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Sample records for nonoscillatory convection schemes

  1. Third-order modified coefficient scheme based on essentially non-oscillatory scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-jun; YANG Yu-yue; SHU Shi

    2008-01-01

    A third-order numerical scheme is presented to give approximate solutions to multi-dimensional hyperbolic conservation laws only using modified coefficients of an essentially non-oscillatory (MCENO) scheme without increasing the base points during construction of the scheme.The construction process shows that the modified coefficient approach preserves favourable properties inherent in the original essentially non oscillatory (ENO) scheme for its essential non-oscillation,total variation bounded (TVB),etc.The new scheme improves accuracy by one order compared to the original one.The proposed MCENO scheme is applied to simulate two-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with densities 1:3 and 1:100,and solve the Lax shock-wave tube numerically.The ratio of CPU time used to implement MCENO,the third-order ENO and fifth-order weighed ENO (WENO) schemes is 0.62:1:2.19.This indicates that MCENO improves accuracy in smooth regions and has higher accuracy and better efficiency compared to the original ENO scheme.

  2. WLS-ENO: Weighted-least-squares based essentially non-oscillatory schemes for finite volume methods on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongxu; Jiao, Xiangmin

    2016-06-01

    ENO (Essentially Non-Oscillatory) and WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) schemes are widely used high-order schemes for solving partial differential equations (PDEs), especially hyperbolic conservation laws with piecewise smooth solutions. For structured meshes, these techniques can achieve high order accuracy for smooth functions while being non-oscillatory near discontinuities. For unstructured meshes, which are needed for complex geometries, similar schemes are required but they are much more challenging. We propose a new family of non-oscillatory schemes, called WLS-ENO, in the context of solving hyperbolic conservation laws using finite-volume methods over unstructured meshes. WLS-ENO is derived based on Taylor series expansion and solved using a weighted least squares formulation. Unlike other non-oscillatory schemes, the WLS-ENO does not require constructing sub-stencils, and hence it provides a more flexible framework and is less sensitive to mesh quality. We present rigorous analysis of the accuracy and stability of WLS-ENO, and present numerical results in 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D for a number of benchmark problems, and also report some comparisons against WENO.

  3. Finite Difference Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Schemes with Constrained Transport for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Christlieb, Andrew J; Tang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    In this work we develop a class of high-order finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (FD-WENO) schemes for solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in 2D and 3D. The philosophy of this work is to use efficient high-order WENO spatial discretizations with high-order strong stability-preserving Runge-Kutta (SSP-RK) time-stepping schemes. Numerical results have shown that with such methods we are able to resolve solution structures that are only visible at much higher grid resolutions with lower-order schemes. The key challenge in applying such methods to ideal MHD is to control divergence errors in the magnetic field. We achieve this by augmenting the base scheme with a novel high-order constrained transport approach that updates the magnetic vector potential. The predicted magnetic field from the base scheme is replaced by a divergence-free magnetic field that is obtained from the curl of this magnetic potential. The non-conservative weakly hyperbolic system that the magnetic vecto...

  4. A family of fourth-order entropy stable nonoscillatory spectral collocation schemes for the 1-D Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2017-02-01

    High-order numerical methods that satisfy a discrete analog of the entropy inequality are uncommon. Indeed, no proofs of nonlinear entropy stability currently exist for high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) finite volume or weak-form finite element methods. Herein, a new family of fourth-order WENO spectral collocation schemes is developed, that are nonlinearly entropy stable for the one-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Individual spectral elements are coupled using penalty type interface conditions. The resulting entropy stable WENO spectral collocation scheme achieves design order accuracy, maintains the WENO stencil biasing properties across element interfaces, and satisfies the summation-by-parts (SBP) operator convention, thereby ensuring nonlinear entropy stability in a diagonal norm. Numerical results demonstrating accuracy and nonoscillatory properties of the new scheme are presented for the one-dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for both continuous and discontinuous compressible flows.

  5. Finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory schemes with constrained transport for ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christlieb, Andrew J.; Rossmanith, James A.; Tang, Qi

    2014-07-01

    In this work we develop a class of high-order finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (FD-WENO) schemes for solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in 2D and 3D. The philosophy of this work is to use efficient high-order WENO spatial discretizations with high-order strong stability-preserving Runge-Kutta (SSP-RK) time-stepping schemes. Numerical results have shown that with such methods we are able to resolve solution structures that are only visible at much higher grid resolutions with lower-order schemes. The key challenge in applying such methods to ideal MHD is to control divergence errors in the magnetic field. We achieve this by augmenting the base scheme with a novel high-order constrained transport approach that updates the magnetic vector potential. The predicted magnetic field from the base scheme is replaced by a divergence-free magnetic field that is obtained from the curl of this magnetic potential. The non-conservative weakly hyperbolic system that the magnetic vector potential satisfies is solved using a version of FD-WENO developed for Hamilton-Jacobi equations. The resulting numerical method is endowed with several important properties: (1) all quantities, including all components of the magnetic field and magnetic potential, are treated as point values on the same mesh (i.e., there is no mesh staggering); (2) both the spatial and temporal orders of accuracy are fourth-order; (3) no spatial integration or multidimensional reconstructions are needed in any step; and (4) special limiters in the magnetic vector potential update are used to control unphysical oscillations in the magnetic field. Several 2D and 3D numerical examples are presented to verify the order of accuracy on smooth test problems and to show high-resolution on test problems that involve shocks.

  6. Gravitational waveforms from binary neutron star mergers with high-order weighted-essentially-nonoscillatory schemes in numerical relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Dietrich, Tim

    2016-09-01

    The theoretical modeling of gravitational waveforms from binary neutron star mergers requires precise numerical relativity simulations. Assessing convergence of the numerical data and building the error budget is currently challenging due to the low accuracy of general-relativistic hydrodynamics schemes and to the grid resolutions that can be employed in (3 +1 )-dimensional simulations. In this work, we explore the use of high-order weighted-essentially-nonoscillatory (WENO) schemes in neutron star merger simulations and investigate the accuracy of the waveforms obtained with such methods. We find that high-order WENO schemes can be robustly employed for simulating the inspiral-merger phase and they significantly improve the assessment of the waveform's error budget with respect to finite-volume methods. High-order WENO schemes can be thus efficiently used for high-quality waveform production, and in future large-scale investigations of the binary parameter space.

  7. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hohenegger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM. Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle.

    Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and mid-latitude continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  8. A non-oscillatory balanced scheme for an idealized tropical climate model. Part II. Nonlinear coupling and moisture effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khouider, Boualem [University of Victoria, Mathematics and Statistics, Victoria, B.C. (Canada); Majda, Andrew J. [New York University, Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere/Ocean Sciences, NY (United States); Courant Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2005-10-01

    We use the non-oscillatory balanced numerical scheme developed in Part I to track the dynamics of a dry highly nonlinear barotropic/baroclinic coupled solitary wave, as introduced by Biello and Majda (2004), and of the moisture fronts of Frierson et al. (2004) in the presence of dry gravity waves, a barotropic trade wind, and the beta effect. It is demonstrated that, for the barotropic/baroclinic solitary wave, except for a little numerical dissipation, the scheme utilized here preserves total energy despite the strong interactions and exchange of energy between the baroclinic and barotropic components of the flow. After a short transient period where the numerical solution stays close to the asymptotic predictions, the flow develops small scale eddies and ultimately becomes highly turbulent. It is found here that the interaction of a dry gravity wave with a moisture front can either result in a reflection of a fast moistening front or the pure extinction of the precipitation. The barotropic trade wind stretches the precipitation patches and increases the lifetime of the moisture fronts which decay naturally by the effects of dissipation through precipitation while the Coriolis effect makes the moving precipitation patches disappear and appear at other times and places. (orig.)

  9. ON DISPERSION-CONTROLLED PRINCIPLES FOR NON-OSCILLATORY SHOCK-CAPTURING SCHEMES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zonglin

    2004-01-01

    The role of dispersions in the numerical solutions of hydrodynamic equation systems has been realized for long time. It is only during the last two decades that extensive studies on the dispersion-controlled dissipative (DCD) schemes were reported. The studies have demonstrated that this kind of the schemes is distinct from conventional dissipation-based schemes in which the dispersion term of the modified equation is not considered in scheme construction to avoid nonphysical oscillation occurring in shock wave simulations. The principle of the dispersion controlled aims at removing nonphysical oscillations by making use of dispersion characteristics instead of adding artificial viscosity to dissipate the oscillation as the conventional schemes do. Research progresses on the dispersioncontrolled principles are reviewed in this paper, including the exploration of the role of dispersions in numerical simulations, the development of the dispersion-controlled principles, efforts devoted to high-order dispersion-controlled dissipative schemes, the extension to both the finite volume and the finite element methods, scheme verification and solution validation, and comments on several aspects of the schemes from author's viewpoint.

  10. Nonoscillatory Central Schemes for Hyperbolic Systems of Conservation Laws in Three-Space Dimensions

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    Andrew N. Guarendi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend a family of high-resolution, semidiscrete central schemes for hyperbolic systems of conservation laws to three-space dimensions. Details of the schemes, their implementation, and properties are presented together with results from several prototypical applications of hyperbolic conservation laws including a nonlinear scalar equation, the Euler equations of gas dynamics, and the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations. Parallel scaling analysis and grid-independent results including contours and isosurfaces of density and velocity and magnetic field vectors are shown in this study, confirming the ability of these types of solvers to approximate the solutions of hyperbolic equations efficiently and accurately.

  11. A class of the fourth order finite volume Hermite weighted essentially non-oscillatory schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,we developed a class of the fourth order accurate finite volume Hermite weighted essentially non-oscillatory(HWENO)schemes based on the work(Computers&Fluids,34:642-663(2005))by Qiu and Shu,with Total Variation Diminishing Runge-Kutta time discretization method for the two-dimensional hyperbolic conservation laws.The key idea of HWENO is to evolve both with the solution and its derivative,which allows for using Hermite interpolation in the reconstruction phase,resulting in a more compact stencil at the expense of the additional work.The main difference between this work and the formal one is the procedure to reconstruct the derivative terms.Comparing with the original HWENO schemes of Qiu and Shu,one major advantage of new HWENOschemes is its robust in computation of problem with strong shocks.Extensive numerical experiments are performed to illustrate the capability of the method.

  12. Improved mixing representation in Emanuel's convection scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandpeix, J. Y.; Phillips, V.; Tailleux, R.

    2004-10-01

    Recent empirical and modelling studies suggest that mid-tropospheric relative humidity (RH) is an important controlling factor of deep atmospheric convection, which appears to be underestimated in present cumulus parametrizations. This indicates the possible presence of shortcomings in the way that entrainment is represented in such parametrizations. This matter was explored in the European Cloud Systems project (EUROCS) by means of an idealized humidity experiment in which the main controlling parameter is RH. In the latter study, cloud-resolving model (CRM) experiments suggested that a shallow/deep convection transition occurs when RH crosses a threshold value that ranges from about RH = 50% to RH = 60%. In this paper, we seek to increase the responsiveness of Emanuel's convection scheme to RH, and to reproduce the threshold behaviour of the idealized humidity case, by replacing the original uniform probability density function (PDF) for mixing fractions by a more flexible two-parameter bell-shaped function that allows a wider range of behaviour. The main result is that the parameters of this PDF can be tuned to allow a regime transition to occur near a threshold value of RH 55%. In contrast to CRM results, however, this transition is between two different regimes of deep convection rather than between a shallow and deep regime. Possible ways to obtain a shallow-to-deep transition with Emanuel's scheme are discussed.

  13. Non-oscillatory Central Differencing (Noc) Scheme to Solve the Shallow Water Equations Coupled with Sediment Transport and Bed Evolution in Two Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, H.; Simpson, G.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between flowing surface water and sediment transport has numerous important applications in Earth science, including controls on river patterns, drainage basin evolution and morphological changes induced by extreme events such as tsunamis and dam breaks. Many of these problems can be investigated with the mathematical model of the shallow water equations coupled to conservation of sediment concentration and empirical functions for bed friction, substrate erosion and deposition. However, this system of equations is highly nonlinear, requiring fast and robust numerical methods. In this study, we investigate the solution of the shallow water equations coupled to sediment transports via the Non-oscillatory Central Differencing (NOC ) method, a second order scheme based on a predictor-corrector method. The scheme is chosen for its relative stability and robustness. The NOC scheme is especially favorable in situations where the water depth approaches zero and for steady flow conditions, both of which cause problems with more naive schemes. The model is verified by comparing computed results with documented solutions. We are currently using the model to investigate coupling between flow and sediment transport in alluvial rivers.

  14. A continuous and prognostic convection scheme based on buoyancy, PCMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérémy, Jean-François; Piriou, Jean-Marcel

    2016-04-01

    A new and consistent convection scheme (PCMT: Prognostic Condensates Microphysics and Transport), providing a continuous and prognostic treatment of this atmospheric process, is described. The main concept ensuring the consistency of the whole system is the buoyancy, key element of any vertical motion. The buoyancy constitutes the forcing term of the convective vertical velocity, which is then used to define the triggering condition, the mass flux, and the rates of entrainment-detrainment. The buoyancy is also used in its vertically integrated form (CAPE) to determine the closure condition. The continuous treatment of convection, from dry thermals to deep precipitating convection, is achieved with the help of a continuous formulation of the entrainment-detrainment rates (depending on the convective vertical velocity) and of the CAPE relaxation time (depending on the convective over-turning time). The convective tendencies are directly expressed in terms of condensation and transport. Finally, the convective vertical velocity and condensates are fully prognostic, the latter being treated using the same microphysics scheme as for the resolved condensates but considering the convective environment. A Single Column Model (SCM) validation of this scheme is shown, allowing detailed comparisons with observed and explicitly simulated data. Four cases covering the convective spectrum are considered: over ocean, sensitivity to environmental moisture (S. Derbyshire) non precipitating shallow convection to deep precipitating convection, trade wind shallow convection (BOMEX) and strato-cumulus (FIRE), together with an entire continental diurnal cycle of convection (ARM). The emphasis is put on the characteristics of the scheme which enable a continuous treatment of convection. Then, a 3D LAM validation is presented considering an AMMA case with both observations and a CRM simulation using the same initial and lateral conditions as for the parameterized one. Finally, global

  15. PERTURBATIONAL FINITE DIFFERENCE SCHEME OF CONVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The Perturbational Finite Difference (PFD) method is a kind of high-order-accurate compact difference method, But its idea is different from the normal compact method and the multi-nodes method. This method can get a Perturbational Exact Numerical Solution (PENS) scheme for locally linearlized Convection-Diffusion (CD) equation. The PENS scheme is similar to the Finite Analytical (FA) scheme and Exact Difference Solution (EDS) scheme, which are all exponential schemes, but PENS scheme is simpler and uses only 3, 5 and 7 nodes for 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional problems, respectively. The various approximate schemes of PENS scheme are also called Perturbational-High-order-accurate Difference (PHD) scheme. The PHD schemes can be got by expanding the exponential terms in the PENS scheme into power series of grid Renold number, and they are all upwind schemes and remain the concise structure form of first-order upwind scheme. For 1-dimensional (1-D) CD equation and 2-D incompressible Navier-Stokes equation, their PENS and PHD schemes were constituted in this paper, they all gave highly accurate results for the numerical examples of three 1-D CD equations and an incompressible 2-D flow in a square cavity.

  16. HDG schemes for stationary convection-diffusion problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautov, R. Z.; Fedotov, E. M.

    2016-11-01

    For stationary linear convection-diffusion problems, we construct and study a hybridized scheme of the discontinuous Galerkin method on the basis of an extended mixed statement of the problem. Discrete schemes can be used for the solution of equations degenerating in the leading part and are stated via approximations to the solution of the problem, its gradient, the flow, and the restriction of the solution to the boundaries of elements. For the spaces of finite elements, we represent minimal conditions responsible for the solvability, stability and accuracy of the schemes.

  17. Evaluation of triggering functions in convective parameterization schemes using observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettammal, S.; Zhang, G. J.

    2013-12-01

    Realistic simulation of different modes of atmospheric variability ranging from the diurnal cycle to inter-annual variability in global climate models (GCMs) depends crucially on the convection triggering criteria. In this study, using the data from constrained variational analysis by the Atmospheric System Research program for single column models (SCM), the performance of the commonly used convective triggering functions in GCMs is evaluated, based on the equitable threat score (ETS) value, a widely used forecast verification metric. From the ETS score, four consistently better performing triggering functions were identified. They are based on dilute dCAPE, parcel buoyancy at the lifting condensation level (Bechtold scheme), undilute dCAPE and dilute CAPE triggering functions. The key variables used to define these triggering functions were examined in detail. It was found that the skill score value of the dilute dCAPE triggering function does not show much variation among different data sets. Analysis of the composite fields and probability distributions of key variables of the triggering functions, based on the correct-prediction, over-prediction, under-prediction of convection and correct prediction of no convection cases for convection onset, brings to light some critical factors responsible for the performance of the trigger functions.

  18. On the characterization of non-oscillatory motions in ferromagnetic convection with magnetic field dependent viscosity in a rotating porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a sufficient condition is derived for the validity of the “principle of the exchange of stabilities” in ferromagnetic convection with magnetic field dependent viscosity, for the case of free boundaries, in porous medium in the presence of a uniform vertical magnetic field and uniform rotation about the vertical axis.

  19. Rethinking convective quasi-equilibrium: observational constraints for stochastic convective schemes in climate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelin, J David; Peters, Ole; Lin, Johnny W-B; Hales, Katrina; Holloway, Christopher E

    2008-07-28

    Convective quasi-equilibrium (QE) has for several decades stood as a key postulate for parametrization of the impacts of moist convection at small scales upon the large-scale flow. Departures from QE have motivated stochastic convective parametrization, which in its early stages may be viewed as a sensitivity study. Introducing plausible stochastic terms to modify the existing convective parametrizations can have substantial impact, but, as for so many aspects of convective parametrization, the results are sensitive to details of the assumed processes. We present observational results aimed at helping to constrain convection schemes, with implications for each of conventional, stochastic or 'superparametrization' schemes. The original vision of QE due to Arakawa fares well as a leading approximation, but with a number of updates. Some, like the imperfect connection between the boundary layer and the free troposphere, and the importance of free-tropospheric moisture to buoyancy, are quantitatively important but lie within the framework of ensemble-average convection slaved to the large scale. Observations of critical phenomena associated with a continuous phase transition for precipitation as a function of water vapour and temperature suggest a more substantial revision. While the system's attraction to the critical point is predicted by QE, several fundamental properties of the transition, including high precipitation variance in the critical region, need to be added to the theory. Long-range correlations imply that this variance does not reduce quickly under spatial averaging; scaling associated with this spatial averaging has potential implications for superparametrization. Long tails of the distribution of water vapour create relatively frequent excursions above criticality with associated strong precipitation events.

  20. A hybrid convection scheme for use in non-hydrostatic numerical weather prediction models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Kuell

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The correct representation of convection in numerical weather prediction (NWP models is essential for quantitative precipitation forecasts. Due to its small horizontal scale convection usually has to be parameterized, e.g. by mass flux convection schemes. Classical schemes originally developed for use in coarse grid NWP models assume zero net convective mass flux, because the whole circulation of a convective cell is confined to the local grid column and all convective mass fluxes cancel out. However, in contemporary NWP models with grid sizes of a few kilometers this assumption becomes questionable, because here convection is partially resolved on the grid. To overcome this conceptual problem we propose a hybrid mass flux convection scheme (HYMACS in which only the convective updrafts and downdrafts are parameterized. The generation of the larger scale environmental subsidence, which may cover several grid columns, is transferred to the grid scale equations. This means that the convection scheme now has to generate a net convective mass flux exerting a direct dynamical forcing to the grid scale model via pressure gradient forces. The hybrid convection scheme implemented into the COSMO model of Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD is tested in an idealized simulation of a sea breeze circulation initiating convection in a realistic manner. The results are compared with analogous simulations with the classical Tiedtke and Kain-Fritsch convection schemes.

  1. Stability-Controllable Second-Order Difference Scheme for Convection Term

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    A new finite difference scheme-SCSD scheme has been propsed based on CD( Central Difference) scheme and SUD(Second-order Upwind Difference)scheme.Its basic feature is controllable convective stability and always second-order accuracy(Stability-Controllable Second-order Difference),It has been proven that this Scheme is convective-Stable if the grid Peclet number|PΔ|≤2/β(0≤β≤1).The advantage of this new scheme has been discussed based on the modified wavenumber analysis by using Fourier transform.This scheme has been applied to the 2-D incompressible convective-diffusive equation and 2-D compressible Euler equation,and corresponding finite difference equations have been derived.Numerical examples of 1-D Burgers equation and 2-D transport equation have been presented to show its good accuracy and controllable convective stability.

  2. A NEW HIGH ORDER SCHEME FOR CONVECTION EQUATION AND ITS APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    With the undetermined coefficient method, a new high order scheme for convection equation named as HAUC was worked out. The accuracy of the new scheme was analyzed by comparing the computed results with the exact solutions of 1-D pure convection equation and nonlinear convection equation. The effectiveness of the HAUC was also examined by comparing with the results obtained by other schemes. Finally, it was applied to simulate 1 -D dam break flow with differenct ratios of initial upstream water depth to downstream one. The results show that the scheme has the ability to simulate both undular bores and moving hydraulic jumps.

  3. A new family of implicit fourth order compact schemes for unsteady convection-diffusion equation with variable convection coefficient

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Shuvam

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new family of implicit compact finite difference schemes for computation of unsteady convection-diffusion equation with variable convection coefficient is proposed. The schemes are fourth order accurate in space and second or lower order accurate in time depending on the choice of weighted time average parameter. The proposed schemes, where transport variable and its first derivatives are carried as the unknowns, combine virtues of compact discretization and Pad\\'{e} scheme for spatial derivative. These schemes which are based on five point stencil with constant coefficients, named as \\emph{(5,5) Constant Coefficient 4th Order Compact} [(5,5)CC-4OC], give rise to a diagonally dominant system of equations and shows higher accuracy and better phase and amplitude error characteristics than some of the standard methods. These schemes are capable of using a grid aspect ratio other than unity and are unconditionally stable. They efficiently capture both transient and steady solutions of linear and ...

  4. GENERALIZED UPWIND SCHEME WITH FRACTIONAL STEPS FOR 3-D PROBLEM OF CONVECTION DOMINATING GROUNDWATER TRANSPORT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚磊华

    1997-01-01

    A generalized upwind scheme with fractional steps for 3-D mathematical models of convection dominating groundwater quality is suggested. The mass transport equation is split into a convection equation and a dispersive equation. The generalized upwind scheme is used to solve the convection equation and the finite element method is used to compute the dispersive equation. These procedures which not only overcome the phenomenon of the negative concentration and numerical dispersion appear frequently with normal FEM or FDM to solve models of convection dominating groundwater transport but also avoid the step for computing each node velocity give a more suitable method to calculate the concentrations of the well points.

  5. DIFFERENCE SCHEME AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION BASED ON MIXED FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR NATURAL CONVECTION PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗振东; 朱江; 谢正辉; 张桂芳

    2003-01-01

    The non-stationary natural convection problem is studied. A lowest order finite difference scheme based on mixed finite element method for non-stationary natural convection problem, by the spatial variations discreted with finite element method and time with finite difference scheme was derived, where the numerical solution of velocity, pressure, and temperature can be found together, and a numerical example to simulate the close square cavity is given, which is of practical importance.

  6. Coupling between lower-tropospheric convective mixing and low-level clouds: Physical mechanisms and dependence on convection scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Jessica; Bony, Sandrine; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Roehrig, Romain

    2016-12-01

    Several studies have pointed out the dependence of low-cloud feedbacks on the strength of the lower-tropospheric convective mixing. By analyzing a series of single-column model experiments run by a climate model using two different convective parametrizations, this study elucidates the physical mechanisms through which marine boundary-layer clouds depend on this mixing in the present-day climate and under surface warming. An increased lower-tropospheric convective mixing leads to a reduction of low-cloud fraction. However, the rate of decrease strongly depends on how the surface latent heat flux couples to the convective mixing and to boundary-layer cloud radiative effects: (i) on the one hand, the latent heat flux is enhanced by the lower-tropospheric drying induced by the convective mixing, which damps the reduction of the low-cloud fraction, (ii) on the other hand, the latent heat flux is reduced as the lower troposphere stabilizes under the effect of reduced low-cloud radiative cooling, which enhances the reduction of the low-cloud fraction. The relative importance of these two different processes depends on the closure of the convective parameterization. The convective scheme that favors the coupling between latent heat flux and low-cloud radiative cooling exhibits a stronger sensitivity of low-clouds to convective mixing in the present-day climate, and a stronger low-cloud feedback in response to surface warming. In this model, the low-cloud feedback is stronger when the present-day convective mixing is weaker and when present-day clouds are shallower and more radiatively active. The implications of these insights for constraining the strength of low-cloud feedbacks observationally is discussed.

  7. An Improvement of the Mass Flux Convection Parameterization Scheme and its Sensitivity Tests for Seasonal Prediction over China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    平凡; 高守亭; 王会军

    2003-01-01

    A modified cumulus parameterization scheme, suitable for use in a seasonal forecast model, is presented. This parameterization scheme is an improvement of the mass flux convection scheme developed by Gregory and Rowntree (1989; 1990). This convection scheme uses a "bulk" cloud model to present an ensemble of convective clouds, and aims to represent shallow, deep, and mid-level convection. At present,this convection scheme is employed in the NCC T63L20 model (National Climate Center, China Meteorological Administration). Simulation results with this scheme have revealed some deficiencies in the scheme,although to some extent, it improves the accuracy of the simulation. In order to alleviate the deficiencies and reflect the effect of cumulus convection in the actual atmosphere, the scheme is modified and improved.The improvements include (i) the full estimation of the effects of the large-scale convergence in the lower layer upon cumulus convection, (ii) the revision of the initial convective mass flux, and (iii) the regulation of convective-scale downdrafts. A comparison of the results obtained by using the original model and the modified one shows that the improvement and modification of the original convection scheme is successful in simulating the precipitation and general circulation field, because the modified scheme provides a good simulation of the main features of seasonal precipitation in China, and an analysis of the anomaly correlation coefficient between the simulation and the observations confirms the improved results.

  8. Arbitrary Dimension Convection-Diffusion Schemes for Space-Time Discretizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bank, Randolph E. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Vassilevski, Panayot S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zikatanov, Ludmil T. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2016-01-20

    This note proposes embedding a time dependent PDE into a convection-diffusion type PDE (in one space dimension higher) with singularity, for which two discretization schemes, the classical streamline-diffusion and the EAFE (edge average finite element) one, are investigated in terms of stability and error analysis. The EAFE scheme, in particular, is extended to be arbitrary order which is of interest on its own. Numerical results, in combined space-time domain demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  9. Do convective schemes substantially alter simulated global climate and cloud feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, S. C.; Webb, M.; Lock, A.; Bretherton, C. S.; Bony, S.; Cole, J. N.; Idelkadi, A.; Kang, S. M.; Koshiro, T.; Kawai, H.; Ogura, T.; Roehrig, R.; Shin, Y.; Mauritsen, T.; Vial, J.; Watanabe, M.; Woelfle, M.; Zhao, M.; Cairns, C. W.; Vallis, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate CFMIP-2 AMIP and AMIP+4K experiments with ten climate models which have had their convective parametrizations turned off. Previous studies have suggested that parameterized convection may be a leading source of inter-model spread in cloud feedbacks and other aspects. We find that model biases in 'ConvOff' runs (those with the convective schemes switched off), for example in tropical lapse rate and relative humidity, are generally smaller than intermodel differences in these fields, in spite of the fact that these fields are widely thought to be controlled by convective processes. This suggests that, to a considerable extent, explicitly resolved convection is able to do most of the overall job of convection in modern climate models at least with respect to phenomena at large scales. We find moreover that 'ConvOff' models have a similar overall range of cloud feedbacks compared to the standard configurations. Furthermore, applying a simple bias correction method to allow for differences in present day global cloud radiative effects substantially reduces the differences between the cloud feedbacks with and without parametrized convection in the individual models. We conclude that, while parametrized convection influences the strength of the cloud feedbacks substantially in some models, other processes must also contribute substantially to the overall inter-model spread. The positive shortwave cloud feedbacks seen in the models in subtropical regimes associated with shallow clouds are still present in the ConvOff experiments. Inter-model spread in shortwave cloud feedback increases slightly in regimes associated with trade cumulus in the ConvOff experiments but is quite similar in the most stable sub-tropical regimes associated with stratocumulus clouds. Inter-model spread in longwave cloud feedbacks in strongly precipitating regions of the tropics is substantially reduced in the ConvOff experiments however, indicating a considerable local contribution

  10. Preliminary Evaluation of a Revised Zhang-McFarlane Convection Scheme Using the NCAR CCM3 GCM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the interaction between convection, clouds, and the large-scale circulation. By examining the sensitivity of the large-scale fields to a modification of the convective parameterization scheme in the NCAR CCM3, we show that the convective parameterization has a strong impact on the tem poral characteristics of the large-scale circulation and clouds. When Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) in the atmosphere is used to close the convective parameterization, the simulated convection is con tinuous, and lacks the observed intermittence. When the CAPE change due to the large-scale forcing in the free troposphere is used, the simulated temporal behavior of convection is in much better agreement with the observations. We attribute this improvement to the enhanced coupling between convection and the large-scale forcing in the convective parameterization.

  11. A RBF Based Local Gridfree Scheme for Unsteady Convection-Diffusion Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanyasiraju VSS Yedida

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work a Radial Basis Function (RBF based local gridfree scheme has been presented for unsteady convection diffusion equations. Numerical studies have been made using multiquadric (MQ radial function. Euler and a three stage Runge-Kutta schemes have been used for temporal discretization. The developed scheme is compared with the corresponding finite difference (FD counterpart and found that the solutions obtained using the former are more superior. As expected, for a fixed time step and for large nodal densities, thought the Runge-Kutta scheme is able to maintain higher order of accuracy over the Euler method, the temporal discretization is independent of the improvement in the solution which in the developed scheme has been achived by optimizing the shape parameter of the RBF.

  12. Decoupled Scheme for Time-Dependent Natural Convection Problem II: Time Semidiscreteness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    stability and the corresponding optimal error estimates are presented. Furthermore, a decoupled numerical scheme is proposed by decoupling the nonlinear terms via temporal extrapolation; optimal error estimates are established. Finally, some numerical results are provided to verify the performances of the developed algorithms. Compared with the coupled numerical scheme, the decoupled algorithm not only keeps good accuracy but also saves a lot of computational cost. Both theoretical analysis and numerical experiments show the efficiency and effectiveness of the decoupled method for time-dependent natural convection problem.

  13. A Symmetric Characteristic Finite Volume Element Scheme for Nonlinear Convection-Diffusion Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Yang; Yi-rang Yuan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we implement alternating direction strategy and construct a symmetric FVE scheme for nonlinear convection-diffusion problems. Comparing to general FVE methods, our method has two advantages. First, the coefficient matrices of the discrete schemes will be symmetric even for nonlinear problems.Second, since the solution of the algebraic equations at each time step can be inverted into the solution of several one-dimensional problems, the amount of computation work is smaller. We prove the optimal H1-norm error estimates of order O(△t2 + h) and present some numerical examples at the end of the paper.

  14. A comparison study of convective schemes in hybrid RANS-LES calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basara, Branislav; Pavlovic, Zoran

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays it is commonly accepted to report on convections schemes in the case of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) calculations. However, in the case of hybrid RANS-LES calculations, the same discussion seems not to be relevant assuming that calculations are anyway performed on the coarser computational meshes and that the amount of unresolved and modelled turbulence impairs the calculation accuracy more than the error of convection schemes used in calculations. Therefore, we want to tackle this issue by using the Partially Averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) model as the representative hybrid RANS-LES method but the conclusions derived in this work are equally applicable to other models. We will present results by using the central differencing (CD), MINMOD and SMART schemes but also using CD scheme only locally in the area of low unresolved-to-total ratios of kinetic energy (fk) . The paper will also show the performance of a step blending function, which depends on the prescribed constant value of the ratio fk and the performance of a smooth function which directly uses the ratio fk as the blending value. The results will be presented for the flow around the square cylinder.

  15. Parametric Sensitivity and Calibration for Kain-Fritsch Convective Parameterization Scheme in the WRF Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Huiping; Qian, Yun; Lin, Guang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Ben; Fu, Q.

    2014-03-25

    Convective parameterizations used in weather and climate models all display sensitivity to model resolution and variable skill in different climatic regimes. Although parameters in convective schemes can be calibrated using observations to reduce model errors, it is not clear if the optimal parameters calibrated based on regional data can robustly improve model skill across different model resolutions and climatic regimes. In this study, this issue is investigated using a regional modeling framework based on the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. To quantify the response and sensitivity of model performance to model parameters, we identified five key input parameters and specified their ranges in the Kain-Fritsch (KF) convection scheme in WRF and calibrated them across different spatial resolutions, climatic regimes, and radiation schemes using observed precipitation data. Results show that the optimal values for the five input parameters in the KF scheme are close and model sensitivity and error exhibit similar dependence on the input parameters for all experiments conducted in this study despite differences in the precipitation climatology. We found that the model overall performances in simulating precipitation are more sensitive to the coefficients of downdraft (Pd) and entrainment (Pe) mass flux and starting height of downdraft (Ph). However, we found that rainfall biases, which are probably more related to structural errors, still exist over some regions in the simulation even with the optimal parameters, suggesting further studies are needed to identify the sources of uncertainties and reduce the model biases or structural errors associated with missed or misrepresented physical processes and/or potential problems with the modeling framework.

  16. Computer difference scheme for a singularly perturbed convection-diffusion equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkin, G. I.

    2014-08-01

    The Dirichlet problem for a singularly perturbed ordinary differential convection-diffusion equation with a perturbation parameter ɛ (that takes arbitrary values from the half-open interval (0, 1]) is considered. For this problem, an approach to the construction of a numerical method based on a standard difference scheme on uniform meshes is developed in the case when the data of the grid problem include perturbations and additional perturbations are introduced in the course of the computations on a computer. In the absence of perturbations, the standard difference scheme converges at an (δ st ) rate, where δ st = (ɛ + N -1)-1 N -1 and N + 1 is the number of grid nodes; the scheme is not ɛ-uniformly well conditioned or stable to perturbations of the data. Even if the convergence of the standard scheme is theoretically proved, the actual accuracy of the computed solution in the presence of perturbations degrades with decreasing ɛ down to its complete loss for small ɛ (namely, for ɛ = (δ-2max i, j |δ a {/i j }| + δ-1 max i, j |δ b {/i j }|), where δ = δ st and δ a {/i j }, δ b {/i j } are the perturbations in the coefficients multiplying the second and first derivatives). For the boundary value problem, we construct a computer difference scheme, i.e., a computing system that consists of a standard scheme on a uniform mesh in the presence of controlled perturbations in the grid problem data and a hypothetical computer with controlled computer perturbations. The conditions on admissible perturbations in the grid problem data and on admissible computer perturbations are obtained under which the computer difference scheme converges in the maximum norm for ɛ ∈ (0, 1] at the same rate as the standard scheme in the absence of perturbations.

  17. A consistent direct discretization scheme on Cartesian grids for convective and conjugate heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Norikazu; Takeuchi, Shintaro; Kajishima, Takeo; Inagaki, Masahide; Horinouchi, Nariaki

    2016-09-01

    A new discretization scheme on Cartesian grids, namely, a "consistent direct discretization scheme", is proposed for solving incompressible flows with convective and conjugate heat transfer around a solid object. The Navier-Stokes and the pressure Poisson equations are discretized directly even in the immediate vicinity of a solid boundary with the aid of the consistency between the face-velocity and the pressure gradient. From verifications in fundamental flow problems, the present method is found to significantly improve the accuracy of the velocity and the wall shear stress. It is also confirmed that the numerical results are less sensitive to the Courant number owing to the consistency between the velocity and pressure fields. The concept of the consistent direct discretization scheme is also explored for the thermal field; the energy equations for the fluid and solid phases are discretized directly while satisfying the thermal relations that should be valid at their interface. It takes different forms depending on the thermal boundary conditions: Dirichlet (isothermal) and Neumann (adiabatic/iso-heat-flux) boundary conditions for convective heat transfer and a fluid-solid thermal interaction for conjugate heat transfer. The validity of these discretizations is assessed by comparing the simulated results with analytical solutions for the respective thermal boundary conditions, and it is confirmed that the present schemes also show high accuracy for the thermal field. A significant improvement for the conjugate heat transfer problems is that the second-order spatial accuracy and numerical stability are maintained even under severe conditions of near-practical physical properties for the fluid and solid phases.

  18. The effects of discontinuities in the Betts Miller cumulus convection scheme on four-dimensional variational data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanski, Dušanka

    1993-10-01

    A tangent linear and an adjoint of the large-scale precipitation and the cumulus convection processes in the National Meteorological Center's NMC/ETA regional forecast model are developed. The effects of discontinuities in the Betts Miller cumulus convection scheme are examined and applicability of derivative minimization methods in four-dimensional variational (4D VAR) data assimilation is considered. It is demonstrated that discontinuities present in the control Betts Miller cumulus convection scheme increase linearization errors to a large extent and have adverse effects on 4D VAR data assimilation. In the experiments performed, discontinuities in the cumulus convection scheme have the most serious effect in low layers. These problems can be reduced by modifying the scheme to make it more continuous in low layers. Positive effects of inclusion of cumulus convection in 4D VAR data assimilation are found in upper layers, especially in humidity fields. The "observations" used are optimal interpolation analyses of temperature, surface pressure, wind and specific humidity. By inclusion of other data, more closely related to the convective processes, such as precipitation and clouds, more benefits should be expected. Even with the difficulties caused by discontinuities, derivative minimization techniques appear to work for the data assimilation problems. In order to get more general conclusions, more experiments are needed with different synoptic situations. The inclusion of other important physical processes such as radiation, surface friction and turbulence in the forecast and the corresponding adjoint models could alter the results since they may reinforce the effects of discontinuities.

  19. Numerical Modeling of Deep Mantle Convection: Advection and Diffusion Schemes for Marker Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Dabrowski, Marcin; Steinberger, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Thermal and chemical evolution of Earth's deep mantle can be studied by modeling vigorous convection in a chemically heterogeneous fluid. Numerical modeling of such a system poses several computational challenges. Dominance of heat advection over the diffusive heat transport, and a negligible amount of chemical diffusion results in sharp gradients of thermal and chemical fields. The exponential dependence of the viscosity of mantle materials on temperature also leads to high gradients of the velocity field. The accuracy of many numerical advection schemes degrades quickly with increasing gradient of the solution, while the computational effort, in terms of the scheme complexity and required resolution, grows. Additional numerical challenges arise due to a large range of length-scales characteristic of a thermochemical convection system with highly variable viscosity. To examplify, the thickness of the stem of a rising thermal plume may be a few percent of the mantle thickness. An even thinner filament of an anomalous material that is entrained by that plume may consitute less than a tenth of a percent of the mantle thickness. We have developed a two-dimensional FEM code to model thermochemical convection in a hollow cylinder domain, with a depth- and temperature-dependent viscosity representative of the mantle (Steinberger and Calderwood, 2006). We use marker-in-cell method for advection of chemical and thermal fields. The main advantage of perfoming advection using markers is absence of numerical diffusion during the advection step, as opposed to the more diffusive field-methods. However, in the common implementation of the marker-methods, the solution of the momentum and energy equations takes place on a computational grid, and nodes do not generally coincide with the positions of the markers. Transferring velocity-, temperature-, and chemistry- information between nodes and markers introduces errors inherent to inter- and extrapolation. In the numerical scheme

  20. Simulation of black carbon aerosol distribution over India: A sensitivity study to different convective schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudipta; Dey, Sagnik; Das, Sushant; Venkataraman, Chandra; Patil, Nitin U.

    2017-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb solar radiation, thereby causing a warming at the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) in contrast to most of the other aerosol species that scatter radiation causing a cooling at TOA. BC is considered to be an important contributor of global warming, second only to CO2 with a net radiative forcing of 1.1 w/m2. They have important regional climate effects, because of their spatially non-uniform heating and cooling. So it is very important to understand the spatio-temporal distribution of BC over India. In this study, we have used a regional climate model RegCM4.5 to simulate BC distribution over India with a focus on the BC estimation. The importance of incorporation of regional emission inventory has been shown and the sensitivity of BC distribution to various convective schemes in the model has been explored. The model output has been validated with in-situ observations. It is quite evident that regional inventory is capturing larger columnar burden of BC and OC than the global inventory. The difference in BC burden is clear at many places with the largest difference (in the order from 2 x 10-11 kg m-2 sec-1 in global inventory to 4 x 10-11 kg m-2 sec-1 in regional inventory) being observed over the Indo-Gangetic Basin. This difference is mainly attributed to the local sources like kerosene lamp burning, residential cooking on solid biomass fuel and agricultural residue burning etc., that are not considered in the global inventory. The difference is also noticeable for OC. Thus BC burden has increased with incorporation of regional emission inventory in the model, suggesting the importance of regional inventory in improved simulation and estimation of aerosols in this region. BC distribution is also sensitive to choice of scheme with Emanuel scheme capturing a comparatively smaller BC burden during the monsoon than Tiedtke scheme. Further long-term simulation with customized model is required to examine impact of BC. Keywords: Black

  1. Comparison of turbulence and convection parametrization schemes in the COSMO-CLM model operated on convection permitting scales over the European Alpine region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaki, Andras; Piazza, Marie; Truhetz, Heimo; Machulskaya, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    One of the biggest challenge in regional climate models is the proper use of parameterizations. Especially when resolutions increase some of the physical processes become (partially) resolved by the model dynamics and hence parameterizations can be switched off. One of the goal of this study is to investigate the relation between deep and shallow convection and the role of turbulence in COSMO-CLM. In the framework of the project Non-Hydrostatic Climate Modeling II (NHCM-2; www.nhcm-2.eu), funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF; project number P24758-N29), sensitivity experiments with the COSMO-CLM version 5.0, using the usual TKE and TKESV (Turbulent Kinetic Energy Scalar Variances) scheme, recently developed at the German Weather Service; DWD) turbulence scheme and the Tiedke scheme with shallow-convection on/off, are performed. These experiments, driven by analysis fields of the Integrated Forecast System (IFS) of the ECMWF, are run with 3 km horizontal grid spacing and 60 vertical levels ("convection permitting" resolution) over the greater Alpine region. The model output is compared to analysis fields (near surface) of the Austrian nowcasting system INCA (1 km grid spacing) and analysis fields (2D and 3D) of the Swiss forecast model COSMO-7 (7 km grid spacing). In addition to a basic evaluation (temperature and precipitation), cloud over, total radiation, moisture, and vertical wind speed are also considered. First results indicate that using the Tiedke scheme in this resolution leads to a lack of the precipitation in summer afternoon, because of unrealistic high cloud production. Shallow convection avoids this and leads to a more realistic diurnal cycle in summer precipitation. Further results (including TKSVE) will be shown.

  2. Arbitrarily high order Convected Scheme solution of the Vlasov-Poisson system

    CERN Document Server

    Güçlü, Yaman; Hitchon, William N G

    2013-01-01

    The Convected Scheme (CS) is a `forward-trajectory' semi-Lagrangian method for solution of transport equations, which has been most often applied to the kinetic description of plasmas and rarefied neutral gases. In its simplest form, the CS propagates the solution by advecting the `moving cells' along their characteristic trajectories, and by remapping them on the mesh at the end of the time step. The CS is conservative, positivity preserving, simple to implement, and not subject to time step restriction to maintain stability. Recently [Y. G\\"u\\c{c}l\\"u and W.N.G. Hitchon, 2012] a new methodology was introduced for reducing numerical diffusion, based on a modified equation analysis: the remapping error was compensated by applying small corrections to the final position of the moving cells prior to remapping. While the spatial accuracy was increased from 2nd to 4th order, the new scheme retained the important properties of the original method, and was shown to be simple and efficient for constant advection pro...

  3. HIGH RESOLUTION SCHEMES FOR CONSERVATION LAWS AND CONVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATIONS WITH VARYING TIME AND SPACE GRIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-zhong Tang; Gerald Warnecke

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a class of high resolution local time step schemes for nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws and the closely related convection-diffusion equations, by projecting the solution increments of the underlying partial differential equations (PDE)at each local time step. The main advantages are that they are of good consistency, and it is convenient to implement them. The schemes are L∞ stable, satisfy a cell entropy inequality, and may be extended to the initial boundary value problem of general unsteady PDEs with higher-order spatial derivatives. The high resolution schemes are given by combining the reconstruction technique with a second order TVD Runge-Kutta scheme or a Lax-Wendroff type method, respectively.The schemes are used to solve a linear convection-diffusion equation, the nonlinear inviscid Burgers' equation, the one- and two-dimensional compressible Euler equations, and the two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical results show that the schemes are of higher-order accuracy, and efficient in saving computational cost,especially, for the case of combining the present schemes with the adaptive mesh method [15]. The correct locations of the slow moving or stronger discontinuities are also obtained,although the schemes are slightly nonconservative.

  4. Comparative Studies of Different Mesoscale Convection Parameterization Schemes in the Simulation of Mei-Yu Front Heavy Rain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PING Fan; LUO Zhe-Xian

    2010-01-01

    The mei-yu front heavy rainstorms occurred over Nanjing on 3-5 and 8-9 July 2003 and were simu-lated in this paper using the Weather Research and Fore-casting Model (WRFv3.1) with various mesoscale con-vection parameterization schemes (MCPSs). The simula-tions show that the temporal and spatial evolution and distribution of rainstorms can be modeled; however, there was incongruity between the comparative simulations of four different MCPSs and the observed data. These dis-parities were exhibited in the simulations of both the 24-hour surface rainfall total and the hourly precipitation rate. Further analysis revealed that the discrepancies of vertical velocity and the convective vorticity vector (CVV) between the four simulations were attributed to the devia-tion of rainfall values. In addition, the simulations show that the mid-scale convection, particularly the mesoscale convection system (MCS) formation, can be well simu-lated with the proper mesoscale convection parameteriza-tion schemes and may be a crucial factor of the mei-yu front heavy rainstorm. These results suggest that, in an effort to enhance simulation'and prediction of heavy rain-fall and rainstorms, subsequent studies should focus on the development and improvement of MCPS.

  5. Development and improve-ment of mass flux convection parameterization scheme and its applications in the seasonal climate predication model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The features of Gregory cumulus parameterization scheme, which is used in British Weather Office, are researched and then this scheme is developed and improved according to the characteristics of area precipitation over China. Firstly, the influence of the large-scale convergence in lower tropopause upon cumulus convection is directly taken into account in a "bulk" cloud model. The organized entrainment and detrainment is considered in the model. Secondly, the initial mass flux is revised. Thirdly, the effects of subcooling water upon saturation vapour pressure are considered. Eventually, the drown-draft air is regulated. For several years, the numerical forecast of seasonal precipitation in China has been carried out by using the modified Gregory scheme. The result shows that the model with improved Gregory scheme well simulates the precipitation over China and the prediction result is good.

  6. Validation of turbulence and convective schemes on western Africa; comparison of LAM and CRM simulations on an AMMA case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, David; Gueremy, Jean-Francois; Beau, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this work is to analyse the behaviour of turbulence and convective parameterizations included in the Météo-France ALADIN-CLIMAT Limited Area Model in the frame of a 48 hour simulation of an AMMA case study, in comparison to observations and to a CRM (Méso-NH, with a 5 km horizontal grid-mesh) simulation carried out under the same boundary forcings. This framework provides an intermediate step of parameterization validation between the Single Column Model and Global Climate Model simulation studies. The chosen case study is the 26-27th July 2006 over a 43° x 40° region centred over Burkina Faso, in continuation to a previous work done with a HAPEX-Sahel case-study. During this 2 day period, two successive mesoscale convective systems are located ahead and in phase with the trough of an African easterly Wave (AEW). Both LAM and CRM simulations have been performed over the same considered domain, using the same ECMWF boundary forcings. Sensitivity tests to resolution (both horizontal and vertical) have been first carried out with ALADIN-CLIMAT. Second, the two different convection schemes used in ALADIN-CLIMAT show two kinds of response mainly due to their different formulations of triggering (no constraints in the dry layer under the convective cloud versus continuous treatment of convection including this dry layer) and closure (moisture convergence versus CAPE). Third, the impact of convective downdrafts will be shown. Fourth, the impact of different boundary forcing fields will also be presented.

  7. Role of the Convective Scheme in Modeling Initiation and Intensification of Tropical Depressions over the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvel, Jean Philippe; Camargo, Suzana; Sobel, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Modifications of the large-scale environment related to intraseasonal (MJO) and interannual (ENSO) time-scale variability or to global climate warming may have important impacts on the tropical cyclonic activity. This sensitivity of tropical cyclones (TC) on environmental changes can now be studied using General Circulation Models (GCM). Before doing sensitivity studies with a GCM, it is interesting to assess the representation of the TC activity for different configurations (resolution, parameterization) of the GCM in present climate conditions and to trace possible causes of bias in TC number, location or strength. A possible approach to do this assessment is to separate initiation and intensification processes. By using either GCM output, or meteorological analysis combined to TC observation databases, it is possible to study the condition of formation of tropical depressions vortices (TDV) at an early stage and their possible intensification into a TC (say the Tropical Storm stage). We use the LMDZ GCM to study the sensitivity of TDV characteristics to different entrainment and closure formulations of the convective scheme. The study focuses on the Tropical North Atlantic using the "zoom" capability of the LMDZ GCM. The horizontal resolution of the model is set to 0.75° over a large region of the North Atlantic and West Africa. The GCM is free to run in this region and is tied to ERA-Interim reanalysis outside that region, with intermediate relaxation times in-between. We use the Tiedtke convective scheme with entrainment and closure based on the moisture convergence, or with an entrainment based on the relative humidity of the environment, and additionally a closure based on CAPE. Each configuration is run for 10 years between 2000 and 2009 with prescribed SST. In summary, the convective entrainment based on the relative humidity in the environment deepens the TDV in LMDZ, resulting in more TDV and TC. The convective closure mitigates this tendency and

  8. Effective control parameters in a deep convection scheme for improved simulation of the Madden-Julian oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin-Ho; Seo, Kyong-Hwan

    2016-07-01

    This work seeks to find the most effective parameters in a deep convection scheme (relaxed Arakawa-Schubert scheme) of the National Centers of Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System model for improved simulation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). A suite of sensitivity experiments are performed by changing physical components such as the relaxation parameter of mass flux for adjustment of the environment, the evaporation rate from large-scale precipitation, the moisture trigger threshold using relative humidity of the boundary layer, and the fraction of re-evaporation of convective (subgrid-scale) rainfall. Among them, the last two parameters are found to produce a significant improvement. Increasing the strength of these two parameters reduces light rainfall that inhibits complete formation of the tropical convective system or supplies more moisture that help increase a potential energy to large-scale environment in the lower troposphere (especially at 700 hPa), leading to moisture preconditioning favorable for further development and eastward propagation of the MJO. In a more humid environment, more organized MJO structure (i.e., space-time spectral signal, eastward propagation, and tilted vertical structure) is produced.

  9. Development of a moisture scheme for the explicit numerical simulation of moist convection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bopape, Mary-Jane M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research is developing a nonhydrostatic sigma coordinate model (NSM). This model will be used to simulate nonhydrostatic processes to help meteorologists better understand and forecast convective processes...

  10. Climatology of precipitating convective clouds in ERA-Interim derived from the Emanuel and Živković-Rothman parameterisation scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Anne; Seibert, Petra

    2016-04-01

    The convective parameterisation scheme of Emanuel and Živković-Rothman (1999) was designed to represent cumulus convection with a special focus on convective water fluxes. This scheme is implemented in the Lagrangian particle transport and dispersion model FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model, http://flexpart.eu) to calculate a redistribution matrix used for the transport simulation. In order to improve the wet scavenging through convective clouds in this model, we are statistically evaluating a global data set of cloud base and cloud top heights of precipitating clouds derived from the EZ99 scheme and based on ECMWF's ERA-Interim data. They have a spectral resolution of about 80 km and 60 vertical levels available every 6 hours. The results will be evaluated as a function of season and geographical region.

  11. Water Vapor and Cloud Radiative Forcings over the Pacific Ocean Simulated by the LASG/IAP AGCM: Sensitivity to Convection Schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chunqiang; ZHOU Tianjun; SUN De-Zheng; BAO Qing

    2011-01-01

    Characteristics of the total clear-sky greenhouse effect (GA) and cloud radiative forcings (CRFs), along with the radiative-related water vapor and cloud properties simulated by the Spectral Atmospheric Model developed by LASG/IAP (SAMIL) are evaluated. Impacts of the convection scheme on the simulation of CRFs are discussed by using two AMIP (Atmospheric Model Inter-comparison Project) type simulations employing different convection schemes: the new Zhang-McFarlane (NZH) and Tiedtke (TDK) convection schemes. It shows that both the climatological GA and its response to El Nifio warming are simulated well, both in terms of spatial pattern and magnitude. The impact of the convection scheme on GA is not significant. The climatological longwav e CRF (LWCRF) and its response to El Nino warming are simulated well, but with a prominently weaker magnitude. The simulation of the climatology (response) of LWCRF in the NZH (TDK) run is slightly more realistic than in the TDK (NZH) simulation, indicating significant impacts of the convection scheme. The shortwave CRF (SWCRF) shows large biases in both spatial pattern and magnitude, and the results from the TDK run are better than those from the NZH run. A spuriously excessive negative climatological SWCRF over the southeastern Pacific and an insufficient response of SWCRF to El Nifio warming over the tropical Pacific are seen in the NZH run. These two biases are alleviated in the TDK run, since it produces vigorous convection, which is related to the low threshold for convection to take place. Also, impacts of the convection scheme on the cloud profile are discussed.

  12. Convective Fins Problem with Variable Thermal Conductivity: An Approach Based on Embedding Green's Functions into Fixed Point Iterative Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafri, H. Q.; Khuri, S. A.; Sayfy, Ali

    2016-12-01

    This article introduces a new numerical approach to solve the equation that models a rectangular purely convecting fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity. The algorithm embeds an integral operator, defined in terms of Green's function, into Krasnoselskii-Mann's fixed point iteration scheme. The validity of the method is demonstrated by a number of examples that consist of a range of values of the parameters that appear in the model. In addition, the evaluation of the fin efficiency is presented. The residual error computations show that the current method provides highly accurate approximations.

  13. S-process nucleosynthesis in AGB stars with the full spectrum of turbulence scheme for convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagüe, A.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Ventura, P.; Lugaro, M.

    2016-07-01

    The chemical evolution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars models depends greatly on the input physics (e.g. convective model, mass loss recipe). Variations of hot bottom burning (HBB) strength, or third dredge-up (TDU) efficiency are among the main consequences of adopting different input physics in the AGB models. The ATON evolutionary code stands apart from others in that it uses the Full Spectrum of Turbulence convective model. Here we present the first results of a newly developed s-process nucleosynthesis module for ATON AGB models. Our results are compared also with observations and theoretical predictions of present AGB nucleosynthesis models using different input physics.

  14. Multi-Dimensional High Order Essentially Non-Oscillatory Finite Difference Methods in Generalized Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chi-Wang

    1998-01-01

    This project is about the development of high order, non-oscillatory type schemes for computational fluid dynamics. Algorithm analysis, implementation, and applications are performed. Collaborations with NASA scientists have been carried out to ensure that the research is relevant to NASA objectives. The combination of ENO finite difference method with spectral method in two space dimension is considered, jointly with Cai [3]. The resulting scheme behaves nicely for the two dimensional test problems with or without shocks. Jointly with Cai and Gottlieb, we have also considered one-sided filters for spectral approximations to discontinuous functions [2]. We proved theoretically the existence of filters to recover spectral accuracy up to the discontinuity. We also constructed such filters for practical calculations.

  15. Solving 3D relativistic hydrodynamical problems with weighted essentially nonoscillatory discontinuous Galerkin methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugner, Marcus; Dietrich, Tim; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Weyhausen, Andreas; Brügmann, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods coupled to weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) algorithms allow high order convergence for smooth problems and for the simulation of discontinuities and shocks. In this work, we investigate WENO-DG algorithms in the context of numerical general relativity, in particular for general relativistic hydrodynamics. We implement the standard WENO method at different orders, a compact (simple) WENO scheme, as well as an alternative subcell evolution algorithm. To evaluate the performance of the different numerical schemes, we study nonrelativistic, special relativistic, and general relativistic test beds. We present the first three-dimensional simulations of general relativistic hydrodynamics, albeit for a fixed spacetime background, within the framework of WENO-DG methods. The most important test bed is a single Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff star in three dimensions, showing that long term stable simulations of single isolated neutron stars can be obtained with WENO-DG methods.

  16. Development of a moisture scheme for the explicit numerical simulation of moist convection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bopape, Mary-Jane M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available , especially within such a densely populated region. Improved forecasting of convective systems can lead to better early warming systems which will in turn reduce casualties and damage to movable properties. Atmospheric models that assume there is a balance...

  17. Difference Schemes and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-06

    of the shallow water equations that is well suited for complex geometries and moving boundaries. Another (similar) regularization of...the solid wall extrapolation followed by the interpolation in the phase space (by solving the Riemann problem between the internal cell averages and...scheme. This Godunov-type scheme enjoys all major advantages of Riemann -problem-solver-free, non-oscillatory central schemes and, at the same time, have

  18. Mixed time integration schemes for transient conduction forced-convection analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. K.; Lin, J. I.

    1983-01-01

    A partition procedure for forced-convection conduction transient problems is presented. Mixed time partitions are defined wherein coupled conduction force-matrix equations are discretized using an implicit integration method, followed by derivation of a mixed time integration technique. Explicit-implicit and explicit-explicit partitions are performed for a stability analysis for transient conditions, e.g., those found in an actively air-cooled engine and airframe structure.

  19. Numerical Simulations of the 1 May 2012 Deep Convection Event over Cuba: Sensitivity to Cumulus and Microphysical Schemes in a High-Resolution Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yandy G. Mayor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the sensitivity to cumulus and microphysics schemes, as represented in numerical simulations of the Weather Research and Forecasting model, in characterizing a deep convection event over the Cuban island on 1 May 2012. To this end, 30 experiments combining five cumulus and six microphysics schemes, in addition to two experiments in which the cumulus parameterization was turned off, are tested in order to choose the combination that represents the event precipitation more accurately. ERA Interim is used as lateral boundary condition data for the downscaling procedure. Results show that convective schemes are more important than microphysics schemes for determining the precipitation areas within a high-resolution domain simulation. Also, while one cumulus scheme captures the overall spatial convective structure of the event more accurately than others, it fails to capture the precipitation intensity. This apparent discrepancy leads to sensitivity related to the verification method used to rank the scheme combinations. This sensitivity is also observed in a comparison between parameterized and explicit cumulus formation when the Kain-Fritsch scheme was used. A loss of added value is also found when the Grell-Freitas cumulus scheme was activated at 1 km grid spacing.

  20. Sensitivity of hurricane track to cumulus parameterization schemes in the WRF model for three intense tropical cyclones: impact of convective asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Tristan J.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2017-08-01

    This study investigates the effect of the choice of convective parameterization (CP) scheme on the simulated tracks of three intense tropical cyclones (TCs), using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. We focus on diagnosing the competing influences of large-scale steering flow, beta drift and convectively induced changes in track, as represented by four different CP schemes (Kain-Fritsch (KF), Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ), Grell-3D (G-3), and the Tiedtke (TD) scheme). The sensitivity of the results to initial conditions, model domain size and shallow convection is also tested. We employ a diagnostic technique by Chan et al. (J Atmos Sci 59:1317-1336, 2002) that separates the influence of the large-scale steering flow, beta drift and the modifications of the steering flow by the storm-scale convection. The combined effect of the steering flow and the beta drift causes TCs typically to move in the direction of the wavenumber-1 (WN-1) cyclonic potential vorticity tendency (PVT). In instances of asymmetrical TCs, the simulated TC motion does not necessarily match the motion expected from the WN-1 PVT due to changes in the convective pattern. In the present study, we test this concept in the WRF simulations and investigate whether if the diagnosed motion from the WN-1 PVT and the TC motion do not match, this can be related to the emerging evolution of changes in convective structure. Several systematic results are found across the three cyclone cases. The sensitivity of TC track to initial conditions (the initialisation time and model domain size) is less than the sensitivity of TC track to changing the CP scheme. The simulated track is not overly sensitive to shallow convection in the KF, BMJ, and TD schemes, compared to the track difference between CP schemes. The G3 scheme, however, is highly sensitive to shallow convection being used. Furthermore, while agreement between the simulated TC track direction and the WN-1 diagnostic is usually good, there are

  1. Sensitivity of hurricane track to cumulus parameterization schemes in the WRF model for three intense tropical cyclones: impact of convective asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Tristan J.; Walsh, Kevin J.

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the effect of the choice of convective parameterization (CP) scheme on the simulated tracks of three intense tropical cyclones (TCs), using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. We focus on diagnosing the competing influences of large-scale steering flow, beta drift and convectively induced changes in track, as represented by four different CP schemes (Kain-Fritsch (KF), Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ), Grell-3D (G-3), and the Tiedtke (TD) scheme). The sensitivity of the results to initial conditions, model domain size and shallow convection is also tested. We employ a diagnostic technique by Chan et al. (J Atmos Sci 59:1317-1336, 2002) that separates the influence of the large-scale steering flow, beta drift and the modifications of the steering flow by the storm-scale convection. The combined effect of the steering flow and the beta drift causes TCs typically to move in the direction of the wavenumber-1 (WN-1) cyclonic potential vorticity tendency (PVT). In instances of asymmetrical TCs, the simulated TC motion does not necessarily match the motion expected from the WN-1 PVT due to changes in the convective pattern. In the present study, we test this concept in the WRF simulations and investigate whether if the diagnosed motion from the WN-1 PVT and the TC motion do not match, this can be related to the emerging evolution of changes in convective structure. Several systematic results are found across the three cyclone cases. The sensitivity of TC track to initial conditions (the initialisation time and model domain size) is less than the sensitivity of TC track to changing the CP scheme. The simulated track is not overly sensitive to shallow convection in the KF, BMJ, and TD schemes, compared to the track difference between CP schemes. The G3 scheme, however, is highly sensitive to shallow convection being used. Furthermore, while agreement between the simulated TC track direction and the WN-1 diagnostic is usually good, there are

  2. A Finite Difference Scheme on a Priori Adapted Meshes for a Singularly Perturbed Parabolic Convection-Diffusion Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grigory I. Shishkin

    2008-01-01

    A boundary value problem is considered for a singularly perturbed parabolic convection-diffusion equation; we construct a finite difference scheme on a priori (se-quentially) adapted meshes and study its convergence. The scheme on a priori adapted meshes is constructed using a majorant function for the singular component of the discrete solution, which allows us to find a priori a subdomain where the computed solution requires a further improvement. This subdomain is defined by the perturbation parameter ε, the step-size of a uniform mesh in x, and also by the required accuracy of the discrete solution and the prescribed number of refinement iterations K for im-proving the solution. To solve the discrete problems aimed at the improvement of the solution, we use uniform meshes on the subdomains. The error of the numerical so-lution depends weakly on the parameter ε. The scheme converges almost ε-uniformly, precisely, under the condition N-1 = o(ev), where N denotes the number of nodes in the spatial mesh, and the value v=v(K) can be chosen arbitrarily small for suitable K.

  3. Validation of turbulence and convective schemes on western Africa; comparison of LAM and CRM simulations on a HAPEX-Sahel case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, D.; Gueremy, J. F.; Beau, I.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this work is to analyse the behaviour of turbulence and convective parameterizations included in the Météo-France ALADIN-CLIMAT Limited Area Model in the frame of a 24 hour simulation of a HAPEX-Sahel case study, in comparison to observations and to a CRM (Méso-NH, with a 5 km horizontal grid-mesh) simulation carried out under the same boundary forcings. This framework provides an intermediate step of parameterization validation between the Single Column Model and Global Climate Model simulation studies. The chosen case study is the 21st August 1992 over a 12° x 12° region centred over SW Niger. It is characterised by the life cycle of a westward propagating convective system associated to an African Easterly Wave. Both LAM and CRM simulations have been performed over the same considered domain, using the same ERA40 boundary forcings. Sensitivity tests to resolution (both horizontal and vertical) have been first carried out with ALADIN-CLIMAT. Second, the two different convection schemes used in ALADIN-CLIMAT show two kinds of response mainly due to their different formulations of triggering (no constraints in the dry layer under the convective cloud versus continuous treatment of convection including this dry layer) and closure (moisture convergence versus CAPE). Third, the impact of entrainment at the top of the PBL (included in the turbulence scheme) and of convective downdrafts will be shown. Fourth, the impact of different boundary forcing fields will also be presented.

  4. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATIONS OF WENO SCHEMES IN CONTINUUM PHYSICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper briefly presents the general ideas of high order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes, and describes the similarities and differences of the two classes of WENO schemes: finite volume schemes and finite difference schemes. We also briefly mention a recent development of WENO schemes,namely an adaptive approach within the finite difference framework using smooth time dependent curvilinear coordinates.``

  5. Uncertainty Quantification and Parameter Tuning: A Case Study of Convective Parameterization Scheme in the WRF Regional Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Y.; Yang, B.; Lin, G.; Leung, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The current tuning process of parameters in global climate models is often performed subjectively or treated as an optimization procedure to minimize model biases based on observations. The latter approach may provide more plausible values for a set of tunable parameters to approximate the observed climate, the system could be forced to an unrealistic physical state or improper balance of budgets through compensating errors over different regions of the globe. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to provide a more flexible framework to investigate a number of issues related uncertainty quantification (UQ) and parameter tuning. The WRF model was constrained by reanalysis of data over the Southern Great Plains (SGP), where abundant observational data from various sources was available for calibration of the input parameters and validation of the model results. Focusing on five key input parameters in the new Kain-Fritsch (KF) convective parameterization scheme used in WRF as an example, the purpose of this study was to explore the utility of high-resolution observations for improving simulations of regional patterns and evaluate the transferability of UQ and parameter tuning across physical processes, spatial scales, and climatic regimes, which have important implications to UQ and parameter tuning in global and regional models. A stochastic important-sampling algorithm, Multiple Very Fast Simulated Annealing (MVFSA) was employed to efficiently sample the input parameters in the KF scheme based on a skill score so that the algorithm progressively moved toward regions of the parameter space that minimize model errors. The results based on the WRF simulations with 25-km grid spacing over the SGP showed that the precipitation bias in the model could be significantly reduced when five optimal parameters identified by the MVFSA algorithm were used. The model performance was found to be sensitive to downdraft- and entrainment

  6. Performance Evaluation of PBL Schemes of ARW Model in Simulating Thermo-Dynamical Structure of Pre-Monsoon Convective Episodes over Kharagpur Using STORM Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madala, Srikanth; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Srinivas, C. V.; Tyagi, Bhishma

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, advanced research WRF (ARW) model is employed to simulate convective thunderstorm episodes over Kharagpur (22°30'N, 87°20'E) region of Gangetic West Bengal, India. High-resolution simulations are conducted using 1 × 1 degree NCEP final analysis meteorological fields for initial and boundary conditions for events. The performance of two non-local [Yonsei University (YSU), Asymmetric Convective Model version 2 (ACM2)] and two local turbulence kinetic energy closures [Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ), Bougeault-Lacarrere (BouLac)] are evaluated in simulating planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameters and thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere. The model-simulated parameters are validated with available in situ meteorological observations obtained from micro-meteorological tower as well has high-resolution DigiCORA radiosonde ascents during STORM-2007 field experiment at the study location and Doppler Weather Radar (DWR) imageries. It has been found that the PBL structure simulated with the TKE closures MYJ and BouLac are in better agreement with observations than the non-local closures. The model simulations with these schemes also captured the reflectivity, surface pressure patterns such as wake-low, meso-high, pre-squall low and the convective updrafts and downdrafts reasonably well. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons reveal that the MYJ followed by BouLac schemes better simulated various features of the thunderstorm events over Kharagpur region. The better performance of MYJ followed by BouLac is evident in the lesser mean bias, mean absolute error, root mean square error and good correlation coefficient for various surface meteorological variables as well as thermo-dynamical structure of the atmosphere relative to other PBL schemes. The better performance of the TKE closures may be attributed to their higher mixing efficiency, larger convective energy and better simulation of humidity promoting moist convection relative to non

  7. The impact of revised simplified Arakawa-Schubert convection parameterization scheme in CFSv2 on the simulation of the Indian summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganai, Malay; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Krishna, R. Phani Murali; Mahakur, M.

    2015-08-01

    Keeping the systematic bias of the climate forecast system model version 2 (CFSv2) in mind, an attempt is made to improve the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall variability in the model from diurnal through daily to seasonal scale. Experiments with default simplified Arakawa-Schubert (SAS) and a revised SAS schemes are carried out to make 15 years climate run (free run) to evaluate the model fidelity with revised SAS as compared to default SAS. It is clearly seen that the revised SAS is able to reduce some of the biases of CFSv2 with default SAS. Improvement is seen in the annual seasonal cycle, onset and withdrawal but most importantly the rainfall probability distribution function (PDF) has improved significantly. To understand the reason behind the PDF improvement, the diurnal rainfall simulation is analysed and it is found that the PDF of diurnal rainfall has significantly improved with respect to even a high resolution CFSv2 T382 version. In the diurnal run with revised SAS, the PDF of rainfall over central India has remarkably improved. The improvement of diurnal cycle of total rainfall has actually been contributed by the improvement of diurnal cycle of convection and associated convective rainfall. This is reflected in outgoing longwave radiation and high cloud diurnal cycle. This improvement of convective cycle has resolved a long standing problem of dry bias by CFSv2 over Indian land mass and wet bias over equatorial Indian Ocean. Besides the improvement, there are some areas where there are still scopes for further development. The cold tropospheric temperature bias, low cloud fractions need further improvement. To check the role of shallow convection, another free run is made with revised SAS along with shallow convection (SC). The major difference between the new and old SC schemes lies in the heating and cooling behavior in lower-atmospheric layers above the planetary boundary layer. However, the inclusion of revised SC scheme could not show much

  8. Simulation of Indian summer monsoon onset with different parameterization convection schemes of RegCM-4.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatla, R.; Ghosh, S.; Mandal, B.; Mall, R. K.; Sharma, Kuldeep

    2016-07-01

    Simulation of Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) onset over South Asia Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) domain in pentad composite pattern is considered for this study. The latest version of the International Center for Theoretical Physics' (ICTP's) Regional Climate Model version 4.3 (RegCM-4.3) is used for the simulation of a pentad composite onset for three time period: Pre-onset, Onset and Post-onset periods of ISM. Each pentad composite is average of five consecutive days. 10 years (2001-2010) worth of pentad composites of rainfall, mean sea level pressure (MSLP), outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), wind at 850 hPa and 925 hPa levels till 7 days prior to the date of onset of monsoon and 7 days after the onset are analyzed to find out the predictive skill. Six Parameterization convection schemes (PCSs) viz. Kuo, Mix98, Mix99, Tiedtke, Emanuel and Grell are used in sensitivity experiment and estimation of their performance has been done. From the experiment, some modulation is found in the OLR field (≤ 200 Wm- 2) within the region 5°N-10°N and 70°N-75°E. Yearly analysis has shown the strength of wind at 925 hPa over the region 5°N-10°N and 70°E-80°E on pentad composite onset of ISM. Yearly analysis is conducted for finding the best fitted PCS which has provided the precursor for simulating the onset.

  9. On the Growth of Nonoscillatory Solutions for Difference Equations with Deviating Argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Došlá Z

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The half-linear difference equations with the deviating argument , are considered. We study the role of the deviating argument , especially as regards the growth of the nonoscillatory solutions and the oscillation. Moreover, the problem of the existence of the intermediate solutions is completely resolved for the classical half-linear equation ( = 1. Some analogies or discrepancies on the growth of the nonoscillatory solutions for the delayed and advanced equations are presented; and the coexistence with different types of nonoscillatory solutions is studied.

  10. Performance of RegCM-4.3 over the Caribbean region using different configurations of the Tiedtke convective parameterization scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Martínez-Castro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A sensitivity study about the performance of the RegCM-4.3 regional climate model, driven by ERA Interim reanalysis was conducted for a domain including the Caribbean, with horizontal resolution of 50 km from year 2000 to 2001. Sixteen configurations of the model, including variations in the parameters of the Tiedtke convective scheme were tested. The performance of the model using these configurations was compared with data and with simulations using Emanuel (EM and Grell over land-Emanuel over sea (GE convective parameterization schemes. Global datasets of temperature and precipitation and quality controlled data form the weather station networks of Cuba, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic were used as reference. After an analysis of the simulated precipitation fields, some of the configurations were discarded and four of them were chosen to evaluate the representation by the model of the main climatological features of the region. The chosen configurations simulate the general wind and precipitation patterns reasonably well, and at the same time, the seasonal diurnal cycles and the Caribbean low level jet, but they showed different skill in reproducing the particular features of the regional climate. For the rainy season GE shows the best performance, while EM and the default Tiedtke scheme (TI widely overestimate precipitation in the Pacific coast of Central America, whereas for the dry season, the Tiedtke scheme underestimates precipitation, but after tuning parameters biases were reduced. TI scheme showed the best representation of the precipitation seasonal cycle, while the diurnal circle was best reproduced by the GE scheme. Temperature fields were best simulated by Tiedtke configurations, as the area with negative bias was reduced.

  11. High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaleev, Nail K.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    A new third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially NonOscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme for scalar and vector linear hyperbolic equations with piecewise continuous initial conditions is developed. The new scheme is proven to be stable in the energy norm for both continuous and discontinuous solutions. In contrast to the existing high-resolution shock-capturing schemes, no assumption that the reconstruction should be total variation bounded (TVB) is explicitly required to prove stability of the new scheme. A rigorous truncation error analysis is presented showing that the accuracy of the 3rd-order ESWENO scheme is drastically improved if the tuning parameters of the weight functions satisfy certain criteria. Numerical results show that the new ESWENO scheme is stable and significantly outperforms the conventional third-order WENO finite difference scheme of Jiang and Shu in terms of accuracy, while providing essentially nonoscillatory solutions near strong discontinuities.

  12. Numerical simulation of precipitation formation in the case orographically induced convective cloud: Comparison of the results of bin and bulk microphysical schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi, N.; Geresdi, I.; Thompson, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, results of bulk and bin microphysical schemes are compared in the case of idealized simulations of pre-frontal orographic clouds with enhanced embedded convection. The description graupel formation by intensive riming of snowflakes was improved compared to prior versions of each scheme. Two methods of graupel melting coincident with collisions with water drops were considered: (1) all simulated melting and collected water drops increase the amount of melted water on the surface of graupel particles with no shedding permitted; (2) also no shedding permitted due to melting, but the collision with the water drops can induce shedding from the surface of the graupel particles. The results of the numerical experiments show: (i) The bin schemes generate graupel particles more efficiently by riming than the bulk scheme does; the intense riming of snowflakes was the most dominant process for the graupel formation. (ii) The collision-induced shedding significantly affects the evolution of the size distribution of graupel particles and water drops below the melting level. (iii) The three microphysical schemes gave similar values for the domain integrated surface precipitation, but the patterns reveal meaningful differences. (iv) Sensitivity tests using the bulk scheme show that the depth of the melting layer is sensitive to the description of the terminal velocity of the melting snow. (v) Comparisons against Convair-580 flight measurements suggest that the bin schemes simulate well the evolution of the pristine ice particles and liquid drops, while some inaccuracy can occur in the description of snowflakes riming. (vi) The bin scheme with collision-induced shedding reproduced well the quantitative characteristics of the observed bright band.

  13. Application of essentially nonoscillatory methods to aeroacoustic flow problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Harold L.

    1995-01-01

    A finite-difference essentially nonoscillatory (ENO) method has been applied to several of the problems prescribed for the workshop sponsored jointly by the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering and by NASA Langley Research Center entitled 'Benchmark Problems in Computational Aeroacoustics'. The workshop focused on computational challenges specific to aeroacoustics. Among these are long-distance propagation of a short-wavelength disturbance, propagation of small-amplitude disturbances, and nonreflective boundary conditions. The shock capturing-capability inherent to the ENO method effectively eliminates oscillations near shock waves without the need to add and tune dissipation or filter terms. The method-of-lines approach allows the temporal and spatial operators to be chosen separately in accordance with the demands of a particular problem. The ENO method was robust and accurate for all problems in which the propagating wave was resolved with 8 or more points per wavelength. The finite-wave-model boundary condition, a local nonlinear acoustic boundary condition, performed well for the one-dimensional problems. The buffer-domain approach performed well for the two-dimensional test problem. The amplitude of nonphysical reflections were less than 1 percent of the exiting wave's amplitude.

  14. Some Issues in Uncertainty Quantification and Parameter Tuning: A Case Study of Convective Parameterization Scheme in the WRF Regional Climate Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ben; Qian, Yun; Lin, Guang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Zhang, Yaocun

    2012-03-05

    The current tuning process of parameters in global climate models is often performed subjectively, or treated as an optimization procedure to minimize the difference between model fields and observations. The later approach may be generating a set of tunable parameters that approximate the observed climate but via an unrealistic balance of physical processes and/or compensating errors over different regions in the globe. In this study, we run the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional model constrained by the reanalysis data over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) where abundant observational data from various resources are available for calibration of the input parameters and validation of the model results. Our goal is to quantify the uncertainty ranges and identify the optimal values of five key input parameters in a new Kain-Frisch (KF) convective parameterization scheme incorporated in the WRF model. A stochastic sampling algorithm, Multiple Very Fast Simulated Annealing (MVFSA), is employed to efficiently sample the input parameters in KF scheme based on the skill score so that the algorithm progressively moves toward regions of the parameter space that minimize model errors. The results based on the WRF simulations with 25-km grid spacing over the SGP show that the model bias for precipitation can be significantly reduced by using five optimal parameters identified by the MVFSA algorithm. The model performance is very sensitive to downdraft and entrainment related parameters and consumption time of Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE). Simulated convective precipitation decreases as the ratio of downdraft to updraft flux increases. Larger CAPE consumption time results in less convective but more stratiform precipitation. The simulation using optimal parameters obtained by only constraining precipitation generates positive impact on the other output variables, such as temperature and wind. By using the optimal parameters obtained at 25 km

  15. On the Growth of Nonoscillatory Solutions for Difference Equations with Deviating Argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marini

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The half-linear difference equations with the deviating argument Δ(an|Δxn|αsgn Δxn+bn|xn+q|αsgn xn+q=0 , q ∈ ℤ are considered. We study the role of the deviating argument q, especially as regards the growth of the nonoscillatory solutions and the oscillation. Moreover, the problem of the existence of the intermediate solutions is completely resolved for the classical half-linear equation (q = 1. Some analogies or discrepancies on the growth of the nonoscillatory solutions for the delayed and advanced equations are presented; and the coexistence with different types of nonoscillatory solutions is studied.

  16. Numerical analysis natural convection of thermo-electrically conducting fluids in a square cavity under a uniform magnetic field. 4th Report. Stable numerical scheme for low magnetic Reynolds numbers: scheme verification; GSMAC yugen yosoho ni yoru naibu hatsunetsu wo tomonau denji netsu ryutai no seihokei cavity nai shizen tairyu kaiseki. 4. Teijiki Reynolds su de anteina kaiho: scheme no kensho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Y.; Tanahashi, T. [Keio University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    1995-07-25

    In the present paper, the natural convections of thermo-electrically conducting fluids in a square cavity under a uniform magnetic field are calculated using GSMAC-FEM in conjunction with the so-called B method. This scheme efficiently satisfies conservation laws of both mass and magnetic flux. In order to establish a stable numerical scheme at low magnetic Reynolds number problems, we introduce both the generalized trapezoidal method and the 3-level fully implicit method into the conventional numerical residual method. The numerical results obtained are in good agreement with the past numerical and experimental results. 13 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Multi-ensemble regional simulation of Indian monsoon during contrasting rainfall years: role of convective schemes and nested domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanand, Anjana; Ghosh, Subimal; Paul, Supantha; Karmakar, Subhankar; Niyogi, Dev

    2017-08-01

    Regional simulations of the seasonal Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) require an understanding of the model sensitivities to physics and resolution, and its effect on the model uncertainties. It is also important to quantify the added value in the simulated sub-regional precipitation characteristics by a regional climate model (RCM), when compared to coarse resolution rainfall products. This study presents regional model simulations of ISMR at seasonal scale using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with the synoptic scale forcing from ERA-interim reanalysis, for three contrasting monsoon seasons, 1994 (excess), 2002 (deficit) and 2010 (normal). Impact of four cumulus schemes, viz., Kain-Fritsch (KF), Betts-Janjić-Miller, Grell 3D and modified Kain-Fritsch (KFm), and two micro physical parameterization schemes, viz., WRF Single Moment Class 5 scheme and Lin et al. scheme (LIN), with eight different possible combinations are analyzed. The impact of spectral nudging on model sensitivity is also studied. In WRF simulations using spectral nudging, improvement in model rainfall appears to be consistent in regions with topographic variability such as Central Northeast and Konkan Western Ghat sub-regions. However the results are also dependent on choice of cumulus scheme used, with KF and KFm providing relatively good performance and the eight member ensemble mean showing better results for these sub-regions. There is no consistent improvement noted in Northeast and Peninsular Indian monsoon regions. Results indicate that the regional simulations using nested domains can provide some improvements on ISMR simulations. Spectral nudging is found to improve upon the model simulations in terms of reducing the intra ensemble spread and hence the uncertainty in the model simulated precipitation. The results provide important insights regarding the need for further improvements in the regional climate simulations of ISMR for various sub-regions and contribute

  18. Some issues in uncertainty quantification and parameter tuning: a case study of convective parameterization scheme in the WRF regional climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B.; Qian, Y.; Lin, G.; Leung, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-03-01

    The current tuning process of parameters in global climate models is often performed subjectively or treated as an optimization procedure to minimize model biases based on observations. While the latter approach may provide more plausible values for a set of tunable parameters to approximate the observed climate, the system could be forced to an unrealistic physical state or improper balance of budgets through compensating errors over different regions of the globe. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to provide a more flexible framework to investigate a number of issues related uncertainty quantification (UQ) and parameter tuning. The WRF model was constrained by reanalysis of data over the Southern Great Plains (SGP), where abundant observational data from various sources was available for calibration of the input parameters and validation of the model results. Focusing on five key input parameters in the new Kain-Fritsch (KF) convective parameterization scheme used in WRF as an example, the purpose of this study was to explore the utility of high-resolution observations for improving simulations of regional patterns and evaluate the transferability of UQ and parameter tuning across physical processes, spatial scales, and climatic regimes, which have important implications to UQ and parameter tuning in global and regional models. A stochastic importance sampling algorithm, Multiple Very Fast Simulated Annealing (MVFSA) was employed to efficiently sample the input parameters in the KF scheme based on a skill score so that the algorithm progressively moved toward regions of the parameter space that minimize model errors. The results based on the WRF simulations with 25-km grid spacing over the SGP showed that the precipitation bias in the model could be significantly reduced when five optimal parameters identified by the MVFSA algorithm were used. The model performance was found to be sensitive to downdraft- and entrainment

  19. Some issues in uncertainty quantification and parameter tuning: a case study of convective parameterization scheme in the WRF regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The current tuning process of parameters in global climate models is often performed subjectively or treated as an optimization procedure to minimize model biases based on observations. While the latter approach may provide more plausible values for a set of tunable parameters to approximate the observed climate, the system could be forced to an unrealistic physical state or improper balance of budgets through compensating errors over different regions of the globe. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model was used to provide a more flexible framework to investigate a number of issues related uncertainty quantification (UQ and parameter tuning. The WRF model was constrained by reanalysis of data over the Southern Great Plains (SGP, where abundant observational data from various sources was available for calibration of the input parameters and validation of the model results. Focusing on five key input parameters in the new Kain-Fritsch (KF convective parameterization scheme used in WRF as an example, the purpose of this study was to explore the utility of high-resolution observations for improving simulations of regional patterns and evaluate the transferability of UQ and parameter tuning across physical processes, spatial scales, and climatic regimes, which have important implications to UQ and parameter tuning in global and regional models. A stochastic importance sampling algorithm, Multiple Very Fast Simulated Annealing (MVFSA was employed to efficiently sample the input parameters in the KF scheme based on a skill score so that the algorithm progressively moved toward regions of the parameter space that minimize model errors.

    The results based on the WRF simulations with 25-km grid spacing over the SGP showed that the precipitation bias in the model could be significantly reduced when five optimal parameters identified by the MVFSA algorithm were used. The model performance was found to be sensitive to

  20. Some issues in uncertainty quantification and parameter tuning: a case study of convective parameterization scheme in the WRF regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current tuning process of parameters in global climate models is often performed subjectively or treated as an optimization procedure to minimize model biases based on observations. While the latter approach may provide more plausible values for a set of tunable parameters to approximate the observed climate, the system could be forced to an unrealistic physical state or improper balance of budgets through compensating errors over different regions of the globe. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model was used to provide a more flexible framework to investigate a number of issues related uncertainty quantification (UQ and parameter tuning. The WRF model was constrained by reanalysis of data over the Southern Great Plains (SGP, where abundant observational data from various sources was available for calibration of the input parameters and validation of the model results. Focusing on five key input parameters in the new Kain-Fritsch (KF convective parameterization scheme used in WRF as an example, the purpose of this study was to explore the utility of high-resolution observations for improving simulations of regional patterns and evaluate the transferability of UQ and parameter tuning across physical processes, spatial scales, and climatic regimes, which have important implications to UQ and parameter tuning in global and regional models. A stochastic important-sampling algorithm, Multiple Very Fast Simulated Annealing (MVFSA was employed to efficiently sample the input parameters in the KF scheme based on a skill score so that the algorithm progressively moved toward regions of the parameter space that minimize model errors.

    The results based on the WRF simulations with 25-km grid spacing over the SGP showed that the precipitation bias in the model could be significantly reduced when five optimal parameters identified by the MVFSA algorithm were used. The model performance was found to be sensitive to

  1. High-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite-difference formulation of the lattice Boltzmann method in generalized curvilinear coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Saadat, Mohammad Hossein; Taheri, Sina

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (WENOLBM) is developed and assessed for an accurate simulation of incompressible flows. To handle curved geometries with nonuniform grids, the incompressible form of the discrete Boltzmann equation with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation is transformed into the generalized curvilinear coordinates and the spatial derivatives of the resulting lattice Boltzmann equation in the computational plane are solved using the fifth-order WENO scheme. The first-order implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme and also the fourth-order Runge-Kutta explicit time integrating scheme are adopted for the discretization of the temporal term. To examine the accuracy and performance of the present solution procedure based on the WENOLBM developed, different benchmark test cases are simulated as follows: unsteady Taylor-Green vortex, unsteady doubly periodic shear layer flow, steady flow in a two-dimensional (2D) cavity, steady cylindrical Couette flow, steady flow over a 2D circular cylinder, and steady and unsteady flows over a NACA0012 hydrofoil at different flow conditions. Results of the present solution are compared with the existing numerical and experimental results which show good agreement. To show the efficiency and accuracy of the solution methodology, the results are also compared with the developed second-order central-difference finite-volume lattice Boltzmann method and the compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method. It is shown that the present numerical scheme is robust, efficient, and accurate for solving steady and unsteady incompressible flows even at high Reynolds number flows.

  2. High-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite-difference formulation of the lattice Boltzmann method in generalized curvilinear coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Saadat, Mohammad Hossein; Taheri, Sina

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (WENOLBM) is developed and assessed for an accurate simulation of incompressible flows. To handle curved geometries with nonuniform grids, the incompressible form of the discrete Boltzmann equation with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation is transformed into the generalized curvilinear coordinates and the spatial derivatives of the resulting lattice Boltzmann equation in the computational plane are solved using the fifth-order WENO scheme. The first-order implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme and also the fourth-order Runge-Kutta explicit time integrating scheme are adopted for the discretization of the temporal term. To examine the accuracy and performance of the present solution procedure based on the WENOLBM developed, different benchmark test cases are simulated as follows: unsteady Taylor-Green vortex, unsteady doubly periodic shear layer flow, steady flow in a two-dimensional (2D) cavity, steady cylindrical Couette flow, steady flow over a 2D circular cylinder, and steady and unsteady flows over a NACA0012 hydrofoil at different flow conditions. Results of the present solution are compared with the existing numerical and experimental results which show good agreement. To show the efficiency and accuracy of the solution methodology, the results are also compared with the developed second-order central-difference finite-volume lattice Boltzmann method and the compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method. It is shown that the present numerical scheme is robust, efficient, and accurate for solving steady and unsteady incompressible flows even at high Reynolds number flows.

  3. A pressure-correction scheme for convection-dominated incompressible flows with discontinuous velocity and continuous pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Lorenzo; Di Pietro, Daniele A.

    2011-02-01

    In this work we present a pressure-correction scheme for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations combining a discontinuous Galerkin approximation for the velocity and a standard continuous Galerkin approximation for the pressure. The main interest of pressure-correction algorithms is the reduced computational cost compared to monolithic strategies. In this work we show how a proper discretization of the decoupled momentum equation can render this method suitable to simulate high Reynolds regimes. The proposed spatial velocity-pressure approximation is LBB stable for equal polynomial orders and it allows adaptive p-refinement for velocity and global p-refinement for pressure. The method is validated against a large set of classical two- and three-dimensional test cases covering a wide range of Reynolds numbers, in which it proves effective both in terms of accuracy and computational cost.

  4. Electromyographic activity of shoulder muscles during exercises performed with oscillatory and non-oscillatory poles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallal, Camilla Z; Marques, Nise R; Silva, Sarah R D; Dieën, Jaap V; Gonçalves, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Pain and dysfunction of the shoulder complex are commonly found physiotherapy practice. These musculoskeletal abnormalities are related to instability and inadequate kinematic function, that depend on the integrity of the muscle tissues. Thus, to enhance the results of exercise therapies, and prevent and attenuate pain and dynfunction, the use of oscillatory pole has been implemented in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to analyze the electromyographic (EMG) activity of shoulder stabilizing muscles during exercises performed with an oscillatory and a non-oscillatory pole. Twelve female volunteers, aged 20.4 years±1.9, participated in this study. EMG data were collected from upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT) and middle deltoid (MD) during three different exercises with an oscillatory and a non-oscillatory pole. The EMG signals were analyzed in the time domain through the calculation of Root Mean Square (RMS). The RMS values were normalized by the peak value obtained over all trials for each muscle. Statistical analysis was performed with repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc of Bonferroni tests. The EMG activity of UT, LT and MD muscles were significantly higher with the oscillatory pole than the non-oscillatory pole (all pmuscles between exercises. The results of the present study indicated that the oscillatory pole does require higher activation of the shoulder muscles and therefore, may be useful in the training of the shoulder complex.

  5. Comparative study of numerical schemes of TVD3, UNO3-ACM and optimized compact scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Duck-Joo; Hwang, Chang-Jeon; Ko, Duck-Kon; Kim, Jae-Wook

    1995-01-01

    Three different schemes are employed to solve the benchmark problem. The first one is a conventional TVD-MUSCL (Monotone Upwind Schemes for Conservation Laws) scheme. The second scheme is a UNO3-ACM (Uniformly Non-Oscillatory Artificial Compression Method) scheme. The third scheme is an optimized compact finite difference scheme modified by us: the 4th order Runge Kutta time stepping, the 4th order pentadiagonal compact spatial discretization with the maximum resolution characteristics. The problems of category 1 are solved by using the second (UNO3-ACM) and third (Optimized Compact) schemes. The problems of category 2 are solved by using the first (TVD3) and second (UNO3-ACM) schemes. The problem of category 5 is solved by using the first (TVD3) scheme. It can be concluded from the present calculations that the Optimized Compact scheme and the UN03-ACM show good resolutions for category 1 and category 2 respectively.

  6. WEIGHTED COMPACT SCHEME FOR SHOCK CAPTURING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new class of finite difference schemes--the weighted compact schemes are proposed. According to the idea of the WENO schemes, the weighted compact scheme is constructed by a combination of the approximations of derivatives on candidate stencils with properly assigned weights so that the non-oscillatory property is achieved when discontinuities appear. The primitive function reconstruction method of ENO schemes is applied to obtain the conservative form of the weighted compact scheme. This new scheme not only preserves the characteristic of standard compact schemes and achieves high order accuracy and high resolution using a compact stencil,but also can accurately capture shock waves and discontinuities without oscillation, Numerical examples show that the new scheme is very promising and successful.``

  7. Finite Boltzmann schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2006-01-01

    In the special case of relaxation parameter = 1 lattice Boltzmann schemes for (convection) diffusion and fluid flow are equivalent to finite difference/volume (FD) schemes, and are thus coined finite Boltzmann (FB) schemes. We show that the equivalence is inherent to the homology of the

  8. Birth of oscillation in coupled non-oscillatory Rayleigh-Duffing oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guin, A.; Dandapathak, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, B. C.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of two bilaterally-coupled non-oscillatory Rayleigh-Duffing oscillators (RDOs). With the increase of coupling factor (CF) between RDOs, birth of periodic oscillations observed. For increased values of CF, dynamics becomes chaotic through a quasi-periodicroute but for even higher CF, synchronized stable periodic oscillations in RDOs are found. Taking direct and anti-diffusive coupling cases into consideration, we derive conditions for periodic bifurcation in parameter space analytically and verified them through numerical solution of system equations. Numerical simulation is also used to predict system states in two parameter space involving CF and linear damping parameter of RDOs. It indicates non-oscillatory, periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic zones of system dynamics. Qualitative explanation of the simulated dynamics is given using homoclinic perturbation theory. Hardware experiment is performed on analog circuits simulating RDO model and obtained results confirm the predictions regarding birth of periodic oscillation and other features of system dynamics. Experimental results examining onset of oscillations in two under-biased bi-laterally coupled X-band Gunn oscillators (which are modelled as RDOs) is presented in support of the analysis.

  9. The onset of double-diffusive convection in a nanofluid layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nield, D.A. [Department of Engineering Science, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Kuznetsov, A.V., E-mail: avkuznet@ncsu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7910, Raleigh, NC 27695-7910 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The onset of double-diffusive convection in a horizontal layer of a nanofluid is studied analytically. The model used for the nanofluid incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. In addition the thermal energy equations include regular diffusion and cross-diffusion terms. The stability boundaries for both non-oscillatory and oscillatory cases have been approximated by simple analytical expressions. Physical significance of the obtained results is discussed.

  10. Parameterizing convective organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Earle Mapes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lateral mixing parameters in buoyancy-driven deep convection schemes are among the most sensitive and important unknowns in atmosphere models. Unfortunately, there is not a true optimum value for plume mixing rate, but rather a dilemma or tradeoff: Excessive dilution of updrafts leads to unstable stratification bias in the mean state, while inadequate dilution allows deep convection to occur too easily, causing poor space and time distributions and variability. In this too-small parameter space, compromises are made based on competing metrics of model performance. We attempt to escape this “entrainment dilemma” by making bulk plume parameters (chiefly entrainment rate depend on a new prognostic variable (“organization,” org meant to reflect the rectified effects of subgrid-scale structure in meteorological fields. We test an org scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5 with a new unified shallow-deep convection scheme (UW-ens, a 2-plume version of the University of Washington scheme. Since buoyant ascent involves natural selection, subgrid structure makes convection systematically deeper and stronger than the pure unorganized case: plumes of average (or randomly sampled air rising in the average environment. To reflect this, org is nonnegative, but we leave it dimensionless. A time scale characterizes its behavior (here ∼3 h for a 2o model. Currently its source is rain evaporation, but other sources can be added easily. We also let org be horizontally transported by advection, as a mass-weighted mean over the convecting layer. Linear coefficients link org to a plume ensemble, which it assists via: 1 plume base warmth above the mean temperature 2 plume radius enhancement (reduced mixing, and 3 increased probability of overlap in a multi-plume scheme, where interactions benefit later generations (this part has only been implemented in an offline toy column model. Since rain evaporation is a source for org, it functions as a time

  11. A Finite Difference Scheme for Double-Diffusive Unsteady Free Convection from a Curved Surface to a Saturated Porous Medium with a Non-Newtonian Fluid

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2011-05-14

    In this paper, a finite difference scheme is developed to solve the unsteady problem of combined heat and mass transfer from an isothermal curved surface to a porous medium saturated by a non-Newtonian fluid. The curved surface is kept at constant temperature and the power-law model is used to model the non-Newtonian fluid. The explicit finite difference method is used to solve simultaneously the equations of momentum, energy and concentration. The consistency of the explicit scheme is examined and the stability conditions are determined for each equation. Boundary layer and Boussinesq approximations have been incorporated. Numerical calculations are carried out for the various parameters entering into the problem. Velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are shown graphically. It is found that as time approaches infinity, the values of wall shear, heat transfer coefficient and concentration gradient at the wall, which are entered in tables, approach the steady state values.

  12. APPLICATION OF WEIGHTED NON- OSCILLATORY AND NON-FREE- PARAMETER DISSIPATION DIFFERENCE SCHEME IN CALCULATING THE FLOW OF VIBRATING FLAT CASCADE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A dual-time method is introduced to calculate the unsteady flow in a certain vibrating flat cascade. An implicit lower-upper symmetric-gauss-seidel scheme(LU-SGS) is applied for time stepping in pseudo time domains, and the convection items are discretized with the spatial three-order weighted non-oscillatory and non-free-parameter dissipation difference (WNND) scheme. The turbulence model adopts q-( low-Reynolds-number model. The frequency spectrums of lift coefficients and the unsteady pressure-difference coefficients at different spanwise heights as well as the entropy contours at blade tips on different vibrating instants, are obtained. By the analysis of frequency spectrums of lift coefficients at three spanwise heights, it is considered that there exist obvious non-linear perturbations in the flow induced by the vibrating, and the perturbation frequencies are higher than the basic frequency. The entropy contours at blade tips at different times display an intensively unsteady attribute of the flow under large amplitudes.

  13. Assessment of shock capturing schemes for discontinuous Galerkin method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于剑; 阎超; 赵瑞

    2014-01-01

    This paper carries out systematical investigations on the performance of several typical shock-capturing schemes for the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method, including the total variation bounded (TVB) limiter and three artificial diffusivity schemes (the basis function-based (BF) scheme, the face residual-based (FR) scheme, and the element residual-based (ER) scheme). Shock-dominated flows (the Sod problem, the Shu-Osher problem, the double Mach reflection problem, and the transonic NACA0012 flow) are considered, addressing the issues of accuracy, non-oscillatory property, dependence on user-specified constants, resolution of discontinuities, and capability for steady solutions. Numerical results indicate that the TVB limiter is more efficient and robust, while the artificial diffusivity schemes are able to preserve small-scale flow structures better. In high order cases, the artificial diffusivity schemes have demonstrated superior performance over the TVB limiter.

  14. High-Order Finite Difference GLM-MHD Schemes for Cell-Centered MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Mignone, A; Bodo, G

    2010-01-01

    We present and compare third- as well as fifth-order accurate finite difference schemes for the numerical solution of the compressible ideal MHD equations in multiple spatial dimensions. The selected methods lean on four different reconstruction techniques based on recently improved versions of the weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes, monotonicity preserving (MP) schemes as well as slope-limited polynomial reconstruction. The proposed numerical methods are highly accurate in smooth regions of the flow, avoid loss of accuracy in proximity of smooth extrema and provide sharp non-oscillatory transitions at discontinuities. We suggest a numerical formulation based on a cell-centered approach where all of the primary flow variables are discretized at the zone center. The divergence-free condition is enforced by augmenting the MHD equations with a generalized Lagrange multiplier yielding a mixed hyperbolic/parabolic correction, as in Dedner et al. (J. Comput. Phys. 175 (2002) 645-673). The resulting...

  15. Non-Oscillatory Central Schemes for One- and Two-Dimensional MHD Equations. II: High-Order Semi-Discrete Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-20

    t) + 4(uWj+1,k(t)− uEj,k(t)) + uSWj+1,k(t)− uSEj,k (t) ) , (2.25) Hzj ,k+ 12 (t) = 1 12 [ g(uSWj,k+1(t)) + g(u NW j,k (t)) + 4(g(u S j,k+1(t)) + g(u...problem consists of a left–moving fast rarefaction wave (FR), followed by a tangential discontinuity ( TD ), and a right moving fast shock (FS) with Mach

  16. CONSTRUCTION OF THIRD-ORDER WNND SCHEME AND ITS APPLICATION IN COMPLEX FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 赵海洋; 谢昱飞

    2005-01-01

    According to the Liu' s weighted idea, a space third-order WNND ( weighted non-oscillatory, containing no free parameters, and dissipative scheme ) scheme was constructed based on the stencils of second-order NND (non-oscillatory, containing no free parameters, and dissipative scheme ) scheme. It was applied in solving linear-wave equation, 1D Euler equations and 3D Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical results indicate that the WNND scheme which does not increase interpolated point ( compared to NND scheme) has more advantages in simulating discontinues and convergence than NND scheme. Appling WNND scheme to simulating the hypersonic flow around lift-body shows:With the AoA ( angle of attack ) increasing from 0° to 50°, the structure of limiting streamline of leeward surface changes from unseparating, open-separating to separating,which occurs from the combined-point (which consists of saddle and node points ). The separating area of upper wing surface is increasing with the AoA's increasing. The topological structures of hypersonic fiowfield based on the sectional flow patterns perpendicular to the body axis agree well with Zhang Hanxin' s theory. Additionally, the unstable-structure phenomenon which is showed by two saddles connection along leeward symmetry line occurs at some sections when the AoA is bigger than 20°.

  17. Moist convection scheme in Model E2

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Daehyun; Yao, Mao-Sung

    2013-01-01

    This documentation describes the version of the Del Genio - Yao cumulus parameterization used in the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Model E2 GCM. This version was used for the official GISS submissions to the CMIP5 archive.

  18. High Order Discontinuous Gelerkin Methods for Convection Dominated Problems with Application to Aeroacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chi-Wang

    2000-01-01

    methods for shock calculations. Jointly with P. Montarnal, we have used a recently developed energy relaxation theory by Coquel and Perthame and high order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes to simulate the Euler equations of real gas. The main idea is an energy decomposition under the form epsilon = epsilon(sub 1) + epsilon(sub 2), where epsilon(sub 1) is associated with a simpler pressure law (gamma)-law in this paper) and the nonlinear deviation epsilon(sub 2) is convected with the flow. A relaxation process is performed for each time step to ensure that the original pressure law is satisfied. The necessary characteristic decomposition for the high order WENO schemes is performed on the characteristic fields based on the epsilon(sub l) gamma-law. The algorithm only calls for the original pressure law once per grid point per time step, without the need to compute its derivatives or any Riemann solvers. Both one and two dimensional numerical examples are shown to illustrate the effectiveness of this approach.

  19. Modification of QUICK scheme by skew points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzaei, M.; Mohammadi, R.; Malekzadeh, M. [K.N. Toosi Univ. of Technology, Aerospace Engineering Dept., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: Mirzaei@kntu.ac.ir

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents a new method for convective flux approximation based on inclusions of skew points. The scheme uses the truncated terms of QUICK scheme and with the aid of an equation extracted from momentum equations, the skew points will appear in the convective flux formula. The results show that the presented scheme has better accuracy than the other schemes. Diffusion fluxes are approximated using power law scheme and for evaluation of the performance of the presented method several test cases were carried out and the results are compared with the results of other numerical works and experimental data. (author)

  20. Impacts of Convective Triggering on Convective Variability in a Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. C.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the impacts of the triggering designs of the deep convection scheme on convective variability from diurnal rainfall cycle to intraseasonal rainfall variability by using NCAR CAM5 model. Using single-column simulations at the Southern Great Plains site, we found that the underestimated nighttime rainfall of diurnal cycle can be greatly improved when two convective triggering designs from the Simplified Arakawa-Schubert scheme (SAS) are implemented into the default Zhang-Mcfarlane (ZM) scheme. We further conducted AMIP-type climate simulations with this modified ZM scheme (ZMMOD), and found that improvements can also be seen for the diurnally propagating convection over topographical regions, such as Maritime Continent and the western coast of Columbia. We further examined the rainfall variability from synoptic to intraseasonal scales, and found that using ZMMOD scheme increases rainfall variability of 2-10-day over South America and Africa land regions. However, this improvement does not seem to transfer to the intraseasonal convective organization (20-100 days), such as the MJO. This study demonstrates the importance of convective triggering and its impacts on convective variability. This work is still on-going to understand the physical processes of such impacts and how they might affect climate systems through multiscale interactions.

  1. HERMITE WENO SCHEMES WITH LAX-WENDROFF TYPE TIME DISCRETIZATIONS FOR HAMILTON-JACOBI EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxian Qiu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we use Hermite weighted essentially non-oscillatory (HWENO) schemes with a Lax-Wendroff time discretization procedure, termed HWENO-LW schemes, to solve Hamilton-Jacobi equations. The idea of the reconstruction in the HWENO schemes comes from the original WENO schemes, however both the function and its first derivative values are evolved in time and are used in the reconstruction. One major advantage of HWENO schemes is its compactness in the reconstruction. We explore the possibility in avoiding the nonlinear weights for part of the procedure, hence reducing the cost but still maintaining non-oscillatory properties for problems with strong discontinuous derivative. As a result,comparing with HWENO with Runge-Kutta time discretizations schemes (HWENO-RK) of Qiu and Shu [19] for Hamilton-Jacobi equations, the major advantages of HWENO-LW schemes are their saving of computational cost and their compactness in the reconstruction.Extensive numerical experiments are performed to illustrate the capability of the method.

  2. Application of ADER Scheme in MHD Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yanyan; FENG Xueshang; JIANG Chaowei; ZHOU Yufen

    2012-01-01

    The Arbitrary accuracy Derivatives Riemann problem method(ADER) scheme is a new high order numerical scheme based on the concept of finite volume integration,and it is very easy to be extended up to any order of space and time accuracy by using a Taylor time expansion at the cell interface position.So far the approach has been applied successfully to flow mechanics problems.Our objective here is to carry out the extension of multidimensional ADER schemes to multidimensional MHD systems of conservation laws by calculating several MHD problems in one and two dimensions: (ⅰ) Brio-Wu shock tube problem,(ⅱ) Dai-Woodward shock tube problem,(ⅲ) Orszag-Tang MHD vortex problem.The numerical results prove that the ADER scheme possesses the ability to solve MHD problem,remains high order accuracy both in space and time,keeps precise in capturing the shock.Meanwhile,the compared tests show that the ADER scheme can restrain the oscillation and obtain the high order non-oscillatory result.

  3. A High Resolution Low Dissipation Hybrid Scheme for Compressible Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jian; YAN Chao; JIANG Zhenhua

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,an efficient hybrid shock capturing scheme is proposed to obtain accurate results both in the smooth region and around discontinuities for compressible flows.The hybrid algorithm is based on a fifth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme in the finite volume form to solve the smooth part of the flow field,which is coupled with a characteristic-based monotone upstream-centered scheme for conservation laws(MUSCL) to capture discontinuities.The hybrid scheme is intended to combine high resolution of MUSCL scheme and low dissipation of WENO scheme.The two ingredients in this hybrid scheme are switched with an indicator.Three typical indicators are chosen and compared.MUSCL and WENO are both shock capturing schemes making the choice of the indicator parameter less crucial.Several test cases are carried out to investigate hybrid scheme with different indicators in terms of accuracy and efficiency.Numerical results demonstrate that the hybrid scheme in the present work performs well in a broad range of problems.

  4. On the Existence of Non-Oscillatory Phase Functions for Second Order Ordinary Differential Equations in the High-Frequency Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-04

    trigonometric functions of large arguments. 11. Conclusions We have shown that the solutions of a large class of second order differential equations can be...nonoscillatory phase functions . In addition, we describe numerical experiments which illustrate com- putational implications of this fact. For example, many...special functions of interest — such as the Bessel functions Jν and Yν — can be evaluated accurately using a number of operations which is Op1q in

  5. Convection in Condensible-rich Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case-water vapor in Earth's present climate-the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO2 is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-co...

  6. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  7. Towards energy-efficient nonoscillatory forward-in-time integrations on lat-lon grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Piotrowski, Zbigniew; Ryczkowski, Adam

    2017-04-01

    The design of the next-generation weather prediction models calls for new algorithmic approaches allowing for robust integrations of atmospheric flow over complex orography at sub-km resolutions. These need to be accompanied by efficient implementations exposing multi-level parallelism, capable to run on modern supercomputing architectures. Here we present the recent advances in the energy-efficient implementation of the consistent soundproof/implicit compressible EULAG dynamical core of the COSMO weather prediction framework. Based on the experiences of the atmospheric dwarfs developed within H2020 ESCAPE project, we develop efficient, architecture agnostic implementations of fully three-dimensional MPDATA advection schemes and generalized diffusion operator in curvilinear coordinates and spherical geometry. We compare optimized Fortran implementation with preliminary C++ implementation employing the Gridtools library, allowing for integrations on CPU and GPU while maintaining single source code.

  8. Coupling of convection and circulation at various resolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Hohenegger

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A correct representation of the coupling between convection and circulation constitutes a prerequisite for a correct representation of precipitation at all scales. In this study, the coupling between convection and a sea breeze is investigated across three main resolutions: large-eddy resolution where convection is fully explicit, convection-permitting resolution where convection is partly explicit and coarse resolution where convection is parameterised. The considered models are the UCLA-LES, COSMO and ICON. Despite the use of prescribed surface fluxes, comparison of the simulations reveals that typical biases associated with a misrepresentation of convection at convection-permitting and coarser resolutions significantly alter the characteristics of the sea breeze. The coarse-resolution simulations integrated without convective parameterisation and the convection-permitting simulations simulate a too slow propagation of the breeze front as compared to the large-eddy simulations. From the various factors affecting the propagation, a delayed onset and intensification of cold pools primarily explains the differences. This is a direct consequence of a delayed development of convection when the grid spacing is coarsened. Scaling the time the sea breeze reaches the centre of the land patch by the time precipitation exceeds 2 mm day−1, used as a measure for significant evaporation, yields a collapse of the simulations onto a simple linear relationship although subtle differences remain due to the use of different turbulence and microphysical schemes. Turning on the convection scheme significantly disrupts the propagation of the sea breeze due to a misrepresented timing (too early triggering and magnitude (too strong precipitation evaporation in one of the tested convection schemes of the convective processes.

  9. 一类对流扩散方程的特征-修正差分格式及最大模估计%MODIFIED CHARACTERISTIC DIFFERENCE SCHEME AND MAXIMUM NORM ESTIMATE FOR A KIND OF CONVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜宁

    2002-01-01

    A new technique is introduced to approximate the values of the inter-polated points instead of using local quadratic interpolation. A modified charac-teristic difference scheme based on the new technique is formulated to treat a con-vection-diffusion problem of the form cu,+bux- (aux)x=f. Convergence and sta-bility of the scheme are analyzed, and an error estimate of O(△t+h2) in maxi-mum norm is presented.

  10. Convection in Condensible-rich Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, F.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.

    2016-05-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case—water vapor in Earth’s present climate—the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO2 is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-convective simulations. As a further illustration of the behavior of the scheme, results for a runaway greenhouse atmosphere for both steady instellation and seasonally varying instellation corresponding to a highly eccentric orbit are presented. The latter case illustrates that the high thermal inertia associated with latent heat in nondilute atmospheres can damp out the effects of even extreme seasonal forcing.

  11. A new framework for parameterization of heterogeneous ocean convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilicak, M.; Adcroft, A.; Legg, S.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new framework for parameterization of ocean convection processes. The new framework is termed ''patchy convection'' since our aim is to represent the heterogeneity of mixing processes that take place within the horizontal scope of a grid cell. We focus on applying this new scheme to represent the effect of pre-conditioning for deep convection by subgrid scale eddy variability. The new scheme relies on mesoscale eddy kinetic energy field. We illustrate the patchy parameterization using a 1D idealized convection case. Next, the scheme is compared against observations. We employed the 1D case using the summer time ARGO floats from the Labrador Sea as initial conditions. We used ECMWF reanalysis atmospheric forcing and compared our results to the winter time ARGO floats. Finally we evaluate the scheme in two different global ocean-ice simulations with prescribed atmospheric forcing (CORE-I); (i) diagnosed eddy velocity field applied only in the Labrador Sea (ii) diagnosed global eddy velocity field. The global simulation results indicate that the patchy convection scheme improves the warm biases in the deep Atlantic Ocean and Southern Ocean. This proof-of-concept study is a first step in developing the patchy parameterization scheme, which will be extended in future to use a prognostic eddy field as well as to parameterize convection due to under-ice brine rejection. This study is funded through the CPT 2: Ocean Mixing Processes Associated with High Spatial Heterogeneity in Sea Ice and the Implications for Climate Models.

  12. High-Order Semi-Discrete Central-Upwind Schemes for Multi-Dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present the first fifth order, semi-discrete central upwind method for approximating solutions of multi-dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi equations. Unlike most of the commonly used high order upwind schemes, our scheme is formulated as a Godunov-type scheme. The scheme is based on the fluxes of Kurganov-Tadmor and Kurganov-Tadmor-Petrova, and is derived for an arbitrary number of space dimensions. A theorem establishing the monotonicity of these fluxes is provided. The spacial discretization is based on a weighted essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction of the derivative. The accuracy and stability properties of our scheme are demonstrated in a variety of examples. A comparison between our method and other fifth-order schemes for Hamilton-Jacobi equations shows that our method exhibits smaller errors without any increase in the complexity of the computations.

  13. On positivity-preserving high order discontinuous Galerkin schemes for compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangxiong

    2017-01-01

    We construct a local Lax-Friedrichs type positivity-preserving flux for compressible Navier-Stokes equations, which can be easily extended to multiple dimensions for generic forms of equations of state, shear stress tensor and heat flux. With this positivity-preserving flux, any finite volume type schemes including discontinuous Galerkin (DG) schemes with strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta time discretizations satisfy a weak positivity property. With a simple and efficient positivity-preserving limiter, high order explicit Runge-Kutta DG schemes are rendered preserving the positivity of density and internal energy without losing local conservation or high order accuracy. Numerical tests suggest that the positivity-preserving flux and the positivity-preserving limiter do not induce excessive artificial viscosity, and the high order positivity-preserving DG schemes without other limiters can produce satisfying non-oscillatory solutions when the nonlinear diffusion in compressible Navier-Stokes equations is accurately resolved.

  14. High-Order Entropy Stable Finite Difference Schemes for Nonlinear Conservation Laws: Finite Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing stable and robust high-order finite difference schemes requires mathematical formalism and appropriate methods of analysis. In this work, nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference methods with formal boundary closures for conservation laws. Particular emphasis is placed on the entropy stability of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A newly derived entropy stable weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite difference method is used to simulate problems with shocks and a conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference approach is used to approximate viscous terms.

  15. Stochastic and Perturbed Parameter Representations of Model Uncertainty in Convection Parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, H. M.; Moroz, I.; Palmer, T.

    2015-12-01

    It is now acknowledged that representing model uncertainty in atmospheric simulators is essential for the production of reliable probabilistic ensemble forecasts, and a number of different techniques have been proposed for this purpose. Stochastic convection parameterization schemes use random numbers to represent the difference between a deterministic parameterization scheme and the true atmosphere, accounting for the unresolved sub grid-scale variability associated with convective clouds. An alternative approach varies the values of poorly constrained physical parameters in the model to represent the uncertainty in these parameters. This study presents new perturbed parameter schemes for use in the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) convection scheme. Two types of scheme are developed and implemented. Both schemes represent the joint uncertainty in four of the parameters in the convection parametrisation scheme, which was estimated using the Ensemble Prediction and Parameter Estimation System (EPPES). The first scheme developed is a fixed perturbed parameter scheme, where the values of uncertain parameters are changed between ensemble members, but held constant over the duration of the forecast. The second is a stochastically varying perturbed parameter scheme. The performance of these schemes was compared to the ECMWF operational stochastic scheme, Stochastically Perturbed Parametrisation Tendencies (SPPT), and to a model which does not represent uncertainty in convection. The skill of probabilistic forecasts made using the different models was evaluated. While the perturbed parameter schemes improve on the stochastic parametrisation in some regards, the SPPT scheme outperforms the perturbed parameter approaches when considering forecast variables that are particularly sensitive to convection. Overall, SPPT schemes are the most skilful representations of model uncertainty due to convection parametrisation. Reference: H. M. Christensen, I

  16. Toward a Unified Representation of Atmospheric Convection in Variable-Resolution Climate Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walko, Robert [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this project was to improve the representation of convection in atmospheric weather and climate models that employ computational grids with spatially-variable resolution. Specifically, our work targeted models whose grids are fine enough over selected regions that convection is resolved explicitly, while over other regions the grid is coarser and convection is represented as a subgrid-scale process. The working criterion for a successful scheme for representing convection over this range of grid resolution was that identical convective environments must produce very similar convective responses (i.e., the same precipitation amount, rate, and timing, and the same modification of the atmospheric profile) regardless of grid scale. The need for such a convective scheme has increased in recent years as more global weather and climate models have adopted variable resolution meshes that are often extended into the range of resolving convection in selected locations.

  17. National Convective Weather Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NCWF is an automatically generated depiction of: (1) current convection and (2) extrapolated signficant current convection. It is a supplement to, but does NOT...

  18. A framework for parameterization of heterogeneous ocean convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilıcak, Mehmet; Adcroft, Alistair J.; Legg, Sonya

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new framework for parameterization of ocean convection processes. The new framework is termed “patchy convection” since our aim is to represent the heterogeneity of mixing processes that take place within the horizontal scope of a grid cell. We focus on applying this new scheme to represent the effect of pre-conditioning for deep convection by subgrid scale eddy variability. The new parameterization separates the grid-cell into two regions of different stratification, applies convective mixing separately to each region, and then recombines the density profile to produce the grid-cell mean density profile. The scheme depends on two parameters: the areal fraction of the vertically-mixed region within the horizontal grid cell, and the density difference between the mean and the unstratified profiles at the surface. We parameterize this density difference in terms of an unresolved eddy kinetic energy. We illustrate the patchy parameterization using a 1D idealized convection case before evaluating the scheme in two different global ocean-ice simulations with prescribed atmospheric forcing; (i) diagnosed eddy velocity field applied only in the Labrador Sea (ii) diagnosed global eddy velocity field. The global simulation results indicate that the patchy convection scheme improves the warm biases in the deep Atlantic Ocean and Southern Ocean. This proof-of-concept study is a first step in developing the patchy parameterization scheme, which will be extended in future to use a prognostic eddy field as well as to parameterize convection due to under-ice brine rejection.

  19. Differences in deep convective transport characteristics between quasi-isolated strong convection and mesoscale convective systems using seasonal WRF simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelbach, B. C.; Mullendore, G. L.; Starzec, M.

    2014-10-01

    We utilize the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with chemistry to simulate mass transport during the 2007 convective season in the U.S. Southern Great Plains at convection-allowing scale. Resolved storms are classified using an object-based classification scheme. This scheme uses model-derived radar reflectivity to classify storm type as quasi-isolated strong convection (QISC) or mesoscale convective system (MCS). Differences between QISCs and MCSs are investigated by analysis of two transport parameters for each convective object: the level of maximum detrainment (LMD) and the detrainment mass flux. Analysis of the mean LMD showed differences between the two regimes is statistically significantly different in May, as the mean QISC LMD is 440 m higher than the mean MCS LMD in May, and statistically insignificant in July where the mean QISC LMD is only 350 m higher. The detrainment flux per deeply convective object showed statistically significant differences between the two regimes in both May (MCS 4.8 times greater than QISC) and July (MCS 6.8 times greater than QISC). Over the entire study period, MCS storms accounted for 72% of the total mass detrainment, even though QISCs were twice as common as MCSs. However, differences in the detrainment flux per unit area of deep convection showed that QISCs exhibited stronger flux (1.1 times greater) than MCSs in both months. Analysis of tropopause-relative LMDs showed that QISCs detrained the maximum amount of mass closer to the tropopause altitude than MCSs for both months. However, only in May is the difference statistically significant (430 m closer).

  20. Superparameterised convection in the EMAC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Harald; Tost, Holger

    2017-04-01

    Clouds in large-scale circulation models are often not well represented due to the large grid box size of these models. Especially convective clouds with a typical extension of a few kilometres only are subgrid-scale compared to the grid box size of the host models. To overcome this scale discrepancy in the chemistry climate model EMAC, a superparameterisation has been implemented, i.e. a cloud resolving model handling both large-scale as well as convective clouds. The gain for the substantial increase in computational costs is an increase in performance for the global precipitation distribution, especially in the tropics. Furthermore, the diurnal cycle of convective activity is much better represented by the superparameterisation compared to traditional convection schemes. We also provide results on the total water budget, e.g. integrated liquid and ice water as well as the partitioning between the two phases, which substantially differs between parameterised and superparameterised convection due to the explicit treatment of cloud microphysical processes in the latter scheme. Especially, this partitioning has implications for the atmospheric radiation budget and consequently also surface temperatures.

  1. Third Order Reconstruction of the KP Scheme for Model of River Tinnelva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susantha Dissanayake

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Saint-Venant equation/Shallow Water Equation is used to simulate flow of river, flow of liquid in an open channel, tsunami etc. The Kurganov-Petrova (KP scheme which was developed based on the local speed of discontinuity propagation, can be used to solve hyperbolic type partial differential equations (PDEs, hence can be used to solve the Saint-Venant equation. The KP scheme is semi discrete: PDEs are discretized in the spatial domain, resulting in a set of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs. In this study, the common 2nd order KP scheme is extended into 3rd order scheme while following the Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO and Central WENO (CWENO reconstruction steps. Both the 2nd order and 3rd order schemes have been used in simulation in order to check the suitability of the KP schemes to solve hyperbolic type PDEs. The simulation results indicated that the 3rd order KP scheme shows some better stability compared to the 2nd order scheme. Computational time for the 3rd order KP scheme for variable step-length ode solvers in MATLAB is less compared to the computational time of the 2nd order KP scheme. In addition, it was confirmed that the order of the time integrators essentially should be lower compared to the order of the spatial discretization. However, for computation of abrupt step changes, the 2nd order KP scheme shows a more accurate solution.

  2. An Efficient High-Resolution Shock-Capturing Scheme for Multi-Dimensional Flows I.Hydrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong Yu

    2006-01-01

    Many problems at the forefront of theoretical astrophysics require a treatment of dynamical fluid behavior. We present an efficient high-resolution shock-capturing hydrodynamic scheme designed to study such phenomena. We have implemented a weighted, essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme to fifth order accuracy in space. HLLE approximate Riemann solver is used for the flux computation at cell interface, which does not require spectral decomposition into characteristic waves and so is computationally friendly. For time integration we apply a third order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme.Extensive testing and comparison with schemes that require characteristic decomposition are carried out demonstrating the ability of our scheme to address challenging open questions in astrophysics.

  3. Nanofluid bio-thermal convection: simultaneous effects of gyrotactic and oxytactic micro-organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, A V, E-mail: avkuznet@eos.ncsu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7910, Raleigh, NC 27695-7910 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    This paper investigates the onset of nanofluid bio-thermal convection in a horizontal layer of finite depth for the case when the suspension contains two species of motile micro-organisms exhibiting different taxes, gyrotactic and oxytactic micro-organisms. The obtained instability problem is controlled by four agencies, namely by distributions of nanoparticles, gyrotactic and oxytactic micro-organisms and by the vertical temperature variation. The utilization of the linear instability theory makes it possible to decouple the effects of these agencies and obtain an eigenvalue equation that involves four Rayleigh numbers: the nanoparticle Rayleigh number, the bioconvection gyrotactic and oxytactic Rayleigh numbers, and the traditional thermal Rayleigh number. Each Rayleigh number represents the effect of one of the four aforementioned agencies. Previously obtained results are recovered for limiting cases. The effects of different agencies on the boundary of marginal non-oscillatory instability are investigated.

  4. Mudanças do esquema de convecção profunda Kain-Fritsch para a região do centro de lançamento de Alcântara Changes in the Kain-Fritsch convective parameterization deep scheme for the Alcântara launch center region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Vicente Pereira Neto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram realizadas mudanças no esquema de parametrização convectiva de Kain-Fritsch (KF2, para melhor representar a precipitação na região do Centro de Lançamento de Alcântara (CLA em simulações com o modelo regional MM5. Simulações de 24 h em um domínio aproximadamente centrado no CLA, com espaçamento de grade de 30 km foram realizadas para o período de 2005-2006 (calibração e 2008 (validação. O KF2 foi modificado sob a seguinte configuração: passo de tempo de 60 s, uso do esquema de convecção explícita warm rain e uso conjunto dos esquemas de convecção rasa de Grell e do KF2. As mudanças no KF2 foram: aumento da profundidade de nuvem necessária para disparar a convecção profunda e ajuste de alguns parâmetros da função disparo da convecção dependentes da velocidade vertical ascendente na coluna atmosférica. Com as modificações, houve expressiva melhoria na representação do total de precipitação e da fração dos dias do mês com chuva na escala mensal. O padrão espacial de erros no domínio, no entanto, não sofreu muitas alterações sobre o continente (em geral, a precipitação foi melhor representada sobre o continente do que sobre o oceano. Todas as etapas de mudanças e ajustes realizadas no trabalho poderão ser empregadas para melhorar a representação da precipitação em outras regiões específicas.Changes in the Kain-Fritsch convective parameterization scheme (KF2 were included to better represent the precipitation in simulations using the MM5 regional model for the Alcântara Launch Center (CLA region. Daily (24 h integrations for a 30 km grid spacing domain centered in CLA were performed for 2005-2006 (calibration and 2008 (validation. KF2 scheme was modified under the following simulation settings: time step of 60 s, use of warm rain scheme and joint use of Grell and KF2 shallow convection schemes. Changes in KF2 were: increase of minimum cloud depth to initiate deep convection and

  5. A new for parameterization of heterogeneous ocean convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilicak, Mehmet; Adcroft, Alistair; Legg, Sonya

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new framework for parameterization of ocean convection processes. The new framework is termed patchy convection. Our aim is to represent the heterogeneity of mixing processes that take place within the horizontal scope of a grid cell. This new scheme is to represent the effect of preconditioning for deep convection by sub-grid scale eddy variability. The new parameterization separates the grid-cell into two regions of different stratification, applies convective mixing separately to each region, and then recombines the density profile to produce the grid-cell mean density profile. The scheme depends on two parameters: the areal fraction of the vertically-mixed region within the horizontal grid cell, and the density difference between the mean and the unstratified profiles at the surface. We parameterize this density difference in terms of an unresolved eddy kinetic energy. We illustrate the patchy parameterization using a 1D idealized convection case before evaluating the scheme in two different global ocean-ice simulations with prescribed atmospheric forcing; i) diagnosed eddy velocity field applied only in the Labrador Sea ii) diagnosed global eddy velocity field. The global simulation results indicate that the patchy convection scheme improves the warm biases in the deep Atlantic Ocean and Southern Ocean.

  6. Colour schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents a framework for analysing colour schemes based on a parametric approach that includes not only hue, value and saturation, but also purity, transparency, luminosity, luminescence, lustre, modulation and differentiation....

  7. The influence of convection parameterisations under alternate climate conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Harald; Tost, Holger

    2013-04-01

    In the last decades several convection parameterisations have been developed to consider the impact of small-scale unresolved processes in Earth System Models associated with convective clouds. Global model simulations, which have been performed under current climate conditions with different convection schemes, significantly differ among each other in the simulated precipitation patterns due to the parameterisation assumptions and formulations, e.g. the simplified treatment of the cloud microphysics. Additionally, the simulated transport of short-lived trace gases strongly depends on the chosen convection parameterisation due to the differences in the vertical redistribution of mass. Furthermore, other meteorological parameters like the temperature or the specific humidity show substantial differences in convectively active regions. This study presents uncertainties of climate change scenarios caused by different convection parameterisations. For this analysis two experiments (reference simulation with a CO2 concentration of 348 ppm; 2xCO2-simulation with a CO2 concentration of 696 ppm) are calculated with the ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric chemistry (EMAC) model applying four different convection schemes (Tiedtke, ECMWF, Emanuel and Zhang-McFarlane - Hack) and two resolutions (T42 and T63), respectively. The results indicate that the equilibrium climate sensitivity is independent of the chosen convection parameterisation. However, the regional temperature increase, induced by a doubling of the carbon dioxide concentration, demonstrates differences of up to a few Kelvin at the surface as well as in the UTLS for the ITCZ region depending on the selected convection parameterisation. The interaction between cloud and convection parameterisations results in a large disagreement of precipitation patterns. Although every 2xCO2 -experiment simulates an increase in global mean precipitation rates, the change of regional precipitation patterns differ widely. Finally, analysing

  8. Parameterization of convective clouds mesoscale convective systems, and convective-generated cirrus. Final report, September 15, 1990--October 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotton, W.R.

    1993-11-05

    The overall goal of this research is to develop a scheme to parameterize diabatic heating, moisture/water substance, and momentum transports, and precipitation from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) for use in general circulation models (GCMs). Our approach is to perform explicit cloud-resolving simulations of MCSs in the spirit of the GEWEX Cloud Systems Study (GCSS), by using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) developed at Colorado State University (CSU). We then perform statistical analyses (conditional sampling, ensemble-averages, trajectory analyses) of simulated MCSs to assist in fabricating a parameterization scheme, calibrating coefficients, and provide independent tests of the efficacy of the parameterization scheme. A cloud-resolving simulation of ordinary cumulonimbi forced by sea breeze fronts has been completed. Analysis of this case and comparison with parameterized convection simulations has resulted in a number of refinements in the scheme. Three three-dimensional, cloud-resolving simulations of MCSs have been completed. Statistical analyses of model-output data are being performed to assist in developing a parameterization scheme of MCSs in general circulation models.

  9. Efficient high-order discontinuous Galerkin schemes with first-order hyperbolic advection-diffusion system approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Alireza; Nishikawa, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    We propose arbitrary high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) schemes that are designed based on a first-order hyperbolic advection-diffusion formulation of the target governing equations. We present, in details, the efficient construction of the proposed high-order schemes (called DG-H), and show that these schemes have the same number of global degrees-of-freedom as comparable conventional high-order DG schemes, produce the same or higher order of accuracy solutions and solution gradients, are exact for exact polynomial functions, and do not need a second-derivative diffusion operator. We demonstrate that the constructed high-order schemes give excellent quality solution and solution gradients on irregular triangular elements. We also construct a Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) limiter for the proposed DG-H schemes and apply it to discontinuous problems. We also make some accuracy comparisons with conventional DG and interior penalty schemes. A relative qualitative cost analysis is also reported, which indicates that the high-order schemes produce orders of magnitude more accurate results than the low-order schemes for a given CPU time. Furthermore, we show that the proposed DG-H schemes are nearly as efficient as the DG and Interior-Penalty (IP) schemes as these schemes produce results that are relatively at the same error level for approximately a similar CPU time.

  10. Application and Study of Precipitation Schemes in Weather Simulation in Summer and Winter over China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guoqiang; WAN Qilin; HUANG Liping; XUE Jishan; CHEN Dehui

    2006-01-01

    Through simulation of summer and winter precipitation cases in China, the cloud precipitation schemes of model were examined. Results indicate that it is discrepant between convective precipitation simulated by the Kain-Fritsch (KF) scheme and Betts-Miller (BM) scheme in summer, the former scheme is better than the latter in this case. The ambient atmosphere may be varied by different convective schemes. The air is wetter and the updraft is stronger in the KF scheme than in the BM scheme, which can induce the more grid scale precipitation in the KF scheme, i.e., the different cumulus schemes may have the different and important effect on the grid scale precipitation. However, there is almost no convective rain in winter in northern China, so the effect of cumulus precipitation on the grid scale precipitation can be disregarded.Therefore, the gird scale precipitation is primary in the winter of northern China.

  11. Off-line algorithm for calculation of vertical tracer transport in the troposphere due to deep convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belikov, D.A.; Maksyutov, S.; Krol, M.C.; Fraser, A.; Rigby, M.; Bian, H.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Bergmann, D.; Bousquet, P.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M.P.; Fortems-Cheiney, A.; Gloor, E.; Haynes, K.; Hess, P.; Houweling, S.; Kawa, S.R.; Law, R.M.; Loh, Z.; Meng, L.; Palmer, P.I.; Patra, P.K.; Prinn, R.G.; Saito, R.; Wilson, C.

    2013-01-01

    A modified cumulus convection parametrisation scheme is presented. This scheme computes the mass of air transported upward in a cumulus cell using conservation of moisture and a detailed distribution of convective precipitation provided by a reanalysis dataset. The representation of vertical

  12. Off-line algorithm for calculation of vertical tracer transport in the troposphere due to deep convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belikov, D.A.; Maksyutov, S.; Krol, M.C.; Fraser, A.; Rigby, M.; Bian, H.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Bergmann, D.; Bousquet, P.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M.P.; Fortems-Cheiney, A.; Gloor, E.; Haynes, K.; Hess, P.; Houweling, S.; Kawa, S.R.; Law, R.M.; Loh, Z.; Meng, L.; Palmer, P.I.; Patra, P.K.; Prinn, R.G.; Saito, R.; Wilson, C.

    2013-01-01

    A modified cumulus convection parametrisation scheme is presented. This scheme computes the mass of air transported upward in a cumulus cell using conservation of moisture and a detailed distribution of convective precipitation provided by a reanalysis dataset. The representation of vertical transpo

  13. Stochastic Convection Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Joao; Reynolds, Carolyn; Suselj, Kay; Matheou, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    computational fluid dynamics, radiation, clouds, turbulence, convection, gravity waves, surface interaction, radiation interaction, cloud and aerosol microphysics, complexity (vegetation, biogeochemistry, radiation versus turbulence/convection stochastic approach, non-linearities, Monte Carlo, high resolutions, large-Eddy Simulations, cloud structure, plumes, saturation in tropics, forecasting, parameterizations, stochastic, radiation-clod interaction, hurricane forecasts

  14. Convection and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Houdek, G

    2010-01-01

    In this short review on stellar convection dynamics I address the following, currently very topical, issues: (1) the surface effects of the Reynolds stresses and nonadiabaticity on solar-like pulsation frequencies, and (2) oscillation mode lifetimes of stochastically excited oscillations in red giants computed with different time-dependent convection formulations.

  15. A decoupled monolithic projection method for natural convection problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaomin; Kim, Kyoungyoun; Lee, Changhoon; Choi, Jung-Il

    2016-06-01

    We propose an efficient monolithic numerical procedure based on a projection method for solving natural convection problems. In the present monolithic method, the buoyancy, linear diffusion, and nonlinear convection terms are implicitly advanced by applying the Crank-Nicolson scheme in time. To avoid an otherwise inevitable iterative procedure in solving the monolithic discretized system, we use a linearization of the nonlinear convection terms and approximate block lower-upper (LU) decompositions along with approximate factorization. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed method is more stable and computationally efficient than other semi-implicit methods, preserving temporal second-order accuracy.

  16. A CLASS OF TWO-STEP TVD MACCORMACK TYPE NUMERICAL SCHEME FOR MHD EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xueshang; WEI Fengsi; ZHONG Dingkun

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a new numerical scheme of Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) MacCormack type for MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) equations is proposed by taking into account of the characteristics such as convergence, stability, resolution. This new scheme is established by solving the MHD equations with a TVD modified MacCormack scheme for the purpose of developing a scheme of quick convergence as well as of TVD property. To show the validation, simplicity and practicability of the scheme for modelling MHD problems, a self-similar Cauchy problem with the discontinuous initial data consisting of constant states, and the collision of two fast MHD shocks, and two-dimensional Orszag and Tang's MHD vortex problem are discussed with the numerical results conforming to the existing results obtained by the Roe type TVD, the high-order Godunov scheme,and Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) scheme. The numerical tests show that this two-step TVD MacCormack numerical scheme for MHD system is of robust operation in the presence of very strong waves, thin shock fronts, thin contact and slip surface discontinuities.

  17. A Parallel Algorithm for the Convection Diffusion Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓遇; 赵凯; 陆金甫

    2004-01-01

    Based on the second-order compact upwind scheme,a group explicit method for solving the two-dimensional time-independent convection-dominated diffusion problem is developed.The stability of the group explicit method is proven strictly.The method has second-order accuracy and good stability.This explicit scheme can be used to solve all Reynolds number convection-dominated diffusion problems.A numerical test using a parallel computer shows high efficiency.The numerical results conform closely to the analytic solution.

  18. Dimensionally Split Higher Order Semi-discrete Central Scheme for Multi-dimensional Conservation Laws

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Prabal Singh

    2015-01-01

    The dimensionally split reconstruction method as described by Kurganov et al.\\cite{kurganov-2000} is revisited for better understanding and a simple fourth order scheme is introduced to solve 3D hyperbolic conservation laws following dimension by dimension approach. Fourth order central weighted essentially non-oscillatory (CWENO) reconstruction methods have already been proposed to study multidimensional problems \\cite{lpr4,cs12}. In this paper, it is demonstrated that a simple 1D fourth order CWENO reconstruction method by Levy et al.\\cite{lpr7} provides fourth order accuracy for 3D hyperbolic nonlinear problems when combined with the semi-discrete scheme by Kurganov et al.\\cite{kurganov-2000} and fourth order Runge-Kutta method for time integration.

  19. Observing Convective Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-06-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  20. Pulsation driving and convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoci, Victoria

    2015-08-01

    Convection in stellar envelopes affects not only the stellar structure, but has a strong impact on different astrophysical processes, such as dynamo-generated magnetic fields, stellar activity and transport of angular momentum. Solar and stellar observations from ground and space have shown that the turbulent convective motion can also drive global oscillations in many type of stars, allowing to study stellar interiors at different evolutionary stages. In this talk I will concentrate on the influence of convection on the driving of stochastic and coherent pulsations across the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and give an overview of recent studies.

  1. A new fifth order finite difference WENO scheme for solving hyperbolic conservation laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Qiu, Jianxian

    2016-08-01

    In this paper a new simple fifth order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is presented in the finite difference framework for solving the hyperbolic conservation laws. The new WENO scheme is a convex combination of a fourth degree polynomial with two linear polynomials in a traditional WENO fashion. This new fifth order WENO scheme uses the same five-point information as the classical fifth order WENO scheme [14,20], could get less absolute truncation errors in L1 and L∞ norms, and obtain the same accuracy order in smooth region containing complicated numerical solution structures simultaneously escaping nonphysical oscillations adjacent strong shocks or contact discontinuities. The associated linear weights are artificially set to be any random positive numbers with the only requirement that their sum equals one. New nonlinear weights are proposed for the purpose of sustaining the optimal fifth order accuracy. The new WENO scheme has advantages over the classical WENO scheme [14,20] in its simplicity and easy extension to higher dimensions. Some benchmark numerical tests are performed to illustrate the capability of this new fifth order WENO scheme.

  2. A central-upwind scheme with artificial viscosity for shallow-water flows in channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Duenas, Gerardo; Beljadid, Abdelaziz

    2016-10-01

    We develop a new high-resolution, non-oscillatory semi-discrete central-upwind scheme with artificial viscosity for shallow-water flows in channels with arbitrary geometry and variable topography. The artificial viscosity, proposed as an alternative to nonlinear limiters, allows us to use high-resolution reconstructions at a low computational cost. The scheme recognizes steady states at rest when a delicate balance between the source terms and flux gradients occurs. This balance in irregular geometries is more complex than that taking place in channels with vertical walls. A suitable technique is applied by properly taking into account the effects induced by the geometry. Incorporating the contributions of the artificial viscosity and an appropriate time step restriction, the scheme preserves the positivity of the water's depth. A description of the proposed scheme, its main properties as well as the proofs of well-balance and the positivity of the scheme are provided. Our numerical experiments confirm stability, well-balance, positivity-preserving properties and high resolution of the proposed method. Comparisons of numerical solutions obtained with the proposed scheme and experimental data are conducted, showing a good agreement. This scheme can be applied to shallow-water flows in channels with complex geometry and variable bed topography.

  3. Convective heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kakac, Sadik; Pramuanjaroenkij, Anchasa

    2014-01-01

    Intended for readers who have taken a basic heat transfer course and have a basic knowledge of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and differential equations, Convective Heat Transfer, Third Edition provides an overview of phenomenological convective heat transfer. This book combines applications of engineering with the basic concepts of convection. It offers a clear and balanced presentation of essential topics using both traditional and numerical methods. The text addresses emerging science and technology matters, and highlights biomedical applications and energy technologies. What’s New in the Third Edition: Includes updated chapters and two new chapters on heat transfer in microchannels and heat transfer with nanofluids Expands problem sets and introduces new correlations and solved examples Provides more coverage of numerical/computer methods The third edition details the new research areas of heat transfer in microchannels and the enhancement of convective heat transfer with nanofluids....

  4. Transparent electric convection heater

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid, A.; Luck, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    An optically transparent electrically heated convection heater for use as a space heater in homes, offices, shops. Typically, said convection heater consists of a transparent layer 1 upon which is deposited a layer of a transparent electrically conductive material 2 such as indium-tin-oxide, electrodes 3 and 3a are formed on opposite edges of the transparent electrically conductive layer 2 and electrical wires 4 and 4a are connected to the electrodes. The transparent electrically conductive l...

  5. A shallow convection parameterization for the non-hydrostatic MM5 mesoscale model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaman, N.L.; Kain, J.S.; Deng, A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A shallow convection parameterization suitable for the Pennsylvannia State University (PSU)/National Center for Atmospheric Research nonhydrostatic mesoscale model (MM5) is being developed at PSU. The parameterization is based on parcel perturbation theory developed in conjunction with a 1-D Mellor Yamada 1.5-order planetary boundary layer scheme and the Kain-Fritsch deep convection model.

  6. Sensitivity of moist convection to environmental humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbyshire, S. H.; Beau, I.; Bechtold, P.; Grandpeix, J.-Y.; Piriou, J.-M.; Redelsperger, J. L.; Soares, P. M. M.

    2004-10-01

    As part of the EUROCS (EUROpean Cloud Systems study) project, cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and parallel single-column model (SCM) tests of the sensitivity of moist atmospheric convection to mid-tropospheric humidity are presented. This sensitivity is broadly supported by observations and some previous model studies, but is still poorly quantified. Mixing between clouds and environment is a key mechanism, central to many of the fundamental differences between convection schemes. Here, we define an idealized quasi-steady 'testbed', in which the large-scale environment is assumed to adjust the local mean profiles on a timescale of one hour. We then test sensitivity to the target profiles at heights above 2 km. Two independent CRMs agree reasonably well in their response to the different background profiles and both show strong deep precipitating convection in the more moist cases, but only shallow convection in the driest case. The CRM results also appear to be numerically robust. All the SCMs, most of which are one-dimensional versions of global climate models (GCMs), show sensitivity to humidity but differ in various ways from the CRMs. Some of the SCMs are improved in the light of these comparisons, with GCM improvements documented elsewhere.

  7. Robust second-order scheme for multi-phase flow computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Khosro

    2017-06-01

    A robust high-order scheme for the multi-phase flow computations featuring jumps and discontinuities due to shock waves and phase interfaces is presented. The scheme is based on high-order weighted-essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) finite volume schemes and high-order limiters to ensure the maximum principle or positivity of the various field variables including the density, pressure, and order parameters identifying each phase. The two-phase flow model considered besides the Euler equations of gas dynamics consists of advection of two parameters of the stiffened-gas equation of states, characterizing each phase. The design of the high-order limiter is guided by the findings of Zhang and Shu (2011) [36], and is based on limiting the quadrature values of the density, pressure and order parameters reconstructed using a high-order WENO scheme. The proof of positivity-preserving and accuracy is given, and the convergence and the robustness of the scheme are illustrated using the smooth isentropic vortex problem with very small density and pressure. The effectiveness and robustness of the scheme in computing the challenging problem of shock wave interaction with a cluster of tightly packed air or helium bubbles placed in a body of liquid water is also demonstrated. The superior performance of the high-order schemes over the first-order Lax-Friedrichs scheme for computations of shock-bubble interaction is also shown. The scheme is implemented in two-dimensional space on parallel computers using message passing interface (MPI). The proposed scheme with limiter features approximately 50% higher number of inter-processor message communications compared to the corresponding scheme without limiter, but with only 10% higher total CPU time. The scheme is provably second-order accurate in regions requiring positivity enforcement and higher order in the rest of domain.

  8. DISCONTINUOUS FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR CONVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdellatif Agouzal

    2000-01-01

    A discontinuous finite element method for convection-diffusion equations is proposed and analyzed. This scheme is designed to produce an approximate solution which is completely discontinuous. Optimal order of convergence is obtained for model problem. This is the same convergence rate known for the classical methods.

  9. On the application of ENO scheme with subcell resolution to conservation laws with stiff source terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Hung

    1991-01-01

    Two approaches are used to extend the essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) schemes to treat conservation laws with stiff source terms. One approach is the application of the Strang time-splitting method. Here the basic ENO scheme and the Harten modification using subcell resolution (SR), ENO/SR scheme, are extended this way. The other approach is a direct method and a modification of the ENO/SR. Here the technique of ENO reconstruction with subcell resolution is used to locate the discontinuity within a cell and the time evolution is then accomplished by solving the differential equation along characteristics locally and advancing in the characteristic direction. This scheme is denoted ENO/SRCD (subcell resolution - characteristic direction). All the schemes are tested on the equation of LeVeque and Yee (NASA-TM-100075, 1988) modeling reacting flow problems. Numerical results show that these schemes handle this intriguing model problem very well, especially with ENO/SRCD which produces perfect resolution at the discontinuity.

  10. Anomalously Weak Solar Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical- harmonic degree l..Within the wavenumber band l convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers l convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  11. Active control of convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bau, H.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  12. Mathematical models of convection

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Victor K; Goncharova, Olga N; Pukhnachev, Vladislav V

    2012-01-01

    Phenomena of convection are abundant in nature as well as in industry. This volume addresses the subject of convection from the point of view of both, theory and application. While the first three chapters provide a refresher on fluid dynamics and heat transfer theory, the rest of the book describes the modern developments in theory. Thus it brings the reader to the ""front"" of the modern research. This monograph provides the theoretical foundation on a topic relevant to metallurgy, ecology, meteorology, geo-and astrophysics, aerospace industry, chemistry, crystal physics, and many other fiel

  13. Improvements in Climate Simulation with Modifications to the Tiedtke Convective Parameterization in the Grid-Point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG (GAMIL)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The grid-point atmospheric model of IAP LASG (GAMIL) was developed in and has been evaluated since early 2004. Although the model shows its ability in simulating the global climate, it suffers from some problems in simulating precipitation in the tropics. These biases seem to result mainly from the treatment of the subgrid scale convection, which is parameterized with Tiedtke's massflux scheme (or the Zhang-McFarlane scheme, as an option) in the model. In order to reduce the systematic biases, several modifications were made to the Tiedtke scheme used in GAMIL, including (1) an increase in lateral convective entrainment/detrainment rate for shallow convection, (2) inclusion of a relative humidity threshold for the triggering of deep convection, and (3) a reduced efficiency for the conversion of cloud water to rainwater in the convection scheme.Two experiments, one with the original Tiedtke scheme used in GAMIL and the other with the modified scheme, were conducted to evaluate the performance of the modified scheme in this study. The results show that both the climatological mean state, such as precipitation, temperature and specific humidity, and interannual variability in the model simulation are improved with the use of this modified scheme. Results from several additional experiments show that the improvements in the model performance in different regions mainly result from either the introduction of the relative humidity threshold for triggering of the deep convection or the suppressed shallow convection due to enhanced lateral convective entrainment/detrainment rates.

  14. CDM Convective Forecast Planning guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CDM Convective Forecast Planning (CCFP) guidance product provides a foreast of en-route aviation convective hazards. The forecasts are updated every 2 hours and...

  15. Role of Cumulus Parameterization Scheme on the Diurnal Cycle of Precipitation over Southeast Asia in RegCM4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Yuk Sing; Tam, Chi Yung Francis; Au-Yeung, Yee Man

    2017-04-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of precipitation simulations over the CORDEX-Southeast Asia (SEA) domain to the cumulus convection scheme used in the Regional Climate Model version 4 (RegCM4). With the ERA-interim reanalysis as lateral boundary conditions, model integrations using the MIT-Emanuel cumulus parameterization scheme, and those using a "mixed convection scheme" (namely with the MIT-Emanuel scheme over ocean and the Grell scheme with Arakawa Schubert-type closure over land), have been carried out for the 2001-2010 period. On the seasonal average, the use of the mixed convection scheme, in comparison to MIT-Emanuel scheme everywhere, improves rainfall simulations over the South China Sea (SCS) by reducing the summer-time wet bias there. On the other hand, runs with the mixed convection scheme under(over)-estimate rainfall over land in Southeastern China (western coastlines of Indochina and the Philippines). For the diurnal variation of precipitation, it is found that the RegCM4 can reproduce well the characteristics of the diurnal cycle (DC) in SEA. Compared with the mixed convection scheme, the MIT-Emanual scheme performs better in reproducing the amplitude and phase of DC over the landside coastal area of Indochina during summer. Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis indicates that switching from the MIT-Emanuel scheme to the mixed convection scheme leads to a reduction in importance of the second EOF mode, which corresponds to rainfall peaked in the afternoon (local time). Further analyses reveal that such underestimation is related to increased cloud cover in RegCM4 using the mixed convection scheme; enhanced cloudiness in turn leads to reduced surface air temperature over land and thus reduced convective instability at 1200 and 1500 local time in the model simulations.

  16. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization – Part I: Convection and Cloud Properties Simulated with Spectral Bin and Bulk Microphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Yi-Chin; Xu, Kuan-Man; North, Kirk; Collis, Scott M.; Dong, Xiquan; Zhang, Guang J.; Chen, Qian; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    The ultimate goal of this study is to improve representation of convective transport by cumulus parameterization for meso-scale and climate models. As Part I of the study, we perform extensive evaluations of cloud-resolving simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complexes in mid-latitude continent and tropical regions using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with spectral-bin microphysics (SBM) and with two double-moment bulk microphysics schemes: a modified Morrison (MOR) and Milbrandt and Yau (MY2). Compared to observations, in general, SBM gives better simulations of precipitation, vertical velocity of convective cores, and the vertically decreasing trend of radar reflectivity than MOR and MY2, and therefore will be used for analysis of scale-dependence of eddy transport in Part II. The common features of the simulations for all convective systems are (1) the model tends to overestimate convection intensity in the middle and upper troposphere, but SBM can alleviate much of the overestimation and reproduce the observed convection intensity well; (2) the model greatly overestimates radar reflectivity in convective cores (SBM predicts smaller radar reflectivity but does not remove the large overestimation); and (3) the model performs better for mid-latitude convective systems than tropical system. The modeled mass fluxes of the mid latitude systems are not sensitive to microphysics schemes, but are very sensitive for the tropical case indicating strong microphysics modification to convection. Cloud microphysical measurements of rain, snow and graupel in convective cores will be critically important to further elucidate issues within cloud microphysics schemes.

  17. Internal Wave Generation by Convection

    OpenAIRE

    Lecoanet, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In nature, it is not unusual to find stably stratified fluid adjacent to convectively unstable fluid. This can occur in the Earth's atmosphere, where the troposphere is convective and the stratosphere is stably stratified; in lakes, where surface solar heating can drive convection above stably stratified fresh water; in the oceans, where geothermal heating can drive convection near the ocean floor, but the water above is stably stratified due to salinity gradients; possible in the Earth's liq...

  18. Off-line algorithm for calculation of vertical tracer transport in the troposphere due to deep convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Belikov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A modified cumulus convection parametrisation scheme is presented. This scheme computes the mass of air transported upward in a cumulus cell using conservation of moisture and a detailed distribution of convective precipitation provided by a reanalysis dataset. The representation of vertical transport within the scheme includes entrainment and detrainment processes in convective updrafts and downdrafts. Output from the proposed parametrisation scheme is employed in the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES global chemical transport model driven by JRA-25/JCDAS reanalysis. The simulated convective precipitation rate and mass fluxes are compared with observations and reanalysis data. A simulation of the short-lived tracer 222Rn is used to further evaluate the performance of the cumulus convection scheme. Simulated distributions of 222Rn are validated against observations at the surface and in the free troposphere, and compared with output from models that participated in the TransCom-CH4 Transport Model Intercomparison. From this comparison, we demonstrate that the proposed convective scheme can successfully reproduce deep cloud convection.

  19. Comparison of the Tangent Linear Properties of Tracer Transport Schemes Applied to Geophysical Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, James; Holdaway, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    A number of geophysical applications require the use of the linearized version of the full model. One such example is in numerical weather prediction, where the tangent linear and adjoint versions of the atmospheric model are required for the 4DVAR inverse problem. The part of the model that represents the resolved scale processes of the atmosphere is known as the dynamical core. Advection, or transport, is performed by the dynamical core. It is a central process in many geophysical applications and is a process that often has a quasi-linear underlying behavior. However, over the decades since the advent of numerical modelling, significant effort has gone into developing many flavors of high-order, shape preserving, nonoscillatory, positive definite advection schemes. These schemes are excellent in terms of transporting the quantities of interest in the dynamical core, but they introduce nonlinearity through the use of nonlinear limiters. The linearity of the transport schemes used in Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5), as well as a number of other schemes, is analyzed using a simple 1D setup. The linearized version of GEOS-5 is then tested using a linear third order scheme in the tangent linear version.

  20. Central upwind scheme for a compressible two-phase flow model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munshoor Ahmed

    Full Text Available In this article, a compressible two-phase reduced five-equation flow model is numerically investigated. The model is non-conservative and the governing equations consist of two equations describing the conservation of mass, one for overall momentum and one for total energy. The fifth equation is the energy equation for one of the two phases and it includes source term on the right-hand side which represents the energy exchange between two fluids in the form of mechanical and thermodynamical work. For the numerical approximation of the model a high resolution central upwind scheme is implemented. This is a non-oscillatory upwind biased finite volume scheme which does not require a Riemann solver at each time step. Few numerical case studies of two-phase flows are presented. For validation and comparison, the same model is also solved by using kinetic flux-vector splitting (KFVS and staggered central schemes. It was found that central upwind scheme produces comparable results to the KFVS scheme.

  1. PERTURBATION FINITE VOLUME METHOD FOR CONVECTIVE-DIFFUSION INTEGRAL EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhi; YANG Guowei

    2004-01-01

    A perturbation finite volume (PFV) method for the convective-diffusion integral equation is developed in this paper. The PFV scheme is an upwind and mixed scheme using any higher-order interpolation and second-order integration approximations, with the least nodes similar to the standard three-point schemes, that is, the number of the nodes needed is equal to unity plus the face-number of the control volume. For instance, in the two-dimensional (2-D) case, only four nodes for the triangle grids and five nodes for the Cartesian grids are utilized, respectively. The PFV scheme is applied on a number of 1-D linear and nonlinear problems, 2-D and 3-D flow model equations. Comparing with other standard three-point schemes, the PFV scheme has much smaller numerical diffusion than the first-order upwind scheme (UDS). Its numerical accuracies are also higher than the second-order central scheme (CDS), the power-law scheme (PLS) and QUICK scheme.

  2. Convective Dynamo Simulation with a Grand Minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Augustson, Kyle; Miesch, Mark; Toomre, Juri

    2015-01-01

    The global-scale dynamo action achieved in a simulation of a Sun-like star rotating at thrice the solar rate is assessed. The 3-D MHD Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code, augmented with a viscosity minimization scheme, is employed to capture convection and dynamo processes in this G-type star. The simulation is carried out in a spherical shell that encompasses 3.8 density scale heights of the solar convection zone. It is found that dynamo action with a high degree of time variation occurs, with many periodic polarity reversals occurring roughly every 6.2 years. The magnetic energy also rises and falls with a regular period. The magnetic energy cycles arise from a Lorentz-force feedback on the differential rotation, whereas the processes leading to polarity reversals are more complex, appearing to arise from the interaction of convection with the mean toroidal fields. Moreover, an equatorial migration of toroidal field is found, which is linked to the changing differential rotation, and potentially to a no...

  3. Parameterizing deep convection using the assumed probability density function method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Storer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their coarse horizontal resolution, present-day climate models must parameterize deep convection. This paper presents single-column simulations of deep convection using a probability density function (PDF parameterization. The PDF parameterization predicts the PDF of subgrid variability of turbulence, clouds, and hydrometeors. That variability is interfaced to a prognostic microphysics scheme using a Monte Carlo sampling method. The PDF parameterization is used to simulate tropical deep convection, the transition from shallow to deep convection over land, and mid-latitude deep convection. These parameterized single-column simulations are compared with 3-D reference simulations. The agreement is satisfactory except when the convective forcing is weak. The same PDF parameterization is also used to simulate shallow cumulus and stratocumulus layers. The PDF method is sufficiently general to adequately simulate these five deep, shallow, and stratiform cloud cases with a single equation set. This raises hopes that it may be possible in the future, with further refinements at coarse time step and grid spacing, to parameterize all cloud types in a large-scale model in a unified way.

  4. A finite volume scheme for the transport of radionucleides in porous media

    OpenAIRE

    Chénier, Eric; Eymard,, Robert; Nicolas, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    International audience; The COUPLEX1 Test case (Bourgeat et al., 2003) is devoted to the comparison of numerical schemes on a convection-diffusion-reaction problem. We first show that the results of the simulation can be mainly predicted by a simple analysis of the data. A finite volume scheme, with three different treatments of the convective term, is then shown to deliver accurate and stable results under a low computational cost.

  5. Convection heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bejan, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Written by an internationally recognized authority on heat transfer and thermodynamics, this second edition of Convection Heat Transfer contains new and updated problems and examples reflecting real-world research and applications, including heat exchanger design. Teaching not only structure but also technique, the book begins with the simplest problem solving method (scale analysis), and moves on to progressively more advanced and exact methods (integral method, self similarity, asymptotic behavior). A solutions manual is available for all problems and exercises.

  6. Theoretical basis for convective invigoration due to increased aerosol concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. J. Lebo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential effects of increased aerosol loading on the development of deep convective clouds and resulting precipitation amounts are studied by employing the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model as a detailed high-resolution cloud resolving model (CRM with both detailed bulk and bin microphysics schemes. Both models include a physically-based activation scheme that incorporates a size-resolved aerosol population. We demonstrate that the aerosol-induced effect is controlled by the balance between latent heating and the increase in condensed water aloft, each having opposing effects on buoyancy. It is also shown that under polluted conditions, increases in the CCN number concentration reduce the cumulative precipitation due to the competition between the sedimentation and evaporation/sublimation timescales. The effect of an increase in the IN number concentration on the dynamics of deep convective clouds is small and the resulting decrease in domain-averaged cumulative precipitation is shown not to be statistically significant, but may act to suppress precipitation. It is also shown that even in the presence of a decrease in the domain-averaged cumulative precipitation, an increase in the precipitation variance, or in other words, andincrease in rainfall intensity, may be expected in more polluted environments, especially in moist environments.

    A significant difference exists between the predictions based on the bin and bulk microphysics schemes of precipitation and the influence of aerosol perturbations on updraft velocity within the convective core. The bulk microphysics scheme shows little change in the latent heating rates due to an increase in the CCN number concentration, while the bin microphysics scheme demonstrates significant increases in the latent heating aloft with increasing CCN number concentration. This suggests that even a detailed two-bulk microphysics scheme, coupled to a detailed activation scheme, may not be

  7. The Solar Convection Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Kurt T.

    2000-01-01

    I helped to complete a research project with NASA scientists Dr. David Hathaway (my mentor), Rick Bogart, and John Beck from the SOHO/SOI collaboration. Our published paper in 'Solar Physics' was titled 'The Solar Convection Spectrum' (April 2000). Two of my undergraduate students were named on the paper--Gavrav Khutri and Josh Petitto. Gavrav also wrote a short paper for the National Conference of Undergraduate Research Proceedings in 1998 using a preliminary result. Our main result was that we show no evidence of a scale of convection named 'mesogranulation'. Instead, we see only direct evidence for the well-known scales of convection known as graduation and supergranulation. We are also completing work on vertical versus horizontal flow fluxes at the solar surface. I continue to work on phase relationships of solar activity indicators, but I have not yet written a paper with my students on this topic. Along with my research results, I have developed and augmented undergraduate courses at Birmingham-Southern College by myself and with other faculty. We have included new labs and observations, speakers from NASA and elsewhere, new subject material related to NASA and space science. I have done a great deal of work in outreach, mostly as President and other offices in the Birmingham Astronomical Society. My work includes speaking, attracting speakers, giving workshops, and governing.

  8. Thermal Vibrational Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershuni, G. Z.; Lyubimov, D. V.

    1998-08-01

    Recent increasing awareness of the ways in which vibrational effects can affect low-gravity experiments have renewed interest in the study of thermal vibrational convection across a wide range of fields. For example, in applications where vibrational effects are used to provide active control of heat and mass transfer, such as in heat exchangers, stirrers, mineral separators and crystal growth, a sound understanding of the fundamental theory is required. In Thermal Vibrational Convection, the authors present the theory of vibrational effects caused by a static gravity field, and of fluid flows which appear under vibration in fluid-filled cavities. The first part of the book discusses fluid-filled cavities where the fluid motion only appears in the presence of temperature non-uniformities, while the second considers those situations where the vibrational effects are caused by a non-uniform field. Throughout, the authors concentrate on consideration of high frequency vibrations, where averaging methods can be successfully applied in the study of the phenomena. Written by two of the pioneers in this field, Thermal Vibrational Convection will be of great interest to scientists and engineers working in the many areas that are concerned with vibration, and its effect on heat and mass transfer. These include hydrodynamics, hydro-mechanics, low gravity physics and mechanics, and geophysics. The rigorous approach adopted in presenting the theory of this fascinating and highly topical area will facilitate a greater understanding of the phenomena involved, and will lead to the development of more and better-designed experiments.

  9. Analysis of Cloud-resolving Simulations of a Tropical Mesoscale Convective System Observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical Fluxes and Draft Properties in Convective and Stratiform Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.; Rio, Catherine; Fridlind, Ann; Ackerman, Andrew; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Pauluis, Olivier; Varble, Adam; Fan, Jiwen

    2012-10-02

    We analyze three cloud-resolving model simulations of a strong convective event observed during the TWP-ICE campaign, differing in dynamical core, microphysical scheme or both. Based on simulated and observed radar reflectivity, simulations roughly reproduce observed convective and stratiform precipitating areas. To identify the characteristics of convective and stratiform drafts that are difficult to observe but relevant to climate model parameterization, independent vertical wind speed thresholds are calculated to capture 90% of total convective and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes. Convective updrafts are fairly consistent across simulations (likely owing to fixed large-scale forcings and surface conditions), except that hydrometeor loadings differ substantially. Convective downdraft and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes vary notably below the melting level, but share similar vertically uniform draft velocities despite differing hydrometeor loadings. All identified convective and stratiform downdrafts contain precipitation below ~10 km and nearly all updrafts are cloudy above the melting level. Cold pool properties diverge substantially in a manner that is consistent with convective downdraft mass flux differences below the melting level. Despite differences in hydrometeor loadings and cold pool properties, convective updraft and downdraft mass fluxes are linearly correlated with convective area, the ratio of ice in downdrafts to that in updrafts is ~0.5 independent of species, and the ratio of downdraft to updraft mass flux is ~0.5-0.6, which may represent a minimum evaporation efficiency under moist conditions. Hydrometeor loading in stratiform regions is found to be a fraction of hydrometeor loading in convective regions that ranges from ~10% (graupel) to ~90% (cloud ice). These findings may lead to improved convection parameterizations.

  10. Global anthropogenic aerosol effects on convective clouds in ECHAM5-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Lohmann

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols affect the climate system by changing cloud characteristics in many ways. They act as cloud condensation and ice nuclei and may have an influence on the hydrological cycle. Here we investigate aerosol effects on convective clouds by extending the double-moment cloud microphysics scheme developed for stratiform clouds, which is coupled to the HAM double-moment aerosol scheme, to convective clouds in the ECHAM5 general circulation model. This enables us to investigate whether more, and smaller cloud droplets suppress the warm rain formation in the lower parts of convective clouds and thus release more latent heat upon freezing, which would then result in more vigorous convection and more precipitation. In ECHAM5, including aerosol effects in large-scale and convective clouds (simulation ECHAM5-conv reduces the sensitivity of the liquid water path increase with increasing aerosol optical depth in better agreement with observations and large-eddy simulation studies. In simulation ECHAM5-conv with increases in greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions since pre-industrial times, the geographical distribution of the changes in precipitation better matches the observed increase in precipitation than neglecting microphysics in convective clouds. In this simulation the convective precipitation increases the most suggesting that the convection has indeed become more vigorous.

  11. Theoretical basis for convective invigoration due to increased aerosol concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. J. Lebo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential effects of increased aerosol loading on the development of deep convective clouds and resulting precipitation amounts are studied by employing the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model as a detailed high-resolution cloud resolving model (CRM with both detailed bulk and bin microphysics schemes. The bulk microphysics scheme incorporates a physically based parameterization of cloud droplet activation as well as homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing in order to explicitly resolve the possible aerosol-induced effects on the cloud microphysics. These parameterizations allow one to segregate the effects of an increase in the aerosol number concentration into enhanced cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and/or ice nuclei (IN concentrations using bulk microphysics. The bin microphysics scheme, with its explicit calculations of cloud particle collisions, is shown to better predict cumulative precipitation. Increases in the CCN number concentration may not have a monotonic influence on the cumulative precipitation resulting from deep convective clouds. We demonstrate that the aerosol-induced effect is controlled by the balance between latent heating and the increase in condensed water aloft, each having opposing effects on buoyancy. It is also shown that under polluted conditions and in relatively dry environments, increases in the CCN number concentration reduce the cumulative precipitation due to the competition between the sedimentation and evaporation/sublimation timescales. The effect of an increase in the IN number concentration on the dynamics of deep convective clouds is small, but may act to suppress precipitation.

    A comparison of the predictions using the bin and bulk microphysics schemes demonstrate a significant difference between the predicted precipitation and the influence of aerosol perturbations on updraft velocity within the convective core. The bulk microphysics scheme is shown to be unable to capture the

  12. A stochastic parameterization for deep convection using cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, L.; Steinheimer, M.; Bechtold, P.; Geleyn, J.

    2012-12-01

    Cumulus parameterizations used in most operational weather and climate models today are based on the mass-flux concept which took form in the early 1970's. In such schemes it is assumed that a unique relationship exists between the ensemble-average of the sub-grid convection, and the instantaneous state of the atmosphere in a vertical grid box column. However, such a relationship is unlikely to be described by a simple deterministic function (Palmer, 2011). Thus, because of the statistical nature of the parameterization challenge, it has been recognized by the community that it is important to introduce stochastic elements to the parameterizations (for instance: Plant and Craig, 2008, Khouider et al. 2010, Frenkel et al. 2011, Bentsson et al. 2011, but the list is far from exhaustive). There are undoubtedly many ways in which stochastisity can enter new developments. In this study we use a two-way interacting cellular automata (CA), as its intrinsic nature possesses many qualities interesting for deep convection parameterization. In the one-dimensional entraining plume approach, there is no parameterization of horizontal transport of heat, moisture or momentum due to cumulus convection. In reality, mass transport due to gravity waves that propagate in the horizontal can trigger new convection, important for the organization of deep convection (Huang, 1988). The self-organizational characteristics of the CA allows for lateral communication between adjacent NWP model grid-boxes, and temporal memory. Thus the CA scheme used in this study contain three interesting components for representation of cumulus convection, which are not present in the traditional one-dimensional bulk entraining plume method: horizontal communication, memory and stochastisity. The scheme is implemented in the high resolution regional NWP model ALARO, and simulations show enhanced organization of convective activity along squall-lines. Probabilistic evaluation demonstrate an enhanced spread in

  13. Finite-volume WENO scheme for viscous compressible multicomponent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2014-01-01

    We develop a shock- and interface-capturing numerical method that is suitable for the simulation of multicomponent flows governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical method is high-order accurate in smooth regions of the flow, discretely conserves the mass of each component, as well as the total momentum and energy, and is oscillation-free, i.e. it does not introduce spurious oscillations at the locations of shockwaves and/or material interfaces. The method is of Godunov-type and utilizes a fifth-order, finite-volume, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for the spatial reconstruction and a Harten-Lax-van Leer contact (HLLC) approximate Riemann solver to upwind the fluxes. A third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta (RK) algorithm is employed to march the solution in time. The derivation is generalized to three dimensions and nonuniform Cartesian grids. A two-point, fourth-order, Gaussian quadrature rule is utilized to build the spatial averages of the reconstructed variables inside the cells, as well as at cell boundaries. The algorithm is therefore fourth-order accurate in space and third-order accurate in time in smooth regions of the flow. We corroborate the properties of our numerical method by considering several challenging one-, two- and three-dimensional test cases, the most complex of which is the asymmetric collapse of an air bubble submerged in a cylindrical water cavity that is embedded in 10% gelatin. PMID:25110358

  14. Off-line algorithm for calculation of vertical tracer transport in the troposphere due to deep convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Belikov

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A modified cumulus convection parametrisation scheme is presented. This scheme computes the mass of air transported upward in a cumulus cell using conservation of moisture and a detailed distribution of convective precipitation provided by a reanalysis dataset. The representation of vertical transport within the scheme includes entrainment and detrainment processes in convective updrafts and downdrafts. Output from the proposed parametrisation scheme is employed in the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES global chemical transport model driven by JRA-25/JCDAS reanalysis. The simulated convective precipitation rate and mass fluxes are compared with observations and reanalysis data. A simulation of the short-lived tracer 222Rn is used to further evaluate the performance of the cumulus convection scheme. Simulated distributions of 222Rn are evaluated against observations at the surface and in the free troposphere, and compared with output from models that participated in the TransCom-CH4 Transport Model Intercomparison. From this comparison, we demonstrate that the proposed convective scheme in general is consistent with observed and modeled results.

  15. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-01

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth’s energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earth’s climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical “parameterizations” that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States

  16. Nonoscillatory Solutions for First-Order Nonlinear Neutral Delay Differential Equations%一阶非线性中立型时滞微分方程的非振动解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁丽芳; 刘桂荣

    2011-01-01

    Using the Bananch contraction mapping theorem,the class of firet-order nonlinear neutral delay differential equation are studied d/(dt)+c(t)x(t-τ1)+d(t)x(t-τ2)]+ h(t)f(t,x(t-σ1(t)),x(t-σ2(t)),…,x(t-σk(t)))=g(t) and the sufficieut conditions for the existence of nonoscillatory solutions.In addition,iterative approximation sequences of corresponding nonoscillatory soultions are obtained.%利用Banach压缩映象原理,研究下列一阶非线性中立型时滞微分方程d/(dt)[x(t)]+c(t)x(t-τ1)+d(t)x(t-τ2)]+h(t)f(t,x(t-σ1(t)),x(t-σ2(t)),…,x(t-σk(t)))=g(t)的非振动解的存在性,并获得了相应非振动解的迭代逼近序列.

  17. Titan Balloon Convection Model Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative research effort is directed at determining, quantitatively, the convective heat transfer coefficients applicable to a Montgolfiere balloon operating...

  18. Bidispersive-inclined convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulone, Giuseppe; Straughan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    A model is presented for thermal convection in an inclined layer of porous material when the medium has a bidispersive structure. Thus, there are the usual macropores which are full of a fluid, but there are also a system of micropores full of the same fluid. The model we employ is a modification of the one proposed by Nield & Kuznetsov (2006 Int. J. Heat Mass Transf. 49, 3068–3074. (doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2006.02.008)), although we consider a single temperature field only. PMID:27616934

  19. Zoned mantle convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarède, Francis; Van Der Hilst, Rob D

    2002-11-15

    We review the present state of our understanding of mantle convection with respect to geochemical and geophysical evidence and we suggest a model for mantle convection and its evolution over the Earth's history that can reconcile this evidence. Whole-mantle convection, even with material segregated within the D" region just above the core-mantle boundary, is incompatible with the budget of argon and helium and with the inventory of heat sources required by the thermal evolution of the Earth. We show that the deep-mantle composition in lithophilic incompatible elements is inconsistent with the storage of old plates of ordinary oceanic lithosphere, i.e. with the concept of a plate graveyard. Isotopic inventories indicate that the deep-mantle composition is not correctly accounted for by continental debris, primitive material or subducted slabs containing normal oceanic crust. Seismological observations have begun to hint at compositional heterogeneity in the bottom 1000 km or so of the mantle, but there is no compelling evidence in support of an interface between deep and shallow mantle at mid-depth. We suggest that in a system of thermochemical convection, lithospheric plates subduct to a depth that depends - in a complicated fashion - on their composition and thermal structure. The thermal structure of the sinking plates is primarily determined by the direction and rate of convergence, the age of the lithosphere at the trench, the sinking rate and the variation of these parameters over time (i.e. plate-tectonic history) and is not the same for all subduction systems. The sinking rate in the mantle is determined by a combination of thermal (negative) and compositional buoyancy and as regards the latter we consider in particular the effect of the loading of plates with basaltic plateaux produced by plume heads. Barren oceanic plates are relatively buoyant and may be recycled preferentially in the shallow mantle. Oceanic plateau-laden plates have a more pronounced

  20. Controls on phase composition and ice water content in a convection-permitting model simulation of a tropical mesoscale convective system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Charmaine N.; Protat, Alain; Leroy, Delphine; Fontaine, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    Simulations of tropical convection from an operational numerical weather prediction model are evaluated with the focus on the model's ability to simulate the observed high ice water contents associated with the outflow of deep convection and to investigate the modelled processes that control the phase composition of tropical convective clouds. The 1 km horizontal grid length model that uses a single-moment microphysics scheme simulates the intensification and decay of convective strength across the mesoscale convective system. However, deep convection is produced too early, the OLR (outgoing longwave radiation) is underestimated and the areas with reflectivities > 30 dBZ are overestimated due to too much rain above the freezing level, stronger updraughts and larger particle sizes in the model. The inclusion of a heterogeneous rain-freezing parameterisation and the use of different ice size distributions show better agreement with the observed reflectivity distributions; however, this simulation still produces a broader profile with many high-reflectivity outliers demonstrating the greater occurrence of convective cells in the simulations. Examining the phase composition shows that the amount of liquid and ice in the modelled convective updraughts is controlled by the following: the size of the ice particles, with larger particles growing more efficiently through riming and producing larger IWC (ice water content); the efficiency of the warm rain process, with greater cloud water contents being available to support larger ice growth rates; and exclusion or limitation of graupel growth, with more mass contained in slower falling snow particles resulting in an increase of in-cloud residence times and more efficient removal of LWC (liquid water content). In this simulated case using a 1 km grid length model, horizontal mass divergence in the mixed-phase regions of convective updraughts is most sensitive to the turbulence formulation. Greater mixing of environmental air

  1. THE ALTERNATING SEGMENT CRANK-NICOLSON METHOD FOR SOLVING CONVECTION-DIFFUSION EQUATION WITH VARIABLE COEFFICIENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文洽

    2003-01-01

    A new discrete approximation to the convection term of the covection-diffusionequation was constructed in Saul' yev type difference scheme, then the alternating segmentCrank-Nicolson( ASC-N) method for solving the convection-diffusion equation with variablecoefficient was developed. The ASC-N method is unconditionally stable. Numericalexperiment shows that this method has the obvious property of parallelism and accuracy. Themethod can be used directly on parallel computers.

  2. Numerical study on passive convective mass transfer enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, G. P.; Muhammed Rafi, K. M.; Deepu, M.

    2017-04-01

    Passive mixing mechanisms are widely used for heat and mass transfer enhancement. Vortices generated in flowfield lead to gradients that favour convective mass transfer. Computations on enhancement of convective mass transfer of sublimating solid fuel by baroclinic torque generated vortices in the wake of a swept ramp placed in high speed flow is presented here. Advection Upstream Splitting Method (AUSM) based computational scheme employed in the present study, to solve compressible turbulent flow field involving species transport, could capture the complex flow features resulted by vortex boundary layer and shock boundary layer interactions. Convective mass transfer is found to get improved in regions near boundary layer by horseshoe vortex and further transported to other regions by counter rotating vortex pair. Vortices resulted by flow expansion near aft wall of wedge and recompression wave-boundary layer interactions also promotes convective mass transport. Extensive computations have been carried out to reveal the role of vortices dominance at various lateral sweep angles in promotion of convective mass transfer in turbulent boundary layer.

  3. A Fast Stable Discretization of the Constant-Convection-Diffusion-Reaction Equations of Kinetic Capillary Electrophoresis (KCE)

    CERN Document Server

    Vass, József

    2016-01-01

    A discretization scheme is introduced for a set of convection-diffusion equations with a non-linear reaction term, where the convection velocity is constant for each reactant. This constancy allows a transformation to new spatial variables, which ensures the global stability of discretization. Convection-diffusion equations are notorious for their lack of stability, arising from the algebraic interaction of the convection and diffusion terms. Unexpectedly, our implemented numerical algorithm proves to be faster than computing exact solutions derived for a special case, while remaining reasonably accurate, as demonstrated in our runtime and error analysis.

  4. Forced Gravity Waves and the Tropospheric Response to Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Oliver; Parker, Doug; Griffiths, Stephen; Stirling, Alison

    2017-04-01

    It has been known for some time that gravity waves facilitate atmospheric adjustment to convective heating. Further, convectively forced gravity waves condition the neighbouring atmosphere for the initiation and / or suppression of convection. Despite this, the radiation of gravity waves in macro-scale models (which are typically forced at the grid-scale, by existing parameterization schemes) is not well understood. We present here theoretical and numerical work directed toward improving our understanding of convectively forced gravity wave effects at the mesoscale. Using the linear hydrostatic equations of motion for an incompressible (but non-Boussinesq) fluid with vertically varying buoyancy frequency, we find a radiating solution to prescribed sensible heating. We then interrogate the spatial and temporal sensitivity of the vertical velocity and potential temperature response to different heating functions, considering the remote and near-field forced response both to steady and pulsed heating. We find that the meso-scale tropospheric response to convection is significantly dependent on the upward radiation characteristics of the gravity waves, which are in turn dependent upon the temporal and spatial structure of the source, and stratification of the domain. Moving from a trapped to upwardly-radiating solution there is a 50% reduction in tropospherically averaged vertical velocity, but significant perturbations persist for up to 4 hours in the far-field. Furthermore, we find the tropospheric adjustment to be sensitive to the horizontal length scale of the heating, observing a 20% reduction in vertical velocity when comparing the response from a 10 km to a 100 km heat source. We assess the implications for parameterization of convection in coarse-grained models in the light of these findings and argue that an idealized 'full-physics' nonlinear simulation of deep convection in the MetUM is qualitatively described by the linear solution: departures are quantified

  5. Analysis of Natural Convection in an Elliptical Cavity,Using a Dini Expansion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Mochimaru

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed is natural transient convection followed by steady-state convection in an elliptical cavity heated from below,using a spectral finite difference scheme in terms of a Dini expansion.The major or minor axis of the elliptic section of the Cavity is assumed to be placed horizontally.As a thermal boundary condition,Dirichlet or Neumann condition is specifice.Not only for nearly pure-heat conduction case at low Grashof numbers but also for strong convection flow with cellular patterns at larger Grashof numbers are found to be attained at least for some combination of Prandtl numbers and geometrical parameters.

  6. The Space-Time Conservative Schemes for Large-Scale, Time-Accurate Flow Simulations with Tetrahedral Meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Friedlander, David J.; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chang, Sin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of development of unstructured mesh methods, high-fidelity time-accurate simulations are still predominantly carried out on structured, or unstructured hexahedral meshes by using high-order finite-difference, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO), or hybrid schemes formed by their combinations. In this work, the space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) method is used to simulate several flow problems including supersonic jet/shock interaction and its impact on launch vehicle acoustics, and direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows using tetrahedral meshes. This paper provides a status report for the continuing development of the space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) numerical and software framework under the Revolutionary Computational Aerosciences (RCA) project. Solution accuracy and large-scale parallel performance of the numerical framework is assessed with the goal of providing a viable paradigm for future high-fidelity flow physics simulations.

  7. A Review of Cloud-Resolving Model Studies of Convective Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqing WU; Xiaofan LI

    2008-01-01

    Convective processes affect large-scale environments through cloud-radiation interaction.cloud micro-physical processes,and surface rainfall processes.Over the last three decades,cloud-resolving models (CRMs)have demonstrated to be capable of simulating convective-radiative responses to an imposed large-scale forcing.The CRM-produced cloud and radiative properties have been utilized to study the convective-related processes and their ensemble effects on large-scale circulations.This review summarizes the recent progress on the understanding of convective processes with the use of CRM simulations,including precipi-tation processes;cloud microphysical and radiative processes;dynamical processes;precipitation efficiency;diurnal variations of tropical oceanic convection;local-scale atmosphere-ocean coupling processes;and tropi-cal convective-radiative equilibrium states.Two different ongoing applications of CRMs to general circulation models(GCMs)are discussed:replacing convection and cloud schemes for studying the interaction between cloud systems and large-scale circulation,and improving the schemes for climate simulations.

  8. Numerical simulation of transonic limit cycle oscillations using high-order low-diffusion schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoyuan; Zha, Ge-Cheng

    2010-05-01

    This paper simulates the NLR7301 airfoil limit cycle oscillation (LCO) caused by fluid-structure interaction (FSI) using Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) coupled with Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) one-equation turbulence model. A low diffusion E-CUSP (LDE) scheme with 5th order weighted essentially nonoscillatory scheme (WENO) is employed to calculate the inviscid fluxes. A fully conservative 4th order central differencing is used for the viscous terms. A fully coupled fluid-structural interaction model is employed. For the case computed in this paper, the predicted LCO frequency, amplitudes, averaged lift and moment, all agree excellently with the experiment performed by Schewe et al. The solutions appear to have bifurcation and are dependent on the initial fields or initial perturbation. The developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD)/computational structure dynamics (CSD) simulation is able to capture the LCO with very small amplitudes measured in the experiment. This is attributed to the high order low diffusion schemes, fully coupled FSI model, and the turbulence model used. This research appears to be the first time that a numerical simulation of LCO matches the experiment. The simulation confirms several observations of the experiment.

  9. Convection in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Nield, Donald A

    1992-01-01

    This book provides a user-friendly introduction to the topic of convection in porous media The authors as- sume that the reader is familiar with the basic elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer, but otherwise the book is self-contained The book will be useful both as a review (for reference) and as a tutorial work, suitable as a textbook in a graduate course or seminar The book brings into perspective the voluminous research that has been performed during the last two decades The field has recently exploded because of worldwide concern with issues such as energy self-sufficiency and pollution of the environment Areas of application include the insulation of buildings and equipment, energy storage and recovery, geothermal reservoirs, nuclear waste disposal, chemical reactor engineering, and the storage of heat-generating materials such as grain and coal Geophysical applications range from the flow of groundwater around hot intrusions to the stability of snow against avalanches

  10. Convection in Porous Media

    CERN Document Server

    Nield, Donald A

    2013-01-01

    Convection in Porous Media, 4th Edition, provides a user-friendly introduction to the subject, covering a wide range of topics, such as fibrous insulation, geological strata, and catalytic reactors. The presentation is self-contained, requiring only routine mathematics and the basic elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer. The book will be of use not only to researchers and practicing engineers as a review and reference, but also to graduate students and others entering the field. The new edition features approximately 1,750 new references and covers current research in nanofluids, cellular porous materials, strong heterogeneity, pulsating flow, and more. Recognized as the standard reference in the field Includes a comprehensive, 250-page reference list Cited over 2300 times to date in its various editions Serves as an introduction for those entering the field and as a comprehensive reference for experienced researchers Features new sections on nanofluids, carbon dioxide sequestration, and applications...

  11. Mixed convection from an isolated spherical particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Singh, Ashok

    2008-01-01

    A numerical study on mixed convection around a hot spherical particle moving vertically downwards in a still fluid medium has been made. The flow field is considered to be axisymmetric for the range of Reynolds number (based on the diameter and the settling velocity of the particle) considered....... A third-order accurate upwind scheme is employed to compute the flow field and the temperature distribution. The form of the wake and the thermal field is analyzed for several values of Grashof number and the Reynolds number. The influence of buoyancy on drag and the rate of heat transfer are studied....... At moderate Reynolds number, recirculating eddy develops in the downstream of the sphere. With the rise of surface temperature this eddy collapses and the fluid adjacent to the heated surface develops into a buoyant plume above the sphere. The increase in surface temperature of the sphere delays the flow...

  12. Natural convection through enclosed disconnected solid blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao, Fernando Cesar De; Junqueira, Silvio L.M.; Franco, Admilson T. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mails: fernandodelai@gmail.com; silvio@utfpr.edu.br; admilson@utfpr.edu.br; Lage, Jose L. [Southern Methodist University (SMU), Dallas, TX (United States)]. E-mail: JLL@smu.edu

    2008-07-01

    In this study, the natural convection inside a fluid filled, enclosure containing several solid obstructions and being heated from the side is modeled and numerically simulated. The solid obstructions are equally spaced, conducting, and disconnected square blocks. The mathematical model is based on the balance equations of mass, momentum and energy, which are then solved numerically via the finite-volume method with the SIMPLEST algorithm and the HYBRID scheme. The effects of varying the solid-fluid thermal conductivity ratio (K), the fluid volume-fraction or porosity ({phi}), the number of solid blocks (N) and the heating strength (represented by the Rayleigh number, Ra) of the enclosure on the Nusselt number based on the surface-averaged heat transfer coefficient along the heated wall of the enclosure are studied. The results indicate a competing effect caused by the proximity of the solid blocks to the heated and cooled walls, vis-a-vis hindering the boundary layer growth, hence reducing the heat transfer effectiveness, and at the same time enhancing the heat transfer when the blocks' thermal conductivity is larger than that of the fluid. An analytical estimate of the minimum number of blocks beyond which the convection hindrance becomes predominant is presented and validated by the numerical results. (author)

  13. An improvement in mass flux convective parameterizations and its impact on seasonal simulations using a coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed Yousef, Ahmed; Ehsan, M. Azhar; Almazroui, Mansour; Assiri, Mazen E.; Al-Khalaf, Abdulrahman K.

    2017-02-01

    A new closure and a modified detrainment for the simplified Arakawa-Schubert (SAS) cumulus parameterization scheme are proposed. In the modified convective scheme which is named as King Abdulaziz University (KAU) scheme, the closure depends on both the buoyancy force and the environment mean relative humidity. A lateral entrainment rate varying with environment relative humidity is proposed and tends to suppress convection in a dry atmosphere. The detrainment rate also varies with environment relative humidity. The KAU scheme has been tested in a single column model (SCM) and implemented in a coupled global climate model (CGCM). Increased coupling between environment and clouds in the KAU scheme results in improved sensitivity of the depth and strength of convection to environmental humidity compared to the original SAS scheme. The new scheme improves precipitation simulation with better representations of moisture and temperature especially during suppressed convection periods. The KAU scheme implemented in the Seoul National University (SNU) CGCM shows improved precipitation over the tropics. The simulated precipitation pattern over the Arabian Peninsula and Northeast African region is also improved.

  14. Generalized Group Signature Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The concept of generalized group signature scheme will bepresent. Based on the generalized secret sharing scheme proposed by Lin and Ha rn, a non-interactive approach is designed for realizing such generalized group signature scheme. Using the new scheme, the authorized subsets of the group in w hich the group member can cooperate to produce the valid signature for any messa ge can be randomly specified

  15. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.S.

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of {approximately} 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for {gamma}-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of {approximately} 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches {approximately} 60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  16. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Douglas Scott [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of ~ 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for γ-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of ~ 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches ~60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  17. MIDI Programming in Scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    A Scheme representation of Standard MIDI Files is proposed. The Scheme expressions are defined and constrained by an XML-language, which in the starting point is inspired by a MIDI XML event language made by the MIDI Manufactures Association. The representation of Standard MIDI Files in Scheme ma...

  18. MIDI Programming in Scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    A Scheme representation of Standard MIDI Files is proposed. The Scheme expressions are defined and constrained by an XML-language, which in the starting point is inspired by a MIDI XML event language made by the MIDI Manufactures Association. The representation of Standard MIDI Files in Scheme ma...

  19. Internally heated convection and Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Goluskin, David

    2016-01-01

    This Brief describes six basic models of buoyancy-driven convection in a fluid layer: three configurations of internally heated convection and three configurations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The author discusses the main quantities that characterize heat transport in each model, along with the constraints on these quantities. This presentation is the first to place the various models in a unified framework, and similarities and differences between the cases are highlighted. Necessary and sufficient conditions for convective motion are given. For the internally heated cases only, parameter-dependent lower bounds on the mean fluid temperature are proven, and results of past simulations and laboratory experiments are summarized and reanalyzed. The author poses several open questions for future study.

  20. Scheme Program Documentation Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses two different Scheme documentation tools. The first is SchemeDoc, which is intended for documentation of the interfaces of Scheme libraries (APIs). The second is the Scheme Elucidator, which is for internal documentation of Scheme programs. Although the tools...... are separate and intended for different documentation purposes they are related to each other in several ways. Both tools are based on XML languages for tool setup and for documentation authoring. In addition, both tools rely on the LAML framework which---in a systematic way---makes an XML language available...

  1. Convection and waves on Small Earth and Deep Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine Semane

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A scaled version of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF spectral hydrostatic forecast model (IFS has been developed with full physics using an Aqua planet configuration. This includes Kuang et al.'s Small Earth Diabatic Acceleration and REscaling (DARE/SE approach bringing the synoptic scale a factor γ closer to the convective scale by reducing the Earth radius by γ, and increasing the rotation rate and all diabatic processes by the same factor. Furthermore, the scaled version also provides an alternative system to DARE/SE, dubbed ‘Deep Atmosphere Diabatic Acceleration and REscaling’ (DARE/DA, which reduces gravity by a factor γ and thereby increases the horizontal scale of convection by γ, while only weakly affecting the large-scale flow. The two approaches have been evaluated using a T159 spectral truncation and γ = 8 with the deep convection scheme switched off. The evaluation is against the baseline unscaled model at T1279 spectral resolution without deep convection parametrisation, as well as the unscaled T159 model using the deep convection parametrisation. It is shown that the DARE/SE and DARE/DA systems provide fairly equivalent results, while the DARE/DA system seems to be the preferred choice as it damps divergent modes, providing a better climatology, and is technically easier to implement. However, neither of the systems could reproduce the motion range and modes of the high-resolution spectral model. Higher equivalent horizontal resolution in the 1–10 km range and the full non-hydrostatic system might be necessary to successfully simulate the convective and large-scale explicitly at reduced cost.

  2. Properties of shallow convection from Large-Eddie simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denby, Leif; Herzog, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Utilizing Large-Eddie simulations (LES) of isolated individual convective clouds in an idealised conditionally unstable atmosphere and large-domain LES simulations of radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE) from the RICO measuring campaign (Rauber et al. 2007), vertical profiles of individual clouds and statistical properties of the cloud ensemble have been extracted and compared against predictions by an 1D entraining parcel model and against the cloud-ensemble model of the CCFM (Wagner and Graf 2010) convection scheme (which comprises a solution of a Lotka-Volterra population dynamics system). For the simulations of isolated clouds it was possible to achieve agreement with the entraining parcel model when simulations were carried out with 2D axisymmetry and the entrainment rate was prescribed using an entraining profile estimated from LES simulation using a passive tracer (in place of the traditional Morton- Turner entrainment rate parameterisation), this agreement was not achieved when comparing against 3D simulations. Integrating the entraining parcel model using the horizontal mean environment profile of the RCE simulation (and so the vertical profile as would be predicted by a climate model) it was not possible to achieve the variation in cloud-top height seen in the RCE simulation, even when greatly increasing the entrainment rate. However, if the near-environment of a convective cloud was used as the environmental profile the variation in cloud-top height was achieved (by varying the cloud-base state variables within values extracted from RCE simulation). This indicates that the near-cloud environment is significantly different that the horizontal mean environment and must be taken into account if the effect of entrainment is to be correctly captured in parameterisations for convection. Finally, size-distribution of convective clouds extracted from RCE simulation showed qualitative agreement with predictions of CCFM's spectrum model.

  3. Monotonicity Conditions for Multirate and Partitioned Explicit Runge-Kutta Schemes

    KAUST Repository

    Hundsdorfer, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Multirate schemes for conservation laws or convection-dominated problems seem to come in two flavors: schemes that are locally inconsistent, and schemes that lack mass-conservation. In this paper these two defects are discussed for one-dimensional conservation laws. Particular attention will be given to monotonicity properties of the multirate schemes, such as maximum principles and the total variation diminishing (TVD) property. The study of these properties will be done within the framework of partitioned Runge-Kutta methods. It will also be seen that the incompatibility of consistency and mass-conservation holds for ‘genuine’ multirate schemes, but not for general partitioned methods.

  4. Validation of Microphysical Schemes in a CRM Using TRMM Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Tao, W.; Matsui, T.; Liu, C.; Masunaga, H.

    2007-12-01

    The microphysical scheme in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model has been the most heavily developed component in the past decade. The cloud-resolving model now has microphysical schemes ranging from the original Lin type bulk scheme, to improved bulk schemes, to a two-moment scheme, to a detailed bin spectral scheme. Even with the most sophisticated bin scheme, many uncertainties still exist, especially in ice phase microphysics. In this study, we take advantages of the long-term TRMM observations, especially the cloud profiles observed by the precipitation radar (PR), to validate microphysical schemes in the simulations of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). Two contrasting cases, a midlatitude summertime continental MCS with leading convection and trailing stratiform region, and an oceanic MCS in tropical western Pacific are studied. The simulated cloud structures and particle sizes are fed into a forward radiative transfer model to simulate the TRMM satellite sensors, i.e., the PR, the TRMM microwave imager (TMI) and the visible and infrared scanner (VIRS). MCS cases that match the structure and strength of the simulated systems over the 10-year period are used to construct statistics of different sensors. These statistics are then compared with the synthetic satellite data obtained from the forward radiative transfer calculations. It is found that the GCE model simulates the contrasts between the continental and oceanic case reasonably well, with less ice scattering in the oceanic case comparing with the continental case. However, the simulated ice scattering signals for both PR and TMI are generally stronger than the observations, especially for the bulk scheme and at the upper levels in the stratiform region. This indicates larger, denser snow/graupel particles at these levels. Adjusting microphysical schemes in the GCE model according the observations, especially the 3D cloud structure observed by TRMM PR, result in a much better agreement.

  5. Plumes in stellar convection zones

    CERN Document Server

    Zahn, J P

    1999-01-01

    All numerical simulations of compressible convection reveal the presence of strong downwards directed flows. Thanks to helioseismology, such plumes have now been detected also at the top of the solar convection zone, on super- granular scales. Their properties may be crudely described by adopting Taylor's turbulent entrainment hypothesis, whose validity is well established under various conditions. Using this model, one finds that the strong density stratification does not prevent the plumes from traversing the whole convection zone, and that they carry upwards a net energy flux (Rieutord & Zahn 1995). They penetrate to some extent in the adjacent stable region, where they establish a nearly adiabatic stratification. These plumes have a strong impact on the dynamics of stellar convection zones, and they play probably a key role in the dynamo mechanism.

  6. Convective cooling of photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, E.; Gibbons, C. [Energy Engineering Group, Mechanical Engineering Department, Cork Institute of Technology, Bishopstown, Cork (Ireland)

    2004-07-01

    Most solar cells presently on the market are based on silicon wafers, the so-called first generation technology. As this technology has matured costs have become increasingly dominated by material costs. In the last ten years, continuous work has brought the efficiency of standard cells to the 25% region. A switch to second generation or thin film technology cells now seems imminent. Thin film technology eliminates the silicon wafer and offer the prospect of reducing material and manufacturing costs, but they exhibit lower efficiencies of around 10% for a commercial device. Third generation or tandem cells are currently at a 'proof of concept' research level, with a theoretical conversion rate of 86.8% being asserted Whatever the material construction and manufacturing method of cells, the thermal effect of overheating will prevail in the semiconductor and it is accepted that a lowered temperature will bring about an increase in conversion efficiency. The aim of this project is to improve the efficiency of PV electrical output, by convectively cooling the cells through perforations in them. As the cells heat up they lose efficiency. As the panel heats up a loss in efficiency of 0.5% per C increase in temperature has been recorded. (orig.)

  7. Separating dynamical and microphysical impacts of aerosols on deep convection applying piggybacking methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Wojciech W.

    2016-04-01

    Formation and growth of cloud and precipitation particles ("cloud microphysics") affect cloud dynamics and such macroscopic cloud field properties as the mean surface rainfall, cloud cover, and liquid/ice water paths. Traditional approaches to investigate the impacts involve parallel simulations with different microphysical schemes or with different scheme parameters (such as the assumed droplet/ice concentration for single-moment bulk schemes or the assumed CCN/IN concentration for double-moment schemes). Such methodologies are not reliable because of the natural variability of a cloud field that is affected by the feedback between cloud microphysics and cloud dynamics. In a nutshell, changing the cloud microphysics leads to a different realization of the cloud-scale flow, and separating dynamical and microphysical impacts is cumbersome. A novel modeling methodology, referred to as the microphysical piggybacking, was recently developed to separate purely microphysical effects from the impact on the dynamics. The main idea is to use two sets of thermodynamic variables driven by two microphysical schemes or by the same scheme with different scheme parameters. One set is coupled to the dynamics and drives the simulation, and the other set piggybacks the simulated flow, that is, it responds to the simulated flow but does not affect it. By switching the sets (i.e., the set driving the simulation becomes the piggybacking one, and vice versa), the impact on the cloud dynamics can be isolated from purely microphysical effects. Application of this methodology to the daytime deep convection development over land based on the observations during the Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere (LBA) field project in Amazonia will be discussed applying single-moment and double-moment bulk microphysics schemes. We show that the new methodology documents a small indirect aerosol impact on convective dynamics, and a strong microphysical effect. These results question the postulated strong

  8. Observation of deep convection initiation from shallow convection environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothon, Marie; Couvreux, Fleur; Guichard, Françoise; Campistron, Bernard; Chong, Michel; Rio, Catherine; Williams, Earle

    2010-05-01

    In the afternoon of 10 July 2006, deep convective cells initiated right in the field of view of the Massachusetts Institute Technology (MIT) C-band Doppler radar. This radar, with its 3D exploration at 10 min temporal resolution and 250 m radial resolution, allows us to track the deep convective cells and also provides clear air observations of the boundary layer structure prior to deep convection initiation. Several other observational platforms were operating then which allow us to thoroughly analyse this case: Vertically pointing aerosol lidar, W-band radar and ceilometer from the ARM Mobile Facility, along with radiosoundings and surface measurements enable us to describe the environment, from before their initiation to after the propagation of of one propagating cell that generated a circular gust front very nicely caught by the MIT radar. The systems considered here differ from the mesoscale convective systems which are often associated with African Easterly Waves, increasing CAPE and decreasing CIN. The former have smaller size, and initiate more locally, but there are numerous and still play a large role in the atmospheric circulation and scalar transport. Though, they remain a challenge to model. (See the presentation by Guichard et al. in the same session, for a model set up based on the same case, with joint single-column model and Large Eddy Simulation, which aims at better understanding and improving the parametrisation of deep convection initiation.) Based on the analysis of the observations mentioned above, we consider here the possible sources of deep convection initiation that day, which showed a typical boundary-layer growth in semi-arid environment, with isolated deep convective events.

  9. Cloud-Resolving Modeling Intercomparison Study of a Squall Line Case from MC3E - Properties of Convective Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Han, B.; Varble, A.; Morrison, H.; North, K.; Kollias, P.; Chen, B.; Dong, X.; Giangrande, S. E.; Khain, A.; Lin, Y.; Mansell, E.; Milbrandt, J.; Stenz, R.; Thompson, G.; Wang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The large spread in CRM model simulations of deep convection and aerosol effects on deep convective clouds (DCCs) makes it difficult to (1) further our understanding of deep convection and (2) define "benchmarks" and then limit their use in parameterization developments. A constrained model intercomparsion study on a mid-latitude mesoscale squall line is performed using the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) model at 1-km horizontal grid spacing with eight cloud microphysics schemes to understand specific processes that lead to the large spreads of simulated convection and precipitation. Various observational data are employed to evaluate the baseline simulations. All simulations tend to produce a wider convective area but a much narrower stratiform area. The magnitudes of virtual potential temperature drop, pressure rise, and wind speed peak associated with the passage of the gust front are significantly smaller compared with the observations, suggesting simulated cool pools are weaker. Simulations generally overestimate the vertical velocity and radar reflectivity in convective cores compared with the retrievals. The modeled updraft velocity and precipitation have a significant spread across eight schemes. The spread of updraft velocity is the combination of both low-level pressure perturbation gradient (PPG) and buoyancy. Both PPG and thermal buoyancy are small for simulations of weak convection but both are large for those of strong convection. Ice-related parameterizations contribute majorly to the spread of updraft velocity, while they are not the reason for the large spread of precipitation. The understandings gained in this study can help to focus future observations and parameterization development.

  10. Convertible Proxy Signcryption Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李继国; 李建中; 曹珍富; 张亦辰

    2004-01-01

    In 1996, Mambo et al introduced the concept of proxy signature. However, proxy signature can only provide the delegated authenticity and cannot provide confidentiality. Recently, Gamage et al and Chan and Wei proposed different proxy signcryption schemes respectively, which extended the concept of proxy signature.However, only the specified receiver can decrypt and verify the validity of proxy signcryption in their schemes.To protect the receiver' s benefit in case of a later dispute, Wu and Hsu proposed a convertible authenticated encryption scheme, which carn enable the receiver to convert signature into an ordinary one that can be verified by anyone. Based on Wu and Hsu' s scheme and improved Kim' s scheme, we propose a convertible proxy signcryption scheme. The security of the proposed scheme is based on the intractability of reversing the one-way hash function and solving the discrete logarithm problem. The proposed scheme can satisfy all properties of strong proxy signature and withstand the public key substitution attack and does not use secure channel. In addition, the proposed scheme can be extended to convertible threshold proxy signcryption scheme.

  11. Evaluation of cloud convection and tracer transport in a three-dimensional chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Feng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the performance of cloud convection and tracer transport in a global off-line 3-D chemical transport model. Various model simulations are performed using different meteorological (reanalyses (ERA-40, ECMWF operational and ECMWF Interim to diagnose the updraft mass flux, convective precipitation and cloud top height.

    The diagnosed upward mass flux distribution from TOMCAT agrees quite well with the ECMWF reanalysis data (ERA-40 and ERA-Interim below 200 hPa. Inclusion of midlevel convection improves the agreement at mid-high latitudes. However, the reanalyses show strong convective transport up to 100 hPa, well into the tropical tropopause layer (TTL, which is not captured by TOMCAT. Similarly, the model captures the spatial and seasonal variation of convective cloud top height although the mean modelled value is about 2 km lower than observed.

    The ERA-Interim reanalyses have smaller archived upward convective mass fluxes than ERA-40, and smaller convective precipitation, which is in better agreement with satellite-based data. TOMCAT captures these relative differences when diagnosing convection from the large-scale fields. The model also shows differences in diagnosed convection with the version of the operational analyses used, which cautions against using results of the model from one specific time period as a general evaluation.

    We have tested the effect of resolution on the diagnosed modelled convection with simulations ranging from 5.6° × 5.6° to 1° × 1°. Overall, in the off-line model, the higher model resolution gives stronger vertical tracer transport, however, it does not make a large change to the diagnosed convective updraft mass flux (i.e., the model results using the convection scheme fail to capture the strong convection transport up to 100 hPa as seen in the archived convective mass fluxes. Similarly, the resolution of the forcing winds in the higher resolution CTM does not make a

  12. Sensitivity of land surface and Cumulus schemes for Thunderstorm prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Mohanty, U. C.; Kumar, Krishan

    2016-06-01

    The cloud processes play an important role in all forms of precipitation. Its proper representation is one of the challenging tasks in mesoscale numerical simulation. Studies have revealed that mesoscale feature require proper initialization which may likely to improve the convective system rainfall forecasts. Understanding the precipitation process, model initial condition accuracy and resolved/sub grid-scale precipitation processes representation, are the important areas which needed to improve in order to represent the mesoscale features properly. Various attempts have been done in order to improve the model performance through grid resolution, physical parameterizations, etc. But it is the physical parameterizations which provide a convective atmosphere for the development and intensification of convective events. Further, physical parameterizations consist of cumulus convection, surface fluxes of heat, moisture, momentum, and vertical mixing in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). How PBL and Cumulus schemes capture the evolution of thunderstorm have been analysed by taking thunderstorm cases occurred over Kolkata, India in the year 2011. PBL and cumulus schemes were customized for WSM-6 microphysics because WSM series has been widely used in operational forecast. Results have shown that KF (PBL scheme) and WSM-6 (Cumulus Scheme) have reproduced the evolution of surface variable such as CAPE, temperature and rainfall very much like observation. Further, KF and WSM-6 scheme also provided the increased moisture availability in the lower atmosphere which was taken to higher level by strong vertical velocities providing a platform to initiate a thunderstorm much better. Overestimation of rain in WSM-6 occurs primarily because of occurrence of melting and freezing process within a deeper layer in WSM-6 scheme. These Schemes have reproduced the spatial pattern and peak rainfall coverage closer to TRMM observation. It is the the combination of WSM-6, and KF schemes

  13. Sensitivity of land surface and Cumulus schemes for Thunderstorm prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The cloud processes play an important role in all forms of precipitation. Its proper representation is one of the challenging tasks in mesoscale numerical simulation. Studies have revealed that mesoscale feature require proper initialization which may likely to improve the convective system rainfall forecasts. Understanding the precipitation process, model initial condition accuracy and resolved/sub grid-scale precipitation processes representation, are the important areas which needed to improve in order to represent the mesoscale features properly. Various attempts have been done in order to improve the model performance through grid resolution, physical parameterizations, etc. But it is the physical parameterizations which provide a convective atmosphere for the development and intensification of convective events. Further, physical parameterizations consist of cumulus convection, surface fluxes of heat, moisture, momentum, and vertical mixing in the planetary boundary layer (PBL. How PBL and Cumulus schemes capture the evolution of thunderstorm have been analysed by taking thunderstorm cases occurred over Kolkata, India in the year 2011. PBL and cumulus schemes were customized for WSM-6 microphysics because WSM series has been widely used in operational forecast. Results have shown that KF (PBL scheme and WSM-6 (Cumulus Scheme have reproduced the evolution of surface variable such as CAPE, temperature and rainfall very much like observation. Further, KF and WSM-6 scheme also provided the increased moisture availability in the lower atmosphere which was taken to higher level by strong vertical velocities providing a platform to initiate a thunderstorm much better. Overestimation of rain in WSM-6 occurs primarily because of occurrence of melting and freezing process within a deeper layer in WSM-6 scheme. These Schemes have reproduced the spatial pattern and peak rainfall coverage closer to TRMM observation. It is the the combination of WSM-6

  14. Efficient Threshold Signature Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sattar J Aboud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a new threshold signature RSA-typed scheme. The proposed scheme has the characteristics of un-forgeable and robustness in random oracle model. Also, signature generation and verification is entirely non-interactive. In addition, the length of the entity signature participate is restricted by a steady times of the length of the RSA signature modulus. Also, the signing process of the proposed scheme is more efficient in terms of time complexity and interaction.

  15. Stateless Transitive Signature Schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Chun-guang; CAI Man-chun; YANG Yi-xian

    2004-01-01

    A new practical method is introduced to transform the stateful transitive signature scheme to stateless one without the loss of security. According to the approach, two concrete stateless transitive signature schemes based on Factoring and RSA are presented respectively. Under the assumption of the hardness of factoring and one-more- RSA-inversion problem, both two schemes are secure under the adaptive chosen-message attacks in random oracle model.

  16. Uncertainties in atmospheric chemistry modelling due to convection parameterisations and subsequent scavenging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tost

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Moist convection in global modelling contributes significantly to the transport of energy, momentum, water and trace gases and aerosols within the troposphere. Since convective clouds are on a scale too small to be resolved in a global model their effects have to be parameterised. However, the whole process of moist convection and especially its parameterisations are associated with uncertainties. In contrast to previous studies on the impact of convection on trace gases, which had commonly neglected the convective transport for some or all compounds, we investigate this issue by examining simulations with five different convection schemes. This permits an uncertainty analysis due to the process formulation, without the inconsistencies inherent in entirely neglecting deep convection or convective tracer transport for one or more tracers.

    Both the simulated mass fluxes and tracer distributions are analysed. Investigating the distributions of compounds with different characteristics, e.g., lifetime, chemical reactivity, solubility and source distributions, some differences can be attributed directly to the transport of these compounds, whereas others are more related to indirect effects, such as the transport of precursors, chemical reactivity in certain regions, and sink processes.

    The model simulation data are compared with the average regional profiles of several measurement campaigns, and in detail with two campaigns in fall and winter 2005 in Suriname and Australia, respectively.

    The shorter-lived a compound is, the larger the differences and consequently the uncertainty due to the convection parameterisation are, as long as it is not completely controlled by local production that is independent of convection and its impacts (e.g. water vapour changes. Whereas for long-lived compounds like CO or O3 the mean differences between the simulations are less than 25%, differences for short-lived compounds reach

  17. An acoustic-convective splitting-based approach for the Kapila two-phase flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Eikelder, M. F. P.; Daude, F.; Koren, B.; Tijsseling, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we propose a new acoustic-convective splitting-based numerical scheme for the Kapila five-equation two-phase flow model. The splitting operator decouples the acoustic waves and convective waves. The resulting two submodels are alternately numerically solved to approximate the solution of the entire model. The Lagrangian form of the acoustic submodel is numerically solved using an HLLC-type Riemann solver whereas the convective part is approximated with an upwind scheme. The result is a simple method which allows for a general equation of state. Numerical computations are performed for standard two-phase shock tube problems. A comparison is made with a non-splitting approach. The results are in good agreement with reference results and exact solutions.

  18. An acoustic-convective splitting-based approach for the Kapila two-phase flow model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eikelder, M.F.P. ten, E-mail: m.f.p.teneikelder@tudelft.nl [EDF R& D, AMA, 7 boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau (France); Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Daude, F. [EDF R& D, AMA, 7 boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau (France); IMSIA, UMR EDF-CNRS-CEA-ENSTA 9219, Université Paris Saclay, 828 Boulevard des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau (France); Koren, B.; Tijsseling, A.S. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper we propose a new acoustic-convective splitting-based numerical scheme for the Kapila five-equation two-phase flow model. The splitting operator decouples the acoustic waves and convective waves. The resulting two submodels are alternately numerically solved to approximate the solution of the entire model. The Lagrangian form of the acoustic submodel is numerically solved using an HLLC-type Riemann solver whereas the convective part is approximated with an upwind scheme. The result is a simple method which allows for a general equation of state. Numerical computations are performed for standard two-phase shock tube problems. A comparison is made with a non-splitting approach. The results are in good agreement with reference results and exact solutions.

  19. Multigrid solution of the convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A fourth-order compact finite difference scheme is employed with the multigrid technique to solve the variable coefficient convection-diffusion equation with high-Reynolds number. Scaled inter-grid transfer operators and potential on vectorization and parallelization are discussed. The high-order multigrid method is unconditionally stable and produces solution of 4th-order accuracy. Numerical experiments are included.

  20. Parallel Computation and Visualization of Three-dimensional, Time-dependent, Thermal Convective Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Li, P.

    1998-01-01

    A high-resolution numerical study on parallel systems is reported on three-dimensional, time-dependent, thermal convective flows. A parallel implentation on the finite volume method with a multigrid scheme is discussed, and a parallel visualization systemm is developed on distributed systems for visualizing the flow.

  1. Entropy Solution Theory for Fractional Degenerate Convection-Diffusion Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobsen, Simone Cifani And Espen R

    2010-01-01

    We study a class of degenerate convection diffusion equations with a fractional nonlinear diffusion term. These equations are natural generalizations of anomalous diffusion equations, fractional conservations laws, local convection diffusion equations, and some fractional Porous medium equations. In this paper we define weak entropy solutions for this class of equations and prove well-posedness under weak regularity assumptions on the solutions, e.g. uniqueness is obtained in the class of bounded integrable functions. Then we introduce a monotone conservative numerical scheme and prove convergence toward an Entropy solution in the class of bounded integrable functions of bounded variation. We then extend the well-posedness results to non-local terms based on general L\\'evy type operators, and establish some connections to fully non-linear HJB equations. Finally, we present some numerical experiments to give the reader an idea about the qualitative behavior of solutions of these equations.

  2. Double MRT thermal lattice Boltzmann method for simulating convective flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezrhab, Ahmed, E-mail: mezrhab@fso.ump.m [Laboratoire de Mecanique and Energetique, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mohammed 1er, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Amine Moussaoui, Mohammed; Jami, Mohammed [Laboratoire de Mecanique and Energetique, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mohammed 1er, 60000 Oujda (Morocco); Naji, Hassan [Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille, and LML UMR CNRS 8107, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Bouzidi, M' hamed [Universite Clermont 2, LaMI EA 3867, IUT de Montlucon, Av. A. Briand, BP 2235, F-03101 Montlucon cedex (France)

    2010-07-26

    A two-dimensional double Multiple Relaxation Time-Thermal Lattice Boltzmann Equation (2-MRT-TLBE) method is developed for predicting convective flows in a square differentially heated cavity filled with air (Pr=0.71). In this Letter, we propose a numerical scheme to solve the flow and the temperature fields using the MRT-D2Q9 model and the MRT-D2Q5 model, respectively. Thus, the main objective of this study is to show the effectiveness of such model to predict thermodynamics for heat transfer. This model is validated by the numerical simulations of the 2-D convective square cavity flow. Excellent agreements are obtained between numerical predictions. These results demonstrate the accuracy and the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  3. Modeling of dendritic growth in the presence of convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Mingfang; DAI; Ting; LEE; Sungyoon; HONG; Chunpyo

    2005-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupling modified cellular automaton (MCA)-transport model has been employed to investigate the asymmetrical dendritic growth behavior in a flowing melt. In the present model, the cellular automaton method for crystal growth is incorporated with a transport model, for numerical calculating of the fluid flow and mass transport by both convection and diffusion. The MCA takes into account the effects of the thermal, the constitutional and the curvature undercoolings on dendritic growth. It also considers the preferred growth orientation of crystal and solute redistribution during solidification. In the transport model, the SIMPLE scheme and a fully implicit finite volume method are employed to solve the governing equations of momentum and species transfers. The present model was applied to simulating the evolution of a single dendrite and multi-dendrites of an Al-3mass%Cu alloy in a forced flow. The simulated results show that dendritic growth morphology is strongly influenced by melt convection.

  4. An efficient compact fourth order FD method for simulating 3-D mantle convection at high Rayleigh number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, G. B.; Barnett, G. A.; Yuen, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    We present an efficient method based on fourth order compact finite-differences for simulating three dimensional mantle convection (i.e. Rayleigh-Bénard convection in the infinite Prandtl number limit) with constant viscosity in a rectangular box. In the high Rayleigh number regime, this thermal convection model has recently been shown to exhibit many of the features of turbulent flow that are typically identified with high Reynolds number flow [1]. High order compact finite schemes are known to be particularly good for simulating turbulent flows because of their spectral like resolution [2], which ameliorates dispersion and anisotropy errors. They have also been shown to be much less susceptible than second order schemes to spurious oscillations for transient convection diffusion equations at large Péclet number (as occurs for the temperature equation in the mantle convection model at high Rayleigh number). Finally, high order schemes have been shown to be more efficient than low order methods in terms of degrees of freedom required to attain a specified error level, which is important for reducing memory requirements so simulations can be performed on emerging low-cost high performance computational platforms like graphics processing units (GPUs). We demonstrate the capabilities of our compact fourth order scheme at accurately capturing such phenomena as transient periods of double layered convection[3] (see Figure 1) and flow reversals using far fewer degrees of freedom than required for traditional second order methods. Finally, we discuss the computational cost of the scheme and its efficient implementation on GPUs. References: [1] M. Breuer and U. Hansen, Turbulent convection in the zero Reynolds number limit, EPL, 86, 24004, 2009. [2] S. K. Lele, Compact finite difference schemes with spectral-like resolution, J. Comput. Phys., 103, 16, 1992. [3] A. P. Boss and I. S. Sacks, Time-dependent models of single- and double-layer mantle convection, Nature, 308

  5. Eigenfunction Expansions for Coupled Nonlinear Convection-Diffusion Problems in Complex Physical Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotta, R. M.; Naveira-Cotta, C. P.; Knupp, D. C.; Zotin, J. L. Z.; Pontes, P. C.

    2016-09-01

    This lecture offers an updated review on the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT), with focus on handling complex geometries, coupled problems, and nonlinear convection-diffusion, so as to illustrate some new application paradigms. Special emphasis is given to demonstrating novel developments, such as a single domain reformulation strategy that simplifies the treatment of complex geometries, an integral balance scheme in handling multiscale problems, the adoption of convective eigenvalue problems in dealing with strongly convective formulations, and the direct integral transformation of nonlinear convection-diffusion problems based on nonlinear eigenvalue problems. Representative application examples are then provided that employ recent extensions on the Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT), and a few numerical results are reported to illustrate the convergence characteristics of the proposed eigenfunction expansions.

  6. A Linearized Prognostic Cloud Scheme in NASAs Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, Daniel; Errico, Ronald M.; Gelaro, Ronald; Kim, Jong G.; Mahajan, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    A linearized prognostic cloud scheme has been developed to accompany the linearized convection scheme recently implemented in NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System data assimilation tools. The linearization, developed from the nonlinear cloud scheme, treats cloud variables prognostically so they are subject to linearized advection, diffusion, generation, and evaporation. Four linearized cloud variables are modeled, the ice and water phases of clouds generated by large-scale condensation and, separately, by detraining convection. For each species the scheme models their sources, sublimation, evaporation, and autoconversion. Large-scale, anvil and convective species of precipitation are modeled and evaporated. The cloud scheme exhibits linearity and realistic perturbation growth, except around the generation of clouds through large-scale condensation. Discontinuities and steep gradients are widely used here and severe problems occur in the calculation of cloud fraction. For data assimilation applications this poor behavior is controlled by replacing this part of the scheme with a perturbation model. For observation impacts, where efficiency is less of a concern, a filtering is developed that examines the Jacobian. The replacement scheme is only invoked if Jacobian elements or eigenvalues violate a series of tuned constants. The linearized prognostic cloud scheme is tested by comparing the linear and nonlinear perturbation trajectories for 6-, 12-, and 24-h forecast times. The tangent linear model performs well and perturbations of clouds are well captured for the lead times of interest.

  7. Efficient Turbulent Compressible Convection in the Deep Stellar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Chun-Lin; Chan, Kwing-Lam; Xiong, Da-Run

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports an application of gas-kinetic BGK scheme to the computation of turbulent compressible convection in the stellar interior. After incorporating the Sub-grid Scale (SGS) turbulence model into the BGK scheme, we tested the effects of numerical parameters on the quantitative relationships among the thermodynamic variables, their fluctuations and correlations in a very deep, initially gravity-stratified stellar atmosphere. Comparison indicates that the thermal properties and dynamic properties are dominated by different aspects of numerical models separately. An adjustable Deardorff constant in the SGS model $c_\\mu=0.25$ and an amplitude of artificial viscosity in the gas-kinetic BGK scheme $C_2=0$ are appropriate for current study. We also calculated the density-weighted auto- and cross-correlation functions in Xiong's (\\cite{xiong77}) turbulent stellar convection theories based on which the gradient type of models of the non-local transport and the anisotropy of the turbulence are preliminarily...

  8. Efficient turbulent compressible convection in the deep stellar atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Lin Tian; Li-Cai Deng; Kwing-Lam Chan; Da-Run Xiong

    2009-01-01

    We report on an application of gas-kinetic BGK scheme to the computation of turbulent compressible convection in the stellar interior. After incorporating the Sub-grid Scale (SGS) turbulence model into the BGK scheme, we tested the effects of numerical parameters on the quantitative relationships among the thermodynamic variables, their fluctuations and correlations in a very deep, initially gravity-stratified stellar atmosphere. Comparison indicates that the thermal properties and dynamic properties are dominated by different aspects of numerical models separately. An adjustable Deardorff constant in the SGS model cμ = 0.25 and an amplitude of artificial viscosity in the gas-kinetic BGK scheme C2 = 0 are appropriate for the current study. We also calculated the density-weighted auto-and cross-correlation functions in Xiong's turbulent stellar convection theory based on which the gradient type of models of the non-local transport and the anisotropy of the turbulence were preliminarily studied. No universal relations or con-stant parameters were found for these models.

  9. Simple high-accuracy resolution program for convective modelling of discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, B. P.

    1988-01-01

    For steady multidimensional convection, the Quadratic Upstream Interpolation for Convective Kinematics (QUICK) scheme has several attractive properties. However, for highly convective simulation of step profiles, QUICK produces unphysical overshoots and a few oscillations, and this may cause serious problems in nonlinear flows. Fortunately, it is possible to modify the convective flux by writing the normalized convected control-volume face value as a function of the normalized adjacent upstream node value, developing criteria for monotonic resolution without sacrificing formal accuracy. This results in a nonlinear functional relationship between the normalized variables, whereas standard methods are all linear in this sense. The resulting Simple High Accuracy Resolution Program (SHARP) can be applied to steady multidimensional flows containing thin shear or mixing layers, shock waves, and other frontal phenomena. This represents a significant advance in modeling highly convective flows of engineering and geophysical importance. SHARP is based on an explicit, conservative, control-volume flux formation, equally applicable to one, two, or three dimensional elliptic, parabolic, hyperbolic, or mixed-flow regimes. Results are given for the bench-mark purely convective first-order results and the nonmonotonic predictions of second- and third-order upwinding.

  10. High-resolution simulations of shallow and deep convection over land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, J. P.; Teixeira, J.; Soares, P. M.; Miranda, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    The GCSS WG4 (Grabowski, 2006) case was chosen to study the transition from shallow to deep convection over land. The case was based on an idealization of observations made during the TRMM-LBA (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission - Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere experiment) in Rondonia, Brazil, on February 23, 1999. The case considered is a daytime convective development over land, which starts with the growth of a mixed boundary layer, evolving to shallow convective clouds with a later transition from shallow to deep precipitating convection. High resolution simulations of this case have been performed using the French community non-hydrostatic model MesoNH. Different model setups were used, with an emphasis on the sensitivity to model resolution, domain size and to the choice of microphysical parametrizations. A single column model (SCM) is also being developed in order to perform a simulation of the same case. The SCM model includes prognostic equations for the wind components, the thermodynamic variables and the turbulent kinetic energy. The sub-grid turbulent and convective fluxes are parameterized using the Eddy- Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach (EDMF) which combines the effects of local and non-local transport in a unified scheme. The comparison between the SCM and the Cloud Resolving Model will provide clues to the improvement of the EDMF framework in order to include the effects of deep convection, since currently it is only suitable to represent dry and shallow cumulus convection.

  11. Internal Wave Generation by Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoanet, Daniel Michael

    In nature, it is not unusual to find stably stratified fluid adjacent to convectively unstable fluid. This can occur in the Earth's atmosphere, where the troposphere is convective and the stratosphere is stably stratified; in lakes, where surface solar heating can drive convection above stably stratified fresh water; in the oceans, where geothermal heating can drive convection near the ocean floor, but the water above is stably stratified due to salinity gradients; possible in the Earth's liquid core, where gradients in thermal conductivity and composition diffusivities maybe lead to different layers of stable or unstable liquid metal; and, in stars, as most stars contain at least one convective and at least one radiative (stably stratified) zone. Internal waves propagate in stably stratified fluids. The characterization of the internal waves generated by convection is an open problem in geophysical and astrophysical fluid dynamics. Internal waves can play a dynamically important role via nonlocal transport. Momentum transport by convectively excited internal waves is thought to generate the quasi-biennial oscillation of zonal wind in the equatorial stratosphere, an important physical phenomenon used to calibrate global climate models. Angular momentum transport by convectively excited internal waves may play a crucial role in setting the initial rotation rates of neutron stars. In the last year of life of a massive star, convectively excited internal waves may transport even energy to the surface layers to unbind them, launching a wind. In each of these cases, internal waves are able to transport some quantity--momentum, angular momentum, energy--across large, stable buoyancy gradients. Thus, internal waves represent an important, if unusual, transport mechanism. This thesis advances our understanding of internal wave generation by convection. Chapter 2 provides an underlying theoretical framework to study this problem. It describes a detailed calculation of the

  12. Multiresolution signal decomposition schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Goutsias (John); H.J.A.M. Heijmans (Henk)

    1998-01-01

    textabstract[PNA-R9810] Interest in multiresolution techniques for signal processing and analysis is increasing steadily. An important instance of such a technique is the so-called pyramid decomposition scheme. This report proposes a general axiomatic pyramid decomposition scheme for signal analysis

  13. Multiresolution signal decomposition schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goutsias, J.; Heijmans, H.J.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    [PNA-R9810] Interest in multiresolution techniques for signal processing and analysis is increasing steadily. An important instance of such a technique is the so-called pyramid decomposition scheme. This report proposes a general axiomatic pyramid decomposition scheme for signal analysis and synthes

  14. Physics-based Stabilization of Spectral Elements for the 3D Euler Equations of Moist Atmospheric Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    3D Euler Equations of Moist Atmospheric Convection 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...STABILIZATION OF SPECTRAL ELEMENTS FOR THE 3D EULER EQUATIONS OF MOIST ATMOSPHERIC CONVECTION SIMONE MARRAS, ANDREAS MÜLLER, FRANCIS X. GIRALDO Dept. Appl...spectral elements, we introduce a dissipative scheme based on the solution of the compressible Euler equations that are regularized through the addi

  15. Two-grid method for characteristisc mixed finite-element solutions of nonlinear convection-diffusion equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Xinqiang; MA Yichen; GONG Chunqiong

    2004-01-01

    A two-grid method for solving nonlinear convection-dominated diffusion equations is presented. The method use discretizations based on a characteristic mixed finite-element method and give the linearization for nonlinear systems by two steps. The error analysis shows that the two-grid scheme combined with the characteristic mixed finite-element method can decrease numerical oscillation caused by dominated convections and solve nonlinear advection-dominated diffusion problems efficiently.

  16. Topology Optimization for Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    2011-01-01

    This report deals with the topology optimization of convection problems.That is, the aim of the project is to develop, implement and examine topology optimization of purely thermal and coupled thermomechanical problems,when the design-dependent eects of convection are taken into consideration.......This is done by the use of a self-programmed FORTRAN-code, which builds on an existing 2D-plane thermomechanical nite element code implementing during the course `41525 FEM-Heavy'. The topology optimizationfeatures have been implemented from scratch, and allows the program to optimize elastostatic mechanical...

  17. A Numerical Solution of the Two-Dimensional Fusion Problem with Convective Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülkaç, Vildan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present an LOD method for solving the two-dimensional fusion problem with convective boundary conditions. In this study, we extend our earlier work [1] on the solution of the two-dimensional fusion problem by considering a class of time-split finite-difference methods, namely locally one-dimensional (LOD) schemes. In addition, following the idea of Douglas [2, 3], a Douglas-like splitting scheme is presented. A stability analysis by Fourier series method (von Neumann stability) of the scheme is also investigated. Computational results obtained by the present method are in excellent agreement with the results reported previously by other research.

  18. Dynamic subgrid heterogeneity of convective cloud in a global model: description and evaluation of the Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) in ECHAM6-HAM2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Labbouz, Laurent; Wagner, Till

    2017-01-01

    The Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) attempts to address some of the shortcomings of both the commonly used bulk mass-flux parameterisations and those using a prescribed spectrum of clouds. By considering the cloud spectrum as a competitive system in which cloud types interact through their environment in competition for convective available potential energy (CAPE), the spectrum is able to respond dynamically to changes in the environment. An explicit Lagrangian entraining plume model for each cloud type allows for the representation of convective-cloud microphysics, paving the way for the study of aerosol-convection interactions at the global scale where their impact remains highly uncertain. In this paper, we introduce a new treatment of convective triggering, extending the entraining plume model below cloud base to explicitly represent the unsaturated thermals which initiate convection. This allows for a realistic vertical velocity to develop at cloud base, so that the cloud microphysics can begin with physically based activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). We evaluate this new version of CCFM in the context of the global model ECHAM6-HAM, comparing its performance to the standard Tiedtke-Nordeng parameterisation used in that model. We find that the spatio-temporal distribution of precipitation is improved, both against a climatology from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) and also against diurnal cycles from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) with a reduced tendency for precipitation to peak too early in the afternoon. Cloud cover is quite sensitive to the vertical level from which the dry convection is initiated, but when this is chosen appropriately the cloud cover compares well with that from Tiedtke-Nordeng. CCFM can thus perform as well as, or better than, the standard scheme while providing additional capabilities to represent convective-cloud microphysics and dynamic cloud morphology at the global scale.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS OF THE INTENSIFICATION CONVECTIVE DRYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Gavrilenkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Identified and analyzed the relationship of the intensity convective drying and air pollution emissions of heat. The ways to reduce the thermal pollution of the atmosphere at convective drying.

  20. Convection in stellar envelopes a changing paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Spruit, H C

    1996-01-01

    Progress in the theory of stellar convection over the past decade is reviewed. The similarities and differences between convection in stellar envelopes and laboratory convection at high Rayleigh numbers are discussed. Direct numerical simulation of the solar surface layers, with no other input than atomic physics, the equations of hydrodynamics and radiative transfer is now capable of reproducing the observed heat flux, convection velocities, granulation patterns and line profiles with remarkably accuracy. These results show that convection in stellar envelopes is an essentially non-local process, being driven by cooling at the surface. This differs distinctly from the traditional view of stellar convection in terms of local concepts such as cascades of eddies in a mean superadiabatic gradient. The consequences this has for our physical picture of processes in the convective envelope are illustrated with the problems of sunspot heat flux blocking, the eruption of magnetic flux from the base of the convection ...

  1. Theoretical Basis for Convective Invigoration due to Increased Aerosol Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, Z. J.; Chen, Y.; Seinfeld, J.

    2010-12-01

    Recent reports using a one-dimensional parcel model suggest that increases in aerosol number concentration may invigorate deep convection by mitigating the autoconversion process until air parcels reach the freezing level. This would lead to an increase in ice water aloft and the potential for enhanced upward heat transport due to phase changes, hence leading to invigorated convection. Other studies have proposed that an increase in aerosol loading may act to increase cloud top height, increasing the liquid water content, which ultimately increases the cumulative precipitation. Here we study the effect of aerosol perturbations on deep convection by employing the Weather Research and Forecasting model as a three-dimensional CRM with a two-moment, six-class bulk microphysics scheme. These results are corroborated using a newly developed bin microphysics scheme. The bulk microphysics scheme is augmented with a state-of-the-art activation scheme based on Köhler Theory and Population Splitting to analyze the effect of CCN perturbations on cloud development. Moreover, we include a physically-based parameterization for homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing to determine the effects of changes in IN number concentration on deep convective cloud development. We perform idealized simulations of deep convection over a wide range of CCN concentrations (i.e., 102 to 103 cm-3), which encompasses clean maritime conditions to polluted continental conditions, respectively. The detailed model calculations reveal that the CCN effect on precipitation in deep convective clouds depends strongly on the ambient water vapor mixing ratio profile. Our simulations suggest that under relatively dry conditions, an increase in aerosol number concentration leads to a decrease in precipitation (-4.2%), while under moist conditions, an increase in aerosol number concentration leads to an increase in precipitation (8.1%). However, when the water vapor in the mid- to upper-troposphere is depleted

  2. AN EXPANDED CHARACTERISTIC-MIXED FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR A CONVECTION-DOMINATED TRANSPORT PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Guo; Huan-zhen Chen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an Expanded Characteristic-mixed Finite Element Method for approximating the solution to a convection dominated transport problem. The method is a combination of characteristic approximation to handle the convection part in time and an expanded mixed finite element spatial approximation to deal with the diffusion part.The scheme is stable since fluid is transported along the approximate characteristics on the discrete level. At the same time it expands the standard mixed finite element method in the sense that three variables are explicitly treated: the scalar unknown, its gradient, and its flux. Our analysis shows the method approximates the scalar unknown, its gradient,and its flux optimally and simultaneously. We also show this scheme has much smaller time-truncation errors than those of standard methods. A numerical example is presented to show that the scheme is of high performance.

  3. A Fuzzy Commitment Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Al-saggaf, Alawi A

    2008-01-01

    This paper attempt has been made to explain a fuzzy commitment scheme. In the conventional Commitment schemes, both committed string m and valid opening key are required to enable the sender to prove the commitment. However there could be many instances where the transmission involves noise or minor errors arising purely because of the factors over which neither the sender nor the receiver have any control. The fuzzy commitment scheme presented in this paper is to accept the opening key that is close to the original one in suitable distance metric, but not necessarily identical. The concept itself is illustrated with the help of simple situation.

  4. How stratified is mantle convection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puster, Peter; Jordan, Thomas H.

    1997-04-01

    We quantify the flow stratification in the Earth's mid-mantle (600-1500 km) in terms of a stratification index for the vertical mass flux, Sƒ (z) = 1 - ƒ(z) / ƒref (z), in which the reference value ƒref(z) approximates the local flux at depth z expected for unstratified convection (Sƒ=0). Although this flux stratification index cannot be directly constrained by observations, we show from a series of two-dimensional convection simulations that its value can be related to a thermal stratification index ST(Z) defined in terms of the radial correlation length of the temperature-perturbation field δT(z, Ω). ST is a good proxy for Sƒ at low stratifications (SƒUniformitarian Principle. The bound obtained here from global tomography is consistent with local seismological evidence for slab flux into the lower mantle; however, the total material flux has to be significantly greater (by a factor of 2-3) than that due to slabs alone. A stratification index, Sƒ≲0.2, is sufficient to exclude many stratified convection models still under active consideration, including most forms of chemical layering between the upper and lower mantle, as well as the more extreme versions of avalanching convection governed by a strong endothermic phase change.

  5. Natural convection from circular cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Boetcher, Sandra K S

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a concise, yet thorough, reference for all heat transfer coefficient correlations and data for all types of cylinders: vertical, horizontal, and inclined. This book covers all natural convection heat transfer laws for vertical and inclined cylinders and is an excellent resource for engineers working in the area of heat transfer engineering.

  6. Subcritical convection in an internally heated layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Linyan; Zikanov, Oleg

    2017-06-01

    Thermal convection in a horizontal layer with uniform internal heating and stress-free constant-temperature boundaries is analyzed numerically. The work is motivated by the questions arising in the development of liquid metal batteries, in which convection is induced by the Joule heating of electrolyte. It is demonstrated that three-dimensional convection cells exist at subcritical Rayleigh numbers.

  7. Examination of Scale-Awareness of Convective Transport for Parameterization Development in Mesoscale and Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Fan, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, K.

    2013-12-01

    Cumulus convection plays a key role in atmospheric circulation. The results of global climate models, which have been widely used in climate research, are highly sensitive to cumulus parameterizations used for modeling cumulus clouds. Existing parameterization schemes have relied upon a number of assumptions whose validity is questionable at high spatial resolutions. In this study, we intended to develop a scale-aware cumulus parameterization based on the conventional Zhang-McFarlane scheme which is suitable for a broad range of uses, ranging from meso-scale to climate models. We conduct analyses from cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations, including two cases from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), to understand scale-dependencies of convective cloud properties following the unified parameterization framework of Arakawa and Wu (2013), but with a more complete set of considerations such as including downdrafts and at different convective stages for eddy flux approximations. Our preliminary results show that downdrafts could make a significant contribution to eddy flux transport at the developed stage of convection. The eddy transported by updrafts and downdrafts with respect to the environmental background increased with the increasing of grid-spacing, but do not change with fraction. There are large differences between the explicit calculation of eddy flux and that from approximations used in cumulus parameterization at grid-spacings of less than 64 km. Much of this difference is due to the sub-grid inhomogeneity of updrafts and downdrafts.

  8. Modelling turbulent stellar convection zones: sub-grid scales effects

    CERN Document Server

    Strugarek, A; Brun, A S; Charbonneau, P; Mathis, S; Smolarkiewicz, P K

    2016-01-01

    The impressive development of global numerical simulations of turbulent stellar interiors unveiled a variety of possible differential rotation (solar or anti-solar), meridional circulation (single or multi-cellular), and dynamo states (stable large scale toroidal field or periodically reversing magnetic fields). Various numerical schemes, based on the so-called anelastic set of equations, were used to obtain these results. It appears today mandatory to assess their robustness with respect to the details of the numerics, and in particular to the treatment of turbulent sub-grid scales. We report on an ongoing comparison between two global models, the ASH and EULAG codes. In EULAG the sub-grid scales are treated implicitly by the numerical scheme, while in ASH their effect is generally modelled by using enhanced dissipation coefficients. We characterize the sub-grid scales effect in a turbulent convection simulation with EULAG. We assess their effect at each resolved scale with a detailed energy budget. We deriv...

  9. CSR schemes in agribusiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pötz, Katharina Anna; Haas, Rainer; Balzarova, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The rise of CSR followed a demand for CSR standards and guidelines. In a sector already characterized by a large number of standards, the authors seek to ask what CSR schemes apply to agribusiness, and how they can be systematically compared and analysed. Design....../methodology/approach – Following a deductive-inductive approach the authors develop a model to compare and analyse CSR schemes based on existing studies and on coding qualitative data on 216 CSR schemes. Findings – The authors confirm that CSR standards and guidelines have entered agribusiness and identify a complex landscape...... of schemes that can be categorized on focus areas, scales, mechanisms, origins, types and commitment levels. Research limitations/implications – The findings contribute to conceptual and empirical research on existing models to compare and analyse CSR standards. Sampling technique and depth of analysis limit...

  10. Tabled Execution in Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willcock, J J; Lumsdaine, A; Quinlan, D J

    2008-08-19

    Tabled execution is a generalization of memorization developed by the logic programming community. It not only saves results from tabled predicates, but also stores the set of currently active calls to them; tabled execution can thus provide meaningful semantics for programs that seemingly contain infinite recursions with the same arguments. In logic programming, tabled execution is used for many purposes, both for improving the efficiency of programs, and making tasks simpler and more direct to express than with normal logic programs. However, tabled execution is only infrequently applied in mainstream functional languages such as Scheme. We demonstrate an elegant implementation of tabled execution in Scheme, using a mix of continuation-passing style and mutable data. We also show the use of tabled execution in Scheme for a problem in formal language and automata theory, demonstrating that tabled execution can be a valuable tool for Scheme users.

  11. Assessing impacts of PBL and surface layer schemes in simulating the surface-atmosphere interactions and precipitation over the tropical ocean using observations from AMIE/DYNAMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Yun; Yan, Huiping; Berg, Larry K.; Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; Yang, Ben; Huang, Maoyi

    2016-11-01

    Accuracy of turbulence parameterization in representing Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) processes in climate models is critical for predicting the initiation and development of clouds, air quality issues, and underlying surface-atmosphere-cloud interactions. In this study, we 1) evaluate WRF model-simulated spatial patterns of precipitation and surface fluxes, as well as vertical profiles of potential temperature, humidity, moist static energy and moisture tendency terms as simulated by WRF at various spatial resolutions and with PBL, surface layer and shallow convection schemes against measurements, 2) identify model biases by examining the moisture tendency terms contributed by PBL and convection processes through nudging experiments, and 3) evaluate the dependence of modeled surface latent heat (LH) fluxes onPBL and surface layer schemes over the tropical ocean. The results show that PBL and surface parameterizations have surprisingly large impacts on precipitation, convection initiation and surface moisture fluxes over tropical oceans. All of the parameterizations tested tend to overpredict moisture in PBL and free atmosphere, and consequently result in larger moist static energy and precipitation. Moisture nudging tends to suppress the initiation of convection and reduces the excess precipitation. The reduction in precipitation bias in turn reduces the surface wind and LH flux biases, which suggests that the model drifts at least partly because of a positive feedback between precipitation and surface fluxes. The updated shallow convection scheme KF-CuP tends to suppress the initiation and development of deep convection, consequently decreasing precipitation. The Eta surface layer scheme predicts more reasonable LH fluxes and the LH-Wind Speed relationship than the MM5 scheme, especially when coupled with the MYJ scheme. By examining various parameterization schemes in WRF, we identify sources of biases and weaknesses of current PBL, surface layer and shallow

  12. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  13. Stress memory effect in viscoelastic stagnant lid convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patočka, V.; Čadek, O.; Tackley, P. J.; Čížková, H.

    2017-06-01

    Present thermochemical convection models of planetary evolution often assume a purely viscous or viscoplastic rheology. Ignoring elasticity in the cold, outer boundary layer is, however, questionable since elastic effects may play an important role there and affect surface topography as well as the stress distribution within the stiff cold lithosphere. Here we present a modelling study focused on the combined effects of Maxwell viscoelastic rheology and a free surface in the stagnant lid planetary convection. We implemented viscoelastic rheology in the StagYY code using a tracer-based stress advection scheme that suppresses subgrid oscillations. We apply this code to perform thermal convection models of the cooling planetary mantles and we demonstrate that while the global characteristics of the mantle flow do not change significantly when including viscoelasticity, the stress state of the cold lithosphere may be substantially different. Transient cooling of an initially thin upper thermal boundary layer results in a complex layered stress structure due to the memory effects of viscoelastic rheology. The stress state of the lid may thus contain a record of the planetary thermal evolution.

  14. Mode-to-mode energy transfers in convective patterns

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra K Verma; Krishna Kumar; Bhaskar Kamble

    2006-12-01

    We investigate the energy transfer between various Fourier modes in a low-dimensional model for thermal convection. We have used the formalism of mode-to-mode energy transfer rate in our calculation. The evolution equations derived using this scheme is the same as those derived using the hydrodynamical equations for thermal convection in Boussinesq fluids. Numerical and analytical studies of this model show that convective rolls appear as the Rayleigh number is raised above its critical value c. Further increase of Rayleigh number generates rolls in the perpendicular directions as well, and we obtain a dynamic asymmetric square pattern. This pattern is due to Hopf bifurcation. There are two sets of limit cycles corresponding to the two competing asymmetric square patterns. When the Rayleigh number is increased further, the limit cycles become unstable simultaneously, and chaotic motion sets in. The onset of chaos is via intermittent route. The trajectories wander for quite a long time almost periodically before jumping irregularly to one of the two ghost limit cycles.

  15. Sensitivity to the representation of precipitating ice in CRM simulations of deep convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Hugh

    A Cloud resolving model (CRM) is a useful tool for providing a proxy for observed data, against which parameterizations of convection in global and regional models can be compared. The parameterization of microphysics in CRMs has been shown to be crucial for the simulation of the evolution of heat and moisture profiles during deep convection. The aim of the study described herein is to validate the microphysics scheme in the U.K. Met. Office's Large Eddy Model as a prelude to future work where simulations of deep convection will be compared to a single column version of the Met. Office's Unified model. Three observed cases of convection are simulated each with different precipitation production mechanisms, as deduced by the multiparameter radar at Chilbolton. Four simulations are carried out of each case, using different representations of precipitation. The aim is to determine whether a flexible microphysics scheme is capable of modelling the evolution of the precipitation in each of the cases without recourse to tuning coefficients for case-specific conditions. The simulations are validated against radar observations by comparing spatial distribution of radar reflectivity and the type of precipitation at the melting layer. A number of systematic errors occur in simulations using a `single-moment' microphysics scheme (where graupel and snow mass concentrations are each represented with one variable and the number concentrations are prescribed). Whereas a `double-moment' microphysics scheme (that predicts both the mass and number concentrations of snow and graupel) produced simulations consistent with radar observations for all three cases. The sensitivity of important quantities relating to the parameterization of convection in GCMs to the microphysical parameterization has been examined. The total precipitation at the ground and the amount of cloud ice are compared between simulations that differ only in their representation of precipitation. The total

  16. High-resolution methods for preserving the sum of mass fractions: improved χ-scheme and an alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syamial, Madhava [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Benyahia, Sofiane [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2013-11-20

    When high resolution convection schemes are used for discretizing chemical species mass balance equations, the mass fractions are not guaranteed to add to one. We show that a proposed remedy called χ-scheme (Darwish and Moukalled, Comput.Methods Appl.Mech. Engrg. 192 (2003): 1711) will degrade to a diffusive first-order scheme when a chemical species vanishes from the mixture, for example, because of chemical reactions. We propose an improvement to the χ-scheme to overcome this problem. Furthermore, a computationally efficient alternative scheme is proposed and evaluated with several examples, to quantify the improvements in the accuracy and the computational time.

  17. The simulation of the diurnal cycle of convective precipitation over land in a global model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, P.; Chaboureau, J. P.; Beljaars, A.; Betts, A. K.; Köhler, M.; Miller, M.; Redelsperger, J. L.

    2004-10-01

    In the context of the European Cloud Systems project, the problem of the simulation of the diurnal cycle of convective precipitation over land is addressed with the aid of cloud-resolving (CRM) and single-column (SCM) model simulations of an idealized midlatitude case for which observations of large-scale and surface forcing are available. The CRM results are compared to different versions of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) convection schemes using different convective trigger procedures and convective closures. In the CRM, maximum rainfall intensity occurs at 15 h (local time). In this idealized midlatitude case, most schemes do not reproduce the afternoon precipitation peak, as (i) they cannot reproduce the gradual growth (typically over 3 hours) of the deep convective cloud layer and (ii) they produce a diurnal cycle of precipitation that is in phase with the diurnal cycle of the convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the convective inhibition (CIN), consistent with the parcel theory and CAPE closure used in the bulk mass-flux scheme. The scheme that links the triggering to the large-scale vertical velocity gets the maximum precipitation at the right time, but this may be artificial as the vertical velocity is enforced in the single-column context. The study is then extended to the global scale using ensembles of 72-hour global forecasts at resolution T511 (40 km), and long-range single 40-day forecasts at resolution T159 (125 km) with the ECMWF general-circulation model. The focus is on tropical South America and Africa where the diurnal cycle is most pronounced. The forecasts are evaluated against analyses and observed radiosonde data, as well as observed surface and satellite-derived rainfall rates. The ECMWF model version with improved convective trigger produces the smallest biases overall. It also shifts the rainfall maximum to 12 h compared to 9.5 h in the original version. In contrast to the SCM, the vertical

  18. Explicit analytical solutions of the anisotropic Brinkman model for the natural convection in porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI; Ruixian(蔡睿贤); ZHANG; Na(张娜)

    2002-01-01

    Some algebraically explicit analytical solutions are derived for the anisotropic Brinkman model an improved Darcy model describing the natural convection in porous media. Besides their important theoretical meaning (for example, to analyze the non-Darcy and anisotropic effects on the convection), such analytical solutions can be the benchmark solutions to promoting the develop ment of computational heat and mass transfer. For instance, we can use them to check the accuracy,convergence and effectiveness of various numerical computational methods and to improve numerical calculation skills such as differential schemes and grid generation ways.

  19. XTR-Kurosawa-Desmedt Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING XIU-HUAN; FU ZHI-GUO; ZHANG SHU-GONG

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes an XTR version of the Kurosawa-Desmedt scheme. Our scheme is secure against adaptive choeen-ciphertext attack under the XTR version of the Decisional Diffie-Hellman assumption in the standard model. Comparing efficiency between the Kurosawa-Desmedt scheme and the proposed XTR-Kurosawa-Desmedt scheme, we find that the proposed scheme is more efficient than the Kurosawa-Desmedt scheme both in communication and computation without compromising security.

  20. Generalized Convective Quasi-Equilibrium Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Plant, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Arakawa and Schubert proposed convective quasi-equilibrium as a basic principle for closing their spectrum mass-flux convection parameterization. In deriving this principle, they show that the cloud work function is a key variable that controls the growth of convection. Thus, this closure hypothesis imposes a steadiness of the cloud work function tendency. This presentation shows how this principle can be generalized so that it can also encompasses both the CAPE and the moisture-convergence closures. Note that the majority of the current mass-flux convection parameterization invokes a CAPE closure, whereas the moisture-convergence closure was extremely popular historically. This generalization, in turn, includes both closures as special cases of convective quasi-equilibrium. This generalization further suggests wide range of alternative possibilities for convective closure. In general, a vertical integral of any function depending on both large-scale and convective-scale variables can be adopted as an alternative closure variables, leading to an analogous formulation as Arakawa and Schubert's convective quasi-equilibrium formulation. Among those, probably the most fascinating possibility is to take a vertical integral of the convective-scale moisture for the closure. Use of a convective-scale variable for closure has a particular appeal by not suffering from a loss of predictability of any large-scale variables. That is a main problem with any of the current convective closures, not only for the moisture-convergence based closure as often asserted.

  1. Statistical evaluation of the simulated convective activity over Central Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartsios, Stergios; Kotsopoulos, Stylianos; Karacostas, Theodore S.; Tegoulias, Ioannis; Pytharoulis, Ioannis; Bampzelis, Dimitrios

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the project DAPHNE (www.daphne-meteo.gr), the non-hydrostatic Weather Research and Forecasting model with the Advanced Research dynamic solver (WRF-ARW, version 3.5.1) is used to produce very high spatiotemporal resolution simulations of the convective activity over Thessaly plain and hence, enhancing our knowledge on the impact of high resolution elevation and land use data in the moist convection. The expecting results act as a precursor for the potential applicability of a planned precipitation enhancement program. The three model domains, covering Europe, the Mediterranean Sea and northern Africa (d01), the wider area of Greece (d02) and Thessaly region-central Greece (d03), are used at horizontal grid-spacings of 15km, 5km and 1km respectively. ECMWF operational analyses at 6-hourly intervals (0.25ox0.25o lat.-long.) are imported as initial and boundary conditions of the coarse domain, while in the vertical, 39 sigma levels (up to 50 hPa) are used, with increased resolution in the boundary layer. Microphysical processes are represented by WSM6 scheme, sub-grid scale convection by Kain-Fritsch scheme, longwave and shortwave radiation by RRTMG scheme, surface layer by Monin-Obukhov (MM5), boundary layer by Yonsei University and soil physics by NOAH Unified model. Six representative days with different upper-air synoptic circulation types are selected, while high resolution (3'') elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM - version 4) are inserted in the innermost domain (d03), along with the Corine Land Cover 2000 raster data (3''x3''). The aforementioned data sets are used in different configurations, in order to evaluate the impact of each one on the simulated convective activity in the vicinity of Thessaly region, using a grid of available meteorological stations in the area. For each selected day, four (4) sensitivity simulations are performed, setting a total number of 24 runs. Finally, the best configuration provides

  2. Uncertainty associated with convective wet removal of entrained aerosols in a global climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, B.; Pierce, J. R.; Martin, R. V.; Hoose, C.; Lohmann, U.

    2012-11-01

    The uncertainties associated with the wet removal of aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases are investigated in a global aerosol-climate model (ECHAM5-HAM) under a set of limiting assumptions for the wet removal of the entrained aerosols. The limiting assumptions for the wet removal of entrained aerosols are negligible scavenging and vigorous scavenging (either through activation, with size-dependent impaction scavenging, or with the prescribed fractions of the standard model). To facilitate this process-based study, an explicit representation of cloud-droplet-borne and ice-crystal-borne aerosol mass and number, for the purpose of wet removal, is introduced into the ECHAM5-HAM model. This replaces and is compared with the prescribed cloud-droplet-borne and ice-crystal-borne aerosol fraction scavenging scheme of the standard model. A 20% to 35% uncertainty in simulated global, annual mean aerosol mass burdens and optical depth (AOD) is attributed to different assumptions for the wet removal of aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases. Assumptions about the removal of aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases control modeled upper tropospheric aerosol concentrations by as much as one order of magnitude. Simulated aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases contribute 20% to 50% of modeled global, annual mean aerosol mass convective wet deposition (about 5% to 10% of the total dry and wet deposition), depending on the aerosol species, when including wet scavenging of those entrained aerosols (either by activation, size-dependent impaction, or with the prescribed fraction scheme). Among the simulations, the prescribed fraction and size-dependent impaction schemes yield the largest global, annual mean aerosol mass convective wet deposition (by about two-fold). However, the prescribed fraction scheme has more vigorous convective mixed-phase wet removal (by two to five-fold relative to the size-dependent impaction scheme) since nearly all

  3. Convective aggregation in realistic convective-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the real-world relevance of idealized-model convective self-aggregation, five 15 day cases of real organized convection in the tropics are simulated. These include multiple simulations of each case to test sensitivities of the convective organization and mean states to interactive radiation, interactive surface fluxes, and evaporation of rain. These simulations are compared to self-aggregation seen in the same model configured to run in idealized radiative-convective equilibrium. Analysis of the budget of the spatial variance of column-integrated frozen moist static energy shows that control runs have significant positive contributions to organization from radiation and negative contributions from surface fluxes and transport, similar to idealized runs once they become aggregated. Despite identical lateral boundary conditions for all experiments in each case, systematic differences in mean column water vapor (CWV), CWV distribution shape, and CWV autocorrelation length scale are found between the different sensitivity runs, particularly for those without interactive radiation, showing that there are at least some similarities in sensitivities to these feedbacks in both idealized and realistic simulations (although the organization of precipitation shows less sensitivity to interactive radiation). The magnitudes and signs of these systematic differences are consistent with a rough equilibrium between (1) equalization due to advection from the lateral boundaries and (2) disaggregation due to the absence of interactive radiation, implying disaggregation rates comparable to those in idealized runs with aggregated initial conditions and noninteractive radiation. This points to a plausible similarity in the way that radiation feedbacks maintain aggregated convection in both idealized simulations and the real world.Plain Language SummaryUnderstanding the processes that lead to the organization of tropical rainstorms is an important challenge for weather

  4. Succesful labelling schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Stacey, Julia

    2001-01-01

    It is usual practice to evaluate the success of a labelling scheme by looking at the awareness percentage, but in many cases this is not sufficient. The awareness percentage gives no indication of which of the consumer segments that are aware of and use labelling schemes and which do not. In the ......It is usual practice to evaluate the success of a labelling scheme by looking at the awareness percentage, but in many cases this is not sufficient. The awareness percentage gives no indication of which of the consumer segments that are aware of and use labelling schemes and which do not....... In the spring of 2001 MAPP carried out an extensive consumer study with special emphasis on the Nordic environmentally friendly label 'the swan'. The purpose was to find out how much consumers actually know and use various labelling schemes. 869 households were contacted and asked to fill in a questionnaire...... it into consideration when I go shopping. The respondent was asked to pick the most suitable answer, which described her use of each label. 29% - also called 'the labelling blind' - responded that they basically only knew the recycling label and the Government controlled organic label 'Ø-mærket'. Another segment of 6...

  5. Experimental investigation of horizontal convection

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Córdoba, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Fluid circulation driven by buoyancy forces due to a thermal gradient on a horizontal boundary, known as horizontal convection, is experimentally studied. For that purpose, a methacrylate box with inner dimensions 300x150x150 mm3 (LxWxH) whose bottom is composed by a heat exchanger and a printed circuit board is lled with water. The heat exchanger provides a uniform temperature boundary condition while the printed circuit board provides a boundary condition of uniform heat ...

  6. The Impact of Microphysics on Intensity and Structure of Hurricanes and Mesoscale Convective Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Shi, Jainn J.; Jou, Ben Jong-Dao; Lee, Wen-Chau; Lin, Pay-Liam; Chang, Mei-Yu

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, both research and operational numerical weather prediction models, e.g. Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model, have started using more complex microphysical schemes originally developed for high-resolution cloud resolving models (CRMs) with a 1-2 km or less horizontal resolutions. WRF is a next-generation mesoscale forecast model and assimilation system that has incorporated modern software framework, advanced dynamics, numeric and data assimilation techniques, a multiple moveable nesting capability, and improved physical packages. WRF model can be used for a wide range of applications, from idealized research to operational forecasting, with an emphasis on horizontal grid sizes in the range of 1-10 km. The current WRF includes several different microphysics options such as Purdue Lin et al. (1983), WSM 6-class and Thompson microphysics schemes. We have recently implemented three sophisticated cloud microphysics schemes into WRF. The cloud microphysics schemes have been extensively tested and applied for different mesoscale systems in different geographical locations. The performances of these schemes have been compared to those from other WRF microphysics options. We are performing sensitivity tests in using WRF to examine the impact of six different cloud microphysical schemes on precipitation processes associated hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems developed at different geographic locations [Oklahoma (IHOP), Louisiana (Hurricane Katrina), Canada (C3VP - snow events), Washington (fire storm), India (Monsoon), Taiwan (TiMREX - terrain)]. We will determine the microphysical schemes for good simulated convective systems in these geographic locations. We are also performing the inline tracer calculation to comprehend the physical processes (i.e., boundary layer and each quadrant in the boundary layer) related to the development and structure of hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems.

  7. High-order central Hermite WENO schemes: Dimension-by-dimension moment-based reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhanjing; Li, Fengyan; Qiu, Jianxian

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a class of high-order central finite volume schemes is proposed for solving one- and two-dimensional hyperbolic conservation laws. Formulated on staggered meshes, the methods involve Hermite WENO (HWENO) spatial reconstructions, and Lax-Wendroff type discretizations or the natural continuous extension of Runge-Kutta methods in time. Differently from the central Hermite WENO methods we developed previously in Tao et al. (2015) [34], the spatial reconstructions, a core ingredient of the methods, are based on the zeroth-order and the first-order moments of the solution, and are implemented through a dimension-by-dimension strategy when the spatial dimension is higher than one. This leads to much simpler implementation of the methods in higher dimension and better cost efficiency. Meanwhile, the proposed methods have the attractive features of the general central Hermite WENO methods such as being compact in reconstruction and requiring neither flux splitting nor numerical fluxes, while being accurate and essentially non-oscillatory. A collection of one- and two-dimensional numerical examples is presented to demonstrate high resolution and robustness of the methods in capturing smooth and non-smooth solutions.

  8. A 3rd Order WENO GLM-MHD Scheme for Magnetic Reconnection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Xueshang; ZHOU Yufen; HU Yanqi

    2006-01-01

    A new numerical scheme of 3rd order Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO)type for 2.5D mixed GLM-MHD in Cartesian coordinates is proposed. The MHD equations are modified by combining the arguments as by Dellar and Dedner et al to couple the divergence constraint with the evolution equations using a Generalized Lagrange Multiplier (GLM). Moreover, the magnetohydrodynamic part of the GLM-MHD system is still in conservation form. Meanwhile, this method is very easy to add to an existing code since the underlying MHD solver does not have to be modified. To show the validation and capacity of its application to MHD problem modelling,interaction between a magnetosonic shock and a denser cloud and magnetic reconnection problems are used to verify this new MHD code. The numerical tests for 2D Orszag and Tang's MHD vortex,interaction between a magnetosonic shock and a denser cloud and magnetic reconnection problems show that the third order WENO MHD solvers are robust and yield reliable results by the new mixed GLM or the mixed EGLM correction here even if it can not be shown that how the divergence errors are transported as well as damped as done for one dimensional ideal MHD by Dedner et al.

  9. Ice Nucleation in Deep Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew; Stevens, David; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The processes controlling production of ice crystals in deep, rapidly ascending convective columns are poorly understood due to the difficulties involved with either modeling or in situ sampling of these violent clouds. A large number of ice crystals are no doubt generated when droplets freeze at about -40 C. However, at higher levels, these crystals are likely depleted due to precipitation and detrainment. As the ice surface area decreases, the relative humidity can increase well above ice saturation, resulting in bursts of ice nucleation. We will present simulations of these processes using a large-eddy simulation model with detailed microphysics. Size bins are included for aerosols, liquid droplets, ice crystals, and mixed-phase (ice/liquid) hydrometers. Microphysical processes simulated include droplet activation, freezing, melting, homogeneous freezing of sulfate aerosols, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. We are focusing on the importance of ice nucleation events in the upper part of the cloud at temperatures below -40 C. We will show that the ultimate evolution of the cloud in this region (and the anvil produced by the convection) is sensitive to these ice nucleation events, and hence to the composition of upper tropospheric aerosols that get entrained into the convective column.

  10. Compact Spreader Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  11. Towards Symbolic Encryption Schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jensen, Christian D.; Zenner, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Symbolic encryption, in the style of Dolev-Yao models, is ubiquitous in formal security models. In its common use, encryption on a whole message is specified as a single monolithic block. From a cryptographic perspective, however, this may require a resource-intensive cryptographic algorithm......, namely an authenticated encryption scheme that is secure under chosen ciphertext attack. Therefore, many reasonable encryption schemes, such as AES in the CBC or CFB mode, are not among the implementation options. In this paper, we report new attacks on CBC and CFB based implementations of the well......-known Needham-Schroeder and Denning-Sacco protocols. To avoid such problems, we advocate the use of refined notions of symbolic encryption that have natural correspondence to standard cryptographic encryption schemes....

  12. Impact of deep convection on the isotopic amount effect in tropical precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharammal, Thejna; Bala, Govindasamy; Noone, David

    2017-02-01

    The empirical "amount effect" observed in the distribution of stable water isotope ratios in tropical precipitation is used in several studies to reconstruct past precipitation. Recent observations suggest the importance of large-scale organized convection systems on amount effect. With a series of experiments with Community Atmospheric Model version 3.0 with water isotope tracers, we quantify the sensitivity of amount effect to changes in modeled deep convection. The magnitude of the regression slope between long-term monthly precipitation amount and isotope ratios in precipitation over tropical ocean reduces by more than 20% with a reduction in mean deep convective precipitation by about 60%, indicating a decline in fractionation efficiency. Reduced condensation in deep convective updrafts results in enrichment of lower level vapor with heavier isotope that causes enrichment in total precipitation. However, consequent increases in stratiform and shallow convective precipitation partially offset the reduction in the slope of amount effect. The net result is a reduced slope of amount effect in tropical regions except the tropical western Pacific, where the effects of enhanced large-scale ascent and increased stratiform precipitation prevail over the influence of reduced deep convection. We also find that the isotope ratios in precipitation are improved over certain regions in the tropics with reduced deep convection, showing that analyses of isotope ratios in precipitation and water vapor are powerful tools to improve precipitation processes in convective parameterization schemes in climate models. Further, our study suggests that the precipitation types over a region can alter the fractionation efficiency of isotopes with implications for the reconstructions of past precipitation.

  13. Parametrization of orographic thermal effect on the deep convection triggering in Global Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingmei, Y.; Jean-Yves, G.; Alain, L.

    2013-05-01

    The work is based on the hypothesis that anabatic winds (or valley breeze) is an important mechanism of deep convection triggering. Induced by the temperature difference between the mountain surface and the environmental air, anabatic winds own a kinetic energy which may eventually overcome the Planet Boundary Layer inhibition (CIN, Convective Inhibition) and allows the associated convection to develop into the free troposphere. This sub-grid scale phenomenon needs a special parametrization in general circulation models (GCMs). Its lack of representation in present GCM versions is thought of being the cause of the deficit of deep convection systems genesis observed in certain orographical zones, as Mount Cameroun in West Africa for example. A valley breeze parametrization has been designed and built in a GCM (LMDZ). The model computes kinetic energy of the valley breeze in relation to the sub-grid scale orographical characteristics (elevation, slope, orientation). It consists of a grid slim layer along the mountain surface. It is coupled with a multi-layers conductive-capacitive soil model. The coupling is accomplished by using the energy budget at the surface of the mountain. The model was tested in the dynamical mode by systematic sensitivity analysis to the principal parameters and to the environmental conditions. It has then been implemented in the 1D version of the GCM (SCM, Single Column Model), coupled with the Emanuel deep convection scheme, and tested against a radiative-convective equilibrium case and the Hapex campaign case. The stationnary solution of the aeraulic part of the model has been adopted for the GCM. The parametrization finally has been introduced in the 3D version of the GCM, in the diagnostic mode (without coupling to the convection process). It gives a spatial distribution of the triggering frequency of deep convection in coherence with that of the satellite image observation in the West Africa region, during the West African Monsoon

  14. Labeling Schemes with Queries

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    We study the question of ``how robust are the known lower bounds of labeling schemes when one increases the number of consulted labels''. Let $f$ be a function on pairs of vertices. An $f$-labeling scheme for a family of graphs $\\cF$ labels the vertices of all graphs in $\\cF$ such that for every graph $G\\in\\cF$ and every two vertices $u,v\\in G$, the value $f(u,v)$ can be inferred by merely inspecting the labels of $u$ and $v$. This paper introduces a natural generalization: the notion of $f$-...

  15. A methodology to evaluate parameterization schemes applied on west africa using enthalpy and water budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, D.; Beau, I.; Gueremy, J. F.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the behavior of turbulence and convection parameterization schemes included in the Météo-France ALADIN-Climat Limited Area Model in the frame of a 24 hour simulation of a HAPEX-Sahel case study (the 21 August 1992). ALADIN-Climat simulations are performed with different horizontal resolutions ranging from 300 to 10 km. Parameterization schemes of convection and turbulence are compared to observations and to a CRM (Méso-NH French model with 5 km horizontal grid-mesh). The explicit and the parametrized simulations are carried out using the same initial conditions and boundary forcings. This framework provides an intermediate step of parameterization evaluation between SCM and GCM simulation studies. Three physical packages have been evaluated, hereafter called Standard (STD), Prognostic 1 (PRO1) and Prognostic 2 (PRO2). The term prognostic refers mainly to the turbulence and microphysics schemes which are diagnostic in the former case and prognostic in the latter.The main difference between PRO1 and PRO2 lies in the convective scheme. For PRO1, the Bougeault (1985) mass-flux convective scheme with a Kuo-type closure (moisture convergence) is used. The most important specificity of the second Prognostic physical package (PRO2) is its treatment of the deep and shallow convection. This convection scheme (Guérémy 2011) provides a continuous treatment of this atmospheric process with a CAPE relaxation closure condition. Several sensitivity tests are made using those three physicals packages : vertical resolutions (31 and 91 levels), horizontal resolutions (from 300 to 10 km) and initial and lateral conditions (ERA40 vs ERAINTERIM). The behaviors of the three physical packages in terms of convection and wave propagation have been studied using two main methods.First, these parameterized simulations are compared with Méso-NH precipitation averaged on the different ALADIN-Climat grid meshes. Second, enthalpy and water budgets have

  16. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement method based on WENO finite difference scheme for the simulation of multi-dimensional detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Dong, XinZhuang; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2015-10-01

    For numerical simulation of detonation, computational cost using uniform meshes is large due to the vast separation in both time and space scales. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is advantageous for problems with vastly different scales. This paper aims to propose an AMR method with high order accuracy for numerical investigation of multi-dimensional detonation. A well-designed AMR method based on finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme, named as AMR&WENO is proposed. A new cell-based data structure is used to organize the adaptive meshes. The new data structure makes it possible for cells to communicate with each other quickly and easily. In order to develop an AMR method with high order accuracy, high order prolongations in both space and time are utilized in the data prolongation procedure. Based on the message passing interface (MPI) platform, we have developed a workload balancing parallel AMR&WENO code using the Hilbert space-filling curve algorithm. Our numerical experiments with detonation simulations indicate that the AMR&WENO is accurate and has a high resolution. Moreover, we evaluate and compare the performance of the uniform mesh WENO scheme and the parallel AMR&WENO method. The comparison results provide us further insight into the high performance of the parallel AMR&WENO method.

  17. 改进的二维三阶半离散中心迎风格式%Modified Two Dimensional Third-order Semi-discrete Central-upwind Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯天相; 纪珍

    2012-01-01

    对二维三阶半离散中心迎风格式中的权函数给出了简化改进.在保持格式精度的基础上,改进后的权函数在二维情况下具有更加简单直接的结构而且严格非负.该改进方法得到的格式仍然具有半离散中心迎风格式的优点,同时保持了重构函数的非振性.时间离散采用保持强稳定性的三阶Runge-Kutta方法,并利用四阶Lax-Wendroff(L-W)格式计算磁流体算例中的磁场散度.用该修正格式计算了二维磁流体数值算例,得到高精度无振荡的结果,验证了此方法的有效性.%The semi-discrete central-upwind scheme is a new Godunov type numerical method which is developed in 1990s. The scheme is widely used in the computational fluid dynamics and its advantages include the simple calculation process, the high calculation precision and so on. But for the third-order scheme, the positivity of the weight function and the non-oscillation of the WENO type reconstruction function in every direction cannot be preserved in two dimensional problems. In this article, a simple, direct modification is taken to the weight function of the two dimensional third-order semi-discrete central-upwind scheme. The modified weight function will keep the posi- tivity all the time while the accuracy of the semi-discrete central-upwind method is preserved. The revised scheme still has the advantages of central-upwind schemes and it keeps the non-oscillation of reconstruction. To explore the potential capability of application of this reformation of weight func- tion, two Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) problems are simulated. In simulations, the third order Runge-Kutta method is used to solve the time evolution and the divergence of magnetic field was calculated by fourth-order Lax-Wendroff (L-W) scheme. All the numerical results demonstrate the modified scheme can solve the MHD equations stably, get high resolution and non-oscillatory results, keep the positivity of the weight

  18. Alternative health insurance schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Hans; Hansen, Bodil O.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple model of health insurance with asymmetric information, where we compare two alternative ways of organizing the insurance market. Either as a competitive insurance market, where some risks remain uninsured, or as a compulsory scheme, where however, the level...... competitive insurance; this situation turns out to be at least as good as either of the alternatives...

  19. Energy Stability Analysis of Some Fully Discrete Numerical Schemes for Incompressible Navier–Stokes Equations on Staggered Grids

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Huangxin

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we consider the energy stability estimates for some fully discrete schemes which both consider time and spatial discretizations for the incompressible Navier–Stokes equations. We focus on three kinds of fully discrete schemes, i.e., the linear implicit scheme for time discretization with the finite difference method (FDM) on staggered grids for spatial discretization, pressure-correction schemes for time discretization with the FDM on staggered grids for the solutions of the decoupled velocity and pressure equations, and pressure-stabilization schemes for time discretization with the FDM on staggered grids for the solutions of the decoupled velocity and pressure equations. The energy stability estimates are obtained for the above each fully discrete scheme. The upwind scheme is used in the discretization of the convection term which plays an important role in the design of unconditionally stable discrete schemes. Numerical results are given to verify the theoretical analysis.

  20. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a horizontal elliptic cylinder with constant heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Tariq; Ahmad, Hussain; Ghaffari, Abuzar

    2015-12-01

    Mixed convection boundary layer flow of a viscous fluid over a horizontal elliptic cylinder with a constant heat flux is investigated numerically. The governing partial differential equations are transformed to non-dimensional form and then are solved by an efficient implicit finite different scheme known as Keller-box method. The solutions are expressed in the form of skin friction and Nusselt number, which are plotted against the eccentric angle. The effect of pertinent parameters such as mixed convection parameter, aspect ratio (ratio of lengths of minor axis to major axis), and Prandtl number on skin friction and Nusselt number are illustrated through graphs for both blunt and slender orientations. The increase in the value of mixed convection parameter results in increase in skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number for blunt as well as slender orientations.

  1. Mechanisms for convection triggering by cold pools

    CERN Document Server

    Torri, Giuseppe; Tian, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cold pools are fundamental ingredients of deep convection. They contribute to organizing the sub-cloud layer and are considered key elements in triggering convective cells. It was long known that this could happen mechanically, through lifting by the cold pools' fronts. More recently, it has been suggested that convection could also be triggered thermodynamically, by accumulation of moisture around the edges of cold pools. A method based on Lagrangian tracking is here proposed to disentangle the signatures of both forcings and quantify their importance in a given environment. Results from a simulation of radiative-convective equilibrium over the ocean show that parcels reach their level of free convection through a combination of both forcings, each being dominant at different stages of the ascent. Mechanical forcing is an important player in lifting parcels from the surface, whereas thermodynamic forcing reduces the inhibition encountered by parcels before they reach their level of free convection.

  2. On laminar convection in solar type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bruevich, E A

    2010-01-01

    We present a new model of large-scale multilayer convection in solar type stars. This model allows us to understand such self-similar structures observed at solar surface as granulation, supergranulation and giant cells. We study the slow-rotated hydrogen star without magnetic field with the spherically-symmetric convective zone. The photon's flux comes to the convective zone from the central thermonuclear zone of the star. The interaction of these photons with the fully ionized hydrogen plasma with $T>10^5K$ is carried out by the Tomson scattering of photon flux on protons and electrons. Under these conditions plasma is optically thick relative to the Tomson scattering. This fact is the fundamental one for the multilayer convection formation. We find the stationary solution of the convective zone structure. This solution describes the convective layers responsible to the formation of the structures on the star's surface.

  3. Effect of thermosolutal convection on directional solidification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suresh V Garimella; James E Simpson

    2001-02-01

    The impact of thermosolutal convection during directional solidification is explored via results of numerical investigations. Results from fully transient numerical simulations of directional solidification in a differentially heated cavity under terrestrial conditions and Bridgman crystal growth in space are discussed. The pivotal role of both thermal and solutal convection in the solidification process is illustrated by examining these two cases. In particular, radial and longitudinal macrosegregation resulting from this thermosolutal convection is discussed.

  4. Traveling wave solutions of a biological reaction-convection-diffusion equation model by using $(G'/G$ expansion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnam Javadi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the $(G'/G$-expansion method is applied to solve a biological reaction-convection-diffusion model arising in mathematical biology. Exact traveling wave solutions are obtained by this method. This scheme can be applied to a wide class of nonlinear partial differential equations.

  5. Results of the meteorological model WRF-ARW over Catalonia, using different parameterizations of convection and cloud microphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mercader

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The meteorological model WRF-ARW (Weather Research and Forecasting - Advanced Research WRF is a new generation model that has a worldwide growing community of users. In the framework of a project that studies the feasibility of implementing it operationally at the Meteorological Service of Catalonia, a verification of the forecasts produced by the model in several cases of precipitation observed over Catalonia has been carried out. Indeed, given the importance of precipitation forecasts in this area, one of the main objectives was to study the sensitivity of the model in different configurations of its parameterizations of convection and cloud microphysics. In this paper, we present the results of this verification for two domains, a 36-km grid size and one of 12 km grid size, unidirectionally nested to the previous one. In the external domain, the evaluation was based on the analysis of the main statistical parameters (ME and RMSE for temperature, relative humidity, geopotential and wind, and it has been determined that the combination using the Kain-Fritsch convective scheme with the WSM5 microphysical scheme has provided the best results. Then, with this configuration set for the external domain, some forecasts at the nested domain have been done, by combining different convection and cloud microphysics schemes, leading to the conclusion that the most accurate configuration is the one combining the convective parameterization of Kain-Fritsch and the Thompson microphysics scheme.

  6. The spectra of stimulated concentration scattering (Mie scattering) on nanoparticles latex suspension in the presence of convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhanov, I. S.; Krivokhizha, S. V.; Chaikov, L. L.

    2016-09-01

    Spectral shifts of the stimulated concentration light scattering (SCLS, stimulated Mie scattering) in suspensions of various sized latex nanoparticles in water were measured by the light guide scheme in conditions of the backscattering in the presence of convection. It is shown that the spectral shift can be either negative or positive depending on the particle size.

  7. Evaluating weather research and forecasting (WRF) model predictions of turbulent flow parameters in a dry convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibbs, J.A.; Fedorovich, E.; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2011-01-01

    Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model predictions using different boundary layer schemes and horizontal grid spacings were compared with observational and numerical large-eddy simulation data for conditions corresponding to a dry atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) over the southern

  8. Application of upwind convective finite elements to practical conduction/forced convection thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    Three practical problems in conduction/forced convection heat transfer are analyzed using a simplified engineering formulation of convective finite elements. Upwind and conventional finite element solutions are compared for steady-state and transient applications.

  9. The DYMECS project: The Dynamical and Microphysical Evolution of Convective Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Thorwald; Hogan, Robin; Hanley, Kirsty; Nicol, John; Plant, Robert; Lean, Humphrey; Clark, Peter; Halliwell, Carol

    2014-05-01

    A new frontier in weather forecasting is emerging by operational forecast models now being run at convection-permitting resolutions at many national weather services. However, this is not a panacea; significant systematic errors remain in the character of convective clouds and rainfall distributions. The DYMECS project (Dynamical and Microphysical Evolution of Convective Storms) is taking a fundamentally new approach to evaluate and improve such models: rather than relying on a limited number of cases, which may not be representative, we have gathered a large database of 3D storm structures on 40 convective days using an automated storm-tracking and scan-scheduling algorithm for the high resolution Chilbolton radar in southern England. These structures have been related to storm life-cycles derived by tracking features in the rainfall from the UK radar network, and compared statistically to simulated reflectivity fields from multiple versions of the Met Office model, varying horizontal grid length between 1.5 km and 100 m, and changing the sub-grid mixing and microphysics schemes. We also evaluated the scale and intensity of convective updrafts using a new radar technique. We find that the horizontal size of simulated convective clouds and the updrafts within them decreases with decreasing grid lengths down to 200 m, below which no further decrease is found. Comparison with observations reveals that at these resolutions, updrafts are about the right size (around 2 km across), but the clouds are typically too narrow and rain too intense (in both cases by around a factor of two), while progressing through their lifecycle too slowly. The scale error may be remedied by artificially increasing mixing length, but the microphysics scheme has little effect on either scale or intensity.

  10. Rotating convection in a viscoelastic magnetic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, L.M. [Departamento de Fíisica y Matemática Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31080 Pamplona (Spain); Laroze, D., E-mail: dlarozen@uta.cl [Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D, Arica (Chile); Díaz, P. [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad de La Frontera, Casilla 54 D, Temuco (Chile); Martinez-Mardones, J. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile); Mancini, H.L. [Departamento de Fíisica y Matemática Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31080 Pamplona (Spain)

    2014-09-01

    We report theoretical and numerical results on convection for a magnetic fluid in a viscoelastic carrier liquid under rotation. The viscoelastic properties are given by the Oldroyd model. We obtain explicit expressions for the convective thresholds in terms of the parameters of the system in the case of idealized boundary conditions. We also calculate numerically the convective thresholds for the case of realistic boundary conditions. The effects of the rheology and of the rotation rate on the instability thresholds for a diluted magnetic suspension are emphasized. - Highlights: • Ferrofluids. • Thermal convection. • Viscoelastic model. • Realistic boundary conditions.

  11. Helioseismology challenges models of solar convection

    CERN Document Server

    Gizon, Laurent; 10.1073/pnas.1208875109

    2012-01-01

    Convection is the mechanism by which energy is transported through the outermost 30% of the Sun. Solar turbulent convection is notoriously difficult to model across the entire convection zone where the density spans many orders of magnitude. In this issue of PNAS, Hanasoge et al. (2012) employ recent helioseismic observations to derive stringent empirical constraints on the amplitude of large-scale convective velocities in the solar interior. They report an upper limit that is far smaller than predicted by a popular hydrodynamic numerical simulation.

  12. Modeling of heat explosion with convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belk, Michael; Volpert, Vitaly

    2004-06-01

    The work is devoted to numerical simulations of the interaction of heat explosion with natural convection. The model consists of the heat equation with a nonlinear source term describing heat production due to an exothermic chemical reaction coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation. We show how complex regimes appear through successive bifurcations leading from a stable stationary temperature distribution without convection to a stationary symmetric convective solution, stationary asymmetric convection, periodic in time oscillations, and finally aperiodic oscillations. A simplified model problem is suggested. It describes the main features of solutions of the complete problem.

  13. A Study of Detrainment from Deep Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, I. B.; Krueger, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty in the results of Global Climate Model simulations has been attributed to errors and simplifications in how parameterizations of convection coarsely represent the processes of entrainment, detrainment, and mixing between convective clouds and their environment. Using simulations of convection we studied these processes at a resolution high enough to explicitly resolve them. Two of several recently developed analysis techniques that allow insight into these processes at their appropriate scale are an Eulerian method of directly measuring entrainment and detrainment, and a Lagrangian method that uses particle trajectories to map convective mass flux over height and a cloud variable of interest. The authors of the Eulerian technique used it to show that the dynamics of shells of cold, humid air that surround shallow convective updrafts have important effects on the properties of air entrained and detrained from the updrafts. There is some evidence for the existence of such shells around deep convective updrafts as well, and that detrainment is more important than entrainment in determining the ultimate effect of the deep convection on the large scale environment. We present results from analyzing a simulation of deep convection through the Eulerian method as well as using Lagrangian particle trajectories to illustrate the role of the shell in the process of detrainment and mixing between deep convection and its environment.

  14. Performance of multi-physics ensembles in convective precipitation events over northeastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ortega, E.; Lorenzana, J.; Merino, A.; Fernández-González, S.; López, L.; Sánchez, J. L.

    2017-07-01

    Convective precipitation with hail greatly affects southwestern Europe, causing major economic losses. The local character of this meteorological phenomenon is a serious obstacle to forecasting. Therefore, the development of reliable short-term forecasts constitutes an essential challenge to minimizing and managing risks. However, deterministic outcomes are affected by different uncertainty sources, such as physics parameterizations. This study examines the performance of different combinations of physics schemes of the Weather Research and Forecasting model to describe the spatial distribution of precipitation in convective environments with hail falls. Two 30-member multi-physics ensembles, with two and three domains of maximum resolution 9 and 3km each, were designed using various combinations of cumulus, microphysics and radiation schemes. The experiment was evaluated for 10 convective precipitation days with hail over 2005-2010 in northeastern Spain. Different indexes were used to evaluate the ability of each ensemble member to capture the precipitation patterns, which were compared with observations of a rain-gauge network. A standardized metric was constructed to identify optimal performers. Results show interesting differences between the two ensembles. In two domain simulations, the selection of cumulus parameterizations was crucial, with the Betts-Miller-Janjic scheme the best. In contrast, the Kain-Fristch cumulus scheme gave the poorest results, suggesting that it should not be used in the study area. Nevertheless, in three domain simulations, the cumulus schemes used in coarser domains were not critical and the best results depended mainly on microphysics schemes. The best performance was shown by Morrison, New Thomson and Goddard microphysics.

  15. Evaluation of the atmospheric transport in a GCM using radon measurements: sensitivity to cumulus convection parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zhang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The radioactive species radon (222Rn has long been used as a test tracer for the numerical simulation of large scale transport processes. In this study, radon transport experiments are carried out using an atmospheric GCM with a finite-difference dynamical core, the van Leer type FFSL advection algorithm, and two state-of-the-art cumulus convection parameterization schemes. Measurements of surface concentration and vertical distribution of radon collected from the literature are used as references in model evaluation.

    The simulated radon concentrations using both convection schemes turn out to be consistent with earlier studies with many other models. Comparison with measurements indicates that at the locations where significant seasonal variations are observed in reality, the model can reproduce both the monthly mean surface radon concentration and the annual cycle quite well. At those sites where the seasonal variation is not large, the model is able to give a correct magnitude of the annual mean. In East Asia, where radon simulations are rarely reported in the literature, detailed analysis shows that our results compare reasonably well with the observations.

    The most evident changes caused by the use of a different convection scheme are found in the vertical distribution of the tracer. The scheme associated with weaker upward transport gives higher radon concentration up to about 6 km above the surface, and lower values in higher altitudes. In the lower part of the atmosphere results from this scheme does not agree as well with the measurements as the other scheme. Differences from 6 km to the model top are even larger, although we are not yet able to tell which simulation is better due to the lack of observations at such high altitudes.

  16. Evaluation of the atmospheric transport in a GCM using radon measurements: sensitivity to cumulus convection parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zhang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The radioactive species radon (222Rn has long been used as a test tracer for the numerical simulation of large scale transport processes. In this study, radon transport experiments are carried out using an atmospheric GCM with a finite-difference dynamical core, the van Leer type FFSL advection algorithm and two state-of-the-art cumulus convection parameterization schemes. Measurements of surface concentration and vertical distribution of radon collected from literature are used as references in model evaluation.

    The simulated radon concentrations using both convection schemes turn out to be consistent with earlier studies with many other models. Comparison with measurements indicates that at the locations where significant seasonal variations are observed in reality, the model can reproduce both the monthly mean surface radon concentration and the annual cycle quite well. At those sites where the seasonal variation is not large, the model is able to give a correct magnitude of the annual mean. In East Asia, where radon simulations are rarely reported in literature, detailed analysis shows that our results compare reasonably well with the observations.

    The most evident changes caused by the use of a different convection scheme are found in the vertical distribution of the tracer. The scheme associated with a weaker upward transport gives higher radon concentration up to about 6 km above the surface, and lower values in higher altitudes. In the lower part of the atmosphere results from this scheme does not agree as well with the measurements as the other scheme. Differences from 6 km to the model top are even larger, although we are not yet able to tell which simulation is better due to the lack of observations at such high altitudes.

  17. Irradiated stars with convective envelopes

    CERN Document Server

    Lucy, L B

    2016-01-01

    The structure of low-mass stars irradiated by a close companion is considered. Irradiation modifies the surface boundary conditions and thereby also the adiabatic constants of their outer convection zones. This then changes the models' radii and luminosities. For short-period M dwarf binaries with components of similar mass, the radius inflation due to their mutual irradiation is found to be < 0.4%. This is an order of magnitude too small to explain the anomalous radii found for such binaries. Although stronger irradiation of an M dwarf results in a monotonically increasing radius, a saturation effect limits the inflation to < 5%.

  18. Convective Heat Transfer in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor of the Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This simulation involved a two-dimensional axisymmetric model of a full motor initial grain of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) of the Space Transportation System (STS). It was conducted with CFD (computational fluid dynamics) commercial code FLUENT. This analysis was performed to: a) maintain continuity with most related previous analyses, b) serve as a non-vectored baseline for any three-dimensional vectored nozzles, c) provide a relatively simple application and checkout for various CFD solution schemes, grid sensitivity studies, turbulence modeling and heat transfer, and d) calculate nozzle convective heat transfer coefficients. The accuracy of the present results and the selection of the numerical schemes and turbulence models were based on matching the rocket ballistic predictions of mass flow rate, head end pressure, vacuum thrust and specific impulse, and measured chamber pressure drop. Matching these ballistic predictions was found to be good. This study was limited to convective heat transfer and the results compared favorably with existing theory. On the other hand, qualitative comparison with backed-out data of the ratio of the convective heat transfer coefficient to the specific heat at constant pressure was made in a relative manner. This backed-out data was devised to match nozzle erosion that was a result of heat transfer (convective, radiative and conductive), chemical (transpirating), and mechanical (shear and particle impingement forces) effects combined.

  19. On Converting Secret Sharing Scheme to Visual Secret Sharing Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Daoshun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Traditional Secret Sharing (SS schemes reconstruct secret exactly the same as the original one but involve complex computation. Visual Secret Sharing (VSS schemes decode the secret without computation, but each share is m times as big as the original and the quality of the reconstructed secret image is reduced. Probabilistic visual secret sharing (Prob.VSS schemes for a binary image use only one subpixel to share the secret image; however the probability of white pixels in a white area is higher than that in a black area in the reconstructed secret image. SS schemes, VSS schemes, and Prob. VSS schemes have various construction methods and advantages. This paper first presents an approach to convert (transform a -SS scheme to a -VSS scheme for greyscale images. The generation of the shadow images (shares is based on Boolean XOR operation. The secret image can be reconstructed directly by performing Boolean OR operation, as in most conventional VSS schemes. Its pixel expansion is significantly smaller than that of VSS schemes. The quality of the reconstructed images, measured by average contrast, is the same as VSS schemes. Then a novel matrix-concatenation approach is used to extend the greyscale -SS scheme to a more general case of greyscale -VSS scheme.

  20. EVALUATION OF AN IMPROVED CONVECTION TRIGGERING MECHANISM IN THE NCAR COMMUNITY ATMOSPHERE MODEL CAM2 UNDER CAPT FRAMEWORK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, S; Boyle, J S; Cederwall, R T; Potter, G L; Zhang, M

    2003-10-15

    The problem that convection over land is overactive during warm-season daytime in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model CAM2 and its previous version (CCM3) has been found both in its single-column model (SCM) simulations (Xie and Zhang 2000; Ghan et al. 2000; Xie et al. 2002) and in its full general circulation model (GCM) short-range weather forecasts (Phillips et al. 2003) and climate simulations (Dai and Trenberth 2003). These studies showed that this problem is closely related to the convection triggering mechanism used in its deep convection scheme (Zhang and McFarlane 1995), which assumes that convection is triggered whenever there is positive convective available potential energy (CAPE). The positive CAPE triggering mechanism initiates model convection too often during the day because of the strong diurnal variations in the surface isolation and the induced CAPE diurnal change over land in the warm season. To reduce the problem, Xie and Zhang (2000) introduced a dynamic constraint, i.e., a dynamic CAPE generation rate (DCAPE) determined by the large-scale advective tendencies of temperature and moisture, to control the onset of deep convection. They showed that positive DCAPE is closely associated with convection in observations and the dynamic constraint could largely reduce the effect of the strong diurnal variations in the surface fluxes on the initiation of convection. Using the SCM version of CCM3, which has the same deep convection scheme as CAM2, Xie and Zhang (2000) showed that considerable improvements can be obtained in the model simulation of precipitation and other thermodynamic fields when the dynamic constraint was applied to the model triggering function. However, the performance of the improved convection triggering mechanism in the full GCM has not been tested. In this study, we will test the improved convection trigger mechanism in CAM2 under the U.S. Department of Energy's Climate Change

  1. 3-D model simulations of dynamical and microphysical interactions in pyro-convective clouds under idealized conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Reutter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pyro-convective clouds, i.e. convective clouds forming over wildland fires due to high sensible heat, play an important role for the transport of aerosol particles and trace gases into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Additionally, due to the emission of a large number of aerosol particles from forest fires, the microphysical structure of a pyro-convective cloud is clearly different from that of ordinary convective clouds. A crucial step in the microphysical evolution of a (pyro- convective cloud is the activation of aerosol particles to form cloud droplets. The activation process affects the initial number and size of cloud droplets and can thus influence the evolution of the convective cloud and the formation of precipitation. Building upon a realistic parameterization of CCN activation, the model ATHAM is used to investigate the dynamical and microphysical processes of idealized three-dimensional pyro-convective clouds in mid-latitudes. A state-of-the-art two-moment microphysical scheme has been implemented in order to study the influence of the aerosol concentration on the cloud development. The results show that the aerosol concentration influences the formation of precipitation. For low aerosol concentrations (NCN=1000 cm−3, rain droplets are rapidly formed by autoconversion of cloud droplets. This also triggers the formation of large graupel and hail particles resulting in an early and strong onset of precipitation. With increasing aerosol concentration (NCN=20 000 cm−3 and NCN=60 000 cm−3 the formation of rain droplets is delayed due to more but smaller cloud droplets. Therefore, the formation of ice crystals and snowflakes becomes more important for the eventual formation of graupel and hail. However, this causes a delay of the onset of precipitation and its intensity for increasing aerosol concentration. This work shows the first detailed investigation of the interaction between cloud microphysics and dynamics of a

  2. A ubiquitous ice size bias in simulations of tropical deep convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Stanford

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The High Altitude Ice Crystals – High Ice Water Content (HAIC-HIWC joint field campaign produced aircraft retrievals of total condensed water content (TWC, hydrometeor particle size distributions (PSDs, and vertical velocity (w in high ice water content regions of mature and decaying tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCSs. The resulting dataset is used here to explore causes of the commonly documented high bias in radar reflectivity within cloud-resolving simulations of deep convection. This bias has been linked to overly strong simulated convective updrafts lofting excessive condensate mass but is also modulated by parameterizations of hydrometeor size distributions, single particle properties, species separation, and microphysical processes. Observations are compared with three Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations of an observed MCS using different microphysics parameterizations while controlling for w, TWC, and temperature. Two popular bulk microphysics schemes (Thompson and Morrison and one bin microphysics scheme (fast spectral bin microphysics are compared. For temperatures between −10 and −40 °C and TWC  >  1 g m−3, all microphysics schemes produce median mass diameters (MMDs that are generally larger than observed, and the precipitating ice species that controls this size bias varies by scheme, temperature, and w. Despite a much greater number of samples, all simulations fail to reproduce observed high-TWC conditions ( >  2 g m−3 between −20 and −40 °C in which only a small fraction of condensate mass is found in relatively large particle sizes greater than 1 mm in diameter. Although more mass is distributed to large particle sizes relative to those observed across all schemes when controlling for temperature, w, and TWC, differences with observations are significantly variable between the schemes tested. As a result, this bias is hypothesized to partly result from

  3. Mixed time discontinuous space-time finite element method for convection diffusion equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A mixed time discontinuous space-time finite element scheme for second-order convection diffusion problems is constructed and analyzed. Order of the equation is lowered by the mixed finite element method. The low order equation is discretized with a space-time finite element method, continuous in space but discontinuous in time. Stability, existence, uniqueness and convergence of the approximate solutions are proved. Numerical results are presented to illustrate efficiency of the proposed method.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zexi; Huang, Juntao; Yong, Wen-An

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose an interfacial scheme accompanying the lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations with general interfacial conditions, including conjugate conditions with or without jumps in heat and mass transfer, continuity of macroscopic variables and normal fluxes in ion diffusion in porous media with different porosity, and the Kapitza resistance in heat transfer. The construction of this scheme is based on our boundary schemes [Huang and Yong, J. Comput. Phys. 300, 70 (2015), 10.1016/j.jcp.2015.07.045] for Robin boundary conditions on straight or curved boundaries. It gives second-order accuracy for straight interfaces and first-order accuracy for curved ones. In addition, the new scheme inherits the advantage of the boundary schemes in which only the current lattice nodes are involved. Such an interfacial scheme is highly desirable for problems with complex geometries or in porous media. The interfacial scheme is numerically validated with several examples. The results show the utility of the constructed scheme and very well support our theoretical predications.

  5. Transitions in turbulent rotating convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaei, Hadi; Alards, Kim; Kunnen, Rudie; Toschi, Federico; Clercx, Herman; Fluid Dynamics Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to explore the flow transition from one state to the other in rotating Rayleigh-Bènard convection using Lagrangian acceleration statistics. 3D particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) is employed in a water-filled cylindrical tank of equal height and diameter. The measurements are performed at the center and close to the top plate at a Rayleigh number Ra = 1.28e9 and Prandtl number Pr = 6.7 for different rotation rates. In parallel, direct numerical simulation (DNS) has been performed to provide detailed information on the boundary layers. We report the acceleration pdfs for different rotation rates and show how the transition from weakly to strongly rotating Rayleigh-Bènard affects the acceleration pdfs in the bulk and boundary layers. We observe that the shapes of the acceleration PDFs as well as the isotropy in the cell center are largely unaffected while crossing the transition point. However, acceleration pdfs at the top show a clear change at the transition point. Using acceleration pdfs and DNS data, we show that the transition between turbulent states is actually a boundary layer transition between Prandtl-Blasius type (typical of non-rotating convection) and Ekman type.

  6. Sensitivity of CO2 Simulation in a GCM to the Convective Transport Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z.; Pawson, S.; Collatz, G. J.; Gregg, W. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Baker, D.; Ott, L.

    2014-01-01

    Convection plays an important role in the transport of heat, moisture and trace gases. In this study, we simulated CO2 concentrations with an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). Three different convective transport algorithms were used. One is a modified Arakawa-Shubert scheme that was native to the GCM; two others used in two off-line chemical transport models (CTMs) were added to the GCM here for comparison purposes. Advanced CO2 surfaced fluxes were used for the simulations. The results were compared to a large quantity of CO2 observation data. We find that the simulation results are sensitive to the convective transport algorithms. Overall, the three simulations are quite realistic and similar to each other in the remote marine regions, but are significantly different in some land regions with strong fluxes such as Amazon and Siberia during the convection seasons. Large biases against CO2 measurements are found in these regions in the control run, which uses the original GCM. The simulation with the simple diffusive algorithm is better. The difference of the two simulations is related to the very different convective transport speed.

  7. A Laboratory Study of the Turbulent Velocity Characteristics in the Convective Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the measurement of the velocity field in the convective boundary layer (CBL) in a convection water tank with the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique, this paper studies the characteristics of the CBL turbulent velocity in a modified convection tank. The experiment results show that the velocity distribution in the mixed layer clearly possesses the characteristics of the CBL thermals, and the turbulent eddies can be seen obviously. The comparison of the vertical distribution of the turbulent velocity variables indicates that the modeling in the new tank is better than in the old one. The experiment data show that the thermal's motion in the entrainment zone sometimes fluctuates obviously due to the intermittence of turbulence. Analyses show that this fluctuation can influence the agreement of the measurement data with the parameterization scheme, in which the convective Richardson number is used to characterize the entrainment zone depth. The normalized square velocity w2i/w2* at the top of the mixed layer seems to be time-dependent, and has a decreasing trend during the experiments. This implies that the vertical turbulent velocity at the top of the mixed layer may not be proportional to the convective velocity (w*).

  8. The heated condensation framework as a convective trigger in the NCEP Climate Forecast System version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardi, Rodrigo J.; Tawfik, Ahmed B.; Manganello, Julia V.; Marx, Lawrence; Shin, Chul-Su; Halder, Subhadeep; Schneider, Edwin K.; Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Kinter, James L.

    2016-09-01

    An updated version of the Heated Condensation Framework (HCF) is implemented as a convective triggering criterion into the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2). The new trigger replaces the original criteria in both the deep (Simplified Arakawa-Schubert - SAS) and shallow (SAS based) convective schemes. The performance of the original and new triggering criteria is first compared against radiosonde observations. Then, a series of hindcasts are performed to evaluate the influence of the triggering criterion in the CFSv2 representation of summer precipitation, the diurnal cycle of precipitation, and hurricanes that made landfall. The observational analysis shows that the HCF trigger better captures the frequency of convection, where the original SAS trigger initiates convection too often. When implemented in CFSv2, the HCF trigger improves the seasonal forecast of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall, including the representation of the onset dates of the rainy season over India. On the other hand, the HCF trigger increases error in the seasonal forecast of precipitation over the eastern United States. The HCF trigger also improves the representation of the intensity of hurricanes. Moreover, the simulation of hurricanes provides insights on the mechanism whereby the HCF trigger impacts the representation of convection.

  9. A test of sensitivity to convective transport in a global atmospheric CO2 simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, H.; Kawa, S. R.; Chin, M.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Rasch, P.; Wu, S.

    2006-11-01

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO2 distributions. Global CO2 in the year 2000 is simulated using the CTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA's Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO2 by adopting the same CO2 emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et al. (convective transport scheme denoted as Conv1). Conv1 approximates the convective transport by using the bulk convective mass fluxes to redistribute trace gases. The alternate approximation, Conv2, partitions fluxes into updraft and downdraft, as well as into entrainment and detrainment, and has potential to yield a more realistic simulation of vertical redistribution through deep convection. Replacing Conv1 by Conv2 results in an overestimate of CO2 over biospheric sink regions. The largest discrepancies result in a CO2 difference of about 7.8 ppm in the July NH boreal forest, which is about 30% of the CO2 seasonality for that area. These differences are compared to those produced by emission scenario variations constrained by the framework of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to account for possible land use change and residual terrestrial CO2 sink. It is shown that the overestimated CO2 driven by Conv2 can be offset by introducing these supplemental emissions.

  10. Non-local convergence coupling in a simple stochastic convection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenowitz, N. D.; Frenkel, Y.; Majda, A. J.

    2016-06-01

    Observational studies show a strong correlation between large-scale wind convergence and precipitation. However, using this as a convective closure assumption to determine the total precipitation in a numerical model typically leads to deleterious wave-CISK behavior such as grid-scale noise. The quasi-equilibrium (QE) schemes ameliorate this issue and smooth the precipitation field, but still inadequately represent the intermittent and organized nature of tropical convection. However, recent observational evidence highlights that the large-scale convergence field primarily affects precipitation by increasing the overall convective cloud fraction rather than the energetics of individual convective elements. In this article, the dynamical consequences of this diagnostic observation are studied using a simple one baroclinic mode stochastic model for convectively coupled waves. A version of this model is implemented which couples the stochastic formation of convective elements to the wind convergence. Linearized analysis shows that using the local convergence results in a classic wave-CISK standing instability where the growth rate increases with the wavenumber. However, using a large-scale averaged convergence restricts the instability to physically plausible scales. Convergence coupling is interpreted as a surrogate for the non-local effects of gregarious convection. In nonlinear stochastic simulations with a non-uniform imposed sea surface temperature (SST) field, the non-local convergence coupling introduces desirable intermittent variability on intraseasonal time scales. Convergence coupling leads to a circulation with a similar mean but higher variability than the equivalent parameterization without convergence coupling. Finally, the model is shown to retain these features on fine and coarse mesh sizes.

  11. Uncertainty of Microphysics Schemes in CRMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W. K.; van den Heever, S. C.; Wu, D.; Saleeby, S. M.; Lang, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Microphysics is the framework through which to understand the links between interactive aerosol, cloud and precipitation processes. These processes play a critical role in the water and energy cycle. CRMs with advanced microphysics schemes have been used to study the interaction between aerosol, cloud and precipitation processes at high resolution. But, there are still many uncertainties associated with these microphysics schemes. This has arisen, in part, from the fact microphysical processes cannot be measured directly; instead, cloud properties, which can be measured, are and have been used to validate model results. The utilization of current and future global high-resolution models is rapidly increasing and are at what has been traditional CRM resolutions and are using microphysics schemes that were developed in traditional CRMs. A potential NASA satellite mission called the Cloud and Precipitation Processes Mission (CaPPM) is currently being planned for submission to the NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey. This mission could provide the necessary global estimates of cloud and precipitation properties with which to evaluate and improve dynamical and microphysical parameterizations and the feedbacks. In order to facilitate the development of this mission, CRM simulations have been conducted to identify microphysical processes responsible for the greatest uncertainties in CRMs. In this talk, we will present results from numerical simulations conducted using two CRMs (NU-WRF and RAMS) with different dynamics, radiation, land surface and microphysics schemes. Specifically, we will conduct sensitivity tests to examine the uncertainty of the some of the key ice processes (i.e. riming, melting, freezing and shedding) in these two-microphysics schemes. The idea is to quantify how these two different models' respond (surface rainfall and its intensity, strength of cloud drafts, LWP/IWP, convective-stratiform-anvil area distribution) to changes of these key ice

  12. Introductory Analysis of Benard-Marangoni Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto, J. A.; Perez-Munuzuri, V.; Romero-Cano, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    We describe experiments on Benard-Marangoni convection which permit a useful understanding of the main concepts involved in this phenomenon such as, for example, Benard cells, aspect ratio, Rayleigh and Marangoni numbers, Crispation number and critical conditions. In spite of the complexity of convection theory, we carry out a simple and…

  13. Spurious multiple equilibria introduced by convective adjustment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Toom, M.; Dijkstra, H.A.; Wubs, F.W.

    2011-01-01

    The application of bifurcation analysis to ocean climate models is substantially hampered by difficulties associated with the use of convective adjustment, i.e. a parameterisation of convection in which the vertical diffusion of heat and salt is greatly enhanced whenever the water column becomes sta

  14. Dependency of stratiform precipitation on a two-moment cloud microphysical scheme in mid-latitude squall line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Yuya; Takahashi, Keiko

    2014-03-01

    Dependency of stratiform precipitation on a two-moment cloud microphysical scheme in mid-latitude squall line is investigated, using full one-moment, full two-moment and partial two-moment schemes. The results show that the effect of two-moment scheme for rain is consistent with those presented in preceding studies, but the effect is found to be dependent on two-moment scheme for ice water species (ice particles) which enhanced detrainment in convective region and increased rearward buoyancy fluxes. Use of the two-moment scheme for cloud water and cloud ice is found to have less direct impact on the formation of stratiform precipitation, but indirectly affects the precipitation by changing source number concentration of large liquid and ice particles. Two-moment treatment for graupel rather than snow is also found to have great impact on stratiform precipitation through the melting process. The horizontally narrow and vertically gradual graupel melting profile originated from its size distribution change causes suppression to the convective updraft in convective region, and thus increases horizontal rearward buoyancy from the convective to stratiform regions with enhanced growth of ice water species, resulting in an increase in stratiform precipitation. To simulate these features, two-moment treatment for graupel or diagnostic model for graupel intercept parameter considering size distribution change is required.

  15. Development of outer-iteration free scheme for MATRA code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyuk; Kim, S. J.; Park, J. P.; Hwang, D. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The Picard scheme involves successive updating of the coefficient on the previously calculated values. The outer-iteration is terminated at that time being satisfied with boundary condition on which a lateral pressure difference between subchannels is even at exit plane. Diversion cross flow is generated to reduce the lateral pressure difference at each axial node. The physics can be numerically implemented with using approximation to force the lateral pressure difference to be the zero. The idea is firstly realized by prediction-correction method by C. Chiu. In this code, two-step method is adopted to approximate the lateral pressure difference term using diversion cross flow. The approximation allows the outer-iteration free scheme. The present study describes the implementation of outer-iteration free scheme, called non-iterative prediction-correction method into MATRA code. Outer-iteration free algorithm is implemented into the subchannel code MATRA. Original prediction-correction method applied only two channel is successfully expanded into the multichannel application. In comparison with the convectional outer-iteration numerical scheme, the present algorithm showed the more efficient and compatible accuracy on the verification problems, such as SMT- 5x5 problem and KSNP single assembly problem. In addition, outer-iteration free algorithm can be calculated in lower mass flow condition in which conventional scheme is breakdown.

  16. Convection of Moist Saturated Air: Analytical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Zakinyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the steady-state stationary thermal convection of moist saturated air in a lower atmosphere has been studied theoretically. Thermal convection was considered without accounting for the Coriolis force, and with only the vertical temperature gradient. The analytical solution of geophysical fluid dynamics equations, which generalizes the formulation of the moist convection problem, is obtained in the two-dimensional case. The stream function is derived in the Boussinesq approximation with velocity divergence taken as zero. It has been shown that the stream function is asymmetrical in vertical direction contrary to the dry and moist unsaturated air convection. It has been demonstrated that the convection in moist atmosphere strongly depends on the vapor mass fraction gradient.

  17. Topology Optimisation for Coupled Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Aage, Niels

    conduction governs in the solid parts of the design domain and couples to convection-dominated heat transfer to a surrounding fluid. Both loosely coupled and tightly coupled problems are considered. The loosely coupled problems are convection-diffusion problems, based on an advective velocity field from......The work focuses on applying topology optimisation to forced and natural convection problems in fluid dynamics and conjugate (fluid-structure) heat transfer. To the authors' knowledge, topology optimisation has not yet been applied to natural convection flow problems in the published literature...... and the current work is thus seen as contributing new results to the field. In the literature, most works on the topology optimisation of weakly coupled convection-diffusion problems focus on the temperature distribution of the fluid, but a selection of notable exceptions also focusing on the temperature...

  18. Topology Optimisation for Coupled Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    This thesis deals with topology optimisation for coupled convection problems. The aim is to extend and apply topology optimisation to steady-state conjugate heat transfer problems, where the heat conduction equation governs the heat transfer in a solid and is coupled to thermal transport...... in a surrounding uid, governed by a convection-diffusion equation, where the convective velocity field is found from solving the isothermal incompressible steady-state Navier-Stokes equations. Topology optimisation is also applied to steady-state natural convection problems. The modelling is done using stabilised...... finite elements, the formulation and implementation of which was done partly during a special course as prepatory work for this thesis. The formulation is extended with a Brinkman friction term in order to facilitate the topology optimisation of fluid flow and convective cooling problems. The derived...

  19. Convection in Oblate Solar-Type Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Junfeng; Liang, Chunlei

    2016-01-01

    We present the first global 3D simulations of thermal convection in the oblate envelopes of rapidly-rotating solar-type stars. This has been achieved by exploiting the capabilities of the new Compressible High-ORder Unstructured Spectral difference (CHORUS) code. We consider rotation rates up to 85\\% of the critical (breakup) rotation rate, which yields an equatorial radius that is up to 17\\% larger than the polar radius. This substantial oblateness enhances the disparity between polar and equatorial modes of convection. We find that the convection redistributes the heat flux emitted from the outer surface, leading to an enhancement of the heat flux in the polar and equatorial regions. This finding implies that lower-mass stars with convective envelopes may not have darker equators as predicted by classical gravity darkening arguments. The vigorous high-latitude convection also establishes elongated axisymmetric circulation cells and zonal jets in the polar regions. Though the overall amplitude of the surface...

  20. A New Deferred Sentencing Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Chakravarti

    1968-10-01

    Full Text Available A new deferred sentencing scheme resembling double sampling scheme has been suggested from viewpoint of operational and administrative. It is recommended particularly when the inspection is destructive. The O.C. curves of the scheme for two sample sizes of 5 and 10 have been given.

  1. Bonus schemes and trading activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pikulina, E.S.; Renneboog, L.D.R.; ter Horst, J.R.; Tobler, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about how different bonus schemes affect traders' propensity to trade and which bonus schemes improve traders' performance. We study the effects of linear versus threshold bonus schemes on traders' behavior. Traders buy and sell shares in an experimental stock market on the basis of

  2. Bonus Schemes and Trading Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pikulina, E.S.; Renneboog, L.D.R.; Ter Horst, J.R.; Tobler, P.N.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Little is known about how different bonus schemes affect traders’ propensity to trade and which bonus schemes improve traders’ performance. We study the effects of linear versus threshold (convex) bonus schemes on traders’ behavior. Traders purchase and sell shares in an experimental stock

  3. Bonus schemes and trading activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pikulina, E.S.; Renneboog, L.D.R.; ter Horst, J.R.; Tobler, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about how different bonus schemes affect traders' propensity to trade and which bonus schemes improve traders' performance. We study the effects of linear versus threshold bonus schemes on traders' behavior. Traders buy and sell shares in an experimental stock market on the basis of

  4. Two Improved Digital Signature Schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, two improved digital signature schemes are presented based on the design of directed signaturescheme [3]. The peculiarity of the system is that only if the scheme is specific recipient, the signature is authenticated.Since the scheme adds the screen of some information parameters, the difficulty of deciphered keys and the security ofdigital signature system are increased.

  5. CONSIDERATIONS CONCERNING GUARANTEE SCHEMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMILIA CLIPICI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available When a large withdrawal from banks occurs, customers withdraw their deposits, so banks are likely to go bankrupt because of liquidity problems. There are several mechanisms that allow the banking system to avoid the phenomenon of massive withdrawals from banks. The most effective one is the deposit insurance. The deposit insurance is seen primarily as a means of protecting depositors of credit institutions, and secondly as a means of ensuring the stability of the banking system. This article described deposit guarantee scheme in Romania and other country.

  6. Marangoni Convection in Binary Mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J; Oron, A; Behringer, Robert P.; Oron, Alexander; Zhang, Jie

    2006-01-01

    Marangoni instabilities in binary mixtures are different from those in pure liquids. In contrast to a large amount of experimental work on Marangoni convection in pure liquids, such experiments in binary mixtures are not available in the literature, to our knowledge. Using binary mixtures of sodium chloride/water, we have systematically investigated the pattern formation for a set of substrate temperatures and solute concentrations in an open system. The flow patterns evolve with time, driven by surface-tension fluctuations due to evaporation and the Soret effect, while the air-liquid interface does not deform. A shadowgraph method is used to follow the pattern formation in time. The patterns are mainly composed of polygons and rolls. The mean pattern size first decreases slightly, and then gradually increases during the evolution. Evaporation affects the pattern formation mainly at the early stage and the local evaporation rate tends to become spatially uniform at the film surface. The Soret effect becomes i...

  7. Natural convection between concentric spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    1992-01-01

    A finite-difference solution for steady natural convective flow in a concentric spherical annulus with isothermal walls has been obtained. The stream function-vorticity formulation of the equations of motion for the unsteady axisymmetric flow is used; interest lying in the final steady solution. Forward differences are used for the time derivatives and second-order central differences for the space derivatives. The alternating direction implicit method is used for solution of the discretization equations. Local one-dimensional grid adaptation is used to resolve the steep gradients in some regions of the flow at large Rayleigh numbers. The break-up into multi-cellular flow is found at high Rayleigh numbers for air and water, and at significantly low Rayleigh numbers for liquid metals. Excellent agreement with previous experimental and numerical data is obtained.

  8. PARALLEL LATTICE BGK SIMULATION OF NATURAL CONVECTION IN A CAVITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Bao-chang; LIU Hong-juan

    2005-01-01

    A Coupled Lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (CLBGK) model was proposed with a robust boundary scheme to model the Bossinesq incompressible flows. The LBGK method is a powerful approach, but is also computationally demanding. Therefore, parallel computing was implemented, and the codes were run on the parallel computer "Lenovo DeepComp 1800" with 24 nodes written in C++ using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) library. Numerical results for natural convection in a cavity with the Rayleigh number (Ra) ranging from 106 to 4×1010 were presented, and found to agree well with the previous work. And with the increase of the resolution rate, the accuracy has been greatly improved. In addition, new models were set up by applying different equilibriums to the CLBGK model to simulate the same problem, which all yield sound results.

  9. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-12-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem.

  10. CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER IN CYCLONE DEVICE WITH EXTERNAL GAS RECIRCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Karpov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the convective heat transfer on the surface of a hollow cylinder or several billets in a cyclone device with the new principle of external gas recirculation. According to this principle, transport of coolant from the lateral surface of the chamber, where the temperature is the highest, in the axial region is being fulfilled due to the pressure drop between the wall and axial areas of cyclonic flow. Dependency analysis of average and local heat transfer coefficients from operational and geometrical parameters has been performed; the generalized similarity equations for the calculation of the latter have been suggested. It is demonstrated that in case of download of a cyclone chamber with several billets, the use of the considered scheme of the external recirculation due to the specific characteristics of aerodynamics practically does not lead to noticeable changes in the intensity of convective heat transfer. Both experimental data and the numerical simulation results obtained with the use of OpenFOAM platform were used in the work. The investigations fulfilled will expand the area of the use of cyclone heating devices.

  11. Three Dimensional Radiative Transfer In Tropical Deep Convective Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Giuseppe, F.

    In this study the focus is on the interaction between short-wave radiation with a field of tropical deep convective events generated using a 3D cloud resolving model (CRM) to assess the significance of 3D radiative transport (3DRT). It is not currently un- derstood what magnitude of error is involved when a two stream approximation is used to describe the radiative transfer through such a cloud field. It seems likely that deep convective clouds could be the most complex to represent, and that the error in neglecting horizontal transport could be relevant in these cases. The field here con- sidered has an extention of roughly 90x90 km, approximately equivalent to the grid box dimension of many global models. The 3DRT results are compared both with the calculations obtained by an Independent Pixel Approximation (IPA) approch and by the Plane Parallel radiative scheme (PP) implemented in ECMWF's Forecast model. The differences between the three calculations are used to assess both problems in current GCM's representation of radiative heating and inaccuracies in the dynamical response of CRM simulations due to the Independent Column Approximation (ICA). The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the main 3DRT/1D differences is the starting point for the future attempt to develop a parameterization procedure.

  12. The Mechanism of First Raindrops Formation in Deep Convective Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khain, Alexander; Prabha, Thara; Benmoshe, Nir; Pandithurai, G.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2013-08-22

    The formation of first raindrops in deep convective clouds is investigated. A combination of observational data analysis and 2-D and 3-D numerical bin microphysical simulations of deep convective clouds suggests that the first raindrops form at the top of undiluted or slightly diluted cores. It is shown that droplet size distributions in these regions are wider and contain more large droplets than in diluted volumes. The results of the study indicate that the initial raindrop formation is determined by the basic microphysical processes within ascending adiabatic volumes. It allows one to predict the height of the formation of first raindrops considering the processes of nucleation, diffusion growth and collisions. The results obtained in the study explain observational results reported by Freud and Rosenfeld (2012) according to which the height of first raindrop formation depends linearly on the droplet number concentration at cloud base. The results also explain why a simple adiabatic parcel model can reproduce this dependence. The present study provides a physical basis for retrieval algorithms of cloud microphysical properties and aerosol properties using satellites proposed by Rosenfeld et al. ( 2012). The study indicates that the role of mixing and entrainment in the formation of the first raindrops is not of crucial importance. It is also shown that low variability of effective and mean volume radii along horizontal traverses, as regularly observed by in situ measurements, can be simulated by high-resolution cloud models, in which mixing is parameterized by a traditional 1.5 order turbulence closure scheme.

  13. Secure mediated certificateless signature scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chen; MA Wen-ping; WANG Xin-mei

    2007-01-01

    Ju et al proposed a certificateless signature scheme with instantaneous revocation by introducing security mediator (SEM) mechanism. This article presents a detailed cryptoanalysis of this scheme and shows that, in their proposed scheme, once a valid signature has been produced, the signer can recover his private key information and the instantaneous revocation property will be damaged. Furthermore, an improved mediated signature scheme, which can eliminate these disadvantages, is proposed, and security proof of the improved scheme under elliptic curve factorization problem (ECFP) assumption and bilinear computational diffie-hellman problem (BCDH) assumption is also proposed.

  14. Internal Gravity Wave Excitation by Turbulent Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoanet, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the flux of internal gravity waves (IGWs) generated by turbulent convection in stars. We solve for the IGW eigenfunctions analytically near the radiative-convective interface in a local, Boussinesq, and cartesian domain. We consider both discontinuous and smooth transitions between the radiative and convective regions and derive Green's functions to solve for the IGWs in the radiative region. We find that if the radiative-convective transition is smooth, the IGW flux ~ F_conv (d/H), where F_conv is the flux carried by the convective motions, d is the width of the transition region, and H is the pressure scale height. This can be much larger than the standard result in the literature for a discontinuous radiative-convective transition, which gives a wave flux ~ F_conv M, where M is the convective Mach number. However, in the smooth transition case, the most efficiently excited perturbations will break immediately when they enter the radiative region. The flux of IGWs which do not break and are abl...

  15. Estimation of convective entrainment properties from a cloud-resolving model simulation during TWP-ICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang J.; Wu, Xiaoqing; Zeng, Xiping; Mitovski, Toni

    2016-10-01

    The fractional entrainment rate in convective clouds is an important parameter in current convective parameterization schemes of climate models. In this paper, it is estimated using a 1-km-resolution cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation of convective clouds from TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment). The clouds are divided into different types, characterized by cloud-top heights. The entrainment rates and moist static energy that is entrained or detrained are determined by analyzing the budget of moist static energy for each cloud type. Results show that the entrained air is a mixture of approximately equal amount of cloud air and environmental air, and the detrained air is a mixture of ~80 % of cloud air and 20 % of the air with saturation moist static energy at the environmental temperature. After taking into account the difference in moist static energy between the entrained air and the mean environment, the estimated fractional entrainment rate is much larger than those used in current convective parameterization schemes. High-resolution (100 m) large-eddy simulation of TWP-ICE convection was also analyzed to support the CRM results. It is shown that the characteristics of entrainment rates estimated using both the high-resolution data and CRM-resolution coarse-grained data are similar. For each cloud category, the entrainment rate is high near cloud base and top, but low in the middle of clouds. The entrainment rates are best fitted to the inverse of in-cloud vertical velocity by a second order polynomial.

  16. High Order Schemes for CFD: A Review%计算流体力学中的高精度数值方法回顾

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成娟; 舒其望

    2009-01-01

    Over the past two decades there have been many research activities in the design and application of high order accurate numerical methods in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). High order methods are especially desirable for simulating flows with complicated solution structures. We give a review on the development and application of several classes of high order schemes in CFD, mainly concentrating on the simulation of compressible flows. An important feature of the compressible flow is the existence of shocks, interfaces and other discontinuities and often also complicated structure in the smooth part of the solution. This gives a unique challenge to the design of high order schemes to be non-oscillatory and yet still maintaining their high order accuracy. We concentrate our discussion on the essentially non-oscillatory (ENO), weighted ENO (WENO) finite difference,finite volume schemes and discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element methods. We attempt to describe their main properties and their relative strength and weakness. We also briefly review their developments and applications, concentrating mainly on the results over the past five years.%在过去的二、三十年中,计算流体力学(CFD)领域的高精度数值方法的设计和应用研究非常活跃.高精度数值方法主要针对具有复杂解结构流场的模拟而设计.回顾CFD中主要用于可压缩流模拟的几类高精度格式的发展与应用.可压缩流的一个重要特征是流场中存在激波、界面以及其它问断,同时还常常在解的光滑区域包含复杂结构.这对设计既不振荡又保持高阶精度的格式带来特别的挑战.重点讨论本质无振荡(ENO)、加权本质无振荡(WENO)有限差分与有限体积格式、间断Galerkin有限元(DG)方法,描述它们各自的特点、长处与不足,简要回顾这些方法的发展和应用,重点介绍它们近五年来的最新进展.

  17. A Comparison of Boundary-Layer Characteristics Simulated Using Different Parametrization Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguo; Shen, Xinyong; Huang, Wenyan

    2016-06-01

    We compare daytime planetary boundary-layer (PBL) characteristics under fair-weather conditions simulated using a single column version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model with different PBL parametrization schemes. The model is driven only by prescribed surface heat fluxes and horizontal pressure gradient forcing. Parametrizations for all physical processes except for turbulence and transport in the PBL are turned off in the simulations to ensure the discrepancies in the simulated PBL flow are due only to differences in the PBL schemes. A large-eddy simulation (LES) of the evolution of a daytime PBL is performed as a benchmark to examine how well a PBL parametrization scheme reproduces the LES results, and performance statistics are compared to rank those schemes. In general, hybrid local and non-local schemes such as the Yonsei University and Asymmetrical Convective Model (version 2) schemes perform better in reproducing the LES results, particularly well-mixed features, than do local schemes. Among local schemes, the University of Washington scheme produces the results closest to the LES. Local schemes, such as those of Mellor-Yamada-Janjic and Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino, simulate too low an entrainment flux, while PBL heights diagnosed from the simulations using local schemes are lower than those from the LES results. Hybrid local and non-local schemes are more sensitive to vertical grid resolution than local schemes. With a higher vertical resolution in the PBL, the schemes using the eddy-diffusivity and mass-flux methods perform better. Differences in the values of eddy diffusivity, length scale, and turbulence kinetic energy and their vertical distributions are large.

  18. A Comparison of Boundary-Layer Characteristics Simulated Using Different Parametrization Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguo; Shen, Xinyong; Huang, Wenyan

    2016-11-01

    We compare daytime planetary boundary-layer (PBL) characteristics under fair-weather conditions simulated using a single column version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model with different PBL parametrization schemes. The model is driven only by prescribed surface heat fluxes and horizontal pressure gradient forcing. Parametrizations for all physical processes except for turbulence and transport in the PBL are turned off in the simulations to ensure the discrepancies in the simulated PBL flow are due only to differences in the PBL schemes. A large-eddy simulation (LES) of the evolution of a daytime PBL is performed as a benchmark to examine how well a PBL parametrization scheme reproduces the LES results, and performance statistics are compared to rank those schemes. In general, hybrid local and non-local schemes such as the Yonsei University and Asymmetrical Convective Model (version 2) schemes perform better in reproducing the LES results, particularly well-mixed features, than do local schemes. Among local schemes, the University of Washington scheme produces the results closest to the LES. Local schemes, such as those of Mellor-Yamada-Janjic and Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino, simulate too low an entrainment flux, while PBL heights diagnosed from the simulations using local schemes are lower than those from the LES results. Hybrid local and non-local schemes are more sensitive to vertical grid resolution than local schemes. With a higher vertical resolution in the PBL, the schemes using the eddy-diffusivity and mass-flux methods perform better. Differences in the values of eddy diffusivity, length scale, and turbulence kinetic energy and their vertical distributions are large.

  19. Multicloud convective parametrizations with crude vertical structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khouider, Boualem [University of Victoria, Mathematics and Statistics, PO BOX 3045 STN CSC, Victoria, BC (Canada); Majda, Andrew J. [New York University, Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere/Ocean Sciences, Courant Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Recent observational analysis reveals the central role of three multi-cloud types, congestus, stratiform, and deep convective cumulus clouds, in the dynamics of large scale convectively coupled Kelvin waves, westward propagating two-day waves, and the Madden-Julian oscillation. The authors have recently developed a systematic model convective parametrization highlighting the dynamic role of the three cloud types through two baroclinic modes of vertical structure: a deep convective heating mode and a second mode with low level heating and cooling corresponding respectively to congestus and stratiform clouds. The model includes a systematic moisture equation where the lower troposphere moisture increases through detrainment of shallow cumulus clouds, evaporation of stratiform rain, and moisture convergence and decreases through deep convective precipitation and a nonlinear switch which favors either deep or congestus convection depending on whether the troposphere is moist or dry. Here several new facets of these multi-cloud models are discussed including all the relevant time scales in the models and the links with simpler parametrizations involving only a single baroclinic mode in various limiting regimes. One of the new phenomena in the multi-cloud models is the existence of suitable unstable radiative convective equilibria (RCE) involving a larger fraction of congestus clouds and a smaller fraction of deep convective clouds. Novel aspects of the linear and nonlinear stability of such unstable RCE's are studied here. They include new modes of linear instability including mesoscale second baroclinic moist gravity waves, slow moving mesoscale modes resembling squall lines, and large scale standing modes. The nonlinear instability of unstable RCE's to homogeneous perturbations is studied with three different types of nonlinear dynamics occurring which involve adjustment to a steady deep convective RCE, periodic oscillation, and even heteroclinic chaos in

  20. Scaling and universality in turbulent convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celani, Antonio; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Mazzino, Andrea; Vergassola, Massimo

    2002-02-01

    Anomalous correlation functions of the temperature field in two-dimensional turbulent convection are shown to be universal with respect to the choice of external sources. Moreover, they are equal to the anomalous correlations of the concentration field of a passive tracer advected by the convective flow itself. The statistics of velocity differences is found to be universal, self-similar, and close to Gaussian. These results point to the conclusion that temperature intermittency in two-dimensional turbulent convection may be traced back to the existence of statistically preserved structures, as it is in passive scalar turbulence.

  1. Transient Mixed Convection Validation for NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Barton [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Schultz, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-19

    The results of this project are best described by the papers and dissertations that resulted from the work. They are included in their entirety in this document. They are: (1) Jeff Harris PhD dissertation (focused mainly on forced convection); (2) Blake Lance PhD dissertation (focused mainly on mixed and transient convection). This dissertation is in multi-paper format and includes the article currently submitted and one to be submitted shortly; and, (3) JFE paper on CFD Validation Benchmark for Forced Convection.

  2. Parameterization for the Depth of the Entrainment Zone above the Convectively Mixed Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jianning; JIANG Weimei; CHEN Ziyun; YUAN Renmin

    2005-01-01

    It has been noted that when the convective Richardson number Ri* is used to characterize the depth of the entrainment zone, various parameterization schemes can be obtained. This situation is often attributed to the invalidity of parcel theory. However, evidence shows that the convective Richardson number Ri*might be an improper characteristic scaling parameter for the entrainment process. An attempt to use an innovative parameter to parameterize the entrainment-zone thickness has been made in this paper.Based on the examination of the data of water-tank experiments and atmospheric measurements, it is found that the total lapse rate of potential temperature across the entrainment zone is proportional to that of the capping inversion layer. Inserting this relationship into the so-called parcel theory, it thus gives a new parameterization scheme for the depth of the entrainment zone. This scheme includes the lapse rate of the capping inversion layer that plays an important role in the entrainment process. Its physical representation is reasonable. The new scheme gives a better ordering of the data measured in both watertank and atmosphere as compared with the traditional method using Ri*. These indicate that the parcel theory can describe the entrainment process suitably and that the new parameter is better than Ri*.

  3. Buoyancy Effects on Unsteady MHD Flow of a Reactive Third-Grade Fluid with Asymmetric Convective Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirivanhu Chinyoka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the combined effects of buoyancy force and asymmetrical convective cooling on unsteady MHD channel flow and heat transfer characteristics of an incompressible, reactive, variable viscosity and electrically conducting third grade fluid. The chemical kinetics in the flow system is exothermic and the asymmetric convective heat transfers at the channel walls follow the Newton’s law of cooling. The coupled nonlinear partial differential equations governing the problem are derived and solved numerically using a semi-implicit finite difference scheme. Graphical results are presented and physical aspects of the problem are discussed with respect to various parameters embedded in the system.

  4. Pretzel scheme for CEPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Huiping

    2016-11-01

    CEPC was proposed as an electron and positron collider ring with a circumference of 50-100 km to study the Higgs boson. Since the proposal was made, the lattice design for CEPC has been carried out and a preliminary conceptual design report has been written at the end of 2014. In this paper, we will describe the principles of pretzel scheme design, which is one of most important issues in CEPC lattice design. Then, we will show the modification of the lattice based on the lattice design shown in the Pre-CDR. The latest pretzel orbit design result will also be shown. The issues remained to be solved in the present design will be discussed and a brief summary will be given at the end.

  5. The importance of spatial resolution and convective parameterisation in modelling soil moisture - precipitation feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Taylor, Christopher M.; Roberts, Malcolm; Marsham, John H.

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture influences low-level temperature and humidity, which can strongly affect convective development. The location of convection in turn alters the soil moisture anomalies present on the following day, providing a feedback mechanism. Satellite observations show that in the tropics afternoon rainfall falls preferentially where the ground is drier than its surroundings. A large number of global weather and climate models, on the other hand, show a positive soil moisture - rainfall feedback, inconsistent with observations. This systematic bias will tend to exaggerate drought impacts in global atmospheric models, and points to missing fundamental processes in the models related to the coupling between the surface and convection. While the source of this error is still unclear, it has been hypothesized that the triggering of parameterisations of convection is excessively sensitive to low-level moisture, leading to convection initiating preferentially over wet soils. Here we quantify the soil-moisture - precipitation feedback sign using the same method as in Taylor et al. (Nature, 2012), which is now part of the ESMValTool model evaluation toolbox. We analyse multi-year global simulations using the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) with different resolutions and representations of convection. Three simulations are run at 15 km grid-spacing with different representations of convection: 1. the standard operational MetUM parameterisation scheme, 2. 'convection permitting', where the parameterisations of shallow and deep convection are turned off, and 3. only the parameterisation of shallow convection is turned on. The use of the same resolution and setup, except for the representation of convection, allows us to exclude any effects from changing resolution. Additional simulations at 30, 50 and 150 km grid-spacings using the standard MetUM parameterisation of convection scheme are then used to explore the impact of resolution. All simulations show daytime

  6. Supersonic Turbulent Convection and the Origin of the Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, A. J. R.; Dyt, C. P.

    2000-10-01

    We report a new set of calculations which support the view that supersonic turbulent convection played a major role in the formation of the solar system. A flux-corrected transport scheme (Zalesak, J. Comp. Phys.} 31 335 1979) is used to numerically simulate thermal convection in a 2D ideal gas layer that is heated from below and is stratified gravitationally across many scale heights. The temperature T0 at the top boundary and the temperature gradient (∂ T/∂ z)1 at the lower boundary are kept constant during the computation. The initial atmosphere is superadiabatic with polytropic index m = 1, specific heats ratio γ = 1.4 and temperature contrast T1}/T{0 = 11. This layer mimics a section of the outer layer of the proto-solar cloud (Dyt & Prentice, MNRAS 296 56 1998). Because the Reynolds number of the real atmosphere is so large, motions whose scale is less than the computational grid size are represented with a Smagorinsky sub-grid scale turbulence approximation (Chan et al, Ap.J.} 263 935 1982). That is, a velocity-dependent turbulent viscosity ν t and thermal diffusivity κ t are chosen so that the high wavenumber kinetic energy spectrum follows Kolmogorov's -5/3 law. The flow soon evolves to a configuration consisting of a network of giant convective cells. At cell boundaries, the downflows are spatially concentrated and rapid. Turbulent pressures t range up to 3 times the local gas pressure pgas. The convection eliminates nearly all of the superadiabaticity in the lower 90% of the atmosphere. In the top 10%, ∂ T/∂ z increases sharply and a steep density inversion occurs, with ρ increasing by a factor of 3-4. This result gives new credibility to the modern Laplacian theory of solar system origin (Moon & Planets} 19 341 1978; ibid 73 237 1996; Phys. Lett. A} 213 253 1996). Even so, we need t ≈ 10 pgas if the proto-solar cloud is to shed discrete gas rings whose orbits match the mean planetary spacings and whose chemical condensates match the

  7. Convection in complex shaped vessel; Convection dans des enceintes de forme complexe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The 8 november 2000, the SFT (Societe Francaise de Thermique) organized a technical day on the convection in complex shaped vessels. Nine papers have been presented in the domains of the heat transfers, the natural convection, the fluid distribution, the thermosyphon effect, the steam flow in a sterilization cycle and the transformers cooling. Eight papers are analyzed in ETDE and one paper dealing with the natural convection in spent fuels depository is analyzed in INIS. (A.L.B.)

  8. NUMERICAL STUDY ON MIXED CONVECTIVE FLOW IN A SOLAR COLLECTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In a solar energy heat collector forced convection and free convection will occur concurrently. In this paper, the mixed convective flow was investigated. The dimensionless equation was derived and the results was verified by experiments. The numerical solution shows that error is less than 5% if the effect of free convection is ignored.

  9. Topology optimisation for natural convection problems

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandersen, Joe; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Sigmund, Ole

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of the density-based topology optimisation approach for the design of heat sinks and micropumps based on natural convection effects. The problems are modelled under the assumptions of steady-state laminar flow using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled to the convection-diffusion equation through the Boussinesq approximation. In order to facilitate topology optimisation, the Brinkman approach is taken to penalise velocities inside the solid domain and the effective thermal conductivity is interpolated in order to accommodate differences in thermal conductivity of the solid and fluid phases. The governing equations are discretised using stabilised finite elements and topology optimisation is performed for two different problems using discrete adjoint sensitivity analysis. The study shows that topology optimisation is a viable approach for designing heat sink geometries cooled by natural convection and micropumps powered by natural convection.

  10. Convective Radio Occultations Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biondi, R. [Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Deep convective systems are destructive weather phenomena that annually cause many deaths and injuries as well as much damage, thereby accounting for major economic losses in several countries. The number and intensity of such phenomena have increased over the last decades in some areas of the globe. Damage is mostly caused by strong winds and heavy rain parameters that are strongly connected to the structure of the particular storm. Convection over land is usually stronger and deeper than over the ocean and some convective systems, known as supercells, also develop tornadoes through processes that remain mostly unclear. The intensity forecast and monitoring of convective systems is one of the major challenges for meteorology because in situ measurements during extreme events are too sparse or unreliable and most ongoing satellite missions do not provide suitable time/space coverage.

  11. Internal Wave Generation by Turbulent Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoanet, D.; Le Bars, M.; Burns, K. J.; Vasil, G. M.; Quataert, E.; Brown, B. P.; Oishi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent measurements suggest that a portion of the Earth's core may be stably stratified. If this is the case, then the Earth's core joins the many planetary and stellar objects which have a stably stratified region adjacent to a convective region. The stably stratified region admits internal gravity waves which can transport angular momentum, energy, and affect magnetic field generation. We describe experiments & simulations of convective excitation of internal waves in water, exploiting its density maximum at 4C. The simulations show that waves are excited within the bulk of the convection zone, opposed to at the interface between the convective and stably stratified regions. We will also present 3D simulations using a compressible fluid. These simulations provide greater freedom in choosing the thermal equilibrium of the system, and are run at higher Rayleigh number.

  12. Layer Formation in Sedimentary Fingering Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Reali, J F; Alsinan, A; Meiburg, E

    2016-01-01

    When particles settle through a stable temperature or salinity gradient they can drive an instability known as sedimentary fingering convection. This phenomenon is thought to occur beneath sediment-rich river plumes in lakes and oceans, in the context of marine snow where decaying organic materials serve as the suspended particles, or in the atmosphere in the presence of aerosols or volcanic ash. Laboratory experiments of Houk and Green (1973) and Green (1987) have shown sedimentary fingering convection to be similar to the more commonly known thermohaline fingering convection in many ways. Here, we study the phenomenon using 3D direct numerical simulations. We find evidence for layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection in regions of parameter space where it does not occur for non-sedimentary systems. This is due to two complementary effects. Sedimentation affects the turbulent fluxes and broadens the region of parameter space unstable to the $\\gamma$-instability (Radko 2003) to include systems at l...

  13. Fingering Convection in Red Giants Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Wachlin, F C; Althaus, L G

    2014-01-01

    Fingering (thermohaline) convection has been invoked for several years as a possible extra-mixing which could occur in Red Giant stars due to the modification of the chemical composition induced by nuclear reactions in the hydrogen burning zone. Recent studies show however that this mixing is not sufficient to account for the needed surface abundances. A new prescription for fingering convection, based on 3D numerical simulations has recently been proposed (BGS). The resulting mixing coefficient is larger than the ones previously given in the literature. We compute models using this new coefficient and compare them to previous studies. We use the LPCODE stellar evolution code with the GNA generalized version of the mixing length theory to compute Red Giant models and we introduce fingering convection using the BGS prescription. The results show that, although the fingering zone now reaches the outer dynamical convective zone, the efficiency of the mixing is not enough to account for the observations. The fing...

  14. An Observational Investigation of Penetrative Convection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Lenschow, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Data taken during the Air Mass Transformation Experiment (AMTEX) by the NCAR Electra aircraft have proven useful for investigating the structure of thermals penetrating into the turbulent inversion layer which caps the convective mixed layer. Variances, covariances, spectra and cospectra...

  15. Destabilization of free convection by weak rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfgat, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This study offers an explanation of a recently observed effect of destabilization of free convective flows by weak rotation. After studying several models where flows are driven by a simultaneous action of convection and rotation, it is concluded that the destabilization is observed in the cases where centrifugal force acts against main convective circulation. At relatively low Prandtl numbers this counter action can split the main vortex into two counter rotating vortices, where the interaction leads to instability. At larger Prandtl numbers, the counter action of the centrifugal force steepens an unstable thermal stratification, which triggers Rayleigh-B\\'enard instability mechanism. Both cases can be enhanced by advection of azimuthal velocity disturbances towards the axis, where they grow and excite perturbations of the radial velocity. The effect was studied considering a combined convective/rotating flow in a cylinder with a rotating lid and a parabolic temperature profile at the sidewall. Next, explana...

  16. Sensitivity of PBL and Cumulus schemes for Thunderstorm prediction over an Indian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Charan Mohanty, Uma; Kumar, Krishan

    2015-04-01

    The cloud processes play an important role in all forms of precipitation. Its proper representation is one of the challenging tasks in mesoscale numerical simulation. Studies have revealed that mesoscale feature require proper initialization which may likely to improve the convective system rainfall forecasts. Understanding the precipitation process, model initial condition accuracy and resolved/sub grid-scale precipitation processes representation, are the important areas which needed to improve in order to represent the mesoscale features properly. Various attempts have been done in order to improve the model performance through grid resolution, physical parameterizations, etc. But it is the physical parameterizations which provide a convective atmosphere for the development and intensification of convective events. Further, physical parameterizations consist of cumulus convection, surface fluxes of heat, moisture, momentum, and vertical mixing in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). How PBL and Cumulus schemes capture the evolution of thunderstorm have been analysed by taking thunderstorm cases occurred over Kolkata, India in the year 2011. PBL and cumulus schemes were customized for WSM-6 microphysics because WSM series has been widely used in operational forecast. Results have shown that KF (PBL scheme) and WSM-6 (Cumulus Scheme) have reproduced the evolution of surface variable such as CAPE, temperature and rainfall very much like observation. Further, KF and WSM-6 scheme also provided the increased moisture availability in the lower atmosphere which was taken to higher level by strong vertical velocities providing a platform to initiate a thunderstorm much better. Overestimation of rain in WSM-6 occurs primarily because of occurrence of melting and freezing process within a deeper layer in WSM-6 scheme. These Schemes have reproduced the spatial pattern and peak rainfall coverage closer to TRMM observation. It is the the combination of WSM-6, and KF schemes

  17. Eye Formation in Rotating Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Oruba, L; Dormy, E

    2016-01-01

    We consider rotating convection in a shallow, cylindrical domain. We examine the conditions under which the resulting vortex develops an eye at its core; that is, a region where the poloidal flow reverses and the angular momentum is low. For simplicity, we restrict ourselves to steady, axisymmetric flows in a Boussinesq fluid. Our numerical experiments show that, in such systems, an eye forms as a passive response to the development of a so-called eyewall, a conical annulus of intense, negative azimuthal vorticity that can form near the axis and separates the eye from the primary vortex. We also observe that the vorticity in the eyewall comes from the lower boundary layer, and relies on the fact the poloidal flow strips negative vorticity out of the boundary layer and carries it up into the fluid above as it turns upward near the axis. This process is effective only if the Reynolds number is sufficiently high for the advection of vorticity to dominate over diffusion. Finally we observe that, in the vicinity o...

  18. Eye formation in rotating convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruba, L.; Davidson, P. A.; Dormy, E.

    2017-02-01

    We consider rotating convection in a shallow, cylindrical domain. We examine the conditions under which the resulting vortex develops an eye at its core; that is, a region where the poloidal flow reverses and the angular momentum is low. For simplicity, we restrict ourselves to steady, axisymmetric flows in a Boussinesq fluid. Our numerical experiments show that, in such systems, an eye forms as a passive response to the development of a so-called eyewall, a conical annulus of intense, negative azimuthal vorticity that can form near the axis and separates the eye from the primary vortex. We also observe that the vorticity in the eyewall comes from the lower boundary layer, and relies on the fact the poloidal flow strips negative vorticity out of the boundary layer and carries it up into the fluid above as it turns upward near the axis. This process is effective only if the Reynolds number is sufficiently high for the advection of vorticity to dominate over diffusion. Finally we observe that, in the vicinity of the eye and the eyewall, the buoyancy and Coriolis forces are negligible, and so although these forces are crucial to driving and shaping the primary vortex, they play no direct role in eye formation in a Boussinesq fluid.

  19. Convective drying of sludge cake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo; Peng, Xiaofeng; Xue, Yuan; Lee, Duujong; Chu, Chingping

    2002-08-01

    This paper presented an experimental study on convective drying of waste water sludge collected from Beijing GaoBeiDian Sewage Treatment Plant, particularly on the correlation between the observed shrinkage dynamics of sludge cake and the drying curve. During the initial stage of drying the process resembles to that of a particulate bed, in which moisture diffuses and evaporates at the upper surface. Conventional drying theory assuming a diffusion-evaporating front interprets this period of drying. Consequently, owing to the very large shrinkage ratio of the dried cake, cracks emerges and propagates on and within the cake body, whence inducing evaporating channel that facilitates the water removal. This occurrence compensates the reduction of surface area for evaporation, whence extending the constant-rate period during the test. Afterwards, the cracks meet with each other and form isolated cake piles, while the subsequent drying occur mainly within these piles and the conventional theory fails. The transition between the drying on a plain cake layer and that on the isolated piles demonstrates the need to adopt distinct descriptions on these two regimes of drying for the sludge cake.

  20. Convection in a vertical channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisserand, J-C; Creyssels, M; Gibert, M; Castaing, B; Chilla, F, E-mail: Francesca.Chilla@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, ENS Lyon, UMR 5672 CNRS, 46 Allee d' Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 7 (France)

    2010-07-15

    The flow generated by heat convection in a long, vertical channel is studied by means of particle imagery velocimetry techniques, with the help of the thermal measurements from a previous paper (Gibert et al 2009 Phys. Fluids 21 035109). We analyse the mean velocity profiles and the Reynolds stresses, and compare the present results with the previous ones obtained in a larger cell and at a larger Reynolds number. We calculate the horizontal temperature profile and the related horizontal heat flux. The pertinence of effective turbulent diffusivity and viscosity is confirmed by the low value of the associated mixing length. We study the one-point and two-point statistics of both velocity components. We show how the concept of turbulent viscosity explains the relations between the local probability density functions (pdf) of fluctuations for temperature, vertical and horizontal velocity components. Despite the low Reynolds number values explored, some conclusions can be drawn about the small scale velocity differences and the related energy cascade.

  1. Convection in horizontally shaken granular material

    OpenAIRE

    Saluena, Clara; Poeschel, Thorsten

    1998-01-01

    In horizontally shaken granular material different types of pattern formation have been reported. We want to deal with the convection instability which has been observed in experiments and which recently has been investigated numerically. Using two dimensional molecular dynamics we show that the convection pattern depends crucial on the inelastic properties of the material. The concept of restitution coefficient provides arguments for the change of the behaviour with variing inelasticity.

  2. Uncertainties in stellar evolution models: convective overshoot

    CERN Document Server

    Bressan, Alessandro; Marigo, Paola; Rosenfield, Philip; Tang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the great effort made in the last decades to improve our understanding of stellar evolution, significant uncertainties remain due to our poor knowledge of some complex physical processes that require an empirical calibration, such as the efficiency of the interior mixing related to convective overshoot. Here we review the impact of convective overshoot on the evolution of stars during the main Hydrogen and Helium burning phases.

  3. Uncertainties in Stellar Evolution Models: Convective Overshoot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Alessandro; Girardi, Léo; Marigo, Paola; Rosenfield, Philip; Tang, Jing

    In spite of the great effort made in the last decades to improve our understanding of stellar evolution, significant uncertainties remain due to our poor knowledge of some complex physical processes that require an empirical calibration, such as the efficiency of the interior mixing related to convective overshoot. Here we review the impact of convective overshoot on the evolution of stars during the main Hydrogen and Helium burning phases.

  4. Convective Heat Transfer for Ship Propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    RD-A124 Wi CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER FOR SHIP PROPULSION (U) ARIZONA 112 UNIV TUCSON ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION PARK ET AL. 01 APR 82 1248-9 N814...395 CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER FOR SHIP PROPULSION Prepared for Office of Naval Research Code 431 Arlington, Virginia Prepared by J. S. Park, M. F...FOR SHIP PROPULSION By J. S. Park, M. F. Taylor and D. M. McEligot Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Department University of Arizona Tucson

  5. Modeling turbulent stellar convection zones: Sub-grid scales effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugarek, A.; Beaudoin, P.; Brun, A. S.; Charbonneau, P.; Mathis, S.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2016-10-01

    The impressive development of global numerical simulations of turbulent stellar interiors unveiled a variety of possible differential rotation (solar or anti-solar), meridional circulation (single or multi-cellular), and dynamo states (stable large scale toroidal field or periodically reversing magnetic fields). Various numerical schemes, based on the so-called anelastic set of equations, were used to obtain these results. It appears today mandatory to assess their robustness with respect to the details of the numerics, and in particular to the treatment of turbulent sub-grid scales. We report on an ongoing comparison between two global models, the ASH and EULAG codes. In EULAG the sub-grid scales are treated implicitly by the numerical scheme, while in ASH their effect is generally modeled by using enhanced dissipation coefficients. We characterize the sub-grid scales effect in a turbulent convection simulation with EULAG. We assess their effect at each resolved scale with a detailed energy budget. We derive equivalent eddy-diffusion coefficients and use the derived diffusivities in twin ASH numerical simulations. We find a good agreement between the large-scale flows developing in the two codes in the hydrodynamic regime, which encourages further investigation in the magnetohydrodynamic regime for various dynamo solutions.

  6. Seismic Sounding of Convection in the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2015-01-01

    Our Sun, primarily composed of ionized hydrogen and helium, has a surface temperature of 5777~K and a radius $R_\\odot \\approx 696,000$ km. In the outer $R_\\odot/3$, energy transport is accomplished primarily by convection. Using typical convective velocities $u\\sim100\\,\\rm{m\\,s^{-1}}$ and kinematic viscosities of order $10^{-4}$ m$^{2}$s$^{-1}$, we obtain a Reynolds number $Re \\sim 10^{14}$. Convection is thus turbulent, causing a vast range of scales to be excited. The Prandtl number, $Pr$, of the convecting fluid is very low, of order $10^{-7}$\\,--\\,$10^{-4}$, so that the Rayleigh number ($\\sim Re^2 Pr$) is on the order of $10^{21}\\,-\\,10^{24}$. Solar convection thus lies in extraordinary regime of dynamical parameters, highly untypical of fluid flows on Earth. Convective processes in the Sun drive global fluid circulations and magnetic fields, which in turn affect its visible outer layers ("solar activity") and, more broadly, the heliosphere ("space weather"). The precise determination of the depth of sola...

  7. Convective overshoot at stiffly stable interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin; Oishi, Jeffrey; Lecoanet, Daniel; Burns, Keaton; Vasil, Geoffrey

    2016-11-01

    Convective overshoot is an important non-local mixing and transport process in stars, extending the influence of turbulent stellar convection beyond the unstable portions of the atmosphere. In the Sun, overshoot into the tachocline at the base of the convection zone has been ascribed a major role in the storage and organization of the global-scale magnetic fields within the solar dynamo. In massive stars, overshooting convection plays an important role in setting the lifespan of the star by mixing fuel into the nuclear burning core. Here we narrowly consider the properties of convective overshoot across very stiff interfaces within fully compressible dynamics across convection zones with significant stratification. We conduct these studies using the Dedalus pseudospectral framework. We extend prior studies of overshoot substantially and find that the depth of overshoot in DNS simulations of a typical plume is well-predicted by a simple buoyancy equilibration model. The implications of this model, extended into the stellar regime, are that very little overshoot should occur under solar conditions. This would seem to sharply limit the role of the tachocline within the global solar dynamo.

  8. Improved Ternary Subdivision Interpolation Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huawei; QIN Kaihuai

    2005-01-01

    An improved ternary subdivision interpolation scheme was developed for computer graphics applications that can manipulate open control polygons unlike the previous ternary scheme, with the resulting curve proved to be still C2-continuous. Parameterizations of the limit curve near the two endpoints are given with expressions for the boundary derivatives. The split joint problem is handled with the interpolating ternary subdivision scheme. The improved scheme can be used for modeling interpolation curves in computer aided geometric design systems, and provides a method for joining two limit curves of interpolating ternary subdivisions.

  9. Formal Verification of NTRUEncrypt Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Moghissi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we explore a mechanized verification of the NTRUEncrypt scheme, with the formal proof system Isabelle/HOL. More precisely, the functional correctness of this algorithm, in its reduced form, is formally verified with computer support. We show that this scheme is correct what is a necessary condition for the usefulness of any cryptographic encryption scheme. Besides, we present a convenient and application specific formalization of the NTRUEncrypt scheme in the Isabelle/HOL system that can be used in further study around the functional and security analysis of NTRUEncrypt family.

  10. Final Report on Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR Community Climate System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X. Wu, G. J. Zhang

    2008-04-23

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations. • The project resulted in nine peer-reviewed publications and numerous scientific presentations that directly address the CCPP’s scientific objective of improving climate models. • We developed a package of improved convection parameterization that includes improved closure, trigger condition for convection, and comprehensive treatment of convective momentum transport. • We implemented the new convection parameterization package into several versions of the NCAR models (both coupled and uncoupled). This has led to 1) Improved simulation of seasonal migration of ITCZ; 2) Improved shortwave cloud radiative forcing response to El Niño in CAM3; 3) Improved MJO simulation in both uncoupled and coupled model; and 4) Improved simulation of ENSO in coupled model. • Using the dynamic core of CCM3, we isolated the dynamic effects of convective momentum transport. • We implemented mosaic treatment of subgrid-scale cloud-radiation interaction in CCM3.

  11. Archimedean Proof of the Physical Impossibility of Earth Mantle Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2010-01-01

    Eight decades ago, Arthur Holmes introducted the idea of mantle convection as a mechanism for continental drift. Five decades ago, continental drift was modified to become plate tectonics theory, which included mantle convection as an absolutely critical component. Using the submarine design and operation concept of "neutral buoyancy", which follows from Archimedes' discoveries, the concept of mantle convection is proven to be incorrect, concomitantly refuting plate tectonics, refuting all mantle convection models, and refuting all models that depend upon mantle convection.

  12. AUTISTIC CHILDREN PROTECTION SCHEME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan LUKIC

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The present article sets forth the theoretical grounds which make the basis for the organizational scheme of the autistic persons social protection. This protection consists of the below listed forms of work:· Health service with the role of an early detection and participation in the creation of rehabilitation programs;· Social protection with its programs of work from the diagnostics where the defectologist makes a team together with the physician and the psychologists to the systems of rehabilitation institutions where the defectologist’s is the main responsibility.The present article underlines two facts, namely:· that an autistic person requires to be followed and every spare moment used to promote and advance the activities the doer commenced himself instead of having him carry out the programs which are beyond his internal motivations and which he finds emotionally inaccessible;· that and form of work organization with autistic persons must subordinate its administrative part to the basic professional requirements this kind of disorder (handicap sets in front of each professional.

  13. Natural Convection Heat Transfer in Concentric Horizontal Annuli Containing a Saturated Porous Medi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed F. Alfahaid, R.Y. Sakr

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural convection in horizontal annular porous media has become a subject receiving increasing attention due to its practical importance in the problem of insulators, such as ducting system in high temperature gas-cooled reactors, heating systems, thermal energy storage systems, under ground cable systems, etc. This paper presents a numerical study for steady state thermal convection in a fully saturated porous media bounded by two horizontal concentric cylinders, the cylinders are impermeable to fluid motion and maintained at different, uniform temperatures.  The solution scheme is based on two-dimensional model, which is governed by Darcy-Oberbeck-Boussinesq equations. The finite element method using Galerkin technique is developed and employed to solve the present problem. A numerical simulation is carried out to examine the parametric effects of Rayleigh number and radius ratio on the role played by natural convection heat transfer in the porous annuli. The numerical results obtained from the present model were compared with the available published results and good agreement is observed. The average Nusselt number at the heating surface of the inner cylinder is correlated to Rayleigh number and radius ratio.Keywords: Natural convection, numerical investigation, saturated porous media, finite element method, concentric horizontal annuli.

  14. Radiation effects on bifurcation and dual solutions in transient natural convection in a horizontal annulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Kang; Yi, Hong-Liang, E-mail: yihongliang@hit.edu.cn; Tan, He-Ping, E-mail: tanheping@hit.edu.cn [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Transitions and bifurcations of transient natural convection in a horizontal annulus with radiatively participating medium are numerically investigated using the coupled lattice Boltzmann and direct collocation meshless (LB-DCM) method. As a hybrid approach based on a common multi-scale Boltzmann-type model, the LB-DCM scheme is easy to implement and has an excellent flexibility in dealing with the irregular geometries. Separate particle distribution functions in the LBM are used to calculate the density field, the velocity field and the thermal field. In the radiatively participating medium, the contribution of thermal radiation to natural convection must be taken into account, and it is considered as a radiative term in the energy equation that is solved by the meshless method with moving least-squares (MLS) approximation. The occurrence of various instabilities and bifurcative phenomena is analyzed for different Rayleigh number Ra and Prandtl number Pr with and without radiation. Then, bifurcation diagrams and dual solutions are presented for relevant radiative parameters, such as convection-radiation parameter Rc and optical thickness τ. Numerical results show that the presence of volumetric radiation changes the static temperature gradient of the fluid, and generally results in an increase in the flow critical value. Besides, the existence and development of dual solutions of transient convection in the presence of radiation are greatly affected by radiative parameters. Finally, the advantage of LB-DCM combination is discussed, and the potential benefits of applying the LB-DCM method to multi-field coupling problems are demonstrated.

  15. An assessment of semi-discrete central schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christon, Mark Allen; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Ketcheson, David Isaac

    2003-09-01

    High-resolution finite volume methods for solving systems of conservation laws have been widely embraced in research areas ranging from astrophysics to geophysics and aero-thermodynamics. These methods are typically at least second-order accurate in space and time, deliver non-oscillatory solutions in the presence of near discontinuities, e.g., shocks, and introduce minimal dispersive and diffusive effects. High-resolution methods promise to provide greatly enhanced solution methods for Sandia's mainstream shock hydrodynamics and compressible flow applications, and they admit the possibility of a generalized framework for treating multi-physics problems such as the coupled hydrodynamics, electro-magnetics and radiative transport found in Z pinch physics. In this work, we describe initial efforts to develop a generalized 'black-box' conservation law framework based on modern high-resolution methods and implemented in an object-oriented software framework. The framework is based on the solution of systems of general non-linear hyperbolic conservation laws using Godunov-type central schemes. In our initial efforts, we have focused on central or central-upwind schemes that can be implemented with only a knowledge of the physical flux function and the minimal/maximal eigenvalues of the Jacobian of the flux functions, i.e., they do not rely on extensive Riemann decompositions. Initial experimentation with high-resolution central schemes suggests that contact discontinuities with the concomitant linearly degenerate eigenvalues of the flux Jacobian do not pose algorithmic difficulties. However, central schemes can produce significant smearing of contact discontinuities and excessive dissipation for rotational flows. Comparisons between 'black-box' central schemes and the piecewise parabolic method (PPM), which relies heavily on a Riemann decomposition, shows that roughly equivalent accuracy can be achieved for the same computational cost with both

  16. Entropy Production in Convective Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersing, Nele; Wellmann, Florian; Niederau, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Exploring hydrothermal reservoirs requires reliable estimates of subsurface temperatures to delineate favorable locations of boreholes. It is therefore of fundamental and practical importance to understand the thermodynamic behavior of the system in order to predict its performance with numerical studies. To this end, the thermodynamic measure of entropy production is considered as a useful abstraction tool to characterize the convective state of a system since it accounts for dissipative heat processes and gives insight into the system's average behavior in a statistical sense. Solving the underlying conservation principles of a convective hydrothermal system is sensitive to initial conditions and boundary conditions which in turn are prone to uncertain knowledge in subsurface parameters. There exist multiple numerical solutions to the mathematical description of a convective system and the prediction becomes even more challenging as the vigor of convection increases. Thus, the variety of possible modes contained in such highly non-linear problems needs to be quantified. A synthetic study is carried out to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in a finite porous layer heated from below. Various two-dimensional models are created such that their corresponding Rayleigh numbers lie in a range from the sub-critical linear to the supercritical non-linear regime, that is purely conductive to convection-dominated systems. Entropy production is found to describe the transient evolution of convective processes fairly well and can be used to identify thermodynamic equilibrium. Additionally, varying the aspect ratio for each Rayleigh number shows that the variety of realized convection modes increases with both larger aspect ratio and higher Rayleigh number. This phenomenon is also reflected by an enlarged spread of entropy production for the realized modes. Consequently, the Rayleigh number can be correlated to the magnitude of entropy production. In cases of moderate

  17. An Unsteady Preconditioning Scheme Based on Convective-Upwind Split-Pressure (CUSP) Artificial Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-07

    a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. Utah State University 1415 Old Main Hill - Room 64 Logan ...Folkner,† Aaron Katz,‡ Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Utah State University, Logan , UT 84322 Venke Sankaran§ Rocket Propulsion

  18. Lattice Boltzmann schemes for convection-diffusion phenomena : application to packages of agricultural products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Packaging is crucial for the control of quality of fresh agricultural products. How to optimise the packaging design for a particular product and distribution chain, is still not fully understood. Various empirical studies have shown that existing packaging designs can still be improved significantl

  19. A Fast Stble Marching Scheme for Calculating Mixed Convection in a Vertical Rotating Annulus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-MinZhang; Zeng-YuanGuo

    1993-01-01

    An iterative simultanous solution method is developed to efficiently solve the Newton-Raphson linear equation set for velocity in three dimensions,pressure and temperature,The proposed method is demonstrated for several cases of the thermal drive in a vertical rotating annulus,and is shown to be insensitive to dimensionless time step,requiring significantly less computational effort to converge to the desired accuracy than SIMPLEC,even for low Prandtl number fluid flows.

  20. Impacts of convection schemes on simulating tropical-temperate troughs over southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tozuka, T

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available region during El Nino (La Nina) years. The SOM analysis reveals that nodes associated with TTTs in the southern (northern) part of the domain are observed less (more) often during El Nino years, while nodes associated with TTTs occur more frequently...

  1. Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR’s Community Climate System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaoqing Wu

    2008-07-31

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations.

  2. Chaotic communication scheme with multiplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobreshov, A. M.; Karavaev, A. A.

    2007-05-01

    A new scheme of data transmission with nonlinear admixing is described, in which the two mutually inverse operations (multiplication and division) ensure multiplicative mixing of the informative and chaotic signals that provides a potentially higher degree of security. A special feature of the proposed scheme is the absence of limitations (related to the division by zero) imposed on the types of informative signals.

  3. Homographic scheme for Riccati equation

    CERN Document Server

    Dubois, François

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a numerical scheme for the resolution of matrix Riccati equation, usualy used in control problems. The scheme is unconditionnaly stable and the solution is definite positive at each time step of the resolution. We prove the convergence in the scalar case and present several numerical experiments for classical test cases.

  4. Differential operators and automorphism schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The ring of global differential operators of a variety is in closed and deep relation with its automorphism scheme.This relation can be applied to the study of homogeneous schemes,giving some criteria of homogeneity,a generalization of Serre-Lang theorem,and some consequences about abelian varieties.

  5. Deciphering Core Collapse Supernovae Is Convection the Key?; 1, prompt convection

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzacappa, A; Bruenn, S W; Blondin, J M; Guidry, M W; Strayer, M R; Umar, A S

    1996-01-01

    We couple two-dimensional hydrodynamics to detailed one-dimensional multigroup flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport to investigate prompt convection in core collapse supernovae. Our initial conditions, time-dependent boundary conditions, and neutrino distributions for computing neutrino heating, cooling, and deleptonization rates are obtained from one-dimensional simulations that implement multigroup flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport and one-dimensional hydrodynamics. The development and evolution of prompt convection and its ramifications for the shock dynamics are investigated for both 15 and 25 solar mass models, representative of the two classes of stars with compact and extended iron cores, respectively. In the absence of neutrino transport, prompt convection develops and dissipates on a time scale $\\sim$15 ms for both models. Prompt convection seeds convection behind the shock, which causes distortions in the shock's sphericity, but on the average, the shock radius is not boosted significan...

  6. Interaction of Magnetic Field and Nonlinear Convection in the Stagnation Point Flow over a Shrinking Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The steady two-dimensional boundary layer stagnation point flow due to a shrinking sheet is analyzed. The combined effects of magnetic field and nonlinear convection are taken into account. The governing equations for the flow are modeled and then simplified using the similarity transformation and boundary layer approach. The numerical solution of the reduced equations is obtained by the second-order finite difference scheme also known as Keller box method. The influence of the pertinent parameters of the problem on velocity and temperature profiles, skin friction, and sheet temperature gradient are presented through the graphs and tables and discussed. The magnetic field and nonlinear convection parameters significantly enhance the solution range.

  7. A new hybrid transfinite element computational methodology for applicability to conduction/convection/radiation heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes new and recent advances in the development of a hybrid transfinite element computational methodology for applicability to conduction/convection/radiation heat transfer problems. The transfinite element methodology, while retaining the modeling versatility of contemporary finite element formulations, is based on application of transform techniques in conjunction with classical Galerkin schemes and is a hybrid approach. The purpose of this paper is to provide a viable hybrid computational methodology for applicability to general transient thermal analysis. Highlights and features of the methodology are described and developed via generalized formulations and applications to several test problems. The proposed transfinite element methodology successfully provides a viable computational approach and numerical test problems validate the proposed developments for conduction/convection/radiation thermal analysis.

  8. Atmospheric circulation of tidally locked exoplanets II: dual-band radiative transfer and convective adjustment

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin; Phillipps, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Improving upon our purely dynamical work, we present three-dimensional simulations of the atmospheric circulation on Earth-like (exo)planets and hot Jupiters using the GFDL-Princeton Flexible Modeling System (FMS). As the first steps away from the purely dynamical benchmarks of Heng, Menou & Phillipps (2011), we add dual-band radiative transfer and dry convective adjustment schemes to our computational setup. Our treatment of radiative transfer assumes stellar irradiation to peak at a wavelength shorter than and distinct from that at which the exoplanet re-emits radiation ("shortwave" versus "longwave"), and also uses a two-stream approximation. Convection is mimicked by adjusting unstable lapse rates to the dry adiabat. The bottom of the atmosphere is bounded by an uniform slab with a finite thermal inertia. For our hot Jupiter models, we include an analytical formalism for calculating temperature-pressure profiles, in radiative equilibrium, which accounts for the effect of collision-induced absorption v...

  9. Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer Model for Convective Drying of Building Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Ashwani; Chandramohan, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model of simultaneous heat and moisture transfer is developed for convective drying of building material. A rectangular brick is considered for sample object. Finite-difference method with semi-implicit scheme is used for solving the transient governing heat and mass transfer equation. Convective boundary condition is used, as the product is exposed in hot air. The heat and mass transfer equations are coupled through diffusion coefficient which is assumed as the function of temperature of the product. Set of algebraic equations are generated through space and time discretization. The discretized algebraic equations are solved by Gauss-Siedel method via iteration. Grid and time independent studies are performed for finding the optimum number of nodal points and time steps respectively. A MATLAB computer code is developed to solve the heat and mass transfer equations simultaneously. Transient heat and mass transfer simulations are performed to find the temperature and moisture distribution inside the brick.

  10. Algebraically explicit analytical solutions of two-buoyancy natural convection in porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Ruixian; ZHANG Na; LIU Weiwei

    2003-01-01

    Analytical solutions of governing equations of various physical phenomena have their own irreplaceable theoretical meaning. In addition, they can also be the benchmark solutions to verify the outcomes and codes of numerical solution, and to develop various numerical methods such as their differencing schemes and grid generation skills as well. In order to promote the development of the discipline of natural convection, three simple algebraically explicit analytical solution sets are derived for a non-linear simultaneous partial differential equation set with five dependent unknown variables, which represents the natural convection in porous media with both temperature and concentration gradients. An extraordinary method separating variables with addition is applied in this paper to deduce solutions.

  11. A new hybrid transfinite element computational methodology for applicability to conduction/convection/radiation heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes new and recent advances in the development of a hybrid transfinite element computational methodology for applicability to conduction/convection/radiation heat transfer problems. The transfinite element methodology, while retaining the modeling versatility of contemporary finite element formulations, is based on application of transform techniques in conjunction with classical Galerkin schemes and is a hybrid approach. The purpose of this paper is to provide a viable hybrid computational methodology for applicability to general transient thermal analysis. Highlights and features of the methodology are described and developed via generalized formulations and applications to several test problems. The proposed transfinite element methodology successfully provides a viable computational approach and numerical test problems validate the proposed developments for conduction/convection/radiation thermal analysis.

  12. Unstable phenomena of low speed compressible natural convection with open boundaries by multi-GPU implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Hsiang; Fu, Wu-Shung; Tsubokura, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Unstable phenomena of low speed compressible natural convection are investigated numerically. Geometry contains parallel square plates or single heated plate with open boundaries is taken into consideration. Numerical methods of the Roe scheme, preconditioning and dual time stepping matching the DP-LUR method are used for low speed compressible flow. The absorbing boundary condition and modified LODI method is adopted to solve open boundary problems. High performance parallel computation is achieved by multi-GPU implementation with CUDA platform. The effects of natural convection by isothermal plates facing upwards in air is then carried out by the methods mentioned above Unstable behaviors appeared upon certain Rayleigh number with characteristic length respect to the width of plates or height between plates.

  13. Group Theory Analysis of Free Convective Boundary—Layer Behavior at a Stretching Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JunmeiShi; XueziXu; 等

    1995-01-01

    In the present study,free convection and heat transfer behavior of electrically conducting fluid in the boundary layer over a vertical continuously stretching surface is investigated.The effects of free convection,magnetic field,suction/blowing at the surface and the stretching speed of the surface on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are considered.By applying one-parametric group theory to analysis of the problem,a similarity solution is found.The governing equations of continuity,momentum and energy are solved numerically by a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme.The numerical results.which are obtained for the flow and heat transfer characteristics,reveal the influences of the parameters.

  14. Magnetite micropolar nanofluid non-aligned MHD flow with mixed convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Rabil; Mehmood, R.; Akbar, N. S.

    2017-06-01

    The magnetite micropolar nanofluid ( Fe3O4 /water) oblique flow in the presence of mixed convection and magnetic field is considered in the present investigation. Magnetite nanoparticles are added to water in order to examine the temperature and velocity characteristics of the flow. Appropriate transformations are employed to obtain the governing equations. Numerical solutions are attained by the Range-Kutta-Fehlberg integration scheme with the shooting method. Characteristics of flow velocity profiles, temperature distribution, micro-rotation, shear stress and heat flux are remarkably influenced by magnetic parameter, magnetite nanoparticles volume fraction and mixed convection parameter. The obtained results indicate that the shear stress at the wall decreases but the local heat flux increases with increase in the nanoparticles volume fraction. Moreover, an increase in the magnetic field strength consequently enhances the shear stress at the surface but decreases the local heat transfer rate at the surface.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of different parameterization schemes using RegCM4.3 for the Carpathian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieczka, Ildikó; Pongrácz, Rita; Szabóné André, Karolina; Kelemen, Fanni Dóra; Bartholy, Judit

    2016-10-01

    In order to quantify the impact of the use of different parameterization schemes on regional climate model outputs, hindcast experiments have been completed applying the Regional Climate Model version 4.3 (RegCM4.3) for the Carpathian region and its surroundings at 10-km horizontal resolution with three different cumulus convection schemes. Besides, the sensitivity of outputs for subgrid-scale processes is also studied by activating the subgrid Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) model within other RegCM experiments. Among the analyzed factors, RegCM is most sensitive to the applied convection scheme. The impact of closure assumption related to the used convective parameterization is secondary, while the use of subgridding has less influence on the outputs. RegCM4.3 results show improved performance over our previous model simulations but still have larger amplitude for annual precipitation cycle than the measurement-based reference data. Our validation results for temperature and precipitation suggest that for the selected region, the overall best performance is achieved when using the mixed Grell-Emanuel scheme together with Fritsch and Chappell closure.

  16. Convective Regimes in Crystallizing Basaltic Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Neufeld, J. A.; Holness, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Cooling through the chamber walls drives crystallisation in crustal magma chambers, resulting in a cumulate pile on the floor and mushy regions at the walls and roof. The liquid in many magma chambers, either the bulk magma or the interstitial liquid in the mushy regions, may convect, driven either thermally, due to cooling, or compositionally, due to fractional crystallization. We have constructed a regime diagram of the possible convective modes in a system containing a basal mushy layer. These modes depend on the large-scale buoyancy forcing characterised by a global Rayleigh number and the proportion of the chamber height constituting the basal mushy region. We have tested this regime diagram using an analogue experimental system composed of a fluid layer overlying a pile of almost neutrally buoyant inert particles. Convection in this system is driven thermally, simulating magma convection above and within a porous cumulate pile. We observe a range of possible convective regimes, enabling us to produce a regime diagram. In addition to modes characterised by convection of the bulk and interstitial fluid, we also observe a series of regimes where the crystal pile is mobilised by fluid motions. These regimes feature saltation and scouring of the crystal pile by convection in the bulk fluid at moderate Rayleigh numbers, and large crystal-rich fountains at high Rayleigh numbers. For even larger Rayleigh numbers the entire crystal pile is mobilised in what we call the snowglobe regime. The observed mobilisation regimes may be applicable to basaltic magma chambers. Plagioclase in basal cumulates crystallised from a dense magma may be a result of crystal mobilisation from a plagioclase-rich roof mush. Compositional convection within such a mush could result in disaggregation, enabling the buoyant plagioclase to be entrained in relatively dense descending liquid plumes and brought to the floor. The phenocryst load in porphyritic lavas is often interpreted as a

  17. Convective transport resistance in the vitreous humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkova, Anita; Sadhal, Satwindar; Ratanakijsuntorn, Komsan; Moats, Rex; Tang, Yang; Hughes, Patrick; Robinson, Michael; Lee, Susan

    2012-11-01

    It has been established by MRI visualization experiments that the convection of nanoparticles and large molecules with high rate of water flow in the vitreous humor will experience resistance, depending on the respective permeabilities of the injected solute. A set of experiments conducted with Gd-DTPA (Magnevist, Bayer AG, Leverkusen, Germany) and 30 nm gadolinium-based particles (Gado CELLTrackTM, Biopal, Worcester, MA) as MRI contrast agents showed that the degree of convective transport in this Darcy-type porous medium varies between the two solutes. These experiments consisted of injecting a mixture of the two (a 30 μl solution of 2% Magnevist and 1% nanoparticles) at the middle of the vitreous of an ex vivo whole bovine eye and subjecting the vitreous to water flow rate of 100 μl/min. The water (0.9% saline solution) was injected at the top of the eye, and was allowed to drain through small slits cut at the bottom of the eyeball. After 50 minutes of pumping, MRI images showed that the water flow carried the Gd-DTPA farther than the nanoparticles, even though the two solutes, being mixed, were subjected to the same convective flow conditions. We find that the convected solute lags the water flow, depending on the solute permeability. The usual convection term needs to be adjusted to allow for the filtration effect on the larger particles in the form (1- σ) u . ∇ c with important implications for the modeling of such systems.

  18. Properties of convective motions in facular regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostik, R.; Khomenko, E. V.

    2012-09-01

    Aims: We study the properties of solar granulation in a facular region from the photosphere up to the lower chromosphere. Our aim is to investigate the dependence of granular structure on magnetic field strength. Methods: We used observations obtained at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife) using two different instruments: the Triple Etalon SOlar Spectrometer (TESOS) to measure velocity and intensity variations along the photosphere in the Ba ii 4554 Å line; and, simultaneously, the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP-II) to the measure Stokes parameters and the magnetic field strength at the lower photosphere in the Fe i 1.56 μm lines. Results: We find that the convective velocities of granules in the facular area decrease with magnetic field while the convective velocities of intergranular lanes increase with the field strength. Similar to the quiet areas, there is a contrast and velocity sign reversal taking place in the middle photosphere. The reversal heights depend on the magnetic field strength and are, on average, about 100 km higher than in the quiet regions. The correlation between convective velocity and intensity decreases with magnetic field at the bottom photosphere, but increases in the upper photosphere. The contrast of intergranular lanes observed close to the disk center is almost independent of the magnetic field strength. Conclusions: The strong magnetic field of the facular area seems to stabilize the convection and to promote more effective energy transfer in the upper layers of the solar atmosphere, since the convective elements reach greater heights.

  19. Nowcasting of convective cells over Italian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Medaglia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is the individuation of convective cells over the Italian peninsula with the conjunction use of geostationary satellite data (METEOSAT, MSG satellite in the IR and WV channels and lightning data. We will use GCD (Global Convective Diagnostic algorithm developed at Aviation Weather Centre (AWC of NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. This algorithm is based on the idea that a deep convective cloud will not have any significant moisture above it. This technique works quite well at identifying active deep convection and can be applied to all the world's geostationary satellites. However it does not always agree with lightning sensors. Low topped convection with lightning will be missed. We will extend the capabilities of GCD using lightning data. The new product will be validate over different cases in the central Italy using the C-band polarimetric radar of ISAC-CNR (Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate-of the Italian National Research Council Rome.

  20. Scaling regimes in spherical shell rotating convection

    CERN Document Server

    Gastine, T; Aubert, J

    2016-01-01

    Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection in rotating spherical shells can be considered as a simplified analogue of many astrophysical and geophysical fluid flows. Here, we use three-dimensional direct numerical simulations to study this physical process. We construct a dataset of more than 200 numerical models that cover a broad parameter range with Ekman numbers spanning $3\\times 10^{-7} \\leq E \\leq 10^{-1}$, Rayleigh numbers within the range $10^3 < Ra < 2\\times 10^{10}$ and a Prandtl number unity. We investigate the scaling behaviours of both local (length scales, boundary layers) and global (Nusselt and Reynolds numbers) properties across various physical regimes from onset of rotating convection to weakly-rotating convection. Close to critical, the convective flow is dominated by a triple force balance between viscosity, Coriolis force and buoyancy. For larger supercriticalities, a subset of our numerical data approaches the asymptotic diffusivity-free scaling of rotating convection $Nu\\sim Ra^{3/2}E^{2}$ in ...

  1. Organised convection embedded in a large-scale flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Ann Kristin; Stevens, Bjorn; Hohenegger, Cathy

    2017-04-01

    In idealised simulations of radiative convective equilibrium, convection aggregates spontaneously from randomly distributed convective cells into organized mesoscale convection despite homogeneous boundary conditions. Although these simulations apply very idealised setups, the process of self-aggregation is thought to be relevant for the development of tropical convective systems. One feature that idealised simulations usually neglect is the occurrence of a large-scale background flow. In the tropics, organised convection is embedded in a large-scale circulation system, which advects convection in along-wind direction and alters near surface convergence in the convective areas. A large-scale flow also modifies the surface fluxes, which are expected to be enhanced upwind of the convective area if a large-scale flow is applied. Convective clusters that are embedded in a large-scale flow therefore experience an asymmetric component of the surface fluxes, which influences the development and the pathway of a convective cluster. In this study, we use numerical simulations with explicit convection and add a large-scale flow to the established setup of radiative convective equilibrium. We then analyse how aggregated convection evolves when being exposed to wind forcing. The simulations suggest that convective line structures are more prevalent if a large-scale flow is present and that convective clusters move considerably slower than advection by the large-scale flow would suggest. We also study the asymmetric component of convective aggregation due to enhanced surface fluxes, and discuss the pathway and speed of convective clusters as a function of the large-scale wind speed.

  2. The Occupational Pension Schemes Survey 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Levy; David Miller

    2008-01-01

    Presents findings on the number of schemes, their membership and contributions to schemes by employers and employeesThis article presents findings on the number of occupational pension schemes in 2006, their membership and contributions to schemes by employers and employees. It is based on the Occupational Pension Schemes Annual Report (2006 edition). The findings distinguish between public and private sector schemes and include breakdowns by scheme status (open, closed, frozen or winding up)...

  3. Tropical convection and climate sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ian Nobuo

    Surface temperature has become a popular measure of climate change, but it does not provide the most critical test of climate models. This thesis presents new methods to evaluate climate models based on processes determining the climate sensitivity to radiative forcing from atmospheric greenhouse gases. Cloud radiative feedbacks depend on temperature and relative humidity profiles in addition to surface temperature, through the dependence of cloud type on boundary layer buoyancy. Buoyancy provides a reference to which the onset of deep convection is invariant, and gives a compact description of sea surface temperature changes and cloud feedbacks suitable for diagnostics and as a basis for simplified climate models. This thesis also addresses uncertainties in climate sensitivity involving terrestrial ecosystem responses to global warming. Different diagnostics support different conclusions about atmospheric transport model errors that could imply either stronger or weaker northern terrestrial carbon sinks. Equilibrium boundary layer concepts were previously used in idealized tropical climate models, and are extended here to develop a diagnostic of boundary layer trace gas transport and mixing. Hypotheses linking surface temperature to climate and precipitation sensitivity were tested in this thesis using comprehensive and idealized climate model simulations, and observational datasets. The results do not support the thermostat hypothesis that predicts deep cloud cover will increase with radiative forcing and limit sea surface temperatures to the maximum present-day warm pool temperature. Warm pool temperatures increased along with or even faster than the tropical average over the past several decades, while diagnosed deep cloud cover has not significantly increased, in agreement with global warming simulations. Precipitation sensitivity also depends on more than surface temperature alone, including thermodynamic profiles and air-sea temperature differences. The

  4. Numerical Simulations of TRMM LBA, TOGA, COARE, GATE, ARM and PRESTORM Convective Systems: Sensitivity tests on Microphysical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W.-K.; Wang, Y.; Lang, S.; Ferrier, B.; Simpson, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model was utilized to examine the behavior and response of simulated deep tropical cloud systems that occurred over the west Pacific warm pool region, the Atlantic ocean and the central United States. The periods chosen for simulation were convectively active periods during TOGA-COARE (February 22 1993, December 11-17, 1992; December 19-28, February 9-13, 1993), GATE (September 4, 1974), LBA (January 26 and February 23, 1998), ARM (1997 IOP) and PRESTORM (June 11, 1985). We will examine differences in the microphysics for both warm rain and ice processes (evaporation /sublimation and condensation/ deposition), Q1 (Temperature), Q2 (Water vapor) and Q3 (momentum both U and V) budgets for these three convective events from different large-scale environments. The contribution of stratiform precipitation and its relationship to the vertical shear of the large-scale horizontal wind will also be examined. New improvements to the GCE model (i.e., microphysics: 4ICE two moments and 3ICE one moment; advection schemes) as well as their sensitivity to the model results will be discussed. Preliminary results indicated that various microphysical schemes could have a major impact on stratiform formation as well as the size of convective systems. However, they do not change the major characteristics of the convective systems, such as: arc shape, strong rotational circulation on both ends of system, heavy precipitation along the leading edge of systems.

  5. Schemes for Deterministic Polynomial Factoring

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanyos, Gábor; Saxena, Nitin

    2008-01-01

    In this work we relate the deterministic complexity of factoring polynomials (over finite fields) to certain combinatorial objects we call m-schemes. We extend the known conditional deterministic subexponential time polynomial factoring algorithm for finite fields to get an underlying m-scheme. We demonstrate how the properties of m-schemes relate to improvements in the deterministic complexity of factoring polynomials over finite fields assuming the generalized Riemann Hypothesis (GRH). In particular, we give the first deterministic polynomial time algorithm (assuming GRH) to find a nontrivial factor of a polynomial of prime degree n where (n-1) is a smooth number.

  6. Coordinated renewable energy support schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthorst, P.E.; Jensen, S.G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper illustrates the effect that can be observed when support schemes for renewable energy are regionalised. Two theoretical examples are used to explain interactive effects on, e.g., the price of power, conditions for conventional power producers, and changes in import and export of power...... RES-E support schemes already has a common liberalised power market. In this case the introduction of a common support scheme for renewable technologies will lead to more efficient sitings of renewable plants, improving economic and environmental performance of the total power system...

  7. Boundary layer control of rotating convection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Eric M; Stellmach, Stephan; Noir, Jerome; Hansen, Ulrich; Aurnou, Jonathan M

    2009-01-15

    Turbulent rotating convection controls many observed features of stars and planets, such as magnetic fields, atmospheric jets and emitted heat flux patterns. It has long been argued that the influence of rotation on turbulent convection dynamics is governed by the ratio of the relevant global-scale forces: the Coriolis force and the buoyancy force. Here, however, we present results from laboratory and numerical experiments which exhibit transitions between rotationally dominated and non-rotating behaviour that are not determined by this global force balance. Instead, the transition is controlled by the relative thicknesses of the thermal (non-rotating) and Ekman (rotating) boundary layers. We formulate a predictive description of the transition between the two regimes on the basis of the competition between these two boundary layers. This transition scaling theory unifies the disparate results of an extensive array of previous experiments, and is broadly applicable to natural convection systems.

  8. A new conceptual model of convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walcek, C. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Classical cumulus parameterizations assume that cumulus clouds are entraining plumes of hot air rising through the atmosphere. However, ample evidence shows that clouds cannot be simulated using this approach. Dr. Walcek suggests that cumulus clouds can be reasonably simulated by assuming that buoyant plumes detrain mass as they rise through the atmosphere. Walcek successfully simulates measurements of tropical convection using this detraining model of cumulus convection. Comparisons with measurements suggest that buoyant plumes encounter resistance to upward movement as they pass through dry layers in the atmosphere. This probably results from turbulent mixing and evaporation of cloud water, which generates negatively buoyant mixtures which detrain from the upward moving plume. This mass flux model of detraining plumes is considerably simpler than existing mass flux models, yet reproduces many of the measured effects associated with convective activity. 1 fig.

  9. Magnetic field generation by intermittent convection

    CERN Document Server

    Chertovskih, R; Chimanski, E V

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic field generation by convective flows in transition to weak turbulence is studied numerically. By fixing the Prandtl number at P=0.3 and varying the Rayleigh number (Ra) as a control parameter in three-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection of an electrically conducting fluid, a recently reported route to hyperchaos involving quasiperiodic regimes, crises and chaotic intermittent attractors is followed, and the critical magnetic Prandtl number ($P_m^c$) for dynamo action is determined as a function of Ra. A mechanism for the onset of on-off intermittency in the magnetic energy is described, the most beneficial convective regimes for dynamo action are identified, and how intermittency affects the dependence of $P_m^c$ on Ra is discussed.

  10. Turbulent Convection in the Classical Variable Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kollath, Z

    1999-01-01

    We give a status report of convective Cepheid and RR Lyrae model pulsations. Some striking successes can be reported, despite the use of a rather simple treatment of turbulent convection with a 1D time-dependent diffusion equation for the turbulent energy. It is now possible to obtain stable double-mode (beat) pulsations in both Cepheid and RR Lyrae models with astrophysical parameters, i.e. periods and amplitude ratios, that are in agreement with observations. The turbulent convective models, however, have difficulties giving global agreement with the observations. In particular, the Magellanic Cloud Cepheids, that have been observed in connection with the microlensing projects have imposed novel observational constraints because of the low metallicity of the MCs.

  11. Basics of lava-lamp convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyüre, Balázs; Jánosi, Imre M.

    2009-10-01

    Laboratory experiments are reported in an immiscible two-fluid system, where thermal convection is initiated by heating at the bottom and cooling at the top. The lava-lamp regime is characterized by a robust periodic exchange process where warm blobs rise from the bottom, attach to the top surface for a while, then cold blobs sink down again. Immiscibility allows to reach real steady (dynamical equilibrium) states which can be sustained for several days. Two modes of lava-lamp convection could be identified by recording and evaluating temperature time series at the bottom and at the top of the container: a “slow” mode is determined by an effective heat transport speed at a given temperature gradient, while a second mode of constant periodicity is viscosity limited. Contrasting of laboratory and geophysical observations yields the conclusion that the frequently suggested lava-lamp analogy fails for the accepted models of mantle convection.

  12. Solar convection and oscillations in magnetic regions

    CERN Document Server

    Jacoutot, L; Wray, A; Mansour, N N

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate how magnetic field affects the dynamics of granular convection and excitation of solar oscillations by means of realistic numerical simulations. We have used a 3D, compressible, non-linear radiative magnetohydrodynamics code developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. This code takes into account several physical phenomena: compressible fluid flow in a highly stratified medium, sub-grid scale turbulence models, radiative energy transfer between the fluid elements, and a real-gas equation of state. We have studied the influence of the magnetic field of various strength on the convective cells and on the excitation mechanisms of the acoustic oscillations by calculating spectral properties of the convective motions and oscillations. The results reveal substantial changes of the granulation structure with increased magnetic field, and a frequency-dependent reduction in the oscillation power in a good agreement with solar observations. These simulations suggest that the ...

  13. Convection and Mixing in Giant Planet Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Vazan, Allona; Kovetz, Attay; Podolak, Morris

    2015-01-01

    The primordial internal structures of gas giant planets are unknown. Often giant planets are modeled under the assumption that they are adiabatic, convective, and homogeneously mixed, but this is not necessarily correct. In this work, we present the first self-consistent calculation of convective transport of both heat and material as the planets evolve. We examine how planetary evolution depends on the initial composition and its distribution, whether the internal structure changes with time, and if so, how it affects the evolution. We consider various primordial distributions, different compositions, and different mixing efficiencies and follow the distribution of heavy elements in a Jupiter-mass planet as it evolves. We show that a heavy-element core cannot be eroded by convection if there is a sharp compositional change at the core-envelope boundary. If the heavy elements are initially distributed within the planet according to some compositional gradient, mixing occurs in the outer regions resulting in a...

  14. Differential Rotation in Solar Convective Dynamo Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuhong

    2015-01-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan & Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  15. Entropy in adiabatic regions of convection simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Tanner, Joel D; Demarque, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest sources of uncertainty in stellar models is caused by the treatment of convection in stellar envelopes. One dimensional stellar models often make use of the mixing length or equivalent approximations to describe convection, all of which depend on various free parameters. There have been attempts to rectify this by using 3D radiative-hydrodynamic simulations of stellar convection, and in trying to extract an equivalent mixing length from the simulations. In this paper we show that the entropy of the deeper, adiabatic layers in these simulations can be expressed as a simple function of og g and log T_{eff} which holds potential for calibrating stellar models in a simple and more general manner.

  16. Amplitude equations for isothermal double diffusive convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becerril, R.; Swift, J.B. [Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Amplitude equations are derived for isothermal double diffusive convection near threshold for both the stationary and oscillatory instabilities as well as in the vicinity of the codimension-2 point. The convecting fluid is contained in a thin Hele-Shaw cell that renders the system two dimensional, and convection is sustained by vertical concentration gradients of two species with different diffusion rates. The locations of the tricritical point for the stationary instability and the codimension-2 point are found. It is shown that these points can be made well separated (in the Rayleigh number R{sub s} of the slow diffusing species) as the Lewis number varies. Hence the behavior near these points should be experimentally accessible. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Magnetic Fields in the Solar Convection Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Fan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Active regions on the solar surface are generally thought to originate from a strong toroidal magnetic field generated by a deep seated solar dynamo mechanism operating at the base of the solar convection zone. Thus the magnetic fields need to traverse the entire convection zone before they reach the photosphere to form the observed solar active regions. Understanding this process of active region flux emergence is therefore a crucial component for the study of the solar cycle dynamo. This article reviews studies with regard to the formation and rise of active region scale magnetic flux tubes in the solar convection zone and their emergence into the solar atmosphere as active regions.

  18. Convective towers detection using GPS radio occultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Neubert, Torsten; Syndergaard, S.

    The tropical deep convection affects the radiation balance of the atmosphere changing the water vapour mixing ratio and the temperature of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. To gain a better understanding of deep convective processes, the study of tropical cyclones could play an import...... (ACES) payload on the International Space Station....... 1194 profiles in a time window of 3 hours and a space window of 300 km from the eye of the cyclone. We show that the bending angle anomaly of a GPS RO signal is typically larger than the climatology above the tropopause. Comparisons with co-located radiosondes, climatology of tropopause altitudes...... and GOES analyses will also be shown to support our hypothesis and to corroborate the idea that the bending angle anomaly can be used as an indicator of convective towers. The results are discussed in connection to the GPS radio occultation receiver which will be part of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space...

  19. On the convective overstability in protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Latter, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the driving of low-level hydrodynamical activity in protoplanetary-disc dead zones. A small adverse radial entropy gradient, ordinarily stabilised by rotation, excites oscillatory convection (`convective overstability') when thermal diffusion, or cooling, is neither too strong nor too weak. I revisit the linear theory of the instability, discuss its prevalence in protoplanetary discs, and show that unstable modes are exact nonlinear solutions in the local Boussinesq limit. Overstable modes cannot grow indefinitely, however, as they are subject to a secondary parametric instability that limits their amplitudes to relatively low levels. If parasites set the saturation level of the ensuing turbulence then the convective overstability is probably too weak to drive significant angular momentum transport or to generate vortices. But I also discuss an alternative, and far more vigorous, saturation route that generates radial `layers' or `zonal flows' (witnessed also in semiconvection). Numerical ...

  20. Differential rotation in solar convective dynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuhong; Fang, Fang

    2016-10-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan and Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  1. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclones to Parameterized Convection in the NASA GEOS5 Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Reale, Oreste; Lee, Myong-In; Molod, Andrea M.; Suarez, Max J.

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of tropical cyclones (TCs) to changes in parameterized convection is investigated to improve the simulation of TCs in the North Atlantic. Specifically, the impact of reducing the influence of the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert (RAS) scheme-based parameterized convection is explored using the Goddard Earth Observing System version5 (GEOS5) model at 0.25 horizontal resolution. The years 2005 and 2006 characterized by very active and inactive hurricane seasons, respectively, are selected for simulation. A reduction in parameterized deep convection results in an increase in TC activity (e.g., TC number and longer life cycle) to more realistic levels compared to the baseline control configuration. The vertical and horizontal structure of the strongest simulated hurricane shows the maximum lower-level (850-950hPa) wind speed greater than 60 ms and the minimum sea level pressure reaching 940mb, corresponding to a category 4 hurricane - a category never achieved by the control configuration. The radius of the maximum wind of 50km, the location of the warm core exceeding 10 C, and the horizontal compactness of the hurricane center are all quite realistic without any negatively affecting the atmospheric mean state. This study reveals that an increase in the threshold of minimum entrainment suppresses parameterized deep convection by entraining more dry air into the typical plume. This leads to cooling and drying at the mid- to upper-troposphere, along with the positive latent heat flux and moistening in the lower-troposphere. The resulting increase in conditional instability provides an environment that is more conducive to TC vortex development and upward moisture flux convergence by dynamically resolved moist convection, thereby increasing TC activity.

  2. Peculiarities of convection and oil maturation in 3D porous medium structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurie Khachay, Professor; Mindubaev, Mansur

    2017-04-01

    An important estimation of oil source thickness productivity is to study the thermal influences of magmatic intrusions on the maturation of the organic matter. The heterogeneity of permeability distribution of the reservoir rock and respectively the convection structure provide temperature heterogeneity and different degree of maturity for the oil source material. A numerical algorithm for solving the problem of developed convection in two-dimensional and three-dimensional models of the porous medium, which consists of a system of Darcy equations, heat conduction with convection term and the continuity equation, is developed. Because of the effective values of the coefficients of thermal conductivity, heat capacity, viscosity and permeability of the medium depend from the temperature; the system of equations is nonlinear. For solution we used the dimensionless system of coordinates. For numerical solution we used the longitudinal cross-implicit scheme. The coordinates step for the 3D model had been used constant and equal to H/20, where H=1- dimensionless thickness of porous medium layer. As it is shown from the variants of numerical solution, by the stationary regime of developed convection because of the temperature heterogeneous distribution in the sedimentary reservoir the formation of oil source matter different degree of maturity is possible. That result is very significant for estimation of reservoirs oil-bearing The work was fulfilled by supporting of the Fund of UB RAS, project 1518532. Reference 1. Yurie Khachay and Mansur Mindubaev, 2016, Effect of convective transport in porous media on the conductions of organic matter maturation and generation of hydrocarbons in trap rocks complexes, Energy Procedia. 74 pp.79-83.

  3. Tangent linear superparameterization of convection in a 10 layer global atmosphere with calibrated climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick; Mapes, Brian; Hu, I.-Kuan; Song, Siwon; Kuang, Zhiming

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes a new intermediate global atmosphere model in which synoptic and planetary dynamics including the advection of water vapor are explicit in 10 layers, the time-mean flow is centered near a realistic state through the use of carefully calibrated time-independent 3-D forcings, and temporal anomalies of convective tendencies of heat and moisture in each column are represented as a linear matrix acting on the anomalous temperature and moisture profiles. Currently, this matrix is Kuang's [] linear response function (LRF) of a cyclic convection-permitting model (CCPM) in equilibrium with specified atmospheric cooling (i.e., without radiation or WISHE interactions, so it conserves column moist static energy exactly). The goal of this effort is to cleanly test the role of convection's free-tropospheric moisture sensitivity in tropical waves, without incurring large changes of mean climate that confuse the interpretation of experiments with entrainment parameters in the convection schemes of full-physics GCMs. When the sensitivity to free-tropospheric moisture is multiplied by a factor ranging from 0 to 2, the model's variability ranges from: (1) moderately strong convectively coupled Kelvin waves with speeds near 20 m s-1; to (0) similar but much weaker waves; to (2) similar but stronger and slightly faster waves as the water vapor field plays an increasingly important role. Longitudinal structure in the model's time-mean tropical flow is not fully realistic, and does change significantly with matrix-coupled variability, but further work on editing the anomaly physics matrix and calibrating the mean state could improve this class of models.

  4. Investigation of a convection event using multisensor observations during HyMeX SOP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Casella, Daniele; Dietrich, Stefano; Panegrossi, Giulia; Petracca, Marco; Sanò, Paolo; Gatlin, Patrick; Baldini, Luca

    2014-05-01

    A multisensor analysis of the convective precipitation event occurred over Rome during the IOP13 (October 15th, 2012) of the HyMeX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean eXperiment) Special Observation Period (SOP) 1 is presented. Thanks to the cooperation among Italian meteorological services and scientific community and a specific agreement with NASA-GSFC, different types of devices for meteorological measurements were made available during the HyMeX SOP.1. For investigating this event, used are the 3-D lightning data provided by the LINET, the CNR ISAC dual-pol C-band radar (Polar 55C), located in Rome, the Drop Size Distributions (DSD) collected by the 2D Video Disdrometer (2DVD) and the collocated Micro Rain Radar (MRR) installed at the Radio Meteorology Lab. of "Sapienza" University of Rome, located 14 km from the Polar 55C radar. The relation between microphysical structure and electrical activity during the convective phase of the event was investigated using LINET lightning data and Polar 55C (working both in PPI and RHI scanning mode) observations. Location of regions of high horizontal reflectivity (Zh) values ( > 50 dBz), indicating convective precipitation, were found to be associated to a high number of LINET strokes. In addition, an hydrometeor classification scheme applied to the Polar 55C scans was used to detect graupel and to identify a relation between number of LINET strokes and integrated IWC of graupel along the event. Properties of DSDs measured by the 2DVD and vertical DSD profiles estimated by MRR and their relation with the lighting activity registered by LINET were investigated with specific focus on the transition from convective to stratiform regimes. A good agreement was found between convection detected by these instruments and the number of strokes detected by LINET.

  5. A Multisensor Investigation of Convection During HyMeX SOP1 IOP13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, N.; Adirosi, E.; Baldini, L.; Casella, D.; Dietrich, S.; Panegrossi, G.; Petracca, M.; Sano, P.; Gatlin, P.

    2014-01-01

    A multisensor analysis of the convective precipitation event occurred over Rome during the IOP13 (October 15th, 2012) of the HyMeX (Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean eXperiment) Special Observation Period (SOP) 1 is presented. Thanks to the cooperation among Italian meteorological services and scientific community and a specific agreement with NASA-GSFC, different types of devices for meteorological measurements were made available during the HyMeX SOP.1. For investigating this event, used are the 3-D lightning data provided by the LINET, the CNR ISAC dual-pol C-band radar (Polar 55C), located in Rome, the Drop Size Distributions (DSD) collected by the 2D Video Disdrometer (2DVD) and the collocated Micro Rain Radar (MRR) installed at the Radio Meteorology Lab. of "Sapienza" University of Rome, located 14 km from the Polar 55C radar. The relation between microphysical structure and electrical activity during the convective phase of the event was investigated using LINET lightning data and Polar 55C (working both in PPI and RHI scanning mode) observations. Location of regions of high horizontal reflectivity (Zh) values ( > 50 dBz), indicating convective precipitation, were found to be associated to a high number of LINET strokes. In addition, an hydrometeor classification scheme applied to the Polar 55C scans was used to detect graupel and to identify a relation between number of LINET strokes and integrated IWC of graupel along the event. Properties of DSDs measured by the 2DVD and vertical DSD profiles estimated by MRR and their relation with the lighting activity registered by LINET were investigated with specific focus on the transition from convective to stratiform regimes. A good agreement was found between convection detected by these instruments and the number of strokes detected by LINET.

  6. A test of sensitivity to convective transport in a global atmospheric CO{sub 2} simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, H. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). UMBC Goddard Earth Science and Technology Center; Kawa, S.R.; Chin, M.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Rasch, P. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Wu, S. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO{sub 2} distributions. Global CO{sub 2} in the year 2000 is simulated using the CTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA's Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO{sub 2} by adopting the same CO{sub 2} emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et al. (convective transport scheme denoted as Conv1). Conv1 approximates the convective transport by using the bulk convective mass fluxes to redistribute trace gases. The alternate approximation, Conv2, partitions fluxes into updraft and downdraft, as well as into entrainment and detrainment, and has potential to yield a more realistic simulation of vertical redistribution through deep convection.Replacing Conv1 by Conv2 results in an overestimate of CO{sub 2} over biospheric sink regions. The largest discrepancies result in a CO{sub 2} difference of about 7.8 ppm in the July NH boreal forest, which is about 30% of the CO{sub 2} seasonality for that area. These differences are compared to those produced by emission scenario variations constrained by the framework of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to account for possible land use change and residual terrestrial CO{sub 2} sink. It is shown that the overestimated CO{sub 2} driven by Conv2 can be offset by introducing these supplemental emissions.

  7. Finding the patterns in mantle convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Suzanne; Rozel, Antoine; Valentine, Andrew; Tackley, Paul; Trampert, Jeannot

    2016-04-01

    Inverting mantle flow for past configurations is one of the great outstanding problems in geodynamics. We demonstrate a new method for probabilistic inversion of present-day Earth observations for mantle properties and history. Convection is a non-linear and chaotic, thwarting most standard inversion methods. Because of its chaotic and unpredictable nature, small errors in initial conditions, parameter selection, and computational precision can all significantly change the results produced by mantle convection simulations. However, some patterns and statistics of convection contain the signature of the parameters used in the simulations over long time-scales. Geodynamical studies often vary these parameters to investigate their effects on the patterns produced. We show that with a large enough set of simulations, we can investigate the relationship between input parameters and convection patterns in a more rigorous way. Probabilistic inversion is the only way to approach highly non-linear problems. We use neural networks to represent the probability density function linking convection simulation input parameters and the patterns they produce. This allows us to find input parameters, whilst taking into account all of the uncertainties that are inherent in the inversion of any Earth system: how well do we understand the physics of the process; what do we already know about the input parameters; and how certain are our observations? We show that the mantle structures produced by 4.5 Gyr of convection simulations contain enough information on yield stress, viscosity coefficients, mantle heating rate, and the initial state of primordial material that we can infer them directly without requiring any other information, such as plate velocity.

  8. Provable Secure Identity Based Generalized Signcryption Scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Gang; Shen, Yong; Han, Wenbao

    2010-01-01

    According to actual needs, generalized signcryption scheme can flexibly work as an encryption scheme, a signature scheme or a signcryption scheme. In this paper, firstly, we give a security model for identity based generalized signcryption which is more complete than existing model. Secondly, we propose an identity based generalized signcryption scheme. Thirdly, we give the security proof of the new scheme in this complete model. Comparing with existing identity based generalized signcryption, the new scheme has less implementation complexity. Moreover, the new scheme has comparable computation complexity with the existing normal signcryption schemes.

  9. A Cloud-Resolving Modeling Intercomparison Study on Properties of Cloud Microphysics, Convection, and Precipitation for a Squall Line Cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Han, B.; Morrison, H.; Varble, A.; Mansell, E.; Milbrandt, J.; Wang, Y.; Lin, Y.; Dong, X.; Giangrande, S. E.; Jensen, M. P.; Collis, S. M.; North, K.; Kollias, P.

    2015-12-01

    The large spread in CRM model simulations of deep convection and aerosol effects on deep convective clouds (DCCs) makes it difficult (1) to further our understanding of deep convection and (2) to define "benchmarks" and recommendations for their use in parameterization developments. Past model intercomparison studies used different models with different complexities of dynamic-microphysics interactions, making it hard to isolate the causes of differences between simulations. In this intercomparison study, we employed a much more constrained approach - with the same model and same experiment setups for simulations with different cloud microphysics schemes (one-moment, two-moment, and bin models). Both the piggybacking and interactive approaches are employed to explore the major microphysical processes that control the model differences and the significance of their feedback to dynamics through latent heating/cooling and cold pool characteristics. Real-case simulations are conducted for the squall line case 20 May 2011 from the MC3E field campaign. Results from the piggybacking approach show substantially different responses of the microphysics schemes to the same dynamical fields. Although the interactive microphysics-dynamics simulations buffer some differences compared with those from the piggyback runs, large differences still exist and are mainly contributed by ice microphysical processes parameterizations. The presentation will include in-depth analyses of the major microphysical processes for the squall line case, the significance of the feedback of the processes to dynamics, and how those results differ in different cloud microphysics schemes.

  10. High Temperature Sodium Thermal Convection Test Loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A project for the evaluation of compatibility characteristic of structural materials used in China experimental fast reactor(CEFR) has been in operation. The conditions which these structural materials contact with liquid sodium in reactor can be simulated by the tests in high temperature sodium thermal convection test loop. The main aims of designing and constructing the thermal convection test loop is for the corrosion test of CEFR materials, and the objective is to obtain the corrosion data of domestic materials.The main features of the test loop are shown in Fig.1. The primary components of the loop

  11. Convective dust clouds in a complex plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mitic, S; Ivlev, A V; Hoefner, H; Thoma, M H; Zhdanov, S; Morfill, G E

    2008-01-01

    The plasma is generated in a low frequency glow discharge within an elongated glass tube oriented vertically. The dust particles added to the plasma are confined above the heater and form counter-rotating clouds close to the tube centre. The shape of the clouds and the velocity field of the conveying dust particles are determined. The forces acting on the particles are calculated. It is shown that convection of the dust is affected by the convective gas motion which is triggered, in turn, by thermal creep of the gas along the inhomogeneously heated walls of the tube.

  12. Laser induced ponderomotive convection in water

    CERN Document Server

    Shneider, M N

    2015-01-01

    A new mechanism for inducing convection during IR laser interaction with water or any absorbing polar liquid is described theoretically. The numerical simulations performed using the developed model show that the ponderomotive force produces water flow in the direction of the laser beam propagation. In the later stage of interaction, when water temperature rises, the Archimedes force becomes first comparable and then dominant producing convection directed against the vector of gravitational acceleration (upward). The theoretical estimates and the numerical simulations predict fluid dynamics that is similar to the observed in the previous experiments.

  13. Thermal convection in a liquid metal battery

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Generation of thermal convection flow in the liquid metal battery, a device recently proposed as a promising solution for the problem of the short-term energy storage, is analyzed using a numerical model. It is found that convection caused by Joule heating of electrolyte during charging or discharging is virtually unavoidable. It exists in laboratory prototypes larger than a few cm in size and should become much stronger in larger-scale batteries. The phenomenon needs further investigation in view of its positive (enhanced mixing of reactants) and negative (loss of efficiency and possible disruption of operation due to the flow-induced deformation of the electrolyte layer) effects.

  14. Thermal convection in a liquid metal battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuxin; Zikanov, Oleg

    2016-08-01

    Generation of thermal convection flow in the liquid metal battery, a device recently proposed as a promising solution for the problem of the short-term energy storage, is analyzed using a numerical model. It is found that convection caused by Joule heating of electrolyte during charging or discharging is virtually unavoidable. It exists in laboratory prototypes larger than a few centimeters in size and should become much stronger in larger-scale batteries. The phenomenon needs further investigation in view of its positive (enhanced mixing of reactants) and negative (loss of efficiency and possible disruption of operation due to the flow-induced deformation of the electrolyte layer) effects.

  15. Convective heat transfer during dendritic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    Axial growth rate measurements were carried out at 17 levels of supercooling between 0.043 C and 2 C, a temperature range in which convection, instead of diffusion, becomes the controlling mechanism of heat transfer in the dentritic growth process. The growth velocity, normalized to that expected for pure diffusive heat transfer, displays a dependence on orientation. The ratio of the observed growth velocity to that for convection-free growth and the coefficients of supercooling are formulated. The dependence of normalized growth rate in supercooling is described for downward growing dendrites. These experimental correlations can be justified theoretically only to a limited extent.

  16. Introductory analysis of Benard-Marangoni convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroto, J A [Group of Physics and Chemistry of Linares, Escuela Politecnica Superior, St Alfonso X El Sabio, 28, University of Jaen, E-23700 Linares, Jaen (Spain); Perez-Munuzuri, V [Group of Nonlinear Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Romero-Cano, M S [Group of Complex Fluids Physics, Department of Applied Physics, University of Almeria, E-04120 Almeria (Spain)

    2007-03-15

    We describe experiments on Benard-Marangoni convection which permit a useful understanding of the main concepts involved in this phenomenon such as, for example, Benard cells, aspect ratio, Rayleigh and Marangoni numbers, Crispation number and critical conditions. In spite of the complexity of convection theory, we carry out a simple and introductory analysis which has the additional advantage of providing very suggestive experiments. As a consequence, we recommend our device for use as a laboratory experiment for undergraduate students of the thermodynamics of nonlinear and fluid physics.

  17. Mantle Convection in a Microwave Oven: New Perspectives for the Internally Heated Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limare, A.; Fourel, L.; Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Surducan, V.; Vilella, K.; Farnetani, C. G.; Kaminski, E. C.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal evolution of silicate planets is primarily controlled by the balance between internal heating - due to radioactive decay - and heat transport by mantle convection. In the Earth, the problem is particularly complex due to the heterogeneous distribution of heat sources in the mantle and the non-linear coupling between this distribution and convective mixing. To investigate the behaviour of such systems, we have developed a new technology based on microwave absorption to study internally-heated convection in the laboratory. This prototype offers the ability to reach the high Rayleigh-Roberts and Prandtl numbers that are relevant for planetary convection. Our experimental results obtained for a uniform distribution of heat sources were compared to numerical calculations reproducing exactly experimental conditions (3D Cartesian geometry and temperature-dependent physical properties), thereby providing the first cross validation of experimental and numerical studies of convection in internally-heated systems. We find that the thermal boundary layer thickness and interior temperature scale with RaH-1/4, where RaH is the Rayleigh-Roberts number, as theoretically predicted by scaling arguments on the dissipation of kinetic energy. Our microwave-based method offers new perspectives for the study of internally-heated convection in heterogeneous systems which have been out of experimental reach until now. We are able to selectively heat specific regions in the convecting layer, through the careful control of the absorption properties of different miscible fluids. This is analogous to convection in the presence of chemical reservoirs with different concentration of long-lived radioactive isotopes. We shall show results for two different cases: the stability of continental lithosphere over a convective fluid and the evolution of a hidden enriched reservoir in the lowermost mantle.

  18. Reverse flood routing with the inverted Muskingum storage routing scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Koussis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work treats reverse flood routing aiming at signal identification: inflows are inferred from observed outflows by orienting the Muskingum scheme against the wave propagation direction. Routing against the wave propagation is an ill-posed, inverse problem (small errors amplify, leading to large spurious responses; therefore, the reverse solution must be smoothness-constrained towards stability and uniqueness (regularised. Theoretical constrains on the coefficients of the reverse routing scheme assist in error control, but optimal grids are derived by numerical experimentation. Exact solutions of the convection-diffusion equation, for a single and a composite wave, are reverse-routed and in both instances the wave is backtracked well for a range of grid parameters. In the arduous test of a square pulse, the result is comparable to those of more complex methods. Seeding outflow data with random errors enhances instability; to cope with the spurious oscillations, the reversed solution is conditioned by smoothing via low-pass filtering or optimisation. Good-quality inflow hydrographs are recovered with either smoothing treatment, yet the computationally demanding optimisation is superior. Finally, the reverse Muskingum routing method is compared to a reverse-solution method of the St. Venant equations of flood wave motion and is found to perform equally well, at a fraction of the computing effort. This study leads us to conclude that the efficiently attained good inflow identification rests on the simplicity of the Muskingum reverse routing scheme that endows it with numerical robustness.

  19. Reverse flood routing with the inverted Muskingum storage routing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koussis, A. D.; Mazi, K.; Lykoudis, S.; Argiriou, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    This work treats reverse flood routing aiming at signal identification: inflows are inferred from observed outflows by orienting the Muskingum scheme against the wave propagation direction. Routing against the wave propagation is an ill-posed, inverse problem (small errors amplify, leading to large spurious responses); therefore, the reverse solution must be smoothness-constrained towards stability and uniqueness (regularised). Theoretical constrains on the coefficients of the reverse routing scheme assist in error control, but optimal grids are derived by numerical experimentation. Exact solutions of the convection-diffusion equation, for a single and a composite wave, are reverse-routed and in both instances the wave is backtracked well for a range of grid parameters. In the arduous test of a square pulse, the result is comparable to those of more complex methods. Seeding outflow data with random errors enhances instability; to cope with the spurious oscillations, the reversed solution is conditioned by smoothing via low-pass filtering or optimisation. Good-quality inflow hydrographs are recovered with either smoothing treatment, yet the computationally demanding optimisation is superior. Finally, the reverse Muskingum routing method is compared to a reverse-solution method of the St. Venant equations of flood wave motion and is found to perform equally well, at a fraction of the computing effort. This study leads us to conclude that the efficiently attained good inflow identification rests on the simplicity of the Muskingum reverse routing scheme that endows it with numerical robustness.

  20. Underground hydro scheme for Ullapool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Scoltish and Southern Energy has awarded a contract for a new hydropower plant Scotland, the company's first hydro project since the 1960s. The S6 million scheme will be built by Miller Civil Engineering Services Ltd.

  1. New Ideas on Labeling Schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotbart, Noy Galil

    evaluation of fully dynamic labeling schemes. Due to a connection between adjacency labeling schemes and the graph theoretical study of induced universal graphs, we study these in depth and show novel results for bounded degree graphs and power-law graphs. We also survey and make progress on the related......With ever increasing size of graphs, many distributed graph systems emerged to store, preprocess and analyze them. While such systems ease up congestion on servers, they incur certain penalties compared to centralized data structure. First, the total storage required to store a graph...... in a distributed fashion increases. Second, attempting to answer queries on vertices of a graph stored in a distributed fashion can be significantly more complicated. In order to lay theoretical foundations to the first penalty mentioned a large body of work concentrated on labeling schemes. A labeling scheme...

  2. Capacity-achieving CPM schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Perotti, Alberto; Benedetto, Sergio; Montorsi, Guido

    2008-01-01

    The pragmatic approach to coded continuous-phase modulation (CPM) is proposed as a capacity-achieving low-complexity alternative to the serially-concatenated CPM (SC-CPM) coding scheme. In this paper, we first perform a selection of the best spectrally-efficient CPM modulations to be embedded into SC-CPM schemes. Then, we consider the pragmatic capacity (a.k.a. BICM capacity) of CPM modulations and optimize it through a careful design of the mapping between input bits and CPM waveforms. The so obtained schemes are cascaded with an outer serially-concatenated convolutional code to form a pragmatic coded-modulation system. The resulting schemes exhibit performance very close to the CPM capacity without requiring iterations between the outer decoder and the CPM demodulator. As a result, the receiver exhibits reduced complexity and increased flexibility due to the separation of the demodulation and decoding functions.

  3. Good governance for pension schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory and market developments have transformed the way in which UK private sector pension schemes operate. This has increased demands on trustees and advisors and the trusteeship governance model must evolve in order to remain fit for purpose. This volume brings together leading practitioners to provide an overview of what today constitutes good governance for pension schemes, from both a legal and a practical perspective. It provides the reader with an appreciation of the distinctive characteristics of UK occupational pension schemes, how they sit within the capital markets and their social and fiduciary responsibilities. Providing a holistic analysis of pension risk, both from the trustee and the corporate perspective, the essays cover the crucial role of the employer covenant, financing and investment risk, developments in longevity risk hedging and insurance de-risking, and best practice scheme administration.

  4. A Novel Iris Segmentation Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Chung Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key steps in the iris recognition system is the accurate iris segmentation from its surrounding noises including pupil, sclera, eyelashes, and eyebrows of a captured eye-image. This paper presents a novel iris segmentation scheme which utilizes the orientation matching transform to outline the outer and inner iris boundaries initially. It then employs Delogne-Kåsa circle fitting (instead of the traditional Hough transform to further eliminate the outlier points to extract a more precise iris area from an eye-image. In the extracted iris region, the proposed scheme further utilizes the differences in the intensity and positional characteristics of the iris, eyelid, and eyelashes to detect and delete these noises. The scheme is then applied on iris image database, UBIRIS.v1. The experimental results show that the presented scheme provides a more effective and efficient iris segmentation than other conventional methods.

  5. Spectral simulation of thermocapillary convection with a deformable free surface using boundary-fitted coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ikramuddin

    A Chebyshev-spectral collocation scheme has been developed to simulate thermocapillary convection processes in a differentially heated cavity with and without buoyancy effects. The time-dependent Navier- Stokes equations in primitive variables were solved with a semi-implicit scheme using the influence matrix technique. The deformable free surface was incorporated by means of a boundary-fitted coordinate (BFC) system. The BFC grid was generated by solving a system of elliptic equations. An iterative scheme based on finite difference methods was found to be sufficient for calculating a smooth distribution of grid-points for relatively low degrees of deformation of the free surface. The metrics of transformation, however, were calculated spectrally in order to achieve a high order of accuracy in the a posteriori mapping of the physical grid to the computational grid. The overall scheme was found to be efficient, economical, and capable of resolving the complex hydrodynamic and thermal structures in thermocapillarity driven flows with deformable free surfaces. The scheme was also modified to study problems with very high Marangoni numbers and non-deformable free surfaces, and later extended to three dimensions with periodic boundary conditions in order to explore the transitions to fully three dimensional phenomena that are anticipated in industrially relevant flow configurations.

  6. A spectral Finite Difference Analysis of Natural Convection in a Rectangular Equilateral Triangle Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshihiromochimaru

    2000-01-01

    A steady-state two-dimensional natural convection in a rectangular equlateral triangle cavity is analyzed numercally,using a spectral finite difference scheme,where a conformal mapping coordinate system is adopted with a unit circle for the boundary.Vorticity-stream function formulation is used in conjunction with an energy equation.Time marching algorithm in a diagonal dominant form under a Fourier series decomposition is used to give a steady-state field for a mixed(Neumann and Dirichlet) thermal boundary condition even at a Grashof number of 106.

  7. Study of First-Order Thermal Sigma-Delta Architecture for Convective Accelerometers

    CERN Document Server

    Nouet, Pascal; Latorre, Laurent; Nouet, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the study of an original closed-loop conditioning approach for fully-integrated convective inertial sensors. The method is applied to an accelerometer manufactured on a standard CMOS technology using an auto-aligned bulk etching step. Using the thermal behavior of the sensor as a summing function, a first order sigma-delta modulator is built. This "electro-physical" modulator realizes an analog-to-digital conversion of the signal. Besides the feedback scheme should improve the sensor performance.

  8. Numerical investigation into entropy generation in a transient generalized Couette flow of nanofluids with convective cooling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M H Mkwizu; O D Makinde; Yaw Nkansah-Gyekye

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the effects of convective cooling on entropy generation in a transient generalized Couette flow of water-based nanofluids containing Copper (Cu) and Alumina (Al2O3) as nanoparticles. Both First and Second Laws of thermodynamics are utilised to analyse the problem. The model partial differential equations for momentum and energy balance are tackled numerically using a semidiscretization finite difference method together with Runge–Kutta Fehlberg integration scheme. Graphical results on the effects of parameter variation on velocity, temperature, skin friction, Nusselt number, entropy generation rate, irreversibility ratio and Bejan number are presented and discussed.

  9. Modelling the Effect of Variable Viscosity on Unsteady Couette Flow of Nanofluids with Convective Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmada Omar Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates numerically the effects of variable viscosity on unsteady generalized Couette flow of a water base nanofluid with convective cooling at the moving surface. The Buongiorno model utilized for the nanofluid incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The nonlinear governing equations of continuity, momentum, energy and nanoparticles concentration are tackled numerically using a semi discretization finite difference method together with Runge-Kutta Fehlberg integration scheme. Numerical results for velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles concentration profiles together with skin friction and Nusselt number are obtained graphically and discussed quantitatively.

  10. An arbitrated quantum signature scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, G; Zeng, Guihua; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2002-01-01

    The general principle for a quantum signature scheme is proposed and investigated based on ideas from classical signature schemes and quantum cryptography. The suggested algorithm is implemented by a symmetrical quantum key cryptosystem and Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) triplet states and relies on the availability of an arbitrator. We can guarantee the unconditional security of the algorithm, mostly due to the correlation of the GHZ triplet states and the use of quantum one-time pads.

  11. Breeding schemes in reindeer husbandry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Rönnegård

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper was to investigate annual genetic gain from selection (G, and the influence of selection on the inbreeding effective population size (Ne, for different possible breeding schemes within a reindeer herding district. The breeding schemes were analysed for different proportions of the population within a herding district included in the selection programme. Two different breeding schemes were analysed: an open nucleus scheme where males mix and mate between owner flocks, and a closed nucleus scheme where the males in non-selected owner flocks are culled to maximise G in the whole population. The theory of expected long-term genetic contributions was used and maternal effects were included in the analyses. Realistic parameter values were used for the population, modelled with 5000 reindeer in the population and a sex ratio of 14 adult females per male. The standard deviation of calf weights was 4.1 kg. Four different situations were explored and the results showed: 1. When the population was randomly culled, Ne equalled 2400. 2. When the whole population was selected on calf weights, Ne equalled 1700 and the total annual genetic gain (direct + maternal in calf weight was 0.42 kg. 3. For the open nucleus scheme, G increased monotonically from 0 to 0.42 kg as the proportion of the population included in the selection programme increased from 0 to 1.0, and Ne decreased correspondingly from 2400 to 1700. 4. In the closed nucleus scheme the lowest value of Ne was 1300. For a given proportion of the population included in the selection programme, the difference in G between a closed nucleus scheme and an open one was up to 0.13 kg. We conclude that for mass selection based on calf weights in herding districts with 2000 animals or more, there are no risks of inbreeding effects caused by selection.

  12. Three-point explicit compact difference scheme with arbitrary order of accuracy and its application in CFD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Jian-guo; XIE Zhi-hua; ZHOU Jun-tao

    2007-01-01

    Based on the successive iteration in the Taylor series expansion method, a three-point explicit compact difference scheme with arbitrary order of accuracy is derived in this paper. Numerical characteristics of the scheme are studied by the Fourier analysis.Unlike the conventional compact difference schemes which need to solve the equation to obtain the unknown derivatives in each node, the proposed scheme is explicit and can achieve arbitrary order of accuracy in space. Application examples for the convectiondiffusion problem with a sharp front gradient and the typical lid-driven cavity flow are given. It is found that the proposed compact scheme is not only simple to implement and economical to use, but also is effective to simulate the convection-dominated problem and obtain high-order accurate solution in coarse grid systems.

  13. The Impacts of Microphysics and Planetary Boundary Layer Physics on Model Simulations of U.S. Deep South Summer Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaul, Eugene W., Jr.; Case, Jonathan L.; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Medlin, Jeffrey; Wood, Lance

    2014-01-01

    Convection-allowing numerical weather simula- tions have often been shown to produce convective storms that have significant sensitivity to choices of model physical parameterizations. Among the most important of these sensitivities are those related to cloud microphysics, but planetary boundary layer parameterizations also have a significant impact on the evolution of the convection. Aspects of the simulated convection that display sensitivity to these physics schemes include updraft size and intensity, simulated radar reflectivity, timing and placement of storm initi- ation and decay, total storm rainfall, and other storm features derived from storm structure and hydrometeor fields, such as predicted lightning flash rates. In addition to the basic parameters listed above, the simulated storms may also exhibit sensitivity to im- posed initial conditions, such as the fields of soil temper- ature and moisture, vegetation cover and health, and sea and lake water surface temperatures. Some of these sensitivities may rival those of the basic physics sensi- tivities mentioned earlier. These sensitivities have the potential to disrupt the accuracy of short-term forecast simulations of convective storms, and thereby pose sig- nificant difficulties for weather forecasters. To make a systematic study of the quantitative impacts of each of these sensitivities, a matrix of simulations has been performed using all combinations of eight separate microphysics schemes, three boundary layer schemes, and two sets of initial conditions. The first version of initial conditions consists of the default data from large-scale operational model fields, while the second features specialized higher- resolution soil conditions, vegetation conditions and water surface temperatures derived from datasets created at NASA's Short-term Prediction and Operational Research Tran- sition (SPoRT) Center at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) in Huntsville, AL. Simulations as

  14. Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    CO2 storage modeling. Our model contains the multiple- relaxation-time scheme and moment-based boundary conditions to avoid the numer- ical slip error that is associated with standard bounce-back. The model’s accuracy and robustness is demonstrated by an excellent agreement between our results and benchmark data for thermal flows ranging from Ra = 103 to 108. Our thermal model captures analogous flow behavior to that of CO2 through fluid-filled porous media, including the transition from diffusive transport to initiation and development of convective fingering.

  15. Thermal convection driven by acoustic field under microgravity

    OpenAIRE

    Tanabe, Mitsuaki; 田辺 光昭

    2007-01-01

    Natural convection is suppressed in space environment due to the weightlessness. Only centrifugal force is utilized currently to drive gas-phase thermal convection in space. This paper presents an alternative way to drive thermal convection. From the investigation of combustion oscillation in rocket motors, a new thermal convection had been found in stationary acoustic fields. Analyzing the phenomena, acoustic radiation force is found to be the candidate driving force. With a simplified syste...

  16. Marangoni Convection and Deviations from Maxwells' Evaporation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, P. N.; Snell, E. H.; Adamek, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the convective dynamics of evaporating pools of volatile liquids using an ultra-sensitive thermal imaging camera. During evaporation, there are significant convective flows inside the liquid due to Marangoni forces. We find that Marangoni convection during evaporation can dramatically affect the evaporation rates of volatile liquids. A simple heat balance model connects the convective velocities and temperature gradients to the evaporation rates.

  17. Toward an Understanding of the Madden-Julian Oscillation: With a Mesoscale-Convection-Resolving Model of 0.2 Degree Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Yamasaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes results from numerical experiments which have been performed as the author's first step toward a better understanding of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO. This study uses the author's mesoscale-convection-resolving model that was developed in the 1980s to improve parametrization schemes of moist convection. Results from numerical experiments by changing the SST anomaly in the warm pool area indicate that the period of the MJO does not monotonously change with increasing SST anomaly. Between the two extreme cases (no anomaly and strong anomaly, there is a regime in which the period varies in a wide range from 20 to 60 days. In the case of no warm pool, eastward-propagating Kelvin waves are dominant, whereas in the case of a strong warm pool, it produces a quasi-stationary convective system (with pronounced time variation. In a certain regime between the two extreme cases, convective activities with two different properties are strongly interacted, and the period of oscillations becomes complicated. The properties and behaviors of large-scale convective system (LCS, synoptic-scale convective system (SCS, mesoscale convective system (MCS, and mesoscale convection (MC, which constitute the hierarchical structure of the MJO, are also examined. It is also shown that cloud clusters, which constitute the SCS (such as super cloud cluster SCC, consist of a few MCS, and a new MCS forms to the west of the existing MCS. The northwesterly and southwesterly low-level flows contribute to this feature. In view of recent emphasis of the importance of the relative humidity above the boundary layer, it is shown that the model can simulate convective processes that moisten the atmosphere, and the importance of latent instability (positive CAPE, which is a necessary condition for the wave-CISK, is emphasized.

  18. Convective mixing in homogeneous porous media flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Jia-Hau; Chen, Peilong; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the flow processes in the technology of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in saline formations, we modeled a homogeneous porous media flow in a Hele-Shaw cell to investigate density-driven convection due to dissolution. We used an analogy of the fluid system to mimic the diffusion and subsequent convection when CO2 dissolves in brine, which generates a heavier solution. By varying the permeability, we examined the onset of convection, the falling dynamics, the wavelengths of fingers, and the rate of dissolution, for the Rayleigh number Ra (a dimensionless forcing term which is the ratio of buoyancy to diffusivity) in the range of 2.0 ×104≤Ra≤8.26 ×105 . Our results reveal that the effect of permeability influences significantly the initial convective speed, as well as the later coarsening dynamics of the heavier fingering plumes. However, the total dissolved mass, characterized by a nondimensional Nusselt number Nu, has an insignificant dependence on Ra. This implies that the total dissolution rate of CO2 is nearly constant in high Ra geological porous structures.

  19. Vortex statistics in turbulent rotating convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Geurts, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The vortices emerging in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water at Rayleigh number Ra=6.0×108 are investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and by direct numerical simulation. The so-called Q criterion is used to detect the vortices from velocity fields. This criter

  20. Determination of the convective heat transfer coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierings, D.; Bosman, F.; Peters, T.; Plasschaert, F.

    1987-01-01

    The value of the convective heat transfer coefficient (htc) is determined under different loading conditions by using a computer aided method. The thermal load has been applied mathematically as well as experimentally to the coronal surface of an axisymmetric tooth model. To verify the assumptions m

  1. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  2. Multiphase Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oresta, P.; Fornarelli, F.; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of two-phase Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylindrical cell with particles or vapor bubbles suspended in the fluid are described. The particles or bubbles are modeled as points, the Rayleigh number is 2×106 and the fluids considered are air, for the particle case, and

  3. Optimal Heating Strategies for a Convection Oven

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigter, J.D.; Scheerlinck, N.; Nicolai, B.M.; Impe, van J.F.

    2001-01-01

    In this study classical control theory is applied to a heat conduction model with convective boundary conditions. Optimal heating strategies are obtained through solution of an associated algebraic Riccati equation for a finite horizon linear quadratic regulator (LQR). The large dimensional system

  4. Convective cores in galactic cooling flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kritsuk, A G; Müller, E

    2000-01-01

    We use hydrodynamic simulations with adaptive grid refinement to study the dependence of hot gas flows in X-ray luminous giant elliptical galaxies on the efficiency of heat supply to the gas. We consider a number of potential heating mechanisms including Type Ia supernovae and sporadic nuclear activity of a central supermassive black hole. As a starting point for this research we use an equilibrium hydrostatic recycling model (Kritsuk 1996). We show that a compact cooling inflow develops, if the heating is slightly insufficient to counterbalance radiative cooling of the hot gas in the central few kiloparsecs. An excessive heating in the centre, instead, drives a convectively unstable outflow. We model the onset of the instability and a quasi-steady convective regime in the core of the galaxy in two-dimensions assuming axial symmetry. Provided the power of net energy supply in the core is not too high, the convection remains subsonic. The convective pattern is dominated by buoyancy driven large-scale mushroom-...

  5. Free convection film flows and heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Deyi

    2010-01-01

    Presents development of systematic studies for hydrodynamics and heat and mass transfer in laminar free convection, accelerating film boiling and condensation of Newtonian fluids, and accelerating film flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids. This book provides a system of analysis models with a developed velocity component method.

  6. Topology optimisation of natural convection problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Aage, Niels; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of the density-based topology optimisation approach for the design of heat sinks and micropumps based on natural convection effects. The problems are modelled under the assumptions of steady-state laminar flow using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation...

  7. Determination of the convective heat transfer coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierings, D.; Bosman, F.; Peters, T.; Plasschaert, F.

    1987-01-01

    The value of the convective heat transfer coefficient (htc) is determined under different loading conditions by using a computer aided method. The thermal load has been applied mathematically as well as experimentally to the coronal surface of an axisymmetric tooth model. To verify the assumptions m

  8. Forced Convection Heat Transfer in Circular Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    One of the pitfalls of engineering education is to lose the physical insight of the problem while tackling the mathematical part. Forced convection heat transfer (the Graetz-Nusselt problem) certainly falls into this category. The equation of energy together with the equation of motion leads to a partial differential equation subject to various…

  9. Evolution of Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally by control of the end losses in the 'scrape off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface...

  10. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  11. Theory and simulations of rotating convection

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, Adrian J; Lithwick, Yoram

    2014-01-01

    We study thermal convection in a rotating fluid, with the ultimate goal of explaining the structure of convection zones in rotating stars and planets. We first derive mixing-length theory for rapidly-rotating convection, arriving at the results of Stevenson (1979) via simple physical arguments. The theory predicts the properties of convection as a function of the imposed heat flux and rotation rate, independent of microscopic diffusivities. In particular, it predicts the mean temperature gradient; the rms velocity and temperature fluctuations; and the size of the eddies that dominate heat transport. We test all of these predictions with high resolution three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. The results agree remarkably well with the theory across more than two orders of magnitude in rotation rate. For example, the temperature gradient is predicted to scale as the rotation rate to the 4/5th power at fixed flux, and the simulations yield $0.75\\pm 0.06$. We conclude that the mixing length theory is a soli...

  12. Extreme Convective Weather in Future Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadian, Alan; Burton, Ralph; Groves, James; Blyth, Alan; Warner, James; Holland, Greg; Bruyere, Cindy; Done, James; Thielen, Jutta

    2016-04-01

    WISER (Weather Climate Change Impact Study at Extreme Resolution) is a project designed to analyse changes in extreme weather events in a future climate, using a weather model (WRF) which is able to resolve small scale processes. Use of a weather model is specifically designed to look at convection which is of a scale which cannot be resolved by climate models. The regional meso-scale precipitation events, which are critical in understanding climate change impacts will be analysed. A channel domain outer model, with a resolution of ~ 20km in the outer domain drives an inner domain of ~ 3 km resolution. Results from 1989-1994 and 2020-2024 and 2030-2034 will be presented to show the effects of extreme convective events over Western Europe. This presentation will provide details of the project. It will present data from the 1989-1994 ERA-interim and CCSM driven simulations, with analysis of the future years as defined above. The representation of pdfs of extreme precipitation, Outgoing Longwave Radiation and wind speeds, with preliminary comparison with observations will be discussed. It is also planned to use the output to drive the EFAS (European Flood model) to examine the predicted changes in quantity and frequency of severe and hazardous convective rainfall events and leading to the frequency of flash flooding due to heavy convective precipitation.

  13. Analogy between thermal convective and magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdmanis, Ya.Ya.; Kukainis, O.A.

    1977-01-01

    An examination is made of the analogy between thermo-convective instability and instability produced by various electromagnetic forces both in steady and alternating thermal and electromagnetic fields. An example is given for calculating an assumed bubble instability which could occur in an alternating magnetic field. 17 references.

  14. Provable Secure Identity Based Generalized Signcryption Scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Gang; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Shen, Yong; Han, Wenbao

    2010-01-01

    According to actual needs, generalized signcryption scheme can flexibly work as an encryption scheme, a signature scheme or a signcryption scheme. In this paper, firstly, we give a security model for identity based generalized signcryption which is more complete than existing model. Secondly, we propose an identity based generalized signcryption scheme. Thirdly, we give the security proof of the new scheme in this complete model. Comparing with existing identity based generalized signcryption...

  15. Convection and convective overshooting in stars more massive than 10 $M_\\odot$

    CERN Document Server

    Jie, Jin; Lv, Guoliang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, four sets of evolutionary models are computed with different values of the mixing length parameter $\\alpha_{\\rm p}$ and the overshooting parameter $\\delta_{\\rm ov}$. The properties of the convective cores and the convective envelopes are studied in the massive stars. We get three conclusions: First, the larger $\\alpha_{\\rm p}$ leads to enhancing the convective mixing, removing the chemical gradient, and increasing the convective heat transfer efficiency. Second, core potential $\\phi_{\\rm c} = M_{\\rm c} / R_{\\rm c}$ describes sufficiently the evolution of a star, whether it is a red or blue supergiant at central helium ignition. Third, the discontinuity of hydrogen profile above the hydrogen burning shell seriously affect the occurrence of blue loops in the Hertzsprung--Russell diagram.

  16. From convection rolls to finger convection in double-diffusive turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yantao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Double diffusive convection (DDC), which is the buoyancy driven flow with fluid density depending on two scalar components, is ubiquitous in many natural and engineering enviroments. Of great interests are scalers transfer rate and flow structures. Here we systematically investigate DDC flow between two horizontal plates, driven by an unstable salinity gradient and stabilized by a temperature gradient. Counterintuitively, when increasing the stabilizing temperature gradient, the salinity flux first increases, even though the velocity monotonically decreases, before it finally breaks down to the purely diffusive value. The enhanced salinity transport is traced back to a transition in the overall flow pattern, namely from large scale convection rolls to well-organised vertically-oriented salt fingers. We also show and explain that the unifying theory of thermal convection originally developed by Grossmann and Lohse for Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection can be directly applied to DDC flow for a wide range of contro...

  17. Influence of convective conditions on three dimensional mixed convective hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, A., E-mail: raufamar@ciitsahiwal.edu.pk [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Siddiq, M.K. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Abbasi, F.M. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Meraj, M.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Ashraf, M. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Pure and Applied Mathematics, Department of Mathematics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 63000 (Pakistan); Shehzad, S.A. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan)

    2016-10-15

    The present work deals with the steady laminar three-dimensional mixed convective magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. A uniform magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. Similarity variables are implemented to convert the non-linear partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Convective boundary conditions are utilized at surface of the sheet. A numerical technique of Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg (RFK45) is used to obtain the results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The physical dimensionless parameters are discussed through tables and graphs. - Highlights: • Mixed convective boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid is taken into account. • Impact of magnetic field is examined. • Convective heat and mass conditions are imposed. • Numerical solutions are presented and discussed.

  18. Equatorial cloud level convection on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon Joo; Imamura, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Sato, Takao M.; Maejima, Yasumitsu

    2016-10-01

    In the equatorial region on Venus, a clear cloud top morphology difference depending on solar local time has been observed through UV images. Laminar flow shaped clouds are shown on the morning side, and convective-like cells on the afternoon side (Titov et al. 2012). Baker et al. (1998) suggested that deep convective motions in the low-to-middle cloud layers at the 40–60 km range can explain cellular shapes. Imamura et al. (2014), however argued that this cannot be a reason, as convection in the low-to-middle cloud layers can be suppressed near sub solar regions due to a stabilizing effect by strong solar heating. We suggest that the observed feature may be related to strong solar heating at local noon time (Lee et al. 2015). Horizontal uneven distribution of an unknown UV absorber and/or cloud top structure may trigger horizontal convection (Toigo et al. 1994). In order to examine these possibilities, we processed 1-D radiative transfer model calculations from surface to 100 km altitude (SHDOM, Evans 1998), which includes clouds at 48-71 km altitudes (Crisp et al. 1986). The results on the equatorial thermal cooling and solar heating profiles were employed in a 2D fluid dynamic model calculation (CReSS, Tsuboki and Sakakibara 2007). The calculation covered an altitude range of 40-80 km and a 100-km horizontal distance. We compared three conditions; an 'effective' global circulation condition that cancels out unbalanced net radiative energy at equator, a condition without such global circulation effect, and the last condition assumed horizontally inhomogeneous unknown UV absorber distribution. Our results show that the local time dependence of lower level cloud convection is consistent with Imamura et al.'s result, and suggest a possible cloud top level convection caused by locally unbalanced net energy and/or horizontally uneven solar heating. This may be related to the observed cloud morphology in UV images. The effective global circulation condition, however

  19. Importance of Marangoni Convection in Laser Full-Penetration Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶晓虎; 陈熙

    2002-01-01

    We study the effects of welding speed, Marangoni convection and natural convection on heat transfer and melt flow in a laser full-penetration welding using a three-dimensional modelling approach. The computed results demonstrate the importance of considering Marangoni convection. The predicted weld pool profile is favourably compared with experimental observation.

  20. Measurement of the convective heat-transfer coefficient

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Rosaria; Fiordilino, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    We propose an experiment for investigating how objects cool down toward the thermal equilibrium with its surrounding through convection. We describe the time dependence of the temperature difference of the cooling object and the environment with an exponential decay function. By measuring the thermal constant tau, we determine the convective heat-transfer coefficient, which is a characteristic constant of the convection system.

  1. Probing the transition from shallow to deep convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Zhiming [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Gentine, Pierre [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-05-01

    In this funded project we highlighted the components necessary for the transition from shallow to deep convection. In particular we defined a prototype of shallow to deep convection, which is currently being implemented in the NASA GISS model. We also tried to highlight differences between land and oceanic convection.

  2. Examining the Impact of Prandtl Number and Surface Convection Models on Deep Solar Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, B. D.; Augustson, K.; Featherstone, N. A.; Miesch, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulent motions within the solar convection zone play a central role in the generation and maintenance of the Sun's magnetic field. This magnetic field reverses its polarity every 11 years and serves as the source of powerful space weather events, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, which can affect artificial satellites and power grids. The structure and inductive properties are linked to the amplitude (i.e. speed) of convective motion. Using the NASA Pleiades supercomputer, a 3D fluids code simulates these processes by evolving the Navier-Stokes equations in time and under an anelastic constraint. This code simulates the fluxes describing heat transport in the sun in a global spherical-shell geometry. Such global models can explicitly capture the large-scale motions in the deep convection zone but heat transport from unresolved small-scale convection in the surface layers must be parameterized. Here we consider two models for heat transport by surface convection, including a conventional turbulent thermal diffusion as well as an imposed flux that carries heat through the surface in a manner that is independent of the deep convection and the entropy stratification it establishes. For both models, we investigate the scaling of convective amplitude with decreasing diffusion (increasing Rayleigh number). If the Prandtl number is fixed, we find that the amplitude of convective motions increases with decreasing diffusion, possibly reaching an asymptotic value in the low diffusion limit. However, if only the thermal diffusion is decreased (keeping the viscosity fixed), we find that the amplitude of convection decreases with decreasing diffusion. Such a high-Prandtl-number, high-Peclet-number limit may be relevant for the Sun if magnetic fields mix momentum, effectively acting as an enhanced viscosity. In this case, our results suggest that the amplitude of large-scale convection in the Sun may be substantially less than in current models that employ an

  3. Natural convection of nanofluids over a convectively heated vertical plate embedded in a porous medium

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ghalambaz; Noghrehabadi,A.; Ghanbarzadeh, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the natural convective flow of nanofluids over a convectively heated vertical plate in a saturated Darcy porous medium is studied numerically. The governing equations are transformed into a set of ordinary differential equations by using appropriate similarity variables, and they are numerically solved using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method associated with the Gauss-Newton method. The effects of parametric variation of the Brownian motion parameter (Nb), thermophoresis param...

  4. Climatology of convective showers dynamics in a convection-permitting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Erwan; Brendel, Christoph; Ahrens, Bodo

    2017-04-01

    Convection-permitting simulations have proven their usefulness in improving both the representation of convective rain and the uncertainty range of climate projections. However, most studies have focused on temporal scales greater or equal to convection cell lifetime. A large knowledge gap remains on the model's performance in representing the temporal dynamic of convective showers and how could this temporal dynamic be altered in a warmer climate. In this study, we proposed to fill this gap by analyzing 5-minute convection-permitting model (CPM) outputs. In total, more than 1200 one-day cases are simulated at the resolution of 0.01° using the regional climate model COSMO-CLM over central Europe. The analysis follows a Lagrangian approach and consists of tracking showers characterized by five-minute intensities greater than 20 mm/hour. The different features of these showers (e.g., temporal evolution, horizontal speed, lifetime) are investigated. These features as modeled by an ERA-Interim forced simulation are evaluated using a radar dataset for the period 2004-2010. The model shows good performance in representing most features observed in the radar dataset. Besides, the observed relation between the temporal evolution of precipitation and temperature are well reproduced by the CPM. In a second modeling experiment, the impact of climate change on convective cell features are analyzed based on an EC-Earth RCP8.5 forced simulation for the period 2071-2100. First results show only minor changes in the temporal structure and size of showers. The increase in convective precipitation found in previous studies seems to be mainly due to an increase in the number of convective cells.

  5. Radial point collocation method (RPCM) for solving convection-diffusion problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, Radial point collocation method (RPCM), a kind ofmeshfree method, is applied to solve convectiondiffusion problem. The main feature of this approach is to use the interpolation schemes in local supported domains based on radial basis functions. As a result, this method is local and hence the system matrix is banded which is very attractive for practical engineering problems. In the numerical examination, RPCM is applied to solve non-linear convection-diffusion 2D Burgers equations. The results obtained by RPCM demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method for solving transient fluid dynamic problems. A fictitious point scheme is adopted to improve the solution accuracy while Neumann boundary conditions exist. The meshfree feature of the present method is very attractive in solving computational fluid problems.

  6. Evaluation of Subgrid-Scale Transport of Hydrometeors in a PDF-based Scheme using High-Resolution CRM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M.; Ovchinnikov, M.; Wang, M.; Larson, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    In current climate models, the model resolution is too coarse to explicitly resolve deep convective systems. Parameterization schemes are therefore needed to represent the physical processes at the sub-grid scale. Recently, an approach based on assumed probability density functions (PDFs) has been developed to help unify the various parameterization schemes used in current global models. In particular, a unified parameterization scheme called the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB) scheme has been developed and tested successfully for shallow boundary-layer clouds. CLUBB's implementation in the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5 (CAM5) is also being extended to treat deep convection cases, but parameterizing subgrid-scale vertical transport of hydrometeors remains a challenge. To investigate the roots of the problem and possible solutions, we generate a high-resolution benchmark simulation of a deep convection case using a cloud-resolving model (CRM) called System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM). We use the high-resolution 3D CRM results to assess the prognostic and diagnostic higher-order moments in CLUBB that are in relation to the subgrid-scale transport of hydrometeors. We also analyze the heat and moisture budgets in terms of CLUBB variables from the SAM benchmark simulation. The results from this study will be used to devise a better representation of vertical subgrid-scale transport of hydrometeors by utilizing the sub-grid variability information from CLUBB.

  7. Multiuser switched diversity scheduling schemes

    KAUST Repository

    Shaqfeh, Mohammad

    2012-09-01

    Multiuser switched-diversity scheduling schemes were recently proposed in order to overcome the heavy feedback requirements of conventional opportunistic scheduling schemes by applying a threshold-based, distributed, and ordered scheduling mechanism. The main idea behind these schemes is that slight reduction in the prospected multiuser diversity gains is an acceptable trade-off for great savings in terms of required channel-state-information feedback messages. In this work, we characterize the achievable rate region of multiuser switched diversity systems and compare it with the rate region of full feedback multiuser diversity systems. We propose also a novel proportional fair multiuser switched-based scheduling scheme and we demonstrate that it can be optimized using a practical and distributed method to obtain the feedback thresholds. We finally demonstrate by numerical examples that switched-diversity scheduling schemes operate within 0.3 bits/sec/Hz from the ultimate network capacity of full feedback systems in Rayleigh fading conditions. © 2012 IEEE.

  8. Optimal probabilistic dense coding schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kögler, Roger A.; Neves, Leonardo

    2017-04-01

    Dense coding with non-maximally entangled states has been investigated in many different scenarios. We revisit this problem for protocols adopting the standard encoding scheme. In this case, the set of possible classical messages cannot be perfectly distinguished due to the non-orthogonality of the quantum states carrying them. So far, the decoding process has been approached in two ways: (i) The message is always inferred, but with an associated (minimum) error; (ii) the message is inferred without error, but only sometimes; in case of failure, nothing else is done. Here, we generalize on these approaches and propose novel optimal probabilistic decoding schemes. The first uses quantum-state separation to increase the distinguishability of the messages with an optimal success probability. This scheme is shown to include (i) and (ii) as special cases and continuously interpolate between them, which enables the decoder to trade-off between the level of confidence desired to identify the received messages and the success probability for doing so. The second scheme, called multistage decoding, applies only for qudits ( d-level quantum systems with d>2) and consists of further attempts in the state identification process in case of failure in the first one. We show that this scheme is advantageous over (ii) as it increases the mutual information between the sender and receiver.

  9. Energy partitioning schemes: a dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, I

    2007-01-01

    Two closely related energy partitioning schemes, in which the total energy is presented as a sum of atomic and diatomic contributions by using the "atomic decomposition of identity", are compared on the example of N,N-dimethylformamide, a simple but chemically rich molecule. Both schemes account for different intramolecular interactions, for instance they identify the weak C-H...O intramolecular interactions, but give completely different numbers. (The energy decomposition scheme based on the virial theorem is also considered.) The comparison of the two schemes resulted in a dilemma which is especially striking when these schemes are applied for molecules distorted from their equilibrium structures: one either gets numbers which are "on the chemical scale" and have quite appealing values at the equilibrium molecular geometries, but exhibiting a counter-intuitive distance dependence (the two-center energy components increase in absolute value with the increase of the interatomic distances)--or numbers with too large absolute values but "correct" distance behaviour. The problem is connected with the quick decay of the diatomic kinetic energy components.

  10. Impact of tropical convection and ENSO variability in vertical distributions of CO and O3 over an urban site of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, L. K.; Sheel, Varun; Kajino, M.; Deushi, M.; Gunthe, Sachin S.; Sinha, P. R.; Yadav, Ravi; Pal, Devendra; Nedelec, P.; Thouret, Valérie; Smit, Herman G.

    2017-07-01

    This study is based on the analysis of the measurement of ozone and water vapor by airbus in-service aircraft (MOZAIC) data of vertical ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) over Hyderabad during November 2005-March 2009. Measurements in the upper troposphere show highest values of O3 (53-75 ppbv) and CO (80-110 ppbv) during the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. The episodes of strong wind shears (>20 ms-1) were frequent during the monsoon/post-monsoon months, while weak shear conditions (MOZART-4 shows rapid increase with OLR indicating large overestimation of convective transport. A modified Tiedtke convective scheme provides better representation compared to the Hack/Zhang-McFarlane schemes for both O3 and CO during the monsoon season. The difference between observation and simulations were particularly large during transition from El Niño to La Niña phases. The different convection scheme and horizontal resolution in the MOZART-4 and CCM2 seem to be the major causes of disagreement between these models. Vertical profiles of both O3 and CO during extreme events such a tropical cyclones (TCs) show strong influence of the convective-dynamics over Bay of Bengal (BOB).

  11. Impact of tropical convection and ENSO variability in vertical distributions of CO and O3 over an urban site of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, L. K.; Sheel, Varun; Kajino, M.; Deushi, M.; Gunthe, Sachin S.; Sinha, P. R.; Yadav, Ravi; Pal, Devendra; Nedelec, P.; Thouret, Valérie; Smit, Herman G.

    2016-09-01

    This study is based on the analysis of the measurement of ozone and water vapor by airbus in-service aircraft (MOZAIC) data of vertical ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) over Hyderabad during November 2005-March 2009. Measurements in the upper troposphere show highest values of O3 (53-75 ppbv) and CO (80-110 ppbv) during the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. The episodes of strong wind shears (>20 ms-1) were frequent during the monsoon/post-monsoon months, while weak shear conditions (MOZART-4 shows rapid increase with OLR indicating large overestimation of convective transport. A modified Tiedtke convective scheme provides better representation compared to the Hack/Zhang-McFarlane schemes for both O3 and CO during the monsoon season. The difference between observation and simulations were particularly large during transition from El Niño to La Niña phases. The different convection scheme and horizontal resolution in the MOZART-4 and CCM2 seem to be the major causes of disagreement between these models. Vertical profiles of both O3 and CO during extreme events such a tropical cyclones (TCs) show strong influence of the convective-dynamics over Bay of Bengal (BOB).

  12. A Physically Based Horizontal Subgrid-scale Turbulent Mixing Parameterization for the Convective Boundary Layer in Mesoscale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bowen; Xue, Ming; Zhu, Kefeng

    2017-04-01

    Compared to the representation of vertical turbulent mixing through various PBL schemes, the treatment of horizontal turbulence mixing in the boundary layer within mesoscale models, with O(10) km horizontal grid spacing, has received much less attention. In mesoscale models, subgrid-scale horizontal fluxes most often adopt the gradient-diffusion assumption. The horizontal mixing coefficients are usually set to a constant, or through the 2D Smagorinsky formulation, or in some cases based on the 1.5-order turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) closure. In this work, horizontal turbulent mixing parameterizations using physically based characteristic velocity and length scales are proposed for the convective boundary layer based on analysis of a well-resolved, wide-domain large-eddy simulation (LES). The proposed schemes involve different levels of sophistication. The first two schemes can be used together with first-order PBL schemes, while the third uses TKE to define its characteristic velocity scale and can be used together with TKE-based higher-order PBL schemes. The current horizontal mixing formulations are also assessed a priori through the filtered LES results to illustrate their limitations. The proposed parameterizations are tested a posteriori in idealized simulations of turbulent dispersion of a passive scalar. Comparisons show improved horizontal dispersion by the proposed schemes, and further demonstrate the weakness of the current schemes.

  13. Explicit simulation of a midlatitude Mesoscale Convective System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, G.D.; Cotton, W.R. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    We have explicitly simulated the mesoscale convective system (MCS) observed on 23-24 June 1985 during PRE-STORM, the Preliminary Regional Experiment for the Stormscale Operational and Research and Meterology Program. Stensrud and Maddox (1988), Johnson and Bartels (1992), and Bernstein and Johnson (1994) are among the researchers who have investigated various aspects of this MCS event. We have performed this MCS simulation (and a similar one of a tropical MCS; Alexander and Cotton 1994) in the spirit of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Cloud Systems Study (GCSS), in which cloud-resolving models are used to assist in the formulation and testing of cloud parameterization schemes for larger-scale models. In this paper, we describe (1) the nature of our 23-24 June MCS dimulation and (2) our efforts to date in using our explicit MCS simulations to assist in the development of a GCM parameterization for mesoscale flow branches. The paper is organized as follows. First, we discuss the synoptic situation surrounding the 23-24 June PRE-STORM MCS followed by a discussion of the model setup and results of our simulation. We then discuss the use of our MCS simulation. We then discuss the use of our MCS simulations in developing a GCM parameterization for mesoscale flow branches and summarize our results.

  14. Distance labeling schemes for trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Gørtz, Inge Li; Bistrup Halvorsen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    We consider distance labeling schemes for trees: given a tree with n nodes, label the nodes with binary strings such that, given the labels of any two nodes, one can determine, by looking only at the labels, the distance in the tree between the two nodes. A lower bound by Gavoille et al. [Gavoille...... variants such as, for example, small distances in trees [Alstrup et al., SODA, 2003]. We improve the known upper and lower bounds of exact distance labeling by showing that 1/4 log2(n) bits are needed and that 1/2 log2(n) bits are sufficient. We also give (1 + ε)-stretch labeling schemes using Theta......(log(n)) bits for constant ε> 0. (1 + ε)-stretch labeling schemes with polylogarithmic label size have previously been established for doubling dimension graphs by Talwar [Talwar, STOC, 2004]. In addition, we present matching upper and lower bounds for distance labeling for caterpillars, showing that labels...

  15. Using Jupiter's gravitational field to probe the Jovian convective dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2016-03-23

    Convective motion in the deep metallic hydrogen region of Jupiter is believed to generate its magnetic field, the strongest in the solar system. The amplitude, structure and depth of the convective motion are unknown. A promising way of probing the Jovian convective dynamo is to measure its effect on the external gravitational field, a task to be soon undertaken by the Juno spacecraft. We calculate the gravitational signature of non-axisymmetric convective motion in the Jovian metallic hydrogen region and show that with sufficiently accurate measurements it can reveal the nature of the deep convection.

  16. Operator Splitting Methods for Degenerate Convection-Diffusion Equations I: Convergence and Entropy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Helge; Karlsen, Kenneth H.; Lie, Knut-Andreas

    1999-10-01

    We present and analyze a numerical method for the solution of a class of scalar, multi-dimensional, nonlinear degenerate convection-diffusion equations. The method is based on operator splitting to separate the convective and the diffusive terms in the governing equation. The nonlinear, convective part is solved using front tracking and dimensional splitting, while the nonlinear diffusion equation is solved by a suitable difference scheme. We verify L{sup 1} compactness of the corresponding set of approximate solutions and derive precise entropy estimates. In particular, these results allow us to pass to the limit in our approximations and recover an entropy solution of the problem in question. The theory presented covers a large class of equations. Important subclasses are hyperbolic conservation laws, porous medium type equations, two-phase reservoir flow equations, and strongly degenerate equations coming from the recent theory of sedimentation-consolidation processes. A thorough numerical investigation of the method analyzed in this paper (and similar methods) is presented in a companion paper. (author)

  17. A review of the theoretical basis for bulk mass flux convective parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Plant

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Most parameterizations for precipitating convection in use today are bulk schemes, in which an ensemble of cumulus elements with different properties is modelled as a single, representative entraining-detraining plume. We review the underpinning mathematical model for such parameterizations, in particular by comparing it with spectral models in which elements are not combined into the representative plume. The chief merit of a bulk model is that the representative plume can be described by an equation set with the same structure as that which describes each element in a spectral model. The equivalence relies on an ansatz for detrained condensate introduced by Yanai et al. (1973 and on a simplified microphysics. There are also conceptual differences in the closure of bulk and spectral parameterizations. In particular, we show that the convective quasi-equilibrium closure of Arakawa and Schubert (1974 for spectral parameterizations cannot be carried over to a bulk parameterization in a straightforward way. Quasi-equilibrium of the cloud work function assumes a timescale separation between a slow forcing process and a rapid convective response. But, for the natural bulk analogue to the cloud-work function, the relevant forcing is characterised by a different timescale, and so its quasi-equilibrium entails a different physical constraint. Closures of bulk parameterizations that use a parcel value of CAPE do not suffer from this timescale issue. However, the Yanai et al. (1973 ansatz must be invoked as a necessary ingredient of those closures.

  18. Numerical simulation on the evolution of cloud particles in 3-D convective cloud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A 3-D convective cloud model with compressible non-hydrostatic dynamics and the spectral bin microphysics of a 2-D slab-symmetric model has been used to simulate an observed supercell storm occurring on 29 June, 2000 near Bird City, Kansas, USA. The main objective of this paper is to study the evolution of particles in this convective storm with bin spectral microphysics scheme. Graupels form and grow through two mechanisms, deposition and riming, with the riming process dominant on top of the inflow and in the upper portion of main updraft. Over the outflow and during the developing and mature stages of the storm, graupel particles mainly grow through deposition with dominant unimodal spectra. Most fall out after growing up. Reducing initial relative humidity disturbance (increasing initial potential temperature disturbance) has negative impact on the formation and growth of graupels over the inflow (outflow). This study shows that large graupel and hail could be suppressed by altering the deposition and coalescence process over the inflow and main updraft. At different locations of the convective cells and with different initial humidity and potential temperature disturbance, the graupel formation and growth mechanisms are different, so as to the feasible hail suppression locations and methods.

  19. Convectively Forced Gravity Waves and their Sensitivity to Heating Profile and Atmospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Oliver; Parker, Douglas; Griffiths, Stephen; Vosper, Simon; Stirling, Alison

    2016-04-01

    It has been known for some time that convective heating is communicated to its environment by gravity waves. Despite this, the radiation of gravity waves in macro-scale models, which are typically forced at the grid-scale by meso-scale parameterization schemes, is not well understood. We present here theoretical work directed toward improving our fundamental understanding of convectively forced gravity wave effects at the meso-scale, in order to begin to address this problem. Starting with the hydrostatic, non-rotating, 2D, Boussinesq equations in a slab geometry, we find a radiating, analytical solution to prescribed sensible heat forcing for both the vertical velocity and potential temperature response. Both Steady and pulsed heating with adjustable horizontal structure is considered. From these solutions we construct a simple model capable of interrogating the spatial and temporal sensitivity to chosen heating functions of the remote forced response in particular. By varying the assumed buoyancy frequency, the influence of the model stratosphere on the upward radiation of gravity waves, and in turn, on the tropospheric response can be understood. Further, we find that the macro-scale response to convection is highly dependent on the radiation characteristics of gravity waves, which are in turn dependent upon the temporal and spatial structure of the source, and upper boundary condition of the domain.

  20. Mixed convection boundary-layer flow about an isothermal solid sphere in a nanofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tham, L [Faculty of Agro Industry and Natural Resources, Universiti Malaysia Kelantan, Kelantan (Malaysia); Nazar, R [School of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia); Pop, I, E-mail: rmn72my@yahoo.com [Faculty of Mathematics, University of Cluj, Cluj (Romania)

    2011-08-01

    The steady mixed convection boundary-layer flow of a nanofluid about a solid sphere with constant surface temperature has been studied for cases of both assisting and opposing flows. The resulting system of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved numerically using an implicit finite-difference scheme known as the Keller-box method. The solutions for the flow and heat-transfer characteristics are evaluated numerically for various values of the parameters, namely the nanoparticle volume fraction {psi} and the mixed convection parameter {lambda} at Prandtl numbers Pr=0.7 and 6.2. The three different types of nanoparticles considered are Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu and TiO{sub 2}, using water-based fluid with Pr=6.2. It is found that for each particular nanoparticle, as the nanoparticle volume fraction {psi} increases, the skin friction coefficient and the heat-transfer rate at the surface also increase. This leads to an increase in the value of the mixed convection parameter {lambda}, which at first gives no separation.