactor (HTR). The thorium-based fuel cycle was studied in the modular HTR to reduce weapons-grade plutonium stockpiles, while producing no additional plutonium or other transuranic elements. Three thorium-uranium fuel cycles were also investigated. The thorium absorption cross sections of the resolved and unresolved resonances were generated using the ZUT-DGL code based on existing resonance data. The equilibrium core of the modular HTR was calculated and analyzed by means of the code VSOP'94. The results show that the modular HTR can incinerate most of the initially loaded plutonium amounting to about 95.3% net 239Pu for weapons-grade plutonium and can effectively utilize the uranium and thorium in the thorium-uranium fuel cycles.

  5. Small Scale SOFC Demonstration Using Bio-Based and Fossil Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrik, Michael [Technology Management Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Ruhl, Robert [Technology Management Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Technology Management, Inc. (TMI) of Cleveland, Ohio, has completed the project entitled Small Scale SOFC Demonstration using Bio-based and Fossil Fuels. Under this program, two 1-kW systems were engineered as technology demonstrators of an advanced technology that can operate on either traditional hydrocarbon fuels or renewable biofuels. The systems were demonstrated at Patterson's Fruit Farm of Chesterland, OH and were open to the public during the first quarter of 2012. As a result of the demonstration, TMI received quantitative feedback on operation of the systems as well as qualitative assessments from customers. Based on the test results, TMI believes that > 30% net electrical efficiency at 1 kW on both traditional and renewable fuels with a reasonable entry price is obtainable. The demonstration and analysis provide the confidence that a 1 kW entry-level system offers a viable value proposition, but additional modifications are warranted to reduce sound and increase reliability before full commercial acceptance.

  6. Fuel assemblies mechanical behaviour improvements based on design changes and loading patterns computational analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, J.; Aullo, M.; Gutierrez, E.

    2001-01-01

    In the past few years, incomplete RCCA insertion events (IRI) have been taking place at some nuclear plants. Large guide thimble distortion caused by high compressive loads together with the irradiation induced material creep and growth, is considered as the primary cause of those events. This disturbing phenomenon is worsened when some fuel assemblies are deformed to the extent that they push the neighbouring fuel assemblies and the distortion is transmitted along the core. In order to better understand this mechanism, ENUSA has developed a methodology based on finite element core simulation to enable assessments on the propensity of a given core loading pattern to propagate the distortion along the core. At the same time, the core loading pattern could be decided interacting with nuclear design to obtain the optimum response under both, nuclear and mechanical point of views, with the objective of progressively attenuating the core distortion. (author)

  7. Catalyst Degradation in High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Buazar, F.; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    and multi‐walled carbon nanotubes were used as supports for electrode catalysts and evaluated in accelerated durability tests under potential cycling at 150 °C. Measurements of open circuit voltage, area specific resistance and hydrogen permeation through the membrane were carried out, indicating little...... contribution of the membrane degradation to the performance losses during the potential cycling tests. As the major mechanism of the fuel cell performance degradation, the electrochemical active area of the cathodic catalysts showed a steady decrease in the cyclic voltammetric measurements, which was also......Degradation of carbon supported platinum catalysts is a major failure mode for the long term durability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells based on phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes. With Vulcan carbon black as a reference, thermally treated carbon black...

  8. A Study on Vehicle Emission Factor Correction Based on Fuel Consumption Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoning; Li, Meng; Peng, Bo

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to address the problem of obvious differences between the calculated and measured emissions of pollutants from motor vehicle by using the existing "Environmental Impact Assessment Specification of Highway Construction Projects". First, a field study collects the vehicle composition ratio, speed, slope, fuel consumption and other essential data. Considering practical applications, the emission factors corresponding to 40km/h and 110km/h and 120km/h velocity are introduced by data fitting. Then, the emission factors of motor vehicle are revised based on the measured fuel consumption, and the pollutant emission modified formula was calculated and compared with the standard recommendation formula. The results show the error between calculated and measured values are within 5%, which can better reflect the actual discharge of the motor vehicle.

  9. Spent fuel and radioactive waste: an integrated data base of inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Forsberg, C.W.; Mastal, E.F.

    1984-01-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program provides official US Department of Energy (DOE) data on spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics. This information is provided through the cooperative efforts of the IDB Program and DOE lead offices, lead sites, major programs, and generator sites. The program is entering its fifth year, and major accomplishments are summarized in three broad areas: (1) the annual inventory report, including ORIGEN2 applications and a Quality Assurance (QA) plan; (2) the summary data file and direct user access; and (3) data processing methodology and support to other programs. Plans for future work in these areas are outlined briefly, including increased utilization of personal computers. Some examples of spent fuel data are given in terms of projected quantities for two growth scenarios, burnup and age profile of the existing inventory, and the approximate specific thermal power relative to high-level waste (HLW) from various sources. 4 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Fabrication, fabrication control and in-core follow up of 4 LEU leader fuel elements based on U3Si2 in RECH-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, J.C.; Barrera, M.; Olivares, L.; Lisboa, J.

    1999-01-01

    The RECH-1 MTR reactor has been converted from HEU to MEU (45% enrichment) and the decision to a LEU (20% enrichment) conversion was taken some years ago. This LEU conversion decision involved a local fuel development and fabrication based on U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel, and a fabrication qualification stage that resulted in four fuel elements fully complying with established fabrication standards for this type of fuel. This report-presents relevant points of these four leaders fuel elements fabrication, in particular a fuel plate core homogeneity control development. A summary of the intended in core follow-up studies for the leaders fuel elements is also presented here. (author)

  11. Melt-Dilute Form of AI-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Criticality Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Vinson; A. Serika

    2002-01-01

    Criticality analysis of the proposed melt-dilute (MD) form of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF), under geologic repository conditions, was performed [1] following the methodology documented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report [2]. This methodology evaluates the potential for nuclear criticality for a waste form in a waste package. Criticality calculations show that even with waste package failure, followed by degradation of material within the waste package and potential loss of neutron absorber materials, sub-critical conditions can be readily demonstrated for the MD form of aluminum-based SNF

  12. Graphene-based Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage: Fuel cells, Supercapacitors and Lithium Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Junbo; Shao, Yuyan; Ellis, Michael A.; Moore, Robert; Yi, Baolian

    2011-09-14

    Graphene has attracted extensive research interest due to its strictly 2-dimensional (2D) structure, which results in its unique electronic, thermal, mechanical, and chemical properties and potential technical applications. These remarkable characteristics of graphene, along with the inherent benefits of a carbon material, make it a promising candidate for application in electrochemical energy devices. This article reviews the methods of graphene preparation, introduces the unique electrochemical behavior of graphene, and summarizes the recent research and development on graphene-based fuel cells, supercapacitors and lithium ion batteries. In addition, promising areas are identified for the future development of graphene-based materials in electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems.

  13. Microbial fuel cell-based biosensor for toxic carbon monoxide monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Shaofeng; Huang, Shaobin; Li, Yi

    2018-01-01

    This study presents an innovative microbial fuel cell-based biosensor for carbon monoxide (CO) monitoring. The hypothesis for the function of the biosensor is that CO inhibits bacterial activity in the anode and thereby reduces electricity production. A mature electrochemically active biofilm...... increasing CO concentration over 70%. Besides, the response time of the biosensor was 1 h. The compact design and simple operation of the biosensor makes it easy to be integrated in existing CO-based industrial facilities either as a forewarning sensor for CO toxicity or even as an individual on...

  14. Fuel cell-based cogeneration system covering data centers’ energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guizzi, Giuseppe Leo; Manno, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The Information and Communication Technology industry has gone in the recent years through a dramatic expansion, driven by many new online (local and remote) applications and services. Such growth has obviously triggered an equally remarkable growth in energy consumption by data centers, which require huge amounts of power not only for IT devices, but also for power distribution units and for air-conditioning systems needed to cool the IT equipment. This paper is dedicated to the economic and energy performance assessment of a cogeneration system based on a natural gas membrane steam reformer producing a pure hydrogen flow for electric power generation in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell. Heat is recovered from both the reforming unit and the fuel cell in order to supply the needs of an office building located near the data center. In this case, the cooling energy needs of the data center are covered by means of a vapor-compression chiller equipped with a free-cooling unit. Since the fuel cell’s output is direct current rather than alternate current, the possibility of further improving data centers’ energy efficiency adopting DC-powered data center equipment is also discussed. -- Highlights: ► Data centers' energy needs are discussed and possible savings from advanced energy management techniques are estimated. ► The thermal energy requirements of an office building close to the data center are added to the energy scenario. ► Significant energy and cost savings can be obtained by means of free-cooling, high-voltage direct current, and a cogeneration facility. ► The cogeneration system is based on a natural gas membrane reformer and a PEM fuel cell. ► Energy flows in the membrane reformer are analyzed and an optimal value of steam-to-carbon ratio is found in order to minimize the required membrane area.

  15. Cobalt oxide-based catalysts deposited by cold plasma for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazimierski, P.; Jozwiak, L.; Sielski, J.; Tyczkowski, J., E-mail: jacek.tyczkowski@p.lodz.pl

    2015-11-02

    In proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), both the anodic hydrogen oxidation reaction and the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) require appropriate catalysts. So far, platinum-based catalysts are still the best option for this purpose. However, because these catalysts are too expensive for making commercially viable fuel cells, extensive research over the past decade has focused on developing noble metal-free alternative catalysts. In this paper, an approach based on cobalt oxide films fabricated by plasma-enhanced metal-organic chemical vapor deposition is presented. Such a material can be used to prepare catalysts for ORR in PEMFC. The films containing CoO{sub X} were deposited on a carbon paper thereby forming the electrode. Morphology and atomic composition of the films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. The possibility of their application as the electro-catalyst for ORR in PEMFC was investigated and the electro-catalytic activities were evaluated by the electrochemical measurements and single cell tests. It was found that the fuel cell with Pt as the anode catalyst and CoO{sub X} deposit as the cathode catalyst was characterized by the open circuit voltage of 635 mV, Tafel slope of approx. 130 mV/dec and the maximum power density of 5.3 W/m{sup 2}. - Highlights: • Cobalt oxide catalyst for proton exchange membrane fuel cells was plasma deposited. • The catalyst exhibits activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. • Morphology and atomic composition of the catalyst were determined.

  16. Technical Report Cellulosic Based Black Liquor Gasification and Fuels Plant Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornetti, Micheal [Escanaba Paper Company, MI (United States); Freeman, Douglas [Escanaba Paper Company, MI (United States)

    2012-10-31

    The Cellulosic Based Black Liquor Gasification and Fuels Plant Project was developed to construct a black liquor to Methanol biorefinery in Escanaba, Michigan. The biorefinery was to be co-located at the existing pulp and paper mill, NewPage’s Escanaba Paper Mill and when in full operation would: • Generate renewable energy for Escanaba Paper Mill • Produce Methanol for transportation fuel of further refinement to Dimethyl Ether • Convert black liquor to white liquor for pulping. Black liquor is a byproduct of the pulping process and as such is generated from abundant and renewable lignocellulosic biomass. The biorefinery would serve to validate the thermochemical pathway and economic models for black liquor gasification. It was a project goal to create a compelling new business model for the pulp and paper industry, and support the nation’s goal for increasing renewable fuels production and reducing its dependence on foreign oil. NewPage Corporation planned to replicate this facility at other NewPage Corporation mills after this first demonstration scale plant was operational and had proven technical and economic feasibility. An overview of the process begins with black liquor being generated in a traditional Kraft pulping process. The black liquor would then be gasified to produce synthesis gas, sodium carbonate and hydrogen sulfide. The synthesis gas is then cleaned with hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide removed, and fed into a Methanol reactor where the liquid product is made. The hydrogen sulfide is converted into polysulfide for use in the Kraft pulping process. Polysulfide is a known additive to the Kraft process that increases pulp yield. The sodium carbonate salts are converted to caustic soda in a traditional recausticizing process. The caustic soda is then part of the white liquor that is used in the Kraft pulping process. Cellulosic Based Black Liquor Gasification and Fuels Plant project set out to prove that black liquor gasification could

  17. Spray combustion of biomass-based renewable diesel fuel using multiple injection strategy in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei; Wu, Zengyang; Roberts, William L.; Fang, Tiegang

    2016-01-01

    Effect of a two-injection strategy associated with a pilot injection on the spray combustion process was investigated under conventional diesel combustion conditions (1000 K and 21% O2 concentration) for a biomass-based renewable diesel fuel, i

  18. Nickel-based anodic electrocatalysts for fuel cells and water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dayi

    Our world is facing an energy crisis, so people are trying to harvest and utilize energy more efficiently. One of the promising ways to harvest energy is via solar water splitting to convert solar energy to chemical energy stored in hydrogen. Another of the options to utilize energy more efficiently is to use fuel cells as power sources instead of combustion engines. Catalysts are needed to reduce the energy barriers of the reactions happening at the electrode surfaces of the water-splitting cells and fuel cells. Nickel-based catalysts happen to be important nonprecious electrocatalysts for both of the anodic reactions in alkaline media. In alcohol fuel cells, nickel-based catalysts catalyze alcohol oxidation. In water splitting cells, they catalyze water oxidation, i.e., oxygen evolution. The two reactions occur in a similar potential range when catalyzed by nickel-based catalysts. Higher output current density, lower oxidation potential, and complete substrate oxidation are preferred for the anode in the applications. In this dissertation, the catalytic properties of nickel-based electrocatalysts in alkaline medium for fuel oxidation and oxygen evolution are explored. By changing the nickel precursor solubility, nickel complex nanoparticles with tunable sizes on electrode surfaces were synthesized. Higher methanol oxidation current density is achieved with smaller nickel complex nanoparticles. DNA aggregates were used as a polymer scaffold to load nickel ion centers and thus can oxidize methanol completely at a potential about 0.1 V lower than simple nickel electrodes, and the methanol oxidation pathway is changed. Nickel-based catalysts also have electrocatalytic activity towards a wide range of substrates. Experiments show that methanol, ethanol, glycerol and glucose can be deeply oxidized and carbon-carbon bonds can be broken during the oxidation. However, when comparing methanol oxidation reaction to oxygen evolution reaction catalyzed by current nickel-based

  19. Effect of engine parameters and type of gaseous fuel on the performance of dual-fuel gas diesel engines. A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, B.B. [Centre for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati 781039 (India); Sahoo, N.; Saha, U.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati 781039 (India)

    2009-08-15

    Petroleum resources are finite and, therefore, search for their alternative non-petroleum fuels for internal combustion engines is continuing all over the world. Moreover gases emitted by petroleum fuel driven vehicles have an adverse effect on the environment and human health. There is universal acceptance of the need to reduce such emissions. Towards this, scientists have proposed various solutions for diesel engines, one of which is the use of gaseous fuels as a supplement for liquid diesel fuel. These engines, which use conventional diesel fuel and gaseous fuel, are referred to as 'dual-fuel engines'. Natural gas and bio-derived gas appear more attractive alternative fuels for dual-fuel engines in view of their friendly environmental nature. In the gas-fumigated dual-fuel engine, the primary fuel is mixed outside the cylinder before it is inducted into the cylinder. A pilot quantity of liquid fuel is injected towards the end of the compression stroke to initiate combustion. When considering a gaseous fuel for use in existing diesel engines, a number of issues which include, the effects of engine operating and design parameters, and type of gaseous fuel, on the performance of the dual-fuel engines, are important. This paper reviews the research on above issues carried out by various scientists in different diesel engines. This paper touches upon performance, combustion and emission characteristics of dual-fuel engines which use natural gas, biogas, producer gas, methane, liquefied petroleum gas, propane, etc. as gaseous fuel. It reveals that 'dual-fuel concept' is a promising technique for controlling both NO{sub x} and soot emissions even on existing diesel engine. But, HC, CO emissions and 'bsfc' are higher for part load gas diesel engine operations. Thermal efficiency of dual-fuel engines improve either with increased engine speed, or with advanced injection timings, or with increased amount of pilot fuel. The ignition

  20. Development of a Liquid Scintillator-Based Active Interrogation System for LEU Fuel Assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Plenteda, Romano; Mascahrenas, Nicholas; Cronholm, L. Marie; Aspinall, Michael; Joyce, Malcolm; Tomanin, Alice; Peerani, Paolo

    2013-06-01

    The IAEA, in collaboration with the Joint Research Center (Ispra, IT) and Hybrid Instruments (Lancaster, UK), has developed a full scale, liquid scintillator-based active interrogation system to determine uranium (U) mass in fresh fuel assemblies. The system implements an array of moderate volume (∼1000 ml) liquid scintillator detectors, a multichannel pulse shape discrimination (PSD) system, and a high-speed data acquisition and signal processing system to assess the U content of fresh fuel assemblies. Extensive MCNPX-PoliMi modelling has been carried out to refine the system design and optimize the detector performance. These measurements, traditionally performed with 3 He-based assay systems (e.g., Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar [UNCL], Active Well Coincidence Collar [AWCC]), can now be performed with higher precision in a fraction of the acquisition time. The system uses a high-flash point, non-hazardous scintillating fluid (EJ309) enabling their use in commercial nuclear facilities and achieves significantly enhanced performance and capabilities through the combination of extremely short gate times, adjustable energy detection threshold, real-time PSD electronics, and high-speed, FPGA-based data acquisition. Given the possible applications, this technology is also an excellent candidate for the replacement of select 3 He-based systems. Comparisons to existing 3 He-based active interrogation systems are presented where possible to provide a baseline performance reference. This paper will describe the laboratory experiments and associated modelling activities undertaken to develop and initially test the prototype detection system. (authors)

  1. 40 CFR 600.206-12 - Calculation and use of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy and carbon-related exhaust emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for... vehicle under § 600.113(a) and (b) and as approved in § 600.008-08(c), are used to determine FTP-based... value exists for an electric vehicle configuration, that value, rounded to the nearest tenth of a mile...

  2. 40 CFR 600.206-08 - Calculation and use of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy values for vehicle configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Procedures... economy value exists for an electric vehicle configuration, all values for that vehicle configuration are... HFET-based fuel economy values for vehicle configurations. 600.206-08 Section 600.206-08 Protection of...

  3. Evaluation of Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Abbott; Edward Casey; Etop Esen; Douglas Smith; Bruce Burke; Binh Nguyen; Samuel Tam; Paul Worhach; Mahabubul Alam; Juhun Song; James Szybist; Ragini Acharya; Vince Zello; David Morris; Patrick Flynn; Stephen Kirby; Krishan Bhatia; Jeff Gonder; Yun Wang; Wenpeng Liu; Hua Meng; Subramani Velu; Jian-Ping Shen, Weidong Gu; Elise Bickford; Chunshan Song; Chao-Yang Wang; Andre' Boehman

    2006-02-28

    ConocoPhillips, in conjunction with Nexant Inc., Penn State University, and Cummins Engine Co., joined with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in a cooperative agreement to perform a comprehensive study of new ultra clean fuels (UCFs) produced from remote sources of natural gas. The project study consists of three primary tasks: an environmental Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), a Market Study, and a series of Engine Tests to evaluate the potential markets for Ultra Clean Fuels. The overall objective of DOE's Ultra Clean Transportation Fuels Initiative is to develop and deploy technologies that will produce ultra-clean burning transportation fuels for the 21st century from both petroleum and non-petroleum resources. These fuels will: (1) Enable vehicles to comply with future emission requirements; (2) Be compatible with the existing liquid fuels infrastructure; (3) Enable vehicle efficiencies to be significantly increased, with concomitantly reduced CO{sub 2} emissions; (4) Be obtainable from a fossil resource, alone or in combination with other hydrocarbon materials such as refinery wastes, municipal wastes, biomass, and coal; and (5) Be competitive with current petroleum fuels. The objectives of the ConocoPhillips Ultra Clean Fuels Project are to perform a comprehensive life cycle analysis and to conduct a market study on ultra clean fuels of commercial interest produced from natural gas, and, in addition, perform engine tests for Fisher-Tropsch diesel and methanol in neat, blended or special formulations to obtain data on emissions. This resulting data will be used to optimize fuel compositions and engine operation in order to minimize the release of atmospheric pollutants resulting from the fuel combustion. Development and testing of both direct and indirect methanol fuel cells was to be conducted and the optimum properties of a suitable fuel-grade methanol was to be defined. The results of the study are also

  4. Logistic Fuel Processor Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salavani, Reza

    2004-01-01

    The Air Base Technologies Division of the Air Force Research Laboratory has developed a logistic fuel processor that removes the sulfur content of the fuel and in the process converts logistic fuel...

  5. Physical characterization of biomass-based pyrolysis liquids. Application of standard fuel oil analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oasmaa, A; Leppaemaeki, E; Koponen, P; Levander, J; Tapola, E [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1998-12-31

    The main purpose of the study was to test the applicability of standard fuel oil methods developed for petroleum-based fuels to pyrolysis liquids. In addition, research on sampling, homogeneity, stability, miscibility and corrosivity was carried out. The standard methods have been tested for several different pyrolysis liquids. Recommendations on sampling, sample size and small modifications of standard methods are presented. In general, most of the methods can be used as such but the accuracy of the analysis can be improved by minor modifications. Fuel oil analyses not suitable for pyrolysis liquids have been identified. Homogeneity of the liquids is the most critical factor in accurate analysis. The presence of air bubbles may disturb in several analyses. Sample preheating and prefiltration should be avoided when possible. The former may cause changes in the composition and structure of the pyrolysis liquid. The latter may remove part of organic material with particles. The size of the sample should be determined on the basis of the homogeneity and the water content of the liquid. The basic analyses of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) include water, pH, solids, ash, Conradson carbon residue, heating value, CHN, density, viscosity, pourpoint, flash point, and stability. Additional analyses are carried out when needed. (orig.) 53 refs.

  6. Development of a skeletal multi-component fuel reaction mechanism based on decoupling methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Balaji; Tay, Kun Lin; Yang, Wenming; Chua, Kian Jon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A compact multi-component skeletal reaction mechanism was developed. • Combined bio-diesel and PRF mechanism was proposed. • The mechanism consists of 68 species and 183 reactions. • Well validated against ignition delay times, flame speed and engine results. - Abstract: A new coupled bio-diesel surrogate and primary reference fuel (PRF) oxidation skeletal mechanism has been developed. The bio-diesel surrogate sub-mechanism consists of oxidation sub-mechanisms of Methyl decanoate (MD), Methyl 9-decenoate (MD9D) and n-Heptane fuel components. The MD and MD9D are chosen to represent the saturated and unsaturated methyl esters respectively in bio-diesel fuels. Then, a reduced iso-Octane oxidation sub-mechanism is added to the bio-diesel surrogate sub-mechanism. Then, all the sub-mechanisms are integrated to a reduced C_2–C_3 mechanism, detailed H_2/CO/C_1 mechanism and reduced NO_x mechanism based on decoupling methodology. The final mechanism consisted of 68 species and 183 reactions. The mechanism was well validated with shock-tube ignition delay times, laminar flame speed and 3D engine simulations.

  7. Ignition of deuterium based fuel cycles in a high beta system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, K.

    1987-01-01

    A steady state self-consistent plasma modeling applied to a system having close to unity, such as FRC or like, is found to be quite effective in solving the problems independently of any anomalous process and proves the existence of ignited state of deuterium based fuel cycles. The temperature ranges that the plasma falls into ignited state are obtained as a function of relative feeding rates of tritium and 3 He to deuterium's. We find pure DD cycle will not ignite so that 3 He or/and tritium must be added as catalyzer to achieve ignition. Standing on the points to construct a cleaner system yielding smaller amount of 14 MeV neutrons and to burn the fuel in steady state for long periods of time, we have confirmed superiority of the complex composed of the master reactor of 3 He-Cat.D cycle (catalyzed DD cycle reinjecting only fusion produced 3 He) and the satellite reactor of 3 He enriched D 3 He cycle. In case storage of tritium for 3 He by β - decay is turned out not to be allowed environmentally, we may utilize conventional catalyzed DD cycle although 14 MeV neutron yields will be increased by 35 % over the complex. It is demonstrated that advanced fuel cycle reactors can be very simple in constructions and compact in size such that the field strength and the plasma volume of the order of JT-60's may be enough for 1000 MW power plant. (author)

  8. A Continuous Liquid-Level Sensor for Fuel Tanks Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. Pozo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A standard problem in large tanks at oil refineries and petrol stations is that water and fuel usually occupy the same tank. This is undesirable and causes problems such as corrosion in the tanks. Normally, the water level in tanks is unknown, with the problems that this entails. We propose herein a method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR to detect in real time the interfaces in a tank which can simultaneously contain water, gasoline (or diesel and air. The plasmonic sensor is composed of a hemispherical glass prism, a magnesium fluoride layer, and a gold layer. We have optimized the structural parameters of the sensor from the theoretical modeling of the reflectance curve. The sensor detects water-fuel and fuel-air interfaces and measures the level of each liquid in real time. This sensor is recommended for inflammable liquids because inside the tank there are no electrical or electronic signals which could cause explosions. The sensor proposed has a sensitivity of between 1.2 and 3.5 RIU−1 and a resolution of between 5.7 × 10−4 and 16.5 × 10−4 RIU.

  9. A highly durable fuel cell electrocatalyst based on double-polymer-coated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Mohamed R; Hafez, Inas H; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-11-23

    Driven by the demand for the commercialization of fuel cell (FC) technology, we describe the design and fabrication of a highly durable FC electrocatalyst based on double-polymer-coated carbon nanotubes for use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The fabricated electrocatalyst is composed of Pt-deposited polybenzimidazole-coated carbon nanotubes, which are further coated with Nafion. By using this electrocatalyst, a high FC performance with a power density of 375 mW/cm(2) (at 70 ˚C, 50% relative humidity using air (cathode)/H2(anode)) was obtained, and a remarkable durability of 500,000 accelerated potential cycles was recorded with only a 5% loss of the initial FC potential and 20% loss of the maximum power density, which were far superior properties compared to those of the membrane electrode assembly prepared using carbon black in place of the carbon nanotubes. The present study indicates that the prepared highly durable fuel cell electrocatalyst is a promising material for the next generation of PEMFCs.

  10. Femtoelectron-Based Terahertz Imaging of Hydration State in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buaphad, P.; Thamboon, P.; Kangrang, N.; Rhodes, M. W.; Thongbai, C.

    2015-08-01

    Imbalanced water management in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell significantly reduces the cell performance and durability. Visualization of water distribution and transport can provide greater comprehension toward optimization of the PEM fuel cell. In this work, we are interested in water flooding issues that occurred in flow channels on cathode side of the PEM fuel cell. The sample cell was fabricated with addition of a transparent acrylic window allowing light access and observed the process of flooding formation (in situ) via a CCD camera. We then explore potential use of terahertz (THz) imaging, consisting of femtoelectron-based THz source and off-angle reflective-mode imaging, to identify water presence in the sample cell. We present simulations of two hydration states (water and nonwater area), which are in agreement with the THz image results. A line-scan plot is utilized for quantitative analysis and for defining spatial resolution of the image. Implementing metal mesh filtering can improve spatial resolution of our THz imaging system.

  11. Increasing the flexibility of base-load generating units in operation on fossil fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girshfel' d, V Ya; Khanaev, V A; Volkova, E D; Gorelov, V A; Gershenkroi, M L

    1979-01-01

    Increasing the flexibility of base-load generating units operating on fossil fuel by modifying them is a necessary measure. The highest economic effect is attained with modification of gas- and oil-fired generating units in the Western United Power Systems of the European part of the SPSS. On the basis of available experience, 150- and 200-MW units can be extensively used to regulate the power in the European part of the SPSS through putting them into reserve for the hours of the load dip at night. The change under favorable conditions of 150- and 200-MW units operating on coal to a district-heating operating mode does not reduce the possibilities for flexible operation of these units because it is possible greatly to unload the turbines while the minimum load level of the pulverized fuel fired boiler is retained through transferring a part of the heat load to the desuperheater. It is necessary to accumulate and analyze experience with operation of generating units (especially of supercritical units) with regular shutdowns and starts of groups of units and to solve the problems of modification of generating units, with differentiation with respect to types of fuel and to the united power supply system.

  12. Homo- and heterofermentative lactobacilli differently affect sugarcane-based fuel ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Thiago Olitta; Gomes, Fernanda Sgarbosa; Lopes, Mario Lucio; de Amorim, Henrique Vianna; Eggleston, Gillian; Basso, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial contamination during industrial yeast fermentation has serious economic consequences for fuel ethanol producers. In addition to deviating carbon away from ethanol formation, bacterial cells and their metabolites often have a detrimental effect on yeast fermentative performance. The bacterial contaminants are commonly lactic acid bacteria (LAB), comprising both homo- and heterofermentative strains. We have studied the effects of these two different types of bacteria upon yeast fermentative performance, particularly in connection with sugarcane-based fuel ethanol fermentation process. Homofermentative Lactobacillus plantarum was found to be more detrimental to an industrial yeast strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae CAT-1), when compared with heterofermentative Lactobacillus fermentum, in terms of reduced yeast viability and ethanol formation, presumably due to the higher titres of lactic acid in the growth medium. These effects were only noticed when bacteria and yeast were inoculated in equal cell numbers. However, when simulating industrial fuel ethanol conditions, as conducted in Brazil where high yeast cell densities and short fermentation time prevail, the heterofermentative strain was more deleterious than the homofermentative type, causing lower ethanol yield and out competing yeast cells during cell recycle. Yeast overproduction of glycerol was noticed only in the presence of the heterofermentative bacterium. Since the heterofermentative bacterium was shown to be more deleterious to yeast cells than the homofermentative strain, we believe our findings could stimulate the search for more strain-specific antimicrobial agents to treat bacterial contaminations during industrial ethanol fermentation.

  13. Fuel cell-based instrumentation for ethanol determination in alcoholic beverages, fermentations, and biofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, K W

    1988-01-01

    The main aim of this project was to devise an alternative method for ethanol assay, employing an electrochemical fuel cell sensor. Thus, the early part of this thesis describes the work carried out in the development of a new analytical technique for this purpose. This work resulted in the production of a successful prototype unit which has led to the development of a commercial instrument, vis., the Lion Drinks Alcolmeter (DA-1) available from Lion Laboratories Ltd. The problem of determining the ethanol content of a fermenting liquor at any point during a fermentation process was also broached and a novel technique combining a flow dilution system, dynamic headspace analysis and a fuel cell sensor was developed. This procedure, suitably automated, will enable the ethanolic content of a fermenting beverage to be determined at any stage during a fermentation, the results obtained in this manner being in excellent agreement with those obtained gas chromatographically. Methods of extending the linear working range of a fuel cell-based sampling system are reported in the hope that the encouraging results obtained may initiate further progress in this field. Finally, the sensing system used in this work has also been utilized with an alternative sampling procedure for the determination of ethanol in biological fluids, mainly for clinical and forensic applications. This work has also led to the production of a commercial instrument, viz. the Lion AE-D3 Alcolmeter.

  14. Energy analysis of a trigeneration plant based on solid oxide fuel cell and organic Rankine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sulaiman, F.A.; Dincer, I.; Hamdullahpur, F.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, energy analysis of a trigeneration plant based on Solid Oxide Fuel cell (SOFC) and organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is carried out. The physical and thermodynamic elements of the plant include a SOFC, ORC, a heating process and a single-effect absorption chiller. The waste heat from the SOFC is used as an input heat to the ORC. In turn, the waste heat from the ORC is used to heat the inlet water, and to provide the heat needed for the single-effect absorption chiller. The results obtained from this study show that the highest cycle efficiency that can be attained under the proposed scheme is 48% and the highest SOFC efficiency is 43%. Furthermore, it is found that the highest net work rate is 435 kW and the highest SOFC-AC work rate is 337 kW. At a current density higher than 0.87 A/cm 2 , the SOFC and cycle efficiencies drop abruptly because of the sharp increase in the voltage losses of the SOFC. At a current density of 0.75 A/cm 2 , the highest SOFC efficiency of 41% is obtained at the inlet fuel cell temperature of 890 K. The change in the inlet pressure of the turbine has insignificant effect on the efficiencies of the ORC and overall cycle. The study shows the effect of both the current density and the inlet fuel cell temperature on the cell voltage and voltage loss. (author)

  15. Can Hawaii Meet Its Renewable Fuel Target? Case Study of Banagrass-Based Cellulosic Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinh Tran

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Banagrass is a biomass crop candidate for ethanol production in the State of Hawaii. This study examines: (i whether enough banagrass can be produced to meet Hawaii’s renewable fuel target of 20% highway fuel demand produced with renewable sources by 2020 and (ii at what cost. This study proposes to locate suitable land areas for banagrass production and ethanol processing, focusing on the two largest islands in the state of Hawaii—Hawaii and Maui. The results suggest that the 20% target is not achievable by using all suitable land resources for banagrass production on both Hawaii and Maui. A total of about 74,224,160 gallons, accounting for 16.04% of the state’s highway fuel demand, can be potentially produced at a cost of $6.28/gallon. Lower ethanol cost is found when using a smaller production scale. The lowest cost of $3.31/gallon is found at a production processing capacity of about 9 million gallons per year (MGY, which meets about 2% of state demand. This cost is still higher than the average imported ethanol price of $3/gallon. Sensitivity analysis finds that it is possible to produce banagrass-based ethanol on Hawaii Island at a cost below the average imported ethanol price if banagrass yield increases of at least 35.56%.

  16. The knock study of methanol fuel based on multi-dimensional simulation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen, Xudong; Liu, Daming; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Methanol is an alternative fuel, and considered to be one of the most favorable fuels for engines. In this study, knocking combustion in a developed ORCEM (optical rapid compression and expansion machine) is studied based on the multi-dimensional simulation analysis. The LES (large-eddy simulation) models coupled with methanol chemical reaction kinetics (contains 21-species and 84-elementary reactions) is adopted to study knocking combustion. The results showed that the end-gas auto-ignition first occurred in the position near the chamber wall because of the higher temperature and pressure. The H_2O_2 species could be a good flame front indicator. OH radicals played the major role, and the HCO radicals almost could be ignored during knocking combustion. The HCO radicals generated little, so its concentration during knocking combustion almost may be ignored. The mean reaction intensity results of CH_2O, OH, H_2O_2, and CO were higher than others during knocking combustion. Finally, this paper put forward some new suggestions on the weakness in the knocking combustion researches of methanol fuel. - Highlights: • Knocking combustion of methanol was studied in a developed ORCEM. • The LES coupled with detailed chemical kinetics was adopted to simulation study. • The end-gas auto-ignition first occurred in the place near the chamber wall. • OH radical was the predominant species during knocking combustion. • The H_2O_2 species could be a good flame front indicator.

  17. Activity-based protein profiling of secreted cellulolytic enzyme activity dynamics in Trichoderma reesei QM6a, NG14, and RUT-C30

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Lindsey N.; Culley, David E.; Hofstad, Beth A.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Zink, Erika M.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Smith, Richard D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Magnuson, Jon M.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-12-01

    Development of alternative, non-petroleum based sources of bioenergy that can be applied in the short-term find great promise in the use of highly abundant and renewable lignocellulosic plant biomass.1 This material obtained from different feedstocks, such as forest litter or agricultural residues, can yield liquid fuels and other chemical products through biorefinery processes.2 Biofuels are obtained from lignocellulosic materials by chemical pretreatment of the biomass, followed by enzymatic decomposition of cellulosic and hemicellulosic compounds into soluble sugars that are converted to desired chemical products via microbial metabolism and fermentation.3, 4 To release soluble sugars from polymeric cellulose multiple enzymes are required, including endoglucanase, exoglucanase, and β-glucosidase.5, 6 However, the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose into soluble sugars remains a significant limiting factor to the efficient and economically viable utilization of lignocellulosic biomass for transport fuels.7, 8 The primary industrial source of cellulose and hemicellulases is the mesophilic soft-rot fungus Trichoderma reesei,9 having widespread applications in food, feed, textile, pulp, and paper industries.10 The genome encodes 200 glycoside hydrolases, including 10 cellulolytic and 16 hemicellulolytic enzymes.11 The hypercellulolytic catabolite derepressed strain RUT-C30 was obtained through a three-step UV and chemical mutagenesis of the original T. reesei strain QM6a,12, 13 in which strains M7 and NG14 were intermediate, having higher cellulolytic activity than the parent strain but less activity and higher catabolite repression than RUT-C30.14 Numerous methods have been employed to optimize the secreted enzyme cocktail of T. reesei including cultivation conditions, operational parameters, and mutagenesis.3 However, creating an optimal and economical enzyme mixture for production-scale biofuels synthesis may take thousands of experiments to identify.

  18. Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development; Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollis, Rebecca

    2013-03-31

    Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in 2005 to study and develop a competing technology for use in future fossil-fueled power generation facilities that could operate with near zero emissions. CES’s background in oxy-fuel (O-F) rocket technology lead to the award of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42645, “Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development,” where CES was to first evaluate the potential of these O-F power cycles, then develop the detailed design of a commercial-scale O-F combustor for use in these clean burning fossil-fueled plants. Throughout the studies, CES found that in order to operate at competitive cycle efficiencies a high-temperature intermediate pressure turbine was required. This led to an extension of the Agreement for, “Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications” where CES was to also develop an intermediate-pressure O-F turbine (OFT) that could be deployed in O-F industrial plants that capture and sequester >99% of produced CO2, at competitive cycle efficiencies using diverse fuels. The following report details CES’ activities from October 2005 through March 2013, to evaluate O-F power cycles, develop and validate detailed designs of O-F combustors (main and reheat), and to design, manufacture, and test a commercial-scale OFT, under the three-phase Cooperative Agreement.

  19. Network-based model for predicting the effect of fuel price on transit ridership and greenhouse gas emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Levin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As fuel prices increase, drivers may make travel choices to minimize not only travel time, but also fuel consumption. Consideration of fuel consumption would affect route choice and influence trip frequency and mode choice. For instance, travelers may elect to live closer to their workplace, or use public transit to avoid fuel consumption and the associated costs. To incorporate network characteristics into predictions of the effects of fuel prices, we develop a multi-class combined elastic demand, mode choice, and user equilibrium model using a generalized cost function of travel time and fuel consumption with a combined solution algorithm. The algorithm is implemented in a custom software package, and a case study application on the Austin, Texas network is presented. We evaluate the fuel-price sensitivity of key variables such as drive-alone and transit class proportions, person-miles traveled, link-level traffic flow and per capita fuel consumption and emissions. These effects are examined across a heterogeneous demand set, with multiple user-classes categorized based on their value of travel time. The highest relative transit elasticities against fuel price are observed among low value of time classes, as expected. Although total personal vehicle travel decreases, congestion increases on some roads due to the generalized cost function. Reductions in system-wide fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions are observed as well. The study uncovers the combined interactions among fuel prices, multi-modal choice behavior, travel performance, and resultant environmental impacts, all of which dictate the urban travel market. It also equips agencies with motivation to tailor emissions reduction and transit-ridership stimulus policies around the most responsive user classes.

  20. Advanced control approach for hybrid systems based on solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Mario L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Advanced new control system for SOFC based hybrid plants. • Proportional–Integral approach with feed-forward technology. • Good control of fuel cell temperature. • All critical properties maintained inside safe conditions. - Abstract: This paper shows a new advanced control approach for operations in hybrid systems equipped with solid oxide fuel cell technology. This new tool, which combines feed-forward and standard proportional–integral techniques, controls the system during load changes avoiding failures and stress conditions detrimental to component life. This approach was selected to combine simplicity and good control performance. Moreover, the new approach presented in this paper eliminates the need for mass flow rate meters and other expensive probes, as usually required for a commercial plant. Compared to previous works, better performance is achieved in controlling fuel cell temperature (maximum gradient significantly lower than 3 K/min), reducing the pressure gap between cathode and anode sides (at least a 30% decrease during transient operations), and generating a higher safe margin (at least a 10% increase) for the Steam-to-Carbon Ratio. This new control system was developed and optimized using a hybrid system transient model implemented, validated and tested within previous works. The plant, comprising the coupling of a tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack with a microturbine, is equipped with a bypass valve able to connect the compressor outlet with the turbine inlet duct for rotational speed control. Following model development and tuning activities, several operative conditions were considered to show the new control system increased performance compared to previous tools (the same hybrid system model was used with the new control approach). Special attention was devoted to electrical load steps and ramps considering significant changes in ambient conditions

  1. TREAT experimental data base regarding fuel dispersals in LMFBR loss-of-flow accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simms, R.; Fink, C.L.; Stanford, G.S.; Regis, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    The reactivity feedback from fuel relocation is a central issue in the analysis of loss-of-flow (LOF) accidents in LMFBRs. Fuel relocation has been studied in a number of LOF simulations in the TREAT reactor. In this paper the results of these tests are analyzed, using, as the principal figure of merit, the changes in equivalent fuel worth associated with the fuel motion. The equivalent fuel worth was calculated from the measured axial fuel distributions by weighting the data with a typical LMFBR fuel-worth function. At nominal power, the initial fuel relocation resulted in increases in equivalent fuel worth. Above nominal power the fuel motion was dispersive, but the dispersive driving forces could not unequivocally be identified from the experimental data

  2. Sensors Based Measurement Techniques of Fuel Injection and Ignition Characteristics of Diesel Sprays in DI Combustion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rehman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Innovative sensor based measurement techniques like needle lift sensor, photo (optical sensor and piezoresistive pressure transmitter are introduced and used to measure the injection and combustion characteristics in direct injection combustion system. Present experimental study is carried out in the constant volume combustion chamber to study the ignition, combustion and injection characteristics of the solid cone diesel fuel sprays impinging on the hot surface. Hot surface ignition approach has been used to create variety of advanced combustion systems. In the present study, the hot surface temperatures were varied from 623 K to 723 K. The cylinder air pressures were 20, 30 and 40 bar and fuel injection pressures were 100, 200 and 300 bar. It is found that ignition delay of fuel sprays get reduced with the rise in injection pressure. The ignition characteristics of sprays much less affected at high fuel injection pressures and high surface temperatures. The fuel injection duration reduces with the increase in fuel injection pressures. The rate of heat release becomes high at high injection pressures and it decreases with the increase in injection duration. It is found that duration of burn/combustion decrease with the increase in injection pressure. The use of various sensors is quite effective, reliable and accurate in measuring the various fuel injection and combustion characteristics. The study simulates the effect of fuel injection system parameters on combustion performance in large heavy duty engines.

  3. Potential pyrolysis pathway assessment for microalgae-based aviation fuel based on energy conversion efficiency and life cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Fang; Wang, Xin; Yang, Xiaoyi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • High lipid content in microalgae increases energy conversion efficiency. • Indirect pathway has the highest mass ratio, energy ratio and energy efficiency. • The Isochrysis indirect pathway produces most kerosene component precursor. • The Isochrysis indirect pyrolysis pathway shows the best performance in LCA. - Abstract: Although the research of microalgae pyrolysis has been conducted for many years, there is a lack of investigations on energy efficiency and life cycle assessment. In this study, we investigated the biocrude yield and energy efficiency of direct pyrolysis, microalgae residue pyrolysis after lipid extraction (indirect pyrolysis), and different microalgae co-pyrolysis. This research also investigated the life cycle assessment of the three different pyrolysis pathways. A system boundary of Well-to-Wake (WTWa) was defined and included sub-process models, such as feedstock production, fuel production and pump-to-wheels (PTW) stages. The pathway of Isochrysis indirect pyrolysis shows the best performance in the mass ratio and energy ratio, produces the most kerosene component precursor, has the lowest WTWa total energy input, fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, and resultes in the best energy efficiency. All the evidence indicates that Isochrysis R2 pathway is a potential and optimal pyrolysis pathway to liquid biofuels. The mass ratio of pyrolysis biocrude is shown to be the decisive factor for different microalgae species. The sensitivity analysis results also indicates that the life cycle indicators are particularly sensitive to the mass ratio of pyrolysis biocrude for microalgae-based hydrotreated pyrolysis aviation fuel.

  4. Algorithm of axial fuel optimization based in progressive steps of turned search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin del Campo, C.; Francois, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The development of an algorithm for the axial optimization of fuel of boiling water reactors (BWR) is presented. The algorithm is based in a serial optimizations process in the one that the best solution in each stage is the starting point of the following stage. The objective function of each stage adapts to orient the search toward better values of one or two parameters leaving the rest like restrictions. Conform to it advances in those optimization stages, it is increased the fineness of the evaluation of the investigated designs. The algorithm is based on three stages, in the first one are used Genetic algorithms and in the two following Tabu Search. The objective function of the first stage it looks for to minimize the average enrichment of the one it assembles and to fulfill with the generation of specified energy for the operation cycle besides not violating none of the limits of the design base. In the following stages the objective function looks for to minimize the power factor peak (PPF) and to maximize the margin of shutdown (SDM), having as restrictions the one average enrichment obtained for the best design in the first stage and those other restrictions. The third stage, very similar to the previous one, it begins with the design of the previous stage but it carries out a search of the margin of shutdown to different exhibition steps with calculations in three dimensions (3D). An application to the case of the design of the fresh assemble for the fourth fuel reload of the Unit 1 reactor of the Laguna Verde power plant (U1-CLV) is presented. The obtained results show an advance in the handling of optimization methods and in the construction of the objective functions that should be used for the different design stages of the fuel assemblies. (Author)

  5. Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-31

    Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

  6. LANDFIRE - A national vegetation/fuels data base for use in fuels treatment, restoration, and suppression planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin C. Ryan; Tonja S. Opperman

    2013-01-01

    LANDFIRE is the working name given to the Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools Project (http://www.landfire.gov). The project was initiated in response to mega-fires and the need for managers to have consistent, wall-to-wall (i.e., all wildlands regardless of agency/ownership), geospatial data, on vegetation, fuels, and terrain to support use of fire...

  7. 40 CFR 600.208-08 - Calculation of FTP-based and HFET-based fuel economy values for a model type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the original base level fuel economy values); and (iii) All subconfigurations within the new base... separating subconfigurations from an existing base level and placing them into a new base level. The new base... this paragraph, as containing a new basic engine. The manufacturer will be permitted to designate such...

  8. Two-dimensional core calculation research for fuel management optimization based on CPACT code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaosong; Peng Lianghui; Gang Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Fuel management optimization process requires rapid assessment for the core layout program, and the commonly used methods include two-dimensional diffusion nodal method, perturbation method, neural network method and etc. A two-dimensional loading patterns evaluation code was developed based on the three-dimensional LWR diffusion calculation program CPACT. Axial buckling introduced to simulate the axial leakage was searched in sub-burnup sections to correct the two-dimensional core diffusion calculation results. Meanwhile, in order to get better accuracy, the weight equivalent volume method of the control rod assembly cross-section was improved. (authors)

  9. Integrated data base report--1995: US spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste inventories, projections, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The information in this report summarizes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) data base for inventories, projections, and characteristics of domestic spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. This report is updated annually to keep abreast of continual waste inventory and projection changes in both the government and commercial sectors. Baseline information is provided for DOE program planning purposes and to support DOE program decisions. Although the primary purpose of this document is to provide background information for program planning within the DOE community, it has also been found useful by state and local governments, the academic community, and some private citizens

  10. Direct and indirect economics of wind energy systems relative to fuel based systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, B

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the addition of an energy-storage system of modest capacity, to a wind energy generator, provides a total-wind-energy electricity-generating system as dependable as current alternative means of producing electricity. It is further shown, based on projections of the mass-production costs of wind-energy generators and energy-storage systems, that such combined systems, as well as fuel-saving generators without storage, appear economically competitive to the alternatives, provided the comparison is made over the entire life cycle of the systems.

  11. Trigeneration System Based on Municipal Waste Gasification, Fuel Cell and an Absorption Chiller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsaros, Giannis; Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Rokni, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    of a specific building is also investigated and the system can fully meet the electricity and cooling demands, whereas the heat needs can be satisfied only up to 55%. Moreover, assuming 20 years of operation, the payback period is 4.3 years and the net present value exceeds 5 MEUR.......The present work focuses on the design of a novel tri-generation system based on municipal solid wastes gasification, solid oxide fuel cell and an ammonia-water absorption chiller. Trigeneration systems can be implemented in buildings such as hospitals, where there is a continuous and large demand...

  12. Durability Issues of High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . As a critical concern, issues of long term durability of PBI based fuel cells are addressed in this talk, including oxidative degradation of the polymer, mechanical failures of the membrane, acid leaching out, corrosion of carbon support and sintering of catalysts particles. Excellent polymer durability has...... or ionically cross-linking and structure modification With load, thermal or startup-shutdown cycling, the performance loss was found to be much bigger, about 300 µV per cycle or 40 µV per operating hour, due to the increased acid loss and catalyst support corrosion, particularly under open circuit voltage...... operation. Further efforts are outlined to the future work....

  13. Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based micro-scale direct methanol fuel cell development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, S.-C.; Tang Xudong; Hsieh, C.-C.; Alyousef, Yousef; Vladimer, Michael; Fedder, Gary K.; Amon, Cristina H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a high-power density, silicon-based micro-scale direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), under development at Carnegie Mellon. Major issues in the DMFC design include the water management and energy-efficient micro fluidic sub-systems. The air flow and the methanol circulation are both at a natural draft, while a passive liquid-gas separator removes CO 2 from the methanol chamber. An effective approach for maximizing the DMFC energy density, pumping the excess water back to the anode, is illustrated. The proposed DMFC contains several unique features: a silicon wafer with arrays of etched holes selectively coated with a non-wetting agent for collecting water at the cathode; a silicon membrane micro pump for pumping the collected water back to the anode; and a passive liquid-gas separator for CO 2 removal. All of these silicon-based components are fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based processes on the same silicon wafer, so that interconnections are eliminated, and integration efforts as well as post-fabrication costs are both minimized. The resulting fuel cell has an overall size of one cubic inch, produces a net output of 10 mW, and has an energy density three to five times higher than that of current lithium-ion batteries

  14. Cost of Equity Estimation in Fuel and Energy Sector Companies Based on CAPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozieł Diana

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents cost of equity estimation of capital groups from the fuel and energy sector, listed at the Warsaw Stock Exchange, based on the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM. The objective of the article was to perform a valuation of equity with the application of CAPM, based on actual financial data and stock exchange data and to carry out a sensitivity analysis of such cost, depending on the financing structure of the entity. The objective of the article formulated in this manner has determined its’ structure. It focuses on presentation of substantive analyses related to the core of equity and methods of estimating its’ costs, with special attention given to the CAPM. In the practical section, estimation of cost was performed according to the CAPM methodology, based on the example of leading fuel and energy companies, such as Tauron GE and PGE. Simultaneously, sensitivity analysis of such cost was performed depending on the structure of financing the company’s operation.

  15. Results from a Field Trial of the Radio Frequency Based Cylinder Accountability and Tracking System at the Global Nuclear Fuel Americas Fuel Fabrication Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, Peter; Laughter, Mark D.; Martyn, Rose; Pickett, Chris A.; Rowe, Nathan C.; Younkin, James R.; Shephard, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    The Cylinder Accountability and Tracking System (CATS) is a tool designed for use by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to improve overall inspector efficiency through real-time unattended monitoring of cylinder movements, site specific rules-based event detection, and the capability to integrate many types of monitoring technologies. The system is based on the tracking of cylinder movements using (radio frequency) RF tags, and the collection of data, such as accountability weights, that can be associated with the cylinders. This presentation will cover the installation and evaluation of the CATS at the Global Nuclear Fuels (GNF) fuel fabrication facility in Wilmington, NC. This system was installed to evaluate its safeguards applicability, operational durability under operating conditions, and overall performance. An overview of the system design and elements specific to the GNF deployment will be presented along with lessons learned from the installation process and results from the field trial.

  16. Hybrid heat pipe based passive cooling device for spent nuclear fuel dry storage cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Hybrid heat pipe was presented as a passive cooling device for dry storage cask of SNF. • A method to utilize waste heat from spent fuel was suggested using hybrid heat pipe. • CFD analysis was performed to evaluate the thermal performance of hybrid heat pipe. • Hybrid heat pipe can increase safety margin and storage capacity of the dry storage cask. - Abstract: Conventional dry storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) were designed to remove decay heat through the natural convection of air, but this method has limited cooling capacity and a possible re-criticality accident in case of flooding. To enhance the safety and capacity of dry storage cask of SNF, hybrid heat pipe-based passive cooling device was suggested. Heat pipe is an excellent passive heat transfer device using the principles of both conduction and phase change of the working fluid. The heat pipe containing neutron absorber material, the so-called hybrid heat pipe, is expected to prevent the re-criticality accidents of SNF and to increase the safety margin during interim and long term storage period. Moreover, a hybrid heat pipe with thermoelectric module, a Stirling engine and a phase change material tank can be used for utilization of the waste heat as heat-transfer medium. Located at the guide tube or instrumentation tube, hybrid heat pipe can remove decay heat from inside the sealed metal cask to outside, decreasing fuel rod temperature. In this paper, a 2-step analysis was performed using computational fluid dynamics code to evaluate the heat and fluid flow inside a cask, which consisted of a single spent fuel assembly simulation and a full-scope dry cask simulation. For a normal dry storage cask, the maximum fuel temperature is 290.0 °C. With hybrid heat pipe cooling, the temperature decreased to 261.6 °C with application of one hybrid heat pipe per assembly, and to 195.1 °C with the application of five hybrid heat pipes per assembly. Therefore, a dry

  17. Environmental effects of fuel peat use in Finland. An LCA-based Decision Analysis Impact Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leijting, J.

    1998-02-01

    Finland is a country where the main domestic energy sources are restricted to hydroelectric power, wood and peat from which hydropower is practically utilized fully. The use of peat as energy source has increased drastically since the oil crisis in the beginning of the seventies and the peat exploitation industry is nowadays a significant supplier of labour in Finland. Peat is, in contrast to fossil energy sources, exploited and used as an energy source within the country's borderline. Therefore, all direct extractions and emissions takes place in Finland.The influence of the processes, which occur during the life cycle of fuel peat, on the environment as a whole is yet somewhat unclear. The aim of the study is to map and assess the overall environmental impacts of production and use of fuel peat in Finland and to bring these impacts in relation with total environmental impacts in Finland caused by anthropogenic emissions. The results should be comparable with the impacts of other product life cycles (for instance other fuels). Furthermore, the detection of data gaps which are present is an important element of the study. Research questions are (1) What are the contributions of the different stressors which are emitted during the life cycle of fuel peat in Finland to global and regional environmental impacts? The environmental impacts involved are global impacts like the greenhouse effect as well as regional environmental impacts, e.g.acidification, eutrophication, toxic effects, ozone formation and effects on biodiversity; and (2) What are the contributions expressed per functional unit? Emissions released during the life cycle of fuel peat were inventorized. The emissions were characterized into the various impact categories and a valuation of the various impacts was performed, based on the Decision Analyses Impact Assessment (DAIA). In DAIA, country specific values were applied for estimating the potential of the stressors to cause adverse environmental effects

  18. Time-resolved fuel injector flow characterisation based on 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crua, Cyril; Heikal, Morgan R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrodynamic turbulence and cavitation are known to play a significant role in high-pressure atomizers, but the small geometries and extreme operating conditions hinder the understanding of the flow’s characteristics. Diesel internal flow experiments are generally conducted using x-ray techniques or on transparent, and often enlarged, nozzles with different orifice geometries and surface roughness to those found in production injectors. In order to enable investigations of the fuel flow inside unmodified injectors, we have developed a new experimental approach to measure time-resolved vibration spectra of diesel nozzles using a 3D laser vibrometer. The technique we propose is based on the triangulation of the vibrometer and fuel pressure transducer signals, and enables the quantitative characterisation of quasi-cyclic internal flows without requiring modifications to the injector, the working fluid, or limiting the fuel injection pressure. The vibrometer, which uses the Doppler effect to measure the velocity of a vibrating object, was used to scan injector nozzle tips during the injection event. The data were processed using a discrete Fourier transform to provide time-resolved spectra for valve-closed-orifice, minisac and microsac nozzle geometries, and injection pressures ranging from 60 to 160 MPa, hence offering unprecedented insight into cyclic cavitation and internal mechanical dynamic processes. A peak was consistently found in the spectrograms between 6 and 7.5 kHz for all nozzles and injection pressures. Further evidence of a similar spectral peak was obtained from the fuel pressure transducer and a needle lift sensor mounted into the injector body. Evidence of propagation of the nozzle oscillations to the liquid sprays was obtained by recording high-speed videos of the near-nozzle diesel jet, and computing the fast Fourier transform for a number of pixel locations at the interface of the jets. This 6-7.5 kHz frequency peak is proposed to be the

  19. Time-resolved fuel injector flow characterisation based on 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crua, Cyril; Heikal, Morgan R

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodynamic turbulence and cavitation are known to play a significant role in high-pressure atomizers, but the small geometries and extreme operating conditions hinder the understanding of the flow’s characteristics. Diesel internal flow experiments are generally conducted using x-ray techniques or on transparent, and often enlarged, nozzles with different orifice geometries and surface roughness to those found in production injectors. In order to enable investigations of the fuel flow inside unmodified injectors, we have developed a new experimental approach to measure time-resolved vibration spectra of diesel nozzles using a 3D laser vibrometer. The technique we propose is based on the triangulation of the vibrometer and fuel pressure transducer signals, and enables the quantitative characterisation of quasi-cyclic internal flows without requiring modifications to the injector, the working fluid, or limiting the fuel injection pressure. The vibrometer, which uses the Doppler effect to measure the velocity of a vibrating object, was used to scan injector nozzle tips during the injection event. The data were processed using a discrete Fourier transform to provide time-resolved spectra for valve-closed-orifice, minisac and microsac nozzle geometries, and injection pressures ranging from 60 to 160 MPa, hence offering unprecedented insight into cyclic cavitation and internal mechanical dynamic processes. A peak was consistently found in the spectrograms between 6 and 7.5 kHz for all nozzles and injection pressures. Further evidence of a similar spectral peak was obtained from the fuel pressure transducer and a needle lift sensor mounted into the injector body. Evidence of propagation of the nozzle oscillations to the liquid sprays was obtained by recording high-speed videos of the near-nozzle diesel jet, and computing the fast Fourier transform for a number of pixel locations at the interface of the jets. This 6–7.5 kHz frequency peak is proposed to be the

  20. A paper-based microbial fuel cell: instant battery for disposable diagnostic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiwan, Arwa; Mukherjee, Sayantika; Sundermier, Steven; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Choi, Seokheun

    2013-11-15

    We present a microfabricated paper-based microbial fuel cell (MFC) generating a maximum power of 5.5 μW/cm(2). The MFC features (1) a paper-based proton exchange membrane by infiltrating sulfonated sodium polystyrene sulfonate and (2) micro-fabricated paper chambers by patterning hydrophobic barriers of photoresist. Once inoculum and catholyte were added to the MFC, a current of 74 μA was generated immediately. This paper-based MFC has the advantages of ease of use, low production cost, and high portability. The voltage produced was increased by 1.9 × when two MFC devices were stacked in series, while operating lifetime was significantly enhanced in parallel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fuzzy Pattern Classification Based Detection of Faulty Electronic Fuel Control (EFC Valves Used in Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Tugsal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop mathematical models of a rotary Electronic Fuel Control (EFC valve used in a Diesel engine based on dynamic performance test data and system identification methodology in order to detect the faulty EFC valves. The model takes into account the dynamics of the electrical and mechanical portions of the EFC valves. A recursive least squares (RLS type system identification methodology has been utilized to determine the transfer functions of the different types of EFC valves that were investigated in this study. Both in frequency domain and time domain methods have been utilized for this purpose. Based on the characteristic patterns exhibited by the EFC valves, a fuzzy logic based pattern classification method was utilized to evaluate the residuals and identify faulty EFC valves from good ones. The developed methodology has been shown to provide robust diagnostics for a wide range of EFC valves.

  2. RIAR experimental base development concept 1. Multi-purpose pyrochemical complex for experimental justification of innovative closed fuel cycle technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bychkov, A.V.; Kormilitsyn, M.V. [Research Institute of Atomic Reactors, Dimitrovgrad-10, Ulyanovsk region, 433510 (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    The principles of closed FC arrangement on the basis of non-aqueous methods allow the development of production addressing two tasks simultaneously: production of fresh fuel and reprocessing of irradiated fuel, that makes it possible to achieve the industrial level of implementation of closed FC of fast reactors of new generation in a series variant of standardized process modules on the basis of innovative pyrochemical high-effective compact technologies. For the purpose of experimental justification of innovative closed FC technologies at the RIAR site, the existing experimental base is being updated and a multi-purpose pyrochemical complex is developed: - Experimental complex of pyrochemical molten salt facilities to reprocess all types of spent fuel (MOX, nitride, metallic, IMF) of fast reactors of new generation (BN-800, MBIR, BREST). - Experimental complex of facilities to master a gas-fluoride technology of reprocessing intractable fuel, research reactors fuel and thermal SNF. - Transition of the existing facility of pyro-electrochemical production of MOX fuel into the mode of reprocessing of the BN-800 MOX SNF. - Renovation of the facilities for production of fuel elements from experimental, re-fabricated, innovative and high-active fuel - a complex of heavy and glove boxes - to produce experimental fuel elements and targets with MAs on the basis of oxides (vibro and pellets), mixed nitrides, metal alloys and inert matrices in heavy boxes. - Upgrading of the complex for mastering and demonstration of the processes for radioactive waste management and spent fuel pyrochemical reprocessing. The report covers main concept and design solutions, plans and schedule of the program for development of pyrochemical complex for experimental justification of innovative closed FC technologies. (authors)

  3. Report on the Savannah River Site aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel alternatives cost study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    Initial estimates of costs for the interim management and disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) were developed during preparation of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel. The Task Team evaluated multiple alternatives, assessing programmatic, technical, and schedule risks, and generated life-cycle cost projections for each alternative. The eight technology alternatives evaluated were: direct co-disposal; melt and dilute; reprocessing; press and dilute; glass material oxidation dissolution system (GMODS); electrometallurgical treatment; dissolve and vitrify; and plasma arc. In followup to the Business Plan that was developed to look at SNF dry storage, WSRC prepared an addendum to the cost study. This addendum estimated the costs for the modification and use of an existing (105L) reactor facility versus a greenfield approach for new facilities (for the Direct Co-Disposal and Melt and Dilute alternatives). WSRC assessed the impacts of a delay in reprocessing due to the potential reservation of H-Canyon for other missions (i.e., down blending HEU for commercial use or the conversion of plutonium to either MOX fuel or an immobilized repository disposal form). This report presents the relevant results from these WSRC cost studies, consistent with the most recent project policy, technology implementation, canyon utilization, and inventory assumptions. As this is a summary report, detailed information on the technical alternatives or the cost assumptions raised in each of the above-mentioned cost studies is not provided. A comparison table that briefly describes the bases used for the WSRC analyses is included as Appendix A

  4. Fuel cell based integrated and distributed energy applications (FC-IDEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotak, D.B.; Wu, S.; Fleetwood, M.S.; Tamoto, H.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The commercial success of fuel cells will depend upon their adaptation to mobile (e.g., cars, wheelchairs, mopeds, bicycles), stationary (e.g., remote or distributed power), and portable energy applications. Typically such applications are capital intensive and involve a lot of unknowns given that they use new and emergent technology. Also many applications (e.g., hydrogen fuelling station) can be achieved using different technologies and 'pathways'. Thus it is important that a full assessment of possible alternatives be carried out taking into consideration factors such as: capital, operating and maintenance costs; equipment performance, utilization, reliability and scalability; effectiveness to meet the energy demand. NRC is developing a generic software tool which industry experts can use to facilitate assessment of alternative solutions to fulfill the energy requirements for their specific application. We call this tool FC-IDEA (Fuel Cell-based Integrated and Distributed Energy Applications). The system has the following key components: - A Web-based Human-Machine Interface designed for the industry expert to configure and assess alternative designs and operational approaches to satisfy their energy needs (e.g., hydrogen demand profile for a fuelling station, electricity demand profile for a stationary power application); - A Comprehensive Database containing the performance characteristics of energy devices (e.g., electrolysers, hydrogen storage tanks, compressors, dispensers, fuel cells, reformers) that may be used to configure the required application; - A Simulation Model capable of representing the physical system in full 3D to enable ' what-if' analysis of design and operational alternatives and measuring such parameters as performance, utilization, failure and maintenance, shift schedules, and costs. Using this system the expert would be able to configure alternative energy nodes (e.g., remote power) consisting of energy devices. Similarly

  5. Biomass based energy combines with motor fuel production; Biobraenslebaserade energikombinat med tillverkning av drivmedel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    In the report the state of development of production processes for various motor fuels, such as FT diesel, methanol , DME and ethanol, from biomass is reviewed. Biomass and black liquor gasification processes as well as processes for ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass are discussed. The processes are complicated and still not very well tried in their whole context. The gas cleaning steps, which are necessary to reach acceptable catalyst lifetimes in the motor fuel production processes based on gasification, have been tested in the oil industry and to some extent in coal gasification plants, but not with syngas from biomass or black liquor gasification. For black liquor gasification particularly, also material selection and material lifetime issues remain to be solved. For ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass process development is needed, to increase the yield in the pre-treatment, hydrolysis and fermentation steps. The energy yields of the processes are dependent on the degree of complexity of the processes, as well as on the integration and balancing of energy demanding steps and steps with energy surplus. This is especially valid for the processes based on gasification, due to high temperatures in the gasifier and some of the catalytic steps, but also for the ethanol process, which benefit from optimal steam integration in the evaporation and distillation steps. Also steam integration with cogeneration plants, or for black liquor gasification with pulp mills, improves the overall energy balance. In addition, the energy yield when motor fuels are produced by gasification is dependent on the usage of the off-gas. The efficiency is improved when the off-gas is burned in a boiler or gas turbine, than when it is flared. In the report examples are given of processes with and without integration.

  6. Effects of an LMR-based partitioning-transmutation system on US nuclear fuel cycle health risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, G.E.; Reich, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    Health risks for the current US nuclear fuel cycle and for an illustrative partitioning and transmutation (P-T) fuel cycle based on Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) technology are calculated and compared. Health risks are calculated for all non-reactor fuel cycle steps, including reprocessing, transportation, and high-level waste (HLW) disposal. Uranium mining and milling health risks have been updated to include recent occupational injury and death statistics, and the radiological health risk to the general public posed by the uranium mining overburden. In addition, the radiological health risks for transportation have been updated to include latent cancer fatalities associated with both normal transport and accidents. Given the assumptions of the study, it is shown that the deployment of an LMR-based P-T system is expected to reduce overall nuclear fuel cycle health risk

  7. Improvement on performance and efficiency of direct methanol fuel cells using hydrocarbon-based membrane electrode assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joon-Hee; Yang, Min-Jee; Park, Jun-Young

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Faradaic efficiency and water transfer coefficient (WTC) of DMFC MEAs are calculated based on mass balance measurements. • Faradaic efficiency of the HC-based MEAs is generally improved over the Nafion-based MEAs. • Nafion-based MEAs show a WTC of 3, whereas the HC-based MEAs show a very low WTC of -2. • Low WTC of the HC-based MEAs indicates the back-diffusion of water from the cathode to the anode. • Performance of HC-based MEAs is improved as the fuel stoichiometry increases, maintaining high Faradaic efficiency. - Abstract: In order to improve the energy efficiency (fuel efficiency and electrical power) of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), the hydrocarbon (HC) membrane-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) are investigated under various operating conditions. The MEAs are then compared with the conventional Nafion-based MEA in terms of their efficiency and performance. The Faradaic efficiency and water transfer coefficient (WTC) are calculated based on mass balance measurements. The Faradaic efficiency of the HC-based MEAs is improved over the Nafion-based MEAs since methanol crossover decreased. The performance of HC-based MEAs shows strong dependency on the anode stoichiometry at high current densities probably because of the limited mass transport of fuel, which is not observed for the Nafion-based MEAs. The Nafion-based MEAs show a WTC of 3, whereas the HC-based MEAs show a very low WTC of −2, indicating the back-diffusion of water from the cathode to the anode. This may have limited mass transport by interrupting proton conduction at high current densities. The performance of HC-based MEAs at high current densities is improved as the fuel stoichiometry increases; High Faradaic efficiency is maintained by decreasing the cathode stoichiometry

  8. Nonproliferation impacts assessment for the management of the Savannah River Site aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    On May 13, 1996, the US established a new, 10-year policy to accept and manage foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel containing uranium enriched in the US. The goal of this policy is to reduce civilian commerce in weapons-usable highly enriched uranium (HEU), thereby reducing the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation. Two key disposition options under consideration for managing this fuel include conventional reprocessing and new treatment and packaging technologies. The Record of Decision specified that, while evaluating the reprocessing option, ''DOE will commission or conduct an independent study of the nonproliferation and other (e.g., cost and timing) implications of chemical separation of spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors.'' DOE's Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation conducted this study consistent with the aforementioned Record of Decision. This report addresses the nonproliferation implications of the technologies under consideration for managing aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site. Because the same technology options are being considered for the foreign research reactor and the other aluminum-based spent nuclear fuels discussed in Section ES.1, this report addresses the nonproliferation implications of managing all the Savannah River Site aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel, not just the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. The combination of the environmental impact information contained in the draft EIS, public comment in response to the draft EIS, and the nonproliferation information contained in this report will enable the Department to make a sound decision regarding how to manage all aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site

  9. Adjoint-based Mesh Optimization Method: The Development and Application for Nuclear Fuel Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Seongmin; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2016-01-01

    In this research, methods for optimizing mesh distribution is proposed. The proposed method uses adjoint base optimization method (adjoint method). The optimized result will be obtained by applying this meshing technique to the existing code input deck and will be compared to the results produced from the uniform meshing method. Numerical solutions are calculated form an in-house 1D Finite Difference Method code while neglecting the axial conduction. The fuel radial node optimization was first performed to match the Fuel Centerline Temperature (FCT) the best. This was followed by optimizing the axial node which the Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT) is matched the best. After obtaining the optimized radial and axial nodes, the nodalization is implemented into the system analysis code and transient analyses were performed to observe the optimum nodalization performance. The developed adjoint-based mesh optimization method in the study is applied to MARS-KS, which is a nuclear system analysis code. Results show that the newly established method yields better results than that of the uniform meshing method from the numerical point of view. It is again stressed that the optimized mesh for the steady state can also give better numerical results even during a transient analysis

  10. Treatment of Mineral Oil Refinery Wastewater in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Ionic Liquid Based Separators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasna Addi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are an environmentally friendly technology that can recover electricity directly from several wastes at ambient temperatures. This work explores the use of mineral oil refinery wastewater as feedstock in single-chamber air-cathode MFC devices. A polymer inclusion membrane based on the ionic liquid methyltrioctylammonium chloride, [MTOA+][Cl−], at a concentration of 70% w/w, was used as separator, showing a good efficiency in power production and chemical oxygen demand (COD removal. The power and the chemical oxygen demand removal reached values of 45 mW/m3 and over 80%, respectively. The evolution of other parameters of the wastewater including nitrites, phosphates and sulphates were also studied. Kjeldahl nitrogen and sulphates were significantly reduced during MFC operation. The results show that mineral oil refinery wastewater can be used as feedstock in air breathing cathode-microbial fuel cells based on polymer ionic liquid inclusion membranes. This configuration could represent a good alternative for wastewater depuration while producing energy during the process.

  11. Zirconium-based alloys, nuclear fuel rods and nuclear reactors including such alloys, and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Robert Dominick

    2014-09-09

    Zirconium-based metal alloy compositions comprise zirconium, a first additive in which the permeability of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperatures at least over a temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C., and a second additive having a solubility in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. At least one of a solubility of the first additive in the second additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. and a solubility of the second additive in the first additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. is higher than the solubility of the second additive in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. Nuclear fuel rods include a cladding material comprising such metal alloy compositions, and nuclear reactors include such fuel rods. Methods are used to fabricate such zirconium-based metal alloy compositions.

  12. Intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell based on lanthanum gallate electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, Toru; Nishiwaki, Futoshi; Yamasaki, Satoru [The Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Energy Use R and D Center, 11-20 Nakoji 3-choume, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-0974 (Japan); Akbay, Taner; Hosoi, Kei [Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, Corporate Technology and Development Division, 1002-14 Mukohyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0102 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc. (KEPCO) and Mitsubishi Materials Corporation (MMC) have been developing intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) which are operable at a temperature range between 600 and 800 C. There are some significant features in IT-SOFC of KEPCO-MMC: (1) highly conductive lanthanum gallate-based oxide is adopted as an electrolyte to realize high-performance disk-type electrolyte-supported cells; (2) the cell-stacks with seal-less structure using metallic separators allow residual fuel to burn around the stack and the combustion heat is utilized for thermally self-sustainable operation; (3) the separators have flexible arms by which separate compressive forces can be applied for manifold parts and interconnection parts. We are currently participating in the project by New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) to develop 10 kW-class combined heat and power (CHP) systems. In FY2006, a 10 kW-class module was developed, with which the electrical efficiency of 50%HHV was obtained based on DC 12.6 kW. In the first quarter of FY2007, the 10 kW-class CHP system using the module gave the electrical efficiency of 41%HHV on AC 10 kW and the overall efficiency of 82%HHV when exhaust heat was recovered as 60 C hot water. Currently, the operation has been accumulated for about 2500 h to evaluate the long-term stability of the system. (author)

  13. Energy management strategy for fuel cell-supercapacitor hybrid vehicles based on prediction of energy demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignano, Mauro G.; Costa-Castelló, Ramon; Roda, Vicente; Nigro, Norberto M.; Junco, Sergio; Feroldi, Diego

    2017-08-01

    Offering high efficiency and producing zero emissions Fuel Cells (FCs) represent an excellent alternative to internal combustion engines for powering vehicles to alleviate the growing pollution in urban environments. Due to inherent limitations of FCs which lead to slow transient response, FC-based vehicles incorporate an energy storage system to cover the fast power variations. This paper considers a FC/supercapacitor platform that configures a hard constrained powertrain providing an adverse scenario for the energy management strategy (EMS) in terms of fuel economy and drivability. Focusing on palliating this problem, this paper presents a novel EMS based on the estimation of short-term future energy demand and aiming at maintaining the state of energy of the supercapacitor between two limits, which are computed online. Such limits are designed to prevent active constraint situations of both FC and supercapacitor, avoiding the use of friction brakes and situations of non-power compliance in a short future horizon. Simulation and experimentation in a case study corresponding to a hybrid electric bus show improvements on hydrogen consumption and power compliance compared to the widely reported Equivalent Consumption Minimization Strategy. Also, the comparison with the optimal strategy via Dynamic Programming shows a room for improvement to the real-time strategies.

  14. In situ microbial fuel cell-based biosensor for organic carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jesus dos Santos Peixoto, Luciana; Min, Booki; Martins, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    The biological oxygen demand (BOD) may be the most used test to assess the amount of pollutant organic matter in water; however, it is time and labor consuming, and is done ex-situ. A BOD biosensor based on the microbial fuel cell principle was tested for online and in situ monitoring of biodegra......The biological oxygen demand (BOD) may be the most used test to assess the amount of pollutant organic matter in water; however, it is time and labor consuming, and is done ex-situ. A BOD biosensor based on the microbial fuel cell principle was tested for online and in situ monitoring...... of biodegradable organic content of domestic wastewater. A stable current density of 282±23mA/m2 was obtained with domestic wastewater containing a BOD5 of 317±15mg O2/L at 22±2°C, 1.53±0.04mS/cm and pH 6.9±0.1. The current density showed a linear relationship with BOD5 concentration ranging from 17±0.5mg O2/L...

  15. RANS based CFD methodology for a real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI PGSFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae-Ho, E-mail: jhjeong@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseoung-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Min-Seop [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 559 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwi-Lim [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseoung-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • This paper presents a suitable way for a practical RANS based CFD methodology which is applicable to real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI PGSFR. • A key point of differentiation of the RANS based CFD methodology in this study is adapting an innovative grid generation method using a fortran based in-house code with a GGI function in a general-purpose commercial CFD code, CFX. • The RANS based CFD methodology is implemented with high resolution scheme and SST turbulence model in the 7-pin 37-pin, and 127-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of PNC and JNC. Furthermore, the RANS based CFD methodology can be successfully extended to the real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel bundles of KAERI PGSFR. • Three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic characteristics have been also investigated briefly. - Abstract: This paper presents a suitable way for a practical RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulation) based CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) methodology which is applicable to real scale 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) PGSFR (Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor). The main purpose of the current study is to support license issue for the KAERI PGSFR core safety and to elucidate thermal-hydraulic characteristics in a 217-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of KAERI PGSFR. A key point of differentiation of the RANS based CFD methodology in this study is adapting an innovative grid generation method using a fortran based in-house code with a GGI (General Grid Interface) function in a general-purpose commercial CFD code, CFX. The innovative grid generation method with GGI function can achieve to simulate a real wire shape with minimizing cell skewness. The RANS based CFD methodology is implemented with high resolution scheme in convection term and SST (Shear Stress Transport) turbulence model in the 7-pin 37-pin, and 127-pin wire-wrapped fuel assembly of PNC (Power reactor and Nuclear fuel

  16. Study of the residual porosity in fuel plate cores based on U3O8 - Al dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durazzo, M.

    2005-01-01

    The residual porosity in the meat of nuclear dispersion fuel plates, the fabrication voids, explains the corrosion behaviour of the meats when exposed to the water used as coolant and moderator of MTR type research reactors. The fabrication voids also explain variations in irradiation performance of many fuel dispersion for nuclear reactors. To obtain improved corrosion and irradiation performance, we must understand the fabrication factors that control the amount of void volume in fuel plate meats. The purpose of this study was to investigate the void content of aluminum-base dispersion-type U 3 O 8 -Al fuel plates depending on the characteristics of the starting fuel dispersion used to produce the fuel meat, which is fabricated by pressing. The void content depends on the U 3 O 8 concentration. For a particular U 3 O 8 content, the rolling process establishes a constant void concentration, which is called equilibrium porosity. The equilibrium quantity of voids is insensitive to the initial density of the fuel compact. (author)

  17. Sulphation of calcium-based sorbents in circulating fluidised beds under oxy-fuel combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco Garcia-Labiano; Luis F. de Diego; Alberto Abad; Pilar Gayan; Margarita de las Obras-Loscertales; Aranzazu Rufas; Juan Adanez [Instituto de Carboquimica (CSIC), Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. Energy and Environment

    2009-07-01

    Sulphur Retention (SR) by calcium-based sorbents is a process highly dependent on the temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. In circulating fluidised beds combustors (CFBC's) operating under oxy-fuel conditions, the sulphation process takes place in atmospheres enriched in CO{sub 2} with bed concentrations that can vary from 40 to 95%. Under so high CO{sub 2} concentrations, very different from that in conventional coal combustion atmosphere with air, the calcination and sulphation behaviour of the sorbent must be defined to optimise the SR process in the combustor. The objective of this work was to determine the SO{sub 2} retention capacity of a Spanish limestone at typical oxy-fuel conditions in CFBC's. Long term duration tests of sulphation (up to 24 h), to simulate the residence time of sorbents in CFBC's, were carried out by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Clear behaviour differences were found under calcining and non-calcining conditions. Especially relevant was the result obtained at calcining conditions but close to the thermodynamic temperature given for sorbent calcination. This situation must be avoided in CFBC's because the CO{sub 2} produced inside the particle during calcination can destroy the particles if a non-porous sulphate product layer has been formed around the particle. The effect of the main variables on the sorbent sulphation such as SO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and particle size were analysed in the long term TGA tests. These data were also used to determine the kinetic parameters for the sulphation under oxy-fuel combustion conditions, which were able to adequately predict the sulphation conversion values in a wide range of operating conditions. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Bench-scale studies of reactor-based treatment of fuel-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truax, D.D.; Britto, R.; Sherrard, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    Biological treatment of hazardous wastes from accidental spills or underground storage tank leaks has generated interest in bioremediation as a natural, economical mechanism for site decontamination. Because of drawbacks of batch systems, and the successful use of continuous flow treatment of wastewater for several decades, it was felt that continuous treatment of such soils would be a feasible alternative treatment technique. Therefore, bench-scale bioreactor treatability studies were conducted and used contaminated soil made in the laboratory using No. 2 diesel fuel and sand. Contamination levels studied were from 1,335--6,675 mg (TPH) as derived from No. 2 fuel oil per kg sand. Variation in mean cell age was obtained between reactors, with sufficient nutrients and oxygen made available to ensure the fuel oil organics were the only limit to microbial growth. A theoretical biokinetic model was formulated based on Monod's theory of limiting substrate and continuous cultures. Biokinetic constants and removal efficiencies were evaluated. The off-gases, CO 2 , and volatile hydrocarbons were monitored for mass balance analysis of the process. The solids retention times for evaluating final TPH concentration of 100 mg/kg were also calculated. Removal efficiencies of up to 91% were attained at a loading of 1,335 mg TPH/kg wet sand, operated at a biological solid retention time (BSRT) of 60 days. Experiments also showed that TPH desorption and volatilization were not rate-limiting in the overall removal process. Sand-to-moisture ratios in excess of 3:1 were also shown to retard TPH removal rates very little. However, biokinetic constants were found to vary over a range of values. This was particularly true at varying diesel loading levels. Nevertheless, significant removal efficiency (up to 86%) was noted at the highest loading level tested, 6,675 mg TPH/kg wet sand

  19. Artificial Neural Network-Based Monitoring of the Fuel Assembly Temperature Sensor and FPGA Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    Numerous methods have been developed around the world to model the dynamic behavior and detect a faulty operating mode of a temperature sensor. In this context, we present in this study a new method based on the dependence between the fuel assembly temperature profile on control rods positions, and the coolant flow rate in a nuclear reactor. This seems to be possible since the insertion of control rods at different axial positions and variations in flow rate of the reactor coolant results in different produced thermal power in the reactor. This is closely linked to the instant fuel rod temperature profile. In a first step, we selected parameters to be used and confirmed the adequate correlation between the chosen parameters and those to be estimated by the proposed monitoring system. In the next step, we acquired and de-noised the data of corresponding parameters, the qualified data is then used to design and train the artificial neural network. The effective data denoising was done by using the wavelet transform to remove a various kind of artifacts such as inherent noise. With the suitable choice of wavelet level and smoothing method, it was possible for us to remove all the non-required artifacts with a view to verify and analyze the considered signal. In our work, several potential mother wavelet functions (Haar, Daubechies, Bi-orthogonal, Reverse Bi-orthogonal, Discrete Meyer and Symlets) were investigated to find the most similar function with the being processed signals. To implement the proposed monitoring system for the fuel rod temperature sensor (03 wire RTD sensor), we used the Bayesian artificial neural network 'BNN' technique to model the dynamic behavior of the considered sensor, the system correlate the estimated values with the measured for the concretization of the proposed system we propose an FPGA (field programmable gate array) implementation. The monitoring system use the correlation. (authors)

  20. UPS Project for GSM base stations with a fuel cell (PEM fuel cell back-up system) - Final report; Projekt USV fuer GSM-Basisstationen mit BZ (PEM fuel cell back-up system) - Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trachte, U.

    2007-07-01

    The University of applied sciences HTA Lucerne designed a prototype of an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) with Fuel Cell technology instead of lead-acid batteries and put it into operation. The delayed start-up of the Fuel Cell was bridged with ultra capacitor technology. In a first project stage the system was designed, assembled and tested in laboratory. In a second stage the installation was connected to a real base station of a telecommunication antenna and put to field tests for one year. The field test included monthly simulations of power failure with antenna load of about 2.4 kW as well as tests with external load up to 8.5 kW to establish the characteristic diagram. Hydrogen was provided by two 50 l pressure tanks. The full quantity of hydrogen secured a stand-alone operation of the Fuel Cell system for about 6 hours under antenna load. The results of the 101 grid-failure simulations demonstrate a very reliable start-up behaviour of the Fuel Cell System. Also during a real power failure due to a thunderstorm the installation provided the demanded power without any problem. The total duration of operation of the Fuel Cell during the field tests was 39 hours. No degradation could be noticed. The project takes place in collaboration with the industrial partners APC Industrial Systems, as a producer and market leader of UPS-Systems, and Swisscom Mobile AG, as a user of UPS-systems in telecommunications. Following the good results and in order to get more experience in long-term operation of the Fuel Cell system the tests will go on for two more years. (author)

  1. Unconventional fossil-based fuels : economic and environmental trade-offs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Both high import payments for petroleum motor fuels and concerns regarding emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) are motivating interest in possible fuel substitutes. In this report, RAND researchers assess the potential future production levels, product...

  2. A Comparison of Materials Issues for Cermet and Graphite-Based NTP Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mark E.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares material issues for cermet and graphite fuel elements. In particular, two issues in NTP fuel element performance are considered here: ductile to brittle transition in relation to crack propagation, and orificing individual coolant channels in fuel elements. Their relevance to fuel element performance is supported by considering material properties, experimental data, and results from multidisciplinary fluid/thermal/structural simulations. Ductile to brittle transition results in a fuel element region prone to brittle fracture under stress, while outside this region, stresses lead to deformation and resilience under stress. Poor coolant distribution between fuel element channels can increase stresses in certain channels. NERVA fuel element experimental results are consistent with this interpretation. An understanding of these mechanisms will help interpret fuel element testing results.

  3. Preparation, characterisation, engine performance and emission characteristics of coconut oil based hybrid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pranil J.; Singh, Anirudh [Division of Physics, School of Engineering and Physics, Faculty of Science, Technology and Environment, University of the South Pacific, 325 Fletcher Road, Suva (Fiji); Khurma, Jagjit [Division of Chemistry, School of Biological, Chemical and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, Technology and Environment, University of the South Pacific, Suva (Fiji)

    2010-09-15

    In this study, hybrid fuels consisting of coconut oil, aqueous ethanol and a surfactant (butan-1-ol) were prepared and tested as a fuel in a direct injection diesel engine. After determining fuel properties such as the density, viscosity and gross calorific values of these fuels, they were used to run a diesel engine. The engine performance and exhaust emissions were investigated and compared with that of diesel. The experimental results show that the efficiency of the hybrid fuels is comparable to that of diesel. As the viscosity of the hybrid fuels decreased and approached that of diesel, the efficiency increased progressively towards that of diesel. The exhaust emissions were lower than those for diesel, except carbon monoxide emissions, which increased. Hence, it is concluded that these hybrid fuels can be used successfully as an alternative fuel in diesel engines without any modifications. Their completely renewable nature ensures that they are environmentally friendly with regard to their emissions characteristics. (author)

  4. Thorium based fuel options for the generation of electricity: Developments in the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    The IAEA has maintained an interest in the thorium fuel cycle and its worldwide utilization within its framework of activities. Periodic reviews have assessed the current status of this fuel cycle, worldwide applications, economic benefits, and perceived advantages with respect to other nuclear fuel cycles. Since 1994, the IAEA convened a number of technical meetings on the thorium fuel cycle and related issues. Between 1995 and 1997 individual contributions on the thorium fuel cycle were elicited from experts from France, Germany, India, Japan, the Russian Federation and the USA. These contributions included evaluations of the status of the thorium fuel cycle worldwide; the new incentives to use thorium due to large stockpiles of plutonium produced in nuclear reactors; new reactor concepts utilizing thorium; strategies for thorium use; and an evaluation of toxicity of the thorium fuel cycle waste compared to that from other fuel cycles. The results of this updated evaluation are summarized in this publication

  5. Iron-based alloy and nitridation treatment for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Yang, Bing [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-09

    A corrosion resistant electrically conductive component that can be used as a bipolar plate in a PEM fuel cell application is composed of an alloy substrate which has 10-30 wt. % Cr, 0.5 to 7 wt. % V, and base metal being Fe, and a continuous surface layer of chromium nitride and vanadium nitride essentially free of base metal. A oxide layer of chromium vanadium oxide can be disposed between the alloy substrate and the continuous surface nitride layer. A method to prepare the corrosion resistant electrically conductive component involves a two-step nitridization sequence by exposing the alloy to a oxygen containing gas at an elevated temperature, and subsequently exposing the alloy to an oxygen free nitrogen containing gas at an elevated temperature to yield a component where a continuous chromium nitride layer free of iron has formed at the surface.

  6. Graphene-based electrochemical energy conversion and storage: fuel cells, supercapacitors and lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Junbo; Shao, Yuyan; Ellis, Michael W; Moore, Robert B; Yi, Baolian

    2011-09-14

    Graphene has attracted extensive research interest due to its strictly 2-dimensional (2D) structure, which results in its unique electronic, thermal, mechanical, and chemical properties and potential technical applications. These remarkable characteristics of graphene, along with the inherent benefits of a carbon material, make it a promising candidate for application in electrochemical energy devices. This article reviews the methods of graphene preparation, introduces the unique electrochemical behavior of graphene, and summarizes the recent research and development on graphene-based fuel cells, supercapacitors and lithium ion batteries. In addition, promising areas are identified for the future development of graphene-based materials in electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  7. Wave-Based Attitude Control of Spacecraft with Fuel Sloshing Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Joseph William

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wave-Based Control has been previously applied successfully to simple under-actuated flexible mechanical systems. Spacecraft and rockets with structural flexibility and sloshing are examples of such systems but have added difficulties due to non-uniform structure, external disturbing forces and non-ideal actuators and sensors. The aim of this paper is to extend the application of WBC to spacecraft systems, to compare the performance of WBC to other popular controllers and to carry out experimental validation of the designed control laws. A mathematical model is developed for an upper stage accelerating rocket moving in a single plane. Fuel sloshing is represented by an equivalent mechanical pendulum model. A wave-based controller is designed for the upper stage AVUM of the European launcher Vega. In numerical simulations the controller successfully suppresses the sloshing motion. A major advantage of the strategy is that no measurement of the pendulum states (sloshing motion is required.

  8. Energy recovery from waste streams with microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng

    to the sediment. The proposed approach may broad the application of sediment MFC technology. A novel submersible microbial desalination cell was developed as an in situ and non-invasive approach for nitrate removal from groundwater. The system performance in terms of power generation and nitrate removal...... efficiency were investigated. The effects of hydraulic retention time, external resistance, other ionic species in the groundwater and external nitrification on the system performance were also elucidated. Over 90% of nitrate was removed from groundwater without energy input, water pressure, draw solution......-based bio-electrochemical systems. To reduce the energy cost in nitrogen removal and during the same process achieve phosphorus elimination, a sediment-type photomicrobial fuel cell was developed based on the cooperation between microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) and electrochemically active bacteria. The main...

  9. Used fuel packing plant for CANDU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzies, I.; Thayer, B.; Bains, N., E-mail: imenzies@atsautomation.com [ATS Automation, Cambridge, ON (Canada); Murchison, A., E-mail: amurchison@nwmo.ca [NWMO, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Large forgings have been selected to containerize Light Water Reactor used nuclear fuel. CANDU fuel, which is significantly smaller in size, allows novel approaches for containerization. For example, by utilizing commercially available extruded ASME pipe a conceptual design of a Used Fuel Packing Plant for containerization of used CANDU fuel in a long lived metallic container has been developed. The design adopts a modular approach with multiple independent work cells to transfer and containerize the used fuel. Based on current technologies and concepts from proven industrial systems, the Used Fuel Packing Plant can assemble twelve used fuel containers per day considering conservative levels of process availability. (author)

  10. Kinetic and thermodynamic bases to resolve issues regarding conditioning of uranium metal fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B.; Ballinger, R.G.; Simpson, K.A.

    1994-12-01

    Numerous uranium - bearing fuels are corroding in fuel storage pools in several countries. At facilities where reprocessing is no longer available, dry storage is being evaluated to preclude aqueous corrosion that is ongoing. It is essential that thermodynamic and kinetic factors are accounted for in transitions of corroding uranium-bearing fuels to dry storage. This paper addresses a process that has been proposed to move Hanford N-Reactor fuel from wet storage to dry storage

  11. Development of a practical Monte Carlo based fuel management system for the Penn State University Breazeale Research Reactor (PSBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tippayakul, Chanatip; Ivanov, Kostadin; Frederick Sears, C.

    2008-01-01

    A practical fuel management system for the he Pennsylvania State University Breazeale Research Reactor (PSBR) based on the advanced Monte Carlo methodology was developed from the existing fuel management tool in this research. Several modeling improvements were implemented to the old system. The improved fuel management system can now utilize the burnup dependent cross section libraries generated specifically for PSBR fuel and it is also able to update the cross sections of these libraries by the Monte Carlo calculation automatically. Considerations were given to balance the computation time and the accuracy of the cross section update. Thus, certain types of a limited number of isotopes, which are considered 'important', are calculated and updated by the scheme. Moreover, the depletion algorithm of the existing fuel management tool was replaced from the predictor only to the predictor-corrector depletion scheme to account for burnup spectrum changes during the burnup step more accurately. An intermediate verification of the fuel management system was performed to assess the correctness of the newly implemented schemes against HELIOS. It was found that the agreement of both codes is good when the same energy released per fission (Q values) is used. Furthermore, to be able to model the reactor at various temperatures, the fuel management tool is able to utilize automatically the continuous cross sections generated at different temperatures. Other additional useful capabilities were also added to the fuel management tool to make it easy to use and be practical. As part of the development, a hybrid nodal diffusion/Monte Carlo calculation was devised to speed up the Monte Carlo calculation by providing more converged initial source distribution for the Monte Carlo calculation from the nodal diffusion calculation. Finally, the fuel management system was validated against the measured data using several actual PSBR core loadings. The agreement of the predicted core

  12. Towards model-based control of RCCI-CDF mode-switching in dual fuel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Indrajuana, Armando; Bekdemir, C.; Feru, E.; Willems, F.P.T.

    2018-01-01

    The operation of a dual fuel combustion engine using combustion mode-switching offers the benefit of higher thermal efficiency compared to single-mode operation. For various fuel combinations, the engine research community has shown that running dual fuel engines in Reactivity Controlled Compression

  13. Min-Max control of fuel-cell-car-based smart energy systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alavi, F.; van de Wouw, N.; de Schutter, B.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the idea of using fuel cell vehicles as the future way of producing electricity has emerged. A fuel cell car has all the necessary devices on board to convert the chemical energy of hydrogen into electricity. This paper considers a scenario where a parking lot for fuel cell cars acts as a

  14. Min-max control of fuel-cell-car-based smart energy systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alavi, F.; van de Wouw, N.; De Schutter, B.H.K.; Rantzer, Anders; Bagterp Jørgensen, John; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the idea of using fuel cell vehicles as the future way of producing electricity has emerged. A fuel cell car has all the necessary devices on board to convert the chemical energy of hydrogen into electricity. This paper considers a scenario where a parking lot for fuel cell cars acts as a

  15. The effects of the evolution of fuel prices and the environmental regulations on the producers of electric power based on fossil fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasoiu, Constantin; Alecu, Sorin

    2006-01-01

    The production of electric power in the context of the concept of human society's lasting development is influenced in the recent years by a series of external factors, both circumstantial and derived from internal and international regulations. This work proposes a theoretical analysis of additional costs induced by the evolution of fuel prices as well as of the short, medium and long term environmental restrictions for the producers of lignite based electric power in Romania. To this purpose, the authors have considered as theoretical elements of analysis, a 330 MW functioning power station, working entirely on lignite GEL (70% expenses on fuel) with a production cost of 40 Euros/MWh at a 70% degree of usage capacity and 36 Euros/MWh at 100%. The paper addresses the following items: 1. The periods of analysis and the influential factors; 2. The evaluation of additional costs for the observance of EU Directive 2001/80/EC; 3. The evaluation of additional costs induced by the stipulations of the Kyoto Protocol; 4. The evaluation of additional costs induced by the evolution of the price of the fuel. In conclusion accumulating all the influences described in the chapters of this material, the impact in the rise of production costs for the described lignite based power plant is summarized by taking into account: the impact of CO 2 emissions; the impact Directive 2001/80/EC; the impact of the fuel price; the total rise. One can notice, that the biggest influence on the additional production costs comes from the impact of CO 2 emissions, in the outlook of the integration in the EU ETS, which depends on: 1) The way in which the National Allocation Plan for the allowances of CO 2 emissions is made in the power sector. The higher D utl.ref is, the stronger will be their place on the market. 2) The evolution of the price of CO 2 emissions on the EU ETS

  16. Development of a treatment technology for diluting highly enriched AL-based DOE spent nuclear fuel: principles and practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, T.M.; Duncan, A.J.; Peacock, H.B.; Fisher, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    The Savannah River Site is the U.S. Department of Energy's preferred site for return and treatment of all aluminum-base, spent, research and test reactor fuel assemblies. There are over 20,000 spent fuel assemblies now stored in different countries around the world, and by 2035 many will be returned to SRS for treatment and interim storage. Interim storage canisters at SRS will be sent to a Mined Geologic Repository for long-term geologic storage. Laboratory and plant layout of a full-scale process for irradiated fuel has been completed. Tests of the off gas absorption system have been initiated using both surrogate and irradiated RERTR mini fuel plates. An pilot-scale L-Area Experimental Facility (LEF) is planned to validate induction furnace operations, remote handling, and the off gas system for trapping volatile elements under plant operating conditions. (authors)

  17. Study on heat transfer and hydraulic model of spiral-fin fuel rods based on equivalent annulus method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dan; Liu Changwen; Lu Jianchao

    2011-01-01

    Tight lattice fuel assembly usually adopts spiral-fin fuel elements. Compared with the traditional PWR fuel rods, the closely packed and spiral fin spacers make the heat transfer and hydraulic phenomena in sub-channels very complicated, and: there was no suitable model and correlation to study it. This paper studied the effect of spiral spacers on the channel geometry in the equivalent annulus and physical performance based on the Rehme equivalent annulus methods, and the heat transfer of the spiral fin fuel rods and hydraulic model were obtained. The new model was verified with the traditional one, and the verification showed that two new models agreed well, which could provide certain theoretical explanation to the effect of the spiral spacer on the thermal hydraulics. (authors)

  18. Microbial Fuels Cell-Based Biosensor for Toxicity Detection: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuoyu Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the unprecedented deterioration of environmental quality, rapid recognition of toxic compounds is paramount for performing in situ real-time monitoring. Although several analytical techniques based on electrochemistry or biosensors have been developed for the detection of toxic compounds, most of them are time-consuming, inaccurate, or cumbersome for practical applications. More recently, microbial fuel cell (MFC-based biosensors have drawn increasing interest due to their sustainability and cost-effectiveness, with applications ranging from the monitoring of anaerobic digestion process parameters (VFA to water quality detection (e.g., COD, BOD. When a MFC runs under correct conditions, the voltage generated is correlated with the amount of a given substrate. Based on this linear relationship, several studies have demonstrated that MFC-based biosensors could detect heavy metals such as copper, chromium, or zinc, as well as organic compounds, including p-nitrophenol (PNP, formaldehyde and levofloxacin. Both bacterial consortia and single strains can be used to develop MFC-based biosensors. Biosensors with single strains show several advantages over systems integrating bacterial consortia, such as selectivity and stability. One of the limitations of such sensors is that the detection range usually exceeds the actual pollution level. Therefore, improving their sensitivity is the most important for widespread application. Nonetheless, MFC-based biosensors represent a promising approach towards single pollutant detection.

  19. Enhanced fuel efficiency on tractor-trailers using synthetic jet-based active flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Michael; Menicovich, David; Gallardo, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    The application of piezo-electrically-driven synthetic-jet-based active flow control to reduce drag on tractor-trailers was explored experimentally in wind tunnel testing as well as full-scale road tests. Aerodynamic drag accounts for more than 50% of the usable energy at highway speeds, a problem that applies primarily to trailer trucks. Therefore, a reduction in aerodynamic drag results in large saving of fuel and reduction in CO2 emissions. The active flow control technique that is being used relies on a modular system comprised of distributed, small, highly efficient actuators. These actuators, called synthetic jets, are jets that are synthesized at the edge of an orifice by a periodic motion of a piezoelectric diaphragm(s) mounted on one (or more) walls of a sealed cavity. The synthetic jet is zero net mass flux (ZNMF), but it allows momentum transfer to flow. It is typically driven near diaphragm and/or cavity resonance, and therefore, small electric input [O(10W)] is required. Another advantage of this actuator is that no plumbing is required. The system doesn't require changes to the body of the truck, can be easily reconfigured to various types of vehicles, and consumes small amounts of electrical power from the existing electrical system of the truck. Preliminary wind tunnel results showed up to 18% reduction in fuel consumption, whereas road tests also showed very promising results.

  20. BN800: The advanced sodium cooled fast reactor plant based on close fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xingman

    2011-01-01

    As one of the advanced countries with actually fastest reactor technology, Russia has always taken a leading role in the forefront of the development of fast reactor technology. After successful operation of BN600 fast reactor nuclear power station with a capacity of six hundred thousand kilowatts of electric power for nearly 30 years, and after a few decades of several design optimization improved and completed on its basis, it is finally decided to build Unit 4 of Beloyarsk nuclear power station (BN800 fast reactor power station). The BN800 fast reactor nuclear power station is considered to be the project of the world's most advanced fast reactor nuclear power being put into implementation. The fast reactor technology in China has been developed for decades. With the Chinese pilot fast reactor to be put into operation soon, the Chinese model fast reactor power station has been put on the agenda. Meanwhile, the closed fuel cycle development strategy with fast reactor as key aspect has given rise to the concern of experts and decision-making level in relevant areas. Based on the experiences accumulated in many years in dealing the Sino-Russian cooperation in fast reactor technology, with reference to the latest Russian published and authoritative literatures regarding BN800 fast reactor nuclear power station, the author compiled this article into a comprehensive introduction for reference by leaders and experts dealing in the related fields of nuclear fuel cycle strategy and fast reactor technology development researches, etc. (authors)

  1. BioBoost. Biomass based energy intermediates boosting bio-fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niebel, Andreas [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Institut fuer Katalyseforschung und -technologie (IKFT)

    2013-10-01

    To increase the share of biomass for renewable energy in Europe conversion pathways which are economic, flexible in feedstock and energy efficient are needed. The BioBoost project concentrates on dry and wet residual biomass and wastes as feedstock for de-central conversion by fast pyrolysis, catalytic pyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonization to the intermediate energy carriers oil, coal or slurry. Based on straw the energy density increases from 2 to 20-30 GJ/m{sup 3}, enabling central GW scale gasification plants for bio-fuel production. A logistic model for feedstock supply and connection of de-central with central conversion is set up and validated allowing the determination of costs, the number and location of de-central and central sites. Techno/economic and environmental assessment of the value chain supports the optimization of products and processes. The utilization of energy carriers is investigated in existing and coming applications of heat and power production and synthetic fuels and chemicals. (orig.)

  2. Forecasting Fossil Fuel Energy Consumption for Power Generation Using QHSA-Based LSSVM Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate forecasting of fossil fuel energy consumption for power generation is important and fundamental for rational power energy planning in the electricity industry. The least squares support vector machine (LSSVM is a powerful methodology for solving nonlinear forecasting issues with small samples. The key point is how to determine the appropriate parameters which have great effect on the performance of LSSVM model. In this paper, a novel hybrid quantum harmony search algorithm-based LSSVM (QHSA-LSSVM energy forecasting model is proposed. The QHSA which combines the quantum computation theory and harmony search algorithm is applied to searching the optimal values of and C in LSSVM model to enhance the learning and generalization ability. The case study on annual fossil fuel energy consumption for power generation in China shows that the proposed model outperforms other four comparative models, namely regression, grey model (1, 1 (GM (1, 1, back propagation (BP and LSSVM, in terms of prediction accuracy and forecasting risk.

  3. Characterization of a microfluidic microbial fuel cell as a power generator based on a nickel electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Yaghmaei, Soheila

    2016-05-15

    This study reports the fabrication of a microfluidic microbial fuel cell (MFC) using nickel as a novel alternative for conventional electrodes and a non-phatogenic strain of Escherichia coli as the biocatalyst. The feasibility of a microfluidic MFC as an efficient power generator for production of bioelectricity from glucose and urea as organic substrates in human blood and urine for implantable medical devices (IMDs) was investigated. A maximum open circuit potential of 459 mV was achieved for the batch-fed microfluidic MFC. During continuous mode operation, a maximum power density of 104 Wm(-3) was obtained with nutrient broth. For the glucose-fed microfluidic MFC, the maximum power density of 5.2 μW cm(-2) obtained in this study is significantly greater than the power densities reported previously for microsized MFCs and glucose fuel cells. The maximum power density of 14 Wm(-3) obtained using urea indicates the successful performance of a microfluidic MFC using human excreta. It features high power density, self-regeneration, waste management and a low production cost (microfluidic MFC as a power supply was characterized based on polarization behavior and cell potential in different substrates, operational modes, and concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Possible configurations for an air independent propulsion (AIP) system for submarines based on fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordallo, C.R.; Moreno, E.; Brey, J.J.; Garcia, C.; Sarmiento, B.; Castro, A.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' Conventional submarines employ an electric propulsion system, based on energy storage in batteries which are recharged using diesel motors connected to generator alternators. This limits their autonomy underwater given that it will be depend on the amount of energy that can be stored in the batteries; currently, a normal value is to have energy to navigate for three days at low speed. As of from the WWII, several shipyards began to carry out research on propulsion systems for submarines that would be capable of operating under anaerobic conditions, independent of the air (AIP Systems). Since then, several proposals have been considered, but there is one option that several navies are currently putting their trust in: fuel cells. The objective of this Project is to stress the different configurations that can be considered to this end, as regards the transportation of hydrogen and oxygen. From the hydrogen point of view, the possibilities of transporting it in metal hydrides or its on-board production through the reforming of different fuels (gas-oil, ethanol, methanol), are analyzed. This study also compares auxiliary systems (including CO2 removers), and proposes solutions, some of which are under development, indicating which are currently being considered to a greater extent. (author)

  5. Possible configurations for an air independent propulsion (AIP) system for submarines based on fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordallo, C.R.; Moreno, E.; Brey, J.J.; Garcia, C.; Sarmiento, B.; Castro, A. [Hynergreen Technologies, S.A., Seville (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    'Full text:' Conventional submarines employ an electric propulsion system, based on energy storage in batteries which are recharged using diesel motors connected to generator alternators. This limits their autonomy underwater given that it will be depend on the amount of energy that can be stored in the batteries; currently, a normal value is to have energy to navigate for three days at low speed. As of from the WWII, several shipyards began to carry out research on propulsion systems for submarines that would be capable of operating under anaerobic conditions, independent of the air (AIP Systems). Since then, several proposals have been considered, but there is one option that several navies are currently putting their trust in: fuel cells. The objective of this Project is to stress the different configurations that can be considered to this end, as regards the transportation of hydrogen and oxygen. From the hydrogen point of view, the possibilities of transporting it in metal hydrides or its on-board production through the reforming of different fuels (gas-oil, ethanol, methanol), are analyzed. This study also compares auxiliary systems (including CO2 removers), and proposes solutions, some of which are under development, indicating which are currently being considered to a greater extent. (author)

  6. Optimization of fuel cells for BWR based in Tabu modified search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J.L.; Palomera P, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The advances in the development of a computational system for the design and optimization of cells for assemble of fuel of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are presented. The method of optimization is based on the technique of Tabu Search (Tabu Search, TS) implemented in progressive stages designed to accelerate the search and to reduce the time used in the process of optimization. It was programed an algorithm to create the first solution. Also for to diversify the generation of random numbers, required by the technical TS, it was used the Makoto Matsumoto function obtaining excellent results. The objective function has been coded in such a way that can adapt to optimize different parameters like they can be the enrichment average or the peak factor of radial power. The neutronic evaluation of the cells is carried out in a fine way by means of the HELIOS simulator. In the work the main characteristics of the system are described and an application example is presented to the design of a cell of 10x10 bars of fuel with 10 different enrichment compositions and gadolinium content. (Author)

  7. Microstructural characterization of composite cobaltite and lanthanum-based ceria for use as fuel cell cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, E.R.T.; Nascimento, R.M.; Miranda, A.C. de; Lima, A.M. de; Macedo, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are devices that convert chemical energy into electricity via redox reactions. In this work, the lanthanum cobaltite doped with strontium and iron (La_0_,_6Sr_0_,_4Co_0_,_2Fe_0_,_8O_3 - LSCF) a traditional cathodes material of the fuel cell was mixed with an electrolyte material (composite) to the base ceria doped with gadolinia and a eutectic mixture of lithium carbonates and sodium (CGO-NLC). The powders of LSCF and CGO-NLC were obtained by the citrate method and mixed to obtain a composite cathode. Samples obtained by uniaxial pressure between 5 and 10 MPa were sintered at 1100°C and investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and micro hardness test. A symmetric cell cathode / electrolyte / cathode, obtained by co-pressing and co-sintering was investigated by electron microscopy. The results indicated that the composite is chemically stable up to the sintering temperature used. The hardness ranged between 51 and 227 HV. (author)

  8. Break-in and Performance Issues on a single cell PBI-based PEM Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk

    of the fuel cell, even though break-in of a fuel cell implemented in a commercial application would most likely not be feasible. In the present work a commercially available PBI-based high temperature MEA is subject to a break-in procedure, as specified by the manufacturer. The cell was operated at 160 °C...... during the break-in procedure at a current density of 0.2 A/cm2. The performance of the cell was measured over the 100 hour break-in period and a polarization curve was recorded after completion of break-in. The performance change was minimal during the break-in cycle. However, in the first hour of op......-eration a significant performance decrease of 30 mV was observed. Hereafter a performance in-crease started and the overall performance change during the break-in procedure was a voltage in-crease of 35 mV corresponding to a rate of 240 μV/hr. The performance increase was however fast-est in the first 50 hours...

  9. Experimental, economical and ecological substantiation of fuel cycle based on pyroelectrochemical reprocessing and vibropac technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.B.; Skiba, O.V.; Mayershin, A.A.; Bychkov, A.V.; Demidova, L.S.; Porodnov, P.T.

    1997-01-01

    The humanity comes to the border of centuries. While growing the population, capacity of manufacture in various industries increases. It will be impossible to solve problems, facing the humanity, without introducing safe and high-efficient technologies. The following principles are considered to be the most important ones for technologies of the future: 1) The closed cycle, i.e. internal isolation of technological processes, aimed at reducing a gross output of dangerous substances, which are harmful to an environment, from industry, 2) Optimization of technological systems which is intended for achieving necessary results (both technological and commercial) with the maximal exception of excessive stages and processes, 3) Maximum level of internally inherent safety, i.e. using processes, in which safety is based not only on engineering barriers of safety, but also on its own, > properties of technological system, which creates a low degree of ecological damage probability. These principles have influence both on general safety and on economy in equal degree. The external nuclear fuel cycle, as a complex technological system, is to be built under the same principles. It is necessary to take into account, that, as a whole, the technologies connected with reprocessing and preparation of nuclear fuel were formed in 50-s years and, besides, the majority of modern technologies were developed as military technologies continuation. It is for this reason, that many technologies have not been optimized yet if real society needs are taken into consideration. (J.P.N.)

  10. Paper-based membraneless hydrogen peroxide fuel cell prepared by micro-fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi Ehteshami, Seyyed Mohsen; Asadnia, Mohsen; Tan, Swee Ngin; Chan, Siew Hwa

    2016-01-01

    A paper-based membraneless single-compartment hydrogen peroxide power source prepared by micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology is reported. The cell utilizes hydrogen peroxide as both fuel and oxidant in a low volume cell fabricated on paper. The fabrication method used is a simple method where precise, small-sized patterns are produced which include the hydrophilic paper bounded by hydrophobic resin. Open circuit potentials of 0.61 V and 0.32 V are achieved for the cells fabricated with Prussian Blue as the cathode and aluminium/nickel as the anode materials, respectively. The power produced by the cells is 0.81 mW cm-2 at 0.26 V and 0.38 mW cm-2 at 0.14 V, respectively, even after the cell is bent or distorted. Such a fuel cell provides an easily fabricated, environmentally friendly, flexible and cost saving power source. The cell may be integrated within a self-sustained diagnostic system to provide the on-demand power for future bio-sensing applications.

  11. Model-based power control strategy development of a fuel cell hybrid vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haitao, Yun [School of Automobile and Traffic, Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao Shandong 266033 (China); School of Automobile, Tongji University, ShangHai 201804 (China); Yulan, Zhao [School of Automobile and Traffic, Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao Shandong 266033 (China); Zechang, Sun; Gang, Wan [School of Automobile, Tongji University, ShangHai 201804 (China)

    2008-06-01

    An integrated procedure for math modeling and power control strategy design for a fuel cell hybrid vehicle (FCHV) is presented in this paper. Dynamic math model of the powertrain is constructed firstly, which includes four modules: fuel cell engine, DC/DC inverter, motor-driver, and power battery. Based on the mathematic model, a power control principle is designed, which uses full-states closed-loop feedback algorithm. To implement full-states feedback, a Luenberger state observer is designed to estimate open circuit voltage (OCV) of the battery, which make the control principle not sensitive to the battery SOC (state of charge) estimated error. Full-states feedback controller is then designed through analyzing step responding of the powertrain and test data. At last of the paper, the results of simulation and field test are illustrated. The results show that the power control strategy designed takes into account the performance and economy characteristics of components of the FCHV powertrain and achieves the control object excellently. (author)

  12. Palladium-based electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reaction in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Leticia Poras Reis de; Amico, Sandro Campos; Malfatti, Celia de Fraga, E-mail: leticiamoraes@usp.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre (Brazil); Matos, Bruno R.; Santiago, Elisabete Inacio; Fonseca, Fabio Coral [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Direct ethanol fuel cells require adequate electrocatalysts to promote the carbon carbon cleavage of ethanol molecule. Typical electrocatalysts are based on platinum, which have shown improved activity in acidic media. However, Pt-based catalysts have high cost and are easily deactivated by CO poisoning. Therefore, novel catalysts have been developed, and among then, palladium-based materials have shown promising results for the oxidation of ethanol in alkaline media. The present study reports on the performance of alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC) by using carbon-supported Pd, PdSn, PdNi, and PdNiSn produced by impregnation-reduction of the metallic precursors. The effect of chemical functionalization by acid treatment of the carbon support (Vulcan) was investigated. The electrocatalysts were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-rays diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and ADEFC tests. TGA measurements of functionalized Vulcan evidenced the characteristic weight losses attributed to the presence of surface functional groups due to the acid treatment. A high degree of alloying between Pd and Sn was inferred from XRD data, whereas in both PdNi and PdNiSn, Ni occurs mostly segregated in the oxide form. TEM analyses indicated agglomeration of Pd and PdSn particles, whereas a more uniform particle distribution was observed for PdNi and PdNiSn samples. CV curves showed that the peak potential for the oxidation of ethanol shifts towards negative values for all samples supported on functionalized Vulcan indicating that ethanol oxidation is facilitated. Microstructural and electrochemical features were confirmed by ADEFC tests, which revealed that the highest open circuit voltage and maximum power density were achieved for PdNiSn electrocatalysts supported on functionalized Vulcan with uniform particle distribution and improved triple phase boundaries. (author)

  13. Palladium-based electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reaction in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Leticia Poras Reis de; Amico, Sandro Campos; Malfatti, Celia de Fraga; Matos, Bruno R.; Santiago, Elisabete Inacio; Fonseca, Fabio Coral

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Direct ethanol fuel cells require adequate electrocatalysts to promote the carbon carbon cleavage of ethanol molecule. Typical electrocatalysts are based on platinum, which have shown improved activity in acidic media. However, Pt-based catalysts have high cost and are easily deactivated by CO poisoning. Therefore, novel catalysts have been developed, and among then, palladium-based materials have shown promising results for the oxidation of ethanol in alkaline media. The present study reports on the performance of alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell (ADEFC) by using carbon-supported Pd, PdSn, PdNi, and PdNiSn produced by impregnation-reduction of the metallic precursors. The effect of chemical functionalization by acid treatment of the carbon support (Vulcan) was investigated. The electrocatalysts were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-rays diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and ADEFC tests. TGA measurements of functionalized Vulcan evidenced the characteristic weight losses attributed to the presence of surface functional groups due to the acid treatment. A high degree of alloying between Pd and Sn was inferred from XRD data, whereas in both PdNi and PdNiSn, Ni occurs mostly segregated in the oxide form. TEM analyses indicated agglomeration of Pd and PdSn particles, whereas a more uniform particle distribution was observed for PdNi and PdNiSn samples. CV curves showed that the peak potential for the oxidation of ethanol shifts towards negative values for all samples supported on functionalized Vulcan indicating that ethanol oxidation is facilitated. Microstructural and electrochemical features were confirmed by ADEFC tests, which revealed that the highest open circuit voltage and maximum power density were achieved for PdNiSn electrocatalysts supported on functionalized Vulcan with uniform particle distribution and improved triple phase boundaries. (author)

  14. Fuzzy Logic Based Controller for a Grid-Connected Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Kalyan; Shankar, Ravi; Kumar, Amit

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes a mathematical model of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power plant integrated in a multimachine power system. The utilization factor of a fuel stack maintains steady state by tuning the fuel valve in the fuel processor at a rate proportional to a current drawn from the fuel stack. A suitable fuzzy logic control is used for the overall system, its objective being controlling the current drawn by the power conditioning unit and meet a desirable output power demand. The proposed control scheme is verified through computer simulations.

  15. A comparison of high-speed flywheels, batteries, and ultracapacitors on the bases of cost and fuel economy as the energy storage system in a fuel cell based hybrid electric vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doucette, Reed T.; McCulloch, Malcolm D. [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Thom Building, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    Fuel cells aboard hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are often hybridized with an energy storage system (ESS). Batteries and ultracapacitors are the most common technologies used in ESSs aboard HEVs. High-speed flywheels are an emerging technology with traits that have the potential to make them competitive with more established battery and ultracapacitor technologies in certain vehicular applications. This study compares high-speed flywheels, ultracapacitors, and batteries functioning as the ESS in a fuel cell based HEV on the bases of cost and fuel economy. In this study, computer models were built to simulate the powertrain of a fuel cell based HEV where high-speed flywheels, batteries, and ultracapacitors of a range of sizes were used as the ESS. A simulated vehicle with a powertrain using each of these technologies was run over two different drive cycles in order to see how the different ESSs performed under different driving patterns. The results showed that when cost and fuel economy were both considered, high-speed flywheels were competitive with batteries and ultracapacitors. (author)

  16. The need for a characteristics-based approach to radioactive waste classification as informed by advanced nuclear fuel cycles using the fuel-cycle integration and tradeoffs (FIT) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djokic, D.; Piet, S.; Pincock, L.; Soelberg, N.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. Because heat generation is generally the most important factor limiting geological repository areal loading, this analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. Waste streams generated in different fuel cycles and their possible classification based on the current U.S. framework and international standards are discussed. It is shown that the effects of separating waste streams are neglected under a source-based radioactive waste classification system. (authors)

  17. BE (fuel element)/ZL (interim storage facility) module. Constituents of the fuel BE data base for BE documentation with respect to the disposal planning and the support of the BE container storage administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, V.; Deutsch, S.; Busch, V.; Braun, A.

    2012-01-01

    The securing of spent fuel element disposal from German nuclear power plants is the main task of GNS. This includes the container supply and the disposal analysis and planning. Therefore GNS operates a data base comprising all in Germany implemented fuel elements and all fuel element containers in interim storage facilities. With specific program modules the data base serves an optimized repository planning for all spent fuel elements from German NPPS and the supply of required data for future final disposal. The data base has two functional models: the BE (fuel element) and the ZL (interim storage) module. The contribution presents the data structure of the modules and details of the data base operation.

  18. Environmental aspects of ethanol-based fuels from Brassica carinata. A case study of second generation ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, Sara; Moreira, M'a Teresa; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Gasol, Carles M.; Gabarrell, Xavier; Rieradevall, Joan

    2009-01-01

    One of the main challenges faced by mankind in the 21st century is to meet the increasing demand for energy requirements by means of a more sustainable energy supply. In countries that are net fossil fuel importers, expectation about the benefit of using alternative fuels on reducing oil imports is the primary driving force behind efforts to promote its production and use. Spain is scarce in domestic energy sources and more than 50% of the energy used is fossil fuel based. The promotion of renewable energies use is one of the principal vectors in the Spanish energy policy. Selected herbaceous crops such as Brassica carinata are currently under study as potential energy sources. Its biomass can be considered as potential feedstock to ethanol conversion by an enzymatic process due to the characteristics of its composition, rich in cellulose and hemicellulose. This paper aims to analyse the environmental performance of two ethanol-based fuel applications (E10 and E85) in a passenger car (E10 fuel: a mixture of 10% ethanol and 90% gasoline by volume; E85 fuel: a mixture of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume) as well as their comparison with conventional gasoline as transport fuel. Two types of functional units are applied in this study: ethanol production oriented and travelling distance oriented functional units in order to reflect the availability or not of ethanol supply. E85 seems to be the best alternative when ethanol production based functional unit is considered in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and E10 in terms of non-renewable energy resources use. Nevertheless, E85 offers the best environmental performance when travelling distance oriented functional unit is assumed in both impacts. In both functional unit perspectives, the use of ethanol-based fuels reduces the global warming and fossil fuels consumption. However, the contributions to other impact indicators (e.g. acidification, eutrophication and photochemical oxidants formation) were lower

  19. Energy recovery from waste streams with microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.

    2012-09-15

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based technologies are promising technologies for direct energy production from various wastewaters and waste streams. Beside electrical power production, more emphasis is recently devoted to alternative applications such as hydrogen production, bioremediation, seawater desalination, and biosensors. Although the technologies are promising, a number of hurdles need to be overcome before that field applications are economically feasible. The main purpose of this work was to improve the performance, reduce the construction cost, and expand the application scopes of MFC-based bio-electrochemical systems. To reduce the energy cost in nitrogen removal and during the same process achieve phosphorus elimination, a sediment-type photomicrobial fuel cell was developed based on the cooperation between microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) and electrochemically active bacteria. The main removal mechanism of nitrogen and phosphorus was algae biomass uptake, while nitrification and denitrification process contributed to part of nitrogen removal. The key factors such as algae concentration, COD/N ratios and photoperiod were systemically studied. A self-powered submersible microbial electrolysis cell was developed for in situ biohydrogen production from anaerobic reactors. The hydrogen production increased along with acetate and buffer concentration. The hydrogen production rate of 32.2 mL/L/d and yield of 1.43 mol-H2/mol-acetate were achieved. Alternate exchanging the function between the two cell units was found to be an effective approach to inhibit methanogens. A sensor, based on a submersible microbial fuel cell, was developed for in situ monitoring of microbial activity and biochemical oxygen demand in groundwater. Presence or absence of a biofilm on the anode was a decisive factor for the applicability of the sensor. Temperature, pH, conductivity and inorganic solid content were significantly affecting the sensitivity of the sensor. The sensor showed

  20. Comparison based on energy and exergy analyses of the potential cogeneration efficiencies for fuel cells and other electricity generation devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, M A [Ryerson Polytechnical Inst., Toronto, (CA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1990-01-01

    Comparisons of the potential cogeneration efficiencies are made, based on energy and exergy analyses, for several devices for electricity generation. The investigation considers several types of fuel cell system (Phosphoric Acid, Alkaline, Solid Polymer Electrolyte, Molten Carbonate and Solid Oxide), and several fossil-fuel and nuclear cogeneration systems based on steam power plants. In the analysis, each system is modelled as a device for which fuel and air enter, and electrical- and thermal-energy products and material and thermal-energy wastes exit. The results for all systems considered indicate that exergy analyses should be used when analysing the cogeneration potential of systems for electricity generation, because they weigh the usefulnesses of heat and electricity on equivalent bases. Energy analyses tend to present overly optimistic views of performance. These findings are particularly significant when large fractions of the heat output from a system are utilized for cogeneration. (author).

  1. Evaluation of Laminaria-based microbial fuel cells (LbMs) for electricity production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadhamshetty, Venkataramana; Belanger, Derek; Gardiner, Carly-Jeanne; Cummings, Anasha; Hynes, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Marine algae represents a sustainable feedstock in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) due to its low water and energy requirements for cultivation, higher capacity to sequester carbondioxide, and high carbohydrate content. Two-compartment MFCs were evaluated under batch-fed mode using Laminaria saccharina as the model for algae-based electron donor, and mixed microbial consortia as the biocatalyst, in the anode compartment. The Laminaria-based MFCs (LBMs) were studied with three different pretreatment conditions for the L. saccharina: (i) autoclaving (Auto), (ii) microwave irradiation (Micro), and (iii) as received treatment (No-Treat). A control was setup to establish base line performance for two-compartment MFCs using glucose as the electron donor in the anode. The performance of LBMs (250 mW/m(2) and 900 mA/m(2)) was on par with glucose-based MFCs. AC impedance analysis revealed that the charge transfer resistance was at least 50-fold higher than the corresponding ohmic losses in both LBMs and glucose-based MFCs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Compressive strength and microstructural analysis of fly ash/palm oil fuel ash based geopolymer mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjbar, Navid; Mehrali, Mehdi; Behnia, Arash; Alengaram, U. Johnson; Jumaat, Mohd Zamin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Results show POFA is adaptable as replacement in FA based geopolymer mortar. • The increase in POFA/FA ratio delay of the compressive development of geopolymer. • The density of POFA based geoploymer is lower than FA based geopolymer mortar. - Abstract: This paper presents the effects and adaptability of palm oil fuel ash (POFA) as a replacement material in fly ash (FA) based geopolymer mortar from the aspect of microstructural and compressive strength. The geopolymers developed were synthesized with a combination of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate as activator and POFA and FA as high silica–alumina resources. The development of compressive strength of POFA/FA based geopolymers was investigated using X-ray florescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). It was observed that the particle shapes and surface area of POFA and FA as well as chemical composition affects the density and compressive strength of the mortars. The increment in the percentages of POFA increased the silica/alumina (SiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 ) ratio and that resulted in reduction of the early compressive strength of the geopolymer and delayed the geopolymerization process

  3. Analysis and performance assessment of a new solar-based multigeneration system integrated with ammonia fuel cell and solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine combined cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Osamah; Dincer, Ibrahim

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, a new solar-based multigeneration system integrated with an ammonia fuel cell and solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine combined cycle to produce electricity, hydrogen, cooling and hot water is developed for analysis and performance assessment. In this regard, thermodynamic analyses and modeling through both energy and exergy approaches are employed to assess and evaluate the overall system performance. Various parametric studies are conducted to study the effects of varying system parameters and operating conditions on the energy and exergy efficiencies. The results of this study show that the overall multigeneration system energy efficiency is obtained as 39.1% while the overall system exergy efficiency is calculated as 38.7%, respectively. The performance of this multigeneration system results in an increase of 19.3% in energy efficiency as compared to single generation system. Furthermore, the exergy efficiency of the multigeneration system is 17.8% higher than the single generation system. Moreover, both energy and exergy efficiencies of the solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine combined cycle are determined as 68.5% and 55.9% respectively.

  4. Adsorptive on-board desulfurization over multiple cycles for fuel-cell-based auxiliary power units operated by different types of fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Raphael; Weinlaender, Christof; Kienzl, Norbert; Bitschnau, Brigitte; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Hochenauer, Christoph

    2018-05-01

    On-board desulfurization is essential to operate fuel-cell-based auxiliary power units (APU) with commercial fuels. In this work, both (i) on-board desulfurization and (ii) on-board regeneration performance of Ag-Al2O3 adsorbent is investigated in a comprehensive manner. The herein investigated regeneration strategy uses hot APU off-gas as the regeneration medium and requires no additional reagents, tanks, nor heat exchangers and thus has remarkable advantages in comparison to state-of-the-art regeneration strategies. The results for (i) show high desulfurization performance of Ag-Al2O3 under al