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Sample records for noncoding mitochondrial rnas

  1. The mitochondrial genome encodes abundant small noncoding RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seungil Ro; Hsiu-Yen Ma; Chanjae Park; Nicole Ortogero; Rui Song; Grant W Hennig; Huili Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs identified thus far are all encoded by the nuclear genome.Here,we report that the murine and human mitochondriai genomes encode thousands of small noncoding RNAs,which are predominantly derived from the sense transcripts of the mitochondrial genes (host genes),and we termed these small RNAs mitochondrial genome-encoded small RNAs (mitosRNAs).DICER inactivation affected,but did not completely abolish mitosRNA production.MitosRNAs appear to be products of currently unidentified mitochondrial ribonucleases.Overexpression of mitosRNAs enhanced expression levels of their host genes in vitro,and dysregulated mitosRNA expression was generally associated with aberrant mitochondrial gene expression in vivo.Our data demonstrate that in addition to 37 known mitochondrial genes,the mammalian mitochondrial genome also encodes abundant mitosRNAs,which may play an important regulatory role in the control of mitochondrial gene expression in the cell.

  2. Comparative and Transcriptome Analyses Uncover Key Aspects of Coding- and Long Noncoding RNAs in Flatworm Mitochondrial Genomes

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    Eric Ross

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Exploiting the conservation of various features of mitochondrial genomes has been instrumental in resolving phylogenetic relationships. Despite extensive sequence evidence, it has not previously been possible to conclusively resolve some key aspects of flatworm mitochondrial genomes, including generally conserved traits, such as start codons, noncoding regions, the full complement of tRNAs, and whether ATP8 is, or is not, encoded by this extranuclear genome. In an effort to address these difficulties, we sought to determine the mitochondrial transcriptomes and genomes of sexual and asexual taxa of freshwater triclads, a group previously poorly represented in flatworm mitogenomic studies. We have discovered evidence for an alternative start codon, an extended cox1 gene, a previously undescribed conserved open reading frame, long noncoding RNAs, and a highly conserved gene order across the large evolutionary distances represented within the triclads. Our findings contribute to the expansion and refinement of mitogenomics to address evolutionary issues in this diverse group of animals.

  3. Expression of a family of noncoding mitochondrial RNAs distinguishes normal from cancer cells

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    Burzio, Verónica A.; Villota, Claudio; Villegas, Jaime; Landerer, Eduardo; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa L.; Martínez, Ronny; Lopez, Constanza; Gaete, Fancy; Toro, Viviana; Rodriguez, Ximena; Burzio, Luis O.

    2009-01-01

    We reported the presence in human cells of a noncoding mitochondrial RNA that contains an inverted repeat (IR) of 815 nucleotides (nt) covalently linked to the 5′ end of the mitochondrial 16S RNA (16S mtrRNA). The transcript contains a stem-loop structure and is expressed in human proliferating cells but not in resting cells. Here, we demonstrate that, in addition to this transcript, normal human proliferating cells in culture express 2 antisense mitochondrial transcripts. These transcripts also contain stem-loop structures but strikingly they are down-regulated in tumor cell lines and tumor cells present in 17 different tumor types. The differential expression of these transcripts distinguishes normal from tumor cells and might contribute a unique vision on cancer biology and diagnostics. PMID:19470459

  4. Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Immunology.

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    Li, Qian; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunology is the study of interaction between cancer cells and immune system by the application of immunology principle and theory. With the recent approval of several new drugs targeting immune checkpoints in cancer, cancer immunology has become a very attractive field of research and is thought to be the new hope to conquer cancer. This chapter introduces the aberrant expression and function of noncoding RNAs, mainly microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs, in tumor-infiltrating immune cells, and their significance in tumor immunity. It also illustrates how noncoding RNAs are shuttled between tumor cells and immune cells in tumor microenvironments via exosomes or other microvesicles to modulate tumor immunity.

  5. Determination of the differential expression of mitochondrial long non-coding RNAs as a noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer

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    Rivas Alexis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bladder cancer is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality with a high recurrence rate. Early detection of bladder cancer is essential in order to remove the tumor, to preserve the organ and to avoid metastasis. The aim of this study was to analyze the differential expression of mitochondrial non-coding RNAs (sense and antisense in cells isolated from voided urine of patients with bladder cancer as a noninvasive diagnostic assay. Methods The differential expression of the sense (SncmtRNA and the antisense (ASncmtRNAs transcripts in cells isolated from voided urine was determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization. The test uses a multiprobe mixture labeled with different fluorophores and takes about 1 hour to complete. We examined the expression of these transcripts in cells isolated from urine of 24 patients with bladder cancer and from 15 healthy donors. Results This study indicates that the SncmtRNA and the ASncmtRNAs are stable in cells present in urine. The test reveals that the expression pattern of the mitochondrial transcripts can discriminate between normal and tumor cells. The analysis of 24 urine samples from patients with bladder cancer revealed expression of the SncmtRNA and down-regulation of the ASncmtRNAs. Exfoliated cells recovered from the urine of healthy donors do not express these mitochondrial transcripts. This is the first report showing that the differential expression of these mitochondrial transcripts can detect tumor cells in the urine of patients with low and high grade bladder cancer. Conclusion This pilot study indicates that fluorescent in situ hybridization of cells from urine of patients with different grades of bladder cancer confirmed the tumor origin of these cells. Samples from the 24 patients with bladder cancer contain cells that express the SncmtRNA and down-regulate the ASncmtRNAs. In contrast, the hybridization of the few exfoliated cells recovered from healthy donors

  6. Long noncoding RNAs and atherosclerosis.

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    Zhou, Tian; Ding, Jia-wang; Wang, Xin-an; Zheng, Xia-xia

    2016-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is universally recognized as a chronic lipid-induced inflammation of the vessel wall in response to dyslipidemia and haemodynamic stress involving dysfunction and activation of resident vascular cells as well as infiltration of leukocytes. As members of nonprotein-coding RNAs, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are implicated in various biological processes. Accumulating evidences suggest that lncRNAs regulate the function of vascular wall, activation of macrophages, lipid metabolism and immune response. Here, we review the effects of lncRNAs on the progress of atherosclerosis.

  7. Panning for Long Noncoding RNAs

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    Li Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent advent of high-throughput approaches has revealed widespread transcription of the human genome, leading to a new appreciation of transcription regulation, especially from noncoding regions. Distinct from most coding and small noncoding RNAs, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are generally expressed at low levels, are less conserved and lack protein-coding capacity. These intrinsic features of lncRNAs have not only hampered their full annotation in the past several years, but have also generated controversy concerning whether many or most of these lncRNAs are simply the result of transcriptional noise. Here, we assess these intrinsic features that have challenged lncRNA discovery and further summarize recent progress in lncRNA discovery with integrated methodologies, from which new lessons and insights can be derived to achieve better characterization of lncRNA expression regulation. Full annotation of lncRNA repertoires and the implications of such annotation will provide a fundamental basis for comprehensive understanding of pervasive functions of lncRNAs in biological regulation.

  8. Long noncoding RNAs regulate adipogenesis.

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    Sun, Lei; Goff, Loyal A; Trapnell, Cole; Alexander, Ryan; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Sauvageau, Martin; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Kelley, David R; Hendrickson, David G; Yuan, Bingbing; Kellis, Manolis; Lodish, Harvey F; Rinn, John L

    2013-02-26

    The prevalence of obesity has led to a surge of interest in understanding the detailed mechanisms underlying adipocyte development. Many protein-coding genes, mRNAs, and microRNAs have been implicated in adipocyte development, but the global expression patterns and functional contributions of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) during adipogenesis have not been explored. Here we profiled the transcriptome of primary brown and white adipocytes, preadipocytes, and cultured adipocytes and identified 175 lncRNAs that are specifically regulated during adipogenesis. Many lncRNAs are adipose-enriched, strongly induced during adipogenesis, and bound at their promoters by key transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPα). RNAi-mediated loss of function screens identified functional lncRNAs with varying impact on adipogenesis. Collectively, we have identified numerous lncRNAs that are functionally required for proper adipogenesis.

  9. Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Medicine

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    Laura Cerchia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Several signalling proteins involved in cell growth and differentiation represent attractive candidate targets for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy since they can act as oncogenes. Because of their high specificity and low immunogeneicity, using artificial small noncoding RNA (ncRNAs as therapeutics has recently become a highly promising and rapidly expanding field of interest. Indeed, ncRNAs may either interfere with RNA transcription, stability, translation or directly hamper the function of the targets by binding to their surface. The recent finding that the expression of several genes is under the control of small single-stranded regulatory RNAs, including miRNAs, makes these genes as appropriate targets for ncRNA gene silencing. Furthermore, another class of small ncRNA, aptamers, act as high-affinity ligands and potential antagonists of disease-associated proteins. We will review here the recent and innovative methods that have been developed and the possible applications of ncRNAs as inhibitors or tracers in cancer medicine.

  10. Noncoding RNAs: Emerging Players in Muscular Dystrophies

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    Germana Falcone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fascinating world of noncoding RNAs has recently come to light, thanks to the development of powerful sequencing technologies, revealing a variety of RNA molecules playing important regulatory functions in most, if not all, cellular processes. Many noncoding RNAs have been implicated in regulatory networks that are determinant for skeletal muscle differentiation and disease. In this review, we outline the noncoding RNAs involved in physiological mechanisms of myogenesis and those that appear dysregulated in muscle dystrophies, also discussing their potential use as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  11. Exploring the Secrets of Long Noncoding RNAs

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    Mingyang Quan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing has revealed that the majority of RNAs have no capacity to encode protein. Among these non-coding transcripts, recent work has focused on the roles of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs of >200 nucleotides. Although many of their attributes, such as patterns of expression, remain largely unknown, lncRNAs have key functions in transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and epigenetic gene regulation; Also, new work indicates their functions in scaffolding ribonuclear protein complexes. In plants, genome-wide identification of lncRNAs has been conducted in several species, including Zea mays, and recent research showed that lncRNAs regulate flowering time in the photoperiod pathway, and function in nodulation. In this review, we discuss the basic mechanisms by which lncRNAs regulate key cellular processes, using the large body of knowledge on animal and yeast lncRNAs to illustrate the significance of emerging work on lncRNAs in plants.

  12. DASHR: database of small human noncoding RNAs.

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    Leung, Yuk Yee; Kuksa, Pavel P; Amlie-Wolf, Alexandre; Valladares, Otto; Ungar, Lyle H; Kannan, Sampath; Gregory, Brian D; Wang, Li-San

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) are highly abundant RNAs, typically database provides searchable, unified annotation, and expression information for full sncRNA transcripts and mature RNA products derived from these larger RNAs. Here, we present the Database of small human noncoding RNAs (DASHR). DASHR contains the most comprehensive information to date on human sncRNA genes and mature sncRNA products. DASHR provides a simple user interface for researchers to view sequence and secondary structure, compare expression levels, and evidence of specific processing across all sncRNA genes and mature sncRNA products in various human tissues. DASHR annotation and expression data covers all major classes of sncRNAs including microRNAs (miRNAs), Piwi-interacting (piRNAs), small nuclear, nucleolar, cytoplasmic (sn-, sno-, scRNAs, respectively), transfer (tRNAs), and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). Currently, DASHR (v1.0) integrates 187 smRNA high-throughput sequencing (smRNA-seq) datasets with over 2.5 billion reads and annotation data from multiple public sources. DASHR contains annotations for ∼ 48,000 human sncRNA genes and mature sncRNA products, 82% of which are expressed in one or more of the curated tissues. DASHR is available at http://lisanwanglab.org/DASHR.

  13. Non-Coding RNAs in Hodgkin Lymphoma

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    Anna Cordeiro

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs, small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to the 3’-UTR of their target genes, can act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Recently, other types of non-coding RNAs—piwiRNAs and long non-coding RNAs—have also been identified. Hodgkin lymphoma (HL is a B cell origin disease characterized by the presence of only 1% of tumor cells, known as Hodgkin and Reed-Stenberg (HRS cells, which interact with the microenvironment to evade apoptosis. Several studies have reported specific miRNA signatures that can differentiate HL lymph nodes from reactive lymph nodes, identify histologic groups within classical HL, and distinguish HRS cells from germinal center B cells. Moreover, some signatures are associated with survival or response to chemotherapy. Most of the miRNAs in the signatures regulate genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, or signaling pathways. Here we review findings on miRNAs in HL, as well as on other non-coding RNAs.

  14. Non-coding RNAs in cardiovascular ageing.

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    Gupta, Shashi Kumar; Piccoli, Maria Teresa; Thum, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The increasing burden of ageing populations and their healthcare expenditure is a major challenge worldwide. Ageing is a complex disorder and can be defined as progressive decline in function with time leading to increased incidence of various cardiovascular, neurological and immunological diseases. The human genome comprises of many protein coding and even more non-coding RNA genes. MicroRNAs, a class of non-coding RNA, regulate the expression of multiple messenger RNAs post-transcriptionally and are reported to be involved in crucial aspects of cell biology encompassing ageing. Recently, several studies have reported the regulation of microRNAs with ageing and microRNAs like miR-34 have emerged as critical regulator of ageing extending from Caenorhabditis elegans to mammals. Here, we summarize the reported role of microRNAs as well as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the process of ageing with a special emphasis on cardiovascular ageing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-Coding RNAs in Retinal Development

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    Robert Hindges

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal development is dependent on an accurately functioning network of transcriptional and translational regulators. Among the diverse classes of molecules involved, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs play a significant role. Members of this family are present in the cell as transcripts, but are not translated into proteins. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small ncRNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators. During the last decade, they have been implicated in a variety of biological processes, including the development of the nervous system. On the other hand, long-ncRNAs (lncRNAs represent a different class of ncRNAs that act mainly through processes involving chromatin remodeling and epigenetic mechanisms. The visual system is a prominent model to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying neurogenesis or circuit formation and function, including the differentiation of retinal progenitor cells to generate the seven principal cell classes in the retina, pathfinding decisions of retinal ganglion cell axons in order to establish the correct connectivity from the eye to the brain proper, and activity-dependent mechanisms for the functionality of visual circuits. Recent findings have associated ncRNAs in several of these processes and uncovered a new level of complexity for the existing regulatory mechanisms. This review summarizes and highlights the impact of ncRNAs during the development of the vertebrate visual system, with a specific focus on the role of miRNAs and a synopsis regarding recent findings on lncRNAs in the retina.

  16. Long noncoding RNAs and neuroblastoma.

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    Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2015-07-30

    Neuroblastoma is a disease that affects infants and despite intense multimodal therapy, high-risk patients have low survival rates (neuroblastoma have just begun to be elucidated. This review summarises where we are with regards to lncRNAs in neuroblastoma. The known mechanistic roles of lncRNAs during neuroblastoma pathogenesis are discussed, as well as the relationship between lncRNA expression and the differentiation capacity of neuroblastoma cells. We speculate about the use of some of these lncRNAs, such as those mapping to the 6p22 hotspot, as biomarkers for neuroblastoma prognosis and treatment. This novel way of thinking about both neuroblastoma and lncRNAs brings a new perspective to the prognosis and treatment of high-risk patients.

  17. Long noncoding RNAs and Alzheimer's disease

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    Luo Q

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Qiong Luo,1,2 Yinghui Chen1,2 1Department of Neurology, Jinshan Hospital, 2Department of Neurology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are typically defined as transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. lncRNAs can regulate gene expression at epigenetic, transcriptional, and posttranscriptional levels. Recent studies have shown that lncRNAs are involved in many neurological diseases such as epilepsy, neurodegenerative conditions, and genetic disorders. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease, which accounts for >80% of dementia in elderly subjects. In this review, we will highlight recent studies investigating the role of lncRNAs in Alzheimer’s disease and focus on some specific lncRNAs that may underlie Alzheimer’s disease pathophysiology and therefore could be potential therapeutic targets. Keywords: lncRNA, Alzheimer’s disease, ncRNAs, amyloid β peptide, BACE1, BC200, BACE1-AS

  18. Short stories on zebrafish long noncoding RNAs.

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    Haque, Shadabul; Kaushik, Kriti; Leonard, Vincent Elvin; Kapoor, Shruti; Sivadas, Ambily; Joshi, Adita; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar

    2014-12-01

    The recent re-annotation of the transcriptome of human and other model organisms, using next-generation sequencing approaches, has unravelled a hitherto unknown repertoire of transcripts that do not have a potential to code for proteins. These transcripts have been largely classified into an amorphous class popularly known as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA). This discovery of lncRNAs in human and other model systems have added a new layer to the understanding of gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In recent years, three independent studies have discovered a number of lncRNAs expressed in different stages of zebrafish development and adult tissues using a high-throughput RNA sequencing approach, significantly adding to the repertoire of genes known in zebrafish. A subset of these transcripts also shows distinct and specific spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression, pointing to a tight regulatory control and potential functional roles in development, organogenesis, and/ or homeostasis. This review provides an overview of the lncRNAs in zebrafish and discusses how their discovery could provide new insights into understanding biology, explaining mutant phenotypes, and helping in potentially modeling disease processes.

  19. Long Noncoding RNAs in Metabolic Syndrome Related Disorders

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    Magdalena Losko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribonucleic acids (RNAs are very complex and their all functions have yet to be fully clarified. Noncoding genes (noncoding RNA, sequences, and pseudogenes comprise 67% of all genes and they are represented by housekeeping noncoding RNAs (transfer RNA (tRNA, ribosomal RNA (rRNA, small nuclear RNA (snRNA, and small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA that are engaged in basic cellular processes and by regulatory noncoding RNA (short and long noncoding RNA (ncRNA that are important for gene expression/transcript stability. In this review, we summarize data concerning the significance of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in metabolic syndrome related disorders, focusing on adipose tissue and pancreatic islands.

  20. Long Noncoding RNAs, Chromatin, and Development

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    Daniel P. Caley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The way in which the genome of a multicellular organism can orchestrate the differentiation of trillions of cells and many organs, all from a single fertilized egg, is the subject of intense study. Different cell types can be defined by the networks of genes they express. This differential expression is regulated at the epigenetic level by chromatin modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, which interact with structural and enzymatic proteins, resulting in the activation or silencing of any given gene. While detailed mechanisms are emerging on the role of different chromatin modifications and how these functions are effected at the molecular level, it is still unclear how their deposition across the epigenomic landscape is regulated in different cells. A raft of recent evidence is accumulating that implicates long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in these processes. Most genomes studied to date undergo widespread transcription, the majority of which is not translated into proteins. In this review, we will describe recent work suggesting that lncRNAs are more than transcriptional "noise", but instead play a functional role by acting as tethers and guides to bind proteins responsible for modifying chromatin and mediating their deposition at specific genomic locations. We suggest that lncRNAs are at the heart of developmental regulation, determining the epigenetic status and transcriptional network in any given cell type, and that they provide a means to integrate external differentiation cues with dynamic nuclear responses through the regulation of a metastable epigenome. Better characterization of the lncRNA-protein "interactome" may eventually lead to a new molecular toolkit, allowing researchers and clinicians to modulate the genome at the epigenetic level to treat conditions such as cancer.

  1. The genetic signatures of noncoding RNAs.

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    John S Mattick

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of the genome in animals and plants is transcribed in a developmentally regulated manner to produce large numbers of non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, whose incidence increases with developmental complexity. There is growing evidence that these transcripts are functional, particularly in the regulation of epigenetic processes, leading to the suggestion that they compose a hitherto hidden layer of genomic programming in humans and other complex organisms. However, to date, very few have been identified in genetic screens. Here I show that this is explicable by an historic emphasis, both phenotypically and technically, on mutations in protein-coding sequences, and by presumptions about the nature of regulatory mutations. Most variations in regulatory sequences produce relatively subtle phenotypic changes, in contrast to mutations in protein-coding sequences that frequently cause catastrophic component failure. Until recently, most mapping projects have focused on protein-coding sequences, and the limited number of identified regulatory mutations have been interpreted as affecting conventional cis-acting promoter and enhancer elements, although these regions are often themselves transcribed. Moreover, ncRNA-directed regulatory circuits underpin most, if not all, complex genetic phenomena in eukaryotes, including RNA interference-related processes such as transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene silencing, position effect variegation, hybrid dysgenesis, chromosome dosage compensation, parental imprinting and allelic exclusion, paramutation, and possibly transvection and transinduction. The next frontier is the identification and functional characterization of the myriad sequence variations that influence quantitative traits, disease susceptibility, and other complex characteristics, which are being shown by genome-wide association studies to lie mostly in noncoding, presumably regulatory, regions. There is every possibility that

  2. Long noncoding RNAs in normal and pathological pluripotency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häfner, Sophia J; Talvard, Thomas G; Lund, Anders H

    2016-01-01

    noncoding transcripts, many of which have proven both functional and crucial for key cellular processes, including stemness maintenance. Moreover, numerous long noncoding RNAs are deregulated in cancer, but little is known concerning their functions and molecular mechanisms. Consequently, it seems essential...

  3. Decoding the function of nuclear long non-coding RNAs.

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    Chen, Ling-Ling; Carmichael, Gordon G

    2010-06-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are mRNA-like, non-protein-coding RNAs that are pervasively transcribed throughout eukaryotic genomes. Rather than silently accumulating in the nucleus, many of these are now known or suspected to play important roles in nuclear architecture or in the regulation of gene expression. In this review, we highlight some recent progress in how lncRNAs regulate these important nuclear processes at the molecular level. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Noncoding RNAs in cancer and cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianzhi Huang; Angel Alvarez; Bo Hu; Shi-Yuan Cheng

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) are of crucial importance for human cancer. The functional relevance of ncRNAs is particularly evident for microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). miRNAs are endogenously expressed small RNA sequences that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and have been extensively studied for their roles in cancers, whereas lncRNAs are emerging as important players in the cancer paradigm in recent years. These noncoding genes are often aberrantly expressed in a variety of human cancers. However, the biological functions of most ncRNAs remain largely unknown. Recently, evidence has begun to accumulate describing how ncRNAs are dysregulated in cancer and cancer stem cells, a subset of cancer cells harboring self-renewal and differentiation capacities. These studies provide insight into the functional roles that ncRNAs play in tumor initiation, progression, and resistance to therapies, and they suggest ncRNAs as attractive therapeutic targets and potential y useful diagnostic tools.

  5. Non-coding RNAs in chromatin disease involving neurological defects

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    Floriana eDella Ragione

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Novel classes of small and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are increasingly becoming apparent, being engaged in diverse structural, functional and regulatory activities. They take part in target gene silencing, play roles in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic processes, such as chromatin remodeling, nuclear reorganization with the formation of silent compartments and fine-tuning of gene recruitment into them. Among their functions, non-coding RNAs are thought to act either as guide or scaffold for epigenetic modifiers that write, erase and read the epigenetic signature over the genome. Studies on human disorders caused by defects in epigenetic modifiers and involving neurological phenotypes highlight the disruption of diverse classes of non-coding RNAs. Noteworthy, these molecules mediate a wide spectrum of neuronal functions, including brain development, and synaptic plasticity. These findings imply a significant contribution of ncRNAs in pathophysiology of the aforesaid diseases and provide new concepts for potential therapeutic applications.

  6. Long noncoding RNAs during normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

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    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Hu, Wenqian; Gromatzky, Austin A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly recognized to contribute to cellular development via diverse mechanisms during both health and disease. Here, we highlight recent progress on the study of lncRNAs that function in the development of blood cells. We emphasize lncRNAs that regulate blood cell fates through epigenetic control of gene expression, an emerging theme among functional lncRNAs. Many of these noncoding genes and their targets become dysregulated during malignant hematopoiesis, directly implicating lncRNAs in blood cancers such as leukemia. In a few cases, dysregulation of an lncRNA alone leads to malignant hematopoiesis in a mouse model. Thus, lncRNAs may be not only useful as markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancers of the blood, but also as potential targets for novel therapies.

  7. Identification and Functional Prediction of Large Intergenic Noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

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    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recognized in recent years as key regulators of diverse cellular processes. Genome-wide large-scale projects have uncovered thousands of lncRNAs in many model organisms. Large intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are lncRNAs that are transcribed from intergeni...

  8. Identifying cancer-causing noncoding RNAs

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    le Sage, Carlos Karel

    2008-01-01

    To circumvent the dependency on prediction models, we developed a microRNA-screen-based assay to establish links between cellular phenotypes and microRNAs (miRNAs). To this end, a miRNA expression library (miR-Lib) was built consisting of 300 annotated miRNAs and around 100 candidate miRNAs. These m

  9. Role of Exosomal Noncoding RNAs in Lung Carcinogenesis

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    Tao Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer death worldwide. Novel, recently discovered classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs have diverse functional and regulatory activities and increasing evidence suggests crucial roles for deregulated ncRNAs in the onset and progression of cancer, including lung cancer. Exosomes are small extracellular membrane vesicles of endocytic origin that are released by many cells and are found in most body fluids. Tumor-derived exosomes mediate tumorigenesis by facilitating tumor growth and metastasis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a subclass of ncRNAs that are present in exosomes. miRNAs are taken up by neighboring or distant cells and modulate various functions of recipient cells. Here, we review exosome-derived ncRNAs with a focus on miRNAs and their role in lung cancer biology.

  10. Non-coding RNAs in primary liver cancer

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    Michele eGhidini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a primary malignancy of the liver with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Over the past few years, many studies have evaluated the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs in hepatocarcinogenesis and tumour progression. ncRNAs were shown to have diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic potential in HCC. In this manuscript, we review the latest major discoveries concerning microRNAs and long ncRNAs in HCC pathogenesis, and discuss the potentials and the limitations for their use in clinical practice.

  11. Non-coding RNAs in the Ovarian Follicle

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    Rosalia Battaglia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian ovarian follicle is the complex reproductive unit comprising germ cell, somatic cells (Cumulus and Granulosa cells, and follicular fluid (FF: paracrine communication among the different cell types through FF ensures the development of a mature oocyte ready for fertilization. This paper is focused on non-coding RNAs in ovarian follicles and their predicted role in the pathways involved in oocyte growth and maturation. We determined the expression profiles of microRNAs in human oocytes and FF by high-throughput analysis and identified 267 microRNAs in FF and 176 in oocytes. Most of these were FF microRNAs, while 9 were oocyte specific. By bioinformatic analysis, independently performed on FF and oocyte microRNAs, we identified the most significant Biological Processes and the pathways regulated by their validated targets. We found many pathways shared between the two compartments and some specific for oocyte microRNAs. Moreover, we found 41 long non-coding RNAs able to interact with oocyte microRNAs and potentially involved in the regulation of folliculogenesis. These data are important in basic reproductive research and could also be useful for clinical applications. In fact, the characterization of non-coding RNAs in ovarian follicles could improve reproductive disease diagnosis, provide biomarkers of oocyte quality in Assisted Reproductive Treatment, and allow the development of therapies for infertility disorders.

  12. Long Non-coding RNAs In Cancer Progression

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    Keiko eTano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent large-scale transcriptome analyses have revealed that transcription is spread throughout the mammalian genomes, yielding large numbers of transcripts, including long non-coding (lnc RNAs with little or no protein-coding capacity. Dozens of lncRNAs have been identified as biologically significant. In many cases, lncRNAs act as key molecules in the regulation of processes such as chromatin remodeling, transcription and post-transcriptional processing. Several lncRNAs (e.g., MALAT1, HOTAIR and ANRIL are associated with human diseases, including cancer. Those lncRNAs associated with cancer are often aberrantly expressed. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms by which lncRNAs regulate cancer development are unclear, recent studies have revealed that such aberrant expression of lncRNAs affects the progression of cancers. In this review, we highlight recent findings regarding the roles of lncRNAs in cancer biology.

  13. Long Non-coding RNAs in the Cytoplasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farooq Rashid; Abdullah Shah; Ge Shan

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) transcribed from eukaryotic genome are important regulators in different aspects of cellular events. Cytoplasm is the residence and the site of action for many lncRNAs. The cytoplasmic lncRNAs play indispensable roles with multiple molecular mechanisms in animal and human cells. In this review, we mainly talk about functions and the underlying mechanisms of lncRNAs in the cytoplasm. We highlight relatively well-studied examples of cytoplasmic lncRNAs for their roles in modulating mRNA stability, regulating mRNA translation, serving as competing endogenous RNAs, functioning as precursors of microRNAs, and mediating protein modifications. We also elaborate the perspectives of cytoplasmic lncRNA studies.

  14. Uncovering RNA editing sites in long non-coding RNAs

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    Ernesto ePicardi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing is an important co/post-transcriptional molecular process able to modify RNAs by nucleotide insertions/deletions or substitutions. In human, the most common RNA editing event involves the deamination of adenosine (A into inosine (I through the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR proteins. Although A-to-I editing can occur in both coding and non coding RNAs, recent findings, based on RNA-seq experiments, have clearly demonstrated that a large fraction of RNA editing events alter non-coding RNAs sequences including untranslated regions of mRNAs (UTRs, introns, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA and low molecular weight RNAs (tRNA, miRNAs and others. An accurate detection of A-to-I events occurring in non-coding RNAs is of utmost importance to clarify yet unknown functional roles of RNA editing in the context of gene expression regulation and maintenance of cell homeostasis. In the last few years, massive transcriptome sequencing has been employed to identify putative RNA editing changes at genome scale. Despite several efforts, the computational prediction of A-to-I sites in complete eukaryotic genomes is yet a challenging task. We have recently developed a software package, called REDItools, in order to simplify the detection of RNA editing events from deep sequencing data. In the present work, we show the potential of our tools in recovering A-to-I candidates from RNA-Seq experiments as well as guidelines to improve the RNA editing detection in non-coding RNAs, with specific attention to the lncRNAs.

  15. Noncoding RNAs in protein clearance pathways: implications in neurodegenerative diseases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SONALI SENGUPTA

    2017-03-01

    The importance of noncoding genome has become more evident in recent years. Before genome sequencing, the most well studied portion of our genome was protein coding genes. Interestingly, this coding portion accounted only for 1.5% of the genome, the rest being the noncoding sequences. Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are involved in normal cell physiology, stress, and disease states. A class of small ncRNAs and miRNAs has gained much importance because of its involvement in human diseases such as cancer. Involvement of long ncRNAs have also been acknowledged in other human diseases, especially inneurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the presence of abnormally folded proteins that are toxic to the cell. Several studies from model organisms suggest upregulation of pathways that clear this toxic protein may provide protection against neurodegeneration. In this review, I summarize the importance of ncRNAs in protein quality control system of cell that is implicated in this fatal group of neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Long Non-Coding RNAs and Complex Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changning Liu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are a heterogeneous class of RNAs that are generally defined as non-protein-coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. Recently, an increasing number of studies have shown that lncRNAs can be involved in various critical biological processes, such as chromatin remodeling, gene transcription, and protein transport and trafficking. Moreover, lncRNAs are dysregulated in a number of complex human diseases, including coronary artery diseases, autoimmune diseases, neurological disorders, and various cancers, which indicates their important roles in these diseases. Here, we reviewed the current understanding of lncRNAs, including their definition and subclassification, regulatory functions, and potential roles in different types of complex human diseases.

  17. Long Non-coding RNAs and Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing-Jing; Xie, Xiao-Juan; Li, Xu; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key players in gene expression that govern cell developmental processes, and thus contributing to diseases, especially cancers. Many studies have suggested that aberrant expression of lncRNAs is responsible for drug resistance, a substantial obstacle for cancer therapy. Drug resistance not only results from individual variations in patients, but also from genetic and epigenetic differences in tumors. It is reported that drug resistance is tightly modulated by lncRNAs which change the stability and translation of mRNAs encoding factors involved in cell survival, proliferation, and drug metabolism. In this review, we summarize recent advances in research on lncRNAs associated with drug resistance and underlying molecular or cellular mechanisms, which may contribute helpful approaches for the development of new therapeutic strategies to overcome treatment failure.

  18. Non-Coding RNAs in Muscle Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferlini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are the most recently identified class of regulatory RNAs with vital functions in gene expression regulation and cell development. Among the variety of roles they play, their involvement in human diseases has opened new avenues of research towards the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. Important data come from the field of hereditary muscle dystrophies, like Duchenne muscle dystrophy and Myotonic dystrophies, rare diseases affecting 1 in 7000–15,000 newborns and is characterized by severe to mild muscle weakness associated with cardiac involvement. Novel therapeutic approaches are now ongoing for these diseases, also based on splicing modulation. In this review we provide an overview about ncRNAs and their behavior in muscular dystrophy and explore their links with diagnosis, prognosis and treatments, highlighting the role of regulatory RNAs in these pathologies.

  19. Non-coding RNAs in neural networks, REST-assured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eROSSBACH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the nervous system, several key steps in cellular complexity and development are regulated by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs and the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor (REST/NRSF. REST recruits gene regulatory complexes to regulatory sequences, among them the repressor element-1/neuron restrictive silencer element (RE1/NRSE, and mediates developmental stage-specific gene expression or repression, chromatin (re-orga-nization or silencing for protein-coding genes as well as for several ncRNAs like microRNAs (miRNAs, short interfering RNAs (siRNAs or long ncRNAs. NcRNAs are far from being just transcriptional noise and are involved in chromatin accessibility, transcription and post-transcriptional processing, trafficking or RNA editing. REST and its cofactor CoREST are both highly regulated through various ncRNAs. The importance of the correct regulation within the ncRNA network, the ncRNAome, is demonstrated when it comes to a deregulation of REST and/or ncRNAs associated with molecular pathophysiology underlying diverse disorders including neurodegenerative diseases or brain tumors.

  20. Expression Signatures of Long Noncoding RNAs in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

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    Xiao-Yang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS, the most common pediatric spinal deformity, is considered a complex genetic disease. Causing genes and pathogenesis of AIS are still unclear. This study was designed to identify differentially expressed long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs involving the pathogenesis of AIS. Methods. We first performed comprehensive screening of lncRNA and mRNA in AIS patients and healthy children using Agilent human lncRNA + mRNA Array V3.0 microarray. LncRNAs expression in different AIS patients was further evaluated using quantitative PCR. Results. A total of 139 lncRNAs and 546 mRNAs were differentially expressed between AIS patients and healthy control. GO and Pathway analysis showed that these mRNAs might be involved in bone mineralization, neuromuscular junction, skeletal system morphogenesis, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism, and regulation of signal pathway. Four lncRNAs (ENST00000440778.1, ENST00000602322.1, ENST00000414894.1, and TCONS_00028768 were differentially expressed between different patients when grouped according to age, height, classification, severity of scoliosis, and Risser grade. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the abnormal expression of lncRNAs and mRNAs in AIS, and the expression of some lncRNAs was related to clinical features. This study is helpful for further understanding of lncRNAs in pathogenesis, treatment, and prognosis of AIS.

  1. Expression Signatures of Long Noncoding RNAs in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Yang; Wang, Liang; Yu, Bin; Zhuang, Qian-yu; Wang, Yi-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), the most common pediatric spinal deformity, is considered a complex genetic disease. Causing genes and pathogenesis of AIS are still unclear. This study was designed to identify differentially expressed long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) involving the pathogenesis of AIS. Methods. We first performed comprehensive screening of lncRNA and mRNA in AIS patients and healthy children using Agilent human lncRNA + mRNA Array V3.0 microarray. LncRNAs expression in different AIS patients was further evaluated using quantitative PCR. Results. A total of 139 lncRNAs and 546 mRNAs were differentially expressed between AIS patients and healthy control. GO and Pathway analysis showed that these mRNAs might be involved in bone mineralization, neuromuscular junction, skeletal system morphogenesis, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism, and regulation of signal pathway. Four lncRNAs (ENST00000440778.1, ENST00000602322.1, ENST00000414894.1, and TCONS_00028768) were differentially expressed between different patients when grouped according to age, height, classification, severity of scoliosis, and Risser grade. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the abnormal expression of lncRNAs and mRNAs in AIS, and the expression of some lncRNAs was related to clinical features. This study is helpful for further understanding of lncRNAs in pathogenesis, treatment, and prognosis of AIS. PMID:26421281

  2. An expanding universe of noncoding RNAs between the poles of basic science and clinical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Patrick P; Hensel, Kai O; Weber, David; Postberg, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The Keystone Symposium 'MicroRNAs and Noncoding RNAs in Cancer', Keystone, CO, USA, 7-12 June 2015 Since the discovery of RNAi, great efforts have been undertaken to unleash the potential biomedical applicability of small noncoding RNAs, mainly miRNAs, involving their use as biomarkers for personalized diagnostics or their usability as active agents or therapy targets. The research's focus on the noncoding RNA world is now slowly moving from a phase of basic discoveries into a new phase, where every single molecule out of many hundreds of cataloged noncoding RNAs becomes dissected in order to investigate these molecules' biomedical relevance. In addition, RNA classes neglected before, such as long noncoding RNAs or circular RNAs attract more attention. Numerous timely results and hypotheses were presented at the 2015 Keystone Symposium 'MicroRNAs and Noncoding RNAs in Cancer'.

  3. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  4. Genome-wide identification of non-coding RNAs interacted with microRNAs in soybean

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    Chuyu eYe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of RNA species interacting with microRNAs (miRNAs form a complex gene regulation network and play vital roles in diverse biological processes. In this study, we performed a genome-wide identification of endogenous target mimics (eTMs for miRNAs and phased-siRNA-producing loci (PHAS in soybean with a focus on those involved in lipid metabolism. The results showed that a large number of eTMs and PHAS genes could be found in soybean. Additionally, we found that lipid metabolism related genes were potentially regulated by 28 miRNAs, and nine of them were potentially further regulated by a number of eTMs with expression evidence. Thirty-three miRNAs were found to trigger production of phasiRNAs from 49 PHAS genes, which were able to target lipid metabolism related genes. Degradome data supported miRNA- and/or phasiRNA-mediated cleavage of genes involved in lipid metabolism. Most eTMs for miRNAs involved in lipid metabolism and phasiRNAs targeting lipid metabolism related genes showed a tissue-specific expression pattern. Our bioinformatical evidences suggested that lipid metabolism in soybean is potentially regulated by a complex non-coding network, including miRNAs, eTMs and phasiRNAs, and the results extended our knowledge on functions of non-coding RNAs.

  5. Epigenetic Regulation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Requires Long Noncoding RNAs

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    Laura Amicone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has proven the relevance of epigenetic changes in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, the major adult liver malignancy. Moreover, HCC onset and progression correlate with the deregulation of several long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs, exhibiting great biological significance. As discussed in this review, many of these transcripts are able to specifically act as tumor suppressors or oncogenes by means of their role as molecular platforms. Indeed, these lncRNAs are able to bind and recruit epigenetic modifiers on specific genomic loci, ultimately resulting in regulation of the gene expression relevant in cancer development. The evidence presented in this review highlights that lncRNAs-mediated epigenetic regulation should be taken into account for potential targeted therapeutic approaches.

  6. Regulatory Non-Coding RNAs in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Rosa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The most part of our genome encodes for RNA transcripts are never translated into proteins. These include families of RNA molecules with a regulatory function, which can be arbitrarily subdivided in short (less than 200 nucleotides and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs. MicroRNAs, which act post-transcriptionally to repress the function of target mRNAs, belong to the first group. Included in the second group are multi-exonic and polyadenylated long ncRNAs (lncRNAs, localized either in the nucleus, where they can associate with chromatin remodeling complexes to regulate transcription, or in the cytoplasm, acting as post-transcriptional regulators. Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, represent useful systems for modeling normal development and human diseases, as well as promising tools for regenerative medicine. To fully explore their potential, however, a deep understanding of the molecular basis of stemness is crucial. In recent years, increasing evidence of the importance of regulation by ncRNAs in pluripotent cells is accumulating. In this review, we will discuss recent findings pointing to multiple roles played by regulatory ncRNAs in ESC and iPSCs, where they act in concert with signaling pathways, transcriptional regulatory circuitries and epigenetic factors to modulate the balance between pluripotency and differentiation.

  7. Circadian changes in long noncoding RNAs in the pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, Steven L; Munson, Peter J; Cherukuri, Praveen F; Sugden, David; Rath, Martin F; Møller, Morten; Clokie, Samuel J H; Fu, Cong; Olanich, Mary E; Rangel, Zoila; Werner, Thomas; Mullikin, James C; Klein, David C

    2012-08-14

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a broad range of biological roles, including regulation of expression of genes and chromosomes. Here, we present evidence that lncRNAs are involved in vertebrate circadian biology. Differential night/day expression of 112 lncRNAs (0.3 to >50 kb) occurs in the rat pineal gland, which is the source of melatonin, the hormone of the night. Approximately one-half of these changes reflect nocturnal increases. Studies of eight lncRNAs with 2- to >100-fold daily rhythms indicate that, in most cases, the change results from neural stimulation from the central circadian oscillator in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (doubling time = 0.5-1.3 h). Light exposure at night rapidly reverses (halving time = 9-32 min) levels of some of these lncRNAs. Organ culture studies indicate that expression of these lncRNAs is regulated by norepinephrine acting through cAMP. These findings point to a dynamic role of lncRNAs in the circadian system.

  8. The Large Mitochondrial Genome of Symbiodinium minutum Reveals Conserved Noncoding Sequences between Dinoflagellates and Apicomplexans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoguchi, Eiichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Hisata, Kanako; Satoh, Nori; Mungpakdee, Sutada

    2015-07-20

    Even though mitochondrial genomes, which characterize eukaryotic cells, were first discovered more than 50 years ago, mitochondrial genomics remains an important topic in molecular biology and genome sciences. The Phylum Alveolata comprises three major groups (ciliates, apicomplexans, and dinoflagellates), the mitochondrial genomes of which have diverged widely. Even though the gene content of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes is reportedly comparable to that of apicomplexans, the highly fragmented and rearranged genome structures of dinoflagellates have frustrated whole genomic analysis. Consequently, noncoding sequences and gene arrangements of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes have not been well characterized. Here we report that the continuous assembled genome (∼326 kb) of the dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium minutum, is AT-rich (∼64.3%) and that it contains three protein-coding genes. Based upon in silico analysis, the remaining 99% of the genome comprises transcriptomic noncoding sequences. RNA edited sites and unique, possible start and stop codons clarify conserved regions among dinoflagellates. Our massive transcriptome analysis shows that almost all regions of the genome are transcribed, including 27 possible fragmented ribosomal RNA genes and 12 uncharacterized small RNAs that are similar to mitochondrial RNA genes of the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Gene map comparisons show that gene order is only slightly conserved between S. minutum and P. falciparum. However, small RNAs and intergenic sequences share sequence similarities with P. falciparum, suggesting that the function of noncoding sequences has been preserved despite development of very different genome structures.

  9. Long noncoding RNAs(lncRNAs) and the molecular hallmarks of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikakis, Ioannis; Panda, Amaresh C; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2014-12-01

    During aging, progressive deleterious changes increase the risk of disease and death. Prominent molecular hallmarks of aging are genomic instability, telomere attrition, epigenetic alterations, loss of proteostasis, cellular senescence, stem cell exhaustion, and altered intercellular communication. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in a wide range of biological processes, including age-related diseases like cancer, cardiovascular pathologies, and neurodegenerative disorders. Evidence is emerging that lncRNAs influence the molecular processes that underlie age-associated phenotypes. Here, we review our current understanding of lncRNAs that control the development of aging traits.

  10. Perspectives of long noncoding RNAs in cancer diagnostics and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo M Reis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs transcribed from intergenic and intronic regions of the human genome constitute a broad class of cellular transcripts that are under intensive investigation. While only a handful of lncRNAs have been characterized, their involvement in fundamental cellular processes that control gene expression highlight a central role in cell homeostasis. Not surprisingly, aberrant expression of regulatory lncRNAs has been increasingly documented in different types of cancer, where they can mediate both oncogenic or tumor suppressor effects. Interaction with chromatin remodeling complexes that promote silencing of specific genes seems to be a general mode of lncRNA regulation, but it is conceivable that additional mechanisms of action are yet to be unveiled. LncRNAs show greater tissue specificity compared to protein-coding mRNAs making them attractive in the search of novel diagnostics/prognostics cancer biomarkers in body fluid samples. In fact, lncRNA PCA3 can be detected in urine samples and has been shown to improve diagnosis of prostate cancer. Identification of regulatory regions controlling the expression of lncRNAs highly expressed in tumors (e.g. lncRNA H19 holds potential to the development of targeted cancer therapies based on vectors carrying toxin genes under control of tumor-specific promoters. Annotation and functional characterization of the lncRNA complement of the cancer transcriptome will conceivably provide new venues for early diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  11. Strategies to identify long noncoding RNAs involved in gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Catherine

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have been detected in nearly every cell type and found to be fundamentally involved in many biological processes. The characterization of lncRNAs has immense potential to advance our comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and gene regulation, along with implications for the treatment of human disease. The recent ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements study reported 9,640 lncRNA loci in the human genome, which corresponds to around half the number of protein-coding genes. Because of this sheer number and their functional diversity, it is crucial to identify a pool of potentially relevant lncRNAs early on in a given study. In this review, we evaluate the methods for isolating lncRNAs by immunoprecipitation and review the advantages, disadvantages, and applications of three widely used approaches – microarray, tiling array, and RNA-seq – for identifying lncRNAs involved in gene regulation. We also look at ways in which data from publicly available databases such as ENCODE can support the study of lncRNAs.

  12. On the classification of long non-coding RNAs

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Lina

    2013-06-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been found to perform various functions in a wide variety of important biological processes. To make easier interpretation of lncRNA functionality and conduct deep mining on these transcribed sequences, it is convenient to classify lncRNAs into different groups. Here, we summarize classification methods of lncRNAs according to their four major features, namely, genomic location and context, effect exerted on DNA sequences, mechanism of functioning and their targeting mechanism. In combination with the presently available function annotations, we explore potential relationships between different classification categories, and generalize and compare biological features of different lncRNAs within each category. Finally, we present our view on potential further studies. We believe that the classifications of lncRNAs as indicated above are of fundamental importance for lncRNA studies, helpful for further investigation of specific lncRNAs, for formulation of new hypothesis based on different features of lncRNA and for exploration of the underlying lncRNA functional mechanisms. © 2013 Landes Bioscience.

  13. Non-coding RNAs in schistosomes: an unexplored world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Katia C; Carvalho, Mariana L P; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Kitajima, João P; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2011-06-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) were recently given much higher attention due to technical advances in sequencing which expanded the characterization of transcriptomes in different organisms. ncRNAs have different lengths (22 nt to >1,000 nt) and mechanisms of action that essentially comprise a sophisticated gene expression regulation network. Recent publication of schistosome genomes and transcriptomes has increased the description and characterization of a large number of parasite genes. Here we review the number of predicted genes and the coverage of genomic bases in face of the public ESTs dataset available, including a critical appraisal of the evidence and characterization of ncRNAs in schistosomes. We show expression data for ncRNAs in Schistosoma mansoni. We analyze three different microarray experiment datasets: (1) adult worms' large-scale expression measurements; (2) differentially expressed S. mansoni genes regulated by a human cytokine (TNF-α) in a parasite culture; and (3) a stage-specific expression of ncRNAs. All these data point to ncRNAs involved in different biological processes and physiological responses that suggest functionality of these new players in the parasite's biology. Exploring this world is a challenge for the scientists under a new molecular perspective of host-parasite interactions and parasite development.

  14. Decoding the non-coding RNAs in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonrock, Nicole; Götz, Jürgen

    2012-11-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are integral components of biological networks with fundamental roles in regulating gene expression. They can integrate sequence information from the DNA code, epigenetic regulation and functions of multimeric protein complexes to potentially determine the epigenetic status and transcriptional network in any given cell. Humans potentially contain more ncRNAs than any other species, especially in the brain, where they may well play a significant role in human development and cognitive ability. This review discusses their emerging role in Alzheimer's disease (AD), a human pathological condition characterized by the progressive impairment of cognitive functions. We discuss the complexity of the ncRNA world and how this is reflected in the regulation of the amyloid precursor protein and Tau, two proteins with central functions in AD. By understanding this intricate regulatory network, there is hope for a better understanding of disease mechanisms and ultimately developing diagnostic and therapeutic tools.

  15. MicroRNAs regulate mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhdoumi, Pouran; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2016-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional gene regulators. They are involved in the pathogenesis of different disorders including heart diseases. MiRNAs contribute to ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/RI) by altering numerous key signaling elements. Together with alterations in the various potential signaling pathways, modification in miRNA expression has been suggested as a part of the response network following ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). In addition, cardiac mitochondrial homeostasis is closely associated with cardiac function and impairment of mitochondrial activity occurred after ischemia/reperfusion injury. MiRNAs play a key role in the regulation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and signaling proteins. In this review, we summarize the knowledge currently available regarding the molecular mechanisms of miRNA-regulated mitochondrial functions during ischemia/reperfusion injury. This regulation occurs in different stages of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

  16. Clusters of internally primed transcripts reveal novel long noncoding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are increasingly being recognized as having important regulatory roles. Although much recent attention has focused on tiny 22- to 25-nucleotide microRNAs, several functional ncRNAs are orders of magnitude larger in size. Examples of such macro ncRNAs include Xist and Air, which in mouse are 18 and 108 kilobases (Kb, respectively. We surveyed the 102,801 FANTOM3 mouse cDNA clones and found that Air and Xist were present not as single, full-length transcripts but as a cluster of multiple, shorter cDNAs, which were unspliced, had little coding potential, and were most likely primed from internal adenine-rich regions within longer parental transcripts. We therefore conducted a genome-wide search for regional clusters of such cDNAs to find novel macro ncRNA candidates. Sixty-six regions were identified, each of which mapped outside known protein-coding loci and which had a mean length of 92 Kb. We detected several known long ncRNAs within these regions, supporting the basic rationale of our approach. In silico analysis showed that many regions had evidence of imprinting and/or antisense transcription. These regions were significantly associated with microRNAs and transcripts from the central nervous system. We selected eight novel regions for experimental validation by northern blot and RT-PCR and found that the majority represent previously unrecognized noncoding transcripts that are at least 10 Kb in size and predominantly localized in the nucleus. Taken together, the data not only identify multiple new ncRNAs but also suggest the existence of many more macro ncRNAs like Xist and Air.

  17. Genome-wide analyses of small noncoding RNAs in streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja ePatenge

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococci represent a diverse group of Gram-positive bacteria, which colonize a wide range of hosts among animals and humans. Streptococcal species occur as commensal as well as pathogenic organisms. Many of the pathogenic species can cause severe, invasive infections in their hosts leading to a high morbidity and mortality. The consequence is a tremendous suffering on the part of men and livestock besides the significant financial burden in the agricultural and healthcare sectors. An environmentally stimulated and tightly controlled expression of virulence factor genes is of fundamental importance for streptococcal pathogenicity. Bacterial small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs modulate the expression of genes involved in stress response, sugar metabolism, surface composition, and other properties that are related to bacterial virulence. Even though the regulatory character is shared by this class of RNAs, variation on the molecular level results in a high diversity of functional mechanisms. The knowledge about the role of sRNAs in streptococci is still limited, but in recent years, genome-wide screens for sRNAs have been conducted in an increasing number of species. Bioinformatics prediction approaches have been employed as well as expression analyses by classical array techniques or next generation sequencing. This review will give an overview of whole genome screens for sRNAs in streptococci with a focus on describing the different methods and comparing their outcome considering sRNA conservation among species, functional similarities, and relevance for streptococcal infection.

  18. Non-Coding RNAs: New Players in Skin Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Eva K; Xu Landén, Ning

    2017-03-01

    Significance: Wound healing is a basic physiological process that is utilized to keep the integrity of the skin. Impaired wound repair, such as chronic wounds and pathological scars, presents a major health and economic burden worldwide. To date, efficient targeted treatment for these wound disorders is still lacking, which is largely due to our limited understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying these diseases. Research driven around discovering new therapies for these complications is, therefore, an urgent need. Recent Advances: The vast majority of the human genome is transcribed to RNAs that lack protein-coding capacity. Intensive research in the recent decade has revealed that these non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) function as important regulators of cellular physiology and pathology, which makes them promising therapeutic and diagnostic entities. Critical Issues: A class of short ncRNAs, microRNAs, has been found to be indispensable for all the phases of skin wound healing and plays important roles in the pathogenesis of wound complications. The role of long ncRNAs (lncRNA) in skin wound healing remains largely unexplored. Recent studies revealed the essential role of lncRNAs in epidermal differentiation and stress response, indicating their potential importance for skin wound healing, which warrants future research. Future Directions: An investigation of ncRNAs will add new layers of complexity to our understanding of normal skin wound healing as well as to the pathogenesis of wound disorders. Development of ncRNA-based biomarkers and treatments is an interesting and important avenue for future research on wound healing.

  19. Long intergenic noncoding RNAs: novel drivers of human lymphocyte differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria ePanzeri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Upon recognition of a foreign antigen, CD4+ naïve T lymphocytes proliferate and differentiate into subsets with distinct functions. This process is fundamental for the proper immune system function, as CD4+ T cells orchestrate both the innate and adaptive immune response. Traditionally, this differentiation event has been regarded as the acquisition of an irreversible cell fate so that memory and effector CD4+ T subsets were considered terminally differentiated cells or lineages. Consequently, these lineages are conventionally defined thanks to their prototypical set of cytokines and transcription factors. However, recent findings suggest that CD4+ T lymphocytes possess a remarkable phenotypic plasticity, as they can often redirect their functional program depending on the milieu they encounter. Therefore new questions are now compelling such as which are the molecular determinants underlying plasticity and stability and how the balance between these two opposite forces drives the cell fate. As already mentioned, in some cases the mere expression of cytokines and master regulators could not fully explain lymphocytes plasticity. We should consider other layers of regulation, including epigenetic factors such as the modulation of chromatin state or the transcription of noncoding RNAs, whose high cell-specificity give a hint on their involvement in cell fate determination. In this review, we will focus on the recent advances in understanding CD4+ T lymphocytes subsets specification from an epigenetic point of view. In particular, we will emphasize the emerging importance of noncoding RNAs as key players in these differentiation events. We will also present here new data from our laboratory highlighting the contribution of long noncoding RNAs in driving human CD4+ T lymphocytes differentiation.

  20. Long Non-Coding RNAs in Endometrial Carcinoma

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    Maria A. Smolle

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial carcinoma (EC, the second most common form of gynaecological malignancy, can be divided into two distinct sub-types: Type I tumours arise from hyperplastic endometrium and typically effect women around the time of menopause, whereas type II tumours arise in postmenopausal women from atrophic endometrium. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are a novel class of non-protein coding molecules that have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of many types of cancer including gynaecological tumours. Although they play critical physiological roles in cellular metabolism, their expression and function are deregulated in EC compared with paired normal tissue, indicating that they may also participate in tumour initiation and progression. For instance, the lncRNA MALAT-1 is down-regulated in EC samples compared to normal or hyperplastic endometrium, whereas the lncRNA OVAL is down-regulated in type II disease but up-regulated in type I disease. Other notatble lncRNAs such as HOTAIR, H19 and SRA become up-regulated with increasing EC tumour grade and other features associated with poor prognosis. In the current review, we will examine the growing body of evidence linking deregulated lncRNAs with specific biological functions of tumour cells in EC, we will highlight associations between lncRNAs and the molecular pathways implicated in EC tumourigenesis and we will identify critical knowledge gaps that remain to be addressed.

  1. Potentials of Long Noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs in Sarcoma: From Biomarkers to Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Min

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoma includes some of the most heterogeneous tumors, which make the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of these rare yet diverse neoplasms especially challenging. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are important regulators of cancer initiation and progression, which implies their potential as neoteric prognostic and diagnostic markers in cancer, including sarcoma. A relationship between lncRNAs and sarcoma pathogenesis and progression is emerging. Recent studies demonstrate that lncRNAs influence sarcoma cell proliferation, metastasis, and drug resistance. Additionally, lncRNA expression profiles are predictive of sarcoma prognosis. In this review, we summarize contemporary advances in the research of lncRNA biogenesis and functions in sarcoma. We also highlight the potential for lncRNAs to become innovative diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers as well as therapeutic targets in sarcoma.

  2. Kinetic models of gene expression including non-coding RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-03-01

    In cells, genes are transcribed into mRNAs, and the latter are translated into proteins. Due to the feedbacks between these processes, the kinetics of gene expression may be complex even in the simplest genetic networks. The corresponding models have already been reviewed in the literature. A new avenue in this field is related to the recognition that the conventional scenario of gene expression is fully applicable only to prokaryotes whose genomes consist of tightly packed protein-coding sequences. In eukaryotic cells, in contrast, such sequences are relatively rare, and the rest of the genome includes numerous transcript units representing non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). During the past decade, it has become clear that such RNAs play a crucial role in gene expression and accordingly influence a multitude of cellular processes both in the normal state and during diseases. The numerous biological functions of ncRNAs are based primarily on their abilities to silence genes via pairing with a target mRNA and subsequently preventing its translation or facilitating degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Many other abilities of ncRNAs have been discovered as well. Our review is focused on the available kinetic models describing the mRNA, ncRNA and protein interplay. In particular, we systematically present the simplest models without kinetic feedbacks, models containing feedbacks and predicting bistability and oscillations in simple genetic networks, and models describing the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks. Mathematically, the presentation is based primarily on temporal mean-field kinetic equations. The stochastic and spatio-temporal effects are also briefly discussed.

  3. RNA templating the epigenome: long noncoding RNAs as molecular scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, Robert C; Tsai, Miao-Chih; Chang, Howard Y

    2011-05-01

    Cellular pathways must be synergized, controlled and organized to manage homeostasis. To achieve high selectivity within the crowded cellular milieu the cell utilizes scaffolding complexes whose role is to bring molecules in proximity thereby controlling and enhancing intermolecular interactions and signaling events. To date, scaffolds have been shown to be composed of proteinaceous units; however, recent evidence has supported the idea that non-coding RNAs may also play a similar role. In this point of view article we discuss recent data on ncRNA scaffolds, with particular focus on ncRNA HOTAIR. Using our current knowledge of signaling networks we discuss the role that RNA may play in writing and regulating histone modifications and the information needed for correct gene expression. Further, we speculate on additional, yet undiscovered roles that ncRNAs may be playing as molecular scaffolds.

  4. Non-coding RNAs: the architects of eukaryotic complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattick, J S

    2001-11-01

    Around 98% of all transcriptional output in humans is non-coding RNA. RNA-mediated gene regulation is widespread in higher eukaryotes and complex genetic phenomena like RNA interference, co-suppression, transgene silencing, imprinting, methylation, and possibly position-effect variegation and transvection, all involve intersecting pathways based on or connected to RNA signaling. I suggest that the central dogma is incomplete, and that intronic and other non-coding RNAs have evolved to comprise a second tier of gene expression in eukaryotes, which enables the integration and networking of complex suites of gene activity. Although proteins are the fundamental effectors of cellular function, the basis of eukaryotic complexity and phenotypic variation may lie primarily in a control architecture composed of a highly parallel system of trans-acting RNAs that relay state information required for the coordination and modulation of gene expression, via chromatin remodeling, RNA-DNA, RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions. This system has interesting and perhaps informative analogies with small world networks and dataflow computing.

  5. Potential roles of noncoding RNAs in environmental epigenetic transgenerational inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei

    2014-12-01

    "Epigenetic transgenerational inheritance" (ETI) has been defined as germline (sperm or egg) transmission of epigenetic information between generations in the absence of direct exposures or genetic manipulations. Among reported cases of ETI in mammals, the majority are induced by environmental factors, including environmental toxicants [e.g. agricultural fungicide vinclozolin, plastic additive bisphenol A, pesticide methoxychlor, dioxin, di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, and hydrocarbons] and poor nutritional conditions. Although the ETI phenomenon is well established, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Putative epimutations, including changes in DNA methylation and histone modification patterns, have been reported, but it remains unclear how these epimutations are formed in the first place, and how they are memorized in the germline and then get transmitted to subsequent generations. Based on recent advances in our understanding of regulatory noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), I propose that ncRNAs are involved in ETI, during both the initial epimutation formation and the subsequent germline transmission of epimutations. ncRNAs can function at epigenetic levels by affecting DNA methylation and histone modifications, thereby changing gene transcriptional activities, which can lead to an altered mRNA transcriptome associated with a disease phenotype. Alternatively, novel or altered ncRNA expression can cause dysregulated post-transcriptional regulation, thus directly affecting the mRNA transcriptome and inducing a disease phenotype. Sperm-borne ncRNAs are potential mediators for epigenetic memory across generations, but they alone may not be sufficient for stable transmission of epimutations across generations. Overall, research on ncRNAs in the context of ETI is urgently needed to shed light on the underlying mechanism of ETI.

  6. Long noncoding RNAs as a novel component of the Myc transcriptional network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkle, Melanie; van den Berg, Anke; Tayari, Masoumeh; Sietzema, Jantine; Terpstra, Martijn; Kortman, Gertrud; de Jong, Debora; Visser, Lydia; Diepstra, Arjan; Kok, Klaas; Kluiver, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Myc is a well-known transcription factor with important roles in cell cycle, apoptosis, and cellular transformation. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently emerged as an important class of regulatory RNAs. Here, we show that lncRNAs are a main component of the Myc-regulated transcriptional prog

  7. Regulation of mammalian cell differentiation by long non-coding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqian; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-11-06

    Differentiation of specialized cell types from stem and progenitor cells is tightly regulated at several levels, both during development and during somatic tissue homeostasis. Many long non-coding RNAs have been recognized as an additional layer of regulation in the specification of cellular identities; these non-coding species can modulate gene-expression programmes in various biological contexts through diverse mechanisms at the transcriptional, translational or messenger RNA stability levels. Here, we summarize findings that implicate long non-coding RNAs in the control of mammalian cell differentiation. We focus on several representative differentiation systems and discuss how specific long non-coding RNAs contribute to the regulation of mammalian development.

  8. Non-coding RNAs in schistosomes: an unexplored world

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    Katia C Oliveira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs were recently given much higher attention due to technical advances in sequencing which expanded the characterization of transcriptomes in different organisms. ncRNAs have different lengths (22 nt to >1, 000 nt and mechanisms of action that essentially comprise a sophisticated gene expression regulation network. Recent publication of schistosome genomes and transcriptomes has increased the description and characterization of a large number of parasite genes. Here we review the number of predicted genes and the coverage of genomic bases in face of the public ESTs dataset available, including a critical appraisal of the evidence and characterization of ncRNAs in schistosomes. We show expression data for ncRNAs in Schistosoma mansoni. We analyze three different microarray experiment datasets: (1 adult worms' large-scale expression measurements; (2 differentially expressed S. mansoni genes regulated by a human cytokine (TNF-α in a parasite culture; and (3 a stage-specific expression of ncRNAs. All these data point to ncRNAs involved in different biological processes and physiological responses that suggest functionality of these new players in the parasite's biology. Exploring this world is a challenge for the scientists under a new molecular perspective of host-parasite interactions and parasite development.RNAs não codificadores (ncRNAs têm sido recentemente objeto de atenção muito maior devido aos avanços técnicos no sequenciamento que expandiram a caracterização dos transcritomas em diferentes organismos. ncRNAs possuem diferentes comprimentos (22 nt a >1.000 nt e mecanismos de ação que essencialmente compreendem uma sofisticada rede de regulação de expressão gênica. A publicação recente dos genomas e transcritomas dos esquistossomos aumentou a descrição e caracterização de um grande número de genes do parasita. Aqui nós revisamos o número de genes preditos e a cobertura das bases do genoma em face

  9. Identification of three novel noncoding RNAs from Drosophila melanogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Hualiang; ZHOU Hui; XIAO Zhendong; ZENG Xianfen; CHEN Junyu; ZHENG Tao; QU Lianghu

    2006-01-01

    Three novel small noncoding RNAs were identified from the conserved intronic regions of D. melanogaster by using comparative genomics method and molecular biology approach. One is a novel snoRNA in a combinated way, which displays structural features typical of C/D box snoRNA family and possesses a 10-nt-long rRNA antisense element for guiding the 2′-O-methylation of the D. melanogaster 28S rRNA at C2673. The other two are miRNAs whose predicted precursors adopt a stemloop structure characteristic of known miRNA. The two miRNAs genes appear to have ubiquitous expression profiles with ~23-nt RNA transcripts detected by Northern blotting. Our study revealed 396multi-species intronic conserved sequences (MCIS)that nested in the introns with a length from 100 to 500 bp. In addition to small RNA coding, the MCIS might function as cis-acting elements involved in gene transcription or post-transcriptional processing.

  10. Biocomputational prediction of non-coding RNAs in model cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ude Susanne

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, non-coding RNAs (ncRNA are crucial regulators of gene expression, controlling various stress responses, virulence, and motility. Previous work revealed a relatively high number of ncRNAs in some marine cyanobacteria. However, for efficient genetic and biochemical analysis it would be desirable to identify a set of ncRNA candidate genes in model cyanobacteria that are easy to manipulate and for which extended mutant, transcriptomic and proteomic data sets are available. Results Here we have used comparative genome analysis for the biocomputational prediction of ncRNA genes and other sequence/structure-conserved elements in intergenic regions of the three unicellular model cyanobacteria Synechocystis PCC6803, Synechococcus elongatus PCC6301 and Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP1 plus the toxic Microcystis aeruginosa NIES843. The unfiltered numbers of predicted elements in these strains is 383, 168, 168, and 809, respectively, combined into 443 sequence clusters, whereas the numbers of individual elements with high support are 94, 56, 64, and 406, respectively. Removing also transposon-associated repeats, finally 78, 53, 42 and 168 sequences, respectively, are left belonging to 109 different clusters in the data set. Experimental analysis of selected ncRNA candidates in Synechocystis PCC6803 validated new ncRNAs originating from the fabF-hoxH and apcC-prmA intergenic spacers and three highly expressed ncRNAs belonging to the Yfr2 family of ncRNAs. Yfr2a promoter-luxAB fusions confirmed a very strong activity of this promoter and indicated a stimulation of expression if the cultures were exposed to elevated light intensities. Conclusion Comparison to entries in Rfam and experimental testing of selected ncRNA candidates in Synechocystis PCC6803 indicate a high reliability of the current prediction, despite some contamination by the high number of repetitive sequences in some of these species. In particular, we

  11. [Epigenetics of plant vernalization regulated by non-coding RNAs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Feng; Li, Xiao-Rong; Sun, Chuan-Bao; He, Yu-Ke

    2012-07-01

    Many higher plants must experience a period of winter cold to accomplish the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. This biological process is called vernalization. Some crops such as wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) produce seeds as edible organs, and therefore special measures of rotation and cultivation are necessary for plants to go through an early vernalization for flower differentiation and development, whereas the other crops such as Chinese cabbage (B rapa ssp. pekinenesis) and cabbage (Brassica napus L.) produce leafy heads as edible organs, and additional practice should be taken to avoid vernalization for a prolonged and fully vegetative growth. Before vernalization, flowering is repressed by the action of a gene called Flowering Locus C (FLC). This paper reviewed the function of non-coding RNAs and some proteins including VRN1, VRN2, and VIN3 in epigenetic regulation of FLC during vernalization.

  12. A screen for nuclear transcripts identifies two linked noncoding RNAs associated with SC35 splicing domains

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    Lynch Christopher R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noncoding RNA species play a diverse set of roles in the eukaryotic cell. While much recent attention has focused on smaller RNA species, larger noncoding transcripts are also thought to be highly abundant in mammalian cells. To search for large noncoding RNAs that might control gene expression or mRNA metabolism, we used Affymetrix expression arrays to identify polyadenylated RNA transcripts displaying nuclear enrichment. Results This screen identified no more than three transcripts; XIST, and two unique noncoding nuclear enriched abundant transcripts (NEAT RNAs strikingly located less than 70 kb apart on human chromosome 11: NEAT1, a noncoding RNA from the locus encoding for TncRNA, and NEAT2 (also known as MALAT-1. While the two NEAT transcripts share no significant homology with each other, each is conserved within the mammalian lineage, suggesting significant function for these noncoding RNAs. NEAT2 is extraordinarily well conserved for a noncoding RNA, more so than even XIST. Bioinformatic analyses of publicly available mouse transcriptome data support our findings from human cells as they confirm that the murine homologs of these noncoding RNAs are also nuclear enriched. RNA FISH analyses suggest that these noncoding RNAs function in mRNA metabolism as they demonstrate an intimate association of these RNA species with SC35 nuclear speckles in both human and mouse cells. These studies show that one of these transcripts, NEAT1 localizes to the periphery of such domains, whereas the neighboring transcript, NEAT2, is part of the long-sought polyadenylated component of nuclear speckles. Conclusion Our genome-wide screens in two mammalian species reveal no more than three abundant large non-coding polyadenylated RNAs in the nucleus; the canonical large noncoding RNA XIST and NEAT1 and NEAT2. The function of these noncoding RNAs in mRNA metabolism is suggested by their high levels of conservation and their intimate

  13. TYPE I INTERFERON REGULATES THE EXPRESSION OF LONG NONCODING RNAs

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    Elena eCarnero

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are key players in the antiviral response. IFN sensing by the cell activates transcription of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs able to induce an antiviral state by affecting viral replication and release. IFN also induces the expression of ISGs that function as negative regulators to limit the strength and duration of IFN response. The ISGs identified so far belong to coding genes. However, only a small proportion of the transcriptome corresponds to coding transcripts and it has been estimated that there could be as many coding as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs. To address whether IFN can also regulate the expression of lncRNAs, we analyzed the transcriptome of HuH7 cells treated or not with IFNα2 by expression arrays. Analysis of the arrays showed increased levels of several well-characterized coding genes that respond to IFN both at early or late times. Furthermore, we identified several IFN-stimulated or -downregulated lncRNAs (ISRs and IDRs. Further validation showed that ISR2, 8 and 12 expression mimics that of their neighboring genes GBP1, IRF1 and IL6, respectively, all related to the IFN response. These genes are induced in response to different doses of IFNα2 in different cell lines at early (ISR2 or 8 or later (ISR12 time points. IFNβ also induced the expression of these lncRNAs. ISR2 and 8 were also induced by an influenza virus unable to block the IFN response but not by other wild-type lytic viruses tested. Surprisingly, both ISR2 and 8 were significantly upregulated in cultured cells and livers from patients infected with HCV. Increased levels of ISR2 were also detected in patients chronically infected with HIV. This is relevant as genome-wide guilt-by-association studies predict that ISR2, 8 and 12 may function in viral processes, in the IFN pathway and the antiviral response. Therefore, we propose that these lncRNAs could be induced by IFN to function as positive or negative regulators of the antiviral response.

  14. Identification of CRISPR and riboswitch related RNAs among novel noncoding RNAs of the euryarchaeon Pyrococcus abyssi

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    Carpousis Agamemnon J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noncoding RNA (ncRNA has been recognized as an important regulator of gene expression networks in Bacteria and Eucaryota. Little is known about ncRNA in thermococcal archaea except for the eukaryotic-like C/D and H/ACA modification guide RNAs. Results Using a combination of in silico and experimental approaches, we identified and characterized novel P. abyssi ncRNAs transcribed from 12 intergenic regions, ten of which are conserved throughout the Thermococcales. Several of them accumulate in the late-exponential phase of growth. Analysis of the genomic context and sequence conservation amongst related thermococcal species revealed two novel P. abyssi ncRNA families. The CRISPR family is comprised of crRNAs expressed from two of the four P. abyssi CRISPR cassettes. The 5'UTR derived family includes four conserved ncRNAs, two of which have features similar to known bacterial riboswitches. Several of the novel ncRNAs have sequence similarities to orphan OrfB transposase elements. Based on RNA secondary structure predictions and experimental results, we show that three of the twelve ncRNAs include Kink-turn RNA motifs, arguing for a biological role of these ncRNAs in the cell. Furthermore, our results show that several of the ncRNAs are subjected to processing events by enzymes that remain to be identified and characterized. Conclusions This work proposes a revised annotation of CRISPR loci in P. abyssi and expands our knowledge of ncRNAs in the Thermococcales, thus providing a starting point for studies needed to elucidate their biological function.

  15. Current Insights into Long Non-Coding RNAs (LncRNAs) in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolle, Maria A.; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Pummer, Karl; Calin, George A.; Pichler, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The importance of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the pathogenesis of various malignancies has been uncovered over the last few years. Their dysregulation often contributes to or is a result of tumour progression. In prostate cancer, the most common malignancy in men, lncRNAs can promote castration resistance, cell proliferation, invasion, and metastatic spread. Expression patterns of lncRNAs often change during tumour progression; their expression levels may constantly rise (e.g., HOX transcript antisense RNA, HOTAIR), or steadily decrease (e.g., downregulated RNA in cancer, DRAIC). In prostate cancer, lncRNAs likewise have diagnostic (e.g., prostate cancer antigen 3, PCA3), prognostic (e.g., second chromosome locus associated with prostate-1, SChLAP1), and predictive (e.g., metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript-1, MALAT-1) functions. Considering their dynamic role in prostate cancer, lncRNAs may also serve as therapeutic targets, helping to prevent development of castration resistance, maintain stable disease, and prohibit metastatic spread. PMID:28241429

  16. Current Insights into Long Non-Coding RNAs (LncRNAs in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Smolle

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of various malignancies has been uncovered over the last few years. Their dysregulation often contributes to or is a result of tumour progression. In prostate cancer, the most common malignancy in men, lncRNAs can promote castration resistance, cell proliferation, invasion, and metastatic spread. Expression patterns of lncRNAs often change during tumour progression; their expression levels may constantly rise (e.g., HOX transcript antisense RNA, HOTAIR, or steadily decrease (e.g., downregulated RNA in cancer, DRAIC. In prostate cancer, lncRNAs likewise have diagnostic (e.g., prostate cancer antigen 3, PCA3, prognostic (e.g., second chromosome locus associated with prostate-1, SChLAP1, and predictive (e.g., metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript-1, MALAT-1 functions. Considering their dynamic role in prostate cancer, lncRNAs may also serve as therapeutic targets, helping to prevent development of castration resistance, maintain stable disease, and prohibit metastatic spread.

  17. Non-coding RNAs in the development of sensory organs and related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Ivan; Banfi, Sandro; Bovolenta, Paola

    2013-11-01

    Genomes are transcribed well beyond the conventionally annotated protein-encoding genes and produce many thousands of regulatory non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). In the last few years, ncRNAs, especially microRNAs and long non-coding RNA, have received increasing attention because of their implication in the function of chromatin-modifying complexes and in the regulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional events. The morphological events and the genetic networks responsible for the development of sensory organs have been well delineated and therefore sensory organs have provided a useful scenario to address the role of ncRNAs. In this review, we summarize the current information on the importance of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs during the development of the eye, inner ear, and olfactory system in vertebrates. We will also discuss those cases in which alteration of ncRNA expression has been linked to pathological conditions affecting these organs.

  18. Identification of maize long non-coding RNAs responsive to drought stress.

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    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs represent a class of riboregulators that either directly act in long form or are processed to shorter miRNAs and siRNAs. Emerging evidence shows that lncRNAs participate in stress responsive regulation. In this study, to identify the putative maize lncRNAs responsive to drought stress, 8449 drought responsive transcripts were first uploaded to the Coding Potential Calculator website for classification as protein coding or non-coding RNAs, and 1724 RNAs were identified as potential non-coding RNAs. A Perl script was written to screen these 1724 ncRNAs and 664 transcripts were ultimately identified as drought-responsive lncRNAs. Of these 664 transcripts, 126 drought-responsive lncRNAs were highly similar to known maize lncRNAs; the remaining 538 transcripts were considered as novel lncRNAs. Among the 664 lncRNAs identified as drought responsive, 567 were upregulated and 97 were downregulated in drought-stressed leaves of maize. 8 lncRNAs were identified as miRNA precursor lncRNAs, 62 were classified as both shRNA and siRNA precursors, and 279 were classified as siRNA precursors. The remaining 315 lncRNAs were classified as other lncRNAs that are likely to function as longer molecules. Among these 315 lncRNAs, 10 are identified as antisense lncRNAs and 7 could pair with 17 CDS sequences with near-perfect matches. Finally, RT-qPCR results confirmed that all selected lncRNAs could respond to drought stress. These findings extend the current view on lncRNAs as ubiquitous regulators under stress conditions.

  19. A long-term demasculinization of X-linked intergenic noncoding RNAs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ge; Vibranovski, Maria D; Zhang, Li; Li, Zheng; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yong E; Li, Xinmin; Zhang, Wenxia; Fan, Qichang; VanKuren, Nicholas W; Long, Manyuan; Wei, Liping

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies have revealed key roles of noncoding RNAs in sex-related pathways, but little is known about the evolutionary forces acting on these noncoding RNAs. Profiling the transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster with whole-genome tiling arrays found that 15% of male-biased transcribed fragments are intergenic noncoding RNAs (incRNAs), suggesting a potentially important role for incRNAs in sex-related biological processes. Statistical analysis revealed a paucity of male-biased incRNAs and coding genes on the X chromosome, suggesting that similar evolutionary forces could be affecting the genomic organization of both coding and noncoding genes. Expression profiling across germline and somatic tissues further suggested that both male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) and sexual antagonism could contribute to the chromosomal distribution of male-biased incRNAs. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the evolutionary age of male-biased incRNAs is a significant predictor of their chromosomal locations. In addition to identifying abundant sex-biased incRNAs in the fly genome, our work unveils a global picture of the complex interplay between noncoding RNAs and sexual chromosome evolution.

  20. Long Noncoding RNAs in Development: Solidifying the Lncs to Hox Gene Regulation

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    Jeremy S. Dasen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are pervasively expressed in mammals, although their functions during development remain poorly understood. In this issue of Cell Reports, Delpretti et al. and Li et al. suggest essential roles for lncRNAs in coordinating Hox gene expression.

  1. From structure prediction to genomic screens for novel non-coding RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are receiving more and more attention not only as an abundant class of genes, but also as regulatory structural elements (some located in mRNAs). A key feature of RNA function is its structure. Computational methods were developed early for folding and prediction...

  2. Identification and Characterization of Small Noncoding RNAs in Genome Sequences of the Edible Fungus Pleurotus ostreatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mengran; Hsiang, Tom; Feng, Xiaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been identified in many fungi. However, no genome-scale identification of ncRNAs has been inventoried for basidiomycetes. In this research, we detected 254 small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) in a genome assembly of an isolate (CCEF00389) of Pleurotus ostreatus, which is a widely cultivated edible basidiomycetous fungus worldwide. The identified sncRNAs include snRNAs, snoRNAs, tRNAs, and miRNAs. SnRNA U1 was not found in CCEF00389 genome assembly and some other basidiomycetous genomes by BLASTn. This implies that if snRNA U1 of basidiomycetes exists, it has a sequence that varies significantly from other organisms. By analyzing the distribution of sncRNA loci, we found that snRNAs and most tRNAs (88.6%) were located in pseudo-UTR regions, while miRNAs are commonly found in introns. To analyze the evolutionary conservation of the sncRNAs in P. ostreatus, we aligned all 254 sncRNAs to the genome assemblies of some other Agaricomycotina fungi. The results suggest that most sncRNAs (77.56%) were highly conserved in P. ostreatus, and 20% were conserved in Agaricomycotina fungi. These findings indicate that most sncRNAs of P. ostreatus were not conserved across Agaricomycotina fungi. PMID:27703969

  3. Identification and Characterization of Small Noncoding RNAs in Genome Sequences of the Edible Fungus Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jibin; Zhao, Mengran; Hsiang, Tom; Feng, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Jinxia; Huang, Chenyang

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been identified in many fungi. However, no genome-scale identification of ncRNAs has been inventoried for basidiomycetes. In this research, we detected 254 small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) in a genome assembly of an isolate (CCEF00389) of Pleurotus ostreatus, which is a widely cultivated edible basidiomycetous fungus worldwide. The identified sncRNAs include snRNAs, snoRNAs, tRNAs, and miRNAs. SnRNA U1 was not found in CCEF00389 genome assembly and some other basidiomycetous genomes by BLASTn. This implies that if snRNA U1 of basidiomycetes exists, it has a sequence that varies significantly from other organisms. By analyzing the distribution of sncRNA loci, we found that snRNAs and most tRNAs (88.6%) were located in pseudo-UTR regions, while miRNAs are commonly found in introns. To analyze the evolutionary conservation of the sncRNAs in P. ostreatus, we aligned all 254 sncRNAs to the genome assemblies of some other Agaricomycotina fungi. The results suggest that most sncRNAs (77.56%) were highly conserved in P. ostreatus, and 20% were conserved in Agaricomycotina fungi. These findings indicate that most sncRNAs of P. ostreatus were not conserved across Agaricomycotina fungi.

  4. Identification and Characterization of Small Noncoding RNAs in Genome Sequences of the Edible Fungus Pleurotus ostreatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibin Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs have been identified in many fungi. However, no genome-scale identification of ncRNAs has been inventoried for basidiomycetes. In this research, we detected 254 small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs in a genome assembly of an isolate (CCEF00389 of Pleurotus ostreatus, which is a widely cultivated edible basidiomycetous fungus worldwide. The identified sncRNAs include snRNAs, snoRNAs, tRNAs, and miRNAs. SnRNA U1 was not found in CCEF00389 genome assembly and some other basidiomycetous genomes by BLASTn. This implies that if snRNA U1 of basidiomycetes exists, it has a sequence that varies significantly from other organisms. By analyzing the distribution of sncRNA loci, we found that snRNAs and most tRNAs (88.6% were located in pseudo-UTR regions, while miRNAs are commonly found in introns. To analyze the evolutionary conservation of the sncRNAs in P. ostreatus, we aligned all 254 sncRNAs to the genome assemblies of some other Agaricomycotina fungi. The results suggest that most sncRNAs (77.56% were highly conserved in P. ostreatus, and 20% were conserved in Agaricomycotina fungi. These findings indicate that most sncRNAs of P. ostreatus were not conserved across Agaricomycotina fungi.

  5. Noncoding RNAs that associate with YB-1 alter proliferation in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Teresa T; Arango-Argoty, Gustavo; Li, Zhihua; Lin, Yuefeng; Kim, Sang Woo; Dueck, Anne; Ozsolak, Fatih; Monaghan, A Paula; Meister, Gunter; DeFranco, Donald B; John, Bino

    2015-06-01

    The highly conserved, multifunctional YB-1 is a powerful breast cancer prognostic indicator. We report on a pervasive role for YB-1 in which it associates with thousands of nonpolyadenylated short RNAs (shyRNAs) that are further processed into small RNAs (smyRNAs). Many of these RNAs have previously been identified as functional noncoding RNAs (http://www.johnlab.org/YB1). We identified a novel, abundant, 3'-modified short RNA antisense to Dicer1 (Shad1) that colocalizes with YB-1 to P-bodies and stress granules. The expression of Shad1 was shown to correlate with that of YB-1 and whose inhibition leads to an increase in cell proliferation. Additionally, Shad1 influences the expression of additional prognostic markers of cancer progression such as DLX2 and IGFBP2. We propose that the examination of these noncoding RNAs could lead to better understanding of prostate cancer progression.

  6. Infection-Induced Retrotransposon-Derived Noncoding RNAs Enhance Herpesviral Gene Expression via the NF-κB Pathway.

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    John Karijolich

    Full Text Available Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs are highly abundant, RNA polymerase III-transcribed noncoding retrotransposons that are silenced in somatic cells but activated during certain stresses including viral infection. How these induced SINE RNAs impact the host-pathogen interaction is unknown. Here we reveal that during murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 infection, rapidly induced SINE RNAs activate the antiviral NF-κB signaling pathway through both mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS-dependent and independent mechanisms. However, SINE RNA-based signaling is hijacked by the virus to enhance viral gene expression and replication. B2 RNA expression stimulates IKKβ-dependent phosphorylation of the major viral lytic cycle transactivator protein RTA, thereby enhancing its activity and increasing progeny virion production. Collectively, these findings suggest that SINE RNAs participate in the innate pathogen response mechanism, but that herpesviruses have evolved to co-opt retrotransposon activation for viral benefit.

  7. Roles, Functions, and Mechanisms of Long Non-coding RNAs in Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiwen Fang; Melissa J Fullwood

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in cancer. They are involved in chromatin remodeling, as well as transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, through a vari-ety of chromatin-based mechanisms and via cross-talk with other RNA species. lncRNAs can func-tion as decoys, scaffolds, and enhancer RNAs. This review summarizes the characteristics of lncRNAs, including their roles, functions, and working mechanisms, describes methods for identi-fying and annotating lncRNAs, and discusses future opportunities for lncRNA-based therapies using antisense oligonucleotides.

  8. Pathophysiology and Clinical Utility of Non-coding RNAs in Epilepsy

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    Yiye Shao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common neurologic disorder. The underlying pathological processes include synaptic strength, inflammation, ion channels, and apoptosis. Acting as epigenetic factors, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs participate in the regulation of pathophysiologic processes of epilepsy and are dysregulated during epileptogenesis. Aberrant expression of ncRNAs are observed in epilepsy patients and animal models of epilepsy. Furthermore, ncRNAs might also be used as biomarkers for diagnosis and the prognosis of treatment response in epilepsy. In this review, we will summarize the role of ncRNAs in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and the putative utilization of ncRNAs as diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  9. Biogenesis and Mechanism of Action of Small Non-Coding RNAs: Insights from the Point of View of Structural Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marina C.; Leitão, Ana Lúcia; Enguita, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs are dominant in the genomic output of the higher organisms being not simply occasional transcripts with idiosyncratic functions, but constituting an extensive regulatory network. Among all the species of non-coding RNAs, small non-coding RNAs (miRNAs, siRNAs and piRNAs) have been shown to be in the core of the regulatory machinery of all the genomic output in eukaryotic cells. Small non-coding RNAs are produced by several pathways containing specialized enzymes that process RNA transcripts. The mechanism of action of these molecules is also ensured by a group of effector proteins that are commonly engaged within high molecular weight protein-RNA complexes. In the last decade, the contribution of structural biology has been essential to the dissection of the molecular mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and function of small non-coding RNAs. PMID:22949860

  10. Genetic variation in the non-coding genome : Involvement of micro-RNAs and long non-coding RNAs in disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hrdlickova, Barbara; de Almeida, Rodrigo Coutinho; Borek, Zuzanna; Withoff, Sebo

    2014-01-01

    It has been found that the majority of disease-associated genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies are located outside of protein-coding regions, where they seem to affect regions that control transcription (promoters, enhancers) and non-coding RNAs that also can influence gene

  11. Global discovery of erythroid long noncoding RNAs reveals novel regulators of red cell maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Shi, Jiahai; Park, Staphany S; Gromatzky, Austin A; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoiesis is regulated at multiple levels to ensure the proper generation of mature red cells under multiple physiological conditions. To probe the contribution of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) to this process, we examined >1 billion RNA-seq reads of polyadenylated and nonpolyadenylated RNA fro

  12. Genome-Wide Discovery of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Rainbow Trout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafet Al-Tobasei

    Full Text Available The ENCODE project revealed that ~70% of the human genome is transcribed. While only 1-2% of the RNAs encode for proteins, the rest are non-coding RNAs. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs form a diverse class of non-coding RNAs that are longer than 200 nt. Emerging evidence indicates that lncRNAs play critical roles in various cellular processes including regulation of gene expression. LncRNAs show low levels of gene expression and sequence conservation, which make their computational identification in genomes difficult. In this study, more than two billion Illumina sequence reads were mapped to the genome reference using the TopHat and Cufflinks software. Transcripts shorter than 200 nt, with more than 83-100 amino acids ORF, or with significant homologies to the NCBI nr-protein database were removed. In addition, a computational pipeline was used to filter the remaining transcripts based on a protein-coding-score test. Depending on the filtering stringency conditions, between 31,195 and 54,503 lncRNAs were identified, with only 421 matching known lncRNAs in other species. A digital gene expression atlas revealed 2,935 tissue-specific and 3,269 ubiquitously-expressed lncRNAs. This study annotates the lncRNA rainbow trout genome and provides a valuable resource for functional genomics research in salmonids.

  13. Differential Expression of Long Noncoding RNAs between Sperm Samples from Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Guang-Jian Jiang; Teng Zhang; Tian An; Dan-Dan Zhao; Xiu-Yan Yang; Dong-Wei Zhang; Yi Zhang; Qian-Qian Mu; Na Yu; Xue-Shan Ma; Si-Hua Gao

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the potential core reproduction-related genes associated with the development of diabetes, the expression profiles of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) in the sperm of diabetic mice were studied. We used microarray analysis to detect the expression of lncRNAs and coding transcripts in six diabetic and six normal sperm samples, and differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs were identified through Volcano Plot filtering. The function of differentially expresse...

  14. Long noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs) - The dawning of a new treatment for cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong; Gao, Quansheng; Cao, Feng

    2017-08-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a category of noncoding RNAs with the potential for genetic and epigenetic regulations. As important regulators of gene expression, increasing evidence has proven that lncRNAs play a significant regulatory role in various cardiovascular pathologies. In particular, lncRNAs have been proved to be participating in gene regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development that can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart. Furthermore, lncRNAs have been revealed as possible therapeutic targets for heart failure with different causes and in different stages. In the journey from a healthy heart to heart failure, lncRNAs have been shown to participate in almost every landmark of heart failure pathogenesis including ischemic injury, cardiac hypertrophy, and cardiac fibrosis. Furthermore, the manipulation of lncRNAs palliates the progression of heart failure by attenuating ischemic heart injury, cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis, as well as facilitating heart regeneration and therapeutic angiogenesis. This review will highlight recent updates regarding the involvement of lncRNAs in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure and their potential as novel therapeutic targets. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Genetic and epigenetic control of heart failure - edited by Jun Ren & Megan Yingmei Zhang. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. There is a world beyond protein mutations: the role of non-coding RNAs in melanomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Rolf K; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2013-05-01

    Until recently, the general perception has been that mutations in protein-coding genes are responsible for tumorigenesis. With the discovery of (V600E)BRAF in about 50% of cutaneous melanomas, there was an increased effort to find additional mutations. However, mutations characterized in melanoma to date cannot account for the development of all melanomas. With the discovery of microRNAs as important players in melanomagenesis, protein mutations are no longer considered the sole drivers of tumors. Recent research findings have expanded the view for tumor initiation and progression to additional non-coding RNAs. The data suggest that tumorigenesis is likely an interplay between mutated proteins and deregulation of non-coding RNAs in the cell with an additional role of the tumor environment. With the exception of microRNAs, our knowledge of the role of non-coding RNAs in melanoma is in its infancy. Using few examples, we will summarize some of the roles of non-coding RNAs in tumorigenesis. Thus, there is a whole world beyond protein-coding sequences and microRNAs, which can cause melanoma.

  16. Long noncoding RNAs in spermatogenesis: insights from recent high-throughput transcriptome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Alfred Chun-Shui; Chan, Wai-Yee; Rennert, Owen M; Lee, Tin-Lap

    2014-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex developmental process in which undifferentiated spermatogonia are differentiated into spermatocytes and spermatids through two rounds of meiotic division and finally giving rise to mature spermatozoa (sperm). These processes involve many testis- or male germ cell-specific gene products that undergo strict developmental regulations. As a result, identifying critical, regulatory genes controlling spermatogenesis provide the clues not only to the regulatory mechanism of spermatogenesis at the molecular level, but also to the identification of candidate genes for infertility or contraceptives development. Despite the biological importance in male germ cell development, the underlying mechanisms of stage-specific gene regulation and cellular transition during spermatogenesis remain largely elusive. Previous genomic studies on transcriptome profiling were largely limited to protein-coding genes. Importantly, protein-coding genes only account for a small percentage of transcriptome; the majority are noncoding transcripts that do not translate into proteins. Although small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as microRNAs, siRNAs, and Piwi-interacting RNAs are extensively investigated in male germ cell development, the role of long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), commonly defined as ncRNAs longer than 200 bp, is relatively unexplored. Herein, we summarize recent transcriptome studies on spermatogenesis and show examples that a subset of noncoding transcript population, known as lncRNAs, constitutes a novel regulatory target in spermatogenesis.

  17. Systematic identification of long noncoding RNAs expressed during zebrafish embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauli, Andrea; Valen, Eivind; Lin, Michael F.;

    2012-01-01

    vertebrate embryogenesis has been elusive. To identify lncRNAs with potential functions in vertebrate embryogenesis, we performed a time series of RNA-Seq experiments at eight stages during early zebrafish development. We reconstructed 56,535 high-confidence transcripts in 28,912 loci, recovering the vast...... overlapping lncRNAs, and precursors for small RNAs (sRNAs). Zebrafish lncRNAs share many of the characteristics of their mammalian counterparts: relatively short length, low exon number, low expression, and conservation levels comparable to introns. Subsets of lncRNAs carry chromatin signatures characteristic...

  18. Non-coding RNAs and the acquisition of genomic imprinting in mammals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YiJun; QU LiangHu

    2009-01-01

    Genomic imprinting, representing parent-specific expression of alleles at a locus, Is mainly evident in flowering plants and placental mammals. Most imprinted genes, including numerous non-coding RNAs, are located in clusters regulated by imprinting control regions (ICRs). The acquisition and evolution of genomic imprinting is among the most fundamental genetic questions. Discoveries about the transition of mammalian imprinted gene domains from their non-imprinted ancestors, especially recent studies undertaken on the most ancient mammalian clades - the marsupials and monotremes from which model species genomes have recently been sequenced, are of high value. By reviewing and analyzing these studies, a close connection between non-coding RNAs and the acquisition of genomic imprinting in mammals is demonstrated. The evidence comes from two observations accompanied with the ac-quisition of the imprinting: (i) many novel non-coding RNA genes emerged in imprinted regions; (ii) the expressions of some conserved non-coding RNAs have changed dramatically. Furthermore, a system-atical analysis of imprinted snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA) genes from 15 vertebrates suggests that the origination of imprinted snoRNAs occurred after the divergence between eutherians and marsupials, followed by a rapid expansion leading to the fixation of major gene families in the eutherian ancestor prior to the radiation of modern placental mammals. Involved in the regulation of imprinted silencing and mediating the ohromatins epigenetic modification may be the major roles that non-coding RNAs play during the acquisition of genomic imprinting in mammals.

  19. 长非编码RNA%Research progress of long noncoding RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祁磊; 苗俊英

    2011-01-01

    人类基因组序列的约5%~10%被稳定转录,蛋白质编码基因仅约占1%,其余4%~9%的序列虽能转录,但转录物功能尚不明确.尽管如此,已确证在非蛋白质编码转录物中,含有具备调节功能的非编码RNA(noncoding RNA,ncRNA).与具有调节功能的短链非编码RNA[如微RNA(microRNA)、小于扰RNA(siRNA),、Piwi-RNA]相比,长非编码RNA(long noncoding RNA,IncRNA)在数量上占大多数.IncRNA通过多种方式产生,以多种途径调节靶基因表达,参与调控生物体生长、发育、衰老、死亡等过程;IncRNA功能异常往往导致疾病发生.本文综述了IncRNA的起源、分类、作用分子机制及IncRNA异常与疾病的相关性等内容,旨在充分了解这一重要新型调控分子.%Approximately 5%~10% of human genome are stably transcribed. Of these sequences, only 1% are protein-coding genes. The functions of other 4%~9% transcripts are unknown. Nevertheless, it has been elucidated that these non-protein-coding transcripts include noncoding RNAs with regulatory capacity. In contrast with short noncoding RNAs with regulatory properties (microRNAs, siRNAs, Piwi-RNAs), long noncoding RNAs account for the overwhelming majority. Long noncoding RNAs generate in various origins and regulate the expression of target genes through multiple manners, participating in the regulation of pathophysiological processes such as growth, development, senescence and death. The dysfunction of lncRNAs is involved in the causation of various diseases. In this review, we summarized the origins, classification and molecular mechanisms of long noncoding RNAs, and discussed the relative diseases associated with long noncoding RNAs for fulfilling the understanding of these novel regulatory molecules.

  20. Dysfunctions of mitochondria in close association with strong perturbation of long noncoding RNAs expression in down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jia-Jun; Liu, Yan-Na; Ren, Zhao-Rui; Yan, Jing-Bin

    2017-09-29

    Trisomy 21 is the most common chromosomal disorder and underlies Down syndrome. Epigenetics, such as DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications, plays a vital role in Down syndrome. However, the functions of epigenetics-related long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), found to have an impact on neural diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, remain unknown in Down syndrome. In this study, we analyzed the RNA sequencing data from Down syndrome-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and normal iPSCs. A large number of lncRNAs were identified differentially expressed in Down syndrome-iPSCs. Notably, stronger perturbation was shown in the expression of lncRNAs compared to protein coding genes (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, PDown syndrome. Through gene set enrichment analysis and bi-clustering, we also found that most of the differential expressed lncRNAs were closely associated with mitochondrial functions (e.g. mitochondrion organization, P=3.21×10(-17); mitochondrial ATP synthesis coupled electron transport, P=1.73×10(-19) and mitochondrial membrane organization, P=4.04×10(-8)). PCR-array and qRT-PCR results revealed that almost all genes related to mitochondria were down-regulated in Down syndrome-iPSCs, implying that mitochondria were dysfunctional in Down syndrome (e.g. ATP5B, Fold Change=-8.2317; COX6A1, Fold Change=-12.7788 and SLC25A17, Fold Change=-22.1296). All in all, our study indicated that a stronger perturbation of lncRNAs expression may lead to the dysfunction of mitochondria in Down syndrome. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Role of Non-Coding RNAs in the Transgenerational Epigenetic Transmission of the Effects of Reprotoxicants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Larriba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are regulatory elements of gene expression and chromatin structure. Both long and small ncRNAs can also act as inductors and targets of epigenetic programs. Epigenetic patterns can be transmitted from one cell to the daughter cell, but, importantly, also through generations. Diversity of ncRNAs is emerging with new and surprising roles. Functional interactions among ncRNAs and between specific ncRNAs and structural elements of the chromatin are drawing a complex landscape. In this scenario, epigenetic changes induced by environmental stressors, including reprotoxicants, can explain some transgenerationally-transmitted phenotypes in non-Mendelian ways. In this review, we analyze mechanisms of action of reprotoxicants upon different types of ncRNAs and epigenetic modifications causing transgenerationally transmitted characters through germ cells but affecting germ cells and reproductive systems. A functional model of epigenetic mechanisms of transgenerational transmission ncRNAs-mediated is also proposed.

  2. Role of Non-Coding RNAs in the Transgenerational Epigenetic Transmission of the Effects of Reprotoxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larriba, Eduardo; del Mazo, Jesús

    2016-03-25

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are regulatory elements of gene expression and chromatin structure. Both long and small ncRNAs can also act as inductors and targets of epigenetic programs. Epigenetic patterns can be transmitted from one cell to the daughter cell, but, importantly, also through generations. Diversity of ncRNAs is emerging with new and surprising roles. Functional interactions among ncRNAs and between specific ncRNAs and structural elements of the chromatin are drawing a complex landscape. In this scenario, epigenetic changes induced by environmental stressors, including reprotoxicants, can explain some transgenerationally-transmitted phenotypes in non-Mendelian ways. In this review, we analyze mechanisms of action of reprotoxicants upon different types of ncRNAs and epigenetic modifications causing transgenerationally transmitted characters through germ cells but affecting germ cells and reproductive systems. A functional model of epigenetic mechanisms of transgenerational transmission ncRNAs-mediated is also proposed.

  3. Long noncoding RNA Tug1 regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics in diabetic nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jianyin; Badal, Shawn S.; Ye, Zengchun; Wang, Yin; Ayanga, Bernard A.; Galvan, Daniel L.; Green, Nathanael H.; Chang, Benny H.; Overbeek, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory roles of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in transcriptional coactivators are still largely unknown. Here, we have shown that the peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator α (PGC-1α, encoded by Ppargc1a) is functionally regulated by the lncRNA taurine-upregulated gene 1 (Tug1). Further, we have described a role for Tug1 in the regulation of mitochondrial function in podocytes. Using a murine model of diabetic nephropathy (DN), we performed an unbiased RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of kidney glomeruli and identified Tug1 as a differentially expressed lncRNA in the diabetic milieu. Podocyte-specific overexpression (OE) of Tug1 in diabetic mice improved the biochemical and histological features associated with DN. Unexpectedly, we found that Tug1 OE rescued the expression of PGC-1α and its transcriptional targets. Tug1 OE was also associated with improvements in mitochondrial bioenergetics in the podocytes of diabetic mice. Mechanistically, we found that the interaction between Tug1 and PGC-1α promotes the binding of PGC-1α to its own promoter. We identified a Tug1-binding element (TBE) upstream of the Ppargc1a gene and showed that Tug1 binds with the TBE to enhance Ppargc1a promoter activity. These findings indicate that a direct interaction between PGC-1α and Tug1 modulates mitochondrial bioenergetics in podocytes in the diabetic milieu. PMID:27760051

  4. Long Non-coding RNAs and Their Roles in Non-small-cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Ming Wei; Guang-Biao Zhou

    2016-01-01

    As a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, lung cancer is a collection of diseases with diverse etiologies which can be broadly classified into small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Lung cancer is characterized by genomic and epigenomic alter-ations; however, mechanisms underlying lung tumorigenesis remain to be elucidated. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a group of non-coding RNAs that consist of P200 nucleotides but possess low or no protein-coding potential. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal expres-sion of lncRNAs is associated with tumorigenesis of various cancers, including lung cancer, through multiple biological mechanisms involving epigenetic, transcriptional, and post-transcriptional alter-ations. In this review, we highlight the expression and roles of lncRNAs in NSCLC and discuss their potential clinical applications as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers, as well as therapeutic targets.

  5. Characterization of Sus scrofa small non-coding RNAs present in both female and male gonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczykiewicz, Dorota; Świercz, Aleksandra; Handschuh, Luiza; Leśniak, Katarzyna; Figlerowicz, Marek; Wrzesinski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) are indispensable for proper germ cell development, emphasizing the need for greater elucidation of the mechanisms of germline development and regulation of this process by sncRNAs. We used deep sequencing to characterize three families of small non-coding RNAs (piRNAs, miRNAs, and tRFs) present in Sus scrofa gonads and focused on the small RNA fraction present in both male and female gonads. Although similar numbers of reads were obtained from both types of gonads, the number of unique RNA sequences in the ovaries was several times lower. Of the sequences detected in the testes, 2.6% of piRNAs, 9% of miRNAs, and 10% of tRFs were also present in the ovaries. Notably, the majority of the shared piRNAs mapped to ribosomal RNAs and were derived from clustered loci. In addition, the most abundant miRNAs present in the ovaries and testes are conserved and are involved in many biological processes such as the regulation of homeobox genes, the control of cell proliferation, and carcinogenesis. Unexpectedly, we detected a novel sncRNA type, the tRFs, which are 30-36-nt RNA fragments derived from tRNA molecules, in gonads. Analysis of S. scrofa piRNAs show that testes specific piRNAs are biased for 5' uracil but both testes and ovaries specific piRNAs are not biased for adenine at the 10th nucleotide position. These observations indicate that adult porcine piRNAs are predominantly produced by a primary processing pathway or other mechanisms and secondary piRNAs generated by ping-pong mechanism are absent.

  6. Characterization of Sus scrofa small non-coding RNAs present in both female and male gonads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Kowalczykiewicz

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs are indispensable for proper germ cell development, emphasizing the need for greater elucidation of the mechanisms of germline development and regulation of this process by sncRNAs. We used deep sequencing to characterize three families of small non-coding RNAs (piRNAs, miRNAs, and tRFs present in Sus scrofa gonads and focused on the small RNA fraction present in both male and female gonads. Although similar numbers of reads were obtained from both types of gonads, the number of unique RNA sequences in the ovaries was several times lower. Of the sequences detected in the testes, 2.6% of piRNAs, 9% of miRNAs, and 10% of tRFs were also present in the ovaries. Notably, the majority of the shared piRNAs mapped to ribosomal RNAs and were derived from clustered loci. In addition, the most abundant miRNAs present in the ovaries and testes are conserved and are involved in many biological processes such as the regulation of homeobox genes, the control of cell proliferation, and carcinogenesis. Unexpectedly, we detected a novel sncRNA type, the tRFs, which are 30-36-nt RNA fragments derived from tRNA molecules, in gonads. Analysis of S. scrofa piRNAs show that testes specific piRNAs are biased for 5' uracil but both testes and ovaries specific piRNAs are not biased for adenine at the 10th nucleotide position. These observations indicate that adult porcine piRNAs are predominantly produced by a primary processing pathway or other mechanisms and secondary piRNAs generated by ping-pong mechanism are absent.

  7. Non-coding RNAs in pluripotency and neural differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukovic, Dunja; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Klabusay, Martin; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Erceg, Slaven

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the important role of non-coding RNAs as regulators of posttranscriptional processes, including stem cells self-renewal and neural differentiation. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (ihPSCs) show enormous potential in regenerative medicine due to their capacity to differentiate to virtually any type of cells of human body. Deciphering the role of non-coding RNAs in pluripotency, self-renewal and neural differentiation will reveal new molecular mechanisms involved in induction and maintenances of pluripotent state as well as triggering these cells toward clinically relevant cells for transplantation. In this brief review we will summarize recently published studies which reveal the role of non-coding RNAs in pluripotency and neural differentiation of hESCs and ihPSC. PMID:24860598

  8. Cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs are frequently bound to and degraded at ribosomes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlevaro-Fita, Joana; Rahim, Anisa; Guigó, Roderic; Vardy, Leah A; Johnson, Rory

    2016-06-01

    Recent footprinting studies have made the surprising observation that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) physically interact with ribosomes. However, these findings remain controversial, and the overall proportion of cytoplasmic lncRNAs involved is unknown. Here we make a global, absolute estimate of the cytoplasmic and ribosome-associated population of stringently filtered lncRNAs in a human cell line using polysome profiling coupled to spike-in normalized microarray analysis. Fifty-four percent of expressed lncRNAs are detected in the cytoplasm. The majority of these (70%) have >50% of their cytoplasmic copies associated with polysomal fractions. These interactions are lost upon disruption of ribosomes by puromycin. Polysomal lncRNAs are distinguished by a number of 5' mRNA-like features, including capping and 5'UTR length. On the other hand, nonpolysomal "free cytoplasmic" lncRNAs have more conserved promoters and a wider range of expression across cell types. Exons of polysomal lncRNAs are depleted of endogenous retroviral insertions, suggesting a role for repetitive elements in lncRNA localization. Finally, we show that blocking of ribosomal elongation results in stabilization of many associated lncRNAs. Together these findings suggest that the ribosome is the default destination for the majority of cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs and may play a role in their degradation.

  9. Computational identification of human long intergenic non-coding RNAs using a GA-SVM algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqiu; Li, Yang; Wang, Qi; Lv, Yingli; Wang, Shiyuan; Chen, Xi; Yu, Xuexin; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a new type of non-coding RNAs and are closely related with the occurrence and development of diseases. In previous studies, most lincRNAs have been identified through next-generation sequencing. Because lincRNAs exhibit tissue-specific expression, the reproducibility of lincRNA discovery in different studies is very poor. In this study, not including lincRNA expression, we used the sequence, structural and protein-coding potential features as potential features to construct a classifier that can be used to distinguish lincRNAs from non-lincRNAs. The GA-SVM algorithm was performed to extract the optimized feature subset. Compared with several feature subsets, the five-fold cross validation results showed that this optimized feature subset exhibited the best performance for the identification of human lincRNAs. Moreover, the LincRNA Classifier based on Selected Features (linc-SF) was constructed by support vector machine (SVM) based on the optimized feature subset. The performance of this classifier was further evaluated by predicting lincRNAs from two independent lincRNA sets. Because the recognition rates for the two lincRNA sets were 100% and 99.8%, the linc-SF was found to be effective for the prediction of human lincRNAs.

  10. The interplay of long non-coding RNAs and MYC in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Hamilton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are a class of RNA molecules that are changing how researchers view eukaryotic gene regulation. Once considered to be non-functional products of low-level aberrant transcription from non-coding regions of the genome, lncRNAs are now viewed as important epigenetic regulators and several lncRNAs have now been demonstrated to be critical players in the development and/or maintenance of cancer. Similarly, the emerging variety of interactions between lncRNAs and MYC, a well-known oncogenic transcription factor linked to most types of cancer, have caught the attention of many biomedical researchers. Investigations exploring the dynamic interactions between lncRNAs and MYC, referred to as the lncRNA-MYC network, have proven to be especially complex. Genome-wide studies have shown that MYC transcriptionally regulates many lncRNA genes. Conversely, recent reports identified lncRNAs that regulate MYC expression both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. These findings are of particular interest because they suggest roles of lncRNAs as regulators of MYC oncogenic functions and the possibility that targeting lncRNAs could represent a novel avenue to cancer treatment. Here, we briefly review the current understanding of how lncRNAs regulate chromatin structure and gene transcription, and then focus on the new developments in the emerging field exploring the lncRNA-MYC network in cancer.

  11. The Emerging Role and Promise of Long Noncoding RNAs in Lung Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Li, Chen; Pan, Yan; Han, Siqi; Feng, Bing; Gao, Yanping; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Rui; Chen, Longbang

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death around the world. The advanced discovery of numerous long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) has dramatically changed the understanding of biology of human cancers, including lung cancer. LncRNAs are a group of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) with a length greater than 200 nucleotides with limited or no protein-coding capacity. Increasing evidence has shown that specific lncRNAs may be implicated in the process of tumorigenesis. Because of their roles in the regulation of multiple molecular pathways associated with changes in gene expression, lncRNAs can serve as potential diagnostic biomarkers or therapeutic targets in lung cancer. Importantly, dysregulated lncRNAs is reported to be correlated with the sensitivity of lung cancer cells to anticancer therapies, including chemotherapy, molecular-targeted therapy, etc. Herein, we review the recent progress of lncRNAs in lung cancer, with a particular focus on the multiple molecular roles of regulatory lncRNAs on the molecular signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis and the resistance to such therapies.

  12. The emerging role of non-coding RNAs in drug addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Charles Sartor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged drug use causes long-lasting neuroadaptations in reward-related brain areas that contribute to addiction. Despite significant amount of research dedicated to understanding the underlying mechanisms of addiction, the molecular underpinnings remain unclear. At the same time, much of the pervasive transcription that encompasses the human genome occurs in the nervous system and contributes to its heterogeneity and complexity. Recent evidence suggests that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs play an important and dynamic role in transcriptional regulation, epigenetic signaling, stress response, and plasticity in the nervous system. Dysregulation of ncRNAs are thought to contribute to many, and perhaps all, neurological disorders, including addiction. Here, we review recent insights in the functional relevance of ncRNAs, including both microRNAs (miRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, and then illustrate specific examples of ncRNA regulation in the context of drug addiction. We conclude that ncRNAs are importantly involved in the persistent neuroadaptations associated with addiction-related behaviors, and that therapies that target specific ncRNAs may represent new avenues for the treatment of drug addiction.

  13. Genome-wide identification, characterization and evolutionary analysis of long intergenic noncoding RNAs in cucumber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Hao

    Full Text Available Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs are intergenic transcripts with a length of at least 200 nt that lack coding potential. Emerging evidence suggests that lincRNAs from animals participate in many fundamental biological processes. However, the systemic identification of lincRNAs has been undertaken in only a few plants. We chose to use cucumber (Cucumis sativus as a model to analyze lincRNAs due to its importance as a model plant for studying sex differentiation and fruit development and the rich genomic and transcriptome data available. The application of a bioinformatics pipeline to multiple types of gene expression data resulted in the identification and characterization of 3,274 lincRNAs. Next, 10 lincRNAs targeted by 17 miRNAs were also explored. Based on co-expression analysis between lincRNAs and mRNAs, 94 lincRNAs were annotated, which may be involved in response to stimuli, multi-organism processes, reproduction, reproductive processes, and growth. Finally, examination of the evolution of lincRNAs showed that most lincRNAs are under purifying selection, while 16 lincRNAs are under natural selection. Our results provide a rich resource for further validation of cucumber lincRNAs and their function. The identification of lincRNAs targeted by miRNAs offers new clues for investigations into the role of lincRNAs in regulating gene expression. Finally, evaluation of the lincRNAs suggested that some lincRNAs are under positive and balancing selection.

  14. Non-coding RNAs and hypertension-unveiling unexpected mechanisms of hypertension by the dark matter of the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor of cardiovascular diseases and a most important health problem in developed countries. Investigations on pathophysiology of hypertension have been based on gene products from coding region that occupies only about 1% of total genome region. On the other hand, non-coding region that occupies almost 99% of human genome has been regarded as "junk" for a long time and went unnoticed until these days. But recently, it turned out that noncoding region is extensively transcribed to non-coding RNAs and has various functions. This review highlights recent updates on the significance of non-coding RNAs such as micro RNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) on the pathogenesis of hypertension, also providing an introduction to basic biology of noncoding RNAs. For example, microRNAs are associated with hypertension via neuro-fumoral factor, sympathetic nerve activity, ion transporters in kidneys, endothelial function, vascular smooth muscle phenotype transformation, or communication between cells. Although reports of lncRNAs on pathogenesis of hypertension are scarce at the moment, new lncRNAs in relation to hypertension are being discovered at a rapid pace owing to novel techniques such as microarray or next-generation sequencing. In the clinical settings, clinical use of non-coding RNAs in identifying cardiovascular risks or developing novel tools for treating hypertension such as molecular decoy or mimicks is promising, although improvement in chemical modification or drug delivery system is necessary.

  15. Long Non-Coding RNAs as Master Regulators in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Krystal; Broskova, Zuzana; Bayoumi, Ahmed S.; Teoh, Jian-peng; Davila, Alec; Tang, Yaoliang; Su, Huabo; Kim, Il-man

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for nearly one in every seven deaths. Over the last decade, various targeted therapeutics have been introduced, but there has been no corresponding improvement in patient survival. Since the mortality rate of cardiovascular disease has not been significantly decreased, efforts have been made to understand the link between heart disease and novel therapeutic targets such as non-coding RNAs. Among multiple non-coding RNAs, long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) has emerged as a novel therapeutic in cardiovascular medicine. LncRNAs are endogenous RNAs that contain over 200 nucleotides and regulate gene expression. Recent studies suggest critical roles of lncRNAs in modulating the initiation and progression of cardiovascular diseases. For example, aberrant lncRNA expression has been associated with the pathogenesis of ischemic heart failure. In this article, we present a synopsis of recent discoveries that link the roles and molecular interactions of lncRNAs to cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, we describe the prevalence of circulating lncRNAs and assess their potential utilities as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of heart disease. PMID:26445043

  16. Long Non-Coding RNAs As Potential Novel Prognostic Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saus, Ester; Brunet-Vega, Anna; Iraola-Guzmán, Susana; Pegueroles, Cinta; Gabaldón, Toni; Pericay, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of death worldwide. Surgery is usually the first line of treatment for patients with CRC but many tumors with similar histopathological features show significantly different clinical outcomes. The discovery of robust prognostic biomarkers in patients with CRC is imperative to achieve more effective treatment strategies and improve patient's care. Recent progress in next generation sequencing methods and transcriptome analysis has revealed that a much larger part of the genome is transcribed into RNA than previously assumed. Collectively referred to as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), some of these RNA molecules such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to be altered and to play critical roles in tumor biology. This discovery leads to exciting possibilities for personalized cancer diagnosis, and therapy. Many lncRNAs are tissue and cancer-type specific and have already revealed to be useful as prognostic markers. In this review, we focus on recent findings concerning aberrant expression of lncRNAs in CRC tumors and emphasize their prognostic potential in CRC. Further studies focused on the mechanisms of action of lncRNAs will contribute to the development of novel biomarkers for diagnosis and disease progression.

  17. Decoding the usefulness of non-coding RNAs as breast cancer markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Maria; Salta, Sofia; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2016-09-15

    Although important advances in the management of breast cancer (BC) have been recently accomplished, it still constitutes the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. BC is a heterogeneous and complex disease, making clinical prediction of outcome a very challenging task. In recent years, gene expression profiling emerged as a tool to assist in clinical decision, enabling the identification of genetic signatures that better predict prognosis and response to therapy. Nevertheless, translation to routine practice has been limited by economical and technical reasons and, thus, novel biomarkers, especially those requiring non-invasive or minimally invasive collection procedures, while retaining high sensitivity and specificity might represent a significant development in this field. An increasing amount of evidence demonstrates that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), particularly microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), are aberrantly expressed in several cancers, including BC. miRNAs are of particular interest as new, easily accessible, cost-effective and non-invasive tools for precise management of BC patients because they circulate in bodily fluids (e.g., serum and plasma) in a very stable manner, enabling BC assessment and monitoring through liquid biopsies. This review focus on how ncRNAs have the potential to answer present clinical needs in the personalized management of patients with BC and comprehensively describes the state of the art on the role of ncRNAs in the diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy in BC.

  18. Circadian changes in long noncoding RNAs in the pineal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coon, Steven L; Munson, Peter J; Cherukuri, Praveen F

    2012-01-01

    oscillator in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (doubling time = 0.5-1.3 h). Light exposure at night rapidly reverses (halving time = 9-32 min) levels of some of these lncRNAs. Organ culture studies indicate that expression of these lncRNAs is regulated by norepinephrine acting through cAMP. These findings point...

  19. Links between the oncoprotein YB-1 and small non-coding RNAs in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherie Blenkiron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The nucleic acid-binding protein YB-1, a member of the cold-shock domain protein family, has been implicated in the progression of breast cancer and is associated with poor patient survival. YB-1 has sequence similarity to LIN28, another cold-shock protein family member, which has a role in the regulation of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs including microRNAs (miRNAs. Therefore, to investigate whether there is an association between YB-1 and sncRNAs in breast cancer, we investigated whether sncRNAs were bound by YB-1 in two breast cancer cell lines (luminal A-like and basal cell-like, and whether the abundance of sncRNAs and mRNAs changed in response to experimental reduction of YB-1 expression. RESULTS: RNA-immunoprecipitation with an anti-YB-1 antibody showed that several sncRNAs are bound by YB-1. Some of these were bound by YB-1 in both breast cancer cell lines; others were cell-line specific. The small RNAs bound by YB-1 were derived from various sncRNA families including miRNAs such as let-7 and miR-320, transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs and small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNA. Reducing YB-1 expression altered the abundance of a number of transcripts encoding miRNA biogenesis and processing proteins but did not alter the abundance of mature or precursor miRNAs. CONCLUSIONS: YB-1 binds to specific miRNAs, snoRNAs and tRNA-derived fragments and appears to regulate the expression of miRNA biogenesis and processing machinery. We propose that some of the oncogenic effects of YB-1 in breast cancer may be mediated through its interactions with sncRNAs.

  20. Interplay of mitochondrial metabolism and microRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiger, Julian; Dalgaard, Louise Torp

    2016-01-01

    or the nucleus, a subset of ~150 different miRNAs, called mitomiRs, has also been found localized to mitochondrial fractions of cells and tissues together with the subunits of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC); the protein complex through which miRNAs normally act to prevent translation of their m......RNA-targets. The focus of this review is on miRNAs and mitomiRs with influence on mitochondrial metabolism and their possible pathophysiological impact....

  1. Long noncoding RNAs responsive to Fusarium oxysporum infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qian-Hao; Stephen, Stuart; Taylor, Jennifer; Helliwell, Chris A; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Short noncoding RNAs have been demonstrated to play important roles in regulation of gene expression and stress responses, but the repertoire and functions of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) remain largely unexplored, particularly in plants. To explore the role of lncRNAs in disease resistance, we used a strand-specific RNA-sequencing approach to identify lncRNAs responsive to Fusarium oxysporum infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. Antisense transcription was found in c. 20% of the annotated A. thaliana genes. Several noncoding natural antisense transcripts responsive to F. oxysporum infection were found in genes implicated in disease defense. While the majority of the novel transcriptionally active regions (TARs) were adjacent to annotated genes and could be an extension of the annotated transcripts, 159 novel intergenic TARs, including 20 F. oxysporum-responsive lncTARs, were identified. Ten F. oxysporum-induced lncTARs were functionally characterized using T-DNA insertion or RNA-interference knockdown lines, and five were demonstrated to be related to disease development. Promoter analysis suggests that some of the F. oxysporum-induced lncTARs are direct targets of transcription factor(s) responsive to pathogen attack. Our results demonstrated that strand-specific RNA sequencing is a powerful tool for uncovering hidden levels of transcriptome and that IncRNAs are important components of the antifungal networks in A. thaliana. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Genome-wide discovery of long non-coding RNAs in Rainbow Trout and their potential roles in muscle growth and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ENCODE project revealed that ~70% of the human genome is transcribed. While only 1-2% of the RNAs encode for proteins, the rest are non-coding RNAs. LncRNAs form a diverse class of non-coding RNAs that are longer than 200nt. Evidences are emerging that lncRNAs play critical roles in various cel...

  3. Predicting the functions of long noncoding RNAs using RNA-seq based on Bayesian network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun; Lv, Yanling; Zhao, Hongying; Gong, Yonghui; Hu, Jing; Li, Feng; Xu, Jinyuan; Bai, Jing; Yu, Fulong; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play key roles in various biological processes. However, functions of most lncRNAs are poorly characterized. Here, we represent a framework to predict functions of lncRNAs through construction of a regulatory network between lncRNAs and protein-coding genes. Using RNA-seq data, the transcript profiles of lncRNAs and protein-coding genes are constructed. Using the Bayesian network method, a regulatory network, which implies dependency relations between lncRNAs and protein-coding genes, was built. In combining protein interaction network, highly connected coding genes linked by a given lncRNA were subsequently used to predict functions of the lncRNA through functional enrichment. Application of our method to prostate RNA-seq data showed that 762 lncRNAs in the constructed regulatory network were assigned functions. We found that lncRNAs are involved in diverse biological processes, such as tissue development or embryo development (e.g., nervous system development and mesoderm development). By comparison with functions inferred using the neighboring gene-based method and functions determined using lncRNA knockdown experiments, our method can provide comparable predicted functions of lncRNAs. Overall, our method can be applied to emerging RNA-seq data, which will help researchers identify complex relations between lncRNAs and coding genes and reveal important functions of lncRNAs.

  4. Predicting the Functions of Long Noncoding RNAs Using RNA-Seq Based on Bayesian Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have been shown to play key roles in various biological processes. However, functions of most lncRNAs are poorly characterized. Here, we represent a framework to predict functions of lncRNAs through construction of a regulatory network between lncRNAs and protein-coding genes. Using RNA-seq data, the transcript profiles of lncRNAs and protein-coding genes are constructed. Using the Bayesian network method, a regulatory network, which implies dependency relations between lncRNAs and protein-coding genes, was built. In combining protein interaction network, highly connected coding genes linked by a given lncRNA were subsequently used to predict functions of the lncRNA through functional enrichment. Application of our method to prostate RNA-seq data showed that 762 lncRNAs in the constructed regulatory network were assigned functions. We found that lncRNAs are involved in diverse biological processes, such as tissue development or embryo development (e.g., nervous system development and mesoderm development. By comparison with functions inferred using the neighboring gene-based method and functions determined using lncRNA knockdown experiments, our method can provide comparable predicted functions of lncRNAs. Overall, our method can be applied to emerging RNA-seq data, which will help researchers identify complex relations between lncRNAs and coding genes and reveal important functions of lncRNAs.

  5. Long noncoding RNAs as a novel component of the Myc transcriptional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle, Melanie; van den Berg, Anke; Tayari, Masoumeh; Sietzema, Jantine; Terpstra, Martijn; Kortman, Gertrud; de Jong, Debora; Visser, Lydia; Diepstra, Arjan; Kok, Klaas; Kluiver, Joost

    2015-06-01

    Myc is a well-known transcription factor with important roles in cell cycle, apoptosis, and cellular transformation. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently emerged as an important class of regulatory RNAs. Here, we show that lncRNAs are a main component of the Myc-regulated transcriptional program using the P493-6 tetracycline-repressible myc model. We demonstrate that both Myc-induced mRNAs and lncRNAs are significantly enriched for Myc binding sites. In contrast to Myc-repressed mRNAs, Myc-repressed lncRNAs are significantly enriched for Myc binding sites. Subcellular localization analysis revealed that compared to mRNAs, lncRNAs more often have a specific subcellular localization with a markedly higher percentage of nuclear enrichment within the Myc-repressed lncRNA set. Parallel analysis of differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs identified 105 juxtaposed lncRNA-mRNA pairs, indicative for regulation in cis. To support the potential relevance of the Myc-regulated lncRNAs in cellular transformation, we analyzed their expression in primary Myc-high and Myc-low B-cell lymphomas. In total, 54% of the lncRNAs differentially expressed between the lymphoma subsets were identified as Myc-regulated in P493-6 cells. This study is the first to show that lncRNAs are an important factor within the Myc-regulated transcriptional program and indicates a marked difference between Myc-repressed lncRNAs and mRNAs.

  6. Long Non-Coding RNAs Embedded in the Rb and p53 Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F.; Lal, Ashish, E-mail: ashish.lal@nih.gov [Genetics Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    In recent years, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have gained significant attention as a novel class of gene regulators. Although a small number of lncRNAs have been shown to regulate gene expression through diverse mechanisms including transcriptional regulation, mRNA splicing and translation, the physiological function and mechanism of action of the vast majority are not known. Profiling studies in cell lines and tumor samples have suggested a potential role of lncRNAs in cancer. Indeed, distinct lncRNAs have been shown to be embedded in the p53 and Rb networks, two of the major tumor suppressor pathways that control cell cycle progression and survival. Given the fact that inactivation of Rb and p53 is a hallmark of human cancer, in this review we discuss recent evidence on the function of lncRNAs in the Rb and p53 signaling pathways.

  7. MetastamiRs: Non-Coding MicroRNAs Driving Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rodriguez-Cuevas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs of ~22 nucleotides that function as negative regulators of gene expression by either inhibiting translation or inducing deadenylation-dependent degradation of target transcripts. Notably, deregulation of miRNAs expression is associated with the initiation and progression of human cancers where they act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors contributing to tumorigenesis. Abnormal miRNA expression may provide potential diagnostic and prognostic tumor biomarkers and new therapeutic targets in cancer. Recently, several miRNAs have been shown to initiate invasion and metastasis by targeting multiple proteins that are major players in these cellular events, thus they have been denominated as metastamiRs. Here, we present a review of the current knowledge of miRNAs in cancer with a special focus on metastamiRs. In addition we discuss their potential use as novel specific markers for cancer progression.

  8. Long non-coding RNAs as novel therapeutic targets in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorgna, Giovanni; Vago, Riccardo; Sarmini, Mohamad; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea; Bellone, Matteo

    2016-08-01

    Thanks to impressive technology advancements, pervasive expression of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has been recently identified in the genome of numerous cancers. Long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) belong to a new class of ncRNAs including tens of thousands different species. A fraction of these molecules shows a striking cancer-enriched expression pattern, suggesting an essential role in tumor cells and, possibly, a utility in therapeutic terms. This review aims at summarizing current knowledge for the identification and validation of lncRNAs as therapeutics targets in tumors. Both in-silico and wet-biology resources are presented in relation to the many challenges that the scientific community still needs to address in terms of lncRNA identification, stratification, patient personalization, drug delivery and toxicity.

  9. Structured non-coding RNAs and the RNP Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, J. Robert; Collins, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Summary Non-protein-coding (nc) RNAs are diverse in their modes of synthesis, processing, assembly, and function. The inventory of transcripts known or suspected to serve their biological roles as RNA has increased dramatically in recent years. Although studies of ncRNA function are only beginning to match the pace of ncRNA discovery, some principles are emerging. Here we focus on a framework for understanding functions of ncRNAs that have evolved in a protein-rich cellular environment, as distinct from ncRNAs that arose originally in the ancestral RNA World. The folding and function of ncRNAs in the context of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes provide myriad opportunities for ncRNA gain of function, leading to a modern-day RNP Renaissance. PMID:18950732

  10. Non-Coding RNAs: The “Dark Matter” of Cardiovascular Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Polimeni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale analyses of mammalian transcriptomes have identified a significant number of different RNA molecules that are not translated into protein. In fact, the use of new sequencing technologies has identified that most of the genome is transcribed, producing a heterogeneous population of RNAs which do not encode for proteins (ncRNAs. Emerging data suggest that these transcripts influence the development of cardiovascular disease. The best characterized non-coding RNA family is represented by short highly conserved RNA molecules, termed microRNAs (miRNAs, which mediate a process of mRNA silencing through transcript degradation or translational repression. These microRNAs (miRNAs are expressed in cardiovascular tissues and play key roles in many cardiovascular pathologies, such as coronary artery disease (CAD and heart failure (HF. Potential links between other ncRNAs, like long non-coding RNA, and cardiovascular disease are intriguing but the functions of these transcripts are largely unknown. Thus, the functional characterization of ncRNAs is essential to improve the overall understanding of cellular processes involved in cardiovascular diseases in order to define new therapeutic strategies. This review outlines the current knowledge of the different ncRNA classes and summarizes their role in cardiovascular development and disease.

  11. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meseda, Clement A. [Division of Viral Products, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Srinivasan, Kumar [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wise, Jasen [Qiagen, Frederick, MD (United States); Catalano, Jennifer [Center for Tobacco Products, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection.

  12. Wolbachia small noncoding RNAs and their role in cross-kingdom communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, Jaime G; Hussain, Mazhar; Joubert, D Albert; Iturbe-Ormaetxe, Iñaki; O'Neill, Scott L; Asgari, Sassan

    2014-12-30

    In prokaryotes, small noncoding RNAs (snRNAs) of 50-500 nt are produced that are important in bacterial virulence and response to environmental stimuli. Here, we identified and characterized snRNAs from the endosymbiotic bacteria, Wolbachia, which are widespread in invertebrates and cause reproductive manipulations. Most importantly, some strains of Wolbachia inhibit replication of several vector-borne pathogens in insects. We demonstrate that two abundant snRNAs, WsnRNA-46 and WsnRNA-49, are expressed in Wolbachia from noncoding RNA transcripts that contain precursors with stem-loop structures. WsnRNAs were detected in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected with the wMelPop-CLA strain of Wolbachia and in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans infected with wMelPop and wAu strains, respectively, indicating that the WsnRNAs are conserved across species and strains. In addition, we show that the WsnRNAs may potentially regulate host genes and Wolbachia genes. Our findings provide evidence for the production of functional snRNAs by Wolbachia that play roles in cross-kingdom communication between the endosymbiont and the host.

  13. MASTR: multiple alignment and structure prediction of non-coding RNAs using simulated annealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgreen, Stinus; Gardner, Paul P; Krogh, Anders

    2007-01-01

    MOTIVATION: As more non-coding RNAs are discovered, the importance of methods for RNA analysis increases. Since the structure of ncRNA is intimately tied to the function of the molecule, programs for RNA structure prediction are necessary tools in this growing field of research. Furthermore, it i...

  14. Emerging Roles for Non-Coding RNAs in Male Reproductive Development in Flowering Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Rodriguez-Enriquez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of sexual reproduction systems in flowering plants is essential to humankind, with crop fertility vitally important for food security. Here, we review rapidly emerging new evidence for the key importance of non-coding RNAs in male reproductive development in flowering plants. From the commitment of somatic cells to initiating reproductive development through to meiosis and the development of pollen—containing the male gametes (sperm cells—in the anther, there is now overwhelming data for a diversity of non-coding RNAs and emerging evidence for crucial roles for them in regulating cellular events at these developmental stages. A particularly exciting development has been the association of one example of cytoplasmic male sterility, which has become an unparalleled breeding tool for producing new crop hybrids, with a non-coding RNA locus.

  15. Mechanism of cancer drug resistance and the involvement of noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongping; Hui, Kam M

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the major reasons for the failure of cancer therapies. Although our understanding of resistance to targeted cancer drugs remains incomplete, new and more creative approaches are being exploited to intercept this phenomenon. Considerable advances have been made in our understanding that cancer drug resistance can be caused by alterations of drug efflux, increases in drug metabolism, mutations of drug targets, alterations in DNA repair and cell cycle, changes in cell apoptosis and autophagy, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the generation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Furthermore, intracellular signalling pathways have been shown to play key physiological roles and the abnormal activation of signalling pathways may be correlated with drug resistance. Recently, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as important regulators of gene expression and alternative splicing, which provides cells with yet another mode to greatly increase regulatory complexity and fine-tune their transcriptome and can rapidly adjust their proteome in response to stimuli. Consequently, a wide variety of biological functions have been shown to depend on the coordinated interactions between noncoding RNAs and cellular signalling networks to achieve a concerted desired physiological outcome, whereas mutations and dysregulation of ncRNAs have been linked to diverse human diseases, including cancer drug resistance. In this review, we will discuss recent findings on the multiple molecular roles of regulatory ncRNAs on the signalling pathways involved in cancer drug resistance and the therapeutic potential of reverse drug resistance.

  16. LncRNAWiki: harnessing community knowledge in collaborative curation of human long non-coding RNAs

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, L.

    2014-11-15

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) perform a diversity of functions in numerous important biological processes and are implicated in many human diseases. In this report we present lncRNAWiki (http://lncrna.big.ac.cn), a wiki-based platform that is open-content and publicly editable and aimed at community-based curation and collection of information on human lncRNAs. Current related databases are dependent primarily on curation by experts, making it laborious to annotate the exponentially accumulated information on lncRNAs, which inevitably requires collective efforts in community-based curation of lncRNAs. Unlike existing databases, lncRNAWiki features comprehensive integration of information on human lncRNAs obtained from multiple different resources and allows not only existing lncRNAs to be edited, updated and curated by different users but also the addition of newly identified lncRNAs by any user. It harnesses community collective knowledge in collecting, editing and annotating human lncRNAs and rewards community-curated efforts by providing explicit authorship based on quantified contributions. LncRNAWiki relies on the underling knowledge of scientific community for collective and collaborative curation of human lncRNAs and thus has the potential to serve as an up-to-date and comprehensive knowledgebase for human lncRNAs.

  17. Non-coding RNAs and the acquisition of genomic imprinting in mammals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Genomic imprinting,representing parent-specific expression of alleles at a locus,is mainly evident in flowering plants and placental mammals.Most imprinted genes,including numerous non-coding RNAs,are located in clusters regulated by imprinting control regions(ICRs).The acquisition and evolution of genomic imprinting is among the most fundamental genetic questions.Discoveries about the transition of mammalian imprinted gene domains from their non-imprinted ancestors,especially recent studies undertaken on the most ancient mammalian clades-the marsupials and monotremes from which model species genomes have recently been sequenced,are of high value.By reviewing and analyzing these studies,a close connection between non-coding RNAs and the acquisition of genomic imprinting in mammals is demonstrated.The evidence comes from two observations accompanied with the acquisition of the imprinting:(i) many novel non-coding RNA genes emerged in imprinted regions;(ii) the expressions of some conserved non-coding RNAs have changed dramatically.Furthermore,a systematical analysis of imprinted snoRNA(small nucleolar RNA) genes from 15 vertebrates suggests that the origination of imprinted snoRNAs occurred after the divergence between eutherians and marsupials,followed by a rapid expansion leading to the fixation of major gene families in the eutherian ancestor prior to the radiation of modern placental mammals.Involved in the regulation of imprinted silencing and mediating the chromatins epigenetic modification may be the major roles that non-coding RNAs play during the acquisition of genomic imprinting in mammals.

  18. Exploiting Long Noncoding RNAs as Pharmacological Targets to Modulate Epigenetic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Bindu; Zhong, Xiao-bo; Rasmussen, Theodore P.

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) constitute the largest class of non-coding transcripts in the human genome. Results from next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics advances indicate that the human genome contains more non-coding RNA genes than protein-coding genes. Validated functions of lncRNAs suggest that they are master regulators of gene expression and often exert their influences via epigenetic mechanisms by modulating chromatin structure. Specific lncRNAs can regulate transcription in gene clusters. Since the functions of protein-coding genes in clusters are often tied to specific pathways, lncRNAs constitute attractive pharmacological targets. Here we review the current knowledge of lncRNA functions in human cells and their roles in disease processes. We also present forward-looking perspectives on how they might be manipulated pharmacologically for the treatment of a variety of human diseases, in which regulation of gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms plays a major role. PMID:28356895

  19. Identification and functional characterization of small non-coding RNAs in Xanthomonas oryzae pathovar oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jie-Qiong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs are regarded as important regulators in prokaryotes and play essential roles in diverse cellular processes. Xanthomonas oryzae pathovar oryzae (Xoo is an important plant pathogenic bacterium which causes serious bacterial blight of rice. However, little is known about the number, genomic distribution and biological functions of sRNAs in Xoo. Results Here, we performed a systematic screen to identify sRNAs in the Xoo strain PXO99. A total of 850 putative non-coding RNA sequences originated from intergenic and gene antisense regions were identified by cloning, of which 63 were also identified as sRNA candidates by computational prediction, thus were considered as Xoo sRNA candidates. Northern blot hybridization confirmed the size and expression of 6 sRNA candidates and other 2 cloned small RNA sequences, which were then added to the sRNA candidate list. We further examined the expression profiles of the eight sRNAs in an hfq deletion mutant and found that two of them showed drastically decreased expression levels, and another exhibited an Hfq-dependent transcript processing pattern. Deletion mutants were obtained for seven of the Northern confirmed sRNAs, but none of them exhibited obvious phenotypes. Comparison of the proteomic differences between three of the ΔsRNA mutants and the wild-type strain by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE analysis showed that these sRNAs are involved in multiple physiological and biochemical processes. Conclusions We experimentally verified eight sRNAs in a genome-wide screen and uncovered three Hfq-dependent sRNAs in Xoo. Proteomics analysis revealed Xoo sRNAs may take part in various metabolic processes. Taken together, this work represents the first comprehensive screen and functional analysis of sRNAs in rice pathogenic bacteria and facilitates future studies on sRNA-mediated regulatory networks in this important phytopathogen.

  20. Identification and Role of Regulatory Non-Coding RNAs in Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mobarak Abu Mraheil

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial regulatory non-coding RNAs control numerous mRNA targets that direct a plethora of biological processes, such as the adaption to environmental changes, growth and virulence. Recently developed high-throughput techniques, such as genomic tiling arrays and RNA-Seq have allowed investigating prokaryotic cis- and trans-acting regulatory RNAs, including sRNAs, asRNAs, untranslated regions (UTR and riboswitches. As a result, we obtained a more comprehensive view on the complexity and plasticity of the prokaryotic genome biology. Listeria monocytogenes was utilized as a model system for intracellular pathogenic bacteria in several studies, which revealed the presence of about 180 regulatory RNAs in the listerial genome. A regulatory role of non-coding RNAs in survival, virulence and adaptation mechanisms of L. monocytogenes was confirmed in subsequent experiments, thus, providing insight into a multifaceted modulatory function of RNA/mRNA interference. In this review, we discuss the identification of regulatory RNAs by high-throughput techniques and in their functional role in L. monocytogenes.

  1. Identification and Role of Regulatory Non-Coding RNAs in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izar, Benjamin; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Hain, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial regulatory non-coding RNAs control numerous mRNA targets that direct a plethora of biological processes, such as the adaption to environmental changes, growth and virulence. Recently developed high-throughput techniques, such as genomic tiling arrays and RNA-Seq have allowed investigating prokaryotic cis- and trans-acting regulatory RNAs, including sRNAs, asRNAs, untranslated regions (UTR) and riboswitches. As a result, we obtained a more comprehensive view on the complexity and plasticity of the prokaryotic genome biology. Listeria monocytogenes was utilized as a model system for intracellular pathogenic bacteria in several studies, which revealed the presence of about 180 regulatory RNAs in the listerial genome. A regulatory role of non-coding RNAs in survival, virulence and adaptation mechanisms of L. monocytogenes was confirmed in subsequent experiments, thus, providing insight into a multifaceted modulatory function of RNA/mRNA interference. In this review, we discuss the identification of regulatory RNAs by high-throughput techniques and in their functional role in L. monocytogenes. PMID:21954346

  2. Targeting antisense mitochondrial ncRNAs inhibits murine melanoma tumor growth and metastasis through reduction in survival and invasion factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Araya, Mariela; Restovic, Franko; Echenique, Javiera; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Briones, Macarena; Villegas, Jaime; Villota, Claudio; Vidaurre, Soledad; Borgna, Vincenzo; Socias, Miguel; Valenzuela, Sebastián; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Varas, Manuel; Díaz, Jorge; Burzio, Luis O.; Burzio, Verónica A.

    2016-01-01

    We reported that knockdown of the antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptotic death of several human tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for selective therapy against different types of cancer. In order to translate these results to a preclinical scenario, we characterized the murine noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ncmtRNAs) and performed in vivo knockdown in syngeneic murine melanoma models. Mouse ncmtRNAs display structures similar to the human counterparts, including long double-stranded regions arising from the presence of inverted repeats. Knockdown of ASncmtRNAs with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) reduces murine melanoma B16F10 cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in vitro through downregulation of pro-survival and metastasis markers, particularly survivin. For in vivo studies, subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice were treated systemically with specific and control antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). For metastasis studies, tumors were resected, followed by systemic administration of ASOs and the presence of metastatic nodules in lungs and liver was assessed. Treatment with specific ASO inhibited tumor growth and metastasis after primary tumor resection. In a metastasis-only assay, mice inoculated intravenously with cells and treated with the same ASO displayed reduced number and size of melanoma nodules in the lungs, compared to controls. Our results suggest that ASncmtRNAs could be potent targets for melanoma therapy. To our knowledge, the ASncmtRNAs are the first potential non-nuclear targets for melanoma therapy. PMID:27507060

  3. New neurons in aging brains: molecular control by small non-coding RNAs

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    Marijn eSchouten

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis is a process that continues in the adult and also aging brain. It generates functional neurons from neural stem cells present in specific brain regions. This phenomenon is largely confined to two main regions: the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, in the hippocampus. With age, the hippocampus and particularly the dentate gyrus are affected. For instance, adult neurogenesis is decreased with aging, in both the number of proliferating cells as well as their neuronal differentiation, while in parallel an age-associated decline in cognitive performance is often seen. Surprisingly, the synaptogenic potential of adult-born neurons appears unaffected by aging. Therefore, although proliferation, differentiation, survival and synaptogenesis of adult-born new neurons in the dentate gyrus are closely related to each other, they appear differentially regulated with aging. In this review we discuss the crucial role of a novel class of recently discovered regulators of gene expression, i.e. the small non-coding RNAs, in the development of adult neurogenesis from neural stem cells to functionally integrated neurons. In particular, a subgroup of the small non-coding RNAs, the microRNAs, fine-tune many events during adult neurogenesis progression. Moreover, multiple small non-coding RNAs are differentially expressed in the aged hippocampus. This makes small non-coding RNAs appealing candidates to orchestrate, and possibly correct or prevent, the functional alterations in adult neurogenesis and cognition associated with aging. Finally, we briefly summarize observations that link changes in circulating levels of steroid hormones with alterations in adult neurogenesis and subsequent vulnerability to psychopathology in advanced age, and discuss a possible role of microRNAs in stress-associated alterations in adult neurogenesis during aging.

  4. Long Non-coding RNAs Expression Profile in HepG2 Cells Reveals the Potential Role of Long Non-coding RNAs in the Cholesterol Metabolism

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    Gang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Green tea has been shown to improve cholesterol metabolism in animal studies, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this function have not been fully understood. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs have recently emerged as a major class of regulatory molecules involved in a broad range of biological processes and complex diseases. Our aim was to identify important lncRNAs that might play an important role in contributing to the benefits of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG on cholesterol metabolism. Methods: Microarrays was used to reveal the lncRNA and mRNA profiles in green tea polyphenol(--epigallocatechin gallate in cultured human liver (HepG2 hepatocytes treated with EGCG and bioinformatic analyses of the predicted target genes were performed to identify lncRNA-mRNA targeting relationships. RNA interference was used to investigate the role of lncRNAs in cholesterol metabolism. Results: The expression levels of 15 genes related to cholesterol metabolism and 285 lncRNAs were changed by EGCG treatment. Bioinformatic analysis found five matched lncRNA-mRNA pairs for five differentially expressed lncRNAs and four differentially expressed mRNA. In particular, the lncRNA AT102202 and its potential targets mRNA-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR were identified. Using a real-time polymerase chain reaction technique, we confirmed that EGCG down-regulated mRNA expression level of the HMGCR and up-regulated expression of AT102202. After AT102202 knockdown in HepG2, we observed that the level of HMGCR expression was significantly increased relative to the scrambled small interfering RNA control (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Our results indicated that EGCG improved cholesterol metabolism and meanwhile changed the lncRNAs expression profile in HepG2 cells. LncRNAs may play an important role in the cholesterol metabolism.

  5. An atlas of human long non-coding RNAs with accurate 5′ ends

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    Hon, Chung-Chau

    2017-02-28

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are largely heterogeneous and functionally uncharacterized. Here, using FANTOM5 cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) data, we integrate multiple transcript collections to generate a comprehensive atlas of 27,919 human lncRNA genes with high-confidence 5′ ends and expression profiles across 1,829 samples from the major human primary cell types and tissues. Genomic and epigenomic classification of these lncRNAs reveals that most intergenic lncRNAs originate from enhancers rather than from promoters. Incorporating genetic and expression data, we show that lncRNAs overlapping trait-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms are specifically expressed in cell types relevant to the traits, implicating these lncRNAs in multiple diseases. We further demonstrate that lncRNAs overlapping expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL)-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms of messenger RNAs are co-expressed with the corresponding messenger RNAs, suggesting their potential roles in transcriptional regulation. Combining these findings with conservation data, we identify 19,175 potentially functional lncRNAs in the human genome.

  6. Exploration of Deregulated Long Non-Coding RNAs in Association with Hepatocarcinogenesis and Survival

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    Shen, Jing, E-mail: js2182@cumc.columbia.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Siegel, Abby B. [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Remotti, Helen [Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Wang, Qiao; Shen, Yueyue [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Santella, Regina M. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States)

    2015-09-10

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are larger than 200 nucleotides in length and pervasively expressed across the genome. An increasing number of studies indicate that lncRNA transcripts play integral regulatory roles in cellular growth, division, differentiation and apoptosis. Deregulated lncRNAs have been observed in a variety of human cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We determined the expression profiles of 90 lncRNAs for 65 paired HCC tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues, and 55 lncRNAs were expressed in over 90% of samples. Eight lncRNAs were significantly down-regulated in HCC tumor compared to non-tumor tissues (p < 0.05), but no lncRNA achieved statistical significance after Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Within tumor tissues, carrying more aberrant lncRNAs (6–7) was associated with a borderline significant reduction in survival (HR = 8.5, 95% CI: 1.0–72.5). The predictive accuracy depicted by the AUC was 0.93 for HCC survival when using seven deregulated lncRNAs (likelihood ratio test p = 0.001), which was similar to that combining the seven lncRNAs with tumor size and treatment (AUC = 0.96, sensitivity = 87%, specificity = 87%). These data suggest the potential association of deregulated lncRNAs with hepatocarcinogenesis and HCC survival.

  7. Next-Generation Sequencing Analysis of Long Noncoding RNAs in CD4+ T Cell Differentiation.

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    Ranzani, Valeria; Arrigoni, Alberto; Rossetti, Grazisa; Panzeri, Ilaria; Abrignani, Sergio; Bonnal, Raoul J P; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing approaches, in particular RNA-seq, provide a genome-wide expression profiling allowing the identification of novel and rare transcripts such as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA). Many RNA-seq studies have now been performed aimed at the characterization of lncRNAs and their possible involvement in cell development and differentiation in different organisms, cell types, and tissues. The adaptive immune system is an extraordinary context for the study of the role of lncRNAs in differentiation. Indeed lncRNAs seem to be key drivers in governing flexibility and plasticity of both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell, together with lineage-specific transcription factors and cytokines, acting as fine-tuners of fate choices in T cell differentiation.We describe here a pipeline for the identification of lncRNAs starting from RNA-Seq raw data.

  8. Noncoding RNAs as potential biomarkers to predict the outcome in pancreatic cancer

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    Jin K

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaizhou Jin,1–3,* Guopei Luo,1–3,* Zhiwen Xiao,1–3 Zuqiang Liu,1–3 Chen Liu,1–3 Shunrong Ji,1–3 Jin Xu,1–3 Liang Liu,1–3 Jiang Long,1–3 Quanxing Ni,1–3 Xianjun Yu1–3 1Department of Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 3Pancreatic Cancer Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC, a common digestive system cancer, is highly malignant and has a poor disease outcome. Currently, all available examination and detection methods cannot accurately predict the clinical outcome. Therefore, it is extremely important to identify novel molecular biomarkers for personalized medication and to significantly improve the overall outcome. The “noncoding RNAs” (ncRNAs are a group of RNAs that do not code for proteins, and they are categorized as structural RNAs and regulatory RNAs. It has been shown that microRNAs and long ncRNAs function as regulatory RNAs to affect the progression of various diseases. Many studies have confirmed a role for ncRNAs in the progression of PDAC during the last few years. Because of the significant role of ncRNAs in PDAC, ncRNA profiling may be used to predict PDAC outcome with high accuracy. This review comprehensively analyzes the value of ncRNAs as potential biomarkers to predict the outcome in PDAC and the possible mechanisms thereof. Keywords: pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, microRNA, long noncoding RNA, outcome prediction

  9. Comparison of non-coding RNAs in human and canine cancer

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    Siegfried eWagner

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the post-transcriptional gene silencing by small non-protein-coding RNAs is considered as a major breakthrough in biology. In the last decade we just started to realize the biologic function and complexity of gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs. Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS is a conserved phenomenon which was observed in various species such as fungi, worms, plants and mammals. Micro RNAs (miRNA and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs are two gene silencing mediators constituting an evolutionary conserved class of non-coding RNAs regulating many biological processes in eukaryotes. As this small RNAs appear to regulate gene expression at translational and transcriptional level it is not surprising that during the last decade many human diseases among them Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular diseases and various cancer types were associated with deregulated miRNA expression. Consequently small RNAs are considered to hold big promises as therapeutic agents. However despite of the enormous therapeutic potential many questions remain unanswered. A major critical point, when evaluating novel therapeutic approaches, is the transfer of in vitro settings to an in vivo model. Classical animal models rely on the laboratory kept animals under artificial conditions and often missing an intact immune system. Model organisms with spontaneously occurring tumors as e.g. dogs provide the possibility to evaluate therapeutic agents under the surveillance of an in intact immune system and thereby providing an authentic tumor reacting scenario. Considering the genomic similarity between canines and humans and the advantages of the dog as cancer model system for human neoplasias the analyses of the complex role of small RNAs in canine tumor development could be of major value for both species. Herein we discuss comparatively the role of miRNAs in human and canine cancer development and highlight the potential and advantages of the model

  10. Non-coding RNAs and epigenome: de novo DNA methylation, allelic exclusion and X-inactivation

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    V. A. Halytskiy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs are widespread class of cell RNAs. They participate in many important processes in cells – signaling, posttranscriptional silencing, protein biosynthesis, splicing, maintenance of genome stability, telomere lengthening, X-inactivation. Nevertheless, activity of these RNAs is not restricted to posttranscriptional sphere, but cover also processes that change or maintain the epigenetic information. Non-coding RNAs can directly bind to the DNA targets and cause their repression through recruitment of DNA methyltransferases as well as chromatin modifying enzymes. Such events constitute molecular mechanism of the RNA-dependent DNA methylation. It is possible, that the RNA-DNA interaction is universal mechanism triggering DNA methylation de novo. Allelic exclusion can be also based on described mechanism. This phenomenon takes place, when non-coding RNA, which precursor is transcribed from one allele, triggers DNA methylation in all other alleles present in the cell. Note, that miRNA-mediated transcriptional silencing resembles allelic exclusion, because both miRNA gene and genes, which can be targeted by this miRNA, contain elements with the same sequences. It can be assumed that RNA-dependent DNA methylation and allelic exclusion originated with the purpose of counteracting the activity of mobile genetic elements. Probably, thinning and deregulation of the cellular non-coding RNA pattern allows reactivation of silent mobile genetic elements resulting in genome instability that leads to ageing and carcinogenesis. In the course of X-inactivation, DNA methylation and subsequent hete­rochromatinization of X chromosome can be triggered by direct hybridization of 5′-end of large non-coding RNA Xist with DNA targets in remote regions of the X chromosome.

  11. Novel modulators of senescence, aging, and longevity: Small non-coding RNAs enter the stage.

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    Grillari, Johannes; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina

    2010-04-01

    During the last decade evidence has accumulated that the aging process is driven by limited allocation of energy to somatic maintenance resulting in accumulation of stochastic damage. This damage, affecting molecules, cells, and tissues, is counteracted by genetically programmed repair, the efficiency of which thus importantly determines the life and 'health span' of organisms. Therefore, understanding the regulation of gene expression during cellular and organismal aging as well as upon exposure to various damaging events is important to understand the biology of aging and to positively influence the health span. The recent identification of small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), has added an additional layer of complexity to the regulation of gene expression with the classes of endogenous small inhibitory RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), QDE1-interacting RNAs (qiRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). Some of these ncRNAs have not yet been identified in mammalian cells and are dependent on RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. The first mammalian enzyme with such activity has only now emerged and surprisingly consists of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) together with RMPR, an alternative RNA component. The so far most studied small non-coding RNAs, miRNAs, however, are now increasingly found to operate in the complex network of cellular aging. Recent findings show that (i) miRNAs are regulated during cellular senescence in vitro, (ii) they contribute to tissue regeneration by regulation of stem cell function, and (iii) at least one miRNA modulates the life span of the model organism C. elegans. Additionally, (iv) they act as inhibitors of proteins mediating the insulin/IGF1 and target of rapamycin (TOR) signalling, both of which are conserved modulators of organism life span. Here we will give an overview on the current status of these topics. Since little is so far known on the functions of small ncRNAs in the context of aging and longevity, the entry of the

  12. Insights into the Function of Long Noncoding RNAs in Sepsis Revealed by Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis

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    Diogo Vieira da Silva Pellegrina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a major cause of death and its incidence and mortality increase exponentially with age. Most gene expression studies in sepsis have focused in protein-coding genes and the expression patterns, and potential roles of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have not been investigated yet. In this study, we performed co-expression network analysis of protein-coding and lncRNAs measured in neutrophil granulocytes from adult and elderly septic patients, along with age-matched healthy controls. We found that the genes displaying highest network similarity are predominantly differently expressed in sepsis and are enriched in loci encoding proteins with structural or regulatory functions related to protein translation and mitochondrial energetic metabolism. A number of lncRNAs are strongly connected to genes from these pathways and may take part in regulatory loops that are perturbed in sepsis. Among those, the ribosomal pseudogenes RP11-302F12.1 and RPL13AP7 are differentially expressed and appear to have a regulatory role on protein translation in both the elderly and adults, and lncRNAs MALAT1, LINC00355, MYCNOS, and AC010970.2 display variable connection strength and inverted expression patterns between adult and elderly networks, suggesting that they are the best candidates to be further studied to understand the mechanisms by which the immune response is impaired by age. In summary, we report the expression of lncRNAs that are deregulated in patients with sepsis, including subsets that display hub properties in molecular pathways relevant to the disease pathogenesis and that may participate in gene expression regulatory circuits related to the poorer disease outcome observed in elderly subjects.

  13. Distinguishing protein-coding from non-coding RNAs through support vector machines.

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    Jinfeng Liu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available RIKEN's FANTOM project has revealed many previously unknown coding sequences, as well as an unexpected degree of variation in transcripts resulting from alternative promoter usage and splicing. Ever more transcripts that do not code for proteins have been identified by transcriptome studies, in general. Increasing evidence points to the important cellular roles of such non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs. The distinction of protein-coding RNA transcripts from ncRNA transcripts is therefore an important problem in understanding the transcriptome and carrying out its annotation. Very few in silico methods have specifically addressed this problem. Here, we introduce CONC (for "coding or non-coding", a novel method based on support vector machines that classifies transcripts according to features they would have if they were coding for proteins. These features include peptide length, amino acid composition, predicted secondary structure content, predicted percentage of exposed residues, compositional entropy, number of homologs from database searches, and alignment entropy. Nucleotide frequencies are also incorporated into the method. Confirmed coding cDNAs for eukaryotic proteins from the Swiss-Prot database constituted the set of true positives, ncRNAs from RNAdb and NONCODE the true negatives. Ten-fold cross-validation suggested that CONC distinguished coding RNAs from ncRNAs at about 97% specificity and 98% sensitivity. Applied to 102,801 mouse cDNAs from the FANTOM3 dataset, our method reliably identified over 14,000 ncRNAs and estimated the total number of ncRNAs to be about 28,000.

  14. Functional annotation of the vlinc class of non-coding RNAs using systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Laurent, Georges; Vyatkin, Yuri; Antonets, Denis; Ri, Maxim; Qi, Yao; Saik, Olga; Shtokalo, Dmitry; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Kawaji, Hideya; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Arner, Erik; Forrest, Alistair R R; Nicolas, Estelle; McCaffrey, Timothy A; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kapranov, Philipp

    2016-04-20

    Functionality of the non-coding transcripts encoded by the human genome is the coveted goal of the modern genomics research. While commonly relied on the classical methods of forward genetics, integration of different genomics datasets in a global Systems Biology fashion presents a more productive avenue of achieving this very complex aim. Here we report application of a Systems Biology-based approach to dissect functionality of a newly identified vast class of very long intergenic non-coding (vlinc) RNAs. Using highly quantitative FANTOM5 CAGE dataset, we show that these RNAs could be grouped into 1542 novel human genes based on analysis of insulators that we show here indeed function as genomic barrier elements. We show that vlinc RNAs genes likely function in cisto activate nearby genes. This effect while most pronounced in closely spaced vlinc RNA-gene pairs can be detected over relatively large genomic distances. Furthermore, we identified 101 vlinc RNA genes likely involved in early embryogenesis based on patterns of their expression and regulation. We also found another 109 such genes potentially involved in cellular functions also happening at early stages of development such as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Overall, we show that Systems Biology-based methods have great promise for functional annotation of non-coding RNAs.

  15. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Long Non-Coding RNAs in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

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    Wu, Yuqian; Cheng, Tingcai; Liu, Chun; Liu, Duolian; Zhang, Quan; Long, Renwen; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as important regulators in various biological processes. However, to date, no systematic characterization of lncRNAs has been reported in the silkworm Bombyx mori. In the present study, we generated eighteen RNA-seq datasets with relatively high depth. Using an in-house designed lncRNA identification pipeline, 11,810 lncRNAs were identified for 5,556 loci. Among these lncRNAs, 474 transcripts were intronic lncRNAs (ilncRNAs), 6,250 transcripts were intergenic lncRNAs (lincRNAs), and 5,086 were natural antisense lncRNAs (lncNATs). Compared with protein-coding mRNAs, silkworm lncRNAs are shorter in terms of full length but longer in terms of exon and intron length. In addition, lncRNAs exhibit a lower level of sequence conservation, more repeat sequences overlapped and higher tissue specificity than protein-coding mRNAs in the silkworm. We found that 69 lncRNA transcripts from 33 gene loci may function as miRNA precursors, and 104 lncRNA transcripts from 72 gene loci may act as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs). In total, 49.47% of all gene loci (2,749/5,556) for which lncRNAs were identified showed sex-biased expression. Co-expression network analysis resulted in 19 modules, 12 of which revealed relatively high tissue specificity. The highlighted darkgoldenrod module was specifically associated with middle and posterior silk glands, and the hub lncRNAs within this module were co-expressed with proteins involved in translation, translocation, and secretory processes, suggesting that these hub lncRNAs may function as regulators of the biosynthesis, translocation, and secretion of silk proteins. This study presents the first comprehensive genome-wide analysis of silkworm lncRNAs and provides an invaluable resource for genetic, evolutionary, and genomic studies of B. mori.

  16. Long Noncoding RNAs as New Architects in Cancer Epigenetics, Prognostic Biomarkers, and Potential Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseure, Didier; Drak Alsibai, Kinan; Nicolas, Andre; Bieche, Ivan; Morillon, Antonin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome-wide analysis have revealed that 66% of the genome is actively transcribed into noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) while less than 2% of the sequences encode proteins. Among ncRNAs, high-resolution microarray and massively parallel sequencing technologies have identified long ncRNAs (>200 nucleotides) that lack coding protein function. LncRNAs abundance, nuclear location, and diversity allow them to create in association with protein interactome, a complex regulatory network orchestrating cellular phenotypic plasticity via modulation of all levels of protein-coding gene expression. Whereas lncRNAs biological functions and mechanisms of action are still not fully understood, accumulating data suggest that lncRNAs deregulation is pivotal in cancer initiation and progression and metastatic spread through various mechanisms, including epigenetic effectors, alternative splicing, and microRNA-like molecules. Mounting data suggest that several lncRNAs expression profiles in malignant tumors are associated with prognosis and they can be detected in biological fluids. In this review, we will briefly discuss characteristics and functions of lncRNAs, their role in carcinogenesis, and their potential usefulness as diagnosis and prognosis biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets.

  17. Long Non-Coding RNAs: The Key Players in Glioma Pathogenesis

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    Kiang, Karrie Mei-Yee; Zhang, Xiao-Qin; Leung, Gilberto Ka-Kit, E-mail: gilberto@hku.hk [Department of Surgery, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-07-29

    Long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) represent a novel class of RNAs with no functional protein-coding ability, yet it has become increasingly clear that interactions between lncRNAs with other molecules are responsible for important gene regulatory functions in various contexts. Given their relatively high expressions in the brain, lncRNAs are now thought to play important roles in normal brain development as well as diverse disease processes including gliomagenesis. Intriguingly, certain lncRNAs are closely associated with the initiation, differentiation, progression, recurrence and stem-like characteristics in glioma, and may therefore be exploited for the purposes of sub-classification, diagnosis and prognosis. LncRNAs may also serve as potential therapeutic targets as well as a novel biomarkers in the treatment of glioma. In this article, the functional aspects of lncRNAs, particularly within the central nervous system (CNS), will be briefly discussed, followed by highlights of the important roles of lncRNAs in mediating critical steps during glioma development. In addition, the key lncRNA players and their possible mechanistic pathways associated with gliomagenesis will be addressed.

  18. Intronic RNAs constitute the major fraction of the non-coding RNA in mammalian cells

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    St Laurent Georges

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The function of RNA from the non-coding (the so called “dark matter” regions of the genome has been a subject of considerable recent debate. Perhaps the most controversy is regarding the function of RNAs found in introns of annotated transcripts, where most of the reads that map outside of exons are usually found. However, it has been reported that the levels of RNA in introns are minor relative to those of the corresponding exons, and that changes in the levels of intronic RNAs correlate tightly with that of adjacent exons. This would suggest that RNAs produced from the vast expanse of intronic space are just pieces of pre-mRNAs or excised introns en route to degradation. Results We present data that challenges the notion that intronic RNAs are mere by-standers in the cell. By performing a highly quantitative RNAseq analysis of transcriptome changes during an inflammation time course, we show that intronic RNAs have a number of features that would be expected from functional, standalone RNA species. We show that there are thousands of introns in the mouse genome that generate RNAs whose overall abundance, which changes throughout the inflammation timecourse, and other properties suggest that they function in yet unknown ways. Conclusions So far, the focus of non-coding RNA discovery has shied away from intronic regions as those were believed to simply encode parts of pre-mRNAs. Results presented here suggest a very different situation – the sequences encoded in the introns appear to harbor a yet unexplored reservoir of novel, functional RNAs. As such, they should not be ignored in surveys of functional transcripts or other genomic studies.

  19. Long non-coding RNAs: novel targets for nervous system disease diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2013-10-01

    The human genome encodes tens of thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a novel and important class of genes. Our knowledge of lncRNAs has grown exponentially since their discovery within the last decade. lncRNAs are expressed in a highly cell- and tissue-specific manner, and are particularly abundant within the nervous system. lncRNAs are subject to post-transcriptional processing and inter- and intra-cellular transport. lncRNAs act via a spectrum of molecular mechanisms leveraging their ability to engage in both sequence-specific and conformational interactions with diverse partners (DNA, RNA, and proteins). Because of their size, lncRNAs act in a modular fashion, bringing different macromolecules together within the three-dimensional context of the cell. lncRNAs thus coordinate the execution of transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and epigenetic processes and critical biological programs (growth and development, establishment of cell identity, and deployment of stress responses). Emerging data reveal that lncRNAs play vital roles in mediating the developmental complexity, cellular diversity, and activity-dependent plasticity that are hallmarks of brain. Corresponding studies implicate these factors in brain aging and the pathophysiology of brain disorders, through evolving paradigms including the following: (i) genetic variation in lncRNA genes causes disease and influences susceptibility; (ii) epigenetic deregulation of lncRNAs genes is associated with disease; (iii) genomic context links lncRNA genes to disease genes and pathways; and (iv) lncRNAs are otherwise interconnected with known pathogenic mechanisms. Hence, lncRNAs represent prime targets that can be exploited for diagnosing and treating nervous system diseases. Such clinical applications are in the early stages of development but are rapidly advancing because of existing expertise and technology platforms that are readily adaptable for these purposes.

  20. Unexpected Diversity of Chloroplast Noncoding RNAs as Revealed by Deep Sequencing of the Arabidopsis Transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotto, Amber M; Schmitz, Robert J; Fei, Zhangjun; Ecker, Joseph R; Stern, David B

    2011-12-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) are widely expressed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Eukaryotic ncRNAs are commonly micro- and small-interfering RNAs (18-25 nt) involved in posttranscriptional gene silencing, whereas prokaryotic ncRNAs vary in size and are involved in various aspects of gene regulation. Given the prokaryotic origin of organelles, the presence of ncRNAs might be expected; however, the full spectrum of organellar ncRNAs has not been determined systematically. Here, strand-specific RNA-Seq analysis was used to identify 107 candidate ncRNAs from Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts, primarily encoded opposite protein-coding and tRNA genes. Forty-eight ncRNAs were shown to accumulate by RNA gel blot as discrete transcripts in wild-type (WT) plants and/or the pnp1-1 mutant, which lacks the chloroplast ribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (cpPNPase). Ninety-eight percent of the ncRNAs detected by RNA gel blot had different transcript patterns between WT and pnp1-1, suggesting cpPNPase has a significant role in chloroplast ncRNA biogenesis and accumulation. Analysis of materials deficient for other major chloroplast ribonucleases, RNase R, RNase E, and RNase J, showed differential effects on ncRNA accumulation and/or form, suggesting specificity in RNase-ncRNA interactions. 5' end mapping demonstrates that some ncRNAs are transcribed from dedicated promoters, whereas others result from transcriptional read-through. Finally, correlations between accumulation of some ncRNAs and the symmetrically transcribed sense RNA are consistent with a role in RNA stability. Overall, our data suggest that this extensive population of ncRNAs has the potential to underpin a previously underappreciated regulatory mode in the chloroplast.

  1. Mechanisms of Long Non-coding RNAs in Mammalian Nervous System Development, Plasticity, Disease, and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, James A; Wolvetang, Ernst J; Mattick, John S; Rinn, John L; Barry, Guy

    2015-12-02

    Only relatively recently has it become clear that mammalian genomes encode tens of thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). A striking 40% of these are expressed specifically in the brain, where they show precisely regulated temporal and spatial expression patterns. This begs the question, what is the functional role of these many lncRNA transcripts in the brain? Here we canvass a growing number of mechanistic studies that have elucidated central roles for lncRNAs in the regulation of nervous system development and function. We also survey studies indicating that neurological and psychiatric disorders may ensue when these mechanisms break down. Finally, we synthesize these insights with evidence from comparative genomics to argue that lncRNAs may have played important roles in brain evolution, by virtue of their abundant sequence innovation in mammals and plausible mechanistic connections to the adaptive processes that occurred recently in the primate and human lineages.

  2. Regulation of chromatin structure by long noncoding RNAs: focus on natural antisense transcripts.

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    Magistri, Marco; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; St Laurent, Georges; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2012-08-01

    In the decade following the publication of the Human Genome, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have reshaped our understanding of the broad landscape of genome regulation. During this period, natural antisense transcripts (NATs), which are transcribed from the opposite strand of either protein or non-protein coding genes, have vaulted to prominence. Recent findings have shown that NATs can exert their regulatory functions by acting as epigenetic regulators of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Here, we review recent work on the mechanisms of epigenetic modifications by NATs and their emerging role as master regulators of chromatin states. Unlike other long ncRNAs, antisense RNAs usually regulate their counterpart sense mRNA in cis by bridging epigenetic effectors and regulatory complexes at specific genomic loci. Understanding the broad range of effects of NATs will shed light on the complex mechanisms that regulate chromatin remodeling and gene expression in development and disease.

  3. The Mechanisms of Virulence Regulation by Small Noncoding RNAs in Low GC Gram-Positive Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Pitman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of small noncoding regulatory RNAs (sRNAs in bacteria has grown tremendously recently, giving new insights into gene regulation. The implementation of computational analysis and RNA sequencing has provided new tools to discover and analyze potential sRNAs. Small regulatory RNAs that act by base-pairing to target mRNAs have been found to be ubiquitous and are the most abundant class of post-transcriptional regulators in bacteria. The majority of sRNA studies has been limited to E. coli and other gram-negative bacteria. However, examples of sRNAs in gram-positive bacteria are still plentiful although the detailed gene regulation mechanisms behind them are not as well understood. Strict virulence control is critical for a pathogen’s survival and many sRNAs have been found to be involved in that process. This review outlines the targets and currently known mechanisms of trans-acting sRNAs involved in virulence regulation in various gram-positive pathogens. In addition, their shared characteristics such as CU interaction motifs, the role of Hfq, and involvement in two-component regulators, riboswitches, quorum sensing, or toxin/antitoxin systems are described.

  4. Direct visualization of the co-transcriptional assembly of a nuclear body by noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuntao S; Sunwoo, Hongjae; Zhang, Bin; Spector, David L

    2011-01-01

    The cell nucleus is a highly compartmentalized organelle harbouring a variety of dynamic membraneless nuclear bodies. How these subnuclear domains are established and maintained is not well understood. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanism of how one nuclear body, the paraspeckle, is assembled and organized. Paraspeckles are discrete ribonucleoprotein bodies found in mammalian cells and implicated in nuclear retention of hyperedited mRNAs. We developed a live-cell imaging system that allows for the inducible transcription of Men ɛ/β (also known as Neat1; ref. 12) noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) and the direct visualization of the recruitment of paraspeckle proteins. Using this system, we demonstrate that Men ɛ/β ncRNAs are essential to initiate the de novo assembly of paraspeckles. These newly formed structures effectively harbour nuclear-retained mRNAs confirming that they are bona fide functional paraspeckles. By three independent approaches, we show that it is the act of Men ɛ/β transcription, but not ncRNAs alone, that regulates paraspeckle maintenance. Finally, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analyses supported a critical structural role for Men ɛ/β ncRNAs in paraspeckle organization. This study establishes a model in which Men ɛ/β ncRNAs serve as a platform to recruit proteins to assemble paraspeckles.

  5. Mycoplasma non-coding RNA: identification of small RNAs and targets

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    Franciele Maboni Siqueira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial non-coding RNAs act by base-pairing as regulatory elements in crucial biological processes. We performed the identification of trans-encoded small RNAs (sRNA from the genomes of Mycoplama hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma flocculare and Mycoplasma hyorhinis, which are Mycoplasma species that have been identified in the porcine respiratory system. Results A total of 47, 15 and 11 putative sRNAs were predicted in M. hyopneumoniae, M. flocculare and M. hyorhinis, respectively. A comparative genomic analysis revealed the presence of species or lineage specific sRNA candidates. Furthermore, the expression profile of some M. hyopneumoniae sRNAs was determined by a reverse transcription amplification approach, in three different culture conditions. All tested sRNAs were transcribed in at least one condition. A detailed investigation revealed a differential expression profile for two M. hyopneumoniae sRNAs in response to oxidative and heat shock stress conditions, suggesting that their expression is influenced by environmental signals. Moreover, we analyzed sRNA-mRNA hybrids and accessed putative target genes for the novel sRNA candidates. The majority of the sRNAs showed interaction with multiple target genes, some of which could be linked to pathogenesis and cell homeostasis activity. Conclusion This study contributes to our knowledge of Mycoplasma sRNAs and their response to environmental changes. Furthermore, the mRNA target prediction provides a perspective for the characterization and comprehension of the function of the sRNA regulatory mechanisms.

  6. Roles of long noncoding RNAs in brain development, functional diversification and neurodegenerative diseases.

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    Wu, Ping; Zuo, Xialin; Deng, Houliang; Liu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Li; Ji, Aimin

    2013-08-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been attracting immense research interest, while only a handful of lncRNAs have been characterized thoroughly. Their involvement in the fundamental cellular processes including regulate gene expression at epigenetics, transcription, and post-transcription highlighted a central role in cell homeostasis. However, lncRNAs studies are still at a relatively early stage, their definition, conservation, functions, and action mechanisms remain fairly complicated. Here, we give a systematic and comprehensive summary of the existing knowledge of lncRNAs in order to provide a better understanding of this new studying field. lncRNAs play important roles in brain development, neuron function and maintenance, and neurodegenerative diseases are becoming increasingly evident. In this review, we also highlighted recent studies related lncRNAs in central nervous system (CNS) development and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and elucidated some specific lncRNAs which may be important for understanding the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases, also have the potential as therapeutic targets.

  7. Non-coding RNAs as epigenetic regulator of glioma stem-like cell differentiation

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    Keisuke eKatsushima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas show heterogeneous histological features. These distinct phenotypic states are thought to be associated with the presence of glioma stem cells (GSCs, which are highly tumorigenic and self-renewing sub-population of tumor cells that have different functional characteristics. Differentiation of GSCs may be regulated by multi-tiered epigenetic mechanisms that orchestrate the expression of thousands of genes. One such regulatory mechanism involves functional non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs; a large number of ncRNAs have been identified and shown to regulate the expression of genes associated with cell differentiation programs. Given the roles of miRNAs in cell differentiation, it is possible they are involved in the regulation of gene expression networks in GSCs that are important for the maintenance of the pluripotent state and for directing differentiation. Here, we review recent findings on ncRNAs associated with GSC differentiation and discuss how these ncRNAs contribute to the establishment of tissue heterogeneity during glioblastoma tumor formation.

  8. Long non-coding RNAs on the stage of cervical cancer (Review).

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    Dong, Junxue; Su, Manman; Chang, Weiqin; Zhang, Kun; Wu, Shuying; Xu, Tianmin

    2017-08-14

    Cervical cancer is one of most malignant gynecological tumors. However, effective means for diagnosing and treating cervical cancer have yet to be identified. A few decades ago, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were regarded as useless parts of the genome, however, increasing data have demonstrated the importance of lncRNAs in the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancers. The aim of the present study is to summarize the role(s) of HOTAIR, MALAT1, CCAT2, SPRY4-IT1, RSU1P2, CCHE1, lncRNA-EBIC and PVT1. Approximately 14 lncRNAs are involved in cervical cancer and several important proteins, miRNAs and other molecules and play crucial roles in a few traditional signaling pathways that have been proven to be related to those lncRNAs. In conclusion, lncRNAs may be useful as exact treatment targets and diagnostic biomarkers for improving therapies in cervical cancer patients and lncRNAs may contribute to effective diagnosis and treatment methods for cervical cancer.

  9. Form and Function of Exosome-Associated Long Non-coding RNAs in Cancer.

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    Hewson, Chris; Morris, Kevin V

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are functional and are not merely "transcriptional noise" has spawned an entirely new arena of investigation. LncRNAs have been found to be functional in the regulation of a wide variety of genes, including those involved in cancer. Studies have identified that lncRNAs play a role in the development and regulation of cancer and can also act as prognostic markers. Meanwhile, exosomes , which are extracellular particles generated endogenously by cells, have been observed to act as transport vesicles for a variety of biological components, particularly proteins and RNAs. This transportation of biological components has been shown to impact a variety of biological processes including the development of cancer. Collectively, these observations, along with those of several recent studies, suggest that lncRNAs and exosomes may function together to disseminate cell signals that alter and/or control local cellular microenvironments. This review will identify the various roles that lncRNAs and exosomes play in cancer development, as well as the possibility that exosomes may transfer functional lncRNAs between cells as a means of cell-to-cell communication.

  10. Transcriptional dynamics reveal critical roles for non-coding RNAs in the immediate-early response.

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    Stuart Aitken

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The immediate-early response mediates cell fate in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and is dysregulated in many cancers. However, the specificity of the response across stimuli and cell types, and the roles of non-coding RNAs are not well understood. Using a large collection of densely-sampled time series expression data we have examined the induction of the immediate-early response in unparalleled detail, across cell types and stimuli. We exploit cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE time series datasets to directly measure promoter activities over time. Using a novel analysis method for time series data we identify transcripts with expression patterns that closely resemble the dynamics of known immediate-early genes (IEGs and this enables a comprehensive comparative study of these genes and their chromatin state. Surprisingly, these data suggest that the earliest transcriptional responses often involve promoters generating non-coding RNAs, many of which are produced in advance of canonical protein-coding IEGs. IEGs are known to be capable of induction without de novo protein synthesis. Consistent with this, we find that the response of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA IEGs can be explained by their transcriptionally poised, permissive chromatin state prior to stimulation. We also explore the function of non-coding RNAs in the attenuation of the immediate early response in a small RNA sequencing dataset matched to the CAGE data: We identify a novel set of microRNAs responsible for the attenuation of the IEG response in an estrogen receptor positive cancer cell line. Our computational statistical method is well suited to meta-analyses as there is no requirement for transcripts to pass thresholds for significant differential expression between time points, and it is agnostic to the number of time points per dataset.

  11. Computational RNomics:Structure identification and functional prediction of non-coding RNAs in silico

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome contains varying numbers of non-coding RNA(ncRNA) genes."Computational RNomics" takes a multidisciplinary approach,like information science,to resolve the structure and function of ncRNAs.Here,we review the main issues in "Computational RNomics" of data storage and management,ncRNA gene identification and characterization,ncRNA target identification and functional prediction,and we summarize the main methods and current content of "computational RNomics".

  12. Special issue on epigenetic inheritance by histone modifications, histone variants and non-coding RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng CAO

    2011-01-01

    @@ Keeping in view the ever-growing importance of understanding the epigenetic phenomena shaping the behavior of life, our team decided to embark on the idea to organize this special issue of Frontiers in Biology on Epigenetics.Epigenetics refers to the study of heritable changes in gene expression without changes in DNA sequence, which is accomplished by DNA methylation, histone modifications, histone variants, chromatin remodeling, and non-coding RNAs.

  13. Differential expression of small non-coding RNAs in serum from cattle challenged with viruses causing bovine respiratory disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    MicroRNAs and tRNA-derived RNA fragments (tRFs) are the two most abundant groups of small non-coding RNAs. The potential for microRNAs and tRFs to be used as pathogen exposure indicators is yet to be fully explored. Our objective was to identify microRNAs and tRFs in cattle challenged with a non-cy...

  14. Noncoding RNAs and HIV: viral manipulation of host dark matter to shape the cellular environment

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    Samantha eBarichievy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available On October 28th 1943 Winston Churchill said we shape our buildings, and afterwards our buildings shape us (Humes, 1994. Churchill was pondering how and when to rebuild the British House of Commons, which had been destroyed by enemy bombs on May 10th 1941. The old House had been small and insufficient to hold all its members, but was restored to its original form in 1950 in order to recapture the convenience and dignity that the building had shaped into its parliamentary members. The circular loop whereby buildings or dwellings are shaped and go on to shape those that reside in them is also true of pathogens and their hosts. As obligate parasites, pathogens need to alter their cellular host environments to ensure survival. Typically pathogens modify cellular transcription profiles and in doing so, the pathogen in turn is affected, thereby closing the loop. As key orchestrators of gene expression, noncoding RNAs provide a vast and extremely precise set of tools for pathogens to target in order to shape the cellular environment. This review will focus on host noncoding RNAs that are manipulated by the infamous intracellular pathogen, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV. We will briefly describe both short and long host noncoding RNAs and discuss how HIV gains control of these factors to ensure widespread dissemination throughout the host as well as the establishment of lifelong, chronic infection.

  15. Transposable elements are major contributors to the origin, diversification, and regulation of vertebrate long noncoding RNAs.

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    Aurélie Kapusta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Advances in vertebrate genomics have uncovered thousands of loci encoding long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs. While progress has been made in elucidating the regulatory functions of lncRNAs, little is known about their origins and evolution. Here we explore the contribution of transposable elements (TEs to the makeup and regulation of lncRNAs in human, mouse, and zebrafish. Surprisingly, TEs occur in more than two thirds of mature lncRNA transcripts and account for a substantial portion of total lncRNA sequence (~30% in human, whereas they seldom occur in protein-coding transcripts. While TEs contribute less to lncRNA exons than expected, several TE families are strongly enriched in lncRNAs. There is also substantial interspecific variation in the coverage and types of TEs embedded in lncRNAs, partially reflecting differences in the TE landscapes of the genomes surveyed. In human, TE sequences in lncRNAs evolve under greater evolutionary constraint than their non-TE sequences, than their intronic TEs, or than random DNA. Consistent with functional constraint, we found that TEs contribute signals essential for the biogenesis of many lncRNAs, including ~30,000 unique sites for transcription initiation, splicing, or polyadenylation in human. In addition, we identified ~35,000 TEs marked as open chromatin located within 10 kb upstream of lncRNA genes. The density of these marks in one cell type correlate with elevated expression of the downstream lncRNA in the same cell type, suggesting that these TEs contribute to cis-regulation. These global trends are recapitulated in several lncRNAs with established functions. Finally a subset of TEs embedded in lncRNAs are subject to RNA editing and predicted to form secondary structures likely important for function. In conclusion, TEs are nearly ubiquitous in lncRNAs and have played an important role in the lineage-specific diversification of vertebrate lncRNA repertoires.

  16. Systematic identification and characterization of long non-coding RNAs in mouse mature sperm

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    Zhang, Xiaoning; Gao, Fengxin; Fu, Jianbo; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Yuqing; Zeng, Xuhui

    2017-01-01

    Increasing studies have shown that mature spermatozoa contain many transcripts including mRNAs and miRNAs. However, the expression profile of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in mammalian sperm has not been systematically investigated. Here, we used highly purified RNA to investigate lncRNA expression profiles in mouse mature sperm by stranded-specific RNA-seq. We identified 20,907 known and 4,088 novel lncRNAs transcripts, and the existence of intact lncRNAs was confirmed by RT-PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization on two representative lncRNAs. Compared to round spermatids, 1,794 upregulated and 165 downregulated lncRNAs and 4,435 upregulated and 3,920 downregulated mRNAs were identified in sperm. Based on the “Cis and Trans” RNA-RNA interaction principle, we found 14,259 targeted coding genes of differently expressed lncRNAs. In terms of Gene ontology (GO) analysis, differentially expressed lncRNAs targeted genes mainly related to nucleic acid metabolic, protein modification, chromatin and histone modification, heterocycle compound metabolic, sperm function, spermatogenesis and other processes. In contrast, differentially expressed transcripts of mRNAs were highly enriched for protein metabolic process and RNA metabolic, spermatogenesis, sperm motility, cell cycle, chromatin organization, heterocycle and aromatic compound metabolic processes. Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that the differentially expressed lncRNAs were involved in RNA transport, mRNA surveillance pathway, PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, AMPK signaling pathway, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum. Metabolic pathways, mRNA surveillance pathway, AMPK signaling pathway, cell cycle, RNA transport splicesome and endocytosis incorporated with the differentially expressed mRNA. Furthermore, many lncRNAs were specifically expressed in testis/sperm, and 880 lncRNAs were conserved between human and mouse. In summary, this study provides a preliminary

  17. Non-Coding RNAs in Lung Cancer: Contribution of Bioinformatics Analysis to the Development of Non-Invasive Diagnostic Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Meik; Wolf, Beat; Schulze, Harald; Atlan, David; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer related mortality due to late diagnosis and limited treatment intervention. Non-coding RNAs are not translated into proteins and have emerged as fundamental regulators of gene expression. Recent studies reported that microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs are involved in lung cancer development and progression. Moreover, they appear as new promising non-invasive biomarkers for early lung cancer diagnosis. Here, we highlight their potential as biomarker in lung cancer and present how bioinformatics can contribute to the development of non-invasive diagnostic tools. For this, we discuss several bioinformatics algorithms and software tools for a comprehensive understanding and functional characterization of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs. PMID:28035947

  18. Microprocessor mediates transcriptional termination of long noncoding RNA transcripts hosting microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Ashish; Dhir, Somdutta; Proudfoot, Nick J; Jopling, Catherine L

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a major part in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Mammalian miRNA biogenesis begins with cotranscriptional cleavage of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcripts by the Microprocessor complex. Although most miRNAs are located within introns of protein-coding transcripts, a substantial minority of miRNAs originate from long noncoding (lnc) RNAs, for which transcript processing is largely uncharacterized. We show, by detailed characterization of liver-specific lnc-pri-miR-122 and genome-wide analysis in human cell lines, that most lncRNA transcripts containing miRNAs (lnc-pri-miRNAs) do not use the canonical cleavage-and-polyadenylation pathway but instead use Microprocessor cleavage to terminate transcription. Microprocessor inactivation leads to extensive transcriptional readthrough of lnc-pri-miRNA and transcriptional interference with downstream genes. Consequently we define a new RNase III-mediated, polyadenylation-independent mechanism of Pol II transcription termination in mammalian cells.

  19. Discovery of putative small non-coding RNAs from the obligate intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis.

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    Megan Woolfit

    Full Text Available Wolbachia pipientis is an endosymbiotic bacterium that induces a wide range of effects in its insect hosts, including manipulation of reproduction and protection against pathogens. Little is known of the molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-Wolbachia interaction, though it is likely to be mediated via the secretion of proteins or other factors. There is an increasing amount of evidence that bacteria regulate many cellular processes, including secretion of virulence factors, using small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs, but sRNAs have not previously been described from Wolbachia. We have used two independent approaches, one based on comparative genomics and the other using RNA-Seq data generated for gene expression studies, to identify candidate sRNAs in Wolbachia. We experimentally characterized the expression of one of these candidates in four Wolbachia strains, and showed that it is differentially regulated in different host tissues and sexes. Given the roles played by sRNAs in other host-associated bacteria, the conservation of the candidate sRNAs between different Wolbachia strains, and the sex- and tissue-specific differential regulation we have identified, we hypothesise that sRNAs may play a significant role in the biology of Wolbachia, and in particular in its interactions with its host.

  20. Application of Long Noncoding RNAs in Osteosarcoma: Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets

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    Zhihong Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone malignancy in children and adolescents. Although improvements in therapeutic strategies were achieved, the outcome remains poor for most patients with metastatic or recurrent osteosarcoma. Therefore, it is imperative to identify novel and effective prognostic biomarker and therapeutic targets for the disease. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are a novel class of RNA molecules defined as transcripts >200 nucleotides that lack protein coding potential. Many lncRNAs are deregulated in cancer and are important regulators for malignancies. Nine lncRNAs (91H, BCAR4, FGFR3-AS1, HIF2PUT, HOTTIP, HULC, MALAT-1, TUG1, UCA1 are upregulated and considered oncogenic for osteosarcoma. Loc285194 and MEG3 are two lncRNAs downregulated and as tumor suppressor for the disease. Moreover, the expressions of LINC00161 and ODRUL are associated with chemo-resistance of osteosarcoma. The mechanisms for these lncRNAs in regulating development of osteosarcoma are diverse, e.g. ceRNA, Wnt/β-catenin pathway, etc. The lncRNAs identified may serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for osteosarcoma.

  1. Long non-coding RNAs as regulators of the endocrine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Marko; Lodish, Harvey F.; Sun, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse group of RNAs that are often lineage-specific and that regulate multiple biological functions. Many are nuclear and are essential parts of ribonucleoprotein complexes that modify chromatin segments and establish active or repressive chromatin states; others are cytosolic and regulate the stability of mRNA or act as microRNA sponges. This Review summarizes the current knowledge of lncRNAs as regulators of the endocrine system, with a focus on the identification and mode of action of several endocrine-important lncRNAs. We highlight lncRNAs that have a role in the development and function of pancreatic β cells, white and brown adipose tissue, and other endocrine organs, and discuss the involvement of these molecules in endocrine dysfunction (for example, diabetes mellitus). We also address the associations of lncRNAs with nuclear receptors involved in major hormonal signalling pathways, such as estrogen and androgen receptors, and the relevance of these associations in certain endocrine cancers. PMID:25560704

  2. Dysregulation of long noncoding RNAs in mouse testes and spermatozoa after exposure to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fengxin; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yunhui; Zhang, Yunwen; Hao, Qingyun; Zhang, Xiaoning

    2017-02-26

    There is increasing evidence that cadmium (Cd) exposure can cause male subfertility and even complete infertility in mammals. Long noncoding (lnc) RNAs are critical for spermatogenesis, and their dysregulation might lead to male infertility. However, whether they are involved in Cd-induced subfertility is unknown. Here we found that intraperitoneal exposure to Cd in mice led to male subfertility indicated by reductions in testicular sperm production and motility, and by abnormal morphology. Testicular and sperm RNAs were used to investigate lncRNA expression profiles by strand-specific RNA sequencing at the transcriptome level to help determine any RNA-related mechanisms in Cd-induced subfertility. The Cd-treated testes and spermatozoa exhibited aberrant expression profiles for lncRNAs and mRNAs. Of the lncRNAs, there were 139 with upregulated expression and 174 with downregulated expression in testes; in contrast, 685 were upregulated and 375 were downregulated in spermatozoa. For mRNA expression, 214 were upregulated and 226 were downregulated in testes; 272 were upregulated and 111 were downregulated in spermatozoa. Gene ontology and pathway analyses showed that the functions of differentially expressed lncRNA targets and mRNAs were closely linked with many processes involved in spermatogenesis. Additionally, many newly identified lncRNAs showed inducible expression, suggesting that they might be good candidate markers for Cd-induced male reproductive toxicity. This study provides a preliminary database for further exploring lncRNA-related mechnisms in male infertility induced by Cd.

  3. Long non-coding RNAs as regulators of the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Marko; Lodish, Harvey F; Sun, Lei

    2015-03-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse group of RNAs that are often lineage-specific and that regulate multiple biological functions. Many are nuclear and are essential parts of ribonucleoprotein complexes that modify chromatin segments and establish active or repressive chromatin states; others are cytosolic and regulate the stability of mRNA or act as microRNA sponges. This Review summarizes the current knowledge of lncRNAs as regulators of the endocrine system, with a focus on the identification and mode of action of several endocrine-important lncRNAs. We highlight lncRNAs that have a role in the development and function of pancreatic β cells, white and brown adipose tissue, and other endocrine organs, and discuss the involvement of these molecules in endocrine dysfunction (for example, diabetes mellitus). We also address the associations of lncRNAs with nuclear receptors involved in major hormonal signalling pathways, such as estrogen and androgen receptors, and the relevance of these associations in certain endocrine cancers.

  4. Discovery of putative small non-coding RNAs from the obligate intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfit, Megan; Algama, Manjula; Keith, Jonathan M; McGraw, Elizabeth A; Popovici, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is an endosymbiotic bacterium that induces a wide range of effects in its insect hosts, including manipulation of reproduction and protection against pathogens. Little is known of the molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-Wolbachia interaction, though it is likely to be mediated via the secretion of proteins or other factors. There is an increasing amount of evidence that bacteria regulate many cellular processes, including secretion of virulence factors, using small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs), but sRNAs have not previously been described from Wolbachia. We have used two independent approaches, one based on comparative genomics and the other using RNA-Seq data generated for gene expression studies, to identify candidate sRNAs in Wolbachia. We experimentally characterized the expression of one of these candidates in four Wolbachia strains, and showed that it is differentially regulated in different host tissues and sexes. Given the roles played by sRNAs in other host-associated bacteria, the conservation of the candidate sRNAs between different Wolbachia strains, and the sex- and tissue-specific differential regulation we have identified, we hypothesise that sRNAs may play a significant role in the biology of Wolbachia, and in particular in its interactions with its host.

  5. Long Non-coding RNAs Expression Profile in HepG2 Cells Reveals the Potential Role of Long Non-coding RNAs in the Cholesterol Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Liu; Xinxin Zheng; Yanlu Xu; Jie Lu; Jingzhou Chen; Xiaohong Huang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Green tea has been shown to improve cholesterol metabolism in animal studies,but the molecular mechanisms underlying this function have not been fully understood.Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently emerged as a major class of regulatory molecules involved in a broad range of biological processes and complex diseases.Our aim was to identify important lncRNAs that might play an important role in contributing to the benefits of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on cholesterol metabolism.Methods:Microarrays was used to reveal the lncRNA and mRNA profiles in green tea polyphenol(-)-epigallocatechin gallate in cultured human liver (HepG2) hepatocytes treated with EGCG and bioinformatic analyses of the predicted target genes were performed to identify lncRNA-mRNA targeting relationships.RNA interference was used to investigate the role of lncRNAs in cholesterol metabolism.Results:The expression levels of 15 genes related to cholesterol metabolism and 285 lncRNAs were changed by EGCG treatment.Bioinformatic analysis found five matched lncRNA-mRNA pairs for five differentially expressed lncRNAs and four differentially expressed mRNA.In particular,the lncRNA4 T102202 and its potential targets mRNA-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) were identified.Using a real-time polymerase chain reaction technique,we confirmed that EGCG down-regulated mRNA expression level of the HMGCR and up-regulated expression ofAT102202.After AT102202 knockdown in HepG2,we observed that the level of HMGCR expression was significantly increased relative to the scrambled small interfering RNA control (P < 0.05).Conclusions:Our results indicated that EGCG improved cholesterol metabolism and meanwhile changed the lncRNAs expression profile in HepG2 cells.LncRNAs may play an important role in the cholesterol metabolism.

  6. Global Analysis of Non-coding Small RNAs in Arabidopsis in Response to Jasmonate Treatment by Deep Sequencing Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bosen Zhang; Zhiping Jin; Daoxin Xie

    2012-01-01

    In plants,non-coding small RNAs play a vital role in plant development and stress responses.To explore the possible role of non-coding small RNAs in the regulation of the jasmonate (JA) pathway,we compared the non-coding small RNAs between the JA-deficient aos mutant and the JA-treated wild type Arabidopsis via high-throughput sequencing.Thirty new miRNAs and 27 new miRNA candidates were identified through bioinformatics approach.Forty-nine known miRNAs (belonging to 24 families),15 new miRNAs and new miRNA candidates (belonging to 11 families) and 3 tasiRNA families were induced by JA,whereas 1 new miRNA,1 tasiRNA family and 22 known miRNAs (belonging to 9 families) were repressed by JA.

  7. Progress and Prospects of Long Noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

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    Chen Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most frequently occurring cancers with poor prognosis, and novel diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for HCC are urgently required. With the advance of high-resolution microarrays and massively parallel sequencing technology, lncRNAs are suggested to play critical roles in the tumorigenesis and development of human HCC. To date, dysregulation of many HCC-related lncRNAs such as HULC, HOTAIR, MALAT1, and H19 have been identified. From transcriptional “noise” to indispensable elements, lncRNAs may re-write the central dogma. Also, lncRNAs found in body fluids have demonstrated their utility as fluid-based noninvasive markers for clinical use and as therapeutic targets for HCC. Even though several lncRNAs have been characterized, the underlying mechanisms of their contribution to HCC remain unknown, and many important questions about lncRNAs need resolving. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism in HCC-related lncRNAs will provide a rationale for novel effective lncRNA-based targeted therapies. In this review, we highlight the emerging roles of lncRNAs in HCC, and discuss their potential clinical applications as biomarkers for the diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring and treatment of HCC.

  8. Two seemingly homologous noncoding RNAs act hierarchically to activate glmS mRNA translation.

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    Johannes H Urban

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding RNAs (sRNA can function as posttranscriptional activators of gene expression to regulate stress responses and metabolism. We here describe the mechanisms by which two sRNAs, GlmY and GlmZ, activate the Escherichia coli glmS mRNA, coding for an essential enzyme in amino-sugar metabolism. The two sRNAs, although being highly similar in sequence and structure, act in a hierarchical manner. GlmZ, together with the RNA chaperone, Hfq, directly activates glmS mRNA translation by an anti-antisense mechanism. In contrast, GlmY acts upstream of GlmZ and positively regulates glmS by antagonizing GlmZ RNA inactivation. We also report the first example, to our knowledge, of mRNA expression being controlled by the poly(A status of a chromosomally encoded sRNA. We show that in wild-type cells, GlmY RNA is unstable due to 3' end polyadenylation; whereas in an E. coli pcnB mutant defective in RNA polyadenylation, GlmY is stabilized and accumulates, which in turn stabilizes GlmZ and causes GlmS overproduction. Our study reveals hierarchical action of two well-conserved sRNAs in a complex regulatory cascade that controls the glmS mRNA. Similar cascades of noncoding RNA regulators may operate in other organisms.

  9. The long and short of non-coding RNAs during post-natal growth and differentiation of skeletal muscles: Focus on lncRNA and miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butchart, Lauren C; Fox, Archa; Shavlakadze, Tea; Grounds, Miranda D

    2016-12-01

    Post-natal growth of skeletal muscle is a dynamic process involving proliferation and fusion of myoblasts with elongating myofibres (hyperplasia of myonuclei) until 3 weeks post-natally in mice, with ongoing differentiation and further increases in myofibre size mostly by hypertrophy until about 12 weeks of age. The expression of mRNAs that control these events are well described, but little is known about the in vivo roles of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including both microRNAs (miRNAs) and the lesser-studied long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). We analysed expression patterns for a broad range of lncRNAs (including Neat1, Malat1, Sra, Meg3, LncMyoD and linc-MD1), miRNAs and mRNAs in muscles of normal male C57Bl/6J mice at 2 days and 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks after birth. These post-natal patterns were compared with expression of these RNAs during classic C2C12 myogenesis and differentiation in tissue culture. This overview of RNAs during post-natal skeletal muscle growth provides a novel focus on ncRNAs during this often overlooked growth period, with many potential applications to normal muscle growth in humans and livestock, and to childhood muscle disorders. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression and functions of long noncoding RNAs during human T helper cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurlock, Charles F; Tossberg, John T; Guo, Yan; Collier, Sarah P; Crooke, Philip S; Aune, Thomas M

    2015-04-23

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulate an array of biological processes in cells and organ systems. Less is known about their expression and function in lymphocyte lineages. Here we have identified >2000 lncRNAs expressed in human T-cell cultures and those that display a TH lineage-specific pattern of expression and are intragenic or adjacent to TH lineage-specific genes encoding proteins with immunologic functions. One lncRNA cluster selectively expressed by the effector TH2 lineage consists of four alternatively spliced transcripts that regulate the expression of TH2 cytokines, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13. Genes encoding this lncRNA cluster in humans overlap the RAD50 gene and thus are contiguous with the previously described TH2 locus control region (LCR) in the mouse. Given its genomic synteny with the TH2-LCR, we refer to this lncRNA cluster as TH2-LCR lncRNA.

  11. Noncoding RNAs and chronic inflammation: Micro-managing the fire within.

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    Alexander, Margaret; O'Connell, Ryan M

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory responses are essential for the clearance of pathogens and the repair of injured tissues; however, if these responses are not properly controlled chronic inflammation can occur. Chronic inflammation is now recognized as a contributing factor to many age-associated diseases including metabolic disorders, arthritis, neurodegeneration, and cardiovascular disease. Due to the connection between chronic inflammation and these diseases, it is essential to understand underlying mechanisms behind this process. In this review, factors that contribute to chronic inflammation are discussed. Further, we emphasize the emerging roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) and other noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) in regulating chronic inflammatory states, making them important future diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets.

  12. Harnessing the Power of SIRT1 and Non-coding RNAs in Vascular Disease.

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    Maiese, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) contribute to a significant amount of disability and death in the world. Of these disorders, vascular disease is ranked high, falls within the five leading causes of death, and impacts multiple other disease entities such as those of the cardiac system, nervous system, and metabolic disease. Targeting the silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (SIRT1) pathway and the modulation of micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) may hold great promise for the development of novel strategies for the treatment of vascular disease since each of these pathways are highly relevant to cardiac and nervous system disorders as well as to metabolic dysfunction. SIRT1 is vital in determining the course of stem cell development and the survival, metabolism, and life span of differentiated cells that are overseen by both autophagy and apoptosis. SIRT1 interfaces with a number of pathways that involve forkhead transcription factors, mechanistic of rapamycin (mTOR), AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1) such that the level of activity of SIRT1 can become a critical determinant for biological and clinical outcomes. The essential fine control of SIRT1 is directly tied to the world of non-coding RNAs that ultimately oversee SIRT1 activity to either extend or end cellular survival. Future studies that can further elucidate the crosstalk between SIRT1 and non-coding RNAs should serve well our ability to harness the power of SIRT1 and non-coding RNAs for the treatment of vascular disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Mining mammalian transcript data for functional long non-coding RNAs.

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    Amit N Khachane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs in controlling gene expression has garnered increased interest in recent years. Sequencing projects, such as Fantom3 for mouse and H-InvDB for human, have generated abundant data on transcribed components of mammalian cells, the majority of which appear not to be protein-coding. However, much of the non-protein-coding transcriptome could merely be a consequence of 'transcription noise'. It is therefore essential to use bioinformatic approaches to identify the likely functional candidates in a high throughput manner. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We derived a scheme for classifying and annotating likely functional lncRNAs in mammals. Using the available experimental full-length cDNA data sets for human and mouse, we identified 78 lncRNAs that are either syntenically conserved between human and mouse, or that originate from the same protein-coding genes. Of these, 11 have significant sequence homology. We found that these lncRNAs exhibit: (i patterns of codon substitution typical of non-coding transcripts; (ii preservation of sequences in distant mammals such as dog and cow, (iii significant sequence conservation relative to their corresponding flanking regions (in 50% cases, flanking regions do not have homology at all; and in the remaining, the degree of conservation is significantly less; (iv existence mostly as single-exon forms (8/11; and, (v presence of conserved and stable secondary structure motifs within them. We further identified orthologous protein-coding genes that are contributing to the pool of lncRNAs; of which, genes implicated in carcinogenesis are significantly over-represented. CONCLUSION: Our comparative mammalian genomics approach coupled with evolutionary analysis identified a small population of conserved long non-protein-coding RNAs (lncRNAs that are potentially functional across Mammalia. Additionally, our analysis indicates that amongst the orthologous protein-coding genes that

  14. Identification of four novel small non-coding RNAs from Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris

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    Lu Guang-Tao

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs have been recognized as important regulators of various cellular processes. Approximately 200 bacterial sRNAs in total have been reported. However, very few sRNAs have been identified from phytopathogenic bacteria. Results Xanthomons campestris pathovar campestris (Xcc is the causal agent of black rot disease of cruciferous crops. In this study, a cDNA library was constructed from the low-molecular weight RNA isolated from the Xcc strain 8004 grown to exponential phase in the minimal medium XVM2. Seven sRNA candidates were obtained by sequencing screen of 2,500 clones from the library and four of them were confirmed to be sRNAs by Northern hybridization, which were named sRNA-Xcc1, sRNA-Xcc2, sRNA-Xcc3, and sRNA-Xcc4. The transcription start and stop sites of these sRNAs were further determined. BLAST analysis revealed that the four sRNAs are novel. Bioinformatics prediction showed that a large number of genes with various known or unknown functions in Xcc 8004 are potential targets of sRNA-Xcc1, sRNA-Xcc3 and sRNA-Xcc4. In contrast, only a few genes were predicted to be potential targets of sRNA-Xcc2. Conclusion We have identified four novel sRNAs from Xcc by a large-scale screen. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that they may perform various functions. This work provides the first step toward understanding the role of sRNAs in the molecular mechanisms of Xanthomonas campestris pathogenesis.

  15. Identification and characterization of proliferative retinopathy-related long noncoding RNAs

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    Zhou, Rong-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Qun; Yao, Jin [Eye Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); The Fourth School of Clinical Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Shen, Yi; Chen, Sai-Nan [Eye Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Yang, Hong [Eye Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); The Fourth School of Clinical Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Jiang, Qin, E-mail: jqin710@vip.sina.com [Eye Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); The Fourth School of Clinical Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Institute of Integrated Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Yan, Biao, E-mail: yanbiao1982@hotmail.com [Eye Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); The Fourth School of Clinical Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Institute of Integrated Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2015-09-25

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a serious complication of retinal detachment and vitreoretinal surgery, which can lead to severe vision reduction. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles in many biological processes and disease development. We attempted to determine the role of lncRNAs in the setting of PVR. Microarray analysis revealed that 78 lncRNAs were abnormally expressed in the epiretinal membranes (ERMs) of PVR patients, including 48 up-regulated and 30 down-regulated lncRNA transcripts. We subsequently focus on one lncRNA, MALAT1, and investigated its expression pattern in the biofluid of PVR patients. MALAT1 was significantly up-regulated in the cellular and plasma fraction of peripheral blood in PVR patients. MALAT1 expression was obviously reduced after PVR operation. In vitro experiments revealed the role of MALAT1 in regulating RPE proliferation and migration, which is critical for ERMs formation. This study suggests that lncRNAs are the potential regulators of PVR pathology. MALAT1 is a potential prognostic indicator and a target for the diagnosis and gene therapy for PVR diseases. - Highlights: • 78 lncRNAs are differentially expressed between PVR-ERMs and secondary ERMs. • MALAT1 level is elevated in the ERMs of PVR patients. • Circulating MALAT1 level is up-regulated in PVR patients. • MALAT1 knockdown regulates RPE proliferation and migration.

  16. Conservation and losses of non-coding RNAs in avian genomes.

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    Paul P Gardner

    Full Text Available Here we present the results of a large-scale bioinformatics annotation of non-coding RNA loci in 48 avian genomes. Our approach uses probabilistic models of hand-curated families from the Rfam database to infer conserved RNA families within each avian genome. We supplement these annotations with predictions from the tRNA annotation tool, tRNAscan-SE and microRNAs from miRBase. We identify 34 lncRNA-associated loci that are conserved between birds and mammals and validate 12 of these in chicken. We report several intriguing cases where a reported mammalian lncRNA, but not its function, is conserved. We also demonstrate extensive conservation of classical ncRNAs (e.g., tRNAs and more recently discovered ncRNAs (e.g., snoRNAs and miRNAs in birds. Furthermore, we describe numerous "losses" of several RNA families, and attribute these to either genuine loss, divergence or missing data. In particular, we show that many of these losses are due to the challenges associated with assembling avian microchromosomes. These combined results illustrate the utility of applying homology-based methods for annotating novel vertebrate genomes.

  17. Genome-wide identification and functional analysis of long noncoding RNAs involved in the response to graphene oxide.

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    Wu, Qiuli; Zhou, Xuefeng; Han, Xiaoxiao; Zhuo, Yizhou; Zhu, Siting; Zhao, Yunli; Wang, Dayong

    2016-09-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are defined as noncoding RNAs having at least 200 nucleotides, can potentially regulate various biological processes. However, the roles of lncRNAs in regulating cellular response to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are still unclear. Using Hiseq 2000 sequencing technique, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify lncRNAs involved in the control of toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) using in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans assay system. HiSeq 2000 sequencing, followed by quantitative analysis, identified only 34 dysregulated lncRNAs in GO exposed nematodes. Bioinformatics analysis implies the biological processes and signaling pathways mediated by candidate lncRNAs involved in the control of GO toxicity. A lncRNAs-miRNAs network possibly involved in the control of GO toxicity was further raised. Moreover, we identified the shared lncRNAs based on the molecular regulation basis for chemical surface modifications and/or genetic mutations in reducing GO toxicity. We further provide direct evidence that these shared lncRNAs, linc-37 and linc-14, were involved in the control of chemical surface modifications and genetic mutations in reducing GO toxicity. linc-37 binding to transcriptional factor FOXO/DAF-16 might be important for the control of GO toxicity. Our whole-genome identification and functional analysis of lncRNAs highlights the important roles of lncRNAs based molecular mechanisms for cellular responses to ENMs in organisms.

  18. Genome-wide identification and characterization of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in Ganoderma lucidum.

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    Jianqin Li

    Full Text Available Ganoderma lucidum is a white-rot fungus best-known for its medicinal activities. We have previously sequenced its genome and annotated the protein coding genes. However, long non-coding RNAs in G. lucidum genome have not been analyzed. In this study, we have identified and characterized long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNA in G. lucidum systematically. We developed a computational pipeline, which was used to analyze RNA-Seq data derived from G. lucidum samples collected from three developmental stages. A total of 402 lincRNA candidates were identified, with an average length of 609 bp. Analysis of their adjacent protein-coding genes (apcGenes revealed that 46 apcGenes belong to the pathways of triterpenoid biosynthesis and lignin degradation, or families of cytochrome P450, mating type B genes, and carbohydrate-active enzymes. To determine if lincRNAs and these apcGenes have any interactions, the corresponding pairs of lincRNAs and apcGenes were analyzed in detail. We developed a modified 3' RACE method to analyze the transcriptional direction of a transcript. Among the 46 lincRNAs, 37 were found unidirectionally transcribed, and 9 were found bidirectionally transcribed. The expression profiles of 16 of these 37 lincRNAs were found to be highly correlated with those of the apcGenes across the three developmental stages. Among them, 11 are positively correlated (r>0.8 and 5 are negatively correlated (r<-0.8. The co-localization and co-expression of lincRNAs and those apcGenes playing important functions is consistent with the notion that lincRNAs might be important regulators for cellular processes. In summary, this represents the very first study to identify and characterize lincRNAs in the genomes of basidiomycetes. The results obtained here have laid the foundation for study of potential lincRNA-mediated expression regulation of genes in G. lucidum.

  19. Hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes originating from long non-coding RNAs.

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    Chen Xie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tinkering with pre-existing genes has long been known as a major way to create new genes. Recently, however, motherless protein-coding genes have been found to have emerged de novo from ancestral non-coding DNAs. How these genes originated is not well addressed to date. Here we identified 24 hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes with precise origination timing in vertebrate phylogeny. Strand-specific RNA-Seq analyses were performed in five rhesus macaque tissues (liver, prefrontal cortex, skeletal muscle, adipose, and testis, which were then integrated with public transcriptome data from human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque. On the basis of comparing the RNA expression profiles in the three species, we found that most of the hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes encoded polyadenylated non-coding RNAs in rhesus macaque or chimpanzee with a similar transcript structure and correlated tissue expression profile. According to the rule of parsimony, the majority of these hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes appear to have acquired a regulated transcript structure and expression profile before acquiring coding potential. Interestingly, although the expression profile was largely correlated, the coding genes in human often showed higher transcriptional abundance than their non-coding counterparts in rhesus macaque. The major findings we report in this manuscript are robust and insensitive to the parameters used in the identification and analysis of de novo genes. Our results suggest that at least a portion of long non-coding RNAs, especially those with active and regulated transcription, may serve as a birth pool for protein-coding genes, which are then further optimized at the transcriptional level.

  20. Hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes originating from long non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tinkering with pre-existing genes has long been known as a major way to create new genes. Recently, however, motherless protein-coding genes have been found to have emerged de novo from ancestral non-coding DNAs. How these genes originated is not well addressed to date. Here we identified 24 hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes with precise origination timing in vertebrate phylogeny. Strand-specific RNA-Seq analyses were performed in five rhesus macaque tissues (liver, prefrontal cortex, skeletal muscle, adipose, and testis, which were then integrated with public transcriptome data from human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque. On the basis of comparing the RNA expression profiles in the three species, we found that most of the hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes encoded polyadenylated non-coding RNAs in rhesus macaque or chimpanzee with a similar transcript structure and correlated tissue expression profile. According to the rule of parsimony, the majority of these hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes appear to have acquired a regulated transcript structure and expression profile before acquiring coding potential. Interestingly, although the expression profile was largely correlated, the coding genes in human often showed higher transcriptional abundance than their non-coding counterparts in rhesus macaque. The major findings we report in this manuscript are robust and insensitive to the parameters used in the identification and analysis of de novo genes. Our results suggest that at least a portion of long non-coding RNAs, especially those with active and regulated transcription, may serve as a birth pool for protein-coding genes, which are then further optimized at the transcriptional level.

  1. Microarray analysis of long non-coding RNAs in COPD lung tissue.

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    Bi, Hui; Zhou, Ji; Wu, Dandan; Gao, Wei; Li, Lingling; Yu, Like; Liu, Feng; Huang, Mao; Adcock, Ian M; Barnes, Peter J; Yao, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of many human diseases. In this study, we provide the description of genome-wide lncRNA expression in the lung tissue of non-smokers without Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), of smokers without COPD and of smokers with COPD. RNA was extracted from human lung tissue and analysed using an Agilent Human lncRNA + mRNA Array v2.0 system. 39,253 distinct lncRNA transcripts were detected in the lung tissues of all subjects. In smokers without COPD 87 lncRNAs were significantly up-regulated and 244 down-regulated compared to non-smokers without COPD with RNA50010|UCSC-9199-1005 and RNA58351| CombinedLit_316_550, the most over- and under-regulated, respectively. In contrast, in COPD patients 120 lncRNAs were over-expressed and 43 under-expressed compared with smokers without COPD with RNA44121|UCSC-2000-3182 and RNA43510|UCSC-1260-3754 being the most over- and under-regulated, respectively. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway analysis indicated that cigarette smoking was associated with activation of metabolic pathways, whereas COPD transcripts were associated with 'hematopoietic cell lineage', intermediary metabolism and immune system processes. We conclude that the altered expression of lncRNAs might play partial role in pathways implicated in COPD onset and progression such as intermediary metabolism and the immune response.

  2. Antisense long noncoding RNAs regulate var gene activation in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

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    Amit-Avraham, Inbar; Pozner, Guy; Eshar, Shiri; Fastman, Yair; Kolevzon, Netanel; Yavin, Eylon; Dzikowski, Ron

    2015-03-03

    The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the deadliest form of human malaria, is attributed to its ability to evade human immunity through antigenic variation. These parasites alternate between expression of variable antigens, encoded by members of a multicopy gene family named var. Immune evasion through antigenic variation depends on tight regulation of var gene expression, ensuring that only a single var gene is expressed at a time while the rest of the family is maintained transcriptionally silent. Understanding how a single gene is chosen for activation is critical for understanding mutually exclusive expression but remains a mystery. Here, we show that antisense long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) initiating from var introns are associated with the single active var gene at the time in the cell cycle when the single var upstream promoter is active. We demonstrate that these antisense transcripts are incorporated into chromatin, and that expression of these antisense lncRNAs in trans triggers activation of a silent var gene in a sequence- and dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, interference with these lncRNAs using complement peptide nucleic acid molecules down-regulated the active var gene, erased the epigenetic memory, and induced expression switching. Altogether, our data provide evidence that these antisense lncRNAs play a key role in regulating var gene activation and mutually exclusive expression.

  3. Global discovery of erythroid long noncoding RNAs reveals novel regulators of red cell maturation.

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    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Shi, Jiahai; Park, Staphany S; Gromatzky, Austin A; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-01-23

    Erythropoiesis is regulated at multiple levels to ensure the proper generation of mature red cells under multiple physiological conditions. To probe the contribution of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) to this process, we examined >1 billion RNA-seq reads of polyadenylated and nonpolyadenylated RNA from differentiating mouse fetal liver red blood cells and identified 655 lncRNA genes including not only intergenic, antisense, and intronic but also pseudogene and enhancer loci. More than 100 of these genes are previously unrecognized and highly erythroid specific. By integrating genome-wide surveys of chromatin states, transcription factor occupancy, and tissue expression patterns, we identify multiple lncRNAs that are dynamically expressed during erythropoiesis, show epigenetic regulation, and are targeted by key erythroid transcription factors GATA1, TAL1, or KLF1. We focus on 12 such candidates and find that they are nuclear-localized and exhibit complex developmental expression patterns. Depleting them severely impaired erythrocyte maturation, inhibiting cell size reduction and subsequent enucleation. One of them, alncRNA-EC7, is transcribed from an enhancer and is specifically needed for activation of the neighboring gene encoding BAND 3. Our study provides an annotated catalog of erythroid lncRNAs, readily available through an online resource, and shows that diverse types of lncRNAs participate in the regulatory circuitry underlying erythropoiesis.

  4. Expression profiling of long noncoding RNAs in neonatal and adult mouse testis

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    Jin Sun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, advancements in genome-wide analyses of the mammalian transcriptome have revealed that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs is pervasively transcribed in the genome and an increasing number of studies have demonstrated lncRNAs as a new class of regulatory molecules are involved in mammalian development (Carninci et al. (2005; Fatica and Bozzoni (2014, but very few studies have been conducted on the potential roles of lncRNAs in mammalian testis development. To get insights into the expression patterns of lncRNA during mouse testis development, we investigated the lncRNAs expression profiles of neonatal and adult mouse testes using microarray platform and related results have been published (Sun et al., PLoS One 8 (2013 e75750.. Here, we describe in detail the experimental system, methods and validation for the generation of the microarray data associated with our recent publication (Sun et al., PLoS One 8 (2013 e75750.. Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database repository with the dataset identifier GSE43442.

  5. Regulation of spermatogenesis by small non-coding RNAs: role of the germ granule.

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    de Mateo, Sara; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The spermatogenic process relays in highly regulated gene expression mechanisms at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels to generate the male gamete that is needed for the perpetuation of the species. Small non-coding RNA pathways have been determined to participate in the post-transcriptional regulatory processes of germ cells. The most important sncRNA molecules that are critically involved in spermatogenesis belong to the miRNA and piRNAs pathways as illustrated by animal models where ablation of specific protein components displays male infertility. Several elements of these regulatory pathways have been found in the nuage or germ granule, a non-membranous cytoplasmatic structure that can be seen in spermatocytes and spermatids. This notion suggests that germ granules may act as organizer centers for silencing pathways in the germline. In general, miRNAs regulate spermatogenesis through targeting and down-regulation of specific transcripts to eventually promote sperm development. However, piRNAs are powerful repressors of transposon elements expression in the spermatogenic process. Here we describe the suggested functions that miRNA and piRNAs pathways execute in the regulation of spermatogenesis and include some recent studies in the field. Despite major strides on the detailed molecular mechanisms of sncRNAs in relation to spermatogenesis, there is plenty to discover on this fascinating regulatory program.

  6. Expression of macro non-coding RNAs Meg8 and Irm in mouse embryonic development.

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    Gu, Tiantian; He, Hongjuan; Han, Zhengbin; Zeng, Tiebo; Huang, Zhijun; Liu, Qi; Gu, Ning; Chen, Yan; Sugimoto, Kenkichi; Jiang, Huijie; Wu, Qiong

    2012-07-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) Meg8 and Irm were previously identified as alternatively splicing isoforms of Rian gene. Ascertaining ncRNAs spatiotemporal expression patterns is crucial for understanding the physiological roles of ncRNAs during tissue and organ development. In this study in mouse embryos, we focused on the developmental regulation expression of imprinted macro ncRNAs, Meg8 and Irm by using in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR). The in situ hybridization results showed that Meg8 and Irm were expressed in the developing brain at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) and E11.5, while Irm expression signals were strikingly detected in the somite, where Meg8 expression signals were undetectable. By E15.5, they were expressed in brain, tongue, liver, lung and neuroendocrine tissues, while Irm displayed more restricted expression in tongue and skeletal muscle than Meg8. Furthermore, quantitative analysis confirmed that they were highly expressed in tongue and brain at E12.5, E15.5 and E18.5. These results indicated that Meg8 and Irm might be coordinately expressed and functionally correlated in diverse of organs. Notably, Irm was more closely associated with morphogenesis of skeletal muscle in contrast to Meg8 during embryonic development.

  7. nocoRNAc: Characterization of non-coding RNAs in prokaryotes

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    Nieselt Kay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interest in non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs constantly rose during the past few years because of the wide spectrum of biological processes in which they are involved. This led to the discovery of numerous ncRNA genes across many species. However, for most organisms the non-coding transcriptome still remains unexplored to a great extent. Various experimental techniques for the identification of ncRNA transcripts are available, but as these methods are costly and time-consuming, there is a need for computational methods that allow the detection of functional RNAs in complete genomes in order to suggest elements for further experiments. Several programs for the genome-wide prediction of functional RNAs have been developed but most of them predict a genomic locus with no indication whether the element is transcribed or not. Results We present NOCORNAc, a program for the genome-wide prediction of ncRNA transcripts in bacteria. NOCORNAc incorporates various procedures for the detection of transcriptional features which are then integrated with functional ncRNA loci to determine the transcript coordinates. We applied RNAz and NOCORNAc to the genome of Streptomyces coelicolor and detected more than 800 putative ncRNA transcripts most of them located antisense to protein-coding regions. Using a custom design microarray we profiled the expression of about 400 of these elements and found more than 300 to be transcribed, 38 of them are predicted novel ncRNA genes in intergenic regions. The expression patterns of many ncRNAs are similarly complex as those of the protein-coding genes, in particular many antisense ncRNAs show a high expression correlation with their protein-coding partner. Conclusions We have developed NOCORNAc, a framework that facilitates the automated characterization of functional ncRNAs. NOCORNAc increases the confidence of predicted ncRNA loci, especially if they contain transcribed ncRNAs. NOCORNAc is not restricted to

  8. DNA methylation patterns of protein coding genes and long noncoding RNAs in female schizophrenic patients.

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    Liao, Qi; Wang, Yunliang; Cheng, Jia; Dai, Dongjun; Zhou, Xingyu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Gao, Shugui; Duan, Shiwei

    2015-02-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a complex mental disorder contributed by both genetic and epigenetic factors. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) was recently found playing an important regulatory role in mental disorders. However, little was known about the DNA methylation of lncRNAs, although numerous SCZ studies have been performed on genetic polymorphisms or epigenetic marks in protein coding genes. We presented a comprehensive genome wide DNA methylation study of both protein coding genes and lncRNAs in female patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ. Using the methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) protein-enriched genome sequencing (MBD-seq), 8,163 and 764 peaks were identified in paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, respectively (p Gene ontology analysis showed that the hypermethylated regions were enriched in the genes related to neuron system and brain for both paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ (p gene promoter regions that might affect gene expression and influence the SCZ related pathways. Interestingly, DNA methylation of 136 and 23 known lncRNAs in Refseq database were identified in paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, respectively. In addition, ∼20% of intergenic peaks annotated based on Refseq genes were overlapped with lncRNAs in UCSC and gencode databases. In order to show the results well for most biological researchers, we created an online database to display and visualize the information of DNA methyation peaks in both types of SCZ (http://www.bioinfo.org/scz/scz.htm). Our results showed that the aberrant DNA methylation of lncRNAs might be another important epigenetic factor for SCZ.

  9. Negative correlation between expression level and evolutionary rate of long intergenic noncoding RNAs.

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    Managadze, David; Rogozin, Igor B; Chernikova, Diana; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Koonin, Eugene V

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian genomes contain numerous genes for long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). The functions of the lncRNAs remain largely unknown but their evolution appears to be constrained by purifying selection, albeit relatively weakly. To gain insights into the mode of evolution and the functional range of the lncRNA, they can be compared with much better characterized protein-coding genes. The evolutionary rate of the protein-coding genes shows a universal negative correlation with expression: highly expressed genes are on average more conserved during evolution than the genes with lower expression levels. This correlation was conceptualized in the misfolding-driven protein evolution hypothesis according to which misfolding is the principal cost incurred by protein expression. We sought to determine whether long intergenic ncRNAs (lincRNAs) follow the same evolutionary trend and indeed detected a moderate but statistically significant negative correlation between the evolutionary rate and expression level of human and mouse lincRNA genes. The magnitude of the correlation for the lincRNAs is similar to that for equal-sized sets of protein-coding genes with similar levels of sequence conservation. Additionally, the expression level of the lincRNAs is significantly and positively correlated with the predicted extent of lincRNA molecule folding (base-pairing), however, the contributions of evolutionary rates and folding to the expression level are independent. Thus, the anticorrelation between evolutionary rate and expression level appears to be a general feature of gene evolution that might be caused by similar deleterious effects of protein and RNA misfolding and/or other factors, for example, the number of interacting partners of the gene product.

  10. The Underexploited Role of Non-Coding RNAs in Lysosomal Storage Diseases

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    de Queiroz, Matheus Trovão; Pereira, Vanessa Gonçalves; do Nascimento, Cinthia Castro; D’Almeida, Vânia

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a functional class of RNA involved in the regulation of several cellular processes which may modulate disease onset, progression, and prognosis. Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) are a group of rare disorders caused by mutations of genes encoding specific hydrolases or non-enzymatic proteins, characterized by a wide spectrum of manifestations. The alteration of ncRNA levels is well established in several human diseases such as cancer and auto-immune disorders; however, there is a lack of information focused on the role of ncRNA in rare diseases. Recent reports related to changes in ncRNA expression and its consequences on LSD physiopathology show us the importance to keep advancing in this field. This article will summarize recent findings and provide key points for further studies on LSD and ncRNA association. PMID:27708618

  11. The Underexploited Role of Non-Coding RNAs in Lysosomal Storage Diseases.

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    Queiroz, Matheus Trovão; Pereira, Vanessa Gonçalves; do Nascimento, Cinthia Castro; D'Almeida, Vânia

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a functional class of RNA involved in the regulation of several cellular processes which may modulate disease onset, progression, and prognosis. Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) are a group of rare disorders caused by mutations of genes encoding specific hydrolases or non-enzymatic proteins, characterized by a wide spectrum of manifestations. The alteration of ncRNA levels is well established in several human diseases such as cancer and auto-immune disorders; however, there is a lack of information focused on the role of ncRNA in rare diseases. Recent reports related to changes in ncRNA expression and its consequences on LSD physiopathology show us the importance to keep advancing in this field. This article will summarize recent findings and provide key points for further studies on LSD and ncRNA association.

  12. Pan-Cancer Analyses Reveal Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs Relevant to Tumor Diagnosis, Subtyping and Prognosis.

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    Ching, Travers; Peplowska, Karolina; Huang, Sijia; Zhu, Xun; Shen, Yi; Molnar, Janos; Yu, Herbert; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Fogelgren, Ben; Fan, Rong; Garmire, Lana X

    2016-05-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a relatively new class of non-coding RNAs that have the potential as cancer biomarkers. To seek a panel of lincRNAs as pan-cancer biomarkers, we have analyzed transcriptomes from over 3300 cancer samples with clinical information. Compared to mRNA, lincRNAs exhibit significantly higher tissue specificities that are then diminished in cancer tissues. Moreover, lincRNA clustering results accurately classify tumor subtypes. Using RNA-Seq data from thousands of paired tumor and adjacent normal samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we identify six lincRNAs as potential pan-cancer diagnostic biomarkers (PCAN-1 to PCAN-6). These lincRNAs are robustly validated using cancer samples from four independent RNA-Seq data sets, and are verified by qPCR in both primary breast cancers and MCF-7 cell line. Interestingly, the expression levels of these six lincRNAs are also associated with prognosis in various cancers. We further experimentally explored the growth and migration dependence of breast and colon cancer cell lines on two of the identified lncRNAs. In summary, our study highlights the emerging role of lincRNAs as potentially powerful and biologically functional pan-cancer biomarkers and represents a significant leap forward in understanding the biological and clinical functions of lincRNAs in cancers.

  13. Rapid and high-throughput construction of microbial cell-factories with regulatory noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Amit Kumar; Na, Dokyun; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2015-11-01

    Due to global crises such as pollution and depletion of fossil fuels, sustainable technologies based on microbial cell-factories have been garnering great interest as an alternative to chemical factories. The development of microbial cell-factories is imperative in cutting down the overall manufacturing cost. Thus, diverse metabolic engineering strategies and engineering tools have been established to obtain a preferred genotype and phenotype displaying superior productivity. However, these tools are limited to only a handful of genes with permanent modification of a genome and significant labor costs, and this is one of the bottlenecks associated with biofactory construction. Therefore, a groundbreaking rapid and high-throughput engineering tool is needed for efficient construction of microbial cell-factories. During the last decade, copious small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been discovered in bacteria. These are involved in substantial regulatory roles like transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation by modulating mRNA elongation, stability, or translational efficiency. Because of their vulnerability, ncRNAs can be used as another layer of conditional control over gene expression without modifying chromosomal sequences, and hence would be a promising high-throughput tool for metabolic engineering. Here, we review successful design principles and applications of ncRNAs for high-throughput metabolic engineering or physiological studies of diverse industrially important microorganisms.

  14. Non-Coding RNAs in Saliva: Emerging Biomarkers for Molecular Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Majem

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Saliva is a complex body fluid that comprises secretions from the major and minor salivary glands, which are extensively supplied by blood. Therefore, molecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA, etc., present in plasma could be also present in saliva. Many studies have reported that saliva body fluid can be useful for discriminating several oral diseases, but also systemic diseases including cancer. Most of these studies revealed messenger RNA (mRNA and proteomic biomarker signatures rather than specific non-coding RNA (ncRNA profiles. NcRNAs are emerging as new regulators of diverse biological functions, playing an important role in oncogenesis and tumor progression. Indeed, the small size of these molecules makes them very stable in different body fluids and not as susceptible as mRNAs to degradation by ribonucleases (RNases. Therefore, the development of a non-invasive salivary test, based on ncRNAs profiles, could have a significant applicability to clinical practice, not only by reducing the cost of the health system, but also by benefitting the patient. Here, we summarize the current status and clinical implications of the ncRNAs present in human saliva as a source of biological information.

  15. Transcription of Satellite III non-coding RNAs is a general stress response in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Chiodi, Ilaria; Giordano, Manuela; Rossi, Antonio; Bazzini, Silvia; Ghigna, Claudia; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    In heat-shocked human cells, heat shock factor 1 activates transcription of tandem arrays of repetitive Satellite III (SatIII) DNA in pericentromeric heterochromatin. Satellite III RNAs remain associated with sites of transcription in nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). Here we use real-time RT-PCR to study the expression of these genomic regions. Transcription is highly asymmetrical and most of the transcripts contain the G-rich strand of the repeat. A low level of G-rich RNAs is detectable in unstressed cells and a 104-fold induction occurs after heat shock. G-rich RNAs are induced by a wide range of stress treatments including heavy metals, UV-C, oxidative and hyper-osmotic stress. Differences exist among stressing agents both for the kinetics and the extent of induction (>100- to 80.000-fold). In all cases, G-rich transcripts are associated with nSBs. On the contrary, C-rich transcripts are almost undetectable in unstressed cells and modestly increase after stress. Production of SatIII RNAs after hyper-osmotic stress depends on the Tonicity Element Binding Protein indicating that activation of the arrays is triggered by different transcription factors. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA whose transcription is controlled by different transcription factors under different growth conditions. PMID:18039709

  16. A self-enhanced transport mechanism through long noncoding RNAs for X chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhe; Hong, Tian; Webb, Chiu-Ho; Karner, Heather; Sun, Sha; Nie, Qing

    2016-08-16

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is the mammalian dosage compensation strategy for balancing sex chromosome content between females and males. While works exist on initiation of symmetric breaking, the underlying allelic choice mechanisms and dynamic regulation responsible for the asymmetric fate determination of XCI remain elusive. Here we combine mathematical modeling and experimental data to examine the mechanism of XCI fate decision by analyzing the signaling regulatory circuit associated with long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) involved in XCI. We describe three plausible gene network models that incorporate features of lncRNAs in their localized actions and rapid transcriptional turnovers. In particular, we show experimentally that Jpx (a lncRNA) is transcribed biallelically, escapes XCI, and is asymmetrically dispersed between two X's. Subjecting Jpx to our test of model predictions against previous experimental observations, we identify that a self-enhanced transport feedback mechanism is critical to XCI fate decision. In addition, the analysis indicates that an ultrasensitive response of Jpx signal on CTCF is important in this mechanism. Overall, our combined modeling and experimental data suggest that the self-enhanced transport regulation based on allele-specific nature of lncRNAs and their temporal dynamics provides a robust and novel mechanism for bi-directional fate decisions in critical developmental processes.

  17. Non-Coding RNAs in Saliva: Emerging Biomarkers for Molecular Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majem, Blanca; Rigau, Marina; Reventós, Jaume; Wong, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Saliva is a complex body fluid that comprises secretions from the major and minor salivary glands, which are extensively supplied by blood. Therefore, molecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA, etc., present in plasma could be also present in saliva. Many studies have reported that saliva body fluid can be useful for discriminating several oral diseases, but also systemic diseases including cancer. Most of these studies revealed messenger RNA (mRNA) and proteomic biomarker signatures rather than specific non-coding RNA (ncRNA) profiles. NcRNAs are emerging as new regulators of diverse biological functions, playing an important role in oncogenesis and tumor progression. Indeed, the small size of these molecules makes them very stable in different body fluids and not as susceptible as mRNAs to degradation by ribonucleases (RNases). Therefore, the development of a non-invasive salivary test, based on ncRNAs profiles, could have a significant applicability to clinical practice, not only by reducing the cost of the health system, but also by benefitting the patient. Here, we summarize the current status and clinical implications of the ncRNAs present in human saliva as a source of biological information. PMID:25898412

  18. Non-coding RNAs in saliva: emerging biomarkers for molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majem, Blanca; Rigau, Marina; Reventós, Jaume; Wong, David T

    2015-04-17

    Saliva is a complex body fluid that comprises secretions from the major and minor salivary glands, which are extensively supplied by blood. Therefore, molecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA, etc., present in plasma could be also present in saliva. Many studies have reported that saliva body fluid can be useful for discriminating several oral diseases, but also systemic diseases including cancer. Most of these studies revealed messenger RNA (mRNA) and proteomic biomarker signatures rather than specific non-coding RNA (ncRNA) profiles. NcRNAs are emerging as new regulators of diverse biological functions, playing an important role in oncogenesis and tumor progression. Indeed, the small size of these molecules makes them very stable in different body fluids and not as susceptible as mRNAs to degradation by ribonucleases (RNases). Therefore, the development of a non-invasive salivary test, based on ncRNAs profiles, could have a significant applicability to clinical practice, not only by reducing the cost of the health system, but also by benefitting the patient. Here, we summarize the current status and clinical implications of the ncRNAs present in human saliva as a source of biological information.

  19. Exploration of small RNA-seq data for small non-coding RNAs in Human Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Srinivas V; Tiwari, Amit K; Hazard, Sprague W; Mahajan, Milind; Ravnic, Dino J

    2017-01-01

    Background: Improved healthcare and recent breakthroughs in technology have substantially reduced cancer mortality rates worldwide. Recent advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) have allowed genomic analysis of the human transcriptome. Now, using NGS we can further look into small non-coding regions of RNAs (sncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs), Piwi-interacting-RNAs (piRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs (sn/snoRNAs) among others. Recent studies looking at sncRNAs indicate their role in important biological processes such as cancer progression and predict their role as biomarkers for disease diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. Results: In the present study, we data mined publically available small RNA sequencing data from colorectal tissue samples of eight matched patients (benign, tumor, and metastasis) and remapped the data for various small RNA annotations. We identified aberrant expression of 13 miRNAs in tumor and metastasis specimens [tumor vs benign group (19 miRNAs) and metastasis vs benign group (38 miRNAs)] of which five were upregulated, and eight were downregulated, during disease progression. Pathway analysis of aberrantly expressed miRNAs showed that the majority of miRNAs involved in colon cancer were also involved in other cancers. Analysis of piRNAs revealed six to be over-expressed in the tumor vs benign cohort and 24 in the metastasis vs benign group. Only two piRNAs were shared between the two cohorts. Examining other types of small RNAs [sn/snoRNAs, mt_rRNA, miscRNA, nonsense mediated decay (NMD), and rRNAs] identified 15 sncRNAs in the tumor vs benign group and 104 in the metastasis vs benign group, with only four others being commonly expressed. Conclusion: In summary, our comprehensive analysis on publicly available small RNA-seq data identified multiple differentially expressed sncRNAs during colorectal cancer progression at different stages compared to normal colon tissue. We speculate that

  20. From structure prediction to genomic screens for novel non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gorodkin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are receiving more and more attention not only as an abundant class of genes, but also as regulatory structural elements (some located in mRNAs. A key feature of RNA function is its structure. Computational methods were developed early for folding and prediction of RNA structure with the aim of assisting in functional analysis. With the discovery of more and more ncRNAs, it has become clear that a large fraction of these are highly structured. Interestingly, a large part of the structure is comprised of regular Watson-Crick and GU wobble base pairs. This and the increased amount of available genomes have made it possible to employ structure-based methods for genomic screens. The field has moved from folding prediction of single sequences to computational screens for ncRNAs in genomic sequence using the RNA structure as the main characteristic feature. Whereas early methods focused on energy-directed folding of single sequences, comparative analysis based on structure preserving changes of base pairs has been efficient in improving accuracy, and today this constitutes a key component in genomic screens. Here, we cover the basic principles of RNA folding and touch upon some of the concepts in current methods that have been applied in genomic screens for de novo RNA structures in searches for novel ncRNA genes and regulatory RNA structure on mRNAs. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different strategies and how they can complement each other.

  1. Sequencing illustrates the transcriptional response of Legionella pneumophila during infection and identifies seventy novel small non-coding RNAs.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Weissenmayer, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    Second generation sequencing has prompted a number of groups to re-interrogate the transcriptomes of several bacterial and archaeal species. One of the central findings has been the identification of complex networks of small non-coding RNAs that play central roles in transcriptional regulation in all growth conditions and for the pathogen\\'s interaction with and survival within host cells. Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative facultative intracellular human pathogen with a distinct biphasic lifestyle. One of its primary environmental hosts in the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and its infection by L. pneumophila mimics that seen in human macrophages. Here we present analysis of strand specific sequencing of the transcriptional response of L. pneumophila during exponential and post-exponential broth growth and during the replicative and transmissive phase of infection inside A. castellanii. We extend previous microarray based studies as well as uncovering evidence of a complex regulatory architecture underpinned by numerous non-coding RNAs. Over seventy new non-coding RNAs could be identified; many of them appear to be strain specific and in configurations not previously reported. We discover a family of non-coding RNAs preferentially expressed during infection conditions and identify a second copy of 6S RNA in L. pneumophila. We show that the newly discovered putative 6S RNA as well as a number of other non-coding RNAs show evidence for antisense transcription. The nature and extent of the non-coding RNAs and their expression patterns suggests that these may well play central roles in the regulation of Legionella spp. specific traits and offer clues as to how L. pneumophila adapts to its intracellular niche. The expression profiles outlined in the study have been deposited into Genbank\\'s Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under the series accession GSE27232.

  2. Sequencing illustrates the transcriptional response of Legionella pneumophila during infection and identifies seventy novel small non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Weissenmayer

    Full Text Available Second generation sequencing has prompted a number of groups to re-interrogate the transcriptomes of several bacterial and archaeal species. One of the central findings has been the identification of complex networks of small non-coding RNAs that play central roles in transcriptional regulation in all growth conditions and for the pathogen's interaction with and survival within host cells. Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative facultative intracellular human pathogen with a distinct biphasic lifestyle. One of its primary environmental hosts in the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and its infection by L. pneumophila mimics that seen in human macrophages. Here we present analysis of strand specific sequencing of the transcriptional response of L. pneumophila during exponential and post-exponential broth growth and during the replicative and transmissive phase of infection inside A. castellanii. We extend previous microarray based studies as well as uncovering evidence of a complex regulatory architecture underpinned by numerous non-coding RNAs. Over seventy new non-coding RNAs could be identified; many of them appear to be strain specific and in configurations not previously reported. We discover a family of non-coding RNAs preferentially expressed during infection conditions and identify a second copy of 6S RNA in L. pneumophila. We show that the newly discovered putative 6S RNA as well as a number of other non-coding RNAs show evidence for antisense transcription. The nature and extent of the non-coding RNAs and their expression patterns suggests that these may well play central roles in the regulation of Legionella spp. specific traits and offer clues as to how L. pneumophila adapts to its intracellular niche. The expression profiles outlined in the study have been deposited into Genbank's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under the series accession GSE27232.

  3. Non-coding RNAs change their expression profile after Retinoid induced differentiation of the promyelocytic cell line NB4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caporaso Maria G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs as fine regulators of eukaryotic gene expression has emerged by several studies focusing on microRNAs (miRNAs. miRNAs represent a newly discovered family of non coding-RNAs. They are thought to be crucial players of human hematopoiesis and related tumorigenesis and to represent a potential tool to detect the early stages of cancer. More recently, the expression regulation of numerous long ncRNAs has been linked to cell growth, differentiation and cancer although the molecular mechanism of their function is still unknown. NB4 cells are promyelocytic cells that can be induced to differentiation upon retinoic acid (ATRA treatment and represent a feasible model to study changes of non coding RNAs expression between cancer cells and their terminally differentiated counterpart. Findings we screened, by microarray analysis, the expression of 243 miRNAs and 492 human genes transcribing for putative long ncRNAs different from miRNAs in NB4 cells before and after ATRA induced differentiation. Our data show that 8 miRNAs, and 58 long ncRNAs were deregulated by ATRA induced NB4 differentiation. Conclusion our data suggest that ATRA-induced differentiation lead to deregulation of a large number of the ncRNAs that can play regulatory roles in both tumorigenesis and differentiation.

  4. Targeting Non-Coding RNAs in Plants with the CRISPR-Cas Technology is a Challenge yet Worth Accepting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Jolly; Nithin, Chandran

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as versatile master regulator of biological functions in recent years. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous ncRNAs of 18-24 nucleotides in length that originates from long self-complementary precursors. Besides their direct involvement in developmental processes, plant miRNAs play key roles in gene regulatory networks and varied biological processes. Alternatively, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse class of transcribed ncRNAs whose length exceed that of 200 nucleotides. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by different RNA polymerases, showing diverse structural features. Plant lncRNAs also are important regulators of gene expression in diverse biological processes. There has been a breakthrough in the technology of genome editing, the CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9) technology, in the last decade. CRISPR loci are transcribed into ncRNA and eventually form a functional complex with Cas9 and further guide the complex to cleave complementary invading DNA. The CRISPR-Cas technology has been successfully applied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and tobacco and important crops like wheat, maize, and rice. However, all these studies are focused on protein coding genes. Information about targeting non-coding genes is scarce. Hitherto, the CRISPR-Cas technology has been exclusively used in vertebrate systems to engineer miRNA/lncRNAs, but it is still relatively unexplored in plants. While briefing miRNAs, lncRNAs and applications of the CRISPR-Cas technology in human and animals, this review essentially elaborates several strategies to overcome the challenges of applying the CRISPR-Cas technology in editing ncRNAs in plants and the future perspective of this field.

  5. Targeting non-coding RNAs in Plants with the CRISPR-Cas technology is a challenge yet worth accepting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly eBasak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have emerged as versatile master regulator of biological functions in recent years. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small endogenous ncRNAs of 18-24 nucleotides in length that originates from long self-complementary precursors. Besides their direct involvement in developmental processes, plant miRNAs play key roles in gene regulatory networks and varied biological processes. Alternatively, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs are a large and diverse class of transcribed ncRNAs whose length exceed that of 200 nucleotides. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by different RNA polymerases, showing diverse structural features. Plant lncRNAs also are important regulators of gene expression in diverse biological processes. There has been a breakthrough in the technology of genome editing, the CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 technology, in the last decade. CRISPR loci are transcribed into ncRNA and eventually form a functional complex with Cas9 and further guide the complex to cleave complementary invading DNA. The CRISPR-Cas technology has been successfully applied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and tobacco and important crops like wheat, maize and rice. However, all these studies are focused on protein coding genes. Information about targeting non-coding genes is scarce. Hitherto, the CRISPR-Cas technology has been exclusively used in vertebrate systems to engineer miRNA/lncRNAs, but it is still relatively unexplored in plants. While briefing miRNAs, lncRNAs and applications of the CRISPR-Cas technology in human and animals, this review essentially elaborates several strategies to overcome the challenges of applying the CRISPR-Cas technology in editing ncRNAs in plants and the future perspective of this field.

  6. Combinatorial Control of mRNA Fates by RNA-Binding Proteins and Non-Coding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Iadevaia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional control of gene expression is mediated by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs and small non-coding RNAs (e.g., microRNAs that bind to distinct elements in their mRNA targets. Here, we review recent examples describing the synergistic and/or antagonistic effects mediated by RBPs and miRNAs to determine the localisation, stability and translation of mRNAs in mammalian cells. From these studies, it is becoming increasingly apparent that dynamic rearrangements of RNA-protein complexes could have profound implications in human cancer, in synaptic plasticity, and in cellular differentiation.

  7. Characterization of human pseudogene-derived non-coding RNAs for functional potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyi Guo

    Full Text Available Thousands of pseudogenes exist in the human genome and many are transcribed, but their functional potential remains elusive and understudied. To explore these issues systematically, we first developed a computational pipeline to identify transcribed pseudogenes from RNA-Seq data. Applying the pipeline to datasets from 16 distinct normal human tissues identified ∼ 3,000 pseudogenes that could produce non-coding RNAs in a manner of low abundance but high tissue specificity under normal physiological conditions. Cross-tissue comparison revealed that the transcriptional profiles of pseudogenes and their parent genes showed mostly positive correlations, suggesting that pseudogene transcription could have a positive effect on the expression of their parent genes, perhaps by functioning as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs, as previously suggested and demonstrated with the PTEN pseudogene, PTENP1. Our analysis of the ENCODE project data also found many transcriptionally active pseudogenes in the GM12878 and K562 cell lines; moreover, it showed that many human pseudogenes produced small RNAs (sRNAs and some pseudogene-derived sRNAs, especially those from antisense strands, exhibited evidence of interfering with gene expression. Further integrated analysis of transcriptomics and epigenomics data, however, demonstrated that trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me3, a posttranslational modification typically associated with gene repression and heterochromatin, was enriched at many transcribed pseudogenes in a transcription-level dependent manner in the two cell lines. The H3K9me3 enrichment was more prominent in pseudogenes that produced sRNAs at pseudogene loci and their adjacent regions, an observation further supported by the co-enrichment of SETDB1 (a H3K9 methyltransferase, suggesting that pseudogene sRNAs may have a role in regional chromatin repression. Taken together, our comprehensive and systematic characterization of pseudogene

  8. Distinct patterns of epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding sites across promoters of sense-intronic long noncoding RNAs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saurav Ghosh; Satish Sati; Shantanu Sengupta; Vinod Scaria

    2015-03-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a new class of noncoding RNAs that have been extensively studied in the recent past as a regulator of gene expression, including modulation of epigenetic regulation. The lncRNAs class encompasses a number of subclasses, classified based on their genomic loci and relation to protein-coding genes. Functional differences between subclasses have been increasingly studied in the recent years, though the regulation of expression and biogenesis of lncRNAs have been poorly studied. The availability of genome-scale datasets of epigenetic marks has motivated us to understand the patterns and processes of epigenetic regulation of lncRNAs. Here we analysed the occurrence of expressive and repressive histone marks at the transcription start site (TSS) of lncRNAs and their subclasses, and compared these profiles with that of the protein-coding regions. We observe distinct differences in the density of histone marks across the TSS of a few lncRNA subclasses. The sense-intronic lncRNA subclass showed a paucity for mapped histone marks across the TSS which were significantly different than all the lncRNAs and protein-coding genes in most cases. Similar pattern was also observed for the density of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). These observations were generally consistent across cell and tissue types. The differences in density across the promoter were significantly associated with the expression level of the genes, but the differences between the densities across long noncoding and protein-coding gene promoters were consistent irrespective of the expression levels. Apart from suggesting general differences in epigenetic regulatory marks across long noncoding RNA promoters, our analysis suggests a possible alternative mechanism of regulation and/or biogenesis of sense-intronic lncRNAs.

  9. Rational Design of Small Molecules Targeting Oncogenic Noncoding RNAs from Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, Matthew D; Angelbello, Alicia J

    2016-12-20

    The discovery of RNA catalysis in the 1980s and the dissemination of the human genome sequence at the start of this century inspired investigations of the regulatory roles of noncoding RNAs in biology. In fact, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has shown that only 1-2% of the human genome encodes protein, yet 75% is transcribed into RNA. Functional studies both preceding and following the ENCODE project have shown that these noncoding RNAs have important roles in regulating gene expression, developmental timing, and other critical functions. RNA's diverse roles are often a consequence of the various folds that it adopts. The single-stranded nature of the biopolymer enables it to adopt intramolecular folds with noncanonical pairings to lower its free energy. These folds can be scaffolds to bind proteins or to form frameworks to interact with other RNAs. Not surprisingly, dysregulation of certain noncoding RNAs has been shown to be causative of disease. Given this as the background, it is easy to see why it would be useful to develop methods that target RNA and manipulate its biology in rational and predictable ways. The antisense approach has afforded strategies to target RNAs via Watson-Crick base pairing and has typically focused on targeting partially unstructured regions of RNA. Small molecule strategies to target RNA would be desirable not only because compounds could be lead optimized via medicinal chemistry but also because structured regions within an RNA of interest could be targeted to directly interfere with RNA folds that contribute to disease. Additionally, small molecules have historically been the most successful drug candidates. Until recently, the ability to design small molecules that target non-ribosomal RNAs has been elusive, creating the perception that they are "undruggable". In this Account, approaches to demystify targeting RNA with small molecules are described. Rather than bulk screening for compounds that bind to singular

  10. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of Long Non-Coding RNAs from Mulberry (Morus notabilis RNA-seq Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Song

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous sources of evidence suggest that most of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed into protein-coding mRNAs and also into a large number of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs. Long ncRNAs (lncRNAs, a group consisting of ncRNAs longer than 200 nucleotides, have been found to play critical roles in transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and epigenetic gene regulation across all kingdoms of life. However, lncRNAs and their regulatory roles remain poorly characterized in plants, especially in woody plants. In this paper, we used a computational approach to identify novel lncRNAs from a published RNA-seq data set and analyzed their sequences and expression patterns. In total, 1133 novel lncRNAs were identified in mulberry, and 106 of these lncRNAs displayed a predominant tissue-specific expression in the five major tissues investigated. Additionally, functional predictions revealed that tissue-specific lncRNAs adjacent to protein-coding genes might play important regulatory roles in the development of floral organ and root in mulberry. The pipeline used in this study would be useful for the identification of lncRNAs obtained from other deep sequencing data. Furthermore, the predicted lncRNAs would be beneficial towards an understanding of the variations in gene expression in plants.

  11. Recent advances in the involvement of long non-coding RNAs in neural stem cell biology and brain pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne eAntoniou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Exploration of non-coding genome has recently uncovered a growing list of formerly unknown regulatory long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs with important functions in stem cell pluripotency, development and homeostasis of several tissues. Although thousands of lncRNAs are expressed in mammalian brain in a highly patterned manner, their roles in brain development have just begun to emerge. Recent data suggest key roles for these molecules in gene regulatory networks controlling neuronal and glial cell differentiation. Analysis of the genomic distribution of genes encoding for lncRNAs indicates a physical association of these regulatory RNAs with transcription factors (TFs with well-established roles in neural differentiation, suggesting that lncRNAs and TFs may form coherent regulatory networks with important functions in neural stem cells (NSCs. Additionally, many studies show that lncRNAs are involved in the pathophysiology of brain-related diseases/disorders. Here we discuss these observations and investigate the links between lncRNAs, brain development and brain-related diseases. Understanding the functions of lncRNAs in NSCs and brain organogenesis could revolutionize the basic principles of developmental biology and neuroscience.

  12. Prediction and characterization of small non-coding RNAs related to secondary metabolites in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Bing Liu

    Full Text Available Saccharopolyspora erythraea produces a large number of secondary metabolites with biological activities, including erythromycin. Elucidation of the mechanisms through which the production of these secondary metabolites is regulated may help to identify new strategies for improved biosynthesis of erythromycin. In this paper, we describe the systematic prediction and analysis of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs in S. erythraea, with the aim to elucidate sRNA-mediated regulation of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. In silico and deep-sequencing technologies were applied to predict sRNAs in S. erythraea. Six hundred and forty-seven potential sRNA loci were identified, of which 382 cis-encoded antisense RNA are complementary to protein-coding regions and 265 predicted transcripts are located in intergenic regions. Six candidate sRNAs (sernc292, sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, sernc361, and sernc389 belong to four gene clusters (tpc3, pke, pks6, and nrps5 that are involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Deep-sequencing data showed that the expression of all sRNAs in the strain HL3168 E3 (E3 was higher than that in NRRL23338 (M, except for sernc292 and sernc361 expression. The relative expression of six sRNAs in strain M and E3 were validated by qRT-PCR at three different time points (24, 48, and 72 h. The results showed that, at each time point, the transcription levels of sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, and sernc389 were higher in E3 than in M, with the largest difference observed at 72 h, whereas no signals for sernc292 and sernc361 were detected. sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, and sernc389 probably regulate iron transport, terpene metabolism, geosmin synthesis, and polyketide biosynthesis, respectively. The major significance of this study is the successful prediction and identification of sRNAs in genomic regions close to the secondary metabolism-related genes in S. erythraea. A better understanding of the sRNA-target interaction would help to

  13. Long noncoding RNAs as auxiliary biomarkers for gastric cancer screening: A pooled analysis of individual studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhaolei; Chen, Yan; Xiao, Zhenzhou; Hu, Minhua; Lin, Yingying; Chen, Yansong; Zheng, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are highlighted as novel cancer biomarkers with great promise. Herein, we focused on summarizing the overall diagnostic performance of lncRNAs for gastric cancer (GC). Methods Publications fulfilling the search criteria were selected from the online databases. Study quality was assessed according to the Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy (QUADAS) checklist. The summary receiver operator characteristic (SROC) curve was plotted using a bivariate meta-analysis model. Statistical analysis was performed based on the platforms of STATA 12.0 and Meta-Disc 1.4 software. Results Fifteen studies with 1252 patients and 1283 matched controls were included. The pooled sensitivity and specificity for lncRNA expression profile in differentiating GC patients from cancer-free individuals were 0.68 (95%CI: 0.61-0.74) and 0.79 (95%CI: 0.72-0.84), respectively, corresponding to an area under curve (AUC) of 0.80. Moreover, the stratified analyses demonstrated that plasma-based lncRNA profiling harbored higher accuracy than that tissue-based assay (specificity: 0.80 versus 0.75; AUC: 0.84 versus 0.77). Conclusions LncRNA profiling hallmarks a moderate diagnostic value in the management of GC and that lncRNA expression patterns may potentially be utilized as auxiliary biomarkers in confirming GC. PMID:27015554

  14. Viral Oncogenes, Noncoding RNAs, and RNA Splicing in Human Tumor Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ming Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral oncogenes are responsible for oncogenesis resulting from persistent virus infection. Although different human tumor viruses express different viral oncogenes and induce different tumors, their oncoproteins often target similar sets of cellular tumor suppressors or signal pathways to immortalize and/or transform infected cells. Expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes in papillomavirus, E1A and E1B oncogenes in adenovirus, large T and small t antigen in polyomavirus, and Tax oncogene in HTLV-1 are regulated by alternative RNA splicing. However, this regulation is only partially understood. DNA tumor viruses also encode noncoding RNAs, including viral microRNAs, that disturb normal cell functions. Among the determined viral microRNA precursors, EBV encodes 25 from two major clusters (BART and BHRF1, KSHV encodes 12 from a latent region, human polyomavirus MCV produce only one microRNA from the late region antisense to early transcripts, but HPVs appears to produce no viral microRNAs.

  15. Lncident: A Tool for Rapid Identification of Long Noncoding RNAs Utilizing Sequence Intrinsic Composition and Open Reading Frame Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyu Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More and more studies have demonstrated that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs play critical roles in diversity of biological process and are also associated with various types of disease. How to rapidly identify lncRNAs and messenger RNA is the fundamental step to uncover the function of lncRNAs identification. Here, we present a novel method for rapid identification of lncRNAs utilizing sequence intrinsic composition features and open reading frame information based on support vector machine model, named as Lncident (LncRNAs identification. The 10-fold cross-validation and ROC curve are used to evaluate the performance of Lncident. The main advantage of Lncident is high speed without the loss of accuracy. Compared with the exiting popular tools, Lncident outperforms Coding-Potential Calculator, Coding-Potential Assessment Tool, Coding-Noncoding Index, and PLEK. Lncident is also much faster than Coding-Potential Calculator and Coding-Noncoding Index. Lncident presents an outstanding performance on microorganism, which offers a great application prospect to the analysis of microorganism. In addition, Lncident can be trained by users’ own collected data. Furthermore, R package and web server are simultaneously developed in order to maximize the convenience for the users. The R package “Lncident” can be easily installed on multiple operating system platforms, as long as R is supported.

  16. New Cross-Talk Layer between Ultraconserved Non-Coding RNAs, MicroRNAs and Polycomb Protein YY1 in Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terreri, Sara; Durso, Montano; Colonna, Vincenza; Romanelli, Alessandra; Terracciano, Daniela; Ferro, Matteo; Perdonà, Sisto; Castaldo, Luigi; Febbraio, Ferdinando; de Nigris, Filomena; Cimmino, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are highly conserved elements in mammals, and exert key regulatory functions. Growing evidence shows that miRNAs can interact with another class of non-coding RNAs, so-called transcribed ultraconserved regions (T-UCRs), which take part in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic regulation processes. We report here the interaction of miRNAs and T-UCRs as a network modulating the availability of these non-coding RNAs in bladder cancer cells. In our cell system, antagomiR-596 increased the expression of T-UCR 201+. Moreover, T-UCR 8+ silencing increased miR-596 expression, which in turn reduced total T-UCR 283+, showing that the perturbation of one element in this network changes the expression of other interactors. In addition, we identify the polycomb protein Yin Yang 1 (YY1) as mediator of binding between miR-596 and T-UCR 8+. These new findings describe for the first time a network between T-UCRs, miRNAs and YY1 protein, highlighting the existence of an additional layer of gene expression regulation. PMID:27983635

  17. New Cross-Talk Layer between Ultraconserved Non-Coding RNAs, MicroRNAs and Polycomb Protein YY1 in Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Terreri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are highly conserved elements in mammals, and exert key regulatory functions. Growing evidence shows that miRNAs can interact with another class of non-coding RNAs, so-called transcribed ultraconserved regions (T-UCRs, which take part in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic regulation processes. We report here the interaction of miRNAs and T-UCRs as a network modulating the availability of these non-coding RNAs in bladder cancer cells. In our cell system, antagomiR-596 increased the expression of T-UCR 201+. Moreover, T-UCR 8+ silencing increased miR-596 expression, which in turn reduced total T-UCR 283+, showing that the perturbation of one element in this network changes the expression of other interactors. In addition, we identify the polycomb protein Yin Yang 1 (YY1 as mediator of binding between miR-596 and T-UCR 8+. These new findings describe for the first time a network between T-UCRs, miRNAs and YY1 protein, highlighting the existence of an additional layer of gene expression regulation.

  18. Overexpression of long non-coding RNAs following exposure to xenobiotics in the aquatic midge Chironomus riparius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Guitarte, Jose-Luis, E-mail: jlmartinez@ccia.uned.es [Grupo de Biologia y Toxicologia Ambiental, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, UNED, Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Planello, Rosario; Morcillo, Gloria [Grupo de Biologia y Toxicologia Ambiental, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, UNED, Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent an important transcriptional output of eukaryotic genomes. In addition to their functional relevance as housekeeping and regulatory elements, recent studies have suggested their involvement in rather unexpected cellular functions. The aim of this work was to analyse the transcriptional behaviour of non-coding RNAs in the toxic response to pollutants in Chironomus riparius, a reference organism in aquatic toxicology. Three well-characterized long non-coding sequences were studied: telomeric repeats, Cla repetitive elements and the SINE CTRT1. Transcription levels were evaluated by RT-PCR after 24-h exposures to three current aquatic contaminants: bisphenol A (BPA), benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) and the heavy metal cadmium (Cd). Upregulation of telomeric transcripts was found after BPA treatments. Moreover, BPA significantly activated Cla transcription, which also appeared to be increased by cadmium, whereas BBP did not affect the transcription levels of these sequences. Transcription of SINE CTRT1 was not altered by any of the chemicals tested. These data are discussed in the light of previous studies that have shown a response by long ncRNAS (lncRNAs) to cellular stressors, indicating a relationship with environmental stimuli. Our results demonstrated for the first time the ability of bisphenol A to activate non-coding sequences mainly located at telomeres and centromeres. Overall, this study provides evidence that xenobiotics can induce specific responses in ncRNAs derived from repetitive sequences that could be relevant in the toxic response, and also suggests that ncRNAs could represent a novel class of potential biomarkers in toxicological assessment.

  19. An improved method for identification of small non-coding RNAs in bacteria using support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Ranjan Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Anirban; Das, Santasabuj

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are not translated into proteins, but act as functional RNAs. They are involved in diverse biological processes like virulence, stress response and quorum sensing. Several high-throughput techniques have enabled identification of sRNAs in bacteria, but experimental detection remains a challenge and grossly incomplete for most species. Thus, there is a need to develop computational tools to predict bacterial sRNAs. Here, we propose a computational method to identify sRNAs in bacteria using support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The primary sequence and secondary structure features of experimentally-validated sRNAs of Salmonella Typhimurium LT2 (SLT2) was used to build the optimal SVM model. We found that a tri-nucleotide composition feature of sRNAs achieved an accuracy of 88.35% for SLT2. We validated the SVM model also on the experimentally-detected sRNAs of E. coli and Salmonella Typhi. The proposed model had robustly attained an accuracy of 81.25% and 88.82% for E. coli K-12 and S. Typhi Ty2, respectively. We confirmed that this method significantly improved the identification of sRNAs in bacteria. Furthermore, we used a sliding window-based method and identified sRNAs from complete genomes of SLT2, S. Typhi Ty2 and E. coli K-12 with sensitivities of 89.09%, 83.33% and 67.39%, respectively.

  20. Production of Small Noncoding RNAs from the flamenco Locus Is Regulated by the gypsy Retrotransposon of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Vincenzo; Cernilogar, Filippo M; Filograna, Angela; De Gregorio, Roberto; Ishizu, Hirotsugu; Siomi, Mikiko C; Schotta, Gunnar; Bellenchi, Gian Carlo; Andrenacci, Davide

    2016-10-01

    Protective mechanisms based on RNA silencing directed against the propagation of transposable elements are highly conserved in eukaryotes. The control of transposable elements is mediated by small noncoding RNAs, which derive from transposon-rich heterochromatic regions that function as small RNA-generating loci. These clusters are transcribed and the precursor transcripts are processed to generate Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs), which silence transposable elements in gonads and somatic tissues. The flamenco locus is a Drosophila melanogaster small RNA cluster that controls gypsy and other transposable elements, and has played an important role in understanding how small noncoding RNAs repress transposable elements. In this study, we describe a cosuppression mechanism triggered by new euchromatic gypsy insertions in genetic backgrounds carrying flamenco alleles defective in gypsy suppression. We found that the silencing of gypsy is accompanied by the silencing of other transposons regulated by flamenco, and of specific flamenco sequences from which small RNAs against gypsy originate. This cosuppression mechanism seems to depend on a post-transcriptional regulation that involves both endo-siRNA and piRNA pathways and is associated with the occurrence of developmental defects. In conclusion, we propose that new gypsy euchromatic insertions trigger a post-transcriptional silencing of gypsy sense and antisense sequences, which modifies the flamenco activity. This cosuppression mechanism interferes with some developmental processes, presumably by influencing the expression of specific genes. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. RNA sequencing and functional analysis implicate the regulatory role of long non-coding RNAs in tomato fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Benzhong; Yang, Yongfang; Li, Ran; Fu, Daqi; Wen, Liwei; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Hongliang

    2015-08-01

    Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play critical regulatory roles in model plants, such as Arabidopsis, rice, and maize. However, the presence of lncRNAs and how they function in fleshy fruit ripening are still largely unknown because fleshy fruit ripening is not present in the above model plants. Tomato is the model system for fruit ripening studies due to its dramatic ripening process. To investigate further the role of lncRNAs in fruit ripening, it is necessary and urgent to discover and identify novel lncRNAs and understand the function of lncRNAs in tomato fruit ripening. Here it is reported that 3679 lncRNAs were discovered from wild-type tomato and ripening mutant fruit. The lncRNAs are transcribed from all tomato chromosomes, 85.1% of which came from intergenic regions. Tomato lncRNAs are shorter and have fewer exons than protein-coding genes, a situation reminiscent of lncRNAs from other model plants. It was also observed that 490 lncRNAs were significantly up-regulated in ripening mutant fruits, and 187 lncRNAs were down-regulated, indicating that lncRNAs could be involved in the regulation of fruit ripening. In line with this, silencing of two novel tomato intergenic lncRNAs, lncRNA1459 and lncRNA1840, resulted in an obvious delay of ripening of wild-type fruit. Overall, the results indicated that lncRNAs might be essential regulators of tomato fruit ripening, which sheds new light on the regulation of fruit ripening.

  2. Spatial proximity of homologous alleles and long noncoding RNAs regulate a switch in allelic gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratigi, Kalliopi; Kapsetaki, Manouela; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Town, Terrence; Flavell, Richard A.; Spilianakis, Charalampos G.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological processes rely on the regulation of total mRNA levels in a cell. In diploid organisms, the transcriptional activation of one or both alleles of a gene may involve trans-allelic interactions that provide a tight spatial and temporal level of gene expression regulation. The mechanisms underlying such interactions still remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that lipopolysaccharide stimulation of murine macrophages rapidly resulted in the actin-mediated and transient homologous spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles, which was necessary for the mono- to biallelic switch in gene expression. We identified two new complementary long noncoding RNAs transcribed from the TNFα locus and showed that their knockdown had opposite effects in Tnfα spatial proximity and allelic expression. Moreover, the observed spatial proximity of Tnfα alleles depended on pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2) and T-helper-inducing POZ-Krüppel-like factor (ThPOK). This study suggests a role for lncRNAs in the regulation of somatic homologous spatial proximity and allelic expression control necessary for fine-tuning mammalian immune responses. PMID:25770217

  3. Identification of novel non-coding RNAs using profiles of short sequence reads from next generation sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makunin Igor V

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing interest in small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs such as microRNAs (miRNAs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs and recent advances in sequencing technology have yielded large numbers of short (18-32 nt RNA sequences from different organisms, some of which are derived from small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs and transfer RNAs (tRNAs. We observed that these short ncRNAs frequently cover the entire length of annotated snoRNAs or tRNAs, which suggests that other loci specifying similar ncRNAs can be identified by clusters of short RNA sequences. Results We combined publicly available datasets of tens of millions of short RNA sequence tags from Drosophila melanogaster, and mapped them to the Drosophila genome. Approximately 6 million perfectly mapping sequence tags were then assembled into 521,302 tag-contigs (TCs based on tag overlap. Most transposon-derived sequences, exons and annotated miRNAs, tRNAs and snoRNAs are detected by TCs, which show distinct patterns of length and tag-depth for different categories. The typical length and tag-depth of snoRNA-derived TCs was used to predict 7 previously unrecognized box H/ACA and 26 box C/D snoRNA candidates. We also identified one snRNA candidate and 86 loci with a high number of tags that are yet to be annotated, 7 of which have a particular 18mer motif and are located in introns of genes involved in development. A subset of new snoRNA candidates and putative ncRNA candidates was verified by Northern blot. Conclusions In this study, we have introduced a new approach to identify new members of known classes of ncRNAs based on the features of TCs corresponding to known ncRNAs. A large number of the identified TCs are yet to be examined experimentally suggesting that many more novel ncRNAs remain to be discovered.

  4. High-throughput, kingdom-wide prediction and annotation of bacterial non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Livny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diverse bacterial genomes encode numerous small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs that regulate myriad biological processes. While bioinformatic algorithms have proven effective in identifying sRNA-encoding loci, the lack of tools and infrastructure with which to execute these computationally demanding algorithms has limited their utilization. Genome-wide predictions of sRNA-encoding genes have been conducted in less than 3% of all sequenced bacterial strains, leading to critical gaps in current annotations. The relative paucity of genome-wide sRNA prediction represents a critical gap in current annotations of bacterial genomes and has limited examination of larger issues in sRNA biology, such as sRNA evolution. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed and deployed SIPHT, a high throughput computational tool that utilizes workflow management and distributed computing to effectively conduct kingdom-wide predictions and annotations of intergenic sRNA-encoding genes. Candidate sRNA-encoding loci are identified based on the presence of putative Rho-independent terminators downstream of conserved intergenic sequences, and each locus is annotated for several features, including conservation in other species, association with one of several transcription factor binding sites and homology to any of over 300 previously identified sRNAs and cis-regulatory RNA elements. Using SIPHT, we conducted searches for putative sRNA-encoding genes in all 932 bacterial replicons in the NCBI database. These searches yielded nearly 60% of previously confirmed sRNAs, hundreds of previously annotated cis-encoded regulatory RNA elements such as riboswitches, and over 45,000 novel candidate intergenic loci. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Candidate loci were identified across all branches of the bacterial evolutionary tree, suggesting a central and ubiquitous role for RNA-mediated regulation among bacterial species. Annotation of candidate loci by SIPHT provides clues

  5. Long Non-Coding RNAs: Key Regulators of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Tumour Drug Resistance and Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heery, Richard; Finn, Stephen P.; Cuffe, Sinead; Gray, Steven G.

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), the adoption by epithelial cells of a mesenchymal-like phenotype, is a process co-opted by carcinoma cells in order to initiate invasion and metastasis. In addition, it is becoming clear that is instrumental to both the development of drug resistance by tumour cells and in the generation and maintenance of cancer stem cells. EMT is thus a pivotal process during tumour progression and poses a major barrier to the successful treatment of cancer. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) often utilize epigenetic programs to regulate both gene expression and chromatin structure. One type of ncRNA, called long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), has become increasingly recognized as being both highly dysregulated in cancer and to play a variety of different roles in tumourigenesis. Indeed, over the last few years, lncRNAs have rapidly emerged as key regulators of EMT in cancer. In this review, we discuss the lncRNAs that have been associated with the EMT process in cancer and the variety of molecular mechanisms and signalling pathways through which they regulate EMT, and finally discuss how these EMT-regulating lncRNAs impact on both anti-cancer drug resistance and the cancer stem cell phenotype. PMID:28430163

  6. Long non-coding RNAs as surrogate indicators for chemical stress responses in human-induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Hidenori; Onuma, Yasuko; Ito, Yuzuru; Torimura, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we focused on two biological products as ideal tools for toxicological assessment: long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). lncRNAs are an important class of pervasive non-protein-coding transcripts involved in the molecular mechanisms associated with responses to cellular stresses. hiPSCs possess the capabilities of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell types, and they are free of the ethical issues associated with human embryonic stem cells. Here, we identified six novel lncRNAs (CDKN2B-AS1, MIR22HG, GABPB1-AS1, FLJ33630, LINC00152, and LINC0541471_v2) that respond to model chemical stresses (cycloheximide, hydrogen peroxide, cadmium, or arsenic) in hiPSCs. Our results indicated that the lncRNAs responded to general and specific chemical stresses. Compared with typical mRNAs such as p53-related mRNAs, the lncRNAs highly and rapidly responded to chemical stresses. We propose that these lncRNAs have the potential to be surrogate indicators of chemical stress responses in hiPSCs.

  7. Integrative analysis reveals clinical phenotypes and oncogenic potentials of long non-coding RNAs across 15 cancer types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Stephen R.; Zhang, Xiao-Qin; Li, Jun-Hao; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to contribute to tumorigenesis. However, surprisingly little is known about the comprehensive clinical and genomic characterization of lncRNAs across human cancer. In this study, we conducted comprehensive analyses for the expression profile, clinical outcomes, somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) profile of lncRNAs in ~7000 clinical samples from 15 different cancer types. We identified significantly differentially expressed lncRNAs between tumor and normal tissues from each cancer. Notably, we characterized 47 lncRNAs which were extensively dysregulated in at least 10 cancer types, suggesting a conserved function in cancer development. We also analyzed the associations between lncRNA expressions and patient survival, and identified sets of lncRNAs that possessed significant prognostic values in specific cancer types. Our combined analysis of SCNA data and expression data uncovered 116 dysregulated lncRNAs are strikingly genomic altered across 15 cancer types, indicating their oncogenic potentials. Our study may lay the groundwork for future functional studies of lncRNAs and help facilitate the discovery of novel clinical biomarkers. PMID:27147563

  8. Long non-coding RNAs as surrogate indicators for chemical stress responses in human-induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Tani

    Full Text Available In this study, we focused on two biological products as ideal tools for toxicological assessment: long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs and human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs. lncRNAs are an important class of pervasive non-protein-coding transcripts involved in the molecular mechanisms associated with responses to cellular stresses. hiPSCs possess the capabilities of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell types, and they are free of the ethical issues associated with human embryonic stem cells. Here, we identified six novel lncRNAs (CDKN2B-AS1, MIR22HG, GABPB1-AS1, FLJ33630, LINC00152, and LINC0541471_v2 that respond to model chemical stresses (cycloheximide, hydrogen peroxide, cadmium, or arsenic in hiPSCs. Our results indicated that the lncRNAs responded to general and specific chemical stresses. Compared with typical mRNAs such as p53-related mRNAs, the lncRNAs highly and rapidly responded to chemical stresses. We propose that these lncRNAs have the potential to be surrogate indicators of chemical stress responses in hiPSCs.

  9. Evolutionarily divergent spliceosomal snRNAs and a conserved non-coding RNA processing motif in Giardia lamblia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Andrew J.; Moore, Ashley N.; Elniski, David; Joseph, Joella; Yee, Janet; Russell, Anthony G.

    2012-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have diverse essential biological functions in all organisms, and in eukaryotes, two such classes of ncRNAs are the small nucleolar (sno) and small nuclear (sn) RNAs. In this study, we have identified and characterized a collection of sno and snRNAs in Giardia lamblia, by exploiting our discovery of a conserved 12 nt RNA processing sequence motif found in the 3′ end regions of a large number of G. lamblia ncRNA genes. RNA end mapping and other experiments indicate the motif serves to mediate ncRNA 3′ end formation from mono- and di-cistronic RNA precursor transcripts. Remarkably, we find the motif is also utilized in the processing pathway of all four previously identified trans-spliced G. lamblia introns, revealing a common RNA processing pathway for ncRNAs and trans-spliced introns in this organism. Motif sequence conservation then allowed for the bioinformatic and experimental identification of additional G. lamblia ncRNAs, including new U1 and U6 spliceosomal snRNA candidates. The U6 snRNA candidate was then used as a tool to identity novel U2 and U4 snRNAs, based on predicted phylogenetically conserved snRNA–snRNA base-pairing interactions, from a set of previously identified G. lamblia ncRNAs without assigned function. The Giardia snRNAs retain the core features of spliceosomal snRNAs but are sufficiently evolutionarily divergent to explain the difficulties in their identification. Most intriguingly, all of these snRNAs show structural features diagnostic of U2-dependent/major and U12-dependent/minor spliceosomal snRNAs. PMID:23019220

  10. Screening of crucial long non-coding RNAs in oral epithelial dysplasia by serial analysis of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, X; Wei, Y B; Tian, G; Tang, Z; Gao, J Y; Xu, X G

    2015-10-02

    Oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) is a premalignant lesion of the oral mucosa. Considering the poor 5-year survival rate of oral cancer, further investigation is needed in order to determine the pathogenesis of OED. In the present study, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) data from patients with OED were compared to normal controls to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). SAGE data were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus, and included samples from patients with mild, moderate, or severe dysplasia. The DEGs were identified using the edgeR software package and functional-enrichment analysis was performed with the DAVID (https://david.ncifcrf.gov/) software program. The co-expression network was constructed using the CoExpress software and target genes of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were predicted according to the proximity between the lncRNAs and mRNAs in the genome. A total of 517 DEGs were identified, including 409 mRNAs and 108 lncRNAs. Functional-enrichment analysis showed that mRNAs and lncRNAs involved in epithelial cell differentiation, epithelium development, and epidermal cell differentiation were significantly enriched in the DEGs. Thirty-eight potential regulatory relationships were unveiled between lncRNAs and mRNAs, and two subnetworks were discovered by analyzing the topological properties of the co-expression network. In conclusion, we have identified key mRNAs and lncRNAs in OED, and these findings may aid in understanding the pathogenesis of OED and advance potential future treatments.

  11. Identification of proteins binding coding and non-coding human RNAs using protein microarrays

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    Siprashvili Zurab

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation and function of mammalian RNAs has been increasingly appreciated to operate via RNA-protein interactions. With the recent discovery of thousands of novel human RNA molecules by high-throughput RNA sequencing, efficient methods to uncover RNA-protein interactions are urgently required. Existing methods to study proteins associated with a given RNA are laborious and require substantial amounts of cell-derived starting material. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a rapid and large-scale approach to characterize binding of in vitro transcribed labeled RNA to ~9,400 human recombinant proteins spotted on protein microarrays. Results We have optimized methodology to probe human protein microarrays with full-length RNA molecules and have identified 137 RNA-protein interactions specific for 10 coding and non-coding RNAs. Those proteins showed strong enrichment for common human RNA binding domains such as RRM, RBD, as well as K homology and CCCH type zinc finger motifs. Previously unknown RNA-protein interactions were discovered using this technique, and these interactions were biochemically verified between TP53 mRNA and Staufen1 protein as well as between HRAS mRNA and CNBP protein. Functional characterization of the interaction between Staufen 1 protein and TP53 mRNA revealed a novel role for Staufen 1 in preserving TP53 RNA stability. Conclusions Our approach demonstrates a scalable methodology, allowing rapid and efficient identification of novel human RNA-protein interactions using RNA hybridization to human protein microarrays. Biochemical validation of newly identified interactions between TP53-Stau1 and HRAS-CNBP using reciprocal pull-down experiments, both in vitro and in vivo, demonstrates the utility of this approach to study uncharacterized RNA-protein interactions.

  12. Transcriptome analysis reveals long intergenic non-coding RNAs involved in skeletal muscle growth and development in pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Cheng; Li, Jingxuan; Luo, Wenzhe; Li, Long; Hu, An; Fu, Yuhua; Hou, Ye; Li, Changchun

    2017-08-18

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) play essential roles in numerous biological processes and are widely studied. The skeletal muscle is an important tissue that plays an essential role in individual movement ability. However, lincRNAs in pig skeletal muscles are largely undiscovered and their biological functions remain elusive. In this study, we assembled transcriptomes using RNA-seq data published in previous studies of our laboratory group and identified 323 lincRNAs in porcine leg muscle. We found that these lincRNAs have shorter transcript length, fewer exons and lower expression level than protein-coding genes. Gene ontology and pathway analyses indicated that many potential target genes (PTGs) of lincRNAs were involved in skeletal-muscle-related processes, such as muscle contraction and muscle system process. Combined our previous studies, we found a potential regulatory mechanism in which the promoter methylation of lincRNAs can negatively regulate lincRNA expression and then positively regulate PTG expression, which can finally result in abnormal phenotypes of cloned piglets through a certain unknown pathway. This work detailed a number of lincRNAs and their target genes involved in skeletal muscle growth and development and can facilitate future studies on their roles in skeletal muscle growth and development.

  13. No longer a nuisance: long non-coding RNAs join CENP-A in epigenetic centromere regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rošić, Silvana; Erhardt, Sylvia

    2016-04-01

    Centromeres represent the basis for kinetochore formation, and are essential for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Despite these essential roles, centromeres are not defined by specific DNA sequences, but by epigenetic means. The histone variant CENP-A controls centromere identity epigenetically and is essential for recruiting kinetochore components that attach the chromosomes to the mitotic spindle during mitosis. Recently, a new player in centromere regulation has emerged: long non-coding RNAs transcribed from repetitive regions of centromeric DNA function in regulating centromeres epigenetically. This review summarizes recent findings on the essential roles that transcription, pericentromeric transcripts, and centromere-derived RNAs play in centromere biology.

  14. The role of non-coding RNAs in diabetic nephropathy: potential applications as biomarkers for disease development and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, M Lucrecia; Distefano, Johanna K

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy, a progressive kidney disease that develops secondary to diabetes, is the major cause of chronic kidney disease in developed countries, and contributes significantly to increased morbidity and mortality among individuals with diabetes. Although the causes of diabetic nephropathy are not fully understood, recent studies demonstrate a role for epigenetic factors in the development of the disease. For example, non-coding RNA (ncRNA) molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs), have been shown to be functionally important in modulating renal response to hyperglycemia and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Characterization of miRNA expression in diabetic nephropathy from studies of animal models of diabetes, and in vitro investigations using different types of kidney cells also support this role. The goal of this review, therefore, is to summarize the current state of knowledge of specific ncRNAs involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy, with a focus on the potential role of miRNAs to serve as sensitive, non-invasive biomarkers of kidney disease and progression. Non-coding RNAs are currently recognized as potentially important regulators of genes involved in processes related to the development of diabetic nephropathy, and as such, represent viable targets for both clinical diagnostic strategies and therapeutic intervention.

  15. Identification of novel non-coding small RNAs from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 using high-resolution genome tiling arrays

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    Swiatlo Edwin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of non-coding transcripts in human, mouse, and Escherichia coli has revealed their widespread occurrence and functional importance in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic life. In prokaryotes, studies have shown that non-coding transcripts participate in a broad range of cellular functions like gene regulation, stress and virulence. However, very little is known about non-coding transcripts in Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus, an obligate human respiratory pathogen responsible for significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. Tiling microarrays enable genome wide mRNA profiling as well as identification of novel transcripts at a high-resolution. Results Here, we describe a high-resolution transcription map of the S. pneumoniae clinical isolate TIGR4 using genomic tiling arrays. Our results indicate that approximately 66% of the genome is expressed under our experimental conditions. We identified a total of 50 non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs from the intergenic regions, of which 36 had no predicted function. Half of the identified sRNA sequences were found to be unique to S. pneumoniae genome. We identified eight overrepresented sequence motifs among sRNA sequences that correspond to sRNAs in different functional categories. Tiling arrays also identified approximately 202 operon structures in the genome. Conclusions In summary, the pneumococcal operon structures and novel sRNAs identified in this study enhance our understanding of the complexity and extent of the pneumococcal 'expressed' genome. Furthermore, the results of this study open up new avenues of research for understanding the complex RNA regulatory network governing S. pneumoniae physiology and virulence.

  16. Identification of four novel small non-coding RNAs from Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Guang-Tao; Jiang Bo-Le; Feng Jia-Xun; He Yong-Qiang; Chen Xiao-Lin; Tang Dong-Jie; Jiang Rui-Ping; Lin Min; Tang Ji-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background In bacteria, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) have been recognized as important regulators of various cellular processes. Approximately 200 bacterial sRNAs in total have been reported. However, very few sRNAs have been identified from phytopathogenic bacteria. Results Xanthomons campestris pathovar campestris (Xcc) is the causal agent of black rot disease of cruciferous crops. In this study, a cDNA library was constructed from the low-molecular weight RNA isolated from the Xc...

  17. Non-coding RNAs and HIV: viral manipulation of host dark matter to shape the cellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barichievy, Samantha; Naidoo, Jerolen; Mhlanga, Musa M

    2015-01-01

    On October 28th 1943 Winston Churchill said "we shape our buildings, and afterward our buildings shape us" (Humes, 1994). Churchill was pondering how and when to rebuild the British House of Commons, which had been destroyed by enemy bombs on May 10th 1941. The old House had been small and insufficient to hold all its members, but was restored to its original form in 1950 in order to recapture the "convenience and dignity" that the building had shaped into its parliamentary members. The circular loop whereby buildings or dwellings are shaped and go on to shape those that reside in them is also true of pathogens and their hosts. As obligate parasites, pathogens need to alter their cellular host environments to ensure survival. Typically pathogens modify cellular transcription profiles and in doing so, the pathogen in turn is affected, thereby closing the loop. As key orchestrators of gene expression, non-coding RNAs provide a vast and extremely precise set of tools for pathogens to target in order to shape the cellular environment. This review will focus on host non-coding RNAs that are manipulated by the infamous intracellular pathogen, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We will briefly describe both short and long host non-coding RNAs and discuss how HIV gains control of these factors to ensure widespread dissemination throughout the host as well as the establishment of lifelong, chronic infection.

  18. Homology-based annotation of non-coding RNAs in the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum

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    Santana Clara

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosomes are trematode parasites of the phylum Platyhelminthes. They are considered the most important of the human helminth parasites in terms of morbidity and mortality. Draft genome sequences are now available for Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum. Non-coding RNA (ncRNA plays a crucial role in gene expression regulation, cellular function and defense, homeostasis, and pathogenesis. The genome-wide annotation of ncRNAs is a non-trivial task unless well-annotated genomes of closely related species are already available. Results A homology search for structured ncRNA in the genome of S. mansoni resulted in 23 types of ncRNAs with conserved primary and secondary structure. Among these, we identified rRNA, snRNA, SL RNA, SRP, tRNAs and RNase P, and also possibly MRP and 7SK RNAs. In addition, we confirmed five miRNAs that have recently been reported in S. japonicum and found two additional homologs of known miRNAs. The tRNA complement of S. mansoni is comparable to that of the free-living planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, although for some amino acids differences of more than a factor of two are observed: Leu, Ser, and His are overrepresented, while Cys, Meth, and Ile are underrepresented in S. mansoni. On the other hand, the number of tRNAs in the genome of S. japonicum is reduced by more than a factor of four. Both schistosomes have a complete set of minor spliceosomal snRNAs. Several ncRNAs that are expected to exist in the S. mansoni genome were not found, among them the telomerase RNA, vault RNAs, and Y RNAs. Conclusion The ncRNA sequences and structures presented here represent the most complete dataset of ncRNA from any lophotrochozoan reported so far. This data set provides an important reference for further analysis of the genomes of schistosomes and indeed eukaryotic genomes at large.

  19. Allele-Selective Transcriptome Recruitment to Polysomes Primed for Translation: Protein-Coding and Noncoding RNAs, and RNA Isoforms.

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    Roshan Mascarenhas

    Full Text Available mRNA translation into proteins is highly regulated, but the role of mRNA isoforms, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs, and genetic variants remains poorly understood. mRNA levels on polysomes have been shown to correlate well with expressed protein levels, pointing to polysomal loading as a critical factor. To study regulation and genetic factors of protein translation we measured levels and allelic ratios of mRNAs and ncRNAs (including microRNAs in lymphoblast cell lines (LCL and in polysomal fractions. We first used targeted assays to measure polysomal loading of mRNA alleles, confirming reported genetic effects on translation of OPRM1 and NAT1, and detecting no effect of rs1045642 (3435C>T in ABCB1 (MDR1 on polysomal loading while supporting previous results showing increased mRNA turnover of the 3435T allele. Use of high-throughput sequencing of complete transcript profiles (RNA-Seq in three LCLs revealed significant differences in polysomal loading of individual RNA classes and isoforms. Correlated polysomal distribution between protein-coding and non-coding RNAs suggests interactions between them. Allele-selective polysome recruitment revealed strong genetic influence for multiple RNAs, attributable either to differential expression of RNA isoforms or to differential loading onto polysomes, the latter defining a direct genetic effect on translation. Genes identified by different allelic RNA ratios between cytosol and polysomes were enriched with published expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs affecting RNA functions, and associations with clinical phenotypes. Polysomal RNA-Seq combined with allelic ratio analysis provides a powerful approach to study polysomal RNA recruitment and regulatory variants affecting protein translation.

  20. Long Noncoding RNA Expression Profiling in Normal B-Cell Subsets and Hodgkin Lymphoma Reveals Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg Cell-Specific Long Noncoding RNAs.

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    Tayari, Mina Masoumeh; Winkle, Melanie; Kortman, Gertrud; Sietzema, Jantine; de Jong, Debora; Terpstra, Martijn; Mestdagh, Pieter; Kroese, Frans G M; Visser, Lydia; Diepstra, Arjan; Kok, Klaas; van den Berg, Anke; Kluiver, Joost

    2016-09-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignancy of germinal center (GC) B-cell origin. To explore the role of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in HL, we studied lncRNA expression patterns in normal B-cell subsets, HL cell lines, and tissues. Naive and memory B cells showed a highly similar lncRNA expression pattern, distinct from GC-B cells. Significant differential expression between HL and normal GC-B cells was observed for 475 lncRNA loci. For two validated lncRNAs, an enhanced expression was observed in HL, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and lymphoblastoid cell lines. For a third lncRNA, increased expression levels were observed in HL and part of Burkitt lymphoma cell lines. RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization on primary HL tissues revealed a tumor cell-specific expression pattern for all three lncRNAs. A potential cis-regulatory role was observed for 107 differentially expressed lncRNA-mRNA pairs localizing within a 60-kb region. Consistent with a cis-acting role, we showed a preferential nuclear localization for two selected candidates. Thus, we showed dynamic lncRNA expression changes during the transit of normal B cells through the GC reaction and widely deregulated lncRNA expression patterns in HL. Three lncRNAs showed a tumor cell-specific expression pattern in HL tissues and might therefore be of value as a biomarker. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Long non-coding RNAs may serve as biomarkers in breast cancer combined with primary lung cancer

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    Mao, Weimin; Chen, Bo; Yang, Shifeng; Ding, Xiaowen; Zou, Dehong; Mo, Wenju; He, Xiangming; Zhang, Xiping

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play important regulatory role in certain type of cancers biology, including breast and lung cancers. However, the lncRNA expression in breast cancer combined with primary lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, databases of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the lncRNA profiler of contained candidate 192 lncRNAs were utilized. 11 lncRNAs were differentially expressed in breast cancer, 9 candidate lncRNAs were differentially expressed in lung cancer. In order to find the aberrant expression of lncRNAs in breast cancer combined with primary lung cancer, seven samples of primary breast cancer and lung cancer were studied for the expression of selected lncRNAs. The results showed that SNHG6 and NEAT1 were reversely expressed in breast cancer combined with primary lung cancer compared with primary breast or lung cancer. In addition, a significant correlation of lncRNAs was found in the patients whose age was above 56 in breast cancer. What's more, PVT1 expression was negatively correlated with the pathological stage, and the level of ER, PR, HER2, p53 in breast cancer. Furthermore, lncRNA expression did not have significant relationship with the 5-year survival of patients with breast cancer combined with primary lung cancer. The findings revealed that PVT1, SNHG6, NEAT1 may serve as a prognostic marker for breast cancer combined with primary lung cancer. Therefore, these lncRNAs are potential molecular indicators in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer in the future. PMID:28938549

  2. The PRC2-binding long non-coding RNAs in human and mouse genomes are associated with predictive sequence features

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    Tu, Shiqi; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Shao, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of molecules involved in many cellular processes. One of their primary functions is to shape epigenetic landscape through interactions with chromatin modifying proteins. However, mechanisms contributing to the specificity of such interactions remain poorly understood. Here we took the human and mouse lncRNAs that were experimentally determined to have physical interactions with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and systematically investigated the sequence features of these lncRNAs by developing a new computational pipeline for sequences composition analysis, in which each sequence is considered as a series of transitions between adjacent nucleotides. Through that, PRC2-binding lncRNAs were found to be associated with a set of distinctive and evolutionarily conserved sequence features, which can be utilized to distinguish them from the others with considerable accuracy. We further identified fragments of PRC2-binding lncRNAs that are enriched with these sequence features, and found they show strong PRC2-binding signals and are more highly conserved across species than the other parts, implying their functional importance.

  3. Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA) regulate gene silencing and modify homeostatic status in animals faced with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)

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    It has been established that reduced susceptibility to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has a genetic component. This genetic component may take the form of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA), which are molecules that function as regulators of gene expression. Various sncRNAs ...

  4. Daily expression pattern of protein-encoding genes and small noncoding RNAs in synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

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    Beck, Christian; Hertel, Stefanie; Rediger, Anne; Lehmann, Robert; Wiegard, Anika; Kölsch, Adrian; Heilmann, Beate; Georg, Jens; Hess, Wolfgang R; Axmann, Ilka M

    2014-09-01

    Many organisms harbor circadian clocks with periods close to 24 h. These cellular clocks allow organisms to anticipate the environmental cycles of day and night by synchronizing circadian rhythms with the rising and setting of the sun. These rhythms originate from the oscillator components of circadian clocks and control global gene expression and various cellular processes. The oscillator of photosynthetic cyanobacteria is composed of three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, linked to a complex regulatory network. Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 possesses the standard cyanobacterial kaiABC gene cluster plus multiple kaiB and kaiC gene copies and antisense RNAs for almost every kai transcript. However, there is no clear evidence of circadian rhythms in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under various experimental conditions. It is also still unknown if and to what extent the multiple kai gene copies and kai antisense RNAs affect circadian timing. Moreover, a large number of small noncoding RNAs whose accumulation dynamics over time have not yet been monitored are known for Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Here we performed a 48-h time series transcriptome analysis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, taking into account periodic light-dark phases, continuous light, and continuous darkness. We found that expression of functionally related genes occurred in different phases of day and night. Moreover, we found day-peaking and night-peaking transcripts among the small RNAs; in particular, the amounts of kai antisense RNAs correlated or anticorrelated with those of their respective kai target mRNAs, pointing toward the regulatory relevance of these antisense RNAs. Surprisingly, we observed that the amounts of 16S and 23S rRNAs in this cyanobacterium fluctuated in light-dark periods, showing maximum accumulation in the dark phase. Importantly, the amounts of all transcripts, including small noncoding RNAs, did not show any rhythm under continuous light or darkness, indicating the absence

  5. DNA methylation patterns of protein-coding genes and long non-coding RNAs in males with schizophrenia.

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    Liao, Qi; Wang, Yunliang; Cheng, Jia; Dai, Dongjun; Zhou, Xingyu; Zhang, Yuzheng; Li, Jinfeng; Yin, Honglei; Gao, Shugui; Duan, Shiwei

    2015-11-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is one of the most complex mental illnesses affecting ~1% of the population worldwide. SCZ pathogenesis is considered to be a result of genetic as well as epigenetic alterations. Previous studies have aimed to identify the causative genes of SCZ. However, DNA methylation of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) involved in SCZ has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was conducted using samples from two male patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, respectively. Methyl-CpG binding domain protein-enriched genome sequencing was used. In the two patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, 1,397 and 1,437 peaks were identified, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that peaks were enriched in protein-coding genes, which exhibited nervous system and brain functions. A number of these peaks in gene promoter regions may affect gene expression and, therefore, influence SCZ-associated pathways. Furthermore, 7 and 20 lncRNAs, respectively, in the Refseq database were hypermethylated. According to the lncRNA dataset in the NONCODE database, ~30% of intergenic peaks overlapped with novel lncRNA loci. The results of the present study demonstrated that aberrant hypermethylation of lncRNA genes may be an important epigenetic factor associated with SCZ. However, further studies using larger sample sizes are required.

  6. Glioma microvesicles carry selectively packaged coding and non-coding RNAs which alter gene expression in recipient cells.

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    Li, Cheryl C Y; Eaton, Sally A; Young, Paul E; Lee, Maggie; Shuttleworth, Rupert; Humphreys, David T; Grau, Georges E; Combes, Valery; Bebawy, Mary; Gong, Joyce; Brammah, Susan; Buckland, Michael E; Suter, Catherine M

    2013-08-01

    Interactions between glioma cells and their local environment are critical determinants of brain tumor growth, infiltration and neovascularisation. Communication with host cells and stroma via microvesicles represents one pathway by which tumors can modify their surroundings to achieve a tumor-permissive environment. Here we have taken an unbiased approach to identifying RNAs in glioma-derived microvesicles, and explored their potential to regulate gene expression in recipient cells. We find that glioma microvesicles are predominantly of exosomal origin and contain complex populations of coding and noncoding RNAs in proportions that are distinct from those in the cells from which they are derived. Microvesicles show a relative depletion in microRNA compared with their cells of origin, and are enriched in unusual or novel noncoding RNAs, most of which have no known function. Short-term exposure of brain microvascular endothelial cells to glioma microvesicles results in many gene expression changes in the endothelial cells, most of which cannot be explained by direct delivery of transcripts. Our data suggest that the scope of potential actions of tumor-derived microvesicles is much broader and more complex than previously supposed, and highlight a number of new classes of small RNA that remain to be characterized.

  7. The Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type A on Expression Profiling of Long Noncoding RNAs in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

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    Ying-ying Miao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was aimed at analyzing the expressions of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in Botulinum Toxin Type A (BoNTA treated human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs in vitro. Methods. We used RNA sequencing to characterize the lncRNAs and mRNAs transcriptome in the control and BoNTA treated group, in conjunction with application of GO (gene ontology analysis and KEGG (kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes analysis to delineate the alterations in gene expression. We also obtained quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR to confirm some differentially expressed genes. Results. Numerous differentially expressed genes were observed by microarrays between the two groups. qRT-PCR confirmed the changes of six lncRNAs (RP11-517C16.2-001, FR271872, LOC283352, RP11-401E9.3, FGFR3P, and XXbac-BPG16N22.5 and nine mRNAs (NOS2, C13orf15, FOS, FCN2, SPINT1, PLAC8, BIRC5, NOS2, and COL19A1. Farther studies indicated that the downregulating effect of BoNTA on the expression of FGFR3P was time-related and the dosage of BoNTA at a range from 2.5 U/106 cells to 7.5 U/106 cells increased the expression of FGFR3P and COL19A1 in HDFs as well. Conclusion. The expression profiling of lncRNAs was visibly changed in BoNTA treated HDFs. Further studies should focus on several lncRNAs to investigate their functions in BoNTA treated HDFs and the underlying mechanisms.

  8. Identification of Aedes aegypti Long Intergenic Non-coding RNAs and Their Association with Wolbachia and Dengue Virus Infection.

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    Kayvan Etebari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs are appearing as an important class of regulatory RNAs with a variety of biological functions. The aim of this study was to identify the lincRNA profile in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and evaluate their potential role in host-pathogen interaction. The majority of previous RNA-Seq transcriptome studies in Ae. aegypti have focused on the expression pattern of annotated protein coding genes under different biological conditions. Here, we used 35 publically available RNA-Seq datasets with relatively high depth to screen the Ae. aegypti genome for lincRNA discovery. This led to the identification of 3,482 putative lincRNAs. These lincRNA genes displayed a slightly lower GC content and shorter transcript lengths compared to protein-encoding genes. Ae. aegypti lincRNAs also demonstrate low evolutionary sequence conservation even among closely related species such as Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles gambiae. We examined their expression in dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2 and Wolbachia infected and non-infected adult mosquitoes and Aa20 cells. The results revealed that DENV-2 infection increased the abundance of a number of host lincRNAs, from which some suppress viral replication in mosquito cells. RNAi-mediated silencing of lincRNA_1317 led to enhancement in viral replication, which possibly indicates its potential involvement in the host anti-viral defense. A number of lincRNAs were also differentially expressed in Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes. The results will facilitate future studies to unravel the function of lncRNAs in insects and may prove to be beneficial in developing new ways to control vectors or inhibit replication of viruses in them.

  9. Identification of Aedes aegypti Long Intergenic Non-coding RNAs and Their Association with Wolbachia and Dengue Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etebari, Kayvan; Asad, Sultan; Zhang, Guangmei; Asgari, Sassan

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are appearing as an important class of regulatory RNAs with a variety of biological functions. The aim of this study was to identify the lincRNA profile in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and evaluate their potential role in host-pathogen interaction. The majority of previous RNA-Seq transcriptome studies in Ae. aegypti have focused on the expression pattern of annotated protein coding genes under different biological conditions. Here, we used 35 publically available RNA-Seq datasets with relatively high depth to screen the Ae. aegypti genome for lincRNA discovery. This led to the identification of 3,482 putative lincRNAs. These lincRNA genes displayed a slightly lower GC content and shorter transcript lengths compared to protein-encoding genes. Ae. aegypti lincRNAs also demonstrate low evolutionary sequence conservation even among closely related species such as Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles gambiae. We examined their expression in dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and Wolbachia infected and non-infected adult mosquitoes and Aa20 cells. The results revealed that DENV-2 infection increased the abundance of a number of host lincRNAs, from which some suppress viral replication in mosquito cells. RNAi-mediated silencing of lincRNA_1317 led to enhancement in viral replication, which possibly indicates its potential involvement in the host anti-viral defense. A number of lincRNAs were also differentially expressed in Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes. The results will facilitate future studies to unravel the function of lncRNAs in insects and may prove to be beneficial in developing new ways to control vectors or inhibit replication of viruses in them. PMID:27760142

  10. The Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type A on Expression Profiling of Long Noncoding RNAs in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ying-ying; Liu, Juan; Zhu, Jie; Tao, Yan-ling; Zhang, Jia-an

    2017-01-01

    Objective. This study was aimed at analyzing the expressions of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in Botulinum Toxin Type A (BoNTA) treated human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) in vitro. Methods. We used RNA sequencing to characterize the lncRNAs and mRNAs transcriptome in the control and BoNTA treated group, in conjunction with application of GO (gene ontology) analysis and KEGG (kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes) analysis to delineate the alterations in gene expression. We also obtained quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to confirm some differentially expressed genes. Results. Numerous differentially expressed genes were observed by microarrays between the two groups. qRT-PCR confirmed the changes of six lncRNAs (RP11-517C16.2-001, FR271872, LOC283352, RP11-401E9.3, FGFR3P, and XXbac-BPG16N22.5) and nine mRNAs (NOS2, C13orf15, FOS, FCN2, SPINT1, PLAC8, BIRC5, NOS2, and COL19A1). Farther studies indicated that the downregulating effect of BoNTA on the expression of FGFR3P was time-related and the dosage of BoNTA at a range from 2.5 U/106 cells to 7.5 U/106 cells increased the expression of FGFR3P and COL19A1 in HDFs as well. Conclusion. The expression profiling of lncRNAs was visibly changed in BoNTA treated HDFs. Further studies should focus on several lncRNAs to investigate their functions in BoNTA treated HDFs and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:28265570

  11. Non-coding roX RNAs prevent the binding of the MSL-complex to heterochromatic regions.

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    Margarida L A Figueiredo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs contribute to dosage compensation in both mammals and Drosophila by inducing changes in the chromatin structure of the X-chromosome. In Drosophila melanogaster, roX1 and roX2 are long non-coding RNAs that together with proteins form the male-specific lethal (MSL complex, which coats the entire male X-chromosome and mediates dosage compensation by increasing its transcriptional output. Studies on polytene chromosomes have demonstrated that when both roX1 and roX2 are absent, the MSL-complex becomes less abundant on the male X-chromosome and is relocated to the chromocenter and the 4th chromosome. Here we address the role of roX RNAs in MSL-complex targeting and the evolution of dosage compensation in Drosophila. We performed ChIP-seq experiments which showed that MSL-complex recruitment to high affinity sites (HAS on the X-chromosome is independent of roX and that the HAS sequence motif is conserved in D. simulans. Additionally, a complete and enzymatically active MSL-complex is recruited to six specific genes on the 4th chromosome. Interestingly, our sequence analysis showed that in the absence of roX RNAs, the MSL-complex has an affinity for regions enriched in Hoppel transposable elements and repeats in general. We hypothesize that roX mutants reveal the ancient targeting of the MSL-complex and propose that the role of roX RNAs is to prevent the binding of the MSL-complex to heterochromatin.

  12. Identification of mRNA-like non-coding RNAs and validation of a mighty one named MAR in Panax ginseng.

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    Wang, Meizhen; Wu, Bin; Chen, Chao; Lu, Shanfa

    2015-03-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play significant roles in plants. However, little is known about lncRNAs in Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer, an economically significant medicinal plant species. A total of 3,688 mRNA-like non-coding RNAs (mlncRNAs), a class of lncRNAs, were identified in P. ginseng. Approximately 40% of the identified mlncRNAs were processed into small RNAs, implying their regulatory roles via small RNA-mediated mechanisms. Eleven miRNA-generating mlncRNAs also produced siRNAs, suggesting the coordinated production of miRNAs and siRNAs in P. ginseng. The mlncRNA-derived small RNAs might be 21-, 22-, or 24-nt phased and could be generated from both or only one strand of mlncRNAs, or from super long hairpin structures. A full-length mlncRNA, termed MAR (multiple-function-associated mlncRNA), was cloned. It generated the most abundant siRNAs. The MAR siRNAs were predominantly 24-nt and some of them were distributed in a phased pattern. A total of 228 targets were predicted for 71 MAR siRNAs. Degradome sequencing validated 68 predicted targets involved in diverse metabolic pathways, suggesting the significance of MAR in P. ginseng. Consistently, MAR was detected in all tissues analyzed and responded to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment. It sheds light on the function of mlncRNAs in plants. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  13. lncRScan-SVM: A Tool for Predicting Long Non-Coding RNAs Using Support Vector Machine.

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    Sun, Lei; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Lin; Meng, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Functional long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been bringing novel insight into biological study, however it is still not trivial to accurately distinguish the lncRNA transcripts (LNCTs) from the protein coding ones (PCTs). As various information and data about lncRNAs are preserved by previous studies, it is appealing to develop novel methods to identify the lncRNAs more accurately. Our method lncRScan-SVM aims at classifying PCTs and LNCTs using support vector machine (SVM). The gold-standard datasets for lncRScan-SVM model training, lncRNA prediction and method comparison were constructed according to the GENCODE gene annotations of human and mouse respectively. By integrating features derived from gene structure, transcript sequence, potential codon sequence and conservation, lncRScan-SVM outperforms other approaches, which is evaluated by several criteria such as sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) and area under curve (AUC). In addition, several known human lncRNA datasets were assessed using lncRScan-SVM. LncRScan-SVM is an efficient tool for predicting the lncRNAs, and it is quite useful for current lncRNA study.

  14. Long non-coding RNAs, a new important regulator of cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

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    Ma, Yidi; Ma, Wenya; Huang, Lina; Feng, Dan; Cai, Benzhi

    2015-06-01

    LncRNAs were previously considered to be the 'noise' of gene transcription having no biological functions, but now it has become evident that lncRNAs function as modulators of gene expression network. LncRNAs may regulate diverse gene expression levels which were roughly summarized to epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. It has been clarified that some lncRNAs were expressed differentially in cardiovascular diseases, and aberrant changes of those lncRNAs were involved in the development of heart disorders. The role of lncRNAs in this process transcended the tradition of protein regulatory platform to be the orchestrator of cardiac sophisticated governing system of heart development, adaptation and pathological reaction. This review summarizes recent advances in the study of functions and mechanisms of lncRNAs in cardiovascular physiology and pathology. The regulatory roles of lncRNAs in cardiovascular diseases provide new strategy for interventional therapy of heart diseases.

  15. dRNA-Seq Reveals Genomewide TSSs and Noncoding RNAs of Plant Beneficial Rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ben; Li, Lei; Chao, Yanjie; Förstner, Konrad; Vogel, Jörg; Borriss, Rainer; Wu, Xiao-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum FZB42 is a representative of Gram-positive plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) that inhabit plant root environments. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms of bacteria-plant symbiosis, we have systematically analyzed the primary transcriptome of strain FZB42 grown under rhizosphere-mimicking conditions using differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq). Our analysis revealed 4,877 transcription start sites for protein-coding genes, identified genes differentially expressed under different growth conditions, and corrected many previously mis-annotated genes. We also identified a large number of riboswitches and cis-encoded antisense RNAs, as well as trans-encoded small noncoding RNAs that may play important roles in the gene regulation of Bacillus. Overall, our analyses provided a landscape of Bacillus primary transcriptome and improved the knowledge of rhizobacteria-host interactions.

  16. Beyond Thymidylate Synthase and Dihydrofolate Reductase: Impact of Non-coding microRNAs in Anticancer Chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jingfang

    2012-09-01

    Chemoresistance is one of the major reasons for the failure of anticancer chemotherapy in treating advanced stage cancer. The mechanism of chemoresistance to fluoropyrimidines and antifolates has been extensively investigated in the past 40 years. It has been well established that thymidylate synthase (TYMS, TS) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) are two major targets for fluoropyrimidines and antifolates, respectively. The regulatory mechanism of TS and DHFR expression is rather complex involving transcriptional, post-transcriptional and translational regulations. Our recent understanding of the chemoresistance mechanism has been extended beyond the simple one target/drug view. In this review, we will focus on the recent advancement of non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) in contributing to the regulations of TS and DHFR expression, and to the chemoresistance mechanism of fluoropyrimidines and antifolates.

  17. dRNA-Seq Reveals Genomewide TSSs and Noncoding RNAs of Plant Beneficial Rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42.

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    Ben Fan

    Full Text Available Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum FZB42 is a representative of Gram-positive plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR that inhabit plant root environments. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms of bacteria-plant symbiosis, we have systematically analyzed the primary transcriptome of strain FZB42 grown under rhizosphere-mimicking conditions using differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq. Our analysis revealed 4,877 transcription start sites for protein-coding genes, identified genes differentially expressed under different growth conditions, and corrected many previously mis-annotated genes. We also identified a large number of riboswitches and cis-encoded antisense RNAs, as well as trans-encoded small noncoding RNAs that may play important roles in the gene regulation of Bacillus. Overall, our analyses provided a landscape of Bacillus primary transcriptome and improved the knowledge of rhizobacteria-host interactions.

  18. Rapid in situ codetection of noncoding RNAs and proteins in cells and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections without protease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Planell-Saguer, Mariàngels; Rodicio, María Celina; Mourelatos, Zissimos

    2010-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) comprise a diverse group of RNAs that function in essential cellular processes such as pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation and also regulate various aspects of gene expression in physiology and development. Methods of subcellular and tissue localization of ncRNAs are essential to understand their biological roles and their contribution to disease. We describe a rapid fluorescent (FISH) or chromogenic (CISH) in situ hybridization protocol for localization of ncRNAs (including microRNAs (miRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), piwi-associated RNAs (piRNAs) and ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs)) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and cultured cells, using locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotides. In this protocol, sections are heated in citrate buffer, which eliminates the need for protease treatment, thus preserving optimal morphology and protein epitopes, and allowing the simultaneous detection of proteins with immunofluorescence staining (IF). LNA-FISH requires 5 h, or between 10 and 36 h when combined with IF; LNA-CISH requires 2 d.

  19. Germ cell-specific sustained activation of Wnt signalling perturbs spermatogenesis in aged mice, possibly through non-coding RNAs

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    Kumar, Manish; Atkins, Joshua; Cairns, Murray; Ali, Ayesha; Tanwar, Pradeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated Wnt signalling is associated with human infertility and testicular cancer. However, the role of Wnt signalling in male germ cells remains poorly understood. In this study, we first confirmed the activity of Wnt signalling in mouse, dog and human testes. To determine the physiological importance of the Wnt pathway, we developed a mouse model with germ cell-specific constitutive activation of βcatenin. In young mutants, similar to controls, germ cell development was normal. However, with age, mutant testes showed defective spermatogenesis, progressive germ cell loss, and flawed meiotic entry of spermatogonial cells. Flow sorting confirmed reduced germ cell populations at the leptotene/zygotene stages of meiosis in mutant group. Using thymidine analogues-based DNA double labelling technique, we further established decline in germ cell proliferation and differentiation. Overactivation of Wnt/βcatenin signalling in a spermatogonial cell line resulted in reduced cell proliferation, viability and colony formation. RNA sequencing analysis of testes revealed significant alterations in the non-coding regions of mutant mouse genome. One of the novel non-coding RNAs was switched on in mutant testes compared to controls. QPCR analysis confirmed upregulation of this unique non-coding RNA in mutant testis. In summary, our results highlight the significance of Wnt signalling in male germ cells. PMID:27992363

  20. A triple helix stabilizes the 3' ends of long noncoding RNAs that lack poly(A) tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilusz, Jeremy E; JnBaptiste, Courtney K; Lu, Laura Y; Kuhn, Claus-D; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Sharp, Phillip A

    2012-11-01

    The MALAT1 (metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1) locus is misregulated in many human cancers and produces an abundant long nuclear-retained noncoding RNA. Despite being transcribed by RNA polymerase II, the 3' end of MALAT1 is produced not by canonical cleavage/polyadenylation but instead by recognition and cleavage of a tRNA-like structure by RNase P. Mature MALAT1 thus lacks a poly(A) tail yet is expressed at a level higher than many protein-coding genes in vivo. Here we show that the 3' ends of MALAT1 and the MEN β long noncoding RNAs are protected from 3'-5' exonucleases by highly conserved triple helical structures. Surprisingly, when these structures are placed downstream from an ORF, the transcript is efficiently translated in vivo despite the lack of a poly(A) tail. The triple helix therefore also functions as a translational enhancer, and mutations in this region separate this translation activity from simple effects on RNA stability or transport. We further found that a transcript ending in a triple helix is efficiently repressed by microRNAs in vivo, arguing against a major role for the poly(A) tail in microRNA-mediated silencing. These results provide new insights into how transcripts that lack poly(A) tails are stabilized and regulated and suggest that RNA triple-helical structures likely have key regulatory functions in vivo.

  1. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseda, Clement A.; Srinivasan, Kumar; Wise, Jasen; Catalano, Jennifer; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2017-01-01

    Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection. PMID:25450361

  2. A-to-I editing of protein coding and noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallela, Arka; Nishikura, Kazuko

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) catalyzes the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. Inosine pairs preferentially with cytidine, as opposed to uridine; therefore, ADAR editing alters the sequence and base pairing properties of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA. Editing can directly alter the sequence of protein-coding transcripts and modify splicing, or affect a variety of non-coding targets, including microRNA, small interfering RNA, viral transcripts, and repeat elements such as Alu and LINE. Such editing has a wide range of physiological effects, including modification of targets in the brain and in disease states.

  3. Roles for small noncoding RNAs in silencing of retrotransposons in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sayan; Chandramohan, Dhruva; Fioriti, Luana; Melnick, Ari M; Hébert, Jean M; Mason, Christopher E; Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Kandel, Eric R

    2016-10-24

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), long thought to be restricted to germline, have recently been discovered in neurons of Aplysia, with a role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression underlying long-term memory. We here ask whether piwi/piRNAs are also expressed and have functional roles in the mammalian brain. Large-scale RNA sequencing and subsequent analysis of protein expression revealed the presence in brain of several piRNA biogenesis factors including a mouse piwi (Mili), as well as small RNAs, albeit at low levels, resembling conserved piRNAs in mouse testes [primarily LINE1 (long interspersed nuclear element1) retrotransposon-derived]. Despite the seeming low expression of these putative piRNAs, single-base pair CpG methylation analyses across the genome of Mili/piRNA-deficient (Mili(-/-)) mice demonstrate that brain genomic DNA is preferentially hypomethylated within intergenic areas and LINE1 promoter areas of the genome. Furthermore, Mili mutant mice exhibit behavioral deficits such as hyperactivity and reduced anxiety. These results suggest that putative piRNAs exist in mammalian brain, and similar to the role of piRNAs in testes, they may be involved in the silencing of retrotransposons, which in brain have critical roles in contributing to genomic heterogeneity underlying adaptation, stress response, and brain pathology. We also describe the presence of another class of small RNAs in the brain, with features of endogenous siRNAs, which may have taken over the role of invertebrate piRNAs in their capacity to target both transposons, as well as protein-coding genes. Thus, RNA interference through gene and retrotransposon silencing previously encountered in Aplysia may also have potential roles in the mammalian brain.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of long non-coding RNAs highlights their spatio-temporal expression patterns and evolutional conservation in Sus scrofa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhonglin; Wu, Yang; Yang, Yalan; Yang, Yu-Cheng T.; Wang, Zishuai; Yuan, Jiapei; Yang, Yang; Hua, Chaoju; Fan, Xinhao; Niu, Guanglin; Zhang, Yubo; Lu, Zhi John; Li, Kui

    2017-01-01

    Despite modest sequence conservation and rapid evolution, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) appear to be conserved in expression pattern and function. However, analysis of lncRNAs across tissues and developmental stages remains largely uncharacterized in mammals. Here, we systematically investigated the lncRNAs of the Guizhou miniature pig (Sus scrofa), which was widely used as biomedical model. We performed RNA sequencing across 9 organs and 3 developmental skeletal muscle, and developed a filtering pipeline to identify 10,813 lncRNAs (9,075 novel). Conservation patterns analysis revealed that 57% of pig lncRNAs showed homology to humans and mice based on genome alignment. 5,455 lncRNAs exhibited typical hallmarks of regulatory molecules, such as high spatio-temporal specificity. Notably, conserved lncRNAs exhibited higher tissue specificity than pig-specific lncRNAs and were significantly enriched in testis and ovary. Weighted co-expression network analysis revealed a set of conserved lncRNAs that are likely involved in postnatal muscle development. Based on the high degree of similarity in the structure, organization, and dynamic expression of pig lncRNAs compared with human and mouse lncRNAs, we propose that these lncRNAs play an important role in organ physiology and development in mammals. Our results provide a resource for studying animal evolution, morphological complexity, breeding, and biomedical research. PMID:28233874

  5. Comprehensive analysis of long non-coding RNAs highlights their spatio-temporal expression patterns and evolutional conservation in Sus scrofa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhonglin; Wu, Yang; Yang, Yalan; Yang, Yu-Cheng T; Wang, Zishuai; Yuan, Jiapei; Yang, Yang; Hua, Chaoju; Fan, Xinhao; Niu, Guanglin; Zhang, Yubo; Lu, Zhi John; Li, Kui

    2017-02-24

    Despite modest sequence conservation and rapid evolution, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) appear to be conserved in expression pattern and function. However, analysis of lncRNAs across tissues and developmental stages remains largely uncharacterized in mammals. Here, we systematically investigated the lncRNAs of the Guizhou miniature pig (Sus scrofa), which was widely used as biomedical model. We performed RNA sequencing across 9 organs and 3 developmental skeletal muscle, and developed a filtering pipeline to identify 10,813 lncRNAs (9,075 novel). Conservation patterns analysis revealed that 57% of pig lncRNAs showed homology to humans and mice based on genome alignment. 5,455 lncRNAs exhibited typical hallmarks of regulatory molecules, such as high spatio-temporal specificity. Notably, conserved lncRNAs exhibited higher tissue specificity than pig-specific lncRNAs and were significantly enriched in testis and ovary. Weighted co-expression network analysis revealed a set of conserved lncRNAs that are likely involved in postnatal muscle development. Based on the high degree of similarity in the structure, organization, and dynamic expression of pig lncRNAs compared with human and mouse lncRNAs, we propose that these lncRNAs play an important role in organ physiology and development in mammals. Our results provide a resource for studying animal evolution, morphological complexity, breeding, and biomedical research.

  6. Identification of novel non-coding RNAs as potential antisense regulators in the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    tang, T. H.; Polacek, N.; Zywicki, M.;

    2005-01-01

    to target the 3'-untranslated regions of certain mRNAs. Furthermore, one of the ncRNAs that does not show antisense elements is transcribed from a repeat unit of a cluster of small regularly spaced repeats in S. solfataricus which is potentially involved in replicon partitioning. In conclusion...

  7. The coilin interactome identifies hundreds of small noncoding RNAs that traffic through Cajal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machyna, Martin; Kehr, Stephanie; Straube, Korinna; Kappei, Dennis; Buchholz, Frank; Butter, Falk; Ule, Jernej; Hertel, Jana; Stadler, Peter F; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2014-11-06

    Coilin protein scaffolds Cajal bodies (CBs)-subnuclear compartments enriched in small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs)-and promotes efficient spliceosomal snRNP assembly. The molecular function of coilin, which is intrinsically disordered with no defined motifs, is poorly understood. We use UV crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) to determine whether mammalian coilin binds RNA in vivo and to identify targets. Robust detection of snRNA transcripts correlated with coilin ChIP-seq peaks on snRNA genes, indicating that coilin binding to nascent snRNAs is a site-specific CB nucleator. Surprisingly, several hundred small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) were identified as coilin interactors, including numerous unannotated mouse and human snoRNAs. We show that all classes of snoRNAs concentrate in CBs. Moreover, snoRNAs lacking specific CB retention signals traffic through CBs en route to nucleoli, consistent with the role of CBs in small RNP assembly. Thus, coilin couples snRNA and snoRNA biogenesis, making CBs the cellular hub of small ncRNA metabolism.

  8. Long noncoding RNAs related to the odontogenic potential of dental mesenchymal cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yunfei; Jia, Lingfei

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the lncRNAs that are associated with the odontogenic potential in mouse dental mesenchymal cells. The odontogenic potential of dental mesenchymal cells was found to be lost in the course of in vitro culture, so the lncRNA profiles were subsequently compared between freshly-isolated and cultured dental mesenchymal cells using RNA-sequencing. A co-expression analysis of differentially expressed lncRNAs and coding RNAs was performed to understand their potential functions. The expression of several selected lncRNAs was also examined in developing tooth germs. Compared with cultured dental mesenchymal cells, 108 lncRNAs were upregulated and 36 lncRNAs were downregulated in freshly-isolated dental mesenchymal cells. Coding genes correlated with the lncRNAs were mainly associated with DNA and protein metabolic processes and cytoskeletal anchorage. Meg3, Malat1, Xist, and Dlx1as were significantly downregulated in cultured dental mesenchymal cells but were upregulated in odontogenic dental mesenchymal tissues. Moreover, the levels of Dlx1as were negatively correlated with that of Dlx1 in dental mesenchymal cells and dental mesenchymal tissues. The lncRNA profiles of dental mesenchymal cells are significantly changed during culturing, and the dysregulation of lncRNAs is associated with the loss of odontogenic potential. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Expression of a novel non-coding mitochondrial RNA in human proliferating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Jaime; Burzio, Veronica; Villota, Claudio; Landerer, Eduardo; Martinez, Ronny; Santander, Marcela; Martinez, Rodrigo; Pinto, Rodrigo; Vera, María I.; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa L.; Burzio, Luis O.

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we reported the presence in mouse cells of a mitochondrial RNA which contains an inverted repeat (IR) of 121 nucleotides (nt) covalently linked to the 5′ end of the mitochondrial 16S RNA (16S mtrRNA). Here, we report the structure of an equivalent transcript of 2374 nt which is over-expressed in human proliferating cells but not in resting cells. The transcript contains a hairpin structure comprising an IR of 815 nt linked to the 5′ end of the 16S mtrRNA and forming a long double-stranded structure or stem and a loop of 40 nt. The stem is resistant to RNase A and can be detected and isolated after digestion with the enzyme. This novel transcript is a non-coding RNA (ncRNA) and several evidences suggest that the transcript is synthesized in mitochondria. The expression of this transcript can be induced in resting lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Moreover, aphidicolin treatment of DU145 cells reversibly blocks proliferation and expression of the transcript. If the drug is removed, the cells re-assume proliferation and over-express the ncmtRNA. These results suggest that the expression of the ncmtRNA correlates with the replicative state of the cell and it may play a role in cell proliferation. PMID:17962305

  10. MicroRNA-210 Plays a Critical Role in the Angiogenic Effect of Isoprenaline on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells via Regulation of Noncoding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-You Yan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: ISO-mediated angiogenesis was associated with altered expression of miR-210, miR-21, and the lncRNAs GAS5 and MEG3. The effects of miR-210 on the expression of VEGF-A and noncoding RNAs were similar to those of ISO, indicating that it might play an important role in ISO-mediated angiogenesis.

  11. NONCODE v2.0: decoding the non-coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shunmin; Liu, Changning; Skogerbø, Geir; Zhao, Haitao; Wang, Jie; Liu, Tao; Bai, Baoyan; Zhao, Yi; Chen, Runsheng

    2008-01-01

    The NONCODE database is an integrated knowledge database designed for the analysis of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Since NONCODE was first released 3 years ago, the number of known ncRNAs has grown rapidly, and there is growing recognition that ncRNAs play important regulatory roles in most organisms. In the updated version of NONCODE (NONCODE v2.0), the number of collected ncRNAs has reached 206 226, including a wide range of microRNAs, Piwi-interacting RNAs and mRNA-like ncRNAs. The improvements brought to the database include not only new and updated ncRNA data sets, but also an incorporation of BLAST alignment search service and access through our custom UCSC Genome Browser. NONCODE can be found under http://www.noncode.org or http://noncode.bioinfo.org.cn.

  12. A particular set of small non-coding RNAs is bound to the distinctive Argonaute protein of Trypanosoma cruzi: insights from RNA-interference deficient organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Silva, Maria Rosa; Sanguinetti, Julia; Cabrera-Cabrera, Florencia; Franzén, Oscar; Cayota, Alfonso

    2014-04-01

    The study of small RNAs and Argonaute proteins in eukaryotes that are deficient in functional RNA interference could provide insights into novel functions of small RNAs. In this study we describe small non-coding RNAs bound to a distinctive Argonaute protein of Trypanosoma cruzi, TcPIWI-tryp. Co-immunoprecipitation of TcPIWI-tryp followed by deep sequencing of isolated RNA identified abundant small RNAs derived from rRNAs and tRNAs. The small RNA repertoire differed from that of the canonical Argonaute in organisms with functional RNA interference, which could indicate novel biological functions for TcPIWI-tryp in T. cruzi and other members of the trypanosomatid clade.

  13. Laminar and Temporal Expression Dynamics of Coding and Noncoding RNAs in the Mouse Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Fertuzinhos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The hallmark of the cerebral neocortex is its organization into six layers, each containing a characteristic set of cell types and synaptic connections. The transcriptional events involved in laminar development and function still remain elusive. Here, we employed deep sequencing of mRNA and small RNA species to gain insights into transcriptional differences among layers and their temporal dynamics during postnatal development of the mouse primary somatosensory neocortex. We identify a number of coding and noncoding transcripts with specific spatiotemporal expression and splicing patterns. We also identify signature trajectories and gene coexpression networks associated with distinct biological processes and transcriptional overlap between these processes. Finally, we provide data that allow the study of potential miRNA and mRNA interactions. Overall, this study provides an integrated view of the laminar and temporal expression dynamics of coding and noncoding transcripts in the mouse neocortex and a resource for studies of neurodevelopment and transcriptome.

  14. Laminar and temporal expression dynamics of coding and noncoding RNAs in the mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertuzinhos, Sofia; Li, Mingfeng; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Ivic, Vedrana; Franjic, Daniel; Singh, Darshani; Crair, Michael; Sestan, Nenad

    2014-03-13

    The hallmark of the cerebral neocortex is its organization into six layers, each containing a characteristic set of cell types and synaptic connections. The transcriptional events involved in laminar development and function still remain elusive. Here, we employed deep sequencing of mRNA and small RNA species to gain insights into transcriptional differences among layers and their temporal dynamics during postnatal development of the mouse primary somatosensory neocortex. We identify a number of coding and noncoding transcripts with specific spatiotemporal expression and splicing patterns. We also identify signature trajectories and gene coexpression networks associated with distinct biological processes and transcriptional overlap between these processes. Finally, we provide data that allow the study of potential miRNA and mRNA interactions. Overall, this study provides an integrated view of the laminar and temporal expression dynamics of coding and noncoding transcripts in the mouse neocortex and a resource for studies of neurodevelopment and transcriptome.

  15. Transcriptional profiling of differentially expressed long non-coding RNAs in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhen Wang

    2015-12-01

    This study was specifically designed to identify the signatures relevant lncRNAs in breast cancer and characterize lncRNAs that modulate the phenotype. Here we provide detailed methods and analysis of microarray data, which is deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO with the accession number GSE64790. The basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in Oncotarget with the PMID 26078338. These data can be used to further elucidate the mechanisms of breast cancer.

  16. Long noncoding RNAs in neuronal-glial fate specification and oligodendrocyte lineage maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Solen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are emerging as important regulators of cellular differentiation and are widely expressed in the brain. Results Here we show that many long ncRNAs exhibit dynamic expression patterns during neuronal and oligodendrocyte (OL lineage specification, neuronal-glial fate transitions, and progressive stages of OL lineage elaboration including myelination. Consideration of the genomic context of these dynamically regulated ncRNAs showed they were part of complex transcriptional loci that encompass key neural developmental protein-coding genes, with which they exhibit concordant expression profiles as indicated by both microarray and in situ hybridization analyses. These included ncRNAs associated with differentiation-specific nuclear subdomains such as Gomafu and Neat1, and ncRNAs associated with developmental enhancers and genes encoding important transcription factors and homeotic proteins. We also observed changes in ncRNA expression profiles in response to treatment with trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor that prevents the progression of OL progenitors into post-mitotic OLs by altering lineage-specific gene expression programs. Conclusion This is the first report of long ncRNA expression in neuronal and glial cell differentiation and of the modulation of ncRNA expression by modification of chromatin architecture. These observations explicitly link ncRNA dynamics to neural stem cell fate decisions, specification and epigenetic reprogramming and may have important implications for understanding and treating neuropsychiatric diseases.

  17. Structural and Functional Characterization of Noncoding Repetitive RNAs Transcribed in Stressed Human CellsD⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Chiodi, Ilaria; Giordano, Manuela; Cobianchi, Fabio; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    Thermal and chemical stresses induce the formation in human cells of novel and transient nuclear structures called nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). These contain heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) and a specific subset of pre-mRNA processing factors. Nuclear stress bodies are assembled on specific pericentromeric heterochromatic domains containing satellite III (SatIII) DNA. In response to stress, these domains change their epigenetic status from heterochromatin to euchromatin and are transcribed in poly-adenylated RNAs that remain associated with nSBs. In this article, we describe the cloning, sequencing, and functional characterization of these transcripts. They are composed of SatIII repeats and originate from the transcription of multiple sites within the SatIII arrays. Interestingly, the level of SatIII RNAs can be down-regulated both by antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Knockdown of SatIII RNA by siRNAs requires the activity of Argonaute 2, a component of the RNA-induced silencing complex. Down-regulation of satellite III RNAs significantly affects the recruitment of RNA processing factors to nSBs without altering the association of HSF-1 with these structures nor the presence of acetylated histones within nSBs. Thus, satellite III RNAs have a major role in the formation of nSBs. PMID:15788562

  18. Global Intersection of Long Non-Coding RNAs with Processed and Unprocessed Pseudogenes in the Human Genome

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    Michael John Milligan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudogenes are abundant in the human genome and had long been thought of purely as nonfunctional gene fossils. Recent observations point to a role for pseudogenes in regulating genes transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally in human cells. To computationally interrogate the network space of integrated pseudogene and long non-coding RNA regulation in the human transcriptome, we developed and implemented an algorithm to identify all long non-coding RNA (lncRNA transcripts that overlap the genomic spans, and specifically the exons, of any human pseudogenes in either sense or antisense orientation. As inputs to our algorithm, we imported three public repositories of pseudogenes: GENCODE v17 (processed and unprocessed, Ensembl 72; Retroposed Pseudogenes V5 (processed only and Yale Pseudo60 (processed and unprocessed, Ensembl 60; two public lncRNA catalogs: Broad Institute, GENCODE v17; NCBI annotated piRNAs; and NHGRI clinical variants. The data sets were retrieved from the UCSC Genome Database using the UCSC Table Browser. We identified 2277 loci containing exon-to-exon overlaps between pseudogenes, both processed and unprocessed, and long non-coding RNA genes. Of these loci we identified 1167 with Genbank EST and full-length cDNA support providing direct evidence of transcription on one or both strands with exon-to-exon overlaps. The analysis converged on 313 pseudogene-lncRNA exon-to-exon overlaps that were bidirectionally supported by both full-length cDNAs and ESTs. In the process of identifying transcribed pseudogenes, we generated a comprehensive, positionally non-redundant encyclopedia of human pseudogenes, drawing upon multiple, and formerly disparate public pseudogene repositories. Collectively, these observations suggest that pseudogenes are pervasively transcribed on both strands and are common drivers of gene regulation.

  19. Circular RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Yi-Neng; Xia, Shengqiang; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a novel type of universal and diverse endogenous noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) and they form a covalently closed continuous loop without 5' or 3' tails unlike linear RNAs. Most circRNAs are presented with characteristics of abundance, stability, conservatism, and often exhi...

  20. Identification and characterization of noncoding small RNAs in Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 2 strain D39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ho-Ching Tiffany; Mukherjee, Dhriti; Ray, Valerie A; Sham, Lok-To; Feig, Andrew L; Winkler, Malcolm E

    2010-01-01

    We report a search for small RNAs (sRNAs) in the low-GC, gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Based on bioinformatic analyses by Livny et al. (J. Livny, A. Brencic, S. Lory, and M. K. Waldor, Nucleic Acids Res. 34:3484-3493, 2006), we tested 40 candidates by Northern blotting and confirmed the expression of nine new and one previously reported (CcnA) sRNAs in strain D39. CcnA is one of five redundant sRNAs reported by Halfmann et al. (A. Halfmann, M. Kovacs, R. Hakenbeck, and R. Bruckner, Mol. Microbiol. 66:110-126, 2007) that are positively controlled by the CiaR response regulator. We characterized 3 of these 14 sRNAs: Spd-sr17 (144 nucleotides [nt]; decreased in stationary phase), Spd-sr37 (80 nt; strongly expressed in all growth phases), and CcnA (93 nt; induced by competence stimulatory peptide). Spd-sr17 and CcnA likely fold into structures containing single-stranded regions between hairpin structures, whereas Spd-sr37 forms a base-paired structure. Primer extension mapping and ectopic expression in deletion/insertion mutants confirmed the independent expression of the three sRNAs. Microarray analyses indicated that insertion/deletion mutants in spd-sr37 and ccnA exerted strong cis-acting effects on the transcription of adjacent genes, indicating that these sRNA regions are also cotranscribed in operons. Deletion or overexpression of the three sRNAs did not cause changes in growth, certain stress responses, global transcription, or virulence. Constitutive ectopic expression of CcnA reversed some phenotypes of D39 Delta ciaR mutants, but attempts to link CcnA to -E to comC as a target were inconclusive in ciaR(+) strains. These results show that S. pneumoniae, which lacks known RNA chaperones, expresses numerous sRNAs, but three of these sRNAs do not strongly affect common phenotypes or transcription patterns.

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome of a Asian lion (Panthera leo goojratensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Fei; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Jian-ning

    2016-01-01

    The entire mitochondrial genome of this Asian lion (Panthera leo goojratensis) was 17,183 bp in length, gene composition and arrangement conformed to other lions, which contained the typical structure of 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs, 13 protein-coding genes and a non-coding region. The characteristic of the mitochondrial genome was analyzed in detail.

  2. Long Non-Coding RNAs in Cancer and Development: Where Do We Go from Here?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Haemmerle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide expression profiling studies have uncovered a huge amount of novel, long non-protein-coding RNA transcripts (lncRNA. In general, these transcripts possess a low, but tissue-specific expression, and their nucleotide sequences are often poorly conserved. However, several studies showed that lncRNAs can have important roles for normal tissue development and regulate cellular pluripotency as well as differentiation. Moreover, lncRNAs are implicated in the control of multiple molecular pathways leading to gene expression changes and thus, ultimately modulate cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Consequently, deregulation of lncRNA expression contributes to carcinogenesis and is associated with human diseases, e.g., neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s Disease. Here, we will focus on some major challenges of lncRNA research, especially loss-of-function studies. We will delineate strategies for lncRNA gene targeting in vivo, and we will briefly discuss important consideration and pitfalls when investigating lncRNA functions in knockout animal models. Finally, we will highlight future opportunities for lncRNAs research by applying the concept of cross-species comparison, which might contribute to novel disease biomarker discovery and might identify lncRNAs as potential therapeutic targets.

  3. Melatonin, Noncoding RNAs, Messenger RNA Stability and Epigenetics—Evidence, Hints, Gaps and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Hardeland

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a highly pleiotropic regulator molecule, which influences numerous functions in almost every organ and, thus, up- or down-regulates many genes, frequently in a circadian manner. Our understanding of the mechanisms controlling gene expression is actually now expanding to a previously unforeseen extent. In addition to classic actions of transcription factors, gene expression is induced, suppressed or modulated by a number of RNAs and proteins, such as miRNAs, lncRNAs, piRNAs, antisense transcripts, deadenylases, DNA methyltransferases, histone methylation complexes, histone demethylases, histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases. Direct or indirect evidence for involvement of melatonin in this network of players has originated in different fields, including studies on central and peripheral circadian oscillators, shift work, cancer, inflammation, oxidative stress, aging, energy expenditure/obesity, diabetes type 2, neuropsychiatric disorders, and neurogenesis. Some of the novel modulators have also been shown to participate in the control of melatonin biosynthesis and melatonin receptor expression. Future work will need to augment the body of evidence on direct epigenetic actions of melatonin and to systematically investigate its role within the network of oscillating epigenetic factors. Moreover, it will be necessary to discriminate between effects observed under conditions of well-operating and deregulated circadian clocks, and to explore the possibilities of correcting epigenetic malprogramming by melatonin.

  4. Crosstalking noncoding RNAs contribute to cell-specific neurodegeneration in SCA7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jennifer Y.; Sirey, Tamara; Watson, Lauren M.; Curtis, Helen J.; Marinello, Martina; Alves, Sandro; Steinkraus, Bruno; Cooper, Sarah; Nesterova, Tatyana; Brockdorff, Neil; Fulga, Tudor; Brice, Alexis; Sittler, Annie; Oliver, Peter L.; Wood, Matthew J.; Ponting, Chris P.; Marques, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    What causes the tissue-specific pathology of diseases resulting from mutations in housekeeping genes? Specifically, in Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7), a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in ATXN7- an essential component of the mammalian transcription co-activation complex, STAGA- the factors underlying the characteristic progressive cerebellar and retinal degeneration observed in patients were unknown. We found that STAGA is required for the transcription initiation of miR-124, which in turn mediates the post-transcriptional crosstalk between lnc-SCA7, a conserved long noncoding RNA, and ATXN7. In SCA7, mutations in ATXN7 disrupt these regulatory interactions and result in a neuron-specific increase in ATXN7 abundance. Strikingly in mouse, this increase is most prominent in the SCA7 disease-relevant tissues, namely the retina and cerebellum. Our results illustrate how noncoding RNA-mediated feedback regulation of a ubiquitously expressed housekeeping gene may contribute to specific neurodegeneration. PMID:25306109

  5. The Long Noncoding RNA Transcriptome of Dictyostelium discoideum Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael D. Rosengarten

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Dictyostelium discoideum live in the soil as single cells, engulfing bacteria and growing vegetatively. Upon starvation, tens of thousands of amoebae enter a developmental program that includes aggregation, multicellular differentiation, and sporulation. Major shifts across the protein-coding transcriptome accompany these developmental changes. However, no study has presented a global survey of long noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs in D. discoideum. To characterize the antisense and long intergenic noncoding RNA (lncRNA transcriptome, we analyzed previously published developmental time course samples using an RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq library preparation method that selectively depletes ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs. We detected the accumulation of transcripts for 9833 protein-coding messenger RNAs (mRNAs, 621 lncRNAs, and 162 putative antisense RNAs (asRNAs. The noncoding RNAs were interspersed throughout the genome, and were distinct in expression level, length, and nucleotide composition. The noncoding transcriptome displayed a temporal profile similar to the coding transcriptome, with stages of gradual change interspersed with larger leaps. The transcription profiles of some noncoding RNAs were strongly correlated with known differentially expressed coding RNAs, hinting at a functional role for these molecules during development. Examining the mitochondrial transcriptome, we modeled two novel antisense transcripts. We applied yet another ribosomal depletion method to a subset of the samples to better retain transfer RNA (tRNA transcripts. We observed polymorphisms in tRNA anticodons that suggested a post-transcriptional means by which D. discoideum compensates for codons missing in the genomic complement of tRNAs. We concluded that the prevalence and characteristics of long ncRNAs indicate that these molecules are relevant to the progression of molecular and cellular phenotypes during development.

  6. Identification of intermediate-size non-coding RNAs involved in the UV-induced DNA damage response in C. elegans.

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    Aqian Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A network of DNA damage response (DDR mechanisms functions coordinately to maintain genome integrity and prevent disease. The Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER pathway is known to function in the response to UV-induced DNA damage. Although numbers of coding genes and miRNAs have been identified and reported to participate in UV-induced DNA damage response (UV-DDR, the precise role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs in UV-DDR remains largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used high-throughput RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq to discover intermediate-size (70-500 nt ncRNAs (is-ncRNAs in C. elegans, using the strains of L4 larvae of wild-type (N2, UV-irradiated (N2/UV100 and NER-deficient mutant (xpa-1, and 450 novel non-coding transcripts were initially identified. A customized microarray assay was then applied to examine the expression profiles of both novel transcripts and known is-ncRNAs, and 57 UV-DDR-related is-ncRNA candidates showed expression variations at different levels between UV irradiated strains and non- irradiated strains. The top ranked is-ncRNA candidates with expression differences were further validated by qRT-PCR analysis, of them, 8 novel is-ncRNAs were significantly up-regulated after UV irradiation. Knockdown of two novel is-ncRNAs, ncRNA317 and ncRNA415, by RNA interference, resulted in higher UV sensitivity and significantly decreased expression of NER-related genes in C. elegans. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The discovery of above two novel is-ncRNAs in this study indicated the functional roles of is-ncRNAs in the regulation of UV-DDR network, and aided our understanding of the significance of ncRNA involvement in the UV-induced DNA damage response.

  7. DES-ncRNA: A knowledgebase for exploring information about human micro and long noncoding RNAs based on literature-mining

    KAUST Repository

    Salhi, Adil

    2017-04-07

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), particularly microRNAs (miRNAs) and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), are important players in diseases and emerge as novel drug targets. Thus, unraveling the relationships between ncRNAs and other biomedical entities in cells are critical for better understanding ncRNA roles that may eventually help develop their use in medicine. To support ncRNA research and facilitate retrieval of relevant information regarding miRNAs and lncRNAs from the plethora of published ncRNA-related research, we developed DES-ncRNA ( www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/des_ncrna ). DES-ncRNA is a knowledgebase containing text- and data-mined information from public scientific literature and other public resources. Exploration of mined information is enabled through terms and pairs of terms from 19 topic-specific dictionaries including, for example, antibiotics, toxins, drugs, enzymes, mutations, pathways, human genes and proteins, drug indications and side effects, mutations, diseases, etc. DES-ncRNA contains approximately 878,000 associations of terms from these dictionaries of which 36,222 (5,373) are with regards to miRNAs (lncRNAs). We provide several ways to explore information regarding ncRNAs to users including controlled generation of association networks as well as hypotheses generation. We show an example how DES-ncRNA can aid research on Alzheimer\\'s disease and suggest potential therapeutic role for Fasudil. DES-ncRNA is a powerful tool that can be used on its own or as a complement to the existing resources, to support research in human ncRNA. To our knowledge, this is the only knowledgebase dedicated to human miRNAs and lncRNAs derived primarily through literature-mining enabling exploration of a broad spectrum of associated biomedical entities, not paralleled by any other resource.

  8. MicroRNAs: short non-coding players in cancer chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzelli, Sara; Mori, Federica; Biagioni, Francesca; Bellissimo, Teresa; Pulito, Claudio; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina; Blandino, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Chemoresistance is one of the main problems in the therapy of cancer. There are a number of different molecular mechanisms through which a cancer cell acquires resistance to a specific treatment, such as alterations in drug uptake, drug metabolism and drug targets. There are several lines of evidence showing that miRNAs are involved in drug sensitivity of cancer cells in different tumor types and by different treatments. In this review, we provide an overview of the more recent and significant findings on the role of miRNAs in cancer cell drug resistance. In particular, we focus on specific miRNA mechanisms of action that in various steps lead from drug cell sensitivity to drug cell resistance. We also provide evidence on how miRNA profiling may unveil relevant predictive biomarkers for therapy outcomes.

  9. Genome-wide screening and characterization of long non-coding RNAs involved in flowering development of trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen-Yang; Liu, Sheng-Rui; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Ma, Yu-Jiao; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been demonstrated to play critical regulatory roles in post-transcriptional and transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis. However, lncRNAs and their functional roles remain poorly characterized in woody plants, including citrus. To identify lncRNAs and investigate their role in citrus flowering, paired-end strand-specific RNA sequencing was performed for precocious trifoliate orange and its wild-type counterpart. A total of 6,584 potential lncRNAs were identified, 51.6% of which were from intergenic regions. Additionally, 555 lncRNAs were significantly up-regulated and 276 lncRNAs were down-regulated in precocious trifoliate orange, indicating that lncRNAs could be involved in the regulation of trifoliate orange flowering. Comparisons between lncRNAs and coding genes indicated that lncRNAs tend to have shorter transcripts and lower expression levels and that they display significant expression specificity. More importantly, 59 and 7 lncRNAs were identified as putative targets and target mimics of citrus miRNAs, respectively. In addition, the targets of Pt-miR156 and Pt-miR396 were confirmed using the regional amplification reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction method. Furthermore, overexpression of Pt-miR156a1 and Pt-miR156a1 in Arabidopsis resulted in an extended juvenile phase, short siliques, and smaller leaves in transgenic plants compared with control plants. These findings provide important insight regarding citrus lncRNAs, thus enabling in-depth functional analyses. PMID:28233798

  10. From structure prediction to genomic screens for novel non-coding RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2011-01-01

    . This and the increased amount of available genomes have made it possible to employ structure-based methods for genomic screens. The field has moved from folding prediction of single sequences to computational screens for ncRNAs in genomic sequence using the RNA structure as the main characteristic feature. Whereas early...... methods focused on energy-directed folding of single sequences, comparative analysis based on structure preserving changes of base pairs has been efficient in improving accuracy, and today this constitutes a key component in genomic screens. Here, we cover the basic principles of RNA folding and touch...

  11. Identification of Potential Key Long Non-Coding RNAs and Target Genes Associated with Pneumonia Using Long Non-Coding RNA Sequencing (lncRNA-Seq): A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sai; Feng, Cong; Chen, Li; Huang, Zhi; Zhou, Xuan; Li, Bei; Wang, Li-li; Chen, Wei; Lv, Fa-qin; Li, Tan-shi

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to identify the potential key long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and target genes associated with pneumonia using lncRNA sequencing (lncRNA-seq). Material/Methods A total of 9 peripheral blood samples from patients with mild pneumonia (n=3) and severe pneumonia (n=3), as well as volunteers without pneumonia (n=3), were received for lncRNA-seq. Based on the sequencing data, differentially expressed lncRNAs (DE-lncRNAs) were identified by the limma package. After the functional enrichment analysis, target genes of DE-lncRNAs were predicted, and the regulatory network was constructed. Results In total, 99 DE-lncRNAs (14 upregulated and 85 downregulated ones) were identified in the mild pneumonia group and 85 (72 upregulated and 13 downregulated ones) in the severe pneumonia group, compared with the control group. Among these DE-lncRNAs, 9 lncRNAs were upregulated in both the mild and severe pneumonia groups. A set of 868 genes were predicted to be targeted by these 9 DE-lncRNAs. In the network, RP11-248E9.5 and RP11-456D7.1 targeted the majority of genes. RP11-248E9.5 regulated several genes together with CTD-2300H10.2, such as QRFP and EPS8. Both upregulated RP11-456D7.1 and RP11-96C23.9 regulated several genes, such as PDK2. RP11-456D7.1 also positively regulated CCL21. Conclusions These novel lncRNAs and their target genes may be closely associated with the progression of pneumonia. PMID:27663962

  12. Noncoding RNAs and RNA editing in brain development, functional diversification, and neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Mark F; Mattick, John S

    2007-07-01

    The progressive maturation and functional plasticity of the nervous system in health and disease involve a dynamic interplay between the transcriptome and the environment. There is a growing awareness that the previously unexplored molecular and functional interface mediating these complex gene-environmental interactions, particularly in brain, may encompass a sophisticated RNA regulatory network involving the twin processes of RNA editing and multifaceted actions of numerous subclasses of non-protein-coding RNAs. The mature nervous system encompasses a wide range of cell types and interconnections. Long-term changes in the strength of synaptic connections are thought to underlie memory retrieval, formation, stabilization, and effector functions. The evolving nervous system involves numerous developmental transitions, such as neurulation, neural tube patterning, neural stem cell expansion and maintenance, lineage elaboration, differentiation, axonal path finding, and synaptogenesis. Although the molecular bases for these processes are largely unknown, RNA-based epigenetic mechanisms appear to be essential for orchestrating these precise and versatile biological phenomena and in defining the etiology of a spectrum of neurological diseases. The concerted modulation of RNA editing and the selective expression of non-protein-coding RNAs during seminal as well as continuous state transitions may comprise the plastic molecular code needed to couple the intrinsic malleability of neural network connections to evolving environmental influences to establish diverse forms of short- and long-term memory, context-specific behavioral responses, and sophisticated cognitive capacities.

  13. LeARN: a platform for detecting, clustering and annotating non-coding RNAs

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    Schiex Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last decade, sequencing projects have led to the development of a number of annotation systems dedicated to the structural and functional annotation of protein-coding genes. These annotation systems manage the annotation of the non-protein coding genes (ncRNAs in a very crude way, allowing neither the edition of the secondary structures nor the clustering of ncRNA genes into families which are crucial for appropriate annotation of these molecules. Results LeARN is a flexible software package which handles the complete process of ncRNA annotation by integrating the layers of automatic detection and human curation. Conclusion This software provides the infrastructure to deal properly with ncRNAs in the framework of any annotation project. It fills the gap between existing prediction software, that detect independent ncRNA occurrences, and public ncRNA repositories, that do not offer the flexibility and interactivity required for annotation projects. The software is freely available from the download section of the website http://bioinfo.genopole-toulouse.prd.fr/LeARN

  14. Improving vascular maturation using noncoding RNAs increases antitumor effect of chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Wang, Hongyu; Jiang, Dahai; Wu, Sherry Y.; Somasunderam, Anoma; Volk, David E.; Lokesh, Ganesh L. R.; Li, Xin; Pradeep, Sunila; Yang, Xianbin; Haemmerle, Monika; Nagaraja, Archana S; Bayraktar, Emine; Bayraktar, Recep; Li, Li; Tanaka, Takemi; Hu, Wei; Gharpure, Kshipra M; McGuire, Michael H.; Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Zhang, Xinna; Maiti, Sourindra N.; Bulayeva, Nataliya; Dorniak, Piotr L.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Gorenstein, David G.; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Current antiangiogenesis therapy relies on inhibiting newly developed immature tumor blood vessels and starving tumor cells. This strategy has shown transient and modest efficacy. Here, we report a better approach to target cancer-associated endothelial cells (ECs), reverse permeability and leakiness of tumor blood vessels, and improve delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the tumor. First, we identified deregulated microRNAs (miRs) from patient-derived cancer-associated ECs. Silencing these miRs led to decreased vascular permeability and increased maturation of blood vessels. Next, we screened a thioaptamer (TA) library to identify TAs selective for tumor-associated ECs. An annexin A2–targeted TA was identified and used for delivery of miR106b-5p and miR30c-5p inhibitors, resulting in vascular maturation and antitumor effects without inducing hypoxia. These findings could have implications for improving vascular-targeted therapy. PMID:27777972

  15. Conservation of a Triple-Helix-Forming RNA Stability Element in Noncoding and Genomic RNAs of Diverse Viruses

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    Kazimierz T. Tycowski

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abundant expression of the long noncoding (lnc PAN (polyadenylated nuclear RNA by the human oncogenic gammaherpesvirus Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV depends on a cis-element called the expression and nuclear retention element (ENE. The ENE upregulates PAN RNA by inhibiting its rapid nuclear decay through triple-helix formation with the poly(A tail. Using structure-based bioinformatics, we identified six ENE-like elements in evolutionarily diverse viral genomes. Five are in double-stranded DNA viruses, including mammalian herpesviruses, insect polydnaviruses, and a protist mimivirus. One is in an insect picorna-like positive-strand RNA virus, suggesting that the ENE can counteract cytoplasmic as well as nuclear RNA decay pathways. Functionality of four of the ENEs was demonstrated by increased accumulation of an intronless polyadenylated reporter transcript in human cells. Identification of these ENEs enabled the discovery of PAN RNA homologs in two additional gammaherpesviruses, RRV and EHV2. Our findings demonstrate that searching for structural elements can lead to rapid identification of lncRNAs.

  16. Regulatory consequences of neuronal ELAV-like protein binding to coding and non-coding RNAs in human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheckel, Claudia; Drapeau, Elodie; Frias, Maria A; Park, Christopher Y; Fak, John; Zucker-Scharff, Ilana; Kou, Yan; Haroutunian, Vahram; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal ELAV-like (nELAVL) RNA binding proteins have been linked to numerous neurological disorders. We performed crosslinking-immunoprecipitation and RNAseq on human brain, and identified nELAVL binding sites on 8681 transcripts. Using knockout mice and RNAi in human neuroblastoma cells, we showed that nELAVL intronic and 3' UTR binding regulates human RNA splicing and abundance. We validated hundreds of nELAVL targets among which were important neuronal and disease-associated transcripts, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) transcripts. We therefore investigated RNA regulation in AD brain, and observed differential splicing of 150 transcripts, which in some cases correlated with differential nELAVL binding. Unexpectedly, the most significant change of nELAVL binding was evident on non-coding Y RNAs. nELAVL/Y RNA complexes were specifically remodeled in AD and after acute UV stress in neuroblastoma cells. We propose that the increased nELAVL/Y RNA association during stress may lead to nELAVL sequestration, redistribution of nELAVL target binding, and altered neuronal RNA splicing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10421.001 PMID:26894958

  17. Back to Water: Signature of Adaptive Evolution in Cetacean Mitochondrial tRNAs.

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    Montelli, Stefano; Peruffo, Antonella; Patarnello, Tomaso; Cozzi, Bruno; Negrisolo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrion is the power plant of the eukaryotic cell, and tRNAs are the fundamental components of its translational machinery. In the present paper, the evolution of mitochondrial tRNAs was investigated in the Cetacea, a clade of Cetartiodactyla that retuned to water and thus had to adapt its metabolism to a different medium than that of its mainland ancestors. Our analysis focussed on identifying the factors that influenced the evolution of Cetacea tRNA double-helix elements, which play a pivotal role in the formation of the secondary and tertiary structures of each tRNA and consequently manipulate the whole translation machinery of the mitochondrion. Our analyses showed that the substitution pathways in the stems of different tRNAs were influenced by various factors, determining a molecular evolution that was unique to each of the 22 tRNAs. Our data suggested that the composition, AT-skew, and GC-skew of the tRNA stems were the main factors influencing the substitution process. In particular, the range of variation and the fluctuation of these parameters affected the fate of single tRNAs. Strong heterogeneity was observed among the different species of Cetacea. Finally, it appears that the evolution of mitochondrial tRNAs was also shaped by the environments in which the Cetacean taxa differentiated. This latter effect was particularly evident in toothed whales that either live in freshwater or are deep divers.

  18. Annotating animal mitochondrial tRNAs: A new scoring scheme and an empirical evaluation of four methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyman, Stacia K.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2003-12-31

    Identification of transfer RNAs in animal mitochondrial genomes is important for many areas of genome analysis including phylogenetic reconstruction, understanding inheritance of disease, and identifying forensic materials. Animal mitochondrial tRNAs differ from the canonical tRNAs in both their secondary structure and level of conservation of nucleotide sequence and therefore, conventional tRNA or general RNA searching software cannot be used for identification and custom methods are required. Here we present the results of an experimental analysis of four different methods tested on a large dataset consisting of 5,720 tRNAs extracted from the entire set of complete animal mitochondrial genomes in GenBank. Methods were evaluated based on number of false negatives and false positives. Additionally, we present a new scoring scheme customized for animal mitochondrial tRNAs.

  19. Identification of novel growth phase- and media-dependent small non-coding RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes M49 using intergenic tiling arrays

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    Patenge Nadja

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs have attracted attention as a new class of gene regulators in both eukaryotes and bacteria. Genome-wide screening methods have been successfully applied in Gram-negative bacteria to identify sRNA regulators. Many sRNAs are well characterized, including their target mRNAs and mode of action. In comparison, little is known about sRNAs in Gram-positive pathogens. In this study, we identified novel sRNAs in the exclusively human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes M49 (Group A Streptococcus, GAS M49, employing a whole genome intergenic tiling array approach. GAS is an important pathogen that causes diseases ranging from mild superficial infections of the skin and mucous membranes of the naso-pharynx, to severe toxic and invasive diseases. Results We identified 55 putative sRNAs in GAS M49 that were expressed during growth. Of these, 42 were novel. Some of the newly-identified sRNAs belonged to one of the common non-coding RNA families described in the Rfam database. Comparison of the results of our screen with the outcome of two recently published bioinformatics tools showed a low level of overlap between putative sRNA genes. Previously, 40 potential sRNAs have been reported to be expressed in a GAS M1T1 serotype, as detected by a whole genome intergenic tiling array approach. Our screen detected 12 putative sRNA genes that were expressed in both strains. Twenty sRNA candidates appeared to be regulated in a medium-dependent fashion, while eight sRNA genes were regulated throughout growth in chemically defined medium. Expression of candidate genes was verified by reverse transcriptase-qPCR. For a subset of sRNAs, the transcriptional start was determined by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR analysis. Conclusions In accord with the results of previous studies, we found little overlap between different screening methods, which underlines the fact that a comprehensive analysis of sRNAs

  20. Translation of mitochondrial swinger RNAs according to tri-, tetra- and pentacodons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-02-01

    Transcriptomes and proteomes include RNA and protein fragments not matching regular transcription/translation. Some 'non-canonical' mitochondrial transcripts match mitogenomes after assuming one among 23 systematic exchanges between nucleotides, producing swinger RNAs (nine symmetric, X↔Y, example C↔T; 14 asymmetric, X→Y→Z→X, example A→T→G→A) in GenBank's EST database. Here, reanalyzes of (a) public human mitochondrial transcriptome data (Illumina: RNA-seq) allowed to detect mitochondrial swinger RNAs for all 23 exchanges and (b) independent public human mitochondrial trypsinized proteomic mass spectrometry data allowed to detect peptides predicted from translation of parts of swinger-transformed mitogenomes covered by detected swinger reads. RNA-seq and previous EST swinger transcript data converge. Swinger RNA translation frequently inserts various amino acids at stop codons. Swinger RNA-peptide associations exist also for peptides matching systematically frameshifting translation, peptides entirely coded by tetra- and pentacodons (regular codons expanded by silent mononucleotides at 4th, and silent dinucleotides at 4th and 5th position(s), respectively). Swinger peptides differ from regular mitochondrial proteins: not membrane embedded, reflect warmer, anaerobic, low resource conditions, reminding a free-living ancestor. Tetra- and pentacoded peptides associate with low, high GC contents, respectively, suggesting expanded codon translations associate with thermic stresses. Results confirm experimentally predicted swinger, tetra- and pentacoded mitochondrial peptides, increasing mitogenomic coding density.

  1. Specific long non-coding RNAs response to occupational PAHs exposure in coke oven workers

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    Chen Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore whether the alteration of lncRNA expression is correlated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs exposure and DNA damage, we examined PAHs external and internal exposure, DNA damage and lncRNAs (HOTAIR, MALAT1, TUG1 and GAS5 expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLCs of 150 male coke oven workers and 60 non-PAHs exposure workers. We found the expression of HOTAIR, MALAT1, and TUG1 were enhanced in PBLCs of coke oven workers and positively correlated with the levels of external PAHs exposure (adjusted Ptrend < 0.001 for HOTAIR and MALAT1, adjusted Ptrend = 0.006 for TUG1. However, only HOTAIR and MALAT1 were significantly associated with the level of internal PAHs exposure (urinary 1-hydroxypyrene with adjusted β = 0.298, P = 0.024 for HOTAIR and β = 0.090, P = 0.034 for MALAT1. In addition, the degree of DNA damage was positively associated with MALAT1 and HOTAIR expression in PBLCs of all subjects (adjusted β = 0.024, P = 0.002 for HOTAIR and β = 0.007, P = 0.003 for MALAT1. Moreover, we revealed that the global histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3 modification was positively associated with the degree of genetic damage (β = 0.061, P < 0.001 and the increase of HOTAIR expression (β = 0.385, P = 0.018. Taken together, our findings suggest that altered HOTAIR and MALAT1 expression might be involved in response to PAHs-induced DNA damage.

  2. Mitochondrial miRNAs in diabetes: just the tip of the iceberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradan, Rohini; Hollander, John M; Das, Samarjit

    2017-10-01

    Over the last 2 decades, mi(cro)RNAs have emerged as one of the key regulators of metabolic homeostasis. Most of the studies have highlighted that, in the cytoplasm, miRNAs directly bind to the 3'-UTR (untranslated region) of a mRNA. Conventional RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) formation results in the post-transcriptional inhibition. This process is known to contribute to the development of metabolic diseases, including diabetes mellitus. Recent advancements with small RNA detection technologies have enabled us to identify miRNAs in the mitochondrial compartment of the cells. We have termed these miRNAs, which translocate into the mitochondria as mitochondrial miRNA, MitomiR. It has been demonstrated that MitomiRs can regulate gene expression, with some evidence even suggesting that, after translocation, MitomiRs can bind to the 3'-end of a mitochondrial gene, altering its regulation. Our main focus in this review is to highlight the potential role of MitomiR in the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders such as diabetes mellitus.

  3. An RNA-Seq strategy to detect the complete coding and non-coding transcriptome including full-length imprinted macro ncRNAs.

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    Ru Huang

    Full Text Available Imprinted macro non-protein-coding (nc RNAs are cis-repressor transcripts that silence multiple genes in at least three imprinted gene clusters in the mouse genome. Similar macro or long ncRNAs are abundant in the mammalian genome. Here we present the full coding and non-coding transcriptome of two mouse tissues: differentiated ES cells and fetal head using an optimized RNA-Seq strategy. The data produced is highly reproducible in different sequencing locations and is able to detect the full length of imprinted macro ncRNAs such as Airn and Kcnq1ot1, whose length ranges between 80-118 kb. Transcripts show a more uniform read coverage when RNA is fragmented with RNA hydrolysis compared with cDNA fragmentation by shearing. Irrespective of the fragmentation method, all coding and non-coding transcripts longer than 8 kb show a gradual loss of sequencing tags towards the 3' end. Comparisons to published RNA-Seq datasets show that the strategy presented here is more efficient in detecting known functional imprinted macro ncRNAs and also indicate that standardization of RNA preparation protocols would increase the comparability of the transcriptome between different RNA-Seq datasets.

  4. A heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs is present in the axons of primary sympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschrafi, Armaz; Kar, Amar N; Gale, Jenna R; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Vargas, Jose Noberto S; Sales, Naomi; Wilson, Gabriel; Tompkins, Miranda; Gioio, Anthony E; Kaplan, Barry B

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are enriched in subcellular regions of high energy consumption, such as axons and pre-synaptic nerve endings. Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial maintenance in these distal structural/functional domains of the neuron depends on the "in-situ" translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs. In support of this notion, we recently provided evidence for the axonal targeting of several nuclear-encoded mRNAs, such as cytochrome c oxidase, subunit 4 (COXIV) and ATP synthase, H+ transporting and mitochondrial Fo complex, subunit C1 (ATP5G1). Furthermore, we showed that axonal trafficking and local translation of these mRNAs plays a critical role in the generation of axonal ATP. Using a global gene expression analysis, this study identified a highly diverse population of nuclear-encoded mRNAs that were enriched in the axon and presynaptic nerve terminals. Among this population of mRNAs, fifty seven were found to be at least two-fold more abundant in distal axons, as compared with the parental cell bodies. Gene ontology analysis of the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs suggested functions for these gene products in molecular and biological processes, including but not limited to oxidoreductase and electron carrier activity and proton transport. Based on these results, we postulate that local translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs present in the axons may play an essential role in local energy production and maintenance of mitochondrial function.

  5. Insertional Editing of Mitochondrial tRNAs of Physarum polycephalum and Didymium nigripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antes, Travis; Costandy, Heba; Mahendran, Ratha; Spottswood, Matthew; Miller, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    tRNAs encoded on the mitochondrial DNA of Physarum polycephalum and Didymium nigripes require insertional editing for their maturation. Editing consists of the specific insertion of a single cytidine or uridine relative to the mitochondrial DNA sequence encoding the tRNA. Editing sites are at 14 different locations in nine tRNAs. Cytidine insertion sites can be located in any of the four stems of the tRNA cloverleaf and usually create a G · C base pair. Uridine insertions have been identified in the T loop of tRNALys from Didymium and tRNAGlu from Physarum. In both tRNAs, the insertion creates the GUUC sequence, which is converted to GTΨC (Ψ = pseudouridine) in most tRNAs. This type of tRNA editing is different from other, previously described types of tRNA editing and resembles the mRNA and rRNA editing in Physarum and Didymium. Analogous tRNAs in Physarum and Didymium have editing sites at different locations, indicating that editing sites have been lost, gained, or both since the divergence of Physarum and Didymium. Although cDNAs derived from single tRNAs are generally fully edited, cDNAs derived from unprocessed polycistronic tRNA precursors often lack some of the editing site insertions. This enrichment of partially edited sequences in unprocessed tRNAs may indicate that editing is required for tRNA processing or at least that RNA editing occurs as an early event in tRNA synthesis. PMID:9819437

  6. A genome-wide survey of highly expressed non-coding RNAs and biological validation of selected candidates in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

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    Keunsub Lee

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen that has the natural ability of delivering and integrating a piece of its own DNA into plant genome. Although bacterial non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have been shown to regulate various biological processes including virulence, we have limited knowledge of how Agrobacterium ncRNAs regulate this unique inter-Kingdom gene transfer. Using whole transcriptome sequencing and an ncRNA search algorithm developed for this work, we identified 475 highly expressed candidate ncRNAs from A. tumefaciens C58, including 101 trans-encoded small RNAs (sRNAs, 354 antisense RNAs (asRNAs, 20 5' untranslated region (UTR leaders including a RNA thermosensor and 6 riboswitches. Moreover, transcription start site (TSS mapping analysis revealed that about 51% of the mapped mRNAs have 5' UTRs longer than 60 nt, suggesting that numerous cis-acting regulatory elements might be encoded in the A. tumefaciens genome. Eighteen asRNAs were found on the complementary strands of virA, virB, virC, virD, and virE operons. Fifteen ncRNAs were induced and 7 were suppressed by the Agrobacterium virulence (vir gene inducer acetosyringone (AS, a phenolic compound secreted by the plants. Interestingly, fourteen of the AS-induced ncRNAs have putative vir box sequences in the upstream regions. We experimentally validated expression of 36 ncRNAs using Northern blot and Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends analyses. We show functional relevance of two 5' UTR elements: a RNA thermonsensor (C1_109596F that may regulate translation of the major cold shock protein cspA, and a thi-box riboswitch (C1_2541934R that may transcriptionally regulate a thiamine biosynthesis operon, thiCOGG. Further studies on ncRNAs functions in this bacterium may provide insights and strategies that can be used to better manage pathogenic bacteria for plants and to improve Agrobacterum-mediated plant transformation.

  7. Fitting the structurally diverse animal mitochondrial tRNAs(Ser) to common three-dimensional constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, S; Gautheret, D; Cedergren, R

    1994-03-04

    We propose three-dimensional models for animal mitochondrial (amt) tRNAs lacking the D-domain based on consideration of universal constraints on tRNA to maintain functionality. The available tRNA sequences are classified into two groups, and distinct models are proposed for both classes derived from common structural features. The distance between the anticodon and the acceptor stem is comparable in the models and corresponds to that observed in conventional tRNAs. This fact averts the problem of how a shorter mitochondrial tRNA could function within the context of a protein synthesis machinery suited to full-sized tRNAs. In the models, the angle which defines the relationship between the helical domains composed of the acceptor/T-stem and the anticodon/D-stem is greater than in conventional tRNAs. These structures resemble more a "boomerang" than an "L". However, even in the boomerang model, the inner surface of tRNA would be sufficiently uncluttered to avoid steric clashes when two tRNA molecules cohabit the ribosome.

  8. Dengue virus genomic variation associated with mosquito adaptation defines the pattern of viral non-coding RNAs and fitness in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Sebastian; Pallarés, Horacio M.; Blair, Carol D.; Fabri, Cintia; Morales, Maria A.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Gamarnik, Andrea V.

    2017-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus includes a large number of medically relevant pathogens that cycle between humans and arthropods. This host alternation imposes a selective pressure on the viral population. Here, we found that dengue virus, the most important viral human pathogen transmitted by insects, evolved a mechanism to differentially regulate the production of viral non-coding RNAs in mosquitos and humans, with a significant impact on viral fitness in each host. Flavivirus infections accumulate non-coding RNAs derived from the viral 3’UTRs (known as sfRNAs), relevant in viral pathogenesis and immune evasion. We found that dengue virus host adaptation leads to the accumulation of different species of sfRNAs in vertebrate and invertebrate cells. This process does not depend on differences in the host machinery; but it was found to be dependent on the selection of specific mutations in the viral 3’UTR. Dissecting the viral population and studying phenotypes of cloned variants, the molecular determinants for the switch in the sfRNA pattern during host change were mapped to a single RNA structure. Point mutations selected in mosquito cells were sufficient to change the pattern of sfRNAs, induce higher type I interferon responses and reduce viral fitness in human cells, explaining the rapid clearance of certain viral variants after host change. In addition, using epidemic and pre-epidemic Zika viruses, similar patterns of sfRNAs were observed in mosquito and human infected cells, but they were different from those observed during dengue virus infections, indicating that distinct selective pressures act on the 3’UTR of these closely related viruses. In summary, we present a novel mechanism by which dengue virus evolved an RNA structure that is under strong selective pressure in the two hosts, as regulator of non-coding RNA accumulation and viral fitness. This work provides new ideas about the impact of host adaptation on the variability and evolution of flavivirus 3

  9. Microarray Expression Profile Analysis of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Umbilical Cord Plasma Reveals their Potential Role in Gestational Diabetes-Induced Macrosomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghua Shi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fetal macrosomia and its associated complications are the most frequent and serious morbidities for infants associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. The associations between long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs and macrosomia have been rarely reported; therefore, we investigated the umbilical cord lncRNA profiles in GDM macrosomia. Method: Thirty pairs of GDM macrosomia and normal controls were divided into three subgroups randomly, and the umbilical cord vein blood from each subgroup was mixed, and hybridized to a microarray containing probes representing 33,000 lncRNA genes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was used to validate selected differentially expressed lncRNAs. The gene ontology (GO, pathway and network analysis were performed. Result: The microarray identified 8814 lncRNAs that were expressed in the umbilical cord blood, of which 349 were significantly upregulated and 892 were significantly downregulated (fold-change ≥ 2.0 in GDM group. The highest enriched GOs targeted by downregulated transcripts were biological regulation. Pathway analysis indicated that nine pathways corresponded to downregulated transcripts. Conclusions: Certain lncRNAs that were aberrantly expressed in the umbilical cord blood from GDM macrosomia might play a partial or key role in GDM macrosomia development. This study provided potential targets for treatment of macrosomia and novel insights into macrosomia biology.

  10. Microarray Expression Profile Analysis of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Umbilical Cord Plasma Reveals their Potential Role in Gestational Diabetes-Induced Macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhonghua; Zhao, Chun; Long, Wei; Ding, Hongjuan; Shen, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Fetal macrosomia and its associated complications are the most frequent and serious morbidities for infants associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The associations between long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and macrosomia have been rarely reported; therefore, we investigated the umbilical cord lncRNA profiles in GDM macrosomia. Thirty pairs of GDM macrosomia and normal controls were divided into three subgroups randomly, and the umbilical cord vein blood from each subgroup was mixed, and hybridized to a microarray containing probes representing 33,000 lncRNA genes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to validate selected differentially expressed lncRNAs. The gene ontology (GO), pathway and network analysis were performed. The microarray identified 8814 lncRNAs that were expressed in the umbilical cord blood, of which 349 were significantly upregulated and 892 were significantly downregulated (fold-change ≥ 2.0) in GDM group. The highest enriched GOs targeted by downregulated transcripts were biological regulation. Pathway analysis indicated that nine pathways corresponded to downregulated transcripts. Certain lncRNAs that were aberrantly expressed in the umbilical cord blood from GDM macrosomia might play a partial or key role in GDM macrosomia development. This study provided potential targets for treatment of macrosomia and novel insights into macrosomia biology. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Non-coding RNAs at the Gnas and Snrpn-Ube3a imprinted gene loci and their involvement in hereditary disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius ePlagge

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have long been recognized at imprinted gene loci and provided early paradigms, to investigate their functions and molecular mechanisms of action. The characteristic feature of imprinted genes, their monoallelic, parental-origin-dependent expression, is achieved through complex epigenetic regulation, which is modulated by ncRNAs. This minireview focuses on two imprinted gene clusters, in which changes in ncRNA expression contribute to human disorders. At the GNAS locus loss of NESP RNA can cause autosomal dominant Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1b (AD-PHP-Ib, while at the SNRPN-UBE3A locus a long ncRNA and processed snoRNAs play a role in Angelman-Syndrome (AS and Prader-Willi-Syndrome (PWS. The ncRNAs silence overlapping protein-coding transcripts in sense or anti-sense orientation through changes in histone modifications as well as DNA methylation at CpG-rich sequence motifs. Their epigenetic modulatory functions are required in early development in the pre-implantation embryo or already in the parental germ cells. However, it remains unclear whether the sequence homology-carrying ncRNA itself is required, or whether the process of its transcription through other promoters causes the silencing effect.

  12. MALAT1 and HOTAIR Long Non-Coding RNAs Play Opposite Role in Estrogen-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Aurora; Bacci, Lorenza; Re, Agnese; Ripoli, Cristian; Pierconti, Francesco; Pinto, Francesco; Masetti, Riccardo; Grassi, Claudio; Gaetano, Carlo; Bassi, Pier Francesco; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Nanni, Simona; Farsetti, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    In the complex network of nuclear hormone receptors, the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as critical determinants of hormone action. Here we investigated the involvement of selected cancer-associated lncRNAs in Estrogen Receptor (ER) signaling. Prior studies by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) Sequencing showed that in prostate cancer cells ERs form a complex with the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and that in turn these complexes associate with chromatin in an estrogen-dependent fashion. Among these associations (peaks) we focused our attention on those proximal to the regulatory region of HOTAIR and MALAT1. These transcripts appeared regulated by estrogens and able to control ERs function by interacting with ERα/ERβ as indicated by RNA-ChIP. Further studies performed by ChIRP revealed that in unstimulated condition, HOTAIR and MALAT1 were present on pS2, hTERT and HOTAIR promoters at the ERE/eNOS peaks. Interestingly, upon treatment with17β-estradiol HOTAIR recruitment to chromatin increased significantly while that of MALAT1 was reduced, suggesting an opposite regulation and function for these lncRNAs. Similar results were obtained in cells and in an ex vivo prostate organotypic slice cultures. Overall, our data provide evidence of a crosstalk between lncRNAs, estrogens and estrogen receptors in prostate cancer with important consequences on gene expression regulation. PMID:27922078

  13. RNA-Seq analysis of non-small cell lung cancer in female never-smokers reveals candidate cancer-associated long non-coding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Bi, Lintao; Shi, Zhangzhen; Sun, Yanxia; Lin, Yumei; Shao, Hui; Zhu, Zhenxing

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to elucidate the potential mechanisms of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the progression of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The microarray datasets of GSE37764, including 3 primary NSCLC tumors and 3 matched normal tissues isolated from 6 Korean female never-smokers, were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. The differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNA in NSCLC samples were identified using NOISeq package. Co-expression network of differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNA was established. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis were respectively performed. Finally, lncRNAs related to NSCLC were predicted by blasting the differentially expressed lncRNAs with all predicted lncRNAs related to NSCLC. A total of 182 and 539 differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNA (109 up- and 73 down-regulated lncRNAs; 307 up- and 232 down-regulated mRNA) were respectively identified. Among them, 4 up-regulated lncRNAs, like lnc-geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase 1 (GGPS1), lnc-zinc finger protein 793 (ZNF793) and lnc-serine/threonine kinase 4 (STK4), and 4 down-regulated lncRNAs including lnc-LOC284440 and lnc-peptidylprolyl isomerase E-like pseudogene (PPIEL), and lnc-zinc finger protein 461 (ZNF461) were predicted related to NSCLC. lncSSPS1, lnc-ZNF793 and lnc-STK4 were co-expressed with linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and Lck interacting transmembrane adaptor 1 (LIME1). Lnc-LOC284440, lnc-PPIEL and lnc-ZNF461 were co-expressed with Src-like-adaptor 2 (SLA2) and defensin beta 4A (DEFB4A). Our study indicates that immune response may be a crucial mechanism involved in NSCLC progression. Lnc-GGPS1, lnc-ZNF793, lnc-STK4, lnc-LOC284440, lnc-PPIEL, and lnc-ZNF461 may be involved in immune response for promoting NSCLC progression via co-expressing with LAT, LIME1, SLA2 and DEFB4A. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Comprehensive Identification of Long Non-coding RNAs in Purified Cell Types from the Brain Reveals Functional LncRNA in OPC Fate Determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin Dong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs (> 200 bp play crucial roles in transcriptional regulation during numerous biological processes. However, it is challenging to comprehensively identify lncRNAs, because they are often expressed at low levels and with more cell-type specificity than are protein-coding genes. In the present study, we performed ab initio transcriptome reconstruction using eight purified cell populations from mouse cortex and detected more than 5000 lncRNAs. Predicting the functions of lncRNAs using cell-type specific data revealed their potential functional roles in Central Nervous System (CNS development. We performed motif searches in ENCODE DNase I digital footprint data and Mouse ENCODE promoters to infer transcription factor (TF occupancy. By integrating TF binding and cell-type specific transcriptomic data, we constructed a novel framework that is useful for systematically identifying lncRNAs that are potentially essential for brain cell fate determination. Based on this integrative analysis, we identified lncRNAs that are regulated during Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell (OPC differentiation from Neural Stem Cells (NSCs and that are likely to be involved in oligodendrogenesis. The top candidate, lnc-OPC, shows highly specific expression in OPCs and remarkable sequence conservation among placental mammals. Interestingly, lnc-OPC is significantly up-regulated in glial progenitors from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE mouse models compared to wild-type mice. OLIG2-binding sites in the upstream regulatory region of lnc-OPC were identified by ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation-Sequencing and validated by luciferase assays. Loss-of-function experiments confirmed that lnc-OPC plays a functional role in OPC genesis. Overall, our results substantiated the role of lncRNA in OPC fate determination and provided an unprecedented data source for future functional investigations in CNS cell types. We present our datasets and

  15. Bovine Leukemia Virus Small Noncoding RNAs Are Functional Elements That Regulate Replication and Contribute to Oncogenesis In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas A Gillet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses are not expected to encode miRNAs because of the potential problem of self-cleavage of their genomic RNAs. This assumption has recently been challenged by experiments showing that bovine leukemia virus (BLV encodes miRNAs from intragenomic Pol III promoters. The BLV miRNAs are abundantly expressed in B-cell tumors in the absence of significant levels of genomic and subgenomic viral RNAs. Using deep RNA sequencing and functional reporter assays, we show that miRNAs mediate the expression of genes involved in cell signaling, cancer and immunity. We further demonstrate that BLV miRNAs are essential to induce B-cell tumors in an experimental model and to promote efficient viral replication in the natural host.

  16. LincSNP 2.0: an updated database for linking disease-associated SNPs to human long non-coding RNAs and their TFBSs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Shangwei; Yue, Ming; Wang, Peng; Liu, Yue; Zhi, Hui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Jizhou; Gao, Yue; Guo, Maoni; Zhou, Dianshuang; Li, Xin; Li, Xia

    2017-01-01

    We describe LincSNP 2.0 (http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/LincSNP), an updated database that is used specifically to store and annotate disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and their transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). In LincSNP 2.0, we have updated the database with more data and several new features, including (i) expanding disease-associated SNPs in human lncRNAs; (ii) identifying disease-associated SNPs in lncRNA TFBSs; (iii) updating LD-SNPs from the 1000 Genomes Project; and (iv) collecting more experimentally supported SNP-lncRNA-disease associations. Furthermore, we developed three flexible online tools to retrieve and analyze the data. Linc-Mart is a convenient way for users to customize their own data. Linc-Browse is a tool for all data visualization. Linc-Score predicts the associations between lncRNA and disease. In addition, we provided users a newly designed, user-friendly interface to search and download all the data in LincSNP 2.0 and we also provided an interface to submit novel data into the database. LincSNP 2.0 is a continually updated database and will serve as an important resource for investigating the functions and mechanisms of lncRNAs in human diseases. PMID:27924020

  17. Current research advances of the relationship between non-coding RNAs and tumor%非编码RNA与肿瘤关系的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李科事; 郭俊明; 肖丙秀; 周辉

    2010-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are RNA molecules that exclude mRNA, tRNA and rRNA,and do not code proteins. ncRNAs play a various roles in the regulation of important vital activities in many organisms such as bacteria, fungi and mammals. Recent researches have shown that ncRNAs, as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, have tremendous impacts on the occurrence and development of tumors. Meanwhile, ncRNAs have become a new type of tumor markers and new targets for cancer treatment. This review describes the research progresses of ncRNAs such as small interference RNA and microRNA, and their roles in carcinogenesis.%非编码RNA是指除mRNA、tRNA和rRNA以外,不编码蛋白质的RNA分子.它们在细菌、真菌和哺乳动物等许多生物体的重要生命活动中发挥着极广泛的调控作用.近年来研究表明,非编码RNA既可作为癌基因,也可作为抑癌基因,对肿瘤的发生、发展产生重大的影响.同时,非编码RNA又有希望成为肿瘤诊断的标志物和肿瘤治疗的新靶点.作者综述了小干扰RNA和微小RNA等主要非编码RNA与肿瘤关系的最新研究进展.

  18. Functional determinants of the quorum-sensing non-coding RNAs and their roles in target regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi; Feng, Lihui; Rutherford, Steven T; Papenfort, Kai; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2013-07-31

    Quorum sensing is a chemical communication process that bacteria use to control collective behaviours including bioluminescence, biofilm formation, and virulence factor production. In Vibrio harveyi, five homologous small RNAs (sRNAs) called Qrr1-5, control quorum-sensing transitions. Here, we identify 16 new targets of the Qrr sRNAs. Mutagenesis reveals that particular sequence differences among the Qrr sRNAs determine their target specificities. Modelling coupled with biochemical and genetic analyses show that all five of the Qrr sRNAs possess four stem-loops: the first stem-loop is crucial for base pairing with a subset of targets. This stem-loop also protects the Qrr sRNAs from RNase E-mediated degradation. The second stem-loop contains conserved sequences required for base pairing with the majority of the target mRNAs. The third stem-loop plays an accessory role in base pairing and stability. The fourth stem-loop functions as a rho-independent terminator. In the quorum-sensing regulon, Qrr sRNAs-controlled genes are the most rapid to respond to quorum-sensing autoinducers. The Qrr sRNAs are conserved throughout vibrios, thus insights from this work could apply generally to Vibrio quorum sensing.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Noncoding Small RNAs in Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 2 Strain D39 ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Tsui, Ho-Ching Tiffany; Mukherjee, Dhriti; Ray, Valerie A.; Sham, Lok-To; Andrew L Feig; Winkler, Malcolm E.

    2009-01-01

    We report a search for small RNAs (sRNAs) in the low-GC, Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Based on bioinformatic analyses by Livny et al. (J. Livny, A. Brencic, S. Lory, and M. K. Waldor, Nucleic Acids Res. 34:3484-3493, 2006), we tested 40 candidates by Northern blotting and confirmed the expression of nine new and one previously reported (CcnA) sRNAs in strain D39. CcnA is one of five redundant sRNAs reported by Halfmann et al. (A. Halfmann, M. Kovacs, R. Hakenbeck, an...

  20. ChIPBase v2.0: decoding transcriptional regulatory networks of non-coding RNAs and protein-coding genes from ChIP-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ke-Ren; Liu, Shun; Sun, Wen-Ju; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2017-01-04

    The abnormal transcriptional regulation of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and protein-coding genes (PCGs) is contributed to various biological processes and linked with human diseases, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we developed ChIPBase v2.0 (http://rna.sysu.edu.cn/chipbase/) to explore the transcriptional regulatory networks of ncRNAs and PCGs. ChIPBase v2.0 has been expanded with ∼10 200 curated ChIP-seq datasets, which represent about 20 times expansion when comparing to the previous released version. We identified thousands of binding motif matrices and their binding sites from ChIP-seq data of DNA-binding proteins and predicted millions of transcriptional regulatory relationships between transcription factors (TFs) and genes. We constructed 'Regulator' module to predict hundreds of TFs and histone modifications that were involved in or affected transcription of ncRNAs and PCGs. Moreover, we built a web-based tool, Co-Expression, to explore the co-expression patterns between DNA-binding proteins and various types of genes by integrating the gene expression profiles of ∼10 000 tumor samples and ∼9100 normal tissues and cell lines. ChIPBase also provides a ChIP-Function tool and a genome browser to predict functions of diverse genes and visualize various ChIP-seq data. This study will greatly expand our understanding of the transcriptional regulations of ncRNAs and PCGs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. 日本血吸虫非编码小RNA研究进展%Advances in small noncoding RNAs of schistosoma japonicum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳青兰(综述); 肖建华(审校)

    2016-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs,a growing family of regulatory RNAs that includes micro-RNAs,endogenous small inter-fering RNA,Piwi-interacting RNA and competitive endogenous RNA,have recently emerged as cruicial components in many biological processes. Recent findings have provided the small noncoding RNAs expression to undergo dramatic changes in the schistosomiasis. Accumulated evidence suggests that host miRNAs may be involved in regulating the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis (miR-454 and miR-203). MiR-223 and miR-451 may be involved in regulating the development of schisto-some. Besides,recent work implies that schistosome-derived miRNAs may play critical regulatory roles in schistosome de-velopment and sexual maturation,egg production,as well as the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis (sja-let-7,sja-bantam). Moreover,sja-miR-3479 and sja-miR-0001 could be used as biomarkers for schistosomiasis diagnosis. Here,we summarize recent progress in regarding small noncoding RNAs in schistosoma japonicum. This may be helpful in search for potential new drugs,and for biomarkers in control of schistosoma japonicum infection leading to schistosomiasis in the future.%非编码小RNA是一类通过调节基因的表达从而影响生命活动的小分子,主要包括微小RNA、内源性小干扰RNA、Piwi蛋白相互作用的RNA及竞争性内源RNA。研究发现日本血吸虫感染动物后,宿主和虫体的非编码小RNA的表达水平均发生了改变。宿主源的非编码小RNA主要为微小RNA,其中miR-454和miR-203与日本血吸虫病发生发展有关,miR-223和miR-451与日本血吸虫自身生长发育有关;日本血吸虫非编码小 RNA包括微小RNA、内源性小干扰RNA,这些非编码小RNA在日本血吸虫的生长、发育、性成熟及产卵中发挥着重要作用,如sja-let-7、sja-bantam,而且像sja-miR-3479和sja-miR-0001还可以诊断日本血吸虫病。就日本血吸虫非编码小RNA的研究进展进行综述,为日本血吸虫病的防治提供参考。

  2. Small RNAs derived from lncRNA RNase MRP have gene-silencing activity relevant to human cartilage–hair hypoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional processing of some long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) reveals that they are a source of miRNAs. We show that the 268-nt non-coding RNA component of mitochondrial RNA processing endoribonuclease, (RNase MRP), is the source of at least two short (∼20 nt) RNAs designated RMRP-S1 and RMRP-S2, which function as miRNAs. Point mutations in RNase MRP cause human cartilage–hair hypoplasia (CHH), and several disease-causing mutations map to RMRP-S1 and -S2. SHAPE chemical probing ident...

  3. Diversity of antisense and other non-coding RNAs in Archaea revealed by comparative small RNA sequencing in four Pyrobaculum species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Bernick

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A great diversity of small, non-coding RNA molecules with roles in gene regulation and RNA processing have been intensely studied in eukaryotic and bacterial model organisms, yet our knowledge of possible parallel roles for small RNAs in archaea is limited. We employed RNA-seq to identify novel small RNA across multiple species of the hyperthermophilic genus Pyrobaculum, known for unusual RNA gene characteristics. By comparing transcriptional data collected in parallel among four species, we were able to identify conserved RNA genes fitting into known and novel families. Among our findings, we highlight three novel cis-antisense small RNAs encoded opposite to key regulatory (ferric uptake regulator, metabolic (triose-phosphate isomerase, and core transcriptional apparatus genes (transcription factor B. We also found a large increase in the number of conserved C/D box small RNA genes over what had been previously recognized; many of these genes are encoded antisense to protein coding genes. The conserved opposition to orthologous genes across the Pyrobaculum genus suggests similarities to other cis-antisense regulatory systems. Furthermore, the genus-specific nature of these small RNAs indicates they are relatively recent, stable adaptations.

  4. Divergent actions of long noncoding RNAs on X-chromosome remodelling in mammals and Drosophila achieve the same end result: dosage compensation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhash C. Lakhotia

    2015-12-01

    Organisms with heterochromatic sex chromosomes need to compensate for differences in dosages of the sex chromosome-linked genes that have somatic functions. In-depth cytological and subsequent biochemical and molecular studies on dosage compensation started with Mary F. Lyon’s proposal in early 1960s that the Barr body in female mammalian somatic cells represented one of the randomly inactivated and heterochromatinized X chromosomes. In contrast, Drosophila was soon shown to achieve dosage compensation through hypertranscription of single X in male whose chromatin remains more open. Identification of proteins that remodel chromatin either to cause one of the two X chromosomes in somatic cells of very early female mammalian embryos to become condensed and inactive or to remodel the single X in male Drosophila embryos to a more open state for hypertranscription provided important insights into the underlying cellular epigenetic processes. However, the most striking and unexpected discoveries were the identification of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), X- inactive specific transcript (Xist) in mammals and roX1/2 in Drosophila, which were essential for achieving the contrasting chromatin organizations but leading to similar end result in terms of dosage compensation of X-linked genes in females and males. An overview of the processes of X inactivation or hyperactivation in mammals and Drosophila, respectively, and the roles played by Xist, roX1/2 and other lncRNAs in these events is presented.

  5. Down-regulation of outer membrane proteins by noncoding RNAs: unraveling the cAMP-CRP- and sigmaE-dependent CyaR-ompX regulatory case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jesper; Eriksen, Maiken; Kallipolitis, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    The sigma(E) (extracytoplasmic stress response sigma factor in Escherichia coli) signaling system of Gram-negative bacteria plays an essential role in the maintenance of the extracytoplasmic compartment. Upon induction of this system, approximately 100 genes are up-regulated. The majority...... is sufficient to trigger the envelope stress response. Recent work indicates that small Hfq-binding RNAs play a major role in maintaining envelope homeostasis and, so far, two sigma(E)-dependent small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs), MicA and RybB, have been shown to facilitate rapid removal of multiple omp transcripts...... is also up-regulated, directly or indirectly, by sigma(E). In addition, this work identified MicA as a factor that cooperates in the negative control of ompX expression. The conservation of CyaR, MicA, RybB, and their targets suggests that the omp mRNA-sRNA regulatory network is an integral part...

  6. Quantification of Small Non-Coding RNAs Allows an Accurate Comparison of miRNA Expression Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Masotti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are highly conserved ∼22-mer RNA molecules, encoded by plants and animals that regulate the expression of genes binding to the 3′-UTR of specific target mRNAs. The amount of miRNAs in a total RNA sample depends on the recovery efficiency that may be significantly affected by the different purification methods employed. Traditional approaches may be inefficient at recovering small RNAs, and common spectrophotometric determination is not adequate to quantify selectively these low molecular weight (LMW species from total RNA samples. Here, we describe the use of qualitative and quantitative lab-on-a-chip tools for the analysis of these LMW RNA species. Our data emphasize the close correlation of LMW RNAs with the expression levels of some miRNAs. We therefore applied our result to the comparison of some miRNA expression profiles in different tissues. Finally, the methods we used in this paper allowed us to analyze the efficiency of extraction protocols, to study the small (but significant differences among various preparations and to allow a proper comparison of some miRNA expression profiles in various tissues.

  7. Disruption of skeletal muscle mitochondrial network genes and miRNAs in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Aaron P; Wada, Shogo; Vergani, Lodovica; Hock, M Benjamin; Lamon, Séverine; Léger, Bertrand; Ushida, Takashi; Cartoni, Romain; Wadley, Glenn D; Hespel, Peter; Kralli, Anastasia; Soraru, Gianni; Angelini, Corrado; Akimoto, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to play a role in the progression and severity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The regulation of transcriptional co-activators involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function in ALS is not well known. When compared with healthy control subjects, patients with ALS, but not neurogenic disease (ND), had lower levels of skeletal muscle peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA and protein and estrogen-related receptor-α (ERRα) and mitofusin-2 (Mfn2) mRNA. PGC-1β, nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) and Mfn1 mRNA as well as cytochrome C oxidase subunit IV (COXIV) mRNA and protein were lower in patients with ALS and ND. Both patient groups had reductions in citrate synthase and cytochrome c oxidase activity. Similar observations were made in skeletal muscle from transgenic ALS G93A transgenic mice. In vitro, PGC-1α and PGC-1β regulated Mfn1 and Mfn2 in an ERRα-dependent manner. Compared to healthy controls, miRNA 23a, 29b, 206 and 455 were increased in skeletal muscle of ALS patients. miR-23a repressed PGC-1α translation in a 3' UTR dependent manner. Transgenic mice over expressing miR-23a had a reduction in PGC-1α, cytochome-b and COXIV protein levels. These results show that skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction in ALS patients is associated with a reduction in PGC-1α signalling networks involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function, as well as increases in several miRNAs potentially implicated in skeletal muscle and neuromuscular junction regeneration. As miR-23a negatively regulates PGC-1α signalling, therapeutic inhibition of miR-23a may be a strategy to rescue PGC-1α activity and ameliorate skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in ALS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Emerging putative associations between non-coding RNAs and protein-coding genes in Neuropathic Pain. Added value from re-using microarray data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Capobianco

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of injured nerves is likely occurring in the peripheral nervous system, but not in the central nervous system. Although protein-coding gene expression has been assessed during nerve regeneration, little is currently known about the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs. This leaves open questions about the potential effects of ncRNAs at transcriptome level. Due to the limited availability of human neuropathic pain data, we have identified the most comprehensive time-course gene expression profile referred to sciatic nerve injury, and studied in a rat model, using two neuronal tissues, namely dorsal root ganglion (DRG and sciatic nerve (SN. We have developed a methodology to identify differentially expressed bioentities starting from microarray probes, and re-purposing them to annotate ncRNAs, while analyzing the expression profiles of protein-coding genes. The approach is designed to reuse microarray data and perform first profiling and then meta-analysis through three main steps. First, we used contextual analysis to identify what we considered putative or potential protein coding targets for selected ncRNAs. Relevance was therefore assigned to differential expression of neighbor protein-coding genes, with neighborhood defined by a fixed genomic distance from long or antisense ncRNA loci, and of parent genes associated with pseudogenes. Second, connectivity among putative targets was used to build networks, in turn useful to conduct inference at interactomic scale. Last, network paths were annotated to assess relevance to neuropathic pain. We found significant differential expression in long-intergenic ncRNAs (32 lincRNAs in SN, and 8 in DRG, antisense RNA (31 asRNA in SN, and 12 in DRG and pseudogenes (456 in SN, 56 in DRG. In particular, contextual analysis centered on pseudogenes revealed some targets with known association to neurodegeneration and/or neurogenesis processes. While modules of the olfactory receptors were clearly

  9. Emerging Putative Associations between Non-Coding RNAs and Protein-Coding Genes in Neuropathic Pain: Added Value from Reusing Microarray Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Hemalatha B.; Tsinoremas, Nicholas F.; Capobianco, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of injured nerves is likely occurring in the peripheral nervous system, but not in the central nervous system. Although protein-coding gene expression has been assessed during nerve regeneration, little is currently known about the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). This leaves open questions about the potential effects of ncRNAs at transcriptome level. Due to the limited availability of human neuropathic pain (NP) data, we have identified the most comprehensive time-course gene expression profile referred to sciatic nerve (SN) injury and studied in a rat model using two neuronal tissues, namely dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and SN. We have developed a methodology to identify differentially expressed bioentities starting from microarray probes and repurposing them to annotate ncRNAs, while analyzing the expression profiles of protein-coding genes. The approach is designed to reuse microarray data and perform first profiling and then meta-analysis through three main steps. First, we used contextual analysis to identify what we considered putative or potential protein-coding targets for selected ncRNAs. Relevance was therefore assigned to differential expression of neighbor protein-coding genes, with neighborhood defined by a fixed genomic distance from long or antisense ncRNA loci, and of parental genes associated with pseudogenes. Second, connectivity among putative targets was used to build networks, in turn useful to conduct inference at interactomic scale. Last, network paths were annotated to assess relevance to NP. We found significant differential expression in long-intergenic ncRNAs (32 lincRNAs in SN and 8 in DRG), antisense RNA (31 asRNA in SN and 12 in DRG), and pseudogenes (456 in SN and 56 in DRG). In particular, contextual analysis centered on pseudogenes revealed some targets with known association to neurodegeneration and/or neurogenesis processes. While modules of the olfactory receptors were clearly identified in protein

  10. Non-coding MicroRNAs hsa-let-7g and hsa-miR-181b are Associated with Chemoresponse to S-1 in Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Go; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Xi, Yaguang; Kudo, Kenji; Uchida, Kazumi; Takasaki, Ken; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Ju, Jingfang

    2006-10-01

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs (~22 nucleotides) that regulate gene expression at a post-transcriptional level via imperfect base pairing to the 3'-UTR of their target mRNAs. Previous studies from our group identified a number of deregulated miRNAs due to the loss of p53 tumor suppressor in colon cancer cell lines. To further investigate the in vivo biological significance of these miRNAs, the expressions of hsa-let-7g, hsa-miR-143, hsa-miR-145, hsa-miR-181b and hsa-miR-200c were investigated using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) colon cancer specimens to evaluate the potential relationship with chemosensitivity and tumorigenesis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty-six patients with recurrent or residual colon cancer lesions were treated with the 5-fluorouracil-based antimetabolite S-1. This includes twenty-one pairs of tumor and normal samples. Total RNAs were isolated and the expression level of each particular miRNA was quantified using real time qRT-PCR analysis. RESULTS: The expression levels of hsa-let-7g, hsa-miR-181b and hsa-miR-200c were over-expressed in tumor tissues compared to normal tissues. The expression levels of hsa-let-7g (p=0.03; Mann-Whitney test) and hsa-miR-181b (p=0.02; Mann-Whitney test) were strongly associated with clinical response to S-1. Although hsa-let-7g and hsa-miR-181b are strongly associated with patient's response to S-1 treatment, they are not significant prognostic factors for predicting survival. CONCLUSION: hsa-let-7g, hsa-miR-181b and hsa-miR-200c may be associated with tumorigenesis in colon cancer. In addition, hsa-let-7g and hsa-miR-181b may be potential indicators for chemoresponse to S-1 based chemotherapy.

  11. The identification and characterization of non-coding and coding RNAs and their modified nucleosides by mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of ribonucleic acids (RNA) by mass spectrometry has been a valuable analytical approach for more than 25 years. In fact, mass spectrometry has become a method of choice for the analysis of modified nucleosides from RNA isolated out of biological samples. This review summarizes recent progress that has been made in both nucleoside and oligonucleotide mass spectral analysis. Applications of mass spectrometry in the identification, characterization and quantification of modified nucleosides are discussed. At the oligonucleotide level, advances in modern mass spectrometry approaches combined with the standard RNA modification mapping protocol enable the characterization of RNAs of varying lengths ranging from low molecular weight short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to the extremely large 23 S rRNAs. New variations and improvements to this protocol are reviewed, including top-down strategies, as these developments now enable qualitative and quantitative measurements of RNA modification patterns in a variety of biological systems. PMID:25616408

  12. Identification of an ortholog of the eukaryotic RNA polymerase III subunit RPC34 in Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota suggests specialization of RNA polymerases for coding and non-coding RNAs in Archaea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blombach, F.; Makarova, K.S.; Marrero, J.; Siebers, B.G.; Koonin, E.V.; Oost, J. van der

    2009-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of eukaryotic information processing is the co-existence of 3 distinct, multi-subunit RNA polymerase complexes that are dedicated to the transcription of specific classes of coding or non-coding RNAs. Archaea encode only one RNA polymerase that resembles the eukaryotic RNA polym

  13. Identification of an ortholog of the eukaryotic RNA polymerase III subunit RPC34 in Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota suggests specialization of RNA polymerases for coding and non-coding RNAs in Archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blombach, F.; Makarova, K.S.; Marrero, J.; Siebers, B.; Koonin, E.V.; Oost, van der J.

    2009-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of eukaryotic information processing is the co-existence of 3 distinct, multi-subunit RNA polymerase complexes that are dedicated to the transcription of specific classes of coding or non-coding RNAs. Archaea encode only one RNA polymerase that resembles the eukaryotic RNA polym

  14. Consideration of Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 as a Functional Backup of Viral Oncoprotein Latent Membrane Protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Kristina M; Pimienta, Genaro

    2016-01-19

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 are highly abundant through all four latency stages of EBV infection (III-II-I-0) and have been associated with an oncogenic phenotype when expressed in cell lines cultured in vitro. In vivo, EBV-infected B cells derived from freshly isolated lymphocytes show that EBER1/2 deletion does not impair viral latency. Based on published quantitative proteomics data from BJAB cells expressing EBER1 and EBER2, we propose that the EBERs, through their activation of AKT in a B-cell-specific manner, are a functionally redundant backup of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1)-an essential oncoprotein in EBV-associated malignancies, with a main role in AKT activation. Our proposed model may explain the lack of effect on viral latency establishment in EBER-minus EBV infection.

  15. Consideration of Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 as a Functional Backup of Viral Oncoprotein Latent Membrane Protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Herbert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-encoded noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 are highly abundant through all four latency stages of EBV infection (III-II-I-0 and have been associated with an oncogenic phenotype when expressed in cell lines cultured in vitro. In vivo, EBV-infected B cells derived from freshly isolated lymphocytes show that EBER1/2 deletion does not impair viral latency. Based on published quantitative proteomics data from BJAB cells expressing EBER1 and EBER2, we propose that the EBERs, through their activation of AKT in a B-cell-specific manner, are a functionally redundant backup of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1—an essential oncoprotein in EBV-associated malignancies, with a main role in AKT activation. Our proposed model may explain the lack of effect on viral latency establishment in EBER-minus EBV infection.

  16. Role of long noncoding RNAs in endocrine and metabolic respects%长链非编码RNA在内分泌及代谢中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡胜清; 陈璐璐

    2016-01-01

    [Summary] Long noncoding RNA( lncRNA) plays an important role in regulating the life activities, and its disordered expression is closely related to many diseases. Several studies have shown that lncRNA could modulate the endocrine metabolic processes at transcription, post-transcription, and the epigenetic modification levels, but the exact mechanism is still unclear. Further research needs to be done. This review will briefly describe the research progress of lncRNAs in endocrine and metabolic respects.%长链非编码RNA( long noncoding RNA,lncRNA)在生命活动中具有重要的调节作用,其表达紊乱与多种疾病密切相关。已有研究表明,lncRNA可通过转录、转录后及表观遗传修饰水平来调节内分泌及代谢过程,但具体机制仍不十分清楚,尚需进一步的研究去揭示。本文就目前lncRNA在内分泌及代谢中的重要作用做一简要阐述。

  17. RNA-Seq of human neurons derived from iPS cells reveals candidate long non-coding RNAs involved in neurogenesis and neuropsychiatric disorders.

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    Mingyan Lin

    Full Text Available Genome-wide expression analysis using next generation sequencing (RNA-Seq provides an opportunity for in-depth molecular profiling of fundamental biological processes, such as cellular differentiation and malignant transformation. Differentiating human neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provide an ideal system for RNA-Seq since defective neurogenesis caused by abnormalities in transcription factors, DNA methylation, and chromatin modifiers lie at the heart of some neuropsychiatric disorders. As a preliminary step towards applying next generation sequencing using neurons derived from patient-specific iPSCs, we have carried out an RNA-Seq analysis on control human neurons. Dramatic changes in the expression of coding genes, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, pseudogenes, and splice isoforms were seen during the transition from pluripotent stem cells to early differentiating neurons. A number of genes that undergo radical changes in expression during this transition include candidates for schizophrenia (SZ, bipolar disorder (BD and autism spectrum disorders (ASD that function as transcription factors and chromatin modifiers, such as POU3F2 and ZNF804A, and genes coding for cell adhesion proteins implicated in these conditions including NRXN1 and NLGN1. In addition, a number of novel lncRNAs were found to undergo dramatic changes in expression, one of which is HOTAIRM1, a regulator of several HOXA genes during myelopoiesis. The increase we observed in differentiating neurons suggests a role in neurogenesis as well. Finally, several lncRNAs that map near SNPs associated with SZ in genome wide association studies also increase during neuronal differentiation, suggesting that these novel transcripts may be abnormally regulated in a subgroup of patients.

  18. Mammalian Mitochondrial ncRNA Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandakumar, Shanmugam; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; Arumugam, Nagarajan; Gromiha, M Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian Mitochondrial ncRNA is a web-based database, which provides specific information on non-coding RNA in mammals. This database includes easy searching, comparing with BLAST and retrieving information on predicted structure and its function about mammalian ncRNAs. The database is available for free at http://www.iitm.ac.in/bioinfo/mmndb/.

  19. The transition from noncoded to coded protein synthesis: did coding mRNAs arise from stability-enhancing binding partners to tRNA?

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    Tate Warren

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the origin of protein synthesis has been notoriously difficult. We have taken as a starting premise Wolf and Koonin's view that "evolution of the translation system is envisaged to occur in a compartmentalized ensemble of replicating, co-selected RNA segments, i.e., in an RNA world containing ribozymes with versatile activities". Presentation of the hypothesis We propose that coded protein synthesis arose from a noncoded process in an RNA world as a natural consequence of the accumulation of a range of early tRNAs and their serendipitous RNA binding partners. We propose that, initially, RNA molecules with 3' CCA termini that could be aminoacylated by ribozymes, together with an ancestral peptidyl transferase ribozyme, produced small peptides with random or repetitive sequences. Our concept is that the first tRNA arose in this context from the ligation of two RNA hairpins and could be similarly aminoacylated at its 3' end to become a substrate for peptidyl transfer catalyzed by the ancestral ribozyme. Within this RNA world we hypothesize that proto-mRNAs appeared first simply as serendipitous binding partners, forming complementary base pair interactions with the anticodon loops of tRNA pairs. Initially this may have enhanced stability of the paired tRNA molecules so they were held together in close proximity, better positioning the 3' CCA termini for peptidyl transfer and enhancing the rate of peptide synthesis. If there were a selective advantage for the ensemble through the peptide products synthesized, it would provide a natural pathway for the evolution of a coding system with the expansion of a cohort of different tRNAs and their binding partners. The whole process could have occurred quite unremarkably for such a profound acquisition. Testing the hypothesis It should be possible to test the different parts of our model using the isolated contemporary 50S ribosomal subunit initially, and then with RNAs

  20. 精子发生过程中调控性非编码RNAs的功能%The role of regulatory non-coding RNAs during spermatogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王燕; 郭文龙; 耿德海; 王波; 张建立; 张艳敏; 刘淑卓

    2014-01-01

    Global rise in male infertility as a result of falling sperm count and quality has been pointed out by many investigations. Therefore, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanism of spermatogenesis and its regulation. Spermatogenesis is characterized by three phases: mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesiss, which are strictly regulated by phase-speciifc gene expression that is controlled by myriads of regulatory non-coding RNAs. Rapid advancement in genome mining technologies has identiifed role of regulatory non-coding RNAs including microRNA(miRNA), small-interfering RNA(siRNA), PIWI-interacting RNA(piRNA) and long non-coding RNA(lncRNA) as controllers of gene expression at transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional level in different biological context and disease processes. Here, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding about the involvement of these transcripts in spermatogenesis. In addition, we review here the relationship between their abnormal experssion and associated diseases.%精子数量下降和质量减低是全球范围内男性不育疾病增加的主要原因。因此理解精子发生及其调控的分子机制是非常必要的。精子发生主要分为有丝分裂、减数分裂和精子形成三个阶段,这些过程被阶段特异性的基因表达严格调控,而众多的调控性非编码RNAs则是基因表达的重要调控因子。飞速发展的基因组检测技术已经证实,调控性非编码RNAs在不同生物演化和疾病进程中基因表达的转录和转录后水平上发挥重要的调控作用,其包括微小RNA(miRNA)、小干扰RNA(siRNA)、与PIWI蛋白相互作用的RNAs(piRNA)和长链非编码RNA(lncRNA)。讨论这些转录本在精子发生中的功能作用,并综述其异常表达与相关疾病的关系。

  1. Autism genetic database (AGD: a comprehensive database including autism susceptibility gene-CNVs integrated with known noncoding RNAs and fragile sites

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    Talebizadeh Zohreh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism is a highly heritable complex neurodevelopmental disorder, therefore identifying its genetic basis has been challenging. To date, numerous susceptibility genes and chromosomal abnormalities have been reported in association with autism, but most discoveries either fail to be replicated or account for a small effect. Thus, in most cases the underlying causative genetic mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present work, the Autism Genetic Database (AGD was developed as a literature-driven, web-based, and easy to access database designed with the aim of creating a comprehensive repository for all the currently reported genes and genomic copy number variations (CNVs associated with autism in order to further facilitate the assessment of these autism susceptibility genetic factors. Description AGD is a relational database that organizes data resulting from exhaustive literature searches for reported susceptibility genes and CNVs associated with autism. Furthermore, genomic information about human fragile sites and noncoding RNAs was also downloaded and parsed from miRBase, snoRNA-LBME-db, piRNABank, and the MIT/ICBP siRNA database. A web client genome browser enables viewing of the features while a web client query tool provides access to more specific information for the features. When applicable, links to external databases including GenBank, PubMed, miRBase, snoRNA-LBME-db, piRNABank, and the MIT siRNA database are provided. Conclusion AGD comprises a comprehensive list of susceptibility genes and copy number variations reported to-date in association with autism, as well as all known human noncoding RNA genes and fragile sites. Such a unique and inclusive autism genetic database will facilitate the evaluation of autism susceptibility factors in relation to known human noncoding RNAs and fragile sites, impacting on human diseases. As a result, this new autism database offers a valuable tool for the research

  2. 长链非编码RNA在宫颈癌中的研究进展%Research Progress of Long Non-coding RNAs in Cervical Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏冠男; 王冬亮; 王武亮; 朱前勇

    2015-01-01

    长链非编码RNA(long non-coding RNA,lncRNA)是一类长度超过200个核苷酸,无蛋白质编码功能的RNA分子,可在转录、转录后及表观遗传学等多个水平参与基因的表达调控,影响细胞的生长、发育、增殖、分化、代谢和凋亡等重要生理过程。越来越多的证据表明lncRNA与宫颈癌的发生发展密切相关,在肿瘤细胞凋亡调控、肿瘤浸润与转移等过程中发挥着促癌或抑癌作用,有望成为宫颈癌诊断及治疗中的新型分子标记物和治疗靶点。结合国内外最新报道,近年发现的与宫颈癌促癌作用相关的lncRNAs主要有HOX转录反义RNA(HOTAIR)、肺腺癌转移相关转录子1(MALAT1)、H19、EBIC、Linc-p21和脑细胞质200(BC200),与宫颈癌抑癌作用有关的lncRNAs主要有母系印迹基因3(MEG3)和XLOC_010588,改变其表达水平对宫颈癌细胞系的增殖、侵袭等生物学行为有明显影响,与宫颈癌临床病理因素密切相关,影响疾病预后。%Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a group of RNA molecules which are longer than 200 nucleotides and they cannot encode proteins. Recent studies have demonstrated that lncRNAs are widely involved in the regulation of gene expression network at transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic levels, which may affect growth, proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, apoptosis and other important physiological processes of cells. In cervical cancer, lncRNA may act as the tumor promoter or tumor suppressor. It is becoming evident that lncRNAs may be an important class of pervasive genes involved in the regulation of multiple cellular biological processes, including apoptosis, tumor invasion and metastasis. lncRNA is hopefully to become the new type of molecular marker and therapeutic target in the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer. Combined with domestic and foreign latest reports, there are mainly six lncRNAs may have the role

  3. Androgen-responsive non-coding small RNAs extend the potential of HCG stimulation to act as a bioassay of androgen sufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodie, M E; Mudaliar, M A V; Herzyk, P; McMillan, M; Boroujerdi, M; Chudleigh, S; Tobias, E S; Ahmed, S F

    2017-10-01

    It is unclear whether a short-term change in circulating androgens is associated with changes in the transcriptome of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). To explore the effect of hCG stimulation on the PBMC transcriptome, 12 boys with a median age (range) of 0.7 years (0.3, 11.2) who received intramuscular hCG 1500u on 3 consecutive days as part of their investigations underwent transcriptomic array analysis on RNA extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and after hCG stimulation. Median pre- and post-hCG testosterone for the overall group was 0.7 nmol/L (hCG stimulation with a pre and post median serum testosterone of hCG effects, all 9 of the hCG responders consistently demonstrated a 20% or greater increase in the expression of piR-37153 and piR-39248, non-coding PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). In addition, of the 9 responders, 8, 6 and 4 demonstrated a 30, 40 and 50% rise, respectively, in a total of 2 further piRNAs. In addition, 3 of the responders showed a 50% or greater rise in the expression of another small RNA, SNORD5. On comparing fold-change in serum testosterone with fold-change in the above transcripts, a positive correlation was detected for SNORD5 (P = 0.01). The identification of a dynamic and androgen-responsive PBMC transcriptome extends the potential value of the hCG test for the assessment of androgen sufficiency. © 2017 The authors.

  4. The Bicoid Stability Factor Controls Polyadenylation and Expression of Specific Mitochondrial mRNAs in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönke, Sebastian; Stewart, James B.; Mourier, Arnaud; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Kukat, Christian; Wibom, Rolf; Habermann, Bianca; Partridge, Linda; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2011-01-01

    The bicoid stability factor (BSF) of Drosophila melanogaster has been reported to be present in the cytoplasm, where it stabilizes the maternally contributed bicoid mRNA and binds mRNAs expressed from early zygotic genes. BSF may also have other roles, as it is ubiquitously expressed and essential for survival of adult flies. We have performed immunofluorescence and cell fractionation analyses and show here that BSF is mainly a mitochondrial protein. We studied two independent RNAi knockdown fly lines and report that reduced BSF protein levels lead to a severe respiratory deficiency and delayed development at the late larvae stage. Ubiquitous knockdown of BSF results in a severe reduction of the polyadenylation tail lengths of specific mitochondrial mRNAs, accompanied by an enrichment of unprocessed polycistronic RNA intermediates. Furthermore, we observed a significant reduction in mRNA steady state levels, despite increased de novo transcription. Surprisingly, mitochondrial de novo translation is increased and abnormal mitochondrial translation products are present in knockdown flies, suggesting that BSF also has a role in coordinating the mitochondrial translation in addition to its role in mRNA maturation and stability. We thus report a novel function of BSF in flies and demonstrate that it has an important intra-mitochondrial role, which is essential for maintaining mtDNA gene expression and oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:22022283

  5. The human PINK1 locus is regulated in vivo by a non-coding natural antisense RNA during modulation of mitochondrial function

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    Wahlestedt Claes

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the PTEN induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1 are implicated in early-onset Parkinson's disease. PINK1 is expressed abundantly in mitochondria rich tissues, such as skeletal muscle, where it plays a critical role determining mitochondrial structural integrity in Drosophila. Results Herein we characterize a novel splice variant of PINK1 (svPINK1 that is homologous to the C-terminus regulatory domain of the protein kinase. Naturally occurring non-coding antisense provides sophisticated mechanisms for diversifying genomes and we describe a human specific non-coding antisense expressed at the PINK1 locus (naPINK1. We further demonstrate that PINK1 varies in vivo when human skeletal muscle mitochondrial content is enhanced, supporting the idea that PINK1 has a physiological role in mitochondrion. The observation of concordant regulation of svPINK1 and naPINK1 during in vivo mitochondrial biogenesis was confirmed using RNAi, where selective targeting of naPINK1 results in loss of the PINK1 splice variant in neuronal cell lines. Conclusion Our data presents the first direct observation that a mammalian non-coding antisense molecule can positively influence the abundance of a cis-transcribed mRNA under physiological abundance conditions. While our analysis implies a possible human specific and dsRNA-mediated mechanism for stabilizing the expression of svPINK1, it also points to a broader genomic strategy for regulating a human disease locus and increases the complexity through which alterations in the regulation of the PINK1 locus could occur.

  6. Cdk5rap1-mediated 2-methylthio modification of mitochondrial tRNAs governs protein translation and contributes to myopathy in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fan-Yan; Zhou, Bo; Suzuki, Takeo; Miyata, Keishi; Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Horiguchi, Haruki; Takahashi, Nozomu; Xie, Peiyu; Michiue, Hiroyuki; Fujimura, Atsushi; Kaitsuka, Taku; Matsui, Hideki; Koga, Yasutoshi; Mohri, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Oike, Yuichi; Tomizawa, Kazuhito

    2015-03-03

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) contain a wide variety of posttranscriptional modifications that are important for accurate decoding. Mammalian mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) are modified by nuclear-encoded tRNA-modifying enzymes; however, the physiological roles of these modifications remain largely unknown. In this study, we report that Cdk5 regulatory subunit-associated protein 1 (Cdk5rap1) is responsible for 2-methylthio (ms(2)) modifications of mammalian mt-tRNAs for Ser(UCN), Phe, Tyr, and Trp codons. Deficiency in ms(2) modification markedly impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis, which resulted in respiratory defects in Cdk5rap1 knockout (KO) mice. The KO mice were highly susceptive to stress-induced mitochondrial remodeling and exhibited accelerated myopathy and cardiac dysfunction under stressed conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the ms(2) modifications of mt-tRNAs were sensitive to oxidative stress and were reduced in patients with mitochondrial disease. These findings highlight the fundamental role of ms(2) modifications of mt-tRNAs in mitochondrial protein synthesis and their pathological consequences in mitochondrial disease.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the spider habronattus oregonensis reveals rearranged and extremely truncated tRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masta, Susan E.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-31

    We sequenced the entire mitochondrial genome of the jumping spider Habronattus oregonensis of the arachnid order Araneae (Arthropoda: Chelicerata). A number of unusual features distinguish this genome from other chelicerate and arthropod mitochondrial genomes. Most of the transfer RNA gene sequences are greatly reduced in size and cannot be folded into typical cloverleaf-shaped secondary structures. At least nine of the tRNA sequences lack the potential to form TYC arm stem pairings, and instead are inferred to have TV-replacement loops. Furthermore, sequences that could encode the 3' aminoacyl acceptor stems in at least 10 tRNAs appear to be lacking, because fully paired acceptor stems are not possible and because the downstream sequences instead encode adjacent genes. Hence, these appear to be among the smallest known tRNA genes. We postulate that an RNA editing mechanism must exist to restore the 3' aminoacyl acceptor stems in order to allow the tRNAs to function. At least seven tRN As are rearranged with respect to the chelicerate Limulus polyphemus, although the arrangement of the protein-coding genes is identical. Most mitochondrial protein-coding genes of H. oregonensis have ATN as initiation codons, as commonly found in arthropod mtDNAs, but cytochrome oxidase subunit 2 and 3 genes apparently use UUG as an initiation codon. Finally, many of the gene sequences overlap one another and are truncated. This 14,381 bp genome, the first mitochondrial genome of a spider yet sequenced, is one of the smallest arthropod mitochondrial genomes known. We suggest that post transcriptional RNA editing can likely maintain function of the tRNAs while permitting the accumulation of mutations that would otherwise be deleterious. Such mechanisms may have allowed for the minimization of the spider mitochondrial genome.

  8. Sequence and expression characteristics of long noncoding RNAs in honey bee caste development--potential novel regulators for transgressive ovary size.

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    Fernanda C Humann

    Full Text Available Division of labor in social insect colonies relies on a strong reproductive bias that favors queens. Although the ecological and evolutionary success attained through caste systems is well sketched out in terms of ultimate causes, the molecular and cellular underpinnings driving the development of caste phenotypes are still far from understood. Recent genomics approaches on honey bee developmental biology revealed a set of genes that are differentially expressed genes in larval ovaries and associated with transgressive ovary size in queens and massive cell death in workers. Amongst these, two contigs called special attention, both being over 200 bp in size and lacking apparent coding potential. Herein, we obtained their full cDNA sequences. These and their secondary structure characteristics placed in evidence that they are bona fide long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA differentially expressed in larval ovaries, thus named lncov1 and lncov2. Genomically, both map within a previously identified QTL on chromosome 11, associated with transgressive ovary size in honey bee workers. As lncov1 was over-expressed in worker ovaries we focused on this gene. Real-time qPCR analysis on larval worker ovaries evidenced an expression peak coinciding with the onset of autophagic cell death. Cellular localization analysis through fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed perinuclear spots resembling omega speckles known to regulate trafficking of RNA-binding proteins. With only four lncRNAs known so far in honey bees, two expressed in the ovaries, these findings open a novel perspective on regulatory factors acting in the fine tuning of developmental processes underlying phenotypic plasticity related to social life histories.

  9. Proteomics and Transcriptomics of BJAB Cells Expressing the Epstein-Barr Virus Noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genaro Pimienta

    Full Text Available In Epstein-Barr virus (EBV latent infection, the EBV-encoded RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 accumulate in the host cell nucleus to ~10(6 copies. While the expression of EBERs in cell lines is associated with transformation, a mechanistic explanation of their roles in EBV latency remains elusive. To identify EBER-specific gene expression features, we compared the proteome and mRNA transcriptome from BJAB cells (an EBV-negative B lymphoma cell line stably transfected with an empty plasmid or with one carrying both EBER genes. We identified ~1800 proteins with at least 2 SILAC pair measurements, of which only 8 and 12 were up- and downregulated ≥ 2-fold, respectively. One upregulated protein was PIK3AP1, a B-cell specific protein adapter known to activate the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway, which regulates alternative splicing and translation in addition to its pro-survival effects. In the mRNA-seq data, the mRNA levels for some of the proteins changing in the SILAC data did not change. We instead observed isoform switch events. We validated the most relevant findings with biochemical assays. These corroborated the upregulation of PIK3AP1 and AKT activation in BJAB cells expressing high levels of both EBERs and EBNA1 (a surrogate of Burkitt's lymphoma EBV latency I relative to those expressing only EBNA1. The mRNA-seq data in these cells showed multiple upregulated oncogenes whose mRNAs are enriched for 3´-UTR AU-rich elements (AREs, such as ccl3, ccr7, il10, vegfa and zeb1. The CCL3, CCR7, IL10 and VEGFA proteins promote cell proliferation and are associated with EBV-mediated lymphomas. In EBV latency, ZEB1 represses the transcription of ZEBRA, an EBV lytic phase activation factor. We previously found that EBER1 interacts with AUF1 in vivo and proposed stabilization of ARE-containing mRNAs. Thus, the ~10(6 copies of EBER1 may promote not only cell proliferation due to an increase in the levels of ARE-containing genes like ccl3, ccr7, il10, and vegfa, but

  10. Proteomics and Transcriptomics of BJAB Cells Expressing the Epstein-Barr Virus Noncoding RNAs EBER1 and EBER2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimienta, Genaro; Fok, Victor; Haslip, Maria; Nagy, Maria; Takyar, Seyedtaghi; Steitz, Joan A

    2015-01-01

    In Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent infection, the EBV-encoded RNAs EBER1 and EBER2 accumulate in the host cell nucleus to ~10(6) copies. While the expression of EBERs in cell lines is associated with transformation, a mechanistic explanation of their roles in EBV latency remains elusive. To identify EBER-specific gene expression features, we compared the proteome and mRNA transcriptome from BJAB cells (an EBV-negative B lymphoma cell line) stably transfected with an empty plasmid or with one carrying both EBER genes. We identified ~1800 proteins with at least 2 SILAC pair measurements, of which only 8 and 12 were up- and downregulated ≥ 2-fold, respectively. One upregulated protein was PIK3AP1, a B-cell specific protein adapter known to activate the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway, which regulates alternative splicing and translation in addition to its pro-survival effects. In the mRNA-seq data, the mRNA levels for some of the proteins changing in the SILAC data did not change. We instead observed isoform switch events. We validated the most relevant findings with biochemical assays. These corroborated the upregulation of PIK3AP1 and AKT activation in BJAB cells expressing high levels of both EBERs and EBNA1 (a surrogate of Burkitt's lymphoma EBV latency I) relative to those expressing only EBNA1. The mRNA-seq data in these cells showed multiple upregulated oncogenes whose mRNAs are enriched for 3´-UTR AU-rich elements (AREs), such as ccl3, ccr7, il10, vegfa and zeb1. The CCL3, CCR7, IL10 and VEGFA proteins promote cell proliferation and are associated with EBV-mediated lymphomas. In EBV latency, ZEB1 represses the transcription of ZEBRA, an EBV lytic phase activation factor. We previously found that EBER1 interacts with AUF1 in vivo and proposed stabilization of ARE-containing mRNAs. Thus, the ~10(6) copies of EBER1 may promote not only cell proliferation due to an increase in the levels of ARE-containing genes like ccl3, ccr7, il10, and vegfa, but also the

  11. Short non-coding RNAs as bacteria species identifiers detected by surface plasmon resonance enhanced common path interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greef, Charles; Petropavlovskikh, Viatcheslav; Nilsen, Oyvind; Khattatov, Boris; Plam, Mikhail; Gardner, Patrick; Hall, John

    2008-04-01

    Small non-coding RNA sequences have recently been discovered as unique identifiers of certain bacterial species, raising the possibility that they can be used as highly specific Biowarfare Agent detection markers in automated field deployable integrated detection systems. Because they are present in high abundance they could allow genomic based bacterial species identification without the need for pre-assay amplification. Further, a direct detection method would obviate the need for chemical labeling, enabling a rapid, efficient, high sensitivity mechanism for bacterial detection. Surface Plasmon Resonance enhanced Common Path Interferometry (SPR-CPI) is a potentially market disruptive, high sensitivity dual technology that allows real-time direct multiplex measurement of biomolecule interactions, including small molecules, nucleic acids, proteins, and microbes. SPR-CPI measures differences in phase shift of reflected S and P polarized light under Total Internal Reflection (TIR) conditions at a surface, caused by changes in refractive index induced by biomolecular interactions within the evanescent field at the TIR interface. The measurement is performed on a microarray of discrete 2-dimensional areas functionalized with biomolecule capture reagents, allowing simultaneous measurement of up to 100 separate analytes. The optical beam encompasses the entire microarray, allowing a solid state detector system with no scanning requirement. Output consists of simultaneous voltage measurements proportional to the phase differences resulting from the refractive index changes from each microarray feature, and is automatically processed and displayed graphically or delivered to a decision making algorithm, enabling a fully automatic detection system capable of rapid detection and quantification of small nucleic acids at extremely sensitive levels. Proof-of-concept experiments on model systems and cell culture samples have demonstrated utility of the system, and efforts are in

  12. Comprehensive Small RNA-Seq of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV)-Infected Human Cells Detects Patterns of Novel, Non-Coding AAV RNAs in the Absence of Cellular miRNA Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutika, Catrin; Mietzsch, Mario; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Weger, Stefan; Sohn, Madlen; Chen, Wei; Heilbronn, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Most DNA viruses express small regulatory RNAs, which interfere with viral or cellular gene expression. For adeno-associated virus (AAV), a small ssDNA virus with a complex biphasic life cycle miRNAs or other small regulatory RNAs have not yet been described. This is the first comprehensive Illumina-based RNA-Seq analysis of small RNAs expressed by AAV alone or upon co-infection with helper adenovirus or HSV. Several hotspots of AAV-specific small RNAs were detected mostly close to or within the AAV-ITR and apparently transcribed from the newly identified anti-p5 promoter. An additional small RNA hotspot was located downstream of the p40 promoter, from where transcription of non-coding RNAs associated with the inhibition of adenovirus replication were recently described. Parallel detection of known Ad and HSV miRNAs indirectly validated the newly identified small AAV RNA species. The predominant small RNAs were analyzed on Northern blots and by human argonaute protein-mediated co-immunoprecipitation. None of the small AAV RNAs showed characteristics of bona fide miRNAs, but characteristics of alternative RNA processing indicative of differentially regulated AAV promoter-associated small RNAs. Furthermore, the AAV-induced regulation of cellular miRNA levels was analyzed at different time points post infection. In contrast to other virus groups AAV infection had virtually no effect on the expression of cellular miRNA, which underscores the long-established concept that wild-type AAV infection is apathogenic. PMID:27611072

  13. Genome-wide detection of predicted non-coding RNAs in Rhizobium etli expressed during free-living and host-associated growth using a high-resolution tiling array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs Inge M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs play a crucial role in the intricate regulation of bacterial gene expression, allowing bacteria to quickly adapt to changing environments. In the past few years, a growing number of regulatory RNA elements have been predicted by computational methods, mostly in well-studied γ-proteobacteria but lately in several α-proteobacteria as well. Here, we have compared an extensive compilation of these non-coding RNA predictions to intergenic expression data of a whole-genome high-resolution tiling array in the soil-dwelling α-proteobacterium Rhizobium etli. Results Expression of 89 candidate ncRNAs was detected, both on the chromosome and on the six megaplasmids encompassing the R. etli genome. Of these, 11 correspond to functionally well characterized ncRNAs, 12 were previously identified in other α-proteobacteria but are as yet uncharacterized and 66 were computationally predicted earlier but had not been experimentally identified and were therefore classified as novel ncRNAs. The latter comprise 17 putative sRNAs and 49 putative cis-regulatory ncRNAs. A selection of these candidate ncRNAs was validated by RT-qPCR, Northern blotting and 5' RACE, confirming the existence of 4 ncRNAs. Interestingly, individual transcript levels of numerous ncRNAs varied during free-living growth and during interaction with the eukaryotic host plant, pointing to possible ncRNA-dependent regulation of these specialized processes. Conclusions Our data support the practical value of previous ncRNA prediction algorithms and significantly expand the list of candidate ncRNAs encoded in the intergenic regions of R. etli and, by extension, of α-proteobacteria. Moreover, we show high-resolution tiling arrays to be suitable tools for studying intergenic ncRNA transcription profiles across the genome. The differential expression levels of some of these ncRNAs may indicate a role in adaptation to changing environmental conditions.

  14. In silico Prediction of MicroRNAs in Plant Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiashre Sridhar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are endogenous, short (ca. 21 base, non-coding, post transcriptional, regulatory RNA molecules. These microRNAs (miRNAs are complementary to their target messenger RNAs, and bind principally to its 3' UTR. The conserved nature of miRNAs, and their high sequence complementarities of miRNA and its targets in plants, provides the basis for the easy identification of miRNA and its targets. Presence of miRNA in plant mitochondria is scantily studied. Identification of miRNA targets in plant mitochondria might indicate the involvement of miRNA in mitochondrial gene regulation and nuclear mitochondrial interactions. In this study, we used a computational approach to predict miRNA targets in plant mitochondria. The mitochondrial gene targets identified for miRNAs are located both in mitochondrial and nuclear compartments. This observation points to a fairly early origin of miRNAs. Besides, most of the targets identified can have copies in two compartments and suggest the possibility of miRNA mediated regulation. This study unfurls the possibility of regulating the plant mitochondrial genes by amending the miRNA genes in the nuclear compartment.

  15. MicroRNAs in the Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2 (MEF2)-regulated Gtl2-Dio3 Noncoding RNA Locus Promote Cardiomyocyte Proliferation by Targeting the Transcriptional Coactivator Cited2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Amanda L; Naya, Francisco J

    2015-09-18

    Understanding cell cycle regulation in postmitotic cardiomyocytes may lead to new therapeutic approaches to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue. We have demonstrated previously that microRNAs encoded by the Gtl2-Dio3 noncoding RNA locus function downstream of the MEF2A transcription factor in skeletal muscle regeneration. We have also reported expression of these miRNAs in the heart. Here we investigated the role of two Gtl2-Dio3 miRNAs, miR-410 and miR-495, in cardiac muscle. Overexpression of miR-410 and miR-495 robustly stimulated cardiomyocyte DNA synthesis and proliferation. Interestingly, unlike our findings in skeletal muscle, these miRNAs did not modulate the activity of the WNT signaling pathway. Instead, these miRNAs targeted Cited2, a coactivator required for proper cardiac development. Consistent with miR-410 and miR-495 overexpression, siRNA knockdown of Cited2 in neonatal cardiomyocytes resulted in robust proliferation. This phenotype was associated with reduced expression of Cdkn1c/p57/Kip2, a cell cycle inhibitor, and increased expression of VEGFA, a growth factor with proliferation-promoting effects. Therefore, miR-410 and miR-495 are among a growing number of miRNAs that have the ability to potently stimulate neonatal cardiomyocyte proliferation.

  16. Small noncoding RNAs in cells transformed by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1: a role for a tRNA fragment as a primer for reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggero, Katia; Guffanti, Alessandro; Corradin, Alberto; Sharma, Varun Kumar; De Bellis, Gianluca; Corti, Giorgio; Grassi, Angela; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ciminale, Vincenzo; D'Agostino, Donna M

    2014-04-01

    The present study employed mass sequencing of small RNA libraries to identify the repertoire of small noncoding RNAs expressed in normal CD4(+) T cells compared to cells transformed with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). The results revealed distinct patterns of microRNA expression in HTLV-1-infected CD4(+) T-cell lines with respect to their normal counterparts. In addition, a search for virus-encoded microRNAs yielded 2 sequences that originated from the plus strand of the HTLV-1 genome. Several sequences derived from tRNAs were expressed at substantial levels in both uninfected and infected cells. One of the most abundant tRNA fragments (tRF-3019) was derived from the 3' end of tRNA-proline. tRF-3019 exhibited perfect sequence complementarity to the primer binding site of HTLV-1. The results of an in vitro reverse transcriptase assay verified that tRF-3019 was capable of priming HTLV-1 reverse transcriptase. Both tRNA-proline and tRF-3019 were detected in virus particles isolated from HTLV-1-infected cells. These findings suggest that tRF-3019 may play an important role in priming HTLV-1 reverse transcription and could thus represent a novel target to control HTLV-1 infection. Small noncoding RNAs, a growing family of regulatory RNAs that includes microRNAs and tRNA fragments, have recently emerged as key players in many biological processes, including viral infection and cancer. In the present study, we employed mass sequencing to identify the repertoire of small noncoding RNAs in normal T cells compared to T cells transformed with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a retrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. The results revealed a distinct pattern of microRNA expression in HTLV-1-infected cells and a tRNA fragment (tRF-3019) that was packaged into virions and capable of priming HTLV-1 reverse transcription, a key event in the retroviral life cycle. These findings

  17. Micro RNAs in animal development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasterk, R.H.A.

    2006-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are approximately 22 nucleotide single-stranded noncoding RNA molecules that bind to target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and silence their expression. This Essay explores the importance of miRNAs in animal development and their possible roles in disease and evolution.

  18. Micro RNAs in animal development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasterk, R.H.A.

    2006-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are approximately 22 nucleotide single-stranded noncoding RNA molecules that bind to target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and silence their expression. This Essay explores the importance of miRNAs in animal development and their possible roles in disease and evolution.

  19. Brain-specific noncoding RNAs are likely to originate in repeats and may play a role in up-regulating genes in cis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francescatto, Margherita; Vitezic, Morana; Heutink, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    . Dysregulation of specific long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) has been shown in neuro-developmental and neuro-degenerative diseases thus highlighting the importance of lncRNAs in brain function. Even though it is known that lncRNAs are expressed in cells at low levels in a tissue-specific manner, bioinformatics analyses...... in the vicinity of brain-specific ncRNAs are significantly up regulated in the brain. Investigations of repeat representation show that brain-specific ncRNAs are significantly more likely to originate in repeat regions especially DNA/TcMar-Tigger compared with non-tissue-specific ncRNAs. We find SINE...

  20. Systematic Analysis of Small RNAs Associated with Human Mitochondria by Deep Sequencing: Detailed Analysis of Mitochondrial Associated miRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Lakshmi; Tomar, Dhanendra; Prajapati, Paresh; Singh, Rochika; Singh, Arun Kumar; Singh, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are one of the central regulators of many cellular processes beyond its well established role in energy metabolism. The inter-organellar crosstalk is critical for the optimal function of mitochondria. Many nuclear encoded proteins and RNA are imported to mitochondria. The translocation of small RNA (sRNA) including miRNA to mitochondria and other sub-cellular organelle is still not clear. We characterized here sRNA including miRNA associated with human mitochondria by cellular fractionation and deep sequencing approach. Mitochondria were purified from HEK293 and HeLa cells for RNA isolation. The sRNA library was generated and sequenced using Illumina system. The analysis showed the presence of unique population of sRNA associated with mitochondria including miRNA. Putative novel miRNAs were characterized from unannotated sRNA sequences. The study showed the association of 428 known, 196 putative novel miRNAs to mitochondria of HEK293 and 327 known, 13 putative novel miRNAs to mitochondria of HeLa cells. The alignment of sRNA to mitochondrial genome was also studied. The targets were analyzed using DAVID to classify them in unique networks using GO and KEGG tools. Analysis of identified targets showed that miRNA associated with mitochondria regulates critical cellular processes like RNA turnover, apoptosis, cell cycle and nucleotide metabolism. The six miRNAs (counts >1000) associated with mitochondria of both HEK293 and HeLa were validated by RT-qPCR. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic study demonstrating the associations of sRNA including miRNA with mitochondria that may regulate site-specific turnover of target mRNA important for mitochondrial related functions. PMID:22984580

  1. Identification of mRNA-like non-coding RNAs and validation of a mighty one named MAR in Panax ginseng

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meizhen Wang; Bin Wu; Chao Chen; Shanfa Lu

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non‐coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play significant roles in plants. However, little is known about lncRNAs in Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer, an economical y significant medicinal plant species. A total of 3,688 mRNA‐like non‐coding RNAs (mlncRNAs), a class of lncRNAs, were identified in P. ginseng. Approximately 40%of the identified mlncRNAs were processed into smal RNAs, implying their regulatory roles via smal RNA‐mediated mechanisms. Eleven miRNA‐generating mlncRNAs also pro-duced siRNAs, suggesting the coordinated production of miRNAs and siRNAs in P. ginseng. The mlncRNA‐derived smal RNAs might be 21‐, 22‐, or 24‐nt phased and could be generated from both or only one strand of mlncRNAs, or from super long hairpin structures. A ful‐length mlncRNA, termed MAR (multiple‐function‐associated mlncRNA), was cloned. It gener-ated the most abundant siRNAs. The MAR siRNAs were predominantly 24‐nt and some of them were distributed in a phased pattern. A total of 228 targets were predicted for 71 MAR siRNAs. Degradome sequencing validated 68 predicted targets involved in diverse metabolic pathways, suggesting the significance of MAR in P. ginseng. Consistently, MAR was detected in al tissues analyzed and responded to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment. It sheds light on the function of mlncRNAs in plants.

  2. Junk DNA and the long non-coding RNA twist in cancer genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Ling (Hui); K. Vincent; M. Pichler; R. Fodde (Riccardo); I. Berindan-Neagoe (Ioana); F.J. Slack (Frank); G.A. Calin (George)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe central dogma of molecular biology states that the flow of genetic information moves from DNA to RNA to protein. However, in the last decade this dogma has been challenged by new findings on non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs). More recently, long non-coding RNAs (lnc

  3. Defective i6A37 modification of mitochondrial and cytosolic tRNAs results from pathogenic mutations in TRIT1 and its substrate tRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Yarham

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the genetic basis for mitochondrial diseases is technically challenging given the size of the mitochondrial proteome and the heterogeneity of disease presentations. Using next-generation exome sequencing, we identified in a patient with severe combined mitochondrial respiratory chain defects and corresponding perturbation in mitochondrial protein synthesis, a homozygous p.Arg323Gln mutation in TRIT1. This gene encodes human tRNA isopentenyltransferase, which is responsible for i6A37 modification of the anticodon loops of a small subset of cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs. Deficiency of i6A37 was previously shown in yeast to decrease translational efficiency and fidelity in a codon-specific manner. Modelling of the p.Arg323Gln mutation on the co-crystal structure of the homologous yeast isopentenyltransferase bound to a substrate tRNA, indicates that it is one of a series of adjacent basic side chains that interact with the tRNA backbone of the anticodon stem, somewhat removed from the catalytic center. We show that patient cells bearing the p.Arg323Gln TRIT1 mutation are severely deficient in i6A37 in both cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs. Complete complementation of the i6A37 deficiency of both cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs was achieved by transduction of patient fibroblasts with wild-type TRIT1. Moreover, we show that a previously-reported pathogenic m.7480A>G mt-tRNASer(UCN mutation in the anticodon loop sequence A36A37A38 recognised by TRIT1 causes a loss of i6A37 modification. These data demonstrate that deficiencies of i6A37 tRNA modification should be considered a potential mechanism of human disease caused by both nuclear gene and mitochondrial DNA mutations while providing insight into the structure and function of TRIT1 in the modification of cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs.

  4. Defective i6A37 modification of mitochondrial and cytosolic tRNAs results from pathogenic mutations in TRIT1 and its substrate tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarham, John W; Lamichhane, Tek N; Pyle, Angela; Mattijssen, Sandy; Baruffini, Enrico; Bruni, Francesco; Donnini, Claudia; Vassilev, Alex; He, Langping; Blakely, Emma L; Griffin, Helen; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Bindoff, Laurence A; Ferrero, Ileana; Chinnery, Patrick F; McFarland, Robert; Maraia, Richard J; Taylor, Robert W

    2014-06-01

    Identifying the genetic basis for mitochondrial diseases is technically challenging given the size of the mitochondrial proteome and the heterogeneity of disease presentations. Using next-generation exome sequencing, we identified in a patient with severe combined mitochondrial respiratory chain defects and corresponding perturbation in mitochondrial protein synthesis, a homozygous p.Arg323Gln mutation in TRIT1. This gene encodes human tRNA isopentenyltransferase, which is responsible for i6A37 modification of the anticodon loops of a small subset of cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs. Deficiency of i6A37 was previously shown in yeast to decrease translational efficiency and fidelity in a codon-specific manner. Modelling of the p.Arg323Gln mutation on the co-crystal structure of the homologous yeast isopentenyltransferase bound to a substrate tRNA, indicates that it is one of a series of adjacent basic side chains that interact with the tRNA backbone of the anticodon stem, somewhat removed from the catalytic center. We show that patient cells bearing the p.Arg323Gln TRIT1 mutation are severely deficient in i6A37 in both cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs. Complete complementation of the i6A37 deficiency of both cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs was achieved by transduction of patient fibroblasts with wild-type TRIT1. Moreover, we show that a previously-reported pathogenic m.7480A>G mt-tRNASer(UCN) mutation in the anticodon loop sequence A36A37A38 recognised by TRIT1 causes a loss of i6A37 modification. These data demonstrate that deficiencies of i6A37 tRNA modification should be considered a potential mechanism of human disease caused by both nuclear gene and mitochondrial DNA mutations while providing insight into the structure and function of TRIT1 in the modification of cytosolic and mitochondrial tRNAs.

  5. Non-DNA-templated addition of nucleotides to the 3' end of RNAs by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase of Physarum polycephalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mara L; Miller, Dennis L

    2008-09-01

    Mitochondrial gene expression is necessary for proper mitochondrial biogenesis. Genes on the mitochondrial DNA are transcribed by a dedicated mitochondrial RNA polymerase (mtRNAP) that is encoded in the nucleus and imported into mitochondria. In the myxomycete Physarum polycephalum, nucleotides that are not specified by the mitochondrial DNA templates are inserted into some RNAs, a process called RNA editing. This is an essential step in the expression of these RNAs, as the insertion of the nontemplated nucleotides creates open reading frames for the production of proteins from mRNAs or produces required secondary structure in rRNAs and tRNAs. The nontemplated nucleotide is added to the 3' end of the RNA as the RNA is being synthesized during mitochondrial transcription. Because RNA editing is cotranscriptional, the mtRNAP is implicated in RNA editing as well as transcription. We have cloned the cDNA for the mtRNAP of Physarum and have expressed the mtRNAP in Escherichia coli. We have used in vitro transcription assays based on the Physarum mtRNAP to identify a novel activity associated with the mtRNAP in which non-DNA-templated nucleotides are added to the 3' end of RNAs. Any of the four ribonucleoside triphosphates (rNTPs) can act as precursors for this process, and this novel activity is observed when only one rNTP is supplied, a condition under which transcription does not occur. The implications of this activity for the mechanism of RNA editing are discussed.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA of Clathrina clathrus (Calcarea, Calcinea): six linear chromosomes, fragmented rRNAs, tRNA editing, and a novel genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, Dennis V; Pett, Walker; Voigt, Oliver; Wörheide, Gert; Forget, Lise; Lang, B Franz; Kayal, Ehsan

    2013-04-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are a large and ancient group of morphologically simple but ecologically important aquatic animals. Although their body plan and lifestyle are relatively uniform, sponges show extensive molecular and genetic diversity. In particular, mitochondrial genomes from three of the four previously studied classes of Porifera (Demospongiae, Hexactinellida, and Homoscleromorpha) have distinct gene contents, genome organizations, and evolutionary rates. Here, we report the mitochondrial genome of Clathrina clathrus (Calcinea, Clathrinidae), a representative of the fourth poriferan class, the Calcarea, which proves to be the most unusual. Clathrina clathrus mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) consists of six linear chromosomes 7.6-9.4 kb in size and encodes at least 37 genes: 13 protein codings, 2 ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), and 24 transfer RNAs (tRNAs). Protein genes include atp9, which has now been found in all major sponge lineages, but no atp8. Our analyses further reveal the presence of a novel genetic code that involves unique reassignments of the UAG codons from termination to tyrosine and of the CGN codons from arginine to glycine. Clathrina clathrus mitochondrial rRNAs are encoded in three (srRNA) and ≥6 (lrRNA) fragments distributed out of order and on several chromosomes. The encoded tRNAs contain multiple mismatches in the aminoacyl acceptor stems that are repaired posttranscriptionally by 3'-end RNA editing. Although our analysis does not resolve the phylogenetic position of calcareous sponges, likely due to their high rates of mitochondrial sequence evolution, it confirms mtDNA as a promising marker for population studies in this group. The combination of unusual mitochondrial features in C. clathrus redefines the extremes of mtDNA evolution in animals and further argues against the idea of a "typical animal mtDNA."

  7. Targeting Glial Mitochondrial Function for Protection from Cerebral Ischemia: Relevance, Mechanisms, and the Role of MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes and microglia play crucial roles in the response to cerebral ischemia and are effective targets for stroke therapy in animal models. MicroRNAs (miRs are important posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression that function by inhibiting the translation of select target genes. In astrocytes, miR expression patterns regulate mitochondrial function in response to oxidative stress via targeting of Bcl2 and heat shock protein 70 family members. Mitochondria play an active role in microglial activation, and miRs regulate the microglial neuroinflammatory response. As endogenous miR expression patterns can be altered with exogenous mimics and inhibitors, miR-targeted therapies represent a viable intervention to optimize glial mitochondrial function and improve clinical outcome following cerebral ischemia. In the present article, we review the role that astrocytes and microglia play in neuronal function and fate following ischemic stress, discuss the relevance of mitochondria in the glial response to injury, and present current evidence implicating miRs as critical regulators in the glial mitochondrial response to cerebral ischemia.

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of the sexual oribatid mite Steganacarus magnus: genome rearrangements and loss of tRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Stephen L

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete mitochondrial (mt genomes and the gene rearrangements therein are increasingly used as molecular markers for investigating phylogenetic relationships, especially for elucidating deep splits. Contributing to the complete mt genomes of arthropods, especially Arachnida, available so far, we provide the first complete mt genome of a sarcoptiform mite species, the sexually reproducing oribatid mite Steganacarus magnus (Acari, Oribatida which was determined by sequencing of long PCR products. Results The mt genome of S. magnus lacks 16 tRNAs, only those for leucine, histidine, proline, tryptophan, glutamine and serine are present. Within those tRNAs only tRNA-His and tRNA-Pro have kept their original position, the others are translocated. Furthermore, the mt genome of S. magnus consists of 13,818 bp and it is composed of 13 protein-coding genes and two genes for the ribosomal RNA subunits that are typically found in metazoan mt genomes. The gene order in S. magnus differs from the hypothetical ancestral chelicerate arrangement as conserved in Limulus polyphemus: instead of nad1-rrnL-rrnS-LNR-nad2 (tRNAs excluded S. magnus is nad2-rrnL-nad1-rrnS-LNR. Phylogenetic analyses of a concatenated amino acid dataset of all mt protein-coding genes of 28 arthropod species suggest a sister-group relationship of sarcoptiform and prostigmatid mites (S. magnus and Leptotrombidium. Conclusion The mt gene arrangement of S. magnus differs from the hypothetical ground plan of arthropods and from that of other mites further contributing to the variety of mt gene arrangements found in Arachnida. The unexpected lack of tRNAs is enigmatic, probably showing that the loss of mt genes is an ongoing evolutionary process. For solving phylogenetic relationships of oribatid mite lineages and their position within Acari further complete mt genomes are needed.

  9. Detection of PIWI and piRNAs in the mitochondria of mammalian cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, ChangHyuk, E-mail: netbuyer@hanmail.net [Cancer Genomics Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Tak, Hyosun, E-mail: chuberry@naver.com [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Mina, E-mail: minarho@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Computer Science, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hae Ryung, E-mail: heyhae@ncc.re.kr [New Experimental Therapeutics Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yon Hui, E-mail: yhkim@ncc.re.kr [New Experimental Therapeutics Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Tae, E-mail: bioktkim@ncc.re.kr [Molecular Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Balch, Curt, E-mail: curt.balch@gmail.com [Medical Sciences Program, Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Lee, Eun Kyung, E-mail: leeek@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Seungyoon, E-mail: seungyoon.nam@ncc.re.kr [Cancer Genomics Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • piRNA sequences were mapped to human mitochondrial (mt) genome. • We inspected small RNA-Seq datasets from somatic cell mt subcellular fractions. • Piwi and piRNA transcripts are present in mammalian somatic cancer cell mt fractions. - Abstract: Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are 26–31 nt small noncoding RNAs that are processed from their longer precursor transcripts by Piwi proteins. Localization of Piwi and piRNA has been reported mostly in nucleus and cytoplasm of higher eukaryotes germ-line cells, where it is believed that known piRNA sequences are located in repeat regions of nuclear genome in germ-line cells. However, localization of PIWI and piRNA in mammalian somatic cell mitochondria yet remains largely unknown. We identified 29 piRNA sequence alignments from various regions of the human mitochondrial genome. Twelve out 29 piRNA sequences matched stem-loop fragment sequences of seven distinct tRNAs. We observed their actual expression in mitochondria subcellular fractions by inspecting mitochondrial-specific small RNA-Seq datasets. Of interest, the majority of the 29 piRNAs overlapped with multiple longer transcripts (expressed sequence tags) that are unique to the human mitochondrial genome. The presence of mature piRNAs in mitochondria was detected by qRT-PCR of mitochondrial subcellular RNAs. Further validation showed detection of Piwi by colocalization using anti-Piwil1 and mitochondria organelle-specific protein antibodies.

  10. Mitochondrial RNAs of myxomycetes terminate with non-encoded 3′ poly(U) tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Tamara L.; Landweber, Laura F.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the 3′ ends of edited RNAs from the myxomycetes Stemonitis flavogenita and Physarum polycephalum using a modified anchor PCR approach. Surprisingly, we found that poly(A) tails are missing from the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 mRNA (coI) from both species and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3 mRNA (cox3) from P.polycephalum. Instead, non-encoded poly(U) tails of varying length were discovered at the 3′ ends of these transcripts. These are the first described examples of 3′ poly(U) tails on mature mRNAs in any system. PMID:11095686

  11. Identification of Circular RNAs From the Parental Genes Involved in Multiple Aspects of Cellular Metabolism in Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz eDarbani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RNA circularization made by head-to-tail back-splicing events is involved in the regulation of gene expression from transcriptional to post-translational levels. By exploiting RNA-Seq data and down-stream analysis, we shed light on the importance of circular RNAs in plants. The results introduce circular RNAs as novel interactors in the regulation of gene expression in plants and imply the comprehensiveness of this regulatory pathway by identifying circular RNAs for a diverse set of genes. These genes are involved in several aspects of cellular metabolism as hormonal signaling, intracellular protein sorting, carbohydrate metabolism and cell-wall biogenesis, respiration, amino acid biosynthesis, transcription and translation, and protein ubiquitination. Additionally, these parental loci of circular RNAs, from both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, encode for different transcript classes including protein coding transcripts, microRNA, rRNA, and long non-coding/microprotein coding RNAs. The results shed light on the mitochondrial exonic circular RNAs and imply the importance of circular RNAs for regulation of mitochondrial genes. Importantly, we introduce circular RNAs in barley and elucidate their cellular-level alterations across tissues and in response to micronutrients iron and zinc. In further support of circular RNAs' functional roles in plants, we report several cases where fluctuations of circRNAs do not correlate with the levels of their parental-loci encoded linear transcripts.Keywords: circular RNAs, coding and non-coding transcripts, leaves, seeds, transfer cells, micronutrients, mitochondria

  12. sRNASVM——基于SVM方法构建大肠杆菌sRNA预测模型%sRNASVM: A MODEL FOR PREDICTION OF SMALL NON-CODING RNAS IN E. coli USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立贵; 应晓敏; 曹源; 查磊; 李伍举

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the bacterial small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) that plays an important role in understanding interactions between bacteria and their environments. Here the authors introduced a scheme for constructing models for prediction of bacterial sRNAs through incorporating validated sRNAs into training dataset, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) K-12 was taken as an example to demonstrate the performance of the scheme. The results indicated that the 10-fold cross-validation classification accuracy of the constructed model, sRNASVM, was as high as 92.45%, which had better performance than two existing models. Therefore, the present work provides better support for experimental identification of bacterial sRNAs. The models and detailed results can be downloaded from the webpage http://ccb.bmi.ac.cn/smasvm/.%在理解细菌与环境的相互作用方面,细菌sRNA的识别发挥重要作用.文章介绍了一个通过增加训练集中实验证实的sRNA来构建细菌sRNA预测模型的策略,并以大肠杆菌K-12的sRNA预测为例来说明策略的可行性.结果表明,按此策略构建的模型sRNASVM的10倍交叉检验精度达到92.45%,高于目前文献中报道的精度.因此,构建的这一模型将为实验发现sRNA提供较好的生物信息学支持.有关模型和详细结果可以从网站http://ccb.bmi.ac.cn/smasvm/下载.

  13. Expression profiles of long non-coding RNAs located in autoimmune disease-associated regions reveal immune cell-type specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hrdlickova, Barbara; Kumar, Vinod; Kanduri, Kartiek; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Tripathi, Subhash; Karjalainen, Juha; Lund, Riikka J.; Li, Yang; Ullah, Ubaid; Modderman, Rutger; Abdulahad, Wayel; Lahdesmaki, Harri; Franke, Lude; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Withoff, Sebo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of variants associated with a risk for autoimmune and immune-related disorders (AID), our understanding of the disease mechanisms is still limited. In particular, more than 90% of the risk variants lie in non-coding

  14. Battles and hijacks: noncoding transcription in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Federico; Romero-Barrios, Natali; Jégu, Teddy; Benhamed, Moussa; Crespi, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription.

  15. Battles and hijacks: Noncoding transcription in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Characterization of mitochondrial control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNAs of Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Norma Machado; de Souza Dias, Aline; da Silva Valente, Vera Lúcia; Valiati, Victor Hugo

    2009-12-01

    The control region in insects is the major noncoding region in animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and is responsible for a large part of the variation in the DNA sequence and size of the genome of this organelle. In this study, the mtDNA control region, two intergenic spacers and tRNA genes of a Zaprionus indianus strain were cloned, sequenced and compared with other Drosophila species. The overall A+T content in the Z. indianus control region is 94.3%, and a comparison with other Drosophila species demonstrated that the most conserved region appears to be the 420 base pairs nearest to the tRNA(ile), similar to the findings of other authors. We also describe conserved sequence blocks, including a poly-T involved in the replication process of Drosophila mtDNA; a putative secondary structure also involved in the replication process and repeated sequences. tRNA(ile) sequence demonstrated the greatest variability when the tRNA sequences of species were compared.

  17. Non-coding RNA repertoires in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Leah; Finn, Stephen P; Cuffe, Sinead; Gray, Steven G

    2015-12-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare malignancy, with extremely poor survival rates. There are limited treatment options, with no second line standard of care for those who fail first line chemotherapy. Recent advances have been made to characterise the underlying molecular mechanisms of mesothelioma, in the hope of providing new targets for therapy. With the discovery that non-coding regions of our DNA are more than mere junk, the field of research into non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has exploded in recent years. Non-coding RNAs have diverse and important roles in a variety of cellular processes, but are also implicated in malignancy. In the following review, we discuss two types of non-coding RNAs, long non-coding RNAs and microRNAs, in terms of their role in the pathogenesis of MPM and their potential as both biomarkers and as therapeutic targets in this disease.

  18. On the consequences of aluminium stress in rye: repression of two mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Moneim, D; Contreras, R; Silva-Navas, J; Gallego, F J; Figueiras, A M; Benito, C

    2015-01-01

    Plants have developed several external and internal aluminium (Al) tolerance mechanisms. The external mechanism best characterised is the exudation of organic acids induced by Al. Rye (Secale cereale L.), one of the most Al-tolerant cereal crops, secretes both citrate and malate from its roots in response to Al. However, the role of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) genes in Al-induced stress has not been studied in rye. We have isolated the ScMDH1 and ScMDH2 genes, encoding two different mitochondrial MDH isozymes, in three Al-tolerant rye cultivars (Ailés, Imperial and Petkus) and one sensitive inbred rye line (Riodeva). These genes, which have seven exons and six introns, were located on the 1R (ScMDH1) and 3RL (ScMDH2) chromosomes. Exon 1 of ScMDH1 and exon 7 of ScMDH2 were the most variable among the different ryes. The hypothetical proteins encoded by these genes were classified as putative mitochondrial MDH isoforms. The phylogenetic relationships obtained using both cDNA and protein sequences indicated that the ScMDH1 and ScMDH2 proteins are orthologous to mitochondrial MDH1 and MDH2 proteins of different Poaceae species. The expression studies of the ScMDH1 and ScMDH2 genes indicate that it is more intense in roots than in leaves. Moreover, the amount of their corresponding mRNAs in roots from plants treated and not treated with Al was higher in the tolerant cultivar Petkus than in the sensitive inbred line Riodeva. In addition, ScMDH1 and ScMDH2 mRNA levels decreased in response to Al stress (repressive behaviour) in the roots of both the tolerant Petkus and the sensitive line Riodeva.

  19. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyeva, Anna V; Kuligina, Elena V; Bariakin, Dmitry N; Kozlov, Vadim V; Ryabchikova, Elena I; Richter, Vladimir A; Semenov, Dmitry V

    2017-01-01

    Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs' fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches.

  20. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Savelyeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs’ fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches.

  1. RNA Processing Factor 5 is required for efficient 5' cleavage at a processing site conserved in RNAs of three different mitochondrial genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauler, Aron; Jonietz, Christian; Stoll, Birgit; Stoll, Katrin; Braun, Hans-Peter; Binder, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    The 5' ends of many mitochondrial transcripts are generated post-transcriptionally. Recently, we identified three RNA PROCESSING FACTORs required for 5' end maturation of different mitochondrial mRNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana. All of these factors are pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPRPs), highly similar to RESTORERs OF FERTILTY (RF), that rescue male fertility in cytoplasmic male-sterile lines from different species. Therefore, we suggested a general role of these RF-like PPRPs in mitochondrial 5' processing. We now identified RNA PROCESSING FACTOR 5, a PPRP not classified as an RF-like protein, required for the efficient 5' maturation of the nad6 and atp9 mRNAs as well as 26S rRNA. The precursor molecules of these RNAs share conserved sequence elements, approximately ranging from positions -50 to +9 relative to mature 5' mRNA termini, suggesting these sequences to be at least part of the cis elements required for processing. The knockout of RPF5 has only a moderate influence on 5' processing of atp9 mRNA, whereas the generation of the mature nad6 mRNA and 26S rRNA is almost completely abolished in the mutant. The latter leads to a 50% decrease of total 26S rRNA species, resulting in an imbalance between the large rRNA and 18S rRNA. Despite these severe changes in RNA levels and in the proportion between the 26S and 18S rRNAs, mitochondrial protein levels appear to be unaltered in the mutant, whereas seed germination capacity is markedly reduced. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Function and Application Areas in Medicine of Non-Coding RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Guzelgul

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available RNA is the genetic material converting the genetic code that it gets from DNA into protein. While less than 2 % of RNA is converted into protein , more than 98 % of it can not be converted into protein and named as non-coding RNAs. 70 % of noncoding RNAs consists of introns , however, the rest part of them consists of exons. Non-coding RNAs are examined in two classes according to their size and functions. Whereas they are classified as long non-coding and small non-coding RNAs according to their size , they are grouped as housekeeping non-coding RNAs and regulating non-coding RNAs according to their function. For long years ,these non-coding RNAs have been considered as non-functional. However, today, it has been proved that these non-coding RNAs play role in regulating genes and in structural, functional and catalitic roles of RNAs converted into protein. Due to its taking a role in gene silencing mechanism, particularly in medical world , non-coding RNAs have led to significant developments. RNAi technolgy , which is used in designing drugs to be used in treatment of various diseases , is a ray of hope for medical world. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(3.000: 141-155

  3. Characterization and comparison of mitochondrial DNAs and rRNAs from Penicillium urticae and P. chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, J; Ohsaki, T; Yamamoto, H; Koichi, K; Shida, T

    1990-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mt DNA) from a patulin producer, Penicillium urticae (synonym P. griseofulvum), was 27.8 kb +/- 0.6 kb in size by electron microscopy and 27.2 kb by agarose gel electrophoresis. Restriction endonuclease maps for nine restriction enzymes were constructed, and eleven fragments which covered the total range of the mt DNA were cloned into the Escherichia coli plasmid vector pUC19. Southern analysis of the native genomes of P. urticae and P. chrysogenum with six of the cloned fragments as probes indicated similar genome arrangements as well as similar restriction maps. Both the large and small rRNA genes of P. urticae and P. chrysogenum were located on these restriction maps using Southern hybridization, and the result also supported the similar arrangement. Agarose/formaldehyde gel electrophoresis indicated that the small rRNA was 1.5 kb in size in both species; but, surprisingly, the large rRNA was 4.2 kb in size for P. urticae and 3.5 kb for P. chrysogenum. These sizes were, respectively, 1.1 kb and 0.4 kb larger than those from the very closely related Aspergillus nidulans.

  4. RNA-seq analysis of prostate cancer in the Chinese population identifies recurrent gene fusions,cancer-associated long noncoding RNAs and aberrant alternative splicings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shancheng Ren; Weidong Xu; Chao Chen; Fubo Wang; Xinwu Guo; Ji Lu; Jun Yang; Min Wei; Zhijian Tian; Yinghui Guan; Liang Tang; Zhiyu Peng; Chuanliang Xu; Linhui Wang; Xu Gao; Wei Tian; Jian Wang; Huanming Yang; Jun Wang; Yinghao Sun; Jian-Hua Mao; Yongwei Yu; Changjun Yin; Xin Gao; Zilian Cui; Jibin Zhang; Kang Yi

    2012-01-01

    There are remarkable disparities among patients of different races with prostate cancer; however,the mechanism underlying this difference remains unclear.Here,we present a comprehensive landscape of the transcriptome profiles of 14 primary prostate cancers and their paired normal counterparts from the Chinese population using RNA-seq,revealing tremendous diversity across prostate cancer transcriptomes with respect to gene fusions,long noneoding RNAs (long ncRNA),alternative splicing and somatic mutations.Three of the 14 tumors (21.4%) harbored a TMPRSS2-ERG fusion,and the low prevalence of this fusion in Chinese patients was further confirmed in an additional tumor set (10/54=18.5%).Notably,two novel gene fusions,CTAGE5-KHDRBS3 (20/54=37%) and USP9Y-TTTY15(19/54=35.2%),occurred frequently in our patient cohort.Further systematic transcriptional profiling identified numerous long ncRNAs that were differentially expressed in the tumors.An analysis of the correlation between expression of long ncRNA and genes suggested that long ncRNAs may have functions beyond transcriptional regulation.This study yielded new insights into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer in the Chinese population.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of Cephalothrix simula (Iwata) (Nemertea: Palaeonemertea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Xia; Sundberg, Per; Norenburg, Jon L; Sun, Shi-Chun

    2009-08-01

    The first complete mitochondrial genome sequence for a nemertean, Cephalothrix simula, was determined by conventional and long PCR and sequencing with primer walking methods. This circular genome is 16,296 bp in size and encodes 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, and 22 transfer RNAs) typically found in metazoans. All genes are encoded on H-strand except two tRNAs (trnT and trnP). It differs from those reported for other metazoans, but some gene junctions are shared with those of other protostomes. Structure of the mitochondrial genome of C. simula is mostly concordant with the partial mitochondrial genome known for Cephalothrix rufifrons, but notable differences include three large indel events and transposition of 2 tRNAs. Nucleotide composition of the mitochondrial genome of C. simula is highly A+T biased. The compositional skew is strongly reflected in the codon-usage patterns and the amino acid compositions of the mitochondrial proteins. An AT-rich noncoding region with potential to form stem-loop structures may be involved in the initiation of replication or transcription. Gene adjacencies and phylogenetic analysis based on the 12 concatenated amino acid sequences (except atp8) of mitochondrial protein-coding genes show that the nemertean is close to the coelomate lophotrochozoans, rather than the acoelomate platyhelminths.

  6. Toward understanding non-coding RNA roles in intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Fengzhen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is a common and frequently life-threatening cerebrovascular disease, which is mostly related with a ruptured intracranial aneurysm. Its complications include rebleeding, early brain injury, cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, chronic hydrocephalus, and also non neurological problems. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, comprising of microRNAs (miRNAs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, play an important role in intracranial aneurysms and SAH. Here, we review the non-coding RNAs expression profile and their related mechanisms in intracranial aneurysms and SAH. Moreover, we suggest that these non-coding RNAs function as novel molecular biomarkers to predict intracranial aneurysms and SAH, and may yield new therapies after SAH in the future.

  7. Identification of miRNA, lncRNA and mRNA-associated ceRNA networks and potential biomarker for MELAS with mitochondrial DNA A3243G mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhuang, Qianqian; Ji, Kunqian; Wen, Bing; Lin, Pengfei; Zhao, Yuying; Li, Wei; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2017-01-01

    Researchers in the field of mitochondrial biology are increasingly unveiling of the complex mechanisms between mitochondrial dysfunction and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). However, roles of ncRNAs underlying mitochondrial myopathy remain unexplored. The aim of this study was to elucidate the regulating networks of dysregulated ncRNAs in Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes (MELAS) with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) A3243G mutation, which might make contributions to the unveiling of the complex mechanisms underlying mitochondrial myopathy and, possibly, new tools applicable to clinical practice. Through high-throughput technology followed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and bioinformatics analyses, for the first time, we found that the dysregulated muscle miRNAs and lncRNAs between 20 MELAS patients with mtDNA A3243G mutation and 20 controls formed complex regulation networks and participated in immune system, signal transduction, translation, muscle contraction and other pathways in discovery and training phase. Then, selected ncRNAs were validated in muscle and serum in independent validation cohorts by qRT-PCR. Finally, ROC curve analysis indicated reduced serum miR-27b-3p had the better diagnosis value than lactate and might serve as a novel, noninvasive biomarker for MELAS. Follow-up investigation is warranted to better understand roles of ncRNAs in mitochondrial myopathy pathogenesis. PMID:28139706

  8. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  9. Two novel DXZ4-associated long noncoding RNAs show developmental changes in expression coincident with heterochromatin formation at the human (Homo sapiens) macrosatellite repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Debbie M; Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2015-12-01

    On the male X and female active X chromosome (Xa), the macrosatellite repeat (MSR) DXZ4 is packaged into constitutive heterochromatin characterized by CpG methylation and histone H3 tri-methylated at lysine-9 (H3K9me3). In contrast, DXZ4 on the female inactive X chromosome (Xi), is packaged into euchromatin, is bound by the architectural protein CCCTC-binding factor, and mediates Xi-specific long-range cis contact with similarly packaged tandem repeats on the Xi. In cancer, male DXZ4 can inappropriately revert to a Xi-like state and other MSRs have been reported to adopt alternate chromatin configurations in response to disease. Given this plasticity, we sought to identify factors that might control heterochromatin at DXZ4. In human embryonic stem cells, we found low levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at DXZ4 and that this mark is lost upon differentiation as H3K9me3 is acquired. We identified two previously undescribed DXZ4 associated noncoding transcripts (DANT1 and DANT2) that are transcribed toward DXZ4 from promoters flanking the array. Each generates transcript isoforms that traverse the MSR. However, upon differentiation, enhancer of Zeste-2 silences DANT1, and DANT2 transcription terminates prior to entering DXZ4. These data support a model wherein DANT1 and/or DANT2 may function to regulate constitutive heterochromatin formation at this MSR.

  10. Two novel DXZ4-associated long noncoding RNAs show developmental changes in expression coincident with heterochromatin formation at the human (Homo sapiens) macrosatellite repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Debbie M.; Darrow, Emily M.; Chadwick, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    On the male X and female active X chromosome (Xa), the macrosatellite repeat (MSR) DXZ4 is packaged into constitutive heterochromatin characterized by CpG methylation and histone H3 tri-methylated at lysine-9 (H3K9me3). In contrast, DXZ4 on the female inactive X chromosome (Xi), is packaged into euchromatin, is bound by the architectural protein CCCTC-binding factor, and mediates Xi-specific long-range cis contact with similarly packaged tandem repeats on the Xi. In cancer, male DXZ4 can inappropriately revert to a Xi-like state and other MSRs have been reported to adopt alternate chromatin configurations in response to disease. Given this plasticity, we sought to identify factors that might control heterochromatin at DXZ4. In human embryonic stem cells, we found low levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at DXZ4, and that this mark is lost upon differentiation as H3K9me3 is acquired. We identified two previously undescribed DXZ4 associated non-coding transcripts (DANT1 and DANT2) that are transcribed towards DXZ4 from promoters flanking the array. Each generates transcript isoforms that traverse the MSR. However, upon differentiation, Enhancer of Zeste-2 silences DANT1, and DANT2 transcription terminates prior to entering DXZ4. These data support a model wherein DANT1 and/or DANT2 may function to regulate constitutive heterochromatin formation at this MSR. PMID:26188586

  11. Diagnostic and therapeutic application of noncoding RNAsfor hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chikako Shibata; Motoyuki Otsuka; Takahiro Kishikawa; Motoko Ohno; Takeshi Yoshikawa; Akemi Takata; Kazuhiko Koike

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNA moleculesthat regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally,targeting thousands of messenger RNAs. Long noncodingRNAs (lncRNAs), another class of noncodingRNAs, have been determined to be also involved intranscription regulation and translation of target genes.Since deregulated expression levels or functions ofmiRNAs and lncRNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)are frequently observed, clinical use of noncodingRNAs for novel diagnostic and therapeutic applicationsin the management of HCCs is highly and emergentlyexpected. Here, we summarize recent findingsregarding deregulated miRNAs and lncRNAs for theirpotential clinical use as diagnostic and prognosticbiomarkers of HCC. Specifically, we emphasize thederegulated expression levels of such noncoding RNAsin patients' sera as noninvasive biomarkers, a field thatrequires urgent improvement in the clinical surveillanceof HCC. Since nucleotide-based strategies are beingapplied to clinical therapeutics, we further summarizeclinical and preclinical trials using oligonucleotidesinvolving the use of miRNAs and small interfering RNAsagainst HCC as novel therapeutics. Finally, we discusscurrent open questions, which must be clarified in thenear future for realistic clinical applications of thesenew strategies.

  12. G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 are required for translation of interferon stimulated mRNAs and are targeted by a dengue virus non-coding RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katell Bidet

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Viral RNA-host protein interactions are critical for replication of flaviviruses, a genus of positive-strand RNA viruses comprising major vector-borne human pathogens including dengue viruses (DENV. We examined three conserved host RNA-binding proteins (RBPs G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 in dengue virus (DENV-2 infection and found them to be novel regulators of the interferon (IFN response against DENV-2. The three RBPs were required for the accumulation of the protein products of several interferon stimulated genes (ISGs, and for efficient translation of PKR and IFITM2 mRNAs. This identifies G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 as novel regulators of the antiviral state. Their antiviral activity was antagonized by the abundant DENV-2 non-coding subgenomic flaviviral RNA (sfRNA, which bound to G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1, inhibited their activity and lead to profound inhibition of ISG mRNA translation. This work describes a new and unexpected level of regulation for interferon stimulated gene expression and presents the first mechanism of action for an sfRNA as a molecular sponge of anti-viral effectors in human cells.

  13. G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 are required for translation of interferon stimulated mRNAs and are targeted by a dengue virus non-coding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidet, Katell; Dadlani, Dhivya; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2014-07-01

    Viral RNA-host protein interactions are critical for replication of flaviviruses, a genus of positive-strand RNA viruses comprising major vector-borne human pathogens including dengue viruses (DENV). We examined three conserved host RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 in dengue virus (DENV-2) infection and found them to be novel regulators of the interferon (IFN) response against DENV-2. The three RBPs were required for the accumulation of the protein products of several interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), and for efficient translation of PKR and IFITM2 mRNAs. This identifies G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 as novel regulators of the antiviral state. Their antiviral activity was antagonized by the abundant DENV-2 non-coding subgenomic flaviviral RNA (sfRNA), which bound to G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1, inhibited their activity and lead to profound inhibition of ISG mRNA translation. This work describes a new and unexpected level of regulation for interferon stimulated gene expression and presents the first mechanism of action for an sfRNA as a molecular sponge of anti-viral effectors in human cells.

  14. Human 45,X Fibroblast Transcriptome Reveals Distinct Differentially Expressed Genes Including Long Noncoding RNAs Potentially Associated with the Pathophysiology of Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patowary, Ashok; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Deobagkar, Deepti D.

    2014-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality characterized by the absence of whole or part of the X chromosome in females. This X aneuploidy condition is associated with a diverse set of clinical phenotypes such as gonadal dysfunction, short stature, osteoporosis and Type II diabetes mellitus, among others. These phenotypes differ in their severity and penetrance among the affected individuals. Haploinsufficiency for a few X linked genes has been associated with some of these disease phenotypes. RNA sequencing can provide valuable insights to understand molecular mechanism of disease process. In the current study, we have analysed the transcriptome profiles of human untransformed 45,X and 46,XX fibroblast cells and identified differential expression of genes in these two karyotypes. Functional analysis revealed that these differentially expressing genes are associated with bone differentiation, glucose metabolism and gonadal development pathways. We also report differential expression of lincRNAs in X monosomic cells. Our observations provide a basis for evaluation of cellular and molecular mechanism(s) in the establishment of Turner syndrome phenotypes. PMID:24932682

  15. 生物节律基因非编码RNA调控机制%Regulation of Circadian Gene by Non-coding RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳利; 曲丽娜; 李莹辉

    2016-01-01

    节律性的振荡不仅存在于生物节律中枢也存在于外周器官、组织及细胞中,其产生依赖于节律基因的转录、转录后及翻译后水平调控.近几年,生物节律转录后水平调控机制研究成为热点.非编码RNA (ncRNAs)调控组分小RNA (microRNA)与长链非编码RNA (lncRNA)作为参与转录后调控的重要分子,已有研究表明microRNA与lncRNA调控节律基因mRNA与蛋白的相位及振幅.本文概述microRNA与lncRNA参与昼夜节律中枢与外周调控的研究进展,为生物节律转录后调控机制的进一步研究提供参考.

  16. Human 45,X fibroblast transcriptome reveals distinct differentially expressed genes including long noncoding RNAs potentially associated with the pathophysiology of Turner syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shriram N Rajpathak

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality characterized by the absence of whole or part of the X chromosome in females. This X aneuploidy condition is associated with a diverse set of clinical phenotypes such as gonadal dysfunction, short stature, osteoporosis and Type II diabetes mellitus, among others. These phenotypes differ in their severity and penetrance among the affected individuals. Haploinsufficiency for a few X linked genes has been associated with some of these disease phenotypes. RNA sequencing can provide valuable insights to understand molecular mechanism of disease process. In the current study, we have analysed the transcriptome profiles of human untransformed 45,X and 46,XX fibroblast cells and identified differential expression of genes in these two karyotypes. Functional analysis revealed that these differentially expressing genes are associated with bone differentiation, glucose metabolism and gonadal development pathways. We also report differential expression of lincRNAs in X monosomic cells. Our observations provide a basis for evaluation of cellular and molecular mechanism(s in the establishment of Turner syndrome phenotypes.

  17. Human 45,X fibroblast transcriptome reveals distinct differentially expressed genes including long noncoding RNAs potentially associated with the pathophysiology of Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpathak, Shriram N; Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen Karuthedath; Patowary, Ashok; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Deobagkar, Deepti D

    2014-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal abnormality characterized by the absence of whole or part of the X chromosome in females. This X aneuploidy condition is associated with a diverse set of clinical phenotypes such as gonadal dysfunction, short stature, osteoporosis and Type II diabetes mellitus, among others. These phenotypes differ in their severity and penetrance among the affected individuals. Haploinsufficiency for a few X linked genes has been associated with some of these disease phenotypes. RNA sequencing can provide valuable insights to understand molecular mechanism of disease process. In the current study, we have analysed the transcriptome profiles of human untransformed 45,X and 46,XX fibroblast cells and identified differential expression of genes in these two karyotypes. Functional analysis revealed that these differentially expressing genes are associated with bone differentiation, glucose metabolism and gonadal development pathways. We also report differential expression of lincRNAs in X monosomic cells. Our observations provide a basis for evaluation of cellular and molecular mechanism(s) in the establishment of Turner syndrome phenotypes.

  18. Advanced formulation of base pair changes in the stem regions of ribosomal RNAs; its application to mitochondrial rRNAs for resolving the phylogeny of animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Jinya; Sugaya, Nobuyoshi

    2003-06-21

    The ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) of animal mitochondria, especially those of arthropod mitochondria, have a higher content of G:U and U:G base pairs in their stem regions than the nuclear rRNAs. Thus, the theoretical formulation of base pair changes is extended to incorporate the faster base pair changes A:UG:UG:C and U:AU:GC:G into the previous formulation of the slower base pair changes between A:U, G:C, C:G and U:A. The relative base pair change probability containing the faster and slower base pair changes is theoretically derived to estimate the divergence time of rRNAs under the influence of selection for these base pairs. Using the cartilaginous fish-teleost fish divergence and the crustacean-insect divergence as calibration points, the present method successfully predicts the divergence times of the main branches of animals: Deuterostomia and Protostomia diverged 9.2 x 10(8) years ago, the divergence of Echinodermata, Hemichordata and Cephalochordata succeedingly occurred during the period from 8 x 10(8) to 6 x 10(8) years ago, while Arthropoda, Annelida and Mollusca diverged almost concomitantly about 7 x 10(8) years ago. The dating for the divergence of Platyhelminthes and Cnidaria is traced back to 1.2 x 10(9) years ago. This result is consistent with the fossil records in the Stirling Range Formation of southwestern Australia, the Ediacara and Avalon faunas and the Cambrian Burgess Shale. Thus, the present method may be useful for estimating the divergence times of animals ranging from 10(8) to 10(9) years ago, resolving the difficult problems, e.g. deviation from rate constancy and large sampling variances, in the usual methods of treating apparent change rates between individual bases and/or base pairs.

  19. A Csr-type regulatory system, including small non-coding RNAs, regulates the global virulence regulator RovA of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis through RovM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Böhme, Katja; Rohde, Manfred; Dersch, Petra

    2008-06-01

    The MarR-type regulator RovA controls expression of virulence genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in response to environmental signals. Using a genetic strategy to discover components that influence rovA expression, we identified new regulatory factors with homology to components of the carbon storage regulator system (Csr). We showed that overexpression of a CsrB- or a CsrC-type RNA activates rovA, whereas a CsrA-like protein represses RovA synthesis. We further demonstrate that influence of the Csr system on rovA is indirect and occurs through control of the LysR regulator RovM, which inhibits rovA transcription. The CsrA protein had also a major influence on the motility of Yersinia, which was independent of RovM. The CsrB and CsrC RNAs are differentially expressed in Yersinia. CsrC is highly induced in complex but not in minimal media, indicating that medium-dependent rovM expression is mediated through CsrC. CsrB synthesis is generally very low. However, overexpression of the response regulator UvrY was found to activate CsrB production, which in turn represses CsrC synthesis independent of the growth medium. In summary, the post-transcriptional Csr-type components were shown to be key regulators in the co-ordinated environmental control of physiological processes and virulence factors, which are crucial for the initiation of Yersinia infections.

  20. Complete mitochondrial genome of Coelomactra antiquata (Mollusca: Bivalvia): The first representative from the family Mactridae with novel gene order and unusual tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xueping; Zhao, Nana; Shen, Xin; Hao, Jue; Liang, Meng; Zhu, Xiaolin; Cheng, Hanliang; Yan, Binlun; Liu, Zhaopu

    2012-06-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome plays an important role in the accurate inference of phylogenetic relationships among metazoans. Mactridae, also known as trough shells or duck clams, is an important family of marine bivalve clams in the order Veneroida. Here we present the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Xishishe Coelomactra antiquata (Mollusca: Bivalvia), which is the first representative from the family Mactridae. The mitochondrial genome of C. antiquata is of 17,384bp in length, and encodes 35 genes, including 12 protein-coding, 21 transfer RNA, and 2 ribosomal RNA genes. Compared with the typical gene content of animal mitochondrial genomes, atp8 and tRNAS(2) are missing. Gene order of the mitochondrial genome of C. antiquata is unique compared with others from Veneroida. In the mitochondrial genome of the C. antiquata, a total of 2189bp of non-coding nucleotides are scattered among 26 non-coding regions. The largest non-coding region contains one section of tandem repeats (99 bp×11), which is the second largest tandem repeats found in the mitochondrial genomes from Veneroida. The phylogenetic trees based on mitochondrial genomes support the monophyly of Veneridae and Lucinidae, and the relationship at the family level: ((Veneridae+Mactridae)+(Cardiidae+Solecurtidae))+Lucinidae. The phylogenetic result is consistent with the morphological classification. Meanwhile, bootstrap values are very high (BP=94-100), suggesting that the evolutionary relationship based on mitochondrial genomes is very reliable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Competitive Endogenous RNAs in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    system in prostate cancer. The goal of this study was to determine whether lncRNAs Body The importance of lncRNAs in human diseases may have to do...exert their functions. For example, lncRNAs may exert their functions through interaction with regulatory proteins such as those chromatin remodeling ...ABSTRACT The human genome actively transcribes a large amount of non-coding genes, including microRNA and long non- coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Compared to

  2. Parallel loss of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and mtDNA-encoded tRNAs in Cnidaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haen, Karri M; Pett, Walker; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2010-10-01

    Unlike most animal mitochondrial (mt) genomes, which encode a set of 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs) sufficient for mt protein synthesis, those of cnidarians have only retained one or two tRNA genes. Whether the missing cnidarian mt-tRNA genes relocated outside the main mt chromosome or were lost remains unclear. It is also unknown what impact the loss of tRNA genes had on other components of the mt translational machinery. Here, we explored the nuclear genome of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis for the presence of mt-tRNA genes and their corresponding mt aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mt-aaRS). We detected no candidates for mt-tRNA genes and only two mt-aaRS orthologs. At the same time, we found that all but one cytosolic aaRS appear to be targeted to mitochondria. These results indicate that the loss of mt-tRNAs in Cnidaria is genuine and occurred in parallel with the loss of nuclear-encoded mt-aaRS. Our phylogenetic analyses of individual aaRS revealed that although the nearly total loss of mt-aaRS is rare, aaRS gene deletion and replacement have occurred throughout the evolution of Metazoa.

  3. Long noncoding RNA in hematopoiesis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, Ansuman T; Chang, Howard Y

    2015-05-19

    Dynamic gene expression during cellular differentiation is tightly coordinated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. An emerging theme is the central role of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the regulation of this specificity. Recent advances demonstrate that lncRNAs are expressed in a lineage-specific manner and control the development of several cell types in the hematopoietic system. Moreover, specific lncRNAs are induced to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. lncRNAs can function via RNA-DNA, RNA-RNA, and RNA-protein target interactions. As a result, they affect several stages of gene regulation, including chromatin modification, mRNA biogenesis, and protein signaling. We discuss recent advances, future prospects, and challenges in understanding the roles of lncRNAs in immunity and immune-mediated diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of a spiraling whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus Russell (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming-Xing, Lu; Zhi-Teng, Chen; Wei-Wei, Yu; Yu-Zhou, Du

    2017-03-01

    We report the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of a spiraling whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). The 16 170 bp long genome consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 20 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs, and a control region. The A. dispersus mitogenome also includes a cytb-like non-coding region and shows several variations relative to the typical insect mitogenome. A phylogenetic tree has been constructed using the 13 protein-coding genes of 12 related species from Hemiptera. Our results would contribute to further study of phylogeny in Aleyrodidae and Hemiptera.

  5. A Protocol for Measurement of Noncoding RNA in Human Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that act as regulators of gene expression by targeting mature messenger RNAs. Following the initial report of the presence of miRNAs in serum and plasma a number of studies have successfully demonstrated the use of these miRNAs as biomarkers of disease. Currently, there are many methods of isolating total RNA from liquid samples. Here, we describe a simple, cost effective method for extraction of RNA from human serum as well as subsequent real time PCR analysis of miRNA levels.

  6. Influenza A virus preferentially snatches noncoding RNA caps

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) lacks the enzyme for adding 5′ caps to its RNAs and snatches the 5′ ends of host capped RNAs to prime transcription. Neither the preference of the host RNA sequences snatched nor the effect of cap-snatching on host processes is completely defined. Previous studies of influenza cap-snatching used poly(A)-selected RNAs from infected cells or relied on annotated host genes to define the snatched host RNAs, and thus lack details on many noncoding host RNAs including snRNAs...

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of the clam Mactra veneriformis (Bivalvia: Mactridae): has a unique non-coding region, missing atp8 and typical tRNA Ser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xueping; Shen, Xin; Zhao, Nana; Tian, Mei; Liang, Meng; Hao, Jue; Cheng, Hanliang; Yan, Binlun; Dong, Zhiguo; Zhu, Xiaoling

    2013-12-01

    Mactra veneriformis (Bivalvia: Mactridae) is one commonly cultured bivalve species in the western Pacific Ocean. In the current study, the complete mitrochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the clam M. veneriformis was determined. The M. veneriformis mt genome is 16,854 bp in length and encodes 34 genes on the same strand, including 12 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 20 transfer RNA genes. The length of 12 PCGs is 11,358 bp, which accounts for 67.4% in whole mt genome. The proportion is similar to other clams' mt genomes and within those of bivalves mt genomes. Gene order (which is the same as that of RZ C. antiquata) of M. veneriformis mt genome is compared with that of other veneroids. Compared with the typical gene content of animal mt genomes, atp8 and two tRNA(Ser) genes are missing in the mt genome. All non-coding regions are 1978 bp in length, among them the longest one is speculated as the control region, which is located between the tRNA(His) and tRNA(Arg). The secondary largest non-coding region (NCR(664)) between the tRNA(Gln) and tRNA(Thr) in the M. veneriformis mt genome contains one section of tandem repeats (125 nt × 5.2 or 249 nt × 2.6). The tandem repeats account for 97.89% (650/664) of the NCR(664), which is a unique characteristic of the M. veneriformis mt non-coding regions compared with those of other veneroids.

  8. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of tetraploid Carassius auratus gibelio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Liang, Hong-Wei; Zou, Gui-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced from the tetraploid Carassius auratus gibelio in this study. The genome sequence was 16,576 bp in length. The mitochondrial genome contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, and 2 non-coding regions (control region and origin of light-strand replication). All genes were encoded on the heavy strain except for ND6 and eight tRNA genes. The overall base composition is 31.61% A, 25.81% T, 26.62% G, 15.96% C, with an A+T bias of 57.42%. The complete mitogenome data provides useful genetic markers for the studies on the molecular identification, population genetics, phylogenetic analysis and conservation genetics.

  9. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Zacco platypus (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueng, Yih-Tsong; Chen, Kun-Neng; Han, Chiao-Chuan; Cheng, Chung-Yao; Li, Yi-Min

    2015-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Zacco platypus (Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae), which has broader distribution range and diverse genetic structure than other species under the genus Zacco, was first determined in this study. The mitochondrial genome is 16,612 base pairs (bp) in length, encoding 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and 1 non-coding control region. Its gene arrangement and translation direction were identical to those of other typical vertebrate. Control region (D-Loop), of 929 bp lengths long, is located between tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe). The overall base composition of the heavy strand shows T 27.02%, C 26.23%, A 28.94% and G 17.82%, with a slight AT bias of 55.95%.

  10. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Microphysogobio brevirostris (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chung-Yao; Wang, Jiang-Ping; Ho, Chuan-Wen; Cheng, Ju-Wen; Ueng, Yih-Tsong

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Microphysogobio brevirostris (Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae), an endemic primary freshwater fish in Taiwan. This mitochondrial genome, consisting of 16,608 base pairs (bp), encoded 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, and a non-coding control region as those found in other vertebrates, with the gene synteny identical to that of typical vertebrates. Control region (D-Loop), of 929 bp lengths long, is located between tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe). The overall base composition of the heavy strand shows T 26.28%, C 26.62%, A 30.26%, and G 16.85%, with a slight AT bias of 56.53%.

  11. Detecting and comparing non-coding RNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Bussotti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    En los últimos años el interés en el campo de los ARN no codificantes ha crecido mucho a causa del enorme aumento de la cantidad de secuencias no codificantes disponibles y a que muchos de estos transcriptos han dado muestra de ser importantes en varias funciones celulares. En este contexto, es fundamental el desarrollo de métodos para la correcta detección y comparativa de secuencias de ARN. Alinear nucleótidos es uno de los enfoques principales para buscar genes homólogos, identificar relac...

  12. Oxidative Stress and MicroRNAs in Vascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Martelli

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has been demonstrated to play a causal role in different vascular diseases, such as hypertension, diabetic vasculopathy, hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Indeed, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production is known to impair endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell functions, contributing to the development of cardiovascular diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are non-coding RNA molecules that modulate the stability and/or the translational efficiency of target messenger RNAs. They have been shown to be modulated in most biological processes, including in cellular responses to redox imbalance. In particular, miR-200 family members play a crucial role in oxidative-stress dependent endothelial dysfunction, as well as in cardiovascular complications of diabetes and obesity. In addition, different miRNAs, such as miR-210, have been demonstrated to play a key role in mitochondrial metabolism, therefore modulating ROS production and sensitivity. In this review, we will discuss miRNAs modulated by ROS or involved in ROS production, and implicated in vascular diseases in which redox imbalance has a pathogenetic role.

  13. Oxidative stress and microRNAs in vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenta, Alessandra; Greco, Simona; Gaetano, Carlo; Martelli, Fabio

    2013-08-22

    Oxidative stress has been demonstrated to play a causal role in different vascular diseases, such as hypertension, diabetic vasculopathy, hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Indeed, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is known to impair endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell functions, contributing to the development of cardiovascular diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNA molecules that modulate the stability and/or the translational efficiency of target messenger RNAs. They have been shown to be modulated in most biological processes, including in cellular responses to redox imbalance. In particular, miR-200 family members play a crucial role in oxidative-stress dependent endothelial dysfunction, as well as in cardiovascular complications of diabetes and obesity. In addition, different miRNAs, such as miR-210, have been demonstrated to play a key role in mitochondrial metabolism, therefore modulating ROS production and sensitivity. In this review, we will discuss miRNAs modulated by ROS or involved in ROS production, and implicated in vascular diseases in which redox imbalance has a pathogenetic role.

  14. Influenza A virus preferentially snatches noncoding RNA caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Weifeng; Gallagher, Glen R; Dai, Weiwei; Liu, Ping; Li, Ruidong; Trombly, Melanie I; Gammon, Don B; Mello, Craig C; Wang, Jennifer P; Finberg, Robert W

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) lacks the enzyme for adding 5' caps to its RNAs and snatches the 5' ends of host capped RNAs to prime transcription. Neither the preference of the host RNA sequences snatched nor the effect of cap-snatching on host processes is completely defined. Previous studies of influenza cap-snatching used poly(A)-selected RNAs from infected cells or relied on annotated host genes to define the snatched host RNAs, and thus lack details on many noncoding host RNAs including snRNAs, snoRNAs, and promoter-associated capped small (cs)RNAs, which are made by "paused" Pol II during transcription initiation. In this study, we used a nonbiased technique, CapSeq, to identify host and viral-capped RNAs including nonpolyadenylated RNAs in the same samples, and investigated the substrate-product correlation between the host RNAs and the viral RNAs. We demonstrated that noncoding host RNAs, particularly U1 and U2, are the preferred cap-snatching source over mRNAs or pre-mRNAs. We also found that csRNAs are highly snatched by IAV. Because the functions of csRNAs remain mostly unknown, especially in somatic cells, our finding reveals that csRNAs at least play roles in the process of IAV infection. Our findings support a model where nascent RNAs including csRNAs are the preferred targets for cap-snatching by IAV and raise questions about how IAV might use snatching preferences to modulate host-mRNA splicing and transcription.

  15. Total mitochondrial genome of mantis shrimp, Squilloides leptosquilla (Brooks, 1886) (Crustacea: Stomatopoda: Squillidae) in Korean waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye-Eun; Kim, Jung Nyun; Yoon, Tae-Ho; Park, Kyeong Dong; Park, Won Gyu; Park, Hyun; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2016-07-01

    We characterized the complete mitochondrial genome of Squilloides leptosquilla (Brooks, 1886) collected from the southern waters of Korea, which is newly recorded into the Korean carcinological fauna. The total mitochondrial genome length of S. leptosquilla was 16,376 bp. This circular DNA encodes 13 proteins, two ribosomal RNAs, and 22 transfer RNAs, as well as a putative control region. Compared with other decapod crustacean mitochondrial genomes, the overall A + T content was relatively high (71.1%) as those among other stomatopod species. Nine and four protein-coding genes are encoded on the H-strand and on the L-strand, respectively. The short non-coding region (210 bp) between tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Phe) may be the good candidate as the molecular marker to discriminate S. leptosequilla from other stomatopods.

  16. The human PINK1 locus is regulated in vivo by a non-coding natural antisense RNA during modulation of mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheele, Camilla; Petrovic, Natasa; Faghihi, Mohammad A

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the PTEN induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) are implicated in early-onset Parkinson's disease. PINK1 is expressed abundantly in mitochondria rich tissues, such as skeletal muscle, where it plays a critical role determining mitochondrial structural integrity in Drosophila...

  17. FASTKD1 and FASTKD4 have opposite effects on expression of specific mitochondrial RNAs, depending upon their endonuclease-like RAP domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Erik; Zaganelli, Sofia; Maundrell, Kinsey; Jourdain, Alexis A; Thore, Stéphane; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2017-06-02

    FASTK family proteins have been identified as regulators of mitochondrial RNA homeostasis linked to mitochondrial diseases, but much remains unknown about these proteins. We show that CRISPR-mediated disruption of FASTKD1 increases ND3 mRNA level, while disruption of FASTKD4 reduces the level of ND3 and of other mature mRNAs including ND5 and CYB, and causes accumulation of ND5-CYB precursor RNA. Disrupting both FASTKD1 and FASTKD4 in the same cell results in decreased ND3 mRNA similar to the effect of depleting FASTKD4 alone, indicating that FASTKD4 loss is epistatic. Interestingly, very low levels of FASTKD4 are sufficient to prevent ND3 loss and ND5-CYB precursor accumulation, suggesting that FASTKD4 may act catalytically. Furthermore, structural modeling predicts that each RAP domain of FASTK proteins contains a nuclease fold with a conserved aspartate residue at the putative active site. Accordingly, mutation of this residue in FASTKD4 abolishes its function. Experiments with FASTK chimeras indicate that the RAP domain is essential for the function of the FASTK proteins, while the region upstream determines RNA targeting and protein localization. In conclusion, this paper identifies new aspects of FASTK protein biology and suggests that the RAP domain function depends on an intrinsic nucleolytic activity. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. A novel type of RNA editing occurs in the mitochondrial tRNAs of the centipede Lithobius forficatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, Dennis V.; Brown, Wesley M.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2000-01-01

    We determined the complete mtDNA sequence of the centipede Lithobius forficatus and found that only one of the 22 inferred tRNA genes encodes a fully paired aminoacyl acceptor stem. The other 21 genes encode tRNAs with up to five mismatches in these stems, and some of these overlap extensively with the downstream genes. Because a well-paired acceptor stem is required for proper tRNA functioning, RNA editing in the products of these genes was suspected. We investigated this hypothesis by studying cDNA sequences from eight tRNAs and found the editing of up to 5 nt at their 3′ ends. This editing appears to occur by a novel mechanism with the 5′ end of the acceptor stem being used as a template for the de novo synthesis of the 3′ end, presumably by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In addition, unusual secondary structures for several tRNAs were found, including those lacking a TΨC (T) or a dihydrouridine (D) arm, and having an unusual number of base pairs in the acceptor or anticodon stems. PMID:11095730

  19. Revisiting lncRNAs: How Do You Know Yours Is Not an eRNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-04-07

    Diverse classes of noncoding RNAs have been recently established, but the defining criteria for each class are not always obvious. New research from Paralkar et al. (2016) in this issue of Molecular Cell challenges the distinction between long noncoding RNAs and enhancer-derived RNAs, and provides an experimental approach to define their mechanism of action.

  20. Plastid mRNAs are neither spliced nor edited in maize and cauliflower mitochondrial in organello systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bolle, Nina; Hinrichsen, Inga; Kempken, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The process of RNA editing in chloroplasts and higher plant mitochondria displays some similarities, raising the question of common or similar components in editing apparatus of these two organelles. To investigate the ability of plant mitochondria to edit plastid transcripts, we employed a previously established mitochondrial maize and cauliflower in organello system. Two plastid genes, Zea mays ndhB and ycf3 containing group II introns and several editing sites, were introduced into mitocho...

  1. Digital genome-wide ncRNA expression, including SnoRNAs, across 11 human tissues using polyA-neutral amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, John C; Armour, Christopher D; Löwer, Martin; Haynor, David; Biery, Matthew; Bouzek, Heather; Chen, Ronghua; Jackson, Stuart; Johnson, Jason M; Rohl, Carol A; Raymond, Christopher K

    2010-07-26

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are an essential class of molecular species that have been difficult to monitor on high throughput platforms due to frequent lack of polyadenylation. Using a polyadenylation-neutral amplification protocol and next-generation sequencing, we explore ncRNA expression in eleven human tissues. ncRNAs 7SL, U2, 7SK, and HBII-52 are expressed at levels far exceeding mRNAs. C/D and H/ACA box snoRNAs are associated with rRNA methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively: spleen expresses both, hypothalamus expresses mainly C/D box snoRNAs, and testes show enriched expression of both H/ACA box snoRNAs and RNA telomerase TERC. Within the snoRNA 14q cluster, 14q(I-6) is expressed at much higher levels than other cluster members. More reads align to mitochondrial than nuclear tRNAs. Many lincRNAs are actively transcribed, particularly those overlapping known ncRNAs. Within the Prader-Willi syndrome loci, the snoRNA HBII-85 (group I) cluster is highly expressed in hypothalamus, greater than in other tissues and greater than group II or III. Additionally, within the disease locus we find novel transcription across a 400,000 nt span in ovaries. This genome-wide polyA-neutral expression compendium demonstrates the richness of ncRNA expression, their high expression patterns, their function-specific expression patterns, and is publicly available.

  2. Noncoding RNA Profiles in Tobacco- and Alcohol-Associated Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares do Amaral, Nayra; Cruz e Melo, Natalia; de Melo Maia, Beatriz; Malagoli Rocha, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco and alcohol are the leading environmental risk factors in the development of human diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and liver injury. Despite the copious amount of research on this topic, by 2030, 8.3 million deaths are projected to occur worldwide due to tobacco use. The expression of noncoding RNAs, primarily microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), is modulated by tobacco and alcohol consumption. Drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes can modulate the expression of miRNAs and lncRNAs through various signaling pathways, such as apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inflammatory pathways—primarily interleukin 6 (IL-6)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which seems to play a major role in the development of diseases associated with these risk factors. Since they may be predictive and prognostic biomarkers, they can be used both as predictors of the response to therapy and as a targeted therapy. Further, circulating miRNAs might be valuable noninvasive tools that can be used to examine diseases that are related to the use of tobacco and alcohol. This review discusses the function of noncoding RNAs in cancer and other human tobacco- and alcohol-associated diseases. PMID:28025544

  3. Noncoding RNA Profiles in Tobacco- and Alcohol-Associated Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayra Soares do Amaral

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco and alcohol are the leading environmental risk factors in the development of human diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and liver injury. Despite the copious amount of research on this topic, by 2030, 8.3 million deaths are projected to occur worldwide due to tobacco use. The expression of noncoding RNAs, primarily microRNAs (miRNAs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs, is modulated by tobacco and alcohol consumption. Drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes can modulate the expression of miRNAs and lncRNAs through various signaling pathways, such as apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inflammatory pathways—primarily interleukin 6 (IL-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, which seems to play a major role in the development of diseases associated with these risk factors. Since they may be predictive and prognostic biomarkers, they can be used both as predictors of the response to therapy and as a targeted therapy. Further, circulating miRNAs might be valuable noninvasive tools that can be used to examine diseases that are related to the use of tobacco and alcohol. This review discusses the function of noncoding RNAs in cancer and other human tobacco- and alcohol-associated diseases.

  4. Bioinformatics of prokaryotic RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backofen, Rolf; Amman, Fabian; Costa, Fabrizio; Findeiß, Sven; Richter, Andreas S; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    The genome of most prokaryotes gives rise to surprisingly complex transcriptomes, comprising not only protein-coding mRNAs, often organized as operons, but also harbors dozens or even hundreds of highly structured small regulatory RNAs and unexpectedly large levels of anti-sense transcripts. Comprehensive surveys of prokaryotic transcriptomes and the need to characterize also their non-coding components is heavily dependent on computational methods and workflows, many of which have been developed or at least adapted specifically for the use with bacterial and archaeal data. This review provides an overview on the state-of-the-art of RNA bioinformatics focusing on applications to prokaryotes.

  5. Plant Mobile Small RNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Dunoyer, Patrice; Melnyk, Charles; Molnar, Attila; Slotkin, R Keith

    2013-01-01

    In plants, RNA silencing is a fundamental regulator of gene expression, heterochromatin formation, suppression of transposable elements, and defense against viruses. The sequence specificity of these processes relies on small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules. Although the spreading of RNA silencing across the plant has been recognized for nearly two decades, only recently have sRNAs been formally demonstrated as the mobile silencing signals. Here, we discuss the various types of mobile sRNA mol...

  6. MicroRNAs in Human Pituitary Adenomas

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    Xu-Hui Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of recently identified noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level. Due to the large number of genes regulated by miRNAs, miRNAs play important roles in many cellular processes. Emerging evidence indicates that miRNAs are dysregulated in pituitary adenomas, a class of intracranial neoplasms which account for 10–15% of diagnosed brain tumors. Deregulated miRNAs and their targets contribute to pituitary adenomas progression and are associated with cell cycle control, apoptosis, invasion, and pharmacological treatment of pituitary adenomas. To provide an overview of miRNAs dysregulation and functions of these miRNAs in pituitary adenoma progression, we summarize the deregulated miRNAs and their targets to shed more light on their potential as therapeutic targets and novel biomarkers.

  7. Noncoding oligonucleotides: the belle of the ball in gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Ka-To; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy carries the promise of cures for many diseases based on manipulating the expression of a person's genes toward the therapeutic goal. The relevance of noncoding oligonucleotides to human disease is attracting widespread attention. Noncoding oligonucleotides are not only involved in gene regulation, but can also be modified into therapeutic tools. There are many strategies that leverage noncoding oligonucleotides for gene therapy, including small interfering RNAs, antisense oligonucleotides, aptamers, ribozymes, decoys, and bacteriophage phi 29 RNAs. In this chapter, we will provide a broad, comprehensive overview of gene therapies that use noncoding oligonucleotides for disease treatment. The mechanism and development of each therapeutic will be described, with a particular focus on its clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the challenges associated with developing nucleic acid therapeutics and the prospects for future success.

  8. microRNAs-powerful repression comes from small RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) encode a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-trancriptionally. miRNAs comprise one of the major non-coding RNA families, whose diverse bio- logical functions and unusual capacity for gene regulation have attracted enormous interests in the RNA world. Over the past 16 years, genetic, biochemical and computational approaches have greatly shaped the growth of the field, leading to the identification of thousands of miRNA genes in nearly all metazoans. The key molecular machinery for miRNA biogenesis and silencing has been identified, yet the precise biochemical and regulatory mechanisms still remain elusive. However, recent findings have shed new light on how miRNAs are generated and how they function to repress gene expression. miRNAs provide a paradigm for endogenous small RNAs that mediate gene silencing at a genome-wide level. The gene silencing mediated by these small RNAs constitutes a major component of gene regu- lation during various developmental and physiological processes. The accumulating knowledge about their biogenesis and gene silencing mechanism will add a new dimension to our understanding about the complex gene regulatory networks.

  9. microRNAs- powerful repression comes from small RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Cong; LIU YuFei; HE Lin

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) encode a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-trancriptionally, miRNAs comprise one of the major non-coding RNA families, whose diverse bio-logical functions and unusual capacity for gene regulation have attracted enormous interests in the RNA world. Over the past 16 years, genetic, biochemical and computational approaches have greatly shaped the growth of the field, leading to the identification of thousands of miRNA genes in nearly all metazoans. The key molecular machinery for miRNA biogenesis and silencing has been identified, yet the precise biochemical and regulatory mechanisms still remain elusive. However, recent findings have shed new light on how miRNAs are generated and how they function to repress gene expression.miRNAs provide a paradigm for endogenous small RNAs that mediate gene silencing at a genome-wide level. The gene silencing mediated by these small RNAs constitutes a major component of gene regu-lation during various developmental and physiological processes. The accumulating knowledge about their biogenesis and gene silencing mechanism will add a now dimension to our understanding about the complex gene regulatory networks.

  10. Noncoding RNA of Glutamine Synthetase I Modulates Antibiotic Production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    OpenAIRE

    D'Alia, Davide; Nieselt, Kay; Steigele, Stephan; Mueller, Jonas; Verburg, Ilse; Takano, Eriko; Alia, Davide D’; Müller, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    Overexpression of antisense chromosomal cis-encoded noncoding RNAss (ncRNAs) in glutamine synthetase I resulted in a decrease in growth, protein synthesis, and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor. In addition, we predicted 3,597 cis-encoded ncRNAs and validated 13 of them experimentally, including several ncRNAs that are differentially expressed in bacterial hormone-defective mutants.

  11. MiR-25 protects cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage by targeting the mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lei; Huang, Bi-Jun; Ma, Xiu-E; Wang, Shi-Yi; Feng, Jing; Lv, Fei; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yi; Li, Chang-Ming; Liang, Dan-Dan; Li, Jun; Xu, Liang; Chen, Yi-Han

    2015-03-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs, whose expression levels vary in different cell types and tissues. Emerging evidence indicates that tissue-specific and -enriched miRNAs are closely associated with cellular development and stress responses in their tissues. MiR-25 has been documented to be abundant in cardiomyocytes, but its function in the heart remains unknown. Here, we report that miR-25 can protect cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage by down-regulating mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). MiR-25 was markedly elevated in response to oxidative stimulation in cardiomyocytes. Further overexpression of miR-25 protected cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage by inactivating the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. MCU was identified as a potential target of miR-25 by bioinformatical analysis. MCU mRNA level was reversely correlated with miR-25 under the exposure of H2O2, and MCU protein level was largely decreased by miR-25 overexpression. The luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-25 bound directly to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of MCU mRNA. MiR-25 significantly decreased H2O2-induced elevation of mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration, which is likely to be the result of decreased activity of MCU. We conclude that miR-25 targets MCU to protect cardiomyocytes against oxidative damages. This finding provides novel insights into the involvement of miRNAs in oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes.

  12. Therapeutic implications of microRNAs in human cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Rossbach

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of highly evolutionarily conserved non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that modulate gene expression. Several studies have shown that the expression of miRNAs is deregulated in human malignancies. For ncRNAs and miRNAs, such gene-profiling studies in tumorigenic tissues have identified significant signatures that are of both diagnostic and prognostic value. Addressing the functions of ncRNAs not only give insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie complex genetic...

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of the mantid shrimp Oratosquilla oratoria (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Stomatopoda): Novel non-coding regions features and phylogenetic implications of the Stomatopoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2010-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence of Oratosquilla oratoria (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Stomatopoda) was determined; a circular molecule of 15,783 bp in length. The gene content and arrangement are consistent with the pancrustacean ground pattern. The mt control region of O. oratoria is characterized by no GA-block near the 3' end and different position of [TA(A)]n-blocks compared with other reported Stomatopoda species. The sequence of the second hairpin structure is relative conserved which suggests this region may be a synapomorphic character for the Stomatopoda. In addition, a relative large intergenic spacer (101 bp) with higher A+T content than that in control region was identified between the tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Phe) genes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the current dataset of complete mt genomes strongly support the Stomatopoda is closely related to Euphausiacea. They in turn cluster with Penaeoidea and Caridea clades while other decapods form a separate group, which rejects the monophyly of Decapoda. This challenges the suitability of Stomatopoda as an outgroup of Decapoda in phylogenetic analyses. The basal position of Stomatopoda within Eumalacostraca according to the morphological characters is also questioned.

  14. The non-coding oncogene: a case of missing DNA evidence?

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    Puja eShahrouki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The evidence that links classical protein-coding proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors, such as MYC, RAS, P53, and RB, to carcinogenesis is indisputable. Multiple lines of proof show how random somatic genomic alteration of such genes (e.g. mutation, deletion or amplification, followed by selection and clonal expansion, forms the main molecular basis of tumor development. Many important cancer genes were discovered using low-throughput approaches in the pre-genomic era, and this knowledge is today solidified and expanded upon by modern genome-scale methodologies. In several recent studies, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, such as microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, have been shown to contribute to tumor development. However, in comparison with coding cancer genes, the genomic (DNA-level evidence is sparse for ncRNAs. The coding proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors that we know of today are major molecular hubs in both normal and malignant cells. The search for non-coding RNAs with tumor driver or suppressor roles therefore holds the additional promise of pinpointing important, biologically active, ncRNAs in a vast and largely uncharacterized non-coding transcriptome. Here, we assess the available DNA-level data that links non-coding genes to tumor development. We further consider historical, methodological and biological aspects, and discuss future prospects of ncRNAs in cancer.

  15. Role of microRNAs in spermatogenesis

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    S. A. Rudneva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Male germ cells have a complex transcriptome. In addition to proteincoding messenger RNAs, many noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs, are produced. The miRNAs are important regulators of gene expression. They function mainly post-transcriptionally to control the stability or translation of their target messenger RNAs. The miRNAs are expressed in a cell-specific manner during spermatogenesis to participate in the control of each stage of male germ cell differentiation. Clinical studies have exploited the well-defined expression profiles of miRNAs, and human spermatozoal or seminal plasma miRNAs have been explored as potential biomarkers for male factor infertility.

  16. MicroRNAs and spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaja, Noora

    2014-06-01

    In mammals, male gametes are produced inside the testis by spermatogenesis, which has three phases: mitotic proliferation of spermatogonia, meiosis of spermatocytes, and haploid differentiation of spermatids. The genome of male germ cells is actively transcribed to produce phase-specific gene expression patterns. Male germ cells have a complex transcriptome. In addition to protein-coding messenger RNAs, many noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), are produced. The miRNAs are important regulators of gene expression. They function mainly post-transcriptionally to control the stability or translation of their target messenger RNAs. The miRNAs are expressed in a cell-specific manner during spermatogenesis to participate in the control of each step of male germ cell differentiation. Genetically modified mouse models have demonstrated the importance of miRNA pathways for normal spermatogenesis, and functional studies have been designed to dissect the roles of specific miRNAs in distinct cell types. Clinical studies have exploited the well-defined expression profiles of miRNAs, and human spermatozoal or seminal plasma miRNAs have been explored as potential biomarkers for male factor infertility. This review article discusses the current findings that support the central role of miRNAs in the regulation of spermatogenesis and male fertility.

  17. The long non coding RNAs (lncRNAs : a new (player in the dark matter.

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    Thomas eDerrien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptome of a cell is represented by a myriad of different RNA molecules with and without protein-coding capacities. In recent years, advances in sequencing technologies have allowed researchers to more fully appreciate the complexity of whole transcriptomes, showing that the vast majority of the genome is transcribed, producing a diverse population of non-protein coding RNAs (ncRNAs. Thus, the biological significance of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have been largely underestimated. Amongst these multiple classes of ncRNAs, the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are apparently the most numerous and functionally diverse. A small but growing number of lncRNAs have been experimentally studied, and a view is emerging that these are key regulators of epigenetic gene regulation in mammalian cells. LncRNAs have already been implicated in human diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration, highlighting the importance of this emergent field. In this article, we review the catalogues of annotated lncRNAs and the latest advances in our understanding of long non-coding RNAs.

  18. Complete mitochondrial genome of the versicoloured emerald hummingbird Amazilia versicolor, a polymorphic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosdocimi, Francisco; Souto, Helena Magarinos; Ruschi, Piero Angeli; Furtado, Carolina; Jennings, W Bryan

    2016-09-01

    The genome of the versicoloured emerald hummingbird (Amazilia versicolor) was partially sequenced in one-sixth of an Illumina HiSeq lane. The mitochondrial genome was assembled using MIRA and MITObim software, yielding a circular molecule of 16,861 bp in length and deposited in GenBank under the accession number KF624601. The mitogenome contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer tRNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs and 1 non-coding control region. The molecule was assembled using 21,927 sequencing reads of 100 bp each, resulting in ∼130 × coverage of uniformly distributed reads along the genome. This is the forth mitochondrial genome described for this highly diverse family of birds and may benefit further phylogenetic, phylogeographic, population genetic and species delimitation studies of hummingbirds.

  19. Chimeric mitochondrial peptides from contiguous regular and swinger RNA

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    Hervé Seligmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous mass spectrometry analyses described human mitochondrial peptides entirely translated from swinger RNAs, RNAs where polymerization systematically exchanged nucleotides. Exchanges follow one among 23 bijective transformation rules, nine symmetric exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C and fourteen asymmetric exchanges (X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A, multiplying by 24 DNA's protein coding potential. Abrupt switches from regular to swinger polymerization produce chimeric RNAs. Here, human mitochondrial proteomic analyses assuming abrupt switches between regular and swinger transcriptions, detect chimeric peptides, encoded by part regular, part swinger RNA. Contiguous regular- and swinger-encoded residues within single peptides are stronger evidence for translation of swinger RNA than previously detected, entirely swinger-encoded peptides: regular parts are positive controls matched with contiguous swinger parts, increasing confidence in results. Chimeric peptides are 200× rarer than swinger peptides (3/100,000 versus 6/1000. Among 186 peptides with >8 residues for each regular and swinger parts, regular parts of eleven chimeric peptides correspond to six among the thirteen recognized, mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Chimeric peptides matching partly regular proteins are rarer and less expressed than chimeric peptides matching non-coding sequences, suggesting targeted degradation of misfolded proteins. Present results strengthen hypotheses that the short mitogenome encodes far more proteins than hitherto assumed. Entirely swinger-encoded proteins could exist.

  20. Chimeric mitochondrial peptides from contiguous regular and swinger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Previous mass spectrometry analyses described human mitochondrial peptides entirely translated from swinger RNAs, RNAs where polymerization systematically exchanged nucleotides. Exchanges follow one among 23 bijective transformation rules, nine symmetric exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric exchanges (X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A), multiplying by 24 DNA's protein coding potential. Abrupt switches from regular to swinger polymerization produce chimeric RNAs. Here, human mitochondrial proteomic analyses assuming abrupt switches between regular and swinger transcriptions, detect chimeric peptides, encoded by part regular, part swinger RNA. Contiguous regular- and swinger-encoded residues within single peptides are stronger evidence for translation of swinger RNA than previously detected, entirely swinger-encoded peptides: regular parts are positive controls matched with contiguous swinger parts, increasing confidence in results. Chimeric peptides are 200 × rarer than swinger peptides (3/100,000 versus 6/1000). Among 186 peptides with > 8 residues for each regular and swinger parts, regular parts of eleven chimeric peptides correspond to six among the thirteen recognized, mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Chimeric peptides matching partly regular proteins are rarer and less expressed than chimeric peptides matching non-coding sequences, suggesting targeted degradation of misfolded proteins. Present results strengthen hypotheses that the short mitogenome encodes far more proteins than hitherto assumed. Entirely swinger-encoded proteins could exist.