WorldWideScience

Sample records for noncooperative stabilization effect

  1. Non-Cooperative Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, E.E.C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe non-cooperative game models and discuss game theoretic solution concepts. Some applications are also noted. Conventional theory focuses on the question ‘how will rational players play?’, and has the Nash equilibrium at its core. We discuss this concept and its interpretations, as well as

  2. Game theory : Noncooperative games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, E.E.C.; Wright, J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe noncooperative game models and discuss game theoretic solution concepts. Some applications are also noted. Conventional theory focuses on the question ‘how will rational players play?’, and has the Nash equilibrium at its core. We discuss this concept and its interpretations, as well as

  3. Video-based noncooperative iris image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yingzi; Arslanturk, Emrah; Zhou, Zhi; Belcher, Craig

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a video-based noncooperative iris image segmentation scheme that incorporates a quality filter to quickly eliminate images without an eye, employs a coarse-to-fine segmentation scheme to improve the overall efficiency, uses a direct least squares fitting of ellipses method to model the deformed pupil and limbic boundaries, and develops a window gradient-based method to remove noise in the iris region. A remote iris acquisition system is set up to collect noncooperative iris video images. An objective method is used to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of the segmentation results. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method. The proposed method would make noncooperative iris recognition or iris surveillance possible.

  4. Robust H∞ Control for Spacecraft Rendezvous with a Noncooperative Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Nan Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The robust H∞ control for spacecraft rendezvous with a noncooperative target is addressed in this paper. The relative motion of chaser and noncooperative target is firstly modeled as the uncertain system, which contains uncertain orbit parameter and mass. Then the H∞ performance and finite time performance are proposed, and a robust H∞ controller is developed to drive the chaser to rendezvous with the non-cooperative target in the presence of control input saturation, measurement error, and thrust error. The linear matrix inequality technology is used to derive the sufficient condition of the proposed controller. An illustrative example is finally provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controller.

  5. Non-cooperative game theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara-Greve, Takako

    2015-01-01

    This is a textbook for university juniors, seniors, and graduate students majoring in economics, applied mathematics, and related fields. Each chapter is structured so that a core concept of that chapter is presented with motivations, useful applications are given, and related advanced topics are discussed for future study. Many helpful exercises at various levels are provided at the end of each chapter. Therefore, this book is most suitable for readers who intend to study non-cooperative game theory rigorously for both theoretical studies and applications. Game theory consists of non-cooperative games and cooperative games. This book covers only non-cooperative games, which are major tools used in current economics and related areas. Non-cooperative game theory aims to provide a mathematical prediction of strategic choices by decision makers (players) in situations of conflicting interest. Through the logical analyses of strategic choices, we obtain a better understanding of social (economic, business) probl...

  6. Dynamic aggregation evolution of competitive societies of cooperative and noncooperative agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Zhen-Quan; Ye Gao-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We propose an evolution model of cooperative agent and noncooperative agent aggregates to investigate the dynamic evolution behaviors of the system and the effects of the competing microscopic reactions on the dynamic evolution. In this model, each cooperative agent and noncooperative agent are endowed with integer values of cooperative spirits and noncooperative spirits, respectively. The cooperative spirits of a cooperative agent aggregate and the noncooperative spirits of a noncooperative agent aggregate change via four competing microscopic reaction schemes: the win-win reaction between two cooperative agents, the lose-lose reaction between two noncooperative agents, the win-lose reaction between a cooperative agent and a noncooperative agent (equivalent to the migration of spirits from cooperative agents to noncooperative agents), and the cooperative agent catalyzed decline of noncooperative spirits. Based on the generalized Smoluchowski's rate equation approach, we investigate the dynamic evolution behaviors such as the total cooperative spirits of all cooperative agents and the total noncooperative spirits of all noncooperative agents. The effects of the three main groups of competition on the dynamic evolution are revealed. These include: (i) the competition between the lose-lose reaction and the win-lose reaction, which gives rise to respectively the decrease and increase in the noncooperative agent spirits; (ii) the competition between the win-win reaction and the win-lose reaction, which gives rise to respectively the increase and decrease in the cooperative agent spirits; (iii) the competition between the win-lose reaction and the catalyzed-decline reaction, which gives rise to respectively the increase and decrease in the noncooperative agent spirits. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  7. Noncooperative models of permit markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godal, Odd

    2011-07-15

    The applicability of some popular and basic permit market theories has been questioned. Drawing on noncooperative equilibrium theory for pure exchange economies, this article adapts several well-established alternative models to permit exchange. Some qualitative properties of the associated equilibria are provided, including two games with equilibria that in a sense coincide. Nevertheless, as there exist quite a few models potentially applicable to emissions trading, with equilibria that range from autarky to Pareto optimality, it seems that economics lacks a broadly accepted basic theory for permit markets. (Author)

  8. Non-cooperative planning theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bogetoft, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Planning in a general sense is concerned with the design of communication and decision making mechanisms in organizations where information and choice are decentralized. Non-cooperative planning theory as it is developed in this book treats the incentive aspects hereof. It stresses how strategic behavior and opportunism may impede planning, and how this can be coped with via the organization of communication and decision making, the design of information and control systems, and the development of incentive schemes. In particular, the book contains a thorough investigation of incentive provision in information production.

  9. Robust H ∞ Control for Spacecraft Rendezvous with a Noncooperative Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Nan; Zhou, Wen-Ya; Tan, Shu-Jun; Wu, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The robust H ∞ control for spacecraft rendezvous with a noncooperative target is addressed in this paper. The relative motion of chaser and noncooperative target is firstly modeled as the uncertain system, which contains uncertain orbit parameter and mass. Then the H ∞ performance and finite time performance are proposed, and a robust H ∞ controller is developed to drive the chaser to rendezvous with the non-cooperative target in the presence of control input saturation, measurement error, and thrust error. The linear matrix inequality technology is used to derive the sufficient condition of the proposed controller. An illustrative example is finally provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controller. PMID:24027446

  10. Non-Coop Station History Forms Digest

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Single 71-page document entitled 'Station history non-COOP Keying Rules & Forms Digest,' dated December 12, 2003. Contractors with NCDC Climate Database...

  11. Non-Coop Station History (Unindexed)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Station history documentation for stations outside the US Cooperative Observer network. Documents should be compared with those in the Non-Coop Station History...

  12. An integrated control scheme for space robot after capturing non-cooperative target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingming; Luo, Jianjun; Yuan, Jianping; Walter, Ulrich

    2018-06-01

    How to identify the mass properties and eliminate the unknown angular momentum of space robotic system after capturing a non-cooperative target is of great challenge. This paper focuses on designing an integrated control framework which includes detumbling strategy, coordination control and parameter identification. Firstly, inverted and forward chain approaches are synthesized for space robot to obtain dynamic equation in operational space. Secondly, a detumbling strategy is introduced using elementary functions with normalized time, while the imposed end-effector constraints are considered. Next, a coordination control scheme for stabilizing both base and end-effector based on impedance control is implemented with the target's parameter uncertainty. With the measurements of the forces and torques exerted on the target, its mass properties are estimated during the detumbling process accordingly. Simulation results are presented using a 7 degree-of-freedom kinematically redundant space manipulator, which verifies the performance and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Accurately bearing measurement in non-cooperative passive location system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhiqiang; Ma Hongguang; Yang Lifeng

    2007-01-01

    The system of non-cooperative passive location based on array is proposed. In the system, target is detected by beamforming and Doppler matched filtering; and bearing is measured by a long-base-ling interferometer which is composed of long distance sub-arrays. For the interferometer with long-base-line, the bearing is measured accurately but ambiguously. To realize unambiguous accurately bearing measurement, beam width and multiple constraint adoptive beamforming technique is used to resolve azimuth ambiguous. Theory and simulation result shows this method is effective to realize accurately bearing measurement in no-cooperate passive location system. (authors)

  14. Robust H(∞) control for spacecraft rendezvous with a noncooperative target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Nan; Zhou, Wen-Ya; Tan, Shu-Jun; Wu, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The robust H(∞) control for spacecraft rendezvous with a noncooperative target is addressed in this paper. The relative motion of chaser and noncooperative target is firstly modeled as the uncertain system, which contains uncertain orbit parameter and mass. Then the H(∞) performance and finite time performance are proposed, and a robust H(∞) controller is developed to drive the chaser to rendezvous with the non-cooperative target in the presence of control input saturation, measurement error, and thrust error. The linear matrix inequality technology is used to derive the sufficient condition of the proposed controller. An illustrative example is finally provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controller.

  15. International pollution control: Cooperative versus noncooperative strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dockner, E.J.; Van Long, N.

    1993-01-01

    International pollution control involving two neighboring countries is modeled as a simple two-player dynamic game. Each country produces a good that is consumed by domestic households. Production of each consumption good results in emissions of pollutants. Households in each country derive utility from the consumption of the domestically produced good but incur costs through the total stock of pollution (stock externality). In this setting we characterize cooperative as well as noncooperative pollution control strategies of the governments of the two countries that maximize the discounted stream of net benefits of a representative consumer. It turns out that when the governments are restricted to use linear strategies noncooperative behavior results in overall losses for both countries. If, on the contrary, governments use nonlinear Markov-perfect strategies and the discount rate is small enough a Pareto-efficient steady-state pollution stock can be supported as a differentiable subgame-perfect equilibrium. Thus, the emergence of first-best solutions (cooperative outcomes) does not require any institutional arrangements (threats, retaliation, etc.) but can be brought about through the use of nonlinear Markov-perfect equilibrium strategies. 20 refs., 1 tab

  16. Incremental inverse kinematics based vision servo for autonomous robotic capture of non-cooperative space debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Gangqi; Zhu, Z. H.

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposed a new incremental inverse kinematics based vision servo approach for robotic manipulators to capture a non-cooperative target autonomously. The target's pose and motion are estimated by a vision system using integrated photogrammetry and EKF algorithm. Based on the estimated pose and motion of the target, the instantaneous desired position of the end-effector is predicted by inverse kinematics and the robotic manipulator is moved incrementally from its current configuration subject to the joint speed limits. This approach effectively eliminates the multiple solutions in the inverse kinematics and increases the robustness of the control algorithm. The proposed approach is validated by a hardware-in-the-loop simulation, where the pose and motion of the non-cooperative target is estimated by a real vision system. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed estimation approach for the target and the incremental control strategy for the robotic manipulator.

  17. Non-Cooperative Bistatic SAR Clock Drift Compensation for Tomographic Acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Azcueta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, an important amount of research has been headed towards the measurement of above-ground forest biomass with polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR tomography techniques. This has motivated the proposal of future bistatic SAR missions, like the recent non-cooperative SAOCOM-CS and PARSIFAL from CONAE and ESA. It is well known that the quality of SAR tomography is directly related to the phase accuracy of the interferometer that, in the case of non-cooperative systems, can be particularly affected by the relative drift between onboard clocks. In this letter, we provide insight on the impact of the clock drift error on bistatic interferometry, as well as propose a correction algorithm to compensate its effect. The accuracy of the compensation is tested on simulated acquisitions over volumetric targets, estimating the final impact on tomographic profiles.

  18. Blind Compressed Sensing Parameter Estimation of Non-cooperative Frequency Hopping Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ying

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the disadvantages of a non-cooperative frequency hopping communication system, such as a high sampling rate and inadequate prior information, parameter estimation based on Blind Compressed Sensing (BCS is proposed. The signal is precisely reconstructed by the alternating iteration of sparse coding and basis updating, and the hopping frequencies are directly estimated based on the results. Compared with conventional compressive sensing, blind compressed sensing does not require prior information of the frequency hopping signals; hence, it offers an effective solution to the inadequate prior information problem. In the proposed method, the signal is first modeled and then reconstructed by Orthonormal Block Diagonal Blind Compressed Sensing (OBD-BCS, and the hopping frequencies and hop period are finally estimated. The simulation results suggest that the proposed method can reconstruct and estimate the parameters of noncooperative frequency hopping signals with a low signal-to-noise ratio.

  19. Foundations of game theory noncooperative games

    CERN Document Server

    Vorob’ev, Nicolai N

    1994-01-01

    The English edition differs only slightly from the Russian original. The main struc­ tural difference is that all the material on the theory of finite noncooperative games has been collected in Chapter 2, with renumbering of the material of the remain­ ing chapters. New sections have been added in this chapter: devoted to general questions of equilibrium theory in nondegenerate games, subsections 3.9-3.17, by N.N. Vorob'ev, Jr.; and § 4, by A.G. Chernyakov; and § 5, by N.N. Vorob'ev, Jr., on the computational complexity of the process of finding equilibrium points in finite games. It should also be mentioned that subsections 3.12-3.14 in Chapter 1 were written by E.B. Yanovskaya especially for the Russian edition. The author regrets that the present edition does not reflect the important game-theoretical achievements presented in the splendid monographs by E. van Damme (on the refinement of equilibrium principles for finite games), as well as those by J.e. Harsanyi and R. Selten, and by W. Giith and B. Ka...

  20. Concurrent image-based visual servoing with adaptive zooming for non-cooperative rendezvous maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomares, Jorge; Felicetti, Leonard; Pérez, Javier; Emami, M. Reza

    2018-02-01

    An image-based servo controller for the guidance of a spacecraft during non-cooperative rendezvous is presented in this paper. The controller directly utilizes the visual features from image frames of a target spacecraft for computing both attitude and orbital maneuvers concurrently. The utilization of adaptive optics, such as zooming cameras, is also addressed through developing an invariant-image servo controller. The controller allows for performing rendezvous maneuvers independently from the adjustments of the camera focal length, improving the performance and versatility of maneuvers. The stability of the proposed control scheme is proven analytically in the invariant space, and its viability is explored through numerical simulations.

  1. Comparisons of Cooperative and Non-Cooperative Students: An Analysis of Student Accounting System Data. Interim Report, June, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Don

    The major purpose of this study was to identify unique effects of cooperative vocational education. This interim report is of results of the analyses of existing data bases. Comparisons of cooperative and non-cooperative vocational programs are made on the following variables: enrollments by age, sex and race, school status, work status,…

  2. On Social Optima of Non-Cooperative Mean Field Games

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Sen; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Lin; Lian, Jianming; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2016-12-12

    This paper studies the social optima in noncooperative mean-field games for a large population of agents with heterogeneous stochastic dynamic systems. Each agent seeks to maximize an individual utility functional, and utility functionals of different agents are coupled through a mean field term that depends on the mean of the population states/controls. The paper has the following contributions. First, we derive a set of control strategies for the agents that possess *-Nash equilibrium property, and converge to the mean-field Nash equilibrium as the population size goes to infinity. Second, we study the social optimal in the mean field game. We derive the conditions, termed the socially optimal conditions, under which the *-Nash equilibrium of the mean field game maximizes the social welfare. Third, a primal-dual algorithm is proposed to compute the *-Nash equilibrium of the mean field game. Since the *-Nash equilibrium of the mean field game is socially optimal, we can compute the equilibrium by solving the social welfare maximization problem, which can be addressed by a decentralized primal-dual algorithm. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  3. On species preservation and Non-Cooperative Exploiters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronbak, Lone Grønbæk; Lindroos, Marko

    cases where several non-cooperative exploiters are involved in mixed fisheries. This paper is targeting biodiversity preservation by setting up a two species model with the aim of ensuring both species survive harvesting of exploiters adapting a non-cooperative behaviour. The model starts out as a multi......-species model without biological dependency and is then modified to include also biological dependency. We contribute to the literature by analytically finding the limits on the number of players preserving both species including the conditions to be satisfied. For visual purposes we simulate a two species...

  4. Scale Invariant Gabor Descriptor-Based Noncooperative Iris Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Yingzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new noncooperative iris recognition method is proposed. In this method, the iris features are extracted using a Gabor descriptor. The feature extraction and comparison are scale, deformation, rotation, and contrast-invariant. It works with off-angle and low-resolution iris images. The Gabor wavelet is incorporated with scale-invariant feature transformation (SIFT for feature extraction to better extract the iris features. Both the phase and magnitude of the Gabor wavelet outputs were used in a novel way for local feature point description. Two feature region maps were designed to locally and globally register the feature points and each subregion in the map is locally adjusted to the dilation/contraction/deformation. We also developed a video-based non-cooperative iris recognition system by integrating video-based non-cooperative segmentation, segmentation evaluation, and score fusion units. The proposed method shows good performance for frontal and off-angle iris matching. Video-based recognition methods can improve non-cooperative iris recognition accuracy.

  5. Scale Invariant Gabor Descriptor-based Noncooperative Iris Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new noncooperative iris recognition method is proposed. In this method, the iris features are extracted using a Gabor descriptor. The feature extraction and comparison are scale, deformation, rotation, and contrast-invariant. It works with off-angle and low-resolution iris images. The Gabor wavelet is incorporated with scale-invariant feature transformation (SIFT for feature extraction to better extract the iris features. Both the phase and magnitude of the Gabor wavelet outputs were used in a novel way for local feature point description. Two feature region maps were designed to locally and globally register the feature points and each subregion in the map is locally adjusted to the dilation/contraction/deformation. We also developed a video-based non-cooperative iris recognition system by integrating video-based non-cooperative segmentation, segmentation evaluation, and score fusion units. The proposed method shows good performance for frontal and off-angle iris matching. Video-based recognition methods can improve non-cooperative iris recognition accuracy.

  6. Toward Efficient Team Formation for Crowdsourcing in Noncooperative Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanyuan; Jiang, Jiuchuan; An, Bo; Jiang, Yichuan; Chen, Bing

    2017-12-01

    Crowdsourcing has become a popular service computing paradigm for requesters to integrate the ubiquitous human-intelligence services for tasks that are difficult for computers but trivial for humans. This paper focuses on crowdsourcing complex tasks by team formation in social networks (SNs) where a requester connects to a large number of workers. A good indicator of efficient team collaboration is the social connection among workers. Most previous social team formation approaches, however, either assume that the requester can maintain information of all workers and can directly communicate with them to build teams, or assume that the workers are cooperative and be willing to join the specific team built by the requester, both of which are impractical in many real situations. To this end, this paper first models each worker as a selfish entity, where the requester prefers to hire inexpensive workers that require less payment and workers prefer to join the profitable teams where they can gain high revenue. Within the noncooperative SNs, a distributed negotiation-based team formation mechanism is designed for the requester to decide which worker to hire and for the worker to decide which team to join and how much should be paid for his skill service provision. The proposed social team formation approach can always build collaborative teams by allowing team members to form a connected graph such that they can work together efficiently. Finally, we conduct a set of experiments on real dataset of workers to evaluate the effectiveness of our approach. The experimental results show that our approach can: 1) preserve considerable social welfare by comparing the benchmark centralized approaches and 2) form the profitable teams within less negotiation time by comparing the traditional distributed approaches, making our approach a more economic option for real-world applications.

  7. Orbit Determination for a Microsatellite Rendezvous with a Non-Cooperative Target

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foster, Brian

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the minimum requirements to establish a satellite tracking system architecture for a hostile "parasitic microsatellite" to rendezvous with a larger, non-cooperative target satellite...

  8. Protected Turning Movements of Noncooperative Automated Vehicles: Geometrics, Trajectories, and Saturation Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is the first to quantify throughput (saturation flow of noncooperative automated vehicles when performing turning maneuvers, which are critical bottlenecks in arterial road networks. We first develop a constrained optimization problem based on AVs’ kinematic behavior during a protected signal phase which considers both ABS-enabled and wheels-locked braking, as well as avoiding encroaching into oncoming traffic or past the edge-of-receiving-lane. We analyze noncooperative (“defensive” behavior, in keeping with the Assured Clear Distance Ahead legal standard to which human drivers are held and AVs will likely also be for the foreseeable future. We demonstrate that, under plausible behavioral parameters, AVs appear likely to have positive impacts on throughput of turning traffic streams at intersections, in the range of +0.2% (under the most conservative circumstances to +43% for a typical turning maneuver. We demonstrate that the primary mechanism of impact of turning radius is its effect on speed, which is likely to be constrained by passenger comfort. We show heterogeneous per-lane throughput in the case of “double turn lanes.” Finally, we demonstrate limited sensitivity to crash-risk criterion, with a 4% difference arising from a change from 1 in 10,000 to 1 in 100,000,000. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of policy implications and future research needs.

  9. Study of Hybrid Localization Noncooperative Scheme in Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Dwiguna Sumitra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we evaluated the experiment and analysis measurement accuracy to determine object location based on wireless sensor network (WSN. The algorithm estimates the position of sensor nodes employing received signal strength (RSS from scattered nodes in the environment, in particular for the indoor building. Besides that, we considered another algorithm based on weight centroid localization (WCL. In particular testbed, we combined both RSS and WCL as hybrid localization in case of noncooperative scheme with considering that source nodes directly communicate only with anchor nodes. Our experimental result shows localization accuracy of more than 90% and obtained the estimation error reduction to 4% compared to existing algorithms.

  10. Noncooperative cadmium(II) binding to human metallothionein 1a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, Duncan E.K.; Stillman, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    The two-domain (βα) mammalian metallothionein binds seven divalent metals, however, the binding mechanism is not well characterized and recent reports require the presence of the partially metallated protein. In this paper, step-wise metallation of the metal-free, two-domain βα-rhMT and the isolated β-rhMT using Cd(II) is shown to proceed in a noncooperative manner by analysis of electrospray ionization mass spectrometric data. Under limiting amounts of Cd(II), all intermediate metallation states up to the fully metallated Cd 3 -β-rhMT and Cd 7 -βα-rhMT were observed. Addition of excess Cd(II), resulted in formation of the supermetallated (metallation in excess of normal levels) Cd 4 -β- and Cd 8 -βα-metallothionein species. These data establish that noncooperative cadmium metallation is a property of each isolated domain and the complete two-domain protein. Our data now also establish that supermetallation is a property that may provide information about the mechanism of metal transfer to other proteins

  11. Non-cooperative and cooperative solutions of government subsidy on public transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husniah Hennie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with two models of government subsidy given to a public transport operator: (i the subsidy for buying bus from an appointed public transport manufacturer, and (ii the subsidy for reimbursing reduced ticket price for passengers. The models are developed to determine the maximum profit for both the public transport operator and the manufacturer. Since we consider two parties – the public transport operator and the manufacturer of the bus, then we use game theoretical approach by considering non-cooperative and cooperative solutions. Furthermore, since the bus is repairable we consider virtual age to model the preventive maintenance and we consider minimal repair to model the corrective maintenance. We analyse both type of subsidy models and give some numerical examples which show the effects of different subsidies to the profit of operator and manufacturer. The result of the numerical examples indicates that reducing ticket price would give a higher profit both to the operator and the manufacturer.

  12. Toward noncooperative iris recognition: a classification approach using multiple signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Hugo; Alexandre, Luís A

    2007-04-01

    This paper focuses on noncooperative iris recognition, i.e., the capture of iris images at large distances, under less controlled lighting conditions, and without active participation of the subjects. This increases the probability of capturing very heterogeneous images (regarding focus, contrast, or brightness) and with several noise factors (iris obstructions and reflections). Current iris recognition systems are unable to deal with noisy data and substantially increase their error rates, especially the false rejections, in these conditions. We propose an iris classification method that divides the segmented and normalized iris image into six regions, makes an independent feature extraction and comparison for each region, and combines each of the dissimilarity values through a classification rule. Experiments show a substantial decrease, higher than 40 percent, of the false rejection rates in the recognition of noisy iris images.

  13. Non-Cooperative Facial Recognition Video Dataset Collection Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Marcia L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Erikson, Rebecca L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lombardo, Nicholas J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will produce a non-cooperative (i.e. not posing for the camera) facial recognition video data set for research purposes to evaluate and enhance facial recognition systems technology. The aggregate data set consists of 1) videos capturing PNNL role players and public volunteers in three key operational settings, 2) photographs of the role players for enrolling in an evaluation database, and 3) ground truth data that documents when the role player is within various camera fields of view. PNNL will deliver the aggregate data set to DHS who may then choose to make it available to other government agencies interested in evaluating and enhancing facial recognition systems. The three operational settings that will be the focus of the video collection effort include: 1) unidirectional crowd flow 2) bi-directional crowd flow, and 3) linear and/or serpentine queues.

  14. A Study of Control Laws for Microsatellite Rendezvous with a Noncooperative Target

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tschirhart, Troy

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using a microsatellite to accomplish an orbital rendezvous with a noncooperative target, with a focus on the control laws necessary for achieving such a rendezvous...

  15. Stabilizing IkappaBalpha by "consensus" design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Diego U; Cervantes, Carla F; Truhlar, Stephanie M E; Cho, Samuel S; Wolynes, Peter G; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-26

    IkappaBalpha is the major regulator of transcription factor NF-kappaB function. The ankyrin repeat region of IkappaBalpha mediates specific interactions with NF-kappaB dimers, but ankyrin repeats 1, 5 and 6 display a highly dynamic character when not in complex with NF-kappaB. Using chemical denaturation, we show here that IkappaBalpha displays two folding transitions: a non-cooperative conversion under weak perturbation, and a major cooperative folding phase upon stronger insult. Taking advantage of a native Trp residue in ankyrin repeat (AR) 6 and engineered Trp residues in AR2, AR4 and AR5, we show that the cooperative transition involves AR2 and AR3, while the non-cooperative transition involves AR5 and AR6. The major structural transition can be affected by single amino acid substitutions converging to the "consensus" ankyrin repeat sequence, increasing the native state stability significantly. We further characterized the structural and dynamic properties of the native state ensemble of IkappaBalpha and the stabilized mutants by H/(2)H exchange mass spectrometry and NMR. The solution experiments were complemented with molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the microscopic origins of the stabilizing effect of the consensus substitutions, which can be traced to the fast conformational dynamics of the folded ensemble.

  16. X-point effect on edge stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarelma, S; Kirk, A; Kwon, O J

    2011-01-01

    We study the effects of the X-point configuration on edge localized mode (ELM) triggering peeling and ballooning modes using fixed boundary equilibria and modifying the plasma shape to approach the limit of a true X-point. The current driven pure peeling modes are asymptotically stabilized by the X-point while the stabilizing effect on ballooning modes depends on the poloidal location of the X-point. The coupled peeling-ballooning modes experience the elimination of the peeling component as the X-point is introduced. This can significantly affect the edge stability diagrams used to analyse the ELM triggering mechanisms.

  17. Stabilizing effect of epoxidized sunflower oil as a secondary stabilizer for Ca/Hg stabilized PVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsaturated triglyceride oil sunflower was epoxidized and characterized by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Epoxidized sunflower oil (ESO was used as an organic thermal co-stabilizer for rigid poly(vinyl chloride (PVC in the presence of tricalcium dicitrate (Ca3(C6H5O72 and mercury (II acetate (Hg(CH3COO2. The thermo-oxidative degradation of PVC was studied in the presence of these ternary stabilizer systems at 170, 180, 190 and 200°C in N2 atmosphere. The effects of metal carboxylate combination Ca/Hg in the absence and in the presence of epoxidized sunflower oil on static heat treatment of PVC have been studied. The formation of polyene sequences was investigated by UV-visible and FT-IR spectroscopy and by comparing viscosity data obtained in the presence and in the absence of the additives. It was found that the additives retard the rate of degradation and reduce the extent of polymer chain scission associated with the thermal degradation of poly(vinyl chloride. Synergistic effects were found when stabilizer was blended in 50:50 weight ratios with either. It was found that ESO exerted a stabilizing effect on the degradation of PVC. The activation energy for degraded PVC in absence of stabilizers was 38.6 kJ•mol–1 and in the presence of Ca/Hg and Ca/Hg/ESO were 53.3 and 64.7 kJ•mol–1 respectively. In order of compare the efficiency of the epoxidized sunflower oil with these metal soap stabilizers, thermal stabilities were evaluated on the basis of evolved hydrogen chloride determined by conductometry technique and degree of discoloration are discussed.

  18. Single beam stability, incoherent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autin, B.; Bassetti, M.; Faugeras, P.; Hilaire, A.; Montague, B.; Potaux, D.; Scandale, W.; Vos, L.; Zyngier, H.

    1980-01-01

    The group first realized that it was difficult in the available time to make an overall review of the many subjects implied by the group's heading. It therefore restricted itself to a few separate topics, which are: 1. Working point. 2. Non-linear coupling. 3. Effect of octupoles. 4. Chromaticity correction and tracking. 5. Vertical dispersion. 6. Beam separation. 7. Remark on non-linear lens experiments. (orig.)

  19. Non-cooperative stochastic differential game theory of generalized Markov jump linear systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Cheng-ke; Zhou, Hai-ying; Bin, Ning

    2017-01-01

    This book systematically studies the stochastic non-cooperative differential game theory of generalized linear Markov jump systems and its application in the field of finance and insurance. The book is an in-depth research book of the continuous time and discrete time linear quadratic stochastic differential game, in order to establish a relatively complete framework of dynamic non-cooperative differential game theory. It uses the method of dynamic programming principle and Riccati equation, and derives it into all kinds of existence conditions and calculating method of the equilibrium strategies of dynamic non-cooperative differential game. Based on the game theory method, this book studies the corresponding robust control problem, especially the existence condition and design method of the optimal robust control strategy. The book discusses the theoretical results and its applications in the risk control, option pricing, and the optimal investment problem in the field of finance and insurance, enriching the...

  20. Pairwise registration of TLS point clouds using covariance descriptors and a non-cooperative game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zai, Dawei; Li, Jonathan; Guo, Yulan; Cheng, Ming; Huang, Pengdi; Cao, Xiaofei; Wang, Cheng

    2017-12-01

    It is challenging to automatically register TLS point clouds with noise, outliers and varying overlap. In this paper, we propose a new method for pairwise registration of TLS point clouds. We first generate covariance matrix descriptors with an adaptive neighborhood size from point clouds to find candidate correspondences, we then construct a non-cooperative game to isolate mutual compatible correspondences, which are considered as true positives. The method was tested on three models acquired by two different TLS systems. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed adaptive covariance (ACOV) descriptor is invariant to rigid transformation and robust to noise and varying resolutions. The average registration errors achieved on three models are 0.46 cm, 0.32 cm and 1.73 cm, respectively. The computational times cost on these models are about 288 s, 184 s and 903 s, respectively. Besides, our registration framework using ACOV descriptors and a game theoretic method is superior to the state-of-the-art methods in terms of both registration error and computational time. The experiment on a large outdoor scene further demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed pairwise registration framework.

  1. Automatic Access Control Based on Face and Hand Biometrics in A Non-Cooperative Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahromi, Mohammad Naser Sabet; Bonderup, Morten Bojesen; Nasrollahi, Kamal

    2018-01-01

    a challenging bimodal database, including face and hand information of the users when they approach a door to open it by its handle in a noncooperative context. We have defined two (an easy and a challenging) protocols on how to use the database. We have reported results on many baseline methods, including deep...... learning techniques as well as conventional methods on the database. The obtained results show the merit of the proposed database and the challenging nature of access control with non-cooperative users....

  2. An Experimental Study of Career Development in Cooperative and Non-Cooperative Education Liberal Arts Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martello, John S.; Shelton, Paul D.

    1980-01-01

    A study comparing cooperative and noncooperative education students across time on several variables related to career maturity, career choice, and major certainty showed that co-op students rate higher in career maturity, career planning and problem-solving abilities. (JOW)

  3. Strategic interaction between government and central bank in framework of cooperative and non-cooperative games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoudinia, D.; Engwerda, Jacob; Esfahani, Rahim Dallali; Dastjerdi, R.B.; Fakhar, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we analyzed the strategic interaction between government and central bank in Iranian economy. Using dynamic differential games and Nash equilibrium within cooperative and non-cooperative setting, we try to find the optimal values of debt, deficit and monetary base. The results of

  4. Effect of core stability exercise on postural stability in children with Down syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sobhy M. Aly

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome is one of the commonest causes of developmental delay in children. Postural stability problems often exist with Down syndrome. To investigate the effect of core stability exercises on postural stability in children with down syndrome. Thirty children (21 boys and 9 girls) with down syndrome, with ages ranged from 6 to 10 years were participated in this study. They were assigned randomlyinto study and control group. Study group received core stability exercises and conventional p...

  5. Peat soils stabilization using Effective Microorganisms (EM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, N. Z.; Samsuddin, N. S.; Hanif, M. F.; Syed Osman, S. B.

    2018-04-01

    Peat soil is known as geotechnical problematic soil since it is the softest soil having highly organic and moisture content which led to high compressibility, low shear strength and long-term settlement. The aim of this study was to obtain the stabilized peat soils using the Effective Microorganisms (EM). The volume of EM added and mixed with peat soils varied with 2%, 4%, 6%, 8% and 10% and then were cured for 7, 14 and 21 days. The experiment was done for uncontrolled and controlled moisture content. Prior conducting the main experiments, the physical properties such as moisture content, liquid limit, specific gravity, and plastic limit etc. were measure for raw peat samples. The Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) test was performed followed by regression analysis to check the effect of EM on the soil strength. Obtained results have shown that the mix design for controlled moisture contents showed the promising improvement in their compressive strength. The peat soil samples with 10% of EM shows the highest increment in UCS value and the percentage of increments are in the range of 44% to 65% after curing for 21 days. The regression analysis of the EM with the soil compressive strength showed that in controlled moisture conditions, EM significantly improved the soil stability as the value of R2 ranged between 0.97 – 0.78. The results have indicated that the addition of EM in peat soils provides significant improving in the strength of the soil as well as the other engineering properties.

  6. Effect of Viscosity on Liquid Curtain Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Suszynski, Wieslaw; Francis, Lorraine; Carvalho, Marcio; Dow Chemical Company Collaboration; PUC Rio Collaboration; University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The effect of viscosity on the stability of Newtonian liquid curtains was explored by high-speed visualization. Glycerol/water solutions with viscosity ranging from 19.1 to 210 mPa.s were used as coating liquids. The experimental set-up used a slide die delivery and steel tube edge guides. The velocity along curtain at different positions was measured by tracking small particles at different flow conditions. The measurements revealed that away from edge guides, velocity is well described by free fall effect. However, close to edge guides, liquid moves slower, revealing formation of a viscous boundary layer. The size of boundary layer and velocity near edge guides are strong function of viscosity. The critical condition was determined by examining flow rate below which curtain broke. Curtain failure was initiated by growth of a hole within liquid curtain, close to edge guides. Visualization results showed that the hole forms in a circular shape then becomes elliptical as it grows faster in vertical direction compared to horizontal direction. As viscosity rises, minimum flow rate for destabilization of curtain increased, indicating connection between interaction with edge guides and curtain stability. We would like to acknowledge the financial support from the Dow Chemical Company.

  7. Milk marketing under cooperative and non-cooperative marketing channels: Evidence from west Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarker Debnarayan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is an attempt to empirically investigate the price spread, marketing costs, marketing margins, marketing efficiency, and profit efficiency among market middlemen under cooperative and non-cooperative marketing channels in the domestic trade market of liquid milk in West Bengal. One of the important findings of this study is that, although the inter-market (and intramarket price variation for liquid milk under the cooperative marketing agency in not far from uniformity, and all marketing agencies under cooperative channels receive much lower abnormal profit per unit of milk as compared with non-cooperative channels, the former fails to provide much economic benefit, either to the producer or to the consumer, because of the burden of much higher fixed cost per unit of liquid milk.

  8. Stochastic noncooperative and cooperative evolutionary game strategies of a population of biological networks under natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Yeh, Chin-Hsun

    2017-12-01

    We review current static and dynamic evolutionary game strategies of biological networks and discuss the lack of random genetic variations and stochastic environmental disturbances in these models. To include these factors, a population of evolving biological networks is modeled as a nonlinear stochastic biological system with Poisson-driven genetic variations and random environmental fluctuations (stimuli). To gain insight into the evolutionary game theory of stochastic biological networks under natural selection, the phenotypic robustness and network evolvability of noncooperative and cooperative evolutionary game strategies are discussed from a stochastic Nash game perspective. The noncooperative strategy can be transformed into an equivalent multi-objective optimization problem and is shown to display significantly improved network robustness to tolerate genetic variations and buffer environmental disturbances, maintaining phenotypic traits for longer than the cooperative strategy. However, the noncooperative case requires greater effort and more compromises between partly conflicting players. Global linearization is used to simplify the problem of solving nonlinear stochastic evolutionary games. Finally, a simple stochastic evolutionary model of a metabolic pathway is simulated to illustrate the procedure of solving for two evolutionary game strategies and to confirm and compare their respective characteristics in the evolutionary process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Toroidal field effects on the stability of Heliotron E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.; Lynch, V.E.

    1986-02-01

    The addition of a small toroidal field to the Heliotron E configuration improves the stability of the n = 1 mode and increases the value of the stability beta critical. Total stabilization of this mode can be achieved with added toroidal fields between 5 and 15% of the total field. In this situation, the plasma can have direct access to the second stability regime. For the Heliotron E configuration, the self-stabilization effect is due to the shear, not to the magnetic well. The toroidal field threshold value for stability depends strongly on the pressure profile and the plasma radius. 21 refs., 15 figs

  10. The effect of electrolytes on emulsions stabilized by nonionic surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomgaard, van den A.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of high electrolyte concentrations on the stability of oil-in-water- emulsions stabilized by nonionic surfactants.

    In chapter 1 several stability mechanisms are briefly outlined and the distinction between coalescence and

  11. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  12. Effects of phosphoramides on wood dimensional stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-Lin. Lee; George C. Chen; Roger M. Rowell

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the dimensional stability of phosphoramide-reacted wood, wood was reacted with a mixture which was derived from compounding phosphorus pentoxide and each of 12 amines including alkyl, halophenyl, and phenyl amines in N,N-dimethylformamide. Dimensional stability of such reacted wood was analyzed by antishrink efficiency (ASE) using the water-soak method....

  13. Radar automatic target recognition (ATR) and non-cooperative target recognition (NCTR)

    CERN Document Server

    Blacknell, David

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect and locate targets by day or night, over wide areas, regardless of weather conditions has long made radar a key sensor in many military and civil applications. However, the ability to automatically and reliably distinguish different targets represents a difficult challenge. Radar Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) and Non-Cooperative Target Recognition (NCTR) captures material presented in the NATO SET-172 lecture series to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art and continuing challenges of radar target recognition. Topics covered include the problem as applied to th

  14. Cooperative and Non-Cooperative Game Control Strategies of the Ship in Collision Situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Lisowski

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces the positional cooperative and non-cooperative game of a greater number of met ships for the description of the process considered as well as for the synthesis of optimal control strategies of the own ship in collision situation. The approximated mathematical model of differential game in the form of triple linear programming problem is used for the synthesis of safe ship trajectory as a multistage process decision. The considerations have been illustrated an example of program computer simulation to determine the safe ship trajectories in situation of passing a many of the ships encountered.

  15. Joint Real-Time Energy and Demand-Response Management using a Hybrid Coalitional-Noncooperative Game

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Fulin; Gu, Yi; Hao, Jun; Zhang, Jun Jason; Wei, Jiaolong; Zhang, Yingchen

    2015-11-11

    In order to model the interactions among utility companies, building demands and renewable energy generators (REGs), a hybrid coalitional-noncooperative game framework has been proposed. We formulate a dynamic non-cooperative game to study the energy dispatch within multiple utility companies, while we take a coalitional perspective on REGs and buildings demands through a hedonic coalition formation game approach. In this case, building demands request different power supply from REGs, then the building demands can be organized into an ultimate coalition structure through a distributed hedonic shift algorithm. At the same time, utility companies can also obtain a stable power generation profile. In addition, the interactive progress among the utility companies and building demands which cannot be supplied by REGs is implemented by distributed game theoretic algorithms. Numerical results illustrate that the proposed hybrid coalitional-noncooperative game scheme reduces the cost of both building demands and utility companies compared with the initial scene.

  16. Atomic physics effects on dissipative toroidal drift wave stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, M.A.; Hahm, T.S.

    1992-02-01

    The effects of atomic physics processes such as ionization, charge exchange, and radiation on the linear stability of dissipative drift waves are investigated in toroidal geometry both numerically and analytically. For typical TFTR and TEXT edge parameters, overall linear stability is determined by the competition between the destabilizing influence of ionization and the stabilizing effect due to the electron temperature gradient. An analytical expression for the linear marginal stability condition, η e crit , is derived. The instability is most likely to occur at the extreme edge of tokamaks with a significant ionization source and a steep electron density gradient

  17. Effect of Chemical Stabilizers in Silver Nanoparticle Suspensions on Nanotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Eun Joo; Park, Hee Jin; Park, Jun Su; Yoon, Je Yong; Yi, Jong Heop; Kim, Young Hun; Choi, Kyung Hee

    2011-01-01

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been commercialized as the typically stabilized form via the addition of a variety of surfactants or polymers. Herein, to examine the effects of stabilizing AgNPs in suspension, we modified the surface of bare AgNPs with four type of surfactants (NaDDBS, SDS, TW80, CTAB) and polymers (PVP, PAA, PAH, CMC). The modified AgNPs was applied to compare suspension stability and nanotoxicity test using Escherichia coli (E. coli) as a model organism. Modification of AgNPs surface using chemical stabilizer may be not related with molecular weight, but chemical structure such as ionic state and functional group of stabilizer. In this study, it is noteworthy that AgNPs modified with a cationic stabilizer (CTAB, PAH) were importantly toxic to E. coli, rather than anionic stabilizers (NaDDBS, SDS). Comparing similar anionic stabilizer, i.e., NaDDBS and SDS, the result showed that lipophilicity of chemical structure can affect on E. coli, because NaDDBS, which contains a lipophilic benzene ring, accelerated the cytotoxicity of AgNPs. Interestingly, none of the stabilizers tested, including biocompatible nonionic stabilizers (i.e., TW80 and cellulose) caused a reduction in AgNP toxicity. This showed that toxicity of AgNPs cannot be reduced using stabilizers

  18. Effect of Chemical Stabilizers in Silver Nanoparticle Suspensions on Nanotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Eun Joo; Park, Hee Jin; Park, Jun Su; Yoon, Je Yong; Yi, Jong Heop [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hun [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyung Hee [National Institute of Environmental Research, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been commercialized as the typically stabilized form via the addition of a variety of surfactants or polymers. Herein, to examine the effects of stabilizing AgNPs in suspension, we modified the surface of bare AgNPs with four type of surfactants (NaDDBS, SDS, TW80, CTAB) and polymers (PVP, PAA, PAH, CMC). The modified AgNPs was applied to compare suspension stability and nanotoxicity test using Escherichia coli (E. coli) as a model organism. Modification of AgNPs surface using chemical stabilizer may be not related with molecular weight, but chemical structure such as ionic state and functional group of stabilizer. In this study, it is noteworthy that AgNPs modified with a cationic stabilizer (CTAB, PAH) were importantly toxic to E. coli, rather than anionic stabilizers (NaDDBS, SDS). Comparing similar anionic stabilizer, i.e., NaDDBS and SDS, the result showed that lipophilicity of chemical structure can affect on E. coli, because NaDDBS, which contains a lipophilic benzene ring, accelerated the cytotoxicity of AgNPs. Interestingly, none of the stabilizers tested, including biocompatible nonionic stabilizers (i.e., TW80 and cellulose) caused a reduction in AgNP toxicity. This showed that toxicity of AgNPs cannot be reduced using stabilizers.

  19. Power distribution effects on boiling water reactor stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiano, B.; March-Leuba, J.

    1989-01-01

    The work presented in this paper deals with the effects of spatial power distributions on the stability of boiling water reactors (BWRs). It is shown that a conservative power distribution exists for which the stability is minimal. These results are relevant because they imply that bounding stability calculations are possible and, thus, a worst-possible scenario may be defined for a particular BWR geometry. These bounding calculations may, then, be used to determine the maximum expected limit-cycle peak powers

  20. Pose Self-Measurement of Noncooperative Spacecraft Based on Solar Panel Triangle Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingzhou Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the recognition and location of noncooperative spacecraft, this paper presents a monocular vision pose measurement method based on solar triangle structure. First of all, an autonomous recognition algorithm of feature structure based on sliding window Hough transformation (SWHT and inscribed circle of a triangle is proposed, and the image coordinates of feature points on the triangle can be obtained relying on this algorithm, combined with the P4P algorithm and the structure of spacecraft, calculating the relative pose of target expressed by rotation and translation matrix. The whole algorithm can be loaded into the prewritten onboard program, which will get the autocomplete feature structure extraction and relative pose measurement without human intervention, and this method does not need to mount any markers on the target. Then compare the measured values with the accurate value of the laser tracker, so that a conclusion can be drawn that the maximum position error is lower than 5% and the rotation error is lower than 4%, which meets the requirements of noncooperative spacecraft’s pose measurement for observations, tracking, and docking in the final rendezvous phase.

  1. Noncooperative 802.11 MAC Layer Fingerprinting and Tracking of Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Robyns

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two novel noncooperative MAC layer fingerprinting and tracking techniques for Wi-Fi (802.11 enabled mobile devices. Our first technique demonstrates how a per-bit entropy analysis of a single captured frame allows an adversary to construct a fingerprint of the transmitter that is 80.0 to 67.6 percent unique for 50 to 100 observed devices and 33.0 to 15.1 percent unique for 1,000 to 10,000 observed devices. We show how existing mitigation strategies such as MAC address randomization can be circumvented using only this fingerprint and temporal information. Our second technique leverages peer-to-peer 802.11u Generic Advertisement Service (GAS requests and 802.11e Block Acknowledgement (BA requests to instigate transmissions on demand from devices that support these protocols. We validate these techniques using two datasets, one of which was recorded at a music festival containing 28,048 unique devices and the other at our research lab containing 138 unique devices. Finally, we discuss a number of countermeasures that can be put in place by mobile device vendors in order to prevent noncooperative tracking through the discussed techniques.

  2. Relative Attitude Estimation for a Uniform Motion and Slowly Rotating Noncooperative Spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel relative attitude estimation approach for a uniform motion and slowly rotating noncooperative spacecraft. It is assumed that the uniform motion and slowly rotating noncooperative chief spacecraft is in failure or out of control and there is no a priori rotation rate information. We utilize a very fast binary descriptor based on binary robust independent elementary features (BRIEF to obtain the features of the target, which are rotational invariance and resistance to noise. And then, we propose a novel combination of single candidate random sample consensus (RANSAC with extended Kalman filter (EKF that makes use of the available prior probabilistic information from the EKF in the RANSAC model hypothesis stage. The advantage of this combination obviously reduces the sample size to only one, which results in large computational savings without the loss of accuracy. Experimental results from real image sequence of a real model target show that the relative angular error is about 3.5% and the mean angular velocity error is about 0.1 deg/s.

  3. Stability of a slotted ALOHA system with capture effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozato, Yoshikuni; Liu, Jin; Noguchi, Shoichi

    1989-02-01

    The stability of a slotted ALOHA system with capture effect is investigated under a general communication environment where terminals are divided into two groups (low-power and high-power) and the capture effect is modeled by capture probabilities. An approximate analysis is developed using catastrophe theory, in which the effects of system and user parameters on the stability are characterized by the cusp catastrophe. Particular attention is given to the low-power group, since it must bear the strain under the capture effect. The stability conditions of the two groups are given explicitly by bifurcation sets.

  4. Effects of Ecohydraulic Bank Stabilization Structures on Bank Stability and Macroinvertebrate Community in Surabaya River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daru Setyo Rini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There were 18 accelerated erosion sites identified along 7 km of Surabaya River Fishery Sanctuary Area. A model of ecohydraulic bank stabilization was applied to reduce bank erosion in Surabaya River at Gresik Regency Indonesia. The model is combination of reprofiled and revegetated bank with rock toe reinforcement and  addition of log groynes. Various native plant species were planted and naturally grown to establish multi-strata littoral vegetation structure. This study assessed effects of ecohydraulic bank stabilization on bank morphology, near bank velocity and littoral macroinvertebrate community during September 2014 to August 2016. The study found that rock toe enforcement, log groynes and reprofiled bank slope could stabilized the eroded bank, and littoral vegetation formation reduced near bank velocity at restored sites. There were 31 families of macroinvertebrate found in Surabaya River with high abundance of moderately pollution sensitive taxa Atyidae and pollution tolerant taxa Corixidae, Chironomidae and Tubificidae. The taxa richness, diversity index and abundance of sensitive and moderately sensitive macroinvertebrate group were increased after application of ecohydraulic bank stabilization at restored area. The results shown that ecohydraulic bank stabilization structure provides multi-benefits in improving bank stabilization against erosion and providing new micro-habitats for biotic community. Keywords:  ecohydraulic bank stabilization, macroinvertebrates, riparian restoration

  5. Effects of attentional focus on walking stability in elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Melker Worms, Jonathan L.A.; Stins, John F.; van Wegen, Erwin E.H.; Verschueren, Sabine M.P.; Beek, Peter J.; Loram, Ian D.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Balance performance in the elderly is related to psychological factors such as attentional focus. We investigated the effects of internal vs. external focus of attention and fall history on walking stability in healthy older adults. Method Walking stability of twenty-eight healthy older

  6. Stabilizing Agents for Drug Nanocrystals: Effect on Bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Tuomela

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug nanocrystals are a versatile option for drug delivery purposes, and while the number of poorly soluble drug materials is all the time increasing, more research in this area is performed. Drug nanocrystals have a simple structure—a solid drug core is surrounded by a layer of stabilizing agent. However, despite the considerably simple structure, the selection of an appropriate stabilizer for a certain drug can be challenging. Mostly, the stabilizer selection is based purely on the requirement of physical stability, e.g., maintaining the nanosized particle size as long as possible after the formation of drug nanocrystals. However, it is also worth taking into account that stabilizer can affect the bioavailability in the final formulation via interactions with cells and cell layers. In addition, formation of nanocrystals is only one process step, and for the final formulation, more excipients are often added to the composition. The role of the stabilizers in the final formulation can be more than only stabilizing the nanocrystal particle size. A good example is the stabilizer’s role as cryoprotectant during freeze drying. In this review, the stabilizing effect, role of stabilizers in final nanocrystalline formulations, challenges in reaching in vitro–in vivo correlation with nanocrystalline products, and stabilizers’ effect on higher bioavailability are discussed.

  7. Stepping stability: effects of sensory perturbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krebs David E

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few tools exist for quantifying locomotor stability in balance impaired populations. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a technique for quantifying stability of stepping in healthy people and people with peripheral (vestibular hypofunction, VH and central (cerebellar pathology, CB balance dysfunction by means a sensory (auditory perturbation test. Methods Balance impaired and healthy subjects performed a repeated bench stepping task. The perturbation was applied by suddenly changing the cadence of the metronome (100 beat/min to 80 beat/min at a predetermined time (but unpredictable by the subject during the trial. Perturbation response was quantified by computing the Euclidian distance, expressed as a fractional error, between the anterior-posterior center of gravity attractor trajectory before and after the perturbation was applied. The error immediately after the perturbation (Emax, error after recovery (Emin and the recovery response (Edif were documented for each participant, and groups were compared with ANOVA. Results Both balance impaired groups exhibited significantly higher Emax (p = .019 and Emin (p = .028 fractional errors compared to the healthy (HE subjects, but there were no significant differences between CB and VH groups. Although response recovery was slower for CB and VH groups compared to the HE group, the difference was not significant (p = .051. Conclusion The findings suggest that individuals with balance impairment have reduced ability to stabilize locomotor patterns following perturbation, revealing the fragility of their impairment adaptations and compensations. These data suggest that auditory perturbations applied during a challenging stepping task may be useful for measuring rehabilitation outcomes.

  8. Kinky Choices, Dictators and Split Might : A Non-Cooperative Model for Household Consumption and Labor Supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; van der Wiel, K.M.; Vermeulen, F.M.P.

    2009-01-01

    It is unlikely that husbands and wives always agree on exactly what public goods to buy. Nor do they necessarily agree on how many hours to work with obvious consequences for the household budget. We therefore model consumption and labor supply behavior of a couple in a non-cooperative setting by

  9. If you can't beat 'em, join 'em: Cooperative and non-cooperative games in network sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offergelt, F.H.S.; Berkers, F.T.H.M.; Hendrix, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    No Mobile Network Operator (MNO) will make the decision to share its network lightly. There are many financial and strategic considerations to this question. In this paper we outline a non-cooperative game which can be used to model the strategic decision of an MNO regarding mobile network sharing

  10. Exploring Hope, Self-Efficacy, Procrastination, and Study Skills between Cooperative and Non-Cooperative Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Maureen T. B.; McBeath, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between participation in cooperative education, and several psychological constructs believed to be related to success in both academic and professional settings. Participants, undergraduate cooperative (n = 1224) and non-cooperative education (n = 746) students in all years of study and from…

  11. [Stabilization and long-term effect of chromium contaminated soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Qi-Shi; Zhang, Chang-Bo; Tan, Liang; Li, Xu

    2013-10-01

    Short-term (3 d and 28 d) and long-term (1 a) stabilization effects of Cr contaminated soil were investigated through nature curing, using four amendments including ferrous sulfide, ferrous sulfate, zero-valent iron and sodium dithionite. The results indicated that ferrous sulfide and zero-valent iron were not helpful for the stabilization of Cr(VI) when directly used because of their poor solubility and immobility. Ferrous sulfate could effectively and rapidly decrease total leaching Cr and Cr(VI) content. The stabilization effect was further promoted by the generation of iron hydroxides after long-term curing. Sodium dithionite also had positive effect on soil stabilization. Appropriate addition ratio of the two chemicals could help maintain the soil pH in range of 6-8.

  12. Survivin counteracts the therapeutic effect of microtubule de-stabilizers by stabilizing tubulin polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Hsing-Pang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin is a dual function protein. It inhibits the apoptosis of cells by inhibiting caspases, and also promotes cell growth by stabilizing microtubules during mitosis. Over-expression of survivin has been demonstrated to induce drug-resistance to various chemo-therapeutic agents such as cisplatin (DNA damaging agent and paclitaxel (microtubule stabilizer in cancers. However, survivin-induced resistance to microtubule de-stabilizers such as Vinca alkaloids and Combretastatin A-4 (CA-4-related compounds were seldom demonstrated in the past. Furthermore, the question remains as to whether survivin plays a dominant role in processing cytokinesis or inhibiting caspases activity in cells treated with anti-mitotic compounds. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of survivin on the resistance and susceptibility of human cancer cells to microtubule de-stabilizer-induced cell death. Results BPR0L075 is a CA-4 analog that induces microtubule de-polymerization and subsequent caspase-dependent apoptosis. To study the relationship between the expression of survivin and the resistance to microtubule de-stabilizers, a KB-derived BPR0L075-resistant cancer cell line, KB-L30, was generated for this study. Here, we found that survivin was over-expressed in the KB-L30 cells. Down-regulation of survivin by siRNA induced hyper-sensitivity to BPR0L075 in KB cells and partially re-stored sensitivity to BPR0L075 in KB-L30 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that down-regulation of survivin induced microtubule de-stabilization in both KB and KB-L30 cells. However, the same treatment did not enhance the down-stream caspase-3/-7 activities in BPR0L075-treated KB cells. Translocation of a caspase-independent apoptosis-related molecule, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, from cytoplasm to the nucleus was observed in survivin-targeted KB cells under BPR0L075 treatment. Conclusion In this study, survivin plays an important role in the

  13. Effect of plasma rotation on sawtooth stabilization by beam ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Nave, M. F. F.; Budny, R.; Cheng, C. Z.; Fu, G. Y.; Hastie, J.; Manickam, J.; Park, W.

    2000-01-01

    The sawtooth period in JET ELM-free H-Mode plasmas is increasing with Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) power. For injected power PNBI 12MW no large sawtooth crash is observed during the ELM-free period. However, as the edge stability is improved and external kink modes and ELMs are delayed, a possible sawtooth crash at a high plasma beta becomes a concern. In JET DT experiments, delaying sawteeth was found to be crucial in the quest for high fusion power. Fast particles are known to provide stabilizing effect on sawteeth, however, sawtooth stabilization by NBI ions is not clearly understood, since NBI ions are usually not ''fast'' enough to stabilize the m/n = 1/1 internal kink mode which is believed to cause the crash. In order to understand the observed sawteeth stabilization in tokamak experiments with NBI heating, the internal kink m/n = 1/1 mode stability of JET plasmas was modeled using the NOVA-K code, which is also benchmarked with the nonperturbative version of NOVA and the M3D code. Comparison of m/n = 1/1 mode stabilization by NBI ions in JET and TFTR and application of the nonlinear stabilization criteria is given

  14. High Accuracy Tracking of Space-Borne Non-Cooperative Targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, David Arge Klevang

    for the spacecraft to navigate safely and autonomously towards the target. These methods are applied on three distinct study cases, which are based on the platform of the microASC instrument. In relation to the Mars2020 rover, a structured light system is used to navigate the PIXL instrument towards the Martian...... surface, whose objective is to seek evidence of ancient life in the form of chemical biosignatures. The structured light is a subsystem of the PIXL instrument consisting of two active lasers and an imager. The structured light makes use of active triangulation to support a safe approach towards...... team and processing of the captured data was recognized with two Group Achievement Awards from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. With today's advancement in autonomy, the focus is set on in-flight tracking of a non-cooperative artificial satellite with the end goal of capturing...

  15. GTDM: A DTN Routing on Noncooperative Game Theory in a City Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzao Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of delay tolerant networks (DTNs can be influenced by movement model in different application environments. The existing routing algorithms of DTNs do not meet the current city environments due to the large differences in node densities, social characteristics, and limited energy. The key indicators of DTNs such as success delivery ratio, average delivery latency, network lifetime, and network overhead ratio can influence the performances of civil DTNs applications. Aiming to improve the key indicators of DTNs in city environments, this paper presents a fixed sink station based structure and a more proper routing algorithm named Game Theory Based Decision Making (GTDM. GTDM shows decision-making process for neighborhood selection and packet delivering strategy which is based on the noncooperative game theory method and city environment characteristics. GTDM performance is evaluated using numerical simulations under Working Day Movement (WDM model and the results suggested that GTDM outperforms other traditional DTNs routing approaches, such as Epidemic and Prophet algorithms.

  16. Manufacturer's pricing strategies in cooperative and non-cooperative advertising supply chain under retail competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Giri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the manufacturer's pricing strategy in a supply chain with a single manufacturer and two competing retailers. The manufacturer, as a Stackelberg leader specifies wholesale prices to two retailers who face advertisement dependent demand. Based on this gaming structure, two mathematical models are developed - the cooperative advertising model where manufacturer shares a fraction of retailers' advertising costs and the non-cooperative advertising model where manufacturer does not share any retailer's advertising expenses. The optimal strategies of the manufacturer and retailers are determined and a numerical example is taken to illustrate the theoretical results derived. We show that cooperative advertising policy is beneficial not only for the participating entities but also for the entire supply chain.

  17. A note on cooperative versus non-cooperative strategies in international pollution control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio, Santiago J.; Casino, Begona [Department of Economic Analysis, University of Valencia, Avda. de los Naranjos s/n, Edificio Departamental Oriental, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2002-06-01

    In this note, we evaluate the scope of Dockner and Long's [Journal of Environment Economics and Management 24 (1993) 13] conclusion on the efficiency of the non-cooperative outcome in a differential game of international pollution control. We also complete the study of the different equilibria the differential game can present. Our results show that their conclusion requires that the initial value of the stock of pollution be higher than the Pareto-efficient pollution stock so that the equilibrium path of emissions involves a decreasing stock of pollution. Our results also show that the application of the procedure proposed by Tsutsui and Mino [Journal of Economic Theory 52 (1990) 136] to construct a Markov-perfect equilibrium using non-linear strategies is problematic when the initial pollution stock is lower than the Pareto-efficient pollution stock.

  18. Designing Leadership models in a Three Level Unlimited Supply Chain: Non-Cooperative Game Theory Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Jaafarnehad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The role and importance of supply chain management, has faced with many challenges and problems. Although a comprehensive model of supply chain issues, has not been explained, we have to indicate that issues such as reviewing the theoretical foundations of information systems, marketing, financial management, logistical and organizational relations have been considered by many researchers. The objective of supply chain management is to improve various activities and components to increase overall supply chain system benefits. In order to achieve the overall objectives, many contradictions may occur between the components and different levels of supply chain and the contradictions that these disorders over time, result in decreased strength and competitiveness of the supply chain. Such conflicts, like marketing costs (advertising, pricing and inventory can occur during the supply chain life cycle. A Game Theory approach with respect to property is the appropriate tool for collaboration in the supply chain. This tool is used for collaborative making in any kind of supply chain such as cooperative supply chain and non-cooperative supply chain. In the present study and assuming a lack of cooperation between different levels of a supply chain, a dynamic game with complete information has been generated. In addition identifying appropriate leaders of various levels of the supply chain is considered. Non-Cooperative dynamic game mode (Stackelberg Game, for each of the three levels of supply chain including retailers, suppliers and manufacturers are modeled. Depending on the bargaining power and its position in the market, any level of supply chain can make a leader of the following rule. In the present study, the equilibrium model to play Stackelberg game may be led by a leader or leading players and ultimately identifying and modeling the appropriate unlimited three level supply chain are determined.

  19. Effects of Initial Stance of Quadruped Trotting on Walking Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peisun Ma

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available It is very important for quadruped walking machine to keep its stability in high speed walking. It has been indicated that moment around the supporting diagonal line of quadruped in trotting gait largely influences walking stability. In this paper, moment around the supporting diagonal line of quadruped in trotting gait is modeled and its effects on body attitude are analyzed. The degree of influence varies with different initial stances of quadruped and we get the optimal initial stance of quadruped in trotting gait with maximal walking stability. Simulation results are presented.

  20. Effects of corn cob ash on lime stabilized lateritic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnochiri, Emeka Segun

    2018-03-01

    This study assesses the effects of Corn Cob Ash (CCA) on lime-stabilized lateritic soil. Preliminary tests were carried out on the natural soil sample for purpose of identification and classification. Lime being the main stabilizing material was thoroughly mixed with the soil sample to determine the optimum lime requirement of the sample as a basis for evaluating the effects of the CCA. The optimum lime requirement was 10%. The CCA was thereafter added to the lime stabilized soil in varying proportions of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10%. Unsoaked CBR increased from 83% at 0% CCA to highest value of 94% at 4% CCA. Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) values increased from 1123kN/m2 at 0% CCA to highest value of 1180kN/m2 at 4% CCA. It was therefore concluded that CCA can serve as a good complement for lime stabilization in lateritic soil.

  1. Boiling water reactor stability revisited: The effects of flashing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadigaroglu, G. [Institute of Energy Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH, ETH-Zentrum, CLT-C1, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: yadi@ethz.ch; Askari, B. [Institute of Energy Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH, ETH-Zentrum, CLT-C1, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-05-01

    There are numerous investigations of two-phase flow stability with particular emphasis to BWR stability; these have become increasingly sophisticated and complete over the years. The basic features of a new development and frequency-domain code capable of considering all the channels (bundles) in a BWR, flashing of the coolant at low pressure, full coupling with 3D, two-group neutronics, etc. are described. The basic thermal-hydraulic model is used to study the effects of flashing on stability in a BWR-like channel. The behavior of the channel is highly dynamic. Contrary to what could have been intuitively guessed, the effect of flashing is stabilizing; the reasons and mechanisms leading to this are discussed.

  2. Boiling water reactor stability revisited: The effects of flashing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.; Askari, B.

    2005-01-01

    There are numerous investigations of two-phase flow stability with particular emphasis to BWR stability; these have become increasingly sophisticated and complete over the years. The basic features of a new development and frequency-domain code capable of considering all the channels (bundles) in a BWR, flashing of the coolant at low pressure, full coupling with 3D, two-group neutronics, etc. are described. The basic thermal-hydraulic model is used to study the effects of flashing on stability in a BWR-like channel. The behavior of the channel is highly dynamic. Contrary to what could have been intuitively guessed, the effect of flashing is stabilizing; the reasons and mechanisms leading to this are discussed

  3. Aging effects on vertical graphene nanosheets and their thermal stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S.; Polaki, S. R.; Ajikumar, P. K.; Krishna, N. G.; Kamruddin, M.

    2018-03-01

    The present study investigates environmental aging effects and thermal stability of vertical graphene nanosheets (VGN). Self-organized VGN is synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and exposed to ambient conditions over 6-month period to examine its aging behavior. A systematic inspection is carried out on morphology, chemical structure, wettability and electrical property by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, water contact angle and four-probe resistivity measurements at regular intervals, respectively. Detailed microscopic and spectroscopic analysis substantiated the retention of graphitic quality and surface chemistry of VGN over the test period. An unchanged sheet resistance and hydrophobicity reveals its electrical and wetting stability over the time, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis ensures an excellent thermal stability of VGN up to 575 °C in ambient atmosphere. These findings of long-term morphological, structural, wetting, electrical and thermal stability of VGN validate their potential utilization for the next-generation device applications.

  4. PROBABILISTIC APPROACH OF STABILIZED ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELEA. I.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the omnipresence of the electromagnetic field are certain and recognized. Assessing as accurately as possible these effects, which characterize random phenomena require the use of statistical-probabilistic calculation. This paper aims at assessing the probability of exceeding the admissible values of the characteristic sizes of the electromagnetic field - magnetic induction and electric field strength. The first part justifies the need for concern and specifies how to approach it. The mathematical model of approach and treatment is presented in the second part of the paper and the results obtained with reference to 14 power stations are synthesized in the third part. In the last part, are formulated the conclusions of the evaluations.

  5. Effect of Amphiphilic Alkyl Chain Length Upon Purified LATEX Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amira Amir Hassan; Amir Hashim Mohd Yatim

    2015-01-01

    Rubber particles in purified latex (PL) are stabilized by a film of protein and fatty acid soap (surfactant). Saturated straight-chain fatty acid soaps can assist an enhancement of latex stability. However, whether the alkyl chain length plays an important role in increasing the stability is still an issue. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of alkyl chain length of anionic surfactant on the stability of purified latex. The fatty acid soap of decanoate (9), laurate (11), sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) (12) and palmitate (15) were used. The numbers in parentheses indicating the number of carbon present in alkyl chain of the soap. The results showed that the impact of alkyl chain length on the stability of latex is in the order of laurate > decanoate > SDS > palmitate > purified latex accordingly. The alkyl chain length does giving a significant effect on latex stability after longer stirring time. The particle size of latex with the presence of surfactant is greater compare to a single particle itself due to extension of particles diameter. Thus suitable interaction of the nonpolar tail of surfactant with the hydrophobic regions of latex surface played a major role in maintaining a stable latex system. (author)

  6. Quantifying Effectiveness of Streambank Stabilization Practices on Cedar River, Nebraska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naisargi Dave

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Excessive sediment is a major pollutant to surface waters worldwide. In some watersheds, streambanks are a significant source of this sediment, leading to the expenditure of billions of dollars in stabilization projects. Although costly streambank stabilization projects have been implemented worldwide, long-term monitoring to quantify their success is lacking. There is a critical need to document the long-term success of streambank restoration projects. The objectives of this research were to (1 quantify streambank retreat before and after the stabilization of 18 streambanks on the Cedar River in North Central Nebraska, USA; (2 assess the impact of a large flood event; and (3 determine the most cost-efficient stabilization practice. The stabilized streambanks included jetties (10, rock-toe protection (1, slope reduction/gravel bank (1, a retaining wall (1, rock vanes (2, and tree revetments (3. Streambank retreat and accumulation were quantified using aerial images from 1993 to 2016. Though streambank retreat has been significant throughout the study period, a breached dam in 2010 caused major flooding and streambank erosion on the Cedar River. This large-scale flood enabled us to quantify the effect of one extreme event and evaluate the effectiveness of the stabilized streambanks. With a 70% success rate, jetties were the most cost-efficient practice and yielded the most deposition. If minimal risk is unacceptable, a more costly yet immobile practice such as a gravel bank or retaining wall is recommended.

  7. Finite Larmor radius effects on Z-pinch stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, J.; Faghihi, M.

    1987-10-01

    The effect of finite Larmor radius (FLR) on the stability of m=1 small axial wavelength kinks in a z-pinch with purely poloidal magnetic field is investigated. We use the Incompressible FLR MHD model; a collisionless fluid model which consistently includes the relevant FLR terms due to ion gyroviscosity, Hall effect and electron diamagnetism. With FLR terms absent, the Kadomtsev criterion of ideal MHD 2rdp/dr+m 2 B 2 /μ 0 >=0 predicts instability for internal modes unless the current density becomes singular at the centre of the pinch. The same result is obtained in the present model, with FLR terms absent. When the FLR terms are included, a normal mode analysis of the linearized equations yields the following results. Marginally unstable (ideal) modes are stabilized by gyroviscosity. The Hall terms have a damping, however not stabilizing, effect, in agreement with earlier work. Specifying a constant current and particle density equilibrium, the effect of electron diamagnetism vanishes. For a z-pinch with parameters relevant to the EXTRAP experiment, the m=1 modes are then fully stabilized over the cross-section for wavelengths λ/a max =3-5x10 18 m -1 is found, above which gyroviscous stabilization near the plasma boundary becomes insufficient. The result holds for wavelengths close to, or smaller than, the pinch radius and for realistic equilibrium profiles. This limit is far below the required limit for a reactor with contained alpha particles, which is in excess of 10 20 m -1 . (authors)

  8. Effects of ventilation tunnel protection on stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strizhiboroda, S K; Kuritsyn, B I; Anosov, O S

    1983-09-01

    Analyzed are effects of strata control on a ventilation gate road situated at a depth of 860 m in a coal seam 0.65 m thick with dip angle of 48 degrees. The direct roof and floor consisted of limestone and the main roof of shales. The ventilation gate road with a cross section of 8.2 m/Sup 2/ was supported by the AP-9.2 arched steel supports. The following methods for gate road protection were used: timber cribbings, reinforced cribbings, strips of pneumatic stowing (using waste rocks), and coal support pillars. Effects of gate road protection on roof subsidence, subsidence rate and on support deformation in the gate road were analyzed considering strata control method and the distance to the advancing longwall face. The results of comparative evaluations, given in 4 diagrams, showed that timber cribbings guaranteed the most regular stress distribution and regular roof subsidence. Use of coal support pillars negatively influenced stress distribution. Irrespective of strata control method from 60 to 80% of roof subsidence occurred at a distance from 0 to 40 m behind a working face. Roof subsidence ranged from 17.3 to 38.3 mm/d when support pillars were used, was 27 mm/d when reinforced cribbings were used and ranged from 9.6 to 16.5 mm/d when pneumatic stowing was used. Use of blocks of reinforced concrete for protecting ventilation gate roads in inclined strata is recommended.

  9. The Effect of Zeolite on Aggregate Stability Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sohrab

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil structural stability affects the profitability and sustainability of agricultural systems. Particle size distribution (PSD and aggregate stability are the important characteristics of soil. Aggregate stability has a significant impact on the development of the root system, water and carbon cycle and soil resistance against soil erosion. Soil aggregate stability, defined as the ability of the aggregates to remain intact when subject to a given stress, is an important soil property that affects the movement and storage of water, aeration, erosion, biological activity and growth of crops. Dry soil aggregate stability (Mean Weight Diameter (MWD, Geometric Mean Diameter (GMD and Wet Aggregate Stability (WAS are important indices for evaluating soil aggregate stability.To improve soil physical properties, including modifying aggregate, using various additives (organic, inorganic and chemicals, zeolites are among what has been studied.According to traditional definition, zeolites are hydratealuminosilicates of alkaline and alkaline-earth minerals. Their structure is made up of a framework of[SiO4]−4 and [AlO4]−5 tetrahedron linked to each other's cornersby sharing oxygen atoms. The substitution of Si+4 by Al+3 intetrahedral sites results inmore negative charges and a high cation exchange capacity.Zeolites, as natural cation exchangers, are suitable substitutes to remove toxic cations. Among the natural zeolites,Clinoptilolite seems to be the most efficient ion exchanger and ion-selective material forremoving and stabilizing heavy metals.Due to theexisting insufficient technical information on the effects of using different levels of zeolite on physical properties of different types of soils in Iran, the aim of this research was to assess the effects of two different types of zeolite (Clinoptilolite natural zeolite, Z4, and Synthetic zeolite, A4 on aggregate stability indicesof soil. Materials and Methods: In this study at first

  10. Effect of sorbitol and glycerol on the stability of trypsin and difference between their stabilization effects in the various solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazhang, Mohammad; Mehrnejad, Faramarz; Pazhang, Yaghub; Falahati, Hanieh; Chaparzadeh, Nader

    2016-01-01

    The effect of glycerol and sorbitol on the stability of porcine pancreas trypsin was investigated in this work. Molecular dynamics simulation and thermostability results showed that trypsin has two flexible regions, and polyols (sorbitol and glycerol) stabilize the enzyme by decreasing the flexibility of these regions. Radial distribution function results exhibited that sorbitol and glycerol were excluded from the first water layer of the enzyme, therefore decrease the flexibility of the regions by preferential exclusion. Also, results showed that the stabilization effect of sorbitol is more than glycerol. This observation could be because of the larger decrease in the fluctuations of trypsin in the presence of sorbitol. We also examined the role of solvent's hydrophobicity in enzyme stabilization by sorbitol and glycerol. To do so, the thermostability of trypsin was evaluated in the presence of solvents with different hydrophobicity (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol and n-propanol) in addition to the polyols. Our results depicted that glycerol is a better stabilizer than sorbitol in the presence of hydrophobic solvents (n-propanol), whereas sorbitol is a better stabilizer than glycerol in the presence of hydrophilic solvents (methanol). © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. ESBWR - Robust design for natural circulation and stability performance effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamgir, M. D.; Marquino, W.; Yang, J.; Saha, P.; Fennern, L.; Colby, M. [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy, M/C A65, 3901Castle Hayne Road, Wilmington, NC 28401 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    ESBWR is a 4500 MWt Generation III+ natural circulation reactor with an array of robust design features and passive safety systems to deliver highly effective plant performance during normal operation and to keep the reactor safe during postulated transients and accidents. With the submittal of the latest revision of the Design Control Document (DCD) to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ESBWR is nearing the completion of the US design certification process. This paper focuses on the natural circulation-driven plant performance aspects during normal operation, and stability evaluation of the robust ESBWR design. The TRACG computer code is used for the analysis of ESBWR plant performance, safety analysis, and stability margins. The paper describes the evaluation of ESBWR stability performance during normal power operation including operation in the Core Power-Feed Water Temperature Operating Domain. For ESBWR the normal power operation condition has the highest power/flow ratio and is limiting from the perspective of stability. The paper includes results from detailed evaluation of the most limiting decay ratio for out-of-phase regional oscillations calculated by perturbing the core inlet flow rate in this out-of-phase mode about the line of symmetry for the azimuthal harmonic mode. The paper also summarizes the ESBWR regional mode stability evaluations during a limiting transient (Loss of Feedwater Heating), and during ATWS (Anticipated Transient without Scram). Nominal decay ratios of limiting Channel oscillation, Core wide oscillation and Regional oscillation are within the maximum acceptance criterion of 0.8, at 95% content and 95% confidence. These stability evaluation results indicate decay ratio is within design limits. The paper also describes the evaluation of ESBWR stability performance during plant startup, and summarizes the defense-in-depth stability solution for ESBWR. (authors)

  12. ESBWR - Robust design for natural circulation and stability performance effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, M. D.; Marquino, W.; Yang, J.; Saha, P.; Fennern, L.; Colby, M.

    2012-01-01

    ESBWR is a 4500 MWt Generation III+ natural circulation reactor with an array of robust design features and passive safety systems to deliver highly effective plant performance during normal operation and to keep the reactor safe during postulated transients and accidents. With the submittal of the latest revision of the Design Control Document (DCD) to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ESBWR is nearing the completion of the US design certification process. This paper focuses on the natural circulation-driven plant performance aspects during normal operation, and stability evaluation of the robust ESBWR design. The TRACG computer code is used for the analysis of ESBWR plant performance, safety analysis, and stability margins. The paper describes the evaluation of ESBWR stability performance during normal power operation including operation in the Core Power-Feed Water Temperature Operating Domain. For ESBWR the normal power operation condition has the highest power/flow ratio and is limiting from the perspective of stability. The paper includes results from detailed evaluation of the most limiting decay ratio for out-of-phase regional oscillations calculated by perturbing the core inlet flow rate in this out-of-phase mode about the line of symmetry for the azimuthal harmonic mode. The paper also summarizes the ESBWR regional mode stability evaluations during a limiting transient (Loss of Feedwater Heating), and during ATWS (Anticipated Transient without Scram). Nominal decay ratios of limiting Channel oscillation, Core wide oscillation and Regional oscillation are within the maximum acceptance criterion of 0.8, at 95% content and 95% confidence. These stability evaluation results indicate decay ratio is within design limits. The paper also describes the evaluation of ESBWR stability performance during plant startup, and summarizes the defense-in-depth stability solution for ESBWR. (authors)

  13. Stabilizing effect of plasma discharge on bubbling fluidized granular bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Mao-Bin; Dang Sai-Chao; Ma Qiang; Xia Wei-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Fluidized beds have been widely used for processing granular materials. In this paper, we study the effect of plasma on the fluidization behavior of a bubbling fluidized bed with an atmospheric pressure plasma discharger. Experiment results show that the bubbling fluidized bed is stabilized with the discharge of plasma. When the discharge current reaches a minimum stabilization current C ms , air bubbles in the bed will disappear and the surface fluctuation is completely suppressed. A simplified model is proposed to consider the effect of electric Coulomb force generated by the plasma. It is found that the Coulomb force will propel the particles to move towards the void area, so that the bubbling fluidized bed is stabilized with a high enough plasma discharge. (paper)

  14. Delay-dependent asymptotic stability of mobile ad-hoc networks: A descriptor system approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Juan; Yang Dan; Zhang Xiao-Hong; Huang Bin; Luo Jian-Lu

    2014-01-01

    In order to analyze the capacity stability of the time-varying-propagation and delay-dependent of mobile ad-hoc networks (MANETs), in this paper, a novel approach is proposed to explore the capacity asymptotic stability for the delay-dependent of MANETs based on non-cooperative game theory, where the delay-dependent conditions are explicitly taken into consideration. This approach is based on the Lyapunov—Krasovskii stability theory for functional differential equations and the linear matrix inequality (LMI) technique. A corresponding Lyapunov—Krasovskii functional is introduced for the stability analysis of this system with use of the descriptor and “neutral-type” model transformation without producing any additional dynamics. The delay-dependent stability criteria are derived for this system. Conditions are given in terms of linear matrix inequalities, and for the first time referred to neutral systems with the time-varying propagation and delay-dependent stability for capacity analysis of MANETs. The proposed criteria are less conservative since they are based on an equivalent model transformation. Furthermore, we also provide an effective and efficient iterative algorithm to solve the constrained stability control model. Simulation experiments have verified the effectiveness and efficiency of our algorithm. (general)

  15. Effects of some storage conditions on the stability of hydrocortisone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the effects of some environmental storage conditionslight, temperature and humidity on the stability of the steroidal drug, hydrocortisone sodium succinate injection were investigated. The drug samples were stored at varying conditions of light, temperature (0°C, 28°C and 60°C) and humidity, after which each ...

  16. Effects of Preservative Techniques on the Storage Stability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of different preservative techniques on the storage stability of sorghum stem sheath beverage was studied. A portion of the beverage samples were pasteurized at 75oC for 15 mins, another pasteurized and refrigerated and the other pasteurized and preserved with 0.1% sodium benzoate and they were studied at ...

  17. Effect of some stabilizing agents on globule characteristics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effects of some stabilizing agents (cassava, maize and bentonite mucilages) on globule characteristics and rheological properties of oil in water emulsions. Emulsions were prepared by mixing varying proportions of the mucilages with Arachis oil in the ratio of 60:40 (oil: water) with the aid of a ...

  18. The stabilizing effects of dibutyltin distearate on some properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of weathering on poly(glycerol-phthalate) based alkyd coatings of the unstabilised and stabilised samples using varying amounts of dibutyltin distearate have been studied. The weathering and stabilization processes were monitored using infrared spectroscopy,gel formation, colour development, tensile strength ...

  19. Effect of different microencapsulation materials on stability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of different microencapsulation materials on the stability of probiotic bacterium (Lactobacillus plantarum DSM 20174). Microencapsulation methods with alginates were carried out using sodium chloride, canola oil, olive oil, and chitosan. The recorded data showed that the ...

  20. The effect of stability treatmetn on the surface energetics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of stability treatmetn on the surface energetics of inhalation grade lactose. IP Okoye. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Pure and Applied Physics Vol. 14 (1) 2008 pp.85-88. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  1. Copolymer adsorption and the effect on colloidal stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijsterbosch, H.D.

    1998-01-01

    The main aim of the work described in this thesis is to study the effect of different types of copolymers on the stability of aqueous oxide dispersions. Such dispersions are a major component in water-borne paints. In order to obtain a better insight in steric stabilisation we first investigated the

  2. Operational Stability of Organic Field‐Effect Transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, P.A.; Sharma, A.; Matthijssen, S.J.G.; Kemerink, M.; de Leeuw, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are considered in technological applications for which low cost or mechanical flexibility are crucial factors. The environmental stability of the organic semiconductors used in OFETs has improved to a level that is now sufficient for commercialization.

  3. Kinetic Effects on the Stability Properties of Field-reversed Configurations: I. Linear Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elena V. Belova; Ronald C. Davidson; Hantao Ji; Masaaki Yamada

    2003-01-28

    New computational results are presented which advance the understanding of the stability properties of the Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). We present results of hybrid and two-fluid (Hall-MHD) simulations of prolate FRCs. The n = 1 tilt instability mechanism and growth rate reduction mechanisms are investigated in detail including resonant particle effects, finite Larmor radius and Hall stabilization, and profile effects. It is shown that the Hall effect determines the mode rotation and the change in the linear mode structure in the kinetic regime; however, the reduction in the growth rate is mostly due to finite Larmor radius effects. Resonant wave-particle interactions are studied as a function of (a) elongation, (b) the kinetic parameter S*, which is proportional to the ratio of the separatrix radius to the thermal ion Larmor radius, and (c) the separatrix shape. It is demonstrated that, contrary to the usually assumed stochasticity of the ion orbits in the FRC, a large fraction of the orbits are regular in long configurations when S* is small. A stochasticity condition is found, and a scaling with the S* parameter is presented. Resonant particle effects are shown to maintain the instability in the large gyroradius regime regardless of the separatrix shape.

  4. Effects of isotropic alpha populations on tokamak ballooning stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spong, D.A.; Sigmar, D.J.; Tsang, K.T.; Ramos, J.J.; Hastings, D.E.; Cooper, W.A.

    1986-12-01

    Fusion product alpha populations can significantly influence tokamak stability due to coupling between the trapped alpha precessional drift and the kinetic ballooning mode frequency. Careful, quantitative evaluations of these effects are necessary in burning plasma devices such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the Joint European Torus, and we have continued systematic development of such a kinetic stability model. In this model we have considered a range of different forms for the alpha distribution function and the tokamak equilibrium. Both Maxwellian and slowing-down models have been used for the alpha energy dependence while deeply trapped and, more recently, isotropic pitch angle dependences have been examined

  5. Effects of gamma irradiation on antioxidants and ultraviolet stabilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Yoko; Miura, Makiko; Miura, Yukiko; Yamada, Takashi

    1998-01-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation on 18 kinds of antioxidants and 10 kinds of ultraviolet stabilizers, intact or in a polyethylene sheet, were studied. After irradiating at a 30kGy dose, the content of additives themselves did not change and new degradation products were not found. While most antioxidants in polyethylene had a decreased content after irradiation, most ultraviolet stabilizers did not change. During the migration tests with aqueous food simulants, additives were not released from either irradiated or unirradiated sheets. For the migration tests with n-heptane, however, all additives were released from the unirradiated sheet, while most of the antioxidants were not released or released only slightly. (author)

  6. The registration of non-cooperative moving targets laser point cloud in different view point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Sun, Huayan; Guo, Huichao

    2018-01-01

    Non-cooperative moving target multi-view cloud registration is the key technology of 3D reconstruction of laser threedimension imaging. The main problem is that the density changes greatly and noise exists under different acquisition conditions of point cloud. In this paper, firstly, the feature descriptor is used to find the most similar point cloud, and then based on the registration algorithm of region segmentation, the geometric structure of the point is extracted by the geometric similarity between point and point, The point cloud is divided into regions based on spectral clustering, feature descriptors are created for each region, searching to find the most similar regions in the most similar point of view cloud, and then aligning the pair of point clouds by aligning their minimum bounding boxes. Repeat the above steps again until registration of all point clouds is completed. Experiments show that this method is insensitive to the density of point clouds and performs well on the noise of laser three-dimension imaging.

  7. Non-cooperative game theory in biology and cooperative reasoning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabalak, Alihan; Smirnova, Elena; Jost, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    The readiness for spontaneous cooperation together with the assumptions that others share this cooperativity has been identified as a fundamental feature that distinguishes humans from other animals, including the great apes. At the same time, cooperativity presents an evolutionary puzzle because non-cooperators do better in a group of cooperators. We develop here an analysis of the process leading to cooperation in terms of rationality concepts, game theory and epistemic logic. We are, however, not attempting to reconstruct the actual evolutionary process. We rather want to provide the logical structure underlying cooperation in order to understand why cooperation is possible and what kind of reasoning and beliefs would lead to cooperative decision-making. Game theory depends on an underlying common belief in non-cooperative rationality of the players, and cooperativity similarly can utilize a common belief in cooperative rationality as its basis. We suggest a weaker concept of rational decision-making in games that encompasses both types of decision-making. We build this up in stages, starting from simple optimization, then using anticipation of the reaction of others, to finally arrive at reflexive and cooperative reasoning. While each stage is more difficult than the preceding, importantly, we also identify a reduction of complexity achieved by the consistent application of higher stage reasoning.

  8. Finite-Larmor-radius effects on z-pinch stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Jan; Faghihi, Mostafa

    1989-06-01

    The effect of finite Larmor radius (FLR) on the stability of m = 1 small-axial-wavelength kinks in a z-pinch with purely poloidal magnetic field is investigated. We use the incompressible FLR MHD model; a collisionless fluid model that consistently includes the relevant FLR terms due to ion gyroviscosity, Hall effect and electron diamagnetism. With FLR terms absent, the Kadomtsev criterion of ideal MHD, 2r dp/dr + m2B2/μ0 ≥ 0 predicts instability for internal modes unless the current density is singular at the centre of the pinch. The same result is obtained in the present model, with FLR terms absent. When the FLR terms are included, a normal-mode analysis of the linearized equations yields the following results. Marginally unstable (ideal) modes are stabilized by gyroviscosity. The Hall term has a damping (but not absolutely stabilizing) effect - in agreement with earlier work. On specifying a constant current and particle density equilibrium, the effect of electron diamagnetism vanishes. For a z-pinch with parameters relevant to the EXTRAP experiment, the m = 1 modes are then fully stabilized over the crosssection for wavelengths λ/a ≤ 1, where a denotes the pinch radius. As a general z-pinch result a critical line-density limit Nmax = 5 × 1018 m-1 is found, above which gyroviscous stabilization near the plasma boundary becomes insufficient. This limit corresponds to about five Larmor radii along the pinch radius. The result holds for wavelengths close to, or smaller than, the pinch radius and for realistic equilibrium profiles. This limit is far below the required limit for a reactor with contained alpha particles, which is in excess of 1020 m-1.

  9. Finite-Larmor-radius effects on z-pinch stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffel, J.; Faghihi, M. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden))

    1989-06-01

    The effect of finite Larmor radius (FLR) on the stability of m = 1 small-axial-wavelength kinks in a z-pinch with purely poloidal magnetic field is investigated. The incompressible FLR MHD model is used; a collisionless fluid model that consistently includes the relevant FLR terms due to ion gyroviscosity, Hall effect and electron diamagnetism. With FLR terms absent, the Kadomtsev criterion of ideal MHD, 2rdp/dr+m{sup 2}B{sup 2}/{mu}{sub 0}{ge}0 predicts instability for internal modes unless the current density is singular at the centre of the pinch. The same result is obtained in the present model, with FLR terms absent. When the LFR terms are included, a normal-mode analysis of the linearized equations yields the following results. Marginally unstable (ideal) modes are stabilized by gyroviscosity. The Hall term has a damping (but no absolutely stabilizing) effect - in agreement with earlier work. On specifying a constant current and particle density equilibrium, the effect of electron diamagnetism vanishes. For a z-pinch with parameters relevant to the EXTRAP experiment, the m = 1 modes are then fully stabilized over the cross-section for wavelengths {lambda}/{alpha}{le}1, where {alpha} denotes the pinch radius. As a general z-pinch result a critical line-density limit ''N''{sub max}=5x10{sup 18}m{sup -1} is found, above which gyroviscous stabilization near the plasma boundary becomes insufficient. This limit corresponds to about five Larmor radii along the pinch radius. The result holds for wavelengths close to, or smaller than, the pinch radius and for realistic equilibrium profiles. This limit is far below the required limit for a reactor with contained alpha particles, which is in excess of 10{sup 20} m{sup -1}. (author).

  10. Finite-Larmor-radius effects on z-pinch stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, J.; Faghihi, M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of finite Larmor radius (FLR) on the stability of m = 1 small-axial-wavelength kinks in a z-pinch with purely poloidal magnetic field is investigated. The incompressible FLR MHD model is used; a collisionless fluid model that consistently includes the relevant FLR terms due to ion gyroviscosity, Hall effect and electron diamagnetism. With FLR terms absent, the Kadomtsev criterion of ideal MHD, 2rdp/dr+m 2 B 2 /μ 0 ≥0 predicts instability for internal modes unless the current density is singular at the centre of the pinch. The same result is obtained in the present model, with FLR terms absent. When the LFR terms are included, a normal-mode analysis of the linearized equations yields the following results. Marginally unstable (ideal) modes are stabilized by gyroviscosity. The Hall term has a damping (but no absolutely stabilizing) effect - in agreement with earlier work. On specifying a constant current and particle density equilibrium, the effect of electron diamagnetism vanishes. For a z-pinch with parameters relevant to the EXTRAP experiment, the m = 1 modes are then fully stabilized over the cross-section for wavelengths λ/α≤1, where α denotes the pinch radius. As a general z-pinch result a critical line-density limit ''N'' max =5x10 18 m -1 is found, above which gyroviscous stabilization near the plasma boundary becomes insufficient. This limit corresponds to about five Larmor radii along the pinch radius. The result holds for wavelengths close to, or smaller than, the pinch radius and for realistic equilibrium profiles. This limit is far below the required limit for a reactor with contained alpha particles, which is in excess of 10 20 m -1 . (author)

  11. Effect of stabilizers on the physico-chemical and sensory attributes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-01-18

    Jan 18, 2008 ... a source of highly nutritive protein, energy from added cane sugar ... stability of the grain during storage, value of its product and ease of .... Effect of stabilizers on the solids and specific gravity of thermized yoghurt*+. Stabilize.

  12. Wellbore stability in shales considering chemo-poroelastic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Ewerton M.P.; Pastor, Jorge A.S.C.; Fontoura, Sergio A.B.; Rabe, Claudio [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Civil. Grupo de Tecnologia e Engenharia de Petroleo

    2004-07-01

    Under compaction and low geothermal gradients are deep water characteristics. Both under compaction and low geothermal gradients generate considerable thickness of smectite-rich shales. These rocks are the major source of wellbore stability problems, because they are susceptible to adverse physico-chemical reactions when in contact with inadequate drilling fluids. Due shales are low permeability rocks diffusion processes dominate the changes of pore pressure around wellbore. Diffusion of fluids, ions and temperature occurs in shales during drilling and demand a fully coupled modelling taking account these factors. Despite temperature importance, in this paper wellbore stability in shales is analyzed through a model that considers only the coupling between poroelastic and physico-chemical effects. The coupled equations are solved analytically and have been implemented in a computational simulator with user-friendly interface. Time-dependent simulations of wellbore stability in shales are presented for a typical deep water scenario. The results show that physico-chemical effects change pore pressure around wellbore and have high impact on the wellbore stability. (author)

  13. Effects of alpha populations on tokamak ballooning stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spong, D.A.; Sigmar, D.J.; Tsang, K.T.; Ramos, J.J.; Hastings, D.E.; Cooper, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Fusion product alpha populations can significantly influence tokamak stability due to coupling between the trapped alpha precessional drift and the kinetic ballooning mode frequency. This effect is of particular importance in parameter regimes where the alpha pressure gradient begins to constitute a sizable fraction of the thermal plasma pressure gradient. Careful, quantitative evaluations of these effects are necessary in burning plasma devices such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the Joint European Torus, and we have continued systematic development of such a kinetic stability model. In this model we have considered a range of different forms for the alpha distribution function and the tokamak equilibrium. Both Maxwellian and slowing-down models have been used for the alpha energy dependence while deeply trapped and, more recently, isotropic pitch angle dependence have been examined

  14. The Condensation effect on the two-phase flow stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou Mohamed, Hesham Nagah

    2005-01-01

    A one-dimensional analytical model has been developed to be used for the linear analysis of density-wave oscillations in a parallel heated channel and a natural circulation loop.The heater and the riser sections are divided into a single-phase and a two-phase region.The two-phase region is represented by the drift-flux model. The model accounts for aphasic slip and subcooled boiling.The localized friction at the heater and the riser exit is treated considering the two-phase mixture.Also the effects of the condensation in the riser and the change in the system pressure have been studied.The exact equation for the heated channel and the total loop pressure drop is perturbed around the steady state.he stability characteristics of the heated channel and the loop are investigated using the Root finding method criterion.The results are summarized on instability maps in the plane of subcooled boiling number vs. phase change number (i.e., inlet subcooling vs. heater heat flux).The predictions of the model are compared with experimental results published in open literature. The results show that, the treatment effect of localized friction in two-phase mixtures stabilizes the system and improves the agreement of the calculations with the experimental results.For a parallel heated channel, the results indicate a more stable system with high inlet restriction, low outlet restriction, and high inlet velocity. And for a natural circulation loop, an increase in the inlet restriction broadened the range of the continuous circulation mode and stabilized the system, a decrease in the exit restriction or the liquid charging level shifted to the right the range of the continuous circulation mode and stabilized the system and an increase in the riser condensation shifted to the right the range of the continuous circulation mode and stabilized the system.The results show that the model agrees well with the available experimental data. In particular, the results show the significance of

  15. Effective interactions approach to phase stability in alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enrique, R.A.; Bellon, P.

    1999-01-01

    Phase stability in alloys under irradiation is studied considering effective thermodynamic potentials. A simple kinetic model of a binary alloy with phase separation is investigated. Time evolution in the alloy results from two competing dynamics: thermal diffusion, and irradiation induced ballistic exchanges The dynamical (steady state) phase diagram is evaluated exactly performing Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The solution is then compared to two theoretical frameworks: the effective quasi-interactions model as proposed by Vaks and Kamishenko, and the effective free energy model as proposed by Martin. New developments of these models are proposed to allow for quantitative comparisons. Both theoretical frameworks yield fairly good approximations to the dynamical phase diagram

  16. Effective interactions approach to phase stability in alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enrique, R.A.; Bellon, P.

    1999-01-01

    Phase stability in alloys under irradiation is studied considering effective thermodynamic potentials. A simple kinetic model of a binary alloy with phase separation is investigated. Time evolution in the alloy results form two competing dynamics: thermal diffusion, and irradiation induced ballistic exchanges. The dynamical (steady state) phase diagram is evaluated exactly performing Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The solution is then compared to two theoretical frameworks: the effective quasi-interactions model as proposed by Vaks and Kamishenko, and the effective free energy model as proposed by Martin. New developments of these models are proposed to allow for quantitative comparisons. Both theoretical frameworks yield fairly good approximations to the dynamical phase diagram

  17. Effect of Rice Husk Ash on Cement Stabilized Laterite

    OpenAIRE

    Musa ALHASSAN; Alhaji Mohammed MUSTAPHA

    2007-01-01

    Laterite soil collected from Maikunkele area of Minna, classified as an A-7-6 on AASHTO classification, was stabilized with 2-8% cement by weight of the dry soil. Using British Standard Light (BSL) compaction energy, the effect of Rice Husk Ash (RHA) on the soil was investigated with respect to compaction characteristics, California Bearing Ratio (CBR) and Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) tests. Results obtained, indicate a general decrease in Maximum Dry Density (MDD) and increase in Op...

  18. Local effect of equilibrium current on tearing mode stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzani, F.

    1985-12-01

    The local effect of the equilibrium current on the linear stability of low poloidal number tearing modes in tokamaks is investigated analytically. The plasma response inside the tearing layer is derived from fluid theory and the local equilibrium current is shown to couple to the mode dynamics through its gradient, which is proportional to the local electron temperature gradient under the approximations used in the analysis. The relevant eigenmode equations, expressing Ampere's law and the plasma quasineutrality condition, respectively, are suitably combined in a single integral equation, from which a variational principle is formulated to derive the mode dispersion relations for several cases of interest. The local equilibrium current is treated as a small perturbation of the known results for the m greater than or equal to 2 and the m = 1 tearing modes in the collisional regime, and the m greater than or equal to 2 tearing mode in the semicollisional regime; its effect is found to enhance stabilization for the m greater than or equal to 2 drift-tearing mode in the collisional regime, whereas the m = 1 growth rate is very slightly increased and the stabilizing effect of the parallel thermal conduction on the m greater than or equal to 2 mode in the semicollisional regime is slightly reduced

  19. Stabilizing Effects of Bacterial Biofilms: EPS Penetration and Redistribution of Bed Stability Down the Sediment Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. D.; Zhang, C. K.; Zhou, Z.; Gong, Z.; Zhou, J. J.; Tao, J. F.; Paterson, D. M.; Feng, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Biofilms, consisting of microorganisms and their secreted extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), serve as "ecosystem engineers" stabilizing sedimentary environments. Natural sediment bed provides an excellent substratum for biofilm growth. The porous structure and rich nutrients allow the EPS matrix to spread deeper into the bed. A series of laboratory-controlled experiments were conducted to investigate sediment colonization of Bacillus subtilis and the penetration of EPS into the sediment bed with incubation time. In addition to EPS accumulation on the bed surface, EPS also penetrated downward. However, EPS distribution developed strong vertical heterogeneity with a much higher content in the surface layer than in the bottom layer. Scanning electron microscope images of vertical layers also displayed different micromorphological properties of sediment-EPS matrix. In addition, colloidal and bound EPSs exhibited distinctive distribution patterns. After the full incubation, the biosedimentary beds were eroded to test the variation of bed stability induced by biological effects. This research provides an important reference for the prediction of sediment transport and hence deepens the understanding of the biologically mediated sediment system and broadens the scope of the burgeoning research field of "biomorphodynamics."

  20. Texture segmentation of non-cooperative spacecrafts images based on wavelet and fractal dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kanzhi; Yue, Xiaokui

    2011-06-01

    With the increase of on-orbit manipulations and space conflictions, missions such as tracking and capturing the target spacecrafts are aroused. Unlike cooperative spacecrafts, fixing beacons or any other marks on the targets is impossible. Due to the unknown shape and geometry features of non-cooperative spacecraft, in order to localize the target and obtain the latitude, we need to segment the target image and recognize the target from the background. The data and errors during the following procedures such as feature extraction and matching can also be reduced. Multi-resolution analysis of wavelet theory reflects human beings' recognition towards images from low resolution to high resolution. In addition, spacecraft is the only man-made object in the image compared to the natural background and the differences will be certainly observed between the fractal dimensions of target and background. Combined wavelet transform and fractal dimension, in this paper, we proposed a new segmentation algorithm for the images which contains complicated background such as the universe and planet surfaces. At first, Daubechies wavelet basis is applied to decompose the image in both x axis and y axis, thus obtain four sub-images. Then, calculate the fractal dimensions in four sub-images using different methods; after analyzed the results of fractal dimensions in sub-images, we choose Differential Box Counting in low resolution image as the principle to segment the texture which has the greatest divergences between different sub-images. This paper also presents the results of experiments by using the algorithm above. It is demonstrated that an accurate texture segmentation result can be obtained using the proposed technique.

  1. SPREADING SPEEDS AND TRAVELING WAVES FOR NON-COOPERATIVE INTEGRO-DIFFERENCE SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The study of spatially explicit integro-difference systems when the local population dynamics are given in terms of discrete-time generations models has gained considerable attention over the past two decades. These nonlinear systems arise naturally in the study of the spatial dispersal of organisms. The brunt of the mathematical research on these systems, particularly, when dealing with cooperative systems, has focused on the study of the existence of traveling wave solutions and the characterization of their spreading speed. Here, we characterize the minimum propagation (spreading) speed, via the convergence of initial data to wave solutions, for a large class of non cooperative nonlinear systems of integro-difference equations. The spreading speed turns out to be the slowest speed from a family of non-constant traveling wave solutions. The applicability of these theoretical results is illustrated through the explicit study of an integro-difference system with local population dynamics governed by Hassell and Comins’ non-cooperative competition model (1976). The corresponding integro-difference nonlinear systems that results from the redistribution of individuals via a dispersal kernel is shown to satisfy conditions that guarantee the existence of minimum speeds and traveling waves. This paper is dedicated to Avner Friedman as we celebrate his immense contributions to the fields of partial differential equations, integral equations, mathematical biology, industrial mathematics and applied mathematics in general. His leadership in the mathematical sciences and his mentorship of students and friends over several decades has made a huge difference in the personal and professional lives of many, including both of us. PMID:24899868

  2. Gyro-effect stabilizes unstable permanent maglev centrifugal pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun-Xi

    2007-03-01

    According to Earnshaw's Theorem (1839), the passive maglev cannot achieve stable equilibrium and thus an extra coil is needed to make the rotor electrically levitated in a heart pump. The author had developed a permanent maglev centrifugal pump utilizing only passive magnetic bearings, to keep the advantages but to avoid the disadvantages of the electric maglev pumps. The equilibrium stability was achieved by use of so-called "gyro-effect": a rotating body with certain high speed can maintain its rotation stably. This pump consisted of a rotor (driven magnets and an impeller), and a stator with motor coil and pump housing. Two passive magnetic bearings between rotor and stator were devised to counteract the attractive force between the motor coil iron core and the rotor driven magnets. Bench testing with saline demonstrated a levitated rotor under preconditions of higher than 3,250 rpm rotation and more than 1 l/min pumping flow. Rotor levitation was demonstrated by 4 Hall sensors on the stator, with evidence of reduced maximal eccentric distance from 0.15 mm to 0.07 mm. The maximal rotor vibration amplitude was 0.06 mm in a gap of 0.15 mm between rotor and stator. It concluded that Gyro-effect can help passive maglev bearings to achieve stabilization of permanent maglev pump; and that high flow rate indicates good hydraulic property of the pump, which helps also the stability of passive maglev pump.

  3. Noise stabilization effects in models of interdisciplinary physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spagnolo, B; Augello, G; Caldara, P; Fiasconaro, A; La Cognata, A; Pizzolato, N; Valenti, D; Dubkov, A A; Pankratov, A L

    2009-01-01

    Metastability is a generic feature of many nonlinear systems, and the problem of the lifetime of metastable states involves fundamental aspects of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The investigation of noise-induced phenomena in far from equilibrium systems is one of the approaches used to understand the behaviour of physical and biological complex systems. The enhancement of the lifetime of metastable states through the noise enhanced stability effect and the role played by the resonant activation phenomenon will be discussed in models of interdisciplinary physics: (i) polymer translocation dynamics; (ii) transient regime of FitzHugh-Nagumo model; (iii) market stability in a nonlinear Heston model; (iv) dynamics of Josephson junctions; (v) metastability in a quantum bitable system.

  4. Effect of Rice Husk Ash on Cement Stabilized Laterite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa ALHASSAN

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Laterite soil collected from Maikunkele area of Minna, classified as an A-7-6 on AASHTO classification, was stabilized with 2-8% cement by weight of the dry soil. Using British Standard Light (BSL compaction energy, the effect of Rice Husk Ash (RHA on the soil was investigated with respect to compaction characteristics, California Bearing Ratio (CBR and Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS tests. Results obtained, indicate a general decrease in Maximum Dry Density (MDD and increase in Optimum Moisture Content (OMC, all with increase in RHA Content (2-8% at specified cement contents. There was also a tremendous improvement in the CBR and UCS with increase in the RHA content at specified cement contents to their peak values at between 4-6% RHA. The UCS values also improved with curing age. This indicates the potentials of using 4-6% RHA admixed with less cement contents for laterite soil stabilization.

  5. Stabilizing effect of driving and dissipation on quantum metastable states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Davide; Carollo, Angelo; Spagnolo, Bernardo

    2018-04-01

    We investigate how the combined effects of strong Ohmic dissipation and monochromatic driving affect the stability of a quantum system with a metastable state. We find that, by increasing the coupling with the environment, the escape time makes a transition from a regime in which it is substantially controlled by the driving, displaying resonant peaks and dips, to a regime of frequency-independent escape time with a peak followed by a steep falloff. The escape time from the metastable state has a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of the thermal-bath coupling, the temperature, and the frequency of the driving. The quantum noise-enhanced stability phenomenon is observed in the investigated system.

  6. Effect of nose bluntness on boundary layer stability and transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M. R.; Spall, R. E.; Chang, C.-L.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of nose bluntness on boundary layer instability is studied theoretically for a Mach 8 flow past a 7 degree semivertex cone. The basic flow is computed by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. Linear stability analysis of the basic flow reveals that, with small amount of bluntness, the critical Reynolds number for the onset of instability increases by an order of magnitude compared to the sharp cone value. The computed second mode frequencies are also in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. The results are used to explain the effect of unit Reynolds number on transition present in the quiet aeroballistic range data.

  7. Numerical studies of transverse curvature effects on transonic flow stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaraeg, M. G.; Daudpota, Q. I.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study of transverse curvature effects on compressible flow temporal stability for transonic to low supersonic Mach numbers is presented for axisymmetric modes. The mean flows studied include a similar boundary-layer profile and a nonsimilar axisymmetric boundary-layer solution. The effect of neglecting curvature in the mean flow produces only small quantitative changes in the disturbance growth rate. For transonic Mach numbers (1-1.4) and aerodynamically relevant Reynolds numbers (5000-10,000 based on displacement thickness), the maximum growth rate is found to increase with curvature - the maximum occurring at a nondimensional radius (based on displacement thickness) between 30 and 100.

  8. Effect of modes interaction on the resistive wall mode stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Longxi; Wu Bin

    2013-01-01

    Effects of modes interaction on the resistive wall mode (RWM) stability are studied. When considering the modes interaction effects, the linear growth rate of the most unstable (3, 1) mode decreases. After linear evolution, the RWM saturates at the nonlinear phase. The saturation can be attributed to flux piling up on the resistive wall. When some modes exist, the (3, 1) mode saturates at lower level compared with single mode evolution. Meanwhile, the magnetic energy of the (5, 2) mode increases correspondingly, but the magnetic energy saturation level of the (2, 1) mode changes weakly. (authors)

  9. Kinky Choices, Dictators and Split Might : A Non-Cooperative Model for Household Consumption and Labor Supply

    OpenAIRE

    Boone, J.; van der Wiel, K.M.; Vermeulen, F.M.P.

    2009-01-01

    It is unlikely that husbands and wives always agree on exactly what public goods to buy. Nor do they necessarily agree on how many hours to work with obvious consequences for the household budget. We therefore model consumption and labor supply behavior of a couple in a non-cooperative setting by adopting a Nash approach. Using minimal assumptions, we prove that demand for public goods is characterized by three regimes. It is either determined by the preferences of one of the partners only (H...

  10. Liquid Self-Balancing Device Effects on Flexible Rotor Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Urbiola-Soto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nearly a century ago, the liquid self-balancing device was first introduced by M. LeBlanc for passive balancing of turbine rotors. Although of common use in many types or rotating machines nowadays, little information is available on the unbalance response and stability characteristics of this device. Experimental fluid flow visualization evidences that radial and traverse circulatory waves arise due to the interaction of the fluid backward rotation and the baffle boards within the self-balancer annular cavity. The otherwise destabilizing force induced by trapped fluids in hollow rotors, becomes a stabilizing mechanism when the cavity is equipped with adequate baffle boards. Further experiments using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV enable to assess the active fluid mass fraction to be one-third of the total fluid mass. An analytical model is introduced to study the effects of the active fluid mass fraction on a flexible rotor supported by flexible supports excited by bwo different destabilizing mechanisms; rotor internal friction damping and aerodynamic cross-coupling. It is found that the fluid radial and traverse forces contribute to the balancing action and to improve the rotor stability, respectively.

  11. Stochastic models (cooperative and non-cooperative) for NMR analysis of the hetero-association of aromatic molecules in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evstigneev, Maxim P. [Department of Physics, Sevastopol National Technical University, Sevastopol 99053, Crimea (Ukraine)], E-mail: max_evstigneev@mail.ru; Davies, David B. [School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Veselkov, Alexei N. [Department of Physics, Sevastopol National Technical University, Sevastopol 99053, Crimea (Ukraine)

    2006-01-25

    Stochastic cooperative (STOCH-C) and non-cooperative (STOCH-NC) models have been developed for NMR analysis of the hetero-association of aromatic compounds in solution, in order to take into account all physically meaningful association reactions of molecules in which there are no limitations on the lengths of the aggregates and complexes. These algorithmical approaches are compared with previously published basic (BASE) and generalized (GEN) analytical statistical thermodynamical models of hetero-association of biologically active aromatic molecules using the same sets of published NMR data measured under the same solution conditions (0.1 M phosphate buffer, pD = 7.1, T = 298 K). It is shown that, within experimental errors, the BASE analytical model may be used to describe molecular systems characterized by relatively small contributions of hetero-association reactions, whereas the GEN model may be applied to hetero-association reactions of any aromatic compound with different self-association properties. The STOCH-C computational algorithm enabled the effect on hetero-association of the interactions of molecules with different cooperativity parameters of self-association to be estimated for the first time and it is proposed that the algorithm for the stochastic models has great potential for detailed investigation and understanding of the interactions of aromatic molecules in solution.

  12. Stochastic models (cooperative and non-cooperative) for NMR analysis of the hetero-association of aromatic molecules in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evstigneev, Maxim P.; Davies, David B.; Veselkov, Alexei N.

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic cooperative (STOCH-C) and non-cooperative (STOCH-NC) models have been developed for NMR analysis of the hetero-association of aromatic compounds in solution, in order to take into account all physically meaningful association reactions of molecules in which there are no limitations on the lengths of the aggregates and complexes. These algorithmical approaches are compared with previously published basic (BASE) and generalized (GEN) analytical statistical thermodynamical models of hetero-association of biologically active aromatic molecules using the same sets of published NMR data measured under the same solution conditions (0.1 M phosphate buffer, pD = 7.1, T = 298 K). It is shown that, within experimental errors, the BASE analytical model may be used to describe molecular systems characterized by relatively small contributions of hetero-association reactions, whereas the GEN model may be applied to hetero-association reactions of any aromatic compound with different self-association properties. The STOCH-C computational algorithm enabled the effect on hetero-association of the interactions of molecules with different cooperativity parameters of self-association to be estimated for the first time and it is proposed that the algorithm for the stochastic models has great potential for detailed investigation and understanding of the interactions of aromatic molecules in solution

  13. Noncommutative solitons: moduli spaces, quantization, finite θ effects and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadasz, Leszek; Rocek, Martin; Lindström, Ulf; von Unge, Rikard

    2001-06-01

    We find the N-soliton solution at infinite θ, as well as the metric on the moduli space corresponding to spatial displacements of the solitons. We use a perturbative expansion to incorporate the leading θ-1 corrections, and find an effective short range attraction between solitons. We study the stability of various solutions. We discuss the finite θ corrections to scattering, and find metastable orbits. Upon quantization of the two-soliton moduli space, for any finite θ, we find an s-wave bound state.

  14. Effects of shock on hypersonic boundary layer stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, F.; Rambaud, P.

    2013-06-01

    The design of hypersonic vehicles requires the estimate of the laminar to turbulent transition location for an accurate sizing of the thermal protection system. Linear stability theory is a fast scientific way to study the problem. Recent improvements in computational capabilities allow computing the flow around a full vehicle instead of using only simplified boundary layer equations. In this paper, the effect of the shock is studied on a mean flow provided by steady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computations and simplified boundary layer calculations.

  15. Stabilization of kinetic internal kink mode by ion diamagnetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitou, H.; Kuramoto, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Yagi, M.; Tokuda, S.; Matsumoto, T.

    2000-04-01

    Ion diamagnetic effects on the m=1 (poloidal mode number) and n=1 (toroidal mode number) kinetic internal kink mode are studied numerically by the three-field gyro-reduced-MHD code in the cylindrical coordinates, GRM3F-CY. In the derivation of the gryo-reduced-MHD model including the ion diamagnetic effects, finite gyroradius effects of ions are added to the gyrokinetic Poisson equation (quasi-neutral condition) and the convection term of the conservation law of the ion density. It is found that the long wavelength approximation, ksub(perpendicular) ρ ti ti is the thermal ion gyroradius, fails to reproduce the correct dispersion relation; the formulation valid even for ksub(perpendicular) ρ ti >> 1 is necessary. The results of numerical calculation coincide with the theory for |ω *e |+|ω *i | 0 , where the growth rate reduces as the density gradient increases. Here ω *e and ω *i are electron and ion diamagnetic angular frequencies estimated at the rational surface of q=1 (q is a safety factor), respectively, and γ 0 is the growth rate for the uniform density. Very weak instability, however, is observed for |ω *e |+|ω *i | 0 , where the theory predicts the complete stabilization. This residual instability appears since the region with the density gradient is limited in the radial direction and the stabilization by the outgoing drift-wave like mode becomes incomplete. (author)

  16. Shear effect on the plasma stability in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogutse, O.P.; Yurchenko, Eh.I.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical criterion of stability of balloon modes is obtained, taking into consideration two new physical effects: destabilization caused by intersection of branches of U-shaped oscillations and the balloon effect related to shear. An asymptotic variational method of solving differential equations having both periodical and non-periodical coefficients has been developed to determine the criterion. This method is a generalization of the sensitive method of asymptotic expansion, but unlike the latter, it allows one to take account of potential effects of the reflection type and wave penetration through the barrier. It is this fact that allows to describe the intersection of branch oscillations. The criterion obtained shows that plasma may be unstable even with configuration with circular magnetic surfaces

  17. The effect of simulated acid rain on the stabilization of cadmium in contaminated agricultural soils treated with stabilizing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hao; Wu, Chunfa; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xumei

    2018-04-16

    Stabilization technology is one of widely used remediation technologies for cadmium (Cd)-contaminated agricultural soils, but stabilized Cd in soil may be activated again when external conditions such as acid rain occurred. Therefore, it is necessary to study the effect of acid rain on the performance of different stabilizing agents on Cd-polluted agriculture soils. In this study, Cd-contaminated soils were treated with mono-calcium phosphate (MCP), mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP), and artificial zeolite (AZ) respectively and incubated 3 months. These treatments were followed by two types of simulated acid rain (sulfuric acid rain and mixed acid rain) with three levels of acidity (pH = 3.0, 4.0, and 5.6). The chemical forms of Cd in the soils were determined by Tessier's sequential extraction procedure, and the leaching toxicities of Cd in the soils were assessed by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). The results show that the three stabilizing agents could decrease the mobility of Cd in soil to some degree with or without simulated acid rain (SAR) treatment. The stabilization performances followed the order of AZ stabilized soil, and both anion composition and pH of acid rain were two important factors that influenced the stabilization effect of Cd.

  18. Thermodynamic effects of proline introduction on protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Ravindra Singh; Das, Mili; Sreeramulu, Sridhar; Sirajuddin, Minhajuddin; Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Krishnamurthy, Vaishnavi; Ranjani, Ranganathan; Ramakrishnan, C; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2007-02-01

    The amino acid Pro is more rigid than other naturally occurring amino acids and, in proteins, lacks an amide hydrogen. To understand the structural and thermodynamic effects of Pro substitutions, it was introduced at 13 different positions in four different proteins, leucine-isoleucine-valine binding protein, maltose binding protein, ribose binding protein, and thioredoxin. Three of the maltose binding protein mutants were characterized by X-ray crystallography to confirm that no structural changes had occurred upon mutation. In the remaining cases, fluorescence and CD spectroscopy were used to show the absence of structural change. Stabilities of wild type and mutant proteins were characterized by chemical denaturation at neutral pH and by differential scanning calorimetry as a function of pH. The mutants did not show enhanced stability with respect to chemical denaturation at room temperature. However, 6 of the 13 single mutants showed a small but significant increase in the free energy of thermal unfolding in the range of 0.3-2.4 kcal/mol, 2 mutants showed no change, and 5 were destabilized. In five of the six cases, the stabilization was because of reduced entropy of unfolding. However, the magnitude of the reduction in entropy of unfolding was typically several fold larger than the theoretical estimate of -4 cal K(-1) mol(-1) derived from the relative areas in the Ramachandran map accessible to Pro and Ala residues, respectively. Two double mutants were constructed. In both cases, the effects of the single mutations on the free energy of thermal unfolding were nonadditive. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Guidance and Control of Position and Attitude for Rendezvous and Dock/Berthing with a Noncooperative/Target Spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Arantes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncooperative target spacecrafts are those assets in orbit that cannot convey any information about their states (position, attitude, and velocities or facilitate rendezvous and docking/berthing (RVD/B process. Designing a guidance, navigation, and control (GNC module for the chaser in a RVD/B mission with noncooperative target should be inevitably solved for on-orbit servicing technologies. The proximity operations and the guidance for achieving rendezvous problems are addressed in this paper. The out-of-plane maneuvers of proximity operations are explored with distinct subphases, including a chaser far approach in the target’s orbit to the first hold point and a closer approach to the final berthing location. Accordingly, guidance solutions are chosen for each subphase from the standard Hill based Closhessy-Willtshire (CW solution, elliptical fly-around, and Glideslope algorithms. The control is based on a linear quadratic regulator approach (LQR. At the final berthing location, attitude tracker based on a proportional derivative (PD form is tested to synchronize the chaser and target attitudes. The paper analyzes the performance of both controllers in terms of the tracking ability and the robustness. Finally, it prescribes any restrictions that may be imposed on the guidance during any subphase which can help to improve the controllers tracking ability.

  20. Effect of natural antioxidant mixtures on margarine stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizkhani, M.; Zandi, P.

    2010-01-01

    In spite of their efficiency, the use of synthetic antioxidants such as tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) has been questioned because of their possible carcinogenic effects. The purpose of this study was to establish a mixture of natural antioxidants that provides the optimum oxidative stability for margarine. Antioxidant treatments included 10 various mixtures (F1- F10) containing 100-500 ppm tocopherol mixture (Toc), 100-200 ppm ascorbyl palmitate (AP), 100-200 ppm rosemary extract (Ros) and 1000 ppm lecithin(Lec) along with a control or F0 (with no antioxidant) and F11 containing 120 ppm TBHQ. The effect of antioxidant mixtures on the stability of margarine samples during an oven test (60 +-1 deg. C), rancimat test at 110 deg. C and storage at 4 deg. C was evaluated. The final ranking of the natural antioxidant mixtures was as follows: F2, F10>F5, F9>F8>F1, F3, F4>F6, F7. Considering the results of this research and ranking criteria, F2 (200 ppmAp + 200 ppmRos) and F10 (200 ppmRos + 200 ppm Toc + 1000 ppm Lec) were recommended as substitutes for TBHQ to maintain the quality and increase the shelf-life of margarine. (author)

  1. Flow effects on the stability of z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumlak, U.; Hartman, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of an axial flow on the m = 1 kink instability in z-pinches is studied numerically by reducing the linearized ideal MHD equations to a one-dimensional eigenvalue equation for the radial displacement. The derivation of the displacement equation for equilibria with axial flows will be presented. A diffuse z-pinch equilibrium is chosen that is made marginally stable to the m = 0 sausage mode by tailoring the pressure profile. The principle result reveals that a sheared axial flow does stabilize the kink mode when the shear exceeds a threshold value. Additionally, the m = 0 sausage mode is driven from marginal stability into the stable regime which suggests that the equilibrium pressure profile control can be relaxed. Fast z-pinches such as liner implosions are plagued by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability which destroys the liner and disrupts the current path before the liner arrives on axis. A sheared axial flow in a liner may quench the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the same way that it quenches MHD instabilities in a diffuse z-pinch. Simulation results will be presented showing the effect of a sheared axial flow on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a fast liner implosion

  2. Pressure effects on the thermal stability of silicon carbide fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Commercially available polymer derived SiC fibers were treated at temperatures from 1000 to 2200 C in vacuum and argon gas pressure of 1 and 1360 atm. Effects of gas pressure on the thermal stability of the fibers were determined through property comparison between the pressure treated fibers and vacuum treated fibers. Investigation of the thermal stability included studies of the fiber microstructure, weight loss, grain growth, and tensile strength. The 1360 atm argon gas treatment was found to shift the onset of fiber weight loss from 1200 to above 1500 C. Grain growth and tensile strength degradation were correlated with weight loss and were thus also inhibited by high pressure treatments. Additional heat treatment in 1 atm argon of the fibers initially treated at 1360 atm argon caused further weight loss and tensile strength degradation, thus indicating that high pressure inert gas conditions would be effective only in delaying fiber strength degradation. However, if the high gas pressure could be maintained throughout composite fabrication, then the composites could be processed at higher temperatures.

  3. Effects of Vojta method on trunk stability in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sun-Young; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2016-12-01

    Vojta reflex locomotion is important to main upright posture through stimulation of breast zone to patient with cerebral palsy. However, application in other diseases is no investigated. So, we determined the effects of stimulation of the breast zone on trunk stability in healthy individuals. Fourteen young healthy adults (7 males and 7 females) voluntarily participated in this study. The subjects were randomly divided into an experimental group (breast zone) and control group (arbitrary point). All groups were stimulated for 5 min on the left and right sides, respectively, for a total 10 times. We used the thickness of the external oblique abdominal muscle (EO), the internal oblique abdominal muscle, the transversus abdominis muscle (TrA), and the rectus abdominis muscles, as well as the area of the diaphragm by using ultrasonography. In the experimental group, the thickness of the TrA significantly increased during stimulation ( P <0.05) while the thickness of the EO significantly decreased ( P <0.05). Also, the area of diaphragm in inspiration was significantly different ( P <0.05). Therefore, stimulation of the breast zone may be effective to improve trunk stability through activation of the TrA muscle and the diaphragm.

  4. Effects of attentional focus on walking stability in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melker Worms, Jonathan L A; Stins, John F; van Wegen, Erwin E H; Verschueren, Sabine M P; Beek, Peter J; Loram, Ian D

    2017-06-01

    Balance performance in the elderly is related to psychological factors such as attentional focus. We investigated the effects of internal vs. external focus of attention and fall history on walking stability in healthy older adults. Walking stability of twenty-eight healthy older adults was assessed by applying random unilateral decelerations on a split-belt treadmill and analysing the resulting balance recovery movements. The internal focus instruction was: concentrate on the movement of your legs, whereas the external focus instruction was: concentrate on the movement of the treadmill. In both conditions participants were asked to look ahead at a screen. Outcome measures were coefficient of variation of step length and step width, and characteristics of the centre of mass velocity time-series as analysed using statistical parametric mapping. Fall history was assessed using a questionnaire. After each perturbation participants required two to three strides to regain a normal gait pattern, as determined by the centre of mass velocity response. No effects were found of internal and external focus of attention instructions and fall history on any of the outcome measures. We conclude that, compared to an internal focus of attention instruction, external focus to the walking surface does not lead to improved balance recovery responses to gait perturbations in the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Initial processes of radiation effects on genomic stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve du Penhoat, Marie-Anne; Touati, Alain; Sage, Evelyne; Houee-Levin, Chantal; Lacombe, Sandrine; Politis, Marie-Françoise; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Spezia, Riccardo; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Wien, Frank; Fujii, Kentaro; Yokoya, Akinari; Shikazono, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    We describe the progresses and current status of the REIMEI study on 'Initial processes of radiation effects on genomic stability', which is a new collaborative project between France and Japan. The theoretical study on the fragmentation pattern of doubly ionized deoxyribose has reached a new stage focusing on the effect of water molecules surrounding the deoxyribose molecule. In order to substantiate the theoretical predictions, new devices have been installed in a SPring-8 beamline. To explore the origin of signal transduction of DNA repair processes, a preliminary CD measurement in the far UV region was performed to study histone conformation changes. Based on these results, we will propose a new experimental subject in SOLEIL synchrotron to investigate the conformational changes of phosphorylated histone. Preliminary experiments using mammalian cell free extract have also been performed focusing on the role of DNA polymerases on the mutagenic potential of clustered DNA lesions. (author)

  6. Effect of dialysate temperature on hemodynamic stability among hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azar, Ahmad Taher

    2009-01-01

    Cooling the dialysate below 36.5 degree C is an important factor that contributes to hemody-namic stability in patients during hemodialysis (HD). In this study, the effect of dialysate tempe-rature on hemodynamic stability, patients' perception of dialysis discomfort and post dialysis fatigue were assessed in a group of patients on HD. A total of 50 patients, all of whom were on 3-times-perweek dialysis regimen, were studied. Patients were assessed during six dialysis sessions; in three sessions, the dialysate temperature was normal (37 degree C) and in three other sessions, the dialysate temperature was low (35 degree C). Specific scale questionnaires were used in each dialysis session, to evaluate the symptoms during the dialysis procedure as well as post-dialysis fatigue, and respective scores were noted. The results showed that usage of low dialysate temperature was associated with the following: higher post dialysis systolic blood pressure (P< 0.05) and lower post dialysis heart rate (P<0.01), with similar ultrafiltration rates, better intra-dialysis symptoms score and post-dialysis fatigue scores (P< 0.001, and P<0.001, respectively), shorter post-dialysis fatigue period (P<0.001) as well as higher urea removal (P< 00001) and Kt/V (P< 0.0001). Patients' perceptions were measured by a questionnaire, which showed that 76% of them felt more energetic after dialysis with cool dialysate and requested to be always dialyzed with cool dialysate. Low temperature dialysate is particularly beneficial for highly symptomatic patients, improves tolerance to dialysis in hypotensive patients and helps increase ultrafiltration while maintaining hemodynamic stability during and after dialysis. (author)

  7. Effect of Rice Husk Ash on Soil Stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Qasim; Aroj Bashir; Mubashar Tanvir; Malik Muhammad Anees

    2015-01-01

    The soil frequently is fragile and has low stability in heavy loading. The objective of this study is to review the stabilization of soil using sustainable methods. Some strengthening approaches are available for stabilization of expansive soils. These methods consist of stabilization with soil replacement, chemical additives, moisture control, rewetting, surcharge loading, compaction control and thermal methods. The disadvantages may be associated with all these methods due to ineffectivenes...

  8. The Effect of Ultrasound Pretreatment on Poplar Wood Dimensional Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Qiu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dimensional stability is a key property of wood that significantly affects its applications. The effect of an ultrasound pretreatment on poplar wood (Populous tomentosa dimensional stability was examined. During the pretreatments, wood samples were immersed in distilled water and treated ultrasonically under three different powers and frequencies. The samples were then analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The chemical transformation of the cell-wall material was studied and then associated with the change of water absorption and the swelling coefficient. The results showed that the water absorption decreased after the ultrasonic pretreatment. The axial and radial swelling coefficients of the pretreated samples decreased, while the tangential swelling coefficients increased. The volumetric swelling coefficient of pretreated specimens fluctuated near 4.48% (the volumetric swelling coefficient of untreated wood. Ultrasonic pretreatment increased the number of hydrophilic groups, such as the hydroxyl, acetyl, and uronic ester groups. Meanwhile, the pretreatment also increased the degree of crystallinity and reduced the available polar groups. These two factors together caused the change of the moisture absorption and the swelling coefficient of the pretreated wood. These conclusions suggest that the ultrasonic pretreatment is a promising method for further chemical modification of wood.

  9. Unconstrained tripolar hip implants: effect on hip stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyen, Olivier; Chen, Qing Shan; Bejui-Hugues, Jacques; Berry, Daniel J; An, Kai-Nan

    2007-02-01

    Tripolar implants were developed to treat unstable total hip arthroplasties. However, there is limited confirmation that they achieve this purpose despite their increasing use. Because they have a larger effective head size, these implants are expected to increase range of motion to impingement and improve stability in situations at risk for impingement compared with conventional implants. We assessed the range of motion to impingement using a tripolar implant mounted to an automated hip simulator using 22.2-mm and 28-mm femoral head sizes. The 22 and 28-mm tripolar implants provided increases of 30.5 degrees in flexion, 15.4 degrees in adduction, and 22.4 degrees in external rotation compared with the conventional 22.2-mm femoral head diameter implant. At the critical position of 90 degrees hip flexion, there was an increase of 45.2 degrees in internal rotation. At 0 degrees and 30 degrees external rotation, extension increases were 18.8 degrees and 7.8 degrees, respectively. Bony impingement was the limiting factor. Tripolar implants increased the arc of motion before impingement in positions at risk for dislocation and are expected to provide greater stability.

  10. Effective stabilization of CLA by microencapsulation in pea protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, A M M; Nunes, J C; Lima, B N B; Pedrosa, C; Calado, V; Torres, A G; Pierucci, A P T R

    2015-02-01

    CLA was microencapsulated by spray drying in ten varied wall systems (WS) consisting of pea protein isolate or pea protein concentrate (PPC) alone at varied core:WS ratios (1:2; 1:3 and 1:4), or blended with maltodextrin (M) and carboxymethylcellulose at a pea protein:carbohydrate ratio of 3:1. The physical-chemical properties of the CLA microparticles were characterised by core retention, microencapsulation efficiency (ME), particle size and moisture. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) showed the most promising results, thus we evaluated the effect of M addition in the WS on other physical-chemical characteristics and oxidative stability (CLA isomer profile, quantification of CLA and volatile compounds by SPME coupled with CG-MS) during two months of storage at room temperature, CLA:PPC (1:4) was selected for comparisons. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) microparticles demonstrated better morphology, solubility, dispersibility and higher glass-transition temperature values. M addition did not influence the oxidative stability of CLA, however its presence improved physical-chemical characteristics necessary for food applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of triethanolamine on the stability of furfurol at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baiburskaya, E.L.; Kalenik, G.S.; Levchenko, E.S.; Martynenko, A.G.; Okhrimenko, N.V.; Shiryaeva, G.P.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of triethanolamine (I) on the stability of furfurol under the conditions of oil purification was studied. It was shown that (I) shows a stabilizing effect at a temperature of 200/sup 0/, which is considerably weakened on heating the furfurol in the presence of air (at atmospheric pressure). At a temperature of 230/sup 0/ (I) is not a stabilizer for furfurol.

  12. Global stability of discrete-time recurrent neural networks with impulse effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, L; Li, C; Wan, J

    2008-01-01

    This paper formulates and studies a class of discrete-time recurrent neural networks with impulse effects. A stability criterion, which characterizes the effects of impulse and stability property of the corresponding impulse-free networks on the stability of the impulsive networks in an aggregate form, is established. Two simplified and numerically tractable criteria are also provided

  13. Effect of Urea on G-Quadruplex Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanyan, Lusine; Ko, Jordan; Kim, Byul G; Vardanyan, Ishkhan; Dalyan, Yeva B; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2017-07-13

    G-quadruplexes represent a class of noncanonical nucleic acid structures implicated in transcriptional regulation, cellular function, and disease. An understanding of the forces involved in stabilization and destabilization of the G-quadruplex conformation relative to the duplex or single-stranded conformation is a key to elucidating the biological role of G-quadruplex-based genomic switches and the quest for therapeutic means for controlled induction or suppression of a G-quadruplex at selected genomic loci. Solute-solvent interactions provide a ubiquitous and, in many cases, the determining thermodynamic force in maintaining and modulating the stability of nucleic acids. These interactions involve water as well as water-soluble cosolvents that may be present in the solution or in the crowded environment in the cell. We present here the first quantitative investigation of the effect of urea, a destabilizing cosolvent, on the conformational preferences of a G-quadruplex formed by the telomeric d[A(G 3 T 2 A) 3 G 3 ] sequence (Tel22). At 20 mM NaCl and room temperature, Tel22 undergoes a two-state urea-induced unfolding transition. An increase in salt mitigates the deleterious effect of urea on Tel22. The urea m-value of Tel22 normalized per change in solvent-accessible surface area, ΔS A , is similar to those for other DNA and RNA structures while being several-fold larger than that of proteins. Our results suggest that urea can be employed as an analytical tool in thermodynamic characterizations of G-quadruplexes in a manner similar to the use of urea in protein studies. We emphasize the need for further studies involving a larger selection of G-quadruplexes varying in sequence, topology (parallel, antiparallel, hybrid), and molecularity (monomolecular, bimolecular, tetramolecular) to outline the advantages and the limits of the use of urea in G-quadruplex studies. A deeper understanding of the effect of solvent and cosolvents on the differential stability of the

  14. Erythrocyte membrane stabilization effect and antioxidant activity of methyl methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, B.

    2004-01-01

    Methyl methacrylate (MMK) is a synthetic product with mild impact on human health that is not well studied on cellular basis. Here, human erythrocytes were used to investigate the effects MMK exerts on acid and heat-induced hemolysis. Biphasic effect of MMK was observed for acid-induced hemolysis; i.e., protection at low (0 - 0.05% v/v) and stimulation at higher (0.1- 0.4% v/v) concentrations. The maximal protective effect was produced at 0.03% (v/v). At this concentration MMK increased the temperatures of heat denaturation of erythrocyte membrane proteins, spectrin and integral proteins, by about 2 0 C and inhibited the heat-induced hemolysis by 20 %. This membrane stabilization effect of MMK is similar to that produced by some anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic drugs. The increased acid resistance possibly indicated anti-oxidant properties of MMK. The nonenzymatic antioxidant activity test evidenced that MMK has no superoxide dismutase-like activity but demonstrates strong catalase-like activity (about 900 kU/mmol at 0.05-0.1 mmol/l concentration). The results indicate that at low concentration MMK exerts benign effect on cellular membrane that could find therapeutic usage. (author)

  15. Effectiveness of electronic stability control on single-vehicle accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Hels, Tove; Bernhoft, Inger Marie

    2015-01-01

    the injury severity categories (slight, severe, and fatal). Conclusions: In line with previous results, this study concludes that ESC reduces the risk for single-vehicle injury accidents by 31% when controlling for various confounding factors related to the driver, the car, and the accident surroundings......Objective: This study aims at evaluating the effectiveness of electronic stability control (ESC) on single-vehicle injury accidents while controlling for a number of confounders influencing the accident risk. Methods: Using police-registered injury accidents from 2004 to 2011 in Denmark with cars...... the following were significant. For the driver: Age, gender, driving experience, valid driving license, and seat belt use. For the vehicle: Year of registration, weight, and ESC. For the accident surroundings: Visibility, light, and location. Finally, for the road: Speed limit, surface, and section...

  16. Storage stability and irradiation effect of red pepper powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C H; Choi, E H; Lee, S R [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Seoul (Republic of Korea); Kim, H S [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea)

    1977-01-01

    To improve the storage stability of Korea red pepper (Capsicum annuum), the equilibrium moisture content of the powder and effects of irradiation on the capsicin, capsanthin and microorganisms were investigated during its storage. The equilibrium moisture contents of the powder at 25 /sup 0/C and relative humidities of 43.7, 53.3, 64.4, 75.4, and 84.3% were 13, 18, 25, 28, and 37%, respectively, and the larger the particle size was, the lower the equilibrium moisture content was under the same storage conditions. Cobalt-60 gamma irradiation degraded partly the capsaicin in red pepper or in solution at dose levels above 500 krad, but did not affect the moisture and capsanthin contents during its storage. Total visible cell count of the powder was around 10/sup 8/ per gram and D/sub 10/ value for the mixed organisms was 210 krad.

  17. Biochar carbon stability and effect on greenhouse gas emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Esben Wilson; Cross, Andrew; Hammond, Jim

    2016-01-01

    As demonstrated by several scientific studies there is no doubt that biochar in general is very recalcitrant compared to other organic matter additions and soil organic matter fractions and also that it is possible to sequester carbon at a climate change relevant time scale (~100 years or more......) by soil application of biochar. However, the carbon stability of biochar in soil is strongly correlated with the degree of thermal alteration of the original feedstock (the lower the temperature, the larger the labile fraction) and in depth understanding of the technology used and its effect...... on the biochar quality is necessary in order to produce the most beneficial biochars for soil application. Beside carbon sequestration in soil biochar may improve the GHG balance by reducing N2O and CH4 soil emissions, although contrasting results are found in the literature. The mechanisms behind...

  18. Effect of gas hydrates melting on seafloor slope stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, N.; Cochonat, P.; Foucher, J. P.; Mienert, J.; Haflidason, H.; Sejrup, H. P.

    2003-04-01

    Henriet, J.-P.; Mienert, J. (Ed.): Gas hydrates: relevance to world margin stability and climate change. Geological Society Special Publication, 137. The Geological Society: London, UK, p. 267-274. Handa,Y.P., 1989. Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure and Salinity on the Stability of Gas Hydrates. J.Phys.Chem., Vol.94, p.2652-2657. Henry, P., Thomas, M.; Clennell, M.B., 1999. Formation of Natural Gas Hydrates in Marine Sediments 2. Thermodynamic Calculations of Stability Conditions in Porous Sediments,” J. Geophys. Res., 104, p. 23005. Sloan, E.D. Jr., 1998. Clathrate hydrates of natural gases. Marcel Dekker Inc., 2nd edition, New York, pp. 705. Soave G, 1972. Equilibrium

  19. Effect of kinesio-taping on ankle joint stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervat A. Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ankle Instability is characterized by recurrent giving way and often develops after repeated lateral ankle sprains. Kinesiotape is more elastic than traditional athletic tape and is becoming increasingly popular. It is reported to decrease pain, improve muscle function, circulation and proprioception, however, research examining the effects of Kinesiotape in ankle instability is limited. The objective of this study was to determine if applying Kinesiotape to unstable ankle may improve performance in the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT, which has been shown to be a sensitive and reliable measure for quantifying dynamic balance. Thirty subjects with first degree ankle sprain were participated in this study. SEBT was used to test the subject dynamic balance under three conditions; without taping, with white athletic tape and with kinesiotape. One way repeated measure ANOVA using Greenhouse-Geisser corrections were conducted to evaluate differences in SEBT for the three conditions. Pairwise comparison of the outcome measures in the three occasions (without taping, with athletic taping, and with kinesio taping revealed statistically significant differences of all outcomes between occasion 1 (without taping and occasion 2 (with athletic taping favoring the athletic taping (p < 0.05. Also, a statistically significant difference between occasion 1 (without taping and occasion 3 (with kinesio taping were found (p < 0.05 favoring kinesio taping. Moreover, pairwise comparison of the ankle stability outcomes using athletic taping versus kinesio taping indicated a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 in favor of kinesio taping measures. Conclusion: kinesiotape has superior effect than athletic tape in patients with first degree ankle sprain and can be used safely for improving ankle joint stability.

  20. Is electronic stability program effective on French roads?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Yves; Cuny, Sophie

    2006-03-01

    This paper proposes an evaluation of the effectiveness of the electronic stability program (ESP) in terms of reduction of injury accidents in France. The method consists of 3 steps: The identification, in the French National injury accident census, of accident-involved cars for which the determination of whether or not the car was fitted with ESP is possible. A sampler of 136 cars involved in injury accidents occurred in 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2003 was then selected. But we had to restrict the analysis to only 588 Renalut Laguna's. The identification of accident situations for which we can determine whether or not ESP is pertinent ( for example ESP is pertinent for loss of control accidents whilst it is not for cars pulling out of a junction). The calculation, via a logistic regression, of the relative risk of being involved in an ESP-pertinent accident for ESP equipped cars versus unequipped cars, divided by the relative risk of being involved in a non-ESP-pertinent accident for ESP equipped cars versus unequipped cars. This relative risk is assumed to be the best estimator of ESP effectiveness. The arguments for such a method, effectiveness indicator and implicit hypothesis are presented and discussed in the paper. Based on a few assumptions, ESP is proved to be likely effective. Currently, the relative risk of being involved in an ESP-pertinent accident for ESP-equipped cars is lower (-44%, although not statistically significant) than for other cars.

  1. Central bank independence and its effect on money market stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Anera Alishani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 1990s many countries have moved toward greater central bank independence (CBI by either amending their Central Bank’s laws or writing them de novo. Also countries of Western Balkans and many other transition countries have moved toward greater CBI. There are many potential benefits associated with greater CBI, and one of them is stable growth of money and liquidity. For a given level of money market development the hypothesis is that a more independent CB is likely to promote more stable growth of money supply (Dželetović et al., 2008. As a result the main research task of this work is to estimate the effects of CBI on money market growth for five Western Balkans countries and five other European transition countries. Because the empirical studies were very limited for the relationship between CBI and money market growth, there were no clear conclusions. In addition, there were different measuring methodologies that attempt to quantify the extent of legal and actual CBI. Related to the main research task, this dissertation has examined the effects of CBI on money market stability (proxied by bank deposit growth for a sample of 10 countries for a period from 1999-2009 by using fixed effect model. Through this methodology different regressions have been estimated, but the results were not robust and there are no clear finding on the relationship between CBI and money market growth.

  2. Effects of SMES units on power system stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byerly, R.T.; Juves, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model suitable for representing SMES units in power system stability studies has been developed and incorporated into an existing large-scale stability program. Demonstration studies have been performed which emphasize the use of SMES units to improve the damping of oscillations associated with synchronizing power flow among generators. The capability exists to conduct stability studies of large systems which include SMES units

  3. Toward the Effective Use of Military Veterinarians in Stability Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Melinda; Fisher, Gail

    2008-01-01

    .... Within the context of stability operations, military veterinarians can contribute to U.S. strategic goals of economic development and humanitarian assistance, especially related to the agriculture sector...

  4. On the permanent hip-stabilizing effect of atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prietzel, Torsten; Hammer, Niels; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Kaßebaum, Eric; Farag, Mohamed; von Salis-Soglio, Georg

    2014-08-22

    Hip joint dislocations related to total hip arthroplasty (THA) are a common complication especially in the early postoperative course. The surgical approach, the alignment of the prosthetic components, the range of motion and the muscle tone are known factors influencing the risk of dislocation. A further factor that is discussed until today is atmospheric pressure which is not taken into account in the present THA concepts. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of atmospheric pressure on hip joint stability. Five joint models (Ø 28-44 mm), consisting of THA components were hermetically sealed with a rubber capsule, filled with a defined amount of fluid and exposed to varying ambient pressure. Displacement and pressure sensors were used to record the extent of dislocation related to intraarticular and ambient pressure. In 200 experiments spontaneous dislocations of the different sized joint models were reliably observed once the ambient pressure was lower than 6.0 kPa. Increasing the ambient pressure above 6.0 kPa immediately and persistently reduced the joint models until the ambient pressure was lowered again. Displacement always exceeded half the diameter of the joint model and was independent of gravity effects. This experimental study gives strong evidence that the hip joint is permanently stabilized by atmospheric pressure, confirming the theories of Weber and Weber (1836). On basis of these findings the use of larger prosthetic heads, capsular repair and the deployment of an intracapsular Redon drain are proposed to substantially decrease the risk of dislocation after THA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of various teas on color stability of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinç Ata, Gül; Gokay, Osman; Müjdeci, Arzu; Kivrak, Tugba Congara; Mokhtari Tavana, Armin

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effect of various teas on color stability of resin composites. Two methacrylate-based (Arabesk Top, Grandio) and a silorane-based (Filtek Silorane) resin composites were used. 110 cylindrical samples of each resin composite were prepared (2 mm thickness and 8 mm diameter), polished and stored in distilled water (37°C for 24 hours). They were randomly divided into 11 groups (n= 10) and color measurements were taken. Then the samples were immersed in tap water (control), a black tea, a green tea or one of the eight herbal-fruit teas (37°C for 1 week) and subsequently subjected to the final color measurements. The color change of samples (ΔE*) was calculated, data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests. Teas, resin composites and their interactions were significant (P= 0.000). All the teas and control caused color changes in all three resin composites. Rosehip tea caused the most color changes, while tap water showed the least in all resin composites. Arabesk Top had the most staining potential in all the teas and control, whereas Filtek Silorane was the most stain resistant except Grandio immersed in sage tea. Color stability of all resin composites used were affected from both structure of resin materials and constituents of teas used. All resin composites were susceptible to staining by all teas especially rosehip tea. Arabesk Top composite showed the greatest color susceptibility in all teas and Filtek Silorane the least with one exception. Color of resin composites can be negatively affected from teas consumed. Clinicians should advise patients that drinking different kind of teas could intensify surface staining of resin based restorations.

  6. Electronic origin of strain effects on solute stabilities in iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei; Li, Xiangyan; Xu, Yichun, E-mail: xuyichun@issp.ac.cn, E-mail: csliu@issp.ac.cn; Liu, C. S., E-mail: xuyichun@issp.ac.cn, E-mail: csliu@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Liang, Yunfeng [Environment and Resource System Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-08-21

    Nonuniform strain fields might induce the segregation of alloying solutes and ultimately lead to the mechanical performance degradation of body-centered-cubic (bcc) Fe based steels serving in extreme environments, which is worthy of investigation. In this paper, two typical volume-conserving strains, shear strain (SS) and normal strain (NS), are proposed to investigate the strain effects on solute stabilities in bcc iron by first-principles calculations. For solutes in each transition metal group, the calculated substitution energy change due to SS exhibits a linear dependence on the valence d radius of the solutes, and the slope decreases in an exponential manner as a function of the absolute difference between the Watson's electronegativity of iron and the averaged value of each transition metal group. This regularity is attributed to the Pauli repulsion between the solutes and the nearest neighboring Fe ions modulated by the hybridization of valence d bands and concluded to be originated from the characteristics of valence d bonding between the transition-metal solutes and Fe ions under SS. For main-group and post transition-metal solutes, the considerable drop of substitution energy change due to NS is concluded to be originated from the low-energy side shift of the widened valence s and p bands of the solutes. Our results indicate that the stabilities of substitutional solutes in iron under volume-conserving strain directly correlate with the intrinsic properties of the alloying elements, such as the valence d radius and occupancy, having or not having valence s and p bands.

  7. Application of cooperative and non-cooperative games in large-scale water quantity and quality management: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjouri, Najmeh; Ardestani, Mojtaba

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, two cooperative and non-cooperative methodologies are developed for a large-scale water allocation problem in Southern Iran. The water shares of the water users and their net benefits are determined using optimization models having economic objectives with respect to the physical and environmental constraints of the system. The results of the two methodologies are compared based on the total obtained economic benefit, and the role of cooperation in utilizing a shared water resource is demonstrated. In both cases, the water quality in rivers satisfies the standards. Comparing the results of the two mentioned approaches shows the importance of acting cooperatively to achieve maximum revenue in utilizing a surface water resource while the river water quantity and quality issues are addressed.

  8. Effect of dielectric layers on device stability of pentacene-based field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Chong-an; Yu, Gui; Liu, Yunqi; Guo, Yunlong; Sun, Xiangnan; Zheng, Jian; Wen, Yugeng; Wang, Ying; Wu, Weiping; Zhu, Daoben

    2009-09-07

    We report stable organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on pentacene. It was found that device stability strongly depends on the dielectric layer. Pentacene thin-film transistors based on the bare or polystyrene-modified SiO(2) gate dielectrics exhibit excellent electrical stabilities. In contrast, the devices with the octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-treated SiO(2) dielectric layer showed the worst stabilities. The effects of the different dielectrics on the device stabilities were investigated. We found that the surface energy of the gate dielectric plays a crucial role in determining the stability of the pentacene thin film, device performance and degradation of electrical properties. Pentacene aggregation, phase transfer and film morphology are also important factors that influence the device stability of pentacene devices. As a result of the surface energy mismatch between the dielectric layer and organic semiconductor, the electronic performance was degraded. Moreover, when pentacene was deposited on the OTS-treated SiO(2) dielectric layer with very low surface energy, pentacene aggregation occurred and resulted in a dramatic decrease of device performance. These results demonstrated that the stable OFETs could be obtained by using pentacene as a semiconductor layer.

  9. Steam Turbine Control Valve Stiction Effect on Power System Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, B.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important problems in power system dynamic stability is low frequency oscillations. This kind of oscillation has significant effects on the stability and security of the power system. In some previous papers, a fact was introduced that a steam pressure continuous fluctuation in turbine steam inlet pipeline may lead to a kind of low frequency oscillation of power systems. Generally, in a power generation plant, steam turbine system composes of some main components, i.e. a boiler or steam generator, stop valves, control valves and turbines that are connected by piping. In the conventional system, the turbine system is composed with a lot of stop and control valves. The steam is provided by a boiler or steam generator. In an abnormal case, the stop valve shuts of the steal flow to the turbine. The steam flow to the turbine is regulated by controlling the control valves. The control valves are provided to regulate the flow of steam to the turbine for starting, increasing or decreasing the power, and also maintaining speed control with the turbine governor system. Unfortunately, the control valve has inherent static friction (stiction) nonlinearity characteristics. Industrial surveys indicated that about 20-30% of all control loops oscillate due to valve problem caused by this nonlinear characteristic. In this paper, steam turbine control valve stiction effect on power system oscillation is presented. To analyze the stiction characteristic effect, firstly a model of control valve and its stiction characteristic are derived by using Newton's laws. A complete tandem steam prime mover, including a speed governing system, a four-stage steam turbine, and a shaft with up to for masses is adopted to analyze the performance of the steam turbine. The governor system consists of some important parts, i.e. a proportional controller, speed relay, control valve with its stiction characteristic, and stem lift position of control valve controller. The steam turbine has

  10. Evaluation of electronic stability control effectiveness in Australasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Jim; Newstead, Stuart

    2008-11-01

    Electronic stability control (ESC) is an in-vehicle technology aimed at improving primary safety by assisting the driver in avoiding loss of control of the vehicle. The aim of this study was to use available crash data from Australia and New Zealand to evaluate the effectiveness of ESC in reducing crash risk and to establish whether benefits estimated from overseas studies have translated to the Australian and New Zealand environments. The sample analysed included 7699 crashed vehicles fitted with ESC which comprised of 90 different models. Poisson regression was used to test whether the differences in the observed and expected crash counts for ESC fitted vehicles were significant, with exposure being induced from counts of rear end impacts. It was found that ESC reduced the risk of single vehicle crashes in which the driver was injured by 68% for 4WDs compared with 27% for passenger cars. The effect of ESC on multiple vehicle crashes in Australia and New Zealand was not clear. The long-term benefits of fitting ESC to all vehicles in Australia were also investigated based on the estimated single vehicle crash reductions.

  11. Thermal stability and haemolytic effects of depolymerized guar gum derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Majid; Zahoor, Tahir; Akhtar, Saeed; Ismail, Amir; Hameed, Aneela

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of current study was to purify and partially depolymerize guar gum by β-mannanase, HCl, Ba(OH) 2 actions and subjected to inspect compositional, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and haemolytic activity. Chemical composition revealed mannose and galactose ratio remained un-altered even after process of purification and hydrolysis. TGA thermograms affirmed initial and final decomposition temperature in various zones. Major decomposition stages apparently revealed partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG) exhibited better heat stable properties having more zones of degradation than crude one. Furthermore, all guar fractions (2.5-250 mg/mL) were subjected to haemolysis to evaluate toxic effects during process of hydrolysis. The crude and hydrolyzed guar galactomannans exhibited minor haemolytic activity (1.9 ± 0.03-7.24 ± 0.02%) when compared to 0.1% Triton-X 100 (100% haemolysis) showing no toxic effects to human RBC's. Conclusively, hydrolyzed guar-galactomannans are safe and can be used in food products with improved heat stability.

  12. Effects of task and category membership on representation stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Manetta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the within-subject stability of 150 participants who performed both a sorting task and a property-generation task over multiple sessions, focusing on three concrete concept categories (food, animals and bathroom products. We hypothesized that (1 the within-subject stability would be higher in the sorting task than in the property-generation task and (2 the nature of the category would influence both the within-subject stability of the classification groups in the sorting task and the properties generated to define these groups. The results show that the within-subject stability of conceptual representations depends both on the task and on the nature of the category. The stability of the representations was greater in the sorting task than in the property-generation task and in the food category. These results are discussed from a longitudinal perspective.

  13. Agglomeration of Celecoxib by Quasi Emulsion Solvent Diffusion Method: Effect of Stabilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maghsoodi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion (QESD has evolved into an effective technique to manufacture agglomerates of API crystals. Although, the proposed technique showed benefits, such as cost effectiveness, that is considerably sensitive to the choice of a stabilizer, which agonizes from a absence of systemic understanding in this field. In the present study, the combination of different solvents and stabilizers were compared to investigate any connections between the solvents and stabilizers. Methods: Agglomerates of celecoxib were prepared by QESD method using four different stabilizers (Tween 80, HPMC, PVP and SLS and three different solvents (methyl acetate, ethyl acetate and isopropyl acetate. The solid state of obtained particles was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy. The agglomerated were also evaluated in term of production yield, distribution of particles and dissolution behavior. Results: The results showed that the effectiveness of stabilizer in terms of particle size and particle size distribution is specific to each solvent candidate. A stabilizer with a lower HLB value is preferred which actually increased its effectiveness with the solvent candidates with higher lipophilicity. HPMC appeared to be the most versatile stabilizer because it showed a better stabilizing effect compared to other stabilizers in all solvents used. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the efficiency of stabilizers in forming the celecoxib agglomerates by QESD was influenced by the HLB of the stabilizer and lipophilicity of the solvents.

  14. Effectiveness of electronic stability control on single-vehicle accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Hels, Tove; Bernhoft, Inger Marie

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the effectiveness of electronic stability control (ESC) on single-vehicle injury accidents while controlling for a number of confounders influencing the accident risk. Using police-registered injury accidents from 2004 to 2011 in Denmark with cars manufactured in the period 1998 to 2011 and the principle of induced exposure, 2 measures of the effectiveness of ESC were calculated: The crude odds ratio and the adjusted odds ratio, the latter by means of logistic regression. The logistic regression controlled for a number of confounding factors, of which the following were significant. For the driver: Age, gender, driving experience, valid driving license, and seat belt use. For the vehicle: Year of registration, weight, and ESC. For the accident surroundings: Visibility, light, and location. Finally, for the road: Speed limit, surface, and section characteristics. The present study calculated the crude odds ratio for ESC-equipped cars of getting in a single-vehicle injury accident as 0.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34-0.47) and the adjusted odds ratio as 0.69 (95% CI, 0.54-0.88). No difference was found in the effectiveness of ESC across the injury severity categories (slight, severe, and fatal). In line with previous results, this study concludes that ESC reduces the risk for single-vehicle injury accidents by 31% when controlling for various confounding factors related to the driver, the car, and the accident surroundings. Furthermore, it is concluded that it is important to control for human factors (at a minimum age and gender) in analyses where evaluations of this type are performed.

  15. Finite Larmor radius effects on the stability properties of internal modes of a z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakerstedt, H.O.

    1987-01-01

    From the Vlasov-fluid model a set of approximate stability equations describing the stability of a cylindrically symmetric z-pinch is derived. The equations are derived in the limit of small gyroradius and include first order kinetic effects such as finite ion Larmor radius effects and resonant ion effects. Neglecting the resonant ion terms, we explicitly solve this set of equations for a constant current density profile leading to a dispersion relation. FLR effects are shown for the case of m=1 internal mode to be stabilizing and for large wavenumbers k, using a trial function approach, absolute stabilization is found. (author)

  16. Stabilization of azadirachtin A in neem formulations: effect of some solid carriers, neem oil, and stabilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J; Parmar, B S

    1999-04-01

    Formulation of azadirachtin A on attapulgite, kaolinite, fuller's earth, hydrated calcium silicate, and fly ash revealed that it degraded to the tune of 70-95% on different solid carriers as compared to 56% in neem oil, during the 14 day heat storage studies at 54 +/- 1 degrees C in the laboratory. The degradation was reduced by 26-60% on different carriers by employing either anthraquinone or epichlorohydrin as stabilizer. Pyrogallol and hydroquinone enhanced the degradation. The cation exchange capacity and surface area of the carriers revealed a significant negative correlation with t(1/2) of azadirachtin A.

  17. Toward the Effective Use of Military Veterinarians in Stability Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Melinda; Fisher, Gail

    2008-01-01

    ... operations, all core missions and of equal importance. In active theaters such as Afghanistan and Iraq, medical civil-military stability operations figure prominently and include activities carried out by military veterinarians...

  18. Lactose in dairy ingredients: Effect on processing and storage stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Thom; Gazi, Inge

    2016-08-01

    Lactose is the main carbohydrate in the milk of most species. It is present in virtually all dry dairy ingredients, with levels ranging from lactose powders. The presence of lactose has a strong effect on ingredient processing and stability. Lactose can negatively influence powder properties and lead to undesirable effects, such as the stickiness of powder resulting in fouling during drying, or caking and related phenomena during storage. In addition, being a reducing carbohydrate, lactose can also participate in the Maillard reaction with free amino groups of proteins, peptides, and free AA. In this review, the influence of the presence (or absence) of lactose on physiochemical properties of dairy ingredients is reviewed, with particular emphasis on behavior during processing and storage. Particularly important features in this respect are whether lactose is in the (glassy) amorphous phase or in the crystalline phase, which is strongly affected by precrystallization conditions (e.g., in lactose, permeate, and whey powders) and by drying conditions. Furthermore, the moisture content and water activity of the ingredients are important parameters to consider, as they determine both mobility and reactivity, influencing Maillard reactions and concomitant browning, the crystallization of amorphous lactose during storage of dairy ingredients, glass transitions temperatures, and associated stickiness and caking phenomena. For the stickiness and caking, a crucial aspect to take into account is powder particle surface composition in relation to the bulk powder. Lactose is typically underrepresented at the powder surface, as a result of which deviations between observed lactose-induced caking and stickiness temperatures, and determined glass transition temperatures arise. By considering lactose as an integral part of ingredient composition along with all other compositional and environmental properties, lactose behavior in dairy ingredients can be understood, controlled, and

  19. Space charge effects and coherent stability limits in barrier buckets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Boine-Frankenheim

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A large-scale Vlasov simulation study of the microwave instability below transition energy in a beam confined between two barrier pulses is performed. Starting from a matched distribution function for the confined ion beam including the space charge impedance the stability threshold in the longitudinal impedance plane is obtained. A simple stability criterium is found to be in good agreement with the simulation results.

  20. Effect of some ultraviolet light absorbers on photo-stabilization of azadirachtin-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deota, P T; Upadhyay, P R; Patel, K B; Mehta, K J; Varshney, A K; Mehta, M H

    2002-10-01

    The effect of photo-stabilization of Azadirachtin-A (Aza-A) was examined when exposed to sunlight and ultraviolet light in the presence of four structurally different ultraviolet stabilizers namely 4-aminobenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone, 4,4'-dihydroxybenzophenone and phenyl salicylate. The percentages of Aza-A recovered at different time intervals from slides exposed to different light conditions with and without UV stabilizers as well as kinetic studies indicated that the addition of phenyl salicylate in methanolic solution of Aza-A (in 1:1 mole ratio) provides the best photo-stabilization of Aza-A molecule among the four UV stabilizers studied.

  1. Atmospheric stability and topography effects on wind turbine performance and wake properties in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Xingxing; Liu, Deyou; Xu, Chang

    2018-01-01

    This paper evaluates the influence of atmospheric stability and topography on wind turbine performance and wake properties in complex terrain. To assess atmospheric stability effects on wind turbine performance, an equivalent wind speed calculated with the power output and the manufacture power...... and topography have significant influences on wind turbine performance and wake properties. Considering effects of atmospheric stability and topography will benefit the wind resource assessment in complex terrain....

  2. Effects of polishing procedures on color stability of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Umut Güler

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different polishing methods on color stability of posterior, universal and nanohybrid composite resin restorative materials upon exposure to a staining agent. Twenty-five specimens were prepared for each of 5 different composite resins (Filtek Z250, Filtek P60, Quadrant LC, Grandio and Filtek Supreme. Specimens were divided into 5 groups and different polishing procedures, including polishing discs (Pd, polishing discs then diamond polishing paste (PdP, polishing discs then a liquid polishing system (Biscover (PdB, and combinations of these (PdPB were used. Unpolished specimens served as the control (C. The specimens were stored for 48 h in a coffee solution. The color of all specimens was measured before and after exposure with a colorimeter, and total color change (DE* were calculated. The data were analyzed with a two-way ANOVA and the means were compared by Tukey HSD test (a=0.05. The lowest color difference was observed in the groups PdP and C, while the highest color difference was observed in PdPB, and PdB. When comparing the five different restorative materials, no significant difference was observed between FiltekP60 and FiltekZ250, and these materials demonstrated significantly less color change than Quadrant LC and the nanohybrid materials (Grandio, Filtek Supreme. The posterior (Filtek P60 and universal (Filtek Z250 composite resin restorative materials, which do not contain tetraethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA, were found to be less stainable than the nanohybrid (Grandio, Filtek Supreme and universal (Quadrant LC composite resins, which contain TEGDMA. The use of diamond polishing paste after polishing with polishing discs significantly decreased staining when compared to the groups that used polishing discs alone, for all restorative materials tested. The highest color change values were obtained for the specimens that were polished with the Biscover liquid polish

  3. The effect of nanoparticle aggregation on surfactant foam stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlYousef, Zuhair A; Almobarky, Mohammed A; Schechter, David S

    2018-02-01

    The combination of nanoparticles (NPs) and surfactant may offer a novel technique of generating stronger foams for gas mobility control. This study evaluates the potential of silica NPs to enhance the foam stability of three nonionic surfactants. Results showed that the concentration of surfactant and NPs is a crucial parameter for foam stability and that there is certain concentrations for strong foam generation. A balance in concentration between the nonionic surfactants and the NPs can enhance the foam stability as a result of forming flocs in solutions. At fixed surfactant concentration, the addition of NPs at low to intermediate concentrations can produce a more stable foam compared to the surfactant. The production of small population of flocs as a result of mixing the surfactant and NPs can enhance the foam stability by providing a barrier between the gas bubbles and delaying the coalescence of bubbles. Moreover, these flocs can increase the solution viscosity and, therefore, slow the drainage rate of thin aqueous film (lamellae). The measurements of foam half-life, bubble size, and mobility tests confirmed this conclusion. However, the addition of more solid particles or surfactant might have a negative impact on foam stability and reduce the maximum capillary pressure of coalescence as a result of forming extensive aggregates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of protein phosphorylation on color stability of ground meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Li, Xin; Xin, Jianzeng; Li, Zheng; Li, Guixia; Zhang, Yan; Du, Manting; Shen, Qingwu W; Zhang, Dequan

    2017-03-15

    The influence of protein phosphorylation on meat color stability was investigated in this study. Phosphatase and protein kinase inhibitors were added to minced ovine Longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) muscle to manipulate the global phosphorylation of sarcoplasmic proteins. The data obtained show that the rate and extent of pH decline, along with lactate accumulation in postmortem muscle, were related to protein phosphorylation. Analysis of meat color and the relative content of myoglobin redox forms revealed that meat color stability was inversely related to the phosphorylation of sarcoplasmic proteins. Thus, this study suggests that protein phosphorylation may be involved in meat color development by regulating glycolysis and the redox stability of myoglobin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Computing Stability Effects of Mutations in Human Superoxide Dismutase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2014-01-01

    Protein stability is affected in several diseases and is of substantial interest in efforts to correlate genotypes to phenotypes. Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is a suitable test case for such correlations due to its abundance, stability, available crystal structures and thermochemical data......, and physiological importance. In this work, stability changes of SOD1 mutations were computed with five methods, CUPSAT, I-Mutant2.0, I-Mutant3.0, PoPMuSiC, and SDM, with emphasis on structural sensitivity as a potential issue in structure-based protein calculation. The large correlation between experimental...... literature data of SOD1 dimers and monomers (r = 0.82) suggests that mutations in separate protein monomers are mostly additive. PoPMuSiC was most accurate (typical MAE ∼ 1 kcal/mol, r ∼ 0.5). The relative performance of the methods was not very structure-dependent, and the more accurate methods also...

  6. Effect of citronella essential oil fractions as oil phase on emulsion stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septiyanti, Melati; Meliana, Yenny; Agustian, Egi

    2017-11-01

    The emulsion system consists of water, oil and surfactant. In order to create stable emulsion system, the composition and formulation between water phase, surfactant and oil phase are very important. Essential oil such as citronella oil has been known as active ingredient which has ability as insect repellent. This research studied the effect of citronella oil and its fraction as oil phase on emulsion stability. The cycle stability test was conducted to check the emulsion stability and it was monitored by pH, density, viscosity, particle size, refractive index, zeta potential, physical appearance and FTIR for 4 weeks. Citronellal fraction has better stability compared to citronella oil and rhodinol fraction with slight change of physical and chemical properties before and after the cycle stability test. However, it is need further study to enhance the stability of the emulsion stability for this formulation.

  7. The Stability of Teacher Performance and Effectiveness: Implications for Policies Concerning Teacher Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Grant B.; Hodge, Kari J.; Trepinski, Tonya M.; Anderson, Lorin W.

    2014-01-01

    The last five to ten years has seen a renewed interest in the stability of teacher behavior and effectiveness. Data on teacher performance and teacher effectiveness are being used increasingly as the basis for decisions about continued employment, tenure and promotion, and financial bonuses. The purpose of this study is to explore the stability of…

  8. Nonneutralized charge effects on tokamak edge magnetohydrodynamic stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Linjin; Horton, W.; Miura, H.; Shi, T.H.; Wang, H.Q.

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the large ion orbits, excessive electrons can accumulate at tokamak edge. We find that the nonneutralized electrons at tokamak edge can contribute an electric compressive stress in the direction parallel to magnetic field by their mutual repulsive force. By extending the Chew–Goldburger–Low theory (Chew et al., 1956 [13]), it is shown that this newly recognized compressive stress can significantly change the plasma average magnetic well, so that a stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes in the pedestal can result. This linear stability regime helps to explain why in certain parameter regimes the tokamak high confinement can be rather quiet as observed experimentally.

  9. Assessment of Slope Stability of Various Cut Slopes with Effects of Weathering by Using Slope Stability Probability Classification (SSPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersöz, Timur; Topal, Tamer

    2017-04-01

    Rocks containing pore spaces, fractures, joints, bedding planes and faults are prone to weathering due to temperature differences, wetting-drying, chemistry of solutions absorbed, and other physical and chemical agents. Especially cut slopes are very sensitive to weathering activities because of disturbed rock mass and topographical condition by excavation. During and right after an excavation process of a cut slope, weathering and erosion may act on this newly exposed rock material. These acting on the material may degrade and change its properties and the stability of the cut slope in its engineering lifetime. In this study, the effect of physical and chemical weathering agents on shear strength parameters of the rocks are investigated in order to observe the differences between weathered and unweathered rocks. Also, slope stability assessment of cut slopes affected by these weathering agents which may disturb the parameters like strength, cohesion, internal friction angle, unit weight, water absorption and porosity are studied. In order to compare the condition of the rock materials and analyze the slope stability, the parameters of weathered and fresh rock materials are found with in-situ tests such as Schmidt hammer and laboratory tests like uniaxial compressive strength, point load and direct shear. Moreover, slake durability and methylene blue tests are applied to investigate the response of the rock to weathering and presence of clays in rock materials, respectively. In addition to these studies, both rock strength parameters and any kind of failure mechanism are determined by probabilistic approach with the help of SSPC system. With these observations, the performances of the weathered and fresh zones of the cut slopes are evaluated and 2-D slope stability analysis are modeled with further recommendations for the cut slopes. Keywords: 2-D Modeling, Rock Strength, Slope Stability, SSPC, Weathering

  10. Driving-induced stability with long-range effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Basu, U.; De Buyl, P.; Maes, Ch.; Netočný, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 3 (2016), 1-7, č. článku 30007. ISSN 0295-5075 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : stochastic thermodynamics * nonequilibrium steady states * stability enhancement Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.957, year: 2016

  11. The effect of betaine on the foam stability: Molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fengfeng [Chemistry Engineering Department, Zibo Vocational Institute, Zibo 255314 (China); Key laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Guokui [Key laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Yuan, Shiling, E-mail: shilingyuan@sdu.edu.cn [Key laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The reasons of betaine to enhance the stability of foam films are investigated by molecular simulation. • An electrostatic structure is formed at the air/water interface due to the electrostatic interaction. • The electrostatic structure becomes denser with the increasing concentration of betaine. - Abstract: Zwitterionic betaines are widely used as foam boosters due to these can enhance the stability of foam films. In this paper, mechanistic insights of betaine to improve the stability of alkyl-polyoxyethylene carboxylate (AEC) foam are provided by molecular simulation. In the simulation, we observe the electropositive nitrogen atoms in betaine interact with the electronegative sulfur atoms, an electrostatic structure is formed at the air/water interface. Interaction energies of the mixed surfactants are calculated by the quantum chemistry methods. The calculations show betaine-AEC and betaine–betaine possess attractive interaction, and that AEC–AEC has repulsion to each other. In the other words, the repulsion between the headgroups of anionic surfactants is relaxed by betaine. Additionally, the influence of concentration of betaine on the stability of foam films is also simulated. The RDF and coordination numbers show that the electrostatic structures become denser with the increasing concentration of betaine. Therefore, entry barrier is enhanced accordingly. The SMD simulation also demonstrates the same variation tendency of entry barrier. The simulation details provide vital supplements to experiments.

  12. The Effect of Political Stability on Public Education Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Adam E.; Kafle, Bhojraj Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a preliminary analysis to evaluate the implications of political stability for educational quality, evident in the survival rate measure. Design/methodology/approach: Secondary analyses were conducted for data drawn from the Political Risk Service Report, the World Bank Report, the United Nations…

  13. The Effects of Core Stabilization Exercise on Dynamic Balance and Gait Function in Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of core stabilization exercise on dynamic balance and gait function in stroke patients. [Subjects] The subjects were 16 stroke patients, who were randomly divided into two groups: a core stabilization exercise group of eight subjects and control group of eight subjects. [Methods] Subjects in both groups received general training five times per week. Subjects in the core stabilization exercise group practiced an additional core s...

  14. Effect of transition metal ions on the conductivity and stability of stabilized zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lybye, D.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2007-01-01

    the effect of co-doping with smaller transition metal ions such as Ti-, Fe- and Mn-ions. Many of the ionic radii of the transition metal ions are too small compared to the host lattice ionic radius of zirconium. Here we explore the effect of a) the small ionic radii compared to the large ionic radii...

  15. Stabilization effect of fission source in coupled Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Borge; Dufek, Jan [Div. of Nuclear Reactor Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-08-15

    A fission source can act as a stabilization element in coupled Monte Carlo simulations. We have observed this while studying numerical instabilities in nonlinear steady-state simulations performed by a Monte Carlo criticality solver that is coupled to a xenon feedback solver via fixed-point iteration. While fixed-point iteration is known to be numerically unstable for some problems, resulting in large spatial oscillations of the neutron flux distribution, we show that it is possible to stabilize it by reducing the number of Monte Carlo criticality cycles simulated within each iteration step. While global convergence is ensured, development of any possible numerical instability is prevented by not allowing the fission source to converge fully within a single iteration step, which is achieved by setting a small number of criticality cycles per iteration step. Moreover, under these conditions, the fission source may converge even faster than in criticality calculations with no feedback, as we demonstrate in our numerical test simulations.

  16. The effects of tether placement on antibody stability on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grawe, Rebecca W.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2017-06-01

    Despite their potential benefits, antibody microarrays have fallen short of performing reliably and have not found widespread use outside of the research setting. Experimental techniques have been unable to determine what is occurring on the surface of an atomic level, so molecular simulation has emerged as the primary method of investigating protein/surface interactions. Simulations of small proteins have indicated that the stability of the protein is a function of the residue on the protein where a tether is placed. The purpose of this research is to see whether these findings also apply to antibodies, with their greater size and complexity. To determine this, 24 tethering locations were selected on the antibody Protein Data Bank (PDB) ID: 1IGT. Replica exchange simulations were run on two different surfaces, one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic, to determine the degree to which these tethering sites stabilize or destabilize the antibody. Results showed that antibodies tethered to hydrophobic surfaces were in general less stable than antibodies tethered to hydrophilic surfaces. Moreover, the stability of the antibody was a function of the tether location on hydrophobic surfaces but not hydrophilic surfaces.

  17. A Non-Cooperative Approach to the Joint Subcarrier and Power Allocation Problem in Multi-Service SCFDMA Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Tsiropoulou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a joint resource allocation problem is studied in a multi-service Single Carrier FDMA (SC-FDMA wireless network. Mobile users request various services with different Quality of Service (QoS characteristics and they determine in a distributed and non-cooperative manner a joint subcarrier and power allocation towards fulfilling their QoS prerequisites. Initially, a well-designed utility function is formulated to appropriately represent users’ diverse QoS prerequisites with respect to their requested service. The subcarriers allocation problem is solved based on a multilateral bargaining model, where users are able to select different discount factors to enter the bargaining game, thus better expressing their different needs in system resources with respect to their requested service. The subcarriers mapping is realized based either on the localized SC-FDMA method where the subcarriers are sequentially allocated to the users or the distributed SC-FDMA via considering the maximum channel gain policy, where each subcarrier is allocated to the user with the maximum channel gain. Given the subcarriers assignment, an optimization problem with respect to users’ uplink transmission power is formulated and solved, in order to determine the optimal power allocation per subcarrier assigned to each user. Finally, the performance of the proposed framework is evaluated via modeling and simulation and extensive numerical results are presented.

  18. The effect of charge-introduction mutations on E. coli thioredoxin stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Jimenez, Raul; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2005-04-01

    Technological applications of proteins are often hampered by their low-stability and, consequently, the development of procedures for protein stabilization is of considerable biotechnological interest. Here, we use simple electrostatics to determine positions in E. coli thioredoxin at which mutations that introduce new charged residues are expected to lead to stability enhancement. We also obtain the corresponding mutants and characterize their stability using differential scanning calorimetry. The results are interpreted in terms of the accessibility in the native structure of the mutated residues and the potential effect of the mutations on the residual structure of the denatured state.

  19. Effect of corner radius in stabilizing the low-Re flow past a cylinder

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei; Samtaney, Ravindra

    2017-01-01

    We perform global linear stability analysis on low-Re flow past an isolated cylinder with rounded corners. The objective of the present work is to investigate the effect of the cylinder geometry (corner radius) on the stability characteristics of the flow. Our investigation sheds light on new physics that the flow can be stabilized by partially rounding the cylinder in the critical and weakly super-critical flow regimes. The flow is first stabilized and then gradually destabilized as the cylinder varies from square to circular geometry. The sensitivity analysis reveals that the variation of stability is attributed to the different spatial variation trends of the backflow velocity in the near- and far-wake regions for various cylinder geometries. The results from the stability analysis are also verified with those of the direct simulations and very good agreement is achieved.

  20. Effect of corner radius in stabilizing the low-Re flow past a cylinder

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei

    2017-08-03

    We perform global linear stability analysis on low-Re flow past an isolated cylinder with rounded corners. The objective of the present work is to investigate the effect of the cylinder geometry (corner radius) on the stability characteristics of the flow. Our investigation sheds light on new physics that the flow can be stabilized by partially rounding the cylinder in the critical and weakly super-critical flow regimes. The flow is first stabilized and then gradually destabilized as the cylinder varies from square to circular geometry. The sensitivity analysis reveals that the variation of stability is attributed to the different spatial variation trends of the backflow velocity in the near- and far-wake regions for various cylinder geometries. The results from the stability analysis are also verified with those of the direct simulations and very good agreement is achieved.

  1. Effect of Footwear on Dynamic Stability during Single-leg Jump Landings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowser, Bradley J; Rose, William C; McGrath, Robert; Salerno, Jilian; Wallace, Joshua; Davis, Irene S

    2017-06-01

    Barefoot and minimal footwear running has led to greater interest in the biomechanical effects of different types of footwear. The effect of running footwear on dynamic stability is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to compare dynamic stability and impact loading across 3 footwear conditions; barefoot, minimal footwear and standard running shoes. 25 injury free runners (21 male, 4 female) completed 5 single-leg jump landings in each footwear condition. Dynamic stability was assessed using the dynamic postural stability index and its directional components (mediolateral, anteroposterior, vertical). Peak vertical ground reaction force and vertical loadrates were also compared across footwear conditions. Dynamic stability was dependent on footwear type for all stability indices (ANOVA, pfootwear for the anteroposterior stability index (pfootwear (p≤0.05). Dynamic stability, peak vertical force, and average loadrates during single-leg jump landings appear to be affected by footwear type. The results suggest greater dynamic stability and lower impact loading when landing barefoot or in minimal footwear. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. On the efficiency gains of emissions trading when climate deals are non-cooperative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godal, Odd; Holtsmark, Bjart

    2011-07-15

    This paper studies, in a numerical environment, climate treaties with emissions trading when national quotas result from strategic individual choice. We find that the larger the number of parties to the deal, the smaller are the emissions reductions and the lower the welfare. If insisting on stability with respect to participation, climate treaties involve few parties and yield practically no emissions reductions. While these results contrast with some optimistic studies, our numerical example conforms established results if modelling the problem in the more traditional sense. (Author)

  3. Neoclassical effects on the stabilization of tearing mode by current modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoqing, E-mail: inkyang@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Wang, Shaojie; Yang, Weihong [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China)

    2014-02-15

    The neoclassical effects on the stabilization of tearing modes by current modulation have been investigated. Neoclassical effects enhance the resistivity and reduce the resistive diffusion time of the modulation current. Therefore, the oscillating current can penetrate deeper into the plasma. With an oscillating loop voltage, the plasma oscillates radially at the Ware-pinch velocity. These neoclassical effects improve the efficiency of tearing mode stabilization by the current modulation.

  4. Effect of asynchronous updating on the stability of cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baetens, J.M.; Van der Weeën, P.; De Baets, B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An upper bound on the Lyapunov exponent of asynchronously updated CA is established. ► The employed update method has repercussions on the stability of CAs. ► A decision on the employed update method should be taken with care. ► Substantial discrepancies arise between synchronously and asynchronously updated CA. ► Discrepancies between different asynchronous update schemes are less pronounced. - Abstract: Although cellular automata (CAs) were conceptualized as utter discrete mathematical models in which the states of all their spatial entities are updated simultaneously at every consecutive time step, i.e. synchronously, various CA-based models that rely on so-called asynchronous update methods have been constructed in order to overcome the limitations that are tied up with the classical way of evolving CAs. So far, only a few researchers have addressed the consequences of this way of updating on the evolved spatio-temporal patterns, and the reachable stationary states. In this paper, we exploit Lyapunov exponents to determine to what extent the stability of the rules within a family of totalistic CAs is affected by the underlying update method. For that purpose, we derive an upper bound on the maximum Lyapunov exponent of asynchronously iterated CAs, and show its validity, after which we present a comparative study between the Lyapunov exponents obtained for five different update methods, namely one synchronous method and four well-established asynchronous methods. It is found that the stability of CAs is seriously affected if one of the latter methods is employed, whereas the discrepancies arising between the different asynchronous methods are far less pronounced and, finally, we discuss the repercussions of our findings on the development of CA-based models.

  5. The effect of platelet-rich fibrin on implant stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öncü, Elif; Alaaddinoğlu, E Emine

    2015-01-01

    Achieving accelerated implant osseointegration could make immediate or early loading of implants more predictable. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is frequently used to accelerate soft and hard tissue healing. The activated platelets in PRF release growth factors, resulting in cellular proliferation, collagen synthesis, and osteoid production. The aim of this study was to compare the stability of dental implants inserted in a one-stage surgical protocol with or without PRF application. Twenty healthy patients with adequate alveolar bone and two or more adjacent missing teeth extracted at least 6 months previously were included in this study. A minimum of two tapered implants (Ankylos, Dentsply/Friadent) were placed in each patient. After surgical preparation of the implant sockets, PRF that had been prepared preoperatively was placed randomly into one of the sockets (PRF+). The acellular plasma portion of PRF was used to wet the implant placed into the PRF-coated socket. Resonance frequency measurements were made after implant placement and at 1 week and 1 month postoperatively. Mean implant stability quotients (ISQs) of the PRF+ implants was 69.3 ± 10.5, and mean ISQs for the PRF- implants was 64.5 ± 12.2 at the end of the first week. The mean ISQs at 4 weeks postoperatively were 77.1 ± 7.1 for the PRF+ group and 70.5 ± 7.7 for the PRF- group. In this study, PRF application increased implant stability during the early healing period, as evidenced by higher ISQ values. Simple application of this material seems to provide faster osseointegration.

  6. Fusion-neutron effects on magnetoresistivity of copper stabilizer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinan, M.W.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this work is to quantify the changes which occur in the magnetoresistivity of coppers (having various purities and pretreatments, and at magnetic fields up to 12 T during the course of sequential fusion neutron irradiations at about 4 0 K and anneals to room temperature. In conjunction with work in progress by Coltman and Klabunde of ORNL, the results should lead to engineering design data for the stabilizers of superconducting magnets in fusion reactors. These magnets are expected to be irradiated during reactor operation and warmed to room temperature periodically during maintenance

  7. Fusion-neutron effects on magnetoresistivity of copper stabilizer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinan, M.W.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1983-02-24

    The objective of this work is to quantify the changes which occur in the magnetoresistivity of coppers (having various purities and pretreatments, and at magnetic fields up to 12 T during the course of sequential fusion neutron irradiations at about 4/sup 0/K and anneals to room temperature. In conjunction with work in progress by Coltman and Klabunde of ORNL, the results should lead to engineering design data for the stabilizers of superconducting magnets in fusion reactors. These magnets are expected to be irradiated during reactor operation and warmed to room temperature periodically during maintenance.

  8. Effect of tautomerism on Au-6-mercaptopurine nanocluster stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidpour, Neda; Kashid, Vikas; Shah, Vaishali

    2013-02-01

    We have investigated the stability of conjugated nanoparticles of Au-6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) using ab initio density functional theory. We have studied the conjugation of the 6 tautomers of 6-MP via the different atomic sites with the gold nanoparticles. Our results show that the least stable tautomer has the strongest adsorption with the Au nanoparticles whereas the most stable tautomer has the weakest adsorption. We will discuss our results to explain the experimentally observed increased plasma half life time of the conjugated drug in vitro.

  9. Thermal effects on the stability of excited atoms in cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, F. C.; Malbouisson, A. P. C.; Malbouisson, J. M. C.; Santana, A. E.

    2010-01-01

    An atom, coupled linearly to an environment, is considered in a harmonic approximation in thermal equilibrium inside a cavity. The environment is modeled by an infinite set of harmonic oscillators. We employ the notion of dressed states to investigate the time evolution of the atom initially in the first excited level. In a very large cavity (free space) for a long elapsed time, the atom decays and the value of its occupation number is the physically expected one at a given temperature. For a small cavity the excited atom never completely decays and the stability rate depends on temperature.

  10. An Effective Distributed Model for Power System Transient Stability Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUTHU, B. M.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The modern power systems consist of many interconnected synchronous generators having different inertia constants, connected with large transmission network and ever increasing demand for power exchange. The size of the power system grows exponentially due to increase in power demand. The data required for various power system applications have been stored in different formats in a heterogeneous environment. The power system applications themselves have been developed and deployed in different platforms and language paradigms. Interoperability between power system applications becomes a major issue because of the heterogeneous nature. The main aim of the paper is to develop a generalized distributed model for carrying out power system stability analysis. The more flexible and loosely coupled JAX-RPC model has been developed for representing transient stability analysis in large interconnected power systems. The proposed model includes Pre-Fault, During-Fault, Post-Fault and Swing Curve services which are accessible to the remote power system clients when the system is subjected to large disturbances. A generalized XML based model for data representation has also been proposed for exchanging data in order to enhance the interoperability between legacy power system applications. The performance measure, Round Trip Time (RTT is estimated for different power systems using the proposed JAX-RPC model and compared with the results obtained using traditional client-server and Java RMI models.

  11. Stabilization effect of fission source in coupled Monte Carlo simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Börge Olsen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A fission source can act as a stabilization element in coupled Monte Carlo simulations. We have observed this while studying numerical instabilities in nonlinear steady-state simulations performed by a Monte Carlo criticality solver that is coupled to a xenon feedback solver via fixed-point iteration. While fixed-point iteration is known to be numerically unstable for some problems, resulting in large spatial oscillations of the neutron flux distribution, we show that it is possible to stabilize it by reducing the number of Monte Carlo criticality cycles simulated within each iteration step. While global convergence is ensured, development of any possible numerical instability is prevented by not allowing the fission source to converge fully within a single iteration step, which is achieved by setting a small number of criticality cycles per iteration step. Moreover, under these conditions, the fission source may converge even faster than in criticality calculations with no feedback, as we demonstrate in our numerical test simulations.

  12. Effect of isotacticity on radiation stability of polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Jinliang; Zhang Fengru; Wei Genshuan; Zhang Juhong; Wu Jilan.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between radiation stability and isotacticity of polypropylene(PP), such as isotactic pentad ratio, was studied in this paper. It was found that the higher isotacticity, the better radiation stability. Compared with normal PP powder which has normal isotacticity, the special PP powder with higher isotacticity, such as, isotactic pentad ratio > 98%, can keep the Melting Index change less than normal PP after UV-light-oxygen aging or γ-irradiation in air. Furthermore, the special PP powder with higher isotacticity has lower intention of crosslinking or branching after 1KGy γ-irradiation in vacuum and has lower intention of degradation after 5KGy γ-irradiation in vacuum. The special PP powder with higher isotacticity also has lower content of carbonyl after 25KGy γ-irradiation in air. These demonstrated that the special PP with higher isotacticity made from 'special catalyst' is more suitable as the material for radiation sterilization than normal PP, because there are less 'week points' in PP with higher isotacticity than that in PP with lower isotacticity. The random copolymer with 2.7% ethylene units made from the 'special catalyst' mentioned above is even more stable in irradiation sterilization than homopolypropylene with higher isotacticity; therefore, it is reasonable that a random copolypropylene with about 4%wt ethylene made from the 'special catalyst' should be the much more suitable PP material than normal PP for irradiation sterilization. (author)

  13. Investigation of the effects of human body stability on joint angles’ prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasha Zanoosi, A. A., E-mail: aliakbar.pasha@yahoo.com, E-mail: aliakbar.pasha@qiau.ac.ir [Islamic Azad University, Faculty of Industrial & Mechanical Engineering, Qazvin Branch (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, D.; Sadeghi-Mehr, M.; Feri, M. [Bu Ali-Sina University, Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Beheshtiha, A. Sh. [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institute of Mechanics and Computational Mechanics (Germany); Fallahnejad, K. [Flinders University, Discipline of Mechanical Engineering, School of Computer Science, Engineering and Mathematics (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Loosing stability control in elderly or paralyzed has motivated researchers to study how a stability control system works and how to determine its state at every time instant. Studying the stability of a human body is not only an important problem from a scientific viewpoint, but also finally leads to new designs of prostheses and orthoses and rehabilitation methods. Computer modeling enables researchers to study and describe the reactions and propose a suitable and optimized motion pattern to strengthen the neuromuscular system and helps a human body maintain its stability. A perturbation as a tilting is exposed to an underfoot plate of a musculoskeletal model of the body to study the stability. The studied model of a human body included four links and three degrees of freedom with eight muscles in the sagittal plane. Lagrangian dynamics was used for deriving equations of motion and muscles were modeled using Hill’s model. Using experimental data of joint trajectories for a human body under tilting perturbation, forward dynamics has been applied to predict joint trajectories and muscle activation. This study investigated the effects of stability on predicting body joints’ motion. A new stability function for a human body, based on the zero moment point, has been employed in a forward dynamics procedure using a direct collocation method. A multi-objective optimization based on genetic algorithm has been proposed to employ stability as a robotic objective function along with muscle stresses as a biological objective function. The obtained results for joints’ motion were compared to experimental data. The results show that, for this type of perturbations, muscle stresses are in conflict with body stability. This means that more body stability requires more stresses in muscles and reverse. Results also show the effects of the stability objective function in better prediction of joint trajectories.

  14. Investigation of the effects of human body stability on joint angles’ prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasha Zanoosi, A. A.; Naderi, D.; Sadeghi-Mehr, M.; Feri, M.; Beheshtiha, A. Sh.; Fallahnejad, K.

    2015-01-01

    Loosing stability control in elderly or paralyzed has motivated researchers to study how a stability control system works and how to determine its state at every time instant. Studying the stability of a human body is not only an important problem from a scientific viewpoint, but also finally leads to new designs of prostheses and orthoses and rehabilitation methods. Computer modeling enables researchers to study and describe the reactions and propose a suitable and optimized motion pattern to strengthen the neuromuscular system and helps a human body maintain its stability. A perturbation as a tilting is exposed to an underfoot plate of a musculoskeletal model of the body to study the stability. The studied model of a human body included four links and three degrees of freedom with eight muscles in the sagittal plane. Lagrangian dynamics was used for deriving equations of motion and muscles were modeled using Hill’s model. Using experimental data of joint trajectories for a human body under tilting perturbation, forward dynamics has been applied to predict joint trajectories and muscle activation. This study investigated the effects of stability on predicting body joints’ motion. A new stability function for a human body, based on the zero moment point, has been employed in a forward dynamics procedure using a direct collocation method. A multi-objective optimization based on genetic algorithm has been proposed to employ stability as a robotic objective function along with muscle stresses as a biological objective function. The obtained results for joints’ motion were compared to experimental data. The results show that, for this type of perturbations, muscle stresses are in conflict with body stability. This means that more body stability requires more stresses in muscles and reverse. Results also show the effects of the stability objective function in better prediction of joint trajectories

  15. The effectiveness of core stabilization exercise in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gür, Gözde; Ayhan, Cigdem; Yakut, Yavuz

    2017-06-01

    Core stabilization training is used to improve postural balance in musculoskeletal problems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of stabilization training in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A randomized controlled trial, pretest-posttest design. In total, 25 subjects with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were randomly divided into two groups: stabilization group ( n = 12) and control group ( n = 13). The stabilization group received core stabilization in addition to traditional rehabilitation, and the control group received traditional rehabilitation for 10 weeks. Assessment included Cobb's angle on radiograph, apical vertebral rotation in Adam's test, trunk asymmetry (Posterior Trunk Symmetry Index), cosmetic trunk deformity (Trunk Appearance Perception Scale), and quality of life (Scoliosis Research Society-22 questionnaire). Inter-group comparisons showed significantly greater improvements in the mean change in lumbar apical vertebral rotation degree and the pain domain of Scoliosis Research Society-22 in the stabilization group than those in the control group ( p adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Clinical relevance Stabilization exercises are more effective in reducing rotation deformity and pain than traditional exercises in the conservative rehabilitation of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. These improvements suggest that stabilization training should be added to rehabilitation programs in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

  16. Effect Mechanism of Penstock on Stability and Regulation Quality of Turbine Regulating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencheng Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effect mechanism of water inertia and head loss of penstock on stability and regulation quality of turbine regulating system with surge tank or not and proposes the construction method of equivalent model of regulating system. Firstly, the complete linear mathematical model of regulating system is established. Then, the free oscillation equation and time response of the frequency that describe stability and regulation quality, respectively, are obtained. Finally, the effects of penstock are analysed by using stability region and response curves. The results indicate that the stability and regulation quality of system without surge tank are determined by time response of frequency which only depends on water hammer wave in penstock, while, for system with surge tank, the time response of frequency depending on water hammer wave in penstock and water-level fluctuation in surge tank jointly determines the stability and regulation quality. Water inertia of penstock mainly affects the stability and time response of frequency of system without surge tank as well as the stability and head wave of time response of frequency with surge tank. Head loss of penstock mainly affects the stability and tail wave of time response of frequency with surge tank.

  17. Hydrodynamic Fluid Film Bearings and Their Effect on the Stability of Rotating Machinery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andres, Luis S

    2006-01-01

    .... This design parameter shows the static performance of the bearing as rotor speed increases. Rotordynamic force coefficients are introduced and their effect on the stability of a rotor-bearing system thoroughly discussed...

  18. Experimental research of "microcable in a microconduct" system stability to effect of freezing water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Vladimir A.; Burdin, Vladimir A.; Nikulina, Tatiana G.; Alekhin, Ivan N.; Gavryushin, Sergey A.; Nikulin, Aleksey G.; Praporshchikov, Denis E.

    2011-12-01

    Results of experimental researches of "optical microcable in a microduct" system stability to effect of freezing water are presented. It is shown this system is steadier to water freezing in comparison to lighten optical cable in protective polymer tube.

  19. Effect of speech rate variation on acoustic phone stability in Afrikaans speech recognition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Badenhorst, JAC

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors analyse the effect of speech rate variation on Afrikaans phone stability from an acoustic perspective. Specifically they introduce two techniques for the acoustic analysis of speech rate variation, apply these techniques to an Afrikaans...

  20. Effect of Tropical Climatic Conditions on the Stability of Cefaclor Dry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    This study was carried out to investigate the effect of moisture sorption at two different storage conditions ... Keywords: Dry powder for suspension; Moisture content; Colour; Stability; Moisture migration;. Interaction. ..... condensation. Sorption of ...

  1. Polyvinylpyrrolidone Matrix as an Effective Reducing Agent and Stabilizer during Reception of Silver Nanoparticles in Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Semenyuk, Nataliya; Kostiv, Ulyana; Dudok, Galyna; Nechay, Jaroslav; Skorokhoda, Volodymyr

    2013-01-01

    The use of polyvinylpyrrolidone matrix as an effective reducing agent and stabilizer during reception of silver nanoparticles in composites is substantiated. The influence of various factors on patterns of obtaining silver nanoparticles and their size.

  2. Stabilization and destabilization effects of the electric field on stochastic precipitate pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagzi, István; Izsak, F.

    2004-01-01

    Stabilization and destabilization effects of an applied electric field on the Liesegang pattern formation in low concentration gradient were studied with numerical model simulations. In the absence of an electric field pattern formation exhibits increasingly stochastic behaviour as the initial

  3. Effects of irradiation on tungsten stabilized martensitic steels*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.; Hsu, C. Y.; Lechtenberg, T. A.

    1988-07-01

    Tungsten stabilized martensitic stainless steels are being developed for fusion reactor first wall applications in order to lower retained radioactivity so as to permit shallow land burial after reactor decommissioning. Two such alloys have been designed, fabricated, fast neutron irradiated in FFTF and examined by transmission electron microscopy. The two compositions were Fe-7.5Cr-2.0W-0.17 C and Fe-10.2Cr-1.7W-0.3V-0.02C. Conditions examined included irradiation temperatures of 365, 426, 520 and 600°C to doses as high as 34 dpa. Small amounts of void swelling are found at the two lowest temperatures. It is demonstrated that levels of tungsten on the order of 2 wt% do not result in excessive intermetallic precipitation under these irradiation conditions.

  4. Influence of size effects on the radiation stability of nanocrystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerasimenko, N. N.; Smirnov, D. I., E-mail: rmta@miee.ru [National Research University of Electronic Technology “MIET” (Russian Federation); Medetov, N. A. [Kostanai Social and Technical University (Kazakhstan); Zaporozhan, O. A. [National Research University of Electronic Technology “MIET” (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    The data reported in publications are analyzed, and on this basis, problems arising in studies of the radiation stability of nanostructures and nanomaterials are formulated. A phenomenological model of the radiation stability of such objects is considered. The model is based on the concept of the behavior of close Frenkel pairs. To test the model proposed in the study, the effect of the size factor on the degree of structural degradation in nanoporous silicon samples when irradiated with phosphorus ions is studied. The effect of elastic strains on the radiation stability of the structures is established.

  5. [Effect of inorganic amendments on the stabilization of heavy metals in contaminated soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Meng-hua; Zhu, Xi; Liu, Huang-cheng; Wang, Lin-ling; Chen, Jing

    2013-09-01

    Effects of single and mixed inorganic amendments on the stabilization of heavy metals in contaminated soils were investigated. Significant synergistic effects on the stabilization of Zn and Cu were observed with the mixed inorganic amendments of KH2PO4 and Ca(OH)2 in the laboratory test. In the field test, the stabilization ratios of Zn, Cu and Cd were 41.8%, 28.2% and 48.4%, respectively, with the dosage of 0.5 kg x m(-2). The growth of peanut was inhibited by the addition of the inorganic amendments. Meanwhile, the uptake of heavy metals was reduced in peanut.

  6. Stabilizing effects of hot electrons on low frequency plasma drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chaosong; Qiu Lijian; Ren Zhaoxing

    1988-01-01

    The MHD equation is used to study the stabilization of low frequency drift waves driven by density gradient of plasma in a hot electron plasma. The dispersion relation is derived, and the stabilizing effects of hot electrons are discussed. The physical mechanism for hot electron stabilization of the low frequency plasma perturbations is charge uncovering due to the hot electron component, which depends only on α, the ratio of N h /N i , but not on the value of β h . The hot electrons can reduce the growth rate of the interchange mode and drift wave driven by the plasma, and suppress the enomalous plasma transport caused by the drift wave. Without including the effectof β h , the stabilization of the interchange mode requires α≅2%, and the stabilization of the drift wave requires α≅40%. The theoretical analyses predict that the drift wave is the most dangerous low frequency instability in the hot electron plasma

  7. Effects of sewage sludge stabilization on fertilizer value and greenhouse gas emissions after soil application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshida, Hiroko; Nielsen, Martin P.; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    was therefore to investigate the effect of sewage sludge stabilization techniques on the C and N mineralization and gaseous emissions from soil. A soil incubation was conducted to determine the rate of C and N mineralization and N2O and CH4 emissions of sewage sludge stabilized using different techniques....... Unstabilized sludge released up to 90% of their C content as CO2, part of which could be caused by release of CO2 from carbonates. Compared with this, sludge stabilization including anaerobic digestion and drying resulted in a reduction of the C mineralization rate of about 40%. Liming reduced C mineralization...... the value of the sludge as a fertilizer. Emissions of CH4 were also reduced through sludge stabilization and mainly occurred after application of easily degradable sludge types, which is likely to have enhanced the creation of anaerobic microsites. The stabilization processes also decreased emissions of N2O...

  8. Effect of soil stabilized by cement on dynamic response of machine foundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Wakel Saad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Machine foundations require significant attention from designers. The main goal of the design of machine foundation is to limit the amplitude displacement and not disturb the people who work near the machine. In some cases, if the design of machine foundations does not satisfy the acceptable value of the dynamic response (such as maximum amplitude of displacement, the stabilization of soil under the machine foundation may be used to decrease the amplitude of displacement. This paper outlines effect of stabilized soil under the foundation by cement on the displacement response of machine foundations. Three-dimensional analyses by using finite element method are carried out to investigate the effect of depth of stabilized layer with different percentage of cement content on the dynamic response of the machine foundation. In addition, the effect of area stabilized by cement material on the dynamic response of machine foundation is investigated. The results shown that, the dynamic response of machine foundations generally decreases with increasing the depth of soil layer stabilized with cement. A significant decrease in the displacement of machine foundations is occurred for the stabilized soil layer with a depth of two times of the width of foundation, and the optimum percentage of cement for stabilizing is 6%.

  9. The effect of partial poloidal wall sections on the wall stabilization of external kink modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.J.

    1996-02-01

    An analysis of the effect on the wall stabilization of external kink modes due to toroidally continuous gaps in the resistive wall is performed. The effects with and without toroidal rotation are studied. For a high-β equilibrium, the mode structure is localized on the outboard side. Therefore, outboard gaps greatly increase the growth rate when there is no rotation. For resistive wall stabilization by toroidal rotation, the presence of gaps has the same effect as moving the wall farther away, i.e. destabilizing for the ideal plasma mode, and stabilizing for the resistive wall mode. The region of stability, in terms of wall position, is reduced in size and moved closer to the plasma. However, complete stabilization becomes possible at considerably reduced rotation frequencies. For a high-β, reverse-shear equilibrium both the resistive wall mode and the ideal plasma mode can be stabilized by close fitting discrete passive plates on the outboard side. The necessary toroidal rotation frequency to stabilize the resistive wall mode using these plates is reduced by a factor of three compared to that for a poloidally continuous and complete wall at the same plasma-wall separation. (author) 15 figs., 24 refs

  10. Biophysical characterization of the strong stabilization of the RNA triplex poly(U•poly(A*poly(U by 9-O-(ω-amino alkyl ether berberine analogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debipreeta Bhowmik

    Full Text Available Binding of two 9-O-(ω-amino alkyl ether berberine analogs BC1 and BC2 to the RNA triplex poly(U(•poly(A(*poly(U was studied by various biophysical techniques.Berberine analogs bind to the RNA triplex non-cooperatively. The affinity of binding was remarkably high by about 5 and 15 times, respectively, for BC1 and BC2 compared to berberine. The site size for the binding was around 4.3 for all. Based on ferrocyanide quenching, fluorescence polarization, quantum yield values and viscosity results a strong intercalative binding of BC1 and BC2 to the RNA triplex has been demonstrated. BC1 and BC2 stabilized the Hoogsteen base paired third strand by about 18.1 and 20.5 °C compared to a 17.5 °C stabilization by berberine. The binding was entropy driven compared to the enthalpy driven binding of berbeine, most likely due to additional contacts within the grooves of the triplex and disruption of the water structure by the alkyl side chain.Remarkably higher binding affinity and stabilization effect of the RNA triplex by the amino alkyl berberine analogs was achieved compared to berberine. The length of the alkyl side chain influence in the triplex stabilization phenomena.

  11. DFT study of stabilization effects on N-doped graphene for ORR catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reda, Mateusz; Hansen, Heine Anton; Vegge, Tejs

    2018-01-01

    Noble metal free catalysts, such as N-doped graphene, have drawn a lot of attention as a promising replacement for platinum in low temperature fuel cells. Computational prediction of catalytic activity requires accurate description of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) intermediates adsorption...... energies. Two stabilizing effects, immanently present in experimental ORR setups with basal plane N-doped graphene catalyst, are studied systematically by means of density functional theory. Distant nitrogen with no adsorbates on neighboring carbon atoms selectively stabilizes *O and *O2 adsorbates. Water...... solvation stabilizes all ORR intermediates, having a greater impact on *O and *O2, than on *OH and *OOH, in contrast to metal and oxide catalysts. Synergistic stabilization of *O caused by both effects reaches remarkably a high value of 1.5 eV for nitrogen concentrations above 4.2% N. Such a strong effect...

  12. Effect of arm swing strategy on local dynamic stability of human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punt, Michiel; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Wittink, Harriet; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-02-01

    Falling causes long term disability and can even lead to death. Most falls occur during gait. Therefore improving gait stability might be beneficial for people at risk of falling. Recently arm swing has been shown to influence gait stability. However at present it remains unknown which mode of arm swing creates the most stable gait. To examine how different modes of arm swing affect gait stability. Ten healthy young male subjects volunteered for this study. All subjects walked with four different arm swing instructions at seven different gait speeds. The Xsens motion capture suit was used to capture gait kinematics. Basic gait parameters, variability and stability measures were calculated. We found an increased stability in the medio-lateral direction with excessive arm swing in comparison to normal arm swing at all gait speeds. Moreover, excessive arm swing increased stability in the anterior-posterior and vertical direction at low gait speeds. Ipsilateral and inphase arm swing did not differ compared to a normal arm swing. Excessive arm swing is a promising gait manipulation to improve local dynamic stability. For excessive arm swing in the ML direction there appears to be converging evidence. The effect of excessive arm swing on more clinically relevant groups like the more fall prone elderly or stroke survivors is worth further investigating. Excessive arm swing significantly increases local dynamic stability of human gait. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Shot Peening on the Fatigue Strength of Automotive Tubular Stabilizer Bars DC 218

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittek A.M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns issues related to the development of designs of stabilizer bars for new motor vehicle models. It involves not only the designing of a stabilizer bar with the shape required by the manufacturer, but also the preparation of bending and heat treatment processes as well as the performance of strength and fatigue tests. In the prototype development phase, the simulations techniques (FEM may be used to assess the design. The article contains a detailed analysis of a stabilizer bar designated with the DC 218 VA symbol. Performed numerical strength and fatigue calculations showed that the developed stabilizer bar design with the desired shape did not achieve the required number of fatigue cycles. It was also proven at the test stand by testing a prototype stabilizer bar. Therefore, it was suggested to supplement the technological process with an additional shot peening operation whose main aim was to reduce the length of microcracks on the stabilizer bar’s surface. This effect was confirmed during comparative metallographic tests of not shot – peened and shot – peened stabilizer bars. After shot peening, the analysed stabilizer bar reached a fatigue strength which exceeded the limits set by the manufacturer.

  14. Effects of q and high beta on tokamak stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brickhouse, N.S.; Callen, J.D.; Dexter, R.N.

    1984-08-01

    In the Columbia University Torus II tokamak plasmas have been studied with volume averaged toroidal beta values as high as 15%. Experimental equilibria have been compared with a 2D free boundary MHD equilibrium code PSEC. The stability of these equilibria has been computed using PEST, the predictions of which are compatible with an observed instability in Torus II which may be characterized as a high toroidal mode number ballooning fluctuation. In the University of Wisconsin Tokapole II tokamak disruptive instability behavior is investigated, with plasma able to be confined on closed magnetic surfaces in the scrape-off region, as the cylindrical edge safety factor is varied from q approx. 3 to q approx. 0.5. It is observed that at q/sub a/ approx. 3 major disruption activity occurs without current terminations, at q/sub a/ less than or equal to 2 well-confined plasmas are obtained without major disruption, and at q/sub a/ approx. 0.5 only partial reconnection accompanies minor disruptions

  15. Effect of hydrogen bonding of a solvent on the thermodynamic stability of cadmium complexes of ethylenediamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledenkov, S.F.; Sharnin, V.A.; Chistyakova, G.V.

    2004-01-01

    The composition and stability of cadmium(II) ethylenediamine complexes in water-dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) mixed solvents, depending on the content of organic component, were studied by the methods of pH-metry and calorimetry. It is shown that increase in DMSO content in the solvent gives rise to higher stability of cadmium complexes. The greatest growth of stability constant was pointed out for coordination-saturated compounds. The complexing thermodynamics was discussed from the viewpoint of solvation approach. Protolytic solvents were shown to produce destabilizing effect on the polyligand complexes owing to participation of coordination sphere in H-binding [ru

  16. The effect of effective microorganisms (EM on EBPR in modified contact stabilization system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab M. Rashed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Excessive phosphorus can cause eutrophication in water bodies and needs to be reduced in most wastewaters before discharge to receiving waters. The enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR process has been shown to be an economical and environmentally compatible method for reducing phosphorus from wastewaters. The experiment has been performed in order to investigate the effect of using effective microorganisms (EM as an application of Enhanced Biological Phosphorous Removal (EBPR in modified contact stabilization activated sludge system by using contact tank as a phosphorus uptake zone and using thickener tank as a phosphorus release zone. The study involved the construction of a pilot plant which was setup in the Quhafa Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP, Al Fayoum, Egypt. Then the uptake and release of total phosphorus were determined through two batch tests using sludge samples from thickener and stabilization tanks. Results showed the removal efficiencies of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD, Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD5 and total phosphorus (TP of this pilot plant were 93%, 93% and 90%, respectively. On the other hand the results of batch tests showed that the reason for high ability of phosphorus removal by this pilot plant is related to the high performance of microorganisms for phosphorus accumulation. Finally providing activated EM to the anaerobic zone was to improve fermentation by achieving the enhancement of the performance of phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs and then increase phosphorous release resulting in the decrease of the average effluent phosphorus concentration.

  17. Effect of virtual mass on the characteristics and the numerical stability in two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, H.C.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1981-04-01

    It is known that the typical six equation two-fluid model of the two-phase flow possesses complex characteristics, exhibits unbounded instabilities in the short-wavelength limit and constitutes an ill-posed initial value problem. Among the suggestions to overcome these difficulties, one model for the virtual mass force terms were studied here, because the virtual mass represents real physical effects to accomplish the dissipation for numerical stability. It was found that the virtual mass has a profound effect upon the mathematical characteristic and numerical stability. Here a quantitative bound on the coefficient of the virtual mass terms was suggested for mathematical hyperbolicity and numerical stability. It was concluded that the finite difference scheme with the virtual mass model is restricted only by the convective stability conditions with the above suggested value

  18. Effective stability around the Cassini state in the spin-orbit problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansottera, Marco; Lhotka, Christoph; Lemaître, Anne

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the long-time stability in the neighborhood of the Cassini state in the conservative spin-orbit problem. Starting with an expansion of the Hamiltonian in the canonical Andoyer-Delaunay variables, we construct a high-order Birkhoff normal form and give an estimate of the effective stability time in the Nekhoroshev sense. By extensively using algebraic manipulations on a computer, we explicitly apply our method to the rotation of Titan. We obtain physical bounds of Titan's latitudinal and longitudinal librations, finding a stability time greatly exceeding the estimated age of the Universe. In addition, we study the dependence of the effective stability time on three relevant physical parameters: the orbital inclination, , the mean precession of the ascending node of Titan orbit, , and the polar moment of inertia,.

  19. Testing the effect of a microbial-based soil amendment on aggregate stability and erodibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malozo, Mponda; Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    to the rainfall-runoff experiment where the microbial-based product had a clear effect on soil erodibility. In relation to measurement of aggregate stability as well as clay dispersion, the picture was less clear. Especially for the sandy Tanzania soil with a low content of organic matter, a clear effect was seen...... aggregate stability and erodibility. Two commercial products, gypsum and a microbial-based solution were used for the experiment and were tested on two Danish sandy loamy soils as well on a sandy soil from Tanzania. The carrier of the microbial-based product, a glycerol solution, was tested as well....... In the laboratory, soils were treated with the soil amendments in a two-step procedure at controlled water contents following aerobic incubation in closed containers. Water-aggregate stability and clay dispersion were measured on soil aggregates less than 8 mm in diameter. Aggregate stability was measured...

  20. Research of the voltage and current stabilization processes by using the silicon field-effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimov, A.V.; Yodgorova, D.M.; Kamanov, B.M.; Giyasova, F.A.; Yakudov, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    The silicon field-effect transistors were investigated to use in circuits for stabilization of current and voltage. As in gallium arsenide field-effect transistors, in silicon field-effect transistors with p-n-junction a new mechanism of saturation of the drain current is experimentally found out due to both transverse and longitudinal compression of channel by additional resistance between the source and the gate of the transistor. The criteria for evaluating the coefficients of stabilization of transient current suppressors and voltage stabilizator based on the field-effect transistor are considered. (authors)

  1. On the stability analysis of a general discrete-time population model involving predation and Allee effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merdan, H.; Duman, O.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the stability analysis of equilibrium points of a general discrete-time population dynamics involving predation with and without Allee effects which occur at low population density. The mathematical analysis and numerical simulations show that the Allee effect has a stabilizing role on the local stability of the positive equilibrium points of this model.

  2. Effect of natural antioxidants on the stability of ostrich meat during storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Arab, E. A.; Abu-Salem, F. M.

    2010-07-01

    Meat from the ostrich is becoming increasingly popular throughout the world. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effects of different antioxidants such as ascorbic acid (AA), {alpha}-tocopherol (Toc) and rosemary herb (Ros) on the stability of ostrich meat during storage. The chemical composition of ostrich meat showed low fat content (1.5 %) combined with high protein content (22.4 %). The combination of AA Ros, Toc Ros and AA Toc was more effective in reducing the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) and peroxide values. The antioxidant showed insignificant effects on acidity as oleic acid. The addition of the efficient role of AA, Toc and Ros showed an improvement in the color stability of ostrich steaks and the combined treatment was more effective in color stability. In conclusion, the addition of AA, Toc and Ros had a positive effect on aroma quality, rancidity and discoloration of refrigerated ostrich meat. (Author) 41 refs.

  3. Effect of tune modulation on the transverse stability of storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jiancheng; Xia Jiawen; Wu Junxia; Xia Guoxing; Liu Wei; Yin Xuejun; Liu Yong; Zhou Xuemei; Mao Lijun

    2004-01-01

    The transverse stability is a critical issue in circular accelerator. In this paper, authors analysed the effect of tune modulation on a FODO lattice with sextupole nonlinear through estimating the dynamic aperture including the influence of the distortion along the phase. It turned out that the tune modulation decreases the stability of particle in storage ring, the extent of this decrease depends largely on the amplitude and tune of modulation. (author)

  4. The Effect of Wearing Different Types of Respirators on Postural Stability and Comfort

    OpenAIRE

    Farhang Akbar-Khanzadeh; Sandra M. Woolley; Kent Huang

    2012-01-01

    Respirators are commonly used to protect workers against workplace airborne contaminants, but this equipment may become a safety hazard by creating discomfort, disorientation and postural instability.Although postural stability is critical to workers, especially those working near moving objects or on surfaces where a loss of balance may become life threatening, little attention has been given to the effect of respirators on wearers’ postural stability. The purpose of this study was to examin...

  5. Evaluation of the simultaneous effects of a heat stabilized starter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-09-28

    Sep 28, 2016 ... marketing opportunities (Kayodé et al., 2007). Thus, ... effective dose and the fermentation duration for this granule are not .... conservation of the fermented foods (Kayodé et al.,. 2005). ..... traditional alcoholic beverages. Food ...

  6. Effect of implementation intentions to change behaviour: moderation by intention stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Gaston; Bélanger-Gravel, Ariane; Amireault, Steve; Gallani, Maria-Cecilia B J; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Pérusse, Louis

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of implementation intentions on leisure-time physical activity, taking into account the stability of intention. At baseline (T0), 349 participants completed a psychosocial questionnaire and were randomly assigned to implementation intention or control condition. Three months after baseline assessment (T1), participants in the experimental group were asked to plan where, when, and how they would exercise. Leisure-time physical activity was assessed 3 mo. later (i.e., at 6-mo. follow-up; T2). The intervention had no significant effect on physical activity at 6-mo. follow-up. However, a significant interaction of group and intention stability was observed, with the effect of the intervention on behaviour statistically significant only among those with unstable intention. Intention stability thus moderated the effect of the intervention, i.e., the intervention was more successful among individuals who needed support to change (unstable intenders).

  7. Effect of Moringa oleifera marinade on microbial stability of smoke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the antimicrobial effect of Moringa oleifera marinade on smoke-dried catfish stored at ambient temperature (37±20C) for two months. The experimental treatments are the control, 1%, 2% and 3% (w/v) Moringa oleifera Marinade (MOM) and 5% Brine (w/v) solutions. Seventy-five fishes of average weight ...

  8. Effect of Surfactants on Plasmid DNA Stability and Release from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of surfactants on plasmid DNA during preparation and release from polylactic glycolide (PLGA) microspheres. Methods: Various surfactants, both ionic and non-ionic (Span, Tween, Triton X100, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium dodecyl sulphate), were added during the ...

  9. Effects of heat treatment on density, dimensional stability and color ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on some physical properties and color change of Pinus nigra wood which has high industrial use potential and large growing stocks in Turkey. Wood samples which comprised the material of the study were obtained from an industrial plant. Samples were ...

  10. Solvation effect on isomer stability and electronic structures of protonated serotonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidyan, Reza; Amanollahi, Zohreh; Azimi, Gholamhassan

    2017-07-01

    Microsolvation effect on geometry and transition energies of protonated serotonin has been investigated by MP2 and CC2 quantum chemical methods. Also, conductor-like screening model, implemented recently in the MP2 and ADC(2) methods, was examined to address the bulk water environment's effect on the isomer stability and electronic transition energies of protonated serotonin. It has been predicted that the dipole moment of gas phase isomers plays the main role on the isomer stabilization in water solution and electronic transition shifts. Also, both red- and blue-shift effects have been predicted to take place on electronic transition energies, upon hydration.

  11. Effects of inserted depth of wall penetration on basal stability of foundation pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aizhao; Shen, Hao; Sun, Jinguo

    2017-05-01

    Evaluation of basal heave stability is one of important design checks for excavations in soft clays. The commonly used classical calculation method based on limit equilibrium theory and the safety coefficient formula recommended by the current code, do not consider the influence of supporting structure of foundation pit depth heave stability, which results in conservative. Considering the wall stiffness and strength, the effective stress changes in different depth of soil, the frictional resistance between the retaining wall and the passive zone, the vertical shear resistance of the soil behind the wall and other factors. The modified safety factor calculation formula of foundation pit stability is presented, comparison analysis of calculation method combined with examples. The calculation results show that the safety factor of foundation pit stability is improved considering the influence of supporting structure depth, the calculation results are more reasonable.

  12. The effect of gamma irradiation on the stability of cemented Winfrith reactor (SGHWR) sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of prolonged self-irradiation within cemented Winfrith SGHWR sludge have been investigated by exposing simulant material to a CO-60 source. Measurements of dimensional stability and radiolysis have been used in this assessment of radiation stability. The dimensional stability of the cement matrix was unaffected by an irradiation intensity which greatly exceeded the expected lifetime dose, and radiolysis rates have followed those which have previously been observed by other researchers. Data obtained for the release of radiolytic hydrogen has allowed a prediction to be made of release from the full-size product, during decay of the principal radioactive species, Co-60. A method has been developed for the determination of dimensional stability using non-standard sized specimens and is appended. (author)

  13. Effects of oxidation potential and retention time on electrochromic stability of poly (3-hexyl thiophene) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Ho; Hyun Song, Seok; Kim, Hyo-Jae; Oh, Seong-Hyeon; Han, Song-Yi; Kim, Goung; Nah, Yoon-Chae

    2018-06-01

    Herein, we report the effects of applied voltage on the electrochromic (EC) stability of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films during EC reactions. The transmittance difference and cycling stability of these films were monitored to optimize the oxidation voltage, and their chemical compositions were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy after long-term electrochemical cycling. High oxidation voltages increased the color contrast of P3HT films but decreased their cycling stability due to facilitating chemical degradation. Furthermore, at an optimized oxidation voltage, the retention time during potential pulsing was adjusted utilizing the optical memory of P3HT, revealing that the decreased voltage application time reduced power consumption by 9.6% and enhanced EC stability without loss of color contrast.

  14. Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jianlu; Li, Liyu; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Vijayakumar, M.; Kim, Soowhan; Wang, Wei; Schwenzer, Birgit; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-01-01

    The stability of the electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow battery was investigated with ex-situ heating/cooling treatment and in-situ flow-battery testing methods. The effects of inorganic and organic additives have been studied. The additives containing the ions of potassium, phosphate, and polyphosphate are not suitable stabilizing agents because of their reactions with V(V) ions, forming precipitates of KVSO6 or VOPO4. Of the chemicals studied, polyacrylic acid and its mixture with CH3SO3H are the most promising stabilizing candidates which can stabilize all the four vanadium ions (V2+, V3+, VO2+, and VO2+) in electrolyte solutions up to 1.8 M. However, further effort is needed to obtain a stable electrolyte solution with >1.8 M V5+ at temperatures higher than 40 C.

  15. [Effects of loess soil stabilization on Lolium perenne L. growth and root activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue-mei; Zhang, Xing-chang; Wang, Dan-dan

    2011-10-01

    Taking the loess soils with bulk density 1.2 g cm(-3), 1.3 g cm(-3), and 1.4 g cm(-3) from Ansai, Shaanxi Province as test objects, a pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of different amendment amount of soil stabilizer (EN-1 stabilizer) on the growth and root activity of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.). Within the range of the bulk densities, the leaf chlorophyll content, root activity, root/shoot ratio, root biomass, and plant biomass of L. perenne all decreased with increasing soil bulk density, and were higher under the amendment of EN-1 stabilizer, as compared with the control. With increasing amendment amount of EN-1 stabilizer, the leaf chlorophyll content, root activity, root/shoot ratio, root biomass, and plant biomass had a trend of increased first and decreased then. Soil bulk density and stabilizer amendment amount had significant interactive effect on the root biomass and plant biomass. Overall, the values of the test indices were the highest under 1.3 g cm(-3) soil bulk density and 0.15% EN-1 stabilizer amendment amount.

  16. Effect of speed on local dynamic stability of locomotion under different task constraints in running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Sina; Arshi, Ahmed Reza; Davids, Keith

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated effects of speed on local dynamic stability of walking, although this relationship has been rarely investigated under changing task constraints, such as during forward and backward running. To rectify this gap in the literature, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of running speed on local dynamic stability of forward and backward running on a treadmill. Fifteen healthy male participants took part in this study. Participants ran in forward and backward directions at speeds of 80%, 100% and 120% of their preferred running speed. The three-dimensional motion of a C7 marker was recorded using a motion capture system. Local dynamic stability of the marker was quantified using short- and long-term largest finite-time Lyapunov exponents (LyE). Results showed that short-term largest finite-time LyE values increased with participant speed meaning that local dynamic stability decreased with increasing speed. Long-term largest finite-time LyEs, however, remained unaffected as speed increased. Results of this study indicated that, as in walking, slow running is more stable than fast running. These findings improve understanding of how stability is regulated when constraints on the speed of movements is altered. Implications for the design of rehabilitation or sport practice programmes suggest how task constraints could be manipulated to facilitate adaptations in locomotion stability during athletic training.

  17. Effect of cooling water on stability of NLC linac components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Le Pimpec et al.

    2003-02-11

    Vertical vibration of linac components (accelerating structures, girders and quadrupoles) in the NLC has been studied experimentally and analytically. Effects such as structural resonances and vibration caused by cooling water both in accelerating structures and quadrupoles have been considered. Experimental data has been compared with analytical predictions and simulations using ANSYS. A design, incorporating the proper decoupling of structure vibrations from the linac quadrupoles, is being pursued.

  18. Effect of Cooling Water on Stability of NLC Linac Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pimpec, Frederic

    2002-11-01

    Vertical vibration of linac components (accelerating structures, girders and quadrupoles) in the NLC has been studied experimentally and analytically. Effects such as structural resonances and vibration caused by cooling water both in accelerating structures and quadrupoles have been considered. Experimental data has been compared with analytical predictions and simulations using ANSYS. A design, incorporating the proper decoupling of structure vibrations from the linac quadrupoles, is being pursued.

  19. Radiation effects on superconductors and magnet stabilizer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Guinan, M.W.

    1980-01-01

    Previously-irradiated Nb 3 Sn wires have been given additional irradiation at room temperature in order to reach the anticipated serious decline in critical current and to evaluate the fluence where it occurs. In addition, an experiment is in preparation which will measure the magnetoresistance of copper and aluminum in fields up to 12 tesla after 14-MeV neutron irradiation. The same experiment will test the effects of repeated irradiation and room temperature annealing on NbTi critical current

  20. Supplier bidding strategy based on non-cooperative game theory concepts in single auction power pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong-Joo; Kim, Balho H.; Hur, Don

    2007-01-01

    In single auction power pools, only generators bid several energy price segments depending on the amount of energy supply, at individual generating companies' (GENCO) own discretion, for every trading interval. Then all selected bidders are paid a uniform Market Clearing Price (MCP). In this paper, it is realized that each GENCO has the complete information on its own payoff as well as the other parties' payoffs, corresponding to each potential combination of choices of strategies by all the players. Specifically, all the suppliers attempt to estimate the others' bids using the concept of Nash equilibrium in the general sense of profit maximization. Under some simplified assumptions, this problem can be modeled as a simultaneous-move game confronted by the bidders. Here, the system demand forecast by competitive sellers is captured for the purpose of constructing the optimal bidding strategy. Finally, a numerical example is presented demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed solution scheme. (author)

  1. The effects of public perception of Yar'adua's leadership on stability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work is an attempt to use the factors of legitimacy, political will, charisma, political culture, popular participation, political stability and social integration; identified by the respondents as the highpoints for determining the effectiveness and efficiency of the president, to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of President ...

  2. Resonant effects on the low frequency vlasov stability of axisymmetric field reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, J.M.; Sudan, R.N.

    We investigate the effect of particle resonances on low frequency MHD modes in field-reversed geometries, e.g., an ion ring. It is shown that, for sufficiently high field reversal, modes which are hydromagnetically stable can be driven unstable by ion resonances. The stabilizing effect of a toroidal magnetic field is discussed

  3. Effect of Tropical Climatic Conditions on the Stability of Cefaclor Dry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Two critical factors that govern the stability of pharmaceutical formulations in the tropics are humidity and temperature. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of moisture sorption at two different storage conditions on Cefaclor dry powder for oral suspension and predict the effect of moisture interaction on ...

  4. IGF-1 has plaque-stabilizing effects in atherosclerosis by altering vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von der Thüsen, Jan H.; Borensztajn, Keren S.; Moimas, Silvia; van Heiningen, Sandra; Teeling, Peter; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is important for the maintenance of plaque stability in atherosclerosis due to its effects on vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effects of the highly inflammatory milieu of the atherosclerotic

  5. Flow shear stabilization of rotating plasmas due to the Coriolis effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, J. W.; de Blank, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    A radially decreasing toroidal rotation frequency can have a stabilizing effect on nonaxisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. We show that this is a consequence of the Coriolis effect that induces a restoring pressure gradient force when plasma is perturbed radially. In a rotating

  6. Flow shear stabilization of rotating plasmas due to the Coriolis effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Haverkort (Willem); H.J. de Blank

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractA radially decreasing toroidal rotation frequency can have a stabilizing effect on nonaxisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. We show that this is a consequence of the Coriolis effect that induces a restoring pressure gradient force when plasma is perturbed radially. In a

  7. Effects of noxious stimulation to the back or calf muscles on gait stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Hug, François; Hodges, Paul W; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-11-26

    Gait stability is the ability to deal with small perturbations that naturally occur during walking. Changes in motor control caused by pain could affect this ability. This study investigated whether nociceptive stimulation (hypertonic saline injection) in a low back (LBP) or calf (CalfP) muscle affects gait stability. Sixteen participants walked on a treadmill at 0.94ms(-1) and 1.67ms(-1), while thorax kinematics were recorded using 3D-motion capture. From 110 strides, stability (local divergence exponent, LDE), stride-to-stride variability and root mean squares (RMS) of thorax linear velocities were calculated along the three movement axes. At 0.94ms(-1), independent of movement axes, gait stability was lower (higher LDE) and stride-to-stride variability was higher, during LBP and CalfP than no pain. This was more pronounced during CalfP, likely explained by the biomechanical function of calf muscles in gait, as supported by greater mediolateral RMS and stance time asymmetry than in LBP and no pain. At 1.67ms(-1), independent of movement axes, gait stability was greater and stride-to-stride variability was smaller with LBP than no pain and CalfP, whereas CalfP was not different from no pain. Opposite effects of LBP on gait stability between speeds suggests a more protective strategy at the faster speed. Although mediolateral RMS was greater and participants had more asymmetric stance times with CalfP than LBP and no pain, limited effect of CalfP at the faster speed could relate to greater kinematic constraints and smaller effects of calf muscle activity on propulsion at this speed. In conclusion, pain effects on gait stability depend on pain location and walking speed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stability of bubble nuclei through Shell-Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Dietrich, Klaus; Pomorski, Krzysztof

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the shell structure of bubble nuclei in simple phenomenological shell models and study their binding energy as a function of the radii and of the number of neutron and protons using Strutinsky's method. Shell effects come about, on the one hand, by the high degeneracy of levels with large angular momentum and, on the other, by the big energy gaps between states with a different number of radial nodes. Shell energies down to -40 MeV are shown to occur for certain magic nuclei. E...

  9. EFFECT OF STABILIZERS ON THE CHEMICAL AND PHOTODEGRADATION OF ASCORBIC ACID IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ascorbic acid (vitamin C is susceptible to light and air and forms various degradation products. A number of stabilizers have been used to study their effect on the degradation of ascorbic acid (AH2 in dark and light at pH 4.0 and 6.0 alone and in combination with citric and tartaric acids. The assay of AH2 in degraded solutions was performed by a specific UV spectrometric method. The degradation product of AH2 at pH 4.0 and 6.0 was identified as dehydroascorbic acid. The degradation of AH2 has been found to follow first-order kinetics. The apparent first-order rate constants, t90 and percent inhibition in rate in the presence of stabilizers and the second-order rate constants for the interaction of stabilizers with AH2 have been determined. The highest stabilizing effect on AH2 was found by sodium metabisulfite, followed by sodium sulfite, sodium bisulfate, sodium thiosulfate and thiourea. The pH of the solutions has also been found to influence the degradation of AH2 as the rates are higher at pH 6.0 compared to those of pH 4.0, probably due to the ionization of AH2. A synergistic effect has been observed when citric or tartaric acid was added to the solutions containing stabilizers where citric acid showed comparatively better effect.

  10. Effect of Core Stability Training on Trunk Function, Standing Balance, and Mobility in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Koshiro; Kawakami, Michiyuki; Otsuka, Tomoyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Trunk function is important for standing balance, mobility, and functional outcome after stroke, but few studies have evaluated the effects of exercises aimed at improving core stability in stroke patients. To investigate the effectiveness of core stability training on trunk function, standing balance, and mobility in stroke patients. An assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial was undertaken in a stroke rehabilitation ward, with 32 participants randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group (n = 16 each). The experimental group received 400 minutes of core stability training in place of conventional programs within total training time, while the control group received only conventional programs. Primary outcome measures were evaluated using the Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS), which reflects trunk function. Secondary outcome measures were evaluated by pelvic tilt active range of motion in the sagittal plane, the Balance Evaluation Systems Test-brief version (Brief-BESTest), Functional Reach test, Timed Up-and-Go test (TUG), and Functional Ambulation Categories (FAC). A general linear repeated-measures model was used to analyze the results. A treatment effect was found for the experimental group on the dynamic balance subscale and total score of the TIS ( P = .002 and P Core stability training has beneficial effects on trunk function, standing balance, and mobility in stroke patients. Our findings might provide support for introducing core stability training in stroke rehabilitation.

  11. Climatic effects of nuclear war: The role of atmospheric stability and ground heat fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.F.B.; Slingo, A.

    1988-01-01

    Most studies of the climatic effects of nuclear war have used atmospheric models with simple representations of important physical processes. In this work, a model is used which treats the diurnal cycle of insolation, and includes surface and boundary layer parameterizations which take into account static stability and a four-layer soil model. Three idealized experiments are described in which a band of smoke is prescribed over northern mid-latitudes in In the experiment, the standard model is used, in the second the effect of deep soil layers is ignored and in the third the stability dependence in the surface and boundary layer processes is removed. It is found that the inclusion of deep soil layers decreases the surface cooling by about 20%, whereas the inclusion of stability effects increases the cooling by about the same amount, though conclusions will depend to some extent on the model used. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  12. The Effects of Electroless Nickel Plating Bath Conditions on Stability of Solution and Properties of Deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Jin; Lee, Jae Ho

    2000-01-01

    Electroless depositions of nickel were conducted in different bath conditions to find optimum conditions of electroless nickel plating at low operating temperature and pH. The effect of complexing reagent on stability of plating solution was investigated. Sodium citrate complexed plating solution is more stable than sodium pyrophosphate complexed solution. The effects of nickel salt concentration, reducing agent, complexing agent and inhibitor on deposition rate was investigated. The effects of pH on deposition rate and content of phosphorous in deposited nickel were also analyzed. Electroless deposited nickel become crystallized with increasing pH due to lower phosphorous content. In optimum operating bath condition, deposition rate was 7 μm/hr at 60 .deg. C and pH 10.0 without stabilizer. The rate was decreased with stabilizer concentration

  13. Effects of tocopherols on oxidative stability of margarine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizkhani, M.; Kamkar, A.; Nejad, A.S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Tocopherols are the most important natural antioxidants which are now added to edible oils. Each individual tocopherol (a, beta and gamma) was added to the oil phase of margarine in 0 (control), 100, 250, and 500 ppm. Anti oxidative activity was evaluated through oven test (at 60 +- 1 deg. C in 5 days and measuring peroxide value and anisidine value) and Ransimat test (110 +- 1 deg. C). Anti oxidative activity increased progressively as concentration of gamma-tocopherol increased. As the concentration of gamma-tocopherol increased from 0 to 100, and 250 ppm, oxidation of oil phase decreased. At 500 ppm, a-tocopherol acted as a prooxidant and gamma-tocopherol did not have any noticable effect, but gamma-tocopherol acted as an antioxidant. The order of anti oxidative activity of tocopherols was: a- < beta- < gamma-. (author)

  14. Effects of toroidal coupling on the stability of tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, B.; Hicks, H.R.; Lee, D.K.

    1980-06-01

    The time evolution of tearing modes in toroidal geometry is studied in the low-β and large aspect ratio limit. An initial value three-dimensional computer code, which numerically advances the reduced set of resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations is employed. Toroidicity has, in general, a destabilizing effect on tearing modes in this limit. A generalization of the Δ' formalism can be used to study the linear regime. The results obtained in this way are in very good agreement with the results from the initial value code. The nonlinear phase of the evolution is also followed numerically. In the case of strong interaction of different helicities, a larger region of stochastic magnetic field lines results than in the cylindrical geometry case

  15. Effect of cariogenic challenge on the stability of dentin bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Blos BORGES

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The oral environment is subject to biofilm accumulation and cariogenic challenge, and few studies exist on the effect of these factors on the bond strength of adhesive systems. The aim of this study was to test if the exposure of adhesive interfaces to cariogenic challenge under biofilm accumulation could promote higher degradation than the exposure to biofilm accumulation alone. Material And Methods: Five molars were ground until exposure of medium dentin and then restored (Single Bond 2 and Z250 3M ESPE. The tooth/resin sets were cut to obtain beam-shaped specimens, which were distributed according to the aging conditions (n=20: water for 24 h (control; biofilm under cariogenic challenge for 3, 5 or 10 days; biofilm without cariogenic challenge for 10 days; and water for 3 months. Microcosm biofilms were formed from human saliva and grown in a saliva analogue medium, supplemented or not with sucrose to promote cariogenic challenge. Specimens were tested for microtensile bond strength, and failure modes were classified using light microscopy. Bond strength data were analyzed using ANOVA and failure modes were analyzed using ANOVA on ranks (α=0.05. Results: No significant differences in bond strength were detected among the aging methods (P=0.248. The aging period was associated with an increase in the frequency of adhesive failures for the groups aged for 10 days or longer (P<0.001. Conclusion: Aging leads to a higher prevalence of interfacial adhesive failures, although this effect is not associated with cariogenic challenge or reduction in bond strengths.

  16. Phenomenology and thermo-hydraulic stability of the CAREM-25 reactor: Evaluation of subcooled boiling effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acuna, F.M.; Marcel, C.P.; Zanocco, P.G.; Delmastro, D.F.

    2012-01-01

    In this article the phenomenology present in self/pressurized, integral, natural circulation, low thermodynamic quality nuclear reactors similar to CAREM-25 is investigated. In particular, analytical relations for the mass flow rate, the core mean enthalpy and the location of the two phase boundary are derived in terms of the so-called natural variables of the system: the nuclear power, the condensation power and the system pressure. In addition, some consequences of the flashing phenomenon in the reactor thermal-hydraulics are discussed emphasizing those affecting the reactor stability. The reactor stability performance was studied by using the HUARPE code which is a low diffusive code. The stability results obtained by neglecting the subcooled effect in the system are presented in the so-called the stability maps in which the results are presented for a wide range of conditions. The stability effect caused by the presence of subcooled boiling in the reactor core was also examined. In order to investigate such a consequence, the code was slightly modified such that the predicted vapor profile in the hot leg is similar to that estimated by RELAP system code at steady state conditions. The simple implemented algorithm allows varying a free parameter with which a broad number of cases can be studied. This is important since the subcooled boiling predictions generally have large uncertainties and therefore to cover a large number of situations is desired to derive confident conclusions. The results show the existence of vapor created by means of subcooled boiling enhances the system stability for a wide range of conditions. For this reason from this preliminary investigation, it is concluded neglecting the subcooled effect in CAREM-25 stability studies is a conservative criterion (author))

  17. Radiosterilization and steam autoclaving sterilization effects on phosphite antioxidant stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagoubi, N.; Boucherie, P.; Ferrier, D.

    1997-01-01

    While the radiosterilization by γ rays, is mainly employed for medical devices, this procedure is not commonly used to sterilize and decontaminate raw material and finished product used in the pharmaceutical industry. Depending on the countries, the requirements for obtaining approval to treat this class of product with γ rays may be different. Usually it is the responsibility of the manufacturer to demonstrate not only the integrity of the irradiated product, but olso its efficiency, safety and quality. Our work consists of a comparative study of the effects of γ radiotreatment at 25 kGy and steam sterilisation on phosphite antioxidant incorporated in polypropylene. The γ radiosensitivity compared with thermolability of this antioxidant was studied by reversed phase HPLC, Fourier transform infrared (IRFT) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results obtained proved that the phosphite incorporated into the polymer and treated with the two types of sterilisation is rapidly oxidized in phosphate. Nevertheless, this oxidation is more important when using radiotreatment at 25 kGy. (orig.)

  18. Does Ferrule Effect Affect Implant-Abutment Stability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajerfar, Maryam; Beyabanaki, Elaheh; Geramy, Allahyar; Siadat, Hakimeh; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the influence of placing implant-supported crowns on the torque loss of the abutment screw before and after loading. Twenty implant-abutment assemblies were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group was consisted of abutments with abutment-level finishing line (abutment-level), and in the second group the crown margin was placed on the implant shoulder (implant-level). Initial torque loss was recorded for all specimens. After 500000 cyclic load of 75 N and frequency of 2 Hz, post loading torque loss was recorded. Finite element model of each group was also modeled and screw energy, and stress were analyzed and compared between two groups. ANOVA for repeated measurements showed that the torque loss did not change significantly after cyclic loading (P=0.73). Crown margin also had no significant effect on the torque loss (P=0.56). However, the energy and stress of screw in abutment-level model (4.49 mJ and 22.74 MPa) was higher than implant-level model (3.52 mJ and 20.81 MPa). Although embracing the implant with crown produced less stress and energy in the abutment-implant screw, it did not have any significant influence on the torque loss of the screw. Copyright© 2016 Dennis Barber Ltd

  19. Thermal stability of the krypton Hall effect thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szelecka Agnieszka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Krypton Large IMpulse Thruster (KLIMT ESA/PECS project, which has been implemented in the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM and now is approaching its final phase, was aimed at incremental development of a ~500 W class Hall effect thruster (HET. Xenon, predominantly used as a propellant in the state-of-the-art HETs, is extremely expensive. Krypton has been considered as a cheaper alternative since more than fifteen years; however, to the best knowledge of the authors, there has not been a HET model especially designed for this noble gas. To address this issue, KLIMT has been geared towards operation primarily with krypton. During the project, three subsequent prototype versions of the thruster were designed, manufactured and tested, aimed at gradual improvement of each next exemplar. In the current paper, the heat loads in new engine have been discussed. It has been shown that thermal equilibrium of the thruster is gained within the safety limits of the materials used. Extensive testing with both gases was performed to compare KLIMT’s thermal behaviour when supplied with krypton and xenon propellants.

  20. Effects of stabilizers on the heat transfer characteristics of a nuclear waste canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vafai, K.; Ettefagh, J.

    1986-07-01

    This report summarizes the feasibility and the effectiveness of using stabilizers (internal metal structural components) to augment the heat transfer characteristics of a nuclear waste canister. The problem was modeled as a transient two-dimensional heat transfer in two physical domains - the stabilizer and the wedge (a 30-degree-angle canister segment), which includes the heat-producing spent-fuel rods. This problem is solved by a simultaneous and interrelated numerical investigation of the two domains in cartesian and polar coordinate systems. The numerical investigations were performed for three cases. In the first case, conduction was assumed to be the dominant mechanism for heat transfer. The second case assumed that radiation was the dominant mechanism, and in the third case both radiation and conduction were considered as mechanisms of heat transfer. The results show that for typical conditions in a waste package design, the stabilizers are quite effective in reducing the overall temperature in a waste canister. Furthermore, the results show that increasing the stabilizer thickness over the thickness specified in the present design has a negligible effect on the temperature distribution in the canister. Finally, the presence of the stabilizers was found to shift the location of the peak temperature areas in the waste canister

  1. Hydrodynamic stability of thermoviscous liquid film inside a rotating horizontal cylinder: Heating and cooling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumawat, Tara Chand; Tiwari, Naveen

    2018-03-01

    Steady two-dimensional solutions and their stability analysis are presented for thin film of a thermoviscous liquid flowing inside a cylinder rotating about its horizontal axis. The inner surface of the cylinder is either uniformly hotter or colder than the enveloping air. The mass, momentum, and energy equations are simplified using thin-film approximation. The analytically obtained film thickness evolution equation consists of various dimensionless parameters such as gravitational number, Bond number, Biot number, thermoviscosity number, and Marangoni number. The viscosity of the liquid is considered as an exponential function of temperature. The viscosity increases (decreases) within the film thickness away from the inner surface of the cylinder when the surface is uniformly hotter (colder) than the atmosphere. For hotter (colder) surface, the film thickness on the rising side decreases (increases) when convective heat transfer at the free surface is increased. The surface tension gradient at the free surface generates Marangoni stress that has a destabilizing (stabilizing) effect on the thin film flow in the case of a hotter (colder) cylinder. The thermoviscosity number stabilizes (destabilizes) the flow on a heating (cooling) surface and this effect increases with an increase in the heat transfer at the free surface. For a hotter surface and in the presence of Marangoni stress, the convective heat transfer at the interface has the destabilizing effect for small values of the Biot number and assumes a stabilizing role for larger values. Non-linear simulations show consistency with the linear stability analysis.

  2. The long-term hydrological effect of forest stands on the stability of slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaard, T. A.; Meng, W.; van Beek, L. P. H.

    2012-04-01

    Forest is widely known to improve slope stability as a result of mechanical and hydrological effects. While the mechanics underlying the stabilizing process of root reinforcement are well understood and quantified, the influence of forest on the occurrence of critical hydrological conditions in terms of suction or pore pressure remains uncertain. Due to seasonal and inter-annual fluctuations, the stabilizing influence of evaporation and transpiration is difficult to isolate from the overall noise of the hydrological signal. More long-term effects of forest stands on soil development are highly variable and thus difficult to observe and quantify. Often these effects are ambivalent, having potentially a stabilizing or destabilizing influence on a slope under particular conditions (e.g., more structured soils leading to both rapid infiltration and drainage). Consequently, it can be postulated that forests will hydrologically influence the magnitude-frequency distribution of landsliding, not only at the stand level but also on a regional scale through the groundwater system. The overall aim of this research is to understand and quantify the stabilizing hydrological effect of forests on potentially unstable slopes. To this end, we focus on the changes in the magnitude-frequency distribution of landsliding that arise as a result of variations in evapotranspiration losses over the life cycle of stands. Temporal variations in evapotranspiration comprise first of all the interception that can account for an important amount of evaporation from a forest, and that changes with seasonal and annual variations in the interception capacity of the canopy and forest floor. Transpiration also represents an important loss that varies over the various growth stages of a forest stand. Based on a literature review of water consumption by tree species and water balance studies of forested catchments we defined the potential transpiration for different growth stages. This information we

  3. EFFECTS OF THE BACK-FILLING TO THE STABILITY OF A CAISSON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yoshiaki; Shinsha, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Kensuke; Eguchi, Shinya

    The back-filling improves the stability of a caisson used for breakwater against wave force. But, the extent of the improvement of the stability is affected by the interaction among the back-filling and the caisson and the foundation. A series of the model loading experiments was carried out to clarify the effects of the interaction to the stability. In this series of experiments, horizontal static load was applied to the model caisson having back-filling. Sliding failure surface was estimated from the deformation of rubble mound and back-filling. Passive earth pressure by back-filling calculated by wedge theory was compared with the experimental results. New stability evaluation method considering circular arc failure mode was developed and evaluated its validity. Followings are main conclusions in this research; 1) Increment of stability of a caisson against wave force can be estimated from wedge theory. 2) Both sliding and bearing capacity stability were considered in one time using newly developed evaluation method considering circular arc failure mode.

  4. Effect of shoulder stabilization on career length in national football league athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Robert H; Gill, Corey S; Lyman, Stephen; Barnes, Ronnie P; Rodeo, Scott A; Warren, Russell F

    2011-04-01

    Shoulder instability and surgical stabilization are common in college football athletes. The effect of shoulder stabilization during college on the length of an athlete's career in the National Football League (NFL) has not been well examined. Athletes with a history of shoulder stabilization before the NFL combine have a shorter career than do matched controls. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A database containing the injury history and career NFL statistics of athletes from 1987 to 2000 was used to match athletes with a history of shoulder stabilization and no other surgery or significant injury to controls without a history of any previous surgery or significant injury. Athletes were matched by position, year drafted, round drafted, and additional minor injury history. Forty-two athletes with a history of shoulder stabilization were identified and matched with controls. A history of shoulder stabilization significantly reduced the length of career in terms of years (5.2 ± 3.9 vs 6.9 ± 3.6 years; P = .01) and games played (56 ± 53 vs 77 ± 50, P = .03) as compared with controls. By position, linemen and linebackers (20 athletes) with a history of shoulder stabilization had a significantly shorter career in years (4.7 ± 3.8 vs 6.7 ± 3.4 years; P = .049) and games played (51 ± 58 vs 81 ± 48; P = .046) than did controls. Among the other positions (22 athletes), the difference was not statistically significant in this small cohort. A history of shoulder stabilization shortens the expected career of a professional football player, particularly for linemen and linebackers. Further research is warranted to better understand how these injuries and surgeries affect an athlete's career and what can be done to improve the long-term outcome after treatment.

  5. Strong toroidal effects on tokamak tearing mode stability in the hybrid and conventional scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, C J; Connor, J W; Cowley, S C; Gimblett, C G; Hastie, R J; Hender, T C; Martin, T J

    2012-01-01

    The hybrid scenario is thought to be an important mode of operation for the ITER tokamak. Analytic and numerical calculations demonstrate that toroidal effects at finite β have a strong influence on tearing mode stability of hybrid modes. Indeed, they persist in the large aspect ratio limit, R/a → ∞. A similar strong coupling effect is found between the m = 1, n = 1 harmonic and the m = 2, n = 1 harmonic if the minimum safety factor is less than unity. In both cases the tearing stability index, Δ′ increases rapidly as β approaches ideal marginal stability, providing a potential explanation for the onset of linearly unstable tearing modes. The numerical calculations have used an improved version of the T7 code (Fitzpatrick et al 1993 Nucl. Fusion 33 1533), and complete agreement is obtained with the analytic theory for this demanding test of the code. (paper)

  6. Effects of processing techniques on oxidative stability of Prunus pedunculatus seed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effects of Prunus pedunculatus (P. pedunculatus seed pre-treatment, including microwaving (M, roasting (R, steaming (S and roasting plus steaming (RS on crude oil quality in terms of yield, color change, fatty acid composition, and oxidative stability. The results showed an increase in monounsaturated fatty acid content and oxidative stability of the oils obtained from different processing treatments compared to the oil obtained from raw seeds (RW without processing. The oils, obtained from pretreated seeds, had higher conjugated diene (CD and 2-thiobarbituric acid (2-TBA values, compared to that obtained from RW when stored in a Schaal oven at 65 °C for 168 h. However, polyphenol and tocopherol contents decreased in all oil samples, processed or unprocessed. The effect of pre-treating the seeds was more prominent in the oil sample obtained through the RS technique, and showed higher oxidative stability than the other processed oils and the oil from RW.

  7. Effect of Cement Replacement with Carbide Waste on the Strength of Stabilized Clay Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntohar A.S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cement is commonly used for soil stabilization and many other ground improvement techniques. Cement is believed to be very good to improve the compressive and split-tensile strength of clay subgrades. In some application cement could be partly or fully replaced with carbide waste. This research is to study the effectiveness of the cement replacement and to find the maximum carbide waste content to be allowed for a clay subgrade. The quantities of cement replaced with the carbide waste were 30, 50, 70, 90, and 100% by its mass. The results show that replacing the cement with carbide waste decreased both the compressive and split tensile strength. Replacing cement content with carbide waste reduced its ability for stabilization. The carbide waste content should be less than 70% of the cement to provide a sufficient stabilizing effect on a clay subgrade.

  8. Computational stability appraisal of rectangular natural circulation loop: Effect of loop inclination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnani, Mayur; Basu, Dipankar N.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Computational model developed for single-phase rectangular natural circulation loop. • Role of loop inclination to vertical on thermalhydraulic stability is explored. • Inclination has strong stabilizing effect due to lower effective gravitation force. • Increase in tilt angle reduces settling time and highest amplitude of oscillation. • An angle of 15° is suggested for the selected loop geometry. - Abstract: Controlling stability behavior of single-phase natural circulation loops, without significantly affecting its steady-state characteristics, is a topic of wide research interest. Present study explores the role of loop inclination on a particular loop geometry. Accordingly a 3D computational model of a rectangular loop is developed and transient conservation equations are solved to obtain the temporal variation in flow parameters. Starting from the quiescent state, simulations are performed for selected sets of operating conditions and also with a few selected inclination angles. System experiences instability at higher heater powers and also with higher sink temperatures. Inclination is found to have a strong stabilizing influence owing to the reduction in the effective gravitational acceleration and subsequent decline in local buoyancy effects. The settling time and highest amplitude of oscillations substantially reduces for a stable system with a small inclination. Typically-unstable systems can also suppress the oscillations, when subjected to tilting, within a reasonable period of time. It is possible to stabilize the loop within shorter time span by increasing the tilt angle, but at the expense of reduction in steady-state flow rate. Overall a tilt angle of 15° is suggested for the selected geometry. Results from the 3D model is compared with the predictions from an indigenous 1D code. While similar qualitative influence of inclination is observed, the 1D model predicts early appearance of the stability threshold and hence hints

  9. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure or hydrophobic modification on thermal stability of xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halalipour, Ali; Duff, Michael R; Howell, Elizabeth E; Reyes-De-Corcuera, José I

    2017-08-01

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on the kinetics of thermal inactivation of xanthine oxidase (XOx) from bovine milk was studied. Inactivation of XOx followed pseudo-first-order kinetics at 0.1-300MPa and 55.0-70.0°C. High pressure up to at least 300MPa stabilized XOx at all the studied temperatures. The highest stabilization effect of HHP on XOx was at 200-300MPa at 55.0 and 58.6°C, and at 250-300MPa at 62.3-70.0°C. The stability of XOx increased 9.5 times at 300MPa and 70.0°C compared to atmospheric pressure at the same temperature. The activation energy of inactivation of XOx decreased with pressure and was 1.9 times less at 300MPa (97.0±8.2kJmol -1 ) than at 0.1MPa (181.7±12.1kJmol -1 ). High pressure decreased the dependence of the rate constant of inactivation to temperature effects compared to atmospheric pressure. The stabilizing effect of HHP on XOx was highest at 70.0°C where the activation volume of inactivation of XOx was 28.9±2.9cm 3 mol -1 . A second approach to try to increase XOx stability involved hydrophobic modification using aniline or benzoate. However, the thermal stability of XOx remained unaffected after 8-14 modifications of carboxyl side groups per XOx monomer with aniline, or 12-17 modifications of amino side groups per XOx monomer with benzoate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of class F fly ash on fine sand compaction through soil stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Mahvash

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation carried out to evaluate the effect of fly ash (FA on fine sand compaction and its suitability as a material for embankments. The literature review demonstrates the lack of research on stabilization of sandy material using FA. The study is concerned with the role of FA content in stabilized soil physical characteristics. The main aim of this paper is to determine the optimum quantity of FA content for stabilization of this type of soil. This is achieved through particle size distribution and compaction (standard proctor tests. The sand was stabilized with three proportions of FA (5%, 10% and 15% and constant cement content of 3% was used as an activator. For better comparison, the sand was also stabilized by 3% cement only so that the effect of FA could be observed more clearly. The results were in line with the literature for other types of soil, i.e. as the % of FA increases, reduction in maximum dry density and higher optimum moisture content were observed.

  11. Using proven, cost-effective chemical stabilization to remediate radioactive and heavy metal contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.; Sogue, A.

    1999-01-01

    Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, L.L.C. (RMRS) has deployed a cost-effective metals stabilization method which can be used to reduce the cost of remediation projects where radioactivity and heavy metals are the contaminants of concern. The Envirobond TM process employs the use of a proprietary chemical process to stabilize metals in many waste forms, and provides an excellent binding system that can easily be compacted to reduce the waste into a shippable brick called Envirobric TM . The advantages of using chemical stabilization are: (1) Low cost, due to the simplicity of the process design and inexpensive reagents. (2) Chemical stabilization is easily deployed in field applications, which limit the amount of shielding and other protective measures. (3) The process does not add volume and bulk to the treated waste; after treatment the materials may be able to remain on-site, or if transportation and disposal is required the cost will be reduced due to lower volumes. (4) No secondary waste. The simplicity of this process creates a safe environment while treating the residues, and the long-term effectiveness of this type of chemical stabilization lowers the risk of future release of hazardous elements associated with the residues. (author)

  12. The Effect of Core Stability Training on Functional Movement Patterns in Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherian, Sajad; Ghasempoor, Khodayar; Rahnama, Nader; Wikstrom, Erik A

    2018-02-06

    Pre-participation examinations are the standard approach for assessing poor movement quality that would increase musculoskeletal injury risk. However, little is known about how core stability influences functional movement patterns. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an 8-week core stability program on functional movement patterns in collegiate athletes. The secondary purpose was to determine if the core stability training program would be more effective in those with worse movement quality (i.e. ≤14 baseline FMS score). Quasi-experimental design. Athletic Training Facility. One-hundred collegiate athletes. Functional movement patterns included the Functional Movement Screen (FMS), Lateral step down (LSD) and Y balance test (YBT) and were assessed before and after the 8-week program. Participants were placed into 1 of the 2 groups: intervention and control. The intervention group was required to complete a core stability training program that met 3 times per week for 8-week. Significant group x time interactions demonstrated improvements in FMS, LSD and YBT scores in the experimental group relative to the control group (pcore stability training program enhances functional movement patterns and dynamic postural control in collegiate athletes. The benefits are more pronounced in collegiate athletes with poor movement quality.

  13. Effect of class F fly ash on fine sand compaction through soil stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahvash, Siavash; López-Querol, Susana; Bahadori-Jahromi, Ali

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation carried out to evaluate the effect of fly ash (FA) on fine sand compaction and its suitability as a material for embankments. The literature review demonstrates the lack of research on stabilization of sandy material using FA. The study is concerned with the role of FA content in stabilized soil physical characteristics. The main aim of this paper is to determine the optimum quantity of FA content for stabilization of this type of soil. This is achieved through particle size distribution and compaction (standard proctor) tests. The sand was stabilized with three proportions of FA (5%, 10% and 15%) and constant cement content of 3% was used as an activator. For better comparison, the sand was also stabilized by 3% cement only so that the effect of FA could be observed more clearly. The results were in line with the literature for other types of soil, i.e. as the % of FA increases, reduction in maximum dry density and higher optimum moisture content were observed.

  14. Assessment of effect of SSSC stabilizer in different control channels on damping inter-area oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakarami, M.R., E-mail: shakarami@iust.ac.i [Centre of Excellence for Power System Automation and Operation, Department of Electrical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemi, A. [Centre of Excellence for Power System Automation and Operation, Department of Electrical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    A static synchronous series compensator (SSSC) is one of the series flexible ac transmission system (FACTS) devices that injects a balanced three-phase voltage in quadrature with the transmission line current. There are two channels for controlling of phase and magnitude of the voltage. When the SSSC is used for damping of inter-area oscillations, a SSSC-based stabilizer can be included in both channels. In this paper, the best location and suitable input control signal for SSSC in order to enhance the damping of inter-area oscillations are selected by residue analysis. A method by quadratic mathematic programming has been presented to the design of the stabilizer. By this method, the effect of the stabilizer in both control channels of the SSSC on damping of inter-area oscillations has been assessed. By considering the gain of stabilizer as a criterion, obtained results from studying on a small and a large multi-machine power system show that the stabilizer in the phase control channel is more effective for damping inter-are oscillations.

  15. Simulating the effect of hydrate dissociation on wellhead stability during oil and gas development in deepwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingchao; Cheng, Yuanfang; Zhang, Huaiwen; Yan, Chuanliang; Liu, Yuwen

    2018-02-01

    It is well known that methane hydrate has been identified as an alternative resource due to its massive reserves and clean property. However, hydrate dissociation during oil and gas development (OGD) process in deep water can affect the stability of subsea equipment and formation. Currently, there is a serious lack of studies over quantitative assessment on the effects of hydrate dissociation on wellhead stability. In order to solve this problem, ABAQUS finite element software was used to develop a model and to evaluate the behavior of wellhead caused by hydrate dissociation. The factors that affect the wellhead stability include dissociation range, depth of hydrate formation and mechanical properties of dissociated hydrate region. Based on these, series of simulations were carried out to determine the wellhead displacement. The results revealed that, continuous dissociation of hydrate in homogeneous and isotropic formations can causes the non-linear increment in vertical displacement of wellhead. The displacement of wellhead showed good agreement with the settlement of overlying formations under the same conditions. In addition, the shallower and thicker hydrate formation can aggravate the influence of hydrate dissociation on the wellhead stability. Further, it was observed that with the declining elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio, the wellhead displacement increases. Hence, these findings not only confirm the effect of hydrate dissociation on the wellhead stability, but also lend support to the actions, such as cooling the drilling fluid, which can reduce the hydrate dissociation range and further make deepwater operations safer and more efficient.

  16. Effect of natural ageing on volume stability of MSW and wood waste incineration residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gori, Manuela; Bergfeldt, Britta; Reichelt, Jürgen; Sirini, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Natural weathering on BA from MSW and wood waste incineration was evaluated. ► Type of mineral phases, pH and volume stability were considered. ► Weathering reactions effect in improved stability of the materials. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of a study on the effect of natural weathering on volume stability of bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and wood waste incineration. BA samples were taken at different steps of treatment (fresh, 4 weeks and 12 weeks aged) and then characterised for their chemical and mineralogical composition and for volume stability by means of the mineralogical test method (M HMVA-StB), which is part of the German quality control system for using aggregates in road construction (TL Gestein-StB 04). Changes of mineralogical composition with the proceeding of the weathering treatment were also monitored by leaching tests. At the end of the 12 weeks of treatment, almost all the considered samples resulted to be usable without restrictions in road construction with reference to the test parameter volume stability

  17. Effects of Humic and Fulvic Acids on Silver Nanoparticle Stability, Dissolution, and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Mousavi, Maral P. S.; Hussein, Kadir; Bühlmann, Philippe; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    The colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in natural aquatic environments influences their transport and environmental persistence, while their dissolution to Ag+ influences their toxicity to organisms. Here, we characterize the colloidal stability, dissolution behavior, and toxicity of two industrially relevant classes of AgNPs (i.e., AgNPs stabilized by citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone) after exposure to natural organic matter (NOM, i.e., Suwannee River Humic and Fulvic Acid Standards and Pony Lake Fulvic Acid Reference). We show that NOM interaction with the nanoparticle surface depends on (i) the NOM’s chemical composition, where sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM more significantly increases colloidal stability, and (ii) the affinity of the capping agent for the AgNP surface, where nanoparticles with loosely bound capping agents are more effectively stabilized by NOM. Adsorption of NOM is shown to have little effect on AgNP dissolution under most experimental conditions, the exception being when the NOM is rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Similarly, the toxicity of AgNPs to a bacterial model (Shewanella oneidensis MR-1) decreases most significantly in the presence of sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM. Our data suggest that the rate of AgNP aggregation and dissolution in aquatic environments containing NOM will depend on the chemical composition of the NOM, and that the toxicity of AgNPs to aquatic microorganisms is controlled primarily by the extent of nanoparticle dissolution. PMID:26047330

  18. Post-sampling release of free fatty acids - effects of heat stabilization and methods of euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernerén, Fredrik; Söderquist, Marcus; Karlsson, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    The field of lipid research has made progress and it is now possible to study the lipidome of cells and organelles. A basic requirement of a successful lipid study is adequate pre-analytical sample handling, as some lipids can be unstable and postmortem changes can cause substantial accumulation of free fatty acids (FFAs). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of conductive heat stabilization and euthanasia methods on FFA levels in the rat brain and liver using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The analysis of brain homogenates clearly demonstrated phospholipase activity and time-dependent post-sampling changes in the lipid pool of snap frozen non-stabilized tissue. There was a significant increase in FFAs already at 2min, which continued over time. Heat stabilization was shown to be an efficient method to reduce phospholipase activity and ex vivo lipolysis. Post-sampling effects due to tissue thawing and sample preparation induced a massive release of FFAs (up to 3700%) from non-stabilized liver and brain tissues compared to heat stabilized tissue. Furthermore, the choice of euthanasia method significantly influenced the levels of FFAs in the brain. The FFAs were decreased by 15-44% in the group of animals euthanized by pentobarbital injection compared with CO2 inhalation or decapitation. Our results highlight the importance of considering euthanasia methods and pre-analytical treatment in lipid analysis, factors which may otherwise interfere with the outcome of the experiments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Antioxidant activity and emulsion-stabilizing effect of pectic enzyme treated pectin in soy protein isolate-stabilized oil/water emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping-Hsiu; Lu, Hao-Te; Wang, Yuh-Tai; Wu, Ming-Chang

    2011-09-14

    The antioxidant activity of pectic enzyme treated pectin (PET-pectin) prepared from citrus pectin by enzymatic hydrolysis and its potential use as a stabilizer and an antioxidant for soy protein isolate (SPI)-stabilized oil in water (O/W) emulsion were investigated. Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) was found to be positively associated with molecular weight (M(w)) of PET-pectin and negatively associated with degree of esterification (DE) of PET-pectin. PET-pectin (1 kDa and 11.6% DE) prepared from citrus pectin after 24 h of hydrolysis by commercial pectic enzyme produced by Aspergillus niger expressed higher α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, TEAC, and reducing power than untreated citrus pectin (353 kDa and 60% DE). The addition of PET-pectin could increase both emulsifying activity (EA) and emulsion stability (ES) of SPI-stabilized O/W emulsion. When the SPI-stabilized lipid droplet was coated with the mixture of PET-pectin and pectin, the EA and ES of the emulsion were improved more than they were when the lipid droplet was coated with either pectin or PET-pectin alone. The amount of secondary oxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) produced in the emulsion prepared with the mixture of SPI and PET-pectin was less than the amount produced in the emulsion prepared with either SPI or SPI/pectin. These results suggest that PET-pectin has an emulsion-stabilizing effect and lipid oxidation inhibition ability on SPI-stabilized emulsion. Therefore, PET-pectin can be used as a stabilizer as well as an antioxidant in plant origin in SPI-stabilized O/W emulsion and thus prolong the shelf life of food emulsion.

  20. Glycerol, trehalose and glycerol–trehalose mixture effects on thermal stabilization of OCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreca, D., E-mail: dbarreca@unime.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Laganà, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Magazù, S.; Migliardo, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Bellocco, E. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Università di Messina, Viale F. Stagno d’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2013-10-16

    Highlights: • Trehalose influences both enzymatic activity and conformational changes of enzyme. • The results obtained by INS and QENS show a switching-off of the fast dynamics at very low glycerol content. • The diffusive dynamics is slowing down at very low glycerol concentration. • The mixtures of trehalose/glycerol lose the thermal stabilizing effects of pure compounds. - Abstract: The stabilization effects of trehalose, glycerol and their mixtures on ornithine carbamoyltransferase catalytic activity has been studied as a function of temperature by complementary techniques. The obtained results show that the kinematic viscosities of trehalose (1.0 M) and protein mixture are higher than the one of glycerol plus protein. Changing the trehalose/glycerol ratio, we notice a decrease of the kinematic viscosity values at almost all the analyzed ratio. In particular, the solution composed of 95% trehalose-5% glycerol shows a peculiar behavior. Moreover the trehalose (1.0 M) solution shows the higher OCT thermal stabilization at 343 K, while all the other solutions show minor effects. The smallest stabilizing effect is revealed for the solution that shows the maximum kinematic viscosity. These results support Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS) and Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) findings, which pointed out a slowing down of the relaxation and diffusive dynamics in some investigated samples.

  1. Evaluation of the effect of temperature on the stability of metal soaps ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thermal stability of calcium and zinc dicarboxylates was studied. The kinetics of the decomposition was studied thermogravimetrically at various temperatures. The rates of the first stage decomposition were used to assess the effect of temperature on the susceptibility of the metal soaps of dicarboxylic acids to ...

  2. Mathematical modeling of photoinitiated coating degradation: Effects of coating glass transition temperature and light stabilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; G.de With, R.A.T.M.Van Benthem

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model, describing coating degradation mechanisms of thermoset coatings exposed to ultraviolet radiation and humidity at constant temperature, was extended to simulate the behavior of a coating with a low glass transition temperature. The effects of adding light stabilizers (a UV...

  3. Aeolian sand transport and its effects on the stability of Miramar-Caranzalem beach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, G.V.; Sastry, J.S.

    Removal of sand by wind from the beach at Miramar-Caranzalem, Goa, has been found to effect its stability over a relatively longer time scale. This aeolian sand transport has been computed for this strip of the beach utilising the relation between...

  4. Stability of the stimulatory effect of preirradiation of agricultural plant seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seregina, M.T.; Orlov, V.V.; Batygin, N.F.

    1982-01-01

    Three interrelated and interdependent factors are responsible for stability of the results obtained with preirradiation of seeds, they are: quality of seeds to be sowed, irradiation schedule and postirradiation conditions. Should these factors be taken into account one can obtain a stable stimulatory effect. The harvest increments make 10-30% after preirradiation of air-dry seeds

  5. On the hydrothermal stability of MCM-41. Evidence of capillary tension-induced effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, Lidia Lopez; van Eck, Ernst R. H.; Melian-Cabrera, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    MCM-41's limited hydrothermal stability has been often related to the hydrolysis of Si-O-Si bonds due to the low degree of condensation, its thin walls or a combination of them. In this work, evidence for an additional factor is provided; a physical effect that occurs during the drying of the

  6. The Effects of pH and Heat Treatment Processing on the Stability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of pH and heat treatment processing on stability and natural food colours used in dairy products. A repeated laboratory experiment was conducted in which loss of colour intensity or change in shade of natural food colours used in acid and nearly neutral dairy products at ...

  7. Effects of PEG size on structure, function and stability of PEGylated BSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Bitten; Fee, Conan J.; Westh, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The effects of PEGylation on the structural, thermal and functional stability of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated using BSA and 6 linear mono-PEGylated BSA compounds. The secondary and tertiary structure of BSA measured by circular dichroism (CD) was independent of PEGylation. In cont...

  8. The Effects of Radiation on the Linear Stability of a horizontal layer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of radiation on the onset of Rayleigh-Benard convection is studied in the case of a radiating Newtonian fluid in a fluid-saturated horizontal porous layer heated from below. The radiative heat transfer is treated using the differential approximation for optically thin limiting case. The linear stability theory is employed ...

  9. Transition to chaos for ballooning modes stabilized by finite Larmor radius effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, J; Wilhelmsson, H [Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, Goeteborg (Sweden). Institutionen foer Elektromagnetisk Faeltteori

    1983-08-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of interacting ballooning modes, stabilized by finite Larmor radius effects is analyzed in terms of a set of equations, which exhibit stochastic properties. These are explicitly shown to depend on the balance between shear and driving pressure force. The onset of bifurcations and chaotic behaviour are directly identified with certain values of parameters characterizing the physical system.

  10. Impulsive effects on global asymptotic stability of delay BAM neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jun; Cui Baotong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the proper Lyapunov functions and the Jacobsthal liner inequality, some sufficient conditions are presented in this paper for global asymptotic stability of delay bidirectional associative memory neural networks with impulses. The obtained results are independently of the delay parameters and can be easily verified. Also, some remarks and an illustrative example are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results

  11. Evaluation of the effects of enzyme-based liquid chemical stabilizers on subgrade soils

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mgangira, Martin B

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to asses the strength of enzyme treated soil material. Thus the aim of the paper is to present laboratory results on the effects of two enzyme-based liquid chemicals as soil stabilizers. Soil samples were prepared...

  12. Effect of flat insoles with different shore A values on posture stability in diabetic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Geffen, J.A.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Hof, A.L.; Halbertsma, J.P.K.; Postema, K.

    The objective of the study was to determine whether insoles with a low Shore A value (15 degrees) as prescribed for patients with a diabetic neuropathy have a negative effect on posture stability because these insoles may reduce somatosensory input under the feet. It was conducted in the Center for

  13. Effect of variations in rainfall intensity on slope stability in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christofer Kristo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous scientific evidence has given credence to the true existence and deleterious impacts of climate change. One aspect of climate change is the variations in rainfall patterns, which affect the flux boundary condition across ground surface. A possible disastrous consequence of this change is the occurrence of rainfall-induced slope failures. This paper aims to investigate the variations in rainfall patterns in Singapore and its effect on slope stability. Singapore's historical rainfall data from Seletar and Paya Lebar weather stations for the period of 1985–2009 were obtained and analysed by duration using linear regression. A general increasing trend was observed in both weather stations, with a possible shift to longer duration rainfall events, despite being statistically insignificant according to the Mann-Kendall test. Using the derived trends, projected rainfall intensities in 2050 and 2100 were used in the seepage and slope stability analyses performed on a typical residual soil slope in Singapore. A significant reduction in factor of safety was observed in the next 50 years, with only a marginal decrease in factor of safety in the subsequent 50 years. This indicates a possible detrimental effect of variations in rainfall patterns on slope stability in Singapore, especially in the next 50 years. The statistical analyses on rainfall data from Seletar and Paya Lebar weather stations for the period of 1985–2009 indicated that rainfall intensity tend to increase over the years, with a possible shift to longer duration rainfall events in the future. The stability analyses showed a significant decrease in factor of safety from 2003 to 2050 due to increase in rainfall intensity, suggesting that a climate change might have existed beyond 2009 with possibly detrimental effects to slope stability. Keywords: Climate change, Rainfall, Seepage, Slope stability

  14. Effect of Filler Concentration on Thermal Stability of Vinyl Copolymer Elastomer (VCE) Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dali [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hubbard, Kevin Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Devlin, David James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henderson, Kevin C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pacheco, Robin Montoya [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-06

    To study the thermal stability of vinyl copolymer elastomer (VCE) in its composite form, systematic TGA characterizations were conducted in both nonisothermal and isothermal modes. The effects of filler concentration on the aging behaviors of the VCE/filler composites were investigated under nitroplasticizer (NP) environment. FTIR characterization was used to probe the structural changes in the VCE polymer before and after the thermal treatments. This study suggests that the filler concentration significantly deteriorates the thermal stability of NP at a moderate temperature (< 70 °C). The degradation of NP, in turn, accelerates the aging process of the VCE polymer in its composite form.

  15. Study of the effect of aggressive media on the long-term stability of reinforced plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelentsov, D.G.; Pochtman, Yu.M.

    1995-01-01

    Many important load-bearing structural elements that operate in agressive media are subjected to simultaneous mechanical and chemical attack. The current status of the problem of designing such members is adequately reflected. It follows from that only a few studies have been devoted to the long-term stability of reinforced plates in aggressive media, and most of them were based on structurally orthotropic theory. Such an approach makes it impossible to construct an adequate model of the deformation process. In particular, it precludes allowance for the effect of the discreteness of the reinforcement on plate stability and determination of changes in the character of deformation of the plate during service

  16. Stability of car following with human memory effects and automatic headway compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipahi, Rifat; Niculescu, Silviu-Iulian

    2010-10-13

    This paper addresses the study of some appropriate control strategies in order to guarantee the exponential stability of a class of deterministic microscopic car-following models including human drivers' memory effects and automated headway controllers. More precisely, the delayed action/decision of human drivers is represented using distributed delays with a gap and the considered automated controller is of proportional derivative type. The analysis is performed in both delay parameter and controller gain parameter spaces, and appropriate algorithms are proposed. Surprisingly, large delays and/or gains improve stability for the corresponding closed-loop schemes. Finally, some illustrative examples as well as various interpretations of the results complete the presentation.

  17. The effect and the amendment of thermoregulation to the stability of radon concentration in radon chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiongjie; Wang Renbo; Qu Jinhui; Tang Bin; Zhu Zhifu; Man Zaigang

    2010-01-01

    When the temperature in the airtight radon chamber was adjusted, it would induce the frequent changes of the air pressure in chamber, then the radon concentration in the radon chamber would continuously reduce, which could seriously destroy the stability of the radon concentration in radon chamber. In this paper, on the study of the effect reasons to the stability of radon concentration in airtight radon chamber due to the thermoregulation, a new amendment scheme was put forward, and the solutions of the relevant parameters were discussed. The amendment scheme had been successfully applied to HD-6 radon chamber, and achieved good results. (authors)

  18. Effect of previous irradiation of mineral powders on stability of suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazaryan, G.A.; Polushkin, V.A.; Vlasov, A.V.; Tsetlin, B.L.; Chakhoyan, P.A.; TsNII Khlopchatobumazhnoj Promyshlennosti, Moscow)

    1984-01-01

    One has investigated the influence of the previous irradiation (X-rays and gamma rays) in the viscosity and the aggregative stability of the suspensions of mineral powders (e. g. kaolin, MgO, TiO 2 ) in a number of organic liquids. It has been shown that when the powders have been irradiated at a dose of the order of 10 to 100 Gy, a considerable increase in the stability of suspensions in polar organic liquids is observed. The detected phenomenon is attributed to the formation of additional, positively charged centres on the surface of the particles of mineral substances under the effect of irradiation

  19. Effect of grape pomace on fermentation quality and aerobic stability of sweet sorghum silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Shen, Yixin; You, Minghong; Zhang, Yu; Yan, Jiajun; Li, Daxue; Bai, Shiqie

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of grape pomace (GP) with different adding levels (0%, 5%, 10% and 15%, fresh matter basis), alone (GP-LAB) or in combine with an inoculant LAB (GP+LAB), on the fermentation quality and aerobic stability of sweet sorghum silage. After 90 days of ensiling in vacuumized mini-silos, silages were subject to a 7-day aerobic stability test, in which chemical, microbial and polyphenol composition were measured. In the GP-LAB group, adding GP decreased (P fermentation. During aerobic exposure, the fungi count, pH value and silage temperature increased (P fermentation products, microbial counts, chemical and polyphenol composition were considered, the use of 10% GP+LAB at ensiling could provide a valuable source for improved fermentation quality and aerobic stability of sweet sorghum silage. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  20. THE EFFECTS OF INOCULANT LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ON THE FERMENTATION AND AEROBIC STABILITY OF SUNFLOWER SILAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisun Koc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the effects of actic acid bacterial inoculant on the fermentation and aerobic stability of sunflower silages. Sunflower was harvested at the milk stage. Inoculant-1174 (Pioneer®,USA was used as homofermentative lactic acid bacterial inoculant. Inoculant was applied 6.00 log10 cfu/g silage levels. Silages with no additive served as controls. After treatment, the chopped sunflower was ensiled in the PVC type laboratory silos. Three silos for each group were sampled for chemical and microbiological analysis on days 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 56 after ensiling. At the end of the ensiling period, all silages were subjected to an aerobic stability test for 14 days. Neither inoculant improved the fermentation parameters of sunflower silages. At the end of the ensiling period, inoculant increased lactic acid bacteria (LAB and decreased yeast and mould numbers of silages. Inoculant treatment did not affect aerobic stability of silages.

  1. Stabilizing effect of passive conductors with arbitrary shape for positional instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Shogo; Ninomiya, Hiromasa; Yoshida, Hidetoshi

    1983-10-01

    For positional instabilities in the tokamak, the stabilizing index nsub(s) is an adequate parameter to characterize the stabilizing effect produced by several kinds of passive conductors around a plasma column such as vacuum vessel and poloidal field coils. Since a system of passive conductors with arbitrary shape can be involved into multiple L-R circuits, this parameter nsub(s) of those passive conductors is expressed in a simple form by using a method of the eigen mode expansion of multiple L-R circuits. This parameter nsub(s) is very useful to estimate not only a growth rate of positional instability and its feedback stabilization but also an inward shift of plasma column due to a minor disruption. (author)

  2. Effect of triple tibial osteotomy on femorotibial stability in canine cranial cruciate ligament deficient stifles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, S.; Vedel, T.; Jensen, Bente Rona

    leveling osteotomy (TPLO), have been biomechanically evaluated (Kipfer et al. (2008), Apelt et al. (2007), Butler et al. (2011), Pozzi et al. (2006) and Rey et al. (2014)), experimental studies on TTO are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of TTO on cadaveric stifle stability....... Limbs were mounted on a custom-made frame, which permitted controlled movement of the tibia relative to the femur, and extended from full flexion whilst recording the stifle region fluoroscopically. Metal markers placed at the CrCL attachment sites were used to monitor cranial tibial subluxation (CTS...... stability was not statistically different to the intact joint. However, the stifle was significantly over-corrected through joint angles 65° to 100° (negative CTS), and under-corrected at joint angles >145°. The maximum CTS due to under-correction in the TTO stabilized stifle was 16.4% of the intact marker...

  3. Demonstration Results on the Effects of Mercury Speciation on the Stabilization of Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, T.B.; Hulet, G.A.; Morris, M.I.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1999-01-01

    Mercury-contaminated wastes are currently being stored at approximately 19 Department of Energy sites, the volume of which is estimated to be about 16m(sup)3. These wastes exist in various forms including soil, sludges, and debris, which present a particular challenge regarding possible mercury stabilization methods. This reports provides the test results of three vendors, Allied Technology Group, IT Corporation, and Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc., that demonstrate the effects of mercury speciation on the stabilization of the mercury wastes. Mercury present in concentrations that exceed 260 parts per million must be removed by extraction methods and requires stabilization to ensure that the final wasteforms leach less than 0.2mg/L of mercury by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure or 0.025 mg/L using the Universal Treatment Standard

  4. The effect of walking speed on local dynamic stability is sensitive to calculation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenum, Jan; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2014-01-01

    Local dynamic stability has been assessed by the short-term local divergence exponent (λS), which quantifies the average rate of logarithmic divergence of infinitesimally close trajectories in state space. Both increased and decreased local dynamic stability at faster walking speeds have been...... reported. This might pertain to methodological differences in calculating λS. Therefore, the aim was to test if different calculation methods would induce different effects of walking speed on local dynamic stability. Ten young healthy participants walked on a treadmill at five speeds (60%, 80%, 100%, 120......% and 140% of preferred walking speed) for 3min each, while upper body accelerations in three directions were sampled. From these time-series, λS was calculated by three different methods using: (a) a fixed time interval and expressed as logarithmic divergence per stride-time (λS-a), (b) a fixed number...

  5. Effect of pasteurization on the protein composition and oxidative stability of beer during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Marianne N; Hoff, Signe; Berner, Torben S; Lametsch, René; Andersen, Mogens L

    2012-12-19

    The impacts of pasteurization of a lager beer on protein composition and the oxidative stability were studied during storage at 22 °C for 426 days in the dark. Pasteurization clearly improved the oxidative stability of beer determined by ESR spectroscopy, whereas it had a minor negative effect on the volatile profile by increasing volatile compounds that is generally associated with heat treatment and a loss of fruity ester aroma. A faster rate of radical formation in unpasteurized beer was consistent with a faster consumption of sulfite. Beer proteins in the unpasteurized beer were more degraded, most likely due to proteolytic enzyme activity of yeast remnants and more precipitation of proteins was also observed. The differences in soluble protein content and composition are suggested to result in differences in the contents of prooxidative metals as a consequence of the proteins ability to bind metals. This also contributes to the differences in oxidative stabilities of the beers.

  6. Effects of hydrated lime on radionuclides stabilization of Hanford tank residual waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong; Cantrell, Kirk J; Snyder, Michelle M V; Bowden, Mark E; Triplett, Mark B; Buck, Edgar C

    2017-10-01

    Chemical stabilization of tank residual waste is part of a Hanford Site tank closure strategy to reduce overall risk levels to human health and the environment. In this study, a set of column leaching experiments using tank C-104 residual waste were conducted to evaluate the leachability of uranium (U) and technetium (Tc) where grout and hydrated lime were applied as chemical stabilizing agents. The experiments were designed to simulate future scenarios where meteoric water infiltrates through the vadose zones into the interior of the tank filled with layers of grout or hydrated lime, and then contacts the residual waste. Effluent concentrations of U and Tc were monitored and compared among three different packing columns (waste only, waste + grout, and waste + grout + hydrated lime). Geochemical modeling of the effluent compositions was conducted to determine saturation indices of uranium solid phases that could control the solubility of uranium. The results indicate that addition of hydrated lime strongly stabilized the uranium through transforming uranium to a highly insoluble calcium uranate (CaUO 4 ) or similar phase, whereas no significant stabilization effect of grout or hydrated lime was observed on Tc leachability. The result implies that hydrated lime could be a great candidate for stabilizing Hanford tank residual wastes where uranium is one of the main concerns. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The effect of emulsifier on the stability of irradiated LA-TZ latex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Made Sumarti K; Utama, Marga; Puspitasari, Tita

    1998-01-01

    The effect of six kinds of stabilizer on the stability of the concentrated LA-TZ latex which contains n-BA have been studied. The six stabilizers are: 1. Naphthalene sulfonic acid formaldehyde condensate, 2. Sodium dialkyl sulfosuccinate, 3. Triethanol amine lauryl sulfate, 4. Sodium polyoxyethylene alkyl phenol ether sulfate, 5. Dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (Neopelex FS), and 6. Ammonium laurat. The concentrations of the stabilizers are in the range of 0,1 to 0,3% and of the n-BA is 5phr (per hundred rubber). The field natural rubber latex was stabilized by Tetramethyl tiuram disulfide - Zine oxide (TMTD-ZnO) and ammonium gas, and was concentrated by centrifuge. The obtain concentrated LA-TZ latex was added by the n-BA and was kept with various storage time i.e. o, 2, 4, 6, 18, and 24 hours. It was found that the stable latex was irradiated by 15 kGy dose and the physical properties was tested, then the maximum tensile strength of 223,3 kg/cm 2 was found on Neopelex FS concentrate at 0,1%. (authors)

  8. Conformation and stability of intramolecular telomeric G-quadruplexes: sequence effects in the loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Sattin

    Full Text Available Telomeres are guanine-rich sequences that protect the ends of chromosomes. These regions can fold into G-quadruplex structures and their stabilization by G-quadruplex ligands has been employed as an anticancer strategy. Genetic analysis in human telomeres revealed extensive allelic variation restricted to loop bases, indicating that the variant telomeric sequences maintain the ability to fold into G-quadruplex. To assess the effect of mutations in loop bases on G-quadruplex folding and stability, we performed a comprehensive analysis of mutant telomeric sequences by spectroscopic techniques, molecular dynamics simulations and gel electrophoresis. We found that when the first position in the loop was mutated from T to C or A the resulting structure adopted a less stable antiparallel topology; when the second position was mutated to C or A, lower thermal stability and no evident conformational change were observed; in contrast, substitution of the third position from A to C induced a more stable and original hybrid conformation, while mutation to T did not significantly affect G-quadruplex topology and stability. Our results indicate that allelic variations generate G-quadruplex telomeric structures with variable conformation and stability. This aspect needs to be taken into account when designing new potential anticancer molecules.

  9. The effects of core stabilization exercise on dynamic balance and gait function in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2013-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of core stabilization exercise on dynamic balance and gait function in stroke patients. [Subjects] The subjects were 16 stroke patients, who were randomly divided into two groups: a core stabilization exercise group of eight subjects and control group of eight subjects. [Methods] Subjects in both groups received general training five times per week. Subjects in the core stabilization exercise group practiced an additional core stabilization exercise program, which was performed for 30 minutes, three times per week, during a period of four weeks. All subjects were evaluated for dynamic balance (Timed Up and Go test, TUG) and gait parameters (velocity, cadence, step length, and stride length). [Results] Following intervention, the core exercise group showed a significant change in TUG, velocity, and cadence. The only significant difference observed between the core group and control group was in velocity. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest the feasibility and suitability of core stabilization exercise for stroke patients.

  10. Linear time delay methods and stability analyses of the human spine. Effects of neuromuscular reflex response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Timothy C; Granata, Kevin P; Madigan, Michael L; Hendricks, Scott L

    2008-08-01

    Linear stability methods were applied to a biomechanical model of the human musculoskeletal spine to investigate effects of reflex gain and reflex delay on stability. Equations of motion represented a dynamic 18 degrees-of-freedom rigid-body model with time-delayed reflexes. Optimal muscle activation levels were identified by minimizing metabolic power with the constraints of equilibrium and stability with zero reflex time delay. Muscle activation levels and associated muscle forces were used to find the delay margin, i.e., the maximum reflex delay for which the system was stable. Results demonstrated that stiffness due to antagonistic co-contraction necessary for stability declined with increased proportional reflex gain. Reflex delay limited the maximum acceptable proportional reflex gain, i.e., long reflex delay required smaller maximum reflex gain to avoid instability. As differential reflex gain increased, there was a small increase in acceptable reflex delay. However, differential reflex gain with values near intrinsic damping caused the delay margin to approach zero. Forward-dynamic simulations of the fully nonlinear time-delayed system verified the linear results. The linear methods accurately found the delay margin below which the nonlinear system was asymptotically stable. These methods may aid future investigations in the role of reflexes in musculoskeletal stability.

  11. Fuel effects on the stability of turbulent flames with compositionally inhomogeneous inlets

    KAUST Repository

    Guiberti, T. F.

    2016-10-11

    This paper reports an analysis of the influence of fuels on the stabilization of turbulent piloted jet flames with inhomogeneous inlets. The burner is identical to that used earlier by the Sydney Group and employs two concentric tubes within the pilot stream. The inner tube, carrying fuel, can be recessed, leading to a varying degree of inhomogeneity in mixing with the outer air stream. Three fuels are tested: dimethyl ether (DME), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and compressed natural gas (CNG). It is found that improvement in flame stability at the optimal compositional inhomogeneity is highest for CNG and lowest for DME. Three possible reasons for this different enhancement in stability are investigated: mixing patterns, pilot effects, and fuel chemistry. Numerical simulations realized in the injection tube highlight similarities and differences in the mixing patterns for all three fuels and demonstrate that mixing cannot explain the different stability gains. Changing the heat release rates from the pilot affects the three fuels in similar ways and this also implies that the pilot stream is unlikely to be responsible for the observed differences. Fuel reactivity is identified as a key factor in enhancing stability at some optimal compositional inhomogeneity. This is confirmed by inference from joint images of PLIF-OH and PLIF-CHO, collected at a repetition rate of 10kHz in turbulent flames of DME, and from one-dimensional calculations of laminar flames using detailed chemistry for DME, CNG, and LPG.

  12. Game Theoretical Analysis on Cooperation Stability and Incentive Effectiveness in Community Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kaida; Wang, Rui; Liu, Yi; Qian, Depei; Zhang, Han; Cai, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Community networks, the distinguishing feature of which is membership admittance, appear on P2P networks, social networks, and conventional Web networks. Joining the network costs money, time or network bandwidth, but the individuals get access to special resources owned by the community in return. The prosperity and stability of the community are determined by both the policy of admittance and the attraction of the privileges gained by joining. However, some misbehaving users can get the dedicated resources with some illicit and low-cost approaches, which introduce instability into the community, a phenomenon that will destroy the membership policy. In this paper, we analyze on the stability using game theory on such a phenomenon. We propose a game-theoretical model of stability analysis in community networks and provide conditions for a stable community. We then extend the model to analyze the effectiveness of different incentive policies, which could be used when the community cannot maintain its members in certain situations. Then we verify those models through a simulation. Finally, we discuss several ways to promote community network's stability by adjusting the network's properties and give some proposal on the designs of these types of networks from the points of game theory and stability.

  13. Game Theoretical Analysis on Cooperation Stability and Incentive Effectiveness in Community Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaida Song

    Full Text Available Community networks, the distinguishing feature of which is membership admittance, appear on P2P networks, social networks, and conventional Web networks. Joining the network costs money, time or network bandwidth, but the individuals get access to special resources owned by the community in return. The prosperity and stability of the community are determined by both the policy of admittance and the attraction of the privileges gained by joining. However, some misbehaving users can get the dedicated resources with some illicit and low-cost approaches, which introduce instability into the community, a phenomenon that will destroy the membership policy. In this paper, we analyze on the stability using game theory on such a phenomenon. We propose a game-theoretical model of stability analysis in community networks and provide conditions for a stable community. We then extend the model to analyze the effectiveness of different incentive policies, which could be used when the community cannot maintain its members in certain situations. Then we verify those models through a simulation. Finally, we discuss several ways to promote community network's stability by adjusting the network's properties and give some proposal on the designs of these types of networks from the points of game theory and stability.

  14. Effect of heavy atoms on the thermal stability of α-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Sugahara

    Full Text Available Currently, there are no versatile and established methods for improving stability of proteins. In an entirely different approach from conventional techniques such as mutagenesis, we attempted to enhance enzyme stability of α-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae using a heavy-atom derivatization technique. We evaluated changes in stability using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Candidate heavy atoms were identified using the Heavy-Atom Database System HATODAS, a Web-based tool designed to assist in heavy-atom derivatization of proteins for X-ray crystallography. The denaturation temperature of α-amylase derivatized with gadolinium (Gd or samarium (Sm ions increased by 6.2 or 5.7°C, respectively, compared to that of the native protein (60.6°C. The binding of six Gd ions was confirmed by X-ray crystallography of the enzyme at 1.5 Å resolution. DSC and dynamic light-scattering data revealed a correlation between stability and the aggregation state upon addition of Gd ions. These results show that HATODAS search is an effective tool for selecting heavy atoms for stabilization of this protein.

  15. TPGS-Stabilized Curcumin Nanoparticles Exhibit Superior Effect on Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation in Wistar Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heni Rachmawati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a hydrophobic polyphenol compound derived from the rhizome of the Curcuma genus, has a wide spectrum of biological and pharmacological applications. Previously, curcumin nanoparticles with different stabilizers had been produced successfully in order to enhance solubility and per oral absorption. In the present study, we tested the anti-inflammatory effect of d-α-Tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles in vivo. Lambda-carrageenan (λ-carrageenan was used to induce inflammation in rats; it was given by an intraplantar route and intrapelurally through surgery in the pleurisy test. In the λ-carrageenan-induced edema model, TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles were given orally one hour before induction and at 0.5, 4.5, and 8.5 h after induction with two different doses (1.8 and 0.9 mg/kg body weight (BW. Sodium diclofenac with a dose of 4.5 mg/kg BW was used as a standard drug. A physical mixture of curcumin-TPGS was also used as a comparison with a higher dose of 60 mg/kg BW. The anti-inflammatory effect was assessed on the edema in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model and by the volume of exudate as well as the number of leukocytes reduced in the pleurisy test. TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles with lower doses showed better anti-inflammatory effects, indicating the greater absorption capability through the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. Effects of alkalinity sources on the stability of anaerobic digestion from food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shujun; Zhang, Jishi; Wang, Xikui

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of some alkalinity sources on the stability of anaerobic digestion (AD) from food waste (FW). Four alkalinity sources, namely lime mud from papermaking (LMP), waste eggshell (WES), CaCO3 and NaHCO3, were applied as buffer materials and their stability effects were evaluated in batch AD. The results showed that LMP and CaCO3 had more remarkable effects than NaHCO3 and WES on FW stabilization. The methane yields were 120.2, 197.0, 156.2, 251.0 and 194.8 ml g(-1) VS for the control and synergistic digestions of CaCO3, NaHCO3, LMP and WES added into FW, respectively. The corresponding final alkalinity reached 5906, 7307, 9504, 7820 and 6782 mg l(-1), while the final acidities were determined to be 501, 200, 50, 350 and 250 mg l(-1), respectively. This indicated that the synergism between alkalinity and inorganic micronutrients from different alkalinity sources played an important role in the process stability of AD from FW. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Effects of nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on synchronous stability of the electric power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manweiler, R.W.

    1975-11-01

    The effects of a nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on the synchronous stability of the electric power transmission and distribution systems are evaluated. The various modes of coupling of EMP to the power system are briefly discussed, with particular emphasis on those perturbations affecting the synchronous stability of the transmission system. A brief review of the fundamental concepts of the stability problem is given, with a discussion of the general characteristics of transient analysis. A model is developed to represent single sets as well as repetitive sets of multiple faults on the distribution systems, as might be produced by EMP. The results of many numerical stability calculations are presented to illustrate the transmission system's response from different types of perturbations. The important parameters of both multiple and repetitive faults are studied, including the dependence of the response on the size of the perturbed area, the fault density, and the effective impedance between the fault location and the transmission system. Both major load reduction and the effect of the opening of tie lines at the time of perturbation are also studied. We conclude that there is a high probability that EMP can induce perturbations on the distribution networks causing a large portion of the transmission network in the perturbed area to lose synchronism. The result would be an immediate and massive power failure

  18. Effect of preparation methods on dispersion stability and electrochemical performance of graphene sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Li, E-mail: chenli1981@lut.cn; Li, Na; Zhang, Mingxia; Li, Pinnan; Lin, Zhengping

    2017-05-15

    Chemical exfoliation is one of the most important strategies for preparing graphene. The aggregation of graphene sheets severely prevents graphene from exhibiting excellent properties. However, there are no attempts to investigate the effect of preparation methods on the dispersity of graphene sheets. In this study, three chemical exfoliation methods, including Hummers method, modified Hummers method, and improved method, were used to prepare graphene sheets. The influence of preparation methods on the structure, dispersion stability in organic solvents, and electrochemical properties of graphene sheets were investigated. Fourier transform infrared microscopy, Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy, and UV–vis spectrophotometry were employed to analyze the structure of the as-prepared graphene sheets. The results showed that graphene prepared by improved method exhibits excellent dispersity and stability in organic solvents without any additional stabilizer or modifier, which is attributed to the completely exfoliation and regular structure. Moreover, cyclic voltammetric and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements showed that graphene prepared by improved method exhibits superior electrochemical properties than that prepared by the other two methods. - Graphical abstract: Graphene oxides with different oxidation degree were obtained via three methods, and then graphene with different crystal structures were created by chemical reduction of exfoliated graphene oxides. - Highlights: • Graphene oxides with different oxidation degree were obtained via three oxidation methods. • The influence of oxidation methods on microstructure of graphene was investigated. • The effect of oxidation methods on dispersion stability of graphene was investigated. • The effect of oxidation methods on electrochemical properties of graphene was discussed.

  19. Effect of preparation methods on dispersion stability and electrochemical performance of graphene sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Li; Li, Na; Zhang, Mingxia; Li, Pinnan; Lin, Zhengping

    2017-01-01

    Chemical exfoliation is one of the most important strategies for preparing graphene. The aggregation of graphene sheets severely prevents graphene from exhibiting excellent properties. However, there are no attempts to investigate the effect of preparation methods on the dispersity of graphene sheets. In this study, three chemical exfoliation methods, including Hummers method, modified Hummers method, and improved method, were used to prepare graphene sheets. The influence of preparation methods on the structure, dispersion stability in organic solvents, and electrochemical properties of graphene sheets were investigated. Fourier transform infrared microscopy, Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy, and UV–vis spectrophotometry were employed to analyze the structure of the as-prepared graphene sheets. The results showed that graphene prepared by improved method exhibits excellent dispersity and stability in organic solvents without any additional stabilizer or modifier, which is attributed to the completely exfoliation and regular structure. Moreover, cyclic voltammetric and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements showed that graphene prepared by improved method exhibits superior electrochemical properties than that prepared by the other two methods. - Graphical abstract: Graphene oxides with different oxidation degree were obtained via three methods, and then graphene with different crystal structures were created by chemical reduction of exfoliated graphene oxides. - Highlights: • Graphene oxides with different oxidation degree were obtained via three oxidation methods. • The influence of oxidation methods on microstructure of graphene was investigated. • The effect of oxidation methods on dispersion stability of graphene was investigated. • The effect of oxidation methods on electrochemical properties of graphene was discussed.

  20. Effect of dispersing and stabilizing additives on rheological characteristics of the upgraded brown coal water mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Datin Fatia; Muta'alim; Usui, Hiromoto; Komoda, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Upgraded brown coal water mixture (UBCWM) preparation by using an Indonesian upgraded coal produced by upgraded brown coal (UBC) process, was carried out to study the effect of dispersing and stabilizing additives on rheological behavior of the UBCWM. Three kinds of anionic dispersing additives, naphthalene sulfonic formaldehyde condensate (NSF), poly (meth) acrylate (PMA) and poly styrene sulfonic acid (PSS) and three kinds of stabilizing additives, carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC), rhansam gum (S-194) and gellan gum (S-60) were used in this study. Results indicate that the addition of NSF 0.3 wt.% together with S-194 0.01 wt.% is effective in preparing UBCWM with good slurryability and stability, based on its rheological characteristics with the apparent viscosity at shear rate of 100 s - 1 and yield stress at zero point of shear rate. The rheological behavior of all of the UBCWM that prepared, exhibits non-Newtonian Bingham plastic. From the economical point of view, the price of S-194 is expensive. On the other hand, CMC is cheap and abundant. Therefore, the addition of CMC 0.01 wt.% together with NSF 0.3 wt.% is also effective in preparing UBCWM with good fluidity and stability. (author)

  1. Ground effects on the stability of separated flow around an airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Yu, Peng; Li, Larry K. B.

    2017-11-01

    We perform a BiGlobal stability analysis on the separated flow around a NACA 4415 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers (Re = 300 - 1000) and a high angle of attack α =20° with a focus on the effect of the airfoil's proximity to a moving ground. The results show that the most dominant perturbation is the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode and that this traveling mode becomes less unstable as the airfoil approaches the ground, although this stabilizing effect diminishes with increasing Reynolds number. By performing a Floquet analysis, we find that this ground effect can also stabilize secondary instabilities. This numerical-theoretical study shows that the ground can have a significant influence on the stability of separated flow around an airfoil at low Reynolds numbers, which could have implications for the design of micro aerial vehicles and for the understanding of natural flyers such as insects and birds. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (Project No. 16235716 and 26202815) and the Special Program for Applied Research on Super Computation of the NSFC-Guangdong Joint Fund (the second phase) under Grant No.U1501501.

  2. Rubber effect and stabilization of martensites in noble metal based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marukawa, K.; Takezawa, K.; Hoshi, H.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous paper, it has been pointed out that the rubber effect and stabilization of the martensite phase are caused by short range reordering during aging [K. Marukawa, K. Tsuchiya, Scripta Metall. Mater. 32 (1995) 77]. This view was further examined by experimental and theoretical studies. It has been found that the change in electrical resistivity produced by aging is well correlated with magnitudes of these effects. The relation between the short range order parameters and the representative quantities of these effects was formulated on the basis of thermodynamics. Quantitative evaluation was performed by numerical calculations utilizing the Monte Carlo method. It was found that the rubber effect is prominent when the aging temperature is in the vicinity of the order-disorder transition temperature. It was also shown that in most cases disordering or lowering in the long range order causes the stabilization. (orig.)

  3. Finite beta and compressibility effects on stability of resistive modes in toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leboeuf, J-N.G.; Kurita, Gen-ichi.

    1998-03-01

    Linear resistive stability results obtained from the toroidal magnetohydrodynamic codes FAR developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in United States of America and AEOLUS developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are compared for carefully constructed benchmark profiles and parameters. These are unstable to a tearing mode with toroidal mode number n=1. The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions calculated with both codes are in close agreement and show that the effect of compressibility is weak for these modes. The effect of finite plasma beta is considered, and the eigenvalues calculated by the FAR and AEOLUS codes also show good agreement. It is shown that the finite beta has a stabilizing effect on the toroidal tearing mode, but that the compressibility also has little effect on finite beta tearing modes. (author)

  4. Effect of high power low frequency ultrasound processing on the stability of lycopene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Valéria S; Rodrigues, Sueli; Fernandes, Fabiano A N

    2015-11-01

    The stability of lycopene was evaluated after application of high power low frequency ultrasound. The study was carried out on a solution containing pure lycopene to evaluate the direct effect of ultrasound on lycopene and on tomato purée to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of ultrasound application within a food matrix. Power densities ranging from 55 to 5000 W/L and temperatures ranging from 23°C (ambient) to 60°C were evaluated. The experiments on pure lycopene showed that the application of ultrasound did not have any direct effect over lycopene. However, the retention of lycopene in tomato puree has decreased indicating an indirect effect on lycopene stability caused by high concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the activation of peroxidase enzymes leading to the reduction of ascorbic acid and its regenerative action towards lycopene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of pilot holes on longitudinal miniscrew stability and bony adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Lauren Ohlenforst; Campbell, Phillip M; Spears, Robert; Ceen, Richard F; Melo, Ana Cláudia; Buschang, Peter H

    2014-11-01

    The purposes of this study were to longitudinally evaluate the effects of pilot holes on miniscrew implant (MSI) stability and to determine whether the effects can be attributed to the quality or the quantity of bone surrounding the MSI. Using a randomized split-mouth design in 6 skeletally mature female foxhound-mix dogs, 17 MSIs (1.6 mm outer diameter) placed with pilot holes (1.1 mm) were compared with 17 identical MSIs placed without pilot holes. Implant stability quotient measurements of MSI stability were taken weekly for 7 weeks. Using microcomputed tomography with an isotropic resolution of 6 μm, bone volume fractions were measured for 3 layers of bone (6-24, 24-42, and 42-60 μm) surrounding the MSIs. At placement, the MSIs with pilot holes showed significantly (P holes (48.3 vs 47.5). Over time, the implant stability quotient values decreased significantly more for the MSIs placed with pilot holes than for those placed without pilot holes. After 7 weeks, the most coronal aspect of the 6- to 24-μm layer of cortical bone and the most coronal aspects of all 3 layers of trabecular bone showed significantly larger bone volume fractions for the MSIs placed without pilot holes than for those placed with pilot holes. MSIs placed with pilot holes show greater primary stability, but greater decreases in stability over time, due primarily to having less trabecular bone surrounding them. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Identifying the effects of parameter uncertainty on the reliability of riverbank stability modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, A.; Amiri-Tokaldany, E.; Darby, S. E.

    2009-05-01

    Bank retreat is a key process in fluvial dynamics affecting a wide range of physical, ecological and socioeconomic issues in the fluvial environment. To predict the undesirable effects of bank retreat and to inform effective measures to prevent it, a wide range of bank stability models have been presented in the literature. These models typically express bank stability by defining a factor of safety as the ratio of driving and resisting forces acting on the incipient failure block. These forces are affected by a range of controlling factors that include such aspects as the bank profile (bank height and angle), the geotechnical properties of the bank materials, as well as the hydrological status of the riverbanks. In this paper we evaluate the extent to which uncertainties in the parameterization of these controlling factors feed through to influence the reliability of the resulting bank stability estimate. This is achieved by employing a simple model of riverbank stability with respect to planar failure (which is the most common type of bank stability model) in a series of sensitivity tests and Monte Carlo analyses to identify, for each model parameter, the range of values that induce significant changes in the simulated factor of safety. These identified parameter value ranges are compared to empirically derived parameter uncertainties to determine whether they are likely to confound the reliability of the resulting bank stability calculations. Our results show that parameter uncertainties are typically high enough that the likelihood of generating unreliable predictions is typically very high (> ˜ 80% for predictions requiring a precision of < ± 15%). Because parameter uncertainties are derived primarily from the natural variability of the parameters, rather than measurement errors, much more careful attention should be paid to field sampling strategies, such that the parameter uncertainties and consequent prediction unreliabilities can be quantified more

  7. The Effects of Lyophilization on the Physico-Chemical Stability of Sirolimus Liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Zakeri-Milani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The major limitation in the widespread use of liposome drug delivery system is its instability. Lyophilization is a promising approach to ensure the long-term stability of liposomes. The aim of this study was to prepare sirolimus-loaded liposomes, study their stability and investigate the effect of lyophilization either in the presence or in the absence of lyoprotectant on liposome properties. Methods: Two types of multi-lamellar liposomes, conventional and fusogenic, containing sirolimus were prepared by modified thin film hydration method with different ratio of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, cholesterol and dioleoylphosphoethanolamine (DOPE, and were lyophilized with or without dextrose as lyoprotectant. Chemical stability investigation was performed at 4°C and 25°C until 6 months using a validated HPLC method. Physical stability was studied with determination of particle size (PS and encapsulation efficiency (EE % of formulations through 6 months. Results: Chemical stability test at 4°C and 25°C until 6 months showed that drug content of liposomes decreased 8.4% and 20.2% respectively. Initial mean EE % and PS were 72.8 % and 582 nm respectively. After 6 months mean EE % for suspended form, lyophilized without lyoprotectant and lyophilized with lyoprotectant were 54.8 %, 62.3% and 67.1 % at 4°C and 48.2%, 60.4 % and 66.8 % at 25°C respectively. Corresponding data for mean PS were 8229 nm, 2397 nm and 688nm at 4°C and 9362 nm, 1944 nm and 737 nm at 25°C respectively. Conclusion: It is concluded that lyophilization with and without dextrose could increase shelf life of liposome and dextrose has lyoprotectant effect that stabilized liposomes in the lyophilization process.

  8. Effect of Variations in Long-Duration Rainfall Intensity on Unsaturated Slope Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Hsin-Fu Yeh; Yi-Jin Tsai

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, many scientific methods have been used to prove that the Earth’s climate is changing. Climate change can affect rainfall patterns, which can in turn affect slope safety. Therefore, this study analyzed the effects of climate change on rainfall patterns from the perspective of rainfall intensity. This analysis was combined with numerical model analysis to examine the rainfall patterns of the Zengwen reservoir catchment area and its effects on slope stability. In this study, the...

  9. Effects of modified β-cyclodextrin on thermal stability and conformation of lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiyama, Tadashi; Satoh, Megumi; Tateishi, Takahiro; Nojiri, Tomoaki; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Kimura, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effects of cyclodextrin on stability and conformation of lysozyme were clarified. ► The CD influences the hydrophobic interaction of lysozyme by the inclusion. ► The CD relatively destabilized the folded state by stabilizing the unfolded state. ► The destabilization depends on the concentration and the substituent of CD. ► The conformation of lysozyme was more spread at unfolded state by inclusion of CD. - Abstract: Effects of cyclic oligosaccharide cyclodextrin (CD) on stability and conformation of lysozyme were clarified thermodynamically and rheologically by DSC, viscosity, and circular dichroism measurements. The modified β-CD relatively destabilized the folded state of lysozyme by stabilizing the unfolded state due to inclusion of hydrophobic part into the hydrophobic interior of CD. The order of higher destabilization effect was acetyl-β-CD > methyl-β-CD > hydroxypropyl-β-CD. Apparent number of bound CD to unfolded state for methyl-, hydroxypropyl-, and acetyl-β-CD is 6.7 ± 0.7, 4.2 ± 1.1, and 18.6 ± 4.3 and the binding constant is 5.5 ± 0.8, 6.7 ± 2.4, and 4.4 ± 1.2 L mol −1 , respectively. The viscosity for unfolded state was increased with an increase in the each modified β-CD concentration, suggesting that the inclusion of CD on a part of hydrophobic core at unfolded state leads to break the hydrophobic core, then lysozyme would be more spread structure. The substituent of CD can accelerate instability by directly breaking hydrogen bond and/or can restrain instability by increase in hydrophobic interaction. The fact that the each modified CDs has different destabilization effect shows a possibility to control the stability of protein by the substitution of CD.

  10. Protein Stabilization and Enzyme Activation in Ionic Liquids: Specific Ion Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    There are still debates on whether the hydration of ions perturbs the water structure, and what is the degree of such disturbance; therefore, the origin of Hofmeister effect on protein stabilization continues being questioned. For this reason, it is suggested to use the ‘specific ion effect’ instead of other misleading terms such as Hofmeister effect, Hofmeister series, lyotropic effect, and lyotropic series. In this review, we firstly discuss the controversial aspect of inorganic ion effects on water structures, and several possible contributors to the specific ion effect of protein stability. Due to recent overwhelming attraction of ionic liquids (ILs) as benign solvents in many enzymatic reactions, we further evaluate the structural properties and molecular-level interactions in neat ILs and their aqueous solutions. Next, we systematically compare the specific ion effects of ILs on enzyme stability and activity, and conclude that (a) the specificity of many enzymatic systems in diluted aqueous IL solutions is roughly in line with the traditional Hofmeister series albeit some exceptions; (b) however, the specificity follows a different track in concentrated or neat ILs because other factors (such as hydrogen-bond basicity, nucelophilicity, and hydrophobicity, etc) are playing leading roles. In addition, we demonstrate some examples of biocatalytic reactions in IL systems that are guided by the empirical specificity rule. PMID:26949281

  11. Effect of small addition of Cr on stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Rumana; Pahlevani, Farshid, E-mail: f.pahlevani@unsw.edu.au; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2017-03-15

    High carbon steels with dual phase structures of martensite and austenite have considerable potential for industrial application in high abrasion environments due to their hardness, strength and relatively low cost. To design cost effective high carbon steels with superior properties, it is crucial to identify the effect of Chromium (Cr) on the stability of retained austenite (RA) and to fully understand its effect on solid-state phase transition. This study addresses this important knowledge gap. Using standard compression tests on bulk material, quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, nano-indentation on individual austenitic grains, transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction–based orientation microscopy techniques, the authors investigated the effect of Cr on the microstructure, transformation behaviour and mechanical stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel, with varying Cr contents. The results revealed that increasing the Cr %, altered the morphology of the RA and increased its stability, consequently, increasing the critical pressure for martensitic transformation. This study has critically addressed the elastoplastic behaviour of retained austenite – and provides a deep understanding of the effect of small additions of Cr on the metastable austenite of high carbon steel from the macro- to nano-level. Consequently, it paves the way for new applications for high carbon low alloy steels. - Highlights: • Effect of small addition of Cr on metastable austenite of high carbon steel from the macro- to nano-level • A multi-scale study of elastoplastic behaviour of retained austenite in high carbon steel • The mechanical stability of retained austenite during plastic deformation increased with increasing Cr content • Effect of grain boundary misorientation angle on hardness of individual retained austenite grains in high carbon steel.

  12. Effectiveness of the Vertical Gas Ventilation Pipes for Promoting Waste Stabilization in Post-Closure Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumasa Tojo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To make inside of the municipal solid waste (MSW landfill aerobic as much as possible is thought to be preferable for promoting waste stabilization, reducing pollutant's load in leachate, minimizing greenhouse gas emission and shortening post-closure-care period. In Japan, installation of semi-aerobic landfill structure has widely spread in order to promote waste stabilization in MSW landfill from 1980s. In semi-aerobic landfill structure, outlet of main leachate collection pipe is opened to atmosphere. Heat generated by aerobic degradation of waste causes natural convection and natural aeration arises from the outlet of leachate collection pipe to the gas vents. It is so-called stack effect. This air flow is thought to be effective for purifying leachate flowing through drainage layer and leachate collection pipes. And it is also thought to be contributing to expanding aerobic region in waste layer in landfill. Recently, measures attempting the promotion of waste stabilization are taken at several landfills at where stabilization of waste delays, in which many vertical gas vents are newly installed and close structure to semi-aerobic landfill is created. However, in many cases, these gas vents are not connected to leachate collection pipes. Many vertical gas vents are just installed without scientific proof regarding whether they can contribute for waste stabilization. In this study, how such installation of gas vents is effective for waste stabilization and aerobization of waste layer was discussed by numerical analysis. In numerical analysis, heat transfer, gas movement by pressure, gas diffusion, biological degradation of organic matter, and heat generation by biodegradation were taken into account. Simulations were carried out by using the general purpose simulator of finite element method. Three types of landfill structure were assumed. As the results, the following information were obtained. In dig-down type landfill, installation of gas

  13. The effect of relativity on stability of Copernicium phases, their electronic structure and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čenčariková, Hana; Legut, Dominik

    2018-05-01

    The phase stability of the various crystalline structures of the super-heavy element Copernicium was determined based on the first-principles calculations with different levels of the relativistic effects. We utilized the Darwin term, mass-velocity, and spin-orbit interaction with the single electron framework of the density functional theory while treating the exchange and correlation effects using local density approximations. It is found that the spin-orbit coupling is the key component to stabilize the body-centered cubic (bcc) structure over the hexagonal closed packed (hcp) structure, which is in accord with Sol. Stat. Comm. 152 (2012) 530, but in contrast to Atta-Fynn and Ray (2015) [11], Gaston et al. (2007) [10], Papaconstantopoulos (2015) [9]. It seems that the main role here is the correct description of the semi-core relativistic 6p1/2 orbitals. The all other investigated structures, i.e. face-centered cubic (fcc) , simple cubic (sc) as well as rhombohedral (rh) structures are higher in energy. The criteria of mechanical stability were investigated based on the calculated elastic constants, identifying the phase instability of fcc and rh structures, but surprisingly confirm the stability of the energetically higher sc structure. In addition, the pressure-induced structural transition between two stable sc and bcc phases has been detected. The ground-state bcc structure exhibits the highest elastic anisotropy from single elements of the Periodic table. At last, we support the experimental findings that Copernicium is a metal.

  14. Effects of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Masahiro; Gomi, Masahiro; Katoh, Munenori

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of trunk stability on isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement while sitting by performing simultaneous measurements with a handheld dynamometer (HHD) and an isokinetic dynamometer (IKD) in the same seated condition. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 healthy volunteers. Isometric knee extension muscle strength was simultaneously measured with a HHD and an IKD by using an IKD-specific chair. The measurement was performed twice. Measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were examined by using the analysis of variance and correlation tests. [Results] The measurement instrument variables and the number of measurements were not significantly different. The correlation coefficients between the HHD and IKD measurements were ≥0.96. [Conclusion] Isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement using the HHD in the sitting position resulted in a lower value than that using the IKD, presumably because of the effect of trunk stability on the measurement. In the same seated posture with trunk stability, no significant difference in measurement values was observed between the HHD and IKD. The present findings suggest that trunk stability while seated during isometric knee extension muscle strength measurement influenced the HHD measurement.

  15. The Effect of the Loading on Dynamic Stability and Scapular Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Azarsa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scapular stabilization and neuromuscular control provide an important parameter to characterize shoulder function during dynamic activities. Many studies have confirmed the effect of the loading on scapular position and scapulohumeral rhythm. Therefore, the evaluation of stabilizer muscles involvement in scapular asymmetry may assist in the development of clinical examination and rehabilitation program. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of loading on dynamic stability and scapular asymmetry in basketball players. Methods: Thirty healthy male basketball players aged between 20 to 31 years old were tested. The linear distance between scapular inferior angle and T7 spinous process was measured using a caliper in 90 degrees of unloaded scaption and with 1, 2 and 4 kg loading. The difference of distances of two sides in the above 4 positions was analyzed. Results: The amount of distances difference in two sides with 1 kg loading was minimal (9.36 mm. This difference increased to 10.19 mm and 12.22 mm, with increasing the loading to 2 and 4 kg respectively; although the 4 positions of the test did not show significant differences in distances difference (P>0.05. Conclusion: This study shows that dynamic stability of the scapula is dependent on the role of muscles, so that with increasing load on the muscles, the scapular asymmetry is more pronounced.

  16. Effect of rosemary extract and TBHQ on the stability of radish seed oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gongling, Z.; Yancheng, G.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of rosemary extract (RE) and tert-Butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) on the storage stability of radish seed oil were studied according to the change of the acid value, peroxide value, tocopherol and sulforaphene in radish seed oil. The results showed that under conditions of accelerated oxidation by (60+-1) degree C, the storage stability of the radish seed oil with antioxidants could be significantly improved, among which TBHQ was better than RE. Besides, RE and TBHQ had a synergistic effect on antioxidation. The compound of 0.01% RE and 0.01% TBHQ had a better antioxidation effect than 0.07% RE and 0.02% TBHQ respectively, which recommended it can be a suitable antioxidant of radish seed oil. (author)

  17. Effects of electrolytes and surfactants on the morphology and stability of advanced silver nano-materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obaid, Abdullah Yousif; AL-Thabaiti, Shaeel Ahmed; El-Mossalamy, E.H. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21413 (Saudi Arabia); Hussain, Javed Ijaz [Nano-science Research Lab, Department of Chemistry, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi 110 025 (India); Khan, Zaheer, E-mail: drkhanchem@yahoo.co.in [Nano-science Research Lab, Department of Chemistry, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi 110 025 (India)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Stoichiometric ratio of S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2−} and Ag{sup +} ions are responsible to the formation of prefect transparent yellow colored silver sol. ► Higher S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2−} concentrations has damping effect. ► Head group of the surfactants and nature of the electrolytes have significant effect on the stability of silver nanoparticles. - Abstract: The impact of electrolytes, stabilizing and/or capping agents on morphology of colloidal silver nano-materials (AgNPs) has been studied spectroscopically. Sodium thiosulfate acts as reducing-, stabilizing- and damping-agents. Stoichiometric ratios of S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2−} and Ag{sup +} ions were responsible to the formation stable and prefect transparent dark yellow colored AgNPs. The S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2−}-stabilized AgNPs were significantly more stable in inorganic electrolytes (NaNO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and KBr). S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2−} is adsorbed more strongly than the used other anions. The addition of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) has significant effects on the absorbance of S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2−}-stabilized AgNPs which can be rationalized in terms of electrostatic attraction and repulsion between the adsorbed S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2−} ions on to the surface of AgNPs and cationic and/or anionic head groups of used surfactants, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy images suggest that AgNPs are polydispersed, spherical and exhibiting an interesting irregular morphology.

  18. Effects of positive emotion, extraversion, and dopamine on cognitive stability-flexibility and frontal EEG asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Jan

    2018-01-01

    The influence of positive emotions on the balance between cognitive stability and flexibility has been suggested to (a) differ among various positive emotional/motivational states (e.g., of varying approach motivation intensity), and (b) be mediated by brain dopamine (DA). Frontal EEG alpha asymmetry (ASY) is considered an indicator of approach motivational states and may be modulated by DA. The personality trait of extraversion is strongly linked to positive emotions and is now thought to reflect DA-based individual differences in incentive/approach motivation. The present study independently manipulated positive emotion (high approach wanting-expectancy [WE] vs. low approach warmth-liking [WL]) and dopamine (placebo vs. DA D2 blocker sulpiride) to examine their effects on both cognitive stability-flexibility and emotion-related ASY changes. The results showed numerically lower stability-flexibility in WE versus WL under placebo and a complete reversal of this effect under the D2 blocker, no differentiation between WE and WL groups in terms of emotion-related ASY change, but an association between self-reported WE and WL and ASY changes toward left and right frontal cortical activity, respectively. Finally, extraversion was positively associated with both stability-flexibility and ASY changes toward left frontal cortical activity under placebo, and these associations were completely reversed under the D2 blocker. The results (a) support a dopaminergic basis for frontal EEG asymmetry, extraversion, and the modulating effect of positive emotions on stability-flexibility, and (b) extend previous reports of cognitive differences between introverts and extraverts. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  19. Effect of an Unstable Load on Primary and Stabilizing Muscles During the Bench Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Stephanie J; Carlson, Lara A; Lawrence, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    Ostrowski, SJ, Carlson, LA, and Lawrence, MA. Effect of an unstable load on primary and stabilizing muscles during the bench press. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 430-434, 2017-Unstable resistance exercises are performed to increase activity of stabilizing muscles. The premise is that this increase in activity will yield greater strength gains than traditional resistance exercises. The purpose of this study was to determine if an unstable load increases muscle activity of stabilizing muscles during a bench press as compared with a standard bench press with a typical load. Fifteen resistance-trained males (age 24.2 ± 2.7 years, mass 84.8 ± 12.0 kg, height 1.77 ± 0.05 m, weight lifting experience 9.9 ± 3.4 years, and bench press 1 repetition maximum [1RM] 107.5 ± 25.9 kg) volunteered for this study. Subjects pressed 2 sets of 5 repetitions in both stable (75% 1RM) and unstable (60% 1RM) conditions using a standard barbell and a flexible Earthquake bar, respectively. Surface electromyography was used to detect muscle activity of primary movers (pectoralis major, anterior deltoid, and triceps) and stabilizing musculature (latissimus dorsi, middle and posterior deltoid, biceps brachii, and upper trapezius). Muscle activity was compared using a multivariate analysis of variance to determine significant (p ≤ 0.05) phase and condition differences. The right and left biceps and the left middle deltoid were significantly more active in the unstable condition. Some of the stabilizing muscles were found to be significantly more active in the unstable condition with 15% less weight. Therefore, bench pressing with an unstable load appears promising in activating stabilizing musculature compared with pressing a typical barbell.

  20. Effect of Stabilization on Morphology Polystyrene and Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Thermoplastic Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozafar Mokhtari Motameni Shirvan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcellular thermoplastic foams can be usually produced in a one-step batch system using a physical foaming agent which is dissolved in a polymer system under specific pressure and temperature, higher than the critical condition of solvent and the glass transition temperature of polymer and solvent mixture. By application of a sudden pressure drop the foam structure is formed through stages of nucleation, growth and coalescence. After pressure drop, if the foam temperature is reduced below the glass transition of the gas-polymer mixture, the cells stop growing which results in a foam with stabilized morphology. This stabilization stage has not been thoroughly focused in previous studies. In this work, polystyrene as a polymer system and supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent were used at 18.5 MPa pressure and different temperatures. The stabilization process took place within milliseconds and helped to a better understanding of cellular structure in thermoplastic foams. In this mechanism, the nucleation takes place in the phase transition of solvent molecules at supercritical state to the gas state and the formation of very small nuclei containing gas molecules between polymer chains. The energy originated from the nuclei growth is in competition with the elastic energy of polymer chains, and the predominance of one type of energy over another determines the final cell size. The results showed that the effect of stabilization process on the structure of the foam depended on the foaming temperature. Stabilization at 110°C resulted in a 50% cell size reduction and a 60% cell density promotion, while at lower temperatures, the stabilization led to greater cell size and reduced cell density.

  1. Effects of Hall current and electrical resistivity on the stability of gravitating anisotropic quantum plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, S.; Prajapati, R. P.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of Hall current and finite electrical resistivity are studied on the stability of uniformly rotating and self-gravitating anisotropic quantum plasma. The generalized Ohm's law modified by Hall current and electrical resistivity is used along with the quantum magnetohydrodynamic fluid equations. The general dispersion relation is derived using normal mode analysis and discussed in the parallel and perpendicular propagations. In the parallel propagation, the Jeans instability criterion, expression of critical Jeans wavenumber, and Jeans length are found to be independent of non-ideal effects and uniform rotation but in perpendicular propagation only rotation affects the Jeans instability criterion. The unstable gravitating mode modified by Bohm potential and the stable Alfven mode modified by non-ideal effects are obtained separately. The criterion of firehose instability remains unaffected due to the presence of non-ideal effects. In the perpendicular propagation, finite electrical resistivity and quantum pressure anisotropy modify the dispersion relation, whereas no effect of Hall current was observed in the dispersion characteristics. The Hall current, finite electrical resistivity, rotation, and quantum corrections stabilize the growth rate. The stability of the dynamical system is analyzed using the Routh-Hurwitz criterion.

  2. Effects of wastewater sludge and its detergents on the stability of rotavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, R.L. (Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, C.S.

    1980-06-01

    Wastewater sludge reduced the heat required to inactivate rotavirus SA-11, and ionic detergents were identified as the sludge components responsible for this effect. A similar result was found previously with reovirus. The quantitative effects of individual ionic detergents on rotavirus and reovirus were very different, and rotavirus was found to be extremely sensitive to several of these detergents. However, neither virus was destabilized by nonionic detergents. On the contrary, rotavirus was stabilized by a nonionic detergent against the potent destabilizing effects of the ionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate. The destabilizing effects of both cationic and anionic detergents on rotavirus were greatly altered by changes in the pH of the medium.

  3. The effect of the masses of the controls on the longitudinal stability with free elevator. Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rudolf

    1939-01-01

    In the present report, aerodynamic relations under the effect of the weight moments are investigated, and an example given of the computation of the stability for a practical case. Later, the effects of the masses of the controls on the dynamic longitudinal stability will be considered.

  4. Disulfide bond effects on protein stability: designed variants of Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavodszky, M; Chen, C W; Huang, J K; Zolkiewski, M; Wen, L; Krishnamoorthi, R

    2001-01-01

    Attempts to increase protein stability by insertion of novel disulfide bonds have not always been successful. According to the two current models, cross-links enhance stability mainly through denatured state effects. We have investigated the effects of removal and addition of disulfide cross-links, protein flexibility in the vicinity of a cross-link, and disulfide loop size on the stability of Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V (CMTI-V; 7 kD) by differential scanning calorimetry. CMTI-V offers the advantage of a large, flexible, and solvent-exposed loop not involved in extensive intra-molecular interactions. We have uncovered a negative correlation between retention time in hydrophobic column chromatography, a measure of protein hydrophobicity, and melting temperature (T(m)), an indicator of native state stabilization, for CMTI-V and its variants. In conjunction with the complete set of thermodynamic parameters of denaturation, this has led to the following deductions: (1) In the less stable, disulfide-removed C3S/C48S (Delta Delta G(d)(50 degrees C) = -4 kcal/mole; Delta T(m) = -22 degrees C), the native state is destabilized more than the denatured state; this also applies to the less-stable CMTI-V* (Delta Delta G(d)(50 degrees C) = -3 kcal/mole; Delta T(m) = -11 degrees C), in which the disulfide-containing loop is opened by specific hydrolysis of the Lys(44)-Asp(45) peptide bond; (2) In the less stable, disulfide-inserted E38C/W54C (Delta Delta G(d)(50 degrees C) = -1 kcal/mole; Delta T(m) = +2 degrees C), the denatured state is more stabilized than the native state; and (3) In the more stable, disulfide-engineered V42C/R52C (Delta Delta G(d)(50 degrees C) = +1 kcal/mole; Delta T(m) = +17 degrees C), the native state is more stabilized than the denatured state. These results show that a cross-link stabilizes both native and denatured states, and differential stabilization of the two states causes either loss or gain in protein stability. Removal of hydrogen

  5. Nature of the Charged-Group Effect on the Stability of the C-Peptide Helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Kevin R.; Kim, Peter S.; Brems, David N.; Marqusee, Susan; York, Eunice J.; Chaiken, Irwin M.; Stewart, John M.; Baldwin, Robert L.

    1985-04-01

    The residues responsible for the pH-dependent stability of the helix formed by the isolated C-peptide (residues 1-13 of ribonuclease A) have been identified by chemical synthesis of analogues and measurement of their helix-forming properties. Each of the residues ionizing between pH 2 and pH 8 has been replaced separately by an uncharged residue. Protonation of Glu-2- is responsible for the sharp decrease in helix stability between pH 5 and pH 2, and deprotonation of His-12+ causes a similar decrease between pH 5 and pH 8. Glu-9- is not needed for helix stability. The results cannot be explained by the Zimm-Bragg model and host-guest data for α -helix formation, which predict that the stability of the C-peptide helix should increase when Glu-2- is protonated or when His-12+ is deprotonated. Moreover, histidine+ is a strong helix-breaker in host-guest studies. In proteins, acidic and basic residues tend to occur at opposite ends of α -helices: acidic residues occur preferentially near the NH2-terminal end and basic residues near the COOH-terminal end. A possible explanation, based on a helix dipole model, has been given [Blagdon, D. E. & Goodman, M. (1975) Biopolymers 14, 241-245]. Our results are consistent with the helix dipole model and they support the suggestion that the distribution of charged residues in protein helices reflects the helix-stabilizing propensity of those residues. Because Glu-9 is not needed for helix stability, a possible Glu-9-\\cdots His-12+ salt bridge does not contribute significantly to helix stability. The role of a possible Glu-2-\\cdots Arg-10+ salt bridge has not yet been evaluated. A charged-group effect on α -helix stability in water has also been observed in a different peptide system [Ihara, S., Ooi, T. & Takahashi, S. (1982) Biopolymers 21, 131-145]: block copolymers containing (Ala)20 and (Glu)20 show partial helix formation at low temperatures, pH 7.5, where the glutamic acid residues are ionized. (Glu)20(Ala)20Phe forms a

  6. STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF SOIL CEMENT ELEMENTS WHEN STABILIZING ROADBED MODEL IN LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D Petrenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose.Experimental studies allow determining th estress-strain state or bearing capacity of the tested soil body. A preliminary study of the results of model testing and experimental research allows us to find the optimal solutions and to justify the parameters of the chosen technology. The purpose of this work is to determine the effect of soil cement elements when stabilizing the roadbed on a weak subgrade using the soil tests in laboratory conditions. Methodology. During the development of measures for the reconstruction and consolidation of soil bodies, their strength is tested using many methods. In all cases, we take into account the physical and mechanical characteristics of soils obtained as a result of research, as well as the existing regulatory documents. We performed the experimental studies by model testing in laboratory conditions. The model testing was based on the corresponding relationships between geometric sizes, mechanical properties of materials, loads and other factors on which the stress-strain state depends. During testing, the model was loaded gradually. We maintained each load level up to conditional stabilization of the soil deformation. We took the readings from measuring devices at each stage of loading after achievement of stabilization of soil mass deformations. We fixed the readings in the test journal. Findings. During stabilization with soil cement piles there is an improvement in mechanical properties, which leads to a decrease in deformations by 2…3.5 times. Each test is accompanied with graphs of relative deformations-stress dependence, as well as deformation curves and compression curves. According to the results of experimental stu-dies, it can be seen that when testing a model with cement piles, compared with a model without soil cement piles, the relative deformations of the samples taken prior to the experiment and after the experiment almost coincide, indicating a decrease in deformability under

  7. ARTHROMETRIC EVALUATION OF STABILIZING EFFECT OF KNEE FUNCTIONAL BRACING AT DIFFERENT FLEXION ANGLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Seyed Mohseni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous in-vivo investigations on the stabilizing efficacy of knee bracing for ACL reconstructed patients have been often limited to 20-30 degrees of knee flexion. In this study, the effectiveness of a uniaxial hinged functional brace to improve the knee stability was assessed at 30, 60 and 90 degrees of knee flexion. Arthrometry tests were conducted on 15 healthy subjects before and following wearing the brace and the tibial displacements were measured at up to 150 N anterior forces. Results indicated that functional bracing has a significant stabilizing effect throughout the range of knee flexion examined (p < 0.05. The rate of effectiveness, however, was not consistent across the flexion range, e.g., 50% at 30 degrees and only 4% at 90 degrees. It was suggested that accurate sizing and fitting as well as attention to correct hinge placement relative to the femoral condyles can limit brace migration and improve its effectiveness in mid and deep knee flexion. With using adaptive limb fittings, through flexible pads, and a polycentric joint a more significant improvement of the overall brace performance and efficacy might be obtained

  8. Laboratory research on tailings stabilization methods and their effectiveness in radiation containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, P.J.; Jensen, C.M.; Rogers, V.C.; Overmyer, R.F.

    1978-04-01

    This report describes a study of various methods, techniques, and materials for stabilizing uranium mill tailings to reduce radon exhalation. Radon emanation from tailings particles, radon exhalation from tailings, and methods that could be used to reduce radon exhalation from tailings piles are discussed. Surface radon flux and soil gas concentrations were measured in experiment chambers or columns consisting of uranium tailings and various types and thicknesses of cover materials. The applicability of diffusion theory was examined and effective diffusion coefficients were determined for clay, soil, and sand. The variation of radon flux with atmospheric effects and moisture also was investigated. The effectiveness of several types of chemical stabilizers for both volumetric and surface application in reducing radon exhalation is reported. Some volumetric stabilizers reduced radon flux by 90 percent or more. Radon flux was determined through the use of charcoal gas mask canisters, and flux accumulation chambers sampled by Lucas cells. Both of these techniques are described. Soil gas concentration was sampled with Lucas cells and counted with a sodium iodide scintillation spectrometer system. Emanating power of uranium tailings was measured for several particle sizes and found to be relatively constant at about 20 percent. Two types of grasses were found that would grow in tailings if sufficient water and fertilizer were provided. The effect of vegetation on radon exhalation was not determined

  9. Effects of mineral additives on biochar formation: carbon retention, stability, and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feiyue; Cao, Xinde; Zhao, Ling; Wang, Jianfei; Ding, Zhenliang

    2014-10-07

    Biochar is being recognized as a promising tool for long-term carbon sequestration, and biochar with high carbon retention and strong stability is supposed to be explored for that purpose. In this study, three minerals, including kaolin, calcite (CaCO3), and calcium dihydrogen phosphate [Ca(H2PO4)2], were added to rice straw feedstock at the ratio of 20% (w/w) for biochar formation through pyrolysis treatment, aiming to improve carbon retention and stabilization in biochar. Kaolin and CaCO3 had little effect on the carbon retention, whereas Ca(H2PO4)2 increased the carbon retention by up to 29% compared to untreated biochar. Although the carbon loss from the kaolin-modified biochar with hydrogen peroxide oxidation was enhanced, CaCO3 and Ca(H2PO4)2 modification reduced the carbon loss by 18.6 and 58.5%, respectively. Moreover, all three minerals reduced carbon loss of biochar with potassium dichromate oxidation from 0.3 to 38.8%. The microbial mineralization as CO2 emission in all three modified biochars was reduced by 22.2-88.7% under aerobic incubation and 5-61% under anaerobic incubation. Enhanced carbon retention and stability of biochar with mineral treatment might be caused by the enhanced formation of aromatic C, which was evidenced by cross-polarization magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. Our results indicated that the three minerals, especially Ca(H2PO4)2, were effective in increasing carbon retention and strengthening biochar stabilization, which provided a novel idea that people could explore and produce the designated biochar with high carbon sequestration capacity and stability.

  10. Evaluation of the effectiveness of olive cake residue as an expansive soil stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbantoglu, Zalihe; Tawfiq, Salma

    2006-08-01

    The quantity of the by-product olive cake residue generated in most parts of the Mediterranean countries continues to increase and expected to double in amount within 10 15 years. This increase intensifies the problems associated with the disposal of this by-product. Olive cake residue has a potential for use as a soil stabilizer and large volumes can be beneficially used. This study is directed toward determining if olive cake residue can be utilized to increase the strength and stability of expansive soils which constitute a costly natural hazard to lightweight structures on shallow foundations. A series of laboratory tests using engineering properties, such as Atterberg limits, moisture-density relationship (compaction), swell, unconfined compressive strength were undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness and performance of the olive cake residue as a soil stabilizer. Test results indicate that an addition of only 3% burned olive waste into the soil causes a reduction in plasticity, volume change and an increase in the unconfined compressive strength. However, it was observed that the presence of burned olive waste in the soil greater than 3% caused an increase in the compressibility and a decrease in the unconfined compressive strength. Test results indicate that the use of olive waste in soil stabilization gives greater benefits to the environment than simply disposing of the by-product, olive cake residue.

  11. Study on the effect of stabilizers on discoloring of PVC by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Chaorong; Wang Jingxia; Chen Zhuping; Liu Siyang

    2009-01-01

    Composites of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) filled with stabilizers was irradiated by 60 Co γ-ray. The effect of different stabilizers on the radiation-induced discoloring of PVC was investigated and the structures of irradiated PVC were characterized by ultraviolet spectrum (UV) and Fourrier transfer infrared spectrum (FT-IR). It shows that the stabilizers including calcium stearate/zinc stearate, epoxidised oil, phosphite and photostabilizer can improve the property of resistance to radiation-induced discoloring of PVC, and phosphite can improve the property of resistance to radiation-induced oxidation of PVC. Among the stabilizers, formulations with calcium stearate/zinc stearate show high transparency and excellent property of resistance to radiation at same absorbed dose. Change rate of yellow index of formulation (calcium stearate: zinc stearate=2:1) has been determined to be 8.3% at the absorbed dose of 30 kGy. It has been found that the structures of PVC with numbers of conjugated double bond or α, β-unsaturated ketone are formed after irradiation by γ-rays. (authors)

  12. Effect of gamma radiation on the stability of UV replicated composite mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaldivar, Rafael J.; Kim, Hyun I.; Ferrelli, Geena L.

    2018-04-01

    Composite replicated mirrors are gaining increasing attention for space-based applications due to their lower density, tailorable mechanical properties, and rapid manufacturing times over state-of-the-art glass mirrors. Ultraviolet (UV)-cured mirrors provide a route by which high-quality mirrors can be manufactured at relatively low processing temperatures that minimize residual stresses. The successful utilization of these mirrors requires nanometer scale dimensional stability after both thermal cycling and hygrothermal exposure. We investigate the effect of gamma irradiation as a process to improve the stability of UV replicated mirrors. Gamma radiation exposure was shown to increase the cure state of these mirrors as evidenced by an increase in modulus, glass transition temperature, and the thermal degradation behavior with dosage. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy also showed evidence of consumption of the primary monomers and initiation of the photosensitive agent with gamma exposure. The gamma-exposed mirrors exhibited significant improvement in stability even after multiple thermal cycling in comparison with nonirradiated composite mirrors. Though improvements in the cure state contribute to the overall stability, the radiation dosage was also shown to reduce the film stress of the mirror by over 80% as evidenced using Stoney replicated specimens. This reduction in residual stress is encouraging considering the utilization of these structures for space applications. This paper shows that replicated composite mirrors are a viable alternative to conventional optical structures.

  13. The effect of posterior tibial slope on knee flexion in posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaojun; Shen, Bin; Kang, Pengde; Yang, Jing; Zhou, Zongke; Pei, Fuxing

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate and quantify the effect of the tibial slope on the postoperative maximal knee flexion and stability in the posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fifty-six patients (65 knees) who had undergone TKA with the posterior-stabilized prostheses were divided into the following 3 groups according to the measured tibial slopes: Group 1: ≤4°, Group 2: 4°-7° and Group 3: >7°. The preoperative range of the motion, the change in the posterior condylar offset, the elevation of the joint line, the postoperative tibiofemoral angle and the preoperative and postoperative Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) scores were recorded. The tibial anteroposterior translation was measured using the Kneelax 3 Arthrometer at both the 30° and the 90° flexion angles. The mean values of the postoperative maximal knee flexion were 101° (SD 5), 106° (SD 5) and 113° (SD 9) in Groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. A significant difference was found in the postoperative maximal flexion between the 3 groups (P slope resulted in a 1.8° flexion increment (r = 1.8, R (2) = 0.463, P slope can significantly increase the postoperative maximal knee flexion. The tibial slope with an appropriate flexion and extension gap balance during the operation does not affect the joint stability.

  14. Coordination exercise and postural stability in elderly people: Effect of Tai Chi Chuan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A M; Lin, Y C; Chou, S W; Tang, F T; Wong, P Y

    2001-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of coordination exercise on postural stability in older individuals by Chinese shadow boxing, Tai Chi Chuan (TCC). Cross-sectional study. Research project in a hospital-based biomechanical laboratory. The TCC group (n = 25) had been practicing TCC regularly for 2 to 35 years. The control group (n = 14) included healthy and active older subjects. Static postural stability test: progressively harder sequential tests with 6 combinations of vision (eyes open, eyes closed, sway-referenced) and support (fixed, sway-referenced); and dynamic balance test: 3 tests of weight shifting (left to right, forward-backward, multidirectional) at 3 speeds. Static and dynamic balance of Sensory Organization Testing (SOT) of the Smart Balance Master System. In static postural control, the results showed no differences between the TCC or control group in the more simple conditions, but in the more complicated SOT (eyes closed with sway surface, sway vision with sway surface), the TCC group had significantly better results than the control group. The TCC group also had significantly better results in the rhythmic forward-backward weight-shifting test. Duration of practice did not seem to affect the stability of elder people. The elderly people who regularly practiced TCC showed better postural stability in the more challenged conditions than those who do not (eg, the condition with simultaneous disturbance of vision and proprioception). TCC as a coordination exercise may reduce the risk of a fall through maintaining the ability of posture control.

  15. Effects of temperature distribution on boundary layer stability for a circular cone at Mach 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigney, Jeffrey M.

    A CFD analysis was conducted on a circular cone at 3 degrees angle of attack at Mach 10 using US3D and STABL 3D to determine the effect of wall temperature on the stability characteristics that lead to laminar-to-turbulent transition. Wall temperature distributions were manipulated while all other flow inputs and geometric qualities were held constant. Laminar-to-turbulent transition was analyzed for isothermal and adiabatic wall conditions, a simulated short-duration wind tunnel case, and several hot-nose temperature distributions. For this study, stability characteristics include maximum N-factor growth and the corresponding frequency range, disturbance spatial amplification rate and the corresponding modal frequency, and stability neutral point location. STABL 3D analysis indicates that temperature distributions typical of those in short-duration hypersonic wind tunnels do not result in any significant difference on the stability characteristics, as compared to an isothermal wall boundary condition. Hypothetical distributions of much greater temperatures at and past the nose tip do show a trend of dampening of second-mode disturbances, most notably on the leeward ray. The most pronounced differences existed between the isothermal and adiabatic cases.

  16. Effect of Alkaline Activator to Fly Ash Ratio for Geopolymer Stabilized Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Muhammad Sofian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymer technology have been developed and explored especially in the construction material field. However, lack of research related to geopolymer stabilized soil. In this research, the utilization of geopolymer has been investigated to stabilize the soil including the factors that affecting the geopolymerization process. Unconfined compressive test (UCT used as indicator to the strength development and hence evaluating the performance of geopolymer stabilized soil. This paper focusing on the effect of fly ash/alkaline activator ratio, Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio and curing time on geopolymer stabilized soil. A various mix design at different fly ash/alkaline activator ratio, Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio were prepared and cured for 7 and 28 days. Molarity and the percentage of geopolymer to soil were fixed at 10 molar and 8 percent respectively. Then, the UCT tests were carried out on 38mm diameter x 76mm height specimens. The highest strength obtained at the fly ash/alkaline activator ratio 2.5 and Na2SiO3/NaOH ratio 2.0 at 28 days curing time.

  17. Effect of Cavity Size of Mesoporous Silica on Short DNA Duplex Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Tsubasa; Shibuya, Yuuta; Arai, Shota; Kobayashi, Sayaka; Suzuki, Sotaro; Kijima, Jun; Itoh, Tetsuji; Sato, Yusuke; Nishizawa, Seiichi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2018-05-15

    We studied the stabilities of short (4- and 3-bp) DNA duplexes within silica mesopores modified with a positively charged trimethyl aminopropyl (TMAP) monolayer (BJH pore diameter 1.6-7.4 nm). The DNA fragments with fluorescent dye were introduced into the pores, and their fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) response was measured to estimate the structuring energies of the short DNA duplexes under cryogenic conditions (temperature 233-323 K). The results confirmed the enthalpic stability gain of the duplex within size-matched pores (1.6 and 2.3 nm). The hybridization equilibrium constants found for the size-matched pores were 2 orders of magnitude larger than those for large pores (≥3.5 nm), and this size-matching effect for the enhanced duplex stability was explained by a tight electrostatic interaction between the duplex and the surface TMAP groups. These results indicate the requirement of the precise regulation of mesopore size to ensure the stabilization of hydrogen-bonded supramolecular assemblies.

  18. Stability of colloidal silver nanoparticles trapped in lipid bilayer: effect of lecithin concentration and applied temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barani, Hossein; Montazer, Majid; Braun, Hans-Georg; Dutschk, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    The use of silver nanoparticle on various substrates has been widespread because of its good antibacterial properties that directly depend on the stability of the silver nanoparticles in a colloidal suspension. In this study, the colloidal solutions of the silver nanoparticles were synthesised by a simple and safe method by using lecithin as a stabilising agent and their stability was examined at various temperatures. The effect of the lecithin concentrations on the stability of the synthesised silver nanoparticles was examined from 25 to 80°C at 5°C intervals, by recording the changes in the UV-vis absorption spectra, the hydrodynamic diameter and the light scattering intensity of the silver nanoparticles. In addition, the morphology of the synthesised silver nanoparticles was investigated with the low-voltage scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that increasing temperature caused different changes in the size of the stabilised and the unstabilised silver nanoparticles. The size of the stabilised silver nanoparticles reduced from 38 to 36 nm during increasing temperature, which confirmed good stability.

  19. Stochastic description of cascade size effects on phase stability under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Bellon, P.

    1988-01-01

    Cascade size may affect phase stability under irradiation because of two distinct contributions: the replacement to displacement cross section ratio depends on the deposited energy density; ballistic jumps which tend to disorder ordere compounds occur by bursts (of size b), while thermal jumps which restored long range order occur one by one. The latter effect cannot be handled by standard rate theory. A stochastic treatment of the problem, based on a Fokker Planck approximation of the relevant master equation is summarized. It is shown that the possible values of the long range order parameter under irradiation are not affected by the size b of the bursts, but that the respective stability of the former is b dependent. As a consequence, the stability diagram of phases under irradiation varies with b. Such a diagram is computed for the Ni 4 Mo system where three structures are competing: the disordered solid solution, D1 a and DO 23 . A broadening by 100K of the stability domain of the short range ordered structure to the expense of the long range ordered one is predicted when increasing b from 1 to 100. The stochastic potentials introduced in the present treatment are by no means free energies of some constrained state. They can however be computed in a mean field type approximation. 23 refs

  20. Effect of liquid density differences on boiling two-phase flow stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Masahiro; Manera, Annalisa; Bragt, David D.B.; Hagen, Tim H.J.J. van der; Kruijf, Willy J.M.de

    2002-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of considering liquid density dependence on local fluid temperature in the thermal-hydraulic stability, a linear stability analysis is performed for a boiling natural circulation loop with an adiabatic riser. Type-I and Type-II instabilities were to investigate according to Fukuda-Kobori's classification. Type-I instability is dominant when the flow quality is low, while Type-II instability is relevant at high flow quality. Type-II instability is well known as the typical density wave oscillation. Neglecting liquid density differences yields estimates of Type-II instability margins that are too small, due to both a change in system-dynamics features and in the operational point. On the other hand, neglecting liquid density differences yields estimates of Type-I stability margins that are too large, especially due to a change in the operational point. Neglecting density differences is thus non-conservative in this case. Therefore, it is highly recommended to include liquid density dependence on the fluid subcooling in the stability analysis if a flow loop with an adiabatic rise is operated under the condition of low flow quality. (author)

  1. Torsional Stiffness Effects on the Dynamic Stability of a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Soo Jeong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aeroelastic instability problems have become an increasingly important issue due to the increased use of larger horizontal axis wind turbines. To maintain these large structures in a stable manner, the blade design process should include studies on the dynamic stability of the wind turbine blade. Therefore, fluid-structure interaction analyses of the large-scaled wind turbine blade were performed with a focus on dynamic stability in this study. A finite element method based on the large deflection beam theory is used for structural analysis considering the geometric nonlinearities. For the stability analysis, a proposed aerodynamic approach based on Greenberg’s extension of Theodorsen’s strip theory and blade element momentum method were employed in conjunction with a structural model. The present methods proved to be valid for estimations of the aerodynamic responses and blade behavior compared with numerical results obtained in the previous studies. Additionally, torsional stiffness effects on the dynamic stability of the wind turbine blade were investigated. It is demonstrated that the damping is considerably influenced by variations of the torsional stiffness. Also, in normal operating conditions, the destabilizing phenomena were observed to occur with low torsional stiffness.

  2. Lake restoration with aluminium, bentonite and Phoslock: the effect on sediment stability and light attenuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egemose, Sara; Reitzel, Kasper; Flindt, Mogens

    treatments on aluminium mobility, sediment stability or light climate. A laboratory flume experiment including three shallow Danish lakes was conducted. We measured the effects of aluminium, Phoslock (a commercial product), bentonite, and a combination of bentonite/aluminium. Each treatment caused a varying...... consolidation of the sediment. The largest consolidation occurred using Phoslock- and bentonite-addition followed by bentonite/aluminium-addition, whereas aluminium alone had no effect. Sediment stability thresholds were measured before and after addition. Especially Phoslock, but also bentonite and bentonite....../aluminium increased sediment erosion threshold, with respectively 200%, 43% and 57%. Aluminium, bentonite/aluminium, and Phoslock improved the light conditions in the water phase, with respectively 60%, 57% and 50%, whereas bentonite created higher turbidity. Conclusively aluminium improved the light conditions...

  3. Dietary supplementation of garlic and rosemary: effects on colour stability and lipid oxidation in lamb meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scafizzari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The colour of fresh meat is an important criterion consumers take into consideration when purchasing meat. Meat colour depends on the occurrence of chemical and microbial deterioration processes. The role of vitamin E and other antioxidants on ruminant meat colour stability and prevention of lipid oxidation has been widely investigated (Macit et al., 2003; Realini et al., 2004. Many natural herbs and plant extracts exert antioxidant effects such as garlic (Yin and Cheng, 2003 and rosemary (Sánchez-Escalante et al., 2001. Their use as additives for animal feeding may be a valid alternative to synthetic antioxidants since they show beneficial effects also on animal welfare and other physiological functions (Tedesco, 2001. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether garlic and rosemary dietary supplementation as compared with vitamin E affects lamb meat colour and lipid stability during storage.

  4. Application of electrolyzer system to enhance frequency stabilization effect of microturbine in a microgrid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vachirasricirikul, Sitthidet [Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Ngamroo, Issarachai; Kaitwanidvilai, Somyot [Center of Excellence for Innovative Energy Systems, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand)

    2009-09-15

    It is well known that the power output of microturbine can be controlled to compensate for load change and alleviate the system frequency fluctuations. Nevertheless, the microturbine may not adequately compensate rapid load change due to its slow dynamic response. Moreover, when the intermittent power generations from wind power and photovoltaic are integrated into the system, they may cause severe frequency fluctuation. In order to study the fast dynamic response, this paper applies electrolyzer system to absorb these power fluctuations and enhance the frequency control effect of microturbine in the microgrid system. The robust coordinated controller of electrolyzer and microturbine for frequency stabilization is designed based on a fixed-structure H{sub {infinity}} loop shaping control. Simulation results exhibit the robustness and stabilizing effects of the proposed coordinated electrolyzer and microturbine controllers against system parameters variation and various operating conditions. (author)

  5. Enhanced stability of black phosphorus field-effect transistors with SiO₂ passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Bensong; Yang, Bingchao; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Junying; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2015-10-30

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) has attracted much attention due to its high mobility and suitable band gap for potential applic5ations in optoelectronics and flexible devices. However, its instability under ambient conditions limits its practical applications. Our investigations indicate that by passivation of the mechanically exfoliated BP flakes with a SiO2 layer, the fabricated BP field-effect transistors (FETs) exhibit greatly enhanced environmental stability. Compared to the unpassivated BP devices, which show a fast drop of on/off current ratio by a factor of 10 after one week of ambient exposure, the SiO2-passivated BP devices display a high retained on/off current ratio of over 600 after one week of exposure, just a little lower than the initial value of 810. Our investigations provide an effective route to passivate the few-layer BPs for enhancement of their environmental stability.

  6. Precipitation Effect on Mechanical Properties and Phase Stability of High Manganese Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Cheoljun; Kim, Rosa; Lee, Un-Hae; Kim, Jongryoul

    2017-09-01

    High manganese (Mn) steels are attractive for automotive applications due to their excellent tensile strength and superior elongation. However, the relatively low yield strength of Mn steels compared to other advanced high-strength steels is a critical problem limiting their use in structural parts. In order to increase the yield strength, the precipitation hardening effect of Mn steels was investigated by the addition of carbide-forming elements. Changes in the austenite phase stability were also evaluated in terms of stacking fault energy (SFE). As a result, fine V(C,N) precipitates were found to increase the yield strength effectively but to lower the SFE by the consumption of matrix carbons. For achieving precipitation hardening without sacrificing austenite stability, the soluble carbon content was discussed.

  7. Effect of different parameters governing the stability of drift wave in a magnetised plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elashkar, F.F.

    1990-01-01

    Influence of the governing parameters, such as electron drift parallel speed, parallel wave length, electron-neutral and ion-neutral collision frequencies, electron temperature and magnetic field, on the stability of drift wave in a magnetized plasma has been studied experimentally and theoretically using a full numerical solution of the exact equation. Drift wave has been excited by a positively biased grid; at a threshold grid potential secondary excitation and ionisation processes take place in the ejected beam of plasma. Effect of the applied magnetic field on the probability of these processes is discussed. Grid positive potential, electron-neutral collision, parallel wave length, electron temperature and speed are found to be destabilizing, While ion neutral collision is stabilizing. Using a new parameter β, the effect of magnetic field is investigated and it is destabilizing only upto a certain limit. (author). 11 figs., 21 refs

  8. Thermodynamic assessment of the stabilization effect in deformed shape memory alloy martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Yohei; Sasaki, Kazuaki

    2011-01-01

    When a martensitic shape memory alloy is deformed, the reverse transformation occurs at higher temperature than that of undeformed martensite. This is a typical case of the stabilization effect of martensite that is commonly observed in shape memory alloys. Regarding previous results measured by electric resistance and/or dilatometoric methods in NiTi and CuAlNi shape memory alloys, this study has performed calorimetric measurement in these alloys in order to re-examine the stabilization effect in terms of thermodynamics. Experimental evidence for appreciable changes in the reverse transformation temperature due to variant change of the martensite is presented. The elastic energy stored in the deformed martensite and the irreversible energy dissipated during the reverse transformation are estimated from the transformation temperatures, the stress-strain curves of the martensite and the latent heat of transformation. The temperatures of the reverse martensitic transformation have been related to these energies in explicit form.

  9. THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT EXPOSURE CONDITIONS ON THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MINERAL MATRICES STABILIZING HAZARDOUS WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Król

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mineral binders are more and more often used in the difficult process of disposal of inorganic hazardous waste containing heavy metals. Composites solidifying hazardous waste are deposited in the environment, which exposes them to the interaction of many variable factors. The paper presents the effect of different exposure conditions on physical and mechanical properties of concrete stabilizing galvanic sewage sludge (GO. The effect of the cyclic freezing and thawing, carbon dioxide (carbonation and high temperatures (200 °C, 400 °C, 600 °C on the properties of stabilizing matrices has been described. The results, in most cases, show a loss of durability of composites solidifying sewage sludge (GO by the influence of external conditions.

  10. THE STABILITY OF OPTICALLY THIN REACTING PLASMAS: EFFECTS OF THE BULK VISCOSITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibanez S, Miguel H.

    2009-01-01

    The thermochemical stability of reacting plasmas is analyzed by taking into account the change in the thermodynamical equilibrium values during the fluctuation. This shift in the equilibrium produces two main effects: a change in the four instability criteria for reacting gases resulting when the above effect is neglected and adds a fifth instability criterion due to the fact that the corresponding secular equation becomes a fifth-order polynomial. The above results are applied to several plasma models, in particular, to a photoionized hydrogen plasma for which the bulk viscosity can be more important than the dynamic viscosity and the thermometric conductivity. Therefore, the bulk viscosity may quench thermochemical instabilities were the thermal conduction is unable of stabilizing. This occurs for low values of the photoionizing energy E. The implications of the above results in explaining the formation of clump structures in different regions of the interstellar medium are outlined.

  11. Effect of magnetic island geometry on ECRH/ECCD and consequences to the NTM stabilization dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziantonaki, I.; Tsironis, C.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.

    2012-09-01

    In the majority of codes that model ECCD-based NTM stabilization, the analysis of the EC propagation and absorption is performed in terms of the axisymmetric magnetic field, ignoring effects due to the island topology. In this paper, we analyze the wave propagation, absorption and current drive in the presence of NTMs, as well as the ECCD-driven island growth, focusing on the effect of the island geometry on the wave de-position. A primary evaluation of the consequences of these effects on the NTM evolution is also made in terms of the modified Rutherford equation.

  12. The effect of exchange-correlation on change and stability of crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazdani, A.; Niazi, M.; Alimardan, V.

    2007-01-01

    Since exchange interaction energy has effect on band structure via polarization of spin of free electron, then can directly effects formation crystal structure. Therefore exchange-correlation is able to have an effect on determination of crystal structure or its change and stability. This energy is subject to fluctuation range of electrons between conduction band and valance band or density of electrons which due to increase the entropy of system, via Gibss Energy .We investigated these factors: 1) Size of ions 2) Density of States 3) Range of inter atomic and pair-potential.

  13. Leaching of concrete : the leaching process : extrapolation of deterioration : effect on the structural stability

    OpenAIRE

    Fagerlund, Göran

    2000-01-01

    The leaching process when water attacks concrete, and the effect of leaching on the strength and durability of a concrete structure, is analysed theoretically. Technique for prediction of the future leaching and structural stability is outlined. The analysis is to a certain extent supported by data from literature. The leaching process is divided in five different types: 1: Pure surface leaching 2: Surface leaching involving erosion 3: Homogeneous leaching over the entire structure 4...

  14. Effect of variations in rainfall intensity on slope stability in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Christofer Kristo; Harianto Rahardjo; Alfrendo Satyanaga

    2017-01-01

    Numerous scientific evidence has given credence to the true existence and deleterious impacts of climate change. One aspect of climate change is the variations in rainfall patterns, which affect the flux boundary condition across ground surface. A possible disastrous consequence of this change is the occurrence of rainfall-induced slope failures. This paper aims to investigate the variations in rainfall patterns in Singapore and its effect on slope stability. Singapore's historical rainfall d...

  15. Stabilizing effect of gas conductivity evolution on the resistive sausage mode of a propagating beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.

    1983-01-01

    Previous theoretical work has shown that a highly current-neutralized charged particle beam propagating in a preionized plasma channel of fixed conductivity is subject to a resistive sausage instability. It is shown that the instability is stabilized, for the case of beam propagation into an initially un-ionized gas, when the effect of beam-collisional ionization on the gas conductivity is modeled fully self-consistently

  16. Development of lyophilization cycle and effect of excipients on the stability of catalase during lyophilization

    OpenAIRE

    Lale, Shantanu V; Goyal, Monu; Bansal, Arvind K

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of the present study was to screen excipients such as amino acids and non-aqueous solvents for their stabilizing effect on catalase, a model protein, for lyophilization. The present study also includes optimization of lyophilization cycle for catalase formulations, which is essential from the commercial point of view, since lyophilization is an extremely costly process. Materials and Methods: Activity of catalase was determined using catalase activity assay. Differen...

  17. Effect of mobilities and electric field on the stability of magnetized positive column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogra, V.K.; Uberoi, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of ratio of the mobilities of electrons and ions and non-dimensional electric field, on the stability of magnetized positive column for all unstable modes is studied in a self-consistent formulation for the perturbations of plasma density and electric potential. The minimum non-dimensional electric field at which magnetized positive column becomes unstable for different ratios of the mobilities of electrons and ions is also investigated. (author)

  18. Effect of Storage Period on Dimensional Stability of Alginplus and Hydrogum 5

    OpenAIRE

    Shima Aalaei; Rohollah Ganj-Khanloo; Fatemeh Gholami

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of storage period on dimensional stability of Alginplus and Hydrogum 5.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro experimental study, 60 impressions were taken of an upper jaw typodont, including 10 impressions for each storage period to be tested (12 minutes, 24 and 120 hours) for each type of alginate. Then, the impressions were stored in an incubator with stable temperature and humidity, and poured using a type III dental stone. Subsequently...

  19. Source/drain electrodes contact effect on the stability of bottom-contact pentacene field-effect transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinge Yu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Bottom-contact pentacene field-effect transistors were fabricated with a PMMA dielectric layer, and the air stability of the transistors was investigated. To characterize the device stability, the field-effect transistors were exposed to ambient conditions for 30 days and subsequently characterized. The degradation of electrical performance was traced to study the variation of field-effect mobility, saturation current and off-state current. By investigating the morphology variance of the pentacene film at the channel and source/drain (S/D contact regions by atomic force microscopy, it was clear that the morphology of the pentacene film adhered to the S/D degenerated dramatically. Moreover, by studying the variation of contact resistance in detail, it was found that the S/D contact effect was the main reason for the degradation in performance.

  20. Effects of Lumbar Core Stability Exercise Programme on Knee Pain, Range of Motion, and Function Post Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Panchal

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Institutional conventional exercise protocol is effective in reducing pain and improving the ROM post and lumbar core stability exercise programme is effective in improving function, post ACL reconstruction.

  1. Phytoplankton Diversity Effects on Community Biomass and Stability along Nutrient Gradients in a Eutrophic Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is a central issue in ecology, but how this relationship is affected by nutrient stress is still unknown. In this study, we analyzed the phytoplankton diversity effects on community biomass and stability along nutrient gradients in an artificial eutrophic lake. Four nutrient gradients, varying from slightly eutrophic to highly eutrophic states, were designed by adjusting the amount of polluted water that flowed into the lake. Mean phytoplankton biomass, species richness, and Shannon diversity index all showed significant differences among the four nutrient gradients. Phytoplankton community biomass was correlated with diversity (both species richness and Shannon diversity index, varying from positive to negative along the nutrient gradients. The influence of phytoplankton species richness on resource use efficiency (RUE also changed from positive to negative along the nutrient gradients. However, the influence of phytoplankton Shannon diversity on RUE was not significant. Both phytoplankton species richness and Shannon diversity had a negative influence on community turnover (measured as community dissimilarity, i.e., a positive diversity–stability relationship. Furthermore, phytoplankton spatial stability decreased along the nutrient gradients in the lake. With increasing nutrient concentrations, the variability (standard deviation of phytoplankton community biomass increased more rapidly than the average total biomass. Results in this study will be helpful in understanding the phytoplankton diversity effects on ecosystem functioning and how these effects are influenced by nutrient conditions in aquatic ecosystems.

  2. Hydration Effects on the Stability of Calcium Carbonate Pre-Nucleation Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Burgos-Cara

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental evidence and computer modeling have shown that the crystallization of a range of minerals does not necessarily follow classical models and theories. In several systems, liquid precursors, stable pre-nucleation clusters and amorphous phases precede the nucleation and growth of stable mineral phases. However, little is known on the effect of background ionic species on the formation and stability of pre-nucleation species formed in aqueous solutions. Here, we present a systematic study on the effect of a range of background ions on the crystallization of solid phases in the CaCO3-H2O system, which has been thoroughly studied due to its technical and mineralogical importance, and is known to undergo non-classical crystallization pathways. The induction time for the onset of calcium carbonate nucleation and effective critical supersaturation are systematically higher in the presence of background ions with decreasing ionic radii. We propose that the stabilization of water molecules in the pre-nucleation clusters by background ions can explain these results. The stabilization of solvation water hinders cluster dehydration, which is an essential step for precipitation. This hypothesis is corroborated by the observed correlation between parameters such as the macroscopic equilibrium constant for the formation of calcium/carbonate ion associates, the induction time, and the ionic radius of the background ions in the solution. Overall, these results provide new evidence supporting the hypothesis that pre-nucleation cluster dehydration is the rate-controlling step for calcium carbonate precipitation.

  3. The effects of plasma deformability on the feedback stabilization of axisymmetric modes in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.J.; Jardin, S.C.

    1991-09-01

    The effects of plasma deformability on the feedback stabilization of axisymmetric modes of tokamak plasmas are studied. It is seen that plasmas with strongly shaped cross sections have unstable motion different from a rigid shift. Furthermore, the placement of passive conductors is shown to modify the non-rigid components of the eigenfunction in a way that reduces the stabilizing eddy currents in these conductors. Passive feedback results using several equilibria of varying shape are presented. The eigenfunction is also modified under the effects of active feedback. This deformation is seen to depend strongly on the position of the flux loops which are used to determine plasma vertical position for the active feedback system. The variations of these non-rigid components of the eigenfunction always serve to reduce the stabilizing effect of the active feedback system by reducing the measurable poloidal flux at the flux-loop locations. Active feedback results are presented for the PBX-M tokamak configuration. (author) 19 figs., 2 tabs., 30 refs

  4. Soil aggregate stability as an indicator for eco-engineering effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Eco-engineering aims at stabilising soil and slopes by applying technical and biological measures. Engineering structures are commonly well defined, immediately usable and operative, and their stability effects quantifiable and verifiable. Differently, the use of plants requires more restrictive boundary conditions and the protection potential is rarely easily calculable and develop-ing as a function of growth rate. Although the use of vegetation is widely appreciated and their stabilising effect recognised, there is an increasing demand on sound facts on its efficiency, in particular, in relation to time. Conclusively, a certain necessity has been recognised to monitor, assess and quantify the effectiveness of ecological restora-tion measures in order to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge. Recent theoretical models emphasize the im-portance of taking an integrated monitoring approach that considers multiple variables. However, limited financial and time resources often prevent such comprehensive assessments. A solution to this problem may be to use integrated indicators that reflect multiple aspects and, therefore, allow extensive information on ecosystem status to be gathered in a relatively short time. Among various other indicators, such as fractal dimension of soil particle size distribution or microbiological parameters, soil aggregate stability seems the most appropriate indicator with regard to protecting slopes from superficial soil failure as it is critical to both plant growth and soil structure. Soil aggregation processes play a crucial role in re-establishing soil structure and function and, conclusively, for successful and sustainable re-colonisation. Whereas the key role of soil aggregate stability in ecosystem functioning is well known concerning water, gas, and nutrient fluxes, only limited information is available with regard to soil mechanical and geotechnical aspects. Correspondingly, in the last couple of years several studies

  5. Effects of circumferential ankle pressure on ankle proprioception, stiffness, and postural stability: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sung H; Granata, Kevin P; Bunker, Linda K

    2004-08-01

    Cross-sectional repeated-measures design. Determine the effects of circumferential ankle pressure (CAP) intervention on proprioceptive acuity, ankle stiffness, and postural stability. The application of CAP using braces, taping, and adaptive shoes or military boots is widely used to address chronic ankle instability (CAI). An underlying assumption is that the CAP intervention might improve ankle stability through increased proprioceptive acuity and stiffness in the ankle. METHOD AND MEASURES: A convenience sample of 10 subjects was recruited from the local university community and categorized according to proprioceptive acuity (high, low) and ankle stability (normal, CAI). Proprioceptive acuity was measured when blindfolded subjects were asked to accurately reproduce a self-selected target ankle position before and after the application of CAP. Proprioceptive acuity was determined in 5 different ankle joint position sense tests: neutral, inversion, eversion, plantar flexion, and dorsiflexion. Joint position angles were recorded electromechanically using a potentiometer. Passive ankle stiffness was computed from the ratio of applied static moment versus angular displacement. Active ankle stiffness was determined from biomechanical analyses of ankle motion following a mediolateral perturbation. Postural stability was quantified from the center of pressure displacement in the mediolateral and the anteroposterior directions in unipedal stance. All measurements were recorded with and without CAP applied by a pediatric blood pressure cuff. Data were analyzed using a separate mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) for each dependent variable. Post hoc comparison using Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) test was performed if significant interactions were obtained. Significance level was set at P<.05 for all analyses. Significant group (high versus low proprioceptive acuity) x CAP interactions were identified for postural stability. Passive ankle stiffness was

  6. EFFECT OF SHOULDER SIDE PACK ON DYNAMIC POSTURAL STABILITY IN YOUNG HEALTHY FEMALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas ELsayed Mohamed Abutaleb

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Control of balance is a complex motor skill that involves integration of sensory inputs and the planning and execution of flexible movement patterns. Carrying side packs is famous in our society especially shoulder side packs. Most students carry shoulder side packs and they don't care about the way to carry them to be more balanced. The purpose of the study is to investigate the effect of carrying shoulder side pack on dynamic postural stability and to determine the best way of carrying a shoulder side pack either on the dominant side or non-dominant side that doesn’t affect dynamic postural stability in young healthy female. Methods: Sixty female volunteers aged from 18 to 25 years old participated in the study. Biodex balance system was used to measure the dynamic postural stability in three different occasions (without carrying a shoulder side pack, with carrying a shoulder side pack on the dominant side, and on the non-dominant side with a rest period in between. Results: Repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Bonferroni post hoc test were used to compare dynamic posture balance without carrying and during carrying a shoulder side pack on dominant and non-dominant sides. Analysis revealed that overall, anteroposterior and mediolateral stability indexes reduced significantly (P<0.0001 when carrying shoulder side pack on dominant side in comparison with when carrying shoulder side pack on non-dominant side and without carrying bag. Conclusion: It was concluded that carrying a shoulder side pack on the non-dominant side didn't disturb the postural stability when compared to carrying on the dominant side so, we recommend the students to carry shoulder side packs on the non-dominant side.

  7. An analysis of the effects of aeroelasticity on static longitudinal stability and control of a swept-back-wing airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Richard B

    1951-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the effects of aeroelasticity on the stick-fixed static longitudinal stability and elevator angle required for balance of an airplane is presented together with calculated effects for a swept-wing bomber of relatively high flexibility. Although large changes in stability due to certain parameters are indicated for the example airplane, the over-all stability change after considering all parameters was quite small, compared to the individual effects, due to the counterbalancing of wing and tail contributions. The effect of flexibility on longitudinal control for the example airplane was found to be of little real importance.

  8. Effect of core stability training on throwing velocity in female handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeterbakken, Atle H; van den Tillaar, Roland; Seiler, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    The purpose was to study the effect of a sling exercise training (SET)-based core stability program on maximal throwing velocity among female handball players. Twenty-four female high-school handball players (16.6 ± 0.3 years, 63 ± 6 kg, and 169 ± 7 cm) participated and were initially divided into a SET training group (n = 14) and a control group (CON, n = 10). Both groups performed their regular handball training for 6 weeks. In addition, twice a week, the SET group performed a progressive core stability-training program consisting of 6 unstable closed kinetic chain exercises. Maximal throwing velocity was measured before and after the training period using photocells. Maximal throwing velocity significantly increased 4.9% from 17.9 ± 0.5 to 18.8 ± 0.4 m·s in the SET group after the training period (p core stability training using unstable, closed kinetic chain movements can significantly improve maximal throwing velocity. A stronger and more stable lumbopelvic-hip complex may contribute to higher rotational velocity in multisegmental movements. Strength coaches can incorporate exercises exposing the joints for destabilization force during training in closed kinetic chain exercises. This may encourage an effective neuromuscular pattern and increase force production and can improve a highly specific performance task such as throwing.

  9. Effect of ohmic heating processing conditions on color stability of fungal pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Machado, Diederich; Morales-Oyervides, Lourdes; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan C; Aguilar, Cristóbal; Méndez-Zavala, Alejandro; Raso, Javier; Montañez, Julio

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of ohmic heating processing conditions on the color stability of a red pigment extract produced by Penicillium purpurogenum GH2 suspended in a buffer solution (pH 6) and in a beverage model system (pH 4). Color stability of pigmented extract was evaluated in the range of 60-90 ℃. The degradation pattern of pigments was well described by the first-order (fractional conversion) and Bigelow model. Degradation rate constants ranged between 0.009 and 0.088 min -1 in systems evaluated. Significant differences in the rate constant values of the ohmic heating-treated samples in comparison with conventional thermal treatment suggested a possible effect of the oscillating electric field generated during ohmic heating. The thermodynamic analysis also indicated differences in the color degradation mechanism during ohmic heating specifically when the pigment was suspended in the beverage model system. In general, red pigments produced by P. purpurogenum GH2 presented good thermal stability under the range of the evaluated experimental conditions, showing potential future applications in pasteurized food matrices using ohmic heating treatment.

  10. Effect of okra cell wall and polysaccharide on physical properties and stability of ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuennan, Pilapa; Sajjaanantakul, Tanaboon; Goff, H Douglas

    2014-08-01

    Stabilizers are used in ice cream to increase mix viscosity, promote smooth texture, and improve frozen stability. In this study, the effects of varying concentrations (0.00%, 0.15%, 0.30%, and 0.45%) of okra cell wall (OKW) and its corresponding water-soluble polysaccharide (OKP) on the physical characteristics of ice cream were determined. Ice cream mix viscosity was measured as well as overrun, meltdown, and consumer acceptability. Ice recrystallization was determined after ice cream was subjected to temperature cycling in the range of -10 to -20 °C for 10 cycles. Mix viscosity increased significantly as the concentrations of OKW and OKP increased. The addition of either OKW or OKP at 0.15% to 0.45% significantly improved the melting resistance of ice cream. OKW and OKP at 0.15% did not affect sensory perception score for flavor, texture, and overall liking of the ice cream. OKW and OKP (0.15%) reduced ice crystal growth to 107% and 87%, respectively, as compared to 132% for the control (0.00%). Thus, our results suggested the potential use of OKW and OKP at 0.15% as a stabilizer to control ice cream quality and retard ice recrystallization. OKP, however, at 0.15% exhibited greater effect on viscosity increase and on ice recrystallization inhibition than OKW. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. The effects of carrying extra weight on ankle stability in adolescent basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozunlu, Nihan; Basari, Gul Oznur; Baltaci, Gul

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of weight on ankle stability in adolescent basketball players. 20 non-injured subjects (age=11.05+/-1.5 years) were included in this study. Each subject performed a 15min warm-up by running or riding a stationary bike. The Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), single-leg balance test (performed with eyes open and eyes closed) and vertical jump test were performed with dominant lower extremity. 1 week later, same tests were performed with a schoolbag. The schoolbag contained weight bars as 20% of the players own body weight. Only posteromedial component of SEBT had significant difference between non-weight measurement and weighted measurement (p=0.004). Single-leg stance test performed with eyes open (p=0.006) and closed (p=0.001) had significant difference between non-weight measurement and weighted measurement. Also the vertical jump test had significant difference between non-weight measurement and weighted measurement (p=0.001). These findings indicate that 20% weight of their own body weight does not affect dynamic ankle stability and postural limitations, which are magnified by advancing weight. We are confident in our conclusions because of the three-way interaction noted with posterior/medial with weight in SEBT. Furthermore, Star Excursion Balance test is more effective both weight and non-weight in measuring functional stability of the ankle. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 3D Microstructure Effects in Ni-YSZ Anodes: Prediction of Effective Transport Properties and Optimization of Redox Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecho, Omar M.; Stenzel, Ole; Iwanschitz, Boris; Gasser, Philippe; Neumann, Matthias; Schmidt, Volker; Prestat, Michel; Hocker, Thomas; Flatt, Robert J.; Holzer, Lorenz

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of microstructure on the effective ionic and electrical conductivities of Ni-YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia) anodes. Fine, medium, and coarse microstructures are exposed to redox cycling at 950 °C. FIB (focused ion beam)-tomography and image analysis are used to quantify the effective (connected) volume fraction (Φeff), constriction factor (β), and tortuosity (τ). The effective conductivity (σeff) is described as the product of intrinsic conductivity (σ0) and the so-called microstructure-factor (M): σeff = σ0 × M. Two different methods are used to evaluate the M-factor: (1) by prediction using a recently established relationship, Mpred = εβ0.36/τ5.17, and (2) by numerical simulation that provides conductivity, from which the simulated M-factor can be deduced (Msim). Both methods give complementary and consistent information about the effective transport properties and the redox degradation mechanism. The initial microstructure has a strong influence on effective conductivities and their degradation. Finer anodes have higher initial conductivities but undergo more intensive Ni coarsening. Coarser anodes have a more stable Ni phase but exhibit lower YSZ stability due to lower sintering activity. Consequently, in order to improve redox stability, it is proposed to use mixtures of fine and coarse powders in different proportions for functional anode and current collector layers. PMID:28793523

  13. 3D Microstructure Effects in Ni-YSZ Anodes: Prediction of Effective Transport Properties and Optimization of Redox Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar M. Pecho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the influence of microstructure on the effective ionic and electrical conductivities of Ni-YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia anodes. Fine, medium, and coarse microstructures are exposed to redox cycling at 950 °C. FIB (focused ion beam-tomography and image analysis are used to quantify the effective (connected volume fraction (Φeff, constriction factor (β, and tortuosity (τ. The effective conductivity (σeff is described as the product of intrinsic conductivity (σ0 and the so-called microstructure-factor (M: σeff = σ0*M. Two different methods are used to evaluate the M-factor: (1 by prediction using a recently established relationship, Mpred = εβ0.36/τ5.17, and (2 by numerical simulation that provides conductivity, from which the simulated M-factor can be deduced (Msim. Both methods give complementary and consistent information about the effective transport properties and the redox degradation mechanism. The initial microstructure has a strong influence on effective conductivities and their degradation. Finer anodes have higher initial conductivities but undergo more intensive Ni coarsening. Coarser anodes have a more stable Ni phase but exhibit lower YSZ stability due to lower sintering activity. Consequently, in order to improve redox stability, it is proposed to use mixtures of fine and coarse powders in different proportions for functional anode and current collector layers.

  14. The effect of structured triglycerides on the kinetic stability of total nutrient admixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Judit; Bubenik, Júlia; Dredán, Judit; Csempesz, Ferenc; Kiss, Dorottya; Zelkó, Romána

    2005-10-05

    The physical stability of two types of total parenteral nutrient (TPN) admixtures was studied as a function of storage time and temperature. One of them contained only structured triglycerides and the other exclusively long-chain triglycerides as lipid components. Droplet size of the mixtures was followed by photon correlation spectroscopy for 10 days. Zeta potential and dynamic surface tension measurements were carried out to evaluate the possible changes in the charge and interfacial surface tension of the emulsion droplets during the storage. pH values were monitored in order to follow the possible decomposition processes in the course of storage. Droplet size of emulsions prepared with lipids containing exclusively long-chain triglycerides showed remarkable increase after 4 days of storage in contrast with that of the mixtures containing structured lipids. The obtained results indicate that besides the advantageous metabolic effects of structured triglycerides, their application is recommended to improve the physical stability of TPN admixtures.

  15. Effect of ionic liquid on activity, stability, and structure of enzymes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naushad, Mu; Alothman, Zied Abdullah; Khan, Abbul Bashar; Ali, Maroof

    2012-11-01

    Ionic liquids have shown their potential as a solvent media for many enzymatic reactions as well as protein preservation, because of their unusual characteristics. It is also observed that change in cation or anion alters the physiochemical properties of the ionic liquids, which in turn influence the enzymatic reactions by altering the structure, activity, enatioselectivity, and stability of the enzymes. Thus, it is utmost need of the researchers to have full understanding of these influences created by ionic liquids before choosing or developing an ionic liquid to serve as solvent media for enzymatic reaction or protein preservation. So, in the present review, we try to shed light on effects of ionic liquids chemistry on structure, stability, and activity of enzymes, which will be helpful for the researchers in various biocatalytic applications. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Effect of base media on the stability of annatto dye in industrial products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audetuyi, A.O.; Lajide, L.; Popoola, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    Colour stability of the versatile annatto dye was examined to monitor the effects of base media on industrial products. The dye was incorporated in two media, namely, palm kernel oil used in products such as body cream and soap, and paraffin wax used in shoe polish and household candle wax. These products were exposed to various light conditions for a specific period before assessment. The melting point of the dye was determined as 176-178 degree C with a molar absorptivity of 13,600 mol/sub -1/ cm/sub -1/ at 545 nm. It imparted its brilliant yellow/orange colouration in industrial products as the colour stability depends on the compounding base media of the products. Losses of beta-carotene was higher and faster in nonaqueous environment as paraffin wax showed low fastness rating values, than in the palm kernel oil based aqueous medium products. (author)

  17. Radial effects in heating and thermal stability of a sub-ignited tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, V.; Shoucri, M.M.; Thibaudeau, G.; Harten, L.; Bers, A.

    1982-02-01

    The existence of thermally stable sub-ignited equilibria of a tokamak reactor, sustained in operation by a feedback-controlled supplementary heating source, is demonstrated. The establishment of stability depends on a number of radially non-uniform, nonlinear processes whose effect is analyzed. One-dimensional (radial) stability analyses of model transport equations, together with numerical results from a 1-D transport code, are used in studying the heating of DT-plasmas in the thermonuclear regime. Plasma core supplementary heating is found to be a thermally more stable process than bulk heating. In the presence of impurity line radiation, however, core-heated temperature profiles may collapse, contracting inward from the limiter, the result of an instability caused by the increasing nature of the radiative cooling rate, with decreasing temperature. Conditions are established for the realization of a sub-ignited high-Q, toroidal reactor plasma with appreciable output power

  18. Effect of Electrodynamic Forces on the Attitude Stabilization of a Satellite in Ecliptic orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Yehia

    This work is based on the previous paper of the author [1]. The present paper is devoted to the investigation of the attitude dynamics of an ecliptic satellite moving in the magnetic field of the Earth. Eelectrodynamic forces result from the motion of a charged satelite relative to the magnetic field of the Earth. The torque due to electrodynamic effect of the Lorentz forces on the attitude stabilization of the satellite is studied with the detailed model of the Earth's magnetic field. A method for estimating the stable and unstable regions of the equilibrium positions based on Euler's equation is also discussed. The results show that Lorentz forces can affect the stablization of the satellite, in particular for highly eccentric orbits and also for large satellte. [1] Abdel-Aziz, Y. A. Attitude Stabilization of a Rigid Spacecraft in the Geomagnetic Field. AdSpR 40, 18-24, 2007.

  19. Finite ion velocity effects on the stability of Pierce-like diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolinsky, H.; Schamel, H.

    1994-01-01

    The stability of Pierce-like plasma diodes is investigated for arbitrary ion injection velocities. A recently developed integral formalism that accounts for ion dynamical effects is applied to derive a generalized dispersion relation for electrostatic perturbations. Its evaluation exhibits several new features, such as the appearance of growing oscillatory modes, which become Pierce--Buneman modes in the limit of initially resting ions, and of weakly damped oscillatory modes, which become undamped ion plasma oscillations in this limit. The stability of this bounded plasma system is shown to be controlled by the new control parameter at signga=α(1+at signgm) 1/2 , where α is the Pierce parameter and at signgm≡m ev 2 e0 /m iv 2 i0 the ratio of electron and ion kinetic energy at the emitter

  20. Effect of a cathode buffer layer on the stability of organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Danbei; Zeng, Wenjin; Chen, Shilin; Su, Xiaodan; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    We present the effect of a cathode buffer layer on the performance and stability of organic photovoltaics (OPVs) based on a blend of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Six kinds of cathode buffer layers, i.e. lithium fluoride, sodium chloride, NaCl/Mg, tris-(8-hydroxy-quinoline) aluminum, bathocuproine and 1,3,5-tris(2-N-phenylbenzimidazolyl)benzene, were inserted between the photoactive layer and an Al cathode, which played a dominant role in the device’s performance. Devices with the cathode buffer layers above exhibited improved performance. The degradation of these devices with encapsulation was further investigated in an inert atmosphere. The results indicated that devices with inorganic cathode buffer layers exhibited better stability than those with organic cathode buffer layers. (paper)

  1. In vitro cytotoxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles: effects of chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol as stabilizing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phong A.; Nguyen, Hiep T.; Fox, Kate; Tran, Nhiem

    2018-03-01

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have significant potential in biomedical applications such as in diagnosis, imaging and therapeutic agent delivery. The choice of stabilizers and surface functionalization is important as it is known to strongly influence the cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles. The present study aimed at investigating the effects of surface charges on the cytotoxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles. We used a co-precipitation method to synthesize iron oxide nanoparticles which were then stabilized with either chitosan (CS) or polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) which have net positive charge and zero charge at physiological pH, respectively. The nanoparticles were characterized in terms of size, charges and chemical oxidation state. Cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles was assessed using mouse fibroblast cells and was correlated with surface charges of the nanoparticles and their aggregation.

  2. Film thickness and chemical processing effects on the stability of cadmium telluride solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albin, D.S.; Demtsu, S.H.; McMahon, T.J.

    2006-01-01

    The performance and stability of CdS/CdTe solar cells as a function of layer thickness, back contact etch, and oxygen during the CdCl 2 anneal was determined. Multiple linear regression models were used to analyze the statistical significance of various first order effects and interactions. With stress, all devices showed a reduction in open-circuit voltage (V oc ) and fill factor (FF) characteristic of increased recombination. Devices using thinner CdS were vulnerable to shunt formation. Oxygen during the CdCl 2 anneal minimizes this effect. A thermodynamic model involving the formation of Cu-oxide is presented to explain the latter

  3. Effect of thermal protectants on the stability of bovine milk immunoglobulin G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C. C. [National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, H. M.

    1998-09-15

    pH stability, thermal stability, and the effect of homogenization and ultrasonic treatment on the stability of bovine milk immunoglobulin G (IgG) in model systems was studied. Separated IgG (0.02 mg/mL) was found to be unstable and susceptible to denaturation when incubated at pH 4 or 10 or thermally treated at temperature 75 degrees C. IgG in the colostrum, on the other hand, was found to be much more stable than in whey or in PBS when thermally treated at temperatures in the range of 75-100 degrees C. The residual IgC content reduced more sharply with increasing heating times, and almost no IgG content was detected when IgG in PBS (0.15 M NaCl/0.01 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.0) was heated at 95 degrees C for 15 s, whereas the corresponding residual IgG contents in whey and colostrum were found to be 42 and 59%, respectively. For IgG in PBS heated at 95 degrees C for 15 s, addition of 5% fructose or maltose displayed most remarkable protection effects by raising the residual IgG content to 31%, followed by sucrose, lactose, glucose, and galactose. However, extravagant addition ( 30%) to IgG in PBS led to a decline in residual IgG content. Addition of 0.4% glutamic acid and 2% glycine to IgG in PBS heated at 95 degrees C for 15 s also remarkably improved the residual IgG content by 13.5 and 26.7%, respectively. Glycerol and sugar alcohol, such as sorbitol, stabilized IgG during the thermal treatment.

  4. Effect of thermal protectants on the stability of bovine milk immunoglobulin G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.C.; Chang, H.M.

    1998-01-01

    pH stability, thermal stability, and the effect of homogenization and ultrasonic treatment on the stability of bovine milk immunoglobulin G (IgG) in model systems was studied. Separated IgG (0.02 mg/mL) was found to be unstable and susceptible to denaturation when incubated at pH 4 or 10 or thermally treated at temperature 75 degrees C. IgG in the colostrum, on the other hand, was found to be much more stable than in whey or in PBS when thermally treated at temperatures in the range of 75-100 degrees C. The residual IgC content reduced more sharply with increasing heating times, and almost no IgG content was detected when IgG in PBS (0.15 M NaCl/0.01 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.0) was heated at 95 degrees C for 15 s, whereas the corresponding residual IgG contents in whey and colostrum were found to be 42 and 59%, respectively. For IgG in PBS heated at 95 degrees C for 15 s, addition of 5% fructose or maltose displayed most remarkable protection effects by raising the residual IgG content to 31%, followed by sucrose, lactose, glucose, and galactose. However, extravagant addition ( 30%) to IgG in PBS led to a decline in residual IgG content. Addition of 0.4% glutamic acid and 2% glycine to IgG in PBS heated at 95 degrees C for 15 s also remarkably improved the residual IgG content by 13.5 and 26.7%, respectively. Glycerol and sugar alcohol, such as sorbitol, stabilized IgG during the thermal treatment

  5. Strong Stability Preserving Explicit Runge--Kutta Methods of Maximal Effective Order

    KAUST Repository

    Hadjimichael, Yiannis

    2013-07-23

    We apply the concept of effective order to strong stability preserving (SSP) explicit Runge--Kutta methods. Relative to classical Runge--Kutta methods, methods with an effective order of accuracy are designed to satisfy a relaxed set of order conditions but yield higher order accuracy when composed with special starting and stopping methods. We show that this allows the construction of four-stage SSP methods with effective order four (such methods cannot have classical order four). However, we also prove that effective order five methods---like classical order five methods---require the use of nonpositive weights and so cannot be SSP. By numerical optimization, we construct explicit SSP Runge--Kutta methods up to effective order four and establish the optimality of many of them. Numerical experiments demonstrate the validity of these methods in practice.

  6. Strong Stability Preserving Explicit Runge--Kutta Methods of Maximal Effective Order

    KAUST Repository

    Hadjimichael, Yiannis; Macdonald, Colin B.; Ketcheson, David I.; Verner, James H.

    2013-01-01

    We apply the concept of effective order to strong stability preserving (SSP) explicit Runge--Kutta methods. Relative to classical Runge--Kutta methods, methods with an effective order of accuracy are designed to satisfy a relaxed set of order conditions but yield higher order accuracy when composed with special starting and stopping methods. We show that this allows the construction of four-stage SSP methods with effective order four (such methods cannot have classical order four). However, we also prove that effective order five methods---like classical order five methods---require the use of nonpositive weights and so cannot be SSP. By numerical optimization, we construct explicit SSP Runge--Kutta methods up to effective order four and establish the optimality of many of them. Numerical experiments demonstrate the validity of these methods in practice.

  7. The effect of copper, MDA, and accelerated aging on jet fuel thermal stability as measured by the gravimetric JFTOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pande, S.G. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Ft. Washington, MD (United States); Hardy, D.R. [Navy Technology Center for Safety and Survivability, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Thermally unstable jet fuels pose operational problems. In order to adequately identify such fuels, factors that realistically impact on thermal stability were examined. Evaluation was based on a quantitative method of measuring thermal stability, viz., NRL`s recently developed gravimetric JFTOT. This method gives a quantitative measurement of both the strip deposit and filterables formed. The pertinent factors examined, included the individual and interactive effects of: soluble copper, MDA (metal deactivator), and aging. The latter was accelerated to simulate field conditions of approximately six months aging at ambient temperature and pressure. The results indicate that the individual and interactive effects of copper, MDA, and accelerated aging appear to be fuel dependent. Based on the results, the three test fuels examined (one JP-8 and two JP-5s) were categorized as exhibiting very good, typical, and poor thermal stabilities, respectively. For both the very good and poor thermal stability fuels, the effect of copper in conjunction with accelerated aging did not significantly increase the total thermal deposits of the neat fuels. In contrast, for the typical thermal stability fuel, the combined effects of copper and accelerated aging, did. Furthermore, the addition of MDA prior to aging of the copper-doped, typical stability fuel significantly counteracted the adverse effect of copper and aging. A similar beneficial effect of MDA was not observed for the poor stability fuel. These results focus on the compositional differences among fuels and the need to elucidate these differences (physical and chemical) for a better understanding and prediction of their performance.

  8. Effect of meniscus replacement fixation technique on restoration of knee contact mechanics and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Lima, D D; Chen, P C; Kessler, O; Hoenecke, H R; Colwell, C W

    2011-06-01

    The menisci are important biomechanical components of the knee. We developed and validated a finite element model of meniscal replacement to assess the effect of surgical fixation technique on contact behavior and knee stability. The geometry of femoral and tibial articular cartilage and menisci was segmented from magnetic resonance images of a normal cadaver knee using MIMICS (Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). A finite element mesh was generated using HyperWorks (Altair Inc, Santa Ana, CA). A finite element solver (Abaqus v6.9, Simulia, Providence, RI) was used to compute contact area and stresses under axial loading and to assess stability (reaction force generated during anteroposterior translation of the femur). The natural and surgical attachments of the meniscal horns and peripheral rim were simulated using springs. After total meniscectomy, femoral contact area decreased by 26% with a concomitant increase in average contact stresses (36%) and peak contact stresses (33%). Replacing the meniscus without suturing the horns did little to restore femoral contact area. Suturing the horns increased contact area and reduced peak contact stresses. Increasing suture stiffness correlated with increased meniscal contact stresses as a greater proportion of tibiofemoral load was transferred to the meniscus. A small incremental benefit was seen of simulated bone plug fixation over the suture construct with the highest stiffness (50 N/mm). Suturing the rim did little to change contact conditions. The nominal anteroposterior stiffness reduced by 3.1 N/mm after meniscectomy. In contrast to contact area and stress, stiffness of the horn fixation sutures had a smaller effect on anteroposterior stability. On the other hand suturing the rim of the meniscus affected anteroposterior stability to a much larger degree. This model emphasizes the importance of the meniscus in knee biomechanics. Appropriate meniscal replacement fixation techniques are likely to be critical to the clinical

  9. Effects of monohydric alcohols and polyols on the thermal stability of a protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Shota [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kinoshita, Masahiro, E-mail: kinoshit@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-03-28

    The thermal stability of a protein is lowered by the addition of a monohydric alcohol, and this effect becomes larger as the size of hydrophobic group in an alcohol molecule increases. By contrast, it is enhanced by the addition of a polyol possessing two or more hydroxyl groups per molecule, and this effect becomes larger as the number of hydroxyl groups increases. Here, we show that all of these experimental observations can be reproduced even in a quantitative sense by rigid-body models focused on the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of solvent molecules. The solvent is either pure water or water-cosolvent solution. Three monohydric alcohols and five polyols are considered as cosolvents. In the rigid-body models, a protein is a fused hard spheres accounting for the polyatomic structure in the atomic detail, and the solvent is formed by hard spheres or a binary mixture of hard spheres with different diameters. The effective diameter of cosolvent molecules and the packing fractions of water and cosolvent, which are crucially important parameters, are carefully estimated using the experimental data of properties such as the density of solid crystal of cosolvent, parameters in the pertinent cosolvent-cosolvent interaction potential, and density of water-cosolvent solution. We employ the morphometric approach combined with the integral equation theory, which is best suited to the physical interpretation of the calculation result. It is argued that the degree of solvent crowding in the bulk is the key factor. When it is made more serious by the cosolvent addition, the solvent-entropy gain upon protein folding is magnified, leading to the enhanced thermal stability. When it is made less serious, the opposite is true. The mechanism of the effects of monohydric alcohols and polyols is physically the same as that of sugars. However, when the rigid-body models are employed for the effect of urea, its addition is predicted to enhance the

  10. The effect of crack instability/stability on fracture toughness of brittle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baratta, F.I.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes three recent experimental works coauthored by the present author regarding the effect of crack instability/stability on fracture toughness, and also includes the necessary formulae for predicting stability. Two recent works have shown that unstable crack extension resulted in apparent increases in fracture toughness compared to that determined during stable crack growth. In the first investigation a quasi-brittle polymer, polymethylmethacrylate, was examined. In the second, a more brittle metallic material, tungsten, was tested. In both cases the transition from unstable to stable behavior was predicted based on stability analyses. The third investigation was conducted on a truly brittle ceramic material, hot pressed silicon nitride. These three papers showed that fracture toughness test results conducted on brittle materials vary according to whether the material fractures in an unstable or stable manner. Suggestions for achieving this important yet difficult phenomenon of stable crack growth, which is necessary when determining the fracture toughness variation occurring during unstable/stable crack advance, are presented, as well as recommendations for further research

  11. The Effects of Natural Weathering on Color Stability of Impregnated and Varnished Wood Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turkay Turkoglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate effects of natural weathering on color stability of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. and Oriental beech (Fagus orientalis L. impregnated with some chemicals [tanalith-E (TN-E, adolit-KD5 (AD-KD5, and chromated copper arsenate (CCA] and then varnished [synthetic varnish (SV and polyurethane varnish (PV]. While applying varnish increased lightness, impregnation decreased lightness of the wood specimens before natural weathering. Natural weathering caused greenish, bluish, and dark color tones of the wood surface. Total color change was increased with increasing exposure times in natural weathering. Untreated (control wood specimens exhibited higher color changes than the other wood specimens in all the stages of natural weathering. The total color changes of untreated Oriental beech specimens were less than untreated Scots pine specimens. The color stability of impregnated and varnished wood specimens gave better results than untreated and solely varnished wood specimens after natural weathering. The best color stability was obtained from both Oriental beech and Scots pine wood impregnated with TN-E before PV coating.

  12. The effect of high pressures on the yoghurt from milk with the stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reps, A.; Jankowska, A.; Wiśniewska, K.

    2008-07-01

    The effect of high pressures on the microbiological and physio-chemical properties of yoghurt was investigated. The best results were obtained when the yoghurt was manufactured from milk with the addition of MYO 752 stabilizer (starch, gelatin, pectin) selected from 10 stabilizers. Yoghurt manufactured with the addition of 0, 6% MYO 752 stabilizer was processed at the pressure of 400-600 MPa/15 min. in the range of 50 MPa. Pressurization caused a total reduction of number of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. Bulgaricus and reduced the number of Streptococcus thermophilus by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Pressurized and non-pressurized yoghurts characterized of a homogenous consistency and typical plain yoghurt taste. The decrease of the number of living bacteria was observed in yoghurts during the storage. The acidity of pressurized yoghurts remained on the some level at the temperature of 4°C and 20°C. The more intensive antibacterial activity of microflora was observed in yoghurts storaged at 20°C in comparison with yoghurts storaged at 4°C. Disadvantageous changes of the pressurized yoghurts consistency were not found. The taste and aroma of yoghurts remained without any changes.

  13. The effect of high pressures on the yoghurt from milk with the stabilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reps, A; Jankowska, A; Wisniewska, K [Chair of Food Biotechnology, University of Warmia and Mazury, Heweliusza str 1., 10-724 Olsztyn (Poland)], E-mail: arnold.reps@uwm.edu.pl

    2008-07-15

    The effect of high pressures on the microbiological and physio-chemical properties of yoghurt was investigated. The best results were obtained when the yoghurt was manufactured from milk with the addition of MYO 752 stabilizer (starch, gelatin, pectin) selected from 10 stabilizers. Yoghurt manufactured with the addition of 0, 6% MYO 752 stabilizer was processed at the pressure of 400-600 MPa/15 min. in the range of 50 MPa. Pressurization caused a total reduction of number of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. Bulgaricus and reduced the number of Streptococcus thermophilus by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Pressurized and non-pressurized yoghurts characterized of a homogenous consistency and typical plain yoghurt taste. The decrease of the number of living bacteria was observed in yoghurts during the storage. The acidity of pressurized yoghurts remained on the some level at the temperature of 4{sup 0}C and 20{sup 0}C. The more intensive antibacterial activity of microflora was observed in yoghurts storaged at 20{sup 0}C in comparison with yoghurts storaged at 4{sup 0}C. Disadvantageous changes of the pressurized yoghurts consistency were not found. The taste and aroma of yoghurts remained without any changes.

  14. Effect of ultrasonic waves on the stability of all-trans lutein and its degradation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiang-Feng; Li, Da-Jing; Pang, Hui-Li; Liu, Chun-Quan

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound treatment has been widely applied in the extraction of biologically active compounds including carotenoids. However, there are few reports on their effects on the stability of these compounds. In the present study, the stability of all-trans lutein, one of the carotenoids, was investigated under the action of ultrasound. Results showed that ultrasound induced the isomerization of all-trans lutein to its isomers, namely to 13-cis lutein, 13'-cis lutein, 9-cis lutein and 9'-cis lutein as analyzed by HPLC coupled with DAD and LC-MS; and the percentage of the isomerization increased with increasing both ultrasonic frequency and power. The stability of all-trans lutein in dichloromethane was worst among multiple kinds of solvents. Interestingly, the retention rate of all-trans lutein improved as the temperature increased, which runs counter to the Arrhenius law. Under ultrasound irradiation, the degradation mechanism might be different with various temperatures, the degradation of all-trans lutein followed first-order kinetics at 20°C, while second-order kinetics was followed at 30-50°C. As the ultrasonic reaction time prolonged, lutein epoxidation nearly occurred. Those results presented here emphasized that UAE techniques should be carefully used in the extraction of all-trans lutein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of rapid maxillary expansion on head posture, postural stability, and fall risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Celebi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of rapid maxillary expansion (RME on head posture, postural stability, and fall risk. Materials and Methods: A sample of 51 adolescent patients was randomly divided into two groups. In the first group, which consisted of 28 patients (15 females and 13 males, RME was performed as a part of routine orthodontic treatment. The remaining 23 individuals (12 females and 11 males served as the control group. Lateral cephalometric radiographs taken in natural head position, postural stability, and fall risk scores were obtained during the first visit. They were repeated on average 3.8 months and 3.5 months later for the study and control groups, respectively. The changes were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, paired samples t-test, Mann–Whitney U-test, and independent samples t-test. Results: As a result of RME, a statistically significant decrease was detected in the fall risk score (P < 0.05 in the study group, while the head position and postural stability remained unchanged. For the control group, no significant changes were observed in all measurements. Conclusions: The result of the present study suggests that RME has a capacity of improving fall risk.

  16. COLOR STABILITY FOR WOOD PRODUCTS DURING USE: EFFECTS OF INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Blanchard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress having been achieved in recent years to improve wood’s durability, additional developments are still necessary to increase its color stability. ZnO and CeO2 nanoparticles were compared to UV absorbers (Tinuvin 477 DW, 292 and 5151 commonly used to stabilize the wood products color. Nanoparticles, with concentrations in the range 1 to 2 wt%, and UV absorbers, using concentrations advised by the manufacturer, were dispersed in a waterborne UV curable polyurethane/polyacrylate resin. Dispersions were carried out with a high speed mixer at 2,500 RPM with micro glass beads or not, depending on the form of the nanoparticles. Nanocomposite coatings were aged with a weather-o-meter (CI 3000+ - Atlas according ASTM G155. Color variations were measured with a colorimeter (BYK Gardner – Color Guide 45/0 working with the CIE L*a*b* system. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of inorganic UV absorbers on the stabilization of color under indoor conditions. Results showed that nanoparticles (ZnO, CeO2 absorbed UV light frequencies in a manner similar to common organic molecules. Their efficiency was better at medium durations of light exposure, for which they could achieve the action of organic absorbers. Finally, the simultaneous use of both absorbers seems to create a protective synergy when degradation is due to UV energy alone.

  17. Thermal-hydraulics stability of natural circulation BWR under startup. Flashing effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Rui; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2009-01-01

    To help achieve the necessary natural circulation flow, a fairly long chimney is installed in a boiling natural circulation reactor like the ESBWR. In such systems, thermal-hydraulic stability during low pressure start-up should be examined while considering the flashing induced by the pressure drop in the channel and the chimney due to gravity head. In this work, a BWR stability analysis code in the frequency domain, named FISTAB (Flashing-Induced STability Analysis for BWR), was developed to address the issue of flashing-induced instability. A thermal-hydraulics non-homogeneous equilibrium model (NHEM) based on a drift flux formulation along with a lumped fuel dynamics model is incorporated in the work. The vapor generation rate is derived from the mixture energy conservation equation while considering the effect of flashing. The functionality of the FISTAB code was confirmed by comparison to experimental results from SIRIUS-N facility at CRIEPI, Japan. Both stationary and perturbation results agree well with the experimental results. (author)

  18. The Effects of Core Stability Exercise on the Dynamic Balance of Volleyball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Sadeghi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic balance is a key component of injury prevention and rehabilitation in sports. Training the core muscles has been hypothesized as an intervention for improving balance. However, there is a lack of current scientific evidence to support this claim. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a core stability program on dynamic balance of volleyball players as measured with the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT. Thirty healthy participants were divided into 2 groups: control and exercise groups. All participants performed the SEBT before and after 8-week exercise time. During the 8-week time, the exercise group performed a core stability program, whereas the control group abstained from any new exercise. These results also illustrated there was significant differences in the scores for pre-test and post-test of all direction according SEBT in the experimental group. An independent sample t-test was conducted to compare experimental and control group (F=43.573, Sig=0.000. These results were a significant difference in the scores for control and experimental groups. Maximum excursion distances improved for the exercise group, compared with the control group. This result justifies the hypothesis that core strengthening can improve dynamic postural control during landing of volleyball players significantly. Keywords: Core stabilization; volleyball player; dynamic balance; SEBT

  19. Effect of storage duration on cytokine stability in human serum and plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Fabien B; Nim, Hieu T; Lee, Jacinta P W; Morand, Eric F; Harris, James

    2018-06-14

    Quantification of analytes such as cytokines in serum samples is intrinsic to translational research in immune diseases. Optimising pre-analytical conditions is critical for ensuring study quality, including evaluation of cytokine stability. We aimed to evaluate the effect on cytokine stability of storage duration prior to freezing of serum, and compare to plasma samples obtained from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Protein stability was analysed by simultaneously quantifying 18 analytes using a custom multi-analyte profile in SLE patient serum and plasma samples that had been prospectively stored at 4 °C for pre-determined periods between 0 and 30 days, prior to freezing. Six analytes were excluded from analysis, because most tested samples were above or below the limit of detection. Amongst the 12 analysed proteins, 11 did not show significant signal degradation. Significant signal degradation was observed from the fourth day of storage for a single analyte, CCL19. Proteins levels were more stable in unseparated serum compared to plasma for most analytes, with the exception of IL-37 which appears slightly more stable in plasma. Based on this, a maximum 3 days of storage at 4 °C for unseparated serum samples is recommended for biobanked samples intended for cytokine analysis in studies of human immune disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of plasma shape and profiles on edge stability in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lao, L.L.; Chan, V.S.; Chen, L.

    1998-12-01

    The results of recent experimental and theoretical studies concerning the effects of plasma shape and current and pressure profiles on edge instabilities in DIII-D are presented. Magnetic oscillations with toroidal mode number n ∼ 2--9 and a fast growth time γ -1 = 20--150 micros are often observed prior to the first giant type 1 ELM in discharges with moderate squareness. High n ideal ballooning second stability access encourages edge instabilities by facilitating the buildup of the edge pressure gradient and bootstrap current density which destabilize the intermediate to low n modes. Analysis suggests that discharges with large edge pressure gradient and bootstrap current density are more unstable to n > 1 modes. Calculations and experimental results show that ELM amplitude and frequency can be varied by controlling access to the second ballooning stability regime at the edge through variation of the squareness of the discharge shape. A new method is proposed to control edge instabilities by reducing access to the second ballooning stability regime at the edge using high order local perturbation of the plasma shape in the outboard bad curvature region

  1. Effect of composition on the stability and inhibitor response of jet fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nixon, A C; Thorpe, R E

    1956-08-01

    The gas oil portion of jet fuels (that part boiling above 177/sup 0/C (350/sup 0/F)) was separated into compound type fractions by distillation followed by chromatography on silica gel and alumina. The separated fractions were analyzed chemically, by ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy, and by mass spectrometry. The storage stability of the fractions were determined by aging them at 43/sup 0/C, 70/sup 0/C, or 100/sup 0/C, followed by measurement of the soluble and insoluble gum. The stability of each fraction was then related to the composition of that fraction. The saturate fractions were very stable and did not form gum. The aromatics fractions were fairly stable. Olefins, particularly conjugated diolefins, gave high soluble gum values but formed relatively little insoluble gum. Aromatic olefins were very reactive and produced large amounts of both soluble and insoluble gum. Thiophenes were very unstable toward formation of both soluble and insoluble gum. Nitrogen compounds isolated from the cracked gas oils were mainly nitrogen bases and pyrroles. When the nitrogen bases were blended with a saturate fraction, they had no effect on the stability of the saturates. However, pyrroles were very unstable; addition of pyrroles to a saturate fraction caused formation of large quantities of soluble and insoluble gum.

  2. The effect of high pressures on the yoghurt from milk with the stabilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reps, A; Jankowska, A; Wisniewska, K

    2008-01-01

    The effect of high pressures on the microbiological and physio-chemical properties of yoghurt was investigated. The best results were obtained when the yoghurt was manufactured from milk with the addition of MYO 752 stabilizer (starch, gelatin, pectin) selected from 10 stabilizers. Yoghurt manufactured with the addition of 0, 6% MYO 752 stabilizer was processed at the pressure of 400-600 MPa/15 min. in the range of 50 MPa. Pressurization caused a total reduction of number of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. Bulgaricus and reduced the number of Streptococcus thermophilus by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Pressurized and non-pressurized yoghurts characterized of a homogenous consistency and typical plain yoghurt taste. The decrease of the number of living bacteria was observed in yoghurts during the storage. The acidity of pressurized yoghurts remained on the some level at the temperature of 4 0 C and 20 0 C. The more intensive antibacterial activity of microflora was observed in yoghurts storaged at 20 0 C in comparison with yoghurts storaged at 4 0 C. Disadvantageous changes of the pressurized yoghurts consistency were not found. The taste and aroma of yoghurts remained without any changes

  3. Effects of plasma shape and profiles on edge stability in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lao, L.L.; Ferron, J.R.; Miller, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    The results of recent experimental and theoretical studies concerning the effects of plasma shape and current and pressure profiles on edge instabilities in DIII-D are presented. Magnetic oscillations with toroidal mode number n∼2-9 and a fast growth time γ -1 =20-150μs are often observed prior to the first giant type I ELM in discharges with moderate squareness. High n ideal ballooning second stability access encourages edge instabilities by facilitating the buildup of the edge pressure gradient and bootstrap current density which destabilize the intermediate to low n modes. Analysis suggests that discharges with large edge pressure gradient and bootstrap current density are more unstable to n>1 modes. Calculations and experimental results show that ELM amplitude and frequency can be varied by controlling access to the second ballooning stability regime at the edge through variation of the squareness of the discharge shape. A new method is proposed to control edge instabilities by reducing access to the second ballooning stability regime at the edge using high order local perturbation of the plasma shape in the outboard bad curvature region. (author)

  4. Effect of nightguard vital bleaching gel on the color stability of provisional restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajunaid, Salwa Omar

    2016-01-01

    To assess the hypothesis that there was no difference in effect of 10% and 15% tooth bleaching agents on color stability of materials used for provisional fixed dental prosthesis. Fifteen samples from two materials used for provisional fixed dental prosthesis: methacrylate-based and composite-based materials and 15 preformed polycarbonate crowns soaked in bleaching gel or distilled water. Spectrophotometer recorded color of specimens at baseline, after 3, 7, and 14 days. Data were statistically analyzed using two-factor ANOVA test to compare the color stability of tested materials. Methyl-based provisional material exhibited statistically higher color change when exposed to 10% and 15% bleaching gel (delta EFNx01: 9.0 and 11.1, respectively) as compared to distilled water (delta EFNx01: 2.9). Delta EFNx01 of composite-based material specimens exposed to distilled water was statistically higher (6.3) than specimens exposed to 10% and 15% bleaching gel (1.5 and 1.1, respectively). Polycarbonate crowns showed a statistically lower color change when exposed to 15% (0.9) than to 10% bleaching gel (5.1) or distilled water (5.5). Composite-based provisional material showed highest color stability when exposed to vital tooth bleaching gel, whereas methacrylate-based material was the least color stable. Polycarbonate crowns were more color stable when exposed to 15% bleaching gel as opposed to 10% bleaching gel.

  5. Effects of shoe sole geometry on toe clearance and walking stability in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, S B; Price, C; Kenney, L P J; Baker, R

    2015-07-01

    Thirty-five percent of people above age 65 fall each year, and half of their falls are associated with tripping: tripping, an apparently 'mundane' everyday problem, therefore, significantly impacts on older people's health and associated medical costs. To avoid tripping and subsequent falling, sufficient toe clearance during the swing phase is crucial. We previously found that a rocker-shaped shoe sole enhances toe clearance in young adults, thereby decreasing their trip-risk. This study investigates whether such sole design also enhances older adults' toe clearance, without inadvertently affecting their walking stability. Toe clearance and its variability are reported together with measures of walking stability for twelve older adults, walking in shoes with rocker angles of 10°, 15°, and 20°. Surface inclinations (flat, incline, decline) were chosen to reflect a potential real-world environment. Toe clearance increased substantially from the 10° to the 15° rocker angle (p=0.003) without compromising measures of walking stability (p>0.05). A further increase in rocker angle to 20° resulted in less substantial enhancement of toe clearance and came at the cost of a decrease in gait speed on the decline. The novelty of this investigation lies in the exploration of the trade-off between reduction of trip-risk through footwear design and adverse effects on walking stability on real-life relevant surfaces. Our two studies suggest that the current focus on slip-resistance in footwear design may need to be generalised to include other factors that affect trip-risk. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Aging effect on step adjustments and stability control in visually perturbed gait initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ruopeng; Cui, Chuyi; Shea, John B

    2017-10-01

    Gait adaptability is essential for fall avoidance during locomotion. It requires the ability to rapidly inhibit original motor planning, select and execute alternative motor commands, while also maintaining the stability of locomotion. This study investigated the aging effect on gait adaptability and dynamic stability control during a visually perturbed gait initiation task. A novel approach was used such that the anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) during gait initiation were used to trigger the unpredictable relocation of a foot-size stepping target. Participants (10 young adults and 10 older adults) completed visually perturbed gait initiation in three adjustment timing conditions (early, intermediate, late; all extracted from the stereotypical APA pattern) and two adjustment direction conditions (medial, lateral). Stepping accuracy, foot rotation at landing, and Margin of Dynamic Stability (MDS) were analyzed and compared across test conditions and groups using a linear mixed model. Stepping accuracy decreased as a function of adjustment timing as well as stepping direction, with older subjects exhibited a significantly greater undershoot in foot placement to late lateral stepping. Late adjustment also elicited a reaching-like movement (i.e. foot rotation prior to landing in order to step on the target), regardless of stepping direction. MDS measures in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior direction revealed both young and older adults exhibited reduced stability in the adjustment step and subsequent steps. However, young adults returned to stable gait faster than older adults. These findings could be useful for future study of screening deficits in gait adaptability and preventing falls. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Gait stability and variability measures show effects of impaired cognition and dual tasking in frail people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Oscar J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls in frail elderly are a common problem with a rising incidence. Gait and postural instability are major risk factors for falling, particularly in geriatric patients. As walking requires attention, cognitive impairments are likely to contribute to an increased fall risk. An objective quantification of gait and balance ability is required to identify persons with a high tendency to fall. Recent studies have shown that stride variability is increased in elderly and under dual task condition and might be more sensitive to detect fall risk than walking speed. In the present study we complemented stride related measures with measures that quantify trunk movement patterns as indicators of dynamic balance ability during walking. The aim of the study was to quantify the effect of impaired cognition and dual tasking on gait variability and stability in geriatric patients. Methods Thirteen elderly with dementia (mean age: 82.6 ± 4.3 years and thirteen without dementia (79.4 ± 5.55 recruited from a geriatric day clinic, walked at self-selected speed with and without performing a verbal dual task. The Mini Mental State Examination and the Seven Minute Screen were administered. Trunk accelerations were measured with an accelerometer. In addition to walking speed, mean, and variability of stride times, gait stability was quantified using stochastic dynamical measures, namely regularity (sample entropy, long range correlations and local stability exponents of trunk accelerations. Results Dual tasking significantly (p Conclusions The observed trunk adaptations were a consistent instability factor. These results support the concept that changes in cognitive functions contribute to changes in the variability and stability of the gait pattern. Walking under dual task conditions and quantifying gait using dynamical parameters can improve detecting walking disorders and might help to identify those elderly who are able to adapt walking

  8. Stabilizing effect of biochar on soil extracellular enzymes after a denaturing stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzobair, Khalid A; Stromberger, Mary E; Ippolito, James A

    2016-01-01

    Stabilizing extracellular enzymes may maintain enzymatic activity while protecting enzymes from proteolysis and denaturation. A study determined whether a fast pyrolysis hardwood biochar (CQuest™) would reduce evaporative losses, subsequently stabilizing soil extracellular enzymes and prohibiting potential enzymatic activity loss following a denaturing stress (microwaving). Soil was incubated in the presence of biochar (0%, 1%, 2%, 5%, or 10% by wt.) for 36 days and then exposed to microwave energies (0, 400, 800, 1600, or 3200 J g(-1) soil). Soil enzymes (β-glucosidase, β-d-cellobiosidase, N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, phosphatase, leucine aminopeptidase, β-xylosidase) were analyzed by fluorescence-based assays. Biochar amendment reduced leucine aminopeptidase and β-xylosidase potential activity after the incubation period and prior to stress exposure. The 10% biochar rate reduced soil water loss at the lowest stress level (400 J microwave energy g(-1) soil). Enzyme stabilization was demonstrated for β-xylosidase; intermediate biochar application rates prevented a complete loss of this enzyme's potential activity after soil was exposed to 400 (1% biochar treatment) or 1600 (5% biochar treatment) J microwave energy g(-1) soil. Remaining enzyme potential activities were not affected by biochar, and activities decreased with increasing stress levels. We concluded that biochar has the potential to reduce evaporative soil water losses and stabilize certain extracellular enzymes where activity is maintained after a denaturing stress; this effect was biochar rate and enzyme dependent. While biochar may reduce the potential activity of certain soil extracellular enzymes, this phenomenon was not universal as the majority of enzymes assayed in this study were unaffected by exposure to biochar. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stabilizing sodium hypochlorite at high pH: effects on soft tissue and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbluth, Holger; Marending, Monika; De-Deus, Gustavo; Sener, Beatrice; Zehnder, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    When sodium hypochlorite solutions react with tissue, their pH drops and tissue sorption decreases. We studied whether stabilizing a NaOCl solution at a high pH would increase its soft-tissue dissolution capacity and effects on the dentin matrix compared with a standard NaOCl solution of the same concentration and similar initial pH. NaOCl solutions were prepared by mixing (1:1) a 10% stock solution with water (standard) or 2 mol/L NaOH (stabilized). Physiological saline and 1 mol/L NaOH served as the controls. Chlorine content and alkaline capacity of NaOCl solutions were determined. Standardized porcine palatal soft-tissue specimens and human root dentin bars were exposed to test and control solutions. Weight loss percentage was assessed in the soft-tissue dissolution assay. Three-point bending tests were performed on the root dentin bars to determine the modulus of elasticity and flexural strength. Values between groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance with the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (α pH level of 7.5, respectively. The stabilized NaOCl dissolved significantly more soft tissue than the standard solution, and the pH remained high. It also caused a higher loss in elastic modulus and flexure strength (P < .05) than the control solutions, whereas the standard solution did not. NaOH-stabilized NaOCl solutions have a higher alkaline capacity and are thus more proteolytic than standard counterparts. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of finishing and polishing on color stability of a nanofilled resin immersed in different media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luísa Botta Martins de OLIVEIRA

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of finishing and polishing on color stability of a nanofilled composite resin (Filtek Z350 XT according to different immersion media.MATERIAL AND METHOD: Composite disks (10 mm diameter, 2 mm thickness were prepared for each group (n = 6 using a stainless steel mold. The groups were divided according to the presence or absence of finishing and polishing procedure and immersion media (artificial saliva, artificial juice- KAPO(r Coca-Cola(rflavors: pineapple, orange, strawberry and grape. The finishing and polishing procedures were performed using Super -Snap(r disks. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 24 hours (baseline and were analyzed using a color spectrophotometer by CIELab system. Then, they were immersed in different media for 5 minutes, 3 times a day, every 4 hours during 60 days. They were stored in artificial saliva at 37 ± 1°C during the immersion intervals. After this time, new measure of color was performed. The data were analyzed using Kruskall-Wallis test and Mann- Whitney test. The significance level was 5%.RESULT: The results showed that the finishing/polishing not significantly influence the color stability of resin composite (p > 0.05. There was no statistically significant difference in the color stability of the studied resin after immersion in different media (p > 0.05.CONCLUSION: The finishing and polishing procedures and the immersion media did not have influence on color stability of nanofilled resin Filtek Z350 XT.

  11. Study Effect of Salt Washing Process on Content and Iodium Stability of Salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Saksono

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Salt Washing Process on Content and Iodium Stability of Salt. Salt washing process should increase the saltquality. It should clean the salt from sludge or clay and also reduce the impurity compound such as Mg, Ca and the reductor content. The objective of these reseach is to assess the effect of washing process on the content og hygroscopic impurities compound (Ca and Mg, and reductor content of salt. The research also investigate the water absorbing, pH, KIO3 content as function of time to obtain effect of washing process on KIO3 stability in salt. The experiment result shows that the lowest content of Mg and reductor compound 0.016 % wt and 2.65 ppm respectively which is reached at the fi ne salt washing process using 27 % wt brine. The analysis of water content indicates an increase the Ca and Mg content, causing an water absorbtion in salt , However the effect on pH the is not clear.

  12. Stability and effectiveness against bacterial adhesion of poly(ethylene oxide) coatings in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosjen, Astrid; de Vries, Joop; van der Mei, Henny C; Norde, Willem; Busscher, Henk J

    2005-05-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) coatings have been shown to reduce the adhesion of different microbial strains and species and thus are promising as coatings to prevent biomaterial-centered infection of medical implants. Clinically, however, PEO coatings are not yet applied, as little is known about their stability and effectiveness in biological fluids. In this study, PEO coatings coupled to a glass substratum through silyl ether bonds were exposed for different time intervals to saliva, urine, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as a reference at 37 degrees C. After exposure, the effectiveness of the coatings against bacterial adhesion was assessed in a parallel plate flow chamber. The coatings appeared effective against Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion for 24, 48, and 0.5 h in PBS, urine, and saliva, respectively. Using XPS and contact-angle measurements, the variations in effectiveness could be attributed to conditioning film formation. The overall short stability results from hydrolysis of the coupling of the PEO chains to the substratum. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. IGF-1 Has Plaque-Stabilizing Effects in Atherosclerosis by Altering Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Thüsen, Jan H.; Borensztajn, Keren S.; Moimas, Silvia; van Heiningen, Sandra; Teeling, Peter; van Berkel, Theo J.C.; Biessen, Erik A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is important for the maintenance of plaque stability in atherosclerosis due to its effects on vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effects of the highly inflammatory milieu of the atherosclerotic plaque on IGF-1 signaling and stability-related phenotypic parameters of murine vSMCs in vitro, and the effects of IGF-1 supplementation on plaque phenotype in an atherosclerotic mouse model. M1-polarized, macrophage-conditioned medium inhibited IGF-1 signaling by ablating IGF-1 and increasing IGF-binding protein 3, increased vSMC apoptosis, and decreased proliferation. Expression of α-actin and col3a1 genes was strongly attenuated by macrophage-conditioned medium, whereas expression of matrix-degrading enzymes was increased. Importantly, all of these effects could be corrected by supplementation with IGF-1. In vivo, treatment with the stable IGF-1 analog Long R3 IGF-1 in apolipoprotein E knockout mice reduced stenosis and core size, and doubled cap/core ratio in early atherosclerosis. In advanced plaques, Long R3 IGF-1 increased the vSMC content of the plaque by more than twofold and significantly reduced the rate of intraplaque hemorrhage. We believe that IGF-1 in atherosclerotic plaques may have a role in preventing plaque instability, not only by modulating smooth muscle cell turnover, but also by altering smooth muscle cell phenotype. PMID:21281823

  14. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate.

  15. Effect of Lumbar Stabilization Exercises Versus Kinesiotaping on Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdellatif, M.M.; Kamel, M.R.; Ahmed, H.H.; Diab, H.R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common musculoskeletal problems in modern society. Approximately two third of the adults are affected by mechanical low back pain. Lumbar stabilization exercise is a therapeutic technique that uses a progressive sequence of training in coordination, balance, endurance and strengthening. It helps increasing the range of joint motion and reducing associated pain. Kinesiotape is an adhesive tape which has approximately the same elasticity as skin. The flexibility of the tape will lift the skin to create space between the skin and the muscle, prompting improvement of blood circulation and lymphatic fluids drainage in the taped area, and this will decrease pain, increase Range Of Motion (ROM) and improve Activities of Daily Level (ADL). Purpose: This study was conducted to compare the effect of lumbar stabilization exercises and Kinesiotape in patients with Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain. Design of the study: Thirty patients were divided randomly into two equal groups. Group A was received lumber stabilization exercises and Infrared Radiation and Group B was received kinesiotape and Infrared Radiation. Method: Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to measure the pain intensity level and Dual Inclinometer was used to measure ROM of the lumbar spine. Results: There was a high significant decrease in pain level in both groups Group A (p < 0.0001) and Group B (p < 0.0001). There was a high significant improvement in Lumbar ROM in both groups A and B where Group A: Flexion (p < 0.0001), extension (p < 0.0001), lateral flexion (p < 0.0001) and rotation (p < 0.0001), Group B: Flexion (p < 0.0001), extension (p < 0.0001), later al flexion (p < 0.0001) and rotation (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between the Lumbar Stabilization Exercise and kinesiotaping for the patients with chronic mechanical low back pain in increasing lumbar ROM and pain relief after treatment and during the follow up after

  16. The Effects of Price Stabilization on Short-Term Returns of IPOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Beserra Pinheiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During the price stabilization in IPOs the underwriter repurchases part of the issue (ASC for aftermarket short covering. Such activity raises question about its real purpose: to keep price artificially high and deceive investors, or avoid price fluctuation resulting from the initial flow of information and the action of flippers. Our analysis indicates that in the post stabilization period stabilized IPOs underperform non-stabilized ones; the higher the intensity of the stabilization the lower are post-stabilization returns; IPOs for which the overallotment is fully covered in the ASC underperform non-stabilized IPOs in the post-stabilization period; the same does not happen when the ASC is only partial. Therefore, both views of the stabilization process are partially right: in some cases, stabilization is used to avoid price volatility and in other cases to keep price artificially high.

  17. Effect of one-step polishing system on the color stability of nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawjali, S S; Lui, J L

    2013-08-01

    This study was to compare the effect of three different one-step polishing systems on the color stability of three different types of nanocomposites after immersion in coffee for one day and seven days and determine which nanocomposite material has the best color stability following polishing with each of the one-step polishing system. The nanocomposites tested were Tetric EvoCeram, Grandio and Herculite Précis. A total of 120 discs (40/nanocomposite, 8mm×2mm) were fabricated. Ten specimens for each nanocomposite cured under Mylar strips served as the control. The other specimens were polished with OptraPol, OneGloss and Occlubrush immersed in coffee (Nescafé) up to seven days. Color measurements were made with a spectrophotometer at baseline and after one and seven days. Two way repeated measure ANOVA, two way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests were used for statistical analyses (P<0.05). The immersion time was a significant factor in the discoloration of the nanocomposites. The effect of three one-step polishing systems on the color stability was also significant. The color change values of the materials cured against Mylar strips were the greatest. The lowest mean color change values were from the Occlubrush polished groups. The effect of the three different types of nanocomposite on the color change was significant. The highest color change values were with Tetric EvoCeram groups. The lowest color change values were with Herculite Précis groups. The color change of nanocomposite resins is affected by the type of composite, polishing procedure and the period of immersion in the staining agent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Doping effect of polyaniline/MWCNT composites on capacitance and cyclic stability of supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, G; Sahoo, S; Nayak, G C; Das, C K

    2012-03-01

    Polyaniline doped by Zn2+ ions was synthesized as nanocomposites with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) by in-situ oxidative polymerization and investigated as electrode material for supercapacitors. The uniform coating of polyaniline on MWCNT was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The effect of Zn2+ ions on nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The electrochemical performances were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), constant current charging/discharging cyclic test (CC) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) using a three-electrode system. The doped polyaniline composites show higher specific capacitance and better cyclic stability.

  19. The Effect of Protein PEGylation on Physical Stability in Liquid Formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Louise Stenstrup; Mcumber, Aaron; Rasmussen, Jakob Ewald

    2014-01-01

    The presence of micron aggregates in protein formulations has recently attracted increased interest from regulatory authorities, industry, and academia because of the potential undesired side effects of their presence. In this study, we characterized the micron aggregate formation of hen egg...... approximately half as many particles as Lyz, despite its lower apparent thermodynamic stability and more loose protein fold. Further characterization showed that the PEGylation led to a change from attractive to repulsive protein-protein interactions, which may partly explain the reduced particle formation...

  20. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Effect of Air Stability on Exhaled Air Dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chunwen; Gong, Guangcai; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2014-01-01

    studies. As the thermal stratification under displacement ventilation blocks the vertical movement of exhaled air, the exhaled contaminant may be trapped between temperature stratifications. As the dispersion of contaminant is closely related to the health of human indoors, the temperature structure...... was used for experimental study, and a numerical person was built to simulate the manikin. The velocity, temperature and concentration of tracer gas in exhaled air are affected by air stability to different degrees. The similarity of this effect among these parameters can also be observed through numerical...

  1. Effect of nitrogen alloying of stainless steels on their corrosion stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigal, V.; Knyazheva, V.M.; Pitter, Ya.; Babich, S.G.; Bogolyubskij, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    Results of corrosion tests and structural investigations of 03Cr18Ni10 and 03Cr18Ni10Mo3 steels without nitrogen and with nitrogen content of 0.15-0.3% are presented. Corrosion-electrochemical behaviour of Cr20Ni20 steel with ultralow carbon content (0.004-0.006%) and nitrogen content with 0-0.5% as well as Cr 2 N nitride behaviour are investigated. A conclusion is made on nitrogen and excessive nitride phase effect on corrosion stability of steel in corrosive media with different reduction-oxidation properties

  2. Effect of steady deflections on the aeroelastic stability of a turbine blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Bjarne Skovmose

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with effects of geometric non-linearities on the aeroelastic stability of a steady-state defl ected blade. Today, wind turbine blades are long and slender structures that can have a considerable steady-state defl ection which affects the dynamic behaviour of the blade. The fl...... apwise blade defl ection causes the edgewise blade motion to couple to torsional blade motion and thereby to the aerodynamics through the angle of attack. The analysis shows that in the worst case for this particular blade, the edgewise damping can be decreased by half. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons......, Ltd....

  3. Effects of switching frequency and leakage inductance on slow-scale stability in a voltage controlled flyback converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fa-Qiang; Ma Xi-Kui

    2013-01-01

    The effects of both the switching frequency and the leakage inductance on the slow-scale stability in a voltage controlled flyback converter are investigated in this paper. Firstly, the system description and its mathematical model are presented. Then, the improved averaged model, which covers both the switching frequency and the leakage inductance, is established, and the effects of these two parameters on the slow-scale stability in the system are analyzed. It is found that the occurrence of Hopf bifurcation in the system is the main reason for losing its slow-scale stability and both the switching frequency and the leakage inductance have an important effect on this slow-scale stability. Finally, the effectiveness of the improved averaged model and that of the corresponding theoretical analysis are confirmed by the simulation results and the experimental results. (general)

  4. Effect of dairy manure rate and the stabilization time of amended soils on atrazine degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Paula; Briceño, Gabriela; Candia, Maribel; Mora, Maria de la Luz; Demanet, Rolando; Palma, Graciela

    2009-10-01

    The application rate of liquid cow manure (LCM) in the field and the stabilization time of amended soils before application of pre-plant herbicides are factors that determine their efficiency. This study includes evaluation of residual atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) in soil and amended soils with equivalent rate of 100,000; 200,000; and 300,000 L ha(-1) of LCM and the effect of pre-incubation time of amended soils on atrazine degradation. The study was carried out under controlled conditions using an Andisol with previous historical application of atrazine. The respiratory activity and fluorescein diacetate (FDA) studies indicated that the time necessary for stabilization of amended soils is over 20-30 d. During the measurement of respiratory and FDA activity, no significant differences were observed when atrazine was applied. The half-life of atrazine ranged from 5 to 8d and the relative distribution of degradation products seem to be affected by the application of LCM. The pre-incubation time of amended soil and LCM dose would not affect atrazine degradation rate, when the soil has a history of herbicide application. However, repeated applications of LCM in a long period of time could change the soil pH and increase the content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) which could further contribute to a faster degradation of atrazine. Both effects would reduce the effectiveness of atrazine in weed control.

  5. Efficiency, effectiveness and treatment stability of clear aligners: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M; Liu, R; Ni, Z; Yu, Z

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review of the orthodontic literature with regard to efficiency, effectiveness and stability of treatment outcome with clear aligners compared with treatment with conventional brackets. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in October 2014 in the following electronic databases: Google Scholar, the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, Scopus, CENTRAL, MEDLINE via OVID, EMBASE via OVID and Web of Science. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles. Quality assessment of the included articles was performed. Two authors were responsible for study selection, validity assessment and data extraction. Four controlled clinical trials including a total of 252 participants satisfied the inclusion criteria. We grouped the trials into four main comparisons. One randomized controlled trial was classified as level 1B evidence, and three cohort studies were classified as level 2B evidence. Clear aligners appear to have a significant advantage with regard to chair time and treatment duration in mild-to-moderate cases based on several cross-sectional studies. No other differences in stability and occlusal characteristics after treatment were found between the two systems. Despite claims about the effectiveness of clear aligners, evidence is generally lacking. Shortened treatment duration and chair time in mild-to-moderate cases appear to be the only significant effectiveness of clear aligners over conventional systems that are supported by the current evidence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effects of fluoride residue on thermal stability in Cu/porous low-k interconnects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Ozaki, S.; Nakamura, T. [FUJITSU LABORATORIES Ltd., 10-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0197 (Japan)

    2014-06-19

    We have investigated the effects of fluoride residue on the thermal stability of a Cu/barrier metal (BM)/porous low-k film (k < 2.3) structure. We confirmed that the Cu agglomerated more on a BM/inter layer dielectric (ILD) with a fluoride residue. To consider the effect of fluoride residue on Cu agglomeration, the structural state at the Cu/BM interface was evaluated with a cross-section transmission electron microscope (TEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). In addition, the chemical bonding state at the Cu/BM interface was evaluated with the interface peeling-off method and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Moreover, we confirmed the ionization of fluoride residue and oxidation of Cu with fluoride and moisture to clarify the effect of fluoride residue on Cu. Our experimental results indicated that the thermal stability in Cu/porous low-k interconnects was degraded by enhancement of Cu oxidation with fluoride ions diffusion as an oxidizing catalyst.

  7. Analysis of nonlinear vibrations and stability of rotating asymmetrical nano-shafts incorporating surface energy effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodousi, Maryam; Shahgholi, Majid; Payganeh, Gholamhassan

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the present work is to investigate the nonlinear vibrations of the rotating asymmetrical nano-shafts by considering surface effect. In order to compute the surface stress tensor, the surface elasticity theory is used. The governing nonlinear equations of motion are obtained with the aid of variational approach. Bubnov-Galerkin is a very effective method for exploiting the reduced-order model of the equations of motion. The averaging method is employed to analyze the reduced-order model of the system. For this purpose, the well-known Van der Pol transformation in the complex form and angle-action transformation are utilized. The effect of surface stress on the forward and backward speeds, steady state responses of the system, fixed points, close orbits and stability of the solutions is examined. The preliminary results of the research show that the absolute values of forward and backward whirling speeds in the presence of surface effect with positive residual surface stress are higher than those of regarding the system without surface effect and in the presence of surface effect with negative residual surface stress. In addition, it is seen that the undamped rotating asymmetrical nano-shaft, for specified value of detuning parameter, in the absence or presence of surface effect has various number of stable and unstable periodic solutions. Besides, there is different number of separatrix (homoclinic orbit type). Furthermore, bifurcations, number of solutions and their stability for damped rotating asymmetrical nano-shaft are investigated. Also, the above results have been obtained for rotating symmetrical nano-shaft.

  8. A new kind of shape-stabilized PCMs with positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-long; Wu, Wan-fan; Song, Jia-liang; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new kind of shape-stabilized PCMs with PTC effect is first prepared. • It provides a potential means for the thermal control of the electronic devices. • The switching temperature of the materials is about 25 °C. • The most appropriate component of the material is found out by experimental study. • The NTC effect of the new PCMs is eliminated effectively by heat treatment. - Abstract: A new kind of shape-stabilized phase change materials (PCMs) with positive temperature coefficient (PTC) effect was prepared in this paper. The materials were prepared by adding graphite powder (GP) to the paraffin/low density polyethylene (LDPE) composite and the PTC characteristic was found by adjusting the component ratio of the material. Then the physical structures and thermal properties of the materials were investigated and the effect of various GP mass fractions and paraffin/LDPE mass proportions on the PTC behavior of the materials was studied experimentally. The results showed that the switching temperature of the materials was about 25 °C (room temperature) which approached to the first phase change temperature of paraffin dispersed in the materials. The PTC behavior of the materials was the best when the GP mass fraction and the mass proportion of LDPE/paraffin were 40 wt% and 30:70, respectively. Furthermore, the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) effect of the materials could be eliminated effectively with heat treatment. This new kind of materials is different from the former PTC materials which the switching temperatures focus on high temperature ranges. It makes up for the defect of previous materials that the switching temperatures only range in high temperature rather than room temperature and provides a potential means for the thermal control of the electronic devices or other room temperature thermal control applications

  9. Investigation at Low Speeds of the Effect of Aspect Ratio and Sweep on Rolling Stability Derivatives of Untapered Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Alex; Fisher, Lewis R

    1950-01-01

    A low-scale wind-tunnel investigation was conducted in rolling flow to determine the effects of aspect ratio and sweep (when varied independently) on the rolling stability derivatives for a series of untapered wings. The rolling-flow equipment of the Langley stability tunnel was used for the tests. The data of the investigation have been used to develop a method of accounting for the effects of the drag on the yawing moment due to rolling throughout the lift range.

  10. Compressibility effects on ideal and kinetic ballooning modes and elimination of finite Larmor radius stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotschenreuther, M.

    1985-07-01

    The dynamics of ideal and kinetic ballooning modes are considered analytically including parallel ion dynamics, but without electron dissipation. For ideal modes, parallel dynamics predominantly determine the growth rate when β is within approx.30% of the ideal threshold, resulting in a substantial reduction in growth rate. Compressibility also eliminates the stabilization effects of finite Larmor radius (FLR); FLR effects (when temperature gradients are neglected) can even increase the growth rate above the MHD value. Temperature gradients accentuate this by adding a new source of free energy independent of the MHD drive, in this region of ballooning coordinate corresponding in MHD to the continuum. Analytic dispersion relations are derived demonstrating the effects above; the formalism emphasizes the similarities between the ideal MHD and kinetic cases

  11. The Effect of Different Perturbations on the Stability Analysis of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dykin, Victor

    2010-09-01

    Neutron noise analysis techniques are studied and developed, with primary use of determining the stability of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). In particular, the role of a specific perturbation prevailing in Light Water Reactors, the propagating density perturbation, in the stability of BWRs and on the noise field of LWRs in general, is investigated by considering three topics. In the first topics, we investigate how the neutronic response of the reactor, usually described as a second order system driven by a white noise driving force, is affected by a non-white driving force. This latter arises from the reactivity effect of the propagating density perturbations. The investigation is performed by using spectral and correlation analysis. Propagating perturbations with different velocities are analyzed. We investigate how the accuracy of the determination of the so-called decay ratio (DR) of the system, based on the assumption of white noise driving force, deteriorates with deviations from the white noise character of the driving force. In the second topics, the space dependence of the neutron noise, induced by propagating density perturbations, represented through the perturbation of the absorption, is determined and discussed. A full analytical solution was obtained by the use of the Green's function technique. The solution was analyzed for different frequencies and different system sizes. An interesting new interference effect between the point-kinetic and space-dependent components of the induced noise was discovered and interpreted in physical terms. In the last topics, a non-linear stability analysis of a BWR is performed, using so called Reduced Order Model (ROM) techniques. A ROM is usually constructed by reducing the full set of 3D space-time dependent neutron-kinetics, thermal-hydraulics and heat transfer equations to time-dependent ones, by considering space dependence in a lumped parameter model (one or two discrete channels). The main novelty of our work

  12. Method of effecting fast turbine valving for improvement of power system stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    As a improved way of effecting fast valving of turbines of power system steam-electric generating units for the purpose of improving the stability of power transmission over transmission circuits to which their generators make connection, when stability is threatened by line faults and certain other stability endangering events, the heretofore employed and/or advocated practice of automatically closing intercept valves at fastest available closing speed in response to a fast valving signal, and thereafter automatically fully reopening them in a matter of seconds, is modified by providing to reopen the valves only partially to and thereafter retain them at a preset partially open position. For best results the process of what can be termed sustained partial reopening is so effected as to result in its completion within a fraction of a second following the peak of the first forward swing of the generator rotor. Control valves may be either held open, or automatically fully or partly closed and thereafter fully opened in a preprogrammed manner, or automatically moved to and thereafter held in a partly closed position, by means of a preprogrammed process of repositioning in which the valves may optionally be first fully or partly closed and thereafter partly reopened. Avoidance of discharge of steam through high pressure safety valves can be had with use of suitably controlled power operated valves that discharge steam to the condenser or to atmosphere. Where there is an intermediate pressure turbine that is supplied with superheated steam, use of sustained partial control valve closure, if employed, is supplemented by provision for reduction of rate of heat release within the steam generator in order to protect the reheater from overheating. As a way to restrict increase of reheat pressure of fossil fuel installations, and to minimize increase in the msr (Moisture separator-reheater) pressure of nuclear units, provision is optionally made of normally closed by-pass v

  13. Effect of pasteurization temperature on stability of an acidified sugarcane juice beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Kunitake

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The shelf life of fresh sugarcane juice is quite limited due to the high rates of microbiological and enzymatic reactions which take place after extraction. In order to evaluate the impact of pasteurization temperature on quality and stability of sugarcane juice with passion fruit pulp, nine batches of sugarcane juice with 4g/100g passion fruit pulp were processed at 85, 90 and 95 °C for 30 s, in triplicate. The pasteurized beverage was aseptically packaged in polyethylene terephthalate (PET bottles and stored at 7 °C in the dark. The beverage was characterized by physicochemical tests. Activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO and peroxidase (POD were determined before and after processing. Coliforms and Salmonella tests were carried out to assure the beverage´s microbiological safety. Color parameters were measured in the processed juice throughout the storage period. Fifty panelists evaluated the beverage's appearance, aroma, flavor, and overall impression using seven-point hedonic scale tests. Sensory stability was estimated by considering score averages above four and percentages of acceptance above 60%. The pH, soluble solids and titratable acidity of end product ranged from 3.96 to 4.19, 19.7 to 20.1 ºBrix, and 0.163 to 0.175 g/100g citric acid, respectively. The three processing binomials were effective for PPO inactivation; however, complete POD inactivation was reached at 95 °C/30 s only. The estimated sensory shelf-lives for sugarcane juice with passion fruit pulp processed at 85, 90 and 95 °C/30 s were 30, 40 and 50 days, respectively. Thus, the increase of pasteurization temperature had a positive effect on product's stability.

  14. Photobiomodulation effects on mRNA levels from genomic and chromosome stabilization genes in injured muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa Alexsandra; Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima; da Silva Sergio, Luiz Philippe; Teixeira, Adilson Fonseca; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Stumbo, Ana Carolina; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2018-04-26

    Muscle injuries are the most prevalent type of injury in sports. A great number of athletes have relapsed in muscle injuries not being treated properly. Photobiomodulation therapy is an inexpensive and safe technique with many benefits in muscle injury treatment. However, little has been explored about the infrared laser effects on DNA and telomeres in muscle injuries. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate photobiomodulation effects on mRNA relative levels from genes related to telomere and genomic stabilization in injured muscle. Wistar male rats were randomly divided into six groups: control, laser 25 mW, laser 75 mW, injury, injury laser 25 mW, and injury laser 75 mW. Photobiomodulation was performed with 904 nm, 3 J/cm 2 at 25 or 75 mW. Cryoinjury was induced by two applications of a metal probe cooled in liquid nitrogen directly on the tibialis anterior muscle. After euthanasia, skeletal muscle samples were withdrawn and total RNA extracted for evaluation of mRNA levels from genomic (ATM and p53) and chromosome stabilization (TRF1 and TRF2) genes by real-time quantitative polymerization chain reaction. Data show that photobiomodulation reduces the mRNA levels from ATM and p53, as well reduces mRNA levels from TRF1 and TRF2 at 25 and 75 mW in injured skeletal muscle. In conclusion, photobiomodulation alters mRNA relative levels from genes related to genomic and telomere stabilization in injured skeletal muscle.

  15. The Effect of Core Stabilization Training Program on the Balance of Mentally Retarded Educable Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Daneshmandi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of core stabilization training program on the balance of mentally retarded educable students. Materials & Methods: The research was use Application of Quasi-experimental design with pretest and posttest control group. Our subjects included 31 students boys mentally retarded in the two groups (control, 14 patients with a mean age of 11.07±3.02years, height 152±7.86cm, weight 44.07 ± 8.08kg and (17experimental group with a mean age 11.23 ± 1.95years, height 147±7.07cm, weighing 38.11±4.85kg of the sample selected. Demographic data includes: height, weight and medical records and also the IQ of them were collected. The training program of experimental group that for 6 weeks, 3 times a week in the first three weeks experimental group performed exercise the 2 sets with 5 repetitions and three the second week of 2 sets with 10 repetitions and for evaluate used the dynamic balance Y test. For analysis data used the paired T test and independent test. Results: Results showed significant differences in mean posterior-lateral and posterior-medial in the experimental group in post-test (P&le0.05. Conclusion: People with mental retardation compared with normal people have problems with delays in motor development that seems to cause deficit in the balance. Due to the lack of balance in the people with mental retarded and the importance of balance in daily activities and the effects of core stability training on the balance was showed this training improve balance in these individuals, on base of the results of this research the core stability exercises can be performed for mental retarded by coaches and teachers.

  16. The Effect of Visual Stimuli on Stability and Complexity of Postural Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haizhen Luo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Visual input could benefit balance control or increase postural sway, and it is far from fully understanding the effect of visual stimuli on postural stability and its underlying mechanism. In this study, the effect of different visual inputs on stability and complexity of postural control was examined by analyzing the mean velocity (MV, SD, and fuzzy approximate entropy (fApEn of the center of pressure (COP signal during quiet upright standing. We designed five visual exposure conditions: eyes-closed, eyes-open (EO, and three virtual reality (VR scenes (VR1–VR3. The VR scenes were a limited field view of an optokinetic drum rotating around yaw (VR1, pitch (VR2, and roll (VR3 axes, respectively. Sixteen healthy subjects were involved in the experiment, and their COP trajectories were assessed from the force plate data. MV, SD, and fApEn of the COP in anterior–posterior (AP, medial–lateral (ML directions were calculated. Two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was conducted to test the statistical significance. We found that all the three parameters obtained the lowest values in the EO condition, and highest in the VR3 condition. We also found that the active neuromuscular intervention, indicated by fApEn, in response to changing the visual exposure conditions were more adaptive in AP direction, and the stability, indicated by SD, in ML direction reflected the changes of visual scenes. MV was found to capture both instability and active neuromuscular control dynamics. It seemed that the three parameters provided compensatory information about the postural control in the immersive virtual environment.

  17. Effect of Al doping on phase formation and thermal stability of iron nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayal, Akhil [Amity Center for Spintronic Materials, Amity University, Sector 125, Noida 201 303 (India); Gupta, Mukul, E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in [Amity Center for Spintronic Materials, Amity University, Sector 125, Noida 201 303 (India); Pandey, Nidhi [Amity Center for Spintronic Materials, Amity University, Sector 125, Noida 201 303 (India); Gupta, Ajay [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001 (India); Horisberger, Michael [Laboratory for Developments and Methods, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Stahn, Jochen [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-11-25

    In the present work, we systematically studied the effect of Al doping on the phase formation of iron nitride (Fe–N) thin films. Fe–N thin films with different concentration of Al (Al = 0, 2, 3, 6, and 12 at.%) were deposited using dc magnetron sputtering by varying the nitrogen partial pressure between 0 and 100%. The structural and magnetic properties of the films were studied using x-ray diffraction and polarized neutron reflectivity. It was observed that at the lowest doping level (2 at.% of Al), nitrogen rich non-magnetic Fe–N phase gets formed at a lower nitrogen partial pressure as compared to the un-doped sample. Interestingly, we observed that as Al doping is increased beyond 3 at.%, nitrogen rich non-magnetic Fe–N phase appears at higher nitrogen partial pressure as compared to un-doped sample. The thermal stability of films were also investigated. Un-doped Fe–N films deposited at 10% nitrogen partial pressure possess poor thermal stability. Doping of Al at 2 at.% improves it marginally, whereas, for 3, 6 and 12 at.% Al doping, it shows significant improvement. The obtained results have been explained in terms of thermodynamics of Fe–N and Al–N. - Highlights: • Doping effects of Al on Fe–N phase formation is studied. • Phase formation shows a non-monotonic behavior with Al doping. • Low doping levels of Al enhance and high levels retard the nitridation process. • Al doping beyond 3 at.% improve thermal stability of Fe–N films.

  18. The effect of the virtual mass force term on the stability of transient two-phase flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadashi; Hirano, Masashi; Tanabe, Fumiya

    1989-08-01

    The effect of the virtual mass force term on the stability of transient two-phase flow analysis is studied. The objective form of the virtual mass acceleration is used. The virtual mass coefficient is determined from the stability condition of basic equations against infinitesimal high wave-number perturbations. The parameter is chosen so that a reasonable agreement between the analytical and experimental sound speed in two-phase flows can be obtained. A one-dimensional sedimentation problem is simulated by the MINCS code which is a tool for transient two-phase flow analysis. The stability analysis is performed for the numerical procedure. It is shown that calculated results are stabilized so long as the virtual mass coefficient satisfies the stability condition of differential equations. (author)

  19. Effects of grab bar on utilized friction and dynamic stability when elderly people enter the bathtub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yusuke; Kato, Tomohisa; Honda, Keita; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Izumi, Shin-Ichi

    2017-08-01

    The effect of the grab bar on dynamic stability when elderly people enter the bathtub remains unclear. The purpose of the present study is to examine the age-related effect of the grab bar on dynamic stability during lateral stepping over an obstacle when entering bathtub. Sixteen young, healthy adults and sixteen elderly adults participated. The subjects performed lateral stepping over an obstacle with and without vertical and horizontal bars. Displacement and velocity of the center of mass and utilized friction, which is the required coefficient of friction to avoid slipping, were simultaneously measured by a three-dimensional motion analysis system and two force plates. A post hoc test for two-way ANOVA revealed that velocity of the center of mass in the vertical direction (pbar were significantly slower and smaller than those without the grab bar in young and elderly people. Moreover, the utilized friction at push off of the trailing leg with the vertical bar in elderly people was lower (pbar. The use of each grab bar while performing a lateral step over an obstacle may help maintaining balance in lateral and vertical directions. However, use of the vertical bar while lateral stepping over an object in elderly people may need low utilized friction to prevent slipping. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rotation and toroidal magnetic field effects on the stability of two-component jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millas, Dimitrios; Keppens, Rony; Meliani, Zakaria

    2017-09-01

    Several observations of astrophysical jets show evidence of a structure in the direction perpendicular to the jet axis, leading to the development of 'spine and sheath' models of jets. Most studies focus on a two-component jet consisting of a highly relativistic inner jet and a slower - but still relativistic - outer jet surrounded by an unmagnetized environment. These jets are believed to be susceptible to a relativistic Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability, depending on the effective inertia ratio of the two components. We extend previous studies by taking into account the presence of a non-zero toroidal magnetic field. Different values of magnetization are examined to detect possible differences in the evolution and stability of the jet. We find that the toroidal field, above a certain level of magnetization σ, roughly equal to 0.01, can stabilize the jet against the previously mentioned instabilities and that there is a clear trend in the behaviour of the average Lorentz factor and the effective radius of the jet when we continuously increase the magnetization. The simulations are performed using the relativistic MHD module from the open source, parallel, grid adaptive, mpi-amrvac code.

  1. The effects of gallic/ferulic/caffeic acids on colour intensification and anthocyanin stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Bing-Jun; Liu, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Shu-Juan; Cai, Jian-Xiong; Jing, Pu

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism by which copigments stabilize colour, by protecting anthocyanin chromophores from nucleophilic attack, seems well accepted. This study was to determine effects of gallic/ferulic/caffeic acids on colour intensification and anthocyanin stability. Molecular dynamics simulations were applied to explore molecular interactions. Phenolic acids intensified the colour by 19%∼27%. Colour fading during heating followed first-order reactions with half-lives of 3.66, 9.64, 3.50, and 3.39h, whereas anthocyanin degradation, determined by the pH differential method (or HPLC-PDA), followed second-order reactions with half-lives of 3.29 (3.40), 3.43 (3.39), 2.29 (0.39), and 2.72 (0.32)h alone or with gallic/ferulic/caffeic acids, respectively, suggesting that anthocyanin degradation was faster than the colour fading. The strongest protection of gallic acids might be attributed to the shortest distance (4.37Å) of its aromatic ring to the anthocyanin (AC) panel. Hyperchromic effects induced by phenolic acids were pronounced and they obscured the accelerated anthocyanin degradation due to self-association interruption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of oxide distributed in grain boundaries on microstructure stability of nanocrystalline metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai; Li, Hui; Biao Pang, Jin; Wang, Zhu

    2013-06-01

    Nanocrystalline copper and zinc prepared by high-pressure compaction method have been studied by positron lifetime spectroscopy associated with X-ray diffraction. For nanocrystalline Cu, mean grain sizes of the samples decrease after being annealed at 900 °C and increase during aging at 180 °C, revealing that the atoms exchange between the two regions. The positron lifetime results indicate that the vacancy clusters formed in the annealing process are unstable and decomposed at the aging time below 6 hours. In addition, the partially oxidized surfaces of the nanoparticles hinder the grain growth during the ageing at 180 °C, and the vacancy clusters inside the disorder regions which are related to Cu2O need longer aging time to decompose. In the case of nanocrystalline Zn, the open volume defect (not larger than divacancy) is dominant according to the high relative intensity for the short positron lifetime (τ1). The oxide (ZnO) inside the grain boundaries has been found having an effect to hinder the decrease of average positron lifetime (τav) during the annealing, which probably indicates that the oxide stabilizes the microstructure of the grain boundaries. For both nanocrystalline copper and zinc, the oxides in grain boundaries enhance the thermal stability of the microstucture, in spite of their different crystal structures. This effect is very important for the nanocrystalline materials using as radiation resistant materials.

  3. Effects of oxide distributed in grain boundaries on microstructure stability of nanocrystalline metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Kai; Li Hui; Pang Jinbiao; Wang Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline copper and zinc prepared by high-pressure compaction method have been studied by positron lifetime spectroscopy associated with X-ray diffraction. For nanocrystalline Cu, mean grain sizes of the samples decrease after being annealed at 900 °C and increase during aging at 180 °C, revealing that the atoms exchange between the two regions. The positron lifetime results indicate that the vacancy clusters formed in the annealing process are unstable and decomposed at the aging time below 6 hours. In addition, the partially oxidized surfaces of the nanoparticles hinder the grain growth during the ageing at 180 °C, and the vacancy clusters inside the disorder regions which are related to Cu 2 O need longer aging time to decompose. In the case of nanocrystalline Zn, the open volume defect (not larger than divacancy) is dominant according to the high relative intensity for the short positron lifetime (τ 1 ). The oxide (ZnO) inside the grain boundaries has been found having an effect to hinder the decrease of average positron lifetime (τ av ) during the annealing, which probably indicates that the oxide stabilizes the microstructure of the grain boundaries. For both nanocrystalline copper and zinc, the oxides in grain boundaries enhance the thermal stability of the microstucture, in spite of their different crystal structures. This effect is very important for the nanocrystalline materials using as radiation resistant materials.

  4. The Effect of Polymer-Cement Stabilization on the Unconfined Compressive Strength of Liquefiable Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ateş

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil stabilization has been widely used as an alternative to substitute the lack of suitable material on site. The use of nontraditional chemical stabilizers in soil improvement is growing daily. In this study a laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of waterborne polymer on unconfined compression strength and to study the effect of cement grout on pre-venting of liquefiable sandy soils. The laboratory tests were performed including grain size of sandy soil, unit weight, ultrasonic pulse velocity, and unconfined compressive strength test. The sand and various amounts of polymer (1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% and cement (10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% were mixed with all of them into dough using mechanical kneader in laboratory conditions. Grouting experiment is performed with a cylindrical mould of  mm. The samples were subjected to unconfined compression tests to determine their strength after 7 and 14 days of curing. The results of the tests indicated that the waterborne polymer significantly improved the unconfined compression strength of sandy soils which have susceptibility of liquefaction.

  5. Atomistic modeling of La3+ doping segregation effect on nanocrystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shenli; Sha, Haoyan; Castro, Ricardo H R; Faller, Roland

    2018-05-16

    The effect of La3+ doping on the structure and ionic conductivity change in nanocrystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was studied using a combination of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation revealed the segregation of La3+ at eight tilt grain boundary (GB) structures and predicted an average grain boundary (GB) energy decrease of 0.25 J m-2, which is close to the experimental values reported in the literature. Cation stabilization was found to be the main reason for the GB energy decrease, and energy fluctuations near the grain boundary are smoothed out with La3+ segregation. Both dynamic and energetic analysis on the Σ13(510)/[001] GB structure revealed La3+ doping hinders O2- diffusion in the GB region, where the diffusion coefficient monotonically decreases with increasing La3+ doping concentration. The effect was attributed to the increase in the site-dependent migration barriers for O2- hopping caused by segregated La3+, which also leads to anisotropic diffusion at the GB.

  6. Effect of melamine phosphate on the thermal stability and flammability of bio-based polyurethanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakushin, Vladimir; Sevastyanova, Irina; Vilsone, Dzintra; Avots, Andris

    2016-01-01

    The effect of melamine phosphate (MP) on the thermal stability of bio-based polyurethane and the flammability parameters of wood samples with polyurethane coatings was studied. Thermogravimetric analysis and cone calorimeter test at a heat flux of 35 kW/m 2 were used for this purpose. The main characteristics of the thermal stability and flammability of the coating with addition of MP were compared with the characteristics of analogous coatings with addition of ammonium polyphosphate (APP), as well as APP in combination with melamine. It was found that the use of MP as an intumescent additive allows a considerable decrease of most of the flammability parameters of the polyurethane based on tall oil fatty acids, like APP. To reach the maximum effect, it is enough to load in the polyurethane 20% of MP. In contrast to APP, MP reduces also the smoke release of the samples. Using MP in combination with APP at definite weight ratios, it is possible to essentially reduce the flammability parameters of polyurethane coatings, such as PHRR, THR and MARHE. (paper)

  7. Effect of tibial slope on the stability of the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, James E; Suero, Eduardo M; Citak, Musa; Petrigliano, Frank P; Bosscher, Marianne R F; Citak, Mustafa; Wickiewicz, Thomas L; Pearle, Andrew D

    2012-08-01

    We aimed to quantify the effect of changes in tibial slope on the magnitude of anterior tibial translation (ATT) in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knee during the Lachman and mechanized pivot shift tests. We hypothesized that increased posterior tibial slope would increase the amount of ATT of an ACL-deficient knee, while leveling the slope of the tibial plateau would decrease the amount of ATT. Lachman and mechanized pivot shift tests were performed on hip-to-toe cadaveric specimens, and ATT of the lateral and the medial compartments was measured using navigation (n = 11). The ACL was then sectioned. Stability testing was repeated, and ATT was recorded. A proximal tibial osteotomy in the sagittal plane was then performed achieving either +5 or -5° of tibial slope variation after which stability testing was repeated (n = 10). Sectioning the ACL resulted in a significant increase in ATT in both the Lachman and mechanized pivot shift tests (P slope of the tibial plateau had no effect on ATT during the Lachman test (n.s.). During the mechanized pivot shift tests, a 5° increase in posterior slope resulted in a significant increase in ATT compared to the native knee (P slope reduced ATT to a level similar to that of the intact knee. Tibial slope changes did not affect the magnitude of translation during a Lachman test. However, large changes in tibial slope variation affected the magnitude of the pivot shift.

  8. Effect of changes in seafloor temperature and sea-level on gas hydrate stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, S.K.; Pritchett, W. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas hydrates occur in oceanic sediments and in permafrost regions around the world. As a greenhouse gas, large amounts of methane released from the global hydrate reservoir would have a significant impact on Earth's climate. The role of methane released by hydrate dissociation in climate change is uncertain. However, changes in global climate such as glaciation and warming can destabilize the hydrates. During the last glacial maximum, the sea level dropped about 100 meters. It has been suggested that the sea-level fall was associated with gas hydrate instability and seafloor slumping. This paper investigated the effect of changes in seafloor temperature and sea level on gas hydrate stability and on gas venting at the seafloor. A one-dimensional numerical computer model (simulator) was developed to describe methane hydrate formation, decomposition, reformation, and distribution with depth below the seafloor in the marine environment. The simulator was utilized to model hydrate distributions at two sites, notably Blake Ridge, located offshore South Carolina and Hydrate Ridge, located off the coast of Oregon. The numerical models for the two sites were conditioned by matching the sulfate, chlorinity, and hydrate distribution measurements. The effect of changes in seafloor temperature and sea-level on gas hydrate stability were then investigated. It was concluded that for Blake Ridge, changes in hydrate concentration were small. Both the changes in seafloor temperature and sea-level led to a substantial increase in gas venting at the seafloor for Hydrate Ridge. 17 refs., 8 figs.

  9. The effects of nonlinear wave propagation on the stability of inertial cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinden, D; Stride, E; Saffari, N

    2009-01-01

    In the context of forecasting temperature and pressure fields generated by high-intensity focussed ultrasound, the accuracy of predictive models is critical for the safety and efficacy of treatment. In such fields 'inertial' cavitation is often observed. Classically, estimations of cavitation thresholds have been based on the assumption that the incident wave at the surface of a bubble is the same as in the far-field, neglecting the effect of nonlinear wave propagation. By modelling the incident wave as a solution to Burgers' equation using weak shock theory, the effects of nonlinear wave propagation on inertial cavitation are investigated using both numerical and analytical techniques. From radius-time curves for a single bubble, it is observed that there is a reduction in the maximum size of a bubble undergoing inertial cavitation and that the inertial collapse occurs earlier in contrast with the classical case. Corresponding stability thresholds for a bubble whose initial radius is slightly below the critical Blake radius are calculated, providing a lower bound for the onset of instability. Bifurcation diagrams and frequency-response curves are presented associated with the loss of stability. The consequences and physical implications of the results are discussed with respect to the classical results.

  10. Uniform Sampling of the Infinite Noncooperative Game on Unit Hypercube and Reshaping Ultimately Multidimensional Matrices of Player’s Payoff Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanuke Vadim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper suggests a method of obtaining an approximate solution of the infinite noncooperative game on the unit hypercube. The method is based on sampling uniformly the players’ payoff functions with the constant step along each of the hypercube dimensions. The author states the conditions for a sufficiently accurate sampling and suggests the method of reshaping the multidimensional matrix of the player’s payoff values, being the former player’s payoff function before its sampling, into a matrix with minimally possible number of dimensions, where also maintenance of one-to-one indexing has been provided. Requirements for finite NE-strategy from NE (Nash equilibrium solution of the finite game as the initial infinite game approximation are given as definitions of the approximate solution consistency. The approximate solution consistency ensures its relative independence upon the sampling step within its minimal neighborhood or the minimally decreased sampling step. The ultimate reshaping of multidimensional matrices of players’ payoff values to the minimal number of dimensions, being equal to the number of players, stimulates shortened computations.

  11. EFFECTS OF CORE STABILIZATION PROGRAM AND CONVENTIONAL EXERCISES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC MECHANICAL LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Babu Reddy .A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional back care exercises are advocated to treat the pain and to strengthen the involved muscles. There will be possibility of the pain getting recurred due to disproportionate balance and stability in the muscles. The core stabilization is major trend in rehabilitation, it aims at improving stability during functional activities, balance, flexibility, strength training and effectively manage the pain as well. Objective: To find the efficacy of the concept of core stabilization when compared to conventional back care exercises in patients with chronic mechanical low back pain. Methods: Forty patients with chronic Mechanical Low back pain were selected through purposive sampling and were randomly assigned into control group who received conventional back exercises and SWD (n=20, experimental group who received core stabilization and SWD (n=20. Both the groups received SWD, along with conventional back exercises for one group and core stabilization for the other group three days a week for 6 weeks. The treatment outcome was assessed using visual analogue scale, Rolland Morris Disability Questionnaire and Lumbar range of motion using goniometer. Results: After a 6 weeks training period the core stabilization group scored significantly higher than the conventional group for VAS (p=0.05 RMDQ (p=0.05 whereas ROM improved higher in conventional group (p=0.05. Conclusion: After the treatment sessions Core stabilization group registered a significant improvement when compared to conventional back care exercises in improving function and in relieving pain.

  12. To what extent does not wearing shoes affect the local dynamic stability of walking?: effect size and intrasession repeatability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Philippe; Reynard, Fabienne

    2014-04-01

    Local dynamic stability (stability) quantifies how a system responds to small perturbations. Several experimental and clinical findings have highlighted the association between gait stability and fall risk. Walking without shoes is known to slightly modify gait parameters. Barefoot walking may cause unusual sensory feedback to individuals accustomed to shod walking, and this may affect stability. The objective was therefore to compare the stability of shod and barefoot walking in healthy individuals and to analyze the intrasession repeatability. Forty participants traversed a 70 m indoor corridor wearing normal shoes in one trial and walking barefoot in a second trial. Trunk accelerations were recorded with a 3D-accelerometer attached to the lower back. The stability was computed using the finite-time maximal Lyapunov exponent method. Absolute agreement between the forward and backward paths was estimated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Barefoot walking did not significantly modify the stability as compared with shod walking (average standardized effect size: +0.11). The intrasession repeatability was high (ICC: 0.73-0.81) and slightly higher in barefoot walking condition (ICC: 0.81-0.87). Therefore, it seems that barefoot walking can be used to evaluate stability without introducing a bias as compared with shod walking, and with a sufficient reliability.

  13. Effects of freeze-thaw on characteristics of new KMP binder stabilized Zn- and Pb-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ming-Li; Du, Yan-Jun; Reddy, Krishna R; Wu, Hao-Liang

    2015-12-01

    For viable and sustainable reuse of solidified/stabilized heavy metal-contaminated soils as roadway subgrade materials, long-term durability of these soils should be ensured. A new binder, KMP, has been developed for solidifying/stabilizing soils contaminated with high concentrations of heavy metals. However, the effects of long-term extreme weather conditions including freeze and thaw on the leachability and strength of the KMP stabilized contaminated soils have not been investigated. This study presents a systematic investigation on the impacts of freeze-thaw cycle on leachability, strength, and microstructural characteristics of the KMP stabilized soils spiked with Zn and Pb individually and together. For comparison purpose, Portland cement is also tested as a conventional binder. Several series of tests are conducted including the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), modified European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction procedure, unconfined compression test (UCT), and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). The results demonstrate that the freeze-thaw cycles have much less impact on the leachability and strength of the KMP stabilized soils as compared to the PC stabilized soils. After the freeze-thaw cycle tests, the KMP stabilized soils display much lower leachability, mass loss, and strength loss. These results are assessed based on the chemical speciation of Zn and Pb, and pore size distribution of the soils. Overall, this study demonstrates that the KMP stabilized heavy metal-contaminated soils perform well under the freeze-thaw conditions.

  14. Effects of toroidal currents upon magnetic configurations and stability in Wendelstein 7-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, A.; Anton, M.; Brakel, R.; Geiger, J.; Hirsch, M.; Jaenicke, R.; Klose, S.; Werner, A.; Sallander, E.

    2001-01-01

    The proposal of new concepts for current carrying hybrid stellarators has raised the issue if current driven instabilities, in particular major disruptions, may be suppressed or mitigated by the externally provided poloidal magnetic field. In W7-AS the internal toroidal currents such as bootstrap and Okhawa currents are cancelled by opposite currents driven inductively or by electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). In this way the edge rotational transform is controlled, and net current-free stable plasmas are maintained. On the other hand, the current drive systems provide a flexible tool to investigate current driven instabilities as well as various issues concerning the effect of magnetic shear on confinement and MHD mode behaviour. The stability studies in the presence of significant toroidal currents have been made in the accessible range of the external rotational transform slash-l ext =0.30...0.56 involving the low order rational surfaces slash-l = 1/2, 3/2, 3/4 and 1. In addition the rational surfaces slash-l=1/3 and 1/4 could be accessed by reverse current drive. Target plasmas heated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), neutral beam injection (NBI) or both were investigated in order to assess to which extent the stability depends on particular current density profiles. Disruption-like events, preceded by tearing mode activity, have been observed in a wide range of the external rotational transform. The mode structures have been analyzed by X-ray tomography, electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics and magnetic measurements. The experimental data are roughly consistent with stability calculations on the basis of a cylindrical Δ'-analysis. In contrast to the tokamak case the plasma equilibrium is maintained even after a thermal collapse enabling a recovery of plasma energy and inductive current. The improved positional stability can result in the formation of very large magnetic islands. Severe disruption-like effects may be controlled by

  15. Dynamic stability of running: The effects of speed and leg amputations on the maximal Lyapunov exponent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Look, Nicole; Arellano, Christopher J.; Grabowski, Alena M.; Kram, Rodger; McDermott, William J.; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study dynamic stability during running, focusing on the effects of speed, and the use of a leg prosthesis. We compute and compare the maximal Lyapunov exponents of kinematic time-series data from subjects with and without unilateral transtibial amputations running at a wide range of speeds. We find that the dynamics of the affected leg with the running-specific prosthesis are less stable than the dynamics of the unaffected leg and also less stable than the biological legs of the non-amputee runners. Surprisingly, we find that the center-of-mass dynamics of runners with two intact biological legs are slightly less stable than those of runners with amputations. Our results suggest that while leg asymmetries may be associated with instability, runners may compensate for this effect by increased control of their center-of-mass dynamics

  16. Effects of oral environment stabilization procedures on Streptococcus mutans counts in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Flavia Cristina; Jeremias, Fabiano; Spolidório, Denise Madalena Palomari; Silva, Silvio Rocha Corrêa da; Valsecki Junior, Aylton; Rosell, Fernanda Lopez

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral environment stabilization (OES) on the counting of Streptococcus mutans in high-caries-risk pregnant women participants of a prevention program in a public teaching institution. The sample was composed of 30 pregnant women aged 18 to 43 years, who looked for treatment at the Preventive Dentistry Clinic of the Araraquara Dental School, UNESP. Saliva samples were collected before and after the OES procedures and were forwarded to the pathology for observation and quantification of S. mutans CFU. There was a decrease in the number of S. mutans CFU, which was significantly different (pmutans CFU in the saliva of high-caries-risk pregnant women. This management is simple and effective, corresponding to the basic treatment needs of pregnant women that search dental care in this public service.

  17. Direct and indirect effects of unilateral divorce law on marital stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneip, Thorsten; Bauer, Gerrit; Reinhold, Steffen

    2014-12-01

    Previous research examining the impact of unilateral divorce law (UDL) on the prevalence of divorce has provided mixed results. Studies based on cross-sectional cross-country/cross-state survey data have received criticism for disregarding unobserved heterogeneity across countries, as have studies using country-level panel data for failing to account for possible mediating mechanisms at the micro level. We seek to overcome both shortcomings by using individual-level event-history data from 11 European countries (SHARELIFE) and controlling for unobserved heterogeneity over countries and cohorts. We find that UDL in total increased the incidence of marital breakdown by about 20 %. This finding, however, neglects potential selection effects into marriage. Accordingly, the estimated effect of unilateral divorce laws becomes much larger when we control for age at marriage, which is used as indicator for match quality. Moreover, we find that UDL particularly affects marital stability in the presence of children.

  18. A theoretical model for investigating the effect of vacuum fluctuations on the electromechanical stability of nanotweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhabadi, A.; Mokhtari, J.; Koochi, A.; Abadyan, M.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the impact of the Casimir attraction on the electromechanical stability of nanowire-fabricated nanotweezers is investigated using a theoretical continuum mechanics model. The Dirichlet mode is considered and an asymptotic solution, based on path integral approach, is applied to consider the effect of vacuum fluctuations in the model. The Euler-Bernoulli beam theory is employed to derive the nonlinear governing equation of the nanotweezers. The governing equations are solved by three different approaches, i.e. the modified variation iteration method, generalized differential quadrature method and using a lumped parameter model. Various perspectives of the problem, including the comparison with the van der Waals force regime, the variation of instability parameters and effects of geometry are addressed in present paper. The proposed approach is beneficial for the precise determination of the electrostatic response of the nanotweezers in the presence of Casimir force.

  19. Shaft flexibility effects on aeroelastic stability of a rotating bladed disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, Naim; Loewy, Robert

    1989-01-01

    A comprehensive study of Coriolis forces and shaft flexibility effects on the structural dynamics and aeroelastic stability of a rotating bladed-disk assembly attached to a cantilever, massless, flexible shaft is presented. Analyses were performed for an actual bladed-disk assembly, used as the first stage in the fan of the 'E3' engine. In the structural model, both in-plane and out-of-plane elastic deformation of the bladed-disk assembly were considered relative to their hub, in addition to rigid disk translations and rotations introduced by shaft flexibility. Besides structural coupling between blades (through the flexible disk), additional coupling is introduced through quasisteady aerodynamic loads. Rotational effects are accounted for throughout the work, and some mode shapes for the whole structure are presented at a selected rpm.

  20. Effect of pulse pressure on borehole stability during shear swirling flow vibration cementing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Cui

    Full Text Available The shear swirling flow vibration cementing (SSFVC technique rotates the downhole eccentric cascade by circulating cementing fluid. It makes the casing eccentrically revolve at high speed around the borehole axis. It produces strong agitation action to the annulus fluid, makes it in the state of shear turbulent flow, and results in the formation of pulse pressure which affects the surrounding rock stress. This study was focused on 1 the calculation of the pulse pressure in an annular turbulent flow field based on the finite volume method, and 2 the analysis of the effect of pulse pressure on borehole stability. On the upside, the pulse pressure is conducive to enhancing the liquidity of the annulus fluid, reducing the fluid gel strength, and preventing the formation of fluid from channeling. But greater pulse pressure may cause lost circulation and even formation fracturing. Therefore, in order to ensure smooth cementing during SSFVC, the effect of pulse pressure should be considered when cementing design.