WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonmedical prescription drugs

  1. Nonmedical Prescription Drug Use among Adolescents: The Influence of Bonds to Family and School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jason A.

    2009-01-01

    There has been a tremendous increase in the prevalence of nonmedical prescription drug use among adolescents in recent years. Research now indicates that the prevalence of nonmedical prescription drug use is greater than the prevalence of other illicit drug use, excluding marijuana. Despite these recent trends, there is a dearth of research in the…

  2. Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs by College Students with Minority Sexual Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duryea, Daniel G.; Calleja, Nancy G.; MacDonald, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Results from the 2009 "National College Health Assessment" were analyzed by gender and sexual orientation for college students' nonmedical use of prescription drugs. Male and female students identified as having a minority sexual orientation (gay or bisexual) were significantly more likely to use nonmedical prescription drugs than…

  3. Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs by College Students with Minority Sexual Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duryea, Daniel G.; Calleja, Nancy G.; MacDonald, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Results from the 2009 "National College Health Assessment" were analyzed by gender and sexual orientation for college students' nonmedical use of prescription drugs. Male and female students identified as having a minority sexual orientation (gay or bisexual) were significantly more likely to use nonmedical prescription drugs than…

  4. Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms and Nonmedical Prescription Drug Use Among College Students With Trauma Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Lindsay S; Wiersma-Mosley, Jacquelyn D; Feldner, Matthew T; Melkonian, Alexander J; Milner, Lauren A; Lewis, Sarah F

    2016-01-01

    Nonmedical prescription drug use, defined as using the drug without a prescription or in ways for which it is not prescribed, and traumatic event exposure are highly prevalent among college students. Despite evidence that posttraumatic stress symptoms could place college students at risk for nonmedical prescription drug problems, no studies have examined this relationship. This study was a preliminary examination of posttraumatic stress symptoms, lifetime nonmedical prescription drug use, hazardous use, and dependence symptoms among college students with trauma exposure. Participants were students attending a rural college in Virginia, recruited through psychology classes, flyers, LISTSERVs, and announcements at student events. All students who reported experiencing at least one traumatic event were included (N = 119); participants' mean age was 19.7 years (SD = 1.90), about half were women (n = 63, 53%), and most were Caucasian (n = 103, 87%). Nearly 60% of participants (n = 71) reported using nonmedical prescription drugs at least once during their lifetime and were more likely than those with no use to report hazardous alcohol use (p stress symptom frequency was positively associated with hazardous nonmedical prescription drug use, after controlling for gender, depressive symptoms, and hazardous alcohol use (p stress symptom frequency was higher for those with any nonmedical prescription drug dependence symptoms (p student had ever engaged in nonmedical prescription drug use. Findings suggest that consideration of the types of behaviors and problems a college student is experiencing related to nonmedical prescription drug use may be more relevant to posttraumatic stress symptom frequency than dichotomous measures of nonmedical prescription drug use alone. Further, the association between the frequency of posttraumatic stress symptoms and both hazardous nonmedical prescription drug use and dependence symptoms among college students with a trauma history deserves

  5. Medical and Nonmedical Users of Prescription Drugs among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenbroek, Katelyn; Rothstein, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine medical and nonmedical users of prescription opioids, central nervous system depressants, and stimulants taken individually and in combination. Participants: Undergraduates at an urban mid-Atlantic university with 12,000 students. Methods: A questionnaire administered in classes provided 413 responses, with a usable response…

  6. Nonmedical Prescription Drug Use among Midwestern Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nicholas K.; Melander, Lisa; Sanchez, Shanell

    2016-01-01

    Prescription drug misuse has been an increasing problem in the United States, yet few studies have examined the protective factors that reduce risk of prescription drug abuse among rural adolescents. Using social control theory as a theoretical framework, we test whether parent, school, and community attachment reduce the likelihood of lifetime…

  7. Nonmedical Use of Antihistaminergic Anxiolytics and Other Prescription Drugs among Persons with Opioid Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Tove; Kral, Alex H.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nonmedical prescription drug use (NMPDU) is an increasing problem, insufficiently studied among people in opioid maintenance treatment (OMT). This study investigates the prevalence of and factors associated with NMPDU for drug classes insufficiently described in opioid-dependent populations, including antihistaminergic anxiolytics and central stimulants. Methods. Study participants were recruited at two OMT clinics in Malmo, Sweden, between October 2014 and December 2015 (N = 73) and interviewed about their use, motivations for use, and acquisition and administration of prescription drugs. Results. The majority of the sample reported lifetime NMPDU: 60% for benzodiazepine-like hypnotics (z-drugs), 21% for pregabalin, 19% for stimulants, and 12%–15% for antihistaminergic anxiolytics. Lower age was associated with nonmedical benzodiazepine use (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 0.89; 95% Confidence Interval = 0.82–0.97). Illicit acquisition was reported by 61% of people using z-drugs, 46% of people using pregabalin, and 38% of people using prescription stimulants, but only by 6–10% of people using antihistaminergic anxiolytics. Conclusions. The substantial nonmedical use of pregabalin, z-drugs, and prescription stimulants found in this study suggests that clinicians should prescribe these drugs with great caution. Nonmedical use of antihistaminergic anxiolytics does not seem to be a clinical issue among people in OMT in a Swedish setting, but we propose future studies to monitor their use. PMID:28097037

  8. Nonmedical Use of Antihistaminergic Anxiolytics and Other Prescription Drugs among Persons with Opioid Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disa Dahlman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nonmedical prescription drug use (NMPDU is an increasing problem, insufficiently studied among people in opioid maintenance treatment (OMT. This study investigates the prevalence of and factors associated with NMPDU for drug classes insufficiently described in opioid-dependent populations, including antihistaminergic anxiolytics and central stimulants. Methods. Study participants were recruited at two OMT clinics in Malmo, Sweden, between October 2014 and December 2015 (N=73 and interviewed about their use, motivations for use, and acquisition and administration of prescription drugs. Results. The majority of the sample reported lifetime NMPDU: 60% for benzodiazepine-like hypnotics (z-drugs, 21% for pregabalin, 19% for stimulants, and 12%–15% for antihistaminergic anxiolytics. Lower age was associated with nonmedical benzodiazepine use (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 0.89; 95% Confidence Interval = 0.82–0.97. Illicit acquisition was reported by 61% of people using z-drugs, 46% of people using pregabalin, and 38% of people using prescription stimulants, but only by 6–10% of people using antihistaminergic anxiolytics. Conclusions. The substantial nonmedical use of pregabalin, z-drugs, and prescription stimulants found in this study suggests that clinicians should prescribe these drugs with great caution. Nonmedical use of antihistaminergic anxiolytics does not seem to be a clinical issue among people in OMT in a Swedish setting, but we propose future studies to monitor their use.

  9. How patients understand the term "nonmedical use" of prescription drugs: insights from cognitive interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Jennifer; Halkitis, Perry N; Horton, Ariana; Khan, Rubina; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2014-01-01

    With rising rates of prescription drug abuse and associated overdose deaths, there is great interest in having accurate and efficient screening tools that identify nonmedical use of prescription drugs in health care settings. The authors sought to gain a better understanding of how patients interpret questions about misuse of prescription drugs, with the goal of improving the accuracy and acceptability of instruments intended for use in primary care. A total of 27 English-speaking adult patients were recruited from an urban safety net primary care clinic to complete a cognitive interview about a 4-item screening questionnaire for tobacco, alcohol, illicit drugs, and misuse of prescription drugs. Detailed field notes were analyzed for overall comprehension of the screening items on illicit drug use and prescription drug misuse, the accuracy with which participants classified drugs into these categories, and whether the screening response correctly captured the participant's substance use behavior. Based on initial responses to the screening items, 6 (22%) participants screened positive for past-year prescription drug misuse, and 8 (30%) for illicit drug use. The majority (26/27) of participants correctly interpreted the item on illicit drug use, and appropriately classified drugs in this category. Eleven (41%) participants had errors in their understanding of the prescription drug misuse item. The most common error was classifying use of medications without abuse potential as nonmedical use. All cases of misunderstanding the prescription drug misuse item occurred among participants who screened negative for illicit drug use. The results suggest that terminology used to describe misuse of prescription medications may be misunderstood by many primary care patients, particularly those who do not use illicit drugs. Failure to improve upon the language used to describe prescription drug misuse in screening questionnaires intended for use in medical settings could

  10. Sexual Orientation and First-Year College Students' Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadick, Richard; Dagirmanjian, Faedra Backus; Trub, Leora; Dawson, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine differences between heterosexual and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and questioning students' nonmedical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD). Participants: First-year university students between October 2009 and October 2013 who self-identified as heterosexual, lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning. Methods: Students completed…

  11. Sexual orientation and first-year college students' nonmedical use of prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadick, Richard; Dagirmanjian, Faedra Backus; Trub, Leora; Dawson, Heather

    2016-01-01

    To examine differences between heterosexual and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and questioning students' nonmedical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD). First-year university students between October 2009 and October 2013 who self-identified as heterosexual, lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning. Students completed questionnaires on demographic variables and NMUPD. Any NMUPD was examined, as were stimulants, anxiolytics, and painkillers. Hierarchical regression was used to examine differential NMUPD based on sexual orientation, gender, and race. For any NMUPD and painkillers, bisexual and questioning students reported higher rates of nonmedical use than heterosexual students and gay men. When compared with heterosexual females, lesbian, bisexual, and questioning females reported higher any NMUPD and nonmedical painkiller use. For stimulants and anxiolytics, bisexual students reported the highest nonmedical use, followed by gay and lesbian students. There may be particular risk for NMUPD associated with membership in marginalized groups in terms of both sexual orientation and gender.

  12. The Association between Non-Medical Prescription Drug Use and Suicidal Behavior among United States Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Divin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence represents a vulnerable time for the development of both drug use/abuse and mental illness. Although previous research has substantiated a relationship between drug use and suicidal behavior, little research has examined this relationship with non-medical prescription drug use. Given the growing prevalence of non-medical prescription drug use (NMPDU among adolescents, this study explored the association between NMPDU and suicidal behavior. Nationally representative data were derived from 16, 410 adolescents who completed the 2009 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Approximately 19.8% of participants reported lifetime NMPDU. NMPDU was associated with significantly increased odds of suicidal behavior (P < 0.01, with seriously considering attempting suicide and making a plan about attempting suicide representing the strongest correlates for males and females. Results suggest the importance of 1 continued reinforcement of drug education programs in high school begun at earlier ages and 2 mental health care and screenings among adolescents.

  13. Non-medical use of prescription drugs among illicit drug users: A case study on an online drug forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönkä, Sanna; Katainen, Anu

    2017-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription drugs is a growing phenomenon associated with increasing health-related harms. However, little is known about the drivers of this process among illicit drug users. Our aim is to show how the qualities of pharmaceutical drugs, pharmaceutical related knowledge, online communities sharing this knowledge and medical professionals mediate and transform the consumption behaviour related to pharmaceutical drugs. The data consist of discussion threads from an online drug use forum. Using actor network theory (ANT), we analysed translations that mediate the online user community's relationship with pharmaceutical drugs. Differences in experienced drug effects are explained both as a process of 'learning' and as differences in brain chemistry at the receptor level. Both science- and experience-based information are shared on best practices to optimise use, avoid adverse health effects and maximise the experience of intoxication. The expanded context of doctors' practices places stress on the medical framework for drug use. Our analysis shows how the non-medical use of psychoactive pharmaceuticals relates to joint, medicalised ideas of bodies as sites of medical experimentation, as well as to the collective process of constructing 'pharmaceutical competences' in user networks. Understandings of intoxication have increasingly been permeated with the pharmacological and scientific logic of knowledge. The forum works as a platform for harm reduction inspired exchange of knowledge. However, the user community's knowledge sharing practices can generate a shared perception of a sufficient or even superior drug use experience and knowledge. This may lead to overdoses and other risky behaviour, and thereby contribute to increased harms related to non-medical use of prescription drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Development and Reliability of Items Measuring the Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs for the Youth Risk Behavior Survey: Results Froman Initial Pilot Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Melissa M.; Weiler, Robert M.; Haddox, J. David

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to develop and test the reliability of self-report survey items designed to monitor the nonmedical use of prescription drugs among adolescents. Methods: Eighteen nonmedical prescription drug items designed to be congruent with the substance abuse items in the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's…

  15. Exploring the Use of Nonmedical Sources of Prescription Drugs among Immigrant Latinos in the Rural Southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissman, Aaron T.; Bloom, Fred R.; Leichliter, Jami S.; Bachmann, Laura H.; Montano, Jaime; Topmiller, Michael; Rhodes, Scott D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little is known about access to medicine among immigrant Latinos in the United States (US). This study explored access to, and use of, prescription drugs obtained from nonmedical sources among recently arrived, Spanish-speaking immigrant Latinos in rural North Carolina (NC). Methods: Our community-based participatory research…

  16. Non-medical use of prescription drugs and HIV risk behaviour in transgender women in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benotsch, Eric G; Zimmerman, Rick S; Cathers, Laurie; Pierce, Juan; McNulty, Shawn; Heck, Ted; Perrin, Paul B; Snipes, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    Male-to-female transgender women (TGW) experience high rates of substance use and HIV. A recent substance use trend is the use of prescription medication without a doctor's consent. No research to date has examined the associations between this non-medical use of prescription drugs and HIV risk behaviour in TGW. In the present study, TGW recruited from community venues (N = 104) in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States completed surveys assessing demographic information, non-medical use of prescription drugs, other substance use, injection practices and sexual risk behaviour. Twenty-four per cent of the sample reported lifetime non-medical use of prescription drugs across the following categories: analgesics (21.2%), anxiolytics (14.4%), stimulants (12.5%) and sedatives (8.7%). Participants reporting non-medical use of prescription drugs were more likely to report other substance use, needle use to inject drugs, injecting silicone and sharing needles. In multivariable analyses, non-medical use of prescription drugs was associated with unprotected sex, sex after engaging in substance use, and commercial sex work, after controlling for demographic factors. Self-esteem and social support from family served as protective factors for non-medical use of prescription drugs. HIV-prevention programmes focused on TGW in the United States may wish to expand their assessment of substance use to include the use of prescription medications without a physician's consent.

  17. Digital social media, youth, and nonmedical use of prescription drugs: the need for reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Tim K; Liang, Bryan A; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2013-07-26

    The tragic death of 18-year-old Ryan Haight highlighted the ethical, public health, and youth patient safety concerns posed by illicit online nonmedical use of prescription drugs (NUPM) sourcing, leading to a federal law in an effort to address this concern. Yet despite the tragedy and resulting law, the NUPM epidemic in the United States has continued to escalate and represents a dangerous and growing trend among youth and adolescents. A critical point of access associated with youth NUPM is the Internet. Internet use among this vulnerable patient group is ubiquitous and includes new, emerging, and rapidly developing technologies-particularly social media networking (eg, Facebook and Twitter). These unregulated technologies may pose a potential risk for enabling youth NUPM behavior. In order to address limitations of current regulations and promote online safety, we advocate for legislative reform to specifically address NUPM promotion via social media and other new online platforms. Using more comprehensive and modernized federal legislation that anticipates future online developments is critical in substantively addressing youth NUPM behavior occurring through the Internet.

  18. Study Drugs and Academic Integrity: The Role of Beliefs about an Academic Honor Code in the Prediction of Nonmedical Prescription Drug Use for Academic Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Kelsy B.; Rutledge, Patricia C.; Conklin, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    The role of beliefs about academic integrity in college students' decisions to use nonmedical prescription drugs (NMPDs) in academic settings was examined. In Spring 2012 the authors obtained survey data from 645 participants at a small, undergraduate, private liberal arts institution in the Northeastern United States. A broadcast e-mail message…

  19. Associations Between the Big Five Personality Traits and the Non-Medical Use of Prescription Drugs for Cognitive Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Sebastian; Schunck, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    While the number of studies of the non-medical use of prescription drugs to augment cognitive functions is growing steadily, psychological factors that can potentially help explain variance in such pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement (CE) behavior are often neglected in research. This study investigates the association between the Big Five personality traits and a retrospective (prior CE-drug use) as well as a prospective (willingness to use CE drugs) measure of taking prescription drugs with the purpose of augmenting one's cognitive functions (e.g., concentration, memory, or vigilance) without medical necessity. We use data from a large representative survey of German employees (N = 6454, response rate = 29.8%). The Five Factor Model (FFM) of Personality was measured with a short version of the Big Five Personality Traits Inventory (BFI-S), which includes: openness to experience, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism. Together with this, demographic variables such as gender, age, education, and income were used as potential confounders in multiple logistic regression models. Our results show a 2.96% lifetime prevalence of CE-drug use and a 10.45% willingness to (re)use such drugs in the future. We found that less conscientious and more neurotic respondents have a higher probability of prior CE-drug use and a greater willingness to use CE drugs in the future. No significant effects were found for openness, extraversion, or agreeableness. Prior CE-drug use was strongly associated with a greater willingness to take such drugs in the future. This study shows that specific personality traits are not only associated with prior enhancement behavior, but also affect the willingness to (re)use such drugs. It helps increase understanding of the risk factors of CE-drug use, which is a health-related behavior that can entail severe side-effects for consumers. The knowledge gathered can thus help improve interventions aimed at minimizing health

  20. Nonmedical prescription drug use among US college students at a Midwest university: a partial test of social learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Robert L; Steele, Jennifer L

    2010-05-01

    We estimate the prevalence of nonmedical prescription drug (NMPD) use and test social learning theory as an explanation for NMPD use based upon data from a large pilot study. Data were collected from 465 college students at a Midwestern university in the USA using a self-administered questionnaire. The sample was predominantly white (88%), 43% were female and the mean age was 22. Most participants (80%) were not members of social fraternities or sororities. A majority of students did not report NMPD use: 39.4% of respondents reported lifetime NMPD use, 31% reported past-year use, and 14.4% reported past-month use. Multivariate regression results partially supported social learning theory as an explanation for lifetime NMPD use. Limitations and suggestions for future research are suggested.

  1. The Role of Traumatic Event History in Non-Medical Use of Prescription Drugs among a Nationally Representative Sample of US Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Jenna L.; Danielson, Carla Kmett; Amstadter, Ananda B.; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Resnick, Heidi S.; Hanson, Rochelle F.; Smith, Daniel W.; Saunders, Benjamin E.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Building on previous research with adolescents that examined demographic variables and other forms of substance abuse in relation to non-medical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD), the current study examined potentially traumatic events, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), other substance use, and delinquent behavior as…

  2. Longitudinal trajectories of non-medical use of prescription medication among middle and high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Carol J.; Cranford, James A.; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2016-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription medications has been identified as a major public health problem among youth, although few longitudinal studies have examined non-medical use of prescription medications in the context of other drug use. Previous cross-sectional studies have shown gender and race differences in non-medical use of prescription medications. It was hypothesized that (1) non-medical use of prescription medications increases with age, and (2) these increases will be stronger in magnitude among female and Caucasian adolescents. Changes in non-medical use of prescription medications across 4 years were examined and compared with changes in other drug use (e.g., alcohol and marijuana). Middle and high school students enrolled in 5 schools in southeastern Michigan completed web-based surveys at 4 annual time points. The cumulative sample size was 5,217. The sample ranged from 12 to 18 years, 61% were Caucasian, 34% were African American, and 50% were female. Using a series of repeated measures latent class analyses, the trajectories of non-medical use of prescription medications were examined, demonstrating a 2-class solution: (1) the no/low non-medical use of prescription medications group had low probabilities of any non-medical use of prescription medications across all grades, and (2) the any non-medical use of prescription medications group showed a roughly linear increase in the probability of non-medical use of prescription medications over time. The probability of any non-medical use of prescription medications increased during the transition from middle school to high school. Results from this longitudinal study yielded several noteworthy findings: Participants who were classified in the any/high non-medical use of prescription medications group showed a discontinuous pattern of non-medical use of prescription medications over time, indicating that non-medical use of prescription medications is a relatively sporadic behavior that does not persist

  3. Concurrent versus simultaneous use of alcohol and non-medical use of prescription drugs: is simultaneous use worse for mental, social, and health issues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggio, Stéphanie; Deline, Stéphane; Studer, Joseph; N'Goran, Alexandra; Mohler-Kuo, Meichun; Daeppen, Jean-Bernard; Gmel, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the difference between concurrent and simultaneous use of alcohol and non-medical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD) in relation to mental, social, and health issues. The 544 study participants of the Swiss ongoing Cohort Study on Substance Use Risk Factors (C-SURF) had a combined use of alcohol with NMUPD during the previous 12 months. Alcohol-related problems (i.e., dependence and consequences), as well as mental, social, and health concerns (i.e., depression, general mental/physical health, and social/health consequences), were assessed. The simultaneous use of alcohol and NMUPD proved to be a greater risk factor for mental, social, and health issues than concurrent use. This study adds information regarding simultaneous polydrug use, which results in distinct effects compared to concurrent use, including important social, psychosocial, and health-related consequences.

  4. Prescription drug misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monheit, Benny

    2010-08-01

    Recognising and dealing with patients who seek drugs for nonmedical purposes can be a difficult problem in general practice. 'Prescription shoppers' and patients with chronic nonmalignant pain problems are the main people who constitute this small but problematic group. The main drugs they seek are benzodiazepines and opioids. To provide data on current trends in prescription drug abuse and to discuss different strategies on how to deal with this issue in the clinic setting. Misuse of prescription drugs can take the form of injecting oral drugs, selling them on the street, or simply overusing the prescribed amount so that patients run short before the due date and then request extra prescriptions from the doctor. Currently oxycontin and alprazolam are the most abused drugs in Australia. Adequate prescription monitoring mechanisms at the systems level are lacking so we need to rely on our clinical skills and the patient's behaviour pattern over time to detect problematic prescription drug misuse. Management strategies may include saying 'no' to patients, having a treatment plan, and adopting a universal precaution approach toward all patients prescribed drugs of addiction. Among patients with chronic nonmalignant pain, requests for increasing opioid doses need careful assessment to elucidate any nonmedical factors that may be at play.

  5. Daily sleep quality affects drug craving, partially through indirect associations with positive affect, in patients in treatment for nonmedical use of prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydon-Staley, David M; Cleveland, H Harrington; Huhn, Andrew S; Cleveland, Michael J; Harris, Jonathan; Stankoski, Dean; Deneke, Erin; Meyer, Roger E; Bunce, Scott C

    2017-02-01

    Sleep disturbance has been identified as a risk factor for relapse in addiction to a range of substances. The relationship between sleep quality and treatment outcome has received relatively little attention in research on nonmedical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD). This study examined the within-person association between sleep quality and craving in medically detoxified patients in residence for the treatment of NMUPD. Participants (n=68) provided daily reports of their sleep quality, negative affect (NA), positive affect (PA), and craving for an average of 9.36 (SD=2.99) days. Within-person associations of sleep quality and craving were examined using multilevel modeling. Within-person mediation analyses were used to evaluate the mediating roles of NA and PA in the relationship between sleep quality and craving. Greater cravings were observed on days of lower than usual sleep quality (γ10=-0.10, p=0.003). Thirty-one percent of the overall association between sleep quality and craving was explained by PA, such that poorer sleep quality was associated with lower PA and, in turn, lower PA was associated with greater craving. No evidence emerged for an indirect association between sleep quality and craving through NA. Daily fluctuations in sleep quality were associated with fluctuations in craving, an association partially explained by the association between sleep quality and daily PA. These data encourage further research on the relationship between sleep, affect, and craving in NMUPD patients, as well as in patients with other substance use disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The mediating effects of depressive symptoms and sleep quality on the relationship between the non-medical use of prescription drugs and suicidal behaviors among Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Yan; Guo, Lan; Deng, Jian-Xiong; Huang, Jing-Hui; Huang, Guo-Liang; Gao, Xue; Wu, Hong; Pan, Si-Yuan; Lu, Ci-Yong

    2017-09-01

    The nature of the relationship between the non-medical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD) and suicide has not been clearly elucidated. Some studies have suggested that the relationship between substance use and suicidal ideation may be spurious and could be explained by other variables. A school-based cross-sectional study was performed in Guangzhou. A total of 5853 students completed questionnaires and were included in the study. NMUPD, alcohol use, illicit drug use, depressive symptoms, sleep quality, and suicidal behaviors were assessed. The mediating effects of depressive symptoms and sleep quality on the relationship between NMUPD and suicidal behaviors were examined using a structural equation model. In the simple model without mediation, a positive relationship between NMUPD and suicidal behaviors in adolescents was found, which was independent of effects from the use of other substances. Both depressive symptoms and sleep quality were significant mediators of this relationship. Public health and educational professionals should survey depressive symptoms and sleep quality and provide interventions when managing suicidal behaviors among adolescents engaging in NMUPD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Nonmedical Use of Prescription Medications Among Medical Students in Greece: Prevalence of and Motivation for Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazisis, Georgios; Tsakiridis, Ioannis; Pourzitaki, Chryssa; Apostolidou, Eirini; Spachos, Dimitrios; Kouvelas, Dimitrios

    2017-08-04

    Non-medical use of prescription medications has risen to unprecedented levels over the past decade worldwide; however, studies assessing misuse across medical students are sparse. The purpose of this study was to1) estimate the lifetime and the past-year prevalence of non-medical use of prescription medications among medical students in Greece 2) identify the motivation for use. 591 medical students completed an anonymous, self-administered, web-based survey assessing lifetime and past-year prevalence of non-medical use of four classes of prescription drugs (opioid painkillers, tranquillizers, sleeping and stimulant medications). According to the motivation to use the responders were classified into three subtypes (selftreatment, recreational, and mixed). The prevalence of lifetime use was 10.7% for at least one of the four prescription drug classes and 9% of the respondents reported lifetime misuse of multiple categories of prescription drugs. The past-year prevalence was approximately 7.7% for at least one of the four prescription drug classes, while the majority misused the drugs "1-2 times per year". Senior students used tranquilizers more than junior students. Self-treatment and mixed subtypes of tranquillizers misuse was more prevalent among women than men while the self-treatment subtype was the most prevalent subtype in all the four drug classes. This is the first study investigating non-medical use of prescription medications among Greek medical students and indicates a high prevalence of misuse of some categories of prescription drugs, mostly for self-treatment purposes.

  8. Prescription Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over-the-counter medications. National Institute on Drug Abuse. http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/prescription-over-counter- ... 2015. Prescription drug abuse. National Institute on Drug Abuse. http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/prescription-drugs/ ...

  9. Surveillance of Diversion and Nonmedical Use of Extended-Release Prescription Amphetamine and Oral Methylphenidate in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Sembower, Mark A.; Ertischek, Michelle D.; Buchholtz, Chloe; Dasgupta, Nabarun; Schnoll, Sidney H.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines rates of nonmedical use and diversion of extended-release amphetamine and extended-release oral methylphenidate in the United States. Prescription dispensing data were sourced from retail pharmacies. Nonmedical use data were collected from the Researched Abuse, Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS) System Drug Diversion Program and Poison Center Program. Drug diversion trends nearly overlapped for extended-release amphetamine and extended-release oral met...

  10. Comparison of awareness, attitude and use of non-prescription drugs among medical and non-medical undergraduates: a questionnaire based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Tikoo

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: There is an increasing trend of self-medication among the youth today. Medical students have a better access to such drugs hence are expected to self-medicate more. But the easy availability about drug information on the internet and their unrestricted supply in the pharmacies are escalating the practice of self-medication among the general population too. It therefore becomes imperative to create awareness against the injudicious use of over the counter drugs without a valid medical prescription to promote rational drug use. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(2.000: 243-250

  11. Prescription Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jackets, Yellows, and Zombie Pills Stimulants: Bennies, Black Beauties, Hearts, Roses, Skippy, The Smart Drug, Speed, and ... used to relieve anxiety or help a person sleep, such as Valium or Xanax Stimulants — used for ...

  12. Prescription Drug Profiles PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Prescription Drug Profiles Public Use Files (PUFs) drawn from Medicare prescription drug claims for the year of the date on which the...

  13. Prescription Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that ... purpose, such as getting high Abusing some prescription drugs can lead to addiction. These include opioids, sedatives, ...

  14. Recognizing Signs of Prescription Drug Abuse and Addiction, Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicilda-Reynaldo, Faye D

    2014-01-01

    Prescription drug abuse/misuse is increasing. Nonmedical use of prescription medications, especially opioid analgesics, now is considered an epidemic in the United States. Medical-surgical nurses are in a strategic position to help address substance abuse problems in patients.

  15. Non-Medical Use of Prescription Stimulants: A Comparison of College Students and their Same-Age Peers Who Do Not Attend College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jason A; Pomykacz, Corey

    2016-01-01

    Data show that the prevalence of non-medical use of prescription stimulants is higher among college students than their same-age peers who do not attend college. Because of this, most of the research in this area focuses on data from samples of college students and on use motivated by academic demands. There is little research that examines whether attending college increases the odds of non-medical use of prescription stimulants while including important covariates in the analytical models. The current research addresses this gap in the literature using data from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health for respondents aged 18 to 25 years old. We estimate a multivariate logistic regression model to determine whether college attendance increased the odds of non-medical use of prescription stimulants. The analysis showed that young adults who enrolled in college full-time were more likely to report non-medical use of prescription stimulants than their same-age peers who did not attend college. There was no significant difference between part-time college students and non-college students. Future research should focus on how specific aspects of the college environment, other than academic stress, may increase the risk of non-medical use of prescription stimulants.

  16. Nonmedical Prescription Stimulant Use among a Sample of College Students: Relationship with Psychological Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyandt, Lisa L.; Janusis, Grace; Wilson, Kimberly G.; Verdi, Genevieve; Paquin, Gregory; Lopes, Justin; Varejao, Michael; Dussault, Crystal

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To further investigate use and potential misuse of prescription stimulants (e.g., Ritalin, Adderall, Concerta) among a sample of college students and to explore the relationship between psychological variables and nonmedical stimulant use. Method: The sample consisted of 390 college students (71.6% female, 28.4% male). Participants were…

  17. Understanding the Nonmedical Use of Prescription Medications in the U.S. High School Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Cynthia G.; Pontes, Nancy M.; Pontes, Manuel C. F.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine relationships between sleep insufficiency, depressive symptoms, demographic factors, and the nonmedical use of prescription medications (NMUPMs) in the U.S. high school students. Data from the 2013 Youth Risk Behavioral Surveillance System were used (n = 13,570) and analyzed using IBM SPSS 23™ (complex…

  18. Prevalence of ADHD Diagnosis and Nonmedical Prescription Stimulant Use in Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Jeffrey P.; Scheurich, Neil E.; Ranseen, John

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors aimed to determine the prevalence of ADHD diagnosis and the prevalence of nonmedical prescription stimulant use among a sample of medical students. Methods: An anonymous survey was administered to 388 medical students (84.0% return rate) across all 4 years of education at a public medical college. Results: Eighteen medical…

  19. Nonmedical Prescription Stimulant Use among a Sample of College Students: Relationship with Psychological Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyandt, Lisa L.; Janusis, Grace; Wilson, Kimberly G.; Verdi, Genevieve; Paquin, Gregory; Lopes, Justin; Varejao, Michael; Dussault, Crystal

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To further investigate use and potential misuse of prescription stimulants (e.g., Ritalin, Adderall, Concerta) among a sample of college students and to explore the relationship between psychological variables and nonmedical stimulant use. Method: The sample consisted of 390 college students (71.6% female, 28.4% male). Participants were…

  20. Adolescents' nonmedical use and excessive medical use of prescription medications and the identification of substance use subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, James A; McCabe, Sean Esteban; Boyd, Carol J

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify subgroups of adolescents based on their past 12 months use of tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, illicit drugs, and nonmedical use and excessive medical use of prescription medications. A cross-sectional Web-based survey of adolescents from two middle and high school districts in Southeastern Michigan was conducted. The sample included 2,744 middle school (7th and 8th grade) and high school (9th through 12th grade) students. Participants had a mean age of 14.8 years (SD = 1.9 years); 50.4% were female, 64.1% were Caucasian, and 30.6% were African American. Participants completed measures of the past 12 months of substance use, parental monitoring, parental substance use, and internalizing and externalizing problems. Exploratory latent class analysis (LCA) indicated four classes. The largest class was composed of participants with low probabilities of using any substances (low/no use class), and the smallest class was composed of participants with relatively high probabilities of using all substances (multiple substances class). A third class included participants with high probabilities of using tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana (TAM). The fourth class consisted of participants with relatively high probabilities of alcohol use, nonmedical prescription drug use, and excessive medical use of prescription drugs (ANM). Female gender predicted membership in the ANM and multiple substance classes, and parental monitoring, parental substance use problems, internalizing, and externalizing problems uniquely predicted membership in all three high-risk risk classes. Results indicated three high-risk subgroups of adolescents, each characterized by a different pattern of substance use. Two risk groups are characterized by relatively high probabilities of nonmedical use and excessive medical use of prescription medications. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Use and Nonmedical Use of Prescription Opioid Analgesics in the General Population of Canada and Correlations with Dispensing Levels in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D Shield

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Canada, harm from nonmedical prescription opioid analgesic (POA use (NMPOU has increased in recent years; however, there are limitations to the current estimates of NMPOU. The 2009 Canadian Alcohol and Drug Use Monitoring Survey presents an opportunity to produce more accurate estimates of NMPOU.

  2. Prescription Drug Overdose

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-07-02

    In this podcast, Dr. Tom Frieden, CDC Director, discusses the epidemic of prescription drug overdose, especially in women, and what can be done about it.  Created: 7/2/2013 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.   Date Released: 3/6/2014.

  3. Non-medical use of prescription stimulants for academic purposes among college students: a test of social learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jason A; Ong, Julianne

    2014-11-01

    The current research examines whether measures associated with Akers' social learning theory are related to non-medical use of prescription stimulants for academic reasons among college students. We examine data from a sample of 549 undergraduate students at one public university in the Southeastern United States. We estimate several logistic regression models to test our hypotheses. The findings indicated that roughly 17% of students reported non-medical use of prescription stimulants for academic reasons during the past year. In separate models, all four of the social learning measures were significantly correlated to non-medical use. In the complete model, the risk of non-medical prescription stimulant use for academic reasons was increased for respondents who reported more of their friends used and also for respondents who believed that prescription stimulants were an effective study aid. The current research fills an important gap in the literature regarding theoretical explanations for non-medical prescription stimulant use. Given the high prevalence of non-medical prescription stimulant use and the known risks associated with non-medical use this research can help inform intervention strategies for college populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nonmedical Use of Prescription Opioids and Heroin Use Among Adolescents Involved in Competitive Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliz, Philip; Boyd, Carol J; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2017-03-01

    Examine the past-year prevalence of nonmedical use of prescription opioids (NUPOs), heroin use, and the concurrent NUPO and heroin in a sample of 12th graders involved in 16 different sports. A secondary analysis of nationally representative data from nine cohorts (2006-2014) of the Monitoring the Future study (n = 21,557). No differences were found between 12th graders who participated in at least one competitive sport and nonparticipants with respect to past-year NUPO, heroin use, and concurrent NUPO and heroin use. Most of the 16 sports analyzed were not associated with the three drug use outcomes. However, 12th graders who participated in ice hockey had substantially greater odds of both past-year heroin use and concurrent NUPO and heroin, while those who participated in weightlifting (NUPO and heroin) and wrestling (NUPO) had slightly higher odds of using these drugs. The study provides critical information to inform physicians, parents, and school officials of the risks associated with participating in certain high contact sports, particularly ice hockey. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit Manual

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Part D Prescription Drug Benefit Manual (PDBM) is user guide to Part D Prescription Drug Program. It includes information on general provisions, benefits,...

  6. Prevalence of self-reported nonmedical use of prescription stimulants in North Carolina Doctor of Pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volger, Emily J; McLendon, Amber N; Fuller, Stephen H; Herring, Charles T

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the prevalence, associated factors, and opinions regarding nonmedical use of prescription stimulants (NMUPS) in Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students. An electronic survey was distributed to professional year 1 through 4 for students at 2 schools of pharmacy (public and private) in North Carolina. The survey was available for 3 weeks. Descriptive statistics (proportion of responders plus 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) were used to describe the primary objective. Of the 1043 surveys distributed, 407 were completed giving a 39% response rate. The results indicated that 9% (95% CI: 6.44-11.93) of PharmD students acknowledge NMUPS at least once during their pharmacy education. Additionally, 3% (95% CI: 1.90-5.45) acknowledge NMUPS at least once during the current pharmacy school year (past 5 months). Nonmedical prescription stimulant users were 9 times more likely to participate in NMUPS prior to pharmacy school (P risk of abuse of prescription drug stimulants, which requires further research and attention. Additionally, there was a clear upward trend in the prevalence of NMUPS, and this misuse was associated with other detrimental behaviors.

  7. Religiosity in the non-medical use of prescription medication in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, Daniel J; Jeffers, Amy J; Benotsch, Eric G; McCauley, Jessica; Bannerman, Dana; Granger, Catherine; Martin, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD) is a hazardous health behavior popular among young adults and college students. Past research has documented prevalence rates and risk factors associated with NMUPD, while little research has addressed protective factors. The present study examined the associations of religiosity and NMUPD in a sample of college students. Young adult (ages 18-25) college students (n = 767) completed an anonymous online survey assessing demographic variables, NMUPD, personality factors, perceptions of risk, mental health, and religiosity. Results showed that greater religiosity scores were consistently associated with lower odds of engaging in NMUPD in the past 3 months. These associations were partially mediated by the personality characteristics of conscientiousness and openness to experience as well as perceived risk of NMUPD. The effect of religiosity on NMUPD was moderated by Greek (i.e., fraternity or sorority) membership, such that those in a Greek organization showed no relation between religiosity and NMUPD, while religiosity served as a protective factor for NMUPD among those who did not have Greek membership. These results extend past research demonstrating that religiosity is protective against substance abuse/misuse. Greek status appears to negate the protective influence of religiosity on NMUPD.

  8. Non-Medical Prescription Stimulant Use in Graduate Students: Relationship With Academic Self-Efficacy and Psychological Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi, Genevieve; Weyandt, Lisa L; Zavras, Brynheld Martinez

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine graduate students' non-medical use of prescription stimulant medication, and the relationship between non-medical use of prescription stimulants with academic self-efficacy, psychological factors (i.e., anxiety, depression, and stress), and internal restlessness. The sample consisted of 807 graduate students from universities located in five geographic regions of the United States. Past-year rates of self-reported non-medical use were determined to be 5.9%, with overall lifetime prevalence of 17.5%. Observed self-reported non-medical use of prescription stimulant medications was significantly correlated with self-reported levels of anxiety and stress, various aspects of internal restlessness, and perceived safety of the medications. Findings support graduate students' motivations of non-medical prescription stimulant use to be both academic and social in nature. Effective prevention and education efforts are needed to help address the non-medical use of prescription stimulants by graduate students on university campuses. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Social context and perspectives of non-medical prescription opioid use among young adults in Rhode Island: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedinak, Jesse L; Kinnard, Elizabeth N; Hadland, Scott E; Green, Traci C; Clark, Melissa A; Marshall, Brandon D L

    2016-12-01

    This pilot study examined the context of nonmedical prescription opioid (NMPO) use and related risk behaviors among young adults in Rhode Island, a New England region with markedly high prevalence of NMPO use and overdose mortality. We conducted semi-structured interviews (n = 13) with young adults (18-29 year-olds) who reported current or recent NMPO use. We also conducted focus groups (two groups, n = 14 total) with professional service providers recruited from service organizations. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed, and key themes were analyzed. Participants discussed high levels of access to prescription opioids for nonmedical use via prescriptions originally provided to family and friends. The contexts described by participants included social environments such as parties, in which mixing opiates with benzodiazepines, alcohol or other types of drugs, and incidents of unintentional overdose were reported. Participants attributed risk for overdose to individual-level factors (eg, users who "couldn't handle it"), rather than contextual factors, and described negative reactions to being labeled as an "addict" or "addicted." Professional service providers had first-hand experience with young adults in treatment settings, yet limited exposure to young adults who were treatment-naïve. Young adult NMPO users described social settings where polysubstance use and pill use were common, and highlighted an aversion to being labeled as having a substance use disorder. To reduce harms of NMPO use among young adults, interventions should address the social context in which drug use and risk behaviors occur. (Am J Addict 2016;25:659-665). © 2016 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  10. Nonmedical use of prescription stimulants and depressed mood among college students: frequency and routes of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Christian J; Falone, Anthony E; Cranford, James A; Boyd, Carol J; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2010-04-01

    Studies demonstrate associations between nonmedical use of prescription stimulants (NMUPS) and depressed mood; however, relevance of NMUPS route of administration and frequency of use have not been examined. We hypothesized frequent NMUPS and nonoral routes would be significantly associated with depressed mood. A Web survey was self-administered by a probability sample of 3,639 undergraduate students at a large U.S. university. The survey contained substance use (e.g., frequency, route of administration) and depressed mood measurement. Past-year prevalence of NMUPS was 6.0% (n = 212). Approximately 50% of frequent or nonoral NMUPS reported depressed mood. Adjusted odds of depressed mood were over two times greater among frequent monthly NMUPS (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-5.15) and nonoral routes of administration (AOR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.36-3.70), after controlling for other variables. Nonmedical users of prescription stimulants should be screened for depressed mood, especially those who report frequent and nonoral routes of administration.

  11. Prescription Drugs and Cold Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on past-month use for illicit drugs (including marijuana and prescription drugs), alcohol, and tobacco. ... neonatal abstinence syndrome, and provides evidence-based treatment options that have been shown to be safe ...

  12. Prescription Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Whether they're using street drugs or medications, drug abusers often have trouble at school, at home, with ... a short period of time may make a drug abuser aggressive or paranoid. Although stimulant abuse might not ...

  13. Substance use - prescription drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Others use them to boost their performance in sports. As street drugs, they come as pills. They ... thinking clearly Mood and emotional problems, such as aggressive or violent behavior Restlessness and tremors

  14. Impact of alcohol and alcohol mixed with energy drinks on non-medical prescription stimulant use in a nationally representative sample of 12th-grade students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housman, Jeff M; Williams, Ronald D; Woolsey, Conrad L

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 30% of high school students use energy drinks. Alcohol use and alcohol mixed with energy drink use (AmED) is associated with risky behavior, including non-medical prescription stimulant use. We assessed alcohol-only, AmED and non-medical prescription stimulant use among 12th grade students in the U.S. using a nationally representative secondary data from the 2012 Monitoring the Future Study. Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests and logistic regression analyses were used to determine differences in non-medical prescription stimulant use by students who used alcohol-only versus AmED and to identify covariates of non-medical prescription stimulant use. Pearson-product moment coefficients were used to determine strength of variable relationships. Significant differences were found in frequency of Ritalin (p energy drink and AmED use, as the combined effects of stimulants contained in energy drinks and the depressant effects of alcohol appear to be associated with increased non-medical prescription stimulant use. Research on the influential factors related to energy drinks, alcohol, and non-medical prescription stimulants will help practitioners to more appropriately design prevention and intervention strategies addressing these high-risk behaviors. (Am J Addict 2016;25:378-384). © 2016 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  15. Prescription Drug Abuse and Youth. Information Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. National Drug Intelligence Center.

    Prescription drugs, a category of psychotherapeutics that comprises prescription-type pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, and sedatives, are among the substances most commonly abused by young people in the United States. Prescription drugs are readily available and can easily be obtained by teenagers who abuse these drugs to experience a…

  16. Route of administration for illicit prescription opioids: a comparison of rural and urban drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havens Jennifer R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonmedical prescription opioid use has emerged as a major public health concern in recent years, particularly in rural Appalachia. Little is known about the routes of administration (ROA involved in nonmedical prescription opioid use among rural and urban drug users. The purpose of this study was to describe rural-urban differences in ROA for nonmedical prescription opioid use. Methods A purposive sample of 212 prescription drug users was recruited from a rural Appalachian county (n = 101 and a major metropolitan area (n = 111 in Kentucky. Consenting participants were given an interviewer-administered questionnaire examining sociodemographics, psychiatric disorders, and self-reported nonmedical use and ROA (swallowing, snorting, injecting for the following prescription drugs: buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, OxyContin® and other oxycodone. Results Among urban participants, swallowing was the most common ROA, contrasting sharply with substance-specific variation in ROA among rural participants. Among rural participants, snorting was the most frequent ROA for hydrocodone, methadone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone, while injection was most common for hydromorphone and morphine. In age-, gender-, and race-adjusted analyses, rural participants had significantly higher odds of snorting hydrocodone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone than urban participants. Urban participants had significantly higher odds of swallowing hydrocodone and oxycodone than did rural participants. Notably, among rural participants, 67% of hydromorphone users and 63% of morphine users had injected the drugs. Conclusions Alternative ROA are common among rural drug users. This finding has implications for rural substance abuse treatment and harm reduction, in which interventions should incorporate methods to prevent and reduce route-specific health complications of drug use.

  17. Use of the Internet to Obtain Drugs without a Prescription Among Treatment-involved Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Clements, Nicolle; Flynn, Anna B; Falco, Mathea; McLellan, A Thomas; Arria, Amelia M

    2016-01-01

    Nonmedical use of prescription drugs is common and poses risks such as injury, overdose, and development of abuse and dependence. Internet pharmacies offer prescription drugs without a prescription, creating a source of illicit drugs accessible to anyone with an Internet connection. We examined this issue in a convenience sample of 1,860 adolescents and young adults from 24 residential and outpatient treatment programs. Few individuals obtained drugs from the Internet (n = 26, 2.3%). Pain relievers were the most frequently purchased type of drug. The majority of adolescents and young adult online purchasers made the purchases from their own or a friend's house.

  18. Prescription drug abuse in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Caren McHenry

    2008-12-01

    The increased use of prescription drugs has brought pain relief too many and often improved the quality of life of elderly patients. But the increase in use and availability of prescription medications-especially controlled substances-brings with it an increased potential for abuse. Studies have shown that intentional abuse of prescription drugs is increasing among all age groups. As the number of persons 65 years of age and older skyrockets with the aging of the baby boomers, experts predict that prescription drug abuse among the elderly also will rise significantly. Efforts to increase awareness of drug abuse among elderly patients, caregivers, and health care practitioners, as well as research into how best to prevent and treat the elderly drug abuser, will be necessary to thwart what could become a significant public health problem.

  19. Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage - General Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MMA legislation provides seniors and people with disabilities with the first comprehensive prescription drug benefit ever offered under the Medicare program, the...

  20. Closing the Prescription Drug Coverage Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs they make are covered during the coverage gap for that calendar year. This includes prescription drugs on the plan’s formulary ( ... you pay for generic drugs during the coverage gap will decrease each year until it reaches 25% in 2020. The coverage ...

  1. Stress, Drugs, and Alcohol Use Among Health Care Professional Students: A Focus on Prescription Stimulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwal, Monica K; Ip, Eric J; Shah, Bijal M; Serino, Melissa J

    2015-12-01

    To contrast the characteristics of pharmacy, medicine, and physician assistant (PA) students regarding the prevalence of drug, alcohol, and tobacco use and to identify risk factors associated with prescription stimulant use. Five hundred eighty nine students were recruited to complete a 50-item Web-based survey. Demographics, nonmedical prescription medication use, illicit drug and alcohol use, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition, Text Revision; DSM-IV-TR) psychiatric diagnoses, and perceived stress scale (PSS) scores. Medicine and PA students reported greater nonmedical prescription stimulant use than pharmacy students (10.4% vs 14.0% vs 6.1%; P students were more likely to report a history of an anxiety disorder (12.1% vs 18.6% vs 5.9%; P students. PSS scores for all 3 groups (21.9-22.3) were roughly twice as high as the general adult population. Illicit drug and prescription stimulant use, psychiatric disorders, and elevated stress levels are prevalent among health care professional students. Health care professional programs may wish to use this information to better understand their student population which may lead to a reassessment of student resources and awareness/prevention programs. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Price Sensitivity of Demand for Prescription Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skipper, Lars; Simonsen, Marianne; Skipper, Niels

    This paper investigates price sensitivity of demand for prescription drugs using drug purchase records for at 20% random sample of the Danish population. We identify price responsiveness by exploiting exogenous variation in prices caused by kinked reimbursement schemes and implement a regression ...... education and income are, however, more responsive to the price. Also, essential drugs that prevent deterioration in health and prolong life have lower associated average price sensitivity....

  3. 21 CFR 202.1 - Prescription-drug advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prescription-drug advertisements. 202.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL PRESCRIPTION DRUG ADVERTISING § 202.1 Prescription-drug advertisements. (a)(1) The... ingredients in the advertisement shall be the same as the order of listing of ingredients on the label of...

  4. Price Sensitivity of Demand for Prescription Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Marianne; Skipper, Lars; Skipper, Niels

    2016-01-01

    We investigate price sensitivity of demand for prescription drugs, using drug purchase records for the entire Danish population. We identify price responsiveness by exploiting variation in prices caused by kinked reimbursement schemes and implement a regression kink design. The results suggest so...... price responsiveness with corresponding price elasticities ranging from −0.2 to −0.7. Individuals with chronic disease and especially individuals above the age of 65 respond less to the price of drugs.......We investigate price sensitivity of demand for prescription drugs, using drug purchase records for the entire Danish population. We identify price responsiveness by exploiting variation in prices caused by kinked reimbursement schemes and implement a regression kink design. The results suggest some...

  5. Routes of administration of cannabis used for nonmedical purposes and associations with patterns of drug use.

    OpenAIRE

    Baggio, S.; Deline, S.; Studer, J.; Mohler-Kuo, M.; Daeppen, J.B.; Gmel, G.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Little is known regarding cannabis administration routes for nonmedical use-that is, its delivery methods (e.g., joints, water pipe, food). Therefore, we examined the prevalence rates of different cannabis delivery methods and assessed the relationship of the distinct administration routes with problematic drug use. Subgroups of cannabis users were also investigated (i.e., "pure" cannabis users, previously described as employing a harmless route of administration, and water pipe user...

  6. NON-MEDICAL DRUG USE AMONG INTERNS AND HOUSE-OFFICERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Singh, Rajpal; Avasthi, Ajit; Gupta, Rajeev

    1980-01-01

    SUMMARY Self-administered questionnaire was given to a sample of 105 interns and house officers working in Govt. Medical College, Jammu. Questionnaire was designed to obtain information about socio-demographic characteristics, the frequency of non-medical drug use during the last one year and to enquire about “reasons” for drug intake. It was found that drugs commonly used were alcohol, tobacco, tranquillizers, amphetamines, cannabis. Most of the subjects used the same for ‘company’, festivity or curiosity. PMID:22058486

  7. 76 FR 51310 - Branded Prescription Drug Fee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... Act (ACA). The regulations affect persons engaged in the business of manufacturing or importing... Clearance Officer, SE:W:CAR:MP:T:T:SP, Washington, DC 20224. Comments on the collection of information... business of manufacturing or importing branded prescription drugs by section 9008 of the ACA. The text of...

  8. Drug prescription in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Fuentes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aging process changes the way in which common drugs act in the elderly. Changes in both the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics make prescribing drugs in geriatrics a process very different from that of the young adult. The aim of this article is to review the physiologic changes that occur with aging and that must be considered when indicating drugs in this age group. For this purpose we conducted a literature review of articles from various journals and textbooks devoted to geriatric medicine in order to extract recommendations for appropriate prescribing in the elderly, represented in easy to use listings of potentially inappropriate medications, according to the quality of evidence and rationale for their avoidance in advanced age.

  9. From PCP to MXE: a comprehensive review of the non-medical use of dissociative drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Hamilton; Wallach, Jason

    2014-01-01

    PCP or phencyclidine was discovered in 1956 and soon became a popular street drug. Dissociatives including PCP, ketamine, and dextromethorphan have been used non-medically for their mind-altering effects for over 60 years. Many of these compounds have also been used clinically and in legitimate research. At least 14 derivatives of PCP were sold for non-medical and illict use from the late 1960s until the 1990s. With the advent of the Internet, the drug market underwent a dramatic evolution. While initially gray-market chemical vendors offering dextromethorphan and ketamine thrived, most recently the market has shifted to legal high and online-based research chemical vendors. Starting with the first dissociative research chemical, 4-MeO-PCP in 2008, the dissociative research chemical market has rapidly evolved and currently comprises at least 12 dissociatives, almost half of which were unknown in the scientific literature prior to their introduction. Several of these, including methoxetamine, have reached widespread use internationally. A historical account of non-medical use of over 30 dissociative compounds was compiled from a diverse collection of sources. The first complete portrait of this underground market is presented along with the relevant legal, technological, and scientific developments which have driven its evolution. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Strategies Used by Adults to Reduce Their Prescription Drug Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order from the National Technical Information Service NCHS Strategies Used by Adults to Reduce Their Prescription Drug ... Interview Survey, alternative therapies, medication Adults used several strategies to reduce prescription drug costs. Figure 1. Percentages ...

  11. Prescription Drug Plan Formulary, Pharmacy Network, and P...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — These public use files contain formulary, pharmacy network, and pricing data for Medicare Prescription Drug Plans and Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug Plans...

  12. [Drug design ideas and methods of Chinese herb prescriptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jun-guo; Liu, Jian-xun

    2015-09-01

    The new drug of Chinese herbal prescription, which is the best carrier for the syndrome differentiation and treatment of Chinese medicine and is the main form of the new drug research and development, plays a very important role in the new drug research and development. Although there are many sources of the prescriptions, whether it can become a new drug, the necessity, rationality and science of the prescriptions are the key to develop the new drug. In this article, aiming at the key issues in prescriptions design, the source, classification, composition design of new drug of Chinese herbal prescriptions are discussed, and provide a useful reference for research and development of new drugs.

  13. Women who doctor shop for prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Thomas, Sandra P

    2014-04-01

    Doctor shopping is a term used to describe a form of diversion of prescription drugs when patients visit numerous prescribers to obtain controlled drugs for illicit use. Gender differences exist in regard to prescription drug abuse and methods of diversion. The purpose of this phenomenological study guided by the existential philosophy of Merleau-Ponty was to understand the lived experience of female doctor shoppers. Interviews were conducted with 14 women, which were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Included in the findings are figural aspects of the participants' experience of doctor shopping related to the existential grounds of world, time, body, and others. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) feeding the addiction, (b) networking with addicts, (c) playing the system, and (d) baiting the doctors. The findings suggest several measures that nurses can take to reduce the incidence of doctor shopping and to provide better care for female doctor shoppers.

  14. Resonant Messages to Prevent Prescription Drug Misuse by Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twombly, Eric C.; Holtz, Kristen D.; Agnew, Christine B.

    2011-01-01

    Prescription drug misuse is a major health problem, particularly among teens. A key step in curbing misuse is the development of effective prescription drug prevention messages. This paper explores the elements of prescription drug misuse prevention messages that resonate with teens using data from focus groups with seventh and eighth grade…

  15. Patterns of Prescription Medication Diversion among Drug Dealers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigg, Khary K.; Kurtz, Steven P.; Surratt, Hilary L.

    2012-01-01

    This research examined the following questions: (1) how do drug dealers acquire their inventories of prescription medications? and (2) which types of prescription medications do dealers most commonly sell? Data are drawn from a National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded research study that examined prescription drug diversion and abuse in South…

  16. Cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs - a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corroon, James M; Mischley, Laurie K; Sexton, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The use of medical cannabis is increasing, most commonly for pain, anxiety and depression. Emerging data suggest that use and abuse of prescription drugs may be decreasing in states where medical cannabis is legal. The aim of this study was to survey cannabis users to determine whether they had intentionally substituted cannabis for prescription drugs. A total of 2,774 individuals were a self-selected convenience sample who reported having used cannabis at least once in the previous 90 days. Subjects were surveyed via an online anonymous questionnaire on cannabis substitution effects. Participants were recruited through social media and cannabis dispensaries in Washington State. A total of 1,248 (46%) respondents reported using cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs. The most common classes of drugs substituted were narcotics/opioids (35.8%), anxiolytics/benzodiazepines (13.6%) and antidepressants (12.7%). A total of 2,473 substitutions were reported or approximately two drug substitutions per affirmative respondent. The odds of reporting substituting were 4.59 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.87-5.43) greater among medical cannabis users compared with non-medical users and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.27-2.16) greater among those reporting use for managing the comorbidities of pain, anxiety and depression. A slightly higher percentage of those who reported substituting resided in states where medical cannabis was legal at the time of the survey (47% vs. 45%, p=0.58), but this difference was not statistically significant. These patient-reported outcomes support prior research that individuals are using cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs, particularly, narcotics/opioids, and independent of whether they identify themselves as medical or non-medical users. This is especially true if they suffer from pain, anxiety and depression. Additionally, this study suggests that state laws allowing access to, and use of, medical cannabis may not be influencing individual

  17. Impact of a Mandatory Prescription Drug Monitoring Program on Prescription of Opioid Analgesics by Dentists

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Rasubala; Lavanya Pernapati; Ximena Velasquez; James Burk; Yan-Fang Ren

    2015-01-01

    Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP) are statewide databases that collect data on prescription of controlled substances. New York State mandates prescribers to consult the PDMP registry before prescribing a controlled substance such as opioid analgesics. The effect of mandatory PDMP on opioid drug prescriptions by dentists is not known. This study investigates the impact of mandatory PDMP on frequency and quantity of opioid prescriptions by dentists in a dental urgent care center. Bas...

  18. Drugs and Pregnancy: The Effects of Nonmedical Use of Drugs on Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Neonates. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Issues 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Patricia, Ed.; And Others

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse presents this report as the fifth in a series intended to summarize the empirical research findings and major theoretical approaches relating to the the issues of drug use and abuse. Included in this volume are summaries of the major research findings concerning the effects of nonmedical drug use on pregnancy.…

  19. Quantitative Information on Oncology Prescription Drug Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Helen W; Aikin, Kathryn J; Squiers, Linda B

    2016-09-02

    Our objective was to determine whether and how quantitative information about drug benefits and risks is presented to consumers and healthcare professionals on cancer-related prescription drug websites. We analyzed the content of 65 active cancer-related prescription drug websites. We assessed the inclusion and presentation of quantitative information for two audiences (consumers and healthcare professionals) and two types of information (drug benefits and risks). Websites were equally likely to present quantitative information for benefits (96.9 %) and risks (95.4 %). However, the amount of the information differed significantly: Both consumer-directed and healthcare-professional-directed webpages were more likely to have quantitative information for every benefit (consumer 38.5 %; healthcare professional 86.1 %) compared with every risk (consumer 3.1 %; healthcare professional 6.2 %). The numeric and graphic presentations also differed by audience and information type. Consumers have access to quantitative information about oncology drugs and, in particular, about the benefits of these drugs. Research has shown that using quantitative information to communicate treatment benefits and risks can increase patients' and physicians' understanding and can aid in treatment decision-making, although some numeric and graphic formats are more useful than others.

  20. Literacy and misunderstanding prescription drug labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Terry C; Wolf, Michael S; Bass, Pat F; Thompson, Jason A; Tilson, Hugh H; Neuberger, Marolee; Parker, Ruth M

    2006-12-19

    Health literacy has increasingly been viewed as a patient safety issue and may contribute to medication errors. To examine patients' abilities to understand and demonstrate instructions found on container labels of common prescription medications. Cross-sectional study using in-person, structured interviews. 3 primary care clinics serving mostly indigent populations in Shreveport, Louisiana; Jackson, Michigan; and Chicago, Illinois. 395 English-speaking adults waiting to see their providers. Correct understanding of instructions on 5 container labels; demonstration of 1 label's dosage instructions. Correct understanding of the 5 labels ranged from 67.1% to 91.1%. Patients reading at or below the sixth-grade level (low literacy) were less able to understand all 5 label instructions. Although 70.7% of patients with low literacy correctly stated the instructions, "Take two tablets by mouth twice daily," only 34.7% could demonstrate the number of pills to be taken daily. After potential confounding variables were controlled for, low (adjusted relative risk, 2.32 [95% CI, 1.26 to 4.28]) and marginal (adjusted relative risk, 1.94 [CI, 1.14 to 3.27]) literacy were significantly associated with misunderstanding. Taking a greater number of prescription medications was also statistically significantly associated with misunderstanding (adjusted relative risk, 2.98 [CI, 1.40 to 6.34] for > or =5 medications). The study sample was at high risk for poor health literacy and outcomes. Most participants were women, and all spoke English. The authors did not examine the association between misunderstanding and medication error or evaluate patients' actual prescription drug-taking behaviors. Lower literacy and a greater number of prescription medications were independently associated with misunderstanding the instructions on prescription medication labels.

  1. Abuse of Prescription (Rx) Drugs Affects Young Adults Most

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Affects Young Adults Most Abuse of Prescription (Rx) Drugs Affects Young Adults Most Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Young adults (age 18 to 25) are the biggest abusers of prescription (Rx) opioid pain relievers, ADHD stimulants, ...

  2. 21 CFR 202.1 - Prescription-drug advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) DRUGS: GENERAL PRESCRIPTION DRUG ADVERTISING § 202.1 Prescription-drug advertisements. (e) * * * (6... drug, nor may an advertisement contain a quantitative statement of safety or effectiveness (a) unless... effectiveness is supported by substantial evidence derived from adequate and well-controlled studies as defined...

  3. Prescription Drug Misuse and Sexual Behavior Among Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Brooke E; Kelly, Brian C; Rendina, H Jonathon; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2015-01-01

    Though research indicates a complex link between substance use and sexual risk behavior, there is limited research on the association between sexual risk behavior and prescription drug misuse. In light of alarming increases in prescription drug misuse and the role of demographic characteristics in sexual risk behavior and outcomes, the current study examined demographic differences (gender, sexual identity, age, relationship status, parental class background, and race/ethnicity) in sexual risk behavior, sexual behavior under the influence of prescription drugs, and sexual risk behavior under the influence of prescription drugs in a sample of 402 young adults (ages 18 to 29) who misused prescription drugs. Nearly half of the sexually active young adult prescription drug misusers in this sample reported recent sex under the influence of prescription drugs; more than three-quarters reported recent sex without a condom; and more than one-third reported recent sex without a condom after using prescription drugs. Zero-inflated Poisson regression models indicated that White race, younger age, higher parental class, and being a heterosexual man were all associated with sexual risk behavior, sex under the influence of prescription drugs, and sexual risk under the influence of prescription drugs. Findings have implications for the targeting of prevention and intervention efforts.

  4. Knowledge of drug prescription in dentistry students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán-Álvarez R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available R Guzmán-Álvarezv,1 M Medeiros,2,3 LI Reyes Lagunes,4 AE Campos-Sepúlveda11Pharmacology Department, UNAM School of Medicine and Dentistry, Mexico City, 2Pharmacology Clinical Seminar, UNAM School of Medicine, Mexico City, 3Medical Sciences Department, Mexico Federico Gómez Children's Hospital, Mexico City, 4Measuring and Evaluation Unit, UNAM School of Psychology, Mexico City, MexicoBackground: Students in schools of dentistry attend to patients with illnesses, and often prescribe medication. Because students are still learning, they are influenced by a variety of factors: the different teaching approaches of the professors at the clinics and in the pharmacology course, fellow students, and even the information provided by the pharmaceutical industry.Objectives: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the prescription knowledge and common mistakes in fourth-year students at the School of Dentistry at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.Methods: In March 2010, a survey was conducted among 66 fourth-year students at the School of Dentistry, applying a previously validated questionnaire consisting of six open-ended questions The following factors were assessed: the most frequent illness requiring dental prescription; the most prescribed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics; the most frequent errors; sources of information used for prescribing drugs; and whether the students knew and followed the World Health Organization Guide to Good Prescribing.Results: The most frequent response for each question was considered the most significant. The most common reason for prescribing medication was infection (n = 37, 56%, followed by pain (n = 24, 38%; the most used painkillers were ibuprofen and acetaminophen at equal levels (n = 25, 37.8%, followed by ketorolac (n = 7, 10.6%, naproxen (n = 6, 9.1%, diclofenac (n = 2, 3%, and aspirin (n = 1, 1.5%; the most widely prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (n = 52, 78

  5. Prescription patterns and utilisation of antihypertensive drugs in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescription patterns and utilisation of antihypertensive drugs in a specialist ... use in the management of essential hypertension in a specialist hospital and its ... of encounters, there were a total of 1544 drugs and 28 non-drug interventions.

  6. Prescription Drug Abuse Information in D.A.R.E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Melissa C.; Cline, Rebecca J. Welch; Weiler, Robert M.; Broadway, S. Camille

    2006-01-01

    This investigation was designed to examine prescription drug-related content and learning objectives in Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) for upper elementary and middle schools. Specific prescription-drug topics and context associated with content and objectives were coded. The coding system for topics included 126 topics organized…

  7. Cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs – a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corroon Jr JM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available James M Corroon Jr,1 Laurie K Mischley,2 Michelle Sexton3 1Center for Medical Cannabis Education, Del Mar, CA, 2Bastyr University Research Institute, Kenmore, WA, 3Department of Medical Research, Center for the Study of Cannabis and Social Policy, Seattle, WA, USA Background: The use of medical cannabis is increasing, most commonly for pain, anxiety and depression. Emerging data suggest that use and abuse of prescription drugs may be decreasing in states where medical cannabis is legal. The aim of this study was to survey cannabis users to determine whether they had intentionally substituted cannabis for prescription drugs.Methods: A total of 2,774 individuals were a self-selected convenience sample who reported having used cannabis at least once in the previous 90 days. Subjects were surveyed via an online anonymous questionnaire on cannabis substitution effects. Participants were recruited through social media and cannabis dispensaries in Washington State.Results: A total of 1,248 (46% respondents reported using cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs. The most common classes of drugs substituted were narcotics/opioids (35.8%, anxiolytics/benzodiazepines (13.6% and antidepressants (12.7%. A total of 2,473 substitutions were reported or approximately two drug substitutions per affirmative respondent. The odds of reporting substituting were 4.59 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.87–5.43 greater among medical cannabis users compared with non-medical users and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.27–2.16 greater among those reporting use for managing the comorbidities of pain, anxiety and depression. A slightly higher percentage of those who reported substituting resided in states where medical cannabis was legal at the time of the survey (47% vs. 45%, p=0.58, but this difference was not statistically significant.Discussion: These patient-reported outcomes support prior research that individuals are using cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs

  8. Impact of a Mandatory Prescription Drug Monitoring Program on Prescription of Opioid Analgesics by Dentists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Rasubala

    Full Text Available Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP are statewide databases that collect data on prescription of controlled substances. New York State mandates prescribers to consult the PDMP registry before prescribing a controlled substance such as opioid analgesics. The effect of mandatory PDMP on opioid drug prescriptions by dentists is not known. This study investigates the impact of mandatory PDMP on frequency and quantity of opioid prescriptions by dentists in a dental urgent care center. Based on the sample size estimate, we collected patient records of a 3-month period before and two consecutive 3-month periods after the mandatory PDMP implementation and analyzed the data on number of visits, treatment types and drug prescriptions using Chi-square tests. For patients who were prescribed pain medications, 452 (30.6%, 190 (14.1%, and 140 (9.6% received opioid analgesics in the three study periods respectively, signifying a statistically significant reduction in the number of opioid prescriptions after implementation of the mandatory PDMP (p<0.05. Total numbers of prescribed opioid pills in a 3-month period decreased from 5096 to 1120, signifying a 78% reduction in absolute quantity. Prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics acetaminophen increased during the same periods (p<0.05. We conclude that the mandatory PDMP significantly affected the prescription pattern for pain medications by dentists. Such change in prescription pattern represents a shift towards the evidence-based prescription practices for acute postoperative pain.

  9. Alcohol and prescription drug safety in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanjani F

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Faika Zanjani,1,2 Aasha I Hoogland,1 Brian G Downer11Department of Gerontology, 2Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USABackground: The objectives of this study were to investigate older adults' knowledge of prescription drug safety and interactions with alcohol, and to identify pharmacists' willingness to disseminate prescription drug safety information to older adults.Methods: The convenience sample consisted of 48 older adults aged 54–89 years who were recruited from a local pharmacy and who completed surveys addressing their alcohol consumption, understanding of alcohol and prescription drug interactions, and willingness to change habits regarding alcohol consumption and prescription drugs. To address pharmacist willingness, 90 pharmacists from local pharmacies volunteered and answered questions regarding their willingness to convey prescription drug safety information to older adults.Results: Older adults reported low knowledge of alcohol and prescription drug safety, with women tending to be slightly more knowledgeable. More importantly, those who drank in the previous few months were less willing to talk to family and friends about how alcohol can have harmful interactions with prescription drugs, or to be an advocate for safe alcohol and prescription drug use than those who had not had a drink recently. Pharmacists reported that they were willing to convey prescription drug safety information to older adults via a variety of formats, including displaying or distributing a flyer, and directly administering a brief intervention.Conclusion: In this study, older adults were found to have inadequate knowledge of prescription drug safety and interactions with alcohol, but pharmacists who regularly come in contact with older adults indicated that they were ready and willing to talk to older adults about prescription drug safety. Future research should focus on interventions

  10. Irrational drug use in India: A prescription survey from Goa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naik D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is concern regarding the irrational production, prescription and use of drugs in India. This study aimed to describe the quality of prescriptions by medical practitioners, including both the layout of the prescription and the type and number of drugs prescribed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A survey of all prescriptions dispensed at a busy pharmacy in the state of Goa, India, was carried out over a consecutive seven-day period. Each prescription was rated on the basis of a priori and pilot-tested variable list. The prescriptions by private practitioners were compared with those from practitioners in the public healthcare system. RESULTS: Nine hundred and ninety prescriptions were collected. The majority (83.9% were from private practitioners. The quality of the layout of the prescriptions was unsatisfactory: information to identify the practitioner was incomplete in more than a third of the prescriptions and information to identify the patient was incomplete in more than half. Clarity of written instructions on how to take the medicines was unsatisfactory in the majority of prescriptions. Polypharmacy was the norm, with more than half (52.7% the prescriptions containing at least 3 medicines. Forty per cent of prescriptions included a vitamin or tonic preparation and a quarter of the prescriptions included an antibiotic and an analgesic. Over 90% of prescriptions contained only branded medicines. Private practitioners prescribed significantly greater number of medicines and were more likely to prescribe vitamins and antibiotics, and branded medicines. DISCUSSION: This study confirms that the quality of prescriptions, both in terms of layout and the content of the drugs prescribed, is inadequate. There is a need to standardize the format of prescriptions in India so that all essential information is included. There is a need to strengthen an independent mechanism for continuing professional development of practitioners to ensure that

  11. Prescription Opioid Usage and Abuse Relationships: An Evaluation of State Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Reisman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The dramatic rise in the use of prescription opioids to treat non-cancer pain has been paralleled by increasing prescription opioid abuse. However, detailed analyses of these trends and programs to address them are lacking.Objective: To study the association between state shipments of prescription opioids for medical use and prescription opioid abuse admissions and to assess the effects of state prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs on prescription opioid abuse admissions.Design and Setting: A retrospective ecological cohort study comparing state prescription opioid shipments (source: Automation of Reports and Consolidated Orders Systems database and inpatient admissions for prescription opioid abuse (source: Treatment Episode Data Set in 14 states with PDMPs (intervention group and 36 states without PDMPs (control group for the period 1997–2003.Results: From 1997 to 2003, oxycodone, morphine, and hydrocodone shipments increased by 479%, 100%, and 148% respectively. Increasing prescription oxycodone shipments were significantly associated with increasing prescription opioid admission rates (p 0.001. PDMP states had significantly lower oxycodone shipments than the control group. PDMP states had less increase in prescription opioid admissions per year (p = 0.063. A patient admitted to an inpatient drug abuse rehabilitation program in a PDMP state was less likely to be admitted for prescription opioid drug abuse (Odds ratio = 0.775, 95% Confidence Interval 0.764–0.785.Conclusions: PDMPs appear to decrease the quantity of oxycodone shipments and the prescription opioid admission rate for states with these programs. Overall, opioid shipments rose significantly in PDMP states during the study period indicating a negligible “chilling effect” on physician prescribing.

  12. Impact of a Mandatory Prescription Drug Monitoring Program on Prescription of Opioid Analgesics by Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasubala, Linda; Pernapati, Lavanya; Velasquez, Ximena; Burk, James; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP) are statewide databases that collect data on prescription of controlled substances. New York State mandates prescribers to consult the PDMP registry before prescribing a controlled substance such as opioid analgesics. The effect of mandatory PDMP on opioid drug prescriptions by dentists is not known. This study investigates the impact of mandatory PDMP on frequency and quantity of opioid prescriptions by dentists in a dental urgent care center. Based on the sample size estimate, we collected patient records of a 3-month period before and two consecutive 3-month periods after the mandatory PDMP implementation and analyzed the data on number of visits, treatment types and drug prescriptions using Chi-square tests. For patients who were prescribed pain medications, 452 (30.6%), 190 (14.1%), and 140 (9.6%) received opioid analgesics in the three study periods respectively, signifying a statistically significant reduction in the number of opioid prescriptions after implementation of the mandatory PDMP (pPrescriptions for non-opioid analgesics acetaminophen increased during the same periods (pprescription pattern for pain medications by dentists. Such change in prescription pattern represents a shift towards the evidence-based prescription practices for acute postoperative pain.

  13. Pattern of prescription drug use in Nigerian army hospitals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To our knowledge, only few studies have been done in Africa on this issue , with inadequate ... high number of drugs per prescription, high rate of antibiotic usage and unscientific prescription by doctors. ..... the managers of Nigerian public health institutions through the ... use promotes drug resistance, increases risk of side.

  14. Preventing Prescription Drug Abuse in Adolescence: A Collaborative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Beth A.; Fullwood, Harry; Hawthorn, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    With the growing awareness of adolescent prescription drug abuse, communities and schools are beginning to explore prevention and intervention strategies which are appropriate for their youth. This article provides a framework for developing a collaborative approach to prescription drug abuse prevention--called the Prevention Awareness Team--that…

  15. Controversy in Purchasing Prescription Drugs Online in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peng; Qi, Lin; Wang, Long

    2016-08-01

    China's government is considering legalization of online prescription drugs to increase the pharmaceutical market and enhance access to necessary medicines. However, challenges such as a shortage of licensed pharmacists and drug quality issues have raised concerns and delayed consensus on the proposal. China's government must address the most pressing issues so it can render a decision on online prescription sales.

  16. Future Challenges and Opportunities in Online Prescription Drug Promotion Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwell, Brian G.; Rupert, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite increased availability of online promotional tools for prescription drug marketers, evidence on online prescription drug promotion is far from settled or conclusive. We highlight ways in which online prescription drug promotion is similar to conventional broadcast and print advertising and ways in which it differs. We also highlight five key areas for future research: branded drug website influence on consumer knowledge and behavior, interactive features on branded drug websites, mobile viewing of branded websites and mobile advertisements, online promotion and non-US audiences, and social media and medication decisions. PMID:26927597

  17. Sequential pattern of non-medical drug use in the drug career of opiate dependents in Nagpur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wairagkar, N S; Wahab, S N; Kulkarni, H R

    1996-12-01

    A study was carried out in a group of opiate addicts who reported to various centers in Nagpur city, India, to know the sequential pattern of nonmedical drug use in the drug career of opiate dependents in Nagpur. The mean age of the study group was 28.2 years, the majority were males, educated up to 10th standard, employed in various occupations like petty business, vehicle driving, etc, with an average monthly income of Rs. 316. The average number of drugs ever used per person was 3.7 +/- 1.2, those recently used was 2.6 +/- 0.9 and currently used was 2.2 +/- 0.6. The study group experienced 13 drug types in their addict careers. Beedi¿cigarette was the first drug abused by the majority. Drug careers starting with beedi¿cigarette, progressing to alcohol and then to canabis and finally to heroin were observed in a majority of subjects. There appeared to be a shift from multidrug use to the singular combination of heroin and beedi¿cigarette currently. Use of all other drugs declined in favor of heroin as the career progressed. The study indicates that preventive programs should be directed at reducing the use of initial drugs like beedi¿cigarette and alcohol and also reducing the social acceptability of these drugs as measure for preventing progression to hard drugs like heroin.

  18. Influences of motivational contexts on prescription drug misuse and related drug problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian C; Rendina, H Jonathon; Vuolo, Mike; Wells, Brooke E; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2015-01-01

    Prescription drug misuse has emerged as a significant problem among young adults. While the effects of motivational contexts have been demonstrated for illicit drugs, the role of motivational contexts in prescription drug misuse remains understudied. Using data from 400 young adults recruited via time-space sampling, we examined the role of motivational contexts in the frequency of misuse of three prescription drug types as well as drug-related problems and symptoms of dependency. Both negative and positive motivations to use drugs are associated with increases in prescription drug misuse frequency. Only negative motivations are associated directly with drug problems and drug dependence, as well as indirectly via prescription pain killer misuse. Addressing positive and negative motivational contexts of prescription drug misuse may not only provide a means to reduce misuse and implement harm reduction measures, but may also inform the content of treatment plans for young adults with prescription drug misuse problems.

  19. The “Black Box” of Prescription Drug Diversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inciardi, James A.; Surratt, Hilary L.; Cicero, Theodore J.; Kurtz, Steven P.; Martin, Steven S.; Parrino, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of surveys and studies are examined in an effort to better understand the scope of prescription drug diversion and to determine if there are consistent patterns of diversion among various populations of prescription drug abusers. Data are drawn from the RADARS® System, the National Survey of Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), the Delaware School Survey, and a series of quantitative and qualitative studies conducted in Miami, Florida. The data suggest that the major sources of diversion include drug dealers, friends and relatives, smugglers, pain patients, and the elderly, but these vary by the population being targeted. In all of the studies examined, the use of the Internet as a source for prescription drugs is insignificant. Little is known about where drug dealers are obtaining their supplies, and as such, prescription drug diversion is a “black box” requiring concentrated systematic study. PMID:20155603

  20. Cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs – a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corroon, James M; Mischley, Laurie K; Sexton, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of medical cannabis is increasing, most commonly for pain, anxiety and depression. Emerging data suggest that use and abuse of prescription drugs may be decreasing in states where medical cannabis is legal. The aim of this study was to survey cannabis users to determine whether they had intentionally substituted cannabis for prescription drugs. Methods A total of 2,774 individuals were a self-selected convenience sample who reported having used cannabis at least once in the previous 90 days. Subjects were surveyed via an online anonymous questionnaire on cannabis substitution effects. Participants were recruited through social media and cannabis dispensaries in Washington State. Results A total of 1,248 (46%) respondents reported using cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs. The most common classes of drugs substituted were narcotics/opioids (35.8%), anxiolytics/benzodiazepines (13.6%) and antidepressants (12.7%). A total of 2,473 substitutions were reported or approximately two drug substitutions per affirmative respondent. The odds of reporting substituting were 4.59 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.87–5.43) greater among medical cannabis users compared with non-medical users and 1.66 (95% CI, 1.27–2.16) greater among those reporting use for managing the comorbidities of pain, anxiety and depression. A slightly higher percentage of those who reported substituting resided in states where medical cannabis was legal at the time of the survey (47% vs. 45%, p=0.58), but this difference was not statistically significant. Discussion These patient-reported outcomes support prior research that individuals are using cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs, particularly, narcotics/opioids, and independent of whether they identify themselves as medical or non-medical users. This is especially true if they suffer from pain, anxiety and depression. Additionally, this study suggests that state laws allowing access to, and use of, medical

  1. Identification and management of prescription drug abuse in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Prescription drug abuse is a growing problem in the United States and many other countries. Estimates of prescription drug abuse rates during pregnancy range from 5% to 20%. The primary prescription drugs designated as controlled drugs with abuse potential in pregnancy are opiates prescribed for pain, benzodiazepines prescribed for anxiety, and stimulants prescribed for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Prescription drugs are obtained for abuse through diversion methods, such as purchasing them from others or by doctor shopping. The use of prescription drugs puts both the mother and the fetus at high risk during pregnancy. Identification of women who are abusing prescription drugs is important so that treatment can be ensured. It is crucial for healthcare professionals to use a multidisciplinary approach and be supportive and maintain a good rapport with pregnant women who abuse prescription drugs. Management includes inpatient hospitalization for detoxification and withdrawal symptoms, and in the case of opiate abuse, opiate maintenance is recommended for pregnant women for the duration of their pregnancy to reduce relapse rates and improve maternal and fetal outcomes. Other recommendations include referral for support groups and supportive housing.

  2. The global diversion of pharmaceutical drugs
non-medical use and diversion of psychotropic prescription drugs in North America: a review of sourcing routes and control measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Benedikt; Bibby, Meagan; Bouchard, Martin

    2010-12-01

    North America features some of the world's highest consumption levels for controlled psychoactive prescription drugs (PPDs; e.g. prescription opioids, benzodiazepines, stimulants), with non-medical use and related harms (e.g. morbidity, mortality) rising in key populations in recent years. While the determinants, characteristics and impacts of these 'use' problems are increasingly well documented, little is known about the 'supply' side of non-medical PPD use, much of which is facilitated by 'diversion' as a key sourcing route. This paper provides a select review of the phenomenon of PPD diversion in North America, also considering interventions and policy implications. A conceptual and empirical review of select-peer- and non-peer-reviewed research literature from 1991 to 2010 focusing upon PPD diversion in North America was conducted. The phenomenon of PPD diversion is heterogeneous. Especially among general populations, a large proportion of PPDs for non-medical use are obtained from friends or family members. Other PPD diversion routes involve 'double doctoring' or 'prescription shopping'; street drug markets; drug thefts, prescription forgeries or fraud; as well as PPD purchases from the internet. The distinct nature and heterogeneity make PPD diversion a complex and difficult target for interventions. Prescription monitoring programs (PMPs) appear to reduce overall PPD use, yet their impact on reducing diversion or non-medical use is not clear. Law enforcement is unlikely to reach PPD diversion effectively. Effective reduction will probably require reductions in overall PPD consumption volumes, although such will need to be accomplished without compromising standards of good medical (e.g. pain) care. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  3. [Failure mode and effects analysis on computerized drug prescriptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Atenciano, J A; Roldán-Aviña, J P; González-García, Mercedes; Blanco-Sánchez, M C; Pinto-Melero, M A; Pérez-Ramírez, C; Calvo Rubio-Burgos, Miguel; Osuna-Navarro, F J; Jurado-Carmona, A M

    2015-01-01

    To identify and analyze errors in drug prescriptions of patients treated in a "high resolution" hospital by applying a Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA).Material and methods A multidisciplinary group of medical specialties and nursing analyzed medical records where drug prescriptions were held in free text format. An FMEA was developed in which the risk priority index (RPI) was obtained from a cross-sectional observational study using an audit of the medical records, carried out in 2 phases: 1) Pre-intervention testing, and (2) evaluation of improvement actions after the first analysis. An audit sample size of 679 medical records from a total of 2,096 patients was calculated using stratified sampling and random selection of clinical events. Prescription errors decreased by 22.2% in the second phase. FMEA showed a greater RPI in "unspecified route of administration" and "dosage unspecified", with no significant decreases observed in the second phase, although it did detect, "incorrect dosing time", "contraindication due to drug allergy", "wrong patient" or "duplicate prescription", which resulted in the improvement of prescriptions. Drug prescription errors have been identified and analyzed by FMEA methodology, improving the clinical safety of these prescriptions. This tool allows updates of electronic prescribing to be monitored. To avoid such errors would require the mandatory completion of all sections of a prescription. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Physicians' decision process for drug prescription and the impact of pharmaceutical marketing mix instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Katia; De Staebel, Odette; Gijsbrechts, Els; van Waterschoot, Walter

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an in-depth, qualitative analysis of the physicians' decision process for drug prescription. Drugs in the considered therapeutic classes are mainly prescribed by specialists, treating patients with obligatory medical insurance, for a prolonged period of time. The research approach is specifically designed to capture the full complexity and sensitive nature of the physician's choice behavior, which appears to be more hybrid and less rational in nature than is often assumed in quantitative, model-based analyses of prescription behavior. Several interesting findings emerge from the analysis: (i) non-compensatory decision rules seem to dominate the decision process, (ii) consideration sets are typically small and change-resistant, (iii) drug cost is not a major issue for most physicians, (iv) detailing remains one of the most powerful pharmaceutical marketing instruments and is highly appreciated as a valuable and quick source of information, and (v) certain types of non-medical marketing incentives (such as free conference participation) may in some situations also influence drug choices.

  5. Basic Stand Alone Medicare Prescription Drug Events PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This is a Public Use File for Prescription Drug Events drawn from the 2008 Beneficiary Summary File of Medicare beneficiaries enrolled during the calendar year 2008,...

  6. Prescription drug monitoring programs in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Sausan El Burai; Mack, Karin

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Since the late 1990s, the number of opioid analgesic overdose deaths has quadrupled in the United States of America (from 4 030 deaths in 1999 to 16 651 in 2010). The objectives of this article are to provide an overview of the problem of prescription drug overdose in the United States and to discuss actions that could help reduce the problem, with particular attention to the characteristics of prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs). These programs consist of state-level databases that monitor controlled substances. The information compiled in the databases is at the disposal of authorized persons (e.g., physicians, pharmacists, and other health-care providers) and may be used only for professional purposes. Suppliers can use such information to prevent interaction with other drugs or therapeutic duplication, or to identify drug-search behavior. Law enforcement agencies can use these programs to identify improper drug prescription or dispensing patterns, or drug diversion. PMID:25563153

  7. Establishing a Link Between Prescription Drug Abuse and Illicit Online Pharmacies: Analysis of Twitter Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuki, Takeo; Mackey, Tim Ken; Cuomo, Raphael

    2015-12-16

    Youth and adolescent non-medical use of prescription medications (NUPM) has become a national epidemic. However, little is known about the association between promotion of NUPM behavior and access via the popular social media microblogging site, Twitter, which is currently used by a third of all teens. In order to better assess NUPM behavior online, this study conducts surveillance and analysis of Twitter data to characterize the frequency of NUPM-related tweets and also identifies illegal access to drugs of abuse via online pharmacies. Tweets were collected over a 2-week period from April 1-14, 2015, by applying NUPM keyword filters for both generic/chemical and street names associated with drugs of abuse using the Twitter public streaming application programming interface. Tweets were then analyzed for relevance to NUPM and whether they promoted illegal online access to prescription drugs using a protocol of content coding and supervised machine learning. A total of 2,417,662 tweets were collected and analyzed for this study. Tweets filtered for generic drugs names comprised 232,108 tweets, including 22,174 unique associated uniform resource locators (URLs), and 2,185,554 tweets (376,304 unique URLs) filtered for street names. Applying an iterative process of manual content coding and supervised machine learning, 81.72% of the generic and 12.28% of the street NUPM datasets were predicted as having content relevant to NUPM respectively. By examining hyperlinks associated with NUPM relevant content for the generic Twitter dataset, we discovered that 75.72% of the tweets with URLs included a hyperlink to an online marketing affiliate that directly linked to an illicit online pharmacy advertising the sale of Valium without a prescription. This study examined the association between Twitter content, NUPM behavior promotion, and online access to drugs using a broad set of prescription drug keywords. Initial results are concerning, as our study found over 45,000 tweets

  8. Drug prescription appropriateness in the elderly: an Italian study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegri, Nicola; Rossi, Federica; Del Signore, Federica; Bertazzoni, Paolo; Bellazzi, Roberto; Sandrini, Giorgio; Vecchi, Tomaso; Liccione, Davide; Pascale, Alessia; Govoni, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Correct drug prescription in the elderly is a difficult task that requires careful survey of the current pharmacological therapies. In this article, we reviewed the drug prescriptions provided to 860 persons aged 65 years or over, residing in a small city of Lombardy, Italy. Methods Subjects were recruited from a local nursing home, the Pavia and Vigevano Neuropsychological Center for Alzheimer’s Disease, general practitioners’ offices, and the local University of the Third Age. For each patient, the amount of potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIPs), sedative and anticholinergic load (SL and AL, respectively), and drug–drug interactions were evaluated. Results Widespread polypharmacy, giving rise to 10.06% of PIPs in the whole collection of prescriptions, was observed. In particular, PIPs mainly concern drugs acting at the central nervous system level, mostly benzodiazepines and antipsychotics. Moreover, approximately one-fourth of the subjects had an elevated SL and approximately one-tenth a high AL. Drug–drug interactions were frequent (266 requiring medical attention), up to five for each single patient. Of concern was the underuse of antidementia drugs: only 20 patients received a cholinesterase inhibitor or memantine, although 183 patients were potentially suitable for this treatment. Conclusion These results demonstrate the need to develop novel strategies aimed at improving the quality of drug prescription. PMID:28228653

  9. The effects of non-medically used psychoactive drugs on monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Fumiko; Nonaka, Ryouichi; Satoh Hisashi Kamimura, Kanako

    2007-03-22

    We developed a reproducible, simple, and small-scale method for determining the re-uptake and release of monoamines (dopamine, serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine) using rat brain synaptosomes. These assays were then applied to study the effects of different kinds of non-medically used psychoactive drugs on monoamine re-uptake and release. The phenethylamine derivatives, 4-fluoroamphetamine, 2-methylamino-3,4-methylene-dioxy-propiophenone (methylone), 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine (BDB), and N-methyl-1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine (MBDB), had strong inhibitory effects on the re-uptake of dopamine, 5-HT and norepinephrine. 4-Fluoroamphetamine, methylone and BDB also strongly increased the release of the three monoamines, but MBDB increased 5-HT and norepinephrine release, but had little effect on dopamine release. However, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenethylamine (2C-I), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylphenethylamine (2C-E), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-chlorophenethylamine (2C-C), 2,4,5-trimethoxyamphetamine (TMA-2) and 2,4,6-trimethoxyamphetamine (TMA-6), which are methoxylated phenethylamine derivatives, slightly influenced the re-uptake and release of monoamines. Alpha-metyltryptamine (AMT), a tryptamine derivative, was one of the strongest re-uptake inhibitors and releasers of the three monoamines. The tryptamine derivative, 5-methoxy-alpha-methyltryptamine (5-MeO-AMT), also strongly inhibited re-uptake and increased the release of the three monoamines. N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT), 5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-DIPT), 5-methoxy-N,N-methylisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-MIPT), and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) inhibited monoamine re-uptake, but had a few effects on monoamine release. 1-(3-Chlorophenyl)piperazine (3CPP) and 1-(methoxyphenyl)piperazine (4MPP), which are piperazine derivatives, inhibited monoamine re-uptake and accelerated their release. The results suggest that some designer drugs strongly act on the central nerve system to the same

  10. Drug prescription appropriateness in the elderly: an Italian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allegri N

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Allegri,1 Federica Rossi,2 Federica Del Signore,2 Paolo Bertazzoni,3 Roberto Bellazzi,4 Giorgio Sandrini,5 Tomaso Vecchi,1 Davide Liccione,1 Alessia Pascale,6 Stefano Govoni6 1Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia, 2Pavia and Vigevano Neuropsychological Center for Alzheimer’s Disease, 3”Bertazzoni” Pharmacy General Partnership, Vigevano, 4Nephrology and Dialysis Ward, Civil Hospital of Vigevano, 5C. Mondino National Institute of Neurology Foundation, IRCCS, 6Department of Drug Sciences, Section of pharmacology, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy Purpose: Correct drug prescription in the elderly is a difficult task that requires careful survey of the current pharmacological therapies. In this article, we reviewed the drug prescriptions provided to 860 persons aged 65 years or over, residing in a small city of Lombardy, Italy.Methods: Subjects were recruited from a local nursing home, the Pavia and Vigevano Neuropsychological Center for Alzheimer’s Disease, general practitioners’ offices, and the local University of the Third Age. For each patient, the amount of potentially inappropriate prescriptions (PIPs, sedative and anticholinergic load (SL and AL, respectively, and drug–drug interactions were evaluated.Results: Widespread polypharmacy, giving rise to 10.06% of PIPs in the whole collection of prescriptions, was observed. In particular, PIPs mainly concern drugs acting at the central nervous system level, mostly benzodiazepines and antipsychotics. Moreover, approximately one-fourth of the subjects had an elevated SL and approximately one-tenth a high AL. Drug–drug interactions were frequent (266 requiring medical attention, up to five for each single patient. Of concern was the underuse of antidementia drugs: only 20 patients received a cholinesterase inhibitor or memantine, although 183 patients were potentially suitable for this treatment.Conclusion: These results demonstrate the need to develop

  11. Vital Signs-Preventing Prescription Drug Overdose

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-01

    This podcast is based on the July 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from an overdose of prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to make painkiller prescribing safer and help prevent overdoses.  Created: 7/1/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/1/2014.

  12. Preventing Prescription Drug Overdose PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-01

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Every day, 46 people in the U.S. die from an overdose of prescription opioid painkillers. Learn what can be done to make painkiller prescribing safer and help prevent overdoses.  Created: 7/1/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/1/2014.

  13. Prescription of fixed dose combination drugs for diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Amit

    2007-01-01

    Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of an antiprotozoal and an antibacterial, for treatment of diarrhoea, have been available in the Indian pharmaceutical market for about a decade. There is little evidence to substantiate this combination therapy. We evaluated 2,163 physician prescriptions for diarrhoea and found that 59 per cent of prescriptions were for FDCs. This is unethical because prescribing such combinations exposes a patient to higher risks of adverse drug reactions and also increases the chances of drug resistance. Physicians' prescribing practices in India are influenced by socioeconomic factors and the pharmaceutical industry's marketing techniques that include giving incentives to physicians to prescribe certain drugs.

  14. Buying prescription drugs on the internet: promises and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Alan M

    2006-03-01

    Patients can save time and money by purchasing drugs from Internet pharmacies, but they can also end up with counterfeit or substandard medications. Online pharmacies bypass the safeguards of a doctor-patient relationship, creating a dangerous opportunity for prescription drug abuse and unchecked medication interactions and side effects.

  15. Americans' access to prescription drugs stabilizes, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukus, Ellyn R; Carrier, Emily R

    2011-12-01

    Despite the weak economy and more people lacking health insurance, the proportion of Americans reporting problems affording prescription drugs remained level between 2007 and 2010, with more than one in eight going without a prescribed drug in 2010, according to a new national study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). While remaining stable overall, access to prescription drugs improved for working-age, uninsured people, likely reflecting a decline in visits to health care providers, as well as changes in the composition of the uninsured population. Likewise, elderly people eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid saw a sharp drop in prescription drug access problems. The most vulnerable people--the uninsured, those with low incomes, people in fair or poor health, and those with multiple chronic conditions--continued to face the most unmet prescription needs. For example, 48 percent of uninsured people in fair or poor health went without a prescription drug because of cost concerns in 2010, almost double the rate of insured people with the same reported health status.

  16. Our prescription drugs kill us in large numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Our prescription drugs are the third leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer in the United States and Europe. Around half of those who die have taken their drugs correctly; the other half die because of errors, such as too high a dose or use of a drug despite contraindications. Our......, widespread crime that includes corruption of the scientific evidence about drugs and bribery of doctors, and lies in drug marketing, which is as harmful as tobacco marketing and, therefore, should be banned. We should take far fewer drugs, and patients should carefully study the package inserts of the drugs...

  17. Diagnosis-prescription studies – important steps towards a national drug prescription statistics in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørund Straand

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available  ABSTRACTIn the first part of this article, drug utilization and prescribing practice is discussed as seen from aNorwegian general practice perspective. Which are the data sources available? What kind of studieshave been performed? Prescription-diagnosis studies are reviewed, in particular the Møre & RomsdalPrescription Study (MRPS. Because the wholesales drug statistics do not include information aboutneither patients, prescribers or diagnoses, there is a current need for establishing a more comprehensivestatistics giving wider and deeper insights into the prescribing and utilization of drugs in the Norwegiansociety. The proposed Norwegian prescription statistics is discussed in relation to previous experiencesfrom prescription-diagnosis studies and current needs for research and statistics in the field. Someexamples are given illustrating why the 11-digit person number probably should be included in thedatabase. Lack of diagnostic information may to some extent be compensated for by introducing a moredifferentiated list of diagnoses for the drugs reimbursed. The use of data from this statistics for qualityassurance in e.g. general practice is discussed. Finally, some suggestions are given for how the Norwegianprescription statistics may be organised.

  18. Getting to the Root of High Prescription Drug Prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, Henry; Corr, Bill; Martin, Kristi; Duong, Sophia

    2017-07-01

    ISSUE: Historic increases in prescription drug prices and spending are contributing to unsustainable health care costs in the United States. There is widespread public support for elected officials to address the problem. GOAL: To document the drivers of high U.S. prescription drug prices and offer a broad range of feasible policy actions. METHODS: Interviews with experts and organizations engaged with prescription drug development and utilization, pricing, regulation, and clinical practice. Review of policy documents, proposals, and position statements from a variety of stakeholders. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: Congress and regulators can undertake a wide range of policy actions to begin to rebalance incentives for innovation and price competition, prioritize patient access and affordability, and maximize the availability of information to patients, providers, and payers.

  19. Justice implications of a proposed Medicare prescription drug policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Heather

    2004-07-01

    Social justice is a core value to the mission of social work. Older people are among the most vulnerable populations for whom social workers are called on to advocate. Although Medicare prescription drug coverage has been a top legislative issue over the past few years, such a benefit expansion has yet to be implemented. This article examines the historical context of Medicare and reviews the proposals for prescription drug coverage, identifying the concerns raised. Literature critiquing the justice dimensions of health care for the elderly population is reviewed. Justice claims are identified and refined, and social justice theories are used in the analysis of the proposed policies.

  20. Review of Experience of a Statewide Poison Control Center With Pediatric Exposures to Oral Antineoplastic Drugs in the Nonmedical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Stephen L; Liu, Jehnan; Soleymani, Kamyar; Romasco, Rebecca L; Farid, Hanieh; Clark, Richard F; Cantrell, F Lee

    2016-01-01

    The use of oral antineoplastic agents in nonmedical settings continues to increase. There are limited data available on pediatric exposures to these agents. We sought to identify characteristics of such exposures. We performed a retrospective review of database of a statewide poison system from 2000 to 2009 for all cases of pediatric exposures to oral antineoplastic agents, which took place in a nonmedical setting. Data collected include gender, age, agent of exposure, dose, drug concentration, reason for exposure, symptoms, outcomes, interventions, and length of hospital stay. There were a total of 328 patients. The mean average age was 4.1 years. Eighty-nine percentage (n = 293) was unintentional. Exposures to 21 different antineoplastic agents were identified. Methotrexate (n = 91) and 6-mercaptopurine (n = 47) were the most common agents encountered. Two hundred ninety-nine (91%) cases had no symptoms reported. When reported, gastrointestinal symptoms (n = 17) and central nervous system sedation (n = 6) were most common. One case of pancytopenia was reported. No deaths were reported in this series. Sixty-seven percent (n = 220) were managed at home, whereas 19 (6%) were admitted to a health care facility. Cases were followed by the poison control center for 0.34 days (SD = 1.40). In this study, exposures to oral antineoplastics were primarily unintentional, asymptomatic, and managed at home. Study limitations include possible reporting bias, inability to objectively confirm exposures, and limited duration of monitoring by the poison control center. In this retrospective review, no significant morbidity or mortality was reported from pediatric exposures to oral antineoplastic drugs in the nonmedical setting.

  1. How Can Prescription Drug Misuse Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults ...

  2. How Can Prescription Drug Addiction Be Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults ...

  3. Epidemiological study of epilepsy by monitoring prescriptions of antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfi, R; Borselli, G; Marinai, C; Borgheresi, A; Cavalieri, A

    1995-07-28

    The aim of this study is to evaluate a simple and effective method of acquiring epidemiological information about epilepsy. Data on antiepileptic drug prescriptions was collected, the utilization pattern being based on defined daily doses (DDDs). Antiepileptic drugs are epidemiological tracers of epilepsy due to their chronic and highly specific usage. Consequently, a prevalence rate for the whole population may be obtained by using DDDs. Data on antiepileptic drug prescriptions for a period of 6 months in 1992 and 6 months in 1993 indicate a utilization of approximately 7 DDDs of antiepileptic drugs per 1,000 inhabitants. The prevalence of epilepsy was estimated by correcting the exposure calculated in DDDs by a factor of 0.68. In our sample, the prevalence of the disease was 5.2 per 1,000 inhabitants in 1992 and 4.9 per 1,000 in 1993. Physician prescriptions were concentrated on four compounds, namely phenobarbital, carbamazepine, valproic acid and phenytoin, which together represented 90% of total antiepileptic drug prescriptions.

  4. Availability of prescription drugs for bipolar disorder at online pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Scott; Glenn, Tasha; Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Bauer, Michael

    2016-03-15

    There is increasing use of online pharmacies to purchase prescription drugs. While some online pharmacies are legitimate and safe, there are many unsafe and illegal so-called "rogue" online pharmacies. This study investigated the availability of psychotropic drugs online to consumers in the US, using 5 commonly prescribed drugs for bipolar disorder. Using the search term "buy [drug name]" in the Google, Yahoo and Bing search engines, the characteristics of the online pharmacies found on the first two pages of search results were investigated. The availability of the requested dosage and formulations of two brand (Seroquel XR, Abilify) and three generic drugs (lamotrigine, lithium carbonate and bupropion SR) were determined. Of 30 online pharmacies found, 17 (57%) were rated as rogue by LegitScript. Of the 30 pharmacies, 15 (50%) require a prescription, 21 (70%) claim to be from Canada, with 20 of these having a Canadian International Pharmacy association (CIPA) seal on the website. Only 13 of the 20 sites with a CIPA seal were active CIPA members. There were about the same number of trust verification seals on the rogue and legitimate pharmacy sites. Some rogue pharmacies are professional in appearance, and may be difficult for consumers to recognize as rogue. All five brand and generic drugs were offered for sale online, with or without a prescription. However, many substitutions were presented such as different strengths and formulations including products not approved by the FDA. No evaluation of product quality, packaging or purchasing. Psychotropic medications are available online with or without a prescription. The majority of online pharmacy websites were rogue. Physicians should ask about the use of online pharmacies. For those who choose to use online pharmacies, two measures to detect rogue pharmacies are recommended: (1) only purchase drugs from pharmacies that require a prescription, and (2) check all pharmacy verification seals directly on the website

  5. A New Prescription for Fighting Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Ron

    2012-01-01

    It's a drug prevention conversation--and program--that was largely missing as recently as a decade ago in most middle and high schools. In those days, the principal concern of health educators and disciplinarians alike was to keep students from misusing alcohol and illegal street drugs such as ecstasy, cocaine and even heroine. But driven by the…

  6. 76 FR 68295 - Reducing Prescription Drug Shortages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... market may use shortages as opportunities to hoard scarce drugs or charge exorbitant prices. The Food and... solutions are outside of the FDA's control, the agency has worked cooperatively with manufacturers to... before a shortage becomes a crisis. However, drug manufacturers have not consistently provided the...

  7. Prescription and use of “equivalent” drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Eandi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Three case reports, where an “equivalent” drugs is prescribed, are described: a patient treated with lanzoprazole, a man with acute myocardial infarction and a young man with epilepsy. These reports are emblematic of the doubts and problems that doctors have to afford in the choice of a generic drug instead of a branded drug. The Author examines not only clinical, legislative and economical aspects of prescription of generic drugs in the Italian context, but also common questions that patients may ask when a generic drug is prescribed.

  8. Chiropractors' attitudes toward drug prescription rights: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emary, Peter Charles; Stuber, Kent Jason

    2014-01-01

    The right to prescribe drugs remains a contentious issue within the chiropractic profession. Nevertheless, drug prescription by manual therapy providers is currently an important topic. Notably, physiotherapists in the United Kingdom were recently granted limited independent prescribing rights. Reports suggest that physiotherapists in Australia now want those same rights, and as such a review of chiropractors' general attitudes toward drug prescription is needed. To examine the literature concerning chiropractors' attitudes toward drug prescription rights and to compare the opinions of chiropractors currently licensed to prescribe medication with those in the profession who are not. This was a narrative review, consisting of a formal literature search and summary of included articles. Electronic databases searched included the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PubMed, and the Index to Chiropractic Literature. Inclusion criteria consisted of prospective studies published in English in peer-reviewed journals. Studies were required to contain data on chiropractors' opinions toward medication prescription rights. Of 33 articles identified, a total of seven surveys were included in the review. Of these, there was a general split in opinion among chiropractors regarding the right to prescribe drugs in chiropractic practice. Those supportive of prescribing rights favoured a limited number of over-the-counter and/or prescription-based medications such as analgesics, anti-inflammatories, and muscle relaxants. When questioned on full prescribing rights, however, chiropractors were generally opposed. In jurisdictions where chiropractors are currently licensed to prescribe from a limited formulary, such as in Switzerland, the majority perceived this right as an advantage for the profession. Moreover, continuing education in pharmacology was viewed as a necessary component of this privilege. Based on the literature to date there is a general split in

  9. Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more related NIDA Notes Related News Releases Journal issue addresses nonmedical use of prescription drugs ( December 2016 ) Multi agency funding announcement to assist with opioid crisis in rural U.S. regions ( October 2016 ) Secondhand marijuana smoke may impair cardiovascular ...

  10. [The evolution of principal drugs in prescription compatibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bing; Shi, Dong-ping

    2009-01-01

    The principal drugs of principal, adjuvant, auxiliary and conductant compatiblity in prescriptions recorded in the ancient literatures had different meaning and quantities. According to the current literatures, Zhuangzi Xu Wugui took the one can cure diseases as the principal drug; The principal, adjuvant, auxiliary and conductant drugs in Shennong Bencao Jing (Shennong's Classic of Materia Medica) can be used to differentiate the good and bad of drugs; Yaoxing Lun (Treatise on medicinal property) of Zheng quan (Tang dynasty) stipulated some drugs as principal drugs; Zazhu Bencao of Jiang Xiaowan (Tang dynasty) took the one can cure yin diseases as the principal drugs; Yixue Qiyuan (the origination of medicine) of Zhang Yuansu (Jin dynasty) took the one of maximum dosage as principal drugs; Piwei Lun (Treatise on Spleen and Stomach) of LI gao (Jin dynasty) took the powerful one as the principal drug; The principal drugs in Yi Lun (medicine treatise) of Wang Kentang (Ming dynasty) changed according to different ages. The quantities of principal drugs can had two and three ingredients even took one prescription as principal drug instead of one ingredient.

  11. Are You Shopping Smart for Prescription Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provides comparative cost and effectiveness of those drugs. Consumer Reports magazine, best known for its ratings of cars, appliances, ... with permission, from the January 2008 issue of Consumer Reports magazine. Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs™ can be found ...

  12. 21 CFR 201.100 - Prescription drugs for human use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., storage, or wholesale distribution of prescription drugs; or (ii) In the possession of a retail, hospital... without naming their components. (ii) Color additives may be designated as coloring without naming specific color components unless the naming of such components is required by a color additive...

  13. Adequacy of anti-tuberculosis drug prescriptions in Viet Nam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoa, N B; Lauritsen, J M; Rieder, H L

    2012-01-01

    SETTING: National Tuberculosis Program, Viet Nam, 2008. OBJECTIVES: To determine drug prescription adherence to national guidelines, to examine factors associated with an erroneous dosage of rifampin (RMP) and to evaluate the impact of an insufficient RMP dosage on treatment outcome. METHODS: A r...

  14. Prescription pattern of drugs in pregnancy induced hypertension in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar T

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: The incidence of single drugs therapy and two drugs was high. Irrational prescriptions were few. The present pattern of prescriptions can be improved by advocating rational drug prescription and awareness regarding safe use of drugs to the obstetricians. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(6.000: 783-787

  15. 76 FR 41434 - Removal of Certain Requirements Related to the Prescription Drug Marketing Act; Opportunity for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-14

    ... prescription drug marketing and distribution. The primary purpose of the PDMA was to increase safeguards to... the Prescription Drug Marketing Act; Opportunity for Public Comment AGENCY: Food and Drug... remove a section of the Prescription Drug Marketing Act (PDMA) regulations requiring that prior to...

  16. Drug prescription behavior in a Teaching Hospital of Western Maharashtra

    OpenAIRE

    Gurpreet Singh; Anuj Bhatnagar; Sandip Mukherji; Dhruv Goel

    2016-01-01

    Context: To identify drug prescription behavior and thus, guide further actions to recommend evidence-based module for learning in postgraduate curriculum. Aims: To determine drug prescribing behavior of postgraduate residents. Settings and Design: Retrospective historical data-based cross-sectional study in a tertiary care, multispecialty teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Calculation of sample size and sampling procedure was based on standard recommendations of the World Health Organ...

  17. State prescription drug price Web sites: how useful to consumers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ha T; Corey, Catherine G

    2008-02-01

    To aid consumers in comparing prescription drug costs, many states have launched Web sites to publish drug prices offered by local retail pharmacies. The current push to make retail pharmacy prices accessible to consumers is part of a much broader movement to increase price transparency throughout the health-care sector. Efforts to encourage price-based shopping for hospital and physician services have encountered widespread concerns, both on grounds that prices for complex services are difficult to measure and compare accurately and that quality varies substantially across providers. Experts agree, however, that prescription drugs are much easier to shop for than other, more complex health services. However, extensive gaps in available price information--the result of relying on Medicaid data--seriously hamper the effectiveness of state drug price-comparison Web sites, according to a new study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). An alternative approach--requiring pharmacies to submit price lists to the states--would improve the usefulness of price information, but pharmacies typically oppose such a mandate. Another limitation of most state Web sites is that price information is restricted to local pharmacies, when online pharmacies, both U.S. and foreign, often sell prescription drugs at substantially lower prices. To further enhance consumer shopping tools, states might consider expanding the types of information provided, including online pharmacy comparison tools, lists of deeply discounted generic drugs offered by discount retailers, and lists of local pharmacies offering price matches.

  18. How Medicare could get better prices on prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outterson, Kevin; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2009-01-01

    Congress may reform drug pricing policies under Medicare Part D as part of a larger health reform effort. Currently, the "noninterference" provision prevents the government from negotiating drug prices on behalf of Medicare Part D prescription drug plans. Commonly considered reform proposals borrow ideas from Medicaid, either through returning dual eligibles to Medicaid drug pricing or by imposing mandatory rebates across the Part D population. We examine a menu of other options, including value-based pricing; expansion of generic and therapeutically equivalent substitution; increased formulary diversity; importation; and limited antitrust waivers. These latter options may reduce federal spending without direct government price negotiations.

  19. Adding a Prescription Drug Benefit to Medicare: An Analysis of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    unpredictable and potentially high costs ( Marmor , 2000). The missing benefit was outpatient prescription drug coverage. On July 30th, President Johnson...Proposed Medicare Benefit At-a-Glance Chart. Retrieved September 12, 2004, from: http://www.kff.org/medicare/ medicarebenefitataglance.cfm Marmor , T.R

  20. 77 FR 16973 - Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertisements; Presentation of the Major Statement in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... Prescription Drug Advertisements; Presentation of the Major Statement in Television and Radio Advertisements in... determining whether the major statement in direct-to- consumer (DTC) television and radio advertisements... and Benefit Information in Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Television...

  1. Characteristics and drug utilization patterns for heavy users of prescription drugs among the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øymoen, Anita; Pottegård, Anton; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objectives of this study were to (1) identify and characterize heavy users of prescription drugs among persons aged 60 years and above; (2) investigate the association of demographic, socioeconomic, and health-related variables with being a heavy drug user; and (3) study the most...... frequently used drugs among heavy drug users and development in use over time. METHOD: This is a descriptive study. Heavy drug users were defined as the accumulated top 1 percentile who accounted for the largest share of prescription drug use measured in number of dispensed defined daily doses (DDDs......). The nationwide Danish registers were used to obtain data. Multivariable logistic binary regression was used to determine which factors were associated with being a heavy drug user. RESULTS: Heavy drug users among persons aged 60 years and above accounted for 6.8, 6.0, and 5.5% of prescription drug use in 2002...

  2. 21 CFR 310.305 - Records and reports concerning adverse drug experiences on marketed prescription drugs for human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... experiences on marketed prescription drugs for human use without approved new drug applications. 310.305 Section 310.305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... adverse drug experiences on marketed prescription drugs for human use without approved new drug...

  3. On the demand for prescription drugs: heterogeneity in price responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, Niels

    2013-07-01

    This paper estimates the price elasticity of demand for prescription drugs using an exogenous shift in consumer co-payment caused by a reform in the Danish subsidy scheme for the general public. Using purchasing records for the entire Danish population, I show that the average price response for the most commonly used drug yields demand elasticities in the range of -0.36 to -0.5. The reform is shown to affect women, the elderly, and immigrants the most. Furthermore, this paper shows significant heterogeneity in the price response over different types of antibiotics, suggesting that the price elasticity of demand varies considerably even across relatively similar drugs.

  4. Women and Drugs: The Heroin Abuser and the Prescription Drug Abuser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierres, Sara E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviewed the literature on female drug use/abuse and derived descriptions of the female heroin abuser and the female prescription drug abuser. Researchers suggest that problems of female drug abusers should be viewed in terms of the feminine role as well as the role of drug abuser. (BH)

  5. 78 FR 8446 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research; Prescription Drug Labeling Improvement and Enhancement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... prescription drug products and reducing the likelihood of medication errors. FDA implemented standardized... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 201, 314, and 601 Center for Drug Evaluation... and Information AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification of an...

  6. Profile of female patients seeking in-patient treatment for prescription opioid abuse from a tertiary care drug dependence treatment centre from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhoo Dayal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: There has been a limited focus on prescription drug abuse among women in the country. Choice of psychoactive substance, reasons for initiation and co-occurring disorders have been found to be different among men and women. The current study was aimed at studying the profile of female patients seeking in-patient treatment for prescription drug use over a period of five years at a tertiary care drug dependence treatment centre in India. Methods: Case records of all female patients admitted with substance use disorder at a national level drug dependence treatment centre in north India across five years (between January 2008 and December 2012 were reviewed retrospectively to study their socio-demographic and clinical profile. The information was gathered using a semi-structured proforma and detailed case records. Abstinence, relapse and retention rates were calculated. Results: Over the five years, 31 female patients were admitted with prescription drug abuse. Of them, 12 (39% used prescription opioids and 11 (36% used prescription opioid along with benzodiazepines. Commonest prescription opioid was pentazocine used by 87 per cent of the women. Twenty two (71% women were introduced to opioid by medical practitioners and commonest reason for introduction was pain (among 48%. Common co-occurring psychiatric diagnoses were depressive disorder (26%, cluster B traits/disorder (19% and somatoform disorder (13%. Eight women did not complete treatment and left against medical advice. Thirteen women were advised maintenance treatment, and 70 per cent of them were retained for at least six months. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings revealed a link between mental illness, pain and non-medical use of prescription opioids among women. Majority of these women received opioids as a legitimate prescription form physician. Therefore, these legitimate prescribers should be trained for pain management to facilitate proper treatment of

  7. Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs and Other Interventions to Combat Prescription Opioid Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath Chakravarthy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC has published significant data and trendsrelated to opioid prescription pain relievers (OPR. In 2008, 20,044 deaths were attributedto prescription drug overdose of which 14,800 (73.8% were due to OPR, an amount greaterthan the number of overdose deaths from heroin and cocaine combined. The majority of thesedeaths were unintentional. Between 1999-2008, overdose deaths from OPR increased almostfour-fold. Correspondingly, sales of OPR were four times greater in 2010 than in 1999. Mostsignificant to emergency physicians is the estimate that 39% of all opioids prescribed, administeredor continued come from the emergency department (ED. We present findings from theCDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR with commentary on current recommendationsand policies for curtailing the OPR epidemic.1

  8. Psychosocial factors associated with the prescription of generic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Calvillo, Javier A; Lana, Alberto; Cueto, Antonio; Markham, Wolfgang A; López, Maria Luisa

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate factors associated with "Generic drug prescription" (GDP) behaviour in Spain using the ASE (Attitude, Social Influence, Self-Efficacy) Model. General Practitioners were sent a validated and anonymous questionnaire measuring the ASE and Motivation variables for GDP and their generic drug prescription percentage. Most (n=486; 61.98%) responded to this cross-sectional survey. The mean scores and the 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. A binary logistic regression was used to identify the variables that best predict GDP behaviour. The main advantages and motivations for GDP were "saving money" and "protecting professional ethics". The greatest social influences were "doctors' personal preferences" and "authorities' pressure". GDP accounted for a scarce 15% of the total prescription. ASE and Motivation items were the best predictors: they explain 25% of being a 'high prescriber'. The highest prescribers were paediatricians (OR=5.07), workers in rural settings (OR=3.68) and professionals with high Motivation (OR=1.17) and Attitude (OR=1.11) scores. GDP percentage is very low compared with other countries. Interventions to modify the Attitudes of Primary Care doctors towards generic drugs should be implemented. Better informed patients, longer doctor appointment times and more varied dosage forms of generic drugs would also facilitate improvements in GDP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 21 CFR 201.56 - Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... human prescription drug and biological products. 201.56 Section 201.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... human prescription drug and biological products. (a) General requirements. Prescription drug labeling... requirements in §§ 201.56(d) and 201.57. (1) The following categories of prescription drug products are...

  10. Study of Potential Drug-Drug Interactions in Prescriptions of University- Based Pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mousavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs are adverse reactions caused by a combination of drugs; they are often predictable and therefore avoidable or manageable. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nature, type and prevalence of potential DDIs in prescriptions dispensed in university-based community pharmacies in Tehran, Iran.Methods: From July 2012 to February 2014, sample of 1260 prescriptions were collected from community and outpatient hospital pharmacies affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS, Iran. The prescriptions were assessed using the reference text “drug interaction facts”. The identified DDIs were categorized according to their level of significance into three classes (minor, moderate, major.Results: At least one drug-drug interaction was present in 339 (26.9% of prescriptions and a total of 751 cases of interactions were found in prescriptions. Major DDIs represented 7.3% of all DDIs detected, whereas moderate DDIs were 75% of all DDIs. The mean number of drugs per prescriptions was 3.2, with a median of 4 (range, 2-10.There was a positive association between number of prescribed drugs and occurrence of DDIs (OR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.9-2.4. The prescriptions of medical specialist had greater risk of occurrence of moderate severity DDIs than general practitioners (OR: 1.52, 95%CI: 1.08-2.15.Conclusion: Despite the prescriptions were collected from university-based pharmacies, but the overall prevalence of potential DDIs were high among patients. Physicians should be aware of potentially harmful DDIs. Meanwhile Pharmacists can contribute to the detection and prevention of drug-related injuries. Appropriate education, collaborating drug selection and pharmaceutical care are strongly recommended for physicians and pharmacists.

  11. Associations between statewide prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) requirement and physician patterns of prescribing opioid analgesics for patients with non-cancer chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsien-Chang; Wang, Zhi; Boyd, Carol; Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Buu, Anne

    2018-01-01

    State-level prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) have been implemented in most states. PDMPs enable registered prescribers to obtain real-time information on patients' prescription history to reduce non-medical use of controlled drugs. This study examined whether PDMP implementation and different levels of PDMP requirements were associated with physicians' patterns of prescribing opioid analgesics for patients with non-cancer chronic pain. This is a secondary analysis study using cross-sectional national data. Patients with non-cancer chronic pain from the 2012 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were included (weighted N=81,018,131; unweighted N=3295). Heckman two-step selection procedure employing two logistic regressions was used to explore the associations between PDMP requirements and physicians' prescribing behaviors, controlling for physician characteristics, patient characteristics, physician-healthcare system interaction, and physician-patient relationship, guided by the Eisenberg's model of physician decision making. State PDMP implementation status and requirement levels were not associated with physician opioid prescribing for non-cancer chronic pain treatment (p's ranged 0.30-0.32). Patients with Medicare coverage were more likely to be prescribed opioid analgesics than those with private health insurance (OR=1.55, prequirements and enforcement for prescribers and related stakeholders. Future studies also are needed to identify characteristics contributing to PDMP effectiveness in reducing non-medical use of prescription opioids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J R; Hensel, P J

    1995-01-01

    Starting consumers off on the "path to purchase" by encouraging them to seek more information is a major goal of direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising for prescription medications. But the authors found that a consumer's attitude toward DTC advertising can determine which of several paths he or she is likely to take. The attitudes of older adults are especially significant for pharmaceutical marketers because these consumers are heavy users of the drugs being advertised.

  13. NIDA Drug Use Screening Tool API

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This Web-based interactive tool provides clinicians with a single-question quick screen about past year alcohol, tobacco, illegal and nonmedical prescription drug...

  14. Attitudes toward drug prescription rights: a survey of Ontario chiropractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emary, Peter Charles; Stuber, Kent Jason

    2015-01-01

    Several published surveys have shown that chiropractors are generally split in their opinions regarding the right to prescribe drugs in chiropractic practice. Many of these studies have been limited by low response rates, leaving the generalizability of their findings open to question. The aim of the current study was to ascertain the general attitudes of chiropractors in Ontario, Canada toward the inclusion of drug prescription rights in their scope of practice. Relationships between these attitudes and the number of years in practice including differences in philosophical orientation were also explored. A 14-item questionnaire was developed and invitations sent via e-mail to all eligible 2,677 chiropractors in active practice registered electronically with the College of Chiropractors of Ontario in February 2015. Data were collected and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. 960 questionnaires were completed for a 36 % response rate. The majority of respondents agreed that chiropractors should be permitted to prescribe musculoskeletal medications such as over-the-counter and prescription-based analgesics, anti-inflammatories, and muscle relaxants. Over two-thirds also felt that with limited prescriptive authority chiropractors could help reduce patients' reliance on these types of drugs. Over three-quarters were opposed however to chiropractors having full prescribing rights. The majority indicated they recommend over-the-counter medications to acute and chronic patients to some extent in clinical practice. Nearly two-thirds perceived their knowledge of musculoskeletal medications as high or very high, while a similar proportion perceived their knowledge of drugs for non-musculoskeletal conditions to be low or very low. A majority of respondents felt that further education in pharmacology would be necessary for those in the profession wishing to prescribe medications. More recent graduates and those who espoused a broad scope of chiropractic

  15. 21 CFR 200.200 - Prescription drugs; reminder advertisements and reminder labeling to provide price information to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prescription drugs; reminder advertisements and... Prescription Drug Consumer Price Listing § 200.200 Prescription drugs; reminder advertisements and reminder labeling to provide price information to consumers. (a) Prescription drug reminder advertisements...

  16. Prescription drug overdose: between patients and their doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Walter Ling,1 Li-Tzy Wu21Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Science, Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAPrescription drug overdoses, mainly involving prescription opioids, have reached epidemic proportions in the United States over the past 20 years.1,2 Since 2003, prescription opioids have been involved in more drug-related overdose deaths than heroin and cocaine combined. Among patients who were prescribed opioids, an estimated 20% were prescribed high doses of opioids by either single or multiple physicians, and these patients appeared to account for the majority of prescription opioid-related overdoses.1,3,4 The increase in prescription overdose deaths has coincided with a major increase in prescription opioid sales.2 The prescribing practices of some physicians are often believed to have contributed in part to the increase in these overdose deaths. In a recently published perspective, Anna Lembke speculated on why doctors prescribe opioids to known prescription opioid abusers.5 Her article raises a timely and troubling issue for all of us interested in this area of medicine. Lembke identifies the root of the problem to lie in the changing societal attitude towards pain and suffering, the ever-growing availability of opioid medications, the regulatory requirements promulgated, and the perceived shift in the role of the medical professional in this context. Central to her argument is that physicians must now practice according to a set of externally imposed expectations of patients, payers, and regulators, putting the prescriber in the position of being "damned if you do and damned if you don’t". If Lembke is right, the physician now prescribes not according to what he or she wants to do, but according to what he or she must do. The result, at one extreme, is the patient acting as their

  17. Prescription Drug Diversion: Predictors of Illicit Acquisition and Redistribution in Three U.S. Metropolitan Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana Harris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Prescription drug diversion, the transfer of prescription drugs from lawful to unlawful channels for distribution or use, is a problem in the United States. Despite the pervasiveness of diversion, there are gaps in the literature regarding characteristics of individuals who participate in the illicit trade of prescription drugs. This study examines a range of predictors (e.g., demographics, prescription insurance coverage, perceived risk associated with prescription drug diversion of membership in three distinct diverter groups: individuals who illicitly acquire prescription drugs, those who redistribute them, and those who engage in both behaviors. Methods: Data were drawn from a cross-sectional Internet study (N = 846 of prescription drug use and diversion patterns in New York City, South Florida, and Washington, D.C.. Participants were classified into diversion categories based on their self-reported involvement in the trade of prescription drugs. Group differences in background characteristics of diverter groups were assessed by Chi-Square tests and followed up with multivariate logistic regressions. Results: While individuals in all diversion groups were more likely to be younger and have a licit prescription for any of the assessed drugs in the past year than those who did not divert, individuals who both acquire and redistribute are more likely to live in New York City, not have prescription insurance coverage, and perceive fewer legal risks of prescription drug diversion. Conclusion: Findings suggest that predictive characteristics vary according to diverter group.

  18. Analysis of Potential Drug-Drug Interactions and Its Clinical Manifestation of Pediatric Prescription on 2 Pharmacies in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa I. Barliana

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDI in prescription have high incidence around the world, including Indonesia. However, scientific evidence regarding DDI in Indonesia is not available. Therefore, in this study we have conducted survey in 2 pharmacies in Bandung against pediatric prescription given by pediatrician. These prescriptions then analyzed the potential for DDI contained in the prescription and clinical manifestation. The analysis showed that in pharmacy A, there are 33 prescriptions (from a total of 155 prescriptions that have potential DDI, or approximately 21.19% (2 prescriptions have the potential DDI major categories, 23 prescriptions categorized as moderate, and 8 prescriptions as minor. In Pharmacy B, there are 6 prescriptions (from a total of 40 prescriptions or 15% of potential DDI (4 prescriptions categorized as moderate and 2 prescriptions as minor. This result showed that potential DDI happened less than 50% in pediatric prescription from both pharmacies. However, this should get attention because DDI should not happen in a prescription considering its clinical manifestations caused by DDI. Moreover, current pharmaceutical care refers to patient oriented than product oriented. In addition, further study for the pediatric prescription on DDI incidence in large scale need to be investigated.

  19. 21 CFR 203.50 - Requirements for wholesale distribution of prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL PRESCRIPTION DRUG MARKETING Wholesale Distribution § 203.50 Requirements for wholesale distribution of prescription drugs. (a) Identifying statement for sales by... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements for wholesale distribution...

  20. How Parents of Teens Store and Monitor Prescription Drugs in the Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Bettina; Moore, Roland S.; Grube, Joel W.; Jennings, Vanessa K.

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative interviews were conducted with parents of teens to explore how parents store and monitor prescription drugs in the home. Most parents had prescription drugs in the house, but took few precautions against teens accessing these drugs. Strategies for monitoring included moving the drugs to different locations, remembering how many pills…

  1. The drug cost gap and the diagnosis-prescription connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dross, David

    2008-01-01

    Although the rise in pharmacy benefit costs continues to outpace overall medical cost inflation, the gap is narrowing. Employers can improve cost and employee wellness even further with an innovative technique for drug therapy compliance called the Diagnosis-Prescription (Dx-Rx) approach. This article reports results from a 2007 national employer survey on pharmacy benefits and describes how the Dx-Rx innovation can keep patients and their doctors on track when it comes to controlling disease and driving down overall medical costs.

  2. Understanding Nonprescription and Prescription Drug Misuse in Late Adolescence/Young Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha A. Fleary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the extent to which nonprescription and prescription drugs misuse among adolescents/young adults are related to their perception that it is safer than illicit drugs, ease of access, and lower societal stigma. Adolescents/young adults (; , completed an online survey about their nonprescription and prescription drug misuse, other substance use, and correlates of use. Perceived risk, societal stigma, and access to nonprescription and prescription drugs were predictive of misuse. Results support program planners working towards targeting perceived risk and societal stigma in reducing misuse and the need to restrict and monitor access to nonprescription and prescription drugs for adolescents/young adults.

  3. Rates of inappropriate antiretroviral prescription among injection drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonner Simon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the survival benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART for the treatment of HIV infection are well established, the clinical management of HIV disease continues to present major challenges. There are particular concerns regarding access to appropriate HIV treatment among HIV-infected injection drug users (IDU. Methods In a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected IDU in Vancouver, Canada, we examined initial ART regimens vis-à-vis the provincial government's therapeutic guidelines at the time ART was initiated. Briefly, there have been four sets of guidelines: Era 1 (1992 to November 1995; double-drug (dual NRTIs ART for patients with a CD4 cell count of 350 or less; Era 2 (December 1995 to May 1996; double-drug therapy for patients with a CD4+ cell count of 500 or less; Era 3 (June 1996 to June 1997; triple-drug therapy (dual NRTIs with a PI or NNRTI for patients who had a plasma viral load of > 100,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL; dual therapy with two NRTIs for those with a plasma viral load of 5,000 to 100,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL; Era 4 (since July 1997; universal use of triple drug therapy as first-line treatment. Results Between May 1996 and May 2003, 431 HIV-infected individuals were enrolled into the cohort. By May 31, 2003, 291 (67.5% individuals had initiated ART. We noted instances of inappropriate antiretroviral prescription in each guideline era, with 9 (53% in Era 1, 3 (12% in Era 2, 22 (28% in Era 3, and 23 (15% in Era 4. Of the 57 subjects who received an inappropriate ART regimen initially, 14 never received the appropriate therapy; among the remaining 43, the median time to the initiation of a guideline-appropriate ART regimen was 12 months (inter-quartile range 5 – 20. Conclusion The present study identified measurable rates of guideline-inappropriate ART prescription for patients who were injection drug users. Rates were highest in the era of dual therapy, although high rates persisted into the triple

  4. Off-label prescription of drugs at hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Arocas Casañ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To develop a procedure for management of off-label medications, and to analyze the treatments, indications, and hospital units which will request them more frequently, as well as which variables will have an impact on the authorization decision, and its economic impact. Methods: A procedure was designed where clinicians would complete request forms and the Hospital Unit would prepare reports assessing their efficacy, safety, convenience, and cost. The request forms for the past five years were analyzed. Results: A total of 834 applications were received, and 88.1% of these were accepted. The authorization rates were higher for Paediatric Units (95.7% vs. 86.6%; p<0.05. The reasons for considering prescriptions as off-label were: different indication (73.2%, different combination (10.2%, different line of treatment (8.6% and different age (8%. A 73.4% of requests were for antineoplastic drugs, and the most frequently prescribed were rituximab (120 and bevacizumab (103. The quality of evidence supporting the prescriptions was moderate-low, though no direct relationship with the likelihood of approval was demonstrated (p = 0.413. The cost of the approved medications was 8,567,537 €, and the theoretical savings for those drugs rejected was of 2,268,642 €. There was a statistically significant decrease in the authorization rate (p < 0.05, Student’s t test when spending increased. Conclusions: The responsibility for assessing off-label prescriptions has fallen on the Pharmacy Unit. It has not been demonstrated that the quality of evidence represents a decisive variable for approval of treatment; on the other hand, age and cost have demonstrated a significant impact

  5. 78 FR 53152 - Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2014; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    .... This document corrects those errors. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Miller, Office of Financial... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2014... Administration is correcting a notice entitled ``Prescription Drug User Fee Rates for Fiscal Year 2014''...

  6. 21 CFR 201.22 - Prescription drugs containing sulfites; required warning statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prescription drugs containing sulfites; required... Prescription drugs containing sulfites; required warning statements. (a) Sulfites are chemical substances that.... Examples of specific sulfites used to inhibit this oxidation process include sodium bisulfite, sodium...

  7. Could adverse reactions of antibiotic drugs in children be detected in a prescription database?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Josta; Bos, Jens H J; de Vries, Tjalling W; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T W

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To explore the possibility to detect adverse drug reactions (ADRs) from a pharmacy prescription database by examining the use of proxy-drugs during the treatment. Methods From a pharmacy prescription database we selected all children of 0-6 years old who started an antibiotic drug between 19

  8. PHYSICIAN PRESCRIBING PRACTICES AND ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS: A Proposal for Further FDA Regulation of Prescription Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Corrigan, Kerry A.

    1995-01-01

    In 1938 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) adopted regulations which created a category of prescription drugs to be distributed only by order of a physician or other licensed medical personnel. This categorization, along with the extensive regulation of the approval, labelling and marketing of human drugs, has substantially reduced the risks which accompanied self-medication. However, the current regulatory regime does not place any limits on physician prescribing. This shortfall in regul...

  9. Social Security Administration Data for Extra Help with Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Cost

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This file contains information about Social Security determinations of eligibility for Extra Help with Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Costs. Specific data elements...

  10. Potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions dispensed in community and hospital pharmacies in East of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Dirin, Mandana Moradi; Mousavi, Sarah; Afshari, Amir Reza; Tabrizian, Kaveh; Ashrafi, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aim to evaluate and compare type and prevalence of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in prescriptions dispensed in both community and hospital setting in Zabol, Iran. Methods: A total of 2796 prescriptions were collected from community and inpatient and outpatient pharmacy of Amir-al-momenin only current acting hospital in Zabol, Iran. The prescriptions were processed using Lexi-Comp drug interaction software. The identified DDIs were categorized into five classes (A, B, C, ...

  11. Exploring the Etiologic Factors and Dynamics of Prescription Drug Abuse in Southwest Virginia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry J Redican

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prescription drug abuse in Southwest Virginia is a serious problem affecting indi-viduals, families, and communities. The aim of this study was to characterize and understand the extent of the prescription drug abuse problem in Southwest, Virginia as well as the dynamics that surround that abuse. More specifically, the study focused on learning the extent of the problem along with which prescription drugs are typically used prior to entering treatment, reasons for prescription drug and methadone abuse, and the sources for prescription drug use, misuse and abuse.Methods: Mixed methodology was employed which included surveying methadone clinic con-sumers at two treatment clinics in Southwest, Virginia and seven focus field interviews of key community stakeholders.Results: The extent of prescription drug abuse is high and that the demographics of prescription drug users are getting younger and now involve more males than females. Oxycodone, hydroco-done, methadone, and morphine were the most commonly used drugs prior to enrollment in the clinics with over one-half of methadone-maintained consumers reporting that they had abused benzodiazepines along with opioids. Focus groups and clinic consumer data highlighted the key etiological factors in prescription drug abuse: use (due to workforce related injuries turning to abuse, wanting to get high, overprescribing and physician issues, lack of information, and cultural acceptance of drug taking as problem solving behavior. The two most common sources for the abused prescription drugs were physicians and street dealers.Conclusions: A constellation of conditions have led to the epidemic of prescription drug abuse in Southwest Virginia, including poverty, unemployment and work-related injuries, besides, public health education programs on the dangers of prescription opiate misuse and abuse are urgently needed.

  12. Worldwide Survey of Alcohol and Nonmedical Drug Use Among Military Personnel: 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    addiction , and long-term organic deter- ioration are linked closely with heavy and frequent use of alcohol (Polich, Armor, and Braiker, 1981). Among...medical/physical, mental health/emotional, family/ friends, legal, job/education, and financial problems as well as dependence, addiction , and...in measurement of use for the following ten categories of drugs: Marijuana or hashish, * PCP (phencyclidine), * LSD or other hallucinogens, * Cocaine

  13. Prescription drug brand Web sites: Guidance where none exists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Glinert, Ph.D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper applies insights from linguistics and discourse analysis to prescription drug brand Web sites, with special reference to the 100 top-selling drugs. Such sites give the outward appearance of being a place to go for straightforward information about a specific brand. In reality, they present a confused mix of brand information, health information and hype, muddled organization, and poor indication of authority, creating an imbalance between benefit and risk content. In so doing, they breach the letter and spirit of the regulations governing direct-to-consumer advertising, which the FDA has by default applied to such Web sites but which were not designed for this special type of discourse. The many communicative difficulties proven to be caused by Web sites in general, in particular for the elderly and less literate, also pose ethical problems. A rethinking of the verbal and visual design of these drug sites is needed -- and new regulatory guidance, for which this paper offers recommendations. At stake is not just the quality of health information at brand drug sites but also their credibility.

  14. [Prescription and drug expenditure in gynecology and obstetrics in Northwest medical units from IMSS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Gómez, Luis Guillermo; Canales Muñoz, José Luis

    2006-08-01

    Drug prescription is the most frequent medical intervention in Gynecology and Obstetrics; however, studies of prescription profile are limited. In this study, we analyzed differences of expense by drug prescription for gynecologic and obstetrics health problems. It was performed a cross sectional study for one year analysis in each medical area that shape IMSS western district. We calculated spending and consumption coefficients for each drug and therapeutic groups. User coefficients were ordered to compare consumption differences. Besides the statistical ratio of consumption between drugs groups, we described the differences found and analyzed the prescription profile among medical regions. Data related to the expenses in each one of the regions show important differences in each one of the drugs and therapeutic groups. The most common expense for drugs is related to the treatment of osteoporosis, menopause and fertility problems. We also found differences in prescription drug preferences in each therapeutic subgroup. Drug prescription studies are useful as a basis for further specific studies in each pharmacologic subgroup. There are few studies that analyze the drug prescription profile on Gynecology and Obstetrics. In this study it is possible to suppose that medical prescription was not based on known medical evidences; therefore, we must reconsider the need of a permanent actualization and systematic medical evaluation.

  15. Income and the use of prescription drugs for near retirement individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Petersen, Søren; Skipper, Niels

    Understanding how demand for prescription drugs responds to changes in income is important for assessing the welfare consequences of reforms affecting income. This becomes more imminent as age progresses, because the use of prescription drugs and the associated budgetary burden increases...... dramatically from about age 55. In this paper we estimate how demand for prescription drugs varies with income for a sample of near retirement individuals. Estimating the prescription drug demand response to income changes is complicated because an important explanatory variable, the health capital......, is unobserved, and because demand is potentially dynamic, for example because some drugs are habitual. The analysis is based on a novel panel data set with information about purchase of prescription drug demand for a very large number of Danish individuals over the period 1995-2003. Our preferred model...

  16. Influence of psychotropic drugs prescription on body weight increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca E. Martínez de Morentin-Aldabe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has become a major public health burden, not only by the rising prevalence but also because of the associated complications. Furthermore there is a number of diseases whose risk and onset is increased in subjects with overweight such as type 2 diabetes, dislipemias, tumors (endometrial, colon, breast, cancer, etc, skeletal disorders, digestive disturbances, cardiovascular diseases, respiratory disorders, psychological problems, obstetric and gynecological disorders.The prescription of psychotropic drugs is important and, in most countries, consumption has been increased in recent years. Indeed, several drugs used in the treatment of anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or epilepsy, can increase body weight and fat deposition or eventually decrease it. These side effects could make a previous situation of obesity to worsen, and it can even cause excessive weight gain in patients with a normal weight at the beginning of the treatment. This increase in adiposity may also contribute to the lack of adherence to the medication and thus a possible relapse of the patients.In this review we report the links between psychotropic drugs administration and weight gain as well as the potential mechanisms that are involved.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14306/renhyd.17.1.4

  17. 77 FR 74827 - Working Group on Access to Information on Prescription Drug Container Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Working Group on Access to Information on Prescription Drug Container... container labels accessible to people who are blind or visually impaired. The working group will hold its... working group to develop best practices for making information on prescription drug container...

  18. 78 FR 15019 - Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act V Benefit-Risk Plan; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    .../UCM329758.pdf . DATES: Submit either electronic or written comments by May 7, 2013. ADDRESSES: Submit...://www.fda.gov/downloads/ForIndustry/UserFees/PrescriptionDrugUserFee/UCM270412.pdf . Section X of the...://www.fda.gov/downloads/ForIndustry/UserFees/PrescriptionDrugUserFee/UCM329758.pdf . The comment...

  19. The War on Drugs That Wasn't: Wasted Whiteness, "Dirty Doctors," and Race in Media Coverage of Prescription Opioid Misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netherland, Julie; Hansen, Helena B

    2016-12-01

    The past decade in the U.S. has been marked by a media fascination with the white prescription opioid cum heroin user. In this paper, we contrast media coverage of white non-medical opioid users with that of black and brown heroin users to show how divergent representations lead to different public and policy responses. A content analysis of 100 popular press articles from 2001 and 2011 in which half describe heroin users and half describe prescription opioid users revealed a consistent contrast between criminalized urban black and Latino heroin injectors with sympathetic portrayals of suburban white prescription opioid users. Media coverage of the suburban and rural opioid "epidemic" of the 2000s helped draw a symbolic, and then legal, distinction between (urban) heroin addiction and (suburban and rural) prescription opioid addiction that is reminiscent of the legal distinction between crack cocaine and powder cocaine of the 1980s and 1990s. This distinction reinforces the racialized deployment of the War on Drugs and is sustained by the lack of explicit discussion of race in the service of "color blind ideology." We suggest potential correctives to these racially divergent patterns, in the form of socially responsible media practices and of clinical engagement with public policy.

  20. Investigation into Self-Medication of Drugs for Primary and Adjunct Therapy in Psychiatric Diseases Among Students in Chittagong City of Bangladesh: A Comparison Between Medical and Nonmedical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Nishat; Haque, Ahsanul; Aysha, Farjana

    2012-01-01

    Background: All kinds of drugs are available over the counter in Bangladesh. Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the over the counter use of self medicated drugs for primary and adjunct therapy in psychiatric diseases among medical and nonmedical students. Materials and Methods: 101 medical students and 186 nonmedical students were found, who used at least one of the nine drugs (believed as antipsychotics among nonmedical people) under survey within 6 months prior to survey date. The nine drugs used for survey were domperidone, sertraline, amitriptyline, midazolam, diazepam, prochlorperazine bromazepam, flupentixol–melitracen, and clonazepam. Statistical Analysis: Snowball sampling method was used. The symptoms, diseases, etc. of the students and the length of therapies they had followed for the respective drugs were noted. Results: Among nonmedical students, several cases were found where drugs were being self medicated in wrong indications, for example, use of flupentixol melitracen and domperidone to treat headache. Conclusion: The nonmedical students chose the fast acting drugs having the strongest effects for self medication. PMID:23723537

  1. Investigation into Self-Medication of Drugs for Primary and Adjunct Therapy in Psychiatric Diseases Among Students in Chittagong City of Bangladesh: A Comparison Between Medical and Nonmedical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishat Chowdhury

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: All kinds of drugs are available over the counter in Bangladesh. Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the over the counter use of self medicated drugs for primary and adjunct therapy in psychiatric diseases among medical and nonmedical students. Materials and Methods: 101 medical students and 186 nonmedical students were found, who used at least one of the nine drugs (believed as antipsychotics among nonmedical people under survey within 6 months prior to survey date. The nine drugs used for survey were domperidone, sertraline, amitriptyline, midazolam, diazepam, prochlorperazine bromazepam, flupentixol-melitracen, and clonazepam. Statistical Analysis: Snowball sampling method was used. The symptoms, diseases, etc. of the students and the length of therapies they had followed for the respective drugs were noted. Results: Among nonmedical students, several cases were found where drugs were being self medicated in wrong indications, for example, use of flupentixol melitracen and domperidone to treat headache. Conclusion: The nonmedical students chose the fast acting drugs having the strongest effects for self medication.

  2. Disease Information in Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Print Ads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikin, Kathryn J; Sullivan, Helen W; Betts, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug advertisements sometimes include information about the disease condition in addition to information about the advertised product. Although the intent of such information is to educate about the disease condition, in some cases consumers may mistakenly assume that the drug will address all of the potential consequences of the condition mentioned in the ad. We investigated the effects of adding disease information to DTC prescription drug print ads on consumer product perceptions and understanding. Participants (4,064 adults) viewed 1 of 15 DTC print ads for fictitious prescription drugs indicated to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, anemia, or lymphoma that varied in disease information presence, type, and format. Participants answered questions that assessed risk and benefit memory, perception, and behavioral intention. Results indicate that exposure to disease information as part of DTC prescription drug ads can promote the impression that the drug addresses consequences of the condition that are not part of the drug's indication.

  3. Prescription auditing and drug utilization pattern in a tertiary care teaching hospital of western UP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afroz Abidi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, a proper reporting of medication errors in the hospital is not available. Drugs worth crores of rupee are consumed every year but a substantial part of these drugs are irrationally prescribed. In order to promote rational drug usage standard policies on use of drugs must be set, and this can be done only after the current prescription practices have been audited. The prescriptions were analyzed based on the objectives of the study in order to promote rational use of drugs in a population. Methods: The study was carried out prospectively over a period of two months and 15 days in general medicine OPD of our tertiary care hospital. A specially designed performa was used with pre-inserted carbons. Results: Two hundred and thirty seven prescriptions were analyzed. Total no. of drugs in 237 prescriptions were 1001. Therefore average number of drugs/prescription is 4.22. Drugs were prescribed by generic names in 3.79% of cases, drugs on EDL are only 53.25% and fixed dose combinations are 26.87% of total drugs. Dosage forms used were mostly oral -93.51%. Injectables were only 6.19% and topical forms were least 0.299%. Doctors profile indicates that maximum number i.e. 93.67% were general practitioners. Basic information of patient was written in 72.57% prescriptions. Complete diagnoses were written in 70.04% prescriptions. Only 88.61% prescriptions were legible and only 76.79% prescriptions were complete in terms of dose, route, strength, frequency and dosage forms. Disease pattern seen was variable. Diseases of respiratory system were maximum 44.72 % followed by infectious and parasitic diseases - 16.03 % and diseases of digestive system - 13.92 %. The most common drug groups prescribed were NSAIDs± serratiopeptidases, antibiotics, antihistaminics, multivitamins, minerals, enzymes and expectorants & bronchodilators. The incidence of polypharmacy was also common with maximum number of drugs which were prescribed per prescription

  4. Awareness of and attitudes toward direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising among young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alperstein, Neil M

    2014-01-01

    This study examines awareness and knowledge of and attitudes toward direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug advertising among young adults between 18 and 24 years of age. The study finds that young adults are not as aware of prescription drug advertising as older consumers, however, they are aware of specific heavily advertised drugs, especially those for allergy medications, birth control, and sleep aids. Young adults hold mixed to negative views about advertising in general, and they do not view DTC prescription drug advertising as a beneficial source of information, nor do they believe such advertising serves to educate consumers.

  5. STUDY ON DRUG COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH COPD PRESCRIPTION MEDICINE IN DENMARK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iris Marie; Anker, Niels; Dolleru, Jens

    2012-01-01

    that the costs associated with COPD in Denmark are significant, but costs of prescription medicine for COPD were not analysed. OBJECTIVES: To analyse the societal costs associated with prescription medicine for COPD in Denmark. METHODS: The study was designed as a nationwide retrospective register study...... of the drug costs (ATC group R03) associated with COPD in the period 2001-2010. Data were retrieved from the Prescription Database, the National Patient Register and the Centralised Civil Register. The population comprised individuals (40+ years) who had at least one prescription of selected R03 drugs and who...... in 2010 with total costs of DKK 685 million (EUR 92 million). The average lifetime costs associated with COPD prescription medicine were estimated to be DKK 70,000-75,000 (EUR 9,416-10,089) per patient (2010 prices). CONCLUSION: The costs associated with prescription medicine for COPD in Denmark...

  6. Preventing Prescription Drug Misuse in Work Settings: Efficacy of a Brief Intervention in Health Consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Gale; Neeper, Michael; Linde, Brittany; Bennett, Joel

    2017-07-06

    It is becoming more commonplace for employees to use prescription medication outside of intended use. Opioid and other prescription misuse has implications for the health and productivity of workers. Easy-to-access webinars that help employees learn about alternatives to prescription use may decrease risk. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of an interactive but brief health consciousness and prescription drug intervention for a diverse sample of employees and show effectiveness via both Internet-delivered webinar and classroom delivery. Employees from a variety of workplaces filled out pre- and post-questionnaires upon completion of a one-hour long intervention. A total of 114 participants completed the pre- and post-questionnaires. Results showed that, compared with before the training, participants reported significantly more knowledge about prescription drug misuse and alternatives to prescription drug use after the training (t113=7.91, P<.001). Moreover, the medium of presentation (ie, face-to-face vs webinar) did not significantly impact effectiveness of the training (F1,98=1.15, P=.29). In both webinar and classroom formats, participants gained knowledge about alternatives to prescription drug use. This intervention appears to be beneficial to employees and assists in the awareness of prescription drug use in general and in the workplace.

  7. Prescription opioid use among university students: assessment of post-cue exposure craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafioun, Lisham; Carels, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    Despite the increasing number of prescriptions written to adolescents and young adults for opioid analgesics, the rise in non-medical use of such drugs among university students, and the potential role of craving in the misuse of opioids, there have been no published studies assessing craving for prescription opioids in this population. Therefore, the current study was designed to assess the impact of prescription opioid-related cue exposure on craving in university students. Students (n=277) recruited from a large university in the Midwestern United States were randomly assigned to two conditions to test the impact of cue exposure to either prescription opioid-related stimuli or control stimuli. Relative to the control condition, prescription opioid-related cue exposure significantly increased overall craving, desire and intention to use prescription opioids, relief from negative states by using prescription opioids, and perceived control over prescription opioid use. In addition, when assessing correlates of post-cue exposure craving, negative mood and procurement of prescription opioids from non-medical sources were the only measured variables that were significantly associated with overall craving and/or any of the craving measure's subscales. Craving may be important aspect of prescription opioid use among university students. Future research assessing craving as a function of non-medical user subtype is warranted.

  8. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of drug prescriptions in south Tehran, Shahre Rey and Islamshahr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslesoleymani H

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Improper drug prescription by physicians due to wrong diagnosis, wrong drug choise or other causes will waste national funds. The annual drug costs in Iran is 900 billions Rials. With approvement of prescription, it can be reduced to 500 billions Rials. Effective factors in costs reduction are: 1 Increasing medical knowledge and persistent education of physicians. 2 Spending more time for each visit. 3 Giving more information to physicians about pharmacological compounds. 4 Teaching symptoms and signs of the common diseases and proper diagnosis of them. 5 Checking the prescriptions of physicians.

  9. Prescription drug abuse as a public health problem in Ohio: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, Erin L; Gay, Joe; Roberts, Lisa; Moseley, Judi; Hall, Orman; Beeghly, B Christine; Winhusen, Theresa; Somoza, Eugene

    2012-11-01

    Prescription drug overdose is the leading cause of injury death in Ohio, as well as in 16 other states. Responding to the prescription drug epidemic is particularly challenging given the fragmentation of the health care system and that the consequences of addiction span across systems that have not historically collaborated. This case study reports on how Ohio is responding to the prescription drug epidemic by developing cross-system collaboration from local public health nurses to the Governor's office. In summary, legal and regulatory policies can be implemented relatively quickly whereas changing the substance abuse treatment infrastructure requires significant financial investments.

  10. Income and the use of prescription drugs for near retirement individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Petersen, Søren; Skipper, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate how demand for prescription drugs varies with income for a sample of near retirement individuals. The analysis is based on a novel panel data set with information about the purchase of prescription drugs for a large number of Danish individuals over the period 1995–2003......–2003. Our preferred model performs better in an external validation test than models that can be estimated on cross section data. Results indicate that demand does respond to variations in income and that reforms affecting income will therefore affect the use of prescription drugs....

  11. A population-based prescription study of asthma drugs during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Charlotte; Thrane, Nana; Nielsen, G.L.

    2001-01-01

    . Methods: The Birth Registry was used to identify all 15,756 primiparous women who gave birth in the County of North Jutland between 1991 and 1996. According to the North Jutland Prescription Database, 303 of these women received prescriptions for asthma drugs during pregnancy. Women who did not purchase...

  12. The impact of science education games on prescription drug abuse attitudes among teens: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klisch, Yvonne; Bowling, Kristi G; Miller, Leslie M; Ramos, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Two online science education games, in which players learn about the risks of prescription drug abuse in the context of investigating crimes, were evaluated to determine shifts of prescription drug abuse attitudes attributable to game exposure. High school students from grades 11 and 12 (n = 179) were assigned to one of the games and participated in a pretest, two game-play sessions, and a delayed posttest. Students in both groups demonstrated more negative attitudes toward prescription drug abuse after playing the game, driven by changes of students' normative beliefs and their ability to make the connection between prescription drug abuse and illicit drugs. A secondary aim was to assess gains in science knowledge; however, due to low internal consistency reliabilities of content measures, students' knowledge acquisition could not be determined.

  13. 76 FR 58020 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act IV Information Technology Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Prescription Drug User Fee Act IV Information Technology... exchange, review, and management of information supporting the process for the review of human drug... Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) IV Information Technology Plan'' (June 2008 plan). This updated plan...

  14. 21 CFR 250.101 - Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded as prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amphetamine and methamphetamine inhalers regarded... DRUGS New Drug or Prescription Status of Specific Drugs § 250.101 Amphetamine and methamphetamine... and the methamphetamine they contain is being used as a substitute for amphetamine...

  15. An explanatory model for state Medicaid per capita prescription drug expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sanjoy; Madhavan, S Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Rising prescription drug expenditure is a growing concern for publicly funded drug benefit programs like Medicaid. To be able to contain drug expenditures in Medicaid, it is important that cause(s) for such increases are identified. This study attempts to establish an explanatory model for Medicaid prescription drugs expenditure based on the impacts of key influencers/predictors identified using a comprehensive framework of drug utilization. A modified Andersen's behavior model of health services utilization is employed to identify potential determinants of pharmaceutical expenditures in state Medicaid programs. Level of federal matching funds, access to primary care, severity of diseases, unemployment, and education levels were found to be key influencers of Medicaid prescription drug expenditure. Increases in all, except education levels, were found to result in increases in drug expenditures. Findings from this study could better inform intervention policies and cost-containment strategies for state Medicaid drug benefit programs.

  16. Which Classes of Prescription Drugs Are Commonly Misused?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, cold flashes with goose bumps, and involuntary leg movements. 29 Misuse of prescription opioids is also a risk factor for transitioning to heroin use. Read more about ...

  17. prescriptions involving analgesic drugs at a secondary health facility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    per patient were recorded and prescriptions involving analgesics were further ... documentation of any untoward effects in the over ... files were sent to the Pharmacy Department of the ..... Efficacy and safety of metamizol vs. acetylsalicylic acid.

  18. Overview of Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit: potential implications for patients with psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jack M

    2007-01-15

    Medicare Part D prescription drug benefits are reviewed. Potential implications for patients with psychotic disorders in relation to Medicare Part D are discussed. The newly created Medicare Part D provides prescription drug benefits to many individuals formerly without prescription benefits and, possibly, lower-cost benefits to those who previously relied on other benefits. Participating prescription plans use a variety of pharmacy management tools to minimize costs while providing benefit plans that meet Part D requirements for composition and coverage. Patients then have the challenge of choosing a prescription drug plan that will best satisfy their prescriptions needs. The rollout of Part D has not been without problems, and although more Medicare participants are receiving prescription drug benefits at a greater savings, there are concerns that Part D may not provide adequate coverage for all patients or for patients requiring certain types of medications, especially some psychotropic medications. Pharmacists have voiced concerns about the Medicare Part D drug plan in regard to both the degree of coverage it provides to enrollees and the difficulty in administering the benefit.

  19. Adverse childhood experiences and prescription drug use in a cohort study of adult HMO patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dube Shanta R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prescription drugs account for approximately 11% of national health expenditures. Prior research on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs, which include common forms of child maltreatment and related traumatic stressors, has linked them to numerous health problems. However, data about the relationship of these experiences to prescription drug use are scarce. Method We used the ACE Score (an integer count of 8 different categories of ACEs as a measure of cumulative exposure to traumatic stress during childhood. We prospectively assessed the relationship of the Score to prescription drug use in a cohort of 15,033 adult HMO patients (mean follow-up: 6.1 years and assessed mediation of this relationship by documented ACE-related health and social problems. Results Nearly 1.2 million prescriptions were recorded; prescriptions rates increased in a graded fashion as the ACE Score increased (p for trend Conclusion ACEs substantially increase the number of prescriptions and classes of drugs used for as long as 7 or 8 decades after their occurrence. The increases in prescription drug use were largely mediated by documented ACE-related health and social problems.

  20. Future Challenges and Opportunities in Online Prescription Drug Promotion Research; Comment on “Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A Content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters”

    OpenAIRE

    SOUTHWELL, BRIAN G.; Rupert, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite increased availability of online promotional tools for prescription drug marketers, evidence on online prescription drug promotion is far from settled or conclusive. We highlight ways in which online prescription drug promotion is similar to conventional broadcast and print advertising and ways in which it differs. We also highlight five key areas for future research: branded drug website influence on consumer knowledge and behavior, interactive features on branded drug websites, mobi...

  1. Prescription drug samples--does this marketing strategy counteract policies for quality use of medicines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, K E M; Sketris, I; Tett, S E

    2003-08-01

    Prescription drug samples, as used by the pharmaceutical industry to market their products, are of current interest because of their influence on prescribing, and their potential impact on consumer safety. Very little research has been conducted into the use and misuse of prescription drug samples, and the influence of samples on health policies designed to improve the rational use of medicines. This is a topical issue in the prescription drug debate, with increasing costs and increasing concerns about optimizing use of medicines. This manuscript critically evaluates the research that has been conducted to date about prescription drug samples, discusses the issues raised in the context of traditional marketing theory, and suggests possible alternatives for the future.

  2. 75 FR 996 - Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 Section 1013: Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ... committees. ] Healthcare, industry, and professional organizations. Academic researchers (including, but not... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and... AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), DHHS. ACTION: Notice of invitation to...

  3. What kind of patients and physicians value direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönül, F F; Carter, F; Wind, J

    2000-06-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising of prescription drugs can enhance the physician-patient relationship, as well as benefiting its sponsor. However, overall benefits can only occur if the patients value the information enough to discuss it with their physicians and the physicians are not predisposed against the DTC information. We investigate the impact of demographics and exposure to marketing on consumers' and physicians' receptiveness to DTC advertising of prescription drugs, using data from two nationwide surveys. We find that consumers who have an ongoing need for health care, that is, those with children or with a chronic condition requiring medication, value prescription drug advertising more highly, while older consumers, consumers who have been sick recently, or more educated consumers are more likely to trust their physicians instead. We find that more experienced physicians, physicians who see more patients, or those who have more exposure to pharmaceutical advertisements are more accepting of DTC advertising of prescription drugs.

  4. Distribution of certain drug products by registered blood establishments and comprehensive hemophilia diagnostic treatment centers that qualify as health care entities; Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements and administrative procedures. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-09

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations to allow certain registered blood establishments and comprehensive hemophilia diagnostic treatment centers that are also health care entities to distribute certain drug products. The final rule amends limited provisions of the regulations implementing the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA). These regulations, among other things, restrict the sale, purchase, or trade of, or the offer to sell, purchase, or trade, prescription drugs purchased by hospitals and other health care entities.

  5. Commercial Speech & Prescription Drug Promotion: Where Have We Been & Are We Going Anywhere?

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Adam

    2005-01-01

    Recent decisions have caused the FDA to question whether its regulations of prescription drug promotion comply with the First Amendment. This paper argues that those recent decisions do not compel the FDA to change its prescription drug promotion regulations and that they cannot be considered in isolation from the historical development of the commercial speech doctrine. When this historical development is considered, two competing interests emerge from commercial speech cases. On one hand, a...

  6. Content analysis of false and misleading claims in television advertising for prescription and nonprescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faerber, Adrienne E; Kreling, David H

    2014-01-01

    False and misleading advertising for drugs can harm consumers and the healthcare system, and previous research has demonstrated that physician-targeted drug advertisements may be misleading. However, there is a dearth of research comparing consumer-targeted drug advertising to evidence to evaluate whether misleading or false information is being presented in these ads. To compare claims in consumer-targeted television drug advertising to evidence, in order to evaluate the frequency of false or misleading television drug advertising targeted to consumers. A content analysis of a cross-section of television advertisements for prescription and nonprescription drugs aired from 2008 through 2010. We analyzed commercial segments containing prescription and nonprescription drug advertisements randomly selected from the Vanderbilt Television News Archive, a census of national news broadcasts. For each advertisement, the most-emphasized claim in each ad was identified based on claim iteration, mode of communication, duration and placement. This claim was then compared to evidence by trained coders, and categorized as being objectively true, potentially misleading, or false. Potentially misleading claims omitted important information, exaggerated information, made lifestyle associations, or expressed opinions. False claims were factually false or unsubstantiated. Of the most emphasized claims in prescription (n = 84) and nonprescription (n = 84) drug advertisements, 33 % were objectively true, 57 % were potentially misleading and 10 % were false. In prescription drug ads, there were more objectively true claims (43 %) and fewer false claims (2 %) than in nonprescription drug ads (23 % objectively true, 7 % false). There were similar numbers of potentially misleading claims in prescription (55 %) and nonprescription (61 %) drug ads. Potentially misleading claims are prevalent throughout consumer-targeted prescription and nonprescription drug advertising on

  7. Benzodiazepines: a major component in unintentional prescription drug overdoses with opioid analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jann, Michael; Kennedy, William Klugh; Lopez, Gaylord

    2014-02-01

    The misuse and abuse of prescription medications in the United States continues to increase despite interventions by health care professionals, regulatory, and law enforcement agencies. Opioid analgesics are the leading class of prescription drugs that have caused unintentional overdose deaths. Benzodiazepines when taken alone are relatively safe agents in overdose. However, a 5-fold increase in deaths attributed to benzodiazepines occurred from 1999 to 2009. Emergency department visits related to opioid analgesics increased by 111% followed by benzodiazepines 89%. During 2003 to 2009, the 2 prescriptions drugs with the highest increase in death rates were oxycodone 264.6% and alprazolam 233.8%. Therefore, benzodiazepines have a significant impact on prescription drug unintentional overdoses second only to the opioid analgesics. The combination prescribing of benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics commonly takes place. The pharmacokinetic drug interactions between benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics are complex. The pharmacodynamic actions of these agents differ as their combined effects produce significant respiratory depression. Physician and pharmacy shopping by patients occurs, and prescription drug-monitoring programs can provide important information on benzodiazepine and opioid analgesic prescribing patterns and patient usage. Health care professionals need to inform patients and work closely with regulatory agencies and legislatures to stem the increasing fatalities from prescription drug unintentional overdoses.

  8. Prescription drug advertising: is it a driving force on drug pricing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millstein, Lloyd G

    2003-01-01

    It has been shown that drug companies will sell more drugs when they use DTC advertising, but it is also true that many consumers who are suffering--unaware there is help for their symptoms--will learn from these ads that help is available. Advertising to consumers, like advertising to professionals, will continue to be one of the best methods of providing information. Of course, healthcare professionals also have the sales representatives, their colleagues, medical journals, and medical conventions as additional options for needed information. The consumer may or may not use other methods, such as the Internet, the library or friends or family, but the advertising is a starting point for a dialogue. If the DTC ad provides consumers with "information," which is different from "advertising," the drug company will be providing a worthwhile service to consumers and potential patients. No doubt consumers will begin demanding higher quality information from DTC ads and will frown upon the ads that are blatantly trying just to sell a drug. It will also reap the benefits of improved consumer awareness and patient compliance. A DTC ad that is consumer-friendly, does not use fear appeal, is educational in tone, and downplays the "hard sell" and hype will go a long way in offering important information to the casual observer. Oversight by the FDA will ensure the information meets the requirements they have set down for prescription drug advertising. That is, advertising will be truthful and fairly balanced and will meet what the government, consumers and, no doubt, the medical community wants. Attempting to control drug costs, by controlling advertising, will not be an easy task. This has an implication across all product areas, not just drugs. DTC advertising has become a lightening rod for cost containment issues, but is it alone driving demand for prescription products? I don't think so.

  9. Drug companies monitor prescriptions and sales to fine-tune their marketing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Market research companies analyse drug prescriptions and sales in community and hospital pharmacies, thus enabling drug companies to refine their marketing strategies. Some information of interest to drug companies is provided directly by healthcare professionals, sometimes unwittingly, and sometimes in return for small "favours".

  10. [Surveillance study about the use actual of prescription drugs from the viewpoint of gender].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Etsuko; Domon, Yuka; Ueda, Manami; Kadowaki, Kyoko; Ueno, Koichi

    2005-10-01

    In recent years, the concept of gender-specific medicine has become generalized in Japan. We need to understand gender differences in the pattern of use prescription drugs for the appropriate use of medications. We therefore investigated gender differences in the use of prescription drugs based on data form nine hospitals in Japan. The data were extracted from their drug ordering systems in the month from March 1 to 31, 2003. We analyzed the data from the viewpoints of sex and age. The frequency of prescriptions for central nervous system drugs and Kampo medicines was higher for women than for men. The same trend was seen for hormones and vitamins. On the other hand, the frequency of prescriptions for cardiovascular drugs for men was higher than that for women. The same trend was found for unclassified metabolic drugs such as arthrifuges. As a result of detailed analysis by age-group, it is suggested that a correlation exists between the age specificity of prescription drugs and gender differences in disease occurrence. This information had not previously been investigated in Japan. Since the results appear useful, we to improve perform more detailed analyses and accumulate evidence to improve drug therapy.

  11. Drug prescriptions in Danish out-of-hours primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Bondo; Nørøxe, Karen Busk; Moth, Grete

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: General practitioners are the first point of contact in Danish out-of-hours (OOH) primary care. The large number of contacts implies that prescribing behaviour may have considerable impact on health-care expenditures and quality of care. The aim of this study was to examine...... the prevailing practices for medication prescription in Danish OOH with a particular focus on patient characteristics and contact type. DESIGN AND SETTING: A one-year population-based retrospective observational study was performed of all contacts to OOH primary care in the Central Denmark Region using registry...... data. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prescriptions were categorised according to Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification (ATC) codes and stratified for patient age, gender and contact type (telephone consultation, clinic consultation or home visit). Prescription rates were calculated as number...

  12. [Prescription of Benzodiazepines and Z-Drugs by German General Practitioners: A Cross-Sectional Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moßhammer, Dirk; Haumann, Hannah; Muche, Rainer; Scheub, David; Joos, Stefanie; Laux, Gunter

    2017-07-03

    Background Due to their addictive potential, benzodiazepine (BZ) and non-benzodiazepine-agonists (NBZ, so-called Z-drugs) should be taken no longer than 6 weeks. BZ and NBZ are primarily prescribed by general practitioners (GPs). Therefore, we aimed to analyze GPs' data on the patients collective, the amount of BZ/NBZ prescribed and the rate of private prescriptions. Methods We analyzed person years of 2-year intervals from 2009 to 2014 of the primary care CONTENT register that contains routine data from 31 general practitioners' practices. We classified BZ/NBZ prescriptions according to risk groups. The association of BZ/NBZ prescription and potential influencing factors was analyzed by calculating the odds ratio with 95% confidence interval (and corresponding p-value) on the basis of a multiple logistic regression model (adjusted by age, sex and type of health insurance). All patients with drug prescription with and without BZ/NBZ-prescription were compared. Results Almost 5% of patients with drug prescriptions received at least one prescription of BZ/NBZ during 1 year of observation. On average these patients were older (67.5 vs. 48 years respectively) and the proportion of women was higher than in the comparison group (69 vs. 58%). About one-third of these patients received more than 600 mg diazepam equivalent dose per person year (according to a 2-month daily intake of more than 10 mg diazepam). About one-third of the prescriptions were private prescriptions. A number of variables were significantly associated with the prescription of BZ/NBZ (e. g. age, gender, diagnosis codes, practices). Conclusion The results provide valuable information about BZ/NBZ prescription routines in general practice. For continuous medical education as well as the development of interventions to reduce the use of BZ/NBZ, patient characteristics (e. g. sex, age, comorbidities, type of insurance) as well as different prescription routines (e. g. private prescriptions

  13. 76 FR 24901 - Request for Input To Inform a Possible Surgeon General Action on Prescription Drug Abuse in Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Action on Prescription Drug Abuse in Youth AGENCY: National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes...: The National Institute on Drug Abuse, a Research Institute of the National Institutes of Health, is... General response to the public health problem of prescription drug abuse among youth....

  14. Pharmacy students teaching prescribers strategies to lower prescription drug costs for underserved patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Marilyn R; Frear, Meghan E; Cutler, Timothy W; Lightwood, James M; Fingado, Amanda R; Lai, Cindy J; Lipton, Helene Levens

    2013-09-01

    The rising costs of health care and, in particular, prescription drugs remains a challenge. Health professionals' ability to promote cost-effective prescription drug use is critical, yet this subject is not included consistently in the curriculum of most health professional schools. As experts in prescription drug selection, use, and cost, pharmacists are in a unique position to help manage prescription drug regimens for the best therapeutic outcome, while also helping to keep patients' out-of-pocket (OOP) prescription drug costs low. In addition to promoting interprofessional collaboration, pharmacy student-led lectures may provide an effective means to teach prescription drug cost-savings strategies to other health professional students and current prescribers. To describe and evaluate the impact of a 60- to 90-minute standardized, case-based lecture on prescribers' attitudes and knowledge about drug cost-containment strategies. Four trained pharmacy students delivered a lecture that focused on strategies to help underserved patients with their OOP prescription drug costs. This lecture was given to health professional students and prescribers across disciplines. For purposes of this study, underserved patients included those with no drug insurance, those with limited financial resources who were unable to pay for their prescription drugs, and those whose drug insurance had significant gaps in coverage (e.g., Medicare Part D patients). Lectures targeted future and current prescribers and were delivered in multiple settings (e.g., residents' seminars, medical grand rounds, required health policy courses for medical and nursing students). Pretest/posttest surveys were administered to assess the impact of the lecture on learners' (a) knowledge of strategies to improve underserved patients' access to needed prescription drugs; (b) willingness to address and discuss cost issues with patients; (c) likelihood of collaborating with other health care professionals; and (d

  15. The Drug Facts Box: Improving the communication of prescription drug information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lisa M.; Woloshin, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Communication about prescription drugs ought to be a paragon of public science communication. Unfortunately, it is not. Consumers see $4 billion of direct-to-consumer advertising annually, which typically fails to present data about how well drugs work. The professional label—the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) mechanism to get physicians information needed for appropriate prescribing—may also fail to present benefit data. FDA labeling guidance, in fact, suggests that industry omit benefit data for new drugs in an existing class and for drugs approved on the basis of unfamiliar outcomes (such as depression rating scales). The medical literature is also problematic: there is selective reporting of favorable trials, favorable outcomes within trials, and “spinning” unfavorable results to maximize benefit and minimize harm. In contrast, publicly available FDA reviews always include the phase 3 trial data on benefit and harm, which are the basis of drug approval. However, these reviews are practically inaccessible: lengthy, poorly organized, and weakly summarized. To improve accessibility, we developed the Drug Facts Box: a one-page summary of benefit and harm data for each indication of a drug. A series of studies—including national randomized trials—demonstrates that most consumers understand the Drug Facts Box and that it improves decision-making. Despite calls from their own Risk Communication Advisory Committee and Congress (in the Affordable Care Act) to consider implementing boxes, the FDA announced it needs at least 3–5 y more to make a decision. Given its potential public health impact, physicians and the public should not have to wait that long for better drug information. PMID:23942130

  16. Placement and Format of Risk Information on Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Helen W; O'Donoghue, Amie C; Rupert, Douglas J; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts; Aikin, Kathryn J

    2017-02-01

    We investigated whether the location and format of risk information on branded prescription drug websites influence consumers' knowledge and perceptions of the drug's risks. Participants (Internet panelists with high cholesterol [n = 2,609] or seasonal allergies [n = 2,637]) were randomly assigned to view a website promoting a fictitious prescription drug for their condition. The website presented risk information at the bottom of the homepage, or at the bottom of the homepage with a signal above indicating that the risk information was located below, or on a linked secondary page. We also varied the format of risk information (paragraph, checklist, bulleted list, highlighted box). Participants then answered questions on risk recall and perceptions. Participants recalled fewer drug risks when the risks were placed on a secondary page. The signal had little effect, and risk information format did not affect outcomes. The location of risk information on prescription drug websites can affect consumer knowledge of drug risks; however, signals and special formatting may not be necessary for websites to adequately inform consumers about drug risks. We recommend that prescription drug websites maintain risk information on their homepages to achieve "fair balance" as required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  17. Estimated cost of universal public coverage of prescription drugs in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Steven G.; Law, Michael; Daw, Jamie R.; Abraham, Liza; Martin, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Background: With the exception of Canada, all countries with universal health insurance systems provide universal coverage of prescription drugs. Progress toward universal public drug coverage in Canada has been slow, in part because of concerns about the potential costs. We sought to estimate the cost of implementing universal public coverage of prescription drugs in Canada. Methods: We used published data on prescribing patterns and costs by drug type, as well as source of funding (i.e., private drug plans, public drug plans and out-of-pocket expenses), in each province to estimate the cost of universal public coverage of prescription drugs from the perspectives of government, private payers and society as a whole. We estimated the cost of universal public drug coverage based on its anticipated effects on the volume of prescriptions filled, products selected and prices paid. We selected these parameters based on current policies and practices seen either in a Canadian province or in an international comparator. Results: Universal public drug coverage would reduce total spending on prescription drugs in Canada by $7.3 billion (worst-case scenario $4.2 billion, best-case scenario $9.4 billion). The private sector would save $8.2 billion (worst-case scenario $6.6 billion, best-case scenario $9.6 billion), whereas costs to government would increase by about $1.0 billion (worst-case scenario $5.4 billion net increase, best-case scenario $2.9 billion net savings). Most of the projected increase in government costs would arise from a small number of drug classes. Interpretation: The long-term barrier to the implementation of universal pharmacare owing to its perceived costs appears to be unjustified. Universal public drug coverage would likely yield substantial savings to the private sector with comparatively little increase in costs to government. PMID:25780047

  18. Prescription drug monitoring program utilization in Kentucky community pharmacies

    OpenAIRE

    Wixson SE; Blumenschein K; Goodin AJ; Talbert J; Freeman PR

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Identify characteristics of Kentucky community pharmacists and community pharmacists? practice environment associated with utilization of the Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting Program (KASPER). Methods: Surveys were mailed to all 1,018 Kentucky pharmacists with a KASPER account and an additional 1,000 licensed pharmacists without an account. Bivariate analyses examined the association between KASPER utilization and practice type (independent or chain) and prac...

  19. Restrictions on Distribution of Use of Prescription Drugs: Current Practices and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Gerber, Monica

    2003-01-01

    FDA must continually balance its dual missions of protecting the public from unsafe and ineffective drugs and expeditiously allowing access to new and beneficial medications. While most risks associated with approved drugs are addressed by appropriate labeling, in the case of certain drugs this approach appears insufficient to ensure an appropriate risk-benefit profile. To avoid the stark choice between permitting a drug with significant risks to remain freely available for prescription and w...

  20. FDA and Social Media: The Impact of Social Media on Prescription Drug Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Kassity Yefei

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates the promotion of prescription drugs. With the emergence of Web 2.0 technology and social media, the FDA faces new regulatory challenges as pharmaceutical companies have started to use social media tools to market prescription drugs to consumers. This paper first explores the history of social media, its use by the FDA, and its growing use by the pharmaceutical industry. The paper then discusses some of the actions that the agency has taken...

  1. FDA and Social Media: The Impact of Social Media on Prescription Drug Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Kassity Yefei

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates the promotion of prescription drugs. With the emergence of Web 2.0 technology and social media, the FDA faces new regulatory challenges as pharmaceutical companies have started to use social media tools to market prescription drugs to consumers. This paper first explores the history of social media, its use by the FDA, and its growing use by the pharmaceutical industry. The paper then discusses some of the actions that the agency has taken...

  2. Patterns of Drug Prescription for Japanese Cedar Pollinosis Using a Clinical Vignette Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goro Takahashi

    2008-01-01

    Conclusions: Our investigation suggested that, compared to ENTs, GPs and IMs have a lower tendency to concomitantly prescribe drugs for localized treatment such as nasal corticosteroids and eye drops with oral medication. There may be differences in prescription patterns of drugs for pollinosis between ENTs and non-specialist physicians.

  3. FDA regulatory affairs: a guide for prescription drugs, medical devices, and biologics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mantus, David; Pisano, Douglas J

    2008-01-01

    ...: A Guide for Prescription Drugs, Medical Devices, and Biologics, Second Edition are covered in a straightforward format. It is a compilation and commentary of selected laws and regulations pertaining to the development and approval of drugs, biologics, and medical devices in the United States. It is not intended to take the place of an actual r...

  4. Comparative study of paediatric prescription drug utilization between the spanish and immigrant population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macipe-Costa Rosa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The immigrant population has increased greatly in Spain in recent years to the point where immigrants made up 12% of the infant population in 2008. There is little information available on the profile of this group with regard to prescription drug utilization in universal public health care systems such as that operating in Spain. This work studies the overall and specific differences in prescription drug utilization between the immigrant and Spanish population. Methods Use was made of the Aragonese Health Service databases for 2006. The studied population comprises 159,908 children aged 0-14 years, 13.6% of whom are foreign nationals. Different utilization variables were calculated for each group. Prescription-drug consumption is measured in Defined Daily Doses (DDD and DDD/1000 persons/day/(DID. Results A total of 833,223 prescriptions were studied. Utilization is lower for immigrant children than in Spanish children for both DID (66.27 v. 113.67 and average annual expense (€21.55 v. €41.14. Immigrant children consume fewer prescription drugs than Spanish children in all of the therapy groups, with the most prescribed (in DID being: respiratory system, anti-infectives for systemic use, nervous system, sensory organs. Significant differences were observed in relation to the type of drugs and the geographical background of immigrants. Conclusion Prescription drug utilization is much greater in Spanish children than in immigrant children, particularly with reference to bronchodilators (montelukast and terbutaline and attention-disorder hyperactivity drugs such as methylphenidate. There are important differences regarding drug type and depending on immigrants' geographical backgrounds that suggest there are social, cultural and access factors underlying these disparities.

  5. Our prescription drugs kill us in large numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    drug agencies are not particularly helpful, as they rely on fake fixes, which are a long list of warnings, precautions, and contraindications for each drug, although they know that no doctor can possibly master all of these. Major reasons for the many drug deaths are impotent drug regulation...

  6. Prescription Drug Promotion from 2001-2014: Data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen W Sullivan

    Full Text Available The volume of prescription drug promotion over time is often measured by assessing changes in ad spending. However, this method obscures the fact that some types of advertising are more expensive than others. Another way to measure the changes in prescription drug promotion over time is to assess the number of promotional pieces submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Form FDA 2253 collects information such as the date submitted and the type of material submitted. We analyzed data from Forms FDA 2253 received from 2001-2014. We examined the frequency of submissions by audience (consumer and healthcare professional and type of promotional material. There was a noted increase in prescription drug promotion submissions across all media in the early 2000s. Although non-Internet promotion submissions have since plateaued, Internet promotion continued to increase. These results can help public health advocates and regulators focus attention and resources.

  7. 78 FR 28860 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for: “Data Rx: Prescription Drug Abuse Infographic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... abuse and the treatment of drug abusers. Consistent with this authority, one of NIDA's strategic goals... Rx: Prescription Drug Abuse Infographic Challenge'' Authority: 15 U.S.C. 3719. SUMMARY: The ``Data Rx: Prescription Drug Abuse Infographic Challenge Concept'' challenges the general public to create an...

  8. [Rational and emotional appeals in prescription drug advertising: study of a weight loss drug].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Melby Karina Zuniga; Campomar, Marcos Cortez

    2008-04-01

    The Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) advertising of medicines encourages people to ask doctors for certain medicines and treatments that require medical prescription. In order to enhance their persuasive power, advertising models recommend matching the appeals (rational and/or emotional) to the consumer's attitude (cognitive and/ or affective) towards the product. This recommendation leads to controversies in the context of DTC advertising. Emotional appeals, although frequently used, would always be inadequate in that kind of advertising. In absence of empiric evidence of the consumer's perspective, a descriptive research was undertaken with the objective of evaluating: i) the components of the attitude toward medicines; ii) attitude and behavioral intentions in response to DTC ads (one appealing to reason and the other appealing to emotion). A prescription weight loss drug was chosen for this purpose. The results revealed a predominantly cognitive attitude toward the product and an attitude and behavioral intention more favorable to the rational ad. Negative cognition about the product played an outstanding role canceling the persuasive power of emotional appeals.

  9. Late Onset of Prescription Drug Abuse or Dependence Among Older Adults: Implications for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Lay

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Prescription drug abuse and dependence is an increasing concern for older adults. This article describes issues specific to older adults with late onset abuse or dependence on prescription sedatives and/or opiates.The older adult with late onset should not be viewed as having the same issues as individuals who have a life pat- tern of drug and alcohol abuse/dependence.A chart review of older adults in a treatment program contrasts late onset prescription dependence clients (n=12 and early onset addiction clients (n=104 and outlines differences and similarities between the two samples. Social workers need to understand the specific and changing needs of older adults as they relate to assessment and treatment of drug abuse and dependence.

  10. PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF DOCTORS HABITS IN PRESCRIPTIONS OF ANTIHYPERTENSIVE DRUGS IN TOWN OF OREL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Shvets

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare prescriptions of antihypertensive drugs in town of Orel with these in Russia in the whole.Material and methods. 23 cardiologists and 78 internists of Orel town were questioned about antihypertensive drug prescriptions in 2006.Results. ACE inhibitors, diuretics, beta-blockers, calcium channels antagonists were prescribed in order of popularity decreasing as mono- or combined therapy. About 70 % of doctors prescribed pharmacotherapy, which cost 100 to 500 rubles per months. Not rational combinations were prescribed in 4,7% of cases. Only 55,4% of respondents used blood pressure level less than 140/90 mm Hg as a target one.Conclusion. Antihypertensive drug prescription for mono- or combined therapy was in accordance to modern guidelines but in the some cases did not meet them.

  11. FDA approval of comparative claims for prescription drugs--the Moxam case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, D

    1983-01-01

    FDA allowance of comparative claims as part of the approved labeling for new prescription drugs creates special problems. Claims contained in prescription drug labeling are viewed by physicians as embodying not just the normal puffery of the manufacturer, but the considered views of government agency charged with protecting public health. Thus, labeling claims for prescription drugs have an impact and significance that promotional claims for other products do not. In the Moxam case--a dispute between Upjohn and Lilly over the FDA's approval of a comparative claim for a new Lilly antibiotic--the agency recognized this fundamental reality. Faced with the prospect of having to provide a procedure to permit competitors to challenge approval of comparative claims, the FDA has moved toward a policy of not permitting such claims in labeling, while allowing them in advertising.

  12. Branded prescription drug fee. Final regulations, temporary regulations, and removal of temporary regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-28

    This document contains final regulations that provide guidance on the annual fee imposed on covered entities engaged in the business of manufacturing or importing branded prescription drugs. This fee was enacted by section 9008 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by section 1404 of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010. This document also withdraws the Branded Prescription Drug Fee temporary regulations and contains new temporary regulations regarding the definition of controlled group that apply beginning on January 1, 2015. The final regulations and the new temporary regulations affect persons engaged in the business of manufacturing or importing certain branded prescription drugs. The text of the temporary regulations in this document also serves as the text of proposed regulations set forth in a notice of proposed rulemaking (REG-123286-14) on this subject in the Proposed Rules section in this issue of the Federal Register.

  13. Reducing Prescriptions of Long-acting Benzodiazepine Drugs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Sophie Isabel; Bjerrum, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged consumption of benzodiazepine drugs (BZD) and benzodiazepine receptor agonists (zolpidem, zaleplon, zopiclone; altogether Z drugs) is related to potential physiological and psychological dependence along with other adverse effects. This study aimed to analyse the prescribing of long...

  14. Psychotropic drug prescriptions in Western European nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janus, Sarah I M; van Manen, Jeannette G; IJzerman, Maarten J; Zuidema, Sytse U

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the numerous warnings of European and national drug agencies as well as clinical guidelines since the year 2004, psychotropic drugs are still frequently used in dementia. A systematic review comparing the use of psychotropic drugs in nursing homes from different European countrie

  15. Psychotropic drug prescriptions in Western European nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janus, Sarah I. M.; van Manen, Jeannette G.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Zuidema, Sytse U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the numerous warnings of European and national drug agencies as well as clinical guidelines since the year 2004, psychotropic drugs are still frequently used in dementia. A systematic review comparing the use of psychotropic drugs in nursing homes from different European countrie

  16. [Evaluation of electronic drug prescriptions at a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiani, Sílvia Helena; Gimenes, Fernanda Raphael; Freire, Cláudia Câmara

    2002-01-01

    The medical orders have an important role in the prevention of medication errors. The objective of this study is to identify and to analyse the causal factors of error in the medication related to electronic prescription in two different clinics of a university hospital of the interior of the state of São Paulo. A questionnaire related to the advantages and disadvantages of electronic prescription was applied to the professionals of these clinics. The data collected was grouped in accordance with the similarity of the answers. These professionals identified causal factors of errors in the medical orders, but they also mentioned the advantages of it when compared to the manual order, such as bigger readability, rapidity and organization of the first one. As we can see, the computerized system of medical order represents a great advance considering strategies to minimize errors from orders badly formulated. However, it does not eliminate the possibility of occurrence of causal factors of errors in the medication, which asks for some modifications in the system.

  17. Prescription drugs associated with reports of violence towards others.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Moore

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Violence towards others is a seldom-studied adverse drug event and an atypical one because the risk of injury extends to others. OBJECTIVE: To identify the primary suspects in adverse drug event reports describing thoughts or acts of violence towards others, and assess the strength of the association. METHODOLOGY: From the Food and Drug Administration (FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS data, we extracted all serious adverse event reports for drugs with 200 or more cases received from 2004 through September 2009. We identified any case report indicating homicide, homicidal ideation, physical assault, physical abuse or violence related symptoms. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Disproportionality in reporting was defined as a 5 or more violence case reports, b at least twice the number of reports expected given the volume of overall reports for that drug, c a χ2 statistic indicating the violence cases were unlikely to have occurred by chance (p<0.01. RESULTS: We identified 1527 cases of violence disproportionally reported for 31 drugs. Primary suspect drugs included varenicline (an aid to smoking cessation, 11 antidepressants, 6 sedative/hypnotics and 3 drugs for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The evidence of an association was weaker and mixed for antipsychotic drugs and absent for all but 1 anticonvulsant/mood stabilizer. Two or fewer violence cases were reported for 435/484 (84.7% of all evaluable drugs suggesting that an association with this adverse event is unlikely for these drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Acts of violence towards others are a genuine and serious adverse drug event associated with a relatively small group of drugs. Varenicline, which increases the availability of dopamine, and antidepressants with serotonergic effects were the most strongly and consistently implicated drugs. Prospective studies to evaluate systematically this side effect are needed to establish the incidence, confirm differences among drugs and

  18. 77 FR 43337 - Drugs for Human Use; Drug Efficacy Study Implementation; Certain Prescription Drugs Offered for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ..., functional diarrhea, drug- induced diarrhea, ulcerative colitis, urinary bladder spasm, and urethral spasm... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket Nos. FDA-1975-N-0336 (Formerly 75N-0184), FDA-1975-N... Hydrocortisone Acetate and Pramoxine Hydrochloride] Drugs for Human Use; Drug Efficacy Study...

  19. New use of prescription drugs prior to a cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    as for nine pre-specified individual drug classes, representing drug treatment likely to be prescribed for symptoms of the given cancers. RESULTS: The incidence rate for new drug treatment among cancer cases was stable around 130 per 1000 persons per month until 6 months prior to cancer diagnosis where......PURPOSE: Cancers often have considerable induction periods. This confers a risk of reverse causation bias in studies of cancer risk associated with drug use, as early symptoms of a yet undiagnosed cancer might lead to drug treatment in the period leading up to the diagnosis. This bias can...... drugs was assessed prior to their cancer diagnosis as well as among population controls (n = 1 402 400). Analyses were conducted for all cancers and for breast, lung, colon and prostate cancer individually. Further, analyses were performed for a composite measure of all incident drug use as well...

  20. New use of prescription drugs prior to a cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Hallas, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cancers often have considerable induction periods. This confers a risk of reverse causation bias in studies of cancer risk associated with drug use, as early symptoms of a yet undiagnosed cancer might lead to drug treatment in the period leading up to the diagnosis. This bias can...... drugs was assessed prior to their cancer diagnosis as well as among population controls (n = 1 402 400). Analyses were conducted for all cancers and for breast, lung, colon and prostate cancer individually. Further, analyses were performed for a composite measure of all incident drug use as well...... as for nine pre-specified individual drug classes, representing drug treatment likely to be prescribed for symptoms of the given cancers. RESULTS: The incidence rate for new drug treatment among cancer cases was stable around 130 per 1000 persons per month until 6 months prior to cancer diagnosis where...

  1. Price Sensitivity of Demand for Prescription Drugs: Exploiting a Regression Kink Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Marianne; Skipper, Lars; Skipper, Niels

    This paper investigates price sensitivity of demand for prescription drugs using drug purchase records for at 20% random sample of the Danish population. We identify price responsiveness by exploiting exogenous variation in prices caused by kinked reimbursement schemes and implement a regression ...... education and income are, however, more responsive to the price. Also, essential drugs that prevent deterioration in health and prolong life have lower associated average price sensitivity....

  2. Prescription audit and drug utilization pattern in a tertiary care teaching hospital in BHOPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Mishra

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that there is scope for improvement in prescribing patterns in areas of writing generic names of drugs, essential drugs, writing legible and complete prescriptions as well as writing prescriptions in capital letters. Polypharmacy was also evident from our study. Establishment and implementation of appropriate clinical guidelines, use of essential medicines list, public education about medicines and regular update to the clinicians will help in implementing the principles of rational pharmacotherapeutics. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 1845-1849

  3. Preventing prescription drug misuse: field test of the SmartRx Web program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitz, Diane K; Cook, Royer F; Hendrickson, April

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the project was to test a Web-based program designed to prevent prescription drug misuse. Study sample consisted of 346 working women randomized into either an experimental or wait-list control condition. Analysis of covariance and logistic regression were used to compare responses. Women receiving the intervention had greater knowledge of drug facts and greater self-efficacy in medication adherence and ability to manage problems with medications compared with controls. Women receiving the intervention also had reduced symptoms reported on the CAGE for prescription medications. Findings suggest that multimedia Web-based programs can be a beneficial addition to substance misuse prevention services. The study's limitations are noted.

  4. Off-Label Prescription of Psychopharmacological Drugs in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braüner, Julie Vestergaard; Johansen, Lily Manzello; Roesbjerg, Troels;

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the frequency of off-label prescriptions of psychopharmacological drugs in a child and adolescent psychiatric setting. A cross-sectional study was conducted on November 1, 2014, including all inpatients and outpatients at the Mental Health Centre for Child and Adolesc......This study aimed to describe the frequency of off-label prescriptions of psychopharmacological drugs in a child and adolescent psychiatric setting. A cross-sectional study was conducted on November 1, 2014, including all inpatients and outpatients at the Mental Health Centre for Child...

  5. A prescription for unemployment? Recessions and the demand for mental health drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, W David; Lastrapes, William D

    2014-11-01

    We estimate the relationship between mental health drug prescriptions and the level of labor market activity in the USA. Based on monthly data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey of physicians and aggregated by US census regions, we find that the number of mental health drug prescriptions (those aimed at alleviating depression and anxiety) rises by about 10% when employment falls by 1% and when unemployment rises by 100 basis points, but only for patients in the Northeast region. This paper is one of the first to look at compensatory health behavior in response to the business cycle.

  6. ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS OF A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM WITHIN MEDICALECONOMIC PREFERENTIAL DRUGS PRESCRIPTION CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshkarov A. A.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There are about 575 thousand of citizens in the Krasnodar Region that are entitled to a preferential medical maintenance in accordance with the Federal Law of 17.07.1999 (№178-FZ "On state social assistance." About 120 thousand of preferential prescriptions for 150 thousand of medicines are serviced per month. In order to make the drugs prescription process based exceptionally on real medical indications in accordance with modern concepts of medical service quality it is necessary to plan the medical-economic drugs prescription validity control (MEC. The work proposes the analysis and synthesis method of decision support system (DSS modules for automation the selection of drugs prescription and medicinal maintenance cases, concerning the federal benefit recipients, while performing the MEC. DSS allows medical experts to estimate the efficiency of federal funds costs, that are spent on the preferential medicinal maintenance, moreover, it can serve as a basis for future purchases planning, as well as to correct and improve the efficiency of medical prescriptions. The DSS was developed in accordance with the approved procedure of information exchange in the Krasnodar Region; it involves the integration with existing systems. Furthermore, as the federal register of persons, entitled to the state social assistance, has common formats among all the Russian Federation subjects, the developed system can be easily adapted in other regions

  7. Future Challenges and Opportunities in Online Prescription Drug Promotion Research; Comment on “Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A Content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G. Southwell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite increased availability of online promotional tools for prescription drug marketers, evidence on online prescription drug promotion is far from settled or conclusive. We highlight ways in which online prescription drug promotion is similar to conventional broadcast and print advertising and ways in which it differs. We also highlight five key areas for future research: branded drug website influence on consumer knowledge and behavior, interactive features on branded drug websites, mobile viewing of branded websites and mobile advertisements, online promotion and non-US audiences, and social media and medication decisions.

  8. Future Challenges and Opportunities in Online Prescription Drug Promotion Research Comment on "Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A Content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwell, Brian G; Rupert, Douglas J

    2016-01-16

    Despite increased availability of online promotional tools for prescription drug marketers, evidence on online prescription drug promotion is far from settled or conclusive. We highlight ways in which online prescription drug promotion is similar to conventional broadcast and print advertising and ways in which it differs. We also highlight five key areas for future research: branded drug website influence on consumer knowledge and behavior, interactive features on branded drug websites, mobile viewing of branded websites and mobile advertisements, online promotion and non-US audiences, and social media and medication decisions.

  9. FDA Approvals of Brand-Name Prescription Drugs in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The drugs included in this review were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2015 and are grouped into the following categories: New Pharmaceuticals: New Molecular Entities and New Biologic License ApplicationsNew Combinations and New IndicationsNew Dosage Forms and New FormulationsNew Biosimilars, Vaccines, Viral Therapies, and Blood Products.

  10. Can Walmart make us healthier? Prescription drug prices and health care utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrescio-Higa, Florencia

    2015-12-01

    This paper analyzes how prices in the retail pharmaceutical market affect health care utilization. Specifically, I study the impact of Walmart's $4 Prescription Drug Program on utilization of antihypertensive drugs and on hospitalizations for conditions amenable to drug therapy. Identification relies on the change in the availability of cheap drugs introduced by Walmart's program, exploiting variation in the distance to the nearest Walmart across ZIP codes in a difference-in-differences framework. I find that living close to a source of cheap drugs increases utilization of antihypertensive medications by 7 percent and decreases the probability of an avoidable hospitalization by 6.2 percent.

  11. Drug prescription based on WHO indicators: Tehran university of medical sciences facilities with pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosleh A.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rationalize of drug use in societies is one of the main responsibilities of health policy makers. In our country irrational use of dugs has increased in the recent years, for example one study in 1998 has shown that average number of medicines per prescription was 3.6, percentage of prescriptions containing antibiotics was 43% and percentage of prescriptions containing Injections was 39%. One of the best tools for evaluation of drug use is the WHO guideline for calculating prescribing indicators. In this study, we had an assessment about prescribing patterns in South of Tehran, Islamshahr and Rey Health Centers.Methods: In order to evaluating prescribing indicators in Tehran University of Medical Sciences region 35 facilities which had pharmacy were selected according to WHO gridline and 4190 prescription from these facilities were studied. Indicators were calculated according to formulas has explained in article. Results: The average number of drug per prescription was 2.58, percentage of drug prescribed by generic name: 99.8%, percentage of encounters prescribed Antibiotics: 62.39% percentage of encounters prescribed Injection: 28.96% & the percentage of drugs prescribed from PHC formulary 99.46%. These findings were almost similar in the three Health Centers.Conclusions: Health facilities are one of the most important bases to improve rational use of Drugs and general practitioners are the major chain in RUD cycle. Results show that we need to design intervention especially educational interventions to improve two WHO prescribing indicators, percentage of encounters prescribed Antibiotics & Injections in this region. For reaching this goals we need to design educational programs for physicians, pharmacists and people too. These educations can be as workshops, seminars, conferences or printed materials such as books, leaflets and etc.

  12. Extent of dispensing prescription-only medications without a prescription in community drug retail outlets in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a simulated-patient study

    OpenAIRE

    Erku DA; Mekuria AB; Surur AS; Gebresillassie BM

    2016-01-01

    Daniel Asfaw Erku,1 Abebe Basazn Mekuria,2 Abdrrahman Shemsu Surur,1 Begashaw Melaku Gebresillassie3 1Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 2Department of Pharmacology, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Purpose: This study was aimed at assessing the extent of dispensing prescription-only medications without a prescription in community drug retail outlets (CDROs) of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional observa...

  13. Prescription patterns and drug use among pregnant women with febrile illnesses in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Birungi, Josephine; Yanow, Stephanie;

    2013-01-01

    -pyrimethamine (SP) resistance in pregnancy, a sample of pregnant women presenting with fever in out-patient clinics was studied. The main objective was to assess prescription patterns and drug use in pregnancy especially SP; and draw implications on the efficacy of SP for intermittent preventive treatment...

  14. Direct-to-consumer advertisements for prescription drugs as an argumentative activity type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierda, R.; Visser, J.; Rubinelli, S.; Snoeck Henkemans, A.F.

    2014-01-01

    With direct-to-consumer advertisements (DTCA), pharmaceutical companies can market their prescription drugs directly to consumers. In order to properly study the argumentative aspects of these advertisements from a pragma-dialectical perspective, it is necessary to characterize DTCA as an 'argumenta

  15. Direct-to-consumer advertisements for prescription drugs as an argumentative activity type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierda, R.; Visser, J.

    2012-01-01

    With direct-to-consumer advertisements (DTCA), pharmaceutical companies can market their prescription drugs directly to consumers. In order to properly study the argumentative aspect of these advertisements from a pragma-dialectical perspective, it is necessary to characterize DTCA as an ‘argumentat

  16. The introduction of deductibles for prescription drugs in a national health insurance: Compulsory or voluntary?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M. Bakker (Frank); R.C.J.A. van Vliet (René)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe consider a situation of full insurance coverage for prescription drugs where, at a certain point in time, people are given the opportunity to take a deductible in exchange for a lower premium. Four determinants of this premium reduction can be considered: expected out-of-pocket paymen

  17. Factors related to psychotropic drug prescription for neuropsychiatric symptoms in nursing home residents with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C.H.; Smalbrugge, M.; Zuidema, S.U.; Derksen, E.; Vries, E. de; Spek, K. van der; Koopmans, R.T.; Gerritsen, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to explore factors that elucidate reasons for psychotropic drug (PD) prescription for neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in nursing home (NH) residents with dementia. DESIGN: A qualitative study using a grounded theory approach. SETTING: Twelve NHs in The

  18. Factors Related to Psychotropic Drug Prescription for Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, Claudia H. W.; Smalbrugge, Martin; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Derksen, Els; de Vries, Erica; van der Spek, Klaas; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.; Gerritsen, Debby L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to explore factors that elucidate reasons for psychotropic drug (PD) prescription for neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in nursing home (NH) residents with dementia. Design: A qualitative study using a grounded theory approach. Setting: Twelve NHs in The

  19. Utilizing Business, University, and Community Resources to Target Adolescent Prescription Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade-Mdivanian, R.; Anderson-Butcher, D.; Hale, K.; Kwiek, N.; Smock, J.; Radigan, D.; Lineberger, J.

    2012-01-01

    "Generation Rx" is a prescription drug abuse prevention strategy which includes a "toolkit" designed to be used with youth. Developed by Cardinal Health Foundation and the Ohio State University, it provides health care providers (especially pharmacists), parents, teachers, youth workers, and other community leaders with interactive tools and…

  20. 77 FR 4273 - Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertisements; Presentation of the Major Statement in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ...-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertisements; Presentation of the Major Statement in Television and Radio Advertisements in a Clear, Conspicuous, and Neutral Manner; Notice of Availability of Study Data AGENCY: Food and...) television and radio advertisements relating to the side effects and contraindications of an...

  1. The relationship between DTCA, drug requests, and prescriptions: Uncovering variation in specialty and space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Stremersch (Stefan); V. Schwartz-Landsman (Vardit); S. Venkataraman (Sriram)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPatients increasingly request their physicians to prescribe specific brands of pharmaceutical drugs. A popular belief is that requests are triggered by direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA). We examine the relationship between DTCA, patient requests, and prescriptions for statins. We fin

  2. Direct-to-consumer advertisements for prescription drugs as an argumentative activity type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierda, R.; Visser, J.; Rubinelli, S.; Snoeck Henkemans, A.F.

    2014-01-01

    With direct-to-consumer advertisements (DTCA), pharmaceutical companies can market their prescription drugs directly to consumers. In order to properly study the argumentative aspects of these advertisements from a pragma-dialectical perspective, it is necessary to characterize DTCA as an

  3. Direct-to-consumer advertisements for prescription drugs as an argumentative activity type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierda, R.; Visser, J.

    2012-01-01

    With direct-to-consumer advertisements (DTCA), pharmaceutical companies can market their prescription drugs directly to consumers. In order to properly study the argumentative aspect of these advertisements from a pragma-dialectical perspective, it is necessary to characterize DTCA as an

  4. The relationship between DTCA, drug requests, and prescriptions: Uncovering variation in specialty and space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Stremersch (Stefan); V. Schwartz-Landsman (Vardit); S. Venkataraman (Sriram)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPatients increasingly request their physicians to prescribe specific brands of pharmaceutical drugs. A popular belief is that requests are triggered by direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA). We examine the relationship between DTCA, patient requests, and prescriptions for statins. We fin

  5. 75 FR 33312 - Indexing Structured Product Labeling for Human Prescription Drug and Biological Products; Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Indexing Structured Product Labeling for Human Prescription... Evaluation and Research (CDER) and Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) are indexing certain... class as a top priority for indexing of product labeling information. FDA is now announcing that...

  6. Factors Related to Psychotropic Drug Prescription for Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, Claudia H. W.; Smalbrugge, Martin; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Derksen, Els; de Vries, Erica; van der Spek, Klaas; Koopmans, Raymond T. C. M.; Gerritsen, Debby L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to explore factors that elucidate reasons for psychotropic drug (PD) prescription for neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in nursing home (NH) residents with dementia. Design: A qualitative study using a grounded theory approach. Setting: Twelve NHs in The Neth

  7. Factors related to psychotropic drug prescription for neuropsychiatric symptoms in nursing home residents with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, C.H.; Smalbrugge, M.; Zuidema, S.U.; Derksen, E.; Vries, E. de; Spek, K. van der; Koopmans, R.T.; Gerritsen, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to explore factors that elucidate reasons for psychotropic drug (PD) prescription for neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in nursing home (NH) residents with dementia. DESIGN: A qualitative study using a grounded theory approach. SETTING: Twelve NHs in The Neth

  8. Dispensing behaviour of pharmacies in prescription drug markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhl, Dennis; Stargardt, Tom; Schneider, Udo; Fischer, Katharina E

    2016-02-01

    We aim to investigate pharmacies' dispensing behaviour under the existing dispensing regulations in Germany. Using administrative data, we performed a cross-sectional retrospective study to analyse whether the competitive environment and pharmacy characteristics, i.e., organisation, lead to dispensing choices aimed at by third-party payers. We specified generalised linear models with the share of imported pharmaceuticals, generic share, and share of preferred brands as dependent variables. The final dataset contained 49,260,902 prescriptions from 16,797 pharmacies. The average share of imported pharmaceuticals across the pharmacies was 18.4% (standard deviation (SD) 8.8), the average generic share was 92.8% (SD 2.1), and compliance with preferred brands was 81.3% (SD 5.9). Pharmacies with little competition used fewer imported pharmaceuticals (ppharmacies yielded similar results. The difference in outcomes between pharmacies in the first and 4th quartiles of the pharmacy organisation variable is 17.4% vs. 17.0% for share of imported pharmaceuticals, 92.8% vs. 92.7% for generic share and 81.9% vs. 81.1% for compliance with preferred brands. We show that pharmacies' dispensing choices meet the aims of payers at high levels. However, dispensing behaviour varies between pharmacies. Increasing competition among pharmacies and targeting pharmacies with high shares of bill auditing seem viable options to improving dispensing behaviour as defined by payers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prescription drug monitoring program utilization in Kentucky community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wixson, Sarah E; Blumenschein, Karen; Goodin, Amie J; Talbert, Jeffery; Freeman, Patricia R

    2015-01-01

    Identify characteristics of Kentucky community pharmacists and community pharmacists' practice environment associated with utilization of the Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting Program (KASPER). Surveys were mailed to all 1,018 Kentucky pharmacists with a KASPER account and an additional 1,000 licensed pharmacists without an account. Bivariate analyses examined the association between KASPER utilization and practice type (independent or chain) and practice location (rural or urban). A multivariate Poisson regression model with robust error variance estimated risk ratios (RR) of KASPER utilization by characteristics of pharmacists' practice environment. Responses were received from 563 pharmacists (response rate 27.9%). Of these, 402 responses from community pharmacists were included in the analyses. A majority of responding pharmacists (84%) indicated they or someone in their pharmacy had requested a patient's controlled substance history since KASPER's inception. Bivariate results showed that pharmacists who practiced in independent pharmacies reported greater KASPER utilization (94%) than pharmacists in chain pharmacies (75%; pcommunity pharmacists with those who practiced in an urban location (RR: 1.11; [1.01-1.21]) or at an independent pharmacy (RR: 1.27; [1.14-1.40]) having an increased likelihood of KASPER utilization. Utilization of KASPER differs by community pharmacists' practice environment, predominantly by practice type and location. Understanding characteristics of community pharmacists and community pharmacists' practice environment associated with PDMP use is necessary to remove barriers to access and increase utilization thereby increasing PDMP effectiveness.

  10. Resolving shortages of prescription drugs: the case for public-private collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Eric Efraim

    2017-01-01

    The recent IJHPR article by Schwartzberg and colleagues presents new data on the growing problem of prescription drug shortages. Resolving shortages typically involves many participants: government, industry, physicians and healthcare facilities. Israel has a strong record of informal collaboration that can fix drug shortages quickly. The success of Israel's informal collaborations, as well as its formal partnerships, deserves broader recognition at home and more attention from the international community.

  11. An assessment of direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfee, J E

    2007-10-01

    Advertising is widely seen by economists and regulators as beneficial to markets and consumers. The prescription drug market offers exceptional opportunities for direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) to provide new-product information, improve compliance, alleviate widespread underdiagnosis and undertreatment, and motivate new-product development.5 DTCA can also induce excess or even dangerous prescribing, however, partly because patients are poorly informed and usually pay far less than the full cost of drugs. Empirical research can help resolve these issues.

  12. Misuse of prescription and illicit drugs among high-risk young adults in Los Angeles and New York

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E. Lankenau

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prescription drug misuse among young adults is increasingly viewed as a public health concern, yet most research has focused on student populations and excluded high-risk groups. Furthermore, research on populations who report recent prescription drug misuse is limited. This study examined patterns of prescription drug misuse among high-risk young adults in Los Angeles (LA and New York (NY, which represent different local markets for illicit and prescription drugs. Design and Methods. Between 2009 and 2011, 596 young adults (16 to 25 years old who had misused prescription drugs within the past 90 days were interviewed in Los Angeles and New York. Sampling was stratified to enroll three groups of high-risk young adults: injection drug users (IDUs; homeless persons; and polydrug users. Results. In both sites, lifetime history of receiving a prescription for an opioid, tranquilizer, or stimulant was high and commonly preceded misuse. Moreover, initiation of opioids occurred before heroin and initiation of prescription stimulants happened prior to illicit stimulants. NY participants more frequently misused oxycodone, heroin, and cocaine, and LA participants more frequently misused codeine, marijuana, and methamphetamine. Combining prescription and illicit drugs during drug using events was commonly reported in both sites. Opioids and tranquilizers were used as substitutes for other drugs, e.g., heroin, when these drugs were not available. Conclusion. Patterns of drug use among high-risk young adults in Los Angeles and New York appear to be linked to differences in local markets in each city for illicit drugs and diverted prescription drugs.

  13. Prescription drug coverage: implications for hormonal therapy adherence in women diagnosed with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Cathy J; Dahman, Bassam; Jagsi, Reshma; Katz, Steven; Hawley, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    In spite of its demonstrated benefits, many women do not initiate hormonal therapy, and among those who do, many discontinue it prematurely. We examined whether differences in hormonal therapy adherence may be at least partially explained by the availability of prescription drug coverage. Women aged 20-79 years diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer between June 2005 and February 2007 were enrolled in the study. Women completed a mailed survey, on average 9 months after diagnosis, and again approximately 4 years later (N = 712). Adjusted logistic regression was used to predict the likelihood of initiating hormonal therapy and hormonal therapy continuation. Women who had prescription drug coverage were more likely to initiate hormonal therapy relative to women without prescription drug coverage (OR 2.91, 95 % CI 1.24-6.84). Women with prescription drug coverage were also more likely to continue hormonal therapy (OR 2.23; 95 % CI 0.99-5.05, p = 0.0543). The lowest income women were also less likely to continue hormonal therapy relative to women with annual household income that exceeded $70,000 (OR 0.55; 95 % CI 0.29-1.04) with a borderline significance of (p = 0.08). This study demonstrates the critical role of prescription drug coverage in hormonal therapy initiation and continuation, independent of health insurance coverage. These findings add to the body of literature that addresses medication adherence. Financial factors must be considered along with behavioral factors that influence adherence, which is becoming increasingly relevant to oncology as treatments are shifted to oral medications, many of which are very expensive.

  14. Analysis of analgesic, antipyretic, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use in pediatric prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tânia R; Lopes, Luciane C

    2016-01-01

    Data on clinical practice in pediatrics on the use of analgesic, antipyretic, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs considering the best available evidence and regulatory-agency approved use are uncertain. This study aimed to determine the frequency of prescription of these drugs according to the best scientific evidence and use approved by regulatory agencies. This was a cross-sectional study of 150 pediatric prescriptions containing analgesic, antipyretic, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, followed by interview with caregivers at 18 locations (nine private drugstores and nine Basic Health Units of the Brazilian Unified Health System). The assessed outcomes included recommended use or use with no contraindication, indications with benefit evidence, and health surveillance agency-approved use. Data were analyzed in electronic databases and the variables were summarized by simple frequency. A total of 164 analgesic, antipyretic, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were prescribed to 150 children aged 1-4 years (38.6%). Dipyrone was included in 82 (54.6%) and ibuprofen in 40 (26.6%) prescriptions. Non-recommended uses were identified in 15% of prescriptions and contraindicated uses were observed in 13.3%. Nimesulide (1.5%) is still prescribed to children younger than 12 years. The dose was incorrect in 74.3% of prescriptions containing dipyrone. Of the 211 reported clinical indications, 56 (26.5%) had no evidence of benefit according to the best available scientific evidence and 66 (31.3%) had indications not approved by the regulatory agencies. There are significant discrepancies between clinical practice and recommended use of analgesic, antipyretic, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pediatrics. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Prescription drug monitoring program utilization in Kentucky community pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wixson SE

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Identify characteristics of Kentucky community pharmacists and community pharmacists’ practice environment associated with utilization of the Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting Program (KASPER. Methods: Surveys were mailed to all 1,018 Kentucky pharmacists with a KASPER account and an additional 1,000 licensed pharmacists without an account. Bivariate analyses examined the association between KASPER utilization and practice type (independent or chain and practice location (rural or urban. A multivariate Poisson regression model with robust error variance estimated risk ratios (RR of KASPER utilization by characteristics of pharmacists’ practice environment. Results: Responses were received from 563 pharmacists (response rate 27.9%. Of these, 402 responses from community pharmacists were included in the analyses. A majority of responding pharmacists (84% indicated they or someone in their pharmacy had requested a patient’s controlled substance history since KASPER’s inception. Bivariate results showed that pharmacists who practiced in independent pharmacies reported greater KASPER utilization (94% than pharmacists in chain pharmacies (75%; p<0.001. Multivariate regression results found utilization of KASPER varied significantly among practice environments of community pharmacists with those who practiced in an urban location (RR: 1.11; [1.01–1.21] or at an independent pharmacy (RR: 1.27; [1.14–1.40] having an increased likelihood of KASPER utilization. Conclusion: Utilization of KASPER differs by community pharmacists’ practice environment, predominantly by practice type and location. Understanding characteristics of community pharmacists and community pharmacists’ practice environment associated with PDMP use is necessary to remove barriers to access and increase utilization thereby increasing PDMP effectiveness.

  16. Prescription of anorectic and benzodiazepine drugs through notification B prescriptions in Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Aparecida Nappo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted on 22,158 special B prescriptions (notificações B containing amphetamine-type anorectic drugs or benzodiazepines, obtained from compounding pharmacies or drugstores located in the city of Natal, RN, Brazil. The data obtained were compared with those from other Brazilian cities. Results showed that compounding pharmacies dispensed 85.4% of the prescriptions, indicating that these pharmacies filled out nearly 10 times more of these prescriptions than did the drugstores. The majority (83.5% of B prescriptions issued for the compounding pharmacies were for women, where the female/male patient ratio ranged from 7.1/1.0 for mazindol to 10.3/1.0 for amfepramone. Similar results were obtained for the benzodiazepines with ratios of 1.9/1.0 for clonazepam to 15.6/1.0 for oxazepam. Omissions and mistakes were present in the B prescriptions, including missing information about the patient (in 49.6% of the documents or about the pharmacies or drugstores (50.4%. There were cases where the name and/or CRM of the physician was lacking. It was noted that one medical doctor made out 1855 B prescriptions within one year. The same patient's name appeared on 138 prescriptions, and the same RG (identification card number was present in 125 others. Comparison of Natal's data with those of several other Brazilian cities disclosed a striking similarity throughout Brazil, from Pelotas - Rio Grande do Sul State to Belem-Para State, revealing a practically identical medical/pharmaceutical behavior. This pattern of prescription/dispensation of amphetamine-type substances mostly to women for weight loss is therefore for cosmetic reasons. Consequently, there is an urgent need for an ethical review of this behavior.Foram examinadas 22.158 notificações B contendo substâncias anoréticas tipo-anfetamina ou de benzodiazepínicos, obtidas de drogarias e de farmácias de manipulação. Os dados foram comparados com os de outras cidades do Brasil, obtendo

  17. Consumers responses to coupons in direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutada, Nilesh S; Cook, Christopher L; Perri, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    A study was conducted to understand the influence of coupons and consumers' level of involvement in direct-to-consumer advertising. Consumers exposed to prescription drug advertising with a coupon had significantly more favorable ad and brand-related attitudes, and intention to inquire about the drug to their doctor. However, there was no significant difference in perceived product risk between consumers exposed to the ad with a coupon and consumers exposed to the ad without a coupon. Highly involved consumers had significantly more favorable ad, brand, and coupon-related attitudes, drug inquiry intention, and perceptions about the risks associated with the drug.

  18. Preferred supplier contracts in post-patent prescription drug markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankart, Carl Rudolf; Stargardt, Tom

    2016-02-22

    In recent years, the expiration of patents for large drug classes has increased the importance of post-patent drug markets. However, previous research has focused solely on patent drug markets. In this study, the authors evaluate the influence of preferred supplier contracts, the German approach to tendering, in post-patent drug markets using a hierarchical market share attraction model. The authors find that preferred supplier contracts are a powerful strategic instrument for generic manufacturers in a highly competitive environment. They quantify the effects of signing a preferred supplier contract and show that brand-name manufacturers are vulnerable to tendering. Therefore, brand-name manufacturers should readjust their strategies and consider including preferred supplier contracts in their marketing mix. In addition, the authors employ a simulation to demonstrate that a first-mover advantage might be gained from signing a preferred supplier contract. Furthermore, their results can be used as a blueprint for decision makers in the pharmaceutical industry to assess the market share effects of different contracting strategies regarding preferred supplier contracts.

  19. Co-prescription of antiepileptic drugs and contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Bos, J.H.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) reduce the efficacy of oral contraceptives. Little is known of contraceptive practice among reproductive-age women who receive AEDs. Study Design: We explored the use of contraceptive methods among Dutch women aged 15 to 49 years with prescripti

  20. Co-prescription of antiepileptic drugs and contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Bos, J.H.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.

    Background: Enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) reduce the efficacy of oral contraceptives. Little is known of contraceptive practice among reproductive-age women who receive AEDs. Study Design: We explored the use of contraceptive methods among Dutch women aged 15 to 49 years with

  1. Co-prescription of antiepileptic drugs and contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Bos, J.H.; de Jong-van den Berg, L.T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) reduce the efficacy of oral contraceptives. Little is known of contraceptive practice among reproductive-age women who receive AEDs. Study Design: We explored the use of contraceptive methods among Dutch women aged 15 to 49 years with prescripti

  2. Drug utilization 90%: an innovative method in assessing quality of drug prescription with specific reference to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Dhananjay

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Preferential cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor NSAIDs were more preferred. Number of prescribed NSAIDs constituting to DU90% is more, thus prescription pattern needs further rationalization. Further large scale study is required to bring out more details about NSAID prescription pattern and its rational use. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 1746-1751

  3. [Medical Treatment of Newly Arrived Refugees in Erlangen: A Study of Drug Prescription Rates Focused on Psychotropic Drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Fabian; Frewer, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Background: In 2015 the number of refugees who sought asylum in Germany has increased dramatically. Therefore, the medical care for these refugees faces huge challenges. The treatment of mental illness of refugees is a particular difficult topic. Objective of this study is the acquisition of the outpatient prescriptions of drugs for newly arrived refugees in Erlangen, focused on psychotropic drugs. Methods: Evaluation of all outpatient prescribed drugs (n=1 137), which were prescribed between 10/01/2014 and 09/30/2015 for asylum seekers living in the refugee center in Erlangen, a branch of the "Central Admission Institution" ("ZAE") Zirndorf. Funding organization of this treatment is the City of Erlangen. Settlement documents of the City of Erlangen were used for the analysis. Results: The prescribed drugs cover the spectrum of acute primary care. Big parts of the prescription rates are antiinfectives (ATC-Code: J), medication for the respiratory system (ATC: R), as well as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID's: ibuprofen, paracetamol, metamizole). The prescription of psychotropic drugs is relatively underrepresented. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Prescription factors associated with medication non-adherence in Japan assessed from leftover drugs in the SETSUYAKU-BAG campaign: Focus on oral antidiabetic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Koyanagi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medication adherence has an important influence on health outcomes in patients with chronic diseases. However, few studies have been performed in Japan to determine factors related to medication non-adherence. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify prescription factors related to medication non-adherence by investigating patient characteristics, all prescriptions, and prescriptions for oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs.Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional survey of prescription data about implementation of dosing regimen was performed at community pharmacies engaged in appropriate use of leftover drugs. We evaluated the amount of drugs originally prescribed and the reduced amount after use of leftover drugs, and then calculated prescription reduction ratio (PRR. We analyzed prescription factors contributing to non-adherence based on the PRR.Results: Prescription information for 1,207 patients was reviewed, revealing that patients were non-adherent to 58% of prescriptions. Lack of a drug copayment, fewer concurrent drugs, and drugs not in single-dose packaging were associated with non-adherence. Among the 1,207 patients, 234 prescriptions for diabetes and 452 OAD formulations were included. Forty-seven percent of prescriptions and 29% of the formulations were non-adherent. A higher dosing frequency and preprandial administration were associated with non-adherence. Among the OADs, adherence was lower for α-glucosidase inhibitors and biguanides than for sulfonylureas. Conclusions: Several factors related to patient characteristics, general drug prescriptions, and OAD prescriptions were associated with non-adherence. Further consideration will be needed to improve adherence to medication in Japan. Health care providers should perform more careful monitoring of adherence in patients with the factors identified by this study.

  5. National health spending in 2006: a year of change for prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlin, Aaron; Cowan, Cathy; Hartman, Micah; Heffler, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, U.S. health care spending increased 6.7 percent to $2.1 trillion, or $7,026 per person. The health care portion of gross domestic product (GDP) was 16.0 percent, slightly higher than in 2005. Prescription drug spending growth accelerated in 2006 to 8.5 percent, partly as a result of Medicare Part D's impact. Most of the other major health care services and public payers experienced slower growth in 2006 than in prior years. The implementation of Medicare Part D caused a major shift in the distribution of payers for prescription drugs, as Medicare played a larger role in drug purchases than it had before.

  6. Governmental oversight of prescribing medications: history of the US Food and Drug Administration and prescriptive authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Linda S

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of drug regulation and awarding of prescriptive authority is a complex and sometimes convoluted process that can be confusing for health care providers. A review of the history of how drugs have been manufactured and dispensed helps explain why this process has been so laborious and complicated. Because the federal and state governments have the responsibility for protecting the public, most regulations have been passed with the intentions of ensuring consumer safety. The current system of laws and regulations is the result of many years of using the legal system to correct drug marketing that had adverse health consequences. Government oversight will continue as prescribing medications transitions to an electronic form and as health care professionals in addition to physicians seek to gain prescriptive authority.

  7. Effect of presentation modality in direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug television advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wogalter, Michael S; Shaver, Eric F; Kalsher, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) drug advertising markets medications requiring a physician's script to the general public. In television advertising, risk disclosures (such as side effects and contraindications) may be communicated in either auditory (voice) or visual (text) or both in the commercials. This research examines presentation modality factors affecting the communication of the risk disclosures in DTC prescription drug television commercials. The results showed that risk disclosures presented either visually only or both visually and auditorily increased recall and recognition compared to no presentation. Risk disclosures presented redundantly in both the visual and auditory modalities produced the highest recall and recognition. Visual only produced better performance than auditory only. Simultaneous presentation of non-risk information together with risk disclosures produced lower recall and recognition compared to risk disclosures alone-without concurrent non-risk information. Implications for the design of DTC prescription drug television commercials and other audio-visual presentations of risk information including on the Internet, are discussed.

  8. Frequency of potential interactions between drugs in medical prescriptions in a city in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genici Weyh Bleich

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Drug interactions form part of current clinical practice and they affect between 3 and 5% of polypharmacy patients. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions for adult and elderly patients. TYPE OF STUDY AND SETTING: Cross-sectional pharmacoepidemiological survey in the Parque Verde housing project, municipality of Cascavel, Paraná, Brazil, between December 2006 and February 2007. METHODS: Stratified cluster sampling, proportional to the total number of homes in the housing project, was used. The sample consisted of 95 homes and 96 male or female patients aged 19 or over, with medical prescriptions for at least two pharmaceutical drugs. Interactions were identified using DrugDigest, Medscape and Micromedex softwares. RESULTS: Most of the patients were female (69.8%, married (59.4% and in the age group of 60 years or over (56.3%, with an income less than or equal to three minimum monthly salaries (81.3% and less than eight years of schooling (69.8%; 90.6% of the patients were living with another person. The total number of pharmaceutical drugs was 406 (average of 4.2 medications per patient. The drugs most prescribed were antihypertensives (47.5%. The frequency of drug interactions was 66.6%. Among the 154 potential drug interactions, 4.6% were classified as major, 65.6% as moderate and 20.1% as minor. CONCLUSION: The high frequency of drug prescriptions with a potential for differentiated interactions indicates a situation that has so far been little explored, albeit a reality in household surveys.

  9. Design of a RESTful web information system for drug prescription and administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Lorenzo; Paganelli, Federica; Pettenati, Maria Chiara; Turchi, Stefano; Ciofi, Lucia; Iadanza, Ernesto; Giuli, Dino

    2014-05-01

    Drug prescription and administration processes strongly impact on the occurrence of risks in medical settings for they can be sources of adverse drug events (ADEs). A properly engineered use of information and communication technologies has proven to be a promising approach to reduce these risks. In this study, we propose PHARMA, a web information system which supports healthcare staff in the secure cooperative execution of drug prescription, transcription and registration tasks. PHARMA allows the easy sharing and management of documents containing drug-related information (i.e., drug prescriptions, medical reports, screening), which is often inconsistent and scattered across different information systems and heterogeneous organization domains (e.g., departments, other hospital facilities). PHARMA enables users to access such information in a consistent and secure way, through the adoption of REST and web-oriented design paradigms and protocols. We describe the implementation of the PHARMA prototype, and we discuss the results of the usability evaluation that we carried out with the staff of a hospital in Florence, Italy.

  10. Quality of Online Pharmacies and Websites Selling Prescription Drugs: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merla, Anna; Schulz, Peter J; Gelatti, Umberto

    2011-01-01

    Background Online pharmacies are companies that sell pharmaceutical preparations, including prescription-only drugs, on the Internet. Very little is known about this phenomenon because many online pharmacies operate from remote countries, where legal bases and business practices are largely inaccessible to international research. Objective The aim of the study was to perform an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the scientific literature focusing on the broader picture of online pharmacies by scanning several scientific and institutional databases, with no publication time limits. Methods We searched 4 electronic databases up to January 2011 and the gray literature on the Internet using the Google search engine and its tool Google Scholar. We also investigated the official websites of institutional agencies (World Health Organization, and US and European centers for disease control and drug regulation authorities). We focused specifically on online pharmacies offering prescription-only drugs. We decided to analyze and report only articles with original data, in order to review all the available data regarding online pharmacies and their usage. Results We selected 193 relevant articles: 76 articles with original data, and 117 articles without original data (editorials, regulation articles, or the like) including 5 reviews. The articles with original data cover samples of online pharmacies in 47 cases, online drug purchases in 13, consumer characteristics in 15, and case reports on adverse effects of online drugs in 12. The studies show that random samples with no specific limits to prescription requirements found that at least some websites sold drugs without a prescription and that an online questionnaire was a frequent tool to replace prescription. Data about geographical characteristics show that this information can be concealed in many websites. The analysis of drug offer showed that online a consumer can get virtually everything. Regarding quality of drugs

  11. Quality of online pharmacies and websites selling prescription drugs: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orizio, Grazia; Merla, Anna; Schulz, Peter J; Gelatti, Umberto

    2011-09-30

    Online pharmacies are companies that sell pharmaceutical preparations, including prescription-only drugs, on the Internet. Very little is known about this phenomenon because many online pharmacies operate from remote countries, where legal bases and business practices are largely inaccessible to international research. The aim of the study was to perform an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the scientific literature focusing on the broader picture of online pharmacies by scanning several scientific and institutional databases, with no publication time limits. We searched 4 electronic databases up to January 2011 and the gray literature on the Internet using the Google search engine and its tool Google Scholar. We also investigated the official websites of institutional agencies (World Health Organization, and US and European centers for disease control and drug regulation authorities). We focused specifically on online pharmacies offering prescription-only drugs. We decided to analyze and report only articles with original data, in order to review all the available data regarding online pharmacies and their usage. We selected 193 relevant articles: 76 articles with original data, and 117 articles without original data (editorials, regulation articles, or the like) including 5 reviews. The articles with original data cover samples of online pharmacies in 47 cases, online drug purchases in 13, consumer characteristics in 15, and case reports on adverse effects of online drugs in 12. The studies show that random samples with no specific limits to prescription requirements found that at least some websites sold drugs without a prescription and that an online questionnaire was a frequent tool to replace prescription. Data about geographical characteristics show that this information can be concealed in many websites. The analysis of drug offer showed that online a consumer can get virtually everything. Regarding quality of drugs, researchers very often found

  12. Prescription of antimicrobial drugs in Norwegian aquaculture with an emphasis on "new" fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grave, Kari; Hansen, Magne Kjerulf; Kruse, Hilde; Bangen, Marit; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen

    2008-02-01

    The usage of antimicrobial (AM) drugs in farmed fish in Norwegian aquaculture for the period 2000-2005 was investigated by using prescription data. These data were validated against national sales data of AM drugs sold for use in farmed fish and were found to be highly valid. The defined course dose (DCD) was applied as the unit of measurement to correct for the variations in the dosages between different AM drugs. The DCD(kg) was the amount of an AM drug recommended for the treatment of a 1-kg fish. The calculated number of prescribed DCD(kg)s is an estimate of the biomass of farmed fish that can be treated with a certain amount AM drug. In the present study, the number of prescriptions issued (i.e., numbers of initiated treatments), weight of active substance prescribed and biomass treated were applied to describe the usage. An increase, although modest, in the AM drug usage in Norwegian aquaculture was observed from 2002 to 2005. This increase was accounted for by new-farmed fish species (other than Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout), especially Atlantic cod. The increased usage of AM drugs in cod in the study period was significantly positively correlated to the biomass produced; even so from 2001 to 2005 the number of prescriptions for cod relative to the produced biomass declined. The AM drug usage in Atlantic halibut as well as the production varied during the study period. For other species such as turbot, coalfish and wolffish the usage of AM drugs was found to be negligible. "Mono-therapy" with quinolones may present a selective pressure in regard to development of quinolone resistance.

  13. Quantifying age-related differences in information processing behaviors when viewing prescription drug labels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Prashant Sundar

    Full Text Available Adverse drug events (ADEs are a significant problem in health care. While effective warnings have the potential to reduce the prevalence of ADEs, little is known about how patients access and use prescription labeling. We investigated the effectiveness of prescription warning labels (PWLs, small, colorful stickers applied at the pharmacy in conveying warning information to two groups of patients (young adults and those 50+. We evaluated the early stages of information processing by tracking eye movements while participants interacted with prescription vials that had PWLs affixed to them. We later tested participants' recognition memory for the PWLs. During viewing, participants often failed to attend to the PWLs; this effect was more pronounced for older than younger participants. Older participants also performed worse on the subsequent memory test. However, when memory performance was conditionalized on whether or not the participant had fixated the PWL, these age-related differences in memory were no longer significant, suggesting that the difference in memory performance between groups was attributable to differences in attention rather than differences in memory encoding or recall. This is important because older adults are recognized to be at greater risk for ADEs. These data provide a compelling case that understanding consumers' attentive behavior is crucial to developing an effective labeling standard for prescription drugs.

  14. Knowledge regarding antibiotic drug action and prescription practices among dentist in Jaipur city, Rajasthan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyant Pal Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dentists prescribe antibiotics routinely to manage oral and dental infections. Unscrupulous antibiotic prescriptions can be associated with unfavorable side effects and the development of resistance. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the level of knowledge regarding antibiotic prescription use among dentists in Jaipur City, Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted among 300 dentists in Jaipur city. A validated, self-designed, 21-item, closed-ended questionnaire was used to collect data on knowledge regarding antibiotic prescription. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results: A total of 300 dental practitioners were included in the study. The majority of the respondents seem to prescribe antibiotics that are broad spectrum or the ones that are commonly used. A considerable percentage of the respondents were not aware of the pregnancy drug risk categories by Food and Drug Administration. The most of the respondents said that they prescribe antibiotics on the basis of the diagnosis, whereas more than two-thirds of the respondents said that they never advise culture sensitivity test before prescribing the antibiotics. Conclusion: Our findings suggest the knowledge of dentists regarding antibiotic prescription is inadequate and more focus should be given to the ongoing training regarding the pharmacological aspects, pertinent medical conditions, and prophylactic use of antibiotics in dentistry.

  15. Quantifying Age-Related Differences in Information Processing Behaviors When Viewing Prescription Drug Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Raghav Prashant; Becker, Mark W.; Bello, Nora M.; Bix, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) are a significant problem in health care. While effective warnings have the potential to reduce the prevalence of ADEs, little is known about how patients access and use prescription labeling. We investigated the effectiveness of prescription warning labels (PWLs, small, colorful stickers applied at the pharmacy) in conveying warning information to two groups of patients (young adults and those 50+). We evaluated the early stages of information processing by tracking eye movements while participants interacted with prescription vials that had PWLs affixed to them. We later tested participants’ recognition memory for the PWLs. During viewing, participants often failed to attend to the PWLs; this effect was more pronounced for older than younger participants. Older participants also performed worse on the subsequent memory test. However, when memory performance was conditionalized on whether or not the participant had fixated the PWL, these age-related differences in memory were no longer significant, suggesting that the difference in memory performance between groups was attributable to differences in attention rather than differences in memory encoding or recall. This is important because older adults are recognized to be at greater risk for ADEs. These data provide a compelling case that understanding consumers’ attentive behavior is crucial to developing an effective labeling standard for prescription drugs. PMID:22719955

  16. Prescriptive Oriented Drug Analysis of Multiple Sclerosis Disease by LC-UV in Whole Human Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneetha, A; Rajeswari, Raja K

    2016-02-01

    As a polytherapy treatment, multiple sclerosis disease demands prescriptions with more than one drug. Polytherapy is sometimes rational for drug combinations chosen to minimize adverse effects. Estimation of drugs that are concomitantly administered in polytherapy is acceptable as it shortens the analytical timepoints and also the usage of biological matrices. In clinical phase trials, the withdrawal of biofluids is a critical issue for each analysis. Estimating all the coadminsitered drugs in a single shot will be more effective and economical for pharmaceuticals. A single, simple, rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography assay method has been developed with UV detection and fully validated for the quantification of 14 drugs (at random combinations) used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis disease. The set of combinations was based on prescriptions to patients. Separations were achieved on an X-Terra MS C18 (100 × 3.9 mm, 5 µm) column. The analytes were extracted from 50 µL aliquots of whole human blood with protein precipitation using acetonitrile. All the drugs were sufficiently stable during storage for 24 h at room temperature and for 23 days at 2-8°C. The percentage recoveries of all drugs were between 90 and 115%, with RSD values drug interaction studies.

  17. Medicare Part D and Its Effect on the Use of Prescription Drugs and Use of Other Health Care Services of the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Robert; Nasreen Khan,

    2012-01-01

    We examine the effect of gaining prescription drug insurance, as a result of Medicare Part D, on use of prescription drugs and other medical services for a nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Given the heightened importance of prescription drugs for those with chronic illness, we provide separate estimates for elderly in…

  18. Racial discrimination, post-traumatic stress and prescription drug problems among Aboriginal Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Cheryl; Wild, T Cameron; Schopflocher, Donald; Laing, Lory

    2015-06-24

    1) To examine associations between racial discrimination and drug problems among urban-based Aboriginal adults; and 2) to determine whether these associations are best explained by symptoms of psychological stress, distress or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Data were collected through in-person surveys with a community-based sample of Aboriginal adults (N = 372) living in a mid-sized city in western Canada in 2010. Associations were examined using bootstrapped linear regression models adjusted for confounders, with continuous prescription and illicit drug problem scores as outcomes. Mediation was examined using the cross-products of coefficients method. More than 80% of Aboriginal adults had experienced racial discrimination in the past year, with the majority reporting high levels in that period. Past-year discrimination was a risk factor for PTSD symptoms and prescription drug problems in models adjusted for confounders and other forms of psychological trauma. In mediation models, PTSD symptoms explained the association between discrimination and prescription drug problems; psychological stress and distress did not. PTSD symptoms also explained this association when the covariance between mediators was controlled. The results also indicate that participation in Aboriginal cultural traditions was associated with increased discrimination. Most efforts to address Aboriginal health inequities in Canada have focused on the role Aboriginal people play in these disparities. The current findings combine with others to call for an expanded focus. Non-Aboriginal Canadians may also play a role in the health inequities observed. The findings of this study suggest efforts to reduce discrimination experienced by Aboriginal adults in cities may reduce PTSD symptomology and prescription drug problems in these populations.

  19. Trends in antihypertensive drug prescriptions and physician visits in Canada between 1996 and 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Chen, Guanmin; Walker, Robin; McAlister, Finlay A; Quan, Hude; Tu, Karen; Khan, Nadia; Campbell, Norm

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 1999, the Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) was launched to develop and implement evidence-based hypertension guidelines. OBJECTIVES: To determine temporal trends in antihypertensive drug prescribing and physician visits for hypertension in Canada, and correlate these trends with CHEP recommendations. METHODS: Longitudinal drug data (Intercontinental Medical Statistics [IMS] CompuScript database; IMS Health Canada) were used to examine prescriptions over an 11-year period (1996 to 2006) for five major cardiovascular drug classes. The IMS Canadian Disease and Therapeutic Index database was used to determine trends in physician office visits for hypertension. RESULTS: Prescriptions for antihypertensive agents increased significantly over the 11-year period (4054% for angiotensin receptor blockers, 127% for thiazide diuretics, 108% for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, 87% for beta-blockers and 55% for calcium channel blockers). Time series analyses demonstrated increases in the growth rate for all drug classes, with the greatest annual change in prescriptions occurring during the 1999 to 2002 time period (except in angiotensin receptor blockers). An increase in prescriptions for fixed-dose combination products occurred, which was temporally related to the change in CHEP recommendations encouraging their use in 2001. The proportion of physician office visits for hypertension increased significantly from 4.9% in 1995 to 6.8% in 2005 (Pantihypertensive drug prescribing occurred in the period immediately following implementation of CHEP (1999 to 2002). Although prescribing rates are still increasing, the rate of change has decreased, suggesting that the treatment market for hypertension may be becoming saturated. The impact of these changes on blood pressure control and clinical outcomes remains to be determined. PMID:18548150

  20. The role of bioethics in the international prescription drug market: economics and global justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Shelby E

    2006-01-01

    In terms of health care access, bioethics has an important role to inform and shape policy issues and develop interdisciplinary ideas and interventions. The rising price of prescription drugs presents one of the most looming barriers to health care access in the world today. Including both theoretical and practical features of the pharmaceutical industry's behavior is necessary to find ethical solutions towards increasing access. Bioethics can evaluate global justice by weighing human rights theory and future innovation at the macro level, and by addressing market forces and responsibilities at the micro level. Inherent structural features of pharmaceuticals, such as its reliance on research and development, cause the industry to employ pricing strategies that seem counter-intuitive to conventional wisdom, but that result in producing a just allocation as defined by market forces. Parallel trade and drug exportation/reimportation threaten the saliency of the industry's differential pricing scheme; a case-study of a single "Euro-price" within the European Union illustrates how this will actually create harm to the most needy member states. This complex situation requires solutions weighing arguments from human rights theory with those from economic theory to arrive at the most globally just allocation of prescription drugs in the global marketplace, as well as to ensure future innovation and scientific progress. Bioethicists as well as economists need to partake urgently in this discourse for the betterment of the global injustices in the international prescription drug market.

  1. Momentary affect and risky behavior correlates of prescription drug misuse among young adult dating couples: An experience sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Lauren M; Blumenstock, Shari M

    2016-02-01

    Although published research based on retrospective survey designs has established prescription drug misuse as a serious health issue for individuals and society, misuse behavior has not been investigated as it occurs in daily life and important relationships. To address this gap, young adult romantic couples were recruited from the community to participate in an experience sampling study. Participants were identified through phone screen procedures as having engaged in recent prescription drug misuse behavior. Participants (n=46 couples) completed electronic diary reports throughout the day for 10days, tapping momentary affect, sexual experiences, prescription drug misuse, and alcohol and other drug use. Dyadic multilevel modeling revealed a more consistent pattern of associations between prescription drug misuse and problematic affective and behavioral outcomes for female partners than male partners. Specifically, during epochs of females' prescription drug misuse, they experienced relatively higher levels of negative affect and sexual regret. Also, females who misused prescriptions more during the study period evidenced lower levels of sexual enjoyment and engaged in more unprotected sex, alcohol use, and heavy alcohol use in daily life. Males' in-the-moment prescription drug misuse was not associated with their concurrent outcomes, though males with relatively more misuse across the reporting period were more likely to engage in heavy drinking. Couples' time together emerged as a moderator of prescription drug misuse in daily life: Females who spent relatively more time with their partner across the study were less likely to engage in misuse, and proportion of time spent together moderated several of the momentary misuse-outcome linkages. This study supports the use of ecologically-valid sampling methods for characterizing young adults' prescription drug misuse in daily life and relationship contexts.

  2. The Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy Scripts: Prescription Drug Pricing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Wesley K; Taniguchi, Ronald; Juarez, Deborah Taira

    2016-01-01

    Prescription drugs have reduced morbidity and mortality and improved the quality of life of millions of Americans. Yet, concerns over drug price increases loom. Drug spending has risen relatively slowly over the past decade because many of the most popular brand-name medicines lost patent protection. In the near future, there will be fewer low-cost generics coming into the market to offset the rising prices of brand-name drugs. Drug expenditures are influenced by both volume and price. This article focuses on how drug prices are set in the United States and current trends. Drug prices are determined through an extremely complicated set of interactions between pharmaceutical manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers, insurers, pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs), managed care organizations, hospitals, chain stores, and consumers. The process differs depending on the type of drug and place of delivery. Rising drug prices have come under increased scrutiny due to increased cost inflation and because many price increases come as a result of mergers and acquisitions of generic drug companies or changes in ownership of brand name drug manufacturers. Other countries have reigned in drug prices by negotiating with or regulating pharmaceutical manufacturers. The best long-term solution to rising drug prices is yet to be determined but the United States will continue to debate this issue and the discussions will get more heated if drug expenditures continue to rise at a rapid rate (ie, increasing 13% in 2014 from the previous year).

  3. The price may not be right: the value of comparison shopping for prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sanjay; Sood, Neeraj; Terp, Sophie; Joyce, Geoffrey

    2017-07-01

    To measure variations in drug prices across and within zip codes that may reveal simple strategies to improve patients' access to prescribed medications. We compared drug prices at different types of pharmacies across and within local markets. In-store prices were compared with a Web-based service providing discount coupons for prescription medications. Prices were collected for 2 generic antibiotics because most patients have limited experience with them and are less likely to know the price ranges for them. Drug prices were obtained via telephone from 528 pharmacies in Los Angeles (LA) County, California, from July to August 2014. Online prices were collected from GoodRx, a popular Web-based service that aggregates available discounts and directly negotiates with retail outlets. Drug prices found at independent pharmacies and by using discount coupons available online were lower on average than at grocery, big-box, or chain drug stores for 2 widely prescribed antibiotics. The lowest-price prescription was offered at a grocery, big-box, or chain drug store in 6% of zip codes within the LA County area. Drug prices varied dramatically within a zip code, however, and were less expensive in lower-income areas. The average price difference within a zip code was $52 for levofloxacin and $17 for azithromycin. Price shopping for medications within a small geographic area can yield considerable cost savings for the uninsured and consumers in high-deductible health plans with high negotiated prices. Clinicians and patient advocates have an incentive to convey this information to patients to improve adherence to prescribed medicines and lower the financial burden of purchasing prescription drugs.

  4. To dope or not to dope: neuroenhancement with prescription drugs and drugs of abuse among Swiss university students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa J Maier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroenhancement is the use of substances by healthy subjects to enhance mood or cognitive function. The prevalence of neuroenhancement among Swiss university students is unknown. Investigating the prevalence of neuroenhancement among students is important to monitor problematic use and evaluate the necessity of prevention programs. STUDY AIM: To describe the prevalence of the use of prescription medications and drugs of abuse for neuroenhancement among Swiss university students. METHOD: In this cross-sectional study, students at the University of Zurich, University of Basel, and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich were invited via e-mail to participate in an online survey. RESULTS: A total of 28,118 students were contacted, and 6,275 students completed the survey. Across all of the institutions, 13.8% of the respondents indicated that they had used prescription drugs (7.6% or drugs of abuse including alcohol (7.8% at least once specifically for neuroenhancement. The most frequently used prescription drugs for neuroenhancement were methylphenidate (4.1%, sedatives (2.7%, and beta-blockers (1.2%. Alcohol was used for this purpose by 5.6% of the participants, followed by cannabis (2.5%, amphetamines (0.4%, and cocaine (0.2%. Arguments for neuroenhancement included increased learning (66.2%, relaxation or sleep improvement (51.2%, reduced nervousness (39.1%, coping with performance pressure (34.9%, increased performance (32.2%, and experimentation (20%. Neuroenhancement was significantly more prevalent among more senior students, students who reported higher levels of stress, and students who had previously used illicit drugs. Although "soft enhancers", including coffee, energy drinks, vitamins, and tonics, were used daily in the month prior to an exam, prescription drugs or drugs of abuse were used much less frequently. CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion of Swiss university students across most academic disciplines reported

  5. On the Ideal Quality Control Specification of Compound Prescription -- Taking thought for the New Ingredients Produced in the Single Drugs Combining Process in Compound Prescription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建利

    2002-01-01

    @@ Effectiveness, safety and quality controllability are the three basic and most important premises for evaluating the quality of drugs. Having undergone clinical tests and been verified in thousands of years, the effectiveness and safety of compound prescription, the chief form of medication in TCM, have been proved reliable. Sometimes due to the lack of quality controllability, incorrect drug or method of preparing being used, so poor therapeutic effect can be seen, though diagnosis and prescription are correct. Quality uncontrollability is also one of the important reasons that causes difficulty for TCM preparation to enter international market. In order to ensure the effectiveness and safety of TCM compound prescription and the entering of TCM preparation into international market, strict quality control specifications should be defined. Although wide attention has been paid to this task, how to define the specifications is still under discussion.

  6. Thinking outside the medicine cabinet: a comparative content analysis of direct-to-consumer advertisements for prescription drug treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeever, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This study content analyzed online direct-to-consumer advertisements (DTCA) for prescription drug treatments to explore whether ads for prescription treatments for psychiatric conditions, which are commonly untreated, differ from other drug advertisements. Coded variables included the presence of interactive technological components, use of promotional incentives, and the social contexts portrayed in images shown on each site. Statistical analysis revealed ads for psychiatric medications contained fewer interactive website features, financial incentives, and calls to action than other types of prescription drug advertisements. Implications for health communication researchers are discussed.

  7. Doping in gymnasiums in Amman: the other side of prescription and nonprescription drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazaify, Mayyada; Bdair, Ahmad; Al-Hadidi, Kamal; Scott, Jenny

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the abuse of over-the-counter (OTC) products (e.g., proteins, dietary supplements) and prescription drugs (e.g., hormones) in gymnasiums in Amman by random distribution of a structured questionnaire to 375 gym clients (November 2012-February 2013). Data were analyzed using SPSS for Windows (version 17.0). A total of 31 (8.8%) clients admitted to using 21 products (mentioned 71 times) of anabolic steroids and other hormones (e.g., growth hormone and thyroxine) to increase muscular power at the gym or build muscle mass. Abuse of different prescription and OTC drugs among gymnasium clients is present in Jordan, but current methods for controlling the problem are ineffective. Better methods should be developed. The study's limitations are noted.

  8. Media credibility and informativeness of direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jisu; DeLorme, Denise E; Reid, Leonard N

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we report the results of a study conducted to determine consumer perceptions of the media credibility and informativeness of direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising (DTC advertising) and to examine how those perceptions are influenced by consumer predispositions and demographic characteristics, especially consumer age. This study specifically surveyed older consumers, who are the most significant market segment for prescription drugs and particularly susceptible and vulnerable to commercial persuasion. Older consumers' perceptions of DTC advertising were found to be neutral but their evaluation of informativeness was found to be more positive. Attitude toward DTC advertising and DTC advertising familiarity predicted perceived credibility across various media and attitude toward DTC advertising was the most prominent predictor of perceived informativeness. Age and usage of different media were also found to predict credibility and informativeness of DTC advertising in certain types of media. This study's findings provide insight into how older consumers evaluate various DTC advertising media as an information source.

  9. Educating nonmedical prescribers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Derek; MacLure, Katie; George, Johnson

    2012-10-01

    The last decade has seen developments in nonmedical prescribing, with the introduction of prescribing rights for healthcare professionals. In this article, we focus on the education, training and practice of nonmedical prescribers in the UK. There are around 20,000 nurse independent prescribers, 2400 pharmacist supplementary/independent prescribers, several hundred allied health professional supplementary prescribers and almost 100 optometrist supplementary/independent prescribers. Many are active prescribers, managing chronic conditions or acute episodes of infections and minor ailments. Key aims of nonmedical prescribing are as follows: to improve patient care; to increase patient choice in accessing medicines; and to make better use of the skills of health professionals. Education and training are provided by higher education institutions accredited by UK professional bodies/regulators,namely, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, General Pharmaceutical Council, Health Professions Council and General Optical Council. The programme comprises two main components: a university component equivalent to 26 days full-time education and a period of learning in practice of 12 days minimum under the supervision of a designated medical practitioner. Course content focuses on the following factors: consultation, decision making, assessment and review; psychology of prescribing; prescribing in team context; applied therapeutics; evidence-based practice and clinical governance; legal, policy, professional and ethical aspects; and prescribing in the public health context. Nonmedical prescribers must practise within their competence, demonstrating continuing professional development to maintain the quality engendered during training. Despite the substantial progress, there are several issues of strategy, capacity, sustainability and a research evidence base which require attention to fully integrate nonmedical prescribing within healthcare. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of

  10. The Use of Prescription Drugs, Recreational Drugs, and "Soft Enhancers" for Cognitive Enhancement among Swiss Secondary School Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Liakoni

    Full Text Available The use of prescription or recreational drugs for cognitive enhancement (CE is prevalent among students. However, the prevalence of CE among Swiss school students is unknown. We therefore performed a cross-sectional online survey including ≥ 16-year-old students from bridge-year schools (10th grade, vocational schools, and upper secondary schools (10th-12th grade in the Canton of Zurich to investigate the prevalence of and motives for the use of prescription drugs, recreational drugs, and/or freely available soft enhancers for CE. A total of 1,139 students were included. Of these, 54.5% reported the use of prescription drugs (9.2%, recreational drugs including alcohol (6.2%, or soft enhancers (51.3% explicitly for CE at least once in their lives. The last-year and last-month prevalence for CE considering all substances was 45.5% and 39.5%, respectively. Soft enhancers were the substances that were most commonly used (ever, last-year, and last-month, respectively, including energy drinks (33.3%, 28.4%, and 24.6%, coffee (29.8%, 25.1%, and 21.9%, and tobacco (12.6%, 9.3%, and 8.3%. CE with methylphenidate was less prevalent (4.0%, 2.8%, and 2.0%. However, the use of prescription drugs, alcohol, or illegal drugs for CE was reported by 13.3% of the participants. The most common motives for use were to stay awake and improve concentration. CE was more prevalent among students who reported higher levels of stress or performance pressure and students with psychiatric disorders. In conclusion, half of the school students had used a substance at least once in their lives to improve school performance. Soft enhancers were most commonly used. Prevalence rates were similar to those reported by Swiss university students, indicating that the use of prescription or recreational drugs for CE already occurs before starting higher education. Performance pressure, stress, and psychiatric disorders may be associated with CE.

  11. Concurrent use of prescription drugs and herbal medicinal products in older adults: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Agbabiaka, Taofikat; Wider, Barbara; Watson, Leala Kay; Goodman, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been a global increase in the use of herbal medicinal products (HMPs). About a quarter of UK adults use HMPs, bought over the counter by self-prescription and often not disclosed to healthcare professionals. Potential herb-drug interaction is a clinical concern, with older people at greater risk because of co-morbidities and slower clearance of pharmacologically active compounds. While there is a good understanding of general herbal medicine use by older people, less is k...

  12. e-Prescription: An e-Health System for Preventing Adverse Drug Events in Community Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Puspitasari, Irma M.; Soegijardjo Soegijoko

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes development activities of an e-health system for community health center (Puskesmas) with integrated adverse drug events e-prescription module, consist of system design and development, human resource development, e-health system realization, laboratory and implementation test of e-health system. Some e-readiness evaluations were conducted, through a number of field visits and questionnaires. The results had been used in the e-health system design and development, installa...

  13. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Incidence and Previous Prescriptions of Drugs for the Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ovidio, Fabrizio; d'Errico, Angelo; Farina, Elena; Calvo, Andrea; Costa, Giuseppe; Chiò, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    An increased frequency of psychotic disorders in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) families compared to controls has been reported. Aim of our study was to assess the relationship between nervous system drugs prescriptions and subsequent onset of ALS in a large Italian population. The study population consisted of all subjects over 15 years at the 2001 Italian census, resident in Turin since 1996 (n = 687,324), followed up for ALS occurrence from 2002 to 2014. Exposure to nervous system drugs was measured until 2012, or until 1 year before ALS onset. The association was estimated for ever and cumulative exposure, through Cox proportional Hazards models adjusted for sex, age, education, marital status and drug co-exposure. In the analysis for ever exposure, opioids were significantly inversely associated with ALS risk (hazard ratio (HR) 0.59; 95% CI 0.35-0.97), while antiepileptics (HR 1.35; 95% CI 0.92-2.00) showed a marginally significantly positive association. Examining cumulative exposure, the protective role of opioids associated with more than 4 prescriptions and the risk effect of antiepileptics for over 6 prescriptions was confirmed. The present study revealed associations of ALS onset with previous exposure to opioids, maybe through the activation of δ receptor and σ receptors and antiepileptics, which are novel findings to our knowledge. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Pharmaco-epidemiologic study of the prescription of contraindicated drugs in a primary care setting of a university: a retrospective review of drug prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabali, A A H; Awang, R; Zyoud, S H

    2011-08-01

    The prescription of contraindicated drugs is a preventable medication error, which can cause morbidity and mortality. Recent data on the factors associated with drug contraindications (DCIs) is limited world-wide, especially in Malaysia. The objectives of this study are 1) to quantify the prevalence of DCIs in a primary care setting at a Malaysian University; 2) to identify patient characteristics associated with increased DCI episodes, and 3) to identify associated factors for these DCIs. We retrospectively collected data from 1 academic year using computerized databases at the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) from patients of USM's primary care. Descriptive and comparative statistics were used to characterize DCIs. There were 1,317 DCIs during the study period. These were observed in a cohort of 923 patients, out of a total of 17,288 patients, representing 5,339 DCIs per 100,000 patients, or 5.3% of all patients over a 1-year period. Of the 923 exposed patients, 745 (80.7%) were exposed to 1 DCI event, 92 (10%) to 2 DCI events, 35 (3.8%) to 3 DCI events, 18 (2%) to 4 DCI events, and 33 patients (3.6%) were exposed to 5 or more DCI events. The average age of the exposed patients was 30.7 ± 15 y, and 51.5% were male. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that being male (OR = 1.3; 95% CI = 1.1 - 1.5; p Malaysia that presents data on the prevalence of DCIs. The prescription of contraindicated drugs was found to be frequent in this primary care setting. Exposure to DCI events was associated with specific socio-demographic and health status factors. Further research is needed to evaluate the relationship between health outcomes and the exposure to DCIs.

  15. Prescription of Kampo Drugs in the Japanese Health Care Insurance Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotoe Katayama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kampo medicine or traditional Japanese medicine has been used under Japan’s National Health Insurance scheme for 46 years. Recent research has shown that more than 80% of physicians use Kampo in daily practice. However, the use of Kampo from the patient perspective has received scant attention. To assess the current use of Kampo drugs in the National Health Insurance Program, we analysed a total of 67,113,579 health care claim records, which had been collected by Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in 2009. We found that Kampo drugs were prescribed for 1.34% of all patients. Among these, 92.2% simultaneously received biomedical drugs. Shakuyakukanzoto was the most frequently prescribed Kampo drug. The usage of frequently prescribed Kampo drugs differed between the youth and the elderly, males and females, and inpatients and outpatients. Kampo medicine has been employed in a wide variety of conditions, but the prescription rate was highest for disorders associated with pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium (4.08%. Although the adoption of Kampo medicine by physicians is large in a variety of diseases, the prescription rate of Kampo drugs is very limited.

  16. Prescription of kampo drugs in the Japanese health care insurance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kotoe; Yoshino, Tetsuhiro; Munakata, Kaori; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Kampo medicine or traditional Japanese medicine has been used under Japan's National Health Insurance scheme for 46 years. Recent research has shown that more than 80% of physicians use Kampo in daily practice. However, the use of Kampo from the patient perspective has received scant attention. To assess the current use of Kampo drugs in the National Health Insurance Program, we analysed a total of 67,113,579 health care claim records, which had been collected by Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in 2009. We found that Kampo drugs were prescribed for 1.34% of all patients. Among these, 92.2% simultaneously received biomedical drugs. Shakuyakukanzoto was the most frequently prescribed Kampo drug. The usage of frequently prescribed Kampo drugs differed between the youth and the elderly, males and females, and inpatients and outpatients. Kampo medicine has been employed in a wide variety of conditions, but the prescription rate was highest for disorders associated with pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium (4.08%). Although the adoption of Kampo medicine by physicians is large in a variety of diseases, the prescription rate of Kampo drugs is very limited.

  17. Pharmaceutical pricing: a review of proposals to improve access and affordability of prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tironi, Paula

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses how pharmaceutical innovation achieves remarkable improvements in human health but a significant portion of the U.S. population cannot afford prescription drugs. The author examines ways that patent protection, generics, supply chain complexity, and the cost of innovation and promotion affect access and affordability. The author then looks at the influences of marketing strategies and industry trends such as the patent cliff and pipeline for new drugs, innovations in biotechnology and genomics, comparative effectiveness analysis, and payor and employer strategies on drug prices. An analysis of reform proposals in the context of industry trends suggests that promoting generic drug use and availability through education, prohibiting authorized generics, and restricting the practice of developing follow-on drugs and discontinuing the original formulations upon patent expiration could improve access and affordability most quickly and significantly.

  18. Literacy demands of product information intended to supplement television direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Rudd, Rima E; DeJong, William; Daltroy, Lawren H

    2004-11-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allows television direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug advertisements that do not fully disclose drug risks if the ads include "adequate provision" for dissemination of the drug's approved labeling. This requirement can be met in part by referring consumers to multiple text sources of product labeling. This study was designed to assess the materials to which consumers were referred in 23 DTC television advertisements. SMOG assessments showed that the average reading grade levels were in the high school range for the main body sections of the materials and college-level range for the brief summary sections. The Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) instrument identified specific difficulties with the materials, including content, graphics, layout, and typography features. Stronger plain language requirements are recommended. Health care providers should be aware that patients who ask about an advertised drug might not have the full information required to make an informed decision.

  19. To dope or not to dope: Neuroenhancement with prescription drugs and drugs of abuse among Swiss university students

    OpenAIRE

    Larissa J Maier; Liechti, M E; Herzig, F; Schaub, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neuroenhancement is the use of substances by healthy subjects to enhance mood or cognitive function. The prevalence of neuroenhancement among Swiss university students is unknown. Investigating the prevalence of neuroenhancement among students is important to monitor problematic use and evaluate the necessity of prevention programs. Study aim: To describe the prevalence of the use of prescription medications and drugs of abuse for neuroenhancement among Swiss university ...

  20. To Dope or Not to Dope: Neuroenhancement with Prescription Drugs and Drugs of Abuse among Swiss University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Larissa J Maier; Liechti, Matthias E.; Fiona Herzig; Schaub, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuroenhancement is the use of substances by healthy subjects to enhance mood or cognitive function. The prevalence of neuroenhancement among Swiss university students is unknown. Investigating the prevalence of neuroenhancement among students is important to monitor problematic use and evaluate the necessity of prevention programs. STUDY AIM: To describe the prevalence of the use of prescription medications and drugs of abuse for neuroenhancement among Swiss university students. ...

  1. Individual and contextual determinants of regional variation in prescription drug use: an analysis of administrative data from British Columbia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G Morgan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increasing attention is being paid to variations in the use of prescription drugs because their role in health care has grown to the point where their use can be considered a proxy for health system performance. Studies have shown that prescription drug use varies across regions in the US, UK, and Canada by more than would be predicted based on age and health status alone. In this paper, we explore the determinants of variations in the use of prescription drugs, drawing on health services theories of access to care. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using population-based administrative health care data for British Columbia (BC, Canada. We used logistic and hierarchical regressions to analyze the effects of individual- and area-level determinants of use of prescriptions overall and rates of purchase of prescriptions from five therapeutic categories representing a range of indications: antihypertensives, statins, acid reducing drugs, opioid drugs, and antidepressants. To indicate the relative scale of regional variations and the importance of individual- and area-level variables in explaining them, we computed standardized rates of utilization for 49 local health areas in BC. RESULTS: We found that characteristics of individuals and the areas in which they live affect likelihood of prescription drug purchase. Individual-level factors influenced prescription drug purchases in ways generally consistent with behavioral models of health services use. Contextual variables exerted influences that differed by type of drug studied. Population health, education levels, and ethnic composition of local areas were associated with significant differences in the likelihood of purchasing medications. Relatively modest regional variations remained after both individual-level and area-level determinants were taken into account. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that individual- and area-level factors should be considered

  2. Impact of celebrity pitch in direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutada, Nilesh S; Menon, Ajit M; Deshpande, Aparna D; Perri, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Online surveys were conducted to determine the impact of endorser credibility, endorser effectiveness, and consumers' involvement in direct-to-consumer advertising. In a randomized posttest only study, using the elaboration likelihood model, survey participants (U.S. adults) were either exposed to a fictitious prescription drug ad with a celebrity or a noncelebrity endorser. There was no significant difference in credibility and effectiveness between the celebrity and the noncelebrity endorser. High involvement consumers viewed the ad more favorably and exhibited significantly stronger drug inquiry intentions during their next doctor visit. Further, consumers' involvement did not moderate the effect of celebrity endorser.

  3. The past, present, and future of direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, M; Shinde, S; Banavali, R

    1999-10-01

    Since the first experiences with direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug advertising in the early 1980s, pharmaceutical marketers, government regulators, researchers, health practitioners, and consumers have been both perplexed and intrigued by this practice. As experience with DTC advertising has expanded, so has knowledge and understanding of its risks and rewards. This article discusses important issues in DTC advertising, such as the effects it may have on the patient-practitioner relationship, the diffusion and adoption of new drugs, prices, and competition. It also discusses the future of DTC advertising.

  4. Multifaceted determinants of online non-prescription drug information seeking and the impact on consumers' use of purchase channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgräfe, Catherine; Zentes, Joachim

    2012-06-01

    The growing importance of the Internet as an information and purchasing channel is drawing widespread attention from marketing decision makers. Nevertheless, the relevance of the Internet to the so-called self-medication market in Germany has been paid barely enough attention. Our study aims to contribute insights concerning the penetration of the Internet in this market, as well as to give an overview of the critical determinants of Internet use for non-prescription drug information seeking, such as the accessibility of professional information, trust in health professionals' opinion and the ability to search online, as well as the perceived usefulness and credibility of online non-prescription drug information. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the preferred use of the Internet as a non-prescription drug information source positively influences the choice of unconventional purchase channels for non-prescription drugs and negatively affects the use of stationary pharmacies.

  5. Innocent parties or devious drug users: the views of primary healthcare practitioners with respect to those who misuse prescription drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheridan Janie

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many health professionals engage in providing health services for drug users; however, there is evidence of stigmatisation by some health professionals. Prescription drug misusers as a specific group, may also be subject to such judgment. This study aimed to understand issues for primary care health practitioners in relation to prescription drug misuse (PDM, by exploring the attitudes and experiences of healthcare professionals with respect to PDM. Methods Tape-recorded interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of general practitioners (17, community pharmacists (16 and 'key experts' (18 in New Zealand. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis undertaken. Participants were offered vouchers to the value of NZ$30 for their participation. Results A major theme that was identified was that of two different types of patients involved in PDM, as described by participants - the 'abuser' and the 'overuser'. The 'abuser' was believed to acquire prescription medicines through deception for their own use or for selling on to the illicit market, to use the drugs recreationally, for a 'high' or to stave off withdrawal from illicit drugs. 'Overusers' were characterised as having become 'addicted' through inadvertent overuse and over prescribing, and were generally viewed more sympathetically by practitioners. It also emerged that practitioners' attitudes may have impacted on whether any harm reduction interventions might be offered. Furthermore, whilst practitioners might be more willing to offer help to the 'over-user', it seemed that there is a lack of appropriate services for this group, who may also lack a peer support network. Conclusions A binary view of PDM may not be helpful in understanding the issues surrounding PDM, nor in providing appropriate interventions. There is a need for further exploration of 'over users’ whose needs may not be being met by mainstream drug services, and issues of stigma in

  6. e-Prescription: An e-Health System for Preventing Adverse Drug Events in Community Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma M. Puspitasari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes development activities of an e-health system for community health center (Puskesmas with integrated adverse drug events e-prescription module, consist of system design and development, human resource development, e-health system realization, laboratory and implementation test of e-health system. Some e-readiness evaluations were conducted, through a number of field visits and questionnaires. The results had been used in the e-health system design and development, installation of the internet access infrastructure, and implementation of the education and hands-on training for the medical and administrative staff of the healthcare units. After completing the e-health system design and development as well as system realization and laboratory tests stages, a series of field implementation and experiments have been successfully conducted at Puskesmas Babakansari in Bandung. A number of users feed back have been obtained and used for further improvements on both of the software and hardware modules. The e-health system with integrated e-prescription module has successfully developed and shown its expected functions in: patient registration, medical record, paperless prescription, producing the required reports and preventing possible adverse drug events.

  7. Principles of rational drug prescription Principios para la prescripción racional de los medicamentos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Romero González

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Adequate drug prescription is a matter of ever increasing importance due to its medical, social, economic, and legal implications. The basic clinical principles for attaining rational prescription are analyzed and the decisions and considerations leading to this medlcal action are reviewed. Any good prescription must start with a precise diagnosis and a thorough knowledge of the disease and finishes with the clear writing of the drug names and the pertinent instructions; It also encompasses a follow- up of the patients.

    La prescripción adecuada de medicamentos ha adquirido cada día mayor Importancia por sus implicaciones médicas, sociales, económicas y legales. En este artículo se hace un análisis de los principios básicos para llegar a una prescripción racional y se revisan las diferentes decisiones y consideraciones que deben tenerse en cuenta para llevarla a cabo. Una buena prescripción se inicia con el diagnóstico preciso y el conocimiento suficiente de la enfermedad, y termina con la elaboración de una receta legible y completa, suministrando Instrucciones claras y realizando un control ulterior del paciente.

  8. [Evaluation of potential drug interactions in primary health care prescriptions in Vitória da Conquista, Bahia (Brazil)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Danyllo Fábio Lessa; de Moura, Cristiano Soares; de Medeiros, Danielle Souto

    2014-01-01

    Drug interactions are risk factors for the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. The risk for drug interactions includes factors related to prescription that are intrinsic to the patient. This study sought to evaluate the potential drug interactions in primary care prescriptions in Vitória da Conquista in the state of Bahia to fill the knowledge gap on this topic in Brazil. Information about several variables derived from the primary health care prescriptions was collected and drug interactions were evaluated based on information from Medscape and Micromedex(R) databases. Polypharmacy frequency and its association with the occurrence of drug interactions were also evaluated. Results revealed a 48,9% frequency of drug interactions, 74,9% of moderate or greater severity, 8,6% of prescriptions in polypharmacy that in the chi-square test showed a positive association with the occurrence of drug interactions (p < 0,001). Prescriptions from primary care in Vitória da Conquista in the state of Bahia showed a high frequency of drug interactions, however it is necessary to analyze other risk factors for their occurrence at this level of health care.

  9. Adverse drug interactions involving common prescription and over-the-counter analgesic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Elliot V; Pinto, Andres; Moore, Paul A

    2007-01-01

    Eight analgesic preparations with approved indications for acute pain were among the top 200 drugs prescribed in the United States in 2006. In addition, an estimated 36 million Americans use over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics daily. Given this volume of use, it is not surprising that a number of drug interactions involving analgesic drugs have been reported. This article examines the pharmacologic factors that enhance the clinical relevance of potential drug interactions and reviews the literature on drug interactions involving the most commonly used analgesic preparations in the United States. A PubMed search was conducted for English-language articles published between January 1967 and July 2007. Among the search terms were drug interactions, acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, celecoxib, NSAIDs, hydrocodone, oxycodone, codeine, tramadol, OTC analgesics, alcohol, ethanol, antihypertensive drugs, methotrexate, warfarin, SSRIs, paroxetine, fluoxetine, sertraline, citalopram, serotonin syndrome, MAOIs, and overdose. Controlled clinical trials, case-control studies, and case reports were included in the review. A number of case reports and well-controlled clinical trials were identified that provided evidence of the relatively well known drug-drug interactions between prescription/OTC NSAIDs and alcohol, antihypertensive drugs, high-dose methotrexate, and lithium, as well as between frequently prescribed narcotics and other central nervous system depressants. In contrast, the ability of recent alcohol ingestion to exacerbate the hepatotoxic potential of therapeutic doses of acetaminophen is not supported by either case reports or clinical research. Use of ibuprofen according to OTC guidelines in patients taking cardioprotective doses of aspirin does not appear to interfere with aspirin's antiplatelet activity, whereas chronic prescription use of ibuprofen and other NSAIDs may interfere. Low-dose aspirin intake appears to abolish the gastroprotective effects

  10. Strategies used by adults to reduce their prescription drug costs: United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robin A; Villarroel, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Among U.S. adults aged 18-64, strategies for reducing prescription drug costs were more commonly practiced by those who were uninsured than those who had public or private coverage. Lack of health insurance coverage and poverty are recognized risk factors for not taking medication as prescribed due to cost. This cost-saving strategy may result in poorer health status and increased emergency room use and hospitalizations, compared with adults who follow their recommended pharmacotherapy. It is unknown whether adverse health outcomes and higher health care costs are also associated with the cost-reduction strategies of alternative therapy use or obtaining prescription drugs from abroad. Among adults aged 65 and over, those covered by both Medicare and Medicaid were more likely to have not taken their medication as prescribed to save money, but were less likely to have asked their doctor for a lower-cost prescription, than those who had private insurance coverage. Differences in cost-saving strategies by insurance coverage may be interrelated with socioeconomic and other patient characteristics. Belief that the recommended pharmacotherapy is needed, and an understanding of the recommended treatment, have been found to be lower among older adults who are economically vulnerable, compared with those with higher income. Income was also associated with the use of cost-reduction strategies. Among adults aged 65 and over, those living with incomes at 139%-400% FPL were more likely than adults living in lower or higher income thresholds to have asked their provider for a lower-cost prescription to save money. These patterns in the estimates by insurance status and poverty level are similar to those previously reported using the 2011 NHIS data.

  11. Association between unemployment rates and prescription drug utilization in the United States, 2007–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background While extensive evidence suggests that the economic recession has had far reaching effects on many economic sectors, little is known regarding its impact on prescription drug utilization. The purpose of this study is to describe the association between state-level unemployment rates and retail sales of seven therapeutic classes (statins, antidepressants, antipsychotics, angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitors, opiates, phosphodiesterase [PDE] inhibitors and oral contraceptives) in the United States. Methods Using a retrospective mixed ecological design, we examined retail prescription sales using IMS Health Xponent™ from September 2007 through July 2010, and we used the Bureau of Labor Statistics to derive population-based rates and mixed-effects modeling with state-level controls to examine the association between unemployment and utilization. Our main outcome measure was state-level utilization per 100,000 people for each class. Results Monthly unemployment levels and rates of use of each class varied substantially across the states. There were no statistically significant associations between use of ACE inhibitors or SSRIs/SNRIs and average unemployment in analyses across states, while for opioids and PDE inhibitors there were small statistically significant direct associations, and for the remaining classes inverse associations. Analyses using each state as its own control collectively exhibited statistically significant positive associations between increases in unemployment and prescription drug utilization for five of seven areas examined. This relationship was greatest for statins (on average, a 4% increase in utilization per 1% increased unemployment) and PDE inhibitors (3% increase in utilization per 1% increased unemployment), and lower for oral contraceptives and atypical antipsychotics. Conclusion We found no evidence of an association between increasing unemployment and decreasing prescription utilization, suggesting that any

  12. Prescription for antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Buregyeya, Esther; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety in the p......OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety......, available antibiotics, knowledge on treatment of pneumonia in children aged antibiotic. RESULTS: A total of 170 registered drug shops were surveyed between August and October 2014. The majority of drug shops, 93.......5% were prescribing antibiotics, especially amoxicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (septrin). The professional qualification of a provider was significantly associated with this practice, p=0.04; where lower cadre staff (nursing assistants and enrolled nurses) overprescribed antibiotics. A third...

  13. Examining Fluoroquinolone Claims Among Gonorrhea-Associated Prescription Drug Claims, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Carroll, Danya S; Gift, Thomas L

    2015-11-01

    After the release of CDC's revised gonorrhea treatment guidelines in April 2007, a study reported the declining use of fluoroquinolones to treat gonorrhea among health departments participating in the Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Network. In this study, we examine the proportion of fluoroquinolone claims among gonorrhea-associated prescription drug claims from a large insurance database from 2000 through 2010. We extracted drug claims associated with gonorrhea diagnosis claims from the MarketScan database for 2000-2010 and calculated the proportion of the drug claims for fluoroquinolones on a monthly basis. We then used an interrupted time series analysis to investigate trend characteristics of fluoroquinolone claims before and after the gonorrhea treatment guidelines were revised in April 2007. Although there was a monthly decline in the proportion of fluoroquinolone claims before April 2007 (-0.11 percentage points, pfluoroquinolones after April 2007, implying a gradual permanent decline over the analytic period. Our results are consistent with the findings of the previous study and indicate a gradual and permanent decline (over the analytic period) in the proportion of fluoroquinolone claims among gonorrhea-associated prescription drug claims. However, because this is a convenience sample of claims data, these findings cannot be generalized to the entire privately insured population in the U.S. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The influence of changes in hospital drug formulary on the prescription of proton pump inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Vázquez-Mourelle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the impact of introducing omeprazole in the drug formulary of the Hospital de Barbanza on prescriptions made in hospital and out-of-hospital (Outpatient Units and Primary Care for all Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs. Material and methods: A 36-month retrospective descriptive study in a level I hospital. The basic units of work are Dose-Population- Day in the outpatient setting, and the Defined Daily Dose/stays-day for hospitalized patients; the proportion of DDDs for omeprazole vs. the rest of PPIs is used as measure of efficiency. For statistical analysis, we built a segmented regression model. Results: In the outpatient units, there are statistically significant changes for pantoprazole and rabeprazole. The first drug, which was stable before the intervention, suffered an immediate decrease; rabeprazole, which was increasing before the intervention, presented a subsequent downward trend. In Primary Care, a statistically significant change was confirmed for pantoprazole, with a long-term decreasing trend. In hospitalization, statistically significant changes were observed for pantoprazole and omeprazole; the first one with an immediate decrease and a long-term tendency to decrease, while omeprazole experienced an immediate increase and long-term growth. The evolution of the omeprazole percentage vs. all PPIs showed increases in all three scenarios. Conclusions: A shift to a more efficient prescription of PPIs was observed in all healthcare settings following the introduction of omeprazole in the hospital drug formulary. The inclusion of efficient drugs, or the removal of those inefficient, can be a potentially useful tool in order to improve prescription profiles.

  15. Potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age in family medicine clinics in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres-Arreola Laura del Pilar

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Mexico, inappropriate prescription of drugs with potential interactions causing serious risks to patient health has been little studied. Work in this area has focused mainly on hospitalized patients, with only specific drug combinations analyzed; moreover, the studies have not produced conclusive results. In the present study, we determined the frequency of potential drug-drug and drug-disease interactions in prescriptions for ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, who used Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS family medicine clinics. In addition, we aimed to identify the associated factors for these interactions. Methods We collected information on general patient characteristics, medical histories, and medication (complete data. The study included 624 ambulatory patients over 50 years of age, with non-malignant pain syndrome, who made ambulatory visits to two IMSS family medicine clinics in Mexico City. The patients received 7-day prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics. The potential interactions were identified by using the Thompson Micromedex program. Data were analyzed using descriptive, bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results The average number of prescribed drugs was 5.9 ± 2.5. About 80.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug-drug interactions and 3.8% of patients were prescribed drug combinations with interactions that should be avoided. Also, 64.0% of patients had prescriptions implying one or more potential drug disease interactions. The factors significantly associated with having one or more potential interactions included: taking 5 or more medicines (adjusted Odds Ratio (OR: 4.34, 95%CI: 2.76–6.83, patient age 60 years or older (adjusted OR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.01–2.74 and suffering from cardiovascular diseases (adjusted OR: 7.26, 95% CI: 4.61–11.44. Conclusion The high frequency of prescription of drugs with potential drug interactions showed in

  16. Unintentional drug overdose death trends in New Mexico, USA, 1990-2005: combinations of heroin, cocaine, prescription opioids and alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nina G; Lathrop, Sarah L; Reichard, R Ross; Landen, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    To determine the contribution of heroin, prescription opioids, cocaine and alcohol/drug combinations to the total overdose death rate and identify changes in drug overdose patterns among New Mexico subpopulations. We analyzed medical examiner data for all unintentional drug overdose deaths in New Mexico during 1990-2005. Age-adjusted drug overdose death rates were calculated by sex and race/ethnicity; we modeled overall drug overdose death adjusting for age and region. The total unintentional drug overdose death rate in New Mexico increased from 5.6 per 100 000 in 1990 to 15.5 per 100 000 in 2005. Deaths caused by heroin, prescription opioids, cocaine and alcohol/drug combinations together ranged from 89% to 98% of the total. Heroin caused the most deaths during 1990-2005, with a notable rate increase in prescription opioid overdose death during 1998-2005 (58%). During 1990-2005, the 196% increase in single drug category overdose death was driven by prescription opioids alone and heroin alone; the 148% increase in multi-drug category overdose death was driven by heroin/alcohol and heroin/cocaine. Hispanic males had the highest overdose death rate, followed by white males, white females, Hispanic females and American Indians. The most common categories causing death were heroin alone and heroin/alcohol among Hispanic males, heroin/alcohol among American Indian males and prescription opioids alone among white males and all female subpopulations. Interventions to prevent drug overdose death should be targeted according to use patterns among at-risk subpopulations. A comprehensive approach addressing both illicit and prescription drug users, and people who use these drugs concurrently, is needed to reduce overdose death.

  17. Changes in Retail Prices of Prescription Dermatologic Drugs From 2009 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Miranda E; Rosenberg, Steven P

    2016-02-01

    Physicians from many specialties as well as primary care prescribe dermatologic medications; as insurance formularies become increasingly restrictive and more patients are covered with high-deductible insurance plans, many patients are forced to pay high retail prices to obtain their medications. To determine the changes in the prices of commonly prescribed dermatologic medications since 2009 and to identify trends in price increases for different classes of drugs. Four national chain pharmacies received surveys requesting price data on commonly prescribed dermatologic drugs in 2009, 2011, 2014, and 2015. The initial survey requested information on 72 brand-name drugs. Subsequent surveys increased to eventually include 120 additional brand-name drugs and their generic alternatives when available. Owing to the frequency of prescription, diseases treated, or unusual price increases, 19 brand-name drugs surveyed in all 4 years were selected for final price trend analysis, which was conducted from August 1 to 15, 2015. Retail prices of topical and systemic drugs for the treatment of various dermatologic conditions. Prices of surveyed brand-name drugs increased rapidly between 2009 and 2015. Of the 19 brand-name drugs analyzed, the retail prices of 7 drugs more than quadrupled during the study period. Among these 19 drugs, the mean price increase was 401% during the 6-year survey period, with the majority of the price increases occurring after 2011. Prices of topical antineoplastic drugs had the greatest mean absolute and percentage increase ($10,926.58 [1240%]). Prices of drugs in the antiinfective class had the smallest mean absolute increase ($333.99); prices of psoriasis medications had the smallest mean percentage increase (180%). Prices of acne and rosacea medications increased a mean of 195%, and prices of topical corticosteroids increased a mean of 290% during the study period. Selected generic drugs surveyed in 2011 and 2014 also increased a mean of 279% during

  18. Concurrent use of prescription drugs and herbal medicinal products in older adults: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbabiaka, Taofikat; Wider, Barbara; Watson, Leala Kay; Goodman, Claire

    2016-04-21

    There has been a global increase in the use of herbal medicinal products (HMPs). About a quarter of UK adults use HMPs, bought over the counter by self-prescription and often not disclosed to healthcare professionals. Potential herb-drug interaction is a clinical concern, with older people at greater risk because of co-morbidities and slower clearance of pharmacologically active compounds. While there is a good understanding of general herbal medicine use by older people, less is known about the extent and implications of concurrent use with prescription medicines. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the prevalence, patterns, safety issues and other factors associated with concurrent prescription and herbal medicines use among older adults. Systematic electronic searches of MEDLINE, PsychINFO, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Web of Science and Cochrane from inception till present for studies reporting the concurrent use of prescription medicines with HMPs in older adults (≥65 years). Lateral searching via related citation (PubMed) and checking reference lists of identified studies will be performed. Two reviewers will independently screen studies, extract data and appraise methodological quality using the Joanna Briggs Institute checklist for prevalence data and the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklist. Qualitative and quantitative studies from all settings will be included. Non-empirical papers, in vitro experiments and animal studies will be excluded. Primary outcomes are prevalence and patterns of concurrent use, number and types of prescription and HMPs and adverse reactions reported. Secondary outcomes are disclosure of HMP use to healthcare professionals and cost of HMPs. A narrative synthesis of included studies will be performed to summarise the evidence. This review will synthesise and critically appraise

  19. Prescription of medicines by medical students of Karachi, Pakistan: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irani Faria A

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prescription of medicines by non-doctors is an issue with serious global implications. To our knowledge prescription of drugs by medical and non-medical students has not been studied before. We aimed to determine the practice and attitudes of drug prescription by medical students and: a how non-medical students respond to this practice, b How this compares with the attitudes and practices of non-medical students. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 600 students randomly selected from 2 medical and 2 non-medical universities. Ethical requirements were ensured and data was collected using self administered questionnaires. The Chi square tests and logistic univariate regression analyses were performed using SPSS v 14 to identify associations and differences. Results A total of 572 forms were completed and the sample consisted of 295 medical students and 277 non-medical students with no significant difference in their demographic profile. Of the 295 medical students 163 (55.3% had prescribed a medicine independently and most (48.5% said that they did this 2–3 times a year. The commonest reasons for this were 'previous experience' (68.7%, 'problem too trivial' (34.4% and 'we knew everything about the condition' (31.3%. One-third (33.6% of the undergraduate medical students thought that it was alright to independently diagnose an illness while a vast majority (78.3% thought that it was alright for them to prescribe medicines to others. Common prescriptions were pain-killers, antipyretics, antiallergics and antibiotics. Medical students who prescribed medicines were of lesser age (CI = 1.366–1.887 and more likely to belong to the 1st (CI = 3.588–21.731, 2nd (CI = 2.059– 10.869 or 3rd (CI = 4.331–26.374 year of medical college. One-third (33.9% of the non-medical students reported that a medical student had prescribed medicines to them and 21.3% said that they trusted medical students and would

  20. The effects of involvement and ad type on attitudes toward direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbu, Yam; Torres, Ivonne M

    2009-01-01

    This article examines consumers' attitudes toward Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) advertising of prescription drugs that are influenced by the use different types of DTC ads and product involvement. Our findings suggest that product involvement and the type of DTC ad are significant predictors of consumers' attitudinal responses toward DTC advertising. High involvement consumers have more favorable attitudes toward the drug's price, DTC ad and brand name, and a higher intention to ask a doctor about the advertised drug than low involvement consumers. In contrast to Informational and Reminder DTC ads, Persuasive ads have more favorable effects on consumers' reactions to DTC prescription drug advertising.

  1. Co-Prescription of QT-Interval Prolonging Drugs: An Analysis in a Large Cohort of Geriatric Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Schächtele

    Full Text Available Drug-induced QT-interval prolongation is associated with occurrence of potentially fatal Torsades de Pointes arrhythmias (TdP. So far, data regarding the overall burden of QT-interval prolonging drugs (QT-drugs in geriatric patients are limited.This study was performed to assess the individual burden of QT-interval prolonging drugs (QT-drugs in geriatric polymedicated patients and to identify the most frequent and risky combinations of QT-drugs.In the discharge medication of geriatric patients between July 2009 and June 2013 from the Geriatrics in Bavaria-Database (GiB-DAT (co-prescriptions of QT-drugs were investigated. QT-drugs were classified according to a publicly available reference site (CredibleMeds® as ALL-QT-drugs (associated with any QT-risk or High-risk-QT-drugs (corresponding to QT-drugs with known risk of Torsades de Pointes according to CredibleMeds® and in addition as SmPC-high-risk-QT-drugs (according to the German prescribing information (SmPC contraindicated co-prescription with other QT-drugs.Of a cohort of 130,434 geriatric patients (mean age 81 years, 67% women, prescribed a median of 8 drugs, 76,594 patients (58.7% received at least one ALL-QT-drug. Co-prescriptions of two or more ALL-QT-drugs were observed in 28,768 (22.1% patients. Particularly risky co-prescriptions of High-risk-QT-drugs or SmPC-high-risk-QT-drugs with at least on further QT-drug occurred in 55.9% (N = 12,633 and 54.2% (N = 12,429 of these patients, respectively. Consideration of SmPCs (SmPC-high-risk-QT-drugs allowed the identification of an additional 15% (N = 3,999 patients taking a risky combination that was not covered by the commonly used CredibleMeds® classification. Only 20 drug-drug combinations accounted for more than 90% of these potentially most dangerous co-prescriptions.In a geriatric study population co-prescriptions of two and more QT-drugs were common. A considerable proportion of QT-drugs with higher risk only could be detected by

  2. [Prescription patterns for antilipidemic drugs in a group of Colombian patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Jorge Enrique; Moncada, Juan Carlos; Mesa, Giovanny

    2008-03-01

    To determine patterns in antilipidemic drug prescriptions among a group of patients covered by the General Social Security System (Sistema General de Seguridad Social) in Colombia. A descriptive, observational study was conducted of 41 580 hyperlipidemics of both sexes, who were over 20 years of age, undergoing treatment from at least April to June 2006, and were residents of one of 19 cities in Colombia. A database was created to track prescription data collected by the pharmaceutical company that dispenses medications to the patients. The mean age was 58.4+/-13.5 years; 58.9% of the participants were women. Of the total number of patients, 95.6% were receiving monotherapy, while 4.4% were receiving two or more antilipidemics. Prescriptions were ranked as follows: statins (70.9%), fibrates (27.5%), bile acid sequestrant resins (0.9%), and others (0.7%), all at low dosage levels. The most common therapy combinations were lovastatin + gemfibrozil (n = 1 568), cholestyramine + gemfibrozil (n = 92), and cholestyramine + lovastatin (n = 78). Comedications most frequently prescribed were: antihypertensive (60.9%), antiinflammatory (56.5%), antiulcer (22.9%), and antidiabetes drugs (20.6%), and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 3.8%). Antianginals and ASA were being underused, while antiinflamatories and antiulcer drugs were being overused. Dyslipidemia is a primary risk factor for developing coronary heart disease and stroke, frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in Colombia and the world. All of the antilipidemics are being used at lower-than-recommended dosage levels. Clearly there is a need for creating educational strategies to address these prescribing habits and for exploring clinical results of the pharmaceuticals studied.

  3. Misuse of prescription stimulants for weight loss, psychosocial variables, and eating disordered behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Amy; Benotsch, Eric G; Koester, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    In recent years there has been a dramatic increase in the non-medical use of prescription drugs among young adults including an increase in the use of prescription stimulants normally used to treat ADHD. Reported motivations for the non-medical use of prescription stimulants (NPS) include enhancing academic performance and to get high. Although a common side effect of these medications is appetite suppression, research examining weight loss as a motivation for NPS among young adults is sparse. In the present study, undergraduate students (n=705) completed an online survey assessing weight loss behaviors, motivations for weight loss, and eating behaviors. Nearly 12% of respondents reported using prescription stimulants to lose weight. Participants who reported using prescription stimulants for weight loss had greater appearance-related motivations for weight loss, greater emotion and stress-related eating, a more compromised appraisal of their ability to cope, lower self-esteem, and were more likely to report engaging in other unhealthy weight loss and eating disordered behaviors. Results suggest some young adults are misusing prescription stimulants for weight loss and that this behavior is associated with other problematic weight loss strategies. Interventions designed to reduce problematic eating behaviors in young adults may wish to assess the misuse of prescription stimulants.

  4. Extent of dispensing prescription-only medications without a prescription in community drug retail outlets in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a simulated-patient study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erku DA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Asfaw Erku,1 Abebe Basazn Mekuria,2 Abdrrahman Shemsu Surur,1 Begashaw Melaku Gebresillassie3 1Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 2Department of Pharmacology, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Purpose: This study was aimed at assessing the extent of dispensing prescription-only medications without a prescription in community drug retail outlets (CDROs of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional observational study design was used to sample 31 pharmacies, 25 drug stores, and two rural drug vendors from August 11, 2015, to October 21, 2015, through a simple random sampling method. A simulated-patient method of visit was implemented to collect data. Requests of six tracer prescription-only medicines (amoxicillin + clavulanic acid capsule, amitriptyline, captopril, glibenclamide [also known as glyburide], omeprazole capsule, and sildenafil citrate and upper respiratory tract infection were selected as the simulated clinical scenario.Results: Amoxicillin–clavulanic acid capsule was dispensed when requested in 87.93% of the dispensaries. All of the CDROs dispensed omeprazole upon request. Sildenafil citrate (Viagra was in stock in 96.55% of the CDROs, all of which issued the requested number of tablets without asking why or for whom the drug was needed. Amitriptyline, captopril, and glibenclamide (glyburide were dispensed in 84.48%, 89.65%, and 87.93% of CDROs upon the provision of an empty container. Antibiotics were obtained from 75.86% of CDROs for presentation of upper respiratory tract infection symptoms. Among the dispensed antibiotics, the most common was amoxicillin (93.18%, followed by amoxicillin–clavulanic acid capsule (72.72%, and azithromycin (50%. Only 4.5% of the dispensaries asked about drug allergies, and 15.9% of the CDROs informed the simulated patient about the possible side effects of the drugs.Conclusion: This study revealed a very high

  5. Extent of dispensing prescription-only medications without a prescription in community drug retail outlets in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a simulated-patient study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erku, Daniel Asfaw; Mekuria, Abebe Basazn; Surur, Abdrrahman Shemsu; Gebresillassie, Begashaw Melaku

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was aimed at assessing the extent of dispensing prescription-only medications without a prescription in community drug retail outlets (CDROs) of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional observational study design was used to sample 31 pharmacies, 25 drug stores, and two rural drug vendors from August 11, 2015, to October 21, 2015, through a simple random sampling method. A simulated-patient method of visit was implemented to collect data. Requests of six tracer prescription-only medicines (amoxicillin + clavulanic acid capsule, amitriptyline, captopril, glibenclamide [also known as glyburide], omeprazole capsule, and sildenafil citrate) and upper respiratory tract infection were selected as the simulated clinical scenario. Results Amoxicillin–clavulanic acid capsule was dispensed when requested in 87.93% of the dispensaries. All of the CDROs dispensed omeprazole upon request. Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) was in stock in 96.55% of the CDROs, all of which issued the requested number of tablets without asking why or for whom the drug was needed. Amitriptyline, captopril, and glibenclamide (glyburide) were dispensed in 84.48%, 89.65%, and 87.93% of CDROs upon the provision of an empty container. Antibiotics were obtained from 75.86% of CDROs for presentation of upper respiratory tract infection symptoms. Among the dispensed antibiotics, the most common was amoxicillin (93.18%), followed by amoxicillin–clavulanic acid capsule (72.72%), and azithromycin (50%). Only 4.5% of the dispensaries asked about drug allergies, and 15.9% of the CDROs informed the simulated patient about the possible side effects of the drugs. Conclusion This study revealed a very high rate of dispensing of prescription-only medicines without a prescription. Antimicrobials and drugs for chronic diseases were obtained with ease from almost all of the randomly sampled CDROs. Putting good dispensing practice into effect and adhering to the existing national

  6. Study of Drug Utilization Pattern for Skin Diseases in Dermatology OPD of an Indian Tertiary Care Hospital - A Prescription Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Anuj Kumar; Kumar, Subodh; Kumar, Manish; Dikshit, Harihar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Skin diseases are the major contributors of disease burden in society. It affects individuals of all ages, neonates to elderly. Owing to its chronic nature, it causes serious impact on quality of life and financial status of the sufferer and his family. The problem gets compounded with the inappropriate and irrational use of medicines. Periodic prescription audit in form of drug utilization study is a way to improve the quality of prescription and curb the menace of irrational prescribing which has become a global phenomenon. Aim This study aims to determine the drug utilization pattern and assess the economic burden of the patient with skin disease. Materials and Methods It was a prospective, cross-sectional study conducted over a period of three months from January to March 2015 in newly diagnosed cases attending outpatient department of Skin and VD, IGIMS, Patna. The prescriptions were analysed with the help of descriptive statistics and results were expressed in percentage. Results Total 752 prescriptions were analysed during the study. Male patients were lesser as compared to female as male to female ratio was 0.88. Over 50% of patients were in adolescent age group i.e. 21-40 years. Acne (17.95%) was most common disease in the study population followed by eczema and Dermatophytosis. Among the drugs, antihistaminics (24.13%) were prescribed most frequently followed by antifungals and antibiotics. Topical agents constituted almost 60% of the total prescription and average number of drugs per prescription was 5.13, irrespective of the dosage forms prescribed. Conclusion This drug utilization study provides an insight to the prescriber regarding various issues related to polypharmacy, cost analysis and prevalent disease pattern in the region. This study also suggests periodic evaluation of prescription pattern to monitor and improve quality of prescription in other departments of the hospital. PMID:27042479

  7. Antiepileptic drugs prescription utilization behavior and direct costs of treatment in a national hospital of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Haroon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The present study evaluated the direct costs of active epilepsy and looked at the pattern of drug prescription and utilization in epileptic patients visiting the neuroscience centre of a national hospital of India. Materials and Methods: A total of 134 epileptic patients were studied over a period of 4 months. Patients demography, commonly prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, socioeconomic status, direct costs, response ratio (RR for newer drugs, and quality of life (QOLIE-10 was evaluated. Results and Discussion: We found a higher percentage of male patients (67.9% as compared with females. Most of the patients were in the age group 11-30 years and majority of them (39.6% belonged to lower middle group. A higher percentage (68.7 of drugs was prescribed as polytherapy. Higher monthly cost was observed for some of the newer AEDs including the lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and lacosamide as compared with older drugs. Among the newer drugs, clobazam had the lowest cost. RR was calculated for 12 patients out of which 8 had a RR < −0.50. The QOL domains, following conventional or newer drugs, were not much affected. Conclusion: The study indicates an increasing trend toward clinical usage of newer AEDs, increasing trend of poly-therapy with significant escalations in the cost of therapy.

  8. Recurrence of adverse drug reactions following inappropriate re-prescription: better documentation, availability of information and monitoring are needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Carolien M J; Jansen, Paul A F; van Marum, Rob J; Grouls, René J E; Korsten, Erik H M; Egberts, Antoine C G

    2010-07-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a common, and often preventable, cause of hospital admission, especially in the elderly, and can occur during hospitalization. In this current opinion article, we present three cases of recurrence of a serious ADR due to re-prescription of a withdrawn medication that highlight the need for a system to prevent the undesirable re-prescription of medications withdrawn because of an ADR. In addition, we describe an electronic system that could help prevent undesirable re-prescription following an ADR. Such a system should document ADRs systematically at the patient level, make this information available to relevant healthcare providers and the patient, and flag re-prescription of the offending drug. The effectiveness and cost effectiveness of such a system would need to be determined.

  9. Initiation into prescription drug misuse: differences between lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) and heterosexual high-risk young adults in Los Angeles and New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecojevic, Aleksandar; Wong, Carolyn F; Schrager, Sheree M; Silva, Karol; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson; Iverson, Ellen; Lankenau, Stephen E

    2012-11-01

    Prescription drug misuse is an important public health problem in the U.S., particularly among adolescents and young adults. Few studies have examined factors contributing to initiation into prescription drug misuse, including sexual orientation and childhood abuse and neglect. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the relationship between initiation into the misuse of prescription drugs (opioids, tranquilizers, and stimulants), sexual identity, and individual and family determinants. Results are based upon data from a cross-sectional survey of 596 youth (polydrug users, homeless youth, and injection drug users) aged 16 to 25 who reported current prescription drug misuse. Participants were recruited in Los Angeles and New York City between 2009 and 2011. We compared initiation behaviors between sexual minority and heterosexual youth and examined factors modifying the relationship between sexual identity and earlier initiation into prescription drug misuse. Sexual minority youth were more likely to report histories of initiation into misuse of prescription opioids and tranquilizers. Further, they were more likely to report various types of childhood abuse than heterosexual youth. However, multivariate analyses indicated that age of first prescribed drug was the most significant factor associated with initiation into misuse of all three categories of prescription drugs. The correlates of initiation into prescription drug misuse are multidimensional and offer opportunities for further research. Identifying additional factors contributing to initiation into prescription drug misuse is essential towards developing interventions that may reduce future drug use among young adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Postmarketing surveillance of adverse drug reactions in general practice. II: Prescription-event monitoring at the University of Southampton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, W H

    1981-04-11

    An independent, non-regulatory drug surveillance research unit has been established at the University of Southampton. Its first task will be to set up a prescription-event monitoring scheme in general practice to enable the pattern of adverse events, as distinct from suspected adverse reactions associated with new drugs to be compared with that of older medicines. Prescriptions for selected drugs will identify patients and a simple questionnaire, designed to be completed in under five minutes, will be used to obtain the required information. Medical opinions about causation need not be given, and the scheme will not interfere with normal prescribing practice.

  11. Prescription monitoring of anti-hypertensive drug utilisation at the Panjab University Health Centre in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, H; Kumar, A; Kulkarni, S K

    2004-03-01

    The present pilot study was conducted in order to establish the drug-prescribing trend of anti-hypertensive agents at the Panjab University Health Centre in India. A pilot study of six-month duration was conducted at the Panjab University Health Centre. The information was collected from the patients attending the outpatient department through a random sample method. World Health Organisation-based prescription-auditing proforma was used for data collection. This study revealed that most of the male patients were on monotherapy (60 percent). In the monotherapy category, four classes of drugs were used. These were calcium channel blockers (48.1 percent), beta-blockers (46.2 percent), ACE inhibitors (3.9 percent) and diuretics (1.9 percent). Among monotherapy drugs, calcium channel blockers were prescribed most whereas diuretics were least used. Among those who were treated with drug combinations, 92.1% received two drugs and 7.9 percent received three drugs. In combination therapy, a two-drug combination consisting of beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers was given to the majority of the patients. Overall, 57.8 percent patients were treated with a single anti-hypertensive drug and 42.2 percent were treated with anti-hypertensive drug combinations. The present study represents the current prescribing trend for anti-hypertensive agents and it highlights certain shortcomings in the existing prescribing practice. There is a considerable scope for improvement, particularly the under-utilisation of diuretics in the present prescribing pattern of anti-hypertensive drugs.

  12. Commercial importation of prescription drugs in the United States: short-run implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzon, Patricia M; Johnson, Scott J; Long, Genia; Furukawa, Michael F

    2011-04-01

    The option of legalizing the commercial importation of prescription drugs is of continued policy interest as a way to reduce U.S. drug spending. Using IMS data, we estimate potential savings from commercial drug importation under assumptions about percentage of drugs likely to attract imports; potential supply from foreign countries; and share of savings passed on to payers. Our base case estimate is that $1.7 billion per year, or 0.6 percent of total drug spending, would be saved by payers; sensitivity analyses range from 0.2 to 2.5 percent under plausible assumptions and up to 17.4 percent under unrealistic assumptions about unlimited foreign supply, costless trade, and zero profits for intermediaries. Estimated savings to payers are less than the average price differentials between the United States and foreign countries because proposed legislation exempts certain drugs from importation; foreign markets are small relative to the United States; regulatory and other constraints may limit the volume of exports; trade is costly; and intermediaries will retain some savings. Although savings to U.S. payers/consumers would likely be small and have minimal impact on total U.S. health care spending, costs to other countries could be significant, due to reduced access and possibly higher prices. In the long run, reduced investment in R&D could adversely affect consumers globally.

  13. 21 CFR 205.50 - Minimum requirements for the storage and handling of prescription drugs and for the establishment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Enforcement Administration (DEA), and shall comply with all applicable State, local, and DEA regulations. (j... regulations. (1) Wholesale drug distributors shall permit the State licensing authority and authorized Federal... Federal, State, or local laws or regulations that relate to prescription drug product salvaging or...

  14. Has The Era Of Slow Growth For Prescription Drug Spending Ended?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Murray; Berndt, Ernst R; Cutler, David; Kleinrock, Michael; Maini, Luca

    2016-09-01

    In the period 2005-13 the US prescription drug market grew at an average annual pace of only 1.8 percent in real terms on an invoice price basis (that is, in constant dollars and before manufacturers' rebates and discounts). But the growth rate increased dramatically in 2014, when the market expanded by 11.5 percent-which raised questions about future trends. We determined the impact of manufacturers' rebates and discounts on prices and identified the underlying factors likely to influence prescription spending over the next decade. These include a strengthening of the innovation pipeline; consolidation among buyers such as wholesalers, pharmacy benefit managers, and health insurers; and reduced incidence of patent expirations, which means that fewer less costly generic drug substitutes will enter the market than in the recent past. While various forecasts indicate that pharmaceutical spending growth will moderate from its 2014 level, the business tension between buyers and sellers could play out in many different ways. This suggests that future spending trends remain highly uncertain.

  15. Varsity Medical Ethics Debate 2015: should nootropic drugs be available under prescription on the NHS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, Emma; Kang, Isaac; D'Costa, Stephanie; Vlazaki, Myrto; Ayeko, Olaoluwa; Arbe-Barnes, Edward H; Swerner, Casey B

    2016-09-13

    The 2015 Varsity Medical Ethics debate convened upon the motion: "This house believes nootropic drugs should be available under prescription". This annual debate between students from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, now in its seventh year, provided the starting point for arguments on the subject. The present article brings together and extends many of the arguments put forward during the debate. We explore the current usage of nootropic drugs, their safety and whether it would be beneficial to individuals and society as a whole for them to be available under prescription. The Varsity Medical Debate was first held in 2008 with the aim of allowing students to engage in discussion about ethics and policy within healthcare. The event is held annually and it is hoped that this will allow future leaders to voice a perspective on the arguments behind topics that will feature heavily in future healthcare and science policy. This year the Oxford University Medical Society at the Oxford Union hosted the debate.

  16. Choice set size and decision making: the case of Medicare Part D prescription drug plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundorf, M Kate; Szrek, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The impact of choice on consumer decision making is controversial in US health policy. The authors' objective was to determine how choice set size influences decision making among Medicare beneficiaries choosing prescription drug plans. The authors randomly assigned members of an Internet-enabled panel age 65 and older to sets of prescription drug plans of varying sizes (2, 5, 10, and 16) and asked them to choose a plan. Respondents answered questions about the plan they chose, the choice set, and the decision process. The authors used ordered probit models to estimate the effect of choice set size on the study outcomes. Both the benefits of choice, measured by whether the chosen plan is close to the ideal plan, and the costs, measured by whether the respondent found decision making difficult, increased with choice set size. Choice set size was not associated with the probability of enrolling in any plan. Medicare beneficiaries face a tension between not wanting to choose from too many options and feeling happier with an outcome when they have more alternatives. Interventions that reduce cognitive costs when choice sets are large may make this program more attractive to beneficiaries.

  17. Utilisation and off-label prescriptions of respiratory drugs in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Schmiedl

    Full Text Available Respiratory drugs are widely used in children to treat labeled and non-labeled indications but only some data are available quantifying comprehensively off-label usage. Thus, we aim to analyse drug utilisation and off-label prescribing of respiratory drugs focusing on age- and indication-related off-label use. Patients aged ≤18 years documented in the Bavarian Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians database (approx. 2 million children between 2004 and 2008 were included in our study. Annual period prevalence rates (PPRs per 10,000 children and the proportion of age- and indication-related off-label prescriptions were calculated and stratified by age and gender. Within the study period, highest PPRs were found for the fixed combination of clenbuterol/ambroxol (between 374-575 per 10,000 children and the inhaled short acting beta-2-agonist salbutamol (between 378-527 per 10,000 children. Highest relative PPR increase was found for oral salbutamol (approx. 39-fold whereas the most distinct decrease was found for oral long-acting beta-2-agonist clenbuterol (-97%. Compound classes most frequently involved in off-label prescribing were inhaled bronchodilative compounds (91,402; 37.3% and oral beta-2-agonists (26,850; 22.5%. The highest absolute number of off-label prescriptions were found for inhaled salbutamol (n = 67,084; 42.0% and oral clenbuterol/ambroxol (fixed combination, n = 18,897; 20.7%. Off-label prescribing due to indication was of much greater relevance than age-related off-label use. Most frequently, bronchodilative compounds were used off-label to treat respiratory tract infections. Highest off-label prescription rates were found in the youngest patients without relevant gender-related differences. Off-label prescribing of respiratory drugs is common especially in young children. Bronchodilative drugs were most frequently used off-label for treating acute bronchitis or upper respiratory tract infections

  18. Ephemeral profiles of prescription drug and formulation tampering: evolving pseudoscience on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Edward J

    2006-06-01

    The magnitude of non-therapeutic use, or misuse of prescription pharmaceuticals now rivals that of illicit drug abuse. Drug and formulation tampering enables misusers to administer higher doses by intended and non-intended routes. Perceived motives appear to be a combination of interests in achieving a faster onset and enhancing psychoactive effects. Narcotic analgesics, stimulants, and depressants are widely sought, examined, and tampered with for recreational use. This review examines tampering methods reported on the Internet for selected pharmaceutical products. The Internet provides broad and varied guidance on tampering methods that are specific to drug classes and unique formulations. Instructions are available on crushing, separating, purifying and chemically altering specific formulations to allow changes in dosage, route of administration, and time course of effects. Many pharmaceutical formulations contain features that serve as "barriers" to tampering. The nature and effectiveness of formulation barriers vary widely with many being overcome by adventurous misusers. Examples of successes and failures in tampering attempts are frequently described on Internet sites that support recreational drug use. Successful tampering methods that have widespread appeal evolve into recipes and become archived on multiple websites. Examples of tampering methods include: (1) how to separate narcotic drugs (codeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone) from excipients and non-desirable actives (aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen); (2) overcoming time-release formulations (beads, layers, matrices); (3) removal of active drug from high-dose formulations (patches, pills); (4) alteration of dosage forms for alternate routes of administration. The development of successful formulations that inhibit or prevent drug/formulation tampering with drugs of abuse should take into consideration the scope and practice of tampering methods available to recreational drug users on the Internet.

  19. How, why, and for whom do emergency medicine providers use prescription drug monitoring programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert J; Kilaru, Austin S; Perrone, Jeanmarie; Paciotti, Breah; Barg, Frances K; Gadsden, Sarah M; Meisel, Zachary F

    2015-06-01

    The prescription opioid epidemic is currently responsible for the greatest number of unintentional deaths in the United States. One potential strategy for decreasing this epidemic is implementation of state-based Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs), which are designed for providers to identify patients who "doctor shop" for prescriptions. Emergency medicine physicians are some of the most frequent PDMP users and opioid prescribers, but little is known about how they actually use PDMPs, for which patients, and for what reasons. We conducted and transcribed semistructured qualitative interviews with 61 physicians at a national academic conference in October 2012. Deidentified transcripts were entered into QSR NVivo 10.0, coded, and analyzed for themes using modified grounded theory. There is variation in pattern and frequency of PDMP access by emergency physicians. Providers rely on both structural characteristics of the PDMP, such as usability, and also their own clinical gestalt impression when deciding to use PDMPs for a given patient encounter. Providers use the information in PDMPs to alter clinical decisions and guide opioid prescribing patterns. Physicians describe alternative uses for the databases, such as improving their ability to facilitate discussions on addiction and provide patient education. PDMPs are used for multiple purposes, including identifying opioid misuse and enhancing provider-patient communication. Given variation in practice, standards may help direct indication and manner of physician use. Steps to minimize administrative barriers to PDMP access are warranted. Finally, alternative PDMP uses should be further studied to determine their appropriateness and potentially expand their role in clinical practice. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Malaria treatment-seeking behaviour and drug prescription practices in an area of low transmission in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Magnussen, Pascal; Clarke, Siân

    2007-01-01

    to protect second-line drugs from misuse. Failure to comply with drug policy in both the private and public sectors is of concern in an era of rapidly evolving drug policy changes and highlights the need for reorientation and training of health staff and drug vendors to improve malaria diagnostic...... actually using insecticide-treated nets. Many patients (25%) had received treatment prior to visiting a health facility, with drug shops and general stores being the main sources of treatment. Some shops dispensed quinine, a second-line drug recommended for complicated malaria. Prescription practices...

  1. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics prescription trends at a central west bank hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayem, Yasin I; Qubaja, Marwan M; Shraim, Riyad K; Taha, Omar B; Abu Shkheidem, Imadeddin A; Ibrahim, Murad A

    2013-11-01

    We aimed to reliably describe the pattern of outpatient prescription of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antibiotics (ATBs) at a central hospital in the West Bank, Palestine. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional study investigating a cohort of 2,208 prescriptions ordered by outpatient clinics and the emergency room over one year in Beit Jala Hospital in Bethlehem, West Bank. The orders were analysed for the rate and types of NSAIDs and ATBs utilised, and the appropriateness of these drugs to the diagnosis. Of the total prescriptions, 410 contained NSAIDs (18.6%), including diclofenac (40.2%), low dose aspirin (23.9%), ibuprofen (17.8%) and indomethacin (15.1%). A minority of these prescriptions contained a combination of these agents (2.5%). Only one prescription contained cyclooxyeganse-2 inhibitors (0.2%). The appropriateness of NSAID use to the diagnosis was as follows: appropriate (58.3%), inappropriate (14.4%) and difficult to tell (27.3%). The rate of ATB use was 30.3% (669 prescriptions). The ATBs prescribed were amoxicillin (23.3%), augmentin (14.3%), quinolones (12.7%), first and second generation cephalosporins (9.4% and 12.7%, respectively) and macrolides (7.2%). ATB combinations were identified in 9.4%, with the most common being second-generation cephalopsorins and metronidazole (4.3%). Regarding the appropriateness of prescribing ATBs according to the diagnosis, it was appropriate in 44.8%, inappropriate in 20.6% and difficult to tell in 34.6% of the prescriptions. These findings revealed a relatively large number and inappropriate utilisation of ATBs and NSAIDs. An interventional programme needs to be adopted to reinforce physicians' knowledge of the rational prescription of these agents.

  2. Nonbioequivalent prescription drug interchangeability, concerns on patient safety and drug market dynamics in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumgartten, Francisco José Roma; Oliveira, Ana Cecilia Amado Xavier de

    2017-08-01

    Since the enforcement of Generics Act (1999), three types of pharmaceutically equivalent products are marketed in Brazil: innovative reference (REF), "similar" (S) and generic (G) drugs. The S (brand name) and G (generic name) borrow from REF (brand name) clinical data on safety and efficacy and dosage regimen. G (but not S) is bioequivalent to and interchangeable with REF. Starting in 2003, Brazilian Sanitary Surveillance Agency (Anvisa) has required data on relative bioavailability tests (with REF) to approve (or renew registration of) S drugs. In 2014, Anvisa extended interchangeability notion to similar drugs with a "comparable" bioavailability, i.e., an "equivalent" similar drug (EQ). Drugs for chronic diseases and "critical dose medicines" are listed among the EQ drugs approved. Interchangeability of nonbioequivalent medicines raises deep concerns regarding therapeutic failures and adverse events. Concerns are even more worrisome if patients switch from one drug to another during an ongoing treatment for illnesses such as epilepsy, congestive heart failure, hypertension, diabetes and/or substitutable drugs have a narrow therapeutic index.

  3. Connecting to young adults: an online social network survey of beliefs and attitudes associated with prescription opioid misuse among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Sarah; Brevard, Julie; Budman, Simon

    2011-01-01

    A survey of motives and attitudes associated with patterns of nonmedical prescription opioid medication use among college students was conducted on Facebook, a popular online social networking Web site. Response metrics for a 2-week random advertisement post, targeting students who had misused prescription medications, surpassed typical benchmarks for online marketing campaigns and yielded 527 valid surveys. Respondent characteristics, substance use patterns, and use motives were consistent with other surveys of prescription opioid use among college populations. Results support the potential of online social networks to serve as powerful vehicles to connect with college-aged populations about their drug use. Limitations of the study are noted.

  4. Visual presentations of efficacy data in direct-to-consumer prescription drug print and television advertisements: A randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Helen W; O'Donoghue, Amie C; Aikin, Kathryn J; Chowdhury, Dhuly; Moultrie, Rebecca R; Rupert, Douglas J

    2016-05-01

    To determine whether visual aids help people recall quantitative efficacy information in direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug advertisements, and if so, which types of visual aids are most helpful. Individuals diagnosed with high cholesterol (n=2504) were randomized to view a fictional DTC print or television advertisement with no visual aid or one of four visual aids (pie chart, bar chart, table, or pictograph) depicting drug efficacy. We measured drug efficacy and risk recall, drug perceptions and attitudes, and behavioral intentions. For print advertisements, a bar chart or table, compared with no visual aid, elicited more accurate drug efficacy recall. The bar chart was better at this than the pictograph and the table was better than the pie chart. For television advertisements, any visual aid, compared with no visual aid, elicited more accurate drug efficacy recall. The bar chart was better at this than the pictograph or the table. Visual aids depicting quantitative efficacy information in DTC print and television advertisements increased drug efficacy recall, which may help people make informed decisions about prescription drugs. Adding visual aids to DTC advertising may increase the public's knowledge of how well prescription drugs work. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions to patients over 45 years of age in primary care, southern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Juarez Vieira Teixeira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few cross-sectional studies involving adults and elderly patients with major DDIs have been conducted in the primary care setting. The study aimed to investigate the prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs in patients treated in primary care. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional study involving patients aged 45 years or older was conducted at 25 Basic Health Units in the city of Maringá (southern Brazil from May to December 2010. The data were collected from prescriptions at the pharmacy of the health unit at the time of the delivery of medication to the patient. After delivery, the researcher checked the electronic medical records of the patient. A total of 827 patients were investigated (mean age: 64.1; mean number of medications: 4.4. DDIs were identified in the Micromedex® database. The prevalence of potential DDIs and major DDIs was 63.0% and 12.1%, respectively. In both the univariate and multivariate analyses, the number of drugs prescribed was significantly associated with potential DDIs, with an increasing risk from three to five drugs (OR = 4.74; 95% CI: 2.90-7.73 to six or more drugs (OR = 23.03; 95% CI: 10.42-50.91. Forty drugs accounted for 122 pairs of major DDIs, the most frequent of which involved simvastatin (23.8%, captopril/enalapril (16.4% and fluoxetine (16.4%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first large-scale study on primary care carried out in Latin America. Based on the findings, the estimated prevalence of potential DDIs was high, whereas clinically significant DDIs occurred in a smaller proportion. Exposing patients to a greater number of prescription drugs, especially three or more, proved to be a significant predictor of DDIs. Prescribers should be more aware of potential DDIs. Future studies should assess potential DDIs in primary care over a longer period of time.

  6. prescription pattern of anti-hypertensive drugs in a tertiary health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emmanuel Ameh

    Objective: This study examined the pattern of physicians' prescription of ... combination therapy, and demonstrate an apparent higher efficacy of calcium channel blocker ... Key words: Antihypertensive, prescription, blood pressure control.

  7. Trust in prescription drug brand websites: website trust cues, attitude toward the website, and behavioral intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jisu; Shin, Wonsun

    2014-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug brand websites, as a form of DTC advertising, are receiving increasing attention due to the growing number and importance as an ad and a consumer information source. This study examined consumer trust in a DTC website as an important factor influencing consumers' attitude toward the website and behavioral intention. Applying the conceptual framework of website trust, the particular focus of investigation was the effect of the website trust cue factor on consumers' perceived DTC website trust and subsequent attitudinal and behavioral responses. Results show a significant relation between the website trust cue factor and consumers' perceived DTC website trust. Perceived DTC website trust, in turn, was found to be significantly associated with consumers' attitude toward the DTC website and behavioral intention.

  8. [Local straight line screening method for the detection of Chinese proprietary medicines containing undeclared prescription drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Cao, Yan; Le, Jian; Chen, Gui-Liang; Chai, Yi-Feng; Lu, Feng

    2009-02-01

    The present paper constructs a new approach named local straight-line screening (LSLS) to detect Chinese proprietary medicines (CPM) containing undeclared prescription drugs (UPD). Different from traditional methods used in analysis of multi-component spectrum, LSLS is proposed according to the characteristics of original infrared spectra of the UPD and suspected CPM, without any pattern recognition or concentration model establishment. Spectrum-subtraction leads to the variance in local straight line, which serves as a key in discrimination of whether suspected CPD is adulterated or not. Sibutramine hydrochloride, fenfluramine hydrochloride, sildenafil citrate and lovastatin were used as reference substances of UPD to analyze 16 suspected CPM samples. The results show that LSLS can obtain an accurate quantitative and qualitative analysis of suspected CPM. It is possible for the method to be potentially used in the preliminary screening of CPM containing possible UPD.

  9. Seniors' uncertainty management of direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising usefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorme, Denise E; Huh, Jisu

    2009-09-01

    This study provides insight into seniors' perceptions of and responses to direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising (DTCA) usefulness, examines support for DTCA regulation as a type of uncertainty management, and extends and gives empirical voice to previous survey results through methodological triangulation. In-depth interview findings revealed that, for most informants, DTCA usefulness was uncertain and this uncertainty stemmed from 4 sources. The majority had negative responses to DTCA uncertainty and relied on 2 uncertainty-management strategies: information seeking from physicians, and inferences of and support for some government regulation of DTCA. Overall, the findings demonstrate the viability of uncertainty management theory (Brashers, 2001, 2007) for mass-mediated health communication, specifically DTCA. The article concludes with practical implications and research recommendations.

  10. Hidden in plain sight marketing prescription drugs to consumers in the twentieth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jeremy A; Herzberg, David

    2010-05-01

    Although the public health impact of direct-to-consumer (DTC) pharmaceutical advertising remains a subject of great controversy, such promotion is typically understood as a recent phenomenon permitted only by changes in federal regulation of print and broadcast advertising over the past two decades. But today's omnipresent ads are only the most recent chapter in a longer history of DTC pharmaceutical promotion (including the ghostwriting of popular articles, organization of public-relations events, and implicit advertising of products to consumers) stretching back over the twentieth century. We use trade literature and archival materials to examine the continuity of efforts to promote prescription drugs to consumers and to better grapple with the public health significance of contemporary pharmaceutical marketing practices.

  11. Are ECG monitoring recommendations before prescription of QT-prolonging drugs applied in daily practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam Jacoba; Rutten, Frans Hendrik; Souverein, Patrick Cyriel

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Monitoring of the QT duration by electrocardiography (ECG) prior to treatment is frequently recommended in the label of QT-prolonging drugs. It is, however, unknown how often general practitioners in daily clinical practice are adhering to these risk-minimization measures. We assessed...... the frequency of ECG measurements in patients where haloperidol was initiated in primary care. METHODS: Patients (≥18 years) with a first prescription of haloperidol in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (2009-2013) were included. The proportion of ECGs made was determined in two blocks of 4 weeks......: during the exposure period when haloperidol was initiated, and during the control period, 1 year before. Conditional logistic regression analysis was applied to calculate the relative risk of having an ECG in the exposure period compared with the control period. Subgroup analyses were performed to assess...

  12. Childhood abuse related to nicotine, illicit and prescription drug use by women: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Cathy L; Vanhorn, Daniel R; Wilson, Josephine F; Martorano, Lisa M; Venema, Jana M; Kennedy, Sarah M

    2008-10-01

    A sample of 811 women ages 18 to 59 (M=26.0, SD=6.5) responded to an advertisement by telephone. Inquiries were made about childhood abuse status and adult use of alcohol, nicotine, and prescription and illicit drugs. Significant associations were noted for reported sexual, physical, and emotional childhood abuse with use of nicotine, marijuana, and antidepressants in adulthood. Reported childhood physical and emotional abuses were also significantly associated with use of cocaine and anxiolytics, and sexual abuse with antipsychotic use in adulthood. Only childhood emotional abuse was associated with the use of sleeping pills. Number of types of abuse was significantly related with use of nicotine, marijuana, cocaine, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and anxiolytics. Alcohol use was not related to any type of abuse. The long-term effects of childhood emotional abuse may be just as severe as physical or sexual abuse.

  13. The Affordable Care Act, health care reform, prescription drug formularies and utilization management tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Brian L; Mullins, C Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (hence, Affordable Care Act, or ACA) was signed into law on March 23, 2010. Goals of the ACA include decreasing the number of uninsured people, controlling cost and spending on health care, increasing the quality of care provided, and increasing insurance coverage benefits. This manuscript focuses on how the ACA affects pharmacy benefit managers and consumers when they have prescriptions dispensed. PBMs use formularies and utilization control tools to steer drug usage toward cost-effective and efficacious agents. A logic model was developed to explain the effects of the new legislation. The model draws from peer-reviewed and gray literature commentary about current and future U.S. healthcare reform. Outcomes were identified as desired and undesired effects, and expected unintended consequences. The ACA extends health insurance benefits to almost 32 million people and provides financial assistance to those up to 400% of the poverty level. Increased access to care leads to a similar increase in overall health care demand and usage. This short-term increase is projected to decrease downstream spending on disease treatment and stunt the continued growth of health care costs, but may unintentionally exacerbate the current primary care physician shortage. The ACA eliminates limitations on insurance and increases the scope of benefits. Online health care insurance exchanges give patients a central location with multiple insurance options. Problems with prescription drug affordability and control utilization tools used by PBMs were not addressed by the ACA. Improving communication within the U.S. healthcare system either by innovative health care delivery models or increased usage of health information technology will help alleviate problems of health care spending and affordability.

  14. An educational intervention on drug use in nursing homes improves health outcomes resource utilization and reduces inappropriate drug prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gollarte, Fermín; Baleriola-Júlvez, José; Ferrero-López, Isabel; Cuenllas-Díaz, Álvaro; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2014-12-01

    Inappropriate drug prescription is a common problem in people living in nursing homes and is linked to adverse health outcomes. This study assessed the effect of an educational intervention directed to nursing home physicians in reducing inappropriate prescription and improving health outcomes and resource utilization. Prospective, randomized, multicenter study. A private organization of nursing homes in Spain. Sixty nursing home physicians caring for approximately 3900 nursing home residents in 37 centers were randomized to receive an educational intervention (30) or as a control group (30). 10 hours educational program, followed by on demand support by phone. Outcomes were assessed in 1018 randomly selected nursing home residents. Appropriateness of drug use [measured by the Screening Tool of Older Persons Prescriptions (STOPP) and Screening Tool to Alert Doctors to Right Treatment (START) criteria], incidence of selected geriatric syndromes (falls, delirium) and health resource utilization (visits to physicians and nursing homes, visits to the emergency room, days of hospitalization) were recorded for 3 months before the intervention started and 3 months after the intervention finished. O total of 716 residents finished the study (344 cared for by the intervention group physicians, 372 cared for by control physicians). Mean age was 84.4 ± 12.7 years; 73% were women. The mean number of inappropriate drugs (STOPP criteria) was higher at the end of the study in the control than in the intervention group (1.29 ± 1.56 vs 0.81 ± 1.13), as was the number of residents on 6 or more drugs (76.5% vs.67.0%), using antipsychotics (9.1% vs 3.2%) or duplicate medications (32.5% vs 9.2%). The number of fallers increased in the control group (from 19.3% to 28%) and did not significantly change in the intervention group (from 25.3% to 23.9%); the number of residents with delirium increased in the control group (from 3.8% to 9.1%) and decreased in the intervention group (from 6

  15. Estimating the effect of current, previous and never use of drugs in studies based on prescription registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Hougaard; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Many studies which investigate the effect of drugs categorize the exposure variable into never, current, and previous use of the study drug. When prescription registries are used to make this categorization, the exposure variable possibly gets misclassified since the registries do not ca...... with Hazard Ratios ranging from 1.68 to 1.78 for current use compared to never use. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that it is possible to estimate the effect of never, current and previous use of HT on breast cancer using prescription data.......PURPOSE: Many studies which investigate the effect of drugs categorize the exposure variable into never, current, and previous use of the study drug. When prescription registries are used to make this categorization, the exposure variable possibly gets misclassified since the registries do...... not carry any information on the time of discontinuation of treatment.In this study, we investigated the amount of misclassification of exposure (never, current, previous use) to hormone therapy (HT) when the exposure variable was based on prescription data. Furthermore, we evaluated the significance...

  16. Change in prescription pattern as a potential marker for adverse drug reactions of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoudpour, Seyed Hamidreza; Asselbergs, Folkert W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270752137; de Keyser, Catherine E; Souverein, Patrick C; Hofman, Albert; Stricker, Bruno H; de Boer, Anthonius; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) are among the most frequently prescribed groups of medications. ACEI-induced adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are the main reason to discontinue or switch ACEI treatment. ADRs information is not available in prescription databases. Objective T

  17. Change in prescription pattern as a potential marker for adverse drug reactions of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.H. Mahmoudpour (Seyed Hamidreza); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); C.E. de Keyser (Catherina Elisabeth); P. Souverein (Patrick); A. Hofman (Albert); B.H. Stricker; A.C. de Boer (Anthonius); A-H. Maitland-van der Zee (Anke-Hilse)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) are among the most frequently prescribed groups of medications. ACEI-induced adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are the main reason to discontinue or switch ACEI treatment. ADRs information is not available in prescription databases.

  18. Trust in online prescription drug information among internet users: the impact on information search behavior after exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Ajit M; Deshpande, Aparna D; Perri, Matthew; Zinkhan, George M

    2002-01-01

    The proliferation of both manufacturer-controlled and independent medication-related websites has aroused concern among consumers and policy-makers concerning the trustworthiness of Web-based drug information. The authors examine consumers' trust in on-line prescription drug information and its influence on information search behavior. The study design involves a retrospective analysis of data from a 1998 national survey. The findings reveal that trust in drug information from traditional media sources such as television and newspapers transfers to the domain of the Internet. Furthermore, a greater trust in on-line prescription drug information stimulates utilization of the Internet for information search after exposure to prescription drug advertising.

  19. Prescription Opioid Analgesics Commonly Unused After Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicket, Mark C; Long, Jane J; Pronovost, Peter J; Alexander, G Caleb; Wu, Christopher L

    2017-08-02

    Prescription opioid analgesics play an important role in the treatment of postoperative pain; however, unused opioids may be diverted for nonmedical use and contribute to opioid-related injuries and deaths. To quantify how commonly postoperative prescription opioids are unused, why they remain unused, and what practices are followed regarding their storage and disposal. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from database inception to October 18, 2016, for studies describing opioid oversupply for adults after a surgical procedure. The primary outcome-opioid oversupply-was defined as the number of patients with either filled but unused opioid prescriptions or unfilled opioid prescriptions. Two reviewers independently screened studies for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed the study quality. Six eligible studies reported on a total of 810 unique patients (range, 30-250 patients) who underwent 7 different types of surgical procedures. Across the 6 studies, 67% to 92% of patients reported unused opioids. Of all the opioid tablets obtained by surgical patients, 42% to 71% went unused. Most patients stopped or used no opioids owing to adequate pain control, and 16% to 29% of patients reported opioid-induced adverse effects. In 2 studies examining storage safety, 73% to 77% of patients reported that their prescription opioids were not stored in locked containers. All studies reported low rates of anticipated or actual disposal, but no study reported US Food and Drug Administration-recommended disposal methods in more than 9% of patients. Postoperative prescription opioids often go unused, unlocked, and undisposed, suggesting an important reservoir of opioids contributing to nonmedical use of these products, which could cause injuries or even deaths.

  20. Trends in manufacturer prices of brand name prescription drugs used by older Americans--first quarter 2004 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, David J; Schondelmeyer, Stephen W; Raetzman, Susan O

    2004-06-01

    This Issue Brief reports on changes in manufacturers' prescription drug prices during the first three months of 2004 (January through March) for the brand name prescription drugs most widely used by Americans age 50 and over. This report is the first quarterly update in an ongoing study of changes in drug manufacturer prices-that is, manufacturers' prices charged for drugs they sold to wholesalers. A baseline study published in May 2004 by the AARP Public Policy Institute identified steady increases in the average annual manufacturer price from calendar year 2000 through calendar year 2003. This report's focus is on changes in the prices that brand name drug manufacturers charge to wholesalers for sales to retail pharmacies. The manufacturer's charge to wholesalers is the most substantial component of a prescription drug's retail price. When there is an increase in the manufacturer price to wholesalers for a brand name drug, this added cost is generally passed on as a similar percent change in the retail price to most prescription purchasers. The report presents three measures of price change (see methodological appendix). The first set of findings are annual rates of change in manufacturers' prices for widely used brand name drugs, using both rolling average and point-to-point estimates; information is presented on percentage change in manufacturer price and on potential dollar changes in consumer spending. The second set of findings are three-month percentage changes in prices (i.e., changes from December 31, 2003 through March 31, 2004); the distribution of percentage price changes is shown, as well as differences in average percentage price changes by manufacturer and by therapeutic category.

  1. The international pharmaceutical market as a source of low-cost prescription drugs for U.S. patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2008-04-15

    In response to increasing prescription drug costs, more U.S. patients and policymakers are importing less-expensive pharmaceutical products from other countries. Large-scale prescription drug importation is currently illegal, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration permits individuals to bring in 90-day supplies of drugs for personal use. As patient use of foreign-bought drugs has increased, federal legislators have continued to debate the full legalization of importation. Three factors help guide whether U.S. patients and policymakers can rely on other countries as sources of imported prescription drugs: whether the safety of the product can be ensured, how the import price compares with domestic prices, and how importation might affect the exporting country's pharmaceutical market. In wealthier countries with active regulatory systems, drug safety can be adequately ensured, and brand-name products are usually less expensive than in the United States (although generic drugs may be more expensive). However, implementing large-scale importation can negatively impact the originating country's market and can diminish the long-term cost savings for U.S. consumers. In low- and middle-income countries, prices may be reduced for both brand-name and generic drugs, but the prevalence of unauthorized products on the market makes ensuring drug safety more difficult. It may be reasonable for individual U.S. consumers to purchase essential medicines from certain international markets, but the most effective way to decrease drug costs overall is the appropriate use of domestic generic drugs, which are available for almost every major therapeutic class.

  2. Misunderstanding of prescription drug warning labels among patients with low literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Michael S; Davis, Terry C; Tilson, Hugh H; Bass, Pat F; Parker, Ruth M

    2006-06-01

    The common causes for misunderstanding prescription drug warning labels (PWLs) among adults with low literacy were studied. A total of 74 patients reading at or below the sixth-grade level and receiving care at the primary care clinic at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport were recruited to participate in structured interviews. Patients were asked to interpret and comment on eight commonly used warning labels found on prescription medications. Correct interpretation was determined by expert panel review of patients' verbatim responses. Qualitative methods were employed to code responses and generate themes regarding the misunderstanding of these PWLs. Among this sample of patients with low literacy skills, rates of correct interpretation for the eight warning labels ranged from 0% to 78.7%. With the exception of the most basic label, less than half of all patients were able to provide adequate interpretations of the warning label messages. Five themes were derived to describe the common causes for misunderstanding the labels: single-step versus multiple-step instructions, reading difficulty of text, use of icons, use of color, and message clarity. Labels were at greater risk for being misunderstood if they included multiple instructions, had a greater reading difficulty, included unfamiliar terms, or used confusing icons that were discordant with text messages. Participants also frequently imposed an incorrect meaning on label colors, which led to further confusion. Patients with low literacy skills demonstrated a lower rate of correct interpretation of the eight most commonly used PWLs than did those with higher literacy skills. Multiple-step instructions, reading difficulty of text, the use of icons, the use of color, and message clarity were the common causes of label misinterpretation.

  3. Prescription pattern of anti-malarial drugs in a tertiary care hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santoshkumar R Jeevangi; Manjunath S; Sharanabasappa M Awanti

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the prescribing pattern of anti malarial drugs in a tertiary care hospital. Methods:A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted for 6 months of patients visiting in Basaveshwar Teaching and General Hospital, Gulbarga. Data were analyzed for various drug use indicators. Results: A total of 212 prescriptions were collected, with 136 (64.15%) male and 76 (35.85%) female. There were 128 (60.37%) Plasmodium vivax cases and 84 (39.63%) Plasmodium falciparum cases. All Plasmodium vivax cases were treated with chloroquine alone and among these 16 (12.5%) recieved radical treatment with primaquine along with chloroquine. Among 84 patients with Pasmodium falciparum, 40 patients received single drug such as quinine/mefloquinine/artesunate/arteether. Another 44 patients received multidrug regime like, quinine+artesunate (54.54%), quinine+mefloquine (27.27%) and quinine+arteether (18.18%). Chloroquine was not administered to any of the patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The most common adverse effects with chloroquine were anorexia, nausea, vomiting and tinnitus in 9.37%of the cases. With quinine it was nausea and vomiting in 17.64%, tinnitus in 11.76%and hypoglycemia in 2.1%of cases. Conclusions: Our study found the perennial favorites like chloroquine for Plasmodium vivax and quinine for Plasmodium falciparum were the most effective drug. In the severe Plasmodium falciparum cases the artesunate derivatives and combination of artesunate with quinine/mefloquine were most effective with fewer incidences of side effects.

  4. Illicit and prescription drug problems among urban Aboriginal adults in Canada: the role of traditional culture in protection and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Cheryl L; Wild, T Cameron; Schopflocher, Donald P; Laing, Lory; Veugelers, Paul

    2013-07-01

    Illicit and prescription drug use disorders are two to four times more prevalent among Aboriginal peoples in North America than the general population. Research suggests Aboriginal cultural participation may be protective against substance use problems in rural and remote Aboriginal communities. As Aboriginal peoples continue to urbanize rapidly around the globe, the role traditional Aboriginal beliefs and practices may play in reducing or even preventing substance use problems in cities is becoming increasingly relevant, and is the focus of the present study. Mainstream acculturation was also examined. Data were collected via in-person surveys with a community-based sample of Aboriginal adults living in a mid-sized city in western Canada (N = 381) in 2010. Associations were analysed using two sets of bootstrapped linear regression models adjusted for confounders with continuous illicit and prescription drug problem scores as outcomes. Psychological mechanisms that may explain why traditional culture is protective for Aboriginal peoples were examined using the cross-products of coefficients mediation method. The extent to which culture served as a resilience factor was examined via interaction testing. Results indicate Aboriginal enculturation was a protective factor associated with reduced 12-month illicit drug problems and 12-month prescription drug problems among Aboriginal adults in an urban setting. Increased self-esteem partially explained why cultural participation was protective. Cultural participation also promoted resilience by reducing the effects of high school incompletion on drug problems. In contrast, mainstream acculturation was not associated with illicit drug problems and served as a risk factor for prescription drug problems in this urban sample. Findings encourage the growth of programs and services that support Aboriginal peoples who strive to maintain their cultural traditions within cities, and further studies that examine how Aboriginal

  5. Psychotropic drug prescription in nursing home patients with dementia : influence of environmental correlates and staff distress on physicians' prescription behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, Sytse U; de Jonghe, Jos F M; Verhey, Frans R J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to examine whether staff distress and aspects of the nursing home environment were associated with psychotropic drug use (PDU) in patients with dementia. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 1289 nursing home patients with dementia from 56 Dementia Specia

  6. Medicare program; Medicare Advantage and prescription drug benefit programs: negotiated pricing and remaining revisions. Final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-12

    This rule contains final regulations governing the Medicare Advantage (MA) program (Part C) and prescription drug benefit program (Part D), and interim final regulations governing certain aspects of the Retiree Drug Subsidy (RDS) Program, and reflecting new statutory definitions relating to Special Needs Plans under Part C. The final regulations revising the Part C and Part D regulations include provisions regarding medical savings account (MSA) plans, cost-sharing for dual eligible enrollees in the MA program, the prescription drug payment and novation processes in the Part D program, and the enrollment and appeals processes for both programs. This final rule with comment period also responds to public comments on the May 16, 2008 proposed rule and takes into account statutory revisions contained in the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008 (MIPPA).

  7. Association between sociodemographic status and antiepileptic drug prescriptions in children with epilepsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mattsson, Peter; Tomson, Torbjörn; Edebol Eeg‐Olofsson, Karin; Brännström, Lars; Ringbäck Weitoft, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    .... We linked individual data to examine whether access by pediatric epilepsy patients to neuropediatricians and the prescription of individual AEDs differed according to gender, age, parental education...

  8. Gender bias in clinical research, pharmaceutical marketing, and the prescription of drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Chilet-Rosell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This thesis is part of the studies of gender bias in health which together with the paradigm of evidence-based medicine shares the empirical assumption that there are inaccuracies in medical practice, in addition to a lack of rigour and transparency. It worked with the distinction between the concepts of sex and gender and between the concepts of sex-related differences and gender inequalities, in terms of applying a gender perspective in the study design and the subsequent analysis. This PhD review presents the research process conducted in Spain, which can provide an example for future research. Study I described a review of 58 clinical trials (CTs of etoricoxib to assess its compliance with the Recommendations of Evaluation of Gender Differences in the Clinical Evaluation of Drugs. In Study II, key informants from professions related to different areas in drug development and pharmacovigilance held a working meeting to reach a consensus document on recommendations for the study and evaluation of gender differences in CTs in Spain. In Study III, the websites of the eight best-selling hormone replacement therapy drugs in Spain on Google first page of results were analysed. In Study IV, a logistic regression analysis was performed to compare analgesic prescription by sex in regions with a higher or lower Gender Development Index (GDI than the Spanish average. Gender biases identified in this thesis limited the legitimacy of medicine, which is not based on the best possible evidence. The results also demonstrate the existence of inequalities between men and women that are not due merely to biological differences, but are gender inequalities stemming from the social differences that exist between both sexes.

  9. Gender bias in clinical research, pharmaceutical marketing, and the prescription of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilet-Rosell, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is part of the studies of gender bias in health which together with the paradigm of evidence-based medicine shares the empirical assumption that there are inaccuracies in medical practice, in addition to a lack of rigour and transparency. It worked with the distinction between the concepts of sex and gender and between the concepts of sex-related differences and gender inequalities, in terms of applying a gender perspective in the study design and the subsequent analysis. This PhD review presents the research process conducted in Spain, which can provide an example for future research. Study I described a review of 58 clinical trials (CTs) of etoricoxib to assess its compliance with the Recommendations of Evaluation of Gender Differences in the Clinical Evaluation of Drugs. In Study II, key informants from professions related to different areas in drug development and pharmacovigilance held a working meeting to reach a consensus document on recommendations for the study and evaluation of gender differences in CTs in Spain. In Study III, the websites of the eight best-selling hormone replacement therapy drugs in Spain on Google first page of results were analysed. In Study IV, a logistic regression analysis was performed to compare analgesic prescription by sex in regions with a higher or lower Gender Development Index (GDI) than the Spanish average. Gender biases identified in this thesis limited the legitimacy of medicine, which is not based on the best possible evidence. The results also demonstrate the existence of inequalities between men and women that are not due merely to biological differences, but are gender inequalities stemming from the social differences that exist between both sexes.

  10. Multiple and substitute addictions involving prescription drugs misuse among 12th graders: gateway theory revisited with Market Basket Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardene, Wasantha Parakrama; YoussefAgha, Ahmed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the sequential patterns of drug use initiation, which included prescription drugs misuse (PDM), among 12th-grade students in Indiana. The study also tested the suitability of the data mining method Market Basket Analysis (MBA) to detect common drug use initiation sequences in large-scale surveys. Data from 2007 to 2009 Annual Surveys of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Use by Indiana Children and Adolescents were used for this study. A close-ended, self-administered questionnaire was used to ask adolescents about the use of 21 substance categories and the age of first use. "Support%" and "confidence%" statistics of Market Basket Analysis detected multiple and substitute addictions, respectively. The lifetime prevalence of using any addictive substance was 73.3%, and it has been decreasing during past few years. Although the lifetime prevalence of PDM was 19.2%, it has been increasing. Males and whites were more likely to use drugs and engage in multiple addictions. Market Basket Analysis identified common drug use initiation sequences that involved 11 drugs. High levels of support existed for associations among alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana, whereas associations that included prescription drugs had medium levels of support. Market Basket Analysis is useful for the detection of common substance use initiation sequences in large-scale surveys. Before initiation of prescription drugs, physicians should consider the adolescents' risk of addiction. Prevention programs should address multiple addictions, substitute addictions, common sequences in drug use initiation, sex and racial differences in PDM, and normative beliefs of parents and adolescents in relation to PDM.

  11. Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: Teaching Drug Marketers How to Inform Better or Spin Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Hyosun Kim’s report "Trouble Spots in Online Direct to Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters" aims to teach marketers how to avoid breaching current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines in their online drug promotion. While Kim hopes to minimise the potential for online promotion to misinform consumers and the study is carefully conducted, teaching drug marketers how to avoid the common mistakes in online drug promotion is more likely to make marketers more adept at spinning information than appropriately balancing it PMID:27239884

  12. Prescription painkillers and controlled substances: an appraisal of drug information provided by six US pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill PS

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Preetinder S GillCollege of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USABackground: Health literacy impacts health outcomes. Health literacy is a measure of a person's competence to find, access, contextualize, and understand the information needed to make health decisions. Low levels of health literacy have been associated with poor health status. Health literacy can be enhanced by improving the readability of health literature. Misuse and abuse of prescription medicines and controlled substances is rising. It could be argued that improving the readability of the drug-information documents associated with these medicines could serve to alleviate this situation in a small, albeit incremental, manner. This paper provides a readability assessment of 71 such documents.Methods: The readability of drug-information documents associated with 12 commonly misused and abused painkiller medicines and controlled substances published by the top six US pharmacies was assessed. The Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG indices were used to assess the readability of these drug-information documents. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to compare the readability of the documents.Results: The average Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level index score was found to be 11.16. The average Flesch Reading Ease index score was found to be 45.94. The average SMOG index score was found to be 13.60. Pharmacies C and E had the best average readability scores, whereas pharmacies A and B had the worst average readability scores.Conclusion: Access, contents, and formatting of the documents were qualitatively analyzed to make recommendations to improve readability. Pharmacies C and E were used as benchmarks to identify the seven best practices. Good drug-information documents should have: (1 clear purpose, (2 limited scope, (3 summary/brief review, (4 well-placed graphics, (5 informative illustrations, (6 clean

  13. Opposite Drug Prescription and Cost Trajectories following Integrative and Conventional Care for Pain – A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Tobias; Petzold, Max; Kohls, Niko; Falkenberg, Torkel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pharmacotherapy may have a limited role in long-term pain management. Comparative trajectories of drug prescriptions and costs, two quality-of-care indicators for pain conditions, are largely unknown subsequent to conventional or integrative care (IC) management. The objectives of this study were to compare prescribed defined daily doses (DDD) and cost of first line drugs for pain patients referred to conventional or anthroposophic IC in Stockholm County, Sweden. Methods In this retrospective high quality registry case-control study, IC and conventional care patients were identified through inpatient care registries and matched on pain diagnosis (ICD-10: M79), age, gender and socio-demographics. National drug registry data was used to investigate changes in DDD and costs from 90/180 days before, to 90/180 days after, index visits to IC and conventional care. The primary selected drug category was analgesics, complemented by musculo-skeletal system drugs (e.g. anti-inflammatories, muscle relaxants) and psycholeptics (e.g. hypnotics, sedatives). Results After index care visits, conventional care pain patients (n = 1050) compared to IC patients (n = 213), were prescribed significantly more analgesics. The average (95% CI) group difference was 15.2 (6.0 to 24.3), p = 0.001, DDD/patient after 90 days; and 21.5 (7.4 to 35.6), p = 0.003, DDD/patient after 180 days. The cost of the prescribed and sold analgesics was significantly higher for conventional care after 90 days: euro/patient 10.7 (1.3 to 20.0), p = 0.025. Changes in drug prescription and costs for the other drug categories were not significantly different between groups. Conclusions Drug prescriptions and costs of analgesics increased following conventional care and decreased following IC, indicating potentially fewer adverse drug events and beneficial societal cost savings with IC. PMID:24827981

  14. Trends and Determinants of Prescription Drug Use during Pregnancy and Postpartum in British Columbia, 2002-2011: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Smolina

    Full Text Available To describe trends, patterns, and determinants of prescription drug use during pregnancy and postpartum.This is a retrospective, population-based study of all women who gave birth between January 2002 and 31 December 2011 in British Columbia, Canada. Study population consisted of 225,973 women who had 322,219 pregnancies. We examined administrative datasets containing person-specific information on filled prescriptions, hospitalizations, and medical services. Main outcome measures were filled prescriptions during pregnancy and postpartum. We used logistic regressions to examine associations between prescription drug use and maternal characteristics.Approximately two thirds of women filled a prescription during pregnancy, increasing from 60% in 2002 to 66% in 2011. The proportion of pregnant women using medicines in all three trimesters of pregnancy increased from 20% in 2002 to 27% in 2011. Use of four or more different types of prescription drug during at least one trimester increased from 8.4% in 2002 to 11.7% in 2011. Higher BMI, smoking during pregnancy, age under 25, carrying multiples, and being diagnosed with a chronic condition all significantly increased the odds of prescription drug use during pregnancy.The observed increase in the number of prescriptions and number of different drugs being dispensed suggests a trend in prescribing practices with potentially important implications for mothers, their neonates, and caregivers. Monitoring of prescribing practices and further research into the safety of most commonly prescribed medications is crucial in better understanding risks and benefits to the fetus and the mother.

  15. The Moderating Role of Age in Responses to Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Jennifer G; Manika, Danae; Stout, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Age is an important factor that can influence processing of and response to health messages. Many studies examining evaluations of and responses to direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising (DTCA) have incorporated age as a predictor variable, moderating variable, or sample criterion. However, findings have been inconsistent. This study attempts to add clarity to this body of research by assessing age differences in the antecedent factors of various DTCA outcomes. A multigroup structural equation modeling analysis revealed several significant differences in variable relationships between older (50+) and younger (<50) adults. Overall, older adults exhibited greater complexity in their consideration of DTCA than younger adults in terms of the sheer number of significant relationships within the model. In particular, trust in mediated health information sources and trust in one's physician appeared to be more relevant predictors for older adults. Trust in DTCA was also distinguished as having an inverse relationship with behavioral intentions among older adults while showing a straightforward positive association with attention among younger adults. Further analysis indicated that health status accounted for some but not all of the age differences. It is suggested that younger adults are more open to seeking additional information following DTCA exposure, whereas older adults remain ambivalent.

  16. Regulating Direct-to-Consumer Advertising of Prescription Drugs in the Digital Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Gibson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prominence of new Internet and social media technologies and their growing importance as a source of health information are pushing the pharmaceutical industry towards digital channels. This paper explores the potential impacts of the pharmaceutical industry’s increasing interest in online marketing and considers how the existing regulatory framework in Canada translates into the social media sphere. Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA of prescription drugs is prohibited in Canada, as it is in most industrialized countries. Although Health Canada has reaffirmed that the existing DTCA regulations apply to new Internet and social media technologies, new dynamics such as user-generated content, consumer propagation, and targeted marketing make applying the existing regulations an uncertain process. Moreover, certain problems often associated with DTCA may be exacerbated in the social media context. Finally, there is skepticism around whether government regulators have the resources or political will to effectively monitor new digital media. As such, this paper considers not only the role of direct government regulation in monitoring and enforcing the regulation of DTCA, but also the role of third party oversight and industry self-regulation—both of which may play an important role in filling the gaps in the regulation of the Internet and social media.

  17. Comparison of two databases to detect potential drug-drug interactions between prescriptions of HIV/AIDS patients in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, G V; Guaraldo, L; Japiassú, A M; Bozza, F A

    2015-02-01

    Adverse drug events (ADE), common and underestimated in ICU patients, have direct consequences on length of stay, mortality and hospital costs. Critically ill patients with HIV/AIDS are at a high risk of ADE because of their need for multiple drug therapies. ADE can be prevented, especially by the identification of potentially harmful drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Electronic databases are useful tools for the investigation of DDIs to avoid potential ADEs, thereby increasing patient safety. The purpose of this study was to compare the classification and severity rating of potential adverse drug interactions seen in the prescriptions for patients with HIV/AIDS in two databases, one with free access (Drugs.com(™)) and another requiring payment for access (Micromedex(®)). A cross-sectional retrospective study of the prescriptions issued for 40 ICU HIV/AIDS patients on mechanical ventilation, admitted for more than 48 h, in a referral hospital for infectious diseases in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was undertaken. One prescription was reviewed each week for each patient from the second day after admission. A list of all drug-drug interactions was generated for each patient using the two drug-drug interactions databases. The weighted kappa index was estimated to assess the agreement between the classifications of DDIs identified by both databases and qualitative assessment made of any discordant classification of recorded drug-drug interactions. Of the 106 prescriptions analysed, Micromedex(®) and Drugs.com identified 347 and 615 potential DDIs, respectively. A predominance of moderate interactions and pharmacokinetic interactions was observed. The agreement between the databases regarding the severity rating was only 68.3%. The weighted kappa of 0.44 is considered moderate. Better agreement (82.4%) was observed in the classification of mechanism of interaction, with a weighted kappa of 0.61. DDIs are common between the prescriptions of patients with HIV/AIDS admitted to

  18. Prescription and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Calderón-Guzmán

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The knowledge about the pattern of prescription and consumption of solid oral drugs dispensed as unitary doses (UD in Mexico is sparing. Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of prescription and consumption of solid oral drugs dispensed as unitary doses (UD in a third level private hospital of Mexico. A retrospective study of a 60-month period (from 2007 to 2011 was carried out to know the pattern of drugs dispensed as UD in a third level hospital. Results: Among the principal drugs consumed were analgesic, antihypertensive, antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, antiepileptic, and diuretics. The dispensation of drugs per year was as follows: 181 drugs with 85,167 UD in 2007; 199 with 90,519 UD in 2008; 193 with 101,479 UD in 2009; 195 with 100,798 UD in 2010; and 198 with 103,913 UD in 2011. Conclusion: The findings confirmed that prescription and consumption of unitary doses in the hospitalization service increased, and revealed the extensive use of analgesics as the principal prescribed drug in this kind of hospital.

  19. Developing Core Competencies for the Prevention and Management of Prescription Drug Misuse: A Medical Education Collaboration in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antman, Karen H; Berman, Harris A; Flotte, Terence R; Flier, Jeffrey; Dimitri, Dennis M; Bharel, Monica

    2016-10-01

    Drug overdose has become the leading cause of injury death in the United States. More than half of those deaths involve prescription drugs, specifically opioids. A key component of addressing this national epidemic is improving prescriber practices.A review of the curricula at the four medical schools in Massachusetts revealed that, although they taught components of addiction medicine, no uniform standard existed to ensure that all students were taught prevention and management strategies for prescription drug misuse. To fill this gap, the governor and the secretary of health and human services invited the deans of the state's four medical schools to convene to develop a common educational strategy for teaching safe and effective opioid-prescribing practices. With leadership from the Department of Public Health and Massachusetts Medical Society, the deans formed the Medical Education Working Group in 2015. This group reviewed the relevant literature and current standards for treating substance use disorders and defined 10 core competencies for the prevention and management of prescription drug misuse.The medical schools have incorporated these competencies into their curricula and have committed to assessing students' competence in these areas. The members of the Medical Education Working Group have agreed to continue to work together on key next steps, including connecting these competencies to those for residents, equipping interprofessional teams to address prescription drug misuse, and developing materials in pain management and opioid misuse for practicing physicians. This first-in-the-nation partnership has yielded cross-institutional competencies that aim to address a public health emergency in real time.

  20. Still the Great Debate - "Fair Balance" in Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertising Comment on "Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A Content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Brent L

    2016-02-10

    The above titled paper examined the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) warning letters and notice of violations (NOV) over a 10-year period. Findings from this content analysis reinforced what has been the primary issue for prescription direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) since its beginning, the fair balance of risk and benefit information. As opposed to another analysis in 2026 about this still being an issue, is there anything that can be done to prevent this problem from continuing?

  1. Evaluation of a Food and Drug Administration Mandate to Limit Acetaminophen in Prescription Combination Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberger, David; Vearrier, David

    2017-07-14

    In 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration limited the production of prescription acetaminophen-opioid combination products to 325 mg per dose unit. The goal of this mandate was to decrease the likelihood of unintentional acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. This study was designed to determine if this federal regulation has succeeded in reducing unintentional acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity from opioid combination products. Using data from the National Poison Data System (NPDS), we analyzed all calls to US Poison Control Centers in the years 2013 and 2015 for acetaminophen-opioid combination product exposures. We then excluded cases that were classified as intentional and those aged 12 years and younger. We used a primary endpoint of N-acetylcysteine administration; secondary endpoints included evidence of hepatotoxicity as aspartate aminotransferase elevation, opioid antagonist administration and severity of overall medical outcome. A total of 18,259 calls between the two yearlong periods met inclusion criteria. 5.16 and 5.01% of calls resulted in N-acetylcysteine administration in 2013 and 2015, respectively. 3.63 and 4.02% received naloxone in 2013 and 2015, respectively, and 0.9% in each year developed hepatotoxicity. Rates of N-acetylcysteine administration, naloxone administration, and hepatotoxicity did not differ significantly between 2013 and 2015. Severity of medical outcome was worse in 2015 as compared to 2013 with more cases being categorized as "major effect" and fewer cases being categorized as "no effect." The Food and Drug Administration limitation on acetaminophen content per dose unit in opioid combination products did not reduce the occurrence of unintentional acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity or N-acetylcysteine administration as reported to NPDS.

  2. Prescription patterns of antihypertensives in a community health centre in Mexico City: a drug utilization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba-Leonel, Adela; Carvajal, Alfonso; Fierro, Immaculada; Castillo-Nájera, Fernando; Campos-Ramos, Oscar; Villa-Romero, Antonio; Molina-Guarneros, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent; in Mexico, the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey reported a prevalence of hypertension of 31.5% in the adult population. Pharmacological treatment is the commonest intervention and has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, and total mortality. Accordingly, the type and number of antihypertensives used and the outcome - in terms of blood pressure (BP) control - are important. Therefore, our purpose is to learn the pattern of antihypertensive drug prescription and explore the determinants of BP control in an urban population in Mexico. A retrospective cross-sectional drug utilization study was conducted. Medical records from a community health centre were searched to identify those corresponding to patients diagnosed with hypertension; information upon antihypertensives used and control of the disease was carefully retrieved. A logistic regression model was built to know the main determinants of BP control. A sample of 345 clinical records of interest was identified. Most patients received antihypertensives (86.4%); the leading medications used were angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, 63.8%; beta-blockers (26.5%), diuretics (19.8%), angiotensin-receptor blockers (15.8%) and calcium-channel blockers (6.4%). Only the age (≥55 years) and BMI (>30) of the patients, and the age of the doctors (≥55 years), had an important influence on BP control. Obesity is a particular and important determinant of uncontrolled hypertension; it is worth to act on body weight, on an individual basis. As lack of control has been also tied to elderly doctors, an education programme could be envisaged. © 2016 The Authors Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  3. Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A Content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyosun Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background For the purpose of understanding the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s concerns regarding online promotion of prescription drugs advertised directly to consumers, this study examines notices of violations (NOVs and warning letters issued by the FDA to pharmaceutical manufacturers. Methods The FDA’s warning letters and NOVs, which were issued to pharmaceutical companies over a 10-year period (2005 to 2014 regarding online promotional activities, were content-analyzed. Results Six violation categories were identified: risk information, efficacy information, indication information, product labeling, material information issues, and approval issues. The results reveal that approximately 95% of the alleged violations were found on branded drug websites, in online paid advertisements, and in online videos. Of the total 179 violations, the majority of the alleged violations were concerned with the lack of risk information and/or misrepresentation of efficacy information, suggesting that achieving a fair balance of benefit versus risk information is a major problem with regard to the direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA of prescription drugs. In addition, the character space limitations of online platforms, eg, sponsored links on search engines, pose challenges for pharmaceutical marketers with regard to adequately communicating important drug information, such as indication information, risk information, and product labeling. Conclusion Presenting drug information in a fair and balanced manner remains a major problem. Industry guidance should consider addressing visibility and accessibility of information in the web environment to help pharmaceutical marketers meet the requirements for direct-to-consumer promotion and to protect consumers from misleading drug information. Promotion via social media warrants further attention, as pharmaceutical manufacturers have already begun actively establishing a social media presence, and the

  4. Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A Content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosun

    2015-08-25

    For the purpose of understanding the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) concerns regarding online promotion of prescription drugs advertised directly to consumers, this study examines notices of violations (NOVs) and warning letters issued by the FDA to pharmaceutical manufacturers. The FDA's warning letters and NOVs, which were issued to pharmaceutical companies over a 10-year period (2005 to 2014) regarding online promotional activities, were content-analyzed. Six violation categories were identified: risk information, efficacy information, indication information, product labeling, material information issues, and approval issues. The results reveal that approximately 95% of the alleged violations were found on branded drug websites, in online paid advertisements, and in online videos. Of the total 179 violations, the majority of the alleged violations were concerned with the lack of risk information and/or misrepresentation of efficacy information, suggesting that achieving a fair balance of benefit versus risk information is a major problem with regard to the direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs. In addition, the character space limitations of online platforms, eg, sponsored links on search engines, pose challenges for pharmaceutical marketers with regard to adequately communicating important drug information, such as indication information, risk information, and product labeling. Presenting drug information in a fair and balanced manner remains a major problem. Industry guidance should consider addressing visibility and accessibility of information in the web environment to help pharmaceutical marketers meet the requirements for direct-to-consumer promotion and to protect consumers from misleading drug information. Promotion via social media warrants further attention, as pharmaceutical manufacturers have already begun actively establishing a social media presence, and the FDA has thus begun to keep tabs on social media promotions of

  5. Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A Content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosun

    2015-01-01

    Background: For the purpose of understanding the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) concerns regarding online promotion of prescription drugs advertised directly to consumers, this study examines notices of violations (NOVs) and warning letters issued by the FDA to pharmaceutical manufacturers. Methods: The FDA’s warning letters and NOVs, which were issued to pharmaceutical companies over a 10-year period (2005 to 2014) regarding online promotional activities, were content-analyzed. Results: Six violation categories were identified: risk information, efficacy information, indication information, product labeling, material information issues, and approval issues. The results reveal that approximately 95% of the alleged violations were found on branded drug websites, in online paid advertisements, and in online videos. Of the total 179 violations, the majority of the alleged violations were concerned with the lack of risk information and/or misrepresentation of efficacy information, suggesting that achieving a fair balance of benefit versus risk information is a major problem with regard to the direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs. In addition, the character space limitations of online platforms, eg, sponsored links on search engines, pose challenges for pharmaceutical marketers with regard to adequately communicating important drug information, such as indication information, risk information, and product labeling. Conclusion: Presenting drug information in a fair and balanced manner remains a major problem. Industry guidance should consider addressing visibility and accessibility of information in the web environment to help pharmaceutical marketers meet the requirements for direct-to-consumer promotion and to protect consumers from misleading drug information. Promotion via social media warrants further attention, as pharmaceutical manufacturers have already begun actively establishing a social media presence, and the FDA has thus

  6. Addressing the challenge of high-priced prescription drugs in the era of precision medicine: A systematic review of drug life cycles, therapeutic drug markets and regulatory frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronde, Toon van der; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A; Pieters, Toine

    2017-01-01

    Recent public outcry has highlighted the rising cost of prescription drugs worldwide, which in several disease areas outpaces other health care expenditures and results in a suboptimal global availability of essential medicines. A systematic review of Pubmed, the Financial Times, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and the Guardian was performed to identify articles related to the pricing of medicines. Changes in drug life cycles have dramatically affected patent medicine markets, which have long been considered a self-evident and self-sustainable source of income for highly profitable drug companies. Market failure in combination with high merger and acquisition activity in the sector have allowed price increases for even off-patent drugs. With market interventions and the introduction of QALY measures in health care, governments have tried to influence drug prices, but often encounter unintended consequences. Patent reform legislation, reference pricing, outcome-based pricing and incentivizing physicians and pharmacists to prescribe low-cost drugs are among the most promising short-term policy options. Due to the lack of systematic research on the effectiveness of policy measures, an increasing number of ad hoc decisions have been made with counterproductive effects on the availability of essential drugs. Future challenges demand new policies, for which recommendations are offered. A fertile ground for high-priced drugs has been created by changes in drug life-cycle dynamics, the unintended effects of patent legislation, government policy measures and orphan drug programs. There is an urgent need for regulatory reform to curtail prices and safeguard equitable access to innovative medicines.

  7. Prescription drug monitoring program data tracking of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in integrated dual diagnosis care involving injectable naltrexone

    OpenAIRE

    Sajid, Ayesha; Whiteman, Aaron; Bell, Richard L.; Greene, Marion S.; Engleman, Eric A; Chambers, R. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Fourfold increases in opioid prescribing and dispensations over 2 decades in the U.S. has paralleled increases in opioid addictions and overdoses, requiring new preventative, diagnostic, and treatment strategies. This study examines Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) tracking as a novel measure of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in a university‐affiliated integrated mental health‐addiction treatment clinic. Methods Repeated measure parametrics examined P...

  8. Medical students' medication communication skills regarding drug prescription-a qualitative analysis of simulated physician-patient consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Katarina; Matthes, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Poor medication communication of physicians to patients is detrimental, e.g. for medication adherence. Reasons for physicians' deficits in medication communication may be unfavourable conditions in daily practice or already insufficient training during their (undergraduate) medical studies. We explored medical students' communication on new medications in simulated physician-patient conversations to identify actual deficits indicating apparent educational needs. Fifth year medical students attending a mandatory course at the University of Cologne had simulated physician-patient consultations aiming at drug prescription. In 2015, 21 consultations were recorded, transcribed and subjected to qualitative content analysis based on the method of inductive coding. Even essential information on drug therapy was often lacking (e.g. adverse effects, drug administration). Some aspects were addressed more frequently than others. This seemed to differ depending on the diagnosis underlying the particular treatment (acute event vs. chronic disease). The extent of information on drug treatments given in simulated physician-patient consultations varied significantly between students. Fifth year medical students showed appreciable deficits in communicating drug prescriptions to patients though there were remarkable inter-individual differences. Our findings suggest that communication on drug therapy to patients is no self-evolving skill. Thus, there is obviously a need for emphasizing medication communication in the training of medical students. Communication aids specifically aiming at medication communication might facilitate learning of adequate medication communication skills.

  9. [Regularity of drugs compatibility of anti-hepatoma traditional Chinese medicine ancient prescriptions and risk evaluation of anti-hepatoma new drug research and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Hong-Fa; Fan, Wei; Liu, Zhen; Man, Shu-Li; Si, Shu-Yong; Gao, Wen-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    Traditional Chinese ancient prescriptions have been used for treatment of liver cancer for a long history and the scientific and rational compatibility is a great wealth for modern research and development (R&D) of new drugs. The research and development of new drugs are often accompanied with a large investment, a long cycle and a high risk, especially for the anti-tumor drugs R&D which are facing more risks and lower successful rate. In this research, the regularity of compatibility of drugs was analyzed from 124 anti-hepatoma ancient prescriptions by computer program. The results can offer help to the R&D of anti-hepatoma new drugs and reduce the risk of drug screening. In addition, we surveyed 22 companies in this field from six provinces such as Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin and so on and obtained 240 risk assessment questionaires. Then we used qualitative analysis method to interpret the greatest impacts for the risks in the process of R&D, production and sales of anti-hepatoma new drugs. The study provides a basis for anti-liver cancer drugs R&D researchers, who can take effective measures to reduce the R&D risks and improve successful rate.

  10. Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: Teaching Drug Marketers How to Inform Better or Spin Better?: Comment on "Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A Content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters"

    OpenAIRE

    Evan Doran

    2016-01-01

    Hyosun Kim’s report "Trouble Spots in Online Direct to Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters" aims to teach marketers how to avoid breaching current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines in their online drug promotion. While Kim hopes to minimise the potential for online promotion to misinform consumers and the study is carefully conducted, teaching drug marketers how to avoid the common mistakes in online drug promotion is more likely to make...

  11. Correction of misleading information in prescription drug television advertising: The roles of advertisement similarity and time delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikin, Kathryn J; Southwell, Brian G; Paquin, Ryan S; Rupert, Douglas J; O'Donoghue, Amie C; Betts, Kevin R; Lee, Philip K

    Prescription drug television advertisements containing potentially consequential misinformation sometimes appear in the United States. When that happens, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration can request that companies distribute corrective advertisements to address misinformation and inaccurate claims. Previous research has demonstrated effectiveness in corrective advertising for various products. The present article builds on that work with a randomized experimental study (n = 6454) of corrective advertising investigating the extent to which visual similarity matters between violative and corrective ads and the extent to which time delay matters between violative and corrective advertisement exposure. Our study sample included overweight or obese U.S. adults recruited from an existing online consumer panel representative of the U.S. adult population. We created a brand for a fictitious prescription weight-loss drug and produced corresponding direct-to-consumer (DTC) television ads. All participants viewed the same violative ad, but were randomly assigned to view corrective ads with different levels of visual similarity and exposure time delay using a 4 × 4 between-subjects factorial design. Results suggest corrective ad exposure can influence consumer perceptions of drug efficacy, risks, and benefits previously established by violative ads that overstated drug efficacy, broadened drug indication, and omitted important risk information. Corrective ads also can weaken consumer intentions to consider and investigate a drug. However, ad similarity does not appear to affect consumer perceptions and preferences. Although we found that the effects of violative ad exposure tend to diminish over time, the length of the delay between violative and corrective ad exposure has limited influence. An exception to this was observed with regard to recall of drug benefits and risks, where the impact of corrective ad exposure increases with greater time delay. These results

  12. 从处方点评中浅析合理用药%Rational Drug Use is Analysed From the Prescription Comment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李楠

    2015-01-01

    目的:通过对该院门诊处方进行点评,查找不合格处方的情况。方法从该院2014年1-12月的5000张门诊处方中,按照处方的规范书写、药品的用法用量、药品配伍禁忌、药品适应症等多个方面进行点评、统计及分析。结果在5000张门诊处方中发现使用抗菌药物的处方1715张,不合理用药处方381张,其中药品用法用量不合理处方128张,药品配伍不合理处方115张,药品适应症不合理处方87张,书写不规范处方51张。结论定期开展处方点评工作,可以确保广大人民群众的用药安全。%Objective Through to review of our hospital outpatient prescription, to find the unqualified prescriptions. Methods From January 2014 to December 5000 outpatient prescriptions, according to the prescription written specification, usage and dosage of the drug, drug compatibility taboo, medicine indications in many ways, such as reviews, statistics and analysis. Results In 5000 found that use of antibacterial drugs in outpatient prescription of the prescription 1715 zhang, unreasonable drug pre-scription 381 zhang, the unreasonable drug usage and dosage prescription 128 zhang, unreasonable prescription drug compatibility 115 pieces, medicine indications unreasonable prescription 87 zhang, writing is not standard prescription 51. Conclusion Carrying out prescription comment on work regularly, can ensure that the people of drug safety.

  13. Unsolicited Reporting to Prescribers of Opioid Analgesics by a State Prescription Drug Monitoring Program: An Observational Study with Matched Comparison Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Leonard D; Kreiner, Peter W; Panas, Lee

    2017-04-04

     State prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) can help detect individuals with multiple provider episodes (MPEs; also referred to as doctor/pharmacy shopping), an indicator of prescription drug abuse and/or diversion. Although unsolicited reporting by PDMPs to prescribers of opioid analgesics is thought to be an important practice in reducing MPEs and the potential harm associated with them, evidence of its effectiveness is mixed. This exploratory research evaluates the impact of unsolicited reports sent by Massachusetts' PDMP to the prescribers of persons with MPEs.  Individuals with MPEs were identified from PDMP records between January 2010 and July 2011 as individuals having Schedule II prescriptions (at least one prescription being an opioid) from four or more distinct prescribers and four or more distinct pharmacies within six months. Based on available MA-PDMP resources, an unsolicited report containing the patient's 12-month prescription history was sent to prescribers of a subset of patients who met the MPE threshold; a comparison group closely matched on demographics and baseline prescription history, whose prescribers were not sent a report, was generated using propensity score matching. The prescription history of each group was examined for 12 months before and after the intervention.  There were eighty-four patients (intervention group) whose prescribers received an unsolicited report and 504 matched patients (comparison group) whose prescribers were not sent a report. Regression analyses indicated significantly greater decreases in the number of Schedule II opioid prescriptions ( P  opioid analgesics from multiple providers.

  14. Seniors' perceptions of prescription drug advertisements: A pilot study of the potential impact on informed decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenard, Jerry L.; Uy, Vsith; Pagán, José A.; Frosch, Dominick L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To conduct a pilot study exploring seniors' perceptions of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs and how the advertisements might prepare them for making informed decisions with their physicians. Methods We interviewed 15 seniors (ages 63-82) individually after they each watched nine prescription drug advertisements recorded from broadcast television. Grounded Theory methods were used to identify core themes related to the research questions. Results Four themes emerged from the interviews about DTCA: (1) awareness of medications was increased, (2) information was missing or misleading and drugs were often perceived as more effective than clinical evidence would suggest, (3) most seniors were more strongly influenced by personal or vicarious experience with a drug – and by their physician – than by DTCA, and (4) most seniors were circumspect about the information in commercial DTCA. Conclusions DTCA may have some limited benefit for informed decision making by seniors, but the advertisements do not provide enough detailed information and some information is misinterpreted. Practical Implications Physicians should be aware that many patients may misunderstand DTCA, and that a certain amount of time may be required during consultations to correct these misconceptions until better advertising methods are employed by the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:21044826

  15. Who are the opinion leaders? The physicians, pharmacists, patients, and direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Annisa Lai

    2010-09-01

    A popular perception holds that physicians prescribe requested drugs to patients influenced by mass mediated direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising. The phenomenon poses a serious challenge to the two-step flow model, which emphasizes the influence of opinion leaders on their followers and their legitimating power over the informing power of the mass media. This study investigates a 2002 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) survey and finds that patients searching for drug information through mass and hybrid media in newspapers and magazines' small print, the Internet, and toll-free numbers are more likely to seek information through interpersonal communication channels like health care providers. Patients using small print, toll-free numbers, one's own physician, and other physicians are associated with influencing their physicians with various drug-requesting behaviors. But physicians only prescribe requested drugs to patients who are influenced by other health care providers, such as pharmacists and other physicians, not the mass media. The influence of expert opinion leaders of drugs is so strong that the patients even would switch from their own unyielding physicians who do not prescribe drugs as advised by the pharmacists. Physicians and patients all are influenced more by other expert opinion leaders of drugs than by the mass media and therefore still uphold the basic tenet of the two-step model.

  16. Examining the Value of Subsidies of Health Plans and Cost-Sharing for Prescription Drugs in the Health Insurance Marketplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngorsuraches, Surachat; Mort, Jane R

    2016-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) initiated federally and state-run health insurance exchanges, or marketplaces, with health plans offering subsidies for plan members as well as coverage for essential health benefits, to help individuals, families, and small businesses find health plans that fit their specific needs. A recent study found that the value of these healthcare subsidies varied with the number of health plans in the different geographic rating areas, but that study only examined the premiums and the deductibles of those health plans. To examine the value of subsidies of health plans, including cost-sharing for prescription drugs in the health insurance marketplace. We have used publicly available health plan data from HealthCare.gov and from county population data obtained from the US Census Bureau in June 2015. The average-weighted premium; medical deductible; medical maximum out-of-pocket spending; and cost-sharing for generic drugs, preferred and nonpreferred brand-name drugs, and specialty drugs were calculated for the second lowest-cost silver plan in each geographic rating area. These were then compared across geographic areas with different numbers of plans to determine the value of the subsidies. We also compared the difference between the cost of the average silver plan and the second lowest-cost silver plan for each area to determine the cost to enrollees if they selected the average silver plan. The monetary value of the subsidies provided by health plans was lower in areas with a larger number of plans, because the second lowest-cost silver plans in these areas tended to have lower premiums and higher deductibles. For the most common type of cost-sharing for generic and for preferred brand-name drugs, plan enrollees would likely have a lower or similar copayment if they selected the average-cost silver plan instead of the second lowest-cost silver plan. However, they may end up paying approximately $8 less in copayment for nonpreferred branded

  17. Patterns of prescription drugs use among pregnant women at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital and Sultan Qaboos University Hospital Family and Community Medicine Clinic, Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Z Al-Hamimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluates the patterns of prescription drugs use among women attending antenatal clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH and SQUH Family and Community Medicine clinic (FAMCO, Oman. Methods: The study was a descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study on pregnant women who attended the antenatal clinic at SQUH and FAMCO from February to April 2014 and received a prescription containing at least one drug. Patients' information was extracted from SQUH electronic records. Results: A total of 105 pregnant women were included in the study. Among the recruited pregnant women, 35 (33.3% had at least one chronic disease. The average number of drugs prescribed per patient per prescription during the period of pregnancy was 2.33 ± 1.43. Vitamins and minerals were the most frequently prescribed class of drugs (30.60% followed by analgesics (11.19% and antidiabetic drugs (10.13%. According to the Food and Drug Administration risk classification, most of the prescribed drugs were from category B (30.0% and C (27.14%. No drug was prescribed from category X. There was a significant decrease in prescribing category A drugs over the three trimesters (20.7%, 12.7%, and 9.3%, respectively (P < 0.047. Conclusion: The study gives an overview of the extent of drug prescription during pregnancy and increases the awareness of health-care providers and women about the potential risks of drug use during pregnancy.

  18. Still the Great Debate – “Fair Balance” in Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertising; Comment on “Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A Content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent L. Rollins

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The above titled paper examined the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s warning letters and notice of violations (NOV over a 10-year period. Findings from this content analysis reinforced what has been the primary issue for prescription direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA since its beginning, the fair balance of risk and benefit information. As opposed to another analysis in 2026 about this still being an issue, is there anything that can be done to prevent this problem from continuing?

  19. Prescription monitoring of management pattern of osteoarthritis with non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs at PUHC, Chandigarh in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnoi M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present prospective study was conducted in order to establish the drug-prescription trend of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs in the management pattern of osteoarthritis at Panjab University Health Centre, Chandigarh, India. The study was carried out in between the months of November 2003 and March 2004. Data was collected from outpatients who visited Panjab University Health Centre. WHO based prescription-auditing performa was used for data collection. Demographic analysis of this prospective and observational study revealed that out of 84 patients most were females (63.1% and maximum patients were in the age group of 40-60 (59.5%. Most of the patients at Panjab University Health Centre had primary generalized Osteoarthritis with the back (50% being the site most commonly affected followed by knee (45.23% and hips (14.3%. Pain and joint stiffness was the common feature of the clinical presentation. Non-Steroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs were mostly prescribed during the observation period predominantly for pain relief. The most commonly prescribed agents were nimesulide, paracetamol, diclofenac and ibuprofen. Mostly the drugs were administered in the tablet form (86.05% with least use of gels/creams and capsules. The use of non-drug therapies including physiotherapy and exercise was least found. The present study represents the current prescribing trend of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs for osteoarthritis at Panjab University Health Centre and it also suggested that there is still considerable scope for improvement, particularly in prescribing non-drug therapies and improving dispensing habits.

  20. Using the theory of planned behavior to examine pharmacists' intention to utilize a prescription drug monitoring program database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Marc L; Barner, Jamie C; Brown, Carolyn M; Shepherd, Marvin D; Strassels, Scott; Novak, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) are state-operated electronic databases that contain patients' controlled drug histories. Most states provide these data to pharmacists via online web portals to combat prescription drug abuse and diversion. The objectives of this study were to: 1) explore the theory of planned behavior's (TPB) utility in predicting Texas pharmacists' intention to utilize an online accessible PDMP; 2) to determine the contribution of each construct, attitude (A), subjective norm (SN) and perceived behavioral control (PBC) in predicting pharmacists' intention; and 3) test whether the addition of perceived obligation (PO) is significantly related to pharmacists' intention. A cross-sectional, 36-item questionnaire was developed from focus groups and literature of pharmacists' views regarding prescription drug abuse. A total of 998 practicing Texas community pharmacists were surveyed to collect data on their intention to utilize a PDMP database. Descriptive statistics, multivariate and hierarchical logistic regression analyses were used to address the study objectives. The response rate was 26.2% (261/998). TPB constructs were significant predictors of pharmacists' high intention to utilize the PDMP. Pharmacists with positive attitudes were almost twice as likely to have high intention (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-2.8). SN was the strongest predictor of pharmacists' high intention (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.4-3.3). Pharmacists with high PBC were also twice as likely to have high intention (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.2-3.0). Additionally, pharmacists' PO contributed to the prediction of high intention (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.0-3.1) above that explained by the TPB model constructs (X(2) = 4.14, P intention to utilize a PDMP database. Interventions that address pharmacists' A, SN, PBC, and PO may be valuable to increase pharmacists' high intention. Pharmacists' utilization of PDMPs may lead to a decrease in the morbidity and

  1. Can gender difference in prescription drug use be explained by gender-related morbidity?: a study on a Swedish population during 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Jessica; Midlöv, Patrik; Borgquist, Lars; Sundquist, Jan; Halling, Anders

    2014-04-08

    It has been reported that there is a difference in drug prescription between males and females. Even after adjustment for multi-morbidity, females tend to use more prescription drugs compared to males. In this study, we wanted to analyse whether the gender difference in drug treatment could be explained by gender-related morbidity. Data was collected on all individuals 20 years and older in the county of Östergötland in Sweden. The Johns Hopkins ACG Case-Mix System was used to calculate individual level of multi-morbidity. A report from the Swedish National Institute of Public Health using the WHO term DALY was the basis for gender-related morbidity. Prescription drugs used to treat diseases that mainly affect females were excluded from the analyses. The odds of having prescription drugs for males, compared to females, increased from 0.45 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44-0.46) to 0.82 (95% CI 0.81-0.83) after exclusion of prescription drugs that are used to treat diseases that mainly affect females. Gender-related morbidity and the use of anti-conception drugs may explain a large part of the difference in prescription drug use between males and females but still there remains a difference between the genders at 18%. This implicates that it is of importance to take the gender-related morbidity into consideration, and to exclude anti-conception drugs, when performing studies regarding difference in drug use between the genders.

  2. Twelve years' experience with direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs in Canada: a cautionary tale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mintzes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA of prescription drugs is illegal in Canada as a health protection measure, but is permitted in the United States. However, in 2000, Canadian policy was changed to allow 'reminder' advertising of prescription drugs. This is a form of advertising that states the brand name without health claims. 'Reminder' advertising is prohibited in the US for drugs that have 'black box' warnings of serious risks. This study examines spending on DTCA in Canada from 1995 to 2006, 12 years spanning this policy shift. We ask how annual per capita spending compares to that in the US, and whether drugs with Canadian or US regulatory safety warnings are advertised to the Canadian public in reminder advertising. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Prescription drug advertising spending data were extracted from a data set on health sector spending in Canada obtained from a market research company, TNS Media Inc. Spending was adjusted for inflation and compared with US spending. Inflation-adjusted spending on branded DTCA in Canada grew from under CAD$2 million per year before 1999 to over $22 million in 2006. The major growth was in broadcast advertising, accounting for 83% of spending in 2006. US annual per capita spending was on average 24 times Canadian levels. Celebrex (celecoxib, which has a US black box and was subject to three safety advisories in Canada, was the most heavily advertised drug on Canadian television in 2005 and 2006. Of 8 brands with >$500,000 spending, which together accounted for 59% of branded DTCA in all media, 6 were subject to Canadian safety advisories, and 4 had US black box warnings. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Branded 'reminder' advertising has grown rapidly in Canada since 2000, mainly due to a growth in television advertising. Although DTCA spending per capita is much lower in Canada than in the US, there is no evidence of safer content or product choice; many heavily-advertised drugs in Canada

  3. Reducing risk for illicit drug use and prescription drug misuse: High school gay-straight alliances and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Nicholas C; Livingston, Nicholas A; Flentje, Annesa; Oost, Kathryn; Stewart, Brandon T; Cochran, Bryan N

    2014-04-01

    Previous research suggests that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are at elevated risk for using illicit drugs and misusing prescription drugs relative to heterosexual youth. Previous research also indicates that LGBT youth who attend high schools with a gay-straight alliance (GSA) report having fewer alcohol problems and lower levels of cigarette smoking. The present study investigates whether the absence of a GSA is associated with risk for illicit drug use and prescription drug misuse in a sample of 475 LGBT high school students (M age=16.79) who completed an online survey. After controlling for demographic variables and risk factors associated with illicit drug use, the results of 12 logistic regression analyses revealed that LGBT youth attending a high school without a GSA evidenced increased risk for using cocaine (adjusted odds ratio [adjOR]=3.11; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]=1.23-7.86), hallucinogens (adjOR=2.59; 95% CI=1.18-5.70), and marijuana (adjOR=2.22; 95% CI=1.37-3.59) relative to peers attending a high school with a GSA. Youth without a GSA also evidenced increased risk for the misuse of ADHD medication (adjOR=2.00; 95% CI=1.02-3.92) and prescription pain medication (adjOR=2.00; 95% CI=1.10-3.65). These findings extend the research base related to GSAs and further demonstrate the importance of providing LGBT youth with opportunities for socialization and support within the school setting. Important limitations of the present study are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Distribution of blood derivatives by registered blood establishments that qualify as health care entities; Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; delay of applicability date. Final rule; delay of applicability date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-13

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is further delaying, until December 1, 2008, the applicability date of a certain requirement of a final rule published in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720) (the final rule). The final rule implements the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). The provisions of the final rule became effective on December 4, 2000, except for certain provisions whose effective or applicability dates were delayed in five subsequent Federal Register notices, until December 1, 2006. The provision with the delayed applicability date would prohibit wholesale distribution of blood derivatives by registered blood establishments that meet the definition of a "health care entity." In the Federal Register of February 1, 2006 (71 FR 5200), FDA published a proposed rule specific to the distribution of blood derivatives by registered blood establishments that qualify as health care entities (the proposed rule). The proposed rule would amend certain limited provisions of the final rule to allow certain registered blood establishments that qualify as health care entities to distribute blood derivatives. In response to the proposed rule, FDA received substantive comments. As explained in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this document, further delaying the applicability of Sec. 203.3(q) (21 CFR 203.3(q)) to the wholesale distribution of blood derivatives by health care entities is necessary to give the agency additional time to address comments on the proposed rule, consider whether regulatory changes are appropriate, and, if so, to initiate such changes.

  5. Do cancer survivors change their prescription drug use for financial reasons? Findings from a nationally representative sample in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiyuan; Han, Xuesong; Guy, Gery P; Davidoff, Amy J; Li, Chunyu; Banegas, Matthew P; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Yabroff, K Robin; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2017-04-15

    There is limited evidence from nationally representative samples about changes in prescription drug use for financial reasons among cancer survivors in the United States. The 2011 to 2014 National Health Interview Survey was used to identify adults who reported ever having been told they had cancer (cancer survivors; n = 8931) and individuals without a cancer history (n = 126,287). Measures of changes in prescription drug use for financial reasons included: 1) skipping medication doses, 2) taking less medicine, 3) delaying filling a prescription, 4) asking a doctor for lower cost medication, 5) buying prescription drugs from another country, and 6) using alternative therapies. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were controlled for demographic characteristics, number of comorbid conditions, interactions between cancer history and number of comorbid conditions, and health insurance coverage. Main analyses were stratified by age (nonelderly, ages 18-64 years; elderly, ages ≥65 years) and time since diagnosis (recently diagnosed, cancer survivors were more likely to report any change in prescription drug use for financial reasons than those without a cancer history (21.4%), with the excess percentage changes for individual measures ranging from 3.5% to 9.9% among previously diagnosed survivors and from 2.6% to 2.7% among recently diagnosed survivors (P cancer survivors and those without a cancer history had comparable rates of changes in prescription drug use for financial reasons. Nonelderly cancer survivors are particularly vulnerable to changes in prescription drug use for financial reasons, suggesting that targeted efforts are needed. Cancer 2017;123:1453-1463. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Prescription Drugs for Children with Special Health Care Needs in Commercial Managed Care: Patterns of Use and Cost, 1999-2001

    OpenAIRE

    Ireys, Henry T.; Jennifer Humensky; Steven Wickstrom; Paula Rheault

    2004-01-01

    Although rapidly rising pharmaceutical costs have contributed to increased health expenditures nationwide, few studies have examined this trend in children with special health care needs. This study used data from two large commercial managed care plans in UnitedHealth Group to examine how many and what kinds of prescription drugs these children used, as well as their costs. The researchers found that children with special health care needs were given many different prescriptions for a wide r...

  7. Impact of an extensive asthma education campaign for physicians on their drug prescription practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Shimemeri Abdullah

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of an extensive education campaign for physicians, in effecting positive changes, in their asthma prescription practice, in line with the ′Saudi protocol for diagnosis and management of asthma′. MATERIALS AND METHODS : An extensive campaign on asthma management for physicians in Saudi Arabia was conducted in 1995-1996, based on the ′Saudi protocol for asthma diagnosis and management′. During this campaign, one day courses-cum-workshops were held in 19 different cities, for over 2500 physicians (8% of all physicians in the kingdom. To evaluate the changes in asthma prescription, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 98 asthmatic patients in 1994 and 100 patients in 1997, attending the outpatient department of two tertiary care hospitals, with over 500 beds, each in Riyadh and Jeddah. Data on demographic profile of the patients, Pulmonary function test and medications prescribed, were analysed and compared between the two groups. RESULTS: The mean age and severity of asthma was similar in both the groups.The prescription rate of inhaled steroids and inhaled beta-agonists increased significantly, with decrease in the use of oral beta-agonists, oral steroids, Theophylline, sodium cromoglycate and ketotifen. Conclusion: The use of inhaled steroids and inhaled beta agonists, considerably improved after the asthma education campaign for physicians in Saudi Arabia. Education campaign for physicians may be effective and could help in the improvement of clinical practice towards a specific disease.

  8. Pharmaceutical penetration of new drug and pharmaceutical market structure in Taiwan: hospital-level prescription of thiazolidinediones for diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Wen; Wen, Yu-Wen; Huang, Weng-Foung; Kuo, Ken N; Chen, Pei-Fen; Shih, Hsin-Wei; Lee, Yue-Chune

    2010-06-01

    This study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance claim database (years 2000-2005) to examine how thiazolidinediones (TZD), a new class of drugs for diabetes, penetrated into Taiwan's hospitals, and its association with the concentration of all diabetes drugs at the hospital level. We collected 72 monthly summaries of diabetes prescriptions from all hospitals in Taiwan. Hospital-level pharmaceutical concentration was measured by penetration of TZD, defined as monthly market share of TZD in each hospital. Concentration of diabetes drugs was measured by Herfindahl-Hirschman indices. We found a negative association (coefficient = -0.3610) between TZD penetration and concentration of diabetes drug but a positive association between penetration of TZD and the volume of prescribed diabetes drugs (coefficient = 0.4088). In conclusion, hospital characteristics and volume of services determined the concentration of pharmaceuticals at the institution level, reflecting the heterogeneous competition between pharmaceutical companies within each hospital. Institution-level pharmaceutical concentration influences the adoption and penetration of new drugs.

  9. Licit prescription drug use in a Swedish population according to age, gender and socioeconomic status after adjusting for level of multi-morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorell, Kristine; Skoog, Jessica; Zielinski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    There is a great variability in licit prescription drug use in the population and among patients. Factors other than purely medical ones have proven to be of importance for the prescribing of licit drugs. For example, individuals with a high age, female gender and low socioeconomic status are mor...

  10. Fair Balance? An Analysis of the Functional Equivalence of Risk and Benefit Information in Prescription Drug Direct-to-Consumer Television Advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird-Harris, Kay

    2009-01-01

    Prescription drug direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) has been a subject of controversy in recent years. Though government regulations require equivalent prominence of risks and benefits, there is concern about the ability of consumers with limited health literacy to fully comprehend the risks and benefits associated with drug use. Evaluating…

  11. PTSD, depression, prescription drug use, and health care utilization of Chinese workers affected by the WTC attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bocanegra, Heike Thiel; Moskalenko, Sophia; Kramer, Elizabeth J

    2006-07-01

    This study assessed the impact of the World Trade Center (WTC) attacks on emotional problems, prescription drug usage, and utilization of medical and mental health services within the Chinese community in lower Manhattan. We administered a survey to 148 randomly selected Chinese workers affected by the WTC attacks in March 2003. Although nearly half of the respondents had elevated PTSD and/or elevated depression scores, only a few (4.4%) had talked to a counselor. However, nearly all (86%) reported having visited a physician at least once since September 11, 2001. Individuals with elevated PTSD scores were significantly more likely to have gone to a physician after 9/11. They were also more likely to have received prescription drugs and to indicate an interest in counseling after 9/11 than individuals with low PTSD scores. The findings highlight the role of the primary care physician as gatekeeper for mental health symptoms after a disaster. They further suggest that primary care physicians should use screening tools for depression and posttraumatic stress after a major disaster and that they should be sensitive to potential emotional problems that are associated with somatic complaints.

  12. 76 FR 1182 - Determination of System Attributes for the Tracking and Tracing of Prescription Drugs; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... consumers from the threats posed by counterfeit drugs. The ability to track and trace finished drug products... the introduction of counterfeit and other substandard drugs. DATES: The public workshop will be held... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Since the formation of the first Counterfeit Drug Task Force in 2003...

  13. An Advance in Prescription Opioid Vaccines: Overdose Mortality Reduction and Extraordinary Alteration of Drug Half-Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimishima, Atsushi; Wenthur, Cody J; Zhou, Bin; Janda, Kim D

    2017-01-20

    Prescription opioids (POs) such as oxycodone and hydrocodone are highly effective medications for pain management, yet they also present a substantial risk for abuse and addiction. The consumption of POs has been escalating worldwide, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths due to overdose each year. Pharmacokinetic strategies based upon vaccination present an attractive avenue to suppress PO abuse. Herein, the preparation of two active PO vaccines is described that were found to elicit high-affinity antiopioid antibodies through a structurally congruent drug-hapten design. Administration of these vaccines resulted in a significant blockade of opioid analgesic activity, along with an unprecedented increase in drug serum half-life and protection against lethal overdose.

  14. Switching of prescription drugs to over-the-counter status: is it a good thing for the elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Sally-Anne; Barnett, Nina; Denham, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Prescription medicines are increasingly being switched to over-the-counter (OTC, nonprescription) status in the developed world, with the support of government policy. These changes may provide greater choice for individuals and offer potential savings in government spending on health while expanding the market for pharmaceutical companies. However, there is concern regarding the safety of these reclassifications. Elderly people are the largest consumers of prescription and OTC medicines and are more vulnerable to drug adverse effects and the risks of multiple or inappropriate medications. Commonly purchased agents such as NSAIDs have recognised adverse effects which have been shown to be more common in the elderly. Furthermore, all sedatives, including antihistamines, have a propensity to cause falls in older people. As many doctors do not ask patients about OTC medicine use, problems related to use of these drugs may go undetected. Furthermore, the increased availability of OTCs may result in a delay in patients consulting medical practitioners for potentially serious conditions, although this has not so far been investigated. In the UK, the recent switch of a low-dose HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) to OTC status has caused concern. Although there might theoretically be some benefits from improved access to medications used in primary and secondary prevention of heart disease, the actual outcomes of use of this reduced dose of the statin will be difficult or impossible for patients or practitioners to monitor. OTC drug use implies a mutual responsibility for communication between patients and health professionals that in practice is not always achieved. Epidemiological research is needed to investigate patterns of OTC use and evaluate the potential risks of OTC medicines in elderly people. Governments, regulatory bodies, professionals and the drug industry have a responsibility to ensure that robust systems are in place if the increased use of OTC medicines

  15. “Give Me Happiness” or “Take Away My Pain”: Explaining consumer responses to prescription drug advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithima Sumpradit

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We examine how consumers react to direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA by investigating the role of goal compatibility between motivation to process advertisements and consumer self-concept. Specifically, we examine the interaction between self-regulatory (prevention versus promotion focus and self-construal orientation (independent versus interdependent and find that prevention (versus promotion focused consumers form stronger intentions to speak with physicians and are more likely to discuss an advertised drug, when the ad uses an interdependence self-construal theme, whereas promotion (versus prevention focused consumers form stronger intentions to speak with physicians and are more likely to discuss an advertised drug, when the ad uses an independent self-construal theme. The above two-way interaction was further found to be governed by attitudes toward DTCA. Under goal compatibility, consumers who had positive or neutral attitudes toward DTCA (versus negative had stronger (a intentions to speak with physicians about the advertised drug, (b stronger intentions to speak with physicians about high cholesterol, (c greater likelihood of discussing the drug with health professionals, and (d greater likelihood of requesting a prescription, yet did not differ in perceptions of drug benefits and risks. Hypotheses were tested on a sample of 197 female staff and retirees (aged 40–80 years at a large university.

  16. Patient Safety in Drug Therapy and the Influence of the Prescription in Dose Errors

    OpenAIRE

    GIMENES, Fernanda Raphael Escobar; Mota,Maria Ludermiller Sabóia; Teixeira,Thalyta Cardoso Alux; Silva,Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Opitz,Simone Perufo; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the redaction of the prescription in dose errors that occurred in general medical units of five Brazilian hospitals and to identify the pharmacological classes involved in these errors. This was a descriptive study that used secondary data obtained from a multicenter study conducted in 2005. The population consisted of 1,425 medication errors and the sample of 215 dose errors. Of these, 44.2% occurred in hospital E. The presence of acronyms and/or abbrev...

  17. Inpatients’ medical prescription errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Melo Santos Silva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify and quantify the most frequent prescription errors in inpatients’ medical prescriptions. Methods: A survey of prescription errors was performed in the inpatients’ medical prescriptions, from July 2008 to May 2009 for eight hours a day. Rresults: At total of 3,931 prescriptions was analyzed and 362 (9.2% prescription errors were found, which involved the healthcare team as a whole. Among the 16 types of errors detected in prescription, the most frequent occurrences were lack of information, such as dose (66 cases, 18.2% and administration route (26 cases, 7.2%; 45 cases (12.4% of wrong transcriptions to the information system; 30 cases (8.3% of duplicate drugs; doses higher than recommended (24 events, 6.6% and 29 cases (8.0% of prescriptions with indication but not specifying allergy. Cconclusion: Medication errors are a reality at hospitals. All healthcare professionals are responsible for the identification and prevention of these errors, each one in his/her own area. The pharmacist is an essential professional in the drug therapy process. All hospital organizations need a pharmacist team responsible for medical prescription analyses before preparation, dispensation and administration of drugs to inpatients. This study showed that the pharmacist improves the inpatient’s safety and success of prescribed therapy.

  18. [Profile of prescription and adequacy of treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Martínez, A; Vidal-Martínez, M; García-Rosa, I; Lázaro-Gómez, M J; Brotons-Román, J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify and describe the prescription profile, as well as to assess the adequacy of treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the diabetic population of a health district. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study aimed at a target population of 2,795 diabetic patients. Data were collected from the computerised clinical records of a sample of 380 individuals. The adequacy of treatment was assessed using the recommendations proposed by the Spanish societies of Rheumatology, Cardiology and Gastroenterology. More than one-quarter (28%) of the diabetic patients received treatment with NSAIDs. The most commonly used ones were ibuprofen, naproxen, and dexketoprofen, with a defined daily dose per 1,000 inhabitants per day of 35.3, 17.2, and 13.2, respectively. In patients with a history of chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular high risk, fewer NSAIDs were prescribed, while they were used most frequently in patients with a risk for gastrointestinal adverse events. The prescription was considered adequate in 46.5% of diabetic patients. The main causes of inappropriate use were the inadequate prescription of NSAIDs (25.2%), and the use of any NSAID other than naproxen (20.6%). The most prescribed NSAIDs were those showing a low cardiovascular risk profile. Treatment with NSAIDs was inadequate in more than half of the patients. Risk factors for cardiovascular, and especially gastrointestinal, events must be considered in order to avoid its use when not indicated, as well as the use of any NSAIDs other than naproxen. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. 76 FR 79194 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Prescription Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed... collection of information to Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630..., Office of Information Management, Food and Drug Administration, 1350 Piccard Dr., PI50-400B,...

  20. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Prescription drug side effects impact emergency services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here' section of MedlinePlus.gov's drug reactions health topic page . A handout on taking multiple medications safely is ... handout' section of MedlinePlus.gov's drug reactions health topic page. MedlinePlus.gov's drug reactions health topic page also ...

  1. Do Prescription Drug Ads Tell Consumers Enough About Benefits and Side Effects? Results From the Health Information National Trends Survey, Fourth Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Helen W; Campbell, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising (DTCA) is a major source of consumer information about prescription drugs. The present study updates 2002 U.S. Food and Drug Administration phone survey questions that found that 44% and 61% of consumers thought that DTCA did not include enough information about benefits and risks, respectively. The present study was administered by mail using a nationally representative sample, and provides a more in-depth understanding of how these beliefs relate to demographic and health characteristics. Data collected from 3,959 respondents to the National Cancer Institute's 2011 Health Information National Trends Survey find results similar to the 2002 survey: 46% and 52% of respondents thought that DCTA did not include enough information about benefits and risks, respectively. Respondents fell into four groups: 23% agreed that DTCA tells enough about drug benefits and risks, 41% disagreed, 18% expressed no opinion, and 18% had discordant beliefs. DTCA attitudes were negatively associated with education, income, and whether respondents purchase prescription drugs; attitudes were positively associated with whether respondents understand prescription drug information. This study confirms that a plurality of Americans believe that DTCA does not include enough information about benefits and risks, suggesting that the educational effect of DTCA could be improved.

  2. FDA regulation mode for advertising of prescription drugs%FDA处方药广告监管方式研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李延敏; 陈蕾; 黄志禄; 白玉萍; 张欣涛; 杨悦

    2012-01-01

    Using method of comparative study, we introduced the development of FDA regulation for prescription drug advertising, the division, financial resource, types and main regulation aspects, as well as Bad Ad Program of FDA. Then we summarized the experience and lesson in order to provide references for improving the regulation mode of dug advertising in our country. These include the rational use of regulation resources for drug advertising, ensuring whether the drug advertising information is easy to understand, and improving the awareness of doctors and the public to drug advertising.%文中运用比较研究法,通过介绍FDA处方药广告监管的发展历程,处方药广告的监管部门、资金来源、处方药广告类型及监管重点,FDA不良广告计划,总结其经验教训,从而为我国药品广告监管方式的完善提供参考,如采取合理利用药品广告监管资源、确保药品广告信息易于理解、提高医药师及公众对药品广告的认识等措施来加强对药品广告的监管.

  3. Patterns of prescription antihypertensive drug utilization and adherence to treatment guidelines in the city of Novi Sad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Ana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Hypertension is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and more than a half of all health insurance expenditures for reimbursed medicines are allocated to antihypertensive drugs in Serbia. The aim of this study was to identify the antihypertensive drug utilization patterns among hypertensive outpatients in the city of Novi Sad, Serbia, determine the adherence to clinical guidelines and address the economic aspects of current prescribing practices. Methods. This retrospective observational study was conducted in Novi Sad over a period of six months. The data on the number of packages, size of packages, and retail price of antihypertensives issued on prescription in outpatients with the diagnosis of essential arterial hypertension was collected from all state-owned pharmacies in Novi Sad. Drug consumption was analyzed using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC/defined daily dose (DDD methodology. Results. Total consumption of antihypertensives issued on prescription over 6 month period in the city of Novi sad, Serbia was 283,48 DDD per 1,000 inhabitans per day (DID. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi were most commonly prescribed drugs, and were used 3 times more often than calcium channel blockers and 5 times more than betablockers. The consumption of diuretics and angiotensin receptor antagonists was low within all groups of outpatients. Both national and international guidelines state superiority and effectiveness of diuretics in treatment of hypertension in the elderly, but their consumption was unreasonable low despite the fact that over 70% of all antihypertensive drugs in the city of Novi Sad were dispensed in people aged > 60. The use of more expensive ACEi was observed, despite the guidelines deeming all the drugs of these class equally effective in treatment of hypertension. Conclusion. Large differences in utilization of different groups of antihypertensive agents were noted

  4. Patterns of prescription antihypertensive drug utilization and adherence to treatment guidelines in the city of Novi Sad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas, Ana; Tomić, Zdenko; Milijasević, Boris; Ban, Milica; Horvat, Olga; Vukmirović, Sasa; Sabo, Ana

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and more than a half of all health insurance expenditures for reimbursed medicines are allocated to antihypertensive drugs in Serbia. The aim of this study was to identify the antihypertensive drug utilization patterns among hypertensive outpatients in the city of Novi Sad, Serbia, determine the adherence to clinical guidelines and address the economic aspects of current prescribing practices. This retrospective observational study was conducted in Novi Sad over a period of six months. The data on the number of packages, size their, and retail price of antihypertensives issued on prescription in outpatients with the diagnosis of essential arterial hypertension was collected from all state-owned pharmacies in Novi Sad. Drug consumption was analyzed using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC)/ defined daily dose (DDD) methodology. Total consumption of antihypertensives issued on prescription over a 6-month period in the city of Novi sad, Serbia was 283.48 DDD per 1,000 inhabitans per day (DID). Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) were most commonly prescribed drugs, and were used 3 times more often than calcium channel blockers and 5 times more than beta-blockers. The consumption of diuretics and angiotensin receptor antagonists was low within all the groups of outpatients. Both national and international guidelines state superiority and effectiveness of diuretics in treatment of hypertension in the elderly, but their consumption was unreasonable low despite the fact that over 70% of all antihypertensive drugs in the city of Novi Sad were dispensed in people aged > 60. The use of more expensive ACEi was observed despite the guidelines deeming all the drugs of this class equally effective in treatment of hypertension. Large differences in utilization of different groups of antihypertensive agents were noted in this study. Underutilization of valuable, efficacious, and

  5. Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: Teaching Drug Marketers How to Inform Better or Spin Better? Comment on "Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A Content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Evan

    2016-02-21

    Hyosun Kim's report "Trouble Spots in Online Direct to Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters" aims to teach marketers how to avoid breaching current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines in their online drug promotion. While Kim hopes to minimise the potential for online promotion to misinform consumers and the study is carefully conducted, teaching drug marketers how to avoid the common mistakes in online drug promotion is more likely to make marketers more adept at spinning information than appropriately balancing it.

  6. Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: Teaching Drug Marketers How to Inform Better or Spin Better?; Comment on “Trouble Spots in Online Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A Content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Doran

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hyosun Kim’s report “Trouble Spots in Online Direct to Consumer Prescription Drug Promotion: A content Analysis of FDA Warning Letters”aims to teach marketers how to avoid breaching current Food and Drug Administration (FDA guidelines in their online drug promotion. While Kim hopes to minimise the potential for online promotion to misinform consumers and the study is carefully conducted, teaching drug marketers how to avoid the common mistakes in online drug promotion is more likely to make marketers more adept at spinning information than appropriately balancing it.

  7. Colleague interactions and new drug prescribing behavior: the case of the initial prescription of antidepressants in Taiwanese medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Jou; Jan, Kuan-An; Kao, Jen-Tse

    2011-10-01

    This research explores the social factors influencing hospital physicians' initial adoption of duloxetine hydrochloride, with a focus on colleague interactions. The study analyzes archival data compiled by the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan to examine how the prescribing decisions made by psychiatrists' colleagues influence the likelihood of the psychiatrists' initial prescription. The results show that the adoption ratio of a physician's colleagues in a medical center is positively associated with the likelihood of a physician's adoption of the new drug. Specifically, colleague groups with similar and longer tenure as well as similar and older age have significantly positive effects. Colleague groups with the same and different gender also have positive effects. In summary, tenure and age, rather than gender, are vital sources of heterogeneous colleague interactions.

  8. Investigating the Impact of Herbal Medicines Marketing Mix and Physicians' Product Involvement on Prescription of these Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Ranjbarian

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the main side effects of chemical medicines have been discovered, the level of using herbal medicines is still low in Iran. Today prescribing herbal medicines along with chemical ones have different kinds of advantages including: increased health rate in society and developed job opportunities in the fields of agriculture, medicine industry and all of related processes. In our country there are few researches in which the important factors influencing the prescription of herbal medicines have been investigated. Thus to fill this gap the main purpose of this paper is to study the impact of marketing mix of herbal medicines and physicians’ involvement about these drugs on prescribing them. Thus to develop this research 253 doctors in Isfahan were evaluated. In order to examine the main hypotheses Spss19, Structural Equation Modeling (SEM and Amos graphic have been used. Results showed that marketing mix and all of its components and also physicians' product Involvement affect prescribing of herbal medicines.

  9. Prescription drug advertising, disease knowledge, and older adults' optimistic bias about the future risk of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Seong; Ju, Ilwoo

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to broaden the scope of knowledge on the role of direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising (DTCA) in the construction of consumers' optimistic bias regarding health issues and their intentions for coping actions. Based on an online survey of U.S. adults aged 65 years or older (N = 622), this study revealed that (a) respondents were optimistically biased in estimating their future risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD); (b) exposure to DTCA for AD medicine related negatively to optimistic bias when respondents had a low level of knowledge about AD, while the relationship disappeared when knowledge was high; (c) optimistic bias was negatively associated with intentions to seek information about AD and professional help to discuss it; and (d) optimistic bias mediated the relationship between the DTCA exposure × AD knowledge interaction and information- and help-seeking intentions. Implications for the theory and practice of DTCA are discussed.

  10. Communication Strategies in Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertising (DTCA): Application of the Six Segment Message Strategy Wheel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Ilwoo; Park, Jin Seong

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses a void in the literature on direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising (DTCA) with a theory-based content analysis. The findings indicate that Taylor's communication strategy wheel provides insight into what and how pharmaceutical marketers communicate with consumers by means of DTCA. Major findings are summarized as follows: (a) In most DTC ads, informational and transformational message themes and creative approaches were simultaneously used, indicating a combination strategy; (b) DTCA message themes were associated with creative strategies in alignment with Taylor's framework; and (c) message themes and creative strategies varied across therapeutic categories and DTCA categories with different levels of ad spending. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  11. 76 FR 29765 - Determination of System Attributes for the Tracking and Tracing of Prescription Drugs; Reopening...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... the Division of Dockets Management (HFA- 305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, rm... possible approaches to developing a track-and-trace system and (2) input from supply chain partners on... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination of System Attributes for the Tracking...

  12. Preventing, Identifying, and Treating Prescription Drug Misuse Among Active-Duty Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-04

    actions, includ- ing courts martial or administrative separation for drug use. Prior to 1981, random drug testing existed but with the primary purpose...Life Course,” Epidemiology Research International, Vol. 2012, January 2012, art . 520894. Paulozzi, Leonard J., Christopher M. Jones, Karin A. Mack

  13. Prescription Drugs: Comparison of DOD, Medicaid, and Medicare Part D Retail Reimbursement Prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    thus GAO could not definitively assign rebates to specific drugs. GAO found that multiple factors affected the net prices paid by each program...sponsor formularies must include all or substantially all drugs in the following six classes of clinical concern as identified by CMS: immunosuppressant

  14. 76 FR 21431 - Medicare Program; Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... Affordable Care Act 1. Cost Sharing for Specified Services at Original Medicare Levels (Sec. 417.454 and Sec... Good Cause and Reinstatement (Sec. 422.74 and Sec. 423.44) 9. Translated Marketing Materials (Sec. 422... for Multi- Ingredient Drug Compounds; Payment for Multi-Ingredient Drug Compounds (Sec. 423.120) 5...

  15. 75 FR 69093 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act; Reopening of the Comment Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; reopening of the comment period. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reopening until October 31, 2011, the comment period... 2011. FDA is reopening the comment period for the expected duration of the public part of the...

  16. A lay prescription for tailor-made drugs--focus group reflections on pharmacogenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn; Traulsen, Janine Morgall

    2005-01-01

    the consequences of the Human Genome Project over the next 40 years, and asked to give advice to politicians and the pharmaceutical industry. A dominating theme in the focus groups was the expectation that drugs developed based on pharmacogenomics will be more expensive than conventional mass produced drugs...

  17. Development of a Web-Based Clinical Decision Support System for Drug Prescription: Non-Interventional Naturalistic Description of the Antipsychotic Prescription Patterns in 4345 Outpatients and Future Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrouiguet, Sofian; Barrigón, Maria Luisa; Brandt, Sara A; Ovejero-García, Santiago; Álvarez-García, Raquel; Carballo, Juan Jose; Lenca, Philippe; Courtet, Philippe; Baca-García, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of electronic prescribing devices with clinical decision support systems (CDSS) is able to significantly improve management pharmacological treatments. We developed a web application available on smartphones in order to help clinicians monitor prescription and further propose CDSS. A web application (www.MEmind.net) was developed to assess patients and collect data regarding gender, age, diagnosis and treatment. We analyzed antipsychotic prescriptions in 4345 patients attended in five Psychiatric Community Mental Health Centers from June 2014 to October 2014. The web-application reported average daily dose prescribed for antipsychotics, prescribed daily dose (PDD), and the PDD to defined daily dose (DDD) ratio. The MEmind web-application reported that antipsychotics were used in 1116 patients out of the total sample, mostly in 486 (44%) patients with schizophrenia related disorders but also in other diagnoses. Second generation antipsychotics (quetiapine, aripiprazole and long-acting paliperidone) were preferably employed. Low doses were more frequently used than high doses. Long acting paliperidone and ziprasidone however, were the only two antipsychotics used at excessive dosing. Antipsychotic polypharmacy was used in 287 (26%) patients with classic depot drugs, clotiapine, amisulpride and clozapine. In this study we describe the first step of the development of a web application that is able to make polypharmacy, high dose usage and off label usage of antipsychotics visible to clinicians. Current development of the MEmind web application may help to improve prescription security via momentary feedback of prescription and clinical decision support system.

  18. Development of a Web-Based Clinical Decision Support System for Drug Prescription: Non-Interventional Naturalistic Description of the Antipsychotic Prescription Patterns in 4345 Outpatients and Future Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrouiguet, Sofian; Barrigón, Maria Luisa; Brandt, Sara A.; Ovejero-García, Santiago; Álvarez-García, Raquel; Carballo, Juan Jose; Lenca, Philippe; Courtet, Philippe; Baca-García, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The emergence of electronic prescribing devices with clinical decision support systems (CDSS) is able to significantly improve management pharmacological treatments. We developed a web application available on smartphones in order to help clinicians monitor prescription and further propose CDSS. Method A web application (www.MEmind.net) was developed to assess patients and collect data regarding gender, age, diagnosis and treatment. We analyzed antipsychotic prescriptions in 4345 patients attended in five Psychiatric Community Mental Health Centers from June 2014 to October 2014. The web-application reported average daily dose prescribed for antipsychotics, prescribed daily dose (PDD), and the PDD to defined daily dose (DDD) ratio. Results The MEmind web-application reported that antipsychotics were used in 1116 patients out of the total sample, mostly in 486 (44%) patients with schizophrenia related disorders but also in other diagnoses. Second generation antipsychotics (quetiapine, aripiprazole and long-acting paliperidone) were preferably employed. Low doses were more frequently used than high doses. Long acting paliperidone and ziprasidone however, were the only two antipsychotics used at excessive dosing. Antipsychotic polypharmacy was used in 287 (26%) patients with classic depot drugs, clotiapine, amisulpride and clozapine. Conclusions In this study we describe the first step of the development of a web application that is able to make polypharmacy, high dose usage and off label usage of antipsychotics visible to clinicians. Current development of the MEmind web application may help to improve prescription security via momentary feedback of prescription and clinical decision support system. PMID:27764107

  19. Impact of Animated Spokes-Characters in Print Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertising: An Elaboration Likelihood Model Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutada, Nilesh S; Rollins, Brent L; Perri, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    A randomized, posttest-only online survey study of adult U.S. consumers determined the advertising effectiveness (attitude toward ad, brand, company, spokes-characters, attention paid to the ad, drug inquiry intention, and perceived product risk) of animated spokes-characters in print direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising of prescription drugs and the moderating effects of consumers' involvement. Consumers' responses (n = 490) were recorded for animated versus nonanimated (human) spokes-characters in a fictitious DTC ad. Guided by the elaboration likelihood model, data were analyzed using a 2 (spokes-character type: animated/human) × 2 (involvement: high/low) factorial multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). The MANCOVA indicated significant main effects of spokes-character type and involvement on the dependent variables after controlling for covariate effects. Of the several ad effectiveness variables, consumers only differed on their attitude toward the spokes-characters between the two spokes-character types (specifically, more favorable attitudes toward the human spokes-character). Apart from perceived product risk, high-involvement consumers reacted more favorably to the remaining ad effectiveness variables compared to the low-involvement consumers, and exhibited significantly stronger drug inquiry intentions during their next doctor visit. Further, the moderating effect of consumers' involvement was not observed (nonsignificant interaction effect between spokes-character type and involvement).

  20. Effects of comparative claims in prescription drug direct-to-consumer advertising on consumer perceptions and recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Amie C; Williams, Pamela A; Sullivan, Helen W; Boudewyns, Vanessa; Squire, Claudia; Willoughby, Jessica Fitts

    2014-11-01

    Although pharmaceutical companies cannot make comparative claims in direct-to-consumer (DTC) ads for prescription drugs without substantial evidence, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration permits some comparisons based on labeled attributes of the drug, such as dosing. Researchers have examined comparative advertising for packaged goods; however, scant research has examined comparative DTC advertising. We conducted two studies to determine if comparative claims in DTC ads influence consumers' perceptions and recall of drug information. In Experiment 1, participants with osteoarthritis (n=1934) viewed a fictitious print or video DTC ad that had no comparative claim or made an efficacy comparison to a named or unnamed competitor. Participants who viewed print (but not video) ads with named competitors had greater efficacy and lower risk perceptions than participants who viewed unnamed competitor and noncomparative ads. In Experiment 2, participants with high cholesterol or high body mass index (n=5317) viewed a fictitious print or video DTC ad that had no comparative claim or made a comparison to a named or unnamed competitor. We varied the type of comparison (of indication, dosing, or mechanism of action) and whether the comparison was accompanied by a visual depiction. Participants who viewed print and video ads with named competitors had greater efficacy perceptions than participants who viewed unnamed competitor and noncomparative ads. Unlike Experiment 1, named competitors in print ads resulted in higher risk perceptions than unnamed competitors. In video ads, participants who saw an indication comparison had greater benefit recall than participants who saw dosing or mechanism of action comparisons. In addition, visual depictions of the comparison decreased risk recall for video ads. Overall, the results suggest that comparative claims in DTC ads could mislead consumers about a drug's efficacy and risk; therefore, caution should be used when presenting

  1. The cost-effectiveness of direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherly, Adam; Rubin, Paul H

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we use published information to analyze the economic value of Direct to Consumer Advertising (DTCA). The reviewed research finds that DTCA leads to increased demand for the advertised drug and that the effect of the drug tends to be class-wide rather than product specific. There is weak evidence that DTCA may increase compliance and improve clinical outcomes. However, there is little research on the effect of DTCA on inappropriate prescribing or on the characteristics of patients who respond to treatment. On net, if the advertised drugs are cost effective on average and the patients using the drugs in response to the advertisement are similar to other users, DTCA is likely cost effective. Overall, the literature to date is consistent with the idea that DTCA is beneficial, but further research is needed before definitive conclusions can be drawn.

  2. Rational prescription of drugs within similar therapeutic or structural class for gastrointestinal disease treatment: Drug metabolism and its related interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To review and summarize drug metabolism and its related interactions in prescribing drugs within the similar therapeutic or structural class for gastrointestinal disease treatment so as to promote rational use of medicines in clinical practice.METHODS: Relevant literature was identified by performing MEDLINE/Pubmed searches covering the period from 1988 to 2006. RESULTS: Seven classes of drugs were chosen, including gastric proton pump inhibitors, histamine H2-receptor antagonists, benzamide-type gastroprokinetic agents, selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, fluoroquinolones, macrolide antibiotics and azole antifungals. They showed significant differences in metabolic profile (I.e., the fraction of drug metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP), CYP reaction phenotype, impact of CYP genotype on interindividual pharmacokinetics variability and CYP-mediated drug-drug interaction potential). Many events of severe adverse drug reactions and treatment failures were closely related to the ignorance of the above issues. CONCLUSION: Clinicians should acquaint themselves with what kind of drug has less interpatient variability in clearance and whether to perform CYP genotyping prior to initiation of therapy. The relevant CYP knowledge helps clinicians to enhance the management of patients with gastrointestinal disease who may require treatment with polytherapeutic regimens.

  3. Trends in oral anti-osteoporosis drug prescription in the United Kingdom between 1990 and 2012 : Variation by age, sex, geographic location and ethnicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, R Y; Wyers, C E; Teesselink, E; Geusens, P P M M; van den Bergh, J P W; de Vries, F; Cooper, C; Harvey, N C; van Staa, T P

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Given the expected increase in the number of patients with osteoporosis and fragility fractures it is important to have concise information on trends in prescription rates of anti-osteoporosis drugs (AOD). METHODS: We undertook a retrospective observational study using the UK Clinical

  4. Application of Hospital Information System in Optimizing the Prescription of Anesthetic Drugs%HIS系统在优化麻醉药品处方的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴淑萍; 颜勤明

    2016-01-01

    手写麻醉药品处方存在合格率低、书写耗费时间长的缺点。利用HIS系统完成麻醉药品处方电子化,使麻醉药品处方开具比手工书写快,并可避免差错;麻醉处方的错方情况明显减少,工作效率提高,导出数据后加以筛选,加强了对麻醉药品合理使用管理。%Handwritten prescription of anesthetic drugs is time-consuming and has low qualified rate. After the application of Hospital Information System (HIS) in electronic prescription of anesthetic drugs, the speed of writing a prescription was faster and more mistakes were avoided; the error rate of prescription of anesthetic drugs was reduced significantly, the work efficiency was improved. The function of exporting data and screening after exporting strengthened the management of rational use of anesthetic drugs.

  5. Characterization of Adolescent Prescription Drug Abuse and Misuse Using the Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS[R]) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zosel, Amy; Bartelson, Becki Bucher; Bailey, Elise; Lowenstein, Steven; Dart, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the characteristics and health effects of adolescent (age 13-19 years) prescription drug abuse and misuse using the Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS[R])) System. Method: Secondary analysis of data collected from RADARS System participating poison centers was performed. Data for all…

  6. The rabbit in the hat: dubious argumentation and the persuasive effects of prescription drug advertising (DTCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinelli, Sara; Nakamoto, Kent; Schulz, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    There is an ongoing global debate over the potential benefits and risks of allowing direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription medicines (DTCA). The core of this debate concerns the identification of DTCA either as a beneficial procedure to be promoted or as a damaging procedure to be abolished. Economic data on DTCA suggest that this form of advertising has an impact on consumers. Based on this premise, we explore the use of argumentation theory to inquire into the reasons for this success. In particular, by combining perspectives from argumentation theory and marketing research this paper aims to test the hypothesis of whether DTCA presents information framed in potentially misleading, but persuasive, argumentative structures. We highlight and discuss the results of two studies designed to assess whether readers perceive DTCA as argumentative and, if so, which explicit and implicit elements provide groundings for the inference that consumers draw from the ads. The analysis highlights the presence in DTCA of dubious arguments (fallacies and distracting claims) that may go unnoticed. Also, it illustrates the nature of readers' wrong assumptions that arise independently from the contents of the ads. These factors seem to influence the level of the self-perceived persuasiveness of DTCA.

  7. Long-term, high-dose benzodiazepine prescriptions in veteran patients with PTSD: influence of preexisting alcoholism and drug-abuse diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermos, John A; Young, Melissa M; Lawler, Elizabeth V; Rosenbloom, David; Fiore, Louis D

    2007-10-01

    Databases from the New England Veterans Integrated Service Network were analyzed to determine factors associated with long-term, high-dose anxiolytic benzodiazepine prescriptions dispensed to patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and existing alcoholism and/or drug abuse diagnoses. Among 2,183 PTSD patients, 234 received the highest 10% average daily doses for alprazolam, clonazepam, diazepam, or lorazepam, doses above those typically recommended. Highest doses were more commonly prescribed to patients with existing drug abuse diagnoses. Among patients with PTSD and alcoholism, younger age, drug abuse, and concurrent prescriptions for another benzodiazepine and oxycodone/acetaminophen independently predicted high doses. Results indicate that for veteran patients with PTSD, alcoholism alone is not associated with high-dose benzodiazepines, but existing drug abuse diagnoses do increase that risk.

  8. Utilización de fármacos para la osteoporosis Drugs prescription for osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Erviti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio es analizar la evolución del uso global y relativo de fármacos indicados en la osteoporosis durante el periodo comprendido entre 1998 y 2002 en Navarra y su adecuación a las evidencias actuales, haciendo referencia a las diferencias del perfil de prescripción en atención primaria y especializada. Para ello se explota la información de todas las recetas prescritas dentro del Sistema Nacional de Salud en las que se indica alguno de estos fármacos, dispensadas en oficinas de farmacia de Navarra y facturadas al Servicio Navarro de Salud-Osasunbidea (SNS-O. El perfil de utilización de fármacos en la osteoporosis difiere significativamente según el tipo de especialista que prescribe. Sería conveniente homogeneizar el abordaje de la prevención de fracturas óseas. En el periodo en estudio el uso de fármacos en Navarra aumentó en un 85,6% en número de dosis/1.000 habitantes/día. El uso relativo de terapia hormonal sustitutiva disminuye de forma constante, el empleo de calcitoninas es sostenido, experimentando un perfil cíclico con picos en invierno y valles en verano, mientras que los bifosfonatos y raloxifeno tienden al aumento de uso relativo. Sería deseable evaluar los resultados en salud de la utilización de estos fármacos en la práctica clínica dados los discretos resultados de eficacia que se obtienen en los ensayos clínicos. Se debería fomentar más el uso de calcio por su potencial en la prevención de fracturas de cadera frente al resto de alternativas farmacológicas. El uso relativo de raloxifeno y calcitoninas parece excesivo.The aim of this study is to analyse the evolution of the global and relative use of medicines recommended for osteoporosis during the period between 1998 and 2002 in Navarra, and their adaptation to present evidence, making reference to the differences in the prescription profile in primary and specialised care. To this end, information is used from all the

  9. Consumers' Understanding of FDA Approval Requirements and Composite Scores in Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Print Ads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Amie C; Sullivan, Helen W; Williams, Pamela A; Squire, Claudia; Betts, Kevin R; Fitts Willoughby, Jessica; Parvanta, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    In 2 studies, we investigated how laypersons perceive the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval process, FDA authority, and the presentation of composite scores in direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug print ads. The 1st study consisted of 4 focus groups (N = 38) in 2 cities. Using a semi-structured guide, a moderator led participants through the viewing of 3 existing DTC print ads that differed in the presence or absence of composite score information, and participants discussed their views of the ads and their understanding of composite scores. The 2nd study surveyed a nationally representative sample of 1,629 individuals from the general population who saw a fictitious DTC print ad and answered closed-ended questions about the same topics. Results showed that knowledge of FDA approval and authority was mixed, with several misconceptions apparent. Many consumers were not familiar with the use of composite scores in a medical context or in advertising and, in the 1st study, expressed distrust of the product and the ad after learning about how composite scores are used. In the 2nd study, receiving composite score information changed the perceived clarity of the ad but not the perceived risk or benefits. Implications for the presentation of complex medical information are discussed.

  10. 42 CFR 423.464 - Coordination of benefits with other providers of prescription drug coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... fees. CMS may impose user fees on Part D plans for the transmittal of information necessary for benefit...) Provides supplemental drug coverage to individuals based on financial need, age, or medical condition, and... effective exchange of information and coordination between such plan and SPAPs and entities providing...

  11. 78 FR 9589 - Disclosures To Participate in State Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... substance'' as a substance identified by United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) regulations (21... Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning the sharing of certain patient information in order... through http://www.regulations.gov ; by mail or hand-delivery to Director, Regulations Management (02REG...

  12. 76 FR 63017 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare Prescription Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ..., Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20201. (Because access to the.... 422.100 and Sec. 422.111) a. Access to Preferred DME Items and Supplies b. Medical Necessity.... 423.458) 11. Access to Covered Part D Drugs Through Use of Standardized Technology and...

  13. How Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage Works with a Medicare Advantage Plan or Medicare Cost Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plans . Medicare drug plans are run by insurance companies and other private companies approved by Medicare. Each plan can vary in ... Plan (PDP). • Medicare HMO Plans —You must use network providers for ... or call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213. TTY users ...

  14. 21 CFR 250.108 - Potassium permanganate preparations as prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... women resulting from the misuse of potassium permanganate in an effort to induce abortion. Reports from... potassium permanganate is not effective in producing abortion, but that instead the drug produces serious...) In view of the very real potentiality for harmful effect, and the actual injuries caused by...

  15. Hypotensive effects of hawthorn for patients with diabetes taking prescription drugs: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ann F; Marakis, Georgios; Simpson, Eleanor; Hope, Jessica L; Robinson, Paul A; Hassanein, Mohamed; Simpson, Hugh C R

    2006-06-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata) leaves, flowers and berries are used by herbal practitioners in the UK to treat hypertension in conjunction with prescribed drugs. Small-scale human studies support this approach. To investigate the effects of hawthorn for hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes taking prescribed drugs. Randomised controlled trial. General practices in Reading, UK. Patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 79) were randomised to daily 1200 mg hawthorn extract (n = 39) or placebo (n = 40) for 16 weeks. At baseline and outcome a wellbeing questionnaire was completed and blood pressure and fasting blood samples taken. A food frequency questionnaire estimated nutrient intake. Hypotensive drugs were used by 71% of the study population with a mean intake of 4.4 hypoglycaemic and/or hypotensive drugs. Fat intake was lower and sugar intake higher than recommendations, and low micronutrient intake was prevalent. There was a significant group difference in mean diastolic blood pressure reductions (P = 0.035): the hawthorn group showed greater reductions (baseline: 85.6 mmHg, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 83.3 to 87.8; outcome: 83.0 mmHg, 95% CI = 80.5 to 85.7) than the placebo group (baseline: 84.5 mmHg, 95% CI = 82 to 87; outcome: 85.0 mmHg, 95% CI = 82.2 to 87.8). There was no group difference in systolic blood pressure reduction from baseline (3.6 and 0.8 mmHg for hawthorn and placebo groups, respectively; P = 0.329). Although mean fat intake met current recommendations, mean sugar intake was higher and there were indications of potential multiple micronutrient deficiencies. No herb-drug interaction was found and minor health complaints were reduced from baseline in both groups. This is the first randomised controlled trial to demonstrate a hypotensive effect of hawthorn in patients with diabetes taking medication.

  16. Heterogeneity in Choice Inconsistencies Among the Elderly: Evidence from Prescription Drug Plan Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaluck, Jason; Gruber, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the degree to which choice inconsistencies documented in the context of Medicare Part D plan choice vary across consumers and geographic regions. Our main finding is that there is surprisingly little variation: regardless of age, gender, predicted drug expenditures or the predictability of drug demand consumers underweight out of pocket costs relative to premiums and fail to consider the individualized consequences of plan characteristics; as a result, they frequently choose plans which are dominated in the sense that an alternative plan provides better risk protection at a lower cost. We find limited evidence that the sickest individuals had more difficulty with plan choice, and we document that much of the variation in potential cost savings across states comes from variation in choice sets, not variation in consumers’ ability to choose. PMID:25663708

  17. In search of a corrected prescription drug elasticity estimate: a meta-regression approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmill, Marin C; Costa-Font, Joan; McGuire, Alistair

    2007-06-01

    An understanding of the relationship between cost sharing and drug consumption depends on consistent and unbiased price elasticity estimates. However, there is wide heterogeneity among studies, which constrains the applicability of elasticity estimates for empirical purposes and policy simulation. This paper attempts to provide a corrected measure of the drug price elasticity by employing meta-regression analysis (MRA). The results indicate that the elasticity estimates are significantly different from zero, and the corrected elasticity is -0.209 when the results are made robust to heteroskedasticity and clustering of observations. Elasticity values are higher when the study was published in an economic journal, when the study employed a greater number of observations, and when the study used aggregate data. Elasticity estimates are lower when the institutional setting was a tax-based health insurance system.

  18. Pharmacy benefit managers and their obligations during serious prescription drug shortages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teagarden, J R; Epstein, R S

    2013-02-01

    Pharmacy benefit managers are connected to some 215 million Americans and to every prescribing physician and retail pharmacy in the United States. Many of them have their own large and sophisticated dispensing operations. These capabilities could be put to use when drug shortages threaten life. Indeed, these capabilities are such that they confer obligations on pharmacy benefit managers to address such shortages--not only on behalf of their clients but for society in general.

  19. The use of nationwide on-line prescription records improves the drug history in hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Poulsen, Henrik E; Dalhoff, Kim P

    2008-01-01

    What is already known about this subject: Structured medication interviews improve the medication history upon hospitalization. Pharmacy records are valid lists of the prescribed medications available to individual patients. In Denmark, treating doctors now have access to their patients' pharmacy...... records through a real-time online electronic database What this study adds: Omission errors are frequent among hospitalized patients despite structured drug interviews and home visits. Pharmacy records may be used to minimize patients' recall bias and improve the medication lists....

  20. Variation in Prescription Drug Coverage for Triptans: Analysis of Insurance Formularies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minen, Mia T; Lindberg, Kate; Langford, Aisha; Loder, Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    To analyze triptan coverage by insurers to examine (1) possible disparities in coverage for different formulations (oral, intranasal, etc) and (2) quantity limits and stepped care requirements to obtain triptans. Triptans are FDA approved migraine abortive medications. Patients frequently state that they have difficulty accessing triptans prescribed to them. We searched the 2015 drug formularies of commercial and government health insurers providing coverage in NY State. We created a spreadsheet with all of the commercially available triptans and included information about covered formulations, tier numbers and quantity limits for each drug. We then calculated the number of listed plans that cover or do not cover each triptan or triptan formulation, the total number of medications not covered by an insurance provided across all of its plans, as well as the percentage of plans offered by individual companies and across all companies that covered each drug. We also calculated the number and proportion of plans that imposed quantity limits or step therapy for each drug. Of the 100 formularies searched, generic sumatriptan (all formulations), naratriptan, and zolmitriptan tablets were covered by all plans, and rizatriptan tablets and ODTs were covered by 98% of plans. Brand triptans were less likely to be covered: 4/36 Medicaid plans covered brand triptans. Commercial insurers were more likely to cover brand triptans. All plans imposed quantity limits on 1+ triptan formulations, with >80% imposing quantity limits on 14/19 formulations studied. Almost all plans used tiers for cost allocation for different medications. Generic triptans were almost always in Tier 1. Brand triptans were most commonly in Tier 3. Approximately 40% of brand triptans required step therapy, compared with 11% of generic triptans. There are substantial variations in coverage and quantity limits and a high degree of complexity in triptan coverage for both government and commercial plans. © 2017

  1. The use of nationwide on-line prescription records improves the drug history in hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Poulsen, Henrik E; Dalhoff, Kim P

    2008-01-01

    records through a real-time online electronic database What this study adds: Omission errors are frequent among hospitalized patients despite structured drug interviews and home visits. Pharmacy records may be used to minimize patients' recall bias and improve the medication lists.......What is already known about this subject: Structured medication interviews improve the medication history upon hospitalization. Pharmacy records are valid lists of the prescribed medications available to individual patients. In Denmark, treating doctors now have access to their patients' pharmacy...

  2. The Landscape of Private Firms Offering Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage in 2006.

    OpenAIRE

    Marsha Gold

    2006-01-01

    This issue brief describes organizations offering the new Medicare drug benefit and analyzes how companies are positioning themselves to attract enrollees. It notes that 7 of the 10 organizations that sponsor stand-alone PDPs nationwide are based in commercial insurance firms with substantial Medicare Advantage experience; 3 of the 10 firms are in the pharmacy benefit management and service sector. Nine organizations offered a Medicare-endorsed discount card in 2004 and 2005, or partnered wit...

  3. Off-label drugs prescription in neonatology: a physician's duty or a medical hazardous attitude?

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Aloja, Ernesto; Paribello, Francesco; Demontis, Roberto; Müller, Mima

    2011-10-01

    The off-label and unlicensed use of drugs in neonatology is a widespread reality in all the NICUs. Several explanations may be given to justify the extension of this phenomenon and, among them, the lack of ad hoc clinical trials in neonatal subpopulation and the freedom to cure worldwide recognized to relatives and physicians. It is well known that adverse effects are more frequent, more serious and more underreported when medicines are used unauthorized or off-label, being physicians in theory responsible for the newborn physical damage. To avoid this responsibility, we believe that a shared legal framework may be helpful where the informative process on risks/benefits ratio for the newborn has a pivotal role. The National and International Scientific Societies should promote a common guidelines also for the informations on drug effects to be supplied to relatives. But at the same time EMA has to implement its strong policy towards the mandatory request on trials, for every new drug, on specific neonatal and pediatric subpopulations.

  4. Serious and actionable risks, plus disclosure: Investigating an alternative approach for presenting risk information in prescription drug television advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Kevin R; Boudewyns, Vanessa; Aikin, Kathryn J; Squire, Claudia; Dolina, Suzanne; Hayes, Jennifer J; Southwell, Brian G

    2017-08-02

    Broadcast direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug ads that present product claims are required to also present the product's major risks. Debate exists regarding how much information should be included in these major risk statements. Some argue that such statements expose people to unnecessary amounts of information, while others argue that they leave out important information. Examine the impact of type of risk statement (unedited versus serious and actionable risks only) and a disclosure indicating that not all risks are presented on consumers' ability to remember the important risks and benefits of a drug following exposure to a DTC television advertisement (ad). Risk and benefit perceptions, ad-prompted actions, recognition of the disclosure statement, and evaluations of both the disclosure and risk statement were also examined. A web-based experiment was conducted in which US adults who self-reported as having depression (N = 500), insomnia (N = 500), or high cholesterol (N = 500) were randomly assigned to view one of four versions of the television ad, and then complete a questionnaire. The type of risk statement had a significant effect on risk recall and recognition, benefit recognition, perceived risk severity (depression condition only), and perceived benefit magnitude (high cholesterol condition only). Disclosure recognition (using bias-corrected scores) ranged from 63% to 70% across the three illness samples. The revised risk statement improved overall processing of the television ad, as evidenced by improved risk recall and recognition and improved benefit recognition. Further, the presence of the disclosure did not adversely affect consumers' processing of drug risk and benefit information. Therefore, limiting the risks presented in DTC television ads and including a disclosure alerting consumers that not all risks are presented may be an effective strategy for communicating product risks. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. 76 FR 11794 - Drugs for Human Use; Unapproved and Misbranded Oral Drugs Labeled for Prescription Use and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... includes other brands, potencies, dosage forms, salts, and esters of the same drug moiety as well as of any..., sustaining the intended effect over the entire dosing interval. Firms submitting applications are required...

  6. The role of Health Insurance Companies in optimising drug prescription in Primary Care; The example of acid suppressing drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    The use of Acid-suppressing drugs (ASDs) in the Netherlands increases more than 10% annually and of the Dutch population 3.5% uses ASD on a daily basis. However, indications for long term use of ASDs for gastrointestinal complaints are often not evidence based and many patients might be able to stop

  7. The role of Health Insurance Companies in optimising drug prescription in Primary Care; The example of acid suppressing drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    The use of Acid-suppressing drugs (ASDs) in the Netherlands increases more than 10% annually and of the Dutch population 3.5% uses ASD on a daily basis. However, indications for long term use of ASDs for gastrointestinal complaints are often not evidence based and many patients might be able to stop

  8. 21 CFR 1306.08 - Electronic prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic prescriptions. 1306.08 Section 1306.08 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRESCRIPTIONS General Information... part 1311 of this chapter. (b) A pharmacy may fill an electronically transmitted prescription for a...

  9. Disagreements with implications: diverging discourses on the ethics of non-medical use of methylphenidate for performance enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Racine Eric

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is substantial evidence that methylphenidate (MPH; Ritalin, is being used by healthy university students for non-medical motives such as the improvement of concentration, alertness, and academic performance. The scope and potential consequences of the non-medical use of MPH upon healthcare and society bring about many points of view. Methods To gain insight into key ethical and social issues on the non-medical use of MPH, we examined discourses in the print media, bioethics literature, and public health literature. Results Our study identified three diverging paradigms with varying perspectives on the nature of performance enhancement. The beneficial effects of MPH on normal cognition were generally portrayed enthusiastically in the print media and bioethics discourses but supported by scant information on associated risks. Overall, we found a variety of perspectives regarding ethical, legal and social issues related to the non-medical use of MPH for performance enhancement and its impact upon social practices and institutions. The exception to this was public health discourse which took a strong stance against the non-medical use of MPH typically viewed as a form of prescription abuse or misuse. Wide-ranging recommendations for prevention of further non-medical use of MPH included legislation and increased public education. Conclusion Some positive portrayals of the non-medical use of MPH for performance enhancement in the print media and bioethics discourses could entice further uses. Medicine and society need to prepare for more prevalent non-medical uses of neuropharmaceuticals by fostering better informed public debates.

  10. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug prescriptions in hospital inpatients: are we assessing the risks?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kitchen, J

    2012-02-01

    AIM: To determine non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) prescribing practices in a tertiary referral hospital. METHODS: A single time-point audit of drug kardexes and clinical notes of n = 388 patients on 2 July 2008 was carried out assessing demographics, gastrointestinal and coronary heart disease risk factors, renal function and co-prescribed medications. RESULTS: Fifty-seven of 388 (14.7%) hospital patients were on NSAIDs. Forty-nine were prescribed NSAID after admission. Nineteen (32.2%) were on regular NSAID (11\\/19 on PPI) and 38 patients were on PRN NSAID (12\\/38 on PPI). Seventeen of 49 patients were on other medications associated with gastrointestinal bleeding (10\\/17 were on PPI). Nineteen patients (33.3%) were >60 years. Eight patients had three or four risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding; six were on PPI. Thirteen patients had two risks; 7 were on PPI. Six of 19 patients with one risk factor were on PPI. 40.3% had stage 2\\/3 chronic kidney disease. 35.1% had ischaemic heart disease. CONCLUSIONS: NSAIDs and PPIs are often prescribed inappropriately.

  11. Health Costs and Outcomes Associated with Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Cost-Sharing in Beneficiaries on Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Haesuk; Rascati, Karen L; Lawson, Kenneth A; Barner, Jamie C; Richards, Kristin M; Malone, Daniel C

    2015-10-01

    High out-of-pocket costs for prescription medications have been associated with poor patient outcomes. A previous study found that the Part D coverage gap was significantly associated with decreases in adherence and persistence for medications frequently used in patients undergoing dialysis. It is not known what effect the decreased use of prescription drugs associated with the coverage gap had on utilization and spending for other medical care.  To determine the relationship between the Part D prescription drug cost-sharing structure and health and economic outcomes in Medicare beneficiaries on dialysis. A retrospective analysis using data from the United States Renal Data System (2006-2008) was conducted for Medicare-eligible patients receiving dialysis. Patients were grouped in 1 of 4 cohorts based on low-income subsidy (LIS) receipt and benefit phase in 2007: Cohort 1 (non-LIS and did not reach the coverage gap); Cohort 2 (non-LIS and reached the coverage gap); Cohort 3 (non-LIS and reached catastrophic coverage after the gap); and Cohort 4 (received an LIS, and none of the LIS patients reached the coverage gap). Outcomes included medical care utilization, direct medical costs, and mortality.  A total of 11,732 subjects met the inclusion criteria. Patients in Cohorts 1, 2, and 3 had $3,222 lower, $2,457 lower, and $1,182 higher adjusted pharmacy costs (P  less than  0.001), but their adjusted hospitalization costs were $1,499 (P = 0.09), $2,287 (P = 0.01), and $2,959 (P = 0.01) higher, respectively, compared with Cohort 4 (LIS). In the propensity score-matched cohorts, patients who reached the coverage gap (Cohort 2) had higher rates of hospitalization (relative risk [RR] = 1.02, 95% CI = 0.94-1.10), outpatient visits (RR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.08-1.25), and other visits (RR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03-1.32) compared with those who had an LIS (Cohort 4). Patients in Cohort 3 had a higher rate of outpatient visits compared with

  12. A systematic review of reference pricing: implications for US prescription drug spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joy Li-Yueh; Fischer, Micahel A; Shrank, William H; Polinski, Jennifer M; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2012-11-01

    Given rising pharmaceutical expenditures and the widespread use of reference pricing as a costcontainment instrument abroad, we systematically reviewed the evidence evaluating reference pricing policies. We performed a structured electronic search of peer-reviewed journals for studies published before that reported on the effects of reference pricing policies on medication use, payer and patient spending, and resource consumption. Our search yielded 16 studies describing 9 reference-pricing policies from 6 countries. Reference-pricing policies led to decreases in drug prices and increases in utilization of targeted medications, while also reducing payer and patient expenditures. In addition, these policies did not lead to increased use of medical services, such as physician office visits and hospitalization. These results suggest that reference pricing may be an attractive policy strategy for the US healthcare system.

  13. Prescription of anti-influenza drugs for healthy adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Jane; Corbett, Mark; Stock, Christian; Nicholson, Karl; Elliot, Alex J; Duffy, Steven; Westwood, Marie; Palmer, Stephen; Stewart, Lesley

    2009-09-01

    In publicly funded health systems with finite resources, management decisions are based on assessments of clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. The UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence commissioned a systematic review to inform their 2009 update to guidance on the use of antiviral drugs for the treatment of influenza. We searched databases for studies of the use of neuraminidase inhibitors for the treatment of seasonal influenza. We present the results for healthy adults (ie, adults without known comorbidities) and people at-risk of influenza-related complications. There was an overall reduction in the median time to symptom alleviation in healthy adults by 0.57 days (95% CI -1.07 to -0.08; p=0.02; 2701 individuals) with zanamivir, and 0.55 days (95% CI -0.96 to -0.14; p=0.008; 1410 individuals) with oseltamivir. In those at risk, the median time to symptom alleviation was reduced by 0.98 days (95% CI -1.84 to -0.11; p=0.03; 1252 individuals) with zanamivir, and 0.74 days (95% CI -1.51 to 0.02; p=0.06; 1472 individuals) with oseltamivir. Little information was available on the incidence of complications. In view of the advantages and disadvantages of different management strategies for controlling seasonal influenza in healthy adults recommending the use of antiviral drugs for the treatment of people presenting with symptoms is unlikely to be the most appropriate course of action.

  14. Promotion of prescription drugs to consumers and providers, 2001-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Kornfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pharmaceutical firms heavily promote their products and may have changed marketing strategies in response to reductions in new product approvals, restrictions on some forms of promotion, and the expanding role of biologic therapies. METHODS: We used descriptive analyses of annual cross-sectional data from 2001 through 2010 to examine direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA (Kantar Media and provider-targeted promotion (IMS Health and SDI, including: (1 inflation-adjusted total promotion spending ($ and percent of sales; (2 distribution by channel (consumer v. provider; and (3 provider specialty both for the industry as a whole and for top-selling biologic and small molecule therapies. RESULTS: Total promotion peaked in 2004 at US$36.1 billion (13.4% of sales. By 2010 it had declined to $27.7B (9.0% of sales. Between 2006 and 2010, similar declines were seen for promotion to providers and DTCA (both by 25%. DTCA's share of total promotion increased from 12% in 2002 to 18% in 2006, but then declined to 16% and remains highly concentrated. Number of products promoted to providers peaked in 2004 at over 3000, and then declined 20% by 2010. In contrast to top-selling small molecule therapies having an average of $370 million (8.8% of sales spent on promotion, top biologics were promoted less, with only $33 million (1.4% of sales spent per product. Little change occurred in the composition of promotion between primary care physicians and specialists from 2001-2010. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that pharmaceutical companies have reduced promotion following changes in the pharmaceutical pipeline and patent expiry for several blockbuster drugs. Promotional strategies for biologic drugs differ substantially from small molecule therapies.

  15. Promotion of prescription drugs to consumers and providers, 2001-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfield, Rachel; Donohue, Julie; Berndt, Ernst R; Alexander, G Caleb

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical firms heavily promote their products and may have changed marketing strategies in response to reductions in new product approvals, restrictions on some forms of promotion, and the expanding role of biologic therapies. We used descriptive analyses of annual cross-sectional data from 2001 through 2010 to examine direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) (Kantar Media) and provider-targeted promotion (IMS Health and SDI), including: (1) inflation-adjusted total promotion spending ($ and percent of sales); (2) distribution by channel (consumer v. provider); and (3) provider specialty both for the industry as a whole and for top-selling biologic and small molecule therapies. Total promotion peaked in 2004 at US$36.1 billion (13.4% of sales). By 2010 it had declined to $27.7B (9.0% of sales). Between 2006 and 2010, similar declines were seen for promotion to providers and DTCA (both by 25%). DTCA's share of total promotion increased from 12% in 2002 to 18% in 2006, but then declined to 16% and remains highly concentrated. Number of products promoted to providers peaked in 2004 at over 3000, and then declined 20% by 2010. In contrast to top-selling small molecule therapies having an average of $370 million (8.8% of sales) spent on promotion, top biologics were promoted less, with only $33 million (1.4% of sales) spent per product. Little change occurred in the composition of promotion between primary care physicians and specialists from 2001-2010. These findings suggest that pharmaceutical companies have reduced promotion following changes in the pharmaceutical pipeline and patent expiry for several blockbuster drugs. Promotional strategies for biologic drugs differ substantially from small molecule therapies.

  16. Legalization of marijuana for non-medical use: health, policy, socioeconomic, and nursing implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Anne

    2014-09-01

    The legalization of marijuana is a controversial issue with implications for health care providers, policy makers, and society at large. The use of marijuana for medical reasons is accepted in many states. However, legal sale of the drug for non-medical use began for the first time on January 1, 2014, in Colorado, following a relaxation of marijuana restrictions that is unprecedented worldwide. News reports have indicated that sales of the drug have been brisk. Marijuana-infused food products have been unexpectedly popular, exceeding sales projections. Marijuana use is associated with numerous physical and mental disorders and could result in addiction. Evidence suggests its potency has increased since the 1980s. Colorado has established regulations regarding the sale of marijuana for non-medical use, but concerns still exist. The current article offers a discussion of the health, public policy, socioeconomic, and nursing implications of the legalization of marijuana for non-medical use.

  17. 1558张静脉营养液处方不合理用药分析%Analysis of Irrational Drug Use of 1 558 Prescriptions of Parenteral Nutrition Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马佩杰; 张妍; 赵婷

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨静脉营养液处方不合理用药情况,为临床合理设计静脉营养液处方提供参考。方法:抽取2009年11月—2013年11月静脉营养液处方1558张,对处方的科室分布、不合理联合用药、单张处方用药品种数等情况进行统计、分析。结果:1558张静脉营养液处方中,联合用药不合理处方为689张,占44�22%。单张用药9~10种的处方为142张,占9�11%;11~12种为1117张,占71�69%;13种以上为299张,占19�20%。用药种数过多,不利于静脉营养液的药剂学稳定性。结论:静脉营养液处方联合用药不合理现象较严重,亟需改进。%OBJECTIVE:To understand the irrational use of drugs in prescriptions of parenteral nutrition soluion in order to provide reference for clinical rational design of parenteral nutrition solution prescriptions. METHODS: The parenteral nutrition solution prescriptions from Nov. 2009 to Nov. 2013 were analyzed statistically with regard to department distribution, irrational drug combination, number of drugs in single⁃drug prescriptions. RESULTS: In 1 558 parenteral nutrition prescriptions, 689(44�22%)prescriptions were irrational in drug combination. 142(9�11%)prescriptions used 9⁃10 drugs of single prescription,1 117(71�69%)prescriptions used 11⁃12 drugs of single prescription,299(19�20%)prescriptions used more than 13 drugs of single prescription. Great number of drugs were used in of parenteral nutrition solution, which did no good to the stability of pharmaceuticshe. CONCLUSIONS:The irrational drug combination of the intravenous nutrition liquid prescriptions is serious, which thus remains to be improved.

  18. Television advertisement format and the provision of risk information about prescription drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinert, Lewis H; Schommer, Jon C

    2005-06-01

    Considerable attention has been afforded to analyzing the content of and assessing consumers' reaction to print direct-to-consumer drug ads, but not so for televised ads. To determine whether advertisements with different risk severity and risk presentation would significantly affect viewers' (1) recall of information contained in the advertisement, (2) evaluation of the advertisement, and (3) perceptions of the advertised product's risks. Data were collected from a sample of 135 first-year pharmacy students at a Midwestern college of pharmacy. After viewing 1 of the 6 advertisements designed for this study, participants were asked to complete a self-administered survey. Chi-square and analysis of variance were used to analyze the data. A 2x3 between subjects design was used to test the effects of 2 levels of risk severity (high- vs low-risk severity) and 3 levels of risk presentation (original ad containing integrated risk message, deintegrated risk message/dual modality using male voice-over, deintegrated risk message/dual modality using female voice-over). Results of analysis of variance procedures revealed that deintegrating risk information by placing it at the end of the advertisement and the use of captions in addition to oral messages (dual modality) (1) improved the recall of general and specific side effect information, (2) led to a perception that the advertisement had greater informational content, (3) resulted in lower Advertisement Distraction, and (4) lessened cognitive and affective aspects of information overload for the advertisement containing the high-risk severity medication. However, this pattern of findings was not found for the low-risk severity medication. Alternative methods for presenting risk information in direct-to-consumer ads affected some aspects of information recall and advertisement evaluation, but were not shown to affect risk perceptions regarding the advertised products.

  19. Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Non-medical Prescribing versus Medical Prescribing for Acute and Chronic Disease Management in Primary and Secondary Care. Cochrane Database Syst Ver. 2016;11:CD011227.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo Silva Duarte

    2017-01-01

    of evidence, among others. Prescription by pharmacists and nurses with different levels of undergraduate, specific and postgraduate education could provide comparable outcomes to medical prescription, specifically with regards to adherence to therapy, adverse events, overall satisfaction, quality of life, and resource utilisation (hospitalisations, visits to the emergency department, and consultations. Non-medical prescribers frequently had medical support available to facilitate a collaborative practice. With appropriate training and support, non-medical prescription by nurses and pharmacists can be as effective as when carried out by doctors.

  20. Agreement between patients' self-report and physicians' prescriptions on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and other drugs used in musculoskeletal disorders: the international Pharmacoepidemiologic General Research eXtension database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi-Bensouda, Lamiae; Rossignol, Michel; Aubrun, Elodie; Benichou, Jacques; Abenhaim, Lucien

    2012-07-01

    PURPOSE: The use of prescription records for the assessment of exposure to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) does not capture over-the-counter drug use. This study compared patients' self-reported use to physician's prescriptions for NSAIDs and other drugs used to treat musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). METHODS: The international Pharmacoepidemiologic General Research eXtension database includes a network of general practitioners recruiting patients without reference to diagnoses or prescriptions. Data on all drug use across France within the 2 years preceding the date of inclusion (index date) were obtained from both patients' self-reports (PSRs) and physicians' prescription reports (PPRs). Patients' reports were obtained using a structured telephone interview combined with an interview guide containing a list of drugs commonly used. Comparisons were made on exposure to four categories of MSD drugs and three time windows up to 24 months before the index date. RESULTS: Agreement between physician and patient reports was assessed on 4152 patient-physician pairs. Bias- and prevalence-adjusted kappa values showed fair agreement for nonaspirin NSAIDs, moderate to fair for nonnarcotic analgesics, high for osteoarthritis and moderate to substantial for muscle relaxants. Over-the-counter drug use was associated with greater disagreement (OR = 2.21, 95%CI = 1.05-1.38). Age was not associated with disagreement. CONCLUSION: Differences between PSR and PPR in estimating the prevalence of MSD drug use varied by the type of drug and the elapsed time from the index date. The patient-assisted interview method used in this study showed better agreement with PPR compared with standard interviews, especially for long time windows and patients older than 65 years. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.