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Sample records for non-thermal plasma reactor

  1. Applying chemical engineering concepts to non-thermal plasma reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro AFFONSO, NOBREGA; Alain, GAUNAND; Vandad, ROHANI; François, CAUNEAU; Laurent, FULCHERI

    2018-06-01

    Process scale-up remains a considerable challenge for environmental applications of non-thermal plasmas. Undersanding the impact of reactor hydrodynamics in the performance of the process is a key step to overcome this challenge. In this work, we apply chemical engineering concepts to analyse the impact that different non-thermal plasma reactor configurations and regimes, such as laminar or plug flow, may have on the reactor performance. We do this in the particular context of the removal of pollutants by non-thermal plasmas, for which a simplified model is available. We generalise this model to different reactor configurations and, under certain hypotheses, we show that a reactor in the laminar regime may have a behaviour significantly different from one in the plug flow regime, often assumed in the non-thermal plasma literature. On the other hand, we show that a packed-bed reactor behaves very similarly to one in the plug flow regime. Beyond those results, the reader will find in this work a quick introduction to chemical reaction engineering concepts.

  2. Pyrite-enhanced methylene blue degradation in non-thermal plasma water treatment reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetoli, Luis Otavio de Brito, E-mail: luskywalcker@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Cadorin, Bruno Mena; Baldissarelli, Vanessa Zanon [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Geremias, Reginaldo [Departamento de Ciencias Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Curitibanos, SC (Brazil); Goncalvez de Souza, Ivan [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Debacher, Nito Angelo, E-mail: debacher@qmc.ufsc.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use O{sub 2} as the feed gas and pyrite was added to the non-thermal plasma reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The methylene blue removal by NTP increased in the presence of pyrite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The total organic carbon content decreased substantially. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acute toxicity test showed that the treated solution is not toxic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dye degradation occurs via electron impact as well as successive hydroxylation. - Abstract: In this study, methylene blue (MB) removal from an aqueous phase by electrical discharge non-thermal plasma (NTP) over water was investigated using three different feed gases: N{sub 2}, Ar, and O{sub 2}. The results showed that the dye removal rate was not strongly dependent on the feed gas when the electrical current was kept the same for all gases. The hydrogen peroxide generation in the water varied according to the feed gas (N{sub 2} < Ar < O{sub 2}). Using O{sub 2} as the feed gas, pyrite was added to the reactor in acid medium resulting in an accentuated increase in the dye removal, which suggests that pyrite acts as a Fenton-like catalyst. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the dye solution decreased slightly as the plasma treatment time increased, but in the presence of the pyrite catalyst the TOC removal increased substantially. The acute toxicity test using Artemia sp. microcrustaceans showed that the treated solution is not toxic when Ar, O{sub 2} or O{sub 2}-pyrite is employed. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis (ESI-MS) of the treated samples indicated that the dye degradation occurs via high energy electron impact as well as successive hydroxylation in the benzene rings of the dye molecules.

  3. Effects of gap and elevated pressure on ethanol reforming in a non-thermal plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Trung Q; Zhu Xinli; Lobban, Lance L; Mallinson, Richard G

    2011-01-01

    Production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles, mobile power generators and for hydrogen-enhanced combustion from ethanol is demonstrated using energy-efficient non-thermal plasma reforming. A tubular reactor with a multipoint electrode system operated in pulsed mode was used. Complete conversion can be achieved with high selectivity (based on ethanol) of H 2 and CO of 111% and 78%, respectively, at atmospheric pressure. An elevated pressure of 15 psig shows improvement of selectivity of H 2 and CO to 120% and 87%, with a significant reduction of C 2 H x side products. H 2 selectivity increased to 127% when a high ratio (29.2) of water-to-ethanol feed was used. Increasing CO 2 selectivity is observed at higher water-to-ethanol ratios indicating that the water gas shift reaction occurs. A higher productivity and lower C 2 H x products were observed at larger gas gaps. The highest overall energy efficiency achieved, including electrical power consumption, was 82% for all products or 66% for H 2 only.

  4. Application of non-thermal plasma reactor and Fenton reaction for degradation of ibuprofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marković, Marijana [Center of Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Jović, Milica; Stanković, Dalibor [Innovation Center, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 51, 11058 Belgrade 118 (Serbia); Kovačević, Vesna [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 44, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Roglić, Goran [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 51, 11058 Belgrade 118 (Serbia); Gojgić-Cvijović, Gordana [Center of Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Manojlović, Dragan, E-mail: manojlo@chem.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 51, 11058 Belgrade 118 (Serbia)

    2015-02-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds have been detected frequently in surface and ground water. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) were reported as very efficient for removal of various organic compounds. Nevertheless, due to incomplete degradation, toxic intermediates can induce more severe effects than the parent compound. Therefore, toxicity studies are necessary for the evaluation of possible uses of AOPs. In this study the effectiveness and capacity for environmental application of three different AOPs were estimated. They were applied and evaluated for removal of ibuprofen from water solutions. Therefore, two treatments were performed in a non-thermal plasma reactor with dielectric barrier discharge with and without a homogenous catalyst (Fe{sup 2+}). The third treatment was the Fenton reaction. The degradation rate of ibuprofen was measured by HPLC-DAD and the main degradation products were identified using LC–MS TOF. Twelve degradation products were identified, and there were differences according to the various treatments applied. Toxicity effects were determined with two bioassays: Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina. The efficiency of AOPs was demonstrated for all treatments, where after 15 min degradation percentage was over 80% accompanied by opening of the aromatic ring. In the treatment with homogenous catalyst degradation reached 99%. V. fischeri toxicity test has shown greater sensitivity to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment in comparison to A. salina. - Highlights: • Twelve ibuprofen degradation products were identified in total. • The degradation percentage differed between treatments (DBD/Fe{sup 2+} was 99%). • In DBD/Fe{sup 2+} only aliphatic degradation products were identified. • V. fischeri was sensitive to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment. • A. salina showed no toxic effect when exposed to all post treatment solutions.

  5. Application of non-thermal plasma reactor and Fenton reaction for degradation of ibuprofen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marković, Marijana; Jović, Milica; Stanković, Dalibor; Kovačević, Vesna; Roglić, Goran; Gojgić-Cvijović, Gordana; Manojlović, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds have been detected frequently in surface and ground water. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) were reported as very efficient for removal of various organic compounds. Nevertheless, due to incomplete degradation, toxic intermediates can induce more severe effects than the parent compound. Therefore, toxicity studies are necessary for the evaluation of possible uses of AOPs. In this study the effectiveness and capacity for environmental application of three different AOPs were estimated. They were applied and evaluated for removal of ibuprofen from water solutions. Therefore, two treatments were performed in a non-thermal plasma reactor with dielectric barrier discharge with and without a homogenous catalyst (Fe 2+ ). The third treatment was the Fenton reaction. The degradation rate of ibuprofen was measured by HPLC-DAD and the main degradation products were identified using LC–MS TOF. Twelve degradation products were identified, and there were differences according to the various treatments applied. Toxicity effects were determined with two bioassays: Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina. The efficiency of AOPs was demonstrated for all treatments, where after 15 min degradation percentage was over 80% accompanied by opening of the aromatic ring. In the treatment with homogenous catalyst degradation reached 99%. V. fischeri toxicity test has shown greater sensitivity to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment in comparison to A. salina. - Highlights: • Twelve ibuprofen degradation products were identified in total. • The degradation percentage differed between treatments (DBD/Fe 2+ was 99%). • In DBD/Fe 2+ only aliphatic degradation products were identified. • V. fischeri was sensitive to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment. • A. salina showed no toxic effect when exposed to all post treatment solutions

  6. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Guibing Zhao; Sanil John

    2006-09-30

    The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. Several pulsed corona discharge (PCD) reactors have been fabricated and used to dissociate H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur. Visual observation shows that the corona is not uniform throughout the reactor. The corona is stronger near the top of the reactor in argon, while nitrogen and mixtures of argon or nitrogen with H{sub 2}S produce stronger coronas near the bottom of the reactor. Both of these effects appear to be explainable base on the different electron collision interactions with monatomic versus polyatomic gases. A series of experiments varying reactor operating parameters, including discharge capacitance, pulse frequency, and discharge voltage were performed while maintaining constant power input to the reactor. At constant reactor power input, low capacitance, high pulse frequency, and high voltage operation appear to provide the highest conversion and the highest energy efficiency for H{sub 2}S decomposition. Reaction rates and energy efficiency per H{sub 2}S molecule increase with increasing flow rate, although overall H{sub 2}S conversion decreases at constant power input. Voltage and current waveform analysis is ongoing to determine the fundamental operating characteristics of the reactors. A metal infiltrated porous ceramic membrane was prepared using vanadium as the metal and an alumina tube. Experiments with this type of membrane are continuing, but the results thus far have been consistent with those obtained in previous project years: plasma driven permeation or superpermeability

  7. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Guibling Zhao; Ji-Jun Zhang; Sanil John

    2005-10-01

    The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. A pulsed corona discharge (PCD) reactor has been fabricated and used to dissociate H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur. A nonthermal plasma cannot be produced in pure H{sub 2}S with our reactor geometry, even at discharge voltages of up to 30 kV, because of the high dielectric strength of pure H{sub 2}S ({approx}2.9 times higher than air). Therefore, H{sub 2}S was diluted in another gas with lower breakdown voltage (or dielectric strength). Breakdown voltages of H{sub 2}S in four balance gases (Ar, He, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}) have been measured at different H{sub 2}S concentrations and pressures. Breakdown voltages are proportional to the partial pressure of H{sub 2}S and the balance gas. H{sub 2}S conversion and the reaction energy efficiency depend on the balance gas and H{sub 2}S inlet concentrations. With increasing H{sub 2}S concentrations, H{sub 2}S conversion initially increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases. H{sub 2}S conversion in atomic balance gases, such as Ar and He, is more efficient than that in diatomic balance gases, such as N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. These observations can be explained by the proposed reaction mechanism of H{sub 2}S dissociation in different balance gases. The results show that nonthermal plasmas are effective for dissociating H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur.

  8. Treatment of methyl orange by nitrogen non-thermal plasma in a corona reactor: The role of reactive nitrogen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadorin, Bruno Mena, E-mail: brunomenacadorin@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Tralli, Vitor Douglas [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Ceriani, Elisa [Department of Chemical Sciences, Università di Padova (Italy); Benetoli, Luís Otávio de Brito [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Marotta, Ester, E-mail: ester.marotta@unipd.it [Department of Chemical Sciences, Università di Padova (Italy); Ceretta, Claudio [Department of Industrial Engineering, Università di Padova (Italy); Debacher, Nito Angelo [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Paradisi, Cristina [Department of Chemical Sciences, Università di Padova (Italy)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Nitration of methyl orange is one of the main processes in treatment with N{sub 2}-plasma. • MS/MS analysis shows preferred nitration of methyl orange in ortho position. • N{sub 2} plasma, N{sub 2}-PAW, reaction with NO{sub 2}{sup −} or NO{sub 2}{sup −}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at pH 2 give the same products. - Abstract: Methyl orange (MO) azo dye served as model organic pollutant to investigate the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in non-thermal plasma (NTP) induced water treatments. The results of experiments in which MO aqueous solutions were directly exposed to N{sub 2}-NTP are compared with those of control experiments in which MO was allowed to react with nitrite, nitrate and hydrogen peroxide, which are species formed in water exposed to N{sub 2}-NTP. Treatment of MO was also performed in PAW, Plasma Activated Water, that is water previously exposed to N{sub 2}-NTP. Both direct N{sub 2}-NTP and N{sub 2}-PAW treatments induced the rapid decay of MO. No appreciable reaction was instead observed when MO was treated with NO{sub 3}{sup −} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} either under acidic or neutral pH. In contrast, in acidic solutions MO decayed rapidly when treated with NO{sub 2}{sup −} and with a combination of NO{sub 2}{sup −} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Thorough product analysis was carried out by HPLC coupled with UV–vis and ESI–MS/MS detectors. In all experiments in which MO reaction was observed, the major primary product was a derivative nitro-substituted at the ortho position with respect to the N,N-dimethylamino group of MO. The reactions of RNS are discussed and a mechanism for the observed nitration products is proposed.

  9. Non-thermal Plasma and Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-09-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been used in medicine to cut and ablate tissues and for coagulation. Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP; non-thermal plasma) is a recently developed, non-thermal technique with possible biomedical applications. Although NEAPP reportedly generates reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, electrons, positive ions, and ultraviolet radiation, few research projects have been conducted to merge this technique with conventional free radical biology. Recently, Prof. Masaru Hori's group (Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University) developed a NEAPP device with high electron density. Here electron spin resonance revealed hydroxyl radicals as a major product. To merge non-thermal plasma biology with the preexisting free radical biology, we evaluated lipid peroxidation and DNA modifications in various in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Conjugated dienes increased after exposure to linoleic and alfa-linolenic acids. An increase in 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was also increased after exposure to phosphatidylcholine, liposomes or liver homogenate. Direct exposure to rat liver in medium produced immunohistochemical evidence of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal- and acrolein-modified proteins. Exposure to plasmid DNA induced dose-dependent single/double strand breaks and increased the amounts of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that oxidative biomolecular damage by NEAPP is dose-dependent and thus can be controlled in a site-specific manner. Simultaneous oxidative and UV-specific DNA damage may be useful in cancer treatment. Other recent advancements in the related studies of non-thermal plasma in Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine will also be discussed.

  10. Application of non-thermal plasma reactor for degradation and detoxification of high concentrations of dye Reactive Black 5 in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dojčinović Biljana P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Degradation and detoxification efficiency of high concentrations of commercially available reactive textile dye Reactive Black 5 solution (40, 80, 200, 500, 1000 mg L-1, were studied. Advanced oxidation processes in water falling film based dielectric barrier discharge as a non-thermal plasma reactor were used. For the first time, this reactor was used for the treatment of high concentrations of organic pollutants such as reactive textile dye Reactive Black 5 in water. Solution of the dye is treated by plasma as thin water solution film that is constantly regenerated. Basically, the reactor works as a continuous flow reactor and the electrical discharge itself takes place at the gas-liquid interphase. The dye solution was recirculated through the reactor with an applied energy density of 0-374 kJ L-1. Decolorization efficiency (% was monitored by UV-VIS spectrophotometric technique. Samples were taken after every recirculation (~ 22 kJ L-1 and decolorization percent was measured after 5 min and 24 h of plasma treatment. The efficiency of degradation (i.e. mineralization and possible degradation products were also tracked by determination of the chemical oxygen demand (COD and by ion chromatography (IC. Initial toxicity and toxicity of solutions after the treatment were studied with Artemia salina test organisms. Efficiency of decolorization decreased with the increase of the dye concentration. Complete decolorization, high mineralization and non-toxicity of the solution (<10 % were acomplished after plasma treatment using energy density of 242 kJ L-1, while the initial concentrations of Reactive Black 5 were 40 and 80 mg L-1. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172030 i br. 171034

  11. Application of Response Surface Methodology for characterization of ozone production from Multi-Cylinder Reactor in non-thermal plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian See, Tan; Zulazlan Shah Zulkifli, Ahmad; Mook Tzeng, Lim

    2018-04-01

    Ozone is a reactant which can be applied for various environmental treatment processes. It can be generated via atmospheric air non-thermal plasmas when sufficient voltages are applied through a combination of electrodes and dielectric materials. In this study, the concentration of ozone generated via two different configurations of multi-cylinder dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor (3 x 40 mm and 10 x 10 mm) was investigated. The influence of the voltage and the duty cycle to the concentration of ozone generated by each configuration was analysed using response surface methodology. Voltage was identified as significant factor to the ozone production process. However, the regressed model was biased towards one of the configuration, leaving the predicted results of another configuration to be out of range.

  12. Application of non-thermal plasmas to pollution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Bardsley, J.N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wallman, P.H.

    1993-06-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques can be used to destroy many types of hazardous molecules. They are particularly efficient when the toxic materials are present in very small concentrations. This paper discusses three particular applications of non-thermal plasmas: (1) decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), (2) removal of trichloroethylene (TCE), and (3) removal of nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Emphasis is placed on the energy cost for implementing the decomposition or removal of these pollutants. Some of the factors affecting the energy cost are discussed. The authors discuss in detail their work at LLNL on pulsed plasma processing for the treatment of NO x in diesel engine exhaust. The results suggest that their plasma reactor can remove up to 70% of NO with relatively high initial concentrations (up to 500 ppM) at a power consumption cost of 2.5% for an engine with an output of 14 kW and an exhaust gas flow rate of 1,200 liters per minute

  13. Application of non-thermal plasmas to pollution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Bardsley, J.N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wallman, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques can be used to destroy many types of hazardous molecules. They are particularly efficient when the toxic materials are present in very small concentrations. This paper discusses three particular applications of non-thermal plasmas: (1) decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), (2) removal of trichloroethylene (TCE), and (3) removal of nitric oxides (NO x ) Emphasis is placed on the energy cost for implementing the decomposition or removal of these pollutants. Some of the factors affecting the energy cost are discussed. We discuss in detail our work at LLNL on pulsed plasma processing for the treatment of NO x in diesel engine exhaust. Our results suggest that our plasma reactor can remove up to 70% of NO x with relatively high initial concentrations (up to 500 ppM) at a power consumption cost of 2.5% for an engine with an output of 14 kill and an exhaust gas flow rate of 1200 liters per minute

  14. Paracetamol degradation in aqueous solution by non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloul, Yasmine; Aubry, Olivier; Rabat, Hervé; Colas, Cyril; Maunit, Benoît; Hong, Dunpin

    2017-08-01

    This study deals with paracetamol degradation in water using a non-thermal plasma (NTP) created by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The effects of the NTP operating conditions on the degradation were studied, showing that the treatment efficiency of the process was highly dependent on the electrical parameters and working gas composition in the reactor containing the aqueous solution. A conversion rate higher than 99% was reached with an energy yield of 12 g/kWh. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) measurements showed that the main species produced in water during the process were nitrogen compounds, carboxylic acids and aromatic compounds. Contribution to the topical issue "The 15th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi and Tomáš Hoder

  15. Non-Thermal Sanitation By Atmospheric Pressure Plasma, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a non-thermal technology based on atmospheric-pressure (AP) cold plasma to sanitize foods, food packaging materials, and other hardware...

  16. Monitoring non-thermal plasma processes for nanoparticle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangolini, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    Process characterization tools have played a crucial role in the investigation of dusty plasmas. The presence of dust in certain non-thermal plasma processes was first detected by laser light scattering measurements. Techniques like laser induced particle explosive evaporation and ion mass spectrometry have provided the experimental evidence necessary for the development of the theory of particle nucleation in silane-containing non-thermal plasmas. This review provides first a summary of these early efforts, and then discusses recent investigations using in situ characterization techniques to understand the interaction between nanoparticles and plasmas. The advancement of such monitoring techniques is necessary to fully develop the potential of non-thermal plasmas as unique materials synthesis and processing platforms. At the same time, the strong coupling between materials and plasma properties suggest that it is also necessary to advance techniques for the measurement of plasma properties while in presence of dust. Recent progress in this area will be discussed.

  17. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy

  18. Development of Scaling Algorithms and Economic Evaluation for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors - Adsorbant/Catalyzer Hybrid System for Control of NOx Released During Army and Related U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urashima, K

    1998-01-01

    Computer code (SUENTP-J) to predict scale-up and economic evaluation of several eligible non-thermal plasma processes for air pollution control - electron beam process, pulsed corona process, and corona radical shower...

  19. A dc non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, WeiDong; Lopez, Jose L.

    2012-06-01

    A direct current (dc), non-thermal, atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet is generated with helium/oxygen gas mixture as working gas. The electrical property is characterized as a function of the oxygen concentration and show distinctive regions of operation. Side-on images of the jet were taken to analyze the mode of operation as well as the jet length. A self-pulsed mode is observed before the transition of the discharge to normal glow mode. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed from both end-on and side-on along the jet to analyze the reactive species generated in the plasma. Line emissions from atomic oxygen (at 777.4 nm) and helium (at 706.5 nm) were studied with respect to the oxygen volume percentage in the working gas, flow rate and discharge current. Optical emission intensities of Cu and OH are found to depend heavily on the oxygen concentration in the working gas. Ozone concentration measured in a semi-confined zone in front of the plasma jet is found to be from tens to ˜120 ppm. The results presented here demonstrate potential pathways for the adjustment and tuning of various plasma parameters such as reactive species selectivity and quantities or even ultraviolet emission intensities manipulation in an atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma source. The possibilities of fine tuning these plasma species allows for enhanced applications in health and medical related areas.

  20. A dc non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Weidong; Lopez, Jose L

    2012-01-01

    A direct current (dc), non-thermal, atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet is generated with helium/oxygen gas mixture as working gas. The electrical property is characterized as a function of the oxygen concentration and show distinctive regions of operation. Side-on images of the jet were taken to analyze the mode of operation as well as the jet length. A self-pulsed mode is observed before the transition of the discharge to normal glow mode. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed from both end-on and side-on along the jet to analyze the reactive species generated in the plasma. Line emissions from atomic oxygen (at 777.4 nm) and helium (at 706.5 nm) were studied with respect to the oxygen volume percentage in the working gas, flow rate and discharge current. Optical emission intensities of Cu and OH are found to depend heavily on the oxygen concentration in the working gas. Ozone concentration measured in a semi-confined zone in front of the plasma jet is found to be from tens to ∼120 ppm. The results presented here demonstrate potential pathways for the adjustment and tuning of various plasma parameters such as reactive species selectivity and quantities or even ultraviolet emission intensities manipulation in an atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma source. The possibilities of fine tuning these plasma species allows for enhanced applications in health and medical related areas. (paper)

  1. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: scanning electron microscopy observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Churpita, Olexandr; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Deyneka, I.G.; Meshkovskii, I.K.; Jäger, Aleš; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 5 (2015), "053703-1"-"053703-5" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA MŠk LO1309 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100101219; SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * plasma medicine * bacteria * cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.142, year: 2015

  2. Pre-treating water with non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young I.; Fridman, Alexander; Rabinovich, Alexander; Cho, Daniel J.

    2017-07-04

    The present invention consists of a method of pre-treatment of adulterated water for distillation, including adulterated water produced during hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") of shale rock during natural gas drilling. In particular, the invention is directed to a method of treating adulterated water, said adulterated water having an initial level of bicarbonate ion in a range of about 250 ppm to about 5000 ppm and an initial level of calcium ion in a range of about 500 ppm to about 50,000 ppm, said method comprising contacting the adulterated water with a non-thermal arc discharge plasma to produce plasma treated water having a level of bicarbonate ion of less than about 100 ppm. Optionally, the plasma treated water may be further distilled.

  3. Atmospheric non-thermal argon-oxygen plasma for sunflower seedling growth improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matra, Khanit

    2018-01-01

    Seedling growth enhancement of sunflower seeds by DC atmospheric non-thermal Ar-O2 plasma has been proposed. The plasma reactor was simply designed by the composition of multi-pin electrodes bonded on a solderable printed circuit board (PCB) anode. A stable plasma was exhibited in the non-periodical self-pulsing discharge mode during the seed treatment. The experimental results showed that non-thermal plasma treatment had a significant positive effect on the sunflower seeds. Ar-O2 mixed gas ratio, treatment time and power source voltage are the important parameters affecting growth stimulation of sunflower sprouts. In this research, the sunflower seeds treated with 3:3 liters per minute (LPM) of Ar-O2 plasma at a source voltage of 8 kV for 1 min showed the best results in stimulating the seedling growth. The results in this case showed that the dry weight and average shoot length of the sunflower sprouts were 1.79 and 2.69 times higher and heavier than those of the untreated seeds, respectively.

  4. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established

  5. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  6. Non-thermal plasmas for non-catalytic and catalytic VOC abatement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenbroucke, Arne M.; Morent, Rino; De Geyter, Nathalie; Leys, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We review the current status of catalytic and non-catalytic VOC abatement based on a vast number of research papers. → The underlying mechanisms of plasma-catalysis for VOC abatement are discussed. → Critical process parameters that determine the influent are discussed and compared. - Abstract: This paper reviews recent achievements and the current status of non-thermal plasma (NTP) technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Many reactor configurations have been developed to generate a NTP at atmospheric pressure. Therefore in this review article, the principles of generating NTPs are outlined. Further on, this paper is divided in two equally important parts: plasma-alone and plasma-catalytic systems. Combination of NTP with heterogeneous catalysis has attracted increased attention in order to overcome the weaknesses of plasma-alone systems. An overview is given of the present understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-catalytic processes. In both parts (plasma-alone systems and plasma-catalysis), literature on the abatement of VOCs is reviewed in close detail. Special attention is given to the influence of critical process parameters on the removal process.

  7. Simulations of planar non-thermal plasma assisted ignition at atmospheric pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, Tiernan A.; Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Arias, Paul G.; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Im, Hong G.; Chen, Jyh Yuan

    2016-01-01

    neutrals and ions to the non-thermal electrons. A two-temperature plasma mechanism describing gas phase combustion, excitation of neutral species, and high-energy electron kinetics is employed to account for non-thermal effects. Charged species transported

  8. Optimization of Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in an In Vivo Model Organism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lee

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasma is increasingly being recognized for a wide range of medical and biological applications. However, the effect of non-thermal plasma on physiological functions is not well characterized in in vivo model systems. Here we use a genetically amenable, widely used model system, Drosophila melanogaster, to develop an in vivo system, and investigate the role of non-thermal plasma in blood cell differentiation. Although the blood system in Drosophila is primitive, it is an efficient system with three types of hemocytes, functioning during different developmental stages and environmental stimuli. Blood cell differentiation in Drosophila plays an essential role in tissue modeling during embryogenesis, morphogenesis and also in innate immunity. In this study, we optimized distance and frequency for a direct non-thermal plasma application, and standardized doses to treat larvae and adult flies so that there is no effect on the viability, fertility or locomotion of the organism. We discovered that at optimal distance, time and frequency, application of plasma induced blood cell differentiation in the Drosophila larval lymph gland. We articulate that the augmented differentiation could be due to an increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS upon non-thermal plasma application. Our studies open avenues to use Drosophila as a model system in plasma medicine to study various genetic disorders and biological processes where non-thermal plasma has a possible therapeutic application.

  9. Changing the surface properties on naval steel as result of non-thermal plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Sabău, A.; Dumitrache, C. L.; Hnatiuc, M.; Crețu, M.; Astanei, D.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of corrosion, related to Biofouling formation, is an issue with very high importance in the maritime domain. According to new rules, the paints and all the technologies for the conditioning of naval materials must fulfil more restrictive environmental conditions. In order to solve this issue, different new clean technologies have been proposed. Among them, the use of non-thermal plasmas produced at atmospheric pressure plays a very important role. This study concerns the opportunity of plasma treatment for preparation or conditioning of naval steel OL36 type. The plasma reactors chosen for the experiments can operate at atmospheric pressure and are easy to use in industrial conditions. They are based on electrical discharges GlidArc and Spark, which already proved their efficiency for the surface activation or even for coatings of the surface. The non-thermal character of the plasma is ensured by a gas flow blown through the electrical discharges. One power supply has been used for reactors that provide a 5 kV voltage and a maximum current of 100 mA. The modifications of the surface properties and composition have been studied by XPS technique (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). There were taken into consideration 5 samples: 4 of them undergoing a Mini-torch plasma, a Gliding Spark, a GlidArc with dry air and a GlidArc with CO2, respectively the fifth sample which is the untreated witness. Before the plasma treatment, samples of naval steel were processed in order to obtain mechanical gloss. The time of treatment was chosen to 12 minutes. In the spectroscopic analysis, done on a ULVAC-PHI, Inc. PHI 5000 Versa Probe scanning XPS microprobe, a monocromated Al Kα X-ray source with a spot size of 100 μm2 was used to scan each sample while the photoelectrons were collected at a 45-degree take-off angle. Differences were found between atomic concentrations in each individual case, which proves that the active species produced by each type of plasma affects

  10. Abatement of global warming gas emissions from semiconductor manufacturing processes by non-thermal plasma-catalyst systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J-S.; Urashima, K. [McMaster Univ., McIARS and Dept. Eng. Phys., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Emission of various hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and greenhouse gases including perfluoro-compounds (PFCs) from semiconductor industries may cause significant impact on human health and the global environment, has attracted much public attention. In this paper, an application of nonthermal plasma-adsorbent system for a removal of PFCs emission from semiconductor process flue gases is experimentally investigated. The non-thermal plasma reactor used is the ferro-electric packed-bed type barrier discharge plasma and adsorbent reactor used is Zeolite bed reactor. The results show that for a simulated semiconductor process flue gas with C{sub 2}F{sub 6} (2000ppm)/ CF{sub 4}(1000ppm)/ N{sub 2}O(1000ppm)/ N{sub 2}/ Air mixture, 54% of C{sub 2}F{sub 6} and 32% of CF{sub 4} were decomposed by the plasma reactor and 100% of C{sub 2}F{sub 6} and 98% of CF{sub 4} were removed by plasma reactor/Zeolite adsorbent hybrid system. For a simulated semiconductor process flue gas with NF{sub 3} (2000ppm)/ SiF{sub 4}(1000ppm)/ N{sub 2}O(200ppm)/ N{sub 2}/ Air mixture, 92% of NF{sub 3} and 32% of SiF{sub 4} were decomposed by the plasma reactor and total (100%) removal of the pollutant gases was achieved by plasma reactor/Zeolite adsorbent hybrid system. (author)

  11. Abatement of global warming gas emissions from semiconductor manufacturing processes by non-thermal plasma-catalyst systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J-S.; Urashima, K.

    2009-01-01

    Emission of various hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and greenhouse gases including perfluoro-compounds (PFCs) from semiconductor industries may cause significant impact on human health and the global environment, has attracted much public attention. In this paper, an application of nonthermal plasma-adsorbent system for a removal of PFCs emission from semiconductor process flue gases is experimentally investigated. The non-thermal plasma reactor used is the ferro-electric packed-bed type barrier discharge plasma and adsorbent reactor used is Zeolite bed reactor. The results show that for a simulated semiconductor process flue gas with C 2 F 6 (2000ppm)/ CF 4 (1000ppm)/ N 2 O(1000ppm)/ N 2 / Air mixture, 54% of C 2 F 6 and 32% of CF 4 were decomposed by the plasma reactor and 100% of C 2 F 6 and 98% of CF 4 were removed by plasma reactor/Zeolite adsorbent hybrid system. For a simulated semiconductor process flue gas with NF 3 (2000ppm)/ SiF 4 (1000ppm)/ N 2 O(200ppm)/ N 2 / Air mixture, 92% of NF 3 and 32% of SiF 4 were decomposed by the plasma reactor and total (100%) removal of the pollutant gases was achieved by plasma reactor/Zeolite adsorbent hybrid system. (author)

  12. Improved oxidation of air pollutants in a non-thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, U.; Holzer, F.; Kopinke, F.-D.

    2002-01-01

    The performance of non-thermal plasma (NTP) for the removal of organic air pollutants (especially in low concentrations) is improved by the introduction of ferroelectric and catalytically active materials into the discharge zone of an NTP reactor. Experiments with model systems (various contaminants and packed-bed materials) have shown that such a modification of a homogeneous gas-phase plasma can overcome the most serious restrictions of the NTP technique at its present state of the art: the incomplete total oxidation (i.e. the low selectivity to CO 2 ) and the energetic inefficiency. Placing a ferroelectric packed-bed material in the discharge zone was shown to result in a lowering of the energy input required. The main effects of plasma catalysis enabled by the introduction of a catalytically active material were an enhanced conversion of pollutants and a higher CO 2 selectivity. These improvements are based on the presence of short-lived oxidising species in the inner volume of porous catalysts. Additionally, the formation of a reservoir of adsorbed oxidants in the NTP zone could be shown. The combination of both modifications (ferroelectric packed-bed materials and plasma catalysis) is a promising method to support the NTP-initiated oxidation of air pollutants

  13. State of the art in medical applications using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Metelmann, Hans-Robert; Hori, Masaru

    2017-12-01

    Plasma medical science is a novel interdisciplinary field that combines studies on plasma science and medical science, with the anticipation that understanding the scientific principles governing plasma medical science will lead to innovations in the field. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma has been used for medical treatments, such as for cancer, blood coagulation, and wound healing. The interactions that occur between plasma and cells/tissues have been analyzed extensively. Direct and indirect treatment of cells with plasma has broadened the applications of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma in medicine. Examples of indirect treatment include plasma-assisted immune-therapy and plasma-activated medium. Controlling intracellular redox balance may be key in plasma cancer treatment. Animal studies are required to test the effectiveness and safety of these treatments for future clinical applications.

  14. Advanced oxidation technology for H2S odor gas using non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, ZHU; Ruonan, WANG; Wenjing, BIAN; Yang, CHEN; Weidong, JING

    2018-05-01

    Non-thermal plasma technology is a new type of odor treatment processing. We deal with H2S from waste gas emission using non-thermal plasma generated by dielectric barrier discharge. On the basis of two criteria, removal efficiency and absolute removal amount, we deeply investigate the changes in electrical parameters and process parameters, and the reaction process of the influence of ozone on H2S gas removal. The experimental results show that H2S removal efficiency is proportional to the voltage, frequency, power, residence time and energy efficiency, while it is inversely proportional to the initial concentration of H2S gas, and ozone concentration. This study lays the foundations of non-thermal plasma technology for further commercial application.

  15. Ion Streaming Instabilities in Pair Ion Plasma and Localized Structure with Non-Thermal Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir Khattak, M.; Mushtaq, A.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Pair ion plasma with a fraction of non-thermal electrons is considered. We investigate the effects of the streaming motion of ions on linear and nonlinear properties of unmagnetized, collisionless plasma by using the fluid model. A dispersion relation is derived, and the growth rate of streaming instabilities with effect of streaming motion of ions and non-thermal electrons is calculated. A qausi-potential approach is adopted to study the characteristics of ion acoustic solitons. An energy integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived during this process. The presence of the streaming term in the energy integral equation affects the structure of the solitary waves significantly along with non-thermal electrons. Possible application of the work to the space and laboratory plasmas are highlighted.

  16. Ion streaming instabilities in pair ion plasma and localized structure with non-thermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khattak, M. Nasir; Qamar, A., E-mail: mnnasirphysics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar (Pakistan); Mushtaq, A. [Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, National Center for Physics, Mardan (Pakistan)

    2015-12-15

    Pair ion plasma with a fraction of non-thermal electrons is considered. We investigate the effects of the streaming motion of ions on linear and nonlinear properties of unmagnetized, collisionless plasma by using the fluid model. A dispersion relation is derived, and the growth rate of streaming instabilities with effect of streaming motion of ions and non-thermal electrons is calculated. A quasi-potential approach is adopted to study the characteristics of ion acoustic solitons. An energy integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived during this process. The presence of the streaming term in the energy integral equation affects the structure of the solitary waves significantly along with non-thermal electrons. Possible application of the work to the space and laboratory plasmas are highlighted. (author)

  17. Inactivation of human pathogenic dermatophytes by non-thermal plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Scholtz, V.; Soušková, H.; Hubka, Vít; Švarcová, M.; Julák, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, DEC 2015 (2015), s. 53-58 ISSN 0167-7012 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Corona discharge * Cometary discharge * Decontamination of surfaces Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.857, year: 2015

  18. Non thermal plasma surface cleaner and method of use

    KAUST Repository

    Neophytou, Marios

    2017-09-14

    Described herein are plasma generation devices and methods of use of the devices. The devices can be used for the cleaning of various surfaces and/or for inhibiting or preventing the accumulation of particulates, such as dust, or moisture on various surfaces. The devices can be used to remove dust and other particulate contaminants from solar panels and windows, or to avoid or minimize condensation on various surfaces. In an embodiment a plasma generation device is provided. The plasma generation device can comprise: a pair of electrodes (1,2) positioned in association with a surface of a dielectric substrate (3). The pair of electrodes (1,2) can comprise a first electrode (1) and a second electrode (2). The first electrode and second electrode can be of different sizes, one of the electrodes being smaller than the other of the electrodes. The first electrode and second electrode can be separated by a distance and electrically connected to a voltage source (4,5).

  19. Non thermal plasma surface cleaner and method of use

    KAUST Repository

    Neophytou, Marios; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Kirkus, Mindaugas

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are plasma generation devices and methods of use of the devices. The devices can be used for the cleaning of various surfaces and/or for inhibiting or preventing the accumulation of particulates, such as dust, or moisture on various surfaces. The devices can be used to remove dust and other particulate contaminants from solar panels and windows, or to avoid or minimize condensation on various surfaces. In an embodiment a plasma generation device is provided. The plasma generation device can comprise: a pair of electrodes (1,2) positioned in association with a surface of a dielectric substrate (3). The pair of electrodes (1,2) can comprise a first electrode (1) and a second electrode (2). The first electrode and second electrode can be of different sizes, one of the electrodes being smaller than the other of the electrodes. The first electrode and second electrode can be separated by a distance and electrically connected to a voltage source (4,5).

  20. Non-thermal Plasma Activates Human Keratinocytes by Stimulation of Antioxidant and Phase II Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anke; Dietrich, Stephan; Steuer, Anna; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas; Masur, Kai; Wende, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma provides a novel therapeutic opportunity to control redox-based processes, e.g. wound healing, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. By spatial and time-resolved delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, it allows stimulation or inhibition of cellular processes in biological systems. Our data show that both gene and protein expression is highly affected by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2) and phase II enzyme pathway components were found to act as key controllers orchestrating the cellular response in keratinocytes. Additionally, glutathione metabolism, which is a marker for NRF2-related signaling events, was affected. Among the most robustly increased genes and proteins, heme oxygenase 1, NADPH-quinone oxidoreductase 1, and growth factors were found. The roles of NRF2 targets, investigated by siRNA silencing, revealed that NRF2 acts as an important switch for sensing oxidative stress events. Moreover, the influence of non-thermal plasma on the NRF2 pathway prepares cells against exogenic noxae and increases their resilience against oxidative species. Via paracrine mechanisms, distant cells benefit from cell-cell communication. The finding that non-thermal plasma triggers hormesis-like processes in keratinocytes facilitates the understanding of plasma-tissue interaction and its clinical application. PMID:25589789

  1. Investigation of non-thermal plasma effects on lung cancer cells within 3D collagen matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Surya B.; Thapa Gupta, Tripti; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M.; Ayan, Halim

    2017-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in plasma medicine have identified a potential application for the non-thermal plasma in cancer therapy. Most studies on the effects of non-thermal plasma on cancer cells have used traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture. However, very few studies are conducted employing non-thermal plasma in animal models. Two dimensional models do not fully mimic the three-dimensional (3D) tumor microenvironment and animal models are expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, we used 3D collagen matrices that closely resemble the native geometry of cancer tissues and provide more physiologically relevant results than 2D models, while providing a more cost effective and efficient precursor to animal studies. We previously demonstrated a role for non-thermal plasma application in promoting apoptotic cell death and reducing the viability of A549 lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells cultured upon 2D matrices. In this study, we wished to determine the efficacy of non-thermal plasma application in driving apoptotic cell death of A549 lung cancer cells encapsulated within a 3D collagen matrix. The percentage of apoptosis increased as treatment time increased and was time dependent. In addition, the anti-viability effect of plasma was demonstrated. Twenty-four hours post-plasma treatment, 38% and 99% of cell death occurred with shortest (15 s) and longest treatment time (120 s) respectively at the plasma-treated region. We found that plasma has a greater effect on the viability of A549 lung cancer cells on the superficial surface of 3D matrices and has diminishing effects as it penetrates the 3D matrix. We also identified the nitrogen and oxygen species generated by plasma and characterized their penetration in vertical and lateral directions within the 3D matrix from the center of the plasma-treated region. Therefore, the utility of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in driving apoptosis and reducing the viability of lung cancer cells

  2. Investigation of non-thermal plasma effects on lung cancer cells within 3D collagen matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karki, Surya B; Gupta, Tripti Thapa; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Ayan, Halim; Eisenmann, Kathryn M

    2017-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in plasma medicine have identified a potential application for the non-thermal plasma in cancer therapy. Most studies on the effects of non-thermal plasma on cancer cells have used traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture. However, very few studies are conducted employing non-thermal plasma in animal models. Two dimensional models do not fully mimic the three-dimensional (3D) tumor microenvironment and animal models are expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, we used 3D collagen matrices that closely resemble the native geometry of cancer tissues and provide more physiologically relevant results than 2D models, while providing a more cost effective and efficient precursor to animal studies. We previously demonstrated a role for non-thermal plasma application in promoting apoptotic cell death and reducing the viability of A549 lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells cultured upon 2D matrices. In this study, we wished to determine the efficacy of non-thermal plasma application in driving apoptotic cell death of A549 lung cancer cells encapsulated within a 3D collagen matrix. The percentage of apoptosis increased as treatment time increased and was time dependent. In addition, the anti-viability effect of plasma was demonstrated. Twenty-four hours post-plasma treatment, 38% and 99% of cell death occurred with shortest (15 s) and longest treatment time (120 s) respectively at the plasma-treated region. We found that plasma has a greater effect on the viability of A549 lung cancer cells on the superficial surface of 3D matrices and has diminishing effects as it penetrates the 3D matrix. We also identified the nitrogen and oxygen species generated by plasma and characterized their penetration in vertical and lateral directions within the 3D matrix from the center of the plasma-treated region. Therefore, the utility of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in driving apoptosis and reducing the viability of lung cancer cells

  3. Non-thermal Plasma Exposure Rapidly Attenuates Bacterial AHL-Dependent Quorum Sensing and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Padrig B.; Busetti, Alessandro; Wielogorska, Ewa; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Elliott, Christopher T.; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Graham, William G.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been exhaustively characterised, however elucidation of the interactions between biomolecules produced and utilised by bacteria and short plasma exposures are required for optimisation and clinical translation of cold plasma technology. This study characterizes the effects of non-thermal plasma exposure on acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS). Plasma exposure of AHLs reduced the ability of such molecules to elicit a QS response in bacterial reporter strains in a dose-dependent manner. Short exposures (30–60 s) produce of a series of secondary compounds capable of eliciting a QS response, followed by the complete loss of AHL-dependent signalling following longer exposures. UPLC-MS analysis confirmed the time-dependent degradation of AHL molecules and their conversion into a series of by-products. FT-IR analysis of plasma-exposed AHLs highlighted the appearance of an OH group. In vivo assessment of the exposure of AHLs to plasma was examined using a standard in vivo model. Lettuce leaves injected with the rhlI/lasI mutant PAO-MW1 alongside plasma treated N-butyryl-homoserine lactone and n-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-homoserine lactone, exhibited marked attenuation of virulence. This study highlights the capacity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma to modify and degrade AHL autoinducers thereby attenuating QS-dependent virulence in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27242335

  4. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma possible application in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out.

  5. Experimental studies on removal of airborne haloanisoles by non-thermal plasma air purifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Hallam, David; Bermúdez, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to test the performance of non-thermal plasma air purifiers on its removal effectiveness of two haloanisoles – 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) and 2,4,6-Tribromoanisole (TBA). TCA and TBA are the two major compounds found in wine cellars that can contaminate wine to ...

  6. Analysis of the step responses of laminar premixed flames to forcing by non-thermal plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna; Moeck, Jonas P.; Roberts, William L.; Chung, Suk-Ho; Cha, Min

    2016-01-01

    The step responses of lean methane-air flames to non-thermal plasma forcing is reported. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner, with a nozzle made of a quartz tube. The equivalence ratio is 0.95, allowing stabilization

  7. The interplay between biological and physical scenarios of bacterial death induced by non-thermal plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, O.; Zablotskyy, V.; Churpita, O.; Jäger, A.; Polívka, L.; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, A.; Kubinová, Šárka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 82, mar. (2016), s. 71-83 ISSN 0142-9612 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * bacteria * cytotoxicity Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines Impact factor: 8.402, year: 2016

  8. Chemically different non-thermal plasmas target distinct cell death pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, O.; Zablotskyy, V.; Chrupina, O.; Lunova, M.; Jirsa, M.; Dejneka, A.; Kubinová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, apr (2017), s. 600 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : chemically different * non-thermal plasmas * target distinct cell death pathways Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  9. Studying the non-thermal plasma jet characteristics and application on bacterial decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-rawaf, Ali F.; Fuliful, Fadhil Khaddam; Khalaf, Mohammed K.; Oudah, Husham. K.

    2018-04-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet represents an excellent approach for the decontamination of bacteria. In this paper, we want to improve and characterize a non-thermal plasma jet to employ it in processes of sterilization. The electrical characteristics was studied to describe the discharge of the plasma jet and the development of plasma plume has been characterized as a function of helium flow rate. Optical emission spectroscopy was employed to detect the active species inside the plasma plume. The inactivation efficiency of non-thermal plasma jet was evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria by measuring the diameter of inhibition zone and the number of surviving cells. The results presented that the plasma plume temperature was lower than 34° C at a flow rate of 4 slm, which will not cause damage to living tissues. The diameter of inhibition zone is directly extended with increased exposure time. We confirmed that the inactivation mechanism was unaffected by UV irradiation. In addition, we concluded that the major reasons for the inactivation process of bacteria is because of the action of the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which formed from ambient air, while the charged particles played a minor role in the inactivation process.

  10. Fundamental limitations of non-thermal plasma processing for internal combustion engine NOx control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the physics and chemistry of non-thermal plasma processing for post-combustion NO x control in internal combustion engines. A comparison of electron beam and electrical discharge processing is made regarding their power consumption, radical production, NO x removal mechanisms, and by product formation. Can non-thermal deNO x operate efficiently without additives or catalysts? How much electrical power does it cost to operate? What are the by-products of the process? This paper addresses these fundamental issues based on an analysis of the electron-molecule processes and chemical kinetics

  11. Non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma induces angiogenesis through reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Friedman, Gary; Fridman, Alexander; Clyne, Alisa Morss

    2012-01-07

    Vascularization plays a key role in processes such as wound healing and tissue engineering. Non-thermal plasma, which primarily produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), has recently emerged as an efficient tool in medical applications including blood coagulation, sterilization and malignant cell apoptosis. Liquids and porcine aortic endothelial cells were treated with a non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in vitro. Plasma treatment of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and serum-free medium increased ROS concentration in a dose-dependent manner, with a higher concentration observed in serum-free medium compared with PBS. Species concentration inside cells peaked 1 h after treatment, followed by a decrease 3 h post treatment. Endothelial cells treated with a plasma dose of 4.2 J cm(-2) had 1.7 times more cells than untreated samples 5 days after plasma treatment. The 4.2 J cm(-2) plasma dose increased two-dimensional migration distance by 40 per cent compared with untreated control, while the number of cells that migrated through a three-dimensional collagen gel increased by 15 per cent. Tube formation was also enhanced by plasma treatment, with tube lengths in plasma-treated samples measuring 2.6 times longer than control samples. A fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) neutralizing antibody and ROS scavengers abrogated these angiogenic effects. These data indicate that plasma enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation is due to FGF-2 release induced by plasma-produced ROS. Non-thermal plasma may be used as a potential tool for applying ROS in precise doses to enhance vascularization.

  12. Non-thermal plasma destruction of allyl alcohol in waste gas: kinetics and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVisscher, A.; Dewulf, J.; Van Durme, J.; Leys, C.; Morent, R.; Van Langenhove, H.

    2008-02-01

    Non-thermal plasma treatment is a promising technique for the destruction of volatile organic compounds in waste gas. A relatively unexplored technique is the atmospheric negative dc multi-pin-to-plate glow discharge. This paper reports experimental results of allyl alcohol degradation and ozone production in this type of plasma. A new model was developed to describe these processes quantitatively. The model contains a detailed chemical degradation scheme, and describes the physics of the plasma by assuming that the fraction of electrons that takes part in chemical reactions is an exponential function of the reduced field. The model captured the experimental kinetic data to less than 2 ppm standard deviation.

  13. Non-thermal plasma destruction of allyl alcohol in waste gas: kinetics and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visscher, A de; Dewulf, J; Durme, J van; Leys, C; Morent, R; Langenhove, H Van

    2008-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma treatment is a promising technique for the destruction of volatile organic compounds in waste gas. A relatively unexplored technique is the atmospheric negative dc multi-pin-to-plate glow discharge. This paper reports experimental results of allyl alcohol degradation and ozone production in this type of plasma. A new model was developed to describe these processes quantitatively. The model contains a detailed chemical degradation scheme, and describes the physics of the plasma by assuming that the fraction of electrons that takes part in chemical reactions is an exponential function of the reduced field. The model captured the experimental kinetic data to less than 2 ppm standard deviation

  14. An investigation of the treatment of particulate matter from gasoline engine exhaust using non-thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Dan; Gao Dengshan; Yu Gang; Shen Xianglin; Gu Fan

    2005-01-01

    A plasma reactor with catalysts was used to treat exhaust gas from a gasoline engine in order to decrease particulate matter (PM) emissions. The effect of non-thermal plasma (NTP) of the dielectric discharges on the removal of PM from the exhaust gas was investigated experimentally. The removal efficiency of PM was based on the concentration difference in PM for particle diameters ranging from 0.3 to 5.0 μm as measured by a particle counter. Several factors affecting PM conversion, including the density of plasma energy, reaction temperature, flow rate of exhaust gas, were investigated in the experiment. The results indicate that PM removal efficiency ranged approximately from 25 to 57% and increased with increasing energy input in the reactor, reaction temperature and residence time of the exhaust gas in the reactor. Enhanced removal of the PM was achieved by filling the discharge gap of the reactor with Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst pellets. In addition, the removal of unburned hydrocarbons was studied. Finally, available approaches for PM conversion were analyzed involving the interactions between discharge and catalytic reactions

  15. Chemically different non-thermal plasmas target distinct cell death pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Lunova, M.; Jirsa, M.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-17, č. článku 600. ISSN 2045-2322 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : chemically different * non-thermal plasmas * target distinct cell death pathways Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  16. Cell death induced by ozone and various non-thermal plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, NOV (2014), "7129-1"-"7129-11" ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1309 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100101219 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : cell death * non-thermal plasma * therapeutic perspectives Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; FH - Neurology (UEM-P); CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 5.578, year: 2014

  17. Investigation of non thermal effects from the Dα line wings in edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marandet, Y.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Stamm, R.; Capes, H.; Guirlet, R.

    2002-01-01

    The far wings of intense Dα lines measured at the edge of the Tore Supra Tokamak are found to exhibit a power-law behavior. The characteristic exponent is not far from two. Since the low density rules out thermal Stark broadening, we discuss non thermal effects which may arise from the edge plasma drift-wave turbulence. We suggest that both the Stark and the Doppler profile could be affected by the turbulence

  18. Non-thermal plasma instabilities induced by deformation of the electron energy distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyatko, N. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Napartovich, A. P.

    2014-08-01

    Non-thermal plasma is a key component in gas lasers, microelectronics, medical applications, waste gas cleaners, ozone generators, plasma igniters, flame holders, flow control in high-speed aerodynamics and others. A specific feature of non-thermal plasma is its high sensitivity to variations in governing parameters (gas composition, pressure, pulse duration, E/N parameter). This sensitivity is due to complex deformations of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) shape induced by variations in electric field strength, electron and ion number densities and gas excitation degree. Particular attention in this article is paid to mechanisms of instabilities based on non-linearity of plasma properties for specific conditions: gas composition, steady-state and decaying plasma produced by the electron beam, or by an electric current pulse. The following effects are analyzed: the negative differential electron conductivity; the absolute negative electron mobility; the stepwise changes of plasma properties induced by the EEDF bi-stability; thermo-current instability and the constriction of the glow discharge column in rare gases. Some of these effects were observed experimentally and some of them were theoretically predicted and still wait for experimental confirmation.

  19. Simulations of planar non-thermal plasma assisted ignition at atmospheric pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, Tiernan A.

    2016-10-21

    The opportunity for ignition assistance by a pulsed applied voltage is investigated in a canonical one-dimensional configuration. An incipient ignition kernel, formed by localized energy deposition into a lean mixture of methane and air at atmospheric pressure, is subjected to sub-breakdown electric fields (E/N ≈ 100 Td) by a DC potential applied across the domain, resulting in non-thermal behavior of the plasma formed during the discharge. A two-fluid approach is employed to couple thermal neutrals and ions to the non-thermal electrons. A two-temperature plasma mechanism describing gas phase combustion, excitation of neutral species, and high-energy electron kinetics is employed to account for non-thermal effects. Charged species transported from the ignition zone drift rapidly through the domain, augmenting the magnitude of the electric field in the fresh gas during the pulse through a dynamic-electrode effect, which results in an increase in the energy of the electrons in the fresh mixture with increasing time. Enhanced fuel and oxidizer decomposition due to electron impact dissociation and interaction with excited neutrals generate a pool of radicals, mostly O and H, in the fresh gas ahead of the flame\\'s preheat zone. In the configuration considered, the effect of the nanosecond pulse is to increase the mass of fuel burned at equivalent times relative to the unsupported ignition through enhanced radical generation, resulting in an increased heat release rate in the immediate aftermath of the pulse.

  20. Ignition phase and steady-state structures of a non-thermal air plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lu Xin Pei

    2003-01-01

    An AC-driven, non-thermal, atmospheric pressure air plasma is generated within the gap separating a disc-shaped metal electrode and a water electrode. The ignition phase and the steady-state are studied by a high-speed CCD camera. It is found that the plasma always initiates at the surface of the water electrode. The plasma exhibits different structures depending on the polarity of the water electrode: when the water electrode plays the role of cathode, a relatively wide but visibly dim plasma column is generated. At the maximum driving voltage, the gas temperature is between 800 and 900 K, and the peak current is 67 mA; when the water electrode is anode, the plasma column narrows but increases its light emission. The gas temperature in this case is measured to be in the 1400-1500 K range, and the peak current is 81 mA.

  1. The interplay between biological and physical scenarios of bacterial death induced by non-thermal plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Jäger, Aleš; Polívka, Leoš; Syková, E.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 82, Mar (2016), s. 71-83 ISSN 0142-9612 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Grant - others:FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568; AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * bacteria * cytotoxicity * apoptosis * bacterial inactivation * reactive oxygen species (ROS) Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 8.402, year: 2016

  2. Modeling and experimental validation of TCE abatement and ozone formation with non thermal plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenbroucke, Arne; Aerts, Robby; Morent, Rino; De Geyter, Nathalie; Bogaerts, Annemie; Leys, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the formation of ozone and the abatement of trichloroethylene (TCE) with non thermal plasma was experimentally and theoretically investigated. The model predicts that the ozone formation increases with the energy deposition and decreases with the relative humidity (RH) of the air, which is qualitatively in agreement with experimental data. For an energy deposition of 0.136 J/cm³, the abatement of 1000 ppm TCE in air with 5 % RH is dominated by atomic oxygen and to a lesser exte...

  3. Toluene degradation by non-thermal plasma combined with a ferroelectric catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wen-Jun; Ma, Lin; Liu, Huan; Li, Jian

    2013-08-01

    Degradation of toluene in a gas by non-thermal plasma with a ferroelectric catalyst was studied at normal temperature and atmospheric pressure. Spontaneous polarization material (BaTiO3) and photocatalyst (TiO2) were added into plasma system simultively. Toluene degradation efficiency and specific energy density during the discharge process were investigated. Furthermore, byproducts and degradation mechanisms of toluene were also investigated. The toluene degradation efficiency increased when non-thermal plasma technology was combined with the catalyst. The toluene degradation efficiencies of the different catalysts tested were in the following order: BaTiO3/TiO2>BaTiO3>TiO2>no catalyst. A mass ratio of 2.38:1 was optimum for the BaTiO3 and TiO2 catalyst. The outlet gas was analyzed by gas chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the main compounds detected were CO2, H2O, O3 and benzene ring derivatives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-thermal plasma technology for the development of antimicrobial surfaces: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Anton; Deng, Xiaolong; Xiong, Qing; Cvelbar, U.; DeGeyter, N.; Morent, R.; Leys, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial coatings are in high demand in many fields including the biomaterials and healthcare sectors. Within recent progress in nanoscience and engineering at the nanoscale, preparation of nanocomposite films containing metal nanoparticles (such as silver nanoparticles, copper nanoparticles, zinc oxide nanoparticles) is becoming an important step in manufacturing biomaterials with high antimicrobial activity. Controlled release of antibiotic agents and eliminating free nanoparticles are of equal importance for engineering antimicrobial nanocomposite materials. Compared to traditional chemical ‘wet’ methods, plasma deposition and plasma polymerization are promising approaches for the fabrication of nanocomposite films with the advantages of gas phase dry processes, effective use of chemicals and applicability to various substrates. In this article, we present a short overview of state-of-the-art engineering of antimicrobial materials based on the use of non-thermal plasmas at low and atmospheric pressure.

  5. Application of pulsed power and power modulation to the non-thermal plasma treatment of hazardous gaseous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.

    1992-10-01

    Acid rain, global warming, ozone depletion, and smog are preeminent environmental problems facing the world today. Non-thermal plasma techniques offer an innovative approach to the cost-effective solution of these problems. Many potential applications of non-thermal plasmas to air pollution control have already been demonstrated. The use of pulsed power and power modulation is essential to the successful implementation of non-thermal plasma techniques. This paper provides an overview of the most recent developments in non-thermal plasma systems that have been applied to gaseous waste treatment. In the non-thermal plasma approach, the nonequilibrium properties of the plasma are fully exploited. These plasmas are characterized by high electron temperatures, while the gas remains at near ambient temperature and pressure. The energy is directed preferentially to the undesirable components, which are often present in very small concentrations. These techniques utilize the dissociation and ionization of the background gas to produce radicals which, in turn, decompose the toxic compounds. The key to success in the non-thermal plasma approach is to produce a discharge in which the majority of the electrical energy goes into the production of energetic electrons, rather than into gas heating. For example, in a typical application to flue gas cleanup, these electrons produce radicals, such as O and OH, through the dissociation or ionization of molecules such as H 2 O or O 2 . The radicals diffuse through the gas and preferentially oxidize the nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides to form acids that can then be easily neutralized to form non-toxic, easily-collectible (and commercially salable) compounds. Non-thermal plasmas can be created in essentially two different ways: by electron-beam irradiation, and by electrical discharges

  6. Growth and male reproduction improvement of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatment on chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao Zhang, Jiao; Luong Huynh, Do; Chandimali, Nisansala; Kang, Tae Yoon; Kim, Nameun; Mok, Young Sun; Kwon, Taeho; Jeong, Dong Kee

    2018-05-01

    This study investigated whether plasma treatment of fertilized eggs before hatching could affect the growth and reproduction of chickens. Three point five-day-incubated fertilized eggs exposed to non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma at 2.81 W of power for 2 min resulted in the highest growth in chickens. Plasma growth-promoting effect was regulated by the reactive oxygen species homeostasis and the improvement of energy metabolism via increasing serum hormones and adenosine triphosphate levels which were resulted from the regulation of genes involved in antioxidant defense, hormone biosynthesis and energetic metabolism. Interestingly, plasma-treated male chickens conspicuously grew faster than females. Further, aspects of male reproductive system (testosterone level and sperm quality) were improved by the plasma treatment but female reproduction (estradiol and progesterone levels, egg-laying rate and egg weight) had no significant changes. Unfortunately, offspring whose parents were the optimal plasma-treated chickens did not show any difference on growth characteristics and failed to inherit excellent growth features from their parents. Our results suggest a new method to improve the growth rate and male reproductive capacity in poultry but it is only effective in the plasma direct-treated generation.

  7. Shock tube experiments on nitromethane and Promotion of chemical reactions by non-thermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seljeskog, Morten

    2002-06-01

    -constant activation energy was found from the correlations, to be 64.574 kJ/mol and 113.544 kJ/mole, respectively. The correlations for the ignition delay for time signals with and without emission were deduced as {tau}{sub emission} 0.3669x10{sup -2}*[NM]{sup -1.02}[O{sub 2}]{sup -1.08}*[Ar]{sup 1.42}*exp(7767/T) and {tau}{sub n} 0.3005*10{sup -2}*[NM]{sup -0.28}[O{sub 2}]{sup 0.12}*[Ar]-{sup 0.59}*exp(13657/T), respective second approach to molecular decomposition concerned the application of non-thermal plasma to initiate reactions and decompose/oxidize selected hydrocarbons, methane and propane, in air. Experiments with a gliding arc discharge device were performed at the university of Orleans on the decomposition/reforming of low-to-stoichiometric concentration air/CH{sub 4} mixtures. The presented results show that complete reduction of methane could be obtained if the residence time in the reactor was sufficiently long. The products of the methane decomposition were mainly CO{sub 2}, CO and H{sub 2}O. The CH{sub 4} conversion rate showed to increase with increasing residence time, temperature of the operating gas, and initial concentration of methane. To achieve complete decomposition of CH{sub 4} in 1 m{sup 3} of a 2 vol% mixture, the energy cost was about 1.5 kWh. However, the formation of both CO and NO{sub x} in the present gliding discharge system was found to be significant. The produced amount of both Co (0.4-1 vol%) and NO{sub x} (2000-3500 ppm) were in such high quantities that they would constitute an important pollution threat if this process as of today was to be used in large scale CH{sub 4} decomposition. Further experimental investigations were performed on self-built laboratory scale, single- and double dielectric-barrier discharge devices as a means of removing CH{sub 4} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8} from simulated reactive inlet mixtures. The different discharge reactors were all powered by an arrangement of commercially available Tesla coil units capable of high

  8. Non-thermal plasma ethanol reforming in bubbles immersed in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Sharma, Ashish; Raja, Laxminarayan L

    2017-01-01

    Ethanol reforming in non-thermal plasma generated in atmospheric-pressure argon bubbles immersed in liquid ethanol/water solution is studied using a self-consistent multi-species fluid model. The influence of the dielectric constant of the liquid on the plasma dynamics and its effect on the generation of active species is analyzed. Several modes of discharge are obtained for large liquid dielectric constant. In these modes, we obtain either an axial streamer or a combination of two simultaneous streamers propagating along the bubble axis and near the liquid wall. The influence of these modes on the production of active species is also studied. The main reactions responsible for the generation of molecular hydrogen and light hydrocarbon species are analyzed. A possible mechanism of hydrogen generation in liquid phase is discussed. (paper)

  9. Analysis of the biological effects of a non-thermal plasma on saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gyung S.; Baik, Ku Y.; Kim, Jung G.; Kim, Yun J.; Lee, Kyung A.; Jung, Ran J.; Cho, Guang S.

    2012-01-01

    The cellular and the molecular responses of eukaryotic yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to a non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure are analyzed. A plasma device with a dielectric barrier discharge is used in order to understand the mechanisms of the plasma action on eukaryotic microbes. When the yeast cells are exposed to a plasma (at a 2-mm distance) and then cultured on a YPD (yeast extract, peptone, and dextrose) - agar plate, the number of surviving cells is reduced over exposure time. More than a 50% reduction in number is observed after two exposures of 5 minutes' duration. In addition, very small whitish colonies appear after the two exposures. The microscopic analysis indicates that the yeast cells treated with this plasma exposure have rough and shrunken shapes in comparison to the oval shapes with smooth surfaces of the control cells. The profile of proteins analyzed by using 2-dimentional electrophoresis demonstrates that the level of proteins with high molecular weights is increased in plasma-treated cells.

  10. Analysis of the step responses of laminar premixed flames to forcing by non-thermal plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2016-07-16

    The step responses of lean methane-air flames to non-thermal plasma forcing is reported. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner, with a nozzle made of a quartz tube. The equivalence ratio is 0.95, allowing stabilization of the flame in a V-shape or an M-shape geometry, over a central stainless steel rod. The plasma is produced by short pulses of 10-ns duration, 8-kV maximum voltage amplitude, applied at 10 kHz. The central rod is used as a cathode, while the anode is a stainless steel ring, fixed on the outer surface of the quartz tube. Plasma forcing is produced by positive or negative steps of plasma. The step response of the flame is investigated through heat release rate (HRR) fluctuations, to facilitate comparisons with flame response to acoustic perturbations. The chemiluminescence of CH* between two consecutive pulses was recorded using an intensified camera equipped with an optical filter to estimate the HRR fluctuations. First, the results show that the flame does not respond to each single plasma pulse, but is affected only by the average plasma power, confirming the step nature of the forcing. The temporal evolutions of HRR are analyzed and the flame transfer functions are determined. A forcing mechanism, as a local increase in the reactivity of the fluid close to the rod, is proposed and compared with numerical simulations. Experiments and numerical simulations are in good qualitative agreement. © 2016.

  11. Atmospheric-Pressure Non-Thermal Plasma Jet for biomedical and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenjo, J; Mora, J; Vargas, A; Brenes, L; Montiel, R; Arrieta, J; Vargas, VI

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present the development and evaluation of a low-cost DBD Plasma- JET reactor using Argon as carrier gas, this device is capable of generating a cold plasma plume several centimeters in length making it suitable for use directly in contact with objects and delicate materials, including living tissue. (paper)

  12. Induction of Immunogenic Cell Death with Non-Thermal Plasma for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Abraham G.

    Even with the recent advancements in cancer immunotherapy, treatments are still associated with debilitating side effects and unacceptable fail rates. Induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD) in tumors is a promising approach to cancer treatment that may overcome these deficiencies. Cells undergoing ICD pathways enhance the interactions between cancerous cells and immune cells of the patient, resulting in the generation of anti-cancer immunity. The goal of this therapy relies on the engagement and reestablishment of the patient's natural immune processes to target and eliminate cancerous cells systemically. The main objective of this research was to determine if non-thermal plasma could be used to elicit immunogenic cancer cell death for cancer immunotherapy. My hypothesis was that plasma induces immunogenic cancer cell death through oxidative stress pathways, followed by development of a specific anti-tumor immune response. This was tested by investigating the interactions between plasma and multiple cancerous cells in vitro and validating anti-tumor immune responses in vivo. Following plasma treatment, two surrogate ICD markers, secreted adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and surface exposed calreticulin (ecto-CRT), were emitted from all three cancerous cell lines tested: A549 lung carcinoma cell line, CNE-1 radiation-resistant nasopharyngeal cell line and CT26 colorectal cancer cell line. When these cells were co-cultured with macrophages, cells of the innate immune system, the tumoricidal activity of macrophages was enhanced, thus demonstrating the immunostimulatory activity of cells undergoing ICD. The underlying mechanisms of plasma-induced ICD were also evaluated. When plasma is generated, four major components are produced: electromagnetic fields, ultraviolet radiation, and charged and neutral reactive species. Of these, we determined that plasma-generated charged and short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) were the major effectors of ICD. Following plasma

  13. Non-thermal Power-Law Distributions in Solar and Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, M.; Battaglia, M.; Birn, J.; Chaston, C. C.; Effenberger, F.; Eriksson, E.; Fletcher, L.; Hatch, S.; Imada, S.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Kuhar, M.; Livadiotis, G.; Miyoshi, Y.; Retino, A.

    2017-12-01

    Particles are accelerated to very high, non-thermal energies in solar and space plasma environments. While energy spectra of accelerated particles often exhibit a power-law and are characterized by the power-law index δ, it remains unclear how particles are accelerated to high energies and how δ is determined. Here, we review previous observations of the power-law index δ in a variety of different plasma environments with a particular focus on sub-relativistic electrons. It appears that in regions more closely related to magnetic reconnection (such as the "above-the-looptop" solar hard X-ray source and the plasma sheet in Earth's magnetotail), the spectra are typically soft (δ> 4). This is in contrast to the typically hard spectra (δuniform in the plasma sheet, while power-law distributions still exist even in quiet times. The role of magnetotail reconnection in the electron power-law formation could therefore be confounded with these background conditions. Because different regions have been studied with different instrumentations and methodologies, we point out a need for more systematic and coordinated studies of power-law distributions for a better understanding of possible scaling laws in particle acceleration as well as their universality.

  14. Non-thermal hydrogen plasma processing effectively increases the antibacterial activity of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Zhigang; Ma, Yulong; Zhu, Zhongjie; Zhao, Hongwei; Wang, Qi; Huang, Qing

    2018-01-01

    Graphene-based materials (GMs) are promising antibacterial agents which provide an alternative route to treat pathogenic bacteria with resistance to conventional antibiotics. To further improve their antibacterial activity, many methods have been developed to functionalize the GMs with chemicals. However, the application of additional chemicals may pose potential risks to the environment and human being. Herein, a radio-frequency-driven inductively coupled non-thermal hydrogen plasma was used to treat and reduce graphene oxide (GO) without using any other chemicals, and we found that the plasma-reduced GO (prGO) is with significantly higher bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli. The mechanism of the increased antibacterial activity of prGO is due to that plasma processing breaks down the GO sheets into smaller layers with more rough surface defects, which can thus induce more destructive membrane damages to the bacteria. This work sets another good example, showing that plasma processing is a green and low-cost alternative for GM modification for biomedical applications.

  15. A universal mirror wave-mode threshold condition for non-thermal space plasma environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Leubner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic fluctuations are recognized in a large variety of space plasmas by increasingly high resolution, in situ observations as mirror wave mode structures. A typical requirement for the excitation of mirror modes is a dominant perpendicular pressure in a high-beta plasma environment. Contrary, we demonstrate from a realistic kinetic analysis how details of the velocity space distributions are of considerable significance for the instability threshold. Introducing the most common characteristics of observed ion and electron distributions by a mixed suprathermal-loss-cone, we derive a universal mirror instability criterion from an energy principle for collisionless plasmas. As a result, the transition from two temperature Maxwellians to realistic non-thermal features provides a strong source for the generation of mirror wave mode activity, reducing drastically the instability threshold. In particular, a number of space-related examples illuminate how the specific structure of the velocity space distribution dominates as a regulating excitation mechanism over the effects related to changes in the plasma parameters.

  16. Improvement of Polytetrafluoroethylene Surface Energy by Repetitive Pulse Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in Atmospheric Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guoqing; Zhang Guanjun; Zhang Wenyuan

    2011-01-01

    Improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy by non-thermal plasma treatment is presented, using a nanosecond-positive-edge repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharge generator in atmospheric air. The electrical parameters including discharging power, peak and density of micro-discharge current were calculated, and the electron energy was estimated. Surface treatment experiments of polytetrafluoroethylene films were conducted for both different applied voltages and different treating durations. Results show that the surface energy of polytetrafluoroethylene film could be improved to 40 mJ/m 2 or more by plasma treatment. Surface roughness measurement and surface X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicate that there are chemical etching and implantation of polar oxygen groups in the sample surface treating process, resulting in the improvement of the sample surface energy. Compared with an AC source of 50 Hz, the dielectric barrier discharges generated by a repetitive pulsed source could provide higher peak power, lower mean power, larger micro-discharge current density and higher electron energy. Therefore, with the same applied peak voltage and treating duration, the improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy using repetitive pulsed plasma is more effective, and the plasma treatment process based on repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in air is thus feasible and applicable.

  17. Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure for ozone generation and volatile organic compounds decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekarek, S.; Khun, J.

    2006-01-01

    The non-thermal plasma technologies based on electrical discharges play an important role in ecological applications. The classical corona discharge is however relatively low power discharge. With the aim to extend its current-voltage range we studied hollow needle-to-plate DC corona discharge enhanced by the flow of a gas through the needle electrode. With this type of the discharge we performed an extensive study of ozone generation and volatile organic compounds decomposition. We found that supply of air through the needle substantially increases current-voltage range of the discharge in comparison with classical pin-to-plate corona discharge. Consequently the ozone generation as well as toluene decomposition efficiency was increased (Authors)

  18. Measurement of the non-thermal properties in a low-pressure spraying plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yong Ho; Chung, Kyu Sun

    2002-01-01

    The non-thermal properties of a low-pressure spraying plasma have been characterized by using optical emission spectroscopy and single probes installed in a fast scanning probe system. A two-temperature model of the electrons is introduced to explain their non-isothermal properties, which are measured using single probes. The excitation temperatures of the atomic and the ionic lines are calculated from measurements of the emission intensities of Ar (I) and Ar (II), and those temperatures can be explained by using a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) or a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) model. In order to deduce more reasonable values (excitation temperatures), we introduce a multi-thermodynamic equilibrium (MTE) model, which gives different temperatures, depending upon the atomic excitation states

  19. Removal of dimethyl sulfide by the combination of non-thermal plasma and biological process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Z S; Li, H Q; He, J C; Ye, Q H; Huang, Q R; Luo, Y W

    2013-10-01

    A bench scale system integrated with a non-thermal plasma (NTP) and a biotricking filtration (BTF) unit for the treatment of gases containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was investigated. DMS removal efficiency in the integrated system was up to 96%. Bacterial communities in the BTF were assessed by PCR-DGGE, which play the dominant role in the biological processes of metabolism, sulfur oxidation, sulfate-reducing and carbon oxidation. The addition of ozone from NTP made microbial community in BTF more complicated and active for DMS removal. The NTP oxidize DMS to simple compounds such as methanol and carbonyl sulfide; the intermediate organic products and DMS are further oxidized to sulfate, carbon dioxide, water vapors by biological degradation. These results show that NTP-BTF is achievable and open new possibilities for applying the integrated with NTP and BTF to odour gas treatment. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Synergistic effects of non-thermal plasma-assisted catalyst and ultrasound on toluene removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongli; Zhou, Libo; Zhang, Luhong; Sui, Hong

    2012-01-01

    A wire-mesh catalyst coated by La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 was combined with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor for toluene removal at atmospheric pressure. It was found that toluene removal efficiency and carbon dioxide selectivity were enhanced in the catalytic packed-bed reactor. In addition, ozone and nitrogen monoxide from the gas effluent byproducts decreased. This is the first time that ultrasound combined with plasma has been used for toluene removal. A synergistic effect on toluene removal was observed in the plasma-assisted ultrasound system. At the same time, the system increased toluene conversion and reduced ozone emission.

  1. Saturated Resin Ectopic Regeneration by Non-Thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjing Hao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Textile dyes are some of the most refractory organic compounds in the environment due to their complex and various structure. An integrated resin adsorption/Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD plasma regeneration was proposed to treat the indigo carmine solution. It is the first time to report ectopic regeneration of the saturated resins by non-thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge. The adsorption/desorption efficiency, surface functional groups, structural properties, regeneration efficiency, and the intermediate products between gas and liquid phase before and after treatment were investigated. The results showed that DBD plasma could maintain the efficient adsorption performance of resins while degrading the indigo carmine adsorbed by resins. The degradation rate of indigo carmine reached 88% and the regeneration efficiency (RE can be maintained above 85% after multi-successive regeneration cycles. The indigo carmine contaminants were decomposed by a variety of reactive radicals leading to fracture of exocyclic C=C bond, which could cause decoloration of dye solution. Based on above results, a possible degradation pathway for the indigo carmine by resin adsorption/DBD plasma treatment was proposed.

  2. Non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Xiaolong [Institute of Environmental Pollution Control Technologies, Xixi Campus, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028, Zhejiang (China); Zhou Ming Hua [Institute of Environmental Pollution Control Technologies, Xixi Campus, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028, Zhejiang (China); Lei Lecheng [Institute of Environmental Pollution Control Technologies, Xixi Campus, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028, Zhejiang (China)]. E-mail: lclei@zju.edu.cn

    2007-03-22

    TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst (P-25) (50 mg L{sup -1}) was tentatively introduced into pulsed high-voltage discharge process for non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of the representative mode organic pollutant parachlorophenol (4-CP), including other compounds phenol and methyl red in water. The experimental results showed that rate constant of 4-CP degradation, energy efficiency for 4-CP removal and TOC removal with TiO{sub 2} were obviously increased. Pulsed high-voltage discharge process with TiO{sub 2} had a promoted effect for the degradation of these pollutants under a broad range of liquid conductivity. Furthermore, the apparent formation rates of chemically active species (e.g., ozone and hydrogen peroxide) were increased, the hydrogen peroxide formation rate from 1.10 x 10{sup -6} to 1.50 x 10{sup -6} M s{sup -1}, the ozone formation rate from 1.99 x 10{sup -8} to 2.35 x 10{sup -8} M s{sup -1}, respectively. In addition, this process had no influence on the photocatalytic properties of TiO{sub 2}. The introduction of TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst into pulsed discharge plasma process in the utilizing of ultraviolet radiation and electric field in pulsed discharge plasma process enhanced the yields of chemically active species, which were available for highly efficient removal and mineralization of organic pollutants.

  3. Non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiao Long; Zhou, Ming Hua; Lei, Le Cheng

    2007-03-22

    TiO(2) photocatalyst (P-25) (50mgL(-1)) was tentatively introduced into pulsed high-voltage discharge process for non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of the representative mode organic pollutant parachlorophenol (4-CP), including other compounds phenol and methyl red in water. The experimental results showed that rate constant of 4-CP degradation, energy efficiency for 4-CP removal and TOC removal with TiO(2) were obviously increased. Pulsed high-voltage discharge process with TiO(2) had a promoted effect for the degradation of these pollutants under a broad range of liquid conductivity. Furthermore, the apparent formation rates of chemically active species (e.g., ozone and hydrogen peroxide) were increased, the hydrogen peroxide formation rate from 1.10x10(-6) to 1.50x10(-6)Ms(-1), the ozone formation rate from 1.99x10(-8) to 2.35x10(-8)Ms(-1), respectively. In addition, this process had no influence on the photocatalytic properties of TiO(2). The introduction of TiO(2) photocatalyst into pulsed discharge plasma process in the utilizing of ultraviolet radiation and electric field in pulsed discharge plasma process enhanced the yields of chemically active species, which were available for highly efficient removal and mineralization of organic pollutants.

  4. Non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiaolong; Zhou Ming Hua; Lei Lecheng

    2007-01-01

    TiO 2 photocatalyst (P-25) (50 mg L -1 ) was tentatively introduced into pulsed high-voltage discharge process for non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of the representative mode organic pollutant parachlorophenol (4-CP), including other compounds phenol and methyl red in water. The experimental results showed that rate constant of 4-CP degradation, energy efficiency for 4-CP removal and TOC removal with TiO 2 were obviously increased. Pulsed high-voltage discharge process with TiO 2 had a promoted effect for the degradation of these pollutants under a broad range of liquid conductivity. Furthermore, the apparent formation rates of chemically active species (e.g., ozone and hydrogen peroxide) were increased, the hydrogen peroxide formation rate from 1.10 x 10 -6 to 1.50 x 10 -6 M s -1 , the ozone formation rate from 1.99 x 10 -8 to 2.35 x 10 -8 M s -1 , respectively. In addition, this process had no influence on the photocatalytic properties of TiO 2 . The introduction of TiO 2 photocatalyst into pulsed discharge plasma process in the utilizing of ultraviolet radiation and electric field in pulsed discharge plasma process enhanced the yields of chemically active species, which were available for highly efficient removal and mineralization of organic pollutants

  5. Nonlinear electron-acoustic rogue waves in electron-beam plasma system with non-thermal hot electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwakil, S. A.; El-hanbaly, A. M.; Elgarayh, A.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Kassem, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    The properties of nonlinear electron-acoustic rogue waves have been investigated in an unmagnetized collisionless four-component plasma system consisting of a cold electron fluid, non-thermal hot electrons obeying a non-thermal distribution, an electron beam and stationary ions. It is found that the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrodinger equation. The dependence of rogue wave profiles on the electron beam and energetic population parameter are discussed. The results of the present investigation may be applicable in auroral zone plasma.

  6. Effect of non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment on gingival wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have been applied in the biomedical field for the improvement of various cellular activities. In dentistry, the healing of gingival soft tissue plays an important role in health and aesthetic outcomes. While the biomedical application of plasma has been thoroughly studied in dentistry, a detailed investigation of plasma-mediated human gingival fibroblast (HGF) migration for wound healing and its underlying biological mechanism is still pending. Therefore, the aim of this study is to apply a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAAPPJ) to HGF to measure the migration and to reveal the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the migration. After the characterization of NTAAPPJ by optical emission spectroscopy, the adherent HGF was treated with NTAAPPJ or air with a different flow rate. Cell viability, lipid peroxidation, migration, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the expression of migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK3) were investigated. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. NTAAPPJ and air treatment with a flow rate of 250–1000 standard cubic centimetres per minute (sccm) for up to 30 s did not induce significant decreases in cell viability or membrane damage. A significant increase in the migration of mitomycin C-treated HGF was observed after 30 s of NTAAPPJ treatment compared to 30 s air-only treatment, which was induced by high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). An increase in migration-related gene expression and EGFR activation was observed following NTAAPPJ treatment in an air flow rate-dependent manner. This is the first report that NTAAPPJ treatment induces an increase in HGF migration without changing cell viability or causing membrane damage. HGF migration was related to an increase in intracellular ROS, changes in the expression of three of the migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK1), and EGFR activation. Therefore

  7. Effect of Non Thermal Plasma on Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Forage Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Daem, G.A.N.A.; El-Aragi, G.M.; Tarrad, M.M.; Zayed, E.M.

    2013-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted at Atomic Energy Authority (AEA) Farm, at Inshas, Egypt during 2011–2012 on alfalfa. The aim of this investigation to caused mutation in alfalfa to obtain new variation. Seeds of the alfalfa were subjected to six doses of non-thermal plasma pulse. The plasma (consisting of ozone, UV and visible light) was injected into the seed samples for different durations or number of pulses. The doses used treatments were 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 pulses (P) and non-treated control. The results showed difference seeds in both level field performances from cut 1st to cut 10th in the forage production. The results showed differences between the Control and treatment (number of pulses (P)) in each of all cuts for the productivity. The results showed the impact of plant height, Number of leaves/plant and number of branches/leaf and stem diameter as well as fresh weight of plant, fresh/weight (t/fed), dry yield (t/fed) in some cuts for Pulses 2, 4 and 10, and the ten pulses were the best for the majority of the qualities and cuts.

  8. Novel Therapeutic Effects of Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma for Muscle Regeneration and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Won; Kang, Sung Un; Kim, Yang Eun; Park, Ju Kyeong; Yang, Sang Sik; Kim, Yeon Soo; Lee, Yun Sang; Lee, Yuijina; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can repair muscle tissue damage, but significant loss of muscle tissue or its long-lasting chronic degeneration makes injured skeletal muscle tissue difficult to restore. It has been demonstrated that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP) can be used in many biological areas including regenerative medicine. Therefore, we determined whether NTP, as a non-contact biological external stimulator that generates biological catalyzers, can induce regeneration of injured muscle without biomaterials. Treatment with NTP in the defected muscle of a Sprague Dawley (SD) rat increased the number of proliferating muscle cells 7 days after plasma treatment (dapt) and rapidly induced formation of muscle tissue and muscle cell differentiation at 14 dapt. In addition, in vitro experiments also showed that NTP could induce muscle cell proliferation and differentiation of human muscle cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that NTP promotes restoration of muscle defects through control of cell proliferation and differentiation without biological or structural supporters, suggesting that NTP has the potential for use in muscle tissue engineering and regenerative therapies. PMID:27349181

  9. Functionalization of polymer surfaces by medium frequency non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, T.; Trigueiro, J. S.; Bundaleski, N.; Teodoro, O. M. N. D.; Sério, S.; Debacher, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    This work addresses the surface modification of different polymers by argon dielectric barrier discharge, using bromoform vapours. Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy showed that plasma etching occurs in stages and may be related to the reach of the species generated and obviously the gap between the electrodes. In addition, the stages of flatten surface or homogeneity may be the result of the transient crosslinking promoted by the intense UV radiation generated by the non- thermal plasma. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy analysis showed that bromine was inserted on the polymer surface as Csbnd Br bonds and as adsorbed HBr. The obtained results demonstrate that the highest degree of bromofunctionalization was achieved on polypropylene surface, which contains about 8,5% of Br. After its derivatization in ammonia, Br disappeared and about 6% of nitrogen in the form of amine group was incorporated at the surface. This result can be considered as a clear fingerprint of the Br substitution by the amine group, thus illustrating the efficiency of the proposed method for functionalization of polymer surfaces.

  10. Temperature diagnostics of a non-thermal plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Jan

    2013-09-01

    The study reflects the concept of the temperature as a physical quantity resulting from the second thermodynamic law. The reliability of different approaches of the temperature diagnostics of open non-equilibrium systems is discussed using examples of low temperature atmospheric pressure discharges. The focus of this work is a miniaturized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet for local surface treatment at ambient atmosphere. The micro-discharge is driven with a capacitively coupled radio frequency electric field at 27.12 MHz and fed with argon at rates of about 1 slm through the capillary with an inner diameter of 4 mm. The discharge consists of several contracted filaments with diameter around 300 μm which are rotating azimuthally in the capillary in a self-organized manner. While the measured temperatures of the filament core exceed 700 K, the heat impact on a target below the plasma jet remains limited leading to target temperatures below 400 K. Different kinds of temperatures and energy transport processes are proposed and experimentally investigated. Nevertheless, a reliable and detailed temperature diagnostics is a challenge. We report on a novel diagnostics approach for the spatially and temporally resolved measurement of the gas temperature based on the optical properties of the plasma. Laser Schlieren Deflectometry is adapted to explore temperature profiles of filaments and their behaviour. In parallel, the method demonstrates a fundamental Fermat's principle of minimal energy. Information acquired with this method plays an important role for the optimization of local thin film deposition and surface functionalization by means of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The work was supported in part by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within SFB-TR 24.

  11. Performance evaluation of non-thermal plasma injection for elemental mercury oxidation in a simulated flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Jiutao; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Jiang, Yuze [Shandong Electric Power Research Institute, Jinan 250002 (China); Wang, Tiecheng [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Jie, E-mail: lijie@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Wu, Yan [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The use of non-thermal plasma injection approach to oxidize Hg{sup 0} in simulated flue gas at 110 °C was studied. • A high Hg{sup 0} oxidation efficiency was observed in the mixed flue gas that included O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO and HCl. • Chemical and physical processes (e.g., ozone, N{sub 2} metastable states and UV-light) contributed to Hg{sup 0} oxidation. • Mercury species mainly existed in the form of HgO(s) adhering to the suspended aerosols in the gas-phase. - Abstract: The use of non-thermal plasma (NTP) injection approach to oxidize elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in simulated flue gas at 110 °C was studied, where a surface discharge plasma reactor (SDPR) inserted in the simulated flue duct was used to generate and inject active species into the flue gas. Approximately 81% of the Hg{sup 0} was oxidized and 20.5 μg kJ{sup −1} of energy yield was obtained at a rate of 3.9 J L{sup −1}. A maximal Hg{sup 0} oxidation efficiency was found with a change in the NTP injection air flow rate. A high Hg{sup 0} oxidation efficiency was observed in the mixed flue gas that included O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO and HCl. Chemical and physical processes (e.g., ozone, N{sub 2} metastable states and UV-light) were found to contribute to Hg{sup 0} oxidation, with ozone playing a dominant role. The deposited mercury species on the internal surface of the flue duct was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electronic probe microanalysis (EPMA), and the deposit was identified as HgO. The mercury species is thought to primarily exist in the form of HgO(s) by adhering to the suspended aerosols in the gas-phase.

  12. Performance evaluation of non-thermal plasma on particulate matter, ozone and CO2 correlation for diesel exhaust emission reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babaie, Meisam; Davari, Pooya; Talebizadeh, Poyan

    2015-01-01

    This study is seeking to investigate the effect of non-thermal plasma technology in the abatement of particulate matter (PM) from the actual diesel exhaust. Ozone (O3) strongly promotes PM oxidation, the main product of which is carbon dioxide (CO2). PM oxidation into the less harmful product (CO2...

  13. Non-thermal plasma-activated water inactivation of food-borne pathogen on fresh produce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ruonan; Wang, Guomin; Tian, Ying; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a new approach to treat S. aureus inoculated on strawberries by PAW. • PAW could inactivate S. aureus on strawberries via the Log Reduction results, further confirmed by CLSM and SEM. • The short-lived ROS in PAW are considered the most important agents in inactivation process. • No significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. - Abstract: Non-thermal plasma has been widely considered to be an effective method for decontamination of foods. Recently, numerous studies report that plasma-activated water (PAW) also has outstanding antibacterial ability. This study presents the first report on the potential of PAW for the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) inoculated on strawberries. PAW treatments achieved a reduction of S. aureus ranging from 1.6 to 2.3 log at day-0 storage, while 1.7 to 3.4 log at day-4 storage. The inactivation efficiency depended on the plasma-activated time for PAW generation and PAW-treated time of strawberries inoculated with S. aureus. LIVE/DEAD staining and scanning electron microscopy results confirm that PAW could damage the bacterial cell wall. Moreover, optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrate the inactivation is mainly attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. In addition, no significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. Thus, PAW can be a promising alternative to traditional sanitizers applied in the fresh produce industry.

  14. Non-thermal plasma-activated water inactivation of food-borne pathogen on fresh produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruonan; Wang, Guomin; Tian, Ying; Wang, Kaile [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Jue, E-mail: zhangjue@pku.edu.cn [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Fang, Jing [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • We propose a new approach to treat S. aureus inoculated on strawberries by PAW. • PAW could inactivate S. aureus on strawberries via the Log Reduction results, further confirmed by CLSM and SEM. • The short-lived ROS in PAW are considered the most important agents in inactivation process. • No significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. - Abstract: Non-thermal plasma has been widely considered to be an effective method for decontamination of foods. Recently, numerous studies report that plasma-activated water (PAW) also has outstanding antibacterial ability. This study presents the first report on the potential of PAW for the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) inoculated on strawberries. PAW treatments achieved a reduction of S. aureus ranging from 1.6 to 2.3 log at day-0 storage, while 1.7 to 3.4 log at day-4 storage. The inactivation efficiency depended on the plasma-activated time for PAW generation and PAW-treated time of strawberries inoculated with S. aureus. LIVE/DEAD staining and scanning electron microscopy results confirm that PAW could damage the bacterial cell wall. Moreover, optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrate the inactivation is mainly attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. In addition, no significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. Thus, PAW can be a promising alternative to traditional sanitizers applied in the fresh produce industry.

  15. Surface modification of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds by non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatment for improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yu-Ri; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Song, Doo-Hoon; Choi, Eun Ha; Lee, Yong-Keun; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn

    2013-01-01

    Surface modifications induced by non-thermal plasma have been used extensively in biomedical applications. The attachment and proliferation of osteoblast cells are important in bone tissue engineering using scaffolds. Hence the effect of non-thermal plasma on hydroxyapatite/β-tri-calcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) scaffolds in terms of improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation was investigated. Experimental groups were treated with non-thermal plasma for 10 min and 20 min and a control group was not treated with non-thermal plasma. For surface chemistry analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was carried out. The hydrophilicity was determined from contact angle measurement on the surface. Atomic force microscopy analysis (AFM) was used to test the change in surface roughness and cell attachment and proliferation were evaluated using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. XPS spectra revealed a decreased amount of carbon on the surface of the plasma-treated sample. The contact angle was also decreased following plasma treatment, indicating improved hydrophilicity of plasma-treated surfaces compared to the untreated disc. A significant increase in MC3T3E-1 cell attachment and proliferation was noted on plasma-treated samples as compared to untreated specimens. The results suggest that non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatments provide beneficial surface characteristics on HA/β-TCP scaffolds. - Highlights: ► Non-thermal plasma increased OH- and decreased C on biphasic scaffold. ► Non-thermal plasma had no effect on surface roughness. ► Non-thermal plasma resulted in hydrophilic surface. ► Non-thermal plasma resulted in better cell attachment and proliferation. ► Non-thermal plasma treatment on biphasic scaffold is useful for tissue engineering

  16. Low temperature synthesis of silicon quantum dots with plasma chemistry control in dual frequency non-thermal plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Bibhuti Bhusan; Yin, Yongyi; Han, Jeon Geon; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-06-21

    The advanced materials process by non-thermal plasmas with a high plasma density allows the synthesis of small-to-big sized Si quantum dots by combining low-temperature deposition with superior crystalline quality in the background of an amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride matrix. Here, we make quantum dot thin films in a reactive mixture of ammonia/silane/hydrogen utilizing dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas with high atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radical densities. Systematic data analysis using different film and plasma characterization tools reveals that the quantum dots with different sizes exhibit size dependent film properties, which are sensitively dependent on plasma characteristics. These films exhibit intense photoluminescence in the visible range with violet to orange colors and with narrow to broad widths (∼0.3-0.9 eV). The observed luminescence behavior can come from the quantum confinement effect, quasi-direct band-to-band recombination, and variation of atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radicals in the film growth network. The high luminescence yields in the visible range of the spectrum and size-tunable low-temperature synthesis with plasma and radical control make these quantum dot films good candidates for light emitting applications.

  17. Disinfection effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma for foodborne bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Mohammad Rasel; Inomata, Takanori; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Kakikawa, Makiko; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Yasunori; Yano, Toshihiro; Miwa, Shoji; Noguchi, Akinori

    2015-09-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NAPP) exposure can be a suitable alternative for bacteria inactivation in food processing industry. Specimen placed in the enclosure are exposed to various reactive radicals produced within the discharge chamber. It is also exposed to the periodic variation of the electric field strength in the chamber. Dielectric barrier discharge is produced by high voltage pulse (Vpp = 18 kV, pulse width 20 μs, repetition frequency 10 kHz) in a polypropylene box (volume = 350 cm3) using helium as main feed gas. Inactivation efficiency of NAPP depends on the duration of NAPP exposure, applied voltage pulse strength and type, pulse duration, electrode separation and feed gas composition. In this study we have investigated inactivation of Bacillus lichenformis spore as an example of food borne bacteria. Keeping applied voltage, electrode configuration and total gas flow rate constant, spores are exposed to direct NAPP for different time duration while O2 concentration in the feed gas composition is varied. 10 minutes NAPP exposure resulted in ~ 3 log reduction of Bacillus lichenformis spores for 1% O2concentration (initial concentration ~ 106 / specimen). This work is supported by research and development promotion grant provided by the Hokuriku Industrial Advancement Center.

  18. Plasma Reforming of Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels in Non-Thermal Plasma-Liquid Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    channel with liquid wall in the microporous media under the ultrasound cavitations has shown the following: · The action of the ultrasound field in the...microporous liquid which has a very large ratio of the plasma-liquid contact surface to the plasma volume. As is known the ultrasonic (US) cavitation is a very...2) and it ran over a flat dielectric surface of the magnetostrictive transmitter (5) which produced ultrasonic (US) cavitations , so the discharge

  19. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, J; Foest, R; Reuter, S; Kewitz, T; Šperka, J; Weltmann, K-D

    2012-10-01

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 ± 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 ± 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable

  20. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K.-D. [INP Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Kewitz, T. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Sperka, J. [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2012-10-15

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 {+-} 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 {+-} 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable

  1. Non-thermal plasma exhaust aftertreatment: Are all plasmas the same?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whealton, J.H.; Hanson, G.R.; Storey, J.M.; Raridon, R.J.; Armfield, J.S.; Bigelow, T.S.; Graves, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The authors describe initial experiments employing 5.5 GHz pulsed microwave power, which should result in enhanced chemistry compared to present state-of-the-art plasma aftertreatments by; reducing plasma electric field shielding, increasing availability of atomic nitrogen, exploiting surface charging of dielectrics, avoiding (low field) threshold initiated discharges, and achieving a higher high energy tail on the electron distribution function. As an example, the authors decided to test for NO reduction in N{sub 2}. While this reaction is not a complete description of the exhaust issues by any means, they thought it would demonstrate the technology proposed.

  2. Artificial vesicles as an animal cell model for the study of biological application of non-thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, S H; Park, J K; Sung, C; Lee, C B; Uhm, H; Choi, E H; Baik, K Y

    2016-01-01

    Artificial cell-like model systems can provide information which is hard to obtain with real biological cells. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) containing intra-membrane DNA or OH radical-binding molecules are used to visualize the cytolytic activity of OH radicals. Changes in the GUV membrane are observed by microscopy or flow cytometry as performed for animal cells after non-thermal plasma treatment. The experimental data shows that OH radicals can be detected inside the membrane, although the biological effects are not as significant as for H 2 O 2 . This artificial model system can provide a systemic means to elucidate the complex interactions between biological materials and non-thermal plasma. (paper)

  3. Dentin surface treatment using a non-thermal argon plasma brush for interfacial bonding improvement in composite restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritts, Andy Charles; Li, Hao; Yu, Qingsong; Xu, Changqi; Yao, Xiaomei; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the treatment effects of non-thermal atmospheric gas plasmas on dentin surfaces for composite restoration. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. The dentin surfaces were treated by using a non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush for various durations. The molecular changes of the dentin surfaces were analyzed using FTIR/ATR and an increase in carbonyl groups on dentin surfaces was detected with plasma treated dentin. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were applied as directed. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, the teeth thus prepared were sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for tensile test. Student Newman Keuls tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment. However, the bonding strength to plasma treated inner dentin did not show any improvement. It was found that plasma treatment of peripheral dentin surface up to 100 s gave an increase in interfacial bonding strength, while a prolong plasma treatment of dentin surfaces, e.g., 5 min treatments, showed a decrease in interfacial bonding strength. PMID:20831586

  4. Decontamination of Bacillus subtilis Spores in a Sealed Package Using a Non-thermal Plasma System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, Kevin M.; Jensen, J. L.; Valdramidis, V. P.; Byrne, E.; Connolly, J.; Mosnier, J. P.; Cullen, P. J.

    The safety of packaged food and medical devices is a major concern to consumers and government officials. Recent inventions (PK-1 and PK-2) based on the principles of non-thermal, atmospheric plasma has shown significant reduction in bacterial contamination inside a sealed package. The objective of this study was to evaluate the PK-1 and PK-2 systems in the reduction of Bacillus subtilis spores using packages containing air or modified atmosphere (MA) gas (65% O2/30% CO2/5% N2). The experimental design consisted of the following parameters: (1) two voltage conditions: 13.5 kV with 1.0 cm electrode gap (PK-1) and 80 kV with 4.5 cm electrode gap (PK-2), (2) two treatment conditions: inside and outside the field of ionization, (3) PK-1 and PK-2 optimized treatment times: 300 and 120 s, respectively, and (4) two package gas types: air and modified atmosphere (MA) gas (65% O2/30% CO2/5% N2). Measurements included: (1) bacterial reductions of Bacillus subtilis var. niger (B. atrophaeus), (2) ozone, nitrous oxides (NOx), and carbon monoxide concentrations, and (3) relative humidity. Bacillus subtilis (1.7 × 106/strip) were loaded into sterile uncovered petri dishes and treated with ionization generated in packages using air or MA gas blend. Samples were treated for 300 s (PK-1) or 120 s (PK-2) and stored at room ­temperature for 24 h. Results documented relative humidity (RH) ranged from 20% to 30%. After 300 s of PK-1 treatment (13.5 kV/44 W/1.0 cm gap), ozone concentrations were 6,000 ppm (air) and 7,500 ppm (MA). After 120 s of PK-2 treatment (80 kV/150 W/4.5 cm), ozone concentrations were 7,500 ppm (air) and 12,000 ppm (MA). Ozone and NOx concentrations were non-detect (ND) after 24 h. PK-1 carbon monoxide levels were package ionization process.

  5. Formation of hydrophobic coating on glass surface using atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma in ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Z; Qiu, Y; Kuffel, E

    2004-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas under atmospheric pressure are of great interest in material surface processing because of their convenience, effectiveness and low cost. In this paper, the treatment of a glass surface for improving hydrophobicity using a non-thermal plasma generated by a dielectric barrier corona discharge (DBCD) with a needle array-to-plane electrode arrangement in atmospheric air is conducted, and the surface properties of the glass before and after the DBCD treatment are studied using contact angle measurement, surface resistance measurement and the wet flashover voltage test. The effects of the plasma dose (the product of average discharge power and treatment time) of DBCD on the surface modification are studied, and the mechanism of interaction between the plasma and glass surface is discussed. It is found that a layer of hydrophobic coating is formed on the glass surface through DBCD treatment, and the improvement of hydrophobicity depends on the plasma dose of the DBCD. It seems that there is an optimum plasma dose for the surface treatment. The test results of thermal ageing and chemical ageing show that the hydrophobic layer has quite stable characteristics

  6. Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment Diminishes Fungal Viability and Up-Regulates Resistance Genes in a Plant Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panngom, Kamonporn; Lee, Sang Hark; Park, Dae Hoon; Sim, Geon Bo; Kim, Yong Hee; Uhm, Han Sup; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun Ha

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can have either harmful or beneficial effects on biological systems depending on the dose administered and the species of organism exposed, suggesting that application of reactive species can possibly produce contradictory effects in disease control, pathogen inactivation and activation of host resistance. A novel technology known as atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma represents a means of generating various reactive species that adversely affect pathogens (inactivation) while simultaneously up-regulating host defense genes. The anti-microbial efficacy of this technology was tested on the plant fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and its susceptible host plant species Solanum lycopercicum. Germination of fungal spores suspended in saline was decreased over time after exposed to argon (Ar) plasma for 10 min. Although the majority of treated spores exhibited necrotic death, apoptosis was also observed along with the up-regulation of apoptosis related genes. Increases in the levels of peroxynitrite and nitrite in saline following plasma treatment may have been responsible for the observed spore death. In addition, increased transcription of pathogenesis related (PR) genes was observed in the roots of the susceptible tomato cultivar (S. lycopercicum) after exposure to the same Ar plasma dose used in fungal inactivation. These data suggest that atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma can be efficiently used to control plant fungal diseases by inactivating fungal pathogens and up-regulating mechanisms of host resistance. PMID:24911947

  7. Non-thermal plasma treatment diminishes fungal viability and up-regulates resistance genes in a plant host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panngom, Kamonporn; Lee, Sang Hark; Park, Dae Hoon; Sim, Geon Bo; Kim, Yong Hee; Uhm, Han Sup; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun Ha

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can have either harmful or beneficial effects on biological systems depending on the dose administered and the species of organism exposed, suggesting that application of reactive species can possibly produce contradictory effects in disease control, pathogen inactivation and activation of host resistance. A novel technology known as atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma represents a means of generating various reactive species that adversely affect pathogens (inactivation) while simultaneously up-regulating host defense genes. The anti-microbial efficacy of this technology was tested on the plant fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and its susceptible host plant species Solanum lycopercicum. Germination of fungal spores suspended in saline was decreased over time after exposed to argon (Ar) plasma for 10 min. Although the majority of treated spores exhibited necrotic death, apoptosis was also observed along with the up-regulation of apoptosis related genes. Increases in the levels of peroxynitrite and nitrite in saline following plasma treatment may have been responsible for the observed spore death. In addition, increased transcription of pathogenesis related (PR) genes was observed in the roots of the susceptible tomato cultivar (S. lycopercicum) after exposure to the same Ar plasma dose used in fungal inactivation. These data suggest that atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma can be efficiently used to control plant fungal diseases by inactivating fungal pathogens and up-regulating mechanisms of host resistance.

  8. Non-thermal plasma treatment diminishes fungal viability and up-regulates resistance genes in a plant host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamonporn Panngom

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can have either harmful or beneficial effects on biological systems depending on the dose administered and the species of organism exposed, suggesting that application of reactive species can possibly produce contradictory effects in disease control, pathogen inactivation and activation of host resistance. A novel technology known as atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma represents a means of generating various reactive species that adversely affect pathogens (inactivation while simultaneously up-regulating host defense genes. The anti-microbial efficacy of this technology was tested on the plant fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and its susceptible host plant species Solanum lycopercicum. Germination of fungal spores suspended in saline was decreased over time after exposed to argon (Ar plasma for 10 min. Although the majority of treated spores exhibited necrotic death, apoptosis was also observed along with the up-regulation of apoptosis related genes. Increases in the levels of peroxynitrite and nitrite in saline following plasma treatment may have been responsible for the observed spore death. In addition, increased transcription of pathogenesis related (PR genes was observed in the roots of the susceptible tomato cultivar (S. lycopercicum after exposure to the same Ar plasma dose used in fungal inactivation. These data suggest that atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma can be efficiently used to control plant fungal diseases by inactivating fungal pathogens and up-regulating mechanisms of host resistance.

  9. Effects of background fluid on the efficiency of inactivating yeast with non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Hyo Ryu

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure has been actively applied to sterilization. However, its efficiency for inactivating microorganisms often varies depending on microbial species and environments surrounding the microorganisms. We investigated the influence of environmental factors (surrounding media on the efficiency of microbial inactivation by plasma using an eukaryotic model microbe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to elucidate the mechanisms for differential efficiency of sterilization by plasma. Yeast cells treated with plasma in water showed the most severe damage in viability and cell morphology as well as damage to membrane lipids, and genomic DNA. Cells in saline were less damaged compared to those in water, and those in YPD (Yeast extract, Peptone, Dextrose were least impaired. HOG1 mitogen activated protein kinase was activated in cells exposed to plasma in water and saline. Inactivation of yeast cells in water and saline was due to the acidification of the solutions by plasma, but higher survival of yeast cells treated in saline may have resulted from the additional effect related to salt strength. Levels of hydroxyl radical (OH· produced by plasma were the highest in water and the lowest in YPD. This may have resulted in differential inactivation of yeast cells in water, saline, and YPD by plasma. Taken together, our data suggest that the surrounding media (environment can crucially affect the outcomes of yeast cell plasma treatment because plasma modulates vital properties of media, and the toxic nature of plasma can also be altered by the surrounding media.

  10. Cell death induced on cell cultures and nude mouse skin by non-thermal, nanosecond-pulsed generated plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Duval

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasmas are gaseous mixtures of molecules, radicals, and excited species with a small proportion of ions and energetic electrons. Non-thermal plasmas can be generated with any high electro-magnetic field. We studied here the pathological effects, and in particular cell death, induced by nanosecond-pulsed high voltage generated plasmas homogeneously applied on cell cultures and nude mouse skin. In vitro, Jurkat cells and HMEC exhibited apoptosis and necrosis, in dose-dependent manner. In vivo, on nude mouse skin, cell death occurred for doses above 113 J/cm(2 for the epidermis, 281 J/cm(2 for the dermis, and 394 J/cm(2 for the hypodermis. Using electron microscopy, we characterized apoptosis for low doses and necrosis for high doses. We demonstrated that these effects were not related to thermal, photonic or pH variations, and were due to the production of free radicals. The ability of cold plasmas to generate apoptosis on cells in suspension and, without any sensitizer, on precise skin areas, opens new fields of application in dermatology for extracorporeal blood cell treatment and the eradication of superficial skin lesions.

  11. ICRF Wave Propagation and Absorption in Plasmas with Non-thermal Populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, R.J.; Phillips, C.K.; Smithe, D.N.

    2002-01-01

    Some results obtained with the one dimensional, all orders, full wave code METS, which has been successfully employed in the past to describe a number of experiments, are reported. By using massively parallel computers, this code has been extended to handle non-thermal populations. Various physical situations, in which non-Maxwellian species are expected to be encountered, are studied, such as simultaneous neutral beam injection and high harmonic fast wave electron heating or ion cyclotron resonance heating in the presence of fusion products

  12. Investigation of atmospheric pressure capillary non-thermal plasmas and their applications to the degradation of volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shu-Min

    Atmospheric pressure capillary non-thermal plasma (AP-CNTP) has been investigated as a potential technology far the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Advanced Life Support Systems (ALS). AP-CNTP is a destructive technology far the removal of VOCs from air streams by active plasma species, such as electrons, ions, and excited molecules. Complete VOC destruction ideally results in the formation of water, carbon dioxide (CO2), and other by-product's may also form, including ozone (O3), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and decomposed hydrocarbons. Several organic compounds, such as BTEX, ethylene, n-heptane, isooctane, methanol and NH3, were tested in an AP-CNTP system. Parametric experiments were carried out by varying plasma discharge power, flowrates, and initial concentrations. The degradation efficiency varied depending on the chemical nature of the compounds. A plasmochemical kinetic model was derived for toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene and n-heptane.

  13. Development of non-thermal plasma jet and its potential application for color degradation of organic pollutant in wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirdo Kasih, Tota; Kharisma, Angel; Perdana, Muhammad Kevin; Murphiyanto, Richard Dimas Julian

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the development of non-thermal plasma-based AOPs for color degradation in wastewater treatment. The plasma itself was generated by an in-house high voltage power supply (HVPS). Instead of gas-phase plasma system, we applied plasma jet system underwater during wastewater treatment without additional any chemicals (chemical-free processing). The method is thought to maximize the energy transfer and increase the efficient interaction between plasma and solution during the process. Our plasma jet system could proceed either by using helium (He), argon (Ar) and air as the medium in an open air atmosphere. Exploring the developed plasma to be applied in organic wastewater treatment, we demonstrated that the plasma jet could be generated underwater and yields in color degradation of methylene blue (MB) wastewater model. When using Ar gas as a medium, the color degradation of MB could be achieved within 90 minutes. Whereas, by using Ar with an admixing of oxygen (O2) gas, the similar result could be accomplished within 60 minutes. Additional O2 gas in the latter might produce more hydroxyl radicals and oxygen-based species which speed up the oxidative reaction with organic pollutants, and hence accelerate the process of color degradation.

  14. Effect of indirect non-thermal plasma on particle size distribution and composition of diesel engine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linbo, GU; Yixi, CAI; Yunxi, SHI; Jing, WANG; Xiaoyu, PU; Jing, TIAN; Runlin, FAN

    2017-11-01

    To explore the effect of the gas source flow rate on the actual diesel exhaust particulate matter (PM), a test bench for diesel engine exhaust purification was constructed, using indirect non-thermal plasma technology. The effects of different gas source flow rates on the quantity concentration, composition, and apparent activation energy of PM were investigated, using an engine exhaust particle sizer and a thermo-gravimetric analyzer. The results show that when the gas source flow rate was large, not only the maximum peak quantity concentrations of particles had a large drop, but also the peak quantity concentrations shifted to smaller particle sizes from 100 nm to 80 nm. When the gas source flow rate was 10 L min-1, the total quantity concentration greatly decreased where the removal rate of particles was 79.2%, and the variation of the different mode particle proportion was obvious. Non-thermal plasma (NTP) improved the oxidation ability of volatile matter as well as that of solid carbon. However, the NTP gas source rate had little effects on oxidation activity of volatile matter, while it strongly influenced the oxidation activity of solid carbon. Considering the quantity concentration and oxidation activity of particles, a gas source flow rate of 10 L min-1 was more appropriate for the purification of particles.

  15. Non-Thermal Plasma (NTP) session overview: Second International Symposium on Environmental Applications of Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosocha, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced Oxidation Technologies (used in pollution control and treating hazardous wastes) has expanded from using hydroxyl radicals to treat organic compounds in water, to using reductive free radicals as well, and to application to pollutants in both gases and aqueous media. Non-Thermal Plasma (NTP) is created in a gas by an electrical discharge or energetic electron injection. Highly reactive species (O atoms, OH, N radicals, plasma electrons) react with entrained hazardous organic chemicals in the gas, converting them to CO2, H2O, etc. NTP can be used to simultaneously remove different kinds of pollutants (eg, VOCs, SOx, NOx in flue gases). This paper presents an overview of NTP technology for pollution control and hazardous waste treatment; it is intended as an introduction to the NTP session of the symposium

  16. Surface modification of gutta-percha cones by non-thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, Maíra; Menezes, Marilia Santana de Oliveira; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida; Barbosa, Carlos Augusto de Melo; Athias, Leonardo; Simão, Renata Antoun

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of Oxygen and Argon plasma on gutta-percha surfaces. A total of 185 flat smooth gutta-percha surfaces were used. Samples were divided into groups: control: no plasma treatment; Oxygen: treatment with Oxygen plasma for 1 min; Argon: treatment with Argon plasma for 1 min. Samples were evaluated topographically by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy; and chemically by Fourier Transform-infrared Spectroscopy. A goniometer was used to determine the surface free energy and the wettability of the endodontic sealers. Additionally 60 bovine teeth were filled using pellets of gutta-percha (control, oxygen and argon plasma) and the sealers. Teeth were evaluated by push-out and microleakage tests. Data were statistically analyzed using specific tests. Argon plasma did not change the surface topography, while Oxygen plasma led to changes. Both treatments chemically modified the gutta-percha surface. Argon and Oxygen plasma increased the surface free energy and favored the wettability of AH Plus and Pulp Canal Sealer EWT. Regarding bond strength analysis, for AH Plus sealer, both plasma treatments on gutta-percha favored the bond strength to dentin. However, for Pulp Canal Sealer, there is no statistically significant influence. For leakage test, dye penetration occurred between sealer and dentin in all groups. In conclusion, Oxygen plasma led to both topographic and chemical changes in the gutta-percha surface, while Argon plasma caused only chemical changes. Both treatments increased the surface free energy, favoring the wettability of AH Plus and Pulp Canal Sealer EWT sealers and influenced positively in the adhesion and leakage. - Highlights: • Argon plasma did not change the gutta-percha surface. • Oxygen plasma led to topographic changes. • Both treatments chemically modified the gutta-percha surface. • Treatments increased the surface free energy and favored the wettability of sealers. • Plasma

  17. Surface modification of gutta-percha cones by non-thermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Maíra, E-mail: maira@metalmat.ufrj.br [Department of Metallurgic and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Menezes, Marilia Santana de Oliveira [Department of Metallurgic and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Endodontics Division, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Barbosa, Carlos Augusto de Melo [Department of Clinical Dentistry, Endodontic Division, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Athias, Leonardo [Social Indicators Division, Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Simão, Renata Antoun [Department of Metallurgic and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro – UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of Oxygen and Argon plasma on gutta-percha surfaces. A total of 185 flat smooth gutta-percha surfaces were used. Samples were divided into groups: control: no plasma treatment; Oxygen: treatment with Oxygen plasma for 1 min; Argon: treatment with Argon plasma for 1 min. Samples were evaluated topographically by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy; and chemically by Fourier Transform-infrared Spectroscopy. A goniometer was used to determine the surface free energy and the wettability of the endodontic sealers. Additionally 60 bovine teeth were filled using pellets of gutta-percha (control, oxygen and argon plasma) and the sealers. Teeth were evaluated by push-out and microleakage tests. Data were statistically analyzed using specific tests. Argon plasma did not change the surface topography, while Oxygen plasma led to changes. Both treatments chemically modified the gutta-percha surface. Argon and Oxygen plasma increased the surface free energy and favored the wettability of AH Plus and Pulp Canal Sealer EWT. Regarding bond strength analysis, for AH Plus sealer, both plasma treatments on gutta-percha favored the bond strength to dentin. However, for Pulp Canal Sealer, there is no statistically significant influence. For leakage test, dye penetration occurred between sealer and dentin in all groups. In conclusion, Oxygen plasma led to both topographic and chemical changes in the gutta-percha surface, while Argon plasma caused only chemical changes. Both treatments increased the surface free energy, favoring the wettability of AH Plus and Pulp Canal Sealer EWT sealers and influenced positively in the adhesion and leakage. - Highlights: • Argon plasma did not change the gutta-percha surface. • Oxygen plasma led to topographic changes. • Both treatments chemically modified the gutta-percha surface. • Treatments increased the surface free energy and favored the wettability of sealers. • Plasma

  18. A novel approach to the pacemaker infection with non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchen; Li, Yu; Li, Yinglong; Yu, Shuang; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Jue

    2017-08-01

    Although the pacemaker (PM) is a key cardiac implantable electrical device for life-threatening arrhythmias treatment, the related infection is a challenge. Thus, the aim of this study is to validate cold plasma as a potential technology for the disinfection of infected pacemakers. Fifty donated PMs were cleaned and sterilized before use and then infected with Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus). Then, each experimental group was treated with cold plasma treatment for 1 min, 3 min, 5 min and 7 min, while the control group was immersed with sterilized water. Effectiveness of disinfection was evaluated by using CFU counting method and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The physicochemical properties of water treated with cold plasma at different time were evaluated, including water temperature change and oxidation reduction potential (ORP). The major reactive species generated by the cold plasma equipment during cold plasma were analyzed with optical emission spectroscopy (OES). No live bacteria were detected with CFU counting method after 7 min of cold plasma treatment, which matches with the CLSM results. The ORP value of water and H2O2 concentration changed significantly after treating with cold plasma. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), especially NO, O (777 nm) and O (844 nm) were probably key inactivation agents in cold plasma treatment. These results indicate that cold plasma could be an effective technology for the disinfection of implantable devices.

  19. Inactivation of Candida biofilms by non-thermal plasma and its enhancement for fungistatic effect of antifungal drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Sun

    Full Text Available We investigated the antifungal effect of non-thermal plasma, as well as its combination with common antifungal drugs, against Candida biofilms. A direct current atmospheric pressure He/O(2 (2% plasma microjet (PMJ was used to treat Candida biofilms in a 96-well plate. Inactivation efficacies of the biofilms were evaluated by XTT assay and counting colony forming units (CFUs. Morphological properties of the biofilms were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The sessile minimal inhibitory concentrations (SMICs of fluconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin for the biofilms were also tested. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR spectroscopy was used to detect the reactive oxygen species (ROS generated directly and indirectly by PMJ. The Candida biofilms were completely inactivated after 1 min PMJ treatment, where severely deformed fungal elements were observed in SEM images. The SMICs of the tested antifungal drugs for the plasma-treated biofilms were decreased by 2-6 folds of dilution, compared to those of the untreated controls. ROS such as hydroxyl radical ((•OH, superoxide anion radical ((•O(2 (- and singlet molecular oxygen ((1O(2 were detected by ESR. We hence conclude that He/O(2 (2% plasma alone, as well as in combination with common antifungal drugs, is able to inactivate Candida biofilms rapidly. The generation of ROS is believed to be one of the underlying mechanisms for the fungicidal activity of plasma.

  20. Disinfection of Streptococcus mutans biofilm by a non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Qing; Dong, Xiaoqing; Chen, Meng; Xu, Yuanxi; Sun, Hongmin; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the argon plasma treatment effect on disinfecting dental biofilm by using an atmospheric pressure plasma brush. Streptococcus mutans biofilms were developed for 3 days on the surfaces of hydroxyapatite (HA) discs, which were used to simulate human tooth enamel. After plasma treatment, cell viability in the S. mutans biofilms was characterized by using 3-(4,5-dimethylazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Compared with the untreated control group, about 90% bacterial reduction in the biofilms was observed after 1 min plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination indicated severe cell damages occurred on the top surface of the plasma treated biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that plasma treatment was effective as deep as 20 µm into the biofilms. When combined with antibiotic treatment using 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution, the plasma treatment became more effective and over 96% bacterial reduction was observed with 1 min plasma treatment.

  1. Acid gas degradation by non-thermal plasma and energy estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivia-Barrientos, R; Pacheco-Sotelo, J; Pacheco-Pacheco, M; Rivera-Rodríguez, C; Ibañez-Olvera, M; Estrada-Martinez, N; Silva-Rosas, J

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method to estimate the energy efficiency in the system performed to treat acid gases by plasma discharges. The electrical energy consumed by the plasma is evaluated by an electrical diagnosis, taking into account the experimental voltage and current applied to the power source. The estimation of the electrical energy generated by solid oxide fuel cells is based on the method of modeling the energy produced by the species generated by the plasma discharge and taking also into account the temperature of the gases.

  2. Non-thermal electron populations in microwave heated plasmas investigated with X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belapure, Jaydeep Sanjay

    2013-04-15

    An investigation of the generation and dynamics of superthermal electrons in fusion plasma is carried out. A SDD+CsI(Tl) based X-ray diagnostic is constructed, characterized and installed at ASDEX Upgrade. In various plasma heating power and densities, the fraction and the energy distribution of the superthermal electrons is obtained by a bi-Maxwellian model and compared with Fokker-Planck simulations.

  3. Non-thermal plasma treatment as a new biotechnology in relation to seeds, dry fruits, and grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božena, ŠERÁ; Michal, ŠERÝ

    2018-04-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) technology offers wide potential use in the food technology, the same as in the unconventional agriculture. Some seeds, dry fruits, grains and their sprouts gain popularity in the culinary industry as ‘raw seeds’. This review paper draws the current research and trends in NTP pre-treatment of selected seeds/fruits that are useable as ‘raw seeds’. The main applications are connected with activation of seed germination, early growth of seedlings, microbial inactivation of seed/fruit surface, and possibility of increasing quantity of biological active compounds in sprouting seeds. The paper presents a list of plant species that are able to be used as ‘raw seed’ including current information about main type of NTP treatment implemented.

  4. Plasma core reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, T.S.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations are being conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Power, in the form of thermal radiation emitted from the high-temperature nuclear fuel, is transmitted through fused-silica transparent walls to working fluids which flow in axial channels embedded in segments of the cavity walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration; each cavity is approximately 1 m in diameter by 4.35 m in length. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall

  5. Application to cleaning of waste plastic surfaces using atmospheric non-thermal plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, Masayuki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Yuji, Toshifumi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)]. E-mail: t-yuji@hiroshima-cmt.ac.jp; Watanabe, Takayuki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Kashihara, Junzou [SHARP corporation, 1-9-2 Nakase, Mihama-Ku, Chiba 261-8520 (Japan); Sumida, Yoshitake [SHARP corporation, 2613-1 Ichinomoto-cho, Tenri 632-8567 (Japan)

    2007-03-12

    The removal of paint on the surface of waste plastics is difficult by the conventional process; in this research, a new cleaning mechanism using atmospheric plasmas was examined through optical emission spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that an increase of pulse frequency enables for a short processing time for the removal of the paint film, signifying that the production of radicals in plasma, especially oxygen radicals, can be controlled by pulse frequency. Plasma jets were generated under the experimental conditions of an input power of 250 W to 400 W, a pulse frequency of 2 kHz to 12 kHz, and a plasma gas flow rate of 30 L/min. Examination of the intensity ratio of the reactive species, as measured by emission spectroscopy, showed that the O/N value increased with an increase in pulse frequency. Results of analysis with electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis show that nitrogen atoms and molybdenum in only the paint film decreased through plasma processing.

  6. Application to cleaning of waste plastic surfaces using atmospheric non-thermal plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, Masayuki; Yuji, Toshifumi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kashihara, Junzou; Sumida, Yoshitake

    2007-01-01

    The removal of paint on the surface of waste plastics is difficult by the conventional process; in this research, a new cleaning mechanism using atmospheric plasmas was examined through optical emission spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that an increase of pulse frequency enables for a short processing time for the removal of the paint film, signifying that the production of radicals in plasma, especially oxygen radicals, can be controlled by pulse frequency. Plasma jets were generated under the experimental conditions of an input power of 250 W to 400 W, a pulse frequency of 2 kHz to 12 kHz, and a plasma gas flow rate of 30 L/min. Examination of the intensity ratio of the reactive species, as measured by emission spectroscopy, showed that the O/N value increased with an increase in pulse frequency. Results of analysis with electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis show that nitrogen atoms and molybdenum in only the paint film decreased through plasma processing

  7. The energy partitioning of non-thermal particles in a plasma: the Coulomb logarithm revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, Robert L Jr; Brown, Lowell S

    2008-01-01

    The charged particle stopping power in a highly ionized and weakly to moderately coupled plasma has been calculated exactly to leading and next-to-leading accuracy in the plasma density by Brown, Preston and Singleton (BPS). Since the calculational techniques of BPS might be unfamiliar to some, and since the same methodology can also be used for other energy transport phenomena, we will review the main ideas behind the calculation. BPS used their stopping power calculation to derive a Fokker-Planck equation, also accurate to leading and next-to-leading orders, and we will also review this. We use this Fokker-Planck equation to compute the electron-ion energy partitioning of a charged particle traversing a plasma. The motivation for this application is ignition for inertial confinement fusion-more energy delivered to the ions means a better chance of ignition, and conversely. It is therefore important to calculate the fractional energy loss to electrons and ions as accurately as possible. One method by which one calculates the electron-ion energy splitting of a charged particle traversing a plasma involves integrating the stopping power dE/dx. However, as the charged particle slows down and becomes thermalized into the background plasma, this method of calculating the electron-ion energy splitting breaks down. As a result, it suffers a systematic error that may be as large as T/E 0 , where T is the plasma temperature and E 0 is the initial energy of the charged particle. The formalism presented here is designed to account for the thermalization process and it provides results that are near-exact.

  8. Non-thermal air plasma promotes the healing of acute skin wounds in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubinová, Šárka; Závišková, Kristýna; Uherková, Lenka; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Lunov, Oleg; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, mar (2017), s. 45183 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04010449 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : randomized controlled-trial * atmospheric argon plasma * nitric-oxide Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; BO - Biophysics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Biochemical research methods; Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) (FZU-D) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  9. Position- and time-resolved Stark broadening diagnostics of a non-thermal laser-induced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hao; Truscott, Benjamin S; Ashfold, Michael N R

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Stark-broadened line shapes of silicon ions in a laser-induced plasma using a model constructed, without assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), using a Druyvesteyn electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The method is applied to temporally and spatially resolved measurements of Si 2+ and Si 3+ emissions from a transient plasma expanding into vacuum, produced by 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a Si (1 0 0) target. The best-fitting simulated line shapes and the corresponding electron number densities and temperatures (or equivalently, Druyvesteyn average energies) are compared with those returned assuming LTE (i.e. for a Maxwellian EEDF). Non-thermal behavior is found to dominate at all but the very earliest stages of expansion close to the target surface, consistent with McWhirter’s criterion for the establishment of LTE. The Druyvesteyn EEDF always yields an equivalent or better model of the experimental measurements, and the observed increasingly strong departure from the Maxwellian case with time and distance from the ablation event highlights the essential invalidity of the LTE assumption for moderate-power, nanosecond laser-induced plasma expanding in vacuo. (paper)

  10. Polarization and spectral features of the hard x-ray continuum from non-thermal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, M.; Platz, P.

    1989-12-01

    Starting from the cross-sections for the free-free radiation obtained within the relativistic Born-Elwert theory, we calculate the spectral and polarization properties of the hard X-ray continuum (hν > 50 KeV) for plasmas containing fast electrons with an anisotropic velocity distribution. The physical and geometrical quantities of our model are oriented towards the future lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments on Tore-Supra. Our parameter space covers parallel and perpendicular temperatures, the nuclear charge of the ions (mainly Z = 14 and 28), the cut-off energy of the electrons, the radial current profile and the viewing angle. Extensive calculations open on the optimum conditions for polarization measurements and also give guide-lines for the quantitative interpretation of data under real plasma conditions. A second part of this report will treat with the operational principles and expected performances of hard X-ray polarimeters

  11. Effects of non-thermal plasmas and electric field on hydrocarbon/air flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Biswa

    2009-10-01

    Need to improve fuel efficiency, and reduce emission from hydrocarbon combustor in automotive and gas turbine engines have reinvigorated interest in reducing combustion instability of a lean flame. The heat generation rate in a binary reaction is HQ =N^2 c1c2 Q exp(-E/RT), where N is the density, c1 and c2 are mol fractions of the reactants, Q is the reaction heat release, E is the activation energy, R is the gas constant and T is the average temperature. For hydrocarbon-air reactions, the typical value of E/R ˜20, so most heat release reactions are confined to a thin reaction sheet at T >=1400 K. The lean flame burning condition is susceptible to combustion instability due to a critical balance between heat generation and heat loss rates, especially at high gas flow rate. Radical injection can increase flame speed by reducing the hydrocarbon oxidation reaction activation barrier and it can improve flame stability. Advances in nonequilibrium plasma generation at high pressure have prompted its application for energy efficient radical production to enhance hydrocarbon-air combustion. Dielectric barrier discharges and short pulse excited corona discharges have been used to enhance combustion stability. Direct electron impact dissociation of hydrocarbon and O2 produces radicals with lower fuel oxidation reaction activation barriers, initiating heat release reaction CnHm+O CnHm-1+ OH (and other similar sets of reactions with partially dissociated fuel) below the typical cross-over temperature. Also, N2 (A) produced in air discharge at a moderate E/n can dissociate O2 leading to oxidation of fuel at lower gas temperature. Low activation energy reactions are also possible by dissociation of hydrocarbon CnHm+e -> CnHm-2+H2+e, where a chain propagation reaction H2+ O OH+H can be initiated at lower gas temperature than possible under thermal equilibrium kinetics. Most of heat release comes from the reaction CO+OH-> CO2 +H, nonthermal OH production seem to improve

  12. Development of hydrophilic dental wax without surfactant using a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Dental wax (DW), a low-melting and high-molecular-weight organic mixture, is widely used in dentistry for forming moulds of teeth. Hydrophilicity is an important property for DW, as a wet dental investment is used to surround the wax before wax burnout is performed. However, recent attempts to improve the hydrophilicity of DW using a surfactant have resulted in the reduced mechanical properties of the dental investment, leading to the failure of the dental restoration. This study applied a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (AAPPJ) for DW surface treatment and investigated its effect on both DW hydrophilicity and the dental investment's mechanical properties. The results showed that the application of the AAPPJ significantly improved the hydrophilicity of the DW, and that the results were similar to that of cleaner-treated DW using commercially available products with surfactant. A surface chemical analysis indicated that the improvement of hydrophilicity was related to an increase in the number of oxygen-related bonds on the DW surface following the removal of carbon hydrate in both AAPPJ and cleaner-treated DW. However, cleaner treatment compromised the mechanical property of the dental investment when the dental investment was in contact with the treated DW, while the AAPPJ treatment did not. Therefore, the use of AAPPJ to treat DW is a promising method for accurate dental restoration, as it induces an improvement in hydrophilicity without harming the dental investment. (paper)

  13. Oxidation of clofibric acid in aqueous solution using a non-thermal plasma discharge or gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Joana; Ceriani, Elisa; Pinhão, Nuno; Marotta, Ester; Melo, Rita; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Paradisi, Cristina; Margaça, Fernanda M. A.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we study degradation of clofibric acid (CFA) in aqueous solution using either ionizing radiation from a $^{60}$Co source or a non-thermal plasma produced by discharges in the air above the solution. The results obtained with the two technologies are compared in terms of effectiveness of CFA degradation and its by-products. In both cases the CFA degradation follows a quasi-exponential decay in time well modelled by a kinetic scheme which considers the competition between CFA and all reaction intermediates for the reactive species generated in solution as well as the amount of the end product formed. A new degradation law is deduced to explain the results. Although the end-product CO$_2$ was detected and the CFA conversion found to be very high under the studied conditions, HPLC analysis reveals several degradation intermediates still bearing the aromatic ring with the chlorine substituent. The extent of mineralization is rather limited. The energy yield is found to be higher in the gamma radiation experiments.

  14. Non-thermal plasma induces mitochondria-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway via ROS generation in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yu, K N; Ma, Jie; Shen, Jie; Cheng, Cheng; Zhou, Fangjian; Cai, Zhiming; Han, Wei

    2017-11-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for anticancer treatment. Although increasing evidence suggests that NTP selectively induces apoptosis in some types of tumor cells, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear. In this study, we further investigated possible molecular mechanisms for NTP-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells. The results showed that NTP exposure significantly inhibited the growth and viability of HeLa cells. Morphological observation and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that NTP exposure induced HeLa cell apoptosis. NTP exposure also activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, which subsequently cleaved poly (ADP- ribose) polymerase. Furthermore, NTP exposure suppressed Bcl-2 expression, enhanced Bax expression and translocation to mitochondria, activated mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, followed by the release of cytochrome c. Further studies showed that NTP treatment led to ROS generation, whereas blockade of ROS generation by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC, ROS scavengers) significantly prevented NTP-induced mitochondrial alteration and subsequent apoptosis of HeLa cells via suppressing Bax translocation, cytochrome c and caspase-3 activation. Taken together, our results indicated that NTP exposure induced mitochondria-mediated intrinsic apoptosis of HeLa cells was activated by ROS generation. These findings provide insights to the therapeutic potential and clinical research of NTP as a novel tool in cervical cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Influence of non-thermal plasma on structural and electrical properties of globular and nanostructured conductive polymer polypyrrole in water suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galář, Pavel; Khun, Josef; Kopecký, Dušan; Scholtz, Vladimír; Trchová, Miroslava; Fučíková, Anna; Jirešová, Jana; Fišer, Ladislav

    2017-11-08

    Non-thermal plasma has proved its benefits in medicine, plasma assisted polymerization, food industry and many other fields. Even though, the ability of non-thermal plasma to modify surface properties of various materials is generally known, only limited attention has been given to exploitations of this treatment on conductive polymers. Here, we show study of non-thermal plasma treatment on properties of globular and nanostructured polypyrrole in the distilled water. We observe that plasma presence over the suspension level doesn't change morphology of the polymer (shape), but significantly influences its elemental composition and physical properties. After 60 min of treatment, the relative concentration of chloride counter ions decreased approximately 3 and 4 times for nanostructured and globular form, respectively and concentration of oxygen increased approximately 3 times for both forms. Simultaneously, conductivity decrease (14 times for globular and 2 times for nanostructured one) and changes in zeta potential characteristics of both samples were observed. The modification evolution was dominated by multi-exponential function with time constants having values approximately 1 and 10 min for both samples. It is expected that these time constants are related to two modification processes connected to direct presence of the spark and to long-lived species generated by the plasma.

  16. Liquid assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition with a non-thermal plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schäfer, J.; Fricke, K.; Mika, Filip; Pokorná, Zuzana; Zajíčková, L.; Foest, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 630, MAY 30 (2017), s. 71-78 ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : plasma jet * liquid assisted plasma enhanced chemical * vapour deposition * silicon oxide Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 1.879, year: 2016

  17. Chlorobenzene degeradation by non-thermal plasma combined with EG-TiO{sub 2}/ZnO as a photocatalyst: Effect of photocatalyst on CO{sub 2} selectivity and byproducts reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbani Shahna, Farshid; Bahrami, Abdulrahman [Center of Excellence for Occupational Health and Research Center for Health Science, School of Public Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alimohammadi, Iraj; Yarahmadi, Rassuol [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jaleh, Babak; Gandomi, Mastaneh [Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, Hossein, E-mail: hossein.ebrahimi@yahoo.com [Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ad-Din Abedi, Kamal [Department of Occupational Health Engineering, Faculty of Health, Kurdistan University of Medical sciences, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} and ZnO Nano particles were coated on the surface of expanded graphite. • Expanded graphite-TiO{sub 2}/ZnO nano composite under UV light was placed downstream non-thermal plasma reactor. • Chlorobenzene removal and selectivity of CO{sub 2} were enhanced in combined system. • Produced harmful byproducts from plasma reactor were reduced dramatically in combined system. - Abstract: The non-thermal plasma (NTP) technique, which suffers from low selectivity in complete oxidation of volatile organic compounds to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, creates unwanted and harmful byproducts. NTP in concert with photocatalyst can resolve this limitation due to additional oxidation. TiO{sub 2} and ZnO nanoparticles were coated on the surface of the expanded graphite and placed downstream of the NTP reactor under UV light. In this study, to compare the performance of NTP and the combined system, chlorobenzene removal, selectivity of CO{sub 2} and byproducts formation were investigated. The results showed that the combined system enhanced both the removal efficiency and CO{sub 2} selectivity. The output gas of the NTP reactor contained chlorobenzene, phosgene, O{sub 3}, NO, NO{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, HCL and CL. The bulk of these byproducts was oxidized on the surface of the nanocomposite; as a result, the content of the byproducts in the output gas of the combined system decreased dramatically. The removal efficiency and CO{sub 2} selectivity increased by rising the applied voltage and residence time because the collision between active species and pollutant molecules increases. Based on these results, the combined system is preferred due to a higher performance and lower formation of harmful byproducts.

  18. Cellular attachment and differentiation on titania nanotubes exposed to air- or nitrogen-based non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Yeon Seo

    Full Text Available The surface topography and chemistry of titanium implants are important factors for successful osseointegration. However, chemical modification of an implant surface using currently available methods often results in the disruption of topographical features and the loss of beneficial effects during the shelf life of the implant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to apply the recently highlighted portable non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ, elicited from one of two different gas sources (nitrogen and air, to TiO2 nanotube surfaces to further improve their osteogenic properties while preserving the topographical morphology. The surface treatment was performed before implantation to avoid age-related decay. The surface chemistry and morphology of the TiO2 nanotube surfaces before and after the NTAPPJ treatment were determined using a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a surface profiler, a contact angle goniometer, and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. The MC3T3-E1 cell viability, attachment and morphology were confirmed using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining, and analysis of gene expression using rat mesenchymal stem cells was performed using a real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that both portable nitrogen- and air-based NTAPPJ could be used on TiO2 nanotube surfaces easily and without topographical disruption. NTAPPJ resulted in a significant increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces as well as changes in the surface chemistry, which consequently increased the cell viability, attachment and differentiation compared with the control samples. The nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment group exhibited a higher osteogenic gene expression level than the air-based NTAPPJ treatment group due to the lower atomic percentage of carbon on the surface that resulted from treatment. It was concluded that NTAPPJ treatment of TiO2 nanotube surfaces results in an increase in

  19. Morphological study of polymer surfaces exposed to non-thermal plasma based on contact angle and the use of scaling laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, T., E-mail: tsfelix81@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Cassini, F.A.; Benetoli, L.O.B. [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Dotto, M.E.R. [Physics Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Debacher, N.A. [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Polymeric surfaces were etched using non-thermal plasma at different intensities. • Polymers of low mechanical hardness reached the saturation level faster. • A mathematical model based on scaling laws was proposed. - Abstract: The experiments presented in this communication have the purpose to elaborate an explanation for the morphological evolution of the growth of polymeric surfaces provided by the treatment of non-thermal plasma. According to the roughness analysis and the model proposed by scaling laws it is possible relate to a predictable or merely random effect. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly(etherether)ketone (PEEK) samples were exposed to a non-thermal plasma discharge and the resulting surfaces roughness were analyzed based on the measurements from contact angle, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy coupled with scaling laws analysis which can help to describe and understand the dynamic of formation of a wide variety of rough surfaces. The roughness, R{sub RMS} (RMS- Root Mean Square) values for polymer surface range between 19.8 nm and 110.9 nm. The contact angle and the AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) measurements as a function of the plasma exposure time were in agreement with both polar and dispersive components according to the surface roughness and also with the morphology evaluated described by Wolf-Villain model, with proximate values of α between 0.91{sub (PET)} and 0.88{sub (PEEK)}, β = 0.25{sub (PET)} and z = 3,64{sub (PET)}.

  20. Electron beam non-thermal plasma hybrid system for reduction of NOx and SOx emissions from power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaroiu, Gh.; Zissulescu, E.; Sandu, M.; Roscia, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper an installation containing a negative corona discharge (DC) reactor, a pulse corona discharge reactor and a combined electron beam (EB) and microwave induced plasma reactor is presented. SO 2 is removed up to 42% through spontaneous reaction with ammonia without EB or microwave irradiation at the temperature below 70 o C. Considering the values of the removal efficiencies of 98% for SO 2 and 80% for NO x applying separate EB irradiation with a dose of 40 kGy, when the simultaneous EB and microwave irradiation is applied, the required absorbed dose is about two times smaller. The SO 2 removal efficiency of simultaneous DC or positive discharge and microwave discharge is higher than separate corona discharge, pulse and microwave discharge. Also, the applied voltage level at which the removal efficiency reaches the maximum value is less than that for the separate application of corona discharge or pulse discharge. The NO x removal efficiency of DC or pulse discharge suffers little change by additional use of the microwave energy. Based on this research and the results obtained by a pilot project built in collaboration with Electrostatica Bucharest, a project for an installation involving simultaneous SO 2 and NO x removal by irradiation with accelerated EBs and microwaves, has been proposed for Thermo-Power Plant CET-West-Bucharest of 550 MW. (author)

  1. The role of non-thermal atmospheric pressure biocompatible plasma in the differentiation of osteoblastic precursor cells, MC3T3-E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ihn; Choi, Eun Ha

    2017-05-30

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is ionized matter, composed of highly reactive species that include positive ions, negative ions, free radicals, neutral atoms, and molecules. Recent reports have suggested that non-thermal biocompatible plasma (NBP) can selectively kill a variety of cancer cells, and promote stem cell differentiation. However as of yet, the regulation of proliferation and differentiation potential of NBP has been poorly understood.Here, we investigated the effects of NBP on the osteogenic differentiation of precursor cell lines of osteoblasts, MC3T3 E1 and SaOS-2. For in vitro osteogenic differentiation, precursor cell lines were treated with NBP, and cultured with osteogenic induction medium. After 10 days of treatment, the NBP was shown to be effective in osteogenic differentiation in MC3T3 E1 cells by von Kossa and Alizarin Red S staining assay. Real-time PCR was then performed to investigate the expression of osteogenic specific genes, Runx2, OCN, COL1, ALP and osterix in MC3T3 E1 cells after treatment with NBP for 4 days. Furthermore, analysis of the protein expression showed that NBP treatment significantly reduced PI3K/AKT signaling and MAPK family signaling. However, p38 controlled phosphorylation of transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) that related to cell differentiation with increased phosphorylated p38. These results suggest that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma can induce osteogenic differentiation, and enhance bone formation.

  2. Removal of gas phase low-concentration toluene over Mn, Ag and Ce modified HZSM-5 catalysts by periodical operation of adsorption and non-thermal plasma regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzheng; Wang, Honglei; Zhu, Tianle; Fan, Xing

    2015-07-15

    Ag/HZSM-5, Mn/HZSM-5, Ce/HZSM-5, Ag-Mn/HZSM-5 and Ce-Mn/HZSM-5 were prepared by impregnation method. Both their adsorption capacity and catalytic activity were investigated for the removal of gas phase low-concentration toluene by periodical operation of adsorption and non-thermal plasma regeneration. Results show that catalysts loaded with Ag (Ag/HZSM-5 and Ag-Mn/HZSM-5) had larger adsorption capacity for toluene than the other catalysts. And Ag-Mn/HZSM-5 displayed the best catalytic performance for both toluene oxidation by non-thermal plasma and byproducts suppression. On the other hand, the deactivated catalyst can be fully regenerated by calcining in air stream when its adsorption capacity and catalytic activity of the Ag-Mn/HZSM-5 catalyst was found to be decreased after 10 cycles of periodical adsorption and non-thermal regeneration. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Morphological study of polymer surfaces exposed to non-thermal plasma based on contact angle and the use of scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felix, T.; Cassini, F.A.; Benetoli, L.O.B.; Dotto, M.E.R.; Debacher, N.A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Polymeric surfaces were etched using non-thermal plasma at different intensities. • Polymers of low mechanical hardness reached the saturation level faster. • A mathematical model based on scaling laws was proposed. - Abstract: The experiments presented in this communication have the purpose to elaborate an explanation for the morphological evolution of the growth of polymeric surfaces provided by the treatment of non-thermal plasma. According to the roughness analysis and the model proposed by scaling laws it is possible relate to a predictable or merely random effect. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly(etherether)ketone (PEEK) samples were exposed to a non-thermal plasma discharge and the resulting surfaces roughness were analyzed based on the measurements from contact angle, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy coupled with scaling laws analysis which can help to describe and understand the dynamic of formation of a wide variety of rough surfaces. The roughness, R_R_M_S (RMS- Root Mean Square) values for polymer surface range between 19.8 nm and 110.9 nm. The contact angle and the AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) measurements as a function of the plasma exposure time were in agreement with both polar and dispersive components according to the surface roughness and also with the morphology evaluated described by Wolf-Villain model, with proximate values of α between 0.91_(_P_E_T_) and 0.88_(_P_E_E_K_), β = 0.25_(_P_E_T_) and z = 3,64_(_P_E_T_).

  4. Kinetic study on non-thermal volumetric plasma decay in the early afterglow of air discharge generated by a short pulse microwave or laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wei, E-mail: yangwei861212@126.com; Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2016-08-28

    This paper reports a kinetic study on non-thermal plasma decay in the early afterglow of air discharge generated by short pulse microwave or laser. A global self-consistent model is based on the particle balance of complex plasma chemistry, electron energy equation, and gas thermal balance equation. Electron-ion Coulomb collision is included in the steady state Boltzmann equation solver to accurately describe the electron mobility and other transport coefficients. The model is used to simulate the afterglow of microsecond to nanosecond pulse microwave discharge in N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and air, as well as femtosecond laser filament discharge in dry and humid air. The simulated results for electron density decay are in quantitative agreement with the available measured ones. The evolution of plasma decay under an external electric field is also investigated, and the effect of gas heating is considered. The underlying mechanism of plasma density decay is unveiled through the above kinetic modeling.

  5. Using the Pairs of Lines Broadened by Collisions with Neutral and Charged Particles for Gas Temperature Determination of Argon Non-Thermal Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Yubero

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The spectroscopic method for gas temperature determination in argon non-thermal plasmas sustained at atmospheric pressure proposed recently by Spectrochimica Acta Part B 129 14 (2017—based on collisional broadening measurements of selected pairs of argon atomic lines, has been applied to other pairs of argon atomic lines, and the discrepancies found in some of these results have been analyzed. For validation purposes, the values of the gas temperature obtained using the different pairs of lines have been compared with the rotational temperatures derived from the OH ro-vibrational bands, using the Boltzmann-plot technique.

  6. Mechanism and comparison of needle-type non-thermal direct and indirect atmospheric pressure plasma jets on the degradation of dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attri, Pankaj; Yusupov, Maksudbek; Park, Ji Hoon; Lingamdinne, Lakshmi Prasanna; Koduru, Janardhan Reddy; Shiratani, Masaharu; Choi, Eun Ha; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-10-01

    Purified water supply for human use, agriculture and industry is the major global priority nowadays. The advanced oxidation process based on atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been used for purification of wastewater, although the underlying mechanisms of degradation of organic pollutants are still unknown. In this study we employ two needle-type atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma jets, i.e., indirect (ID-APPJ) and direct (D-APPJ) jets operating at Ar feed gas, for the treatment of methylene blue, methyl orange and congo red dyes, for two different times (i.e., 20 min and 30 min). Specifically, we study the decolorization/degradation of all three dyes using the above mentioned plasma sources, by means of UV-Vis spectroscopy, HPLC and a density meter. We also employ mass spectroscopy to verify whether only decolorization or also degradation takes place after treatment of the dyes by the NTP jets. Additionally, we analyze the interaction of OH radicals with all three dyes using reactive molecular dynamics simulations, based on the density functional-tight binding method. This investigation represents the first report on the degradation of these three different dyes by two types of NTP setups, analyzed by various methods, and based on both experimental and computational studies.

  7. Morphological study of polymer surfaces exposed to non-thermal plasma based on contact angle and the use of scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, T.; Cassini, F. A.; Benetoli, L. O. B.; Dotto, M. E. R.; Debacher, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The experiments presented in this communication have the purpose to elaborate an explanation for the morphological evolution of the growth of polymeric surfaces provided by the treatment of non-thermal plasma. According to the roughness analysis and the model proposed by scaling laws it is possible relate to a predictable or merely random effect. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly(etherether)ketone (PEEK) samples were exposed to a non-thermal plasma discharge and the resulting surfaces roughness were analyzed based on the measurements from contact angle, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy coupled with scaling laws analysis which can help to describe and understand the dynamic of formation of a wide variety of rough surfaces. The roughness, RRMS (RMS- Root Mean Square) values for polymer surface range between 19.8 nm and 110.9 nm. The contact angle and the AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) measurements as a function of the plasma exposure time were in agreement with both polar and dispersive components according to the surface roughness and also with the morphology evaluated described by Wolf-Villain model, with proximate values of α between 0.91(PET) and 0.88(PEEK), β = 0.25(PET) and z = 3,64(PET).

  8. Non-thermally activated chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiller, W.

    1987-01-01

    The subject is covered under the following headings: state-of-the art of non-thermally activated chemical processes; basic phenomena in non-thermal chemistry including mechanochemistry, photochemistry, laser chemistry, electrochemistry, photo-electro chemistry, high-field chemistry, magneto chemistry, plasma chemistry, radiation chemistry, hot-atom chemistry, and positronium and muonium chemistry; elementary processes in non-thermal chemistry including nuclear chemistry, interactions of electromagnetic radiations, electrons and heavy particles with matter, ionic elementary processes, elementary processes with excited species, radicalic elementary processes, and energy-induced elementary processes on surfaces and interfaces; and comparative considerations. An appendix with historical data and a subject index is given. 44 figs., 41 tabs., and 544 refs

  9. Study of hydroxylation of benzene and toluene using a micro-DBD plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, H; Ando, M; Kojima, H

    2005-01-01

    The hydroxylation behaviour of benzene and toluene were studied using a micro-plasma reactor, where an atmospheric non-thermal plasma was generated by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The results indicated that oxidation products primarily consisted of phenol and C 4 -compounds for benzene hydroxylation, whereas cresol, benzaldehyde, benzylalcohol and C 4 -compounds were detected for toluene hydroxylation. By taking into consideration the reaction mechanism in the plasma reactor, these products were classified into (1) oxidation of the aromatic ring and functional group on the ring and (2) cleavage of the aromatic ring or dissociation of the functional group on the ring

  10. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure HF plasma source: generation of nitric oxide and ozone for bio-medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, S.; Bibinov, N.; Gesche, R.; Awakowicz, P.

    2010-01-01

    A new miniature high-frequency (HF) plasma source intended for bio-medical applications is studied using nitrogen/oxygen mixture at atmospheric pressure. This plasma source can be used as an element of a plasma source array for applications in dermatology and surgery. Nitric oxide and ozone which are produced in this plasma source are well-known agents for proliferation of the cells, inhalation therapy for newborn infants, disinfection of wounds and blood ozonation. Using optical emission spectroscopy, microphotography and numerical simulation, the gas temperature in the active plasma region and plasma parameters (electron density and electron distribution function) are determined for varied nitrogen/oxygen flows. The influence of the gas flows on the plasma conditions is studied. Ozone and nitric oxide concentrations in the effluent of the plasma source are measured using absorption spectroscopy and electro-chemical NO-detector at variable gas flows. Correlations between plasma parameters and concentrations of the particles in the effluent of the plasma source are discussed. By varying the gas flows, the HF plasma source can be optimized for nitric oxide or ozone production. Maximum concentrations of 2750 ppm and 400 ppm of NO and O3, correspondingly, are generated.

  11. Non Thermal Plasma Assisted Catalytic Reactor for CO2 Methanation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In situ production of methane as propellant and oxygen as life support consumables from the atmospheric CO2 and water on Mars is a key enabling technology required...

  12. Catalytic non-thermal plasma reactor for the decomposition of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    diseases), hence has a negative impact on the environ- ment.1–4 Some of the well-established technologies for. VOC abatement are thermal and catalytic ... motor driven syringe pump and mixed with ambient air. (300 ml/min at STP) in a mixing chamber. Air flow was regulated by pre-calibrated mass flow controllers.

  13. Catalytic non-thermal plasma reactor for the decomposition of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Among the catalytic study, MnOx/SMF (manganese oxide on sintered metal fibres electrode) shows better performance, probably due to the formation of active oxygen species by in situ decomposition of ozone on the catalyst surface. Water vapour further enhanced the performance due to the in situ ...

  14. Non Thermal Plasma Assisted Catalytic Reactor for CO2 Methanation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In situ production of methane as propellant by methanation of CO2, also called Sabatier reaction, is a key enabling technology required for sustainable and...

  15. Non-thermal plasma modified growth and differentiation process of Capsicum annuum PP805 Godiva in in vitro conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Nasrin; Iranbakhsh, Alireza; Ardebili, Zahra Oraghi

    2017-05-01

    With the aim of evaluating the possible impacts of cold plasma on the structure and growth pattern of Capsicum annuum, the current study was carried out. The seeds were exposed to an argon-derived plasma (0.84 W cm-2 surface power densities) for 0, 1 or 2 minutes. Plasma-treated seeds were grown in the Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium or MS medium supplemented with BA and IAA. The presence of purple stems was recorded in plasma-treated plants grown in the medium supplemented with hormones. The recorded morphological differences were dependent on the exposure time of plasma treatments and/or the presence of hormones in the culture media. Plasma treatment of 1 minute had an improving effect on the shoot and root lengths as well as total leaf area, whereas plasma treatment of 2 minutes had an adverse effect. In contrast to the 1 minute treatment, plasma treatment of 2 minutes significantly impaired growth and hence reduced the total biomass. Alterations in stem diameter and differences in tissue patterns (especially in the vascular system) occurred, and were mainly dependent on the plasma exposure time and/or the presence of hormones. This is a first report on the effects of cold plasma on plant growth in in vitro conditions.

  16. Measurement of the non-thermal properties of a low pressure spraying plasma by electric and spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yong Ho

    2003-02-01

    For the case of an atmospheric plasma, the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model can be applied to plasmas at a nozzle entrance and to those on the axis of the plasma flame, but it is not easy to justify applying the LTE model to off-center plasma and to a low-pressure spraying plasma. Although the energy distribution of the electrons is assumed to be Maxwellian for the most of spraying plasmas, the non-Maxwellian distribution is possible for the case of low-pressure spaying plasma and edge plasma of atmospheric spraying plasma. In this work, the non-Maxwellian distribution of electrons was measured by using an electric probe installed on the fast scanning probe system, and non-LTE effects were measured by using the optical emission spectroscopy system. Distribution of the electrons of a low-pressure spraying plasma is observed not as Maxwellian but as bi-Maxwellian by the measurement of the single probe. Bi-Maxwellian distribution appears in the edge of a low pressure spraying plasma and seems to be due to the reduction of the collisonality by the drastic variation of the plasma density. Non-LTE characteristics of a low-pressure spraying plasma can be deuced from the measured results of the optical emission spectroscopy and is analyzed by the collisional radiative equilibrium (CRE) model, where the Maxwellian and the non-Maxwellian distributions are assumed for comparison. For the electron temperature, the results from optical emission spectroscopy were similar to the results from the single probe (3∼5 % in error)

  17. The Role of Higher-Order Modes on the Electromagnetic Whistler-Cyclotron Wave Fluctuations of Thermal and Non-Thermal Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.; Moya, Pablo S.; Navarro, Roberto; Araneda, Jamie A.

    2014-01-01

    Two fundamental challenging problems of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are the understanding of the relaxation of a collisionless plasmas with nearly isotropic velocity distribution functions and the resultant state of nearly equipartition energy density with electromagnetic plasma turbulence. Here, we present the results of a study which shows the role that higher-order-modes play in limiting the electromagnetic whistler-like fluctuations in a thermal and non-thermal plasma. Our main results show that for a thermal plasma the magnetic fluctuations are confined by regions that are bounded by the least-damped higher order modes. We further show that the zone where the whistler-cyclotron normal modes merges the electromagnetic fluctuations shifts to longer wavelengths as the beta(sub e) increases. This merging zone has been interpreted as the beginning of the region where the whistler-cyclotron waves losses their identity and become heavily damped while merging with the fluctuations. Our results further indicate that in the case of nonthermal plasmas, the higher-order modes do not confine the fluctuations due to the effective higher-temperature effects and the excess of suprathermal plasma particles. The analysis presented here considers the second-order theory of fluctuations and the dispersion relation of weakly transverse fluctuations, with wave vectors parallel to the uniform background magnetic field, in a finite temperature isotropic bi-Maxwellian and Tsallis-kappa-like magnetized electron-proton plasma. Our results indicate that the spontaneously emitted electromagnetic fluctuations are in fact enhanced over these quasi modes suggesting that such modes play an important role in the emission and absorption of electromagnetic fluctuations in thermal or quasi-thermal plasmas.

  18. Effects of a non thermal plasma treatment alone or in combination with gemcitabine in a MIA PaCa2-luc orthotopic pancreatic carcinoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Brullé

    Full Text Available Pancreatic tumors are the gastrointestinal cancer with the worst prognosis in humans and with a survival rate of 5% at 5 years. Nowadays, no chemotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in terms of survival for this cancer. Previous study focused on the development of a new therapy by non thermal plasma showed significant effects on tumor growth for colorectal carcinoma and glioblastoma. To allow targeted treatment, a fibered plasma (Plasma Gun was developed and its evaluation was performed on an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma using a MIA PaCa2-luc bioluminescent cell line. The aim of this study was to characterize this pancreatic carcinoma model and to determine the effects of Plasma Gun alone or in combination with gemcitabine. During a 36 days period, quantitative BLI could be used to follow the tumor progression and we demonstrated that plasma gun induced an inhibition of MIA PaCa2-luc cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo and that this effect could be improved by association with gemcitabine possibly thanks to its radiosensitizing properties.

  19. Effects of a non thermal plasma treatment alone or in combination with gemcitabine in a MIA PaCa2-luc orthotopic pancreatic carcinoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Martel, Eric; Robert, Eric; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Trichet, Valérie; Richard, Serge; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel; Le Pape, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are the gastrointestinal cancer with the worst prognosis in humans and with a survival rate of 5% at 5 years. Nowadays, no chemotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in terms of survival for this cancer. Previous study focused on the development of a new therapy by non thermal plasma showed significant effects on tumor growth for colorectal carcinoma and glioblastoma. To allow targeted treatment, a fibered plasma (Plasma Gun) was developed and its evaluation was performed on an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic carcinoma using a MIA PaCa2-luc bioluminescent cell line. The aim of this study was to characterize this pancreatic carcinoma model and to determine the effects of Plasma Gun alone or in combination with gemcitabine. During a 36 days period, quantitative BLI could be used to follow the tumor progression and we demonstrated that plasma gun induced an inhibition of MIA PaCa2-luc cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo and that this effect could be improved by association with gemcitabine possibly thanks to its radiosensitizing properties.

  20. Influence of non-thermal plasma forming gases on improvement of surface properties of low density polyethylene (LDPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandiyaraj, K. Navaneetha, E-mail: dr.knpr@gmail.com [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Shakthi Institute of Engineering and Technology, L and T by pass, Chinniyam Palayam (post), Coimbatore 641062 (India); Deshmukh, R.R. [Department of Physics, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India); Ruzybayev, Inci; Shah, S. Ismat [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, 208 Dupont Hall, Newark, NJ (United States); Su, Pi-Guey [Department of Chemistry, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 111, Taiwan (China); Halleluyah, Jr. mercy; Halim, Ahmad Sukari [School of Medical Sciences, Health Campus Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia)

    2014-07-01

    Owing to the superior physico-chemical properties, the low density polyethylene (LDPE) has been widely used in the various industrial applications; especially in biomedical field for artificial organs, medical devices and disposable clinical apparatus. However, the poor anticoagulation property is one of the main drawbacks of the LDPE due to its poor surface properties. Therefore, in this paper we present the effect of plasma forming gases such as argon (Ar), oxygen (O{sub 2}), air and argon-oxygen (Ar + O{sub 2}) mixture on improvement of the surfaces properties of LDPE film using direct current (dc) excited glow discharge plasma. Contact angle with evaluation of surface energy, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to examine the change in surface properties such as hydrophilicity, chemical composition and surface topography, respectively. Furthermore, the hydrophobic recovery of the plasma treated LDPE was analyzed using ageing effect under different storage condition i.e. in air and water. The adhesive strength of the LDPE films was determined using T-peel test. In vitro tests were used to examine the blood compatibility of the surface modified LDPE films. It has been found that the hydrophilicity of the various plasma treated LDPE films was improved significantly due to the formation of oxygen containing polar groups such as OH, COO, C-O, C=O as confirmed by contact angle and XPS analysis. AFM revealed the changes in surface topography of plasma processed films. The gas mixture Ar + O{sub 2} plasma influenced the remarkable improvement on the surface properties of a LDPE film compared with other gaseous plasmas. These physiochemical changes induced by the plasma on the surface facilitate to improve the adhesive strength and blood compatibility.

  1. Influence of non-thermal plasma forming gases on improvement of surface properties of low density polyethylene (LDPE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandiyaraj, K. Navaneetha; Deshmukh, R.R.; Ruzybayev, Inci; Shah, S. Ismat; Su, Pi-Guey; Halleluyah, Jr. mercy; Halim, Ahmad Sukari

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the superior physico-chemical properties, the low density polyethylene (LDPE) has been widely used in the various industrial applications; especially in biomedical field for artificial organs, medical devices and disposable clinical apparatus. However, the poor anticoagulation property is one of the main drawbacks of the LDPE due to its poor surface properties. Therefore, in this paper we present the effect of plasma forming gases such as argon (Ar), oxygen (O 2 ), air and argon-oxygen (Ar + O 2 ) mixture on improvement of the surfaces properties of LDPE film using direct current (dc) excited glow discharge plasma. Contact angle with evaluation of surface energy, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to examine the change in surface properties such as hydrophilicity, chemical composition and surface topography, respectively. Furthermore, the hydrophobic recovery of the plasma treated LDPE was analyzed using ageing effect under different storage condition i.e. in air and water. The adhesive strength of the LDPE films was determined using T-peel test. In vitro tests were used to examine the blood compatibility of the surface modified LDPE films. It has been found that the hydrophilicity of the various plasma treated LDPE films was improved significantly due to the formation of oxygen containing polar groups such as OH, COO, C-O, C=O as confirmed by contact angle and XPS analysis. AFM revealed the changes in surface topography of plasma processed films. The gas mixture Ar + O 2 plasma influenced the remarkable improvement on the surface properties of a LDPE film compared with other gaseous plasmas. These physiochemical changes induced by the plasma on the surface facilitate to improve the adhesive strength and blood compatibility.

  2. Diagnostics of an AC driven atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma jet and its use for radially directed jet array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Wang, R.

    2017-08-01

    An alternating current atmospheric pressure plasma jet is generated with noble gas or noble gas/oxygen admixture as working gas. A "core plasma filament" is observed at the center of the dielectric tube and extends to the plasma jet at higher peak-to-peak voltages. This type of plasma jet is believed to be of the same nature with the reported plasma bullet driven by pulsed DC power sources. Double current probes are used to assess the speed of the plasma bullet and show that the speed is around 104-105 m/s. The time dependence of the downstream bullet speed is attributed to the gas heating and in turn the increase of the reduced electric field E/N. Optical emission spectra show the dependence of helium and oxygen emission intensities on the concentration of oxygen additive in the carrier gas, with peak values found at 0.5% O2. Multiple radial jets are realized on dielectric tubes of different sizes. As a case study, one of these multi-jet devices is used to treat B. aureus on the inner surface of a plastic beaker and is shown to be more effective than a single jet.

  3. Chlorobenzene degeradation by non-thermal plasma combined with EG-TiO2/ZnO as a photocatalyst: Effect of photocatalyst on CO2 selectivity and byproducts reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani Shahna, Farshid; Bahrami, Abdulrahman; Alimohammadi, Iraj; Yarahmadi, Rassuol; Jaleh, Babak; Gandomi, Mastaneh; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Ad-Din Abedi, Kamal

    2017-02-15

    The non-thermal plasma (NTP) technique, which suffers from low selectivity in complete oxidation of volatile organic compounds to CO 2 and H 2 O, creates unwanted and harmful byproducts. NTP in concert with photocatalyst can resolve this limitation due to additional oxidation. TiO 2 and ZnO nanoparticles were coated on the surface of the expanded graphite and placed downstream of the NTP reactor under UV light. In this study, to compare the performance of NTP and the combined system, chlorobenzene removal, selectivity of CO 2 and byproducts formation were investigated. The results showed that the combined system enhanced both the removal efficiency and CO 2 selectivity. The output gas of the NTP reactor contained chlorobenzene, phosgene, O 3 , NO, NO 2 , CO, CO 2 , HCL and CL. The bulk of these byproducts was oxidized on the surface of the nanocomposite; as a result, the content of the byproducts in the output gas of the combined system decreased dramatically. The removal efficiency and CO 2 selectivity increased by rising the applied voltage and residence time because the collision between active species and pollutant molecules increases. Based on these results, the combined system is preferred due to a higher performance and lower formation of harmful byproducts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A study of oxidative stress induced by non-thermal plasma-activated water for bacterial damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qian; Ma, Ruonan; Tian, Ying [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liang, Yongdong; Feng, Hongqing [College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-05-20

    Ar/O{sub 2} (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to create plasma-activated water (PAW). The disinfection efficacy of PAW against Staphylococcus aureus showed that PAW can effectively disinfect bacteria. Optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrated the inactivation is attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. Moreover, the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the chemical state of cell surface, the integrity of cell membrane, as well as the cell internal components and structure were damaged by the oxidative stress.

  5. A study of oxidative stress induced by non-thermal plasma-activated water for bacterial damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qian; Ma, Ruonan; Tian, Ying; Liang, Yongdong; Feng, Hongqing; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Ar/O 2 (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to create plasma-activated water (PAW). The disinfection efficacy of PAW against Staphylococcus aureus showed that PAW can effectively disinfect bacteria. Optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrated the inactivation is attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. Moreover, the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the chemical state of cell surface, the integrity of cell membrane, as well as the cell internal components and structure were damaged by the oxidative stress.

  6. Evaluation of mechanism of non-thermal plasma effect on the surface of polypropylene films for enhancement of adhesive and hemo compatible properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navaneetha Pandiyaraj, K., E-mail: dr.knpr@gmail.com [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Shakthi Institute of Engineering and Technology, L& T by pass, Chinniyam Palayam (post), Coimbatore-641062 (India); Deshmukh, R.R. [Department of Physics, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai-400 019 (India); Arunkumar, A.; Ramkumar, M.C. [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Shakthi Institute of Engineering and Technology, L& T by pass, Chinniyam Palayam (post), Coimbatore-641062 (India); Ruzybayev, I.; Ismat Shah, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, 208 Dupont Hall, Newark (United States); Su, Pi-Guey [Department of Chemistry, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 111, Taiwan (China); Periayah, Mercy Halleluyah; Halim, A.S. [School of Medical Sciences, Health Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 16150 Kubang Kerian, Kelantan (Malaysia)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Investigated the mechanism of effect of various gaseous plasma treatments on the surface properties of Polypropylene (PP) films. • The improvement in surface energy is basically due to the incorporation of polar functional groups onto the PP films. • The extent of surface modification and hydrophobic recovery depends upon the type of plasma forming gas. • Due to the significant morphological and chemical changes induced by the gaseous plasma treatment, improved the blood compatibility as well as adhesive strength of the PP films. - Abstract: The hydro-carbon based polymers have attracted attention of scientists for its use in bio-medical field as various implants due to inherent flexibility. However, they have poor surface properties; particularly they have low surface energy (SE). Hence, blood components (platelets, blood proteins, etc.)-polymer surface interaction is the major concern when it comes in contact with blood. Thus, surface modification is required to develop the perfect antithrombogenic property without affecting the materials bulk. The present study describes the improvement in adhesive and blood compatible properties of polypropylene (PP) by low temperature (non-thermal) plasma of various gases such as Ar, O{sub 2}, air and Ar + O{sub 2} for biomedical applications. The changes in surface morphological, chemical and hydrophilic modification induced by the gaseous plasma treatment were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and contact angle measurements, respectively. Moreover, the stability of plasma effect was also studied for the different storage conditions. Variation in adhesive strength of the plasma treated PP film was studied by T-Peel and Lap-Shear strength tests. The blood compatibility of the surface modified PP films was investigated by in vitro analysis. It was found that gaseous plasma treatment improved the blood compatibility

  7. Evaluation of mechanism of non-thermal plasma effect on the surface of polypropylene films for enhancement of adhesive and hemo compatible properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navaneetha Pandiyaraj, K.; Deshmukh, R.R.; Arunkumar, A.; Ramkumar, M.C.; Ruzybayev, I.; Ismat Shah, S.; Su, Pi-Guey; Periayah, Mercy Halleluyah; Halim, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigated the mechanism of effect of various gaseous plasma treatments on the surface properties of Polypropylene (PP) films. • The improvement in surface energy is basically due to the incorporation of polar functional groups onto the PP films. • The extent of surface modification and hydrophobic recovery depends upon the type of plasma forming gas. • Due to the significant morphological and chemical changes induced by the gaseous plasma treatment, improved the blood compatibility as well as adhesive strength of the PP films. - Abstract: The hydro-carbon based polymers have attracted attention of scientists for its use in bio-medical field as various implants due to inherent flexibility. However, they have poor surface properties; particularly they have low surface energy (SE). Hence, blood components (platelets, blood proteins, etc.)-polymer surface interaction is the major concern when it comes in contact with blood. Thus, surface modification is required to develop the perfect antithrombogenic property without affecting the materials bulk. The present study describes the improvement in adhesive and blood compatible properties of polypropylene (PP) by low temperature (non-thermal) plasma of various gases such as Ar, O 2 , air and Ar + O 2 for biomedical applications. The changes in surface morphological, chemical and hydrophilic modification induced by the gaseous plasma treatment were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS), electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and contact angle measurements, respectively. Moreover, the stability of plasma effect was also studied for the different storage conditions. Variation in adhesive strength of the plasma treated PP film was studied by T-Peel and Lap-Shear strength tests. The blood compatibility of the surface modified PP films was investigated by in vitro analysis. It was found that gaseous plasma treatment improved the blood compatibility as well

  8. Development of ultra-hydrophilic and non-cytotoxic dental vinyl polysiloxane impression materials using a non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae-Sung; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2013-05-01

    Dental vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression materials are widely used for the replication of intraoral tissue where hydrophilicity is important as the oral tissues are surrounded by wet saliva. Recent attempts to improve the wettability of VPS using a ‘surfactant’, however, have resulted in a high level of cytotoxicity. Hence, in this study, application of a non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ) on VPS and its effects in terms of both hydrophilicity and cytotoxicity were investigated. The results showed that the application of the plasma jet resulted in significant improvement of hydrophilicity of VPS that had no surfactant, whereby the results were similar to commercially available products with the surfactant. The surface chemical analysis results indicated that this was due to the oxidation and decreased amount of hydrocarbon on the surface following NTAPPJ exposure. Meanwhile, an NTAPPJ-treated sample was shown to be non-cytotoxic. Therefore, the use of dental VPS impression materials without any surfactant, in conjunction with an NTAPPJ treatment, is a promising method for ultra-hydrophilic but yet non-cytotoxic materials.

  9. Development of ultra-hydrophilic and non-cytotoxic dental vinyl polysiloxane impression materials using a non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Jae-Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha

    2013-01-01

    Dental vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression materials are widely used for the replication of intraoral tissue where hydrophilicity is important as the oral tissues are surrounded by wet saliva. Recent attempts to improve the wettability of VPS using a ‘surfactant’, however, have resulted in a high level of cytotoxicity. Hence, in this study, application of a non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ) on VPS and its effects in terms of both hydrophilicity and cytotoxicity were investigated. The results showed that the application of the plasma jet resulted in significant improvement of hydrophilicity of VPS that had no surfactant, whereby the results were similar to commercially available products with the surfactant. The surface chemical analysis results indicated that this was due to the oxidation and decreased amount of hydrocarbon on the surface following NTAPPJ exposure. Meanwhile, an NTAPPJ-treated sample was shown to be non-cytotoxic. Therefore, the use of dental VPS impression materials without any surfactant, in conjunction with an NTAPPJ treatment, is a promising method for ultra-hydrophilic but yet non-cytotoxic materials. (paper)

  10. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma inhibits thyroid papillary cancer cell invasion via cytoskeletal modulation, altered MMP-2/-9/uPA activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Won Chang

    Full Text Available Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is defined as a partially or completely ionized gas that includes a mixture of electrons and ions. Advances in plasma physics have made it possible to use non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP in cancer research. However, previous studies have focused mainly on apoptotic cancer cell death mediated by NTP as a potential cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of NTP on invasion or metastasis, as well as the mechanism by which plasma induces anti-migration and anti-invasion properties in human thyroid papillary cancer cell lines (BHP10-3 and TPC1. Wound healing, pull-down, and Transwell assays demonstrated that NTP reduced cell migration and invasion. In addition, NTP induced morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements, as detected by scanning electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry. We also examined matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2/-9 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA activity using gelatin zymography, uPA assays and RT-PCR. FAK, Src, and paxillin expression was detected using Western blot analyses and immunocytochemistry. NTP decreased FAK, Src, and paxillin expression as well as MMP/uPA activity. In conclusion, NTP inhibited the invasion and metastasis of BHP10-3 and TPC1 cells by decreasing MMP-2/-9 and uPA activities and rearranging the cytoskeleton, which is regulated by the FAK/Src complex. These findings suggest novel actions for NTP and may aid in the development of new therapeutic strategies for locally invasive and metastatic cancers.

  11. Plasma-gun fueling for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1980-11-01

    In light of the uncertain extrapolation of gas puffing for reactor fueling and certain limitations to pellet injection, the snowplow plasma gun has been studied as a fueling device. Based on current understanding of gun and plasma behavior a design is proposed, and its performance is predicted in a tokamak reactor environment

  12. Influence of Ar addition on ozone generation in a non-thermal plasma-a numerical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hsin Liang; Lee, How Ming; Chen, Shiaw Huei; Wei, Ta Chin; Chang, Moo Been

    2010-01-01

    A numerical model based on a dielectric barrier discharge is developed in this study to investigate the influence of Ar addition on ozone generation. The simulation results show good agreement with the experimental data, confirming the validity of the numerical model. The mechanisms regarding how the Ar addition affects ozone generation are investigated with the assistance of a numerical simulation by probing into the following two questions, (1) why the ozone concentration just slightly decreases in the low specific input energy (SIE, the ratio of discharge power to gas flow rate) region even if the inlet O 2 concentration is substantially decreased and (2) why the variation of the increased rate of ozone concentration with SIE (i.e. the variation in the slope of ozone concentration versus SIE) is more significant for an O 2 /Ar mixture plasma. As SIE is relatively low, ozone decomposition through electron-impact and radical attack reactions is less significant because of low ozone concentration and gas temperature. Therefore, the ozone concentration depends mainly on the amount of oxygen atoms generated. The simulation results indicate that the amount of oxygen atoms generated per electronvolt for Ar concentrations of 0%, 10%, 30%, 50% and 80% are 0.178, 0.174, 0.169, 0.165 and 0.166, respectively, explaining why the ozone concentration does not decrease linearly with the inlet O 2 concentration in the low SIE region. On the other hand, the simulation results show that increasing Ar concentration would lead to a lower reduced field and a higher gas temperature. The former would lead to an increase in the rate constant of e + O 3 → e + O + O 2 while the latter would result in a decrease in the rate constant of O + O 2 + M → O 3 + M and an increase in that of O 3 + O → 2O 2 . The changes in the rate constants of these reactions would have a negative effect on ozone generation, which is the rationale for the second question.

  13. Research on plasma core reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, G.A.; Barton, D.M.; Helmick, H.H.; Bernard, W.; White, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments and theoretical studies are being conducted for NASA on critical assemblies with 1-m-diam by 1-m-long low-density cores surrounded by a thick beryllium reflector. These assemblies make extensive use of existing nuclear propulsion reactor components, facilities, and instrumentation. Due to excessive porosity in the reflector, the initial critical mass was 19 kg U(93.2). Addition of a 17-cm-thick by 89-cm-diam beryllium flux trap in the cavity reduced the critical mass to 7 kg when all the uranium was in the zone just outside the flux trap. A mockup aluminum UF 6 container was placed inside the flux trap and fueled with uranium-graphite elements. Fission distributions and reactivity worths of fuel and structural materials were measured. Finally, an 85,000-cm 3 aluminum canister in the central region was fueled with UF 6 gas and fission density distributions determined. These results will be used to guide the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test energy removal by optical radiation

  14. Optimization of non-thermal plasma efficiency in the simultaneous elimination of benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene from polluted airstreams using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpoor, Ali Asghar; Jonidi Jafari, Ahmad; Hosseinzadeh, Ahmad; Khani Jazani, Reza; Bargozin, Hasan

    2018-01-01

    Treatment with a non-thermal plasma (NTP) is a new and effective technology applied recently for conversion of gases for air pollution control. This research was initiated to optimize the efficient application of the NTP process in benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX) removal. The effects of four variables including temperature, initial BTEX concentration, voltage, and flow rate on the BTEX elimination efficiency were investigated using response surface methodology (RSM). The constructed model was evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA). The model goodness-of-fit and statistical significance was assessed using determination coefficients (R 2 and R 2 adj ) and the F-test. The results revealed that the R 2 proportion was greater than 0.96 for BTEX removal efficiency. The statistical analysis demonstrated that the BTEX removal efficiency was significantly correlated with the temperature, BTEX concentration, voltage, and flow rate. Voltage was the most influential variable affecting the dependent variable as it exerted a significant effect (p < 0.0001) on the response variable. According to the achieved results, NTP can be applied as a progressive, cost-effective, and practical process for treatment of airstreams polluted with BTEX in conditions of low residence time and high concentrations of pollutants.

  15. A Brief Study on the Ignition of the Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet from a Double Dielectric Barrier Configured Plasma Pencil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, Asma; Laroussi, Mounir; Pervez, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the self sustained propagation of the plasma jet/bullet in air under atmospheric pressure, the ignition of the plasma jet/bullet, the plasma jet/bullet ignition point in the plasma pencil, the formation time and the formation criteria from a dielectric barrier configured plasma pencil were investigated in this study. The results were confirmed by comparing these results with the plasma jet ignition process in the plasma pencil without a dielectric barrier. Electrical, optical, and imaging techniques were used to study the formation of the plasma jet from the ignition of discharge in a double dielectric barrier configured plasma pencil. The investigation results show that the plasma jet forms at the outlet of the plasma pencil as a donut shaped discharge front because of the electric field line along the outlet's surface. It is shown that the required time for the formation of the plasma jet changes with the input voltage of the discharge. The input power calculation for the gap discharge and for the whole system shows that 56% of the average input power is used by the first gap discharge. The estimated electron density inside the gap discharge is in the order of 10 11 cm −3 . If helium is used as a feeding gas, a minimum 1.48×10 −8 C charge is required per pulse in the gap discharge to generate a plasma jet

  16. Plasma spheroidization of nickel powders in a plasma reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    and size of the particles are among critical parameters ... shape components, which helps to conserve scarce raw materials. There are several methods of producing rapidly solidi- ... spherical nickel powders using the d.c. plasma reactor is.

  17. Study on dynamics of the influence exerted by plasma on gas flow field in non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qaisrani, M. Hasnain; Xian, Yubin, E-mail: yubin.xian@hotmail.com; Li, Congyun; Pei, Xuekai; Ghasemi, Maede; Lu, Xinpei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, first, steady state of the plasma jet at different operating conditions is investigated through Schlieren photography with and without applying shielding gas. Second, the dynamic process for the plasma impacting on the gas flow field is studied. When the discharge is ignited, reduction in laminar flow occurs. However, when the gas flow rate is too low or too high, this phenomenon is not obvious. What is more, both frequency and voltage have significant impact on the effect of plasma on the gas flow, but the former is more significant. Shielding gas provides a curtain for plasma to propagate further. High speed camera along with Schlieren photography is utilized to study the impact of plasma on the gas flow when plasma is switched on and off. The transition of the gas flow from laminar to turbulent or vice versa happens right after the turbulent front. It is concluded that appearance and propagation of turbulence front is responsible for the transition of the flow state.

  18. Reactions of nitroxide radicals in aqueous solutions exposed to non-thermal plasma: limitations of spin trapping of the plasma induced species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbanev, Yury; Stehling, Nicola; O'Connell, Deborah; Chechik, Victor

    2016-10-01

    Low temperature (‘cold’) atmospheric pressure plasmas have gained much attention in recent years due to their biomedical effects achieved through the interactions of plasma-induced species with the biological substrate. Monitoring of the radical species in an aqueous biological milieu is usually performed via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using various nitrone spin traps, which form persistent radical adducts with the short-lived radicals. However, the stability of these nitroxide radical adducts in the plasma-specific environment is not well known. In this work, chemical transformations of nitroxide radicals in aqueous solutions using a model nitroxide 4-oxo-TEMPO were studied using EPR and LC-MS. The kinetics of the nitroxide decay when the solution was exposed to plasma were assessed, and the reactive pathways proposed. The use of different scavengers enabled identification of the types of reactive species which cause the decay, indicating the predominant nitroxide group reduction in oxygen-free plasmas. The 2H adduct of the PBN spin trap (PBN-D) was shown to decay similarly to the model molecule 4-oxo-TEMPO. The decay of the spin adducts in plasma-treated solutions must be considered to avoid rendering the spin trapping results unreliable. In particular, the selectivity of the decay indicated the limitations of the PTIO/PTI nitroxide system in the detection of nitric oxide.

  19. Electron beam non-thermal plasma hybrid system for reduction of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions from power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaroiu, Gh [Department of Power Plants, University Polytechnic of Bucharest, 313 Splaiul Independentei Street, 060042 Bucharest (Romania); Zissulescu, E [ICPET ECO SA Bucharest, 104 Berceni Street, 041912 Bucharest (Romania); Sandu, M [Technical University of Civil Engineering of Bucharest, 124 Lacul Tei Street, 020396 Bucharest (Romania); Roscia, M [University of Bergamo, 5 Marconi Street, 24044 Dalmine, Bergamo (Italy)

    2007-12-15

    In this paper an installation containing a negative corona discharge (DC) reactor, a pulse corona discharge reactor and a combined electron beam (EB) and microwave induced plasma reactor is presented. SO{sub 2} is removed up to 42% through spontaneous reaction with ammonia without EB or microwave irradiation at the temperature below 70{sup o}C. Considering the values of the removal efficiencies of 98% for SO{sub 2} and 80% for NO{sub x} applying separate EB irradiation with a dose of 40 kGy, when the simultaneous EB and microwave irradiation is applied, the required absorbed dose is about two times smaller. The SO{sub 2} removal efficiency of simultaneous DC or positive discharge and microwave discharge is higher than separate corona discharge, pulse and microwave discharge. Also, the applied voltage level at which the removal efficiency reaches the maximum value is less than that for the separate application of corona discharge or pulse discharge. The NO{sub x} removal efficiency of DC or pulse discharge suffers little change by additional use of the microwave energy. Based on this research and the results obtained by a pilot project built in collaboration with Electrostatica Bucharest, a project for an installation involving simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal by irradiation with accelerated EBs and microwaves, has been proposed for Thermo-Power Plant CET-West-Bucharest of 550 MW. (author)

  20. Plasma Diagnostics in High Density Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daltrini, A. M.; Moshkalyov, S.; Monteiro, M. J. R.; Machida, M.; Kostryukov, A.; Besseler, E.; Biasotto, C.; Diniz, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    Langmuir electric probes and optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics were developed for applications in high density plasmas. These diagnostics were employed in two plasma sources: an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma and an RF driven inductively coupled plasma (ICP) plasma. Langmuir probes were tested using a number of probing dimensions, probe tip materials, circuits for probe bias and filters. Then, the results were compared with the optical spectroscopy measurements. With these diagnostics, analyses of various plasma processes were performed in both reactors. For example, it has been shown that species like NH radicals generated in gas phase can have critical impact on films deposited by ECR plasmas. In the ICP source, plasmas in atomic and molecular gases were shown to have different spatial distributions, likely due to nonlocal electron heating. The low-to-high density transitions in the ICP plasma were also studied. The role of metastables is shown to be significant in Ar plasmas, in contrast to plasmas with additions of molecular gases

  1. Nonthermal fusion reactor concept based on Hall-effect magnetohydrodynamics plasma theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witalis, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    The failure of magnetic confinement controlled thermonuclear fusion research to achieve its goal is attributed to its foundation on the incomplete MHD plasma description instead of the more general HMHD (Hall-effect magnetohydrodynamics) theory. The latter allows for a certain magnetic plasma self-confinement under described stringent conditions. A reactor concept based on the formation, acceleration, and forced disintegration of magnetized whirl structures, plasmoids, is proposed. The four conventional MHD theory objections, i.e., absence of dynamo action, fast decay caused by resistivity, non-existence of magnetic self-confinement, and negligible non-thermal fusion yield, are shown not to apply. Support for the scheme from dense plasma focus research is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  2. Plasma startup patterns in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Koichi; Tone, Tatsuzo.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma startup patterns are studied from the viewpoint of net power loss represented by the total power loss less the α-particle heating power. The existence is shown of a critical temperature of plasma at which the net power loss becomes independent of plasma density. Observations are made which indicate that the net power loss decreases with lowering plasma density in the range below the critical temperature and vice versa, whether governed by empirical or trapped-ion scaling laws. A startup pattern is presented which minimizes the net power loss during startup, and which prescribes that: (1) The plasma density should be kept as low as possible until the plasma is heated up to the critical temperature; (2) thereafter, the plasma density should be increased to its steady state value while retaining the critical temperature; and (3) finally, with the density kept constant, the temperature should be further raised to its steady state value. The net power loss at critical temperature represents the lower limit of heating power required to bring the plasma to steady state in tokamak reactors. (author)

  3. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  4. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamann, S.; Röpcke, J.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , HCN, and NH 3 ). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined

  5. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, S., E-mail: hamann@inp-greifswald.de; Röpcke, J. [INP-Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Materials Engineering, Gustav-Zeuner-Str. 5, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Strämke, M.; Strämke, S. [ELTRO GmbH, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Ring 3, 52499 Baesweiler (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  6. Enhancement of Wound Healing by Non-Thermal N2/Ar Micro-Plasma Exposure in Mice with Fractional-CO2-Laser-Induced Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Pei-Lin; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Wong, Tak-Wah; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Leu, Steve; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2016-01-01

    Micro-plasma is a possible alternative treatment for wound management. The effect of micro-plasma on wound healing depends on its composition and temperature. The authors previously developed a capillary-tube-based micro-plasma system that can generate micro-plasma with a high nitric oxide-containing species composition and mild working temperature. Here, the efficacy of micro-plasma treatment on wound healing in a laser-induced skin wound mouse model was investigated. A partial thickness wound was created in the back skin of each mouse and then treated with micro-plasma. Non-invasive methods, namely wound closure kinetics, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and laser Doppler scanning, were used to measure the healing efficiency in the wound area. Neo-tissue growth and the expressions of matrix metallopeptidase-3 (MMP-3) and laminin in the wound area were assessed using histological and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. The results show that micro-plasma treatment promoted wound healing. Micro-plasma treatment significantly reduced the wound bed region. The OCT images and histological analysis indicates more pronounced tissue regrowth in the wound bed region after micro-plasma treatment. The laser Doppler images shows that micro-plasma treatment promoted blood flow in the wound bed region. The IHC results show that the level of laminin increased in the wound bed region after micro-plasma treatment, whereas the level of MMP-3 decreased. Based on these results, micro-plasma has potential to be used to promote the healing of skin wounds clinically. PMID:27248979

  7. Spectroscopic studies of non-thermal plasma jet at atmospheric pressure formed in low-current nonsteady-state plasmatron for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkin, V. P.; Melnichuk, S. V.; Demkin, O. V. [National Research Tomsk State University, Lenin 36, 634050 Tomsk, The Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Kingma, H.; Van de Berg, R. [National Research Tomsk State University, Lenin 36, 634050 Tomsk, The Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Minderbroedersberg 4-6, 6211 LK Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    The optical and electrophysical characteristics of the nonequilibrium low-temperature plasma formed by a low-current nonsteady-state plasmatron are experimentally investigated in the present work. It is demonstrated that experimental data on the optical diagnostics of the plasma jet can provide a basis for the construction of a self-consistent physical and mathematical plasma model and for the creation of plasma sources with controllable electrophysical parameters intended for the generation of the required concentration of active particles. Results of spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma of the low-current nonsteady-state plasmatron confirm that the given source is efficient for the generation of charged particles and short-wavelength radiation—important plasma components for biomedical problems of an increase in the efficiency of treatment of biological tissues by charged particles. Measurement of the spatial distribution of the plasma jet potential by the probe method has demonstrated that a negative space charge is formed in the plasma jet possibly due to the formation of electronegative oxygen ions.

  8. Shapes of agglomerates in plasma etching reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.Y.; Kushner, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Dust particle contamination of wafers in reactive ion etching (RIE) plasma tools is a continuing concern in the microelectronics industry. It is common to find that particles collected on surfaces or downstream of the etch chamber are agglomerates of smaller monodisperse spherical particles. The shapes of the agglomerates vary from compact, high fractal dimension structures to filamentary, low fractal dimension structures. These shapes are important with respect to the transport of particles in RIE tools under the influence electrostatic and ion drag forces, and the possible generation of polarization forces. A molecular dynamics simulation has been developed to investigate the shapes of agglomerates in plasma etching reactors. We find that filamentary, low fractal dimension structures are generally produced by smaller (<100s nm) particles in low powered plasmas where the kinetic energy of primary particles is insufficient to overcome the larger Coulomb repulsion of a compact agglomerate. This is analogous to the diffusive regime in neutral agglomeration. Large particles in high powered plasmas generally produce compact agglomerates of high fractal dimension, analogous to ballistic agglomeration of neutrals. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  9. Influence of non-thermal plasma on structural and electrical properties of globular and nanostructured conductive polymer polypyrrole in water suspension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Galář, P.; Khun, J.; Kopecký, D.; Scholtz, V.; Trchová, Miroslava; Fučíková, A.; Jirešová, J.; Fišer, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, 08 November (2017), s. 1-10, č. článku 15068. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-04109S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : conductive polymer * polypyrrole * plasma Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  10. Transfer functions of laminar premixed flames subjected to forcing by acoustic waves, AC electric fields, and non-thermal plasma discharges

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna; Xiong, Yuan; Moeck, Jonas P.; Chung, Suk-Ho; Roberts, William L.; Cha, Min

    2016-01-01

    The responses of laminar methane-air flames to forcing by acoustic waves, AC electric fields, and nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) glow discharges are reported here. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner with a nozzle made from a quartz tube. Three different flame geometries have been studied: conical, M-shaped and V-shaped flames. A central stainless steel rod is used as a cathode for the electric field and plasma excitations. The acoustic forcing is obtained with a loudspeaker located at the bottom part of the burner. For forcing by AC electric fields, a metallic grid is placed above the rod and connected to an AC power supply. Plasma forcing is obtained by applying high-voltage pulses of 10-ns duration applied at 10 kHz, between the rod and an annular stainless steel ring, placed at the outlet of the quartz tube. The chemiluminescence of CH is used to determine the heat release rate fluctuations. For forcing by acoustic waves and plasma, the geometry of the flame plays a key role in the response of the combustion, while the flame shape does not affect the response of the combustion to electric field forcing. The flame response to acoustic forcing of about 10% of the incoming flow is similar to those obtained in the literature. The flames are found to be responsive to an AC electric field across the whole range of frequencies studied. A forcing mechanism, based on the generation of ionic wind, is proposed. The gain of the transfer function obtained for plasma forcing is found to be up to 5 times higher than for acoustic forcing. A possible mechanism of plasma forcing is introduced.

  11. Transfer functions of laminar premixed flames subjected to forcing by acoustic waves, AC electric fields, and non-thermal plasma discharges

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna

    2016-06-23

    The responses of laminar methane-air flames to forcing by acoustic waves, AC electric fields, and nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) glow discharges are reported here. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner with a nozzle made from a quartz tube. Three different flame geometries have been studied: conical, M-shaped and V-shaped flames. A central stainless steel rod is used as a cathode for the electric field and plasma excitations. The acoustic forcing is obtained with a loudspeaker located at the bottom part of the burner. For forcing by AC electric fields, a metallic grid is placed above the rod and connected to an AC power supply. Plasma forcing is obtained by applying high-voltage pulses of 10-ns duration applied at 10 kHz, between the rod and an annular stainless steel ring, placed at the outlet of the quartz tube. The chemiluminescence of CH is used to determine the heat release rate fluctuations. For forcing by acoustic waves and plasma, the geometry of the flame plays a key role in the response of the combustion, while the flame shape does not affect the response of the combustion to electric field forcing. The flame response to acoustic forcing of about 10% of the incoming flow is similar to those obtained in the literature. The flames are found to be responsive to an AC electric field across the whole range of frequencies studied. A forcing mechanism, based on the generation of ionic wind, is proposed. The gain of the transfer function obtained for plasma forcing is found to be up to 5 times higher than for acoustic forcing. A possible mechanism of plasma forcing is introduced.

  12. Roles of plasma neutron source reactor in development of fusion reactor engineering: Comparison with fission reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Shoichi; Kawabe, Takaya

    1995-01-01

    The history of development of fusion power reactor has come to a turning point, where the main research target is now shifting from the plasma heating and confinement physics toward the burning plasma physics and reactor engineering. Although the development of fusion reactor system is the first time for human beings, engineers have experience of development of fission power reactor. The common feature between them is that both are plants used for the generation of nuclear reactions for the production of energy, nucleon, and radiation on an industrial scale. By studying the history of the development of the fission reactor, one can find the existence of experimental neutron reactors including irradiation facilities for fission reactor materials. These research neutron reactors played very important roles in the development of fission power reactors. When one considers the strategy of development of fusion power reactors from the points of fusion reactor engineering, one finds that the fusion neutron source corresponds to the neutron reactor in fission reactor development. In this paper, the authors discuss the roles of the plasma-based neutron source reactors in the development of fusion reactor engineering, by comparing it with the neutron reactors in the history of fission power development, and make proposals for the strategy of the fusion reactor development. 21 refs., 6 figs

  13. Applications of plasma core reactors to terrestrial energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantham, T.S.; Biancardi, F.R.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma core reactors offer several new options for future energy needs in addition to space power and propulsion applications. Power extraction from plasma core reactors with gaseous nuclear fuel allows operation at temperatures higher than conventional reactors. Highly efficient thermodynamic cycles and applications employing direct coupling of radiant energy are possible. Conceptual configurations of plasma core reactors for terrestrail applications are described. Closed-cycle gas turbines, MHD systems, photo- and thermo-chemical hydrogen production processes, and laser systems using plasma core reactors as prime energy sources are considered. Cycle efficiencies in the range of 50 to 65 percent are calculated for closed-cycle gas turbine and MHD electrical generators. Reactor advantages include continuous fuel reprocessing which limits inventory of radioactive by-products and thorium-U-233 breeder configurations with about 5-year doubling times

  14. Enhancement of sorption capacity of cocoa shell biomass modified with non-thermal plasma for removal of both cationic and anionic dyes from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takam, Brice; Acayanka, Elie; Kamgang, Georges Y; Pedekwang, Merlin T; Laminsi, Samuel

    2017-07-01

    Removal of cationic dye, Azur II, and anionic dye, Reactive Red 2 (RR-2) from aqueous solutions, has been successfully achieved by using a modified agricultural biomaterial waste: cocoa shell husk (Theobroma cacao) treated by gliding arc plasma (CPHP). The biomass in its natural form CPHN and modified form CPHP was characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and point of zero charge (pH pzc ). Experimental variables such as initial pH, contact time, and temperature were optimized for adsorptive characteristics of CPHN and CPHP. The results show that the removal of the Azur II dye was favorable in the basic pH region (pH 10) while the Reactive Red 2 dye was favorable in the acidic pH region (pH 2). The minimum equilibrium time for Azur II and RR-2 dye was obtained after 40 and 240 min, respectively. The adsorption kinetics and isotherm data obtained were best described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic rate model and a combination of Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm models. This work indicates that the plasma-treated raw materials are good alternative multi-purpose sorbents for the removal of many coexisting pollutants from aqueous solutions.

  15. On the Non-Thermal Energy Content of Cosmic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Vazza

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: the budget of non-thermal energy in galaxy clusters is not well constrained, owing to the observational and theoretical difficulties in studying these diluted plasmas on large scales; (2 Method: we use recent cosmological simulations with complex physics in order to connect the emergence of non-thermal energy to the underlying evolution of gas and dark matter; (3 Results: the impact of non-thermal energy (e.g., cosmic rays, magnetic fields and turbulent motions is found to increase in the outer region of galaxy clusters. Within numerical and theoretical uncertainties, turbulent motions dominate the budget of non-thermal energy in most of the cosmic volume; (4 Conclusion: assessing the distribution non-thermal energy in galaxy clusters is crucial to perform high-precision cosmology in the future. Constraining the level of non-thermal energy in cluster outskirts will improve our understanding of the acceleration of relativistic particles and of the origin of extragalactic magnetic fields.

  16. SUPPRESSION OF PARALLEL TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT MAGNETIZED PLASMAS AND ITS IMPACT ON THE NON-THERMAL AND THERMAL ASPECTS OF SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Kontar, Eduard P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Emslie, A. Gordon, E-mail: n.bian@physics.gla.ac.uk, E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States)

    2016-06-20

    The transport of the energy contained in electrons, both thermal and suprathermal, in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of the flare phenomenon, from the spatial distribution of hard X-ray emission to global energetics. Motivated by recent RHESSI observations that point to the existence of a mechanism that confines electrons to the coronal parts of flare loops more effectively than Coulomb collisions, we here consider the impact of pitch-angle scattering off turbulent magnetic fluctuations on the parallel transport of electrons in flaring coronal loops. It is shown that the presence of such a scattering mechanism in addition to Coulomb collisional scattering can significantly reduce the parallel thermal and electrical conductivities relative to their collisional values. We provide illustrative expressions for the resulting thermoelectric coefficients that relate the thermal flux and electrical current density to the temperature gradient and the applied electric field. We then evaluate the effect of these modified transport coefficients on the flare coronal temperature that can be attained, on the post-impulsive-phase cooling of heated coronal plasma, and on the importance of the beam-neutralizing return current on both ambient heating and the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons. We also discuss the possible ways in which anomalous transport processes have an impact on the required overall energy associated with accelerated electrons in solar flares.

  17. Air trichloroethylene oxidation in a corona plasma-catalytic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masoomi-Godarzi, S.; Ranji-Burachaloo, H.; Khodadadi, A.A.; Vesali-Naseh, M.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative decomposition of trichloroethylene (TCE; 300 ppm) by non-thermal corona plasma was investigated in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, both in the absence and presence of catalysts including MnO x , CoO x . The catalysts were synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The morphology and structure of the catalysts were characterized by BET surface area measurement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) methods. Decomposition of TCE and distribution of products were evaluated by a gas chromatograph (GC) and an FTIR. In the absence of the catalyst, TCE removal is increased with increases in the applied voltage and current intensity. Higher TCE removal and CO 2 selectivity is observed in presence of the corona and catalysts, as compared to those with the plasma alone. The results show that MnO x and CoO x catalysts can dissociate the in-plasma produced ozone to oxygen radicals, which enhances the TCE decomposition. (author)

  18. Air trichloroethylene oxidation in a corona plasma-catalytic reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoomi-Godarzi, S.; Ranji-Burachaloo, H.; Khodadadi, A. A.; Vesali-Naseh, M.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2014-08-01

    The oxidative decomposition of trichloroethylene (TCE; 300 ppm) by non-thermal corona plasma was investigated in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, both in the absence and presence of catalysts including MnOx, CoOx. The catalysts were synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The morphology and structure of the catalysts were characterized by BET surface area measurement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) methods. Decomposition of TCE and distribution of products were evaluated by a gas chromatograph (GC) and an FTIR. In the absence of the catalyst, TCE removal is increased with increases in the applied voltage and current intensity. Higher TCE removal and CO2 selectivity is observed in presence of the corona and catalysts, as compared to those with the plasma alone. The results show that MnOx and CoOx catalysts can dissociate the in-plasma produced ozone to oxygen radicals, which enhances the TCE decomposition.

  19. Matching of dense plasma focus devices with fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, A.A.; Heindler, M.

    1978-01-01

    The potential role of dense plasma focus devices as compact neutron sources for fissile fuel breeding in conjunction with existing fission reactors is considered. It is found that advanced plasma focus devices can be used effectively in conjunction with neutronically efficient fission reactors to constitute ''self-sufficient'' breeders. Correlations among the various parameters such as the power output and conversion ratio of the fission reactor with the neutron yield and capacitor bank energy of the dense plasma focus device are presented and discussed

  20. Critical plasma-materials issues for fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.; Bauer, W.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma-materials interactions are a dominant driving force in the design of fusion power reactors. This paper presents a summary of plasma-materials interactions research. Emphasis is placed on critical aspects related to reactor design. Particular issues to be addressed are plasma edge characterization, hydrogen recycle, impurity introduction, and coating development. Typical wall fluxes in operating magnetically confined devices are summarized. Recent calculations of tritium inventory and first wall permeation, based on laboratory measurements of hydrogen recycling, are given for various reactor operating scenarios. Impurity introduction/wall erosion mechanisms considered include sputtering, chemical erosion, and evaporation (melting). Finally, the advanced material development for in-vessel components is discussed. (author)

  1. Numerical Modelling of Wood Gasification in Thermal Plasma Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hirka, Ivan; Živný, Oldřich; Hrabovský, Milan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 4 (2017), s. 947-965 ISSN 0272-4324 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma modelling * CFD * Thermal plasma reactor * Biomass * Gasification * Syngas Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.355, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11090-017-9812-z

  2. Non-thermal AGN models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, D.L.

    1986-12-01

    The infrared, optical and x-ray continua from radio quiet active galactic nuclei (AGN) are explained by a compact non-thermal source surrounding a thermal ultraviolet emitter, presumably the accretion disk around a supermassive black hole. The ultraviolet source is observed as the ''big blue bump.'' The flat (..cap alpha.. approx. = .7) hard x-ray spectrum results from the scattering of thermal ultraviolet photons by the flat, low energy end of an electron distribution ''broken'' by Compton losses; the infrared through soft x-ray continuum is the synchrotron radiation of the steep, high energy end of the electron distribution. Quantitative fits to specific AGN result in models which satisfy the variability constraints but require electron (re)acceleration throughout the source. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  3. TREATMENT OF REFRACTORY OXIDES IN HF-PLASMA REACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Bakhvalov , A.; Dresvin , S.; Levitskaya , T.; Paskalov , G.; Philippov , A.

    1990-01-01

    Results of theoretical and experimental studies of SiO2 NaBSi, MgO, W and some other materials treatment in induction type high-frequency plasma under atmospheric pressure are presented. Key study objective - optimization of plasma installation operating modes with maximum efficiency -0.6 -0.7 ; spheroidization extent -90-99%, size of treated particles 1-500 mkm. Diagnostics of thermophysical and gasodynamical plasma reactor specifications has been presented.

  4. Hybrid Plasma Reactor/Filter for Transportable Collective Protection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Frye, J. G.; Riley, Brian J.; Rappe, Kenneth G.

    2011-04-06

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has performed an assessment of a Hybrid Plasma/Filter system as an alternative to conventional methods for collective protection. The key premise of the hybrid system is to couple a nonthermal plasma (NTP) reactor with reactive adsorption to provide a broader envelope of protection than can be provided through a single-solution approach. The first step uses highly reactive species (e.g. oxygen radicals, hydroxyl radicals, etc.) created in a nonthermal plasma (NTP) reactor to destroy the majority (~75% - 90%) of an incoming threat. Following the NTP reactor an O3 reactor/filter uses the O3 created in the NTP reactor to further destroy the remaining organic materials. This report summarizes the laboratory development of the Hybrid Plasma Reactor/Filter to protect against a ‘worst-case’ simulant, methyl bromide (CH3Br), and presents a preliminary engineering assessment of the technology to Joint Expeditionary Collective Protection performance specifications for chemical vapor air purification technologies.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Carbon Plasma in Arc and RF Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovic-Markovic, B.; Markovic, Z.; Mohai, I.; Szepvolgyi, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results on studies of molecular spectra emitted in the initial stages of fullerene formation during the processing of graphite powder in induction RF reactor and evaporation of graphite electrodes in arc reactor are presented in this paper. It was found that C2 radicals were dominant molecular species in both plasmas. C2 radicals have an important role in the process of fullerene synthesis. The rotational-vibrational temperatures of C2 and CN species were calculated by fitting the experimental spectra to the simulated ones. The results of optical emission study of C2 radicals generated in carbon arc plasma have shown that rotational temperature of C2 species depends on carbon concentration and current intensity significantly. The optical emission study of induction RF plasma and SEM analysis of graphite powder before and after plasma treatment have shown that evaporation of the processed graphite powder depends on feed rate and composition of gas phase significantly. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that in the plasma region CN radicals could be formed by the reaction of C2 species with atomic nitrogen at smaller loads. At larger feed rate of graphite powder, CN species were produced by surface reaction of the hot carbon particles with nitrogen atoms. The presence of nitrogen in induction RF plasma reduces the fullerene yield significantly. The fullerene yield obtained in two different reactors was: 13% in arc reactor and 4.1% in induction RF reactor. However, the fullerene production rate was higher in induction RF reactor-6.4 g/h versus 1.7 g/h in arc reactor

  6. Plasma engineering innovations for the ORNL TNS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Houlberg, W.A.; Mense, A.T.; Rome, J.A.; Uckan, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    Recent plasma engineering studies have ascertained a viable concept for The Next Step (TNS) reactor based on medium toroidal fields between 4 T and 7 T at the plasma center, plasma β values up to 10 percent and averaged densities between 0.6 x 10 14 cm -3 and 2.5 x 10 14 cm -3 . Plasma engineering innovations that can substantially reduce the size, cost, and complexity of the TNS reactor have been explored and are summarized. It is shown that the previously anticipated requirement of high pellet velocities can be substantially reduced; the toroidal field (TF) ripple requirements may be relaxed to reduce the number of TF coils and improve machine access; hybrid equilibrium field (EF) coils have been shown to require building only small interior coils and to reduce the power supply required by the exterior coils; proper approaches of microwave plasma preheating may reduce the peak loop voltage for start-up by an order of magnitude. The medium-field TNS reactor concepts and the plasma engineering innovations discussed should be applicable to other designs of tokamak reactors

  7. Plasma engineering analysis of a small torsatron reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacatski, J.T.; Houlberg, W.A.; Uckan, N.A.

    1985-10-01

    This study examines the plasma physics and reactor engineering feasibility of a small, medium aspect ratio, high-beta, l = 2, D-T torsatron power reactor, based on the magnetic configuration of the Advanced Toroidal Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Plasma analyses are performed to assess whether confinement in a small, average radius plasma is sufficient to yield an ignited or high-Q driven device. Much of the physics assessment focuses on an evaluation of the radial electric field created by the nonambipolar particle flux. Detailed transport simulations are done with both fixed and self-consistent evolution of the radial electric field. Basic reactor engineering considerations taken into account are neutron wall loading, maximum magnetic field at the helical coils, coil shield thickness, and tritium breeding blanket-shield thickness

  8. Plasma Reactors and Plasma Thrusters Modeling by Ar Complete Global Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Berenguer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A complete global model for argon was developed and adapted to plasma reactor and plasma thruster modeling. It takes into consideration ground level and excited Ar and Ar+ species and the reactor and thruster form factors. The electronic temperature, the species densities, and the ionization percentage, depending mainly on the pressure and the absorbed power, have been obtained and commented for various physical conditions.

  9. A plasma arc reactor for fullerene research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. T.; Dyer, P. L.; Dykes, J. W.; Klavins, P.; Anderson, P. E.; Liu, J. Z.; Shelton, R. N.

    1994-12-01

    A modified Krätschmer-Huffman reactor for the mass production of fullerenes is presented. Fullerene mass production is fundamental for the synthesis of higher and endohedral fullerenes. The reactor employs mechanisms for continuous graphite-rod feeding and in situ slag removal. Soot collects into a Soxhlet extraction thimble which serves as a fore-line vacuum pump filter, thereby easing fullerene separation from soot. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) for yield determination is reported. This TGA method is faster and uses smaller samples than Soxhlet extraction methods which rely on aromatic solvents. Production of 10 g of soot per hour is readily achieved utilizing this reactor. Fullerene yields of 20% are attained routinely.

  10. Converting a Microwave Oven into a Plasma Reactor: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor J. Law

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the use of domestic microwave ovens as plasma reactors for applications ranging from surface cleaning to pyrolysis and chemical synthesis. This review traces the developments from initial reports in the 1980s to today’s converted ovens that are used in proof-of-principle manufacture of carbon nanostructures and batch cleaning of ion implant ceramics. Information sources include the US and Korean patent office, peer-reviewed papers, and web references. It is shown that the microwave oven plasma can induce rapid heterogeneous reaction (solid to gas and liquid to gas/solid plus the much slower plasma-induced solid state reaction (metal oxide to metal nitride. A particular focus of this review is the passive and active nature of wire aerial electrodes, igniters, and thermal/chemical plasma catalyst in the generation of atmospheric plasma. In addition to the development of the microwave oven plasma, a further aspect evaluated is the development of methodologies for calibrating the plasma reactors with respect to microwave leakage, calorimetry, surface temperature, DUV-UV content, and plasma ion densities.

  11. HAZARDOUS WASTE DECONTAMINATION WITH PLASMA REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of electrical energy in the form of plasma has been considered as a potentially efficient means of decontaminating hazardous waste, although to date only a few attempts have been made to do so. There are a number of relative advantages and some potential disadvantages to...

  12. Structural stability analysis considerations in fusion reactor plasma chamber design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, M.J.; Cramer, B.A.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing a toroidal plasma chamber for the prevention of both static and dynamic buckling. Results of stability analyses performed for the doublet shaped plasma chamber of the General Atomic 3.8 meter radius TNS ignition test reactor are presented. Load conditions are the static external atmospheric pressure load and the dynamic plasma disruption pulse load. Methods for analysis of plasma chamber structures are presented for both types of load. Analysis for static buckling is based on idealizing the plasma chamber into standard structural shapes and applying classical cylinder and circular torus buckling equations. Results are verified using the Buckling of Shells of Revolution (BOSOR4) finite difference computer code. Analysis for the dynamic loading is based on a pulse buckling analysis method for circular cylinders

  13. Non-equilibrium plasma reactor for natrual gas processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shair, F.H.; Ravimohan, A.L.

    1974-01-01

    A non-equilibrium plasma reactor for natural gas processing into ethane and ethylene comprising means of producing a non-equilibrium chemical plasma wherein selective conversion of the methane in natural gas to desired products of ethane and ethylene at a pre-determined ethane/ethylene ratio in the chemical process may be intimately controlled and optimized at a high electrical power efficiency rate by mixing with a recycling gas inert to the chemical process such as argon, helium, or hydrogen, reducing the residence time of the methane in the chemical plasma, selecting the gas pressure in the chemical plasma from a wide range of pressures, and utilizing pulsed electrical discharge producing the chemical plasma. (author)

  14. Low temperature plasma metallurgy. Reduction of metals in plasma reactors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eliáš, M.; Frgala, Z.; Kudrle, V.; Janča, J.; Brožek, Vlastimil

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2004), s. 91-97 ISSN 1203-8407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasmachemistry reduction, tungsten, hydrogen plasma Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.451, year: 2002

  15. Fueling moving ring field-reversed mirror reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felber, F.S.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of small fusion reactors is being studied jointly by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory General Atomic Company, and Pacific Gas and Electric Company. The objective is to investigate alternatives and then to develop a conceptual design for a small reactor that could produce useful, though not necessarily economical, energy by the late 1980s. Three methods of fueling a small moving ring field-reversed mirror are considered: injection of fuel pellets accelerated by laser ablation, injection of fuel pellets accelerated by deflagration-gun ablation, and direct injection of plasma by a deflagration gun. 13 refs

  16. Plasma driving system requirements for commercial tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Kustom, R.C.; Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma driving system for a tokamak reactor is composed of an ohmic heating (OH) coil, equilibrium field (EF) coil, and their respective power supplies. Conceptual designs of an Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) and scoping studies of a Demonstration Power Reactor have shown that the driving system constitutes a significant part of the overall reactor cost. The capabilities of the driving system also set or help set important parameters of the burn cycle, such as the startup time, and the net power output. Previous detailed studies on driving system dynamics have helped to define the required characteristics for fast-pulsed superconducting magnets, homopolar generators, and very high power (GVA) power supplies for an EPR. This paper summarizes results for a single reactor configuration together with several design concepts for the driving system. Both the reactor configuration and the driving system concepts are natural extensions from the EPR. Thus, the new results presented in this paper can be compared with the previous EPR results to obtain a consistent picture of how the driving system requirements will evolve--for one particular design configuration

  17. Plasma driving system requirements for commercial tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Kustom, R.C.; Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The plasma driving system for a tokamak reactor is composed of an ohmic heating (OH) coil, equilibrium field (EF) coil, and their respective power supplies. Conceptual designs of an Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) and scoping studies of a Demonstration Power Reactor have shown that the driving system constitutes a significant part of the overall reactor cost. The capabilities of the driving system also set or help set important parameters of the burn cycle, such as the startup time, and the net power output. Previous detailed studies on driving system dynamics have helped to define the required characteristics for fast-pulsed superconducting magnets, homopolar generators, and very high power (GVA) power supplies for an EPR. This paper summarizes results for a single reactor configuration together with several design concepts for the driving system. Both the reactor configuration and the driving system concepts are natural extensions from the EPR. Thus, the new results can be compared with the previous EPR results to obtain a consistent picture of how the driving system requirements will evolve--for one particular design configuration

  18. Development of a new plasma reactor for propene removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukacine, Linda; Tatibouët, Jean-Michel

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop a new plasma reactor being applied to gas phase pollution abatement, involving a surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) at atmospheric pressure. Propene was chosen as a model pollutant. The system can associate a SDBD with a volume dielectric barrier discharge (VDBD). A specific catalyst can be placed in post-plasma site in order to destroy the residual ozone after use it as a strong oxidant for total oxidation of propene and by-products formed by the plasma reactor. A comparative study has been established between the propene removal efficiency of these two plasma geometries. The results demonstrate that SDBD is a promising system for gas cleaning. The experiments show that ozone production depends on plasma system configuration and indicate the effectiveness of combining SDBD and VDBD. The NOx formation remains very low, whereas ozone formation is the highest for the SDBD. The influence of some materials on the propene removal and the ozone production were studied.

  19. Conception of divertorless tokamak reactor with turbulent plasma blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedospasov, A.V.; Tokar, M.Z.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the calculations presented here demonstrate that, with technically reasonable degree of the magnetic field stochastisation, the turbulent plasma blanket can take the place of a divertor. It performs the three main functions of the divertor: (a) the exhaust of the helium and unburned fuel; (b) weakening of the fast particle flux to the wall surface; and (c) essential reduction of the impurity content in the active zone of the reactor. Taking into account that plasma flows to the first wall along field lines, we may figuratively say that the first wall plays the role of a divertor in our conception. (orig.)

  20. LIB fusion. Plasma system and reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, K.

    1985-01-01

    Twelve Marx generators, whose total stored energy is 21MJ and diode voltage is 9MV or 4.1MV, supply the energy to diodes to extract proton beams. The combination of two types of diodes are used. One type of diode has the outer radius of 32.3cm and the inner radius of 30cm insulated by the radial magnetic field and extracts the rotating ring beam whose energy is 0.80MJ, pulse width is 40ns, propagation energy is 4.1MeV, mean rotation energy is 3.3MeV and electric current along the propagation direction is 1.4MA. The other type of diodes is the ordinal one, from which the proton beam of 0.52MJ, 40ns, 4.1MeV and 2.5MA is extracted and fills the inner hollow part of the rotating ring beam. The argon gas filling the reactor cavity with the number density of 10 22 /m 3 neutralizes the charge of proton beam during lns, but does not neutralize the current of the beam because the mean Larmor radius of electron in the argon gas is shorter than the electron mean free path. The proton beam pinches to the radius of 5.5mm by the action of self-induced magnetic field in the azimuthal direction and its propagation is stablized by the action of self-induced magnetic field in the propagation direction. The cryogenic hollow shell target of 6mm radius consists of three layers of Pb, Al and DT fuel

  1. Pulsed lower-hybrid wave penetration in reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    Providing lower-hybrid power in short, intense (GW) pulses allows enhanced wave penetration in reactor-grade plasmas. We examine nonlinear absorption, ray propagation, and parametric instability of the intense pulses. We find that simultaneously achieving good penetration while avoiding parametric instabilities is possible, but imposes restrictions on the peak power density, pulse duration, and/or r.f. spot shape. In particular, power launched in narrow strips, elongated along the field direction, is desired

  2. Thermal energy and bootstrap current in fusion reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.

    1993-01-01

    For DT fusion reactors with prescribed alpha particle heating power P α , plasma volume V and burn temperature i > ∼ 10 keV specific relations for the thermal energy content, bootstrap current, central plasma pressure and other quantities are derived. It is shown that imposing P α and V makes these relations independent of the magnitudes of the density and temperature, i.e. they only depend on P α , V and shape factors or profile parameters. For model density and temperature profiles analytic expressions for these shape factors and for the factor C bs in the bootstrap current formula I bs ∼ C bs (a/R) 1/2 β p I p are given. In the design of next-step devices and fusion reactors, the fusion power is a fixed quantity. Prescription of the alpha particle heating power and plasma volume results in specific relations which can be helpful for interpreting computer simulations and for the design of fusion reactors. (author) 5 refs

  3. Kinetics of decolorization of azo dye by bipolar pulsed barrier discharge in a three-phase discharge plasma reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruobing; Zhang, Chi; Cheng, XingXin; Wang, Liming; Wu, Yan; Guan, Zhicheng

    2007-04-02

    Removal of amaranth, a commercial synthetic azo dye widely used in the dye and food industry, was examined as a possible remediation technology for treating dye-contaminated water. Effects of various parameters such as gas flow rate, solution conductivity, pulse repetition frequency, etc., on decolorization kinetics were investigated. Experimental results show that an aqueous solution of 24 mg/l dye is 81.24% decolorized following 30 min plasma treatment for a 50 kV voltage and 0.75 m(3)/h gas flow rate. Decolorization reaction of amaranth in the plasma reactor is a pseudo first order reaction. Rate constant (k) of decolorization increases quickly with increasing the applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency and the gas flow rate. However, when the applied voltage is beyond 50 kV and increases further, increase rate of k decreases. In addition, k decreases quickly when the solution conductivity increases from 200 to 1481 microS/cm. The decolorization reaction has a high rate constant (k=0.0269 min(-1)) when the solution pH is beyond 10. Rate constant k decreases with the decrease of pH and reaches minimum at a pH of about 5 (k(min)=0.01603 min(-1)), then increases to 0.02105 min(-1) when pH decreases to 3.07. About 15% of the initial TOC can be degraded only in about 120 min non-thermal plasma treatment.

  4. Kinetics of decolorization of azo dye by bipolar pulsed barrier discharge in a three-phase discharge plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruobing; Zhang Chi; Cheng Xingxin; Wang Liming; Wu Yan; Guan Zhicheng

    2007-01-01

    Removal of amaranth, a commercial synthetic azo dye widely used in the dye and food industry, was examined as a possible remediation technology for treating dye-contaminated water. Effects of various parameters such as gas flow rate, solution conductivity, pulse repetition frequency, etc., on decolorization kinetics were investigated. Experimental results show that an aqueous solution of 24 mg/l dye is 81.24% decolorized following 30 min plasma treatment for a 50 kV voltage and 0.75 m 3 /h gas flow rate. Decolorization reaction of amaranth in the plasma reactor is a pseudo first order reaction. Rate constant (k) of decolorization increases quickly with increasing the applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency and the gas flow rate. However, when the applied voltage is beyond 50 kV and increases further, increase rate of k decreases. In addition, k decreases quickly when the solution conductivity increases from 200 to 1481 μS/cm. The decolorization reaction has a high rate constant (k = 0.0269 min -1 ) when the solution pH is beyond 10. Rate constant k decreases with the decrease of pH and reaches minimum at a pH of about 5 (k min = 0.01603 min -1 ), then increases to 0.02105 min -1 when pH decreases to 3.07. About 15% of the initial TOC can be degraded only in about 120 min non-thermal plasma treatment

  5. Electro-Catalysis System for Biodiesel Synthesis from Palm Oil over Dielectric-Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel synthesis reaction routes from palm oil using plasma electro-catalysis process over Dielectric-Barrier Discharge (DBD plasma reactor were studied. The study was focused on finding possible reaction mechanism route during plasma electro-catalysis process. The prediction was performed based on the changes of Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FT-IR analyses to the biodiesel products with respect to time length of plasma treatment. It was found that main reaction mechanism occurred in the plasma electro-catalysis system was non-thermal pyrolysis rather than transesterification. The main reactions within the plasma treatment were due to collision between high energetic electrons (supplied from high voltage power supply through high voltage electrode and the reaction mixtures. The high energetic electrons affected the electrons pair of covalent bonding to be excited or dissociated even ionized at higher energy. Therefore, this plasma electro-catalysis system was promising for biodiesel synthesis from vegetable oils due to only very short time reaction was needed, even no need a catalyst, no soap formation, and no glycerol by-product. This system could produce fatty acid methyl ester yield of 75.65% at 120 seconds and other possible chemicals, such as alkynes, alkanes, esters, carboxylic acid, and aldehydes. However, during the plasma process, the reaction mechanisms were still difficult to be controlled due the action of available high energetic electrons. The advanced studies on how to control the reaction mechanism selectively in the plasma electro-catalysis will be published elsewhere. © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 23rd January 2014; Revised: 20th March 2014; Accepted: 23rd March 2014[How to Cite: Istadi, I., Yudhistira, A.D., Anggoro, D.D., Buchori, L. (2014. Electro-Catalysis System for Biodiesel Synthesis from Palm Oil over Dielectric-Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor

  6. Material Challenges For Plasma Facing Components in Future Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, J; Pintsuk, G.; Rödig, M.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing attention is directed towards thermonuclear fusion as a possible future energy source. Major advantages of this energy conversion technology are the almost inexhaustible resources and the option to produce energy without CO2-emissions. However, in the most advanced field of magnetic plasma confinement a number of technological challenges have to be met. In particular high-temperature resistant and plasma compatible materials have to be developed and qualified which are able to withstand the extreme environments in a commercial thermonuclear power reactor. The plasma facing materials (PFMs) and components (PFCs) in such fusion devices, i.e. the first wall (FW), the limiters and the divertor, are strongly affected by the plasma wall interaction processes and the applied intense thermal loads during plasma operation. On the one hand, these mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; on the other hand, they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour. In present-day and next step devices the resulting thermal steady state heat loads to the first wall remain below 1 MWm-2; the limiters and the divertor are expected to be exposed to power densities being at least one order of magnitude above the FW-level, i.e. up to 20 MWm-2 for next step tokamaks such as ITER or DEMO. These requirements are responsible for high demands on the selection of qualified PFMs and heat sink materials as well as reliable fabrication processes for actively cooled plasma facing components. The technical solutions which are considered today are mainly based on the PFMs beryllium, carbon or tungsten joined to copper alloys or stainless steel heat sinks. In addition to the above mentioned quasi-stationary heat loads, short transient thermal pulses with deposited energy densities up to several tens of MJm-2 are a serious concern for next step tokamak devices. The most frequent events are so-called Edge Localized Modes (type I ELMs) and plasma disruptions

  7. Integrated CO{sub 2} Capture and Utilization Using Non-Thermal Plasmolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, Matthew, E-mail: mmoss1@sheffield.ac.uk; Reed, Daniel G.; Allen, Ray W. K.; Styring, Peter [UK Centre for Carbon Dioxide Utilisation, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-02

    In this work, two simple processes for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) such as capture and utilization have been combined to form a whole systems approach to carbon capture and utilization (CCU). The first stage utilizes a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system, which offers many benefits over current amine technologies. It was found that high selectivity can be achieved with rapid adsorption/desorption times while employing a cheap, durable sorbent that exhibits no sorbent losses and is easily regenerated by simple pressure drops. The PSA system is capable of capturing and upgrading the CO{sub 2} concentration of a waste gas stream from 12.5% to a range of higher purities. As many CCU end processes have some tolerance toward impurities in the feed, in the form of nitrogen (N{sub 2}), for example, this is highly advantageous for this PSA system since CO{sub 2} purities in excess of 80% can be achieved with only a few steps and minimal energy input. Non-thermal plasma is one such technology that can tolerate, and even benefit from, small N{sub 2} impurities in the feed, therefore a 100% pure CO{sub 2} stream is not required. The second stage of this process deploys a nanosecond pulsed corona discharge reactor to split the captured CO{sub 2} into carbon monoxide (CO), which can then be used as a chemical feedstock for other syntheses. Corona discharge has proven industrial applications for gas cleaning and the benefit of pulsed power reduces the energy consumption of the system. The wire-in-cylinder geometry concentrates the volume of gas treated into the area of high electric field. Previous work has suggested that moderate conversions can be achieved (9%), compared to other non-thermal plasma methods, but with higher energy efficiencies (>60%).

  8. Plasma behaviour in large reversed-field pinches and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.P.; Bodin, H.A.B.; Carolan, P.G.; Johnston, J.W.; Newton, A.A.; Roberts, K.V.; Robinson, D.C.; Watts, M.R.C.; Piotrowicz, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recent analytic and numerical results on large reversed-field-pinch (RFP) systems and RFP reactors are presented. Predictions are made of the plasma behaviour in Eta Beta II, HBTXIA (under construction) and RFX (planned). The setting-up phase of an RFP is studied by using turbulence theory in transport equilibrium calculations, and estimates are made of the volt-seconds consumption for four different modes of field control. A prescription is given for a dynamo producing self-reversal which yields finite-β configurations. Residual instabilities of these equilibria may be resistive pressure-driven g-modes, and a new study of these modes that includes parallel viscosity indicates stability for anti β approximately 10%. The sustainment phase of the RFP is examined with tokamak scaling laws assumed for the energy confinement time. Temperatures in excess of 1keV are predicted for currents of 2MA in RFX. An operating cycle for a pulsed RFP reactor including gas puffing to reach ignition is proposed following a study of the energy replacement time for an Ohmically heated plasma. The scaling of the reactor parameters with minor radius is also investigated. (author)

  9. Degradation of nicotine in water solutions using a water falling film DBD plasma reactor: direct and indirect treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupež, Jelena; Kovačević, Vesna V.; Jović, Milica; Roglić, Goran M.; Natić, Maja M.; Kuraica, Milorad M.; Obradović, Bratislav M.; Dojčinović, Biljana P.

    2018-05-01

    Nicotine degradation efficiency in water solutions was studied using a water falling film dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. Two different treatments were applied: direct treatment, the recirculation of the solution through a DBD reactor, and indirect treatment, the bubbling of the gas from the DBD through the porous filter into the solution. In a separate experiment, samples spiked with nicotine in double distilled water (ddH2O) and tap water were studied and compared after both treatments. Furthermore, the effects of the homogeneous catalysts, namely, Fe2+ and H2O2, were tested in the direct treatment. Nicotine degradation efficiency was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. A degradation efficiency of 90% was achieved after the direct treatment catalyzed with Fe2+. In order to analyze the biodegradability, mineralization level, and toxicity of the obtained solutions, after all degradation procedures the values of the following parameters were determined: total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, and the Artemia salina toxicity test. The results showed that an increase in biodegradability was obtained, after all treatments. A partial nicotine mineralization was achieved and the mortality of the A. salina organism decreased in the treated samples, all of which indicating the effective removal of nicotine and the creation of less toxic solutions. Nicotine degradation products were identified using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a linear ion trap Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer and a simple mechanism for oxidative degradation of nicotine in non-thermal plasma systems is proposed.

  10. Scaling laws for particle growth in plasma reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemons, D.S.; Keinigs, R.K.; Winske, D.; Jones, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    We quantify a model which incorporates observed features of contaminant particle growth in plasma processing reactors. According to the model, large open-quote open-quote predator close-quote close-quote particles grow by adsorbing smaller, typically neutral, open-quote open-quote prey close-quote close-quote protoparticles. The latter are supplied by an assumed constant mass injection of contaminant material. Scaling laws and quantitative predictions compare favorably with published experimental results. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. Plasma engineering analyses of tokamak reactor operating space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    A comprehensive method is presented for analyzing the potential physics operating regime of fusion reactor plasmas with detailed transport codes. Application is made to the tokamak Fusion Engineering Device (FED). The relationships between driven and ignited operation and supplementary heating requirements are examined. The reference physics models give a finite range of density and temperature over which physics objectives can be reached. Uncertainties in the confinement scaling and differences in supplementary heating methods can expand or contract this operating regime even to the point of allowing ignition with the more optimistic models

  12. Plasma needle : non-thermal atmospheric plasmas in dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sladek, R.E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Who is not afraid of the dentist? Or to be more specific. . . who is not afraid of the dental drill? Caries is a common ailment, that is caused by bacteria in dental plaque. Cavities will form when you do not properly remove the plaque on your teeth. The improvement of caries prevention and

  13. Dense Medium Plasma Water Purification Reactor (DMP WaPR), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Dense Medium Plasma Water Purification Reactor offers significant improvements over existing water purification technologies used in Advanced Life Support...

  14. Low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing in plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauchyn, V.; Khvedchyn, I.; Van Oost, G.

    2013-01-01

    Methods of low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing comprise: cementation, bituminization, curing in polymer matrices, combustion and pyrolysis. All these methods are limited in their application in the field of chemical, morphological, and aggregate composition of material to be processed. The thermal plasma method is one of the universal methods of RAW processing. The use of electric-arc plasma with mean temperatures 2000 - 8000 K can effectively carry out the destruction of organic compounds into atoms and ions with very high speeds and high degree of conversion. Destruction of complex substances without oxygen leads to a decrease of the volume of exhaust gases and dimension of gas cleaning system. This paper presents the plasma reactor for thermal processing of low and intermediate level radioactive waste of mixed morphology. The equipment realizes plasma-pyrolytic conversion of wastes and results in a conditioned product in a single stage. As a result, the volume of conditioned waste is significantly reduced (more than 10 times). Waste is converted into an environmentally friendly form that suits long-term storage. The leaching rate of macro-components from the vitrified compound is less than 1.10 -7 g/(cm 2 .day). (authors)

  15. Characterization of a capillary plasma reactor for carbon dioxide decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Shinsuke; Yamamoto, Aguru; Suzuki, Masaaki

    2006-01-01

    The decomposition of carbon dioxide in a plasma reactor was investigated experimentally, using capillary discharge tubes with a diameter of 0.5 or 3.0 mm and a length of 25, 50, 75, 100 or 150 mm. The chemical composition of the reaction products and the current-voltage characteristics were measured over a pressure range of 3.33-120 Torr, and the CO 2 conversion rates and reduced electric fields were calculated. The results show that the influence of downscaling on the reduced electric fields can be well evaluated by adjusting both the current density, i, and the products of the pressure and the tube diameter, pd. However, the characteristics of CO 2 decomposition cannot be determined based on i and pd; they are better characterized by i and p. It can be deduced from our experimental results that the CO 2 conversion rate is predominated by the electron impact CO 2 dissociation and gas phase reverse reactions even in a capillary plasma reactor

  16. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  17. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.; Voitsekhovitch, I.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  18. Relevance, Realization and stability of a cold layer at the plasma edge for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The workshop was dedicated to the realization and stability of a cold layer at the plasma edge for fusion reactors. The subjects of the communications presented were: impurity transport, and control, plasma boundary layers, power balance, radiation control and modifications, limiter discharges, tokamak density limit, Asdex divertor discharges, thermal stability of a radiating diverted plasma, plasma stability, auxiliary heating in Textor, detached plasma in Tore Supra, poloidal divertor tokamak, radiation cooling, neutral-particle transport, plasma scrape-off layer, edge turbulence

  19. Plasma position control in a tokamak reactor around ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carretta, U.; Minardi, E.; Bacelli, N.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma position control in a tokamak reactor in the phase approaching ignition is closely related to burn control. If ignited burn corresponds to a thermally unstable situation the plasma becomes sensitive to the thermal instability already in the phase when ignition is approached so that the trajectory in the position-pressure (R,p) space becomes effectively unpredictable. For example, schemes involving closed cycles around ignition can be unstable in the heating-cooling phases, and the deviations may be cumulative in time. Reliable plasma control in pressure-position (p, R) space is achieved by beforehand constraining the p, R trajectory rigidly with suitable feedback vertical field stabilization, which is to be established already below ignition. A scheme in which ignition is approached in a stable and automatic way by feedback stabilization on the vertical field is proposed and studied in detail. The values of the gain coefficient ensuring stabilization and the associated p and R excursions are discussed both analytically, with a 0-D approximation including non-linear effects, and numerically with a 1-D code in cylindrical geometry. Profile effects increase the excursions, in particular above ignition. (author)

  20. Novel Approach to Plasma Facing Materials in Nuclear Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livramento, V.; Correia, J. B.; Shohoji, N.; Osawa, E.; Nunes, D.; Carvalho, P. A.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Hanada, K.

    2008-01-01

    A novel material design in nuclear fusion reactors is proposed based on W-nDiamond nanostructured composites. Generally, a microstructure refined to the nanometer scale improves the mechanical strength due to modification of plasticity mechanisms. Moreover, highly specific grain-boundary area raises the number of sites for annihilation of radiation induced defects. However, the low thermal stability of fine-grained and nanostructured materials demands the presence of particles at the grain boundaries that can delay coarsening by a pinning effect. As a result, the concept of a composite is promising in the field of nanostructured materials. The hardness of diamond renders nanodiamond dispersions excellent reinforcing and stabilization candidates and, in addition, diamond has extremely high thermal conductivity. Consequently, W-nDiamond nanocomposites are promising candidates for thermally stable first-wall materials. The proposed design involves the production of W/W-nDiamond/W-Cu/Cu layered castellations. The W, W-nDiamond and W-Cu layers are produced by mechanical alloying followed by a consolidation route that combines hot rolling with spark plasma sintering (SPS). Layer welding is achieved by spark plasma sintering. The present work describes the mechanical alloying processsing and consolidation route used to produce W-nDiamond composites, as well as microstructural features and mechanical properties of the material produced Long term plasma exposure experiments are planned at ISTTOK and at FTU (Frascati)

  1. Towards the understanding of non-thermal airplasma action: effects on bacteria and fibroblasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Jäger, Aleš; Polívka, Leoš; Syková, Eva; Terebova, N.; Kulikov, A.; Kubinová, Šárka; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 30 (2016), 25286-25292 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * bactericidal effects * medical applications Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  2. Plasma-arc reactor for production possibility of powdered nano-size materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadzhiyski, V; Mihovsky, M; Gavrilova, R

    2011-01-01

    Nano-size materials of various chemical compositions find increasing application in life nowadays due to some of their unique properties. Plasma technologies are widely used in the production of a range of powdered nano-size materials (metals, alloys, oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides, carbonitrides, etc.), that have relatively high melting temperatures. Until recently, the so-called RF-plasma generated in induction plasma torches was most frequently applied. The subject of this paper is the developments of a new type of plasma-arc reactor, operated with transferred arc system for production of disperse nano-size materials. The new characteristics of the PLASMALAB reactor are the method of feeding the charge, plasma arc control and anode design. The disperse charge is fed by a charge feeding system operating on gravity principle through a hollow cathode of an arc plasma torch situated along the axis of a water-cooled wall vertical tubular reactor. The powdered material is brought into the zone of a plasma space generated by the DC rotating transferred plasma arc. The arc is subjected to Auto-Electro-Magnetic Rotation (AEMR) by an inductor serially connected to the anode circuit. The anode is in the form of a water-cooled copper ring. It is mounted concentrically within the cylindrical reactor, with its lower part electrically insulated from it. The electric parameters of the arc in the reactor and the quantity of processed charge are maintained at a level permitting generation of a volumetric plasma discharge. This mode enables one to attain high mean mass temperature while the processed disperse material flows along the reactor axis through the plasma zone where the main physico-chemical processes take place. The product obtained leaves the reactor through the annular anode, from where it enters a cooling chamber for fixing the produced nano-structure. Experiments for AlN synthesis from aluminium power and nitrogen were carried out using the plasma reactor

  3. Acceleration of relativistic electrons in plasma reactors and non-linear spectra of cosmic radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, S.A.; Lomadze, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    A second approximation to the theory of turbulent plasma reactors in connection with the problem of interpretation of the non-linear spectra of cosmic radio sources has been investigated by the authors (Kaplan and Lomadze, 1977; Lomadze, 1977). The present paper discusses the basic results received for a Compton reactor with plasma waves of phase velocities smaller than the velocity of light, as well as for the synchrotron reactor. The distortion of the distribution function of relativistic electrons caused by their diffusion from the reactor is also presented as an example. (Auth.)

  4. Influence of non-thermal TiCl{sub 4}/Ar + O{sub 2} plasma-assisted TiOx based coatings on the surface of polypropylene (PP) films for the tailoring of surface properties and cytocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandiyaraj, K.N., E-mail: dr.knpr@gmail.com [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Shakthi Institute of Engineering and Technology, L& T by pass, Chinniyam Palayam (post), Coimbatore 641062 (India); Kumar, A. Arun; Ramkumar, M.C. [Surface Engineering Laboratory, Department of Physics, Sri Shakthi Institute of Engineering and Technology, L& T by pass, Chinniyam Palayam (post), Coimbatore 641062 (India); Sachdev, A.; Gopinath, P. [Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Centre for Nanotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247667 (India); Cools, Pieter; De Geyter, N.; Morent, R. [Research Unit Plasma Technology (RUPT), Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, Jozef Plateaustraat 22, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Deshmukh, R.R. [Department of Physics, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India); Hegde, P. [William Mason High School, Mason 45040 (United States); Han, C. [Department of Biomedical, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0012 (United States); Nadagouda, M.N. [Center for Nanoscale Multifunctional Materials, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The superior bulk properties (corrosion resistance, high strength to weight ratio, relatively low cost and easy processing) of hydrocarbon based polymers such as polypropylene (PP) have contributed significantly to the development of new biomedical applications such as artificial organs and cell scaffolds. However, low cell affinity is one of the main draw backs for PP due to its poor surface properties. In tissue engineering, physico-chemical surface properties such as hydrophilicity, polar functional groups, surface charge and morphology play a crucial role to enrich the cell proliferation and adhesion. In this present investigation TiOx based biocompatible coatings were developed on the surface of PP films via DC excited glow discharge plasma, using TiCl{sub 4}/Ar + O{sub 2} gas mixture as a precursor. Various TiOx-based coatings are deposited on the surface of PP films as a function of discharge power. The changes in hydrophilicity of the TiO{sub x}/PP film surfaces were studied using contact angle analysis and surface energy calculations by Fowke's approximation. X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the surface chemical composition of TiOx/PP films. The surface morphology of the obtained TiO{sub x}/PP films was investigated by scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy (SEM &TEM). Moreover, the surface topography of the material was analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cytocompatibility of the TiO{sub x}/PP films was investigated via in vitro analysis (cell viability, adhesion and cytotoxicity) using NIH3T3 (mouse embryonic fibroblast) cells. Furthermore the antibacterial activities of TiO{sub x}/PP films were also evaluated against two distinct bacterial models namely Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) and Gram negative Escherichia coli DH5α. (E.coli) bacteria. XPS results clearly indicate the successful incorporation of TiO{sub x} and oxygen containing polar functional groups on the surface

  5. Properties Influencing Plasma Discharges in Packed Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for CO2 removal and conversion of waste gases into higher value compounds. We report on results of a computational investigation of PBR-DBD properties using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM with a comparison to experiments. Dielectric beads (rods in 2D) were inserted between two coplanar electrodes, 1 cm apart filled by humid air. A step-pulse of -30 kV was applied to the top electrode. Material properties of the beads (dielectric constant, secondary emission coefficient) and gas properties (photoionization and photo-absorption cross-sections, temperature) were varied. We found that photoionization plays a critical role in the propagation of the discharge through the PBR, as it serves to seed charges in regions of high electric field. Increasing rates of photo-ionization enable increases in the discharge propagation velocity, ionization rates and production of radicals. A transition between DBD-like and arc-like discharges occurs as the radiation mean free path decreases. Increasing the dielectric constant of the beads increased electric fields in the gas, which translated to increased discharge propagation velocity and charge density until ɛ/ɛ0 100. Secondary electron emission coefficient and gas temperature have minimal impacts on the discharge propagation though the latter did affect the production of reactive species. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  6. Startup of reversed-field mirror reactors using coaxial plasma guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C. Jr.; Hartman, C.W.; Carlson, G.A.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Eddleman, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary calculations are given that indicate that a coaxial plasma gun might scale reasonably to reactor-grade operating conditions. Ongoing experiments and numerical simulations should shed some light on the validity of the described scaling laws

  7. Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, and chemical reactant sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C

    2013-11-26

    Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, chemical reactant sources, and related methods are disclosed. In one embodiment, a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor system comprising a reaction chamber, a combustion torch positioned to direct a flame into the reaction chamber, and one or more reactant feed assemblies configured to electrically energize at least one electrically conductive solid reactant structure to form a plasma and feed each electrically conductive solid reactant structure into the plasma to form at least one product is disclosed. In an additional embodiment, a chemical reactant source for a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor comprising an elongated electrically conductive reactant structure consisting essentially of at least one chemical reactant is disclosed. In further embodiments, methods of forming a chemical reactant source and methods of chemically converting at least one reactant into at least one product are disclosed.

  8. Role of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition reactor wall conditions on radical and ion substrate fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, Mark J., E-mail: msowa@ultratech.com [Ultratech/Cambridge NanoTech, 130 Turner Street, Building 2, Waltham, Massachusetts 02453 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Chamber wall conditions, such as wall temperature and film deposits, have long been known to influence plasma source performance on thin film processing equipment. Plasma physical characteristics depend on conductive/insulating properties of chamber walls. Radical fluxes depend on plasma characteristics as well as wall recombination rates, which can be wall material and temperature dependent. Variations in substrate delivery of plasma generated species (radicals, ions, etc.) impact the resulting etch or deposition process resulting in process drift. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition is known to depend strongly on substrate radical flux, but film properties can be influenced by other plasma generated phenomena, such as ion bombardment. In this paper, the chamber wall conditions on a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process are investigated. The downstream oxygen radical and ion fluxes from an inductively coupled plasma source are indirectly monitored in temperature controlled (25–190 °C) stainless steel and quartz reactors over a range of oxygen flow rates. Etch rates of a photoresist coated quartz crystal microbalance are used to study the oxygen radical flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Plasma density estimates from Langmuir probe ion saturation current measurements are used to study the ion flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Reactor temperature was not found to impact radical and ion fluxes substantially. Radical and ion fluxes were higher for quartz walls compared to stainless steel walls over all oxygen flow rates considered. The radical flux to ion flux ratio is likely to be a critical parameter for the deposition of consistent film properties. Reactor wall material, gas flow rate/pressure, and distance from the plasma source all impact the radical to ion flux ratio. These results indicate maintaining chamber wall conditions will be important for delivering consistent results from plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

  9. A conceptual fusion reactor based on the high-plasma-density Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.; Carlson, G.; Hoffman, M.; Werner, R.

    1977-01-01

    Conceptual DT and DD fusion reactors are discussed based on magnetic confinement with the high-plasma-density Z-pinch. The reactor concepts have no ''first wall'', the fusion neutrons and plasma energy being absorbed directly into a surrounding lithium vortex blanket. Efficient systems with low re-circulated power are projected, based on a flow-through pinch cycle for which overall Q values can approach 10. The conceptual reactors are characterized by simplicity, small minimum size (100MW(e)) and by the potential for minimal radioactivity hazards. (author)

  10. Plasma engineering design of a compact reversed-field pinch reactor (CRFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Embrechts, M.J.; Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The rationale for and the characteristics of the high-power-density Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR) are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to key plasma engineering aspects of the conceptual design, including plasma operations, current drive, and impurity/ash control by means of pumped limiters or magnetic divertors. A brief description of the Fusion-Power-Core integration is given

  11. Dismantling of JPDR reactor internals by underwater plasma arc cutting technique using robotic manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, M.

    1988-01-01

    The actual dismantling of JPDR started on December 4, 1986. As of now, equipment that surrounds the reactor has mostly been removed to provide working space in reactor containment prior to the dismantling of reactor internals. Some reactor internals have been successfully dismantled using the underwater arc cutting system with a robotic manipulator during the period of January to March 1988. The cutting system is composed of an underwater plasma arc cutting device and a robotic manipulator. The cut off reactor internals were core spray block, feedwater sparger and stabilizers for fuel upper grid tube. The plasma arc cutting device was developed to dismantle the reactor internals underwater. It mainly consists of a plasma torch, power and gas supply systems for the torch, and by-product treatment systems. It has the cutting ability of 130 mm thickness stainless steel underwater. The robotic manipulator has seven degrees of freedom of movement, enabling it to move in almost the same way as the arm of a human being. The arm of the robot is mounted on a supporting device which is suspended by three chains from the support structure set on a service floor. A plasma torch is griped by the robotic hand; its position to the structure to be cut is controlled from a remote control room, about 100 meters outside the reactor containment

  12. The Use of Multi-Reactor Cascade Plasma Electrolysis for Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksono, Nelson; Ibrahim; Zainah; Budikania, Trisutanti

    2018-03-01

    Plasma electrolysis is a method that can produce large amounts of hydroxyl radicals to degrade organic waste. The purpose of this study is to improve the effectiveness of Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) degradation by using multi-reactor cascade plasma electrolysis. The reactor which operated in circulation system, using 3 reactors series flow and 6 L of LAS with initial concentration of 100 ppm. The results show that the LAS degradation can be improved multi-reactor cascade plasma electrolysis. The greatest LAS degradation is achieved up to 81.91% with energy consumption of 2227.34 kJ/mmol that is obtained during 120 minutes by using 600 Volt, 0.03 M of KOH, and 0.5 cm of the anode depth.

  13. Abatement of fluorinated compounds using a 2.45 GHz microwave plasma torch with a reverse vortex plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H.; Cho, C.H.; Shin, D.H. [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Oxikdo-dong, Gunsan-city, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Y.C., E-mail: ychong@nfri.re.kr [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Oxikdo-dong, Gunsan-city, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Y.W. [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Oxikdo-dong, Gunsan-city, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); School of Advanced Green Energy and Environments, Handong Global University, Heunghae-eup, Buk-gu, Pohang-city, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • We developed a microwave plasma torch with reverse vortex reactor (RVR). • We calculated a volume fraction and temperature distribution of discharge gas and waste. • The performance of reverse vortex reactor increased from 29% to 43% than conventional vortex reactor. - Abstract: Abatement of fluorinated compounds (FCs) used in semiconductor and display industries has received an attention due to the increasingly stricter regulation on their emission. We have developed a 2.45 GHz microwave plasma torch with reverse vortex reactor (RVR). In order to design a reverse vortex plasma reactor, we calculated a volume fraction and temperature distribution of discharge gas and waste gas in RVR by ANSYS CFX of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation code. Abatement experiments have been performed with respect to SF{sub 6}, NF{sub 3} by varying plasma power and N{sub 2} flow rates, and FCs concentration. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF{sub 3} and SF{sub 6} in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). The DRE of 99.9% for NF{sub 3} was achieved without an additive gas at the N{sub 2} flow rate of 150 liter per minute (L/min) by applying a microwave power of 6 kW with RVR. Also, a DRE of SF{sub 6} was 99.99% at the N{sub 2} flow rate of 60 L/min using an applied microwave power of 6 kW. The performance of reverse vortex reactor increased about 43% of NF{sub 3} and 29% of SF{sub 6} abatements results definition by decomposition energy per liter more than conventional vortex reactor.

  14. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Goeler, S. von; Houlberg, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear plasmas. The profile evolution of trace tritium and helium, and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in ERS plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the reverse shear region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  15. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.; Von Goeler, S.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear plasmas. The profile evolution of trace tritium and helium, and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in ERS plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the reverse shear region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  16. Degradation of Acid Orange 7 Dye in Two Hybrid Plasma Discharge Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yongjun; Ding Jiandong; Lei Lecheng; Zhang Xingwang

    2014-01-01

    To get an optimized pulsed electrical plasma discharge reactor and to increase the energy utilization efficiency in the removal of pollutants, two hybrid plasma discharge reactors were designed and optimized. The reactors were compared via the discharge characteristics, energy transfer efficiency, the yields of the active species and the energy utilization in dye wastewater degradation. The results showed that under the same AC input power, the characteristics of the discharge waveform of the point-to-plate reactor were better. Under the same AC input power, the two reactors both had almost the same peak voltage of 22 kV. The peak current of the point-to-plate reactor was 146 A, while that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor was only 48.8 A. The peak powers of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.38 MW and 1.01 MW, respectively. The energy per pulse of the point-to-plate reactor was 0.2221 J, which was about 29.4% higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (0.1716 J). To remove 50% Acid Orange 7 (AO7), the energy utilizations of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.02 × 10 −9 mol/L and 0.61 × 10 −9 mol/L, respectively. In the point-to-plate reactor, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in pure water was 3.6 mmol/L after 40 min of discharge, which was higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (2.5 mmol/L). The concentration of liquid phase ozone in the point-to-plate reactor (5.7 × 10 −2 mmol/L) was about 26.7% higher than that in the wire-to-cylinder reactor (4.5 × 10 −2 mmol/L). The analysis results of the variance showed that the type of reactor and reaction time had significant impacts on the yields of the hydrogen peroxide and ozone. The main degradation intermediates of AO7 identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GCMS) were acetic acid, maleic anhydride, p-benzoquinone, phenol, benzoic acid, phthalic anhydride, coumarin and 2-naphthol. Proposed degradation

  17. Emission spectroscopy of argon ferrocene mixture jet in a low pressure plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, N.; Tak, A.K.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Shukla, A.; Meher, K.C.; Ghorui, S.; Thiyagarajan, T.K.

    2015-01-01

    Emission spectroscopy is employed to measure the plasma temperature and species identification in a reactor used for studying homogenous nucleation and growth of iron nano particle. Reactor employs segmented non transferred plasma torch mounted on water cooled cylindrical chamber. The plasma jet passes through graphite nozzle and expands in low pressure reactor. Ferrocene is fed into the nozzle where it mixes with Argon plasma jet. A high resolution spectrograph (SHAMROCK 303i, resolution 0.06 nm) has been used to record the spectra over a wide range. Identification of different emission lines has been done using NIST database. Lines from (700 to 860nm) were considered for calculation of temperature. Spectra were recorded for different axial location, pressure and power. Temperature was calculated using Maxwell Boltzman plot method. Variation in temperature with pressure and location is presented and possible reasons for different behaviour are explored. (author)

  18. Highly Radiative Plasmas for Local Transport Studies and Power and Particle Handling in Reactor Regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Hill, K.W.

    1998-01-01

    To study the applicability of artificially enhanced impurity radiation for mitigation of the plasma-limiter interaction in reactor regimes, krypton and xenon gases were injected into the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) supershots and high-l(subscript) plasmas. At neutral beam injection (NBI) powers P(subscript B) greater than or equal to 30 MW, carbon influxes (blooms) were suppressed, leading to improved energy confinement and neutron production in both deuterium (D) and deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas, and the highest DT fusion energy production (7.6 MJ) in a TFTR pulse. Comparisons of the measured radiated power profiles with predictions of the MIST impurity transport code have guided studies of highly-radiative plasmas in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The response of the electron and ion temperatures to greatly increased radiative losses from the electrons was used to study thermal transport mechanisms

  19. Fueling, heating, and leaking of plasma in mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Moir, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The principles of mirror machine confinement are reviewed with emphasis on the physical process of neutral beam injection and plasma end leakage. The characteristics of efficient neutral beam injectors and direct energy convertors for the plasma and leakage are described

  20. Development of time dependent safety analysis code for plasma anomaly events in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takuro; Okazaki, Takashi; Bartels, H.W.; Uckan, N.A.; Seki, Yasushi.

    1997-01-01

    A safety analysis code SAFALY has been developed to analyze plasma anomaly events in fusion reactors, e.g., a loss of plasma control. The code is a hybrid code comprising a zero-dimensional plasma dynamics and a one-dimensional thermal analysis of in-vessel components. The code evaluates the time evolution of plasma parameters and temperature distributions of in-vessel components. As the plasma-safety interface model, we proposed a robust plasma physics model taking into account updated data for safety assessment. For example, physics safety guidelines for beta limit, density limit and H-L mode confinement transition threshold power, etc. are provided in the model. The model of the in-vessel components are divided into twenty temperature regions in the poloidal direction taking account of radiative heat transfer between each surface of each region. This code can also describe the coolant behavior under hydraulic accidents with the results by hydraulics code and treat vaporization (sublimation) from plasma facing components (PFCs). Furthermore, the code includes the model of impurity transport form PFCs by using a transport probability and a time delay. Quantitative analysis based on the model is possible for a scenario of plasma passive shutdown. We examined the possibility of the code as a safety analysis code for plasma anomaly events in fusion reactors and had a prospect that it would contribute to the safety analysis of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). (author)

  1. Plasma-material interactions in current tokamaks and their implications for next step fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.

    2001-01-01

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next step DT fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically in influence its operation, safety and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimetres from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma facing components. Controlling plasma-wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present day tokamaks, and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena stimulated an internationally co-ordinated effort in the part of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project (ITER), and significant progress has been made in better understanding these issues. The paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material inter actions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interaction are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation and (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modelling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D avenues for their resolution are presented. (author)

  2. Plasma-material interactions in current tokamaks and their implications for next-step fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.

    2001-01-01

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several cm from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally co-ordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the engineering design activities of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor project (ITER) and significant progress has been made in better understanding these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/re-deposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modelling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D avenues for their resolution are presented. (orig.)

  3. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisch, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave rf energy is injected into said plasma to establish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected rf energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected rf energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range delta . The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width delta in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated in the plasma

  4. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bers, A.

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave rf energy is injected into said plasma to estalish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected rf energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected rf energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range delta . The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width delta in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated inthe plasma

  5. Non-thermal effects in a hot dense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.A.; Kania, D.R.; Hammel, B.A.; Kallne, E.; Maestas, M.D.; McGurn, J.; Shepherd, R.

    1985-01-01

    A hollow gas shell Z-pinch device is described, and some initial observations are shown to lead to the conclusion that there is an energetic electron beam produced along the axis of the collapsing gas shell. An experiment is summarized that directly measured some of the characteristics of this runaway electron beam. Finally, the results of an experiment which observed a new affect are presented along with a model that uses a runaway electron beam to explain this new effect. 9 refs., 17 figs

  6. Titanium nitride plasma-chemical synthesis with titanium tetrachloride raw material in the DC plasma-arc reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpichev, D. E.; Sinaiskiy, M. A.; Samokhin, A. V.; Alexeev, N. V.

    2017-04-01

    The possibility of plasmochemical synthesis of titanium nitride is demonstrated in the paper. Results of the thermodynamic analysis of TiCl4 - H2 - N2 system are presented; key parameters of TiN synthesis process are calculated. The influence of parameters of plasma-chemical titanium nitride synthesis process in the reactor with an arc plasmatron on characteristics on the produced powders is experimentally investigated. Structure, chemical composition and morphology dependencies on plasma jet enthalpy, stoichiometric excess of hydrogen and nitrogen in a plasma jet are determined.

  7. Catalytic-Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor For Methane and Carbon Dioxide Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A catalytic - DBD plasma reactor was designed and developed for co-generation of synthesis gas and C2+ hydrocarbons from methane. A hybrid Artificial Neural Network - Genetic Algorithm (ANN-GA was developed to model, simulate and optimize the reactor. Effects of CH4/CO2 feed ratio, total feed flow rate, discharge voltage and reactor wall temperature on the performance of catalytic DBD plasma reactor was explored. The Pareto optimal solutions and corresponding optimal operating parameters ranges based on multi-objectives can be suggested for catalytic DBD plasma reactor owing to two cases, i.e. simultaneous maximization of CH4 conversion and C2+ selectivity, and H2 selectivity and H2/CO ratio. It can be concluded that the hybrid catalytic DBD plasma reactor is potential for co-generation of synthesis gas and higher hydrocarbons from methane and carbon dioxide and showed better than the conventional fixed bed reactor with respect to CH4 conversion, C2+ yield and H2 selectivity for CO2 OCM process. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: I. Istadi, N.A.S. Amin. (2007. Catalytic-Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Reactor For Methane and Carbon Dioxide Conversion. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 37-44.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.8.37-44][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.8.37-44 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/8][Cited by: Scopus 1 |

  8. Development, diagnostic and applications of radio-frequency plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puac, N.

    2008-07-01

    In many areas of the industry, plasma processing of materials is a vital technology. Nonequilibrium plasmas proved to be able to produce chemically reactive species at a low gas temperature while maintaining highly uniform reaction rates over relatively large areas (Makabe and Petrovic 2006). At the same time nonequilibrium plasmas provide means for good and precise control of the properties of active particles that determine the surface modification. Plasma needle is one of the atmospheric pressure sources that can be used for treatment of the living matter which is highly sensitive when it comes to low pressure or high temperatures (above 40 C). Dependent on plasma conditions, several refined cell responses are induced in mammalian cells (Sladek et al. 2005). It appears that plasma treatment may find many biomedical applications. However, there are few data in the literature about plasma effects on plant cells and tissues. So far, only the effect of low pressure plasmas on seeds was investigated. It was shown that short duration pretreatments by non equilibrium low temperature air plasma were stimulative in light induced germination of Paulownia tomentosa seeds (Puac et al. 2005). As membranes of plants have different properties to those of animals and as they show a wide range of properties we have tried to survey some of the effects of typical plasma which is envisaged to be used in biotechnological applications on plant cells. In this paper we will make a comparison between two configurations of plasma needle that we have used in treatment of biological samples (Puac et al. 2006). Difference between these two configurations is in the additional copper ring that we have placed around glass tube at the tip of the needle. We will show some of the electrical characteristics of the plasma needle (with and without additional copper ring) and, also, plasma emission intensity obtained by using fast ICCD camera.

  9. Degradation of Acid Orange 7 Dye in Two Hybrid Plasma Discharge Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yongjun; Lei, Lecheng; Zhang, Xingwang; Ding, Jiandong

    2014-11-01

    To get an optimized pulsed electrical plasma discharge reactor and to increase the energy utilization efficiency in the removal of pollutants, two hybrid plasma discharge reactors were designed and optimized. The reactors were compared via the discharge characteristics, energy transfer efficiency, the yields of the active species and the energy utilization in dye wastewater degradation. The results showed that under the same AC input power, the characteristics of the discharge waveform of the point-to-plate reactor were better. Under the same AC input power, the two reactors both had almost the same peak voltage of 22 kV. The peak current of the point-to-plate reactor was 146 A, while that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor was only 48.8 A. The peak powers of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.38 MW and 1.01 MW, respectively. The energy per pulse of the point-to-plate reactor was 0.2221 J, which was about 29.4% higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (0.1716 J). To remove 50% Acid Orange 7 (AO7), the energy utilizations of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.02 × 10-9 mol/L and 0.61 × 10-9 mol/L, respectively. In the point-to-plate reactor, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in pure water was 3.6 mmol/L after 40 min of discharge, which was higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (2.5 mmol/L). The concentration of liquid phase ozone in the point-to-plate reactor (5.7 × 10-2 mmol/L) was about 26.7% higher than that in the wire-to-cylinder reactor (4.5 × 10-2 mmol/L). The analysis results of the variance showed that the type of reactor and reaction time had significant impacts on the yields of the hydrogen peroxide and ozone. The main degradation intermediates of AO7 identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GCMS) were acetic acid, maleic anhydride, p-benzoquinone, phenol, benzoic acid, phthalic anhydride, coumarin and 2-naphthol. Proposed degradation pathways were

  10. Numerical modeling of disperse material evaporation in axisymmetric thermal plasma reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Predrag Lj.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical 3D Euler-Lagrangian stochastic-deterministic (LSD model of two-phase flow laden with solid particles was developed. The model includes the relevant physical effects, namely phase interaction, panicle dispersion by turbulence, lift forces, particle-particle collisions, particle-wall collisions, heat and mass transfer between phases, melting and evaporation of particles, vapour diffusion in the gas flow. It was applied to simulate the processes in thermal plasma reactors, designed for the production of the ceramic powders. Paper presents results of extensive numerical simulation provided (a to determine critical mechanism of interphase heat and mass transfer in plasma flows, (b to show relative influence of some plasma reactor parameters on solid precursor evaporation efficiency: 1 - inlet plasma temperature, 2 - inlet plasma velocity, 3 - particle initial diameter, 4 - particle injection angle a, and 5 - reactor wall temperature, (c to analyze the possibilities for high evaporation efficiency of different starting solid precursors (Si, Al, Ti, and B2O3 powder, and (d to compare different plasma reactor configurations in conjunction with disperse material evaporation efficiency.

  11. ORNL TNS Program: plasma engineering considerations and innovations for a medium field tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.; Mense, A.T.; Rome, J.A.; Uckan, N.A.

    1977-12-01

    Recent plasma engineering studies have ascertained a viable concept for The Next Step (TNS) reactor based on medium toroidal fields between 4 T and 7 T at the plasma center, plasma anti β values up to 10%, and averaged densities between 0.6 x 10 14 cm -3 and 2.5 x 10 14 cm -3 . Plasma engineering innovations that can substantially reduce the size, cost, and complexity of the TNS reactor have been explored and are summarized. It is shown that the previously anticipated requirement of high pellet velocities can be substantially reduced; the toroidal field (TF) ripple requirements may be relaxed to reduce the number of TF coils and improve machine access; hybrid equilibrium field (EF) coils have been shown to require building only small interior coils and to reduce the power supply required by the exterior coils; proper approaches of microwave plasma preheating may reduce the peak loop voltage for start-up by an order of magnitude. The medium-field TNS reactor concepts and the plasma engineering innovations discussed should be applicable to other designs of tokamak reactors; some of the suggested innovations will be tested in upcoming experiments

  12. Safety analyses for transient behavior of plasma and in-vessel components during plasma abnormal events in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takuro; Okazaki, Takashi; Bartels, H.W.; Uckan, N.A.; Seki, Yasushi.

    1997-01-01

    Safety analyses on plasma abnormal events have been performed using a hybrid code of a plasma dynamics model and a heat transfer model of in-vessel components. Several abnormal events, e.g., increase in fueling rate, were selected for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and transient behavior of the plasma and the invessel components during the events was analyzed. The physics model for safety analysis was conservatively prepared. In most cases, the plasma is terminated by a disruption or it returns to the original operation point. When the energy confinement improves by a factor of 2.0 in the steady state, which is a hypothetical assumption under the present plasma data, the maximum fusion power reaches about 3.3 GW at about 3.6 s and the plasma is terminated due to a disruption. However, the results obtained in this study show the confinement boundary of ITER can be kept almost intact during the abnormal plasma transients, as long as the cooling system works normally. Several parametric studies are needed to comprehend the overpower transient including structure behavior, since many uncertainties are connected to the filed of the plasma physics. And, future work will need to discuss the burn control scenario considering confinement mode transition, system specifications, experimental plans and safety regulations, etc. to confirm the safety related to the plasma anomaly. (author)

  13. Comprehensive safety analysis code system for nuclear fusion reactors II: Thermal analysis during plasma disruptions for international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, T.; Maki, K.; Okazaki, T.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal characteristics of a fusion reactor [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Conceptual Design Activity] during plasma disruptions have been analyzed by using a comprehensive safety analysis code for nuclear fusion reactors. The erosion depth due to disruptions for the armor of the first wall depends on the current quench time of disruptions occurring in normal operation. If it is possible to extend the time up to ∼50 ms, the erosion depth is considerably reduced. On the other hand, the erosion depth of the divertor is ∼570 μm for only one disruption, which is determined only by the thermal flux during the thermal quench. This means that the divertor plate should be exchanged after about nine disruptions. Counter-measures are necessary for the divertor to relieve disruption influences. As other scenarios of disruptions, beta-limit disruptions and vertical displacement events were also investigated quantitatively. 13 refs., 5 figs

  14. Treatment of gaseous effluents by using surface discharge plasma in continuous reactors: Process modelling and simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Assadi , Aymen ,; Bouzaza , Abdelkrim; Wolbert , Dominique

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In the present work, the oxidation of isovaleraldehyde, a typical pollutant of indoor air, is investigated by using two different plasma DBD reactors: cylindrical and planar reactor. The study of the influence of the specific energy shows that its increment is accompanied by an increase of the removal efficiency. In fact, when specific energy extends three times, the removal efficiency is increased from 5 to 40%. Moreover an increase of the specific energy induces a hi...

  15. Study of carbon dioxide gas treatment based on equations of kinetics in plasma discharge reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi-Varaki, Mehdi

    2017-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) as the primary greenhouse gas, is the main pollutant that is warming earth. CO2 is widely emitted through the cars, planes, power plants and other human activities that involve the burning of fossil fuels (coal, natural gas and oil). Thus, there is a need to develop some method to reduce CO2 emission. To this end, this study investigates the behavior of CO2 in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor. The behavior of different species and their reaction rates are studied using a zero-dimensional model based on equations of kinetics inside plasma reactor. The results show that the plasma reactor has an effective reduction on the CO2 density inside the reactor. As a result of reduction in the temporal variations of reaction rate, the speed of chemical reactions for CO2 decreases and very low concentration of CO2 molecules inside the plasma reactor is generated. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental and simulation findings in the literature.

  16. Particle formation and its control in dual frequency plasma etching reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Munsu; Cheong, Hee-Woon; Whang, Ki-Woong

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of a particle cloud in plasma etching reactors at the moment when radio frequency (RF) power changes, that is, turning off and transition steps, was observed using the laser-light-scattering method. Two types of reactors, dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and the hybrid CCP/inductively coupled plasma (ICP), were set up for experiments. In the hybrid CCP/ICP reactor (hereafter ICP reactor), the position and shape of the cloud were strongly dependent on the RF frequency. The particle cloud becomes larger and approaches the electrode as the RF frequency increases. By turning the lower frequency power off later with a small delay time, the particle cloud is made to move away from the electrode. Maintaining lower frequency RF power only was also helpful to reduce the particle cloud size during this transition step. In the ICP reactor, a sufficient bias power is necessary to make a particle trap appear. A similar particle cloud to that in the CCP reactor was observed around the sheath region of the lower electrode. The authors can also use the low-frequency effect to move the particle cloud away from the substrate holder if two or more bias powers are applied to the substrate holder. The dependence of the particle behavior on the RF frequencies suggests that choosing the proper frequency at the right moment during RF power changes can reduce particle contamination effectively

  17. Effect of plasma physics on choices of first wall materials and structures for a thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, D.M.

    1975-01-01

    Impurity ions adversely affect the behavior of present-day tokamaks, and control of impurities is expected to be a key element in determining the feasibility of thermonuclear fusion reactors. The plasma-surface interactions for tokamaks and several techniques for controlling impurities are described. The plasma-surface problem of next generation devices PLT, PDX, DIII and TFTR is expected to be similar to those encountered in a reactor. For these devices calculations indicate that most of the particle energy efflux will be in the 1 keV region. Ironically this energy region has not yet been investigated thoroughly by the surface physicists

  18. Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, Raymond W.

    2012-07-30

    This project, Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine was established at the Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT). The associated CRADA was established with Campbell Applied Physics (CAP) located in El Dorado Hills, California. This project extends an earlier project involving both CAP and KIPT conducted under a separate CRADA. The initial project developed the basic Plasma Chemical Reactor (PCR) for generation of ozone gas. This project built upon the technology developed in the first project, greatly enhancing the output of the PCR while also improving reliability and system control.

  19. Some considerations on a plasma in the JAERI experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, T.; Yamato, H.; Maki, K.

    1976-01-01

    The preliminary analysis of the plasma characteristics for the JAERI tokamak experimental fusion reactor is reported. In order to make the reactor compact, the self-sustaining condition has been removed. Stationary heating by 200 keV neutral deuteron beam to maintain the power balance is applied expecting the power amplification by the TCT effect. The main parameters determined are power output of 100 MW, toroidal field on axis of 6 T, aspect ratio of 4.5 and major radius of 6.75 m. The results of the plasma power balance, fueling by means of the gas blanket scheme, power stabilization with feedback and the start-up are presented

  20. The reactor plasma physics of tandem mirror startup and fractional power operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantrowitz, F.D.; Firestone, M.A.; Guebel, D.M.; Mau, T.K.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma behavior and the performance of plasma technologies are studied during the startup and fractional power operation of tandem mirrors. Five phases of machine operation are identified, some of which require plasma. The plasma phases include plasma initiation and heating, a standby phase with plasma at the density and temperature characteristics of full design performance in reactors, a deuterium-tritium fractional power operating phase in which the fusion plasma undergoes staged power increases to full power, and rated power operating phase. Plasma initiation and heating uses electron cyclotron resonance heating preionization of background gas in the plug and ion cyclotron resonance heating in the central cell. Operation of the radio-frequency systems, the neutral beams, and the direct converter are studied to determine constraints affecting plasma operation. Studies of fractional power operation, carried out using a quasi-steady-state analysis, show that the plasma Q value can be made remarkably insensitive to the level of fusion power by controlling the plasma radius. Copper insert coils used to increase the maximum choke field require considerable power and cause the recirculating power fraction to increase sharply as the fusion power is reduced. Moreover, when an efficient drift pumping scheme is used, achieved improvements in plasma Q by using high-field choke coils must be weighed against their power consumption and other technological difficulties

  1. Plasma features and alpha particle transport in low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qiang; Wang Shaojie

    1997-06-01

    The results of the experiment and theory from low-aspect ratio tokamak devices have proved that the MHD stability will be improved. Based on present plasma physics and extrapolation to reduced aspect ratio, the feature of physics of low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor is discussed primarily. Alpha particle confinement and loss in the self-justified low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor parameters and the effect of alpha particle confinement and loss for different aspect ratio are calculated. The results provide a reference for the feasible research of compact tokamak reactor. (9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.)

  2. Voltage uniformity study in large-area reactors for RF plasma deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansonnens, L.; Pletzer, A.; Magni, D.; Howling, A.A.; Hollenstein, C. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP); Schmitt, J.P.M. [Balzers Process Systems, Palaiseau (France)

    1996-09-01

    Non-uniform voltage distribution across the electrode area results in inhomogeneous thin-film RF plasma deposition in large area reactors. In this work, a two-dimensional analytic model for the calculation of the voltage distribution across the electrode area is presented. The results of this model are in good agreement with measurements performed without plasma at 13.56 MHz and 70 MHz in a large area reactor. The principal voltage inhomogeneities are caused by logarithmic singularities in the vicinity of RF connections and not by standing waves. These singularities are only described by a two-dimensional model and cannot be intuitively predicted by analogy to a one-dimensional case. Plasma light emission measurements and thickness homogeneity studies of a-Si:H films show that the plasma reproduces these voltage inhomogeneities. Improvement of the voltage uniformity is investigated by changing the number and position of the RF connections. (author) 13 figs., 20 refs.

  3. Burning plasma simulation and environmental assessment of tokamak, spherical tokamak and helical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Uemura, S.; Oishi, T.; Arimoto, H.; Shoji, T.; Garcia, J.

    2009-01-01

    Reference 1-GWe DT reactors (tokamak TR-1, spherical tokamak ST-1 and helical HR-1 reactors) are designed using physics, engineering and cost (PEC) code, and their plasma behaviours with internal transport barrier operations are analysed using toroidal transport analysis linkage (TOTAL) code, which clarifies the requirement of deep penetration of pellet fuelling to realize steady-state advanced burning operation. In addition, economical and environmental assessments were performed using extended PEC code, which shows the advantage of high beta tokamak reactors in the cost of electricity (COE) and the advantage of compact spherical tokamak in life-cycle CO 2 emission reduction. Comparing with other electric power generation systems, the COE of the fusion reactor is higher than that of the fission reactor, but on the same level as the oil thermal power system. CO 2 reduction can be achieved in fusion reactors the same as in the fission reactor. The energy payback ratio of the high-beta tokamak reactor TR-1 could be higher than that of other systems including the fission reactor.

  4. Coatings and claddings for the reduction of plasma contamination and surface erosion in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminsky, M.

    1980-01-01

    For the successful operation of plasma devices and future fusion reactors it is necessary to control plasma impurity release and surface erosion. Effective methods to obtain such controls include the application of protective coatings to, and the use of clad materials for, certain first wall components. Major features of the development programs for coatings and claddings for fusion applications will be described together with an outline of the testing program. A discussion of some pertinent test results will be included

  5. Non-thermal particle acceleration in collisionless relativistic electron-proton reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Begelman, M. C.; Cerutti, B.; Nalewajko, K.

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic reconnection in relativistic collisionless plasmas can accelerate particles and power high-energy emission in various astrophysical systems. Whereas most previous studies focused on relativistic reconnection in pair plasmas, less attention has been paid to electron-ion plasma reconnection, expected in black hole accretion flows and relativistic jets. We report a comprehensive particle-in-cell numerical investigation of reconnection in an electron-ion plasma, spanning a wide range of ambient ion magnetizations σi, from the semirelativistic regime (ultrarelativistic electrons but non-relativistic ions, 10-3 ≪ σi ≪ 1) to the fully relativistic regime (both species are ultrarelativistic, σi ≫ 1). We investigate how the reconnection rate, electron and ion plasma flows, electric and magnetic field structures, electron/ion energy partitioning, and non-thermal particle acceleration depend on σi. Our key findings are: (1) the reconnection rate is about 0.1 of the Alfvénic rate across all regimes; (2) electrons can form concentrated moderately relativistic outflows even in the semirelativistic, small-σi regime; (3) while the released magnetic energy is partitioned equally between electrons and ions in the ultrarelativistic limit, the electron energy fraction declines gradually with decreased σi and asymptotes to about 0.25 in the semirelativistic regime; and (4) reconnection leads to efficient non-thermal electron acceleration with a σi-dependent power-law index, p(σ _i)˜eq const+0.7σ _i^{-1/2}. These findings are important for understanding black hole systems and lend support to semirelativistic reconnection models for powering non-thermal emission in blazar jets, offering a natural explanation for the spectral indices observed in these systems.

  6. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C.

    2001-01-01

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT (deuterium-tritium) fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D (Research and Development) avenues for their resolution are presented

  7. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C. [and others

    2001-01-10

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  8. Use of coaxial plasma guns to start up field-reversed-mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C. Jr.; Carlson, G.A.; Eddleman, J.L.; Hartman, C.W.; Neef, W.S. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Application of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for start-up of a field-reversed-mirror reactor is considered. The design is based on preliminary scaling laws and is compared to the design of the start-up gun used in the Beta II experiment

  9. Engineering solutions for components facing the plasma in experimental power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casini, G.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the engineering problems related to the structures in front of the plasma of experimental Tokamak-type reactors is made. Attention is focused on the so-named ''first wall'', i.e. the wall side of the blanket segments facing the plasma, and on the collector plates of the impurity control system, in particular for the case of the single-null poloidal divertor. Even if the uncertainties related to the plasma-wall interaction are stil relevant, some engineering solutions which look manageable are identified and described. (orig.)

  10. Low temperature plasma near a tokamak reactor limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.; Singer, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    Analytic and two-dimensional computational solutions for the plasma parameters near a toroidally symmetric limiter are illustrated for the projected parameters of a Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX). The temperature near the limiter plate is below 20 eV, except when the density 10 cm inside the limiter contact is 8 x 10 13 cm -3 or less and the thermal diffusivity in the edge region is 2 x 10 4 cm 2 /s or less. Extrapolation of recent experimental data suggests that neither of these conditions is likely to be met near ignition in TFCX, so a low plasma temperature near the limiter should be considered a likely possibility

  11. Pyrolysis treatment of waste tire powder in a capacitively coupled RF plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Waihuanxi Road, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, L. [Department of Civil Engineering, Guangzhou University, Waihuanxi Road, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2009-03-15

    A capacitively coupled radio-frequency (RF) plasma reactor was tested mainly for the purpose of solid waste treatment. It was found that using a RF input power between 1600 and 2000 W and a reactor pressure between 3000 and 8000 Pa (absolute pressure), a reactive plasma environment with a gas temperature between 1200 and 1800 K can be reached in this lab scale reactor. Under these conditions, pyrolysis of tire powder gave two product streams: a combustible gas and a pyrolytic char. The major components of the gas product are H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} The physical properties (surface area, porosity, and particle morphology) as well as chemical properties (elemental composition, heating value, and surface functional groups) of the pyrolytic char has also been examined. (author)

  12. Analysis of a gas-liquid film plasma reactor for organic compound oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Kevin [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Wang, Huijuan [School of Environmental and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Locke, Bruce R., E-mail: blocke@fsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Non-homogeneous filamentary plasma discharge formed along gas-liquid interface. • Hydrogen peroxide formed near interface favored over organic oxidation from liquid. • Post-plasma Fenton reactions lead to complete utilization of hydrogen peroxide. - Abstract: A pulsed electrical discharge plasma formed in a tubular reactor with flowing argon carrier gas and a liquid water film was analyzed using methylene blue as a liquid phase hydroxyl radical scavenger and simultaneous measurements of hydrogen peroxide formation. The effects of liquid flow rate, liquid conductivity, concentration of dye, and the addition of ferrous ion on dye decoloration and degradation were determined. Higher liquid flow rates and concentrations of dye resulted in less decoloration percentages and hydrogen peroxide formation due to initial liquid conductivity effects and lower residence times in the reactor. The highest decoloration energy yield of dye found in these studies was 5.2 g/kWh when using the higher liquid flow rate and adding the catalyst. The non-homogeneous nature of the plasma discharge favors the production of hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-liquid interface over the chemical oxidation of the organic in the bulk liquid phase and post-plasma reactions with the Fenton catalyst lead to complete utilization of the plasma-formed hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Non-thermal escape of molecular hydrogen from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacesa, M.; Zhang, P.; Kharchenko, V.

    2012-05-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of non-thermal escape of molecular hydrogen from Mars induced by collisions with hot atomic oxygen from the Martian corona. To accurately describe the energy transfer in O + H2(v, j) collisions, we performed extensive quantum-mechanical calculations of state-to-state elastic, inelastic, and reactive cross sections. The escape flux of H2 molecules was evaluated using a simplified 1D column model of the Martian atmosphere with realistic densities of atmospheric gases and hot oxygen production rates for low solar activity conditions. An average intensity of the non-thermal escape flux of H2 of 1.9 × 105 cm-2s-1 was obtained considering energetic O atoms produced in dissociative recombinations of O2+ ions. Predicted ro-vibrational distribution of the escaping H2 was found to contain a significant fraction of higher rotational states. While the non-thermal escape rate was found to be lower than Jeans rate for H2 molecules, the non-thermal escape rates of HD and D2 are significantly higher than their respective Jeans rates. The accurate evaluation of the collisional escape flux of H2 and its isotopes is important for understanding non-thermal escape of molecules from Mars, as well as for the formation of hot H2 Martian corona. The described molecular ejection mechanism is general and expected to contribute to atmospheric escape of H2 and other light molecules from planets, satellites, and exoplanetary bodies.

  14. Spectra of heliumlike krypton from tokamak fusion test reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitter, M.; Hsuan, H.; Bush, C.; Cohen, S.; Cummings, C.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Schivell, J.; Zarnstorff, M.; Smith, A.; Fraenkel, B.

    1993-04-01

    Krypton has been injected into ohmically-heated TFTR plasmas with peak electron temperatures of 6 key to study the effects of krypton on the plasma performance and to investigate the emitted krypton line radiation, which is of interest for future-generation tokamaks such as ITER, both as a diagnostic of the central ion temperature and for the control of energy release from the plasma by radiative cooling. The emitted radiation was monitored with a bolometer array, an X-ray pulse height analysis system, and a high-resolution Johann-type crystal spectrometer; and it was found to depend very sensitively on the electron temperature profile. Satellite spectra of heliumlike krypton, KrXXXV, near 0.95 Angstrom including lithiumlike, berylliumlike and boronlike features were recorded in second order Bragg reflection. Radiative cooling and reduced particle recycling at the plasma edge region were observed as a result of the krypton injection for all investigated discharges. The observations are in reasonable agreement with modeling calculations of the krypton ion charge state distribution including radial transport

  15. Toxic waste treatment with sliding centrifugal plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, J.; Pacheco, M.; Valdivia, R.; Ramos, F.; Duran, M.; Hidalgo, M.; Cruz, A.; Martinez, J. C.; Martinez, R.; De la Cruz, S.; Flores, T.; Vidal, E.; Escobar, S.; Garduno, M.; Garcia, M.; Portillo, J.; Torres, C.; Estrada, N.; Velazquez, S.; Vasquez, C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim is to develop technology for hazardous waste treatment, including the building and putting into operation of a prototype based on a sliding centrifugal plasma technology to demonstrate its ability to degradation taking in account the existing environmental standards. (Author)

  16. Fusion performance analysis of plasmas with reversed magnetic shear in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Synakowski, E.J.; Goeler, S. von; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    A case for substantial loss of fast ions degrading the performance of tokamak fusion test reactor plasmas [Phys. Plasmas 2, 2176 (1995)] with reversed magnetic shear (RS) is presented. The principal evidence is obtained from an experiment with short (40 - 70 ms) tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium beam heated RS plasmas [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 924 (1999)]. Modeling of this experiment indicates that up to 40% beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the beam - ion slowing down time. Critical parameters which connect modeling and experiment are: The total 14 MeV neutron emission, its radial profile, and the transverse stored energy. The fusion performance of some plasmas with internal transport barriers is further deteriorated by impurity accumulation in the plasma core. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  17. Mini-cavity plasma core reactors for dual-mode space nuclear power/propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, S.

    1976-01-01

    A mini-cavity plasma core reactor is investigated for potential use in a dual-mode space power and propulsion system. In the propulsive mode, hydrogen propellant is injected radially inward through the reactor solid regions and into the cavity. The propellant is heated by both solid driver fuel elements surrounding the cavity and uranium plasma before it is exhausted out the nozzle. The propellant only removes a fraction of the driver power, the remainder is transferred by a coolant fluid to a power conversion system, which incorporates a radiator for heat rejection. In the power generation mode, the plasma and propellant flows are shut off, and the driver elements supply thermal power to the power conversion system, which generates electricity for primary electric propulsion purposes

  18. Toroidal plasma reactor with low external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beklemishev, A.D.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Petviashvili, V.I.; Tajima, T.; Gordin, V.A.; Tajima, T.

    1991-01-01

    A toroidal pinch configuration with safety factor q < 0.5 decreasing from the center to periphery without field reversal is proposed. This is capable of containing high pressure plasma with only small toroidal external magnetic field. Sufficient conditions for magnetohydrodynamic stability are fulfilled in this configuration. The stability is studied by constructing the Lyapunov functional and investigating its extrema both analytically and numerically. Comparison of the Lyapunov stability conditions with the conventional linear theory is carried out. Stable configurations are found with average β near 15%, with magnetic field associated mainly with plasma current. The β value calculated with the external magnetic field can be over 100%. Fast charged particles produced by fusion reactions are asymmetrically confined by the poloidal magnetic field (and due to the lack of strong toroidal field). They thus generate a current in the noncentral part of plasma to reinforce the poloidal field. This current drive can sustain the monotonic decrease of q with radius. 20 refs., 9 figs

  19. Reactor aspects of counterstreaming-ion tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1975-06-01

    Toroidal DT plasmas in which the D and T ions make up two distinct, quasi-thermal velocity distributions, oppositely displaced in velocity along the magnetic axis, are discussed. Such counterstreaming distributions can be set up by introducing all ions by tangential injection of neutral beams, and by removing ions from the plasma shortly after they have decelerated to an energy approximate to or less than 2T/sub e/ by Coulomb drag on the plasma electrons. A simple physical model for counterstreaming-ion operation is postulated, which allows one to deduce the ion velocity distributions and required energy and particle confinement times that are in good agreement with the results of previous Fokker-Planck calculations. The variations of fusion reactivity, power gain, and power density with injection energy and electron temperature are presented. The practical problems of implementing counter-streaming operation in a tokamak, such as charge-exchange losses, the prompt removal of cold ions, and the effect of impurities are discussed. (U.S.)

  20. Toxic waste treatment with sliding centrifugal plasma reactor; Tratamiento de residuos toxicos con reactores de plasma centrifugo deslizante (PCD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, J.; Pacheco, M.; Valdivia, R.; Ramos, F.; Duran, M.; Hidalgo, M.; Cruz, A.; Martinez, J. C.; Martinez, R.; De la Cruz, S.; Flores, T.; Vidal, E.; Escobar, S. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garduno, M.; Garcia, M.; Portillo, J.; Torres, C.; Estrada, N.; Velazquez, S.; Vasquez, C. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Av. Instituto Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho la Virgen, Metepec 52140, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The aim is to develop technology for hazardous waste treatment, including the building and putting into operation of a prototype based on a sliding centrifugal plasma technology to demonstrate its ability to degradation taking in account the existing environmental standards. (Author)

  1. Nonthermal plasma reactors for the production of light hydrocarbon olefins from heavy oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prieto

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, nonthermal plasma technology was applied in many different fields, focusing attention on the destruction of harmful compounds in the air. This paper deals with nonthermal plasma reactors for the conversion of heavy oil into light hydrocarbon olefins, to be employed as gasoline components or to be added in small amounts for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide compounds in the treatment of exhaust gas at power plants. For the process, the plate-plate nonthermal plasma reactor driven by AC high voltage was selected. The reactor was modeled as a function of parameter characteristics, using the methodology provided by the statistical experimental design. The parameters studied were gap distance between electrodes, carrier gas flow and applied power. Results indicate that the reactions occurring in the process of heavy oil conversion have an important selective behavior. The products obtained were C1-C4 hydrocarbons with ethylene as the main compound. Operating the parameters of the reactor within the established operative window of the system and close to the optimum conditions, efficiencies as high as 70 (mul/joule were obtained. These values validate the process as an in-situ method to produce light olefins for the treatment of nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gas from diesel engines.

  2. Calculation of gas-flow in plasma reactor for carbon partial oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespala, Evgeny; Myshkin, Vyacheslav; Novoselov, Ivan; Pavliuk, Alexander; Makarevich, Semen; Bespala, Yuliya

    2018-03-01

    The paper discusses isotopic effects at carbon oxidation in low temperature non-equilibrium plasma at constant magnetic field. There is described routine of experiment and defined optimal parameters ensuring maximum enrichment factor at given electrophysical, gas-dynamic, and thermodymanical parameters. It has been demonstrated that at high-frequency generator capacity of 4 kW, supply frequency of 27 MHz and field density of 44 mT the concentration of paramagnetic heavy nuclei 13C in gaseous phase increases up to 1.78 % compared to 1.11 % for natural concentration. Authors explain isotopic effect decrease during plasmachemical separation induced by mixing gas flows enriched in different isotopes at the lack of product quench. With the help of modeling the motion of gas flows inside the plasma-chemical reactor based on numerical calculation of Navier-Stokes equation authors determine zones of gas mixing and cooling speed. To increase isotopic effects and proportion of 13C in gaseous phase it has been proposed to use quench in the form of Laval nozzle of refractory steel. The article represents results on calculation of optimal Laval Nozzle parameters for plasma-chemical reactor of chosen geometry of. There are also given dependences of quench time of products on pressure at the diffuser output and on critical section diameter. Authors determine the location of quench inside the plasma-chemical reactor in the paper.

  3. Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectroscopy diagnostic system for the study of non-thermal electrons at Aditya tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, S; Joisa, Y S; Raval, J V; Ghosh, J; Tanna, R; Shukla, B K; Bhatt, S B

    2014-11-01

    Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectrometer diagnostic was developed to study the non-thermal electron for Aditya tokamak plasma. The diagnostic was mounted on a radial mid plane port at the Aditya. The objective of diagnostic includes the estimation of the non-thermal electron temperature for the ohmically heated plasma. Bi-Maxwellian plasma model was adopted for the temperature estimation. Along with that the study of high Z impurity line radiation from the ECR pre-ionization experiments was also aimed. The performance and first experimental results from the new X-ray spectrometer system are presented.

  4. Experimental and numerical studies of microwave-plasma interaction in a MWPECVD reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Massaro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with and proposes a simple and compact diagnostic method able to characterize the interaction between microwave and plasma without the necessity of using an external diagnostic tool. The interaction between 2.45 GHz microwave and plasma, in a typical ASTeX-type reactor, is investigated from experimental and numerical view points. The experiments are performed by considering plasmas of three different gas mixtures: H2, CH4-H2 and CH4-H2-N2. The two latter are used to deposit synthetic undoped and n-doped diamond films. The experimental setup equipped with a matching network enables the measurements of very low reflected power. The reflected powers show ripples due to the mismatching between wave and plasma impedance. Specifically, the three types of plasma exhibit reflected power values related to the variation of electron-neutral collision frequency among the species by changing the gas mixture. The different gas mixtures studied are also useful to test the sensitivity of the reflected power measurements to the change of plasma composition. By means of a numerical model, only the interaction of microwave and H2 plasma is examined allowing the estimation of plasma and matching network impedances and of reflected power that is found about eighteen times higher than that measured.

  5. Dynamic behavior of plasma-facing materials during plasma instabilities in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.

    1997-01-01

    Damage to plasma-facing and nearby components due to plasma instabilities remains a major obstacle to a successful tokamak concept. The high energy deposited on facing materials during plasma instabilities can cause severe erosion, plasma contamination, and structural failure of these components. Erosion damage can take various forms such as surface vaporization, spallation, and liquid ejection of metallic materials. Comprehensive thermodynamic and radiation hydrodynamic codes have been developed, integrated, and used to evaluate the extent of various damage to plasma-facing and nearby components. The eroded and splashed materials will be transported and then redeposited elsewhere on other plasma-facing components. Detailed physics of plasma/solid-liquid/vapor interaction in a strong magnetic field have been developed, optimized, and implemented in a self-consistent model. The plasma energy deposited in the evolving divertor debris is quickly and intensely reradiated, which may cause severe erosion and melting of other nearby components. Factors that influence and reduce vapor-shielding efficiency such as vapor diffusion and turbulence are also discussed and evaluated

  6. Highly radiative plasmas for local transport studies and power and particle handling in reactor regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, K.W.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.

    1999-01-01

    To study the applicability of artificially enhanced impurity radiation for mitigation of the plasma-limiter interaction in reactor regimes, krypton and xenon gases were injected into TFTR supershots and high-l i plasmas. At neutral beam injection (NBI) powers P B ≥ 30 MW, carbon influxes (blooms) were suppressed, leading to improved energy confinement and neutron production in both D and DT plasmas, and the highest DT fusion energy production (7.6 MJ) in a TFTR pulse. Comparisons of the measured radiated power profiles with predictions of the MIST impurity transport code have guided studies of highly-radiative plasmas in ITER. The response of the electron and ion temperatures to greatly increased radiative losses from the electrons was used to study thermal transport mechanisms. (author)

  7. Highly radiative plasmas for local transport studies and power and particle handling in reactor regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, K.W.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.

    2001-01-01

    To study the applicability of artificially enhanced impurity radiation for mitigation of the plasma-limiter interaction in reactor regimes, krypton and xenon gases were injected into TFTR supershots and high-l i plasmas. At neutral beam injection (NBI) powers P B ≤30MW, carbon influxes (blooms) were suppressed, leading to improved energy confinement and neutron production in both D and DT plasmas, and the highest DT fusion energy production (7.6 MJ) in a TFTR pulse. Comparisons of the measured radiated power profiles with predictions of the MIST impurity transport code have guided studies of highly-radiative plasmas in ITER. The response of the electron and ion temperatures to greatly increased radiative losses from the electrons was used to study thermal transport mechanisms. (author)

  8. The development of beryllium plasma spray technology for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Elliott, K.E.; Hollis, K.J.; Watson, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Over the past five years, four international parties, which include the European Communities, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States, have been collaborating on the design and development of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the next generation magnetic fusion energy device. During the ITER Engineering Design Activity (EDA), beryllium plasma spray technology was investigated by Los Alamos National Laboratory as a method for fabricating and repairing and the beryllium first wall surface of the ITER tokamak. Significant progress has been made in developing beryllium plasma spraying technology for this application. Information will be presented on the research performed to improve the thermal properties of plasma sprayed beryllium coatings and a method that was developed for cleaning and preparing the surface of beryllium prior to depositing plasma sprayed beryllium coatings. Results of high heat flux testing of the beryllium coatings using electron beam simulated ITER conditions will also be presented

  9. Modelling of flow stabilization by the swirl of a peripheral flow as applied to plasma reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volchkov, E.P.; Lebedev, V.P.; Terekhov, V.I.; Shishkin, N.E.

    2000-01-01

    The gas-swirl stabilization of plasma jets is one of effective methods of its retention in the near-axial area of channels in generators of low-temperature plasma. Except the effect of gas-dynamic compression, the peripheral swirl allows to solve another urgent problem - to protect the reactor walls from the heat influence of the plasma jet. Swirl flows are also used for the flow structure formation and control of the heat and gas-dynamic characteristics of different power devices and apparatuses, using high-temperature working media: in swirl furnaces and burners, in aviation engines, etc. Investigations show that during swirl stabilization the gas-dynamic structure of the flow influences significantly the spatial stability of the plasma column and its characteristics

  10. Non-thermal production of pure hydrogen from biomass : HYVOLUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, P.A.M.; Vrije, de G.J.

    2006-01-01

    HYVOLUTION is the acronym of an Integrated Project ¿Non-thermal production of pure hydrogen from biomass¿ which has been granted in the Sixth EU Framework Programme on Research, Technological Development and Demonstration, Priority 6.1.ii, Sustainable Energy Systems. The aim of HYVOLUTION:

  11. Ultrafast Non-Thermal Electron Dynamics in Single Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novoselov K.S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the ultrafast dynamics of non-thermal electron relaxation in graphene upon impulsive excitation. The 10-fs resolution two color pump-probe allows us to unveil the non-equilibrium electron gas decay at early times.

  12. Atomic and molecular physics of plasma-based environmental technologies for abatement of volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B. M.; Hsiao, M. C.; Bardsley, J. N.; Merritt, B. T.; Vogtin, G. E.; Kuthi, A.; Burkhart, C. P.; Bayless, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques represent a new generation of air emission control technology that potentially could treat large-volume emissions containing dilute concentrations of volatile organic compounds. In order to apply non-thermal plasmas in an industrial scale, it is important to establish the electrical power requirements and byproducts of the process.There is a need for reliable data concerning the primary decomposition mechanisms and subsequent chemical kinetics associated with non- thermal plasma processing of volatile organic compounds. There are many basic atomic and molecular physics issues that are essential in evaluating the economic performance of non-thermal plasma reactors. These studies are important in understanding how the input electrical power is dissipated in the plasma and how efficiently it is converted to the production of the plasma species (radicals, ions or electrons) responsible for the decomposition of the volatile organic compounds. This paper will present results from basic experimental and theoretical studies aimed at identifying the reaction mechanisms responsible for the primary decomposition of various types of volatile organic compounds. (authors)

  13. Interactions between plasma and wall materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, L.; Moser, L.

    2016-11-01

    First mirrors of optical diagnostics in ITER were exposed in Magnum-PSI linear plasma device and JET-ILW tokamak. For JET-ILW the mirrors with a rhodium (Rh) or a molybdenum (Mo) coating exhibited a decrease of the reflectivity according the location in the torus and especially the amount of beryllium (Be) deposited on them. No delamination of the coated reflective film was observed. Under very harsh erosion conditions in Magnum-PSI, Rh thick coated mock ups, cooled or not, for a high flux exposure the films underwent delamination. Mo coating on water cooled mock up mirrors exhibited a high diffuse reflectivity after H 2 /Ar plasma exposure inducing an important decrease of the specular reflectivity and show important oxidation of the surface. Cleaning of mirrors was extensively studied during this period, with magnetic field in collaboration with the SPC Lausanne, or in term of repetitive cleaning till 34 cycles. Polycrystalline molybdenum mirror shows a high diffuse reflectivity after cleaning cycle and clearly demonstrate that they are not suitable for this purpose. Coated Rh or Mo mirrors like single crystal maintained good reflectivity. Test under magnetic field revealed the non-uniform erosion of the mirrors according the orientation between the field and the mirror. All these tests bring to a suitable schematic of the implementation of this technique in ITER and were deeply explained. The cleaning of the Be contaminated mirrors will be carried out using new parameters in December 2016. Investigations on formation of tungsten fuzz were carried out either in Basel using a new setup or in Pilot-PSI. These thickness measurements showed the fuzz growth is in square root dependence to time or fluence. From the results in Pilot-PSI, it has been shown that time was a critical parameter for the development of He-induced morphology changes and one needs to keep that factor in mind. (authors)

  14. Treatment of Dye Wastewater by Using a Hybrid Gas/Liquid Pulsed Discharge Plasma Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Na; Li Jie; Wu Yan; Masayuki, Sato

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid gas/liquid pulsed discharge plasma reactor using a porous ceramic tube is proposed for dye wastewater treatment. High voltage pulsed discharge plasma was generated in the gas phase and simultaneously the plasma channel was permeated through the tiny holes of the ceramic tube into the water phase accompanied by gas bubbles. The porous ceramic tube not only separated the gas phase and liquid phase but also offered an effective plasma spreading channel. The effects of the peak pulse voltage, additive gas varieties, gas bubbling rate, solution conductivity and TiO 2 addition were investigated. The results showed that this reactor was effective for dye wastewater treatment. The decoloration efficiency of Acid Orange II was enhanced with an increase in the power supplied. Under the studied conditions, 97% of Acid Orange II in aqueous solution was effectively decolored with additive oxygen gas, which was 51% higher than that with argon gas, and the increasing O 2 bubbling rate also benefited the decoloration of dye wastewater. Water conductivity had a small effect on the level of decoloration. Catalysis of TiO 2 could be induced by the pulsed discharge plasma and addition of TiO 2 aided the decoloration of Acid Orange II.

  15. Simulation of MHD instability effects on burning plasma transport with ITB in tokamak and helical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Yamada, I.; Taniguchi, S.; Oishi, T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The high performance plasma behavior is required to realize economic and environmental-friendly fusion reactors compatible with conventional power plant systems. To improve plasma confinement, the formation of internal transport barrier (ITB) is anticipated, and its behavior is analyzed by the simulation code TOTAL (Toroidal Transport Linkage Analysis). This TOTAL code comprises a 2- or 3-dimensional equilibrium and 1-dimensional predictive transport code for both tokamak and helical systems. In the tokamak code TOTAL-T, the external current drive, bootstrap current, sawtooth oscillation, ballooning mode and neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) analyses are included. The steady-state burning plasma operation is achieved by the feedback control of pellet injection fuelling and external heating power control. The impurity dynamics of iron and tungsten is also included in this code. The NTM effects are evaluated using the modified Rutherford Model with the stabilization of the ECCD current drive. The excitation of m=2/n=1 NTM leads to the 20 % reduction in the central temperature in ITER-like reactors. Recently, the external non-resonant helical field application is analyzed and its stabilization properties are evaluated. The pellet injection effects on ITB formation is also clarified in tokamak and helical plasmas. Relationship between sawtooth oscillation and impurity ejection is recently simulated in comparison with experimental data. In this conference, we will show above-stated new results on MHD instability effects on burning plasma transport. (author)

  16. Preliminary study on power balance in the plasma of an experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, Tatsuzo; Yamato, Harumi

    1976-03-01

    The preliminary study on power balance in the plasma is described in the first-stage design of an experimental fusion reactor. The purpose is to show the ranges of plasma parameters for the design output of about 100 MW with an injection power less than 50 MW. The impurity is permitted to the extent of Zsub(eff) -- 5 to meet the design requirement. Influences of the uncertainty in scaling law on the power output and injection power are discussed, and also possibility of the self-ignition. (auth.)

  17. The effect of reactor geometry on the synthesis of graphene materials in plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavelkina, M. B.; Amirov, R. H.; Shatalova, T. B.

    2017-05-01

    The possibility of synthesis of graphene and graphane (hydrogenated graphene) using the decomposition of hydrocarbons by thermal plasma has been investigated. Investigations of the influence of the plasma-forming gas on the efficiency of synthesis and the morphology of graphene materials were carried out. The synthesis products have been characterized by the methods of scanning microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermal analysis. It is found that the morphology of graphene materials is affected by the geometry of the reactor. It was demonstrated that the obtained graphene materials are uniformly distributed in the volume of plastic based on cyanate ester resins under mixing.

  18. A syncopated leap-frog algorithm for orbit consistent plasma simulation of materials processing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, J.W.; Leboeuf, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    The authors present a particle algorithm to extend simulation capabilities for plasma based materials processing reactors. The orbit integrator uses a syncopated leap-frog algorithm in cylindrical coordinates, which maintains second order accuracy, and minimizes computational complexity. Plasma source terms are accumulated orbit consistently directly in the frequency and azimuthal mode domains. Finally they discuss the numerical analysis of this algorithm. Orbit consistency greatly reduces the computational cost for a given level of precision. The computational cost is independent of the degree of time scale separation

  19. Plasma flow reactor for steady state monitoring of physical and chemical processes at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroglu, Batikan; Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael R; Crowhurst, Jonathan C; Weisz, David G; Zaug, Joseph M; Dai, Zurong; Radousky, Harry B; Chernov, Alex; Ramon, Erick; Stavrou, Elissaios; Knight, Kim; Fabris, Andrea L; Cappelli, Mark A; Rose, Timothy P

    2017-09-01

    We present the development of a steady state plasma flow reactor to investigate gas phase physical and chemical processes that occur at high temperature (1000 flow injector). We have modeled the system using computational fluid dynamics simulations that are bounded by measured temperatures. In situ line-of-sight optical emission and absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine the structures and concentrations of molecules formed during rapid cooling of reactants after they pass through the plasma. Emission spectroscopy also enables us to determine the temperatures at which these dynamic processes occur. A sample collection probe inserted from the open end of the reactor is used to collect condensed materials and analyze them ex situ using electron microscopy. The preliminary results of two separate investigations involving the condensation of metal oxides and chemical kinetics of high-temperature gas reactions are discussed.

  20. Hydrogen Generation by Koh-Ethanol Plasma Electrolysis Using Double Compartement Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksono, Nelson; Sasiang, Johannes; Dewi Rosalina, Chandra; Budikania, Trisutanti

    2018-03-01

    This study has successfully investigated the generation of hydrogen using double compartment reactor with plasma electrolysis process. Double compartment reactor is designed to achieve high discharged voltage, high concentration, and also reduce the energy consumption. The experimental results showed the use of double compartment reactor increased the productivity ratio 90 times higher compared to Faraday electrolysis process. The highest hydrogen production obtained is 26.50 mmol/min while the energy consumption can reach up 1.71 kJ/mmol H2 at 0.01 M KOH solution. It was shown that KOH concentration, addition of ethanol, cathode depth, and temperature have important effects on hydrogen production, energy consumption, and process efficiency.

  1. Integrated CFD Model for Nanoparticle Production in Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactor: Implementation and Application

    OpenAIRE

    Benros Santos Lopes, Silvania

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles represent a very exciting new area of research. Their small size, ranging from several nanometers to tens of nanometers, is responsible for many changes in the structural, thermal, electromagnetic, optical and mechanical properties in comparison with the bulk solid of the same materials. However, promoting the use of such material requires well-controlled synthesis techniques to be developed. Inductively coupled thermal plasma (ICTP) reactors have been shown to offer unique adva...

  2. Phenomena of non-thermal electrons from the X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on J-TEXT tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Chen, Z.Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Jin, W. [Center of Interface Dynamics for Sustainability, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu 610200, Sichuan (China); Huang, D.W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Lee, S.G.; Shi, Y.J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Tong, R.H.; Wang, S.Y.; Wei, Y.N.; Ma, T.K.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Some lines from X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) can be enhanced by non-thermal electrons, such as q, r satellite lines and z lines. • Analyze the non-thermal phenomena can reduce the error of electron temperature deduced from the intensity ratio of different lines of the He-like argon spectra from XICS. • XICS can be a tool to measure the non-thermal phenomena from these enhanced lines. - Abstract: A high spectra resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been implemented on J-TEXT Tokamak for the measurements of K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. The wavelength range of K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon is from 3.9494 Å to 3.9944 Å that includes the resonance line w, intercombination lines x and y, forbidden line z and numerous satellite lines, referenced using standard Gabriel notation. In low-density discharge, the intensity of q, r satellite lines and z lines can be significantly enhanced by non-thermal electrons. Non-thermal electrons are produced due to the low plasma density. The high hard X-ray flux from NaI detector and significant downshift electron cyclotron emissions from energetic runaway electrons also indicated that there is a large population of runaway electrons in the low-density discharge. The non-thermal part of electrons can affect the excitation/transition equilibrium or ionization/recombination equilibrium. The q line is mainly produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon, and the r line is partially produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon and dielectronic recombination of helium-like argon.

  3. Phenomena of non-thermal electrons from the X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on J-TEXT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z.Y.; Jin, W.; Huang, D.W.; Lee, S.G.; Shi, Y.J.; Tong, R.H.; Wang, S.Y.; Wei, Y.N.; Ma, T.K.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Some lines from X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) can be enhanced by non-thermal electrons, such as q, r satellite lines and z lines. • Analyze the non-thermal phenomena can reduce the error of electron temperature deduced from the intensity ratio of different lines of the He-like argon spectra from XICS. • XICS can be a tool to measure the non-thermal phenomena from these enhanced lines. - Abstract: A high spectra resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been implemented on J-TEXT Tokamak for the measurements of K_α spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. The wavelength range of K_α spectra of helium-like argon is from 3.9494 Å to 3.9944 Å that includes the resonance line w, intercombination lines x and y, forbidden line z and numerous satellite lines, referenced using standard Gabriel notation. In low-density discharge, the intensity of q, r satellite lines and z lines can be significantly enhanced by non-thermal electrons. Non-thermal electrons are produced due to the low plasma density. The high hard X-ray flux from NaI detector and significant downshift electron cyclotron emissions from energetic runaway electrons also indicated that there is a large population of runaway electrons in the low-density discharge. The non-thermal part of electrons can affect the excitation/transition equilibrium or ionization/recombination equilibrium. The q line is mainly produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon, and the r line is partially produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon and dielectronic recombination of helium-like argon.

  4. High-frequency irreversible electroporation (H-FIRE for non-thermal ablation without muscle contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arena Christopher B

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Therapeutic irreversible electroporation (IRE is an emerging technology for the non-thermal ablation of tumors. The technique involves delivering a series of unipolar electric pulses to permanently destabilize the plasma membrane of cancer cells through an increase in transmembrane potential, which leads to the development of a tissue lesion. Clinically, IRE requires the administration of paralytic agents to prevent muscle contractions during treatment that are associated with the delivery of electric pulses. This study shows that by applying high-frequency, bipolar bursts, muscle contractions can be eliminated during IRE without compromising the non-thermal mechanism of cell death. Methods A combination of analytical, numerical, and experimental techniques were performed to investigate high-frequency irreversible electroporation (H-FIRE. A theoretical model for determining transmembrane potential in response to arbitrary electric fields was used to identify optimal burst frequencies and amplitudes for in vivo treatments. A finite element model for predicting thermal damage based on the electric field distribution was used to design non-thermal protocols for in vivo experiments. H-FIRE was applied to the brain of rats, and muscle contractions were quantified via accelerometers placed at the cervicothoracic junction. MRI and histological evaluation was performed post-operatively to assess ablation. Results No visual or tactile evidence of muscle contraction was seen during H-FIRE at 250 kHz or 500 kHz, while all IRE protocols resulted in detectable muscle contractions at the cervicothoracic junction. H-FIRE produced ablative lesions in brain tissue that were characteristic in cellular morphology of non-thermal IRE treatments. Specifically, there was complete uniformity of tissue death within targeted areas, and a sharp transition zone was present between lesioned and normal brain. Conclusions H-FIRE is a feasible technique for

  5. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l i ). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q a ∼ 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l i plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q 0 > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions

  6. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Tri Nugroho

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production has received considerable attention in the recent past as a renewable fuel. The production of biodiesel by conventional transesterification process employs alkali or acid catalyst and has been industrially accepted for its high conversion and reaction rates. However for alkali catalyst, there may be risk of free acid or water contamination and soap formation is likely to take place which makes the separation process difficult. Although yield is high, the acids, being corrosive, may cause damage to the equipment and the reaction rate was also observed to be low. This research focuses on empirical modeling and optimization for the biodiesel production over plasma reactor. The plasma reactor technology is more promising than the conventional catalytic processes due to the reducing reaction time and easy in product separation. Copyright (c 2009 by BCREC. All Rights reserved.[Received: 10 August 2009, Revised: 5 September 2009, Accepted: 12 October 2009][How to Cite: I. Istadi, D.D. Anggoro, P. Marwoto, S. Suherman, B.T. Nugroho (2009. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(1: 23-31. doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.1.23.23-31][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.1.23.23-31

  7. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi Istadi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production has received considerable attention in the recent past as a renewable fuel. The production of biodiesel by conventional transesterification process employs alkali or acid catalyst and has been industrially accepted for its high conversion and reaction rates. However for alkali catalyst, there may be risk of free acid or water contamination and soap formation is likely to take place which makes the separation process difficult. Although yield is high, the acids, being corrosive, may cause damage to the equipment and the reaction rate was also observed to be low. This research focuses on empirical modeling and optimization for the biodiesel production over plasma reactor. The plasma reactor technology is more promising than the conventional catalytic processes due to the reducing reaction time and easy in product separation. Copyright (c 2009 by BCREC. All Rights reserved.[Received: 10 August 2009, Revised: 5 September 2009, Accepted: 12 October 2009][How to Cite: I. Istadi, D.D. Anggoro, P. Marwoto, S. Suherman, B.T. Nugroho (2009. Biodiesel Production from Vegetable Oil over Plasma Reactor: Optimization of Biodiesel Yield using Response Surface Methodology. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(1: 23-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.1.7115.23-31][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.1.7115.23-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7115

  8. Production of Monodisperse Nanoparticles and Application of Discrete-Monodisperse Model in Plasma Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Kyo-Seon; Zhao, Qian-Qiu

    2003-01-01

    The particle growth in plasma reactor were investigated by using the discrete-monodisperse (D-M) model for various process conditions. The monodisperse large sized particle distribution predicted by the D-M model are in good agreement with the large sized particles by the discrete-sectional model and also in the experiments by Shiratani et al. (1996). Some fractions of the small size particles are in a neutral state or even charged positively, but most of the large sized monodisperse particles are charged negatively. As the mass generation rate of monomers increases, the large sized particles grow more quickly and the production rate of nanoparticles of 100nm by plasma reactor increases. As the initial electron concentration or the monomer diameter increases, it takes longer time for the large sized particles to grow up to 100nm, but the large sized particle concentration of 100nm increases and the resulting production rate of large sized particles of 100nm increases. As the residence time increases, the time for the large sized particles to grow up to 100nm decreases and the large sized particle concentration of 100nm increases and, as a result, the production rate of large sized particles of 100nm increases. We propose that the plasma reactor can be a good candidate to produce monodisperse nanoparticles

  9. Diffuse plasma treatment of polyamide 66 fabric in atmospheric pressure air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lee; Peng, Ming-yang; Teng, Yun; Gao, Guozhen

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A cylindrical-electrode nanosecond-pulse diffuse-discharge reactor is presented. • Large-scale non-thermal plasmas were generated steadily in atmospheric air. • Treated PA66 fabric is etched with oxygen-containing group increases. • The hydrophily of treated PA66 fabric improves effectively. • Extending the treatment time is a method to reduce the treatment frequency. - Abstract: The polyamide 66 (PA66) fabrics are hard to be colored or glued in industrial production due to the poor hydrophily. Diffuse plasma is a kind of non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure in air. This paper proposes that large-scale diffuse plasma generated between wire electrodes can be employed for improving the hydrophily of PA66 fabrics. A repetitive nanosecond-pulse diffuse-discharge reactor using a cylindrical wire electrode configuration is presented, which can generate large-scale non-thermal plasmas steadily at atmospheric pressure without any barrier dielectric. Then the reactor is used to treat PA66 fabrics in different discharge conditions. The hydrophilicity property of modified PA66 is measured by wicking test method. The modified PA66 is also analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to prove the surface changes in physical microstructure and chemical functional groups, respectively. What's more, the effects of treatment time and treatment frequency on surface modification are investigated and discussed.

  10. Flow reactor studies of non-equilibrium plasma-assisted oxidation of n-alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolas, Nicholas; Lee, Jong Guen; Yetter, Richard A

    2015-08-13

    The oxidation of n-alkanes (C1-C7) has been studied with and without the effects of a nanosecond, non-equilibrium plasma discharge at 1 atm pressure from 420 to 1250 K. Experiments have been performed under nearly isothermal conditions in a flow reactor, where reactive mixtures are diluted in Ar to minimize temperature changes from chemical reactions. Sample extraction performed at the exit of the reactor captures product and intermediate species and stores them in a multi-position valve for subsequent identification and quantification using gas chromatography. By fixing the flow rate in the reactor and varying the temperature, reactivity maps for the oxidation of fuels are achieved. Considering all the fuels studied, fuel consumption under the effects of the plasma is shown to have been enhanced significantly, particularly for the low-temperature regime (T<800 K). In fact, multiple transitions in the rates of fuel consumption are observed depending on fuel with the emergence of a negative-temperature-coefficient regime. For all fuels, the temperature for the transition into the high-temperature chemistry is lowered as a consequence of the plasma being able to increase the rate of fuel consumption. Using a phenomenological interpretation of the intermediate species formed, it can be shown that the active particles produced from the plasma enhance alkyl radical formation at all temperatures and enable low-temperature chain branching for fuels C3 and greater. The significance of this result demonstrates that the plasma provides an opportunity for low-temperature chain branching to occur at reduced pressures, which is typically observed at elevated pressures in thermal induced systems. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of EDTA contained reactor coolant using water dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sang Heon; Kwon, Daniel; Kim, Gon Ho

    2005-01-01

    EDTA (Ethylene Diamine Tetraacetic Acid) is used as a main absorbent for the metal ion in the secondary loop of the nuclear reactor. Dissolving the wasted EDTA with low cost, therefore, is important issue for the maintenance of the nuclear power reactor and the protection of environment. EDTA is not easily biodegradable, furthermore these methods could make remained another pollutant as complex chemical compounds. Compared to chemical method, the physical methods, using the energetic particles and UVs, are more favorable because they dissociate the bonds of organic compounds directly without the secondary chemical reactions during the treatment. Recently, high energy electron beam, the plasma torch, and the water breakdown by high voltage pulse are applied to treatment of the waste water contained chemicals. Here consideration is narrow down to improve the interaction between the plasma and the chemical bonds of EDTA because the energetic particles; activated radicals, and UVs, are abundant in plasmas. The new method adapted of the water DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) which plasma generates directly on the top of the water contained EDTA is proposed. The application of DBD plasmas has been extended for cleaning the organic compounds from the contaminated surface and also for removing volatile organic chemicals (VOC) such as NO x and SO x from the exhausted gases. Here, the water DBD reactor (SEMTECH, SD-DWG-04-1) is consisted that the one electrode is a ceramic insulator and another one is the water itself. Interestingly, the one electrode, the water, is not the solid dielectric electrode. In this study, therefore, the characteristics with driving frequency are considered and the feasibility of this new method for the DBD treatment of EDTA contained water is demonstrated

  12. Assessment of quasi-linear effect of RF power spectrum for enabling lower hybrid current drive in reactor plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, Roberto; Cardinali, Alessandro; Castaldo, Carmine; Amicucci, Luca; Ceccuzzi, Silvio; Galli, Alessandro; Napoli, Francesco; Panaccione, Luigi; Santini, Franco; Schettini, Giuseppe; Tuccillo, Angelo Antonio

    2017-10-01

    The main research on the energy from thermonuclear fusion uses deuterium plasmas magnetically trapped in toroidal devices. To suppress the turbulent eddies that impair thermal insulation and pressure tight of the plasma, current drive (CD) is necessary, but tools envisaged so far are unable accomplishing this task while efficiently and flexibly matching the natural current profiles self-generated at large radii of the plasma column [1-5]. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) [6] can satisfy this important need of a reactor [1], but the LHCD system has been unexpectedly mothballed on JET. The problematic extrapolation of the LHCD tool at reactor graded high values of, respectively, density and temperatures of plasma has been now solved. The high density problem is solved by the FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) method [7], and solution of the high temperature one is presented here. Model results based on quasi-linear (QL) theory evidence the capability, w.r.t linear theory, of suitable operating parameters of reducing the wave damping in hot reactor plasmas. Namely, using higher RF power densities [8], or a narrower antenna power spectrum in refractive index [9,10], the obstacle for LHCD represented by too high temperature of reactor plasmas should be overcome. The former method cannot be used for routinely, safe antenna operations, Thus, only the latter key is really exploitable in a reactor. The proposed solutions are ultimately necessary for viability of an economic reactor.

  13. Plasma-catalytic decomposition of TCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, A.; Morent, R.; De Geyter, N.; Leys, C. [Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium). Dept. of Applied Physics; Tuan, N.D.M.; Giraudon, J.M.; Lamonier, J.F. [Univ. des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Villeneuve (France). Dept. de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide

    2010-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are gaseous pollutants that pose an environmental hazard due to their high volatility and their possible toxicity. Conventional technologies to reduce the emission of VOCs have their advantages, but they become cost-inefficient when low concentrations have to be treated. In the past 2 decades, non-thermal plasma technology has received growing attention as an alternative and promising remediation method. Non-thermal plasmas are effective because they produce a series of strong oxidizers such as ozone, oxygen radicals and hydroxyl radicals that provide a reactive chemical environment in which VOCs are completely oxidized. This study investigated whether the combination of NTP and catalysis could improve the energy efficiency and the selectivity towards carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Trichloroethylene (TCE) was decomposed by non-thermal plasma generated in a DC-excited atmospheric pressure glow discharge. The production of by-products was qualitatively investigated through FT-IR spectrometry. The results were compared with those from a catalytic reactor. The removal rate of TCE reached a maximum of 78 percent at the highest input energy. The by-products of TCE decomposition were CO{sub 2}, carbon monoxide (CO) hydrochloric acid (HCl) and dichloroacetylchloride. Combining the plasma system with a catalyst located in an oven downstream resulted in a maximum removal of 80 percent, at an energy density of 300 J/L, a catalyst temperature of 373 K and a total air flow rate of 2 slm. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  14. In situ Raman spectroscopy for growth monitoring of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes in plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbaye, T.; Gaillard, M.; Lecas, T.; Kovacevic, E.; Boulmer-Leborgne, Ch.; Guimbretière, G. [GREMI, Université-CNRS, BP6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Canizarès, A.; Raimboux, N.; Simon, P.; Ammar, M. R., E-mail: mohamed-ramzi.ammar@cnrs-orleans.fr [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Strunskus, T. [Institute of Material Science, Chritian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2014-11-24

    Portable and highly sensitive Raman setup was associated with a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor enabling in situ growth monitoring of multi-wall carbon nanotubes despite the combination of huge working distance, high growth speed and process temperature and reactive plasma condition. Near Edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used for ex situ sample analysis as a complementary method to in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results confirmed the fact that the “alternating” method developed here can accurately be used for in situ Raman monitoring under reactive plasma condition. The original analytic tool can be of great importance to monitor the characteristics of these nanostructured materials and readily define the ultimate conditions for targeted results.

  15. Some non-thermal microbial inactivation methods in dairy products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yangilar, F.; Kabil, E.

    2013-01-01

    During the production of dairy products, some thermal processes such as pasteurization and sterilization are used commonly to inactive microorganisms. But as a result of thermal processes, loss of nutrient and aroma, non-enzymatic browning and organoleptic differentiation especially in dairy products are seen. Because of this, alternative methods are needed to provide microbial inactivation and as major problems are caused by high temperatures, non-thermal processes are focused on. For this purpose, some methods such as high pressure (HP), pulsed light (PL), ultraviolet radiation (UV), supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) or pulsed electric field (PEF) are used in food. These methods products are processed in ambient temperature and so not only mentioned losses are minimized but also freshness and naturality of products can be preserved. In this work, we will try to be given information about methods of non-thermal microbial inactivation of dairy products. (author) [tr

  16. Some perspectives in nuclear astrophysics on non-thermal phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatischeff, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this HDR (Accreditation to Supervise Researches) report, the author presents and comments his research activities on nuclear phenomena in stellar eruptions (solar eruptions, lithium nucleosynthesis in stellar eruptions), on particle acceleration in shock waves of stellar explosions (diffusive acceleration by shock wave, particle acceleration in symbiotic novae, particle acceleration in radio-detected supernovae), of research on low energy cosmic rays (galactic emission of nuclear gamma rays, non thermal soft X rays as new tracer of accelerated particles), and on the origin of short period radioactivities in the primitive solar system (extinguished radio-activities and formation of the solar system, origin of berylium-10 in the primitive solar system). The author concludes with some perspectives on non thermal phenomena in nuclear astrophysics, and on research and development for the future of medium-energy gamma astronomy [fr

  17. Non-thermal leptogenesis after Majoron hilltop inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antusch, Stefan; Marschall, Kenneth

    2018-05-01

    We analyse non-thermal leptogenesis after models of Majoron hilltop inflation, where the scalar field that provides masses for the right-handed neutrinos and sneutrinos via its vacuum expectation value acts as the inflaton. We discuss different realisations of Majoron inflation models with different hilltop shapes and couplings to the right-handed (s)neutrinos. To study the non-thermally produced baryon asymmetry in these models, we numerically solve the relevant Boltzmann equations. In contrast to previous studies, we include the effects from resonant sneutrino particle production during preheating. We find that these effects can result in an enhancement of the produced baryon asymmetry by more than an order of magnitude. This can significantly change the favoured parameter regions of these models.

  18. Plasma-materials interaction issues for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; Werley, K.A.

    1992-02-01

    Analysis of proposed operating scenarios for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor has yielded predictions for the power and particle fluxes onto the material surfaces facing the plasma. The particles, mostly deuterium, tritium, and helium ions, would have energies in the range of 50--2000 eV and fluxes up to 5 x 10 23 /m 2 s. Lower fluxes of multi-MeV electrons and alpha particles may also strike the plasma-facing surfaces, primarily during transient events. The peak power fluxes onto the plasma-facing surfaces during normal operation are expected to be 5--100 MW/m 2 , but much higher during transient events. At the extreme conditions expected for steady-state operation, commonly used heat-removal structures are unable to withstand either the high sputter erosion rates or power loads. To reduce the time-averaged power flux, active control of the plasma position is specified to sweep the plasma heat load across larger areas of plasma-facing components. However, the cyclic heat load creates fatigue lifetime problems. Solutions to these lifetime and reliability problems by (1) changes in machine design and operation, (2) redeposition mechanisms, and (3) changes in materials, will be discussed. A proposed accelerated-life test facility for prototype divertor plate development is described

  19. Atomic and molecular physics of plasma-based environmental technologies for abatement of volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.; Merrit, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Kuthi, A.; Burkhart, C.P.; Bayless, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques represent a new generation of air emission control technology that potentially could treat large-volume emissions containing dilute concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In order to apply non-thermal in an industrial scale, it is important to establish the electrical power requirements and byproducts of the process. There is a need for reliable data concerning the primary decomposition mechanisms and subsequent chemical kinetics associated with non-thermal plasma processing of VOCs. There are many basic atomic and molecular physics issues that are essential in evaluating the economic performance of non-thermal plasma reactor. These studies are important in understanding how the input electrical power is dissipated in the plasma and how efficiency it is converted to the production of the plasma species (radicals, ions or electrons) responsible for the decomposition of the VOCs. This paper presents results from basic experimental and theoretical studied aimed at identifying the reaction mechanisms responsible for the primary decomposition of various types of VOCs. (Authors)

  20. Non-thermal pressure in the outskirts of Abell 2142

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco-Femiano, Roberto; Lapi, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    Clumping and turbulence are expected to affect the matter accreted on to the outskirts of galaxy clusters. To determine their impact on the thermodynamic properties of Abell 2142, we perform an analysis of the X-ray temperature data from XMM-Newton via our SuperModel, a state-of-the-art tool for investigating the astrophysics of the intracluster medium already tested on many individual clusters (since Cavaliere, Lapi & Fusco-Femiano 2009). Using the gas density profile corrected for clumpiness derived by Tchernin et al. (2016), we find evidence for the presence of a non-thermal pressure component required to sustain gravity in the cluster outskirts of Abell 2142, that amounts to about 30 per cent of the total pressure at the virial radius. The presence of the non-thermal component implies the gas fraction to be consistent with the universal value at the virial radius and the electron thermal pressure profile to be in good agreement with that inferred from the SZ data. Our results indicate that the presence of gas clumping and of a non-thermal pressure component are both necessary to recover the observed physical properties in the cluster outskirts. Moreover, we stress that an alternative method often exploited in the literature (included Abell 2142) to determine the temperature profile kBT = Pe/ne basing on a combination of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) pressure Pe and of the X-ray electron density ne does not allow us to highlight the presence of non-thermal pressure support in the cluster outskirts.

  1. Constraining Non-thermal and Thermal properties of Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupal eDev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the evolution of Dark Matter (DM abundance from the very onset of its creation from inflaton decay under the assumption of an instantaneous reheating. Based on the initial conditions such as the inflaton mass and its decay branching ratio to the DM species, the reheating temperature, and the mass and interaction rate of the DM with the thermal bath, the DM particles can either thermalize (fully/partially with the primordial bath or remain non-thermal throughout their evolution history. In the thermal case, the final abundance is set by the standard freeze-out mechanism for large annihilation rates, irrespective of the initial conditions. For smaller annihilation rates, it can be set by the freeze-in mechanism which also does not depend on the initial abundance, provided it is small to begin with. For even smaller interaction rates, the DM decouples while being non-thermal, and the relic abundance will be essentially set by the initial conditions. We put model-independent constraints on the DM mass and annihilation rate from over-abundance by exactly solving the relevant Boltzmann equations, and identify the thermal freeze-out, freeze-in and non-thermal regions of the allowed parameter space. We highlight a generic fact that inflaton decay to DM inevitably leads to an overclosure of the Universe for a large range of DM parameter space, and thus poses a stringent constraint that must be taken into account while constructing models of DM. For the thermal DM region, we also show the complementary constraints from indirect DM search experiments, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background, Planck measurements, and theoretical limits due to the unitarity of S-matrix. For the non-thermal DM scenario, we show the allowed parameter space in terms of the inflaton and DM masses for a given reheating temperature, and compute the comoving free-streaming length to identify the hot, warm and cold DM regimes.

  2. Light higgsino dark matter from non-thermal cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aparicio, Luis [ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Cicoli, Michele [ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Dutta, Bhaskar [Department of Physics and Astronomy,Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy,TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Muia, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Quevedo, Fernando [ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-08

    We study the scenario of higgsino dark matter in the context of a non-standard cosmology with a period of matter domination prior to Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Matter domination changes the dark matter relic abundance if it ends via reheating to a temperature below the higgsino thermal freeze-out temperature. We perform a model independent analysis of the higgsino dark matter production in such scenario. We show that light higgsino-type dark matter is possible for reheating temperatures close to 1 GeV. We study the impact of dark matter indirect detection and collider physics in this context. We show that Fermi-LAT data rule out non-thermal higgsinos with masses below 300 GeV. Future indirect dark matter searches from Fermi-LAT and CTA will be able to cover essentially the full parameter space. Contrary to the thermal case, collider signals from a 100 TeV collider could fully test the non-thermal higgsino scenario. In the second part of the paper we discuss the motivation of such non-thermal cosmology from the perspective of string theory with late-time decaying moduli for both KKLT and LVS moduli stabilisation mechanisms. We finally describe the impact of embedding higgsino dark matter in these scenarios.

  3. Cyclotron radiation from thermal and non-thermal electrons in the WEGA-stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekaar, H.W.; Rutgers, W.R.

    1980-11-01

    Electron cyclotron radiation measurements on the WEGA-stellarator are reported. Emission spectra around 2ωsub(ce) and 3ωsub(ce) were measured with a far-infra-red spectrometer and InSb detectors. When the plasma loop voltage is high, runaway electrons give rise to intense broad-band emission. Runaway particles can be removed by increasing the plasma density. For low loop voltage discharges the electron temperature profile was deduced from thermal emission around 2ωsub(ce). In spite of the low E-field, runaway particles are still created and pitch-angle scattered because ωsub(pe)/ωsub(ce) approximately 1. From non-thermal emission below 2ωsub(ce) and 3ωsub(ce) the energy and number of particles could be calculated, and was found to be in agreement with existing theories

  4. Development of the reactor lithium ampoule device for research of spectral-luminescent characteristics of nuclear-excited plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batyrbekov, E.G. [National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Gordienko, Yu. N., E-mail: gordienko@nnc.kz [National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Ponkratov, Yu. V. [National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Khasenov, M.U. [PI “National Laboratory Astana”, Astana (Kazakhstan); Tazhibayeva, I.L.; Barsukov, N.I.; Kulsartov, T.V.; Zaurbekova, Zh. A.; Tulubayev, Ye. Yu.; Skakov, M.K. [National Nuclear Center of RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • The development procedure of the ampoule device for experiments with nuclear-excited plasma under neutron irradiation is described. • The methods of nuclear reactions’ energy conversion into the energy of optical radiation of nuclear-excited plasma are presented. • A scheme of reactor experiments, the experimental facility and experimental device to carry out the reactor experiments are considered. - Abstract: This paper describes the development procedure of the reactor ampoule device to perform the experiments on study of spectral luminescence characteristics of nuclear-excited plasma formed by products of {sup 6}Li(n,α){sup 3}H reaction under neutron irradiation at the IVG.1 M research reactor. The methods of nuclear reactions’ energy conversion into the energy of optical radiation of nuclear-excited plasma are presented. A scheme of reactor experiments, the experimental facility and experimental device to carry out the reactor experiments are considered in paper. The designed ampoule device is totally meets the requirements of irradiation experiments on the IVG.1M reactor.

  5. Steady-state plasma and reactor parameters for elliptical cross section tokamaks with very large power ratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, J.L.; Powell, J.R.

    1975-06-01

    In previous studies only circular cross section reactor plasmas were considered. The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of elliptical plasma cross sections. Several technological benefits have been determined. Maximum magnetic field strength requirements are 30 to 65 percent less than for 5000 MW (th) reactors and may be as much as 40 percent less than for circular cross section reactors of comparable size. Very large n tau values are found (10 15 to 10 17 sec/cm 3 ), which produce large burn-up fractions (15 to 60 percent). There is relatively little problem with impurity build-up. Long confinement times (60 to 500 seconds) are found. Finally, the elliptical cross section reactors exhibit a major toroidal radius reduction of as large as 30 percent over circular reactors operating at comparable power levels

  6. Hierarchical modeling of plasma and transport phenomena in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, N.; Aggelopoulos, C. A.; Skouras, E. D.; Tsakiroglou, C. D.; Burganos, V. N.

    2017-12-01

    A novel dual-time hierarchical approach is developed to link the plasma process to macroscopic transport phenomena in the interior of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor that has been used for soil remediation (Aggelopoulos et al 2016 Chem. Eng. J. 301 353-61). The generation of active species by plasma reactions is simulated at the microseconds (µs) timescale, whereas convection and thermal conduction are simulated at the macroscopic (minutes) timescale. This hierarchical model is implemented in order to investigate the influence of the plasma DBD process on the transport and reaction mechanisms during remediation of polluted soil. In the microscopic model, the variables of interest include the plasma-induced reactive concentrations, while in the macroscopic approach, the temperature distribution, and the velocity field both inside the discharge gap and within the polluted soil material as well. For the latter model, the Navier-Stokes and Darcy Brinkman equations for the transport phenomena in the porous domain are solved numerically using a FEM software. The effective medium theory is employed to provide estimates of the effective time-evolving and three-phase transport properties in the soil sample. Model predictions considering the temporal evolution of the plasma remediation process are presented and compared with corresponding experimental data.

  7. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Nonthermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris Argyle; John Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Gui-Bing Zhao; Sanil John; Ji-Jun Zhang; Linna Wang

    2007-09-30

    The goal of this experimental project was to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a nonthermal plasma and to recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), but it was not achieved at the moderate pressure conditions used in this study. However, H{sub 2}S was successfully decomposed at energy efficiencies higher than any other reports for the high H{sub 2}S concentration and moderate pressures (corresponding to high reactor throughputs) used in this study.

  8. Neutralized solar wind ahead of the Earth's magnetopause as contribution to non-thermal exospheric hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In a most recent paper by Qin and Waldrop (2016, it had been found that the scale height of hydrogen in the upper exosphere of the Earth, especially during solar minimum conditions, appears to be surprisingly large. This indicates that during minimum conditions when exobasic temperatures should be small, large exospheric H-scale heights predominate. They thus seem to indicate the presence of a non-thermal hydrogen component in the upper exosphere. In the following parts of the paper we shall investigate what fraction of such expected hot hydrogen atoms could have their origin from protons of the shocked solar wind ahead of the magnetopause converted into energetic neutral atoms (ENAs via charge-exchange processes with normal atmospheric, i.e., exospheric hydrogen atoms that in the first step evaporate from the exobase into the magnetosheath plasma region. We shall show that, dependent on the sunward location of the magnetopause, the density of these types of non-thermal hydrogen atoms (H-ENAs becomes progressively comparable with the density of exobasic hydrogen with increasing altitude. At low exobasic heights, however, their contribution is negligible. At the end of this paper, we finally study the question of whether the H-ENA population could even be understood as a self-consistency phenomenon of the H-ENA population, especially during solar activity minimum conditions, i.e., H-ENAs leaving the exosphere being replaced by H-ENAs injected into the exosphere.

  9. Neutralized solar wind ahead of the Earth's magnetopause as contribution to non-thermal exospheric hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, Hans J.; Nass, Uwe; Dutta-Roy, Robindro; Zoennchen, Jochen H.

    2018-03-01

    In a most recent paper by Qin and Waldrop (2016), it had been found that the scale height of hydrogen in the upper exosphere of the Earth, especially during solar minimum conditions, appears to be surprisingly large. This indicates that during minimum conditions when exobasic temperatures should be small, large exospheric H-scale heights predominate. They thus seem to indicate the presence of a non-thermal hydrogen component in the upper exosphere. In the following parts of the paper we shall investigate what fraction of such expected hot hydrogen atoms could have their origin from protons of the shocked solar wind ahead of the magnetopause converted into energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) via charge-exchange processes with normal atmospheric, i.e., exospheric hydrogen atoms that in the first step evaporate from the exobase into the magnetosheath plasma region. We shall show that, dependent on the sunward location of the magnetopause, the density of these types of non-thermal hydrogen atoms (H-ENAs) becomes progressively comparable with the density of exobasic hydrogen with increasing altitude. At low exobasic heights, however, their contribution is negligible. At the end of this paper, we finally study the question of whether the H-ENA population could even be understood as a self-consistency phenomenon of the H-ENA population, especially during solar activity minimum conditions, i.e., H-ENAs leaving the exosphere being replaced by H-ENAs injected into the exosphere.

  10. Galaxy Cluster Outskirts from the Thermal SZ and Non-Thermal Synchrotron Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustuv Basu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Galaxy cluster merger shocks are the main agent for the thermalization of the intracluster medium and the energization of cosmic ray particles in it. Shock propagation changes the state of the tenuous intracluster plasma, and the corresponding signal variations are measurable with the current generation of X-ray and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (SZ effect instruments. Additionally, non-thermal electrons (re-energized by the shocks sometimes give rise to extended and luminous synchrotron sources known as radio relics, which are prominent indicators of shocks propagating roughly in the plane of the sky. In this short review, we discuss how the joint modeling of the non-thermal and thermal signal variations across radio relic shock fronts is helping to advance our knowledge of the gas thermodynamical properties and magnetic field strengths in the cluster outskirts. We describe the first use of the SZ effect to measure the Mach numbers of relic shocks, for both the nearest (Coma and the farthest (El Gordo clusters with known radio relics.

  11. Applications and interactions of solid impurity pellets with reactor relevant plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Baiquan; Peng Lilin; Huang Jinhua; Yan Jiancheng

    2003-01-01

    Based on the kinetic two-dimensional lentil-shape ablation theory of hydrogenic pellet developed by Kuteev, the new extended algorithm for erosion speed and ablation rate calculations of the impurity pellets in reactor relevant plasma has been derived. The preliminary exploration for the feasibility of applying impurity pellet injection to the α particle diagnostics in the future ITER device has been performed. The comparisons between the numerical integral calculation results and analysis show that the lithium pellet injection possesses much more compatibilities. It might be feasible to apply this technique to both α particle diagnostics and safety factor q profile measurement in the future ITER device. (authors)

  12. A review of the US joining technologies for plasma facing components in the ITER fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C.H.; Watson, R.D.; Slattery, K.T.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is a review of the current joining technologies for plasma facing components in the US for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. Many facilities are involved in this project. Many unique and innovative joining techniques are being considered in the quest to join two candidate armor plate materials (beryllium and tungsten) to a copper base alloy heat sink (CuNiBe, OD copper, CuCrZr). These techniques include brazing and diffusion bonding, compliant layers at the bond interface, and the use of diffusion barrier coatings and diffusion enhancing coatings at the bond interfaces. The development and status of these joining techniques will be detailed in this report

  13. Intense lower-hybrid wave penetration and current drive in reactor-grade plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Rognlien, T.D; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.

    1990-01-01

    Apply lower-hybrid power in short, intense pulses can overcome Landau damping, allowing penetration into the core of reactor-grade plasmas. We present a theoretical description of the absorption and parametric stability of the pulses, and show results of ray-tracing calculations which include the absorption calculation. Consideration of the absorption and potential source availability lead to the consideration of 5--10 GW peak power, 30--100 μs pulses for ITER, and ∼ 2 MW, 20 μs pulses for a proof-of-principle experiment in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX)

  14. Intense lower-hybrid wave penetration and current drive in reactor-grade plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, R.H.; Rognlien, T.D (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Plasma Fusion Center)

    1990-01-01

    Apply lower-hybrid power in short, intense pulses can overcome Landau damping, allowing penetration into the core of reactor-grade plasmas. We present a theoretical description of the absorption and parametric stability of the pulses, and show results of ray-tracing calculations which include the absorption calculation. Consideration of the absorption and potential source availability lead to the consideration of 5--10 GW peak power, 30--100 {mu}s pulses for ITER, and {approximately} 2 MW, 20 {mu}s pulses for a proof-of-principle experiment in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX).

  15. Smooth hybrid inflation and non-thermal Type II leptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sil, Arunansu

    2013-01-01

    We consider a smooth hybrid inflation scenario based on a supersymmetricSU(2) L ⊗ SU(2) R ⊗ U(1) B-L model. The Higgs triplets involved in the model play a key role in inflation as well as in explaining the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe. We show that the baryon asymmetry can originate via non-thermal triplet leptogenesis from the decay of SU(2) B-L triplets, whose tiny vacuum expectation values also provide masses for the light neutrinos. (author)

  16. Thermal responses of tokamak reactor first walls during cyclic plasma burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Charak, I.

    1978-01-01

    The CINDA-3G computer code has been adapted to analyze the thermal responses and operating limitations of two fusion reactor first-wall concepts under normal cyclic operation. A component of an LMFBR computer code has been modified and adapted to analyze the ablative behavior of first-walls after a plasma disruption. The first-wall design concepts considered are a forced-circulation water-cooled stainless steel panel with and without a monolithic graphite liner. The thermal gradients in the metal wall and liner have been determined for several burn-cycle scenarios and the extent of surface ablation that results from a plasma disruption has been determined for stainless steel and graphite first surfaces

  17. Mathematical modeling of quartz particle melting process in plasma-chemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volokitin, Oleg, E-mail: volokitin-oleg@mail.ru; Volokitin, Gennady, E-mail: vgg-tomsk@mail.ru; Skripnikova, Nelli, E-mail: nks2003@mai.ru; Shekhovtsov, Valentin, E-mail: shehovcov2010@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Vlasov, Viktor, E-mail: rector@tsuab.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30, Lenin Ave., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Among silica-based materials vitreous silica has a special place. The paper presents the melting process of a quartz particle under conditions of low-temperature plasma. A mathematical model is designed for stages of melting in the experimental plasma-chemical reactor. As calculation data show, quartz particles having the radius of 0.21≤ r{sub p} ≤0.64 mm completely melt at W = 0.65 l/s particle feed rate depending on the Nusselt number, while 0.14≤ r{sub p} ≤0.44 mm particles melt at W = 1.4 l/s. Calculation data showed that 2 mm and 0.4 mm quartz particles completely melted during and 0.1 s respectively. Thus, phase transformations occurred in silicon dioxide play the important part in its heating up to the melting temperature.

  18. Thermal responses of tokamak reactor first walls during cyclic plasma burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Charak, I.

    1977-01-01

    The CINDA-3G computer code has been adapted to analyze the thermal responses and operating limitations of two fusion reactor first-wall concepts under normal cyclic operation. A component of an LMFBR computer has been modified and adapted to analyze the ablative behavior of first-walls after a plasma disruption. The first-wall design concepts considered are a forced-circulation water-cooled stainless steel panel with and without a monolithic graphite liner. The thermal gradients in the metal wall and liner have been determined for several burn-cycle scenarios and the extent of surface ablation that results from a plasma disruption has been determined for stainless steel and graphite first surfaces

  19. Evaluation of remote maintenance schemes by plasma equilibrium analysis in Tokamak DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utoh, Hiroyasu; Tobita, Kenji; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The remote maintenance schemes in DEMO reactor were evaluated by the plasma equilibrium analysis. • Horizontal sector transport maintenance scheme requires the largest total PF coil current. • The difference of total PF coil current for MHD equilibrium in between the large segmented divertor maintenance and the segmentalized divertor maintenance was about 10%. - Abstract: The remote maintenance schemes in a DEMO reactor are categorized by insertion direction, blanket segmentation, and divertor maintenance scheme, and are quantitatively evaluated by analysing the plasma equilibrium. The positions of the poloidal field (PF) coil are limited by the size of the toroidal field (TF) coil and the maintenance port layout of each remote maintenance scheme. Because the PF coils are located near the larger TF coil and far from the plasma surface, the horizontal sector transport maintenance scheme requires the largest part of total PF coil current, 25% larger than that required for separated sector transport using vertical maintenance ports with segmented divertor maintenance (SDM). In the unsegmented divertor maintenance (UDM) scheme, the total magnetic stored energy in the PF coils at plasma equilibrium is about 30% larger than that stored in the SDM scheme, but the time required for removal and installation of all the divertor cassettes in the UDM scheme is roughly a third of that required in the SDM scheme because the number of divertor cassettes in the UDM scheme is a third of that in the SDM scheme. From the viewpoint of simple maintenance operations, the merit of the UDM scheme has more merit than the SDM scheme

  20. Development and evaluation of plasma facing materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Roedig, M.; Schmidt, A.; Thomser, C.

    2010-01-01

    More and more attention is directed towards thermonuclear fusion as a possible future energy source. Major advantages of this energy conversion technology are the almost inexhaustible resources and the option to produce energy without CO 2 -emissions. However, in the most advanced field of magnetic plasma confinement a number of technological challenges have to be met. In particular high-temperature resistant and plasma compatible meterials have to be developed and qualified which are able to withstand the extreme environments in a commercial thermonuclear power reactor. The plasma facing materials (PEMs) and components (PFCs) in such fusion devices, i.e. the first wall (FW), the limiters and the divertor, are strongly affected by the plasma wall interaction processes and the applied intense thermal loads during plasma operation. On the one hand, these mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; on the other hand, they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour. Materials for plasma facing components have to fulfill a number of requirements. First of all the materials have to be plasma compatible, i.e. they should exhibit a low atomic number to avoid radiative losses whenever atoms from the wall material will be ionized in the plasma. In addition, the materials must have a high melting point, a high thermal conductivity, and adequate mechanical properties. To select the most suitable material candidates, a comprehensive data base is required which includes all thermo-physical and mechanical properties. In present-day and next step devices the resulting thermal steady state heat loads to the first wall remain below 1 MWm -2 , meanwhile the limiters and the divertor are expected to be exposed to power densities being at least one order of magnitude above the FW-level, i.e. up to 20 MWm -2 for next step tokamaks such as ITER or DEMO. These requirements are responsible for high demands on the selection of qualified PFMs and heat

  1. Development and evaluation of plasma facing materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Roedig, M.; Schmidt, A.; Thomser, C. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Juelich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    More and more attention is directed towards thermonuclear fusion as a possible future energy source. Major advantages of this energy conversion technology are the almost inexhaustible resources and the option to produce energy without CO{sub 2}-emissions. However, in the most advanced field of magnetic plasma confinement a number of technological challenges have to be met. In particular high-temperature resistant and plasma compatible meterials have to be developed and qualified which are able to withstand the extreme environments in a commercial thermonuclear power reactor. The plasma facing materials (PEMs) and components (PFCs) in such fusion devices, i.e. the first wall (FW), the limiters and the divertor, are strongly affected by the plasma wall interaction processes and the applied intense thermal loads during plasma operation. On the one hand, these mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; on the other hand, they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour. Materials for plasma facing components have to fulfill a number of requirements. First of all the materials have to be plasma compatible, i.e. they should exhibit a low atomic number to avoid radiative losses whenever atoms from the wall material will be ionized in the plasma. In addition, the materials must have a high melting point, a high thermal conductivity, and adequate mechanical properties. To select the most suitable material candidates, a comprehensive data base is required which includes all thermo-physical and mechanical properties. In present-day and next step devices the resulting thermal steady state heat loads to the first wall remain below 1 MWm{sup -2}, meanwhile the limiters and the divertor are expected to be exposed to power densities being at least one order of magnitude above the FW-level, i.e. up to 20 MWm{sup -2} for next step tokamaks such as ITER or DEMO. These requirements are responsible for high demands on the selection of qualified PFMs

  2. Interactions between plasma and wall materials in fusion reactors; Plasma-Wand Wechselwirkungen von Fusionsreaktormaterialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marot, L.; Moser, L.; and others

    2016-11-15

    First mirrors of optical diagnostics in ITER were exposed in Magnum-PSI linear plasma device and JET-ILW tokamak. For JET-ILW the mirrors with a rhodium (Rh) or a molybdenum (Mo) coating exhibited a decrease of the reflectivity according the location in the torus and especially the amount of beryllium (Be) deposited on them. No delamination of the coated reflective film was observed. Under very harsh erosion conditions in Magnum-PSI, Rh thick coated mock ups, cooled or not, for a high flux exposure the films underwent delamination. Mo coating on water cooled mock up mirrors exhibited a high diffuse reflectivity after H{sub 2}/Ar plasma exposure inducing an important decrease of the specular reflectivity and show important oxidation of the surface. Cleaning of mirrors was extensively studied during this period, with magnetic field in collaboration with the SPC Lausanne, or in term of repetitive cleaning till 34 cycles. Polycrystalline molybdenum mirror shows a high diffuse reflectivity after cleaning cycle and clearly demonstrate that they are not suitable for this purpose. Coated Rh or Mo mirrors like single crystal maintained good reflectivity. Test under magnetic field revealed the non-uniform erosion of the mirrors according the orientation between the field and the mirror. All these tests bring to a suitable schematic of the implementation of this technique in ITER and were deeply explained. The cleaning of the Be contaminated mirrors will be carried out using new parameters in December 2016. Investigations on formation of tungsten fuzz were carried out either in Basel using a new setup or in Pilot-PSI. These thickness measurements showed the fuzz growth is in square root dependence to time or fluence. From the results in Pilot-PSI, it has been shown that time was a critical parameter for the development of He-induced morphology changes and one needs to keep that factor in mind. (authors)

  3. Control of plasma layer in a fusion reactor correlated to DC motor control using PSO-ANFIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahapatra, Sakuntala; Daniel, Raju; Dey, Deep Narayan

    2013-01-01

    Plasma position and shape control is very crucial for the overall performance of the fusion reactor such as Tokamak. The quality of the discharge in the Saskatchewan TORus-Modified (STOR-M) tokamak is strongly related to the position of the plasma column within the discharge vessel. If the plasma column approaches too near the wall, then either minor or complete disruption occurs. Consequently it is necessary to be able to control dynamically the position of the plasma column throughout the entire discharge. Now a day's most fusion reactor employs the traditional PID controller for the confinement of plasma layer. Fuzzy logic is used for the control of Plasma layer. In this paper we have used the hybrid of PSO-ANFIS technique to control the speed of a DC motor. We have used two input parameters like speed, torque and output is firing angle. In our work first order Sugeno fuzzy model is taken with three rules and the parameters of Gaussian membership function is controlled by the PSO technique. PSO-ANFIS speed controller obtains better dynamic behavior and superior performance of the DC motor speed control. Similar approach can be correlated to the control of plasma layer. For the plasma control two inputs can be taken as plasma position ΔH and the plasma current and the single output, the control decision u(t). (author)

  4. Plasma properties in a large-volume, cylindrical and asymmetric radio-frequency capacitively coupled industrial-prototype reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazović, Saša; Puač, Nevena; Spasić, Kosta; Malović, Gordana; Petrović, Zoran Lj; Cvelbar, Uroš; Mozetič, Miran; Radetić, Maja

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a large-volume low-pressure cylindrical plasma reactor with a size that matches industrial reactors for treatment of textiles. It was shown that it efficiently produces plasmas with only a small increase in power as compared with a similar reactor with 50 times smaller volume. Plasma generated at 13.56 MHz was stable from transition to streamers and capable of long-term continuous operation. An industrial-scale asymmetric cylindrical reactor of simple design and construction enabled good control over a wide range of active plasma species and ion concentrations. Detailed characterization of the discharge was performed using derivative, Langmuir and catalytic probes which enabled determination of the optimal sets of plasma parameters necessary for successful industry implementation and process control. Since neutral atomic oxygen plays a major role in many of the material processing applications, its spatial profile was measured using nickel catalytic probe over a wide range of plasma parameters. The spatial profiles show diffusion profiles with particle production close to the powered electrode and significant wall losses due to surface recombination. Oxygen atom densities range from 10 19 m −3 near the powered electrode to 10 17 m −3 near the wall. The concentrations of ions at the same time are changing from 10 16 to the 10 15 m −3 at the grounded chamber wall. (paper)

  5. Determination of the neutral oxygen atom density in a plasma reactor loaded with metal samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozetic, Miran; Cvelbar, Uros

    2009-08-01

    The density of neutral oxygen atoms was determined during processing of metal samples in a plasma reactor. The reactor was a Pyrex tube with an inner diameter of 11 cm and a length of 30 cm. Plasma was created by an inductively coupled radiofrequency generator operating at a frequency of 27.12 MHz and output power up to 500 W. The O density was measured at the edge of the glass tube with a copper fiber optics catalytic probe. The O atom density in the empty tube depended on pressure and was between 4 and 7 × 1021 m-3. The maximum O density was at a pressure of about 150 Pa, while the dissociation fraction of O2 molecules was maximal at the lowest pressure and decreased with increasing pressure. At about 300 Pa it dropped below 10%. The measurements were repeated in the chamber loaded with different metallic samples. In these cases, the density of oxygen atoms was lower than that in the empty chamber. The results were explained by a drain of O atoms caused by heterogeneous recombination on the samples.

  6. Plasma, a plant safety monitoring and assessment system for VVER-440 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornaes, A.; Hulsund, J. E. [Institutt for energiteknikk (IFE), OECD Halden Reactor Project, Halden (Norway); Lipcsei, S.; Major, Cs.; Racz, A.; Vegh, J. [KFKI, Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest (Hungary); Eiler, J. [Paks, Nuclear Power Plant Ltd, Paks (Hungary)

    1999-05-15

    The objective with the Plant Safety Monitoring and Assessment System (PLASMA) is to develop an operator support system to support the execution of new symptom-based Emergency Operating Procedures for application in VVER reactors, with the Paks NPP in Hungary as the target plant. Many of the VVER reactors are rewriting their EOPs to comply more with Western standards of symptom-based EOPs. In this connection it is desirable to improve the data validation, information integration and presentation for operators when executing the EOPs. The entry-point to a symptom-oriented procedure is defined by the occurrence of a well-defined reactor operation status, with all its symptoms. However, the application of the EOF benefits from an operator support system, which performs plant status and symptom identification reliably and accurately. The development of the PLASMA system is a joint venture between Institutt for energiteknikk (IFE) and KFKI with the NPP Paks as the target plant. The project has been initiated and partly funded by the Science and Technology Agency (STA), Japan through the OECD NEA assistance program. In Hungary, considerable effort has concentrated on the safety reassessment of the Paks NPP and new EOPs are being written, but no comprehensive Operator Support System (OSS) for plant safety assessment is installed. Some safety parameter display functions are incorporated into diverse operator support systems, but an online 'plant safety monitoring and assessment system' is still missing. The present project comprises designing, constructing, testing and installing such an OSS, which to a great extent could support plant operators in their safety assessment work (author) (ml)

  7. The effect of dielectric top lids on materials processing in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, J.W.M.; Chan, C.S.; Xu, L.; Xu, S.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of the plasma revolution began in the 1970's with the exploitation of plasma sources for anisotropic etching and processing of materials. In recent years, plasma processing has gained popularity, with research institutions adopting projects in the field and industries implementing dry processing in their production lines. The advantages of utilizing plasma sources would be uniform processing over a large exposed surface area, and the reduction of toxic emissions. This leads to reduced costs borne by manufacturers which could be passed down as consumer savings, and a reduction in negative environmental impacts. Yet, one constraint that plagues the industry would be the control of contaminants in a plasma reactor which becomes evident when reactions are conducted in a clean vacuum environment. In this work, amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films were grown on glass substrates in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor with a top lid made of quartz. Even though the chamber was kept at high vacuum (~10 −4 Pa), it was evident through secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) that oxygen contaminants were present. With the aid of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) the contaminant species were identified. The design of the LF-ICP reactor was then modified to incorporate an Alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) lid. Results indicate that there were reduced amounts of contaminants present in the reactor, and that an added benefit of increased power transfer to the plasma, improving deposition rate of thin films was realized. The results of this study is conclusive in showing that Al 2 O 3 is a good alternative as a top-lid of an LF-ICP reactor, and offers industries a solution in improving quality and rate of growth of thin films. (author)

  8. Physics and chemistry of plasma pollution control technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J S

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous pollution control technologies for acid gases (NO x , SO x , etc), volatile organic compounds, greenhouse gases, ozone layer depleting substances, etc have been commercialized based on catalysis, incineration and adsorption methods. However, non-thermal plasma techniques based on electron beams and corona discharges are becoming significant due to advantages such as lower costs, higher removal efficiency and smaller space volume. In order to commercialize this new technology, the pollution gas removal rate, energy efficiency of removal, pressure drop of reactors and useable by-product production rates must be improved and identification of major fundamental processes and optimizations of reactor and power supply for an integrated system must be investigated. In this work, the chemistry and physics of plasma pollution control are discussed and the limitation of this type of plasma is outlined based on the plasma parameters.

  9. High effective heterogeneous plasma vortex reactor for production of heat energy and hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, N. K.; Zavershinskii, I. P.; Klimov, A. I.; Molevich, N. E.; Porfiriev, D. P.; Tolkunov, B. N.

    2018-03-01

    This work is a continuation of our previous studies [1-10] of physical parameters and properties of a long-lived heterogeneous plasmoid (plasma formation with erosive nanoclusters) created by combined discharge in a high-speed swirl flow. Here interaction of metal nanoclusters with hydrogen atoms is studied in a plasma vortex reactor (PVR) with argon-water steam mixture. Metal nanoclusters were created by nickel cathode’s erosion at combined discharge on. Dissociated hydrogen atoms and ions were obtained in water steam by electric discharge. These hydrogen atoms and ions interacted with metal nanoclusters, which resulted in the creation of a stable plasmoid in a swirl gas flow. This plasmoid has been found to create intensive soft X-ray radiation. Plasma parameters of this plasmoid were measured by optical spectroscopy method. It has been obtained that there is a high non-equilibrium plasmoid: Te > TV >> TR. The measured coefficient of energy performance of this plasmoid is about COP = 2÷10. This extra power release in plasmoid is supposed to be connected with internal excited electrons. The obtained experimental results have proved our suggestion.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Non-Thermal Food Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, C.; Krauss, J.; Ertunc, Ö.; Delgado, a.

    2010-09-01

    Food preservation is an important process step in food technology regarding product safety and product quality. Novel preservation techniques are currently developed, that aim at improved sensory and nutritional value but comparable safety than in conventional thermal preservation techniques. These novel non-thermal food preservation techniques are based for example on high pressures up to one GPa or pulsed electric fields. in literature studies the high potential of high pressures (HP) and of pulsed electric fields (PEF) is shown due to their high retention of valuable food components as vitamins and flavour and selective inactivation of spoiling enzymes and microorganisms. for the design of preservation processes based on the non-thermal techniques it is crucial to predict the effect of high pressure and pulsed electric fields on the food components and on the spoiling enzymes and microorganisms locally and time-dependent in the treated product. Homogenous process conditions (especially of temperature fields in HP and PEF processing and of electric fields in PEF) are aimed at to avoid the need of over-processing and the connected quality loss and to minimize safety risks due to under-processing. the present contribution presents numerical simulations of thermofluiddynamical phenomena inside of high pressure autoclaves and pulsed electric field treatment chambers. in PEF processing additionally the electric fields are considered. Implementing kinetics of occurring (bio-) chemical reactions in the numerical simulations of the temperature, flow and electric fields enables the evaluation of the process homogeneity and efficiency connected to different process parameters of the preservation techniques. Suggestions to achieve safe and high quality products are concluded out of the numerical results.

  11. Experimental studies of thermal and non-thermal electron cyclotron phenomena in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, F.S.

    1984-12-01

    A direct measurement of wave absorption in the ISX-B tokamak at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency is reported. Measurements of the absorption of a wave polarized in the extraordinary mode and propagating perpendicular to the toroidal magnetic field are in agreement with the absorption predicted by the linearized Vlasov equation for a thermal plasma. Agreement is found both for an analytic approximation to the wave absorption and for a numerical simulation of ray propagation in toroidal geometry. Observations are also reported on a non-linear, three-wave interaction process occurring during high power electron cyclotron resonance heating in the Versator II tokamak. The measured spectra and the threshold power are consistent with a model in which the incident power in the extraordinary mode of polarization decays at the upper hybrid resonance layer into a lower hybrid wave and an electron Bernstein wave. Finally, measurements of non-thermal emission at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency and below the electron plasma frequency are reported from low density, non-Maxwellian plasma in the Versator II tokamak. The emission spectra are in agreement with a model in which waves are driven unstable at the anomalous Doppler resonance, while only weakly damped at the Cerenkov resonance

  12. Particulate Filtration from Emissions of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly Reactor Using Regenerable Porous Metal Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Abney, Morgan; Greenwood, Zachary; West, Philip; Mitchell, Karen; Vijayakumar, R.; Berger, Gordon M.

    2017-01-01

    Microwave-based plasma pyrolysis technology is being studied as a means of supporting oxygen recovery in future spacecraft life support systems. The process involves the conversion of methane produced from a Sabatier reactor to acetylene and hydrogen, with a small amount of solid carbon particulates generated as a side product. The particles must be filtered before the acetylene is removed and the hydrogen-rich gas stream is recycled back to the CRA. We discuss developmental work on porous metal media filters for removing the carbon particulate emissions from the PPA exit gas stream and to provide in situ media regeneration capability. Because of the high temperatures involved in oxidizing the deposited carbon during regeneration, there was particular focus in this development on the materials that could be used, the housing design, and heating methods. This paper describes the design and operation of the filter and characterizes their performance from integrated testing at the Environmental Chamber (E-Chamber) at MSFC.

  13. Flash pyrolysis of agricultural residues using a plasma heated laminar entrained flow reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu Shuangning; Yi Weiming; Li Baoming

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the volatilization characteristics of biomass particles at flash heating rates, a plasma heated laminar entrained flow reactor (PHLEFR) was designed and built in our lab. Two agricultural residues, wheat straw and corn stalk, were chosen as feedstock for pyrolysis which were conducted on the PHLEFR with the aim of determining the extent of thermal decomposition at high heating rate (more than 10 4o Cs -1 ). Based on the experimental data, a first order kinetic model was introduced and the relevant kinetic parameters (apparent active energy and apparent frequency factor) were determined for the two straws: E=31.51kJmol -1 , A=1028s -1 (wheat straw) and E=33.74kJmol -1 , A=1013s -1 (corn stalk). The predicted conversion of the fitted model to the experimental data provided general agreements when one considered the experimental errors

  14. Removal of NO and SO2 in Corona Discharge Plasma Reactor with Water Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺元吉; 董丽敏; 杨嘉祥

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a novel type of a corona discharge plasma reactor was designed, which consists of needle-plate-combined electrodes, in which a series of needle electrodes are placed in a glass container filled with flue gas, and a plate electrode is immersed in the water. Based on this model, the removal of NO and SO2 was tested experimentally. In addition, the effect of streamer polarity on the reduction of SO2 and NO was investigated in detail. The experimental results show that the corona wind formed between the high-voltage needle electrode and the water by corona discharge enhances the cleaning efficiency of the flue gas because of the presence of water,and the cleaning efficiency will increase with the increase of applied dc voltage within a definite range. The removal efficiency of SO2 up to 98%, and about 85% of NOx removal under suitable conditions is obtained in our experiments.

  15. Fuel gas and char from pyrolysis of waste paper in a microwave plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khongkrapan, Parin; Thanompongchart, Patipat; Tippayawong, Nakorn; Kiatsiriroat, Tanongkiat [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a microwave plasma reactor was used for pyrolysis of waste papers. The effects of different argon flow rates on char and gas generation were investigated. Changes in carbon and oxygen contents from those in paper to char were significant. Char yield of over 25 % was obtained with the heating value of about 38 MJ/kg. Average gas yield and total content of combustible fraction (CO, CH4 and H2) in the gas product were 2.56 m3/kg and 36 %, respectively. The heating value of gas product and carbon conversion efficiency of the process were maximum at 6.0 MJ/m3 and 73 %, respectively.

  16. Influence of implanted helium on nickel resistance under simulation of plasma flux disruption in nuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadin, B.A.; Pol'skij, V.I.; Yakushin, V.L.; Markin, A.V.; Tserevitinov, S.S.; Vasil'ev, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    Investigation results are presented of radiation erosion of constructive materials of the first wall of a thermonuclear reactor. The erosion is conditioned by successive repeated action of pulse processes, imitating plasma disruption, and helium ion fluxes at 40 keV and 2 x 10 21 -10 22 m -2 fluence. As imitating processes are used fluxes of deuterium high-temperature plasma. It is shown that preliminary action by high-temperature plasma leads to substantial suppression of radiation erosion, included by subsequent ion irradiation

  17. Optimization of tungsten-steel joints for plasma facing components in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuer, Simon; Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik, Juelich (Germany); Weber, Thomas; Linke, Jochen [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Werkstoffstruktur und -eigenschaften, Juelich (Germany); Matejicek, Jiri [Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    Tungsten, joint to a martensitic-ferritic EUROFER97 structure, is a promising plasma facing material composite for fusion reactors. Due to the effect of mismatch in thermo-mechanical properties direct bonding is not feasible. Current research is therefore ongoing on interlayer systems. While the adhesion was already improved by the utilization of a discrete Cu, Ti or V interlayer, that is able to relax stresses by plastic deformation, joints still do not resist the expected load cycles in a fusion reactor. Therefore, alternatives for the interface are needed. This contribution presents research on functionally graded materials (FGM). The particular microstructure of a graded interlayer allows re-distributing macro stresses from a discrete interface to a greater volume while avoiding in particular Cu which tends to swell under neutron irradiation. A parameter study on the basis of finite element analysis will be presented as well as first results of several processing routes for FGM that shall be evaluated and benchmarked by mechanical as well as thermal testing.

  18. Final Report: Safety of Plasma Components and Aerosol Transport During Hard Disruptions and Accidental Energy Release in Fusion Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourham, Mohamed A.; Gilligan, John G.

    1999-08-14

    Safety considerations in large future fusion reactors like ITER are important before licensing the reactor. Several scenarios are considered hazardous, which include safety of plasma-facing components during hard disruptions, high heat fluxes and thermal stresses during normal operation, accidental energy release, and aerosol formation and transport. Disruption events, in large tokamaks like ITER, are expected to produce local heat fluxes on plasma-facing components, which may exceed 100 GW/m{sup 2} over a period of about 0.1 ms. As a result, the surface temperature dramatically increases, which results in surface melting and vaporization, and produces thermal stresses and surface erosion. Plasma-facing components safety issues extends to cover a wide range of possible scenarios, including disruption severity and the impact of plasma-facing components on disruption parameters, accidental energy release and short/long term LOCA's, and formation of airborne particles by convective current transport during a LOVA (water/air ingress disruption) accident scenario. Study, and evaluation of, disruption-induced aerosol generation and mobilization is essential to characterize database on particulate formation and distribution for large future fusion tokamak reactor like ITER. In order to provide database relevant to ITER, the SIRENS electrothermal plasma facility at NCSU has been modified to closely simulate heat fluxes expected in ITER.

  19. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  20. The application of dynamic method for the temperature measurement of gas destruction in a plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryszard, Sarba

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical study of the conversion of measuring probe temperature into hot gas temperature. The author gives a solution to the problem of a destruction temperature measurement in a plasma reactor. The temperature conversion is based on the thermodynamic similarity theory and statistical thermodynamics verification. The experimental measurements of the hot gas temperature have been made in the place where it considerably exceeds the melting point of the measuring probe material. The heat exchange phenomenon on the measuring probe's surface with the hot gas surrounding it is described by a forced convection equation. An analysis has been made of the heat flowing in and out of the measuring probe. The experimental part of the paper includes: an experimental measurement of gas velocity by means of luminous particles, a hot gas measurement for one distance from a nozzle and different diameters of the measuring probe, as well as different probing velocities. Numerical simulations have been made of the temperature distribution in a plasma jet. The experimental results are congruent with theoretical predictions. The aim of this research is a contribution to the structuring of a mathematical model of mass and energy balance in the processes of NHF 2 CL waste destruction.

  1. Manufacturing and testing in reactor relevant conditions of brazed plasma facing components of the ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisio, M.; Branca, V.; Marco, M. Di; Federici, A.; Grattarola, M.; Gualco, G.; Guarnone, P.; Luconi, U.; Merola, M.; Ozzano, C.; Pasquale, G.; Poggi, P.; Rizzo, S.; Varone, F.

    2005-01-01

    A fabrication route based on brazing technology has been developed for the realization of the high heat flux components for the ITER vertical target and Dome-Liner. The divertor vertical target is armoured with carbon fiber reinforced carbon and tungsten in the lower straight part and in the upper curved part, respectively. The armour material is joined to heat sinks made of precipitation hardened copper-chromium-zirconium alloy. The plasma facing units of the dome component are based on a tungsten flat tile design with hypervapotron cooling. An innovative brazing technique based on the addition of carbon fibers to the active brazing alloy, developed by Ansaldo Ricerche for applications in the field of the energy production, has been used for the carbon fiber composite to copper joint to reduce residual stresses. The tungsten-copper joint has been realized by direct casting. A proper brazing thermal cycle has been studied to guarantee the required mechanical properties of the precipitation hardened alloy after brazing. The fabrication route of plasma facing components for the ITER vertical target and dome based on the brazing technology has been proved by means of thermal fatigue tests performed on mock-ups in reactor relevant conditions

  2. The thermal response of the first wall of a fusion reactor blanket to plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klippel, H.Th.

    1983-09-01

    Major plasma disruptions in Tokamak power reactors are potentially dangerous because high thermal overloading of the first wall may occur, resulting in melting and evaporation. The present uncertainties of the disruption characteristics, in particular the space and time dependence of the energy deposition, lead to a wide variation in the prospective surface energy loads. The thermal response of a first wall of aluminium, stainless steel and of graphite subjected to disruption energy loads up to 1000 J cm -2 has been analysed including the effects of melting and surface evaporation, vapour recondensation, vapour shielding, and the moving of the surface boundary caused by the evaporation. A special calculation model has been developed for this purpose. The main results are the following: by values of local transient energy depositions over 1500 J cm -2 bare stainless steel walls are damaged severely. Further calculations are needed to estimate the endurance limit of several candidate first wall materials. Applications of coatings on surfaces need special attention. For the reference INTOR disruption (approx. 100 J cm -2 ) evaporation is not significant. The effect of vapour shielding on evaporation has been found to be significant. The effect on melting is less pronounced. In a complete analysis the stability and dynamic behaviour of the melted layer under electromagnetic forces should be included. Also a reliable set of plasma disruption characteristics should be gathered

  3. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  4. Modelling of non-thermal electron cyclotron emission during ECRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribaldos, V.; Krivenski, V.

    1990-01-01

    The existence of suprathermal electrons during Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating experiments in tokamaks is today a well established fact. At low densities the creation of large non-thermal electron tails affects the temperature profile measurements obtained by 2 nd harmonic, X-mode, low-field side, electron cyclotron emission. At higher densities suprathermal electrons can be detected by high-field side emission. In electron cyclotron current drive experiments a high energy suprathermal tail, asymmetric in v, is observed. Non-Maxwellian electron distribution functions are also typically observed during lower-hybrid current drive experiments. Fast electrons have been observed during ionic heating by neutral beams as well. Two distinct approaches are currently used in the interpretation of the experimental results: simple analytical models which reproduce some of the expected non-Maxwellian characteristics of the electron distribution function are employed to get a qualitative picture of the phenomena; sophisticated numerical Fokker-Planck calculations give the electron distribution function from which the emission spectra are computed. No algorithm is known to solve the inverse problem, i.e. to compute the electron distribution function from the emitted spectra. The proposed methods all relay on the basic assumption that the electron distribution function has a given functional dependence on a limited number of free parameters, which are then 'measured' by best fitting the experimental results. Here we discuss the legitimacy of this procedure. (author) 7 refs., 5 figs

  5. 1st IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'plasma-material interaction data for mixed plasma facing materials in fusion reactors'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.; Longhurst, G.

    1998-12-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the 1st IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Mixed Plasma Facing Materials in Fusion Reactors', held on December 19 and 20, 1998 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by meeting participants, a review of the data availability and data needs in the areas from the scope of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on the subject of the meeting, and recommendations regarding the future work within this CRP. (author)

  6. 2nd (final) IAEA research co-ordination meeting on 'plasma-material interaction data for mixed plasma facing materials in fusion reactors'. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2001-11-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the 2nd Research Co-ordination Meeting on 'Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Mixed Plasma Facing Materials in Fusion Reactors', held on October 16 and 17, 2000 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, are briefly described. This report includes a summary of the presentations made by the meeting participants and a review of the accomplishments of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP). In addition, short summaries from the participants are included indicating the specific research completed in support of this CRP. (author)

  7. Electric discharge plasmas influence attachment of cultured CHO k1 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieft, I.E.; Broers, J.L.V.; Caubet-Hilloutou, V.; Slaaf, D.W.; Ramaekers, F.C.S.; Stoffels - Adamowicz, E.

    2004-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas can be generated by electric discharges in gases. These plasmas are reactive media, capable of superficial treatment of various materials. A novel non-thermal atmospheric plasma source (plasma needle) has been developed and tested. Plasma appears at the end of a metal pin as a

  8. Characterization of pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma streams (PAPS) generated by a plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, E.; Sarron, V.; Riès, D.; Dozias, S.; Vandamme, M.; Pouvesle, J.-M.

    2012-06-01

    An experimental study of atmospheric-pressure rare gas plasma propagation in a high-aspect-ratio capillary is reported. The plasma is generated with a plasma gun device based on a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor powered by either nanosecond or microsecond rise-time high-voltage pulses at single-shot to multi-kHz frequencies. The influence of the voltage waveform, pulse polarity, pulse repetition rate and capillary material have been studied using nanosecond intensified charge-coupled device imaging and plasma-front velocity measurements. The evolution of the plasma appearance during its propagation and the study of the role of the different experimental parameters lead us to suggest a new denomination of pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma streams to describe all the plasma features, including the previously so-called plasma bullet. The unique properties of such non-thermal plasma launching in capillaries, far from the primary DBD plasma, are associated with a fast ionization wave travelling with velocity in the 107-108 cm s-1 range. Voltage pulse tailoring is shown to allow for a significant improvement of such plasma delivery. Thus, the plasma gun device affords unique opportunities in biomedical endoscopic applications.

  9. Characterization of pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma streams (PAPS) generated by a plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, E; Sarron, V; Riès, D; Dozias, S; Vandamme, M; Pouvesle, J-M

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study of atmospheric-pressure rare gas plasma propagation in a high-aspect-ratio capillary is reported. The plasma is generated with a plasma gun device based on a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor powered by either nanosecond or microsecond rise-time high-voltage pulses at single-shot to multi-kHz frequencies. The influence of the voltage waveform, pulse polarity, pulse repetition rate and capillary material have been studied using nanosecond intensified charge-coupled device imaging and plasma-front velocity measurements. The evolution of the plasma appearance during its propagation and the study of the role of the different experimental parameters lead us to suggest a new denomination of pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma streams to describe all the plasma features, including the previously so-called plasma bullet. The unique properties of such non-thermal plasma launching in capillaries, far from the primary DBD plasma, are associated with a fast ionization wave travelling with velocity in the 10 7 –10 8 cm s −1 range. Voltage pulse tailoring is shown to allow for a significant improvement of such plasma delivery. Thus, the plasma gun device affords unique opportunities in biomedical endoscopic applications. (paper)

  10. Reaction-rate coefficients, high-energy ions slowing-down, and power balance in a tokamak fusion reactor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, Tatsuzo

    1978-07-01

    Described are the reactivity coefficient of D-T fusion reaction, slowing-down processes of deuterons injected with high energy and 3.52 MeV alpha particles generated in D-T reaction, and the power balance in a Tokamak reactor plasma. Most of the results were obtained in the first preliminary design of JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) driven with stationary neutral beam injection. A manual of numerical computation program ''BALTOK'' developed for the calculations is given in the appendix. (auth.)

  11. Analysis of non-thermal velocities in the solar corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Contesse

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe new ground-based spectroscopic observations made using a 40-cm aperture coronagraph over a whole range of radial distances (up to heights of 12' above the limb and along four different heliocentric directions N, E, S and W. The analysis is limited to the study of the brightest forbidden emission line of Fe XIV at 530.3nm, in order to reach the best possible signal-to-noise ratio. To make the results statistically more significant, the extracted parameters are averaged over the whole length of the slit, and measurements are repeated fives times at each position; the corresponding dispersions in the results obtained along the slit are given. Central line profile intensities and full line widths (FWHM are plotted and compared to measurements published by other authors closer to the limb. We found widths and turbulent (non-thermal velocities of significantly higher values above the polar regions, especially when a coronal hole is present along the line of sight. We do not see a definitely decreasing behaviour of widths and turbulent velocities in equatorial directions for larger radial distances, as reported in the literature, although lower values are measured compared to the values in polar regions. The variation in the high corona is rather flat and a correlation diagram indicates that it is different for different regions and different radial distances. This seems to be the first analysis of the profiles of this coronal line, up to large heights above the limb for both equatorial and polar regions.

  12. Thermal and mechanical design of the plasma core CXRS diagnostics for the fusion reactor ITER; Thermische und mechanische Auslegung der Plasma Core CXRS Diagnostik des ITER Kernfusionsreaktors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greza, H. [WTI Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Neubauer, O.; Wolters, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    In the frame of the research project ITER (international thermonuclear experimental reactor) the plasma state is monitored using the plasma core diagnostics CXRS (charge exchange recombination spectroscopy).The authors describe the thermal and mechanical design of the first mirror of the CXRS diagnostics. The components of the first mirror are exposed to high heat and neutron irradiation. The surface temperature will be 300 to 400 deg C. The misalignment tolerance is plus or minus 0.1 degree. The maximum mechanical stresses in the mirror have to be minimized. The design calculations use the finite element code ANSYS. The results indicate that the heat input from the plasma can be removed by the coolant flow. Further calculation shave to concern the brazed joints between mirror and cooling block.

  13. Thermal and mechanical design of the plasma core CXRS diagnostics for the fusion reactor ITER; Thermische und mechanische Auslegung der Plasma Core CXRS Diagnostik des ITER Kernfusionsreaktors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greza, H.; Knauff, R. [Wissenschaftlich-Technische Ingenieurberatung GmbH (WTI), Juelich (Germany); Neubauer, O.; Wolters, J.; Offermanns, G.; Biel, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In the frame of the research project ITER (international thermonuclear experimental reactor) the plasma state is monitored using the plasma core diagnostics CXRS (charge exchange recombination spectroscopy).The authors describe the thermal and mechanical design of the first mirror of the CXRS diagnostics. The components of the first mirror are exposed to high heat and neutron irradiation. The surface temperature will be 300 to 400 deg C. The misalignment tolerance is plus or minus 0.1 degree. The maximum mechanical stresses in the mirror have to be minimized. The design calculations use the finite element code ANSYS. The results indicate that the heat input from the plasma can be removed by the coolant flow. Further calculation shave to concern the brazed joints between mirror and cooling block.

  14. Valorization of biogas into liquid hydrocarbons in plasma-catalyst reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikravech, Mehrdad; Rahmani, Abdelkader; Labidi, Sana; Saintini, Noiric

    2016-09-01

    Biogas represents an important source of renewable energy issued from biological degradation of biomass. It is planned to produce in Europe the amount of biogas equivalent to 6400 kWh electricity and 4500 kteo (kilo tons equivalent oil) in 2020. Currently the biogas is used in cogeneration engines to produce heat and electricity directly in farms or it is injected in gas networks after purification and odorisation. The aim of this work is to propose a third option that consists of valorization of biogas by transformation into liquid hydrocarbons like acetone, methanol, ethanol, acetic acid etc. These chemicals, among the most important feed materials for chemical industries, retain CO2 molecules participating to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions and have high storage energy capacity. We developed a low temperature atmospheric plasma-catalyst reactor (surface dielectric barrier discharge) to transform biogas into chemicals. The conversion rates of CH4 and CO2 are respectively about 50% and 30% depending on operational conditions. The energetic cost is 25 eV/molecule. The yields of liquid hydrocarbon reaches currently 10% wt. More the 11 liquid chemicals are observed in the liquid fraction. Acknowledgements are due to SPC Programme Energie de demain.

  15. Study of Raw Materials Treatment by Melting and Gasification Process in Plasma Arc Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter KURILLA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The world consumption of metals and energy has increased in last few decades and it is still increasing. Total volume production results to higher waste production. Raw material basis of majority metals and fossil fuels for energy production is more complex and current waste treatment has long term tendency. Spent power cells of different types have been unneeded and usually they are classified as dangerous waste. This important issue is the main topic of the thesis, in which author describes pyrometallurgical method for storage batteries – power cells and catalysts treatment. During the process there were tested a trial of spent NiMH, Li – ion power cells and spent copper catalysts with metal content treatment by melting and gasification process in plasma arc reactor. The synthetic gas produced from gasification process has been treated by cogenerations micro turbines units for energy recovery. The metal and slag from treatment process are produced into two separately phases and they were analyzing continually.

  16. Packed-bed reactor/silent-discharge plasma design data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facility Compliance Act requiring the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). The DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) currently does not have adequate systems to treat the mixed wastes generated and stored at the nine DOE-AL sites. In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity, DOE-AL organized a Treatment Selection Team under the Mixed-Waste Treatment Program (MWTP) to match mixed wastes with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of its mixed waste. The strategy developed by the Treatment Selection Team, as described in the AL Mixed-Waste Treatment Plan (DOE 1994), is to use available off-site commercial treatment facilities for all wastes that can be successfully and cost-effectively treated by such facilities. Where no appropriate commercial treatment facilities exist, mobile treatment units (MTUs) would be developed to treat wastes at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed waste must not only address the hazardous component (i.e., meet LDRs) but also must contain the radioactive component in a form that allows final disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. The packed-bed reactor/silent discharge plasma was chosen as a potential candidate for the treatment of the mixed wastes. The process is described.

  17. Packed-bed reactor/silent-discharge plasma design data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facility Compliance Act requiring the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). The DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) currently does not have adequate systems to treat the mixed wastes generated and stored at the nine DOE-AL sites. In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity, DOE-AL organized a Treatment Selection Team under the Mixed-Waste Treatment Program (MWTP) to match mixed wastes with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of its mixed waste. The strategy developed by the Treatment Selection Team, as described in the AL Mixed-Waste Treatment Plan (DOE 1994), is to use available off-site commercial treatment facilities for all wastes that can be successfully and cost-effectively treated by such facilities. Where no appropriate commercial treatment facilities exist, mobile treatment units (MTUs) would be developed to treat wastes at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed waste must not only address the hazardous component (i.e., meet LDRs) but also must contain the radioactive component in a form that allows final disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. The packed-bed reactor/silent discharge plasma was chosen as a potential candidate for the treatment of the mixed wastes. The process is described

  18. Electron temperature profiles in high power neutral-beam-heated TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.; Grek, B.; Stauffer, F.J.; Goldston, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Wieland, R.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1987-09-01

    In 1986, the maximum neutral beam injection (NBI) power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was increased to 20 MW, with three beams co-parallel and one counter-parallel to I/sub p/. TFTR was operated over a wide range of plasma parameters; 2.5 19 19 m -3 . Data bases have been constructed with over 600 measured electron temperature profiles from multipoint TV Thomson scattering which span much of this parameter space. We have also examined electron temperature profile shapes from electron cyclotron emission at the fundamental ordinary mode and second harmonic extraordinary mode for a subset of these discharges. In the light of recent work on ''profile consistency'' we have analyzed these temperature profiles in the range 0.3 < (r/a) < 0.9 to determine if a profile shape exists which is insensitive to q/sub cyl/ and beam-heating profile. Data from both sides of the temperature profile [T/sub e/(R)] were mapped to magnetic flux surfaces [T/sub e/(r/a)]. Although T/sub e/(r/a), in the region where 0.3 < r/a < 0.9 was found to be slightly broader at lower q/sub cyl/, it was found to be remarkably insensitive to β/sub p/, to the fraction of NBI power injected co-parallel to I/sub p/, and to the heating profile going from peaked on axis, to hollow. 10 refs., 8 figs

  19. Free fall plasma-arc reactor for synthesis of carbon nanotubes in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    High temperatures inside the plasma of a carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection which has an effect on the growth and morphology of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was designed and developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from buoyant convective flows. An arc reactor was operated in the 2.2 and 5.18 s drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The apparatus employed a 4 mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300 A at 30 V to the arc for the duration of a 5 s drop. However, the principal result is that no dramatic difference in sample yield or composition was noted between normal gravity and 2.2 and 5 s long microgravity runs. Much longer duration microgravity time is required for SWNT's growth such as the zero-G aircraft, but more likely will need to be performed on the international space station or an orbiting spacecraft

  20. Modeling of thermal effects on TIBER II [Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor] divertor during plasma disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, M.L.; Perkins, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping the disruption power flow from the mid-plane of the TIBER Engineering Test Reactor to its divertor and calculating the resulting thermal effects are accomplished through the modification and coupling of three presently existing computer codes. The resulting computer code TADDPAK (Thermal Analysis Divertor during Disruption PAcKage) provides three-dimensional graphic presentations of time and positional dependent thermal effects on a poloidal cross section of the double-null-divertor configured reactor. These thermal effects include incident heat flux, surface temperature, vaporization rate, total vaporization, and melting depth. The dependence of these thermal effects on material choice, disruption pulse shape, and the characteristic thickness of the plasma scrape-off layer is determined through parametric analysis with TADDPAK. This computer code is designed to be a convenient, rapid, and user-friendly modeling tool which can be easily adapted to most tokamak double-null-divertor reactor designs. 14 refs

  1. Evaluation on nitrogen oxides and nanoparticle removal and nitrogen monoxide generation using a wet-type nonthermal plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehana, Kotaro; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2018-05-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted from power plants and combustion sources cause air pollution problems. Selective catalytic reduction technology is remarkably useful for NOx removal. However, there are several drawbacks such as preparation of reducing agents, usage of harmful heavy metals, and higher cost. On the other hand, trace NO is a vasodilator agent and employed in inhalation therapies for treating pulmonary hypertension in humans. Considering these factors, in the present study, a wet-type nonthermal plasma reactor, which can control NOx and nanoparticle emissions and generate NO, is investigated. The fundamental characteristics of the reactor are investigated. First, the experiment of nanoparticle removal is carried out. Collection efficiencies of over 99% are achieved for nanoparticles at 50 and 100 ml min‑1 of liquid flow rates. Second, experiments of NOx removal under air atmosphere and NOx generation under nitrogen atmosphere are carried out. NOx-removal efficiencies of over 95% under the air plasma are achieved in 50–200 ml min‑1 liquid flow rates. Moreover, under nitrogen plasma, NOx is generated, of which the major portion is NO. For example, NO concentration is 25 ppm, while NOx concentration is 31 ppm at 50 ml min‑1 liquid flow rate. Finally, experiments of NO generation under the nitrogen atmosphere with or without flowing water are carried out. When water flows on the inner surface of the reactor, approximately 14 ppm of NO is generated. Therefore, NO generation requires flowing water. It is considered that the reaction of N and OH, which is similar to the extended Zeldovich mechanism, could occur to induce NO formation. From these results, it is verified that the wet-type plasma reactor is useful for NOx removal and NO generation under nitrogen atmosphere with flowing water.

  2. Local Physics Basis of Confinement Degradation in JET ELMy H-Mode Plasmas and Implications for Tokamak Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budny, R.V.; Alper, B.; Borba, D.; Cordey, J.G.; Ernst, D.R.; Gowers, C.

    2001-01-01

    First results of gyrokinetic analysis of JET [Joint European Torus] ELMy [Edge Localized Modes] H-mode [high-confinement modes] plasmas are presented. ELMy H-mode plasmas form the basis of conservative performance predictions for tokamak reactors of the size of ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor]. Relatively high performance for long duration has been achieved and the scaling appears to be favorable. It will be necessary to sustain low Z(subscript eff) and high density for high fusion yield. This paper studies the degradation in confinement and increase in the anomalous heat transport observed in two JET plasmas: one with an intense gas puff and the other with a spontaneous transition between Type I to III ELMs at the heating power threshold. Linear gyrokinetic analysis gives the growth rate, gamma(subscript lin) of the fastest growing modes. The flow-shearing rate omega(subscript ExB) and gamma(subscript lin) are large near the top of the pedestal. Their ratio decreases approximately when the confinement degrades and the transport increases. This suggests that tokamak reactors may require intense toroidal or poloidal torque input to maintain sufficiently high |gamma(subscript ExB)|/gamma(subscript lin) near the top of the pedestal for high confinement

  3. IRIS , Hinode , SDO , and RHESSI Observations of a White Light Flare Produced Directly by Non-thermal Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun [Hinode Science Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Imada, Shinsuke [Institute for Space–Earth Environmental Research (ISEE), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Watanabe, Kyoko [National Defense Academy of Japan, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka 239-8686 (Japan); Bamba, Yumi [Hinode team, ISAS/JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Brooks, David H., E-mail: ksun.lee@nao.ac.jp [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2017-02-20

    An X1.6 flare occurred in active region AR 12192 on 2014 October 22 at 14:02 UT and was observed by Hinode , IRIS , SDO , and RHESSI . We analyze a bright kernel that produces a white light (WL) flare with continuum enhancement and a hard X-ray (HXR) peak. Taking advantage of the spectroscopic observations of IRIS and Hinode /EIS, we measure the temporal variation of the plasma properties in the bright kernel in the chromosphere and corona. We find that explosive evaporation was observed when the WL emission occurred, even though the intensity enhancement in hotter lines is quite weak. The temporal correlation of the WL emission, HXR peak, and evaporation flows indicates that the WL emission was produced by accelerated electrons. To understand the WL emission process, we calculated the energy flux deposited by non-thermal electrons (observed by RHESSI ) and compared it to the dissipated energy estimated from a chromospheric line (Mg ii triplet) observed by IRIS . The deposited energy flux from the non-thermal electrons is about (3–7.7) × 10{sup 10} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} for a given low-energy cutoff of 30–40 keV, assuming the thick-target model. The energy flux estimated from the changes in temperature in the chromosphere measured using the Mg ii subordinate line is about (4.6–6.7) × 10{sup 9} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}: ∼6%–22% of the deposited energy. This comparison of estimated energy fluxes implies that the continuum enhancement was directly produced by the non-thermal electrons.

  4. Feasibility studies on plasma vertical position control by ex-vessel coils in ITER-like tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Shimomura, Yasuo

    1993-01-01

    Feasibility of the plasma vertical position control by control coils installed outside the vacuum vessel (ex-vessel) in a tokamak fusion reactor is examined for an ITER-like device. When a pair of ex-vessel control coils is made of normal conductor material and located near the outmost superconducting (SC) poloidal field (PF) coils, the applied voltage of several hundred volts on the control coils is the maximum allowable value which is limited by the maximum allowable induced voltage and eddy current heating on the SC PF coils, under the conditions that the SC PF coils are connected in series and a partitioning connection is employed for each of these PF coils. A proportional and derivative (PD) controller with and without voltage limitation has been employed to examine the feasibility. Indices of settling time and overshoot are introduced to measure the controllability of the control system. Based on these control schemes and indices, higher elongation (κ=2) and moderate elongation (κ=1.6) plasmas are examined for normal and deteriorated (low beta value and peaked current profile) plasma conditions within the restriction of applied voltage and current of control coils. The effect of the time constant of the passive stabilizer is also examined. The major results are: (1) A plasma with an elongation of 2.0 inevitably requires a passive stabilizer close to the plasma surface, (2) in case of a higher elongation than κ=2, even the ex-vessel control coil system is marginally controllable under normal plasma conditions, while it is difficult to control the deteriorated plasma conditions, (3) the time constant of the passive stabilizer is not an essential parameter for the controllability, (4) when the elongation is reduced down to 1.6, the ex-vessel control coil system can control the plasma even under deteriorated plasma conditions. (orig.)

  5. Report of the study meeting on the interaction between plasma and the first wall of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Akira; Akaishi, Kenya; Kawamura, Takaichi; Kabetani, Zenzaburo; Sagara, Akio.

    1978-12-01

    The study meeting on the interaction between plasma and the first wall of a fusion reactor was held from July 24 to July 27, 1978. At this meeting, discussions were made on the interaction between plasma and wall and the effect of impurities. Reports on the ISS observation concerning the Mo surface as a limiter, on the measurement of sputter rate by a microbalance, on the surface roughness of the materials for the first wall at the atomic order, on the selective sputtering of binary alloys, and on the physical and chemical sputtering on the material surface of C and SiC were also presented. The research projects of the Institute of Plasma Physics and Hokkaido University were introduced. Collaboration of two groups was considered. (Kato, T.)

  6. A Non-thermal Pulsed X-Ray Emission of AR Scorpii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, J.; Hu, C.-P.; Lin, L. C. C.; Tam, P. H. T.; Pal, P. S.; Hui, C. Y.; Kong, A. K. H.; Cheng, K. S.

    2018-02-01

    We report the analysis result of UV/X-ray emission from AR Scorpii, which is an intermediate polar (IP) composed of a magnetic white dwarf and an M-type star, with the XMM-Newton data. The X-ray/UV emission clearly shows a large variation over the orbit, and their intensity maximum (or minimum) is located at the superior conjunction (or inferior conjunction) of the M star orbit. The hardness ratio of the X-ray emission shows a small variation over the orbital phase and shows no indication of the absorption by an accretion column. These properties are naturally explained by the emission from the M star surface rather than that from the accretion column on the white dwarf’s (WD) star, which is similar to usual IPs. Additionally, the observed X-ray emission also modulates with the WD’s spin with a pulse fraction of ∼14%. The peak position is aligned in the optical/UV/X-ray band. This supports the hypothesis that the electrons in AR Scorpii are accelerated to a relativistic speed and emit non-thermal photons via the synchrotron radiation. In the X-ray bands, evidence of the power-law spectrum is found in the pulsed component, although the observed emission is dominated by the optically thin thermal plasma emissions with several different temperatures. It is considered that the magnetic dissipation/reconnection process on the M star surface heats up the plasma to a temperature of several keV and also accelerates the electrons to the relativistic speed. The relativistic electrons are trapped in the WD’s closed magnetic field lines by the magnetic mirror effect. In this model, the observed pulsed component is explained by the emissions from the first magnetic mirror point.

  7. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor: an efficient tool to prepare novel RuO2 nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananth, Antony; Gandhi, Mani Sanjeeva; Mok, Young Sun

    2013-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructured materials have attracted a great deal of interest owing to their potential applications in various industries. Due to the limitations and cost associated with conventional low-pressure plasma systems, atmospheric-pressure plasma techniques such as dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) are investigated as an alternative approach for inducing specific chemical reactions. RuO 2 nanomaterials are widely used as supercapacitor electrodes, in field-emission devices and for catalytic applications. In such applications, size and shape dependent properties of nanomaterials play critical roles in improving the performance. In this paper, an attempt is made to prepare 1D RuO 2 nanostructured materials using a DBD plasma. It is reported here that the composition of feed gas is an important factor in determining the final morphology. For example, an Ar + H 2 plasma yields aggregated RuO 2 nanostructures, whereas ‘nanopillar’ and ‘nanorod’ morphologies are obtained when using Ar + O 2 and Ar, respectively. Possible mechanisms behind the morphological differences are elucidated on the basis of the temperature variations inside the plasma reactor and the chemistry of the gaseous reactive species. The application of a DBD plasma to the synthesis of RuO 2 nanorods is reported for the first time in this paper. (paper)

  8. Spontaneous non-thermal leptogenesis in high-scale inflation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, M.; Takahashi, F.; Yanagida, T.T.; Tokyo Univ.

    2006-11-01

    We argue that a non-thermal leptogenesis occurs spontaneously, without direct couplings of the inflation with right-handed neutrinos, in a wide class of high-scale inflation models such as the chaotic and hybrid inflation. It is only a finite vacuum expectation value of the inflaton, of more precisely, a linear term in the Kaehler potential, that is a prerequisite for the spontaneous non-thermal leptogenesis. To exemplify how it works, we show that a chaotic inflation model in supergravity naturally produces a right amount of baryon asymmetry via the spontaneous non-thermal leptogenesis. We also discuss the gravitino production from the inflation. (orig.)

  9. Non-thermal emission from young supernova remnants: Implications on cosmic ray acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya-Arguedas, Miguel A.

    For a long time, supernova remnants have been thought to constitute the main source of galactic cosmic rays. Plausible mechanisms have been proposed through which these objects would be able to transfer some of their energy to charged particles. Detailed studies of SNRs, particularly allowed by the spectral and spatial resolution obtained with telescopes such as the Chandra X-Ray Observatory , have permitted us to understand some of the properties of high-energy particles within these objects and their interactions with their environment. In the first part of this work, the basic concepts of particle acceleration in SNRs are outlined, and the main observational tools available today for studying high-energy phenomena in astrophysics are mentioned briefly. In the second part, a study of non-thermal emission from the young SNR Cassiopeia A is presented. Through the use of a very deep one million-second Chandra observation of this remnant, the spectral evolution across non-thermal filaments near the forward shock was studied. A consistent hardening of the spectrum towards the exterior of the remnant was found and explained via a model developed that takes into account particle diffusion, plasma advection and radiation losses. The role of particle diffusion was studied and its effect on the photon spectral index quantified. In the model, the diffusion is included as a fraction of Bohm-type diffusion, which is consistent with the data. The model also allowed an estimation of the electron distribution, the magnetic field and its orientation, as well as the level of magnetic turbulence. In the third part, a multi-wavelength study of two young SNRs is presented. Multi-wavelength modeling of spectral energy distributions (SED) may hold the key to disentangle the nature and content of cosmic rays within these objects. The first model shown presents state of the art measurements gathered for Cassiopeia A, and the modeling is based partly on the results presented in the second

  10. Plasma and catalyst for the oxidation of NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jögi, I.; Erme, K.; Levoll, E.

    2017-01-01

    The removal of NOx from the exhaust gases requires the oxidation of most abundant NO to NO2 or N2O5. The oxidation can be done by non-thermal plasma but the efficiency is limited due to the back-reaction of NO2 to NO by O radicals. Present contribution investigates the role of catalysts in the im......The removal of NOx from the exhaust gases requires the oxidation of most abundant NO to NO2 or N2O5. The oxidation can be done by non-thermal plasma but the efficiency is limited due to the back-reaction of NO2 to NO by O radicals. Present contribution investigates the role of catalysts...... in the improvement of oxidation efficiency based on the stationary and time-dependent studies of the NOx oxidation at different reactor configurations and experimental conditions. The plasma produced active oxygen species (O, O3) were shown to play an important role in the reactions taking place on the catalyst...... surfaces while the exact mechanism and extent of the effect depended on the reactor configuration. The effect of catalyst at different experimental conditions was quantitatively described with the aid of analytical lumped kinetic models derived for the NOx oxidation when the catalyst was directly...

  11. Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  12. COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON–ION SHOCKS IN RELATIVISTIC UNMAGNETIZED JET–AMBIENT INTERACTIONS: NON-THERMAL ELECTRON INJECTION BY DOUBLE LAYER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardaneh, Kazem; Cai, Dongsheng; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    The course of non-thermal electron ejection in relativistic unmagnetized electron–ion shocks is investigated by performing self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. The shocks are excited through the injection of a relativistic jet into ambient plasma, leading to two distinct shocks (referred to as the trailing shock and leading shock) and a contact discontinuity. The Weibel-like instabilities heat the electrons up to approximately half of the ion kinetic energy. The double layers formed in the trailing and leading edges then accelerate the electrons up to the ion kinetic energy. The electron distribution function in the leading edge shows a clear, non-thermal power-law tail which contains ∼1% of electrons and ∼8% of the electron energy. Its power-law index is −2.6. The acceleration efficiency is ∼23% by number and ∼50% by energy, and the power-law index is −1.8 for the electron distribution function in the trailing edge. The effect of the dimensionality is examined by comparing the results of three-dimensional simulations with those of two-dimensional simulations. The comparison demonstrates that electron acceleration is more efficient in two dimensions.

  13. Effects of vortex-like and non-thermal ion distributions on non-linear dust-acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamun, A.A.; Cairns, R.A.; Shukla, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of vortex-like and non-thermal ion distributions are incorporated in the study of nonlinear dust-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma. It is found that owing to the departure from the Boltzmann ion distribution to a vortex-like phase space distribution, the dynamics of small but finite amplitude dust-acoustic waves is governed by a modified Kortweg endash de Vries equation. The latter admits a stationary dust-acoustic solitary wave solution, which has larger amplitude, smaller width, and higher propagation velocity than that involving adiabatic ions. On the other hand, consideration of a non-thermal ion distribution provides the possibility of coexistence of large amplitude rarefactive as well as compressive dust-acoustic solitary waves, whereas these structures appear independently when the wave amplitudes become infinitely small. The present investigation should help us to understand the salient features of the non-linear dust-acoustic waves that have been observed in a recent numerical simulation study. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. Predictions of ion energy distributions and radical fluxes in radio frequency biased inductively coupled plasma etching reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Robert J.; Kushner, Mark J.

    1996-03-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactors are being developed for low gas pressure (radio frequency (rf) bias is applied to the substrate. One of the goals of these systems is to independently control the magnitude of the ion flux by the inductively coupled power deposition, and the acceleration of ions into the substrate by the rf bias. In high plasma density reactors the width of the sheath above the wafer may be sufficiently thin that ions are able to traverse it in approximately 1 rf cycle, even at 13.56 MHz. As a consequence, the ion energy distribution (IED) may have a shape typically associated with lower frequency operation in conventional reactive ion etching tools. In this paper, we present results from a computer model for the IED incident on the wafer in ICP etching reactors. We find that in the parameter space of interest, the shape of the IED depends both on the amplitude of the rf bias and on the ICP power. The former quantity determines the average energy of the IED. The latter quantity controls the width of the sheath, the transit time of ions across the sheath and hence the width of the IED. In general, high ICP powers (thinner sheaths) produce wider IEDs.

  15. Plasma induced material defects and threshold values for thermal loads in high temperature resistant alloys and in refractory metals for first wall application in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.; Hoven, H.; Kny, E.; Koizlik, K.; Linke, J.; Nickel, H.; Wallura, E.

    1986-10-01

    Materials for the application in the first wall of fusion reactors of the tokamak type are subjected to pulsed heat fluxes which range from some 0.5 MW m -2 to 10 MW m -2 during normal plasma operation, and which can exceed 1000 MW m -2 during total plasma disruptions. The structural defects and material fatigue caused by this types of plasma wall interaction are investigated and the results are plotted in threshold loading curves. Additionally, the results are, as far as possible, compared with quantitative, theoretical calculations. These procedures allow a semiquantitative evaluation of the applicability of the mentioned metals in the first wall of fusion reactors. (orig.) [de

  16. A new non-thermal galactic radio source with a possible binary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerst, E.; Reich, W.; Reich, P.; Sofue, Y.; Handa, T.

    1985-01-01

    A galactic object [G18.95-1.1], detected recently in a galactic plane survey, may belong to a new class of non-thermal radio sources that originate in accreting binary systems. The data on integrated flux density spectral index and the polarization, proves the non-thermal nature of the source. The morphology defies any classification as a supernova remnant. The authors suggest that the object is a binary system containing a compact component. (U.K.)

  17. SYNTHESIS OF BIODIESEL ON A HYBRID CATALYTIC-PLASMA REACTOR OVER K2O/CaO-ZnO CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqman Buchori

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to study the synergistic effects of dielectric barrier discharge plasma and 5 % K2O/CaO-ZnO catalyst on biodiesel synthesis. The catalyst was prepared using co-precipitation followed by impregnation method. The catalyst was characterized by XRD, while the catalyst basicity was tested by titration method. The effects of voltage, weight hourly space velocity (WHSV, and catalyst pellet diameter on the yield of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME and biodiesel were studied. The transesterification process within and without plasma environment was investigated to find synergistic effect between the role of high energetic electrons from the plasma through the catalytic reaction zone and the role of basicity in the catalyst. From the results, an applied voltage of 5 kV, a WHSV of 1.186 min-1, and a catalyst diameter of 5 mm gave the better FAME yield of 77.19 %. The reaction time required was only 1.25 minutes at a discharge power of 530 W. This result proved that the plasma environment has a significant effect on performance of the hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor for biodiesel production.

  18. Numerical simulation of dual frequency etching reactors: Influence of the external process parameters on the plasma characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgieva, V.; Bogaerts, A.

    2005-01-01

    A one-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo model is used to investigate Ar/CF 4 /N 2 discharges sustained in capacitively coupled dual frequency reactors, with special emphasis on the influence of the reactor parameters such as applied voltage amplitudes and frequencies of the two voltage sources. The presented calculation results include plasma density, ion current, average sheath potential and width, electron and ion average energies and energy distributions, and ionization rates. The simulations were carried out for high frequencies (HFs) of 27, 40, 60, and 100 MHz and a low frequency (LF) of 1 or 2 MHz, varying the LF voltage and keeping the HF voltage constant and vice versa. It is observed that the decoupling of the two sources is possible by increasing the applied HF to very high values (above 60 MHz) and it is not defined by the frequency ratio. Both voltage sources have influence on the plasma characteristics at a HF of 27 MHz and to some extent at 40 MHz. At HFs of 60 and 100 MHz, the plasma density and ion flux are determined only by the HF voltage source. The ion energy increases and the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) becomes broader with HF or LF voltage amplitude, when the other voltage is kept constant. The IEDF is broader with the increase of HF or the decrease of LF

  19. On the Absence of Non-thermal X-Ray Emission around Runaway O Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toalá, J. A. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA), Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Oskinova, L. M. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Theoretical models predict that the compressed interstellar medium around runaway O stars can produce high-energy non-thermal diffuse emission, in particular, non-thermal X-ray and γ -ray emission. So far, detection of non-thermal X-ray emission was claimed for only one runaway star, AE Aur. We present a search for non-thermal diffuse X-ray emission from bow shocks using archived XMM-Newton observations for a clean sample of six well-determined runaway O stars. We find that none of these objects present diffuse X-ray emission associated with their bow shocks, similarly to previous X-ray studies toward ζ Oph and BD+43°3654. We carefully investigated multi-wavelength observations of AE Aur and could not confirm previous findings of non-thermal X-rays. We conclude that so far there is no clear evidence of non-thermal extended emission in bow shocks around runaway O stars.

  20. Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Cladding materials via Spark Plasma Sintering for Ultra High Temperature Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charit, Indrajit; Butt, Darryl; Frary, Megan; Carroll, Mark

    2012-11-05

    This research will develop an optimized, cost-effective method for producing high-purity tungsten-rhenium alloyed fuel clad forms that are crucial for the development of a very high-temperature nuclear reactor. The study will provide critical insight into the fundamental behavior (processing-microstructure- property correlations) of W-Re alloys made using this new fabrication process comprising high-energy ball milling (HEBM) and spark plasma sintering (SPS). A broader goal is to re-establish the U.S. lead in the research field of refractory alloys, such as W-Re systems, with potential applications in very high-temperature nuclear reactors. An essential long-term goal for nuclear power is to develop the capability of operating nuclear reactors at temperatures in excess of 1,000K. This capability has applications in space exploration and some special terrestrial uses where high temperatures are needed in certain chemical or reforming processes. Refractory alloys have been identified as being capable of withstanding temperatures in excess of 1,000K and are considered critical for the development of ultra hightemperature reactors. Tungsten alloys are known to possess extraordinary properties, such as excellent high-temperature capability, including the ability to resist leakage of fissile materials when used as a fuel clad. However, there are difficulties with the development of refractory alloys: 1) lack of basic experimental data on thermodynamics and mechanical and physical properties, and 2) challenges associated with processing these alloys.

  1. TMRBAR: a code to calculate plasma parameters for tandem-mirror reactors operating in the MARS mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the plasma power balance model currently used by LLNL to calculate steady state operating points for tandem mirror reactors. The code developed from this model, TMRBAR, has been used to predict the performance and define supplementary heating requirements for drivers used in the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) and for the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) study. The equations solved included particle and energy balance for central cell and end cell species, quasineutrality at several cardinal points in the end cell region, as well as calculations of volumes, densities and average energies based on given constraints of beta profiles and fusion power output. Alpha particle ash is treated self-consistently, but no other impurity species is treated

  2. Plasma CVD reactor with two-microwave oscillators for diamond film synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatsu, M.; Miyake, M.; Maeda, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we present the experimental results of a new type of microwave plasma CVD system, where two of 1.5 kW microwave sources were used for enlarging the plasma discharge and the diamond film growth. One of the microwave oscillators was used to produce the microwave plasma as in the conventional microwave plasma CVD device, while the second one was used to enlarge the plasma by introducing microwave from the launcher mounted at the substrate stage. We demonstrated the enlargement of plasma discharge area from 60 mm to 100 mm in diameter by using the two-microwave oscillators system. Characteristics of diamond films deposited using H 2 /CH 4 plasmas were also investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy

  3. Report of second meeting on the interaction of plasma and the first wall of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashina, Toshiro; Watanabe, Kuniaki; Mori, Mamoru; Tominaga, Goro; Kinbara, Akira.

    1979-10-01

    This report presents various problems on the interaction between plasma and materials. The first half of this report is the reports of international meetings. First topical meeting on fusion reactor materials, IEA-Textor workshop on surface measurements, and sixth international vacuum metallurgy conference on special melting and metallurgical coatings are summarized. The other half of the report is described on the present and future plans of the analysis of material surfaces which are carried out at the laboratories in Japan. The last part of the report introduces the TEXTOR international cooperative study project. (Kato, T.)

  4. Functionalization of polymer powders for SLS-processes using an atmospheric plasma jet in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, Marius; Schmitt, Adeliene; Schmidt, Jochen; Peukert, Wolfgang; Wirth, Karl-Ernst [Institute of Particle Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    Recently additive manufacturing processes such as selective laser sintering (SLS) of polymers have gained more importance for industrial applications [1]. Tailor-made modification of polymers is essential in order to make these processes more efficient and to cover the industrial demands. The so far used polymer materials show weak performance regarding the mechanical stability of processed parts. To overcome this limitation, a new route to functionalize the surface of commercially available polymer particles (PA12; PE-HD; PP) using an atmospheric plasma jet in combination with a fluidized bed reactor has been investigated. Consequently, an improvement of adhesion and wettability [2] of the polymer surface without restraining the bulk properties of the powder is achieved. The atmospheric plasma jet process can provide reactive species at moderate temperatures which are suitable for polymer material. The functionalization of the polymer powders improves the quality of the devices build in a SLS-process.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigations of a plasma reactor for the thermal destruction of medical waste using a model substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, J; Lietz, E; Bendix, D; Hebecker, D

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration plant for the thermal destruction of medical waste using dc plasma torches as the energy source has been developed and tested in several set-ups and under different conditions. Three-dimensional CFD modelling of the gaseous phase in the thermal plasma reactor has been carried out to investigate the experimentally observed phenomena, with the objective of improving the process with respect to conversion rate and power consumption per unit weight. Several models for energy release, and additional parameter studies required to approach the real process as closely as possible, will be discussed. Results for velocity, temperature, and residence time distribution are presented and qualitatively compared with images taken from the running process

  6. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  7. Influence of the low-frequency source parameters on the plasma characteristics in a dual frequency capacitively coupled plasma reactor: Two dimensional simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Xu; Hao Ge; Shuai Wang; Zhongling Dai; Younian Wang; Aimin Zhu

    2009-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) fluid model is presented to study the discharge of argon in a dual frequency capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) reactor. We are interested in the influence of low-frequency (LF) source parameters such as applied voltage amplitudes and low frequencies on the plasma characteristics. In this paper, the high frequency is set to 60 MHz with voltage 50 V. The simulations were carried out for low frequencies of 1, 2 and 6 MHz with LF voltage 100 V, and for LF voltages of 60, 90 and 120 V with low frequency 2 MHz. The results of 2D distributions of electric field and ion density, the ion flux impinging on the substrate and the ion energy on the powered electrode are shown. As the low frequency increases, two sources become from uncoupling to coupling, When two sources are uncoupling, the increase in LF has little impact on the plasma characteristics, but when two sources are coupling, the increase in LF decreases the uniformities of ion density and ion flux noticeably. It is also found that with the increase in LF voltage, the uniformities in the radial direction of ion density distribution and ion flux at the powered electrode decreases significantly, and the energy of ions bombarding on the powered electrode increases significantly.

  8. The component content of active particles in a plasma-chemical reactor based on volume barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloshenko, I. A.; Tsiolko, V. V.; Pogulay, S. S.; Terent'yeva, A. G.; Bazhenov, V. Yu; Shchedrin, A. I.; Ryabtsev, A. V.; Kuzmichev, A. I.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper the results of theoretical and experimental studies of the component content of active particles formed in a plasma-chemical reactor composed of a multiple-cell generator of active particles, based on volume barrier discharge, and a working chamber are presented. For calculation of the content of uncharged plasma components an approach is proposed which is based on averaging of the power introduced over the entire volume. Advantages of such an approach lie in an absence of fitting parameters, such as the dimensions of microdischarges, their surface density and rate of breakdown. The calculation and the experiment were accomplished with the use of dry air (20% relative humidity) as the plasma generating medium. Concentrations of O3, HNO3, HNO2, N2 O5 and NO3 were measured experimentally in the discharge volume and working chamber for the residence time of particles on a discharge of 0.3 s and more and discharge specific power of 1.5 W cm-3. It has been determined that the best agreement between the calculation and the experiment occurs at calculated gas medium temperatures in the discharge plasma of about 400-425 K, which correspond to the experimentally measured rotational temperature of nitrogen. In most cases the calculated concentrations of O3, HNO3, HNO2, N2O5 and NO3 for the barrier discharge and the working chamber are in fairly good agreement with the respective measured values.

  9. The component content of active particles in a plasma-chemical reactor based on volume barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloshenko, I A; Tsiolko, V V; Pogulay, S S; Terent'yeva, A G; Bazhenov, V Yu; Shchedrin, A I; Ryabtsev, A V; Kuzmichev, A I

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the results of theoretical and experimental studies of the component content of active particles formed in a plasma-chemical reactor composed of a multiple-cell generator of active particles, based on volume barrier discharge, and a working chamber are presented. For calculation of the content of uncharged plasma components an approach is proposed which is based on averaging of the power introduced over the entire volume. Advantages of such an approach lie in an absence of fitting parameters, such as the dimensions of microdischarges, their surface density and rate of breakdown. The calculation and the experiment were accomplished with the use of dry air (20% relative humidity) as the plasma generating medium. Concentrations of O 3 , HNO 3 , HNO 2 , N 2 O 5 and NO 3 were measured experimentally in the discharge volume and working chamber for the residence time of particles on a discharge of 0.3 s and more and discharge specific power of 1.5 W cm -3 . It has been determined that the best agreement between the calculation and the experiment occurs at calculated gas medium temperatures in the discharge plasma of about 400-425 K, which correspond to the experimentally measured rotational temperature of nitrogen. In most cases the calculated concentrations of O 3 , HNO 3 , HNO 2 , N 2 O 5 and NO 3 for the barrier discharge and the working chamber are in fairly good agreement with the respective measured values

  10. Collaboration on Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Text Reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrator, T.

    2000-01-01

    This proposal was peer reviewed and funded as a Collaboration on ''Low Phase Speed Radio Frequency Current Drive Experiments at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''. The original plans we had were to carry out the collaboration proposal by including a post doctoral scientist stationed at PPPL. In response to a 60+% funding cut, all expenses were radically pruned. The post doctoral position was eliminated, and the Principal Investigator (T. Intrator) carried out the brunt of the collaboration. Visits to TFTR enabled T. Intrator to set up access to the TFTR computing network, database, and get familiar with the new antennas that were being installed in TFTR during an up to air. One unfortunate result of the budget squeeze that TFTR felt for its last year of operation was that the experiments that we specifically got funded to perform were not granted run time on TFTR., On the other hand we carried out some modeling of the electric field structure around the four strap direct launch Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) antenna that was operated on TFTR. This turned out to be a useful exercise and shed some light on the operational characteristics of the IBW antenna and its coupling to the plasma. Because of this turn of events, the project was renamed ''Modeling of Ion Bernstein Wave Antenna Array and Coupling to Plasma on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor''

  11. Theory and measurements of electrophoretic effects in monolith, fixed-bed, and fluidized-bed plasma reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morin, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Pressure gradients and secondary flow fields generated by the passage of electrical current in a d.c. gas discharge or gas laser are topics of longstanding interest in the gaseous electronics literature. These hydrodynamic effects of space charge fields and charged particle density gradients have been principally exploited in the development of gas separation and purification processes. In recent characterization studies of fixed-bed and fluidized-bed plasma reactors several anomalous flow features have been observed. These reactors involve the contacting of a high-frequency, resonantly-sustained, disperse gas discharge with granular solids in a fixed or fluidized bed. Anomalies in the measured pressure drops and fluidization velocities have motivated the development of an appropriate theoretical approach to, and some additional experimental investigations of electrophoretic effects in disperse gas discharges. In this paper, a theory which includes the effects of space charge and diffusion is used to estimate the electric field and charged particle density profiles. These profiles are then used to calculate velocity fields and gas flow rates for monolith, fixed-bed, and fluidized-bed reactors. These results are used to rationalize measurements of gas flow rates and axial pressure gradients in high-frequency disperse gas discharges with and without an additional d.c. axial electric field

  12. Tailoring nanomaterial products through electrode material and oxygen partial pressure in a mini-arc plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Shumao; Mattson, Eric C.; Lu, Ganhua; Hirschmugl, Carol; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija; Chen Junhong

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials with controllable morphology and composition are synthesized by a simple one-step vapor condensation process using a mini-arc plasma source. Through systematic investigation of mini-arc reactor parameters, the roles of carrier gas, electrode material, and precursor on producing diverse nanomaterial products are revealed. Desired nanomaterial products, including tungsten oxide nanoparticles (NPs), tungsten oxide nanorods (NRs), tungsten oxide and tin oxide NP mixtures and pure tin dioxide NPs can thus be obtained by tailoring reaction conditions. The amount of oxygen in the reactor is critical to determining the final nanomaterial product. Without any precursor material present, a lower level of oxygen in the reactor favors the production of W 18 O 49 NRs with tungsten as cathode, while a high level of oxygen produces more round WO 3 NPs. With the presence of a precursor material, amorphous particles are favored with a high ratio of argon:oxygen. Oxygen is also found to affect tin oxide crystallization from its amorphous phase in the thermal annealing. Results from this study can be used for guiding gas phase nanomaterial synthesis in the future.

  13. Dusty Plasma Modeling of the Fusion Reactor Sheath Including Collisional-Radiative Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezairi, Aouatif; Samir, Mhamed; Eddahby, Mohamed; Saifaoui, Dennoun; Katsonis, Konstantinos; Berenguer, Chloe

    2008-01-01

    The structure and the behavior of the sheath in Tokamak collisional plasmas has been studied. The sheath is modeled taking into account the presence of the dust 2 and the effects of the charged particle collisions and radiative processes. The latter may allow for optical diagnostics of the plasma.

  14. TRANSFERABLE CLASTOGENIC ACTIVITY IN PLASMA FROM PERSONS EXPOSED AS SALVAGE PERSONNEL OF THE CHERNOBYL REACTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EMERIT, [No Value; LEVY, A; CERNJAVSKI, L; ARUTYUNYAN, R; OGANESYAN, N; POGOSIAN, A; MEJLUMIAN, H; SARKISIAN, T; GULKANDANIAN, M; QUASTEL, M; GOLDSMITH, J; RIKLIS, E; KORDYSH, E; POLIAK, S; MERKLIN, L

    Clastogenic factors were first described in the plasma of people who had been accidentally or therapeutically irradiated. They were found also in A-bomb survivors, where they persisted for many years after the irradiation. The present study searched for these factors in the plasma of 32 civil

  15. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nad, Shreya [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (η) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100–260 Torr pressure range and 1.5–2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve η > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (η{sub coup}) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance.

  16. RADYN Simulations of Non-thermal and Thermal Models of Ellerman Bombs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jie; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: dmd@nju.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2017-08-20

    Ellerman bombs (EBs) are brightenings in the H α line wings that are believed to be caused by magnetic reconnection in the lower atmosphere. To study the response and evolution of the chromospheric line profiles, we perform radiative hydrodynamic simulations of EBs using both non-thermal and thermal models. Overall, these models can generate line profiles that are similar to observations. However, in non-thermal models we find dimming in the H α line wings and continuum when the heating begins, while for the thermal models dimming occurs only in the H α line core, and with a longer lifetime. This difference in line profiles can be used to determine whether an EB is dominated by non-thermal heating or thermal heating. In our simulations, if a higher heating rate is applied, then the H α line will be unrealistically strong and there are still no clear UV burst signatures.

  17. RADYN Simulations of Non-thermal and Thermal Models of Ellerman Bombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jie; Carlsson, Mats; Ding, M. D.

    2017-08-01

    Ellerman bombs (EBs) are brightenings in the Hα line wings that are believed to be caused by magnetic reconnection in the lower atmosphere. To study the response and evolution of the chromospheric line profiles, we perform radiative hydrodynamic simulations of EBs using both non-thermal and thermal models. Overall, these models can generate line profiles that are similar to observations. However, in non-thermal models we find dimming in the Hα line wings and continuum when the heating begins, while for the thermal models dimming occurs only in the Hα line core, and with a longer lifetime. This difference in line profiles can be used to determine whether an EB is dominated by non-thermal heating or thermal heating. In our simulations, if a higher heating rate is applied, then the Hα line will be unrealistically strong and there are still no clear UV burst signatures.

  18. Evolution of titanium residue on the walls of a plasma-etching reactor and its effect on the polysilicon etching rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Kosa, E-mail: hirota-kousa@sme.hitachi-hitec.com; Itabashi, Naoshi; Tanaka, Junichi [Hitachi, Ltd., Central Research Laboratory, 1-280, Higashi-Koigakubo, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8601 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    The variation in polysilicon plasma etching rates caused by Ti residue on the reactor walls was investigated. The amount of Ti residue was measured using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with the HgCdTe (MCT) detector installed on the side of the reactor. As the amount of Ti residue increased, the number of fluorine radicals and the polysilicon etching rate increased. However, a maximum limit in the etching rate was observed. A mechanism of rate variation was proposed, whereby F radical consumption on the quartz reactor wall is suppressed by the Ti residue. The authors also investigated a plasma-cleaning method for the removal of Ti residue without using a BCl{sub 3} gas, because the reaction products (e.g., boron oxide) on the reactor walls frequently cause contamination of the product wafers during etching. CH-assisted chlorine cleaning, which is a combination of CHF{sub 3} and Cl{sub 2} plasma treatment, was found to effectively remove Ti residue from the reactor walls. This result shows that CH radicals play an important role in deoxidizing and/or defluorinating Ti residue on the reactor walls.

  19. NOx removal from the flue gas of oil-fired boiler using a multistage plasma-catalyst hybrid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Youl; Deshwal, Bal Raj; Moon, Seung Hyun

    2008-01-01

    The study on removal of NO x from the flue gas of oil-fired boiler has been carried out using non-thermal plasma cum catalyst hybrid reactor at 150 C. Propylene (C 3 H 6 ) was used as a reducing agent. A multistage plasma-catalyst hybrid reactor was newly designed and successfully operated to clean up the flue gas stream having a flow rate of 30 Nm 3 /h. TiO 2 and Pd/ZrO 2 wash-coated on cordierite honeycomb were used as catalysts in the present study. Though the plasma-catalyst hybrid reactor with TiO 2 showed good activity on the removal of NO yet it removed only 50-60% of NO x because a significant portion of NO oxidized to NO 2 . On the contrary, the plasma-catalyst hybrid reactor with Pd/ZrO 2 removed about 50% of inlet NO with a negligible amount of NO oxidation into NO 2 . The plasma/dual-catalysts hybrid system (front two units of plasma-Pd/ZrO 2 + rear two units of plasma/TiO 2 ) proved to be very promising in NO x removal in the presence of C 3 H 6 . DeNO x efficiency of about 74% has been achieved at a space velocity of 3300/h at 150 C. (author)

  20. Multifarious Physics Analyses of the Core Plasma Properties in a Helical DEMO Reactor FFHR-d1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, J.; Satake, S.; Goto, T.; Seki, R.; Nunami, M.; Funaba, H.; Yamada, I.; Suzuki, C.; Sakamoto, R.; Motojima, G.; Yamada, H.; Sagara, A., E-mail: miyazawa@lhd.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Yokoyama, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Masaoka, Y.; Murakami, S. [Departement Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Theoretical analyses on the MHD equilibrium, the neoclassical transport, and the alpha particle transport, etc., are being carried out for a helical fusion DEMO reactor named FFHR- d1, using radial profiles extrapolated from LHD. FFHR-d1 is a heliotron type DEMO reactor of which the conceptual design activity has been launched since 2010. It is possible to sustain the burning plasma without auxiliary heating (i.e., self-ignition) in FFHR-d1, since there is no need of plasma current drive in heliotron plasmas. The device size is 4 times enlarged from LHD, i.e., the major radius of helical coil center is 15.6 m, the magnetic field strength at the helical coil center is 4.7 T, and the fusion output is {approx} 3 GW. One of the distinguished subjects in FFHR-d1 compared with the former FFHR design series is the robust similarity with LHD. The arrangement of superconducting magnet coils in FFHR-d1 is similar to that of LHD, except a pair of planar poloidal coils omitted to maximize the maintenance ports. This makes reasonable to assume a similar MHD equilibrium as observed in LHD for FFHR-d1, as long as the beta profiles in these two are similar. In FFHR-d1, radial profiles of density and temperature are determined by multiplying proper enhancement factors on those obtained in LHD, according to the DPE (Direct Profile Extrapolation) method. The enhancement factors are calculated consistently with the gyro-Bohm model. Therefore, the global confinement properties as expressed in ISS95 or ISS04 are kept in FFHR-d1. A large Shafranov shift is foreseen in FFHR-d1 due to its high-beta property. This leads to deterioration in the neoclassical transport and alpha particle confinement. Effectiveness of plasma position control and/or magnetic configuration optimization has been examined to solve this problem and to check the validity of extrapolated profiles. According to these analyses, it is concluded that the self-ignition condition can be achieved in FFHR-d1 by

  1. On the influence of fusion reactor conditions on optical properties of metallic plasma-viewing mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitsenya, V.S.; Gritsyna, V.I.; Konovalov, V.G.; Ruzhitskij, V.V.; Shapoval, A.N.; Orlinskij, D.V.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of imitation experiments concerning the effects of fusion reactor conditions on the properties of mirrors made of stainless steel, copper and beryllium. The neutron irradiation was imitated using MeV energy range ions. To imitate the effects of charge exchange atoms (CXA) bombardment, keV energy range D + and He + ions were used. From the data obtained it was concluded that not only the reflectivity but also the resistance to CXA sputtering have to be taken into account when choosing the materials for the first mirrors of a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  2. Destruction of POPs agents in a Plasma-Arc Reactor and equilibrium calculations of steam injected for syngas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Junguo; Li, Yaojian; Wang, Rui; Xu, Yongjiang; Sheng, Hongzhi

    2010-01-01

    Full text: A 30 kW DC plasma-arc reactor has been used to destruct hazardous Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of POPs is investigated. Due to similar to several POPs at chemical structure such as DDT, PCBs, pure chlorobenzene (C 6 H 5 Cl) is selected as the experimental material. Because the arc temperature attains 5000 K and the average temperature exceeds 1600 K in reaction area, the chlorinated organics, which are difficult to be destructed in conventional incinerators, can be rapidly pyrolyzed into simple molecules. Detected by Gas Chromatography (CP-3800 Varian), the off-gas is a mixture of H 2 , HCl and some hydrocarbons such as CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 4 , and C 6 H 5 Cl is not detected in the off-gas. Furthermore, the treatment of POPs in a steam-plasma system has been simulated. The process acts as energy transformation - electrical energy is restored in the syngas. Based on the principle of Gibbs free energy minimum, the equilibrium product distribution versus steam content and temperature is calculated. At the ideal temperature of POPs treatment, the energy recovered (Qre) minus the energy input (Qin) gets to maximum while the molar ration of oxygen to carbon (O/C) is near 1. The results show that the plasma-arc technology is environmentally friendly and economically feasible for disposal of POPs. (author)

  3. 1st IAEA research coordination meeting on tritium retention in fusion reactor plasma facing components. October 5-6, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the 1st IAEA research Coordination Meeting on ''Tritium Retention in Fusion Reactor Plasma Facing Components'' held on October 5 and 6, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the retention, release and removal of tritium from plasma facing components, a summary of data evaluation, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). 4 tabs

  4. Final IAEA research coordination meeting on plasma-interaction induced erosion of fusion reactor materials. October 9-11, 1995, Vienna, Austria. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The proceedings and results of the Final IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on ''Plasma-interaction Induced Erosion of Fusion Reactor Materials'' held on October 9, 10 and 11, 1995 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna are briefly described. This report includes a summary of presentations made by the meeting participants, the results of a data survey and needs assessment for the erosion of plasma facing components and in-vessel materials, and recommendations regarding future work. (author). Refs, figs, tabs

  5. Gravimetrical and chemical characterization of SiOx structures deposited on fine powders by short plasma exposure in a plasma down stream reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spillmann, Adrian; Sonnenfeld, Axel; Rohr, Philipp Rudolf von

    2008-01-01

    The surface of lactose particles was modified by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process to improve the flow behavior of the powder. For this, the particulates were treated in a plasma down stream reactor which provides a short (50 ms) and homogeneous exposure to the capacitively coupled RF discharge. The organosilicon monomer hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) was used as a precursor for the formation of SiO x which is deposited on the substrate particle surface. For varying process gas mixtures (O 2 /Ar/HMDSO) and RF power applied, the amount of the deposited material was determined gravimetrically after dissolution of the lactose substrate particles and the chemical composition of the accumulated deposition material was investigated by means of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The concentration of the deposited SiO x relating to the substrate material was found to be in the range of 0.1 wt.%. Based on the ATR-FTIR analysis, the inorganic, i.e. oxidic SiO x fraction of the obtained deposits was shown to be controllable by varying the process parameters, whilst a relatively large amount of organic structures must be considered.

  6. Effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity and Catalyst Diameter on Performance of Hybrid Catalytic-Plasma Reactor for Biodiesel Synthesis over Sulphated Zinc Oxide Acid Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqman Buchori

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel synthesis through transesterification of soybean oil with methanol on hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor over sulphated zinc oxide (SO42-/ZnO active acid catalyst was investigated. This research was aimed to study effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity (WHSV and the catalyst diameter on performance of the hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor for biodiesel synthesis. The amount (20.2 g of active sulphated zinc oxide solid acid catalysts was loaded into discharge zone of the reactor. The WHSV and the catalyst diameter were varied between 0.89 to 1.55 min-1 and 3, 5, and 7 mm, respectively. The molar ratio of methanol to oil as reactants of 15:1 is fed to the reactor, while operating condition of the reactor was kept at reaction temperature of 65 oC and ambient pressure. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME component in biodiesel product was identified by Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. The results showed that the FAME yield decreases with increasing WHSV. It was found that the optimum FAME yield was achieved of 56.91 % at WHSV of 0.89 min-1 and catalyst diameter of 5 mm and reaction time of 1.25 min. It can be concluded that the biodiesel synthesis using the hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor system exhibited promising the FAME yield. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 15th November 2016; Revised: 24th December 2016; Accepted: 16th February 2017 How to Cite: Buchori, L., Istadi, I., Purwanto, P. (2017. Effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity and Catalyst Diameter on Performance of Hybrid Catalytic-Plasma Reactor for Biodiesel Synthesis over Sulphated Zinc Oxide Acid Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (2: 227-234 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.2.775.227-234 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.2.775.227-234

  7. Experimental and density functional theoretical study of the effects of Fenton’s reaction on the degradation of Bisphenol A in a high voltage plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Fei; Fan, Xiangru; Stratton, Gunnar R.; Bellona, Christopher L.; Holsen, Thomas M.; Crimmins, Bernard S.; Xia, Xiaoyan; Mededovic Thagard, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Combining the Fenton reaction with the plasma treatment reduces Bisphenol A concentration below the detection limit within 30 min. • Carbon steel electrode in the plasma reactor can be used as a source of iron ions. • OH radical attack on Bisphenol A is the primary pathway for byproduct formation. - Abstract: A novel electrical discharge plasma reactor configuration with and without iron ions was evaluated for the degradation of 0.02 mM Bisphenol A (BPA). The pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant calculated for the plasma treatment of BPA with a stainless steel electrode in the presence of dissolved ferrous ion (Fe"2"+) salts (termed plasma/Fenton treatment) was higher than in the plasma treatment in the absence of iron salts. At the optimal ferrous ion concentration, longer plasma treatment times resulted in higher BPA degradation rates, likely due to increased hydroxyl (OH) radical concentration formed through the decomposition of H_2O_2. Replacing the stainless steel with a carbon steel grounded electrode resulted in the release of iron ions from the carbon steel thereby increasing the rate of BPA removal and eliminating the need for iron salts. After the plasma/Fenton treatment, >97% of the residual iron salts were removed by coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation. Byproduct identification coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirmed that OH radical attack on BPA’s hydroxyl group is the primary pathway for byproduct formation.

  8. Experimental and density functional theoretical study of the effects of Fenton’s reaction on the degradation of Bisphenol A in a high voltage plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Fei, E-mail: daif@clarkson.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Fan, Xiangru, E-mail: fanx@clarkson.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Stratton, Gunnar R., E-mail: strattgr@clarkson.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Bellona, Christopher L., E-mail: cbellona@clarkson.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1500 Illinois St., Colorado School of Mines, Golden, 80401 CO (United States); Holsen, Thomas M., E-mail: tholsen@clarkson.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Crimmins, Bernard S., E-mail: bcrimmin@clarkson.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Xia, Xiaoyan, E-mail: xiax@clarkson.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States); Mededovic Thagard, Selma, E-mail: smededov@clarkson.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Clarkson University, Potsdam, 13699 NY (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Combining the Fenton reaction with the plasma treatment reduces Bisphenol A concentration below the detection limit within 30 min. • Carbon steel electrode in the plasma reactor can be used as a source of iron ions. • OH radical attack on Bisphenol A is the primary pathway for byproduct formation. - Abstract: A novel electrical discharge plasma reactor configuration with and without iron ions was evaluated for the degradation of 0.02 mM Bisphenol A (BPA). The pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant calculated for the plasma treatment of BPA with a stainless steel electrode in the presence of dissolved ferrous ion (Fe{sup 2+}) salts (termed plasma/Fenton treatment) was higher than in the plasma treatment in the absence of iron salts. At the optimal ferrous ion concentration, longer plasma treatment times resulted in higher BPA degradation rates, likely due to increased hydroxyl (OH) radical concentration formed through the decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Replacing the stainless steel with a carbon steel grounded electrode resulted in the release of iron ions from the carbon steel thereby increasing the rate of BPA removal and eliminating the need for iron salts. After the plasma/Fenton treatment, >97% of the residual iron salts were removed by coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation. Byproduct identification coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations confirmed that OH radical attack on BPA’s hydroxyl group is the primary pathway for byproduct formation.

  9. Polarization of hard X-rays, a contribution to the measurement of the non-thermal electron distribution function (L.H.C.D.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, M.; Platz, P.

    1990-01-01

    The hard X-ray spectrum emitted by a plasma containing non-thermal electrons generated during Lower Hybrid Current Drive experiments has already been measured on several tokamaks, but the properties of the bremsstrahlung have not yet been studied. The present study starts with the comparison of tractable analytical expressions of cross-sections with more precise computer-calculated values; then an evaluation of the polarization is carried out under real tokamak current drive situations and finally a proposal of a new diagnostic for the Tore Supra LHCD experiment is presented. (author) 6 refs., 6 figs

  10. Photobiomodulation with non-thermal lasers: Mechanisms of action and therapeutic uses in dermatology and aesthetic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Mark; Andriessen, Anneke; Berman, Brian; Katz, Bruce E; Gilbert, Dore; Goldberg, David J; Gold, Michael H; Kirsner, Robert S; Lorenc, Paul Z

    2017-08-01

    Non-thermal laser therapy in dermatology, is a growing field in medical technology by which therapeutic effects are achieved by exposing tissues to specific wavelengths of light. The purpose of this review was to gain a better understanding of the science behind non-thermal laser and the evidence supporting its use in dermatology. A group of dermatologists and surgeons recently convened to review the evidence supporting the use of non-thermal laser for body sculpting, improving the appearance of cellulite, and treating onychomycosis. The use of non-thermal laser for body sculpting is supported by three randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled studies (N = 161), one prospective open-label study (N = 54), and two retrospective studies (N = 775). Non-thermal laser application for improving the appearance of cellulite is supported by one randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study (N = 38). The use of non-thermal laser for the treatment of onychomycosis is supported by an analysis of three non-randomized, open-label studies demonstrating clinical improvement of nails (N = 292). Non-thermal laser is steadily moving into mainstream medical practice, such as dermatology. Although present studies have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of non-thermal laser for body sculpting, cellulite reduction and onychomycosis treatment, studies demonstrating the efficacy of non-thermal laser as a stand-alone procedure are still inadequate.

  11. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua [Key Laboratory of Solar Activities, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Tsap, Yuri T., E-mail: huangj@nao.cas.cn [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory of Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, 98409 Crimea, Nauchny (Ukraine)

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  12. Study of a low power plasma reactor for the synthesis of zinc oxide as window layers in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Alexandre, E-mail: alexadre.ma@chimie-paristech.fr [Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), Equipe 2PM (Procédés, Plasmas, Microsystèmes), UMR 8247, Chimie ParisTech-CNRS, 11 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Institute of Research and Development of Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), UMR7174, EDF-CNRS-Chimie ParisTech, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); ADEME (French Environment and Energy Management Agency), 20 avenue du Grésillé, BP 90406, 49004 Angers Cedex 01 (France); Donsanti, Frédérique [Institute of Research and Development of Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), UMR7174, EDF-CNRS-Chimie ParisTech, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Rousseau, Frédéric; Morvan, Daniel [Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris (IRCP), Equipe 2PM (Procédés, Plasmas, Microsystèmes), UMR 8247, Chimie ParisTech-CNRS, 11 Rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2015-05-01

    The low power plasma reactor is an original process which allows the deposition of ZnO controlled thickness films from an aqueous precursor solution in a cold plasma only in order to reach high growth rates. The quality of the deposited material (purity, crystallinity, size of the grains…) depends primarily on the interactions in the reactor between the droplets and the plasma. In this study, the parameters of the deposition (composition of the gases, pressure, power, temperature…) were studied and controlled. The doping characteristics are mainly influenced by the concentration of the precursors in the solution and by the method of injection. The final optimizations allowed high growth rates ranging from 0.6 to 1 nm/s. X-ray Diffraction results show a good crystallinity of the deposited layer (würtzite structure). According to the transmittance measurements, the films present a good transparency and a calculated optical gap value ranging between 3.2 and 3.3 eV. This deposition technique using plasma is fast, flexible, low power consuming and easily adaptable. Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells with a ZnO window layer have successfully been achieved by using the low power plasma reactor and their performances show an efficiency of 11%. - Highlights: • The low power plasma reactor is a very fast and flexible deposition process. • ZnO films are realized from an aqueous nitrate solution in a plasma discharge only. • ZnO films exhibit good properties for the window layer application. • CIGS solar cells present promising performances with an efficiency of 11%.

  13. Synthesis of nanocrystalline Y2O3 in a specially designed atmospheric pressure radio frequency thermal plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhamale, G. D.; Mathe, V. L.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Ghorui, S.

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of yttrium oxide nanoparticles in a specially designed radio frequency thermal plasma reactor is reported. Good crystallinity, narrow size distribution, low defect state concentration, high purity, good production rate, single-step synthesis, and simultaneous formation of nanocrystalline monoclinic and cubic phases are some of the interesting features observed. Synthesized particles are characterized through X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermo-luminescence (TL), and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis. Polymorphism of the nanocrystalline yttria is addressed in detail. Synthesis mechanism is explored through in-situ emission spectroscopy. Post-synthesis environmental effects and possible methods to eliminate the undesired phases are probed. Defect states are investigated through the study of TL spectra

  14. Plasma exposure behavior of re-deposited tungsten on structural materials of fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Wang, Jing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhou, Hai-Shan, E-mail: haishanzhou@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Feng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Li, Zeng-De [General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); Li, Xiao-Chun; Lu, Tao [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Hao-Dong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei 230031 (China); Ding, Fang; Mao, Hong-Min; Zhao, Ming-Zhong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Lin, Chen-Guang [General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); Luo, Guang-Nan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science & Technology of China, Hefei 230031 (China); Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology, Hefei 230031 (China); Hefei Science Center of Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei 230027 (China)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the effects of re-deposited tungsten (W) on the surface modification and hydrogen isotope retention behavior of fusion structural materials, the plasma exposure behavior of re-deposited W samples prepared by magnetron sputtering on the F82H steel, the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy as well as bare substrate samples was investigated. All the samples were exposed to 367 shots of deuterium plasmas in the 2015 spring EAST campaign. After the plasma exposure, large area of W layer was exfoliated, while big blisters were found at the interface between the remaining W layer and the substrate materials. The deuterium retention behavior of the samples with re-deposited W layer was characterized by thermal desorption spectroscopy and compared with the bare substrate samples.

  15. Development of a real-time simulation tool towards self-consistent scenario of plasma start-up and sustainment on helical fusion reactor FFHR-d1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, T.; Miyazawa, J.; Sakamoto, R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, C.; Seki, R.; Satake, S.; Huang, B.; Nunami, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Sagara, A.; the FFHR Design Group

    2017-06-01

    This study closely investigates the plasma operation scenario for the LHD-type helical reactor FFHR-d1 in view of MHD equilibrium/stability, neoclassical transport, alpha energy loss and impurity effect. In 1D calculation code that reproduces the typical pellet discharges in LHD experiments, we identify a self-consistent solution of the plasma operation scenario which achieves steady-state sustainment of the burning plasma with a fusion gain of Q ~ 10 was found within the operation regime that has been already confirmed in LHD experiment. The developed calculation tool enables systematic analysis of the operation regime in real time.

  16. Coatings for reducing plasma contamination and power loss in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dua, A.K.; Agarwala, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    It has been brought out that the use of suitable low atomic number refractory material coatings, on different components (such as first wall, limiter, armours etc.) of 'Tokomak' fusion reactor, offers the desired, degree of design flexibility. Coating characteristics of interest, their preparation and characterization have been discussed. Status of the developmental work has been reviewed. Work on various aspects of the different coating-substrate combinations have been analysed singling out the systems which presently appear more appropriate. (orig.)

  17. Calculation of momentum distribution function of a non-thermal fermionic dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Anirban; Gupta, Aritra, E-mail: anirbanbiswas@hri.res.in, E-mail: aritra@hri.res.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India)

    2017-03-01

    The most widely studied scenario in dark matter phenomenology is the thermal WIMP scenario. Inspite of numerous efforts to detect WIMP, till now we have no direct evidence for it. A possible explanation for this non-observation of dark matter could be because of its very feeble interaction strength and hence, failing to thermalise with the rest of the cosmic soup. In other words, the dark matter might be of non-thermal origin where the relic density is obtained by the so-called freeze-in mechanism. Furthermore, if this non-thermal dark matter is itself produced substantially from the decay of another non-thermal mother particle, then their distribution functions may differ in both size and shape from the usual equilibrium distribution function. In this work, we have studied such a non-thermal (fermionic) dark matter scenario in the light of a new type of U(1){sub B−L} model. The U(1){sub B−L} model is interesting, since, besides being anomaly free, it can give rise to neutrino mass by Type II see-saw mechanism. Moreover, as we will show, it can accommodate a non-thermal fermionic dark matter as well. Starting from the collision terms, we have calculated the momentum distribution function for the dark matter by solving a coupled system of Boltzmann equations. We then used it to calculate the final relic abundance, as well as other relevant physical quantities. We have also compared our result with that obtained from solving the usual Boltzmann (or rate) equations directly in terms of comoving number density, Y . Our findings suggest that the latter approximation is valid only in cases where the system under study is close to equilibrium, and hence should be used with caution.

  18. Chemical modeling of a high-density inductively-coupled plasma reactor containing silane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Boogaard, A.; Brunets, I.; Holleman, J.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    We carried out the modeling of chemical reactions in a silane-containing remote Inductively Coupled Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (ICPECVD) system, intended for deposition of silicon, silicon oxide, and silicon nitride layers. The required electron densities and Electron Energy

  19. Review of the works on plasma-wall interactions in fusion reactors, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sone, Kazuho

    1975-09-01

    A review is made of the works on sputtering as one of the plasma-wall interactions in thermonuclear fusion devices. The present status and future problems are described mainly in experiments of low-energy light ions such as H + , H 2 + , D + , D 2 + and He + , heavy ions including self-ions, and fast neutrons for polycrystalline metal targets. (auth.)

  20. Chemical reactions inside the plasma chamber of the SEAFP reactor plant models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, J.M.; Ebert, E.; Mazille, F.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of coolant or loss of vacuum accidents may lead to chemical reactions between the protecting materials of the plasma facing components and air or water. A production of energy, reaction products and hydrogen may be induced. The paper defines the operating conditions and chemical reactions and presents the main results from the underlying studies. (orig.)

  1. Impurity Control Test Facility (ICTF) for the study of fusion reactor plasma/edge materials interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Mattas, R.F.; Ehst, D.A.; Boley, C.D.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1984-05-01

    A test facility for investigating many of the impurity control issues associated with the interactions of materials with the plasma edge is outlined. Analysis indicates that the plasma edge conditions expected in TFCX, INTOR, etc. can be readily produced at the end cells of an rf stabilized mirror, similar in some respects to the Phaedrus device at the University of Wisconsin. A steady-state, Impurity Control Test Facility (ICTF) based on such a mirror device is expected to produce a plasma with typical parameters of n/sub e/ approx. 3 x 10 18 m -3 , T/sub e/ = 50 eV, and T/sub i/ = 100 eV at each end cell. A heat load of approx. 2 MW/m 2 over areas of approx. 1600 cm 2 could be produced at each end with 800 kW of ICRH power. These conditions would provide a unique capability for examining issues such as erosion/redeposition behavior, properties of redeposited materials, high recycling regimes, plasma edge operating limits for high-Z materials, and particle pumping efficiencies for limiter and divertor designs

  2. Final Report: Safety of Plasma-Facing Components and Aerosol Transport During Hard Disruptions and Accidental Energy Release in Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourham, Mohamed A.; Gilligan, John G.

    1999-01-01

    Safety considerations in large future fusion reactors like ITER are important before licensing the reactor. Several scenarios are considered hazardous, which include safety of plasma-facing components during hard disruptions, high heat fluxes and thermal stresses during normal operation, accidental energy release, and aerosol formation and transport. Disruption events, in large tokamaks like ITER, are expected to produce local heat fluxes on plasma-facing components, which may exceed 100 GW/m 2 over a period of about 0.1 ms. As a result, the surface temperature dramatically increases, which results in surface melting and vaporization, and produces thermal stresses and surface erosion. Plasma-facing components safety issues extends to cover a wide range of possible scenarios, including disruption severity and the impact of plasma-facing components on disruption parameters, accidental energy release and short/long term LOCA's, and formation of airborne particles by convective current transport during a LOVA (water/air ingress disruption) accident scenario. Study, and evaluation of, disruption-induced aerosol generation and mobilization is essential to characterize database on particulate formation and distribution for large future fusion tokamak reactor like ITER. In order to provide database relevant to ITER, the SIRENS electrothermal plasma facility at NCSU has been modified to closely simulate heat fluxes expected in ITER

  3. Silicon Nanocrystal Synthesis in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with grains smaller than 5 nm are widely recognized as a key material in optoelectronic devices, lithium battery electrodes, and bio-medical labels. Another important characteristic is that silicon is an environmentally safe material that is used in numerous silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. In this study, we explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles on a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using a very-high-frequency (144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with volume of less than 1 μl. Fundamental plasma parameters of the microplasma were characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, which respectively indicated electron density of 1015 cm-3, argon excitation temperature of 5000 K, and rotational temperature of 1500 K. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma can decompose silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated silicon vapor, followed by gas-phase nucleation via three-body collision: particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation processes. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei can be terminated in a short-residence-time reactor. Micro-Raman scattering spectra showed that as-deposited particles are mostly amorphous silicon with a small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrography confirmed individual 3-15 nm silicon nanocrystals. Although particles were not mono-dispersed, they were well separated and not coagulated.

  4. Synthesis of Silicon Nanocrystals in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a grain size of at least less than 10 nm are widely recognized as one of the key materials in optoelectronic devices, electrodes of lithium battery, bio-medical labels. There is also important character that silicon is safe material to the environment and easily gets involved in existing silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. We explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for the efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles in a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using very high frequency (VHF = 144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with a volume of less than 1 μ-liter. Fundamental plasma parameters of VHF capacitively coupled microplasma were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy, showing electron density of approximately 1015 cm-3 and rotational temperature of 1500 K, respectively. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma has a capability of decomposing silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated atomic silicon vapor, followed by gas phase nucleation via three-body collision. The particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation process. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei was able to be favorably terminated in a short-residence time reactor. Micro Raman scattering spectrum showed that as-deposited particles were mostly amorphous silicon with small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrograph confirmed individual silicon nanocrystals of 3-15 nm size. Although those particles were not mono-dispersed, they were

  5. Scientific report. Plasma-wall interaction studies related to fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temmerman, G. De

    2006-01-01

    This scientific report summarises research done on erosion and deposition mechanisms affecting the optical reflectivity of potential materials for use in the mirrors used in fusion reactors. Work done in Juelich, Germany, at the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland, the JET laboratory in England and in Basle is discussed. Various tests made with the mirrors are described. Results obtained are presented in graphical and tabular form and commented on. The influence of various material choices on erosion and deposition mechanisms is discussed

  6. Performance Test of Korea Heat Load Test Facility (KoHLT-EB) for the Plasma Facing Components of Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won; Cho, Seungyon

    2014-01-01

    The main components of the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the tokamak are the blanket first wall and divertor, which include the armour materials, the heat sink with the cooling mechanism, and the diagnostics devices for the temperature measurement. The Korea Heat Load Test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB) has been operating for the plasma facing components to develop fusion engineering. This electron beam facility was constructed using a 300 kW electron gun and a cylindrical vacuum chamber. Performance tests were carried out for the calorimetric calibrations with Cu dummy mockup and for the heat load test of large Cu module. For the simulation of the heat load test of each mockup, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses with ANSYS-CFX were performed. For the development of the plasma facing components in the fusion reactors, test mockups were fabricated and tested in the high heat flux test facility. To perform a beam profile test, an assessment of the possibility of electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the results of the absorbed power for that profile before the test starts are needed. To assess the possibility of a Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of the Gaussian heat load profile, a calorimeter mockup and large Cu module were manufactured to simulate real heat. For this high-heat flux test, the Korean high-heat flux test facility using an electron beam system was constructed. In this facility, a cyclic heat flux test will be performed to measure the surface heat flux, surface temperature profile, and cooling capacity

  7. Performance Test of Korea Heat Load Test Facility (KoHLT-EB) for the Plasma Facing Components of Fusion Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The main components of the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the tokamak are the blanket first wall and divertor, which include the armour materials, the heat sink with the cooling mechanism, and the diagnostics devices for the temperature measurement. The Korea Heat Load Test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB) has been operating for the plasma facing components to develop fusion engineering. This electron beam facility was constructed using a 300 kW electron gun and a cylindrical vacuum chamber. Performance tests were carried out for the calorimetric calibrations with Cu dummy mockup and for the heat load test of large Cu module. For the simulation of the heat load test of each mockup, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses with ANSYS-CFX were performed. For the development of the plasma facing components in the fusion reactors, test mockups were fabricated and tested in the high heat flux test facility. To perform a beam profile test, an assessment of the possibility of electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the results of the absorbed power for that profile before the test starts are needed. To assess the possibility of a Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of the Gaussian heat load profile, a calorimeter mockup and large Cu module were manufactured to simulate real heat. For this high-heat flux test, the Korean high-heat flux test facility using an electron beam system was constructed. In this facility, a cyclic heat flux test will be performed to measure the surface heat flux, surface temperature profile, and cooling capacity.

  8. Modelling of the hydrogen effects on the morphogenesis of hydrogenated silicon nano-structures in a plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brulin, Q.

    2006-01-01

    This work pursues the goal of understanding mechanisms related to the morphogenesis of hydrogenated silicon nano-structures in a plasma reactor through modeling techniques. Current technologies are first reviewed with an aim to understand the purpose behind their development. Then follows a summary of the possible studies which are useful in this particular context. The various techniques which make it possible to simulate the trajectories of atoms by molecular dynamics are discussed. The quantum methods of calculation of the interaction potential between chemical species are then developed, reaching the conclusion that only semi-empirical quantum methods are sufficiently fast to be able to implement an algorithm of quantum molecular dynamics on a reasonable timescale. From the tools introduced, a reflection on the nature of molecular metastable energetic states is presented for the theoretical case of the self-organized growth of a linear chain of atoms. This model - which consists of propagating the growth of a chain by the successive addition of the atom which least increases the electronic energy of the chain - shows that the Fermi level is a parameter essential to self organization during growth. This model also shows that the structure formed is not necessarily a total minimum energy structure. From all these numerical tools, the molecular growth of clusters can be simulated by using parameters from magnetohydrodynamic calculation results of plasma reactor modeling (concentrations of the species, interval between chemical reactions, energy of impact of the reagents...). The formation of silicon-hydrogen clusters is thus simulated by the successive capture of silane molecules. The structures formed in simulation at the operating temperatures of the plasma reactor predict the formation of spherical clusters constituting an amorphous silicon core covered by hydrogen. These structures are thus not in a state of minimum energy, contrary to certain experimental

  9. Implementation of vertically asymmetric toroidal-field ripple for beam heating of tokamak reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Sheffield, G.V.; Towner, H.H.; Weissenburger, D.W.

    1976-10-01

    The neutral-beam energy required for adequate penetration of tokamak plasmas of high opacity can be reduced by a large factor if the beam is injected vertically into a region of large TF (toroidal-field) ripple. Energetic ions are trapped in local magnetic wells and drift vertically toward the midplane (z = 0). If the ripple is made very small on the opposite side of the midplane, drifting ions are detrapped and thermalized in the central plasma region. This paper discusses design considerations for establishing the required vertically asymmetric ripple. Examples are given of special TF-coil configurations, and of the use of auxiliary coil windings to create the prescribed ripple profiles

  10. An analysis of the plasma impurity influx from alkali-metal coatings for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWald, A.B.; Davidson, J.N.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that alkali-metal covered surfaces be applied to magnetic fusion devices as a means of controlling plasma impurity contamination and shielding the substrate from erosion. Monolayer films of alkali metals have been shown to sputter primarily as ions under particle bombardment. Thus, it is thought that a sheath potential and/or magnetic fields encountered by a sputtered ion will return the ion to the surface without entering the plasma. In this paper, we investigate the net wall impurity influx associated with coatings which exhibit substantial secondary ion emission compared with those which sputter only as neutral atoms. Included in the analysis are sputtered substrate atoms. These are sometimes found to be a significant fraction of the total sputtering yield for low-Z alkali monolayers and affect the overall performance of such coatings. Estimates of the impurity influx made in the neighborhood of a sheath potential show that secondary-ion emitting coatings are effective as a means of inhibiting plasma impurity contamination and wall erosion. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of the plasma impurity influx from alkali-metal coatings for fusion-reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWald, A.B.; Davidson, J.N.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that alkali-metal covered surfaces be applied to magnetic fusion devices as a means of controlling plasma impurity contamination and shielding the substrate from erosion. Monolayer films of alkali metals have been shown to sputter primarily as ions under particle bombardment. Thus, it is thought that a sheath potential and/or magnetic fields encountered by a sputtered ion will return the ion to the surface without entering the plasma. In this paper, we investigate the net wall impurity influx associated with coatings which exhibit substantial secondary ion emission as compared to those which sputter only as neutral atoms. Included in the analysis are sputtered substrate atoms. These are sometimes found to be a significant fraction of the total sputtering yield for low-Z alkali monolayers and affect the overall performance of such coatings. Estimates of the impurity influx made in the neighborhood of a sheath potential show that secondary-ion emitting coatings are effective as a means of inhibiting plasma impurity contamination and wall erosion

  12. A study on the fusion reactor - Study of ICRF coupling in the KAIST tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Duk In; Chang, Hong Young; Lee, Sun Chil; Jun, Sang Jin; Kwon, Gi Chung; Seo, Sung Hun; Heo, Sung Hoi; You, Kwang Il; Song, Soo Bin; Lee, Sung Chul; Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Chan Hui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-09-01

    Research objectives are to design and fabricate the antenna, measure t property of absorption transmitted to the plasma, and research the physical phenomena about the ICRF coupling, Main heating method is ohmic heating at the KAIST tokamak. The power of the plasma produced by ohmic heating is about 100 kW. Because the toroidal field is 5 {approx} 8 kG, the RF system`s output power is about 10 kW and frequency range is 7 {approx} 30 MHz. In the first year, a 1 kW RF preamplifier was bought. In this year, a CW 2 kW RF main amp. and RF power monitoring system was bought. In the research on antenna, we study the method how to measure electric field emitted from antenna using piezo elements. The matching network composed of two VVC (35 kV), 100 {approx} 1000 pF match firmly up to 50 kW power. We studied the measurement method of antenna impedance theoretically, and measured power efficiency and antenna impedance in the helicon plasma. 32 refs., 5 tabs., 29 figs. (author)

  13. Evaluation of compatibility of flowing liquid lithium curtain for blanket with core plasma in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Baiquan; Huang Jinhua; Peng Lilin; Yan Jiancheng

    2003-01-01

    A global model analysis of the compatibility of flowing liquid lithium curtain for blanket with core plasma has been performed. The relationships between the surface temperature of lithium curtain and mean effective plasma charges, fuel dilution and produced fusion power have been obtained. Results show that under normal circumstances, the evaporation of liquid lithium does not affect Z eff seriously, but affects fuel dilution and fusion power sensitively. The authors have investigated the relationships between the flow velocity of liquid lithium and its surface temperature rise based on the conditions of the option II of the fusion experimental breeder (FEB-E) design with reversed shear configuration and fairly high power density. The authors concluded that the effects of evaporation from liquid lithium curtain for FEB-E on plasma are negligible even if the flow velocity of liquid lithium is as low as 0.5 m·s -1 . Finally, the sputtering yield of liquid lithium saturated by hydrogen isotopes is briefly discussed

  14. Edge Plasma Physics Issues for the Fusion Advanced Studies Torus (FAST) in Reactor Relevant Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddaluno, G.; Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Apicella, M.L.; Calabro, G.; Crisanti, F.; Cucchiaro, A.; Ramogida, G.; Zagorski, R.

    2008-01-01

    The issue of First wall materials and compatibility with ITER /DEMO relevant plasmas is among the RD missions for possible new European plasma fusion devices that the FAST project will address. FAST can operate with ITER relevant values of P/R (up to 22 MW/m, against the ITER 24 MW/m, inclusive of the α particles power), thanks to its compactness; thus it can investigate the physics of large heat loads on divertor plates. The FAST divertor will be made of bulk W tiles, for basic operations, but also fully toroidal divertor targets made of liquid lithium (L-Li) are foreseen. To have reliable predictions of the thermal loads on the divertor plates and of the core plasma purity a number of numerical self-consistent simulations have been made for the H-mode and steady-state scenario by using the code COREDIV. This code, already validated in the past on experimental data (namely JET, FTU, Textor), is able to describe self-consistently the core and edge plasma in a tokamak device by imposing the continuity of energy and particle fluxes and of particle densities and temperatures at the separatrix. In the present work the results of such calculations will be illustrated, including heat loads on the divertor. The overall picture shows that, marginally in the intermediate and, necessarily in the high density H-mode scenarios ( e >=2 and 5·10 20 m -3 respectively), impurity seeding should be foreseen with W as target material: however, only a small amount of Ar (0.03% atomic concentration), not affecting the core purity, is sufficient to maintain the divertor peak loads below 18 MW/m 2 , that represents the safety limit for the W mono block technology, presently accepted for the ITER divertor tiles. Li always needs additional impurities for decreasing divertor heat loads, the Z eff value being ≤ than 1.8. At low plasma densities (but ≥ 1.3·10 20 m -3 ), typical of steady state regimes, W by alone is effective in dissipating the input power by radiative losses, without

  15. Field induced decrystallization of silicon: Evidence of a microwave non-thermal effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozariasbmarz, Amin; Dsouza, Kelvin; Vashaee, Daryoosh

    2018-02-01

    It is rather strange and not fully understood that some materials decrystallize when exposed to microwave radiation, and it is still debatable if such a transformation is a thermal or non-thermal effect. We hereby report experimental evidences that weight the latter effect. First, a single crystal silicon wafer exposed to microwaves showed strong decrystallization at high temperature. Second, when some areas of the wafer were masked with metal coating, only the exposed areas underwent decrystallization. Transmission electron microscopy analysis, x-ray diffraction data, and thermal conductivity measurements all indicated strong decrystallization, which occurred in the bulk of the material and was not a surface effect. These observations favor the existence of a non-thermal microwave effect.

  16. Non-thermal Hard X-Ray Emission from Coma and Several Abell Clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, C

    2004-01-01

    We report results of hard X-Ray observations of the clusters Coma, Abell 496, Abell754, Abell 1060, Abell 1367, Abell2256 and Abell3558 using RXTE data from the NASA HEASARC public archive. Specifically we searched for clusters with hard x-ray emission that can be fitted by a power law because this would indicate that the cluster is a source of non-thermal emission. We are assuming the emission mechanism proposed by Vahk Petrosian where the inter cluster space contains clouds of relativistic electrons that by themselves create a magnetic field and emit radio synchrotron radiation. These relativistic electrons Inverse-Compton scatter Microwave Background photons up to hard x-ray energies. The clusters that were found to be sources of non-thermal hard x-rays are Coma, Abell496, Abell754 and Abell 1060

  17. Statistical physics of non-thermal phase transitions from foundations to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Abaimov, Sergey G

    2015-01-01

    Statistical physics can be used to better understand non-thermal complex systems—phenomena such as stock-market crashes, revolutions in society and in science, fractures in engineered materials and in the Earth’s crust, catastrophes, traffic jams, petroleum clusters, polymerization, self-organized criticality and many others exhibit behaviors resembling those of thermodynamic systems. In particular, many of these systems possess phase transitions identical to critical or spinodal phenomena in statistical physics. The application of the well-developed formalism of statistical physics to non-thermal complex systems may help to predict and prevent such catastrophes as earthquakes, snow-avalanches and landslides, failure of engineering structures, or economical crises. This book addresses the issue step-by-step, from phenomenological analogies between complex systems and statistical physics to more complex aspects, such as correlations, fluctuation-dissipation theorem, susceptibility, the concept of free ener...

  18. A Green Process for High-Concentration Ethylene and Hydrogen Production from Methane in a Plasma-Followed-by-Catalyst Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kangjun; Li Xiaosong; Zhu Aimin

    2011-01-01

    A green process for the oxygen-free conversion of methane to high-concentration ethylene and hydrogen in a plasma-followed-by-catalyst (PFC) reactor is presented. Without any catalysts and with pure methane used as the feed gas, a stable kilohertz spark discharge leads to an acetylene yield of 64.1%, ethylene yield of 2.5% and hydrogen yield of 59.0% with 80.0% of methane conversion at a methane flow rate of 50 cm 3 /min and a specific input energy of 38.4 kJ/L. In the effluent gas from a stable kilohertz spark discharge reactor, the concentrations of acetylene, ethylene and hydrogen were 18.1%, 0.7% and 66.9%, respectively. When catalysts Pd-Ag/SiO 2 were employed in the second stage with discharge conditions same as in the case of plasma alone, the PFC reactor provides an ethylene yield of 52.1% and hydrogen yield of 43.4%. The concentrations of ethylene and hydrogen in the effluent gas from the PFC reactor were found to be as high as 17.1% and 62.6%, respectively. Moreover, no acetylene was detected in the effluent gas. This means that a high concentration of ethylene and oxygen-free hydrogen can be co-produced directly from methane in the PFC reactor.

  19. A global model for SF6 plasmas coupling reaction kinetics in the gas phase and on the surface of the reactor walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokkoris, George; Panagiotopoulos, Apostolos; Gogolides, Evangelos; Goodyear, Andy; Cooke, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Gas phase and reactor wall-surface kinetics are coupled in a global model for SF 6 plasmas. A complete set of gas phase and surface reactions is formulated. The rate coefficients of the electron impact reactions are based on pertinent cross section data from the literature, which are integrated over a Druyvesteyn electron energy distribution function. The rate coefficients of the surface reactions are adjustable parameters and are calculated by fitting the model to experimental data from an inductively coupled plasma reactor, i.e. F atom density and pressure change after the ignition of the discharge. The model predicts that SF 6 , F, F 2 and SF 4 are the dominant neutral species while SF 5 + and F - are the dominant ions. The fit sheds light on the interaction between the gas phase and the reactor walls. A loss mechanism for SF x radicals by deposition of a fluoro-sulfur film on the reactor walls is needed to predict the experimental data. It is found that there is a net production of SF 5 , F 2 and SF 6 , and a net consumption of F, SF 3 and SF 4 on the reactor walls. Surface reactions as well as reactions between neutral species in the gas phase are found to be important sources and sinks of the neutral species.

  20. Vehicle exhaust gas clearance by low temperature plasma-driven nano-titanium dioxide film prepared by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Yu

    Full Text Available A novel plasma-driven catalysis (PDC reactor with special structure was proposed to remove vehicle exhaust gas. The PDC reactor which consisted of three quartz tubes and two copper electrodes was a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD reactor. The inner and outer electrodes firmly surrounded the outer surface of the corresponding dielectric barrier layer in a spiral way, respectively. Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2 film prepared by radiofrequency (RF magnetron sputtering was coated on the outer wall of the middle quartz tube, separating the catalyst from the high voltage electrode. The spiral electrodes were designed to avoid overheating of microdischarges inside the PDC reactor. Continuous operation tests indicated that stable performance without deterioration of catalytic activity could last for more than 25 h. To verify the effectiveness of the PDC reactor, a non-thermal plasma(NTP reactor was employed, which has the same structure as the PDC reactor but without the catalyst. The real vehicle exhaust gas was introduced into the PDC reactor and NTP reactor, respectively. After the treatment, compared with the result from NTP, the concentration of HC in the vehicle exhaust gas treated by PDC reactor reduced far more obviously while that of NO decreased only a little. Moreover, this result was explained through optical emission spectrum. The O emission lines can be observed between 870 nm and 960 nm for wavelength in PDC reactor. Together with previous studies, it could be hypothesized that O derived from catalytically O3 destruction by catalyst might make a significant contribution to the much higher HC removal efficiency by PDC reactor. A series of complex chemical reactions caused by the multi-components mixture in real vehicle exhaust reduced NO removal efficiency. A controllable system with a real-time feedback module for the PDC reactor was proposed to further improve the ability of removing real vehicle exhaust gas.

  1. Time history of diesel particle deposition in cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebizadeh, P.; Rahimzadeh, H.; Ahmadi, G.; Brown, R.; Inthavong, K.

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) treatment reactors have recently been developed for elimination of diesel particulate matter for reducing both the mass and number concentration of particles. The role of the plasma itself is obscured by the phenomenon of particle deposition on the reactor surface. Therefore, in this study, the Lagrangian particle transport model is used to simulate the dispersion and deposition of nano-particles in the range of 5 to 500 nm in a NTP reactor in the absence of an electric field. A conventional cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge reactor is selected for the analysis. Brownian diffusion, gravity and Saffman lift forces were included in the simulations, and the deposition efficiencies of different sized diesel particles were studied. The results show that for the studied particle diameters, the effect of Saffman lift is negligible and gravity only affects the motion of particles with a diameter of 500 nm or larger. Time histories of particle transport and deposition were evaluated for one-time injection and a continuous (multiple-time) injection. The results show that the number of deposited particles for one-time injection is identical to the number of deposited particles for multiple-time injections when adjusted with the shift in time. Furthermore, the maximum number of escaped particles occurs at 0.045 s after the injection for all particle diameters. The presented results show that some particle reduction previously ascribed to plasma treatment has ignored contributions from the surface deposition.

  2. Time history of diesel particle deposition in cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talebizadeh, P.; Rahimzadeh, H., E-mail: rahimzad@aut.ac.ir [Amirkabir University of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, G. [Clarkson University, Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering (United States); Brown, R. [Queensland University of Technology, Biofuel Engine Research Facility (Australia); Inthavong, K. [RMIT University, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) treatment reactors have recently been developed for elimination of diesel particulate matter for reducing both the mass and number concentration of particles. The role of the plasma itself is obscured by the phenomenon of particle deposition on the reactor surface. Therefore, in this study, the Lagrangian particle transport model is used to simulate the dispersion and deposition of nano-particles in the range of 5 to 500 nm in a NTP reactor in the absence of an electric field. A conventional cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge reactor is selected for the analysis. Brownian diffusion, gravity and Saffman lift forces were included in the simulations, and the deposition efficiencies of different sized diesel particles were studied. The results show that for the studied particle diameters, the effect of Saffman lift is negligible and gravity only affects the motion of particles with a diameter of 500 nm or larger. Time histories of particle transport and deposition were evaluated for one-time injection and a continuous (multiple-time) injection. The results show that the number of deposited particles for one-time injection is identical to the number of deposited particles for multiple-time injections when adjusted with the shift in time. Furthermore, the maximum number of escaped particles occurs at 0.045 s after the injection for all particle diameters. The presented results show that some particle reduction previously ascribed to plasma treatment has ignored contributions from the surface deposition.

  3. Novel electrode structure in a DBD reactor applied to the degradation of phenol in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado-Cabrera, Antonio; Peña-Eguiluz, Rosendo; López-Callejas, Régulo; Jaramillo-Sierra, Bethsabet; Valencia-Alvarado, Raúl; Rodríguez-Méndez, Benjamín; Muñoz-Castro, Arturo E.

    2017-07-01

    Phenol degradation experimental results are presented in a similar wastewater aqueous solution using a non-thermal plasma reactor in a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge. The novelty of the work is that one of the electrodes of the reactor has the shape of a hollow screw which shows an enhanced efficiency compared with a traditional smooth structure. The experimentation was carried out with gas mixtures of 90% Ar-10% O2, 80% Ar-20% O2 and 0% Ar-100% O2. After one hour of treatment the removal efficiency was 76%, 92%, and 97%, respectively, assessed with a gas chromatographic mass spectrometry technique. For both reactors used, the ozone concentration was measured. The screw electrode required less energy, for all gas mixtures, than the smooth electrode, to maintain the same ozone concentration. On the other hand, it was also observed that in both electrodes the electrical conductivity of the solution changed slightly from ˜0.0115 S m-1 up to ˜0.0430 S m-1 after one hour of treatment. The advantages of using the hollow screw electrode structure compared with the smooth electrode were: (1) lower typical power consumption, (2) the generation of a uniform plasma throughout the reactor benefiting the phenol degradation, (3) a relatively lower temperature of the aqueous solution during the process, and (4) the plasma generation length is larger.

  4. Destruction of tributylphosphate by cold plasma. Use of a gliding arc reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, David

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear industry uses the Purex process for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel by plutonium and uranium separation. This process uses complexing properties of tributylphosphate. This solvent is aged by the high radioactivity and acidity of the medium and loses its extracting properties. Thus it becomes an highly radioactive liquid organic waste and it must be degraded before its conditioning. We have elaborated a new method for mineralizing TBP by exposure to the plasma produced by a wet air gliding arc. Electric discharges in wet air give rise to very reactive species like excited molecules and radicals. Such species can accelerate oxidation and degradation of organic compounds. The gliding arc discharge is obtained by applying high voltage between two divergent metal electrodes disposed around a blowing nozzle. The arc formed between the electrodes is blown by the air flow with growing in length. Thus a quenched wet air plasma trail is formed and licks an upper layer of TBP while the lower layer is water. Our device can degrade almost 40 percent of the treated TBP. The main degradation product is phosphoric acid for which we have monitored the production kinetics and suggested a model of a surface oxidation process to explain it. Another part of the TBP is converted into a phosphate layer found on the electrodes and phosphorus oxide white smokes present in exhaust fumes. By means of chromatography and spectroscopic analysis we have found the dibutyl-phosphoric acid as the main partial degradation product. The gliding arc device presents several advantages towards other plasma processes which are a low cost and especially for the present task i.e. an easy building and use, operating at atmospheric pressure and moderate temperature, and the possibility to use high powers (several kW for one unit). (author) [fr

  5. Co-generation of synthesis gas and C{sub 2+} hydrocarbons from methane and carbon dioxide in a hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Istadi; Nor Aishah Saidina Amin [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru (Malaysia). Chemical Reaction Engineering Group (CREG), Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering

    2006-03-15

    The topics on conversion and utilization of methane and carbon dioxide are important issues in tackling the global warming effects from the two greenhouse gases. Several technologies including catalytic and plasma have been proposed to improve the process involving conversion and utilization of methane and carbon dioxide. In this paper, an overview of the basic principles, and the effects of CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} feed ratio, total feed flow rate, discharge power, catalyst, applied voltage, wall temperature, and system pressure in dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor are addressed. The discharge power, discharge gap, applied voltage and CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} ratio in the feed showed the most significant effects on the reactor performance. Co-feeding carbon dioxide with the methane feed stream reduced coking and increased methane conversion. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the products was significantly affected by CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} ratio. The synergism of the catalyst placed in the discharge gap and the plasma affected the products distribution significantly. Methane and carbon dioxide conversions were influenced significantly by discharge power and applied voltage. The drawbacks of DBD plasma application in the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} conversion should be taken into consideration before a new plausible reactor system can be implemented. 76 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Radiation transport effects in divertor plasmas generated during a tokamak reactor disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.R.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Wang, P.

    1994-01-01

    Vaporization of material from tokamak divertors during disruptions is a critical issue for tokamak reactors from ITER to commercial power plants. Radiation transport from the vaporized material onto the remaining divertor surface plays an important role in the total mass loss to the divertor. Radiation transport in such a vapor is very difficult to calculate in full detail, and this paper quantifies the sensitivity of the divertor mass loss to uncertainties in the radiation transport. Specifically, the paper presents the results of computer simulations of the vaporization of a graphite coated divertor during a tokamak disruption with ITER CDA parameters. The results show that a factor of 100 change in the radiation conductivity changes the mass loss by more than a factor of two

  7. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Thermal Plasma Reactor at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Szymanski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel approach to the synthesis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs in reactors operating at atmospheric pressure is presented. Based on the literature and our own research results, the most effective methods of CNT synthesis are investigated. Then, careful selection of reagents for the synthesis process is shown. Thanks to the performed calculations, an optimum composition of gases and the temperature for successful CNT synthesis in the CVD (chemical vapor deposition process can be chosen. The results, having practical significance, may lead to an improvement of nanomaterials synthesis technology. The study can be used to produce CNTs for electrical and electronic equipment (i.e., supercapacitors or cooling radiators. There is also a possibility of using them in medicine for cancer diagnostics and therapy.

  8. Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for non-thermal treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. T