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Sample records for non-target organs impair

  1. Do insect repellents induce drift behaviour in aquatic non-target organisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Patrick; Moelzner, Jana; Berghahn, Ruediger; von Elert, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic insect repellents are compounds applied to surfaces to discourage insects, mainly mosquitoes, from landing on those surfaces. As some of these repellents have repeatedly been detected in surface waters at significant concentrations, they may also exert repellent effects on aquatic non-target organisms. In running water systems, aquatic invertebrates actively enter downstream drift in order to avoid unfavourable environmental conditions. We thus tested the hypothesis that the widely used insect repellents DEET (N,N-Diethyl-m-toluamide), EBAAP (3-[N-butyl-N-acetyl]-aminopropionic acid ethyl ester) and Icaridin (1-piperidinecarboxylic acid 2-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-methylpropyl ester) induce downstream drift behaviour in the aquatic invertebrates Gammarus pulex (Crustacea, Amphipoda) and Cloeon dipterum (Insecta, Ephemeroptera), using a laboratory-scale drift assay. We found no clear increase in the drift behaviour of both invertebrate species across a concentration gradient of eight orders of magnitude and even beyond maximum environmental concentrations for any of the three repellents. We found no evidence for a direct drift-inducing activity of insect repellents on aquatic non-target organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of fungicide and insecticide use on non-target aquatic organisms in rice paddy fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana Cristina Dorneles Wandscheer

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The intensive use of plant protection products in rice paddy fields ( Oryza sativa L. has caused concern about the environmental impact on communities of non-target organisms that are natural inhabitants in these agroecosystems. The purpose of this review is to analyze the data currently available in the literature about some important fungicides and insecticides (such as trifloxystrobin, tebuconazole, tricyclazole, lambda-cyhalothrin, and thiamethoxam, which are currently used to control pests and diseases in rice paddy fields, as well as their effects on the community of non-target aquatic organisms.

  3. Impact of parathion exposure on some biochemical parameters in rabbit as a non target organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagat Aly

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: The results indicated that changes in body and organ weights have been used as indicators of adverse effects of parathion and also alteration in tested enzymes activity can be used as relevant biomarkers for monitoring toxicity due to parathion exposure in non target organisms.

  4. ASSESSING POSSIBLE ECOLOGICAL RISKS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS: GENE EXPRESSION ASSAYS AND GENETIC MONITORING OF NON-TARGET ORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread planting of genetically modified crops with the Bt transgene pesticide has led to concern over non-target effects of Bt compounds in agroecosystems. While some research suggests that non-target organisms exposed to Bt toxin exhibit reduced fecundity and increased morta...

  5. Acute Toxicity of the Antifouling Compound Butenolide in Non-Target Organisms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yi-Fan

    2011-08-29

    Butenolide [5-octylfuran-2(5H)-one] is a recently discovered and very promising anti-marine-fouling compound. In this study, the acute toxicity of butenolide was assessed in several non-target organisms, including micro algae, crustaceans, and fish. Results were compared with previously reported results on the effective concentrations used on fouling (target) organisms. According to OECD\\'s guideline, the predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) was 0.168 µg l^(−1), which was among one of the highest in representative new biocides. Mechanistically, the phenotype of butenolide-treated Danio rerio (zebrafish) embryos was similar to the phenotype of the pro-caspase-3 over-expression mutant with pericardial edema, small eyes, small brains, and increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the bodies of zebrafish embryos. Butenolide also induced apoptosis in HeLa cells, with the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), Bcl-2 family proteins, and caspases and proteasomes/lysosomes involved in this process. This is the first detailed toxicity and toxicology study on this antifouling compound.

  6. Scientific Opinion on the assessment of potential impacts of genetically modified plants on non-target organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arpaia, Salvatore; Bartsch, Detlef; Delos, Marc

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms to establish a self-tasking Working Group with the aim of (1) producing a scientific review of the current guidance of the GMO Panel for Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA), focusing on the potential impacts...... of GM plants on Non-Target Organisms (NTOs), (2) proposing criteria for NTOs selection, and (3) providing advise on standardized testing methodology. This initiative was undertaken in response to a need and request from a wide range of stakeholders, including the European Commission and Member States....... In first instance, the self-tasking Working Group on Non-Target Organisms (EFSA NTO WG) mainly considered impacts of GM plants on invertebrate species, but also took account of ecosystem functions that could be altered. The EFSA NTO WG considered the necessity for clear and objective protection goals...

  7. Assessment of Total Risk on Non-Target Organisms in Fungicide Application for Agricultural Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Musa Bozdogan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In Turkey, in 2010, the amount of pesticide (active ingredient; a.i. used in agriculture was about 23,000 metric tons, of which approximately 32% was fungicides. In 2012, 14 a.i. were used for fungus control in wheat cultivation areas in Adana province, Turkey. These a.i. were: azoxystrobin, carbendazim, difenoconazole, epoxiconazole, fluquinconazole, prochloraz, propiconazole, prothioconazole, pyraclostrobin, spiroxamine, tebuconazole, thiophanate-methyl, triadimenol, and trifloxystrobin. In this study, the potential risk of a.i. on non-target organisms in fungicide application of wheat cultivation was assessed by The Pesticide Occupational and Environmental Risk (POCER indicators. In this study, the highest human health risk was for fluquinconazole (Exceedence Factor (EF 1.798 for human health, whereas the fungicide with the highest environmental risk was propiconazole (EF 2.000 for the environment. For non-target organisms, the highest potential risk was determined for propiconazole when applied at 0.1250 kg a.i. ha-1 (EF 2.897. The lowest total risk was for azoxystrobin when applied at  0.0650 kg a.i. ha-1 (EF 0.625.

  8. The Presence of Algae Mitigates the Toxicity of Copper-Based Algaecides to a Non-Target Organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, West M; Willis, Ben E; Richardson, Robert J; Cope, W Gregory

    2018-05-07

    Copper-based algaecides are routinely applied to target noxious algal blooms in freshwaters. Standard toxicity testing data with copper suggest typical concentrations used to control algae can cause deleterious acute impacts to non-target organisms. These "clean" water experiments lack algae, which are specifically targeted in field applications of algaecides and contain competing ligands. This research measured the influence of algae on algaecide exposure and subsequent response of the non-target species Daphnia magna to copper sulfate and an ethanolamine-chelated copper algaecide (Captain®). Significant shifts (Palgae were present in exposures along with a copper salt or chelated copper formulation. Copper sulfate 48-h LC50 values shifted from 75.3 to 317.8 and 517.8 µg Cu/L whereas Captain increased from 353.8 to 414.2 and 588.5 µg Cu/L in no algae, 5 × 10 5 and 5 × 10 6 cells/mL algae treatments, respectively. Larger shifts were measured with copper sulfate exposures, although Captain was less toxic to Daphnia magna in all corresponding treatments. Captain was more effective at controlling Scenedesmus dimorphus at most concentrations, and control was inversely proportional to toxicity to D. magna. Overall, incorporating target competing ligands (i.e., algae) into standard toxicity testing is important for accurate risk assessment, and copper formulation can significantly alter algaecidal efficacy and risks to non-target organisms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. [Target and non-target screening of volatile organic compounds in industrial exhaust gas using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huilian; Jin, Jing; Li, Yun; Chen, Jiping

    2017-10-08

    A method of comprehensive screening of the target and non-target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in industrial exhaust gas using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has been developed. In this paper, two types of solid phase adsorption column were compared, and the Tenex SS TD Tube was selected. The analytes were enriched into the adsorption tube by constant flow sampling, and detected by TD-GC-MS in full scan mode. Target compounds were quantified by internal standard method, and the quantities of non-target compounds were calculated by response coefficient of toluene. The method detection limits (MDLs) for the 24 VOCs were 1.06 to 5.44 ng, and MDLs could also be expressed as 0.004 to 0.018 mg/m 3 assuming that the sampling volume was 300 mL. The average recoveries were in the range of 78.4% to 89.4% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 3.9% to 14.4% ( n =7). The established analytical method was applied for the comprehensive screening of VOCs in a waste incineration power plant in Dalian city. Twenty-nine VOCs were identified. In these compounds, only five VOCs were the target compounds set in advance, which accounted for 26.7% of the total VOCs identified. Therefore, this study further proved the importance of screening non-target compounds in the analysis of VOCs in industrial exhaust gas, and has certain reference significance for the complete determination of VOCs distribution.

  10. Non-Governmental Organization (NGO Libraries for The Visually Impaired in Nigeria: Alternative Format Use and Perception of Information Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetoro, 'Niran

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nigeria's non-government organization (NGO libraries for the visually impaired has over the years been at the forefront of information services provision to persons with visual impairment. This study adopted a survey research design to investigate use of alternative formats and perceptions of information services to the visually impaired, focusing on two purposively chosen NGO libraries for the visually impaired in Nigeria. Using a complete enumeration approach, data were gathered from 180 users of the libraries through the use of a structured questionnaire with a reliability score (${\\alpha}=0.74$. Data from 112 (62.2% of the 180 administered copies of a questionnaire that were retrieved were analysed. The study found that Braille materials had a high level of utilization ($\\bar{x}=4.46$ and were the most frequently utilized (90.9%. Perception of information services by the visually impaired was positive while use of alternative formats was significantly and positively related to users' perception of information services (r = .041; p < 0.05. The study recommends improved transcription and investment in alternative formats and in e-resources. It also recommends collaborations to widen access as well as constant evaluation of services.

  11. Attractive Toxic Sugar Bait (ATSB) For Control of Mosquitoes and Its Impact on Non-Target Organisms: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorenzano, Jodi M; Koehler, Philip G; Xue, Rui-De

    2017-04-10

    Mosquito abatement programs contend with mosquito-borne diseases, insecticidal resistance, and environmental impacts to non-target organisms. However, chemical resources are limited to a few chemical classes with similar modes of action, which has led to insecticide resistance in mosquito populations. To develop a new tool for mosquito abatement programs that control mosquitoes while combating the issues of insecticidal resistance, and has low impacts of non-target organisms, novel methods of mosquito control, such as attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSBs), are being developed. Whereas insect baiting to dissuade a behavior, or induce mortality, is not a novel concept, as it was first introduced in writings from 77 AD, mosquito baiting through toxic sugar baits (TSBs) had been quickly developing over the last 60 years. This review addresses the current body of research of ATSB by providing an overview of active ingredients (toxins) include in TSBs, attractants combined in ATSB, lethal effects on mosquito adults and larvae, impact on non-target insects, and prospects for the use of ATSB.

  12. Learning Building Layouts with Non-geometric Visual Information: The Effects of Visual Impairment and Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Amy A.; Legge, Gordon E.; Giudice, Nicholas A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that humans rely on geometric visual information (hallway structure) rather than non-geometric visual information (e.g., doors, signs and lighting) for acquiring cognitive maps of novel indoor layouts. This study asked whether visual impairment and age affect reliance on non-geometric visual information for layout learning. We tested three groups of participants—younger (sighted, older (50–70 years) normally sighted, and low vision (people with heterogeneous forms of visual impairment ranging in age from 18–67). Participants learned target locations in building layouts using four presentation modes: a desktop virtual environment (VE) displaying only geometric cues (Sparse VE), a VE displaying both geometric and non-geometric cues (Photorealistic VE), a Map, and a Real building. Layout knowledge was assessed by map drawing and by asking participants to walk to specified targets in the real space. Results indicate that low-vision and older normally-sighted participants relied on additional non-geometric information to accurately learn layouts. In conclusion, visual impairment and age may result in reduced perceptual and/or memory processing that makes it difficult to learn layouts without non-geometric visual information. PMID:19189732

  13. Molecular effects and bioaccumulation of levonorgestrel in the non-target organism Dreissena polymorpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Lorenz, Claudia; Pflugmacher, Stephan; Nuetzmann, Gunnar; Kloas, Werner; Wiegand, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Bioaccumulation and effects of the contraceptive hormone levonorgestrel were examined in the non-target organism Dreissena polymorpha. Molecular biomarkers of biotransformation, elimination, antioxidant defence and protein damage were analyzed after exposure to increasing concentrations of levonorgestrel in a flow-through system. The lowest concentration (0.312 μg L -1 ) was 100-fold bioconcentrated within four days. A decrease of the bioconcentration factor was observed within one week for the highest test concentrations (3.12 and 6.24 μg L -1 ) suggesting enhanced excretory processes. The immediate mRNA up-regulation of pi class glutathione S-transferase proved that phase II biotransformation processes were induced. Disturbance of fundamental cell functions was assumed since the aryl hydrocarbon receptor has been permanently down-regulated. mRNA up-regulation of P-glycoprotein, superoxide dismutase and metallothioneine suggested enhanced elimination processes and ongoing oxidative stress. mRNA up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 in mussels exposed to the two highest concentrations clearly indicated impacts on protein damage. - Fundamental cell processes as biotransformation, elimination and prevention from oxidative stress are influenced by exposure of the contraceptive levonorgestrel in non-target organisms. - Research highlights: → Bioaccumulation of levonorgestrel in mussels is higher than expected based on its lipophilicity. → Exposure to levonorgestrel causes oxidative stress and enhanced elimination processes. → Glutathione S-transferase (pi class) mRNA induction after one day hint on phase II biotransformation. → mRNA induction of heat shock protein 70 after one week prove protein damage.

  14. 20 CFR 220.102 - Non-severe impairment(s), defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-severe impairment(s), defined. 220.102 Section 220.102 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT... these include— (1) Physical functions such as walking, standing, sitting, lifting, pushing, pulling...

  15. Persistent non-verbal memory impairment in remitted major depression - caused by encoding deficits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnken, Andreas; Schöning, Sonja; Gerss, Joachim; Konrad, Carsten; de Jong-Meyer, Renate; Zwanzger, Peter; Arolt, Volker

    2010-04-01

    While neuropsychological impairments are well described in acute phases of major depressive disorders (MDD), little is known about the neuropsychological profile in remission. There is evidence for episodic memory impairments in both acute depressed and remitted patients with MDD. Learning and memory depend on individuals' ability to organize information during learning. This study investigates non-verbal memory functions in remitted MDD and whether nonverbal memory performance is mediated by organizational strategies whilst learning. 30 well-characterized fully remitted individuals with unipolar MDD and 30 healthy controls matching in age, sex and education were investigated. Non-verbal learning and memory were measured by the Rey-Osterrieth-Complex-Figure-Test (RCFT). The RCFT provides measures of planning, organizational skills, perceptual and non-verbal memory functions. For assessing the mediating effects of organizational strategies, we used the Savage Organizational Score. Compared to healthy controls, participants with remitted MDD showed more deficits in their non-verbal memory function. Moreover, participants with remitted MDD demonstrated difficulties in organizing non-verbal information appropriately during learning. In contrast, no impairments regarding visual-spatial functions in remitted MDD were observed. Except for one patient, all the others were taking psychopharmacological medication. The neuropsychological function was solely investigated in the remitted phase of MDD. Individuals with MDD in remission showed persistent non-verbal memory impairments, modulated by a deficient use of organizational strategies during encoding. Therefore, our results strongly argue for additional therapeutic interventions in order to improve these remaining deficits in cognitive function. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biosafety research for non-target organism risk assessment of RNAi-based GE plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Andrew F.; Devos, Yann; Lemgo, Godwin N. Y.; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference, or RNAi, refers to a set of biological processes that make use of conserved cellular machinery to silence genes. Although there are several variations in the source and mechanism, they are all triggered by double stranded RNA (dsRNA) which is processed by a protein complex into small, single stranded RNA, referred to as small interfering RNAs (siRNA) with complementarity to sequences in genes targeted for silencing. The use of the RNAi mechanism to develop new traits in plants has fueled a discussion about the environmental safety of the technology for these applications, and this was the subject of a symposium session at the 13th ISBGMO in Cape Town, South Africa. This paper continues that discussion by proposing research areas that may be beneficial for future environmental risk assessments of RNAi-based genetically modified plants, with a particular focus on non-target organism assessment. PMID:26594220

  17. Toxicity risk of non-target organs at risk receiving low-dose radiation: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shueng, Pei-Wei; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Chang, Hou-Tai; Chong, Ngot-Swan; Chen, Yu-Jen; Wang, Li-Ying; Hsieh, Yen-Ping; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2009-01-01

    The spine is the most common site for bone metastases. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for palliation of pain and for prevention or treatment of spinal cord compression. Helical tomotherapy (HT), a new image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), delivers highly conformal dose distributions and provides an impressive ability to spare adjacent organs at risk, thus increasing the local control of spinal column metastases and decreasing the potential risk of critical organs under treatment. However, there are a lot of non-target organs at risk (OARs) occupied by low dose with underestimate in this modern rotational IMRT treatment. Herein, we report a case of a pathologic compression fracture of the T9 vertebra in a 55-year-old patient with cholangiocarcinoma. The patient underwent HT at a dose of 30 Gy/10 fractions delivered to T8-T10 for symptom relief. Two weeks after the radiotherapy had been completed, the first course of chemotherapy comprising gemcitabine, fluorouracil, and leucovorin was administered. After two weeks of chemotherapy, however, the patient developed progressive dyspnea. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed an interstitial pattern with traction bronchiectasis, diffuse ground-glass opacities, and cystic change with fibrosis. Acute radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed. Oncologists should be alert to the potential risk of radiation toxicities caused by low dose off-targets and abscopal effects even with highly conformal radiotherapy

  18. Effect of seed kernel aqueous extract from Annona squamosa against three mosquito vectors and its impact on non-target aquatic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran Ramanibai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the toxicity of Annona squamosa (A. squamosa aqueous (physiological saline seed soluble extract and its control of mosquito population. Methods: Ovicidal, larvicidal and pupicidal activity of A. squamosa crude soluble seed kernel extract was determined according to World Health Organization. The mortality of each mosquito stage was recorded after 24 h exposured to plant material. Toxicity assay was used to assess the non-target organisms with different concentrations according to Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Results: The aqueous solubilized extracts of A. squamosa elicit the toxicity against all stages of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus, and the LC50 values against stages of egg, 1st-4th larvae were (1.45 and 1.26–2.5 mg/mL, (1.12 and 1.19–2.81 mg/ mL and (1.80 and 2.12–3.41 mg/mL respectively. The pupicidal activity also brought forth amended activity against all three mosquitoes species, and the LC50 values were consider to be 3.19, 2.42 and 4.47 mg/mL. Ultimately there was no mortality observed from non-target organism of Chironomus costatus. Conclusions: Based on the findings of the study, it suggests that the use of A. squamosa plant extract can act as an alternate insecticidal agents for controlling target mosquitoes without affecting the non-target aquatic insect. Further investigation to identify the active compounds and their mechanisms of action is recommended.

  19. Effect of malachite green toxicity on non target soil organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinathan, R; Kanhere, J; Banerjee, J

    2015-02-01

    Although malachite green (MG), is banned in Europe and US for its carcinogenic and teratogenic effect, the dye being cheap, is persistently used in various countries for fish farming, silk, dye, leather and textile industries. Current research, however, fails to elucidate adequate knowledge concerning the effects of MG in our ecosystem. In the present investigation, for the first time, an attempt has been made to study the effects of MG on soil biota by testing Bacillus subtilis, Azotobacter chroococcum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Penicillium roqueforti, Eisenia fetida and seeds of three crop plants of different families. Various tests were conducted for determining cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, acute toxicity, morphological and germination effect. Our data confirmed MG toxicity on fungi and bacteria (gram positive and gram negative organisms) showing elevated level of ROS. Genotoxicity caused in the microorganisms was detected by DNA polymorphism and fragmentation. Also, scanning electron microscopy data suggests that the inhibitory effect of MG to these beneficial microbes in the ecosystem might be due to pore formation in the cell and its eventual disruption. Filter paper and artificial soil test conducted on earthworms demonstrated a LC 50 of 2.6 mg cm(-2) and 1.45 mg kg(-1) respectively with severe morphological damage. However, seed germination of Mung bean, Wheat and Mustard was found to be unaffected in presence of MG up to 100 mL(-1) concentration. Thus, understanding MG toxicity in non target soil organisms and emphasis on its toxicological effects would potentially explicate its role as an environmental contaminant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Real-time non-rigid target tracking for ultrasound-guided clinical interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zachiu, Cornel; Ries, Mario G; Ramaekers, Pascal; Guey, Jean-Luc; Moonen, Chrit T W; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis

    2017-01-01

    Biological motion is a problem for non- or mini-invasive interventions when conducted in mobile/deformable organs due to the targeted pathology moving/deforming with the organ. This may lead to high miss rates and/or incomplete treatment of the pathology. Therefore, real-time tracking of the target

  1. NON-TARGET AND ECOSYSTEM IMPACTS FROM GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS CONTAINING PLANT INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS (PIPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The risk of unintended and unexpected adverse impacts on non-target organisms and ecosystems is a key issue in environmental risk assessment of PIP crop plants. While there has been considerable examination of the effects of insect resistant crops on certain non-target organisms...

  2. Quality of laboratory studies assessing effects of Bt-proteins on non-target organisms: minimal criteria for acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schrijver, Adinda; Devos, Yann; De Clercq, Patrick; Gathmann, Achim; Romeis, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    The potential risks that genetically modified plants may pose to non-target organisms and the ecosystem services they contribute to are assessed as part of pre-market risk assessments. This paper reviews the early tier studies testing the hypothesis whether exposure to plant-produced Cry34/35Ab1 proteins as a result of cultivation of maize 59122 is harmful to valued non-target organisms, in particular Arthropoda and Annelida. The available studies were assessed for their scientific quality by considering a set of criteria determining their relevance and reliability. As a case-study, this exercise revealed that when not all quality criteria are met, weighing the robustness of the study and its relevance for risk assessment is not obvious. Applying a worst-case expected environmental concentration of bioactive toxins equivalent to that present in the transgenic crop, confirming exposure of the test species to the test substance, and the use of a negative control were identified as minimum criteria to be met to guarantee sufficiently reliable data. This exercise stresses the importance of conducting studies meeting certain quality standards as this minimises the probability of erroneous or inconclusive results and increases confidence in the results and adds certainty to the conclusions drawn.

  3. Pain in cognitively impaired, non-communicating children

    OpenAIRE

    Stallard, P; Williams, L; Lenton, S; Velleman, R

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To detail the everyday occurrence of pain in non-communicating children with cognitive impairment.
METHODS—Thirty four parents of cognitively impaired verbally non-communicating children completed pain diaries over a two week period. Each day, for five defined periods, parents rated whether their child had been in pain, and if so, its severity and duration.
RESULTS—Twenty five (73.5%) children experienced pain on at least one day, with moderate or severe levels of pai...

  4. Studies of Non-Targeted Effects of Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleg V Belyakov; Heli Mononen; Marjo Peraelae

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of ionising radiation induced non-targeted effects is important for understanding the dose-response mechanisms relevant to low dose irradiation in vivo. One important question is whether the non-targeted effects relates to a protective mechanism or whether, conversely, it amplifies the number of cells damaged by the isolated radiation tracks of low dose exposures leading to an increased risk of carcinogenesis. One theory supported by the experimental data obtained during this project is that the main functions of the non-targeted effects are to decrease the risk of transformation in a multicellular organism exposed to radiation. Differences in the gene expression profiles, temporal and spatial patterns of key proteins expressed in directly irradiated and bystander cells may determine how the cells ultimately respond to low doses of radiation. Such a mechanism of co-operative response would make the tissue system much more robust. (N.C.)

  5. Studies of Non-Targeted Effects of Ionising Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleg V Belyakov; Heli Mononen; Marjo Peraelae [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The discovery of ionising radiation induced non-targeted effects is important for understanding the dose-response mechanisms relevant to low dose irradiation in vivo. One important question is whether the non-targeted effects relates to a protective mechanism or whether, conversely, it amplifies the number of cells damaged by the isolated radiation tracks of low dose exposures leading to an increased risk of carcinogenesis. One theory supported by the experimental data obtained during this project is that the main functions of the non-targeted effects are to decrease the risk of transformation in a multicellular organism exposed to radiation. Differences in the gene expression profiles, temporal and spatial patterns of key proteins expressed in directly irradiated and bystander cells may determine how the cells ultimately respond to low doses of radiation. Such a mechanism of co-operative response would make the tissue system much more robust. (N.C.)

  6. A new approach to data evaluation in the non-target screening of organic trace substances in water analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Alexander; Schulz, Wolfgang; Ruck, Wolfgang K L; Weber, Walter H

    2011-11-01

    Non-target screening via high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) has gained increasingly in importance for monitoring organic trace substances in water resources targeted for the production of drinking water. In this article a new approach for evaluating the data from non-target HPLC-MS screening in water is introduced and its advantages are demonstrated using the supply of drinking water as an example. The crucial difference between this and other approaches is the comparison of samples based on compounds (features) determined by their full scan data. In so doing, we take advantage of the temporal, spatial, or process-based relationships among the samples by applying the set operators, UNION, INTERSECT, and COMPLEMENT to the features of each sample. This approach regards all compounds, detectable by the used analytical method. That is the fundamental meaning of non-target screening, which includes all analytical information from the applied technique for further data evaluation. In the given example, in just one step, all detected features (1729) of a landfill leachate sample could be examined for their relevant influences on water purification respectively drinking water. This study shows that 1721 out of 1729 features were not relevant for the water purification. Only eight features could be determined in the untreated water and three of them were found in the final drinking water after ozonation. In so doing, it was possible to identify 1-adamantylamine as contamination of the landfill in the drinking water at a concentration in the range of 20 ng L(-1). To support the identification of relevant compounds and their transformation products, the DAIOS database (Database-Assisted Identification of Organic Substances) was used. This database concept includes some functions such as product ion search to increase the efficiency of the database query after the screening. To identify related transformation products the database function

  7. Control of sand flies with attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) and potential impact on non-target organisms in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, Whitney A; Müller, Gunter C; Khallaayoune, Khalid; Revay, Edita E; Zhioua, Elyes; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D; Arheart, Kristopher L; Xue, Rui-De; Schlein, Yosef; Hausmann, Axel; Kline, Daniel L; Beier, John C

    2015-02-08

    The persistence and geographical expansion of leishmaniasis is a major public health problem that requires the development of effective integrated vector management strategies for sand fly control. Moreover, these strategies must be economically and environmentally sustainable approaches that can be modified based on the current knowledge of sand fly vector behavior. The efficacy of using attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) for sand fly control and the potential impacts of ATSB on non-target organisms in Morocco was investigated. Sand fly field experiments were conducted in an agricultural area along the flood plain of the Ourika River. Six study sites (600 m x 600 m); three with "sugar rich" (with cactus hedges bearing countless ripe fruits) environments and three with "sugar poor" (green vegetation only suitable for plant tissue feeding) environments were selected to evaluate ATSB, containing the toxin, dinotefuran. ATSB applications were made either with bait stations or sprayed on non-flowering vegetation. Control sites were established in both sugar rich and sugar poor environments. Field studies evaluating feeding on vegetation treated with attractive (non-toxic) sugar baits (ASB) by non-target arthropods were conducted at both sites with red stained ASB applied to non-flowering vegetation, flowering vegetation, or on bait stations. At both the sites, a single application of ATSB either applied to vegetation or bait stations significantly reduced densities of both female and male sand flies (Phlebotomus papatasi and P. sergenti) for the five-week trial period. Sand fly populations were reduced by 82.8% and 76.9% at sugar poor sites having ATSB applied to vegetation or presented as a bait station, respectively and by 78.7% and 83.2%, respectively at sugar rich sites. The potential impact of ATSB on non-targets, if applied on green non-flowering vegetation and bait stations, was low for all non-target groups as only 1% and 0.7% were stained with non-toxic bait

  8. Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation: A New Strategy in Mild Cognitive Impairment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birba, Agustina; Ibáñez, Agustín; Sedeño, Lucas; Ferrari, Jesica; García, Adolfo M.; Zimerman, Máximo

    2017-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques can significantly modulate cognitive functions in healthy subjects and patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Recently, they have been applied in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) to prevent or delay the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we review this emerging empirical corpus and discuss therapeutic effects of NIBS on several target functions (e.g., memory for face-name associations and non-verbal recognition, attention, psychomotor speed, everyday memory). Available studies have yielded mixed results, possibly due to differences among their tasks, designs, and samples, let alone the latter’s small sizes. Thus, the impact of NIBS on cognitive performance in MCI and SCI remains to be determined. To foster progress in this direction, we outline methodological approaches that could improve the efficacy and specificity of NIBS in both conditions. Furthermore, we discuss the need for multicenter studies, accurate diagnosis, and longitudinal approaches combining NIBS with specific training regimes. These tenets could cement biomedical developments supporting new treatments for MCI and preventive therapies for AD. PMID:28243198

  9. Comparative ecotoxicity of chlorantraniliprole to non-target soil invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavtižar, Vesna; Berggren, Kristina; Trebše, Polonca; Kraak, Michiel H S; Verweij, Rudo A; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2016-09-01

    The insecticide chlorantraniliprole (CAP) is gaining importance in agricultural practice, but data on its possible negative effects on non-target organisms is severely deficient. This study therefore determined CAP toxicity to non-target soil invertebrates playing a crucial role in ecosystem functioning, including springtails (Folsomia candida), isopods (Porcellio scaber), enchytraeids (Enchytraeus crypticus) and oribatid mites (Oppia nitens). In sublethal toxicity tests in Lufa 2.2 soil, chronic exposure to CAP concentrations up to 1000 mg/kgdw did not affect the survival and reproduction of E. crypticus and O. nitens nor the survival, body weight and consumption of P. scaber. In contrast, the survival and reproduction of F. candida was severely affected, with an EC50 for effects on reproduction of 0.14 mg CAP/kgdw. The toxicity of CAP to the reproduction of F. candida was tested in four different soils following OECD guideline 232, and additionally in an avoidance test according to ISO guideline 17512-2. A significantly lower toxicity in soils rich in organic matter was observed, compared to low organic soils. Observations in the avoidance test with F. candida suggest that CAP acted in a prompt way, by affecting collembolan locomotor abilities thus preventing them from escaping contaminated soil. This study shows that CAP may especially pose a risk to non-target soil arthropods closely related to insects, while other soil invertebrates seem rather insensitive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Morphological Effect of Non-targeted Biomolecule-Modified MNPs on Reticuloendothelial System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Hu, Yan; Xiao, Jie; Cheng, Dengfeng; Xiu, Yan; Shi, Hongcheng

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with special morphology were commonly used as biomaterials, while morphological effects of non-targeted biomolecule-modified MNPs on biological behaviors were still unclear. In this research, spherical and rod-like Fe3O4 in a comparable size were synthesized and then surface-modified by bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model of non-targeted biomolecule-modified MNPs. Morphological effects were featured by TEM and quantification of in vitro phagocytic uptake, as well as the in vivo quantification of particles in reticuloendothelial system (RES)-related organs of normal Kunming mice. For these non-targeted BSA-modified MNPs, intracellular distributions were the same, but the rod-like MNPs were more likely to be uptake by macrophages; furthermore, the BSA-modified MNPs gathered in RES-related organs soon after intravenous injection, but the rod-like ones were expelled from the lung more quickly and expelled from the spleen more slowly. These preliminary results may be referable if MNPs or other similar biomolecule-modified nanoparticles were used.

  11. Compatibility of organic farming treatments against Monosteira unicostata with non-target arthropod fauna of almond trees canopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Ramos, I.; Marcotegui, A.; Pascual, S.; Fernández, C.E.; Cobos, G.; González-Núñez, M.

    2017-07-01

    Field trials had shown that 1-2 applications of kaolin and potassium salts of fatty acids combined with thyme essential oil (PSTEO) reduced the abundance of the lace bug Monosteira unicostata (Mulsant & Rey) (Hemiptera: Tingidae), an important pest of almond trees in the Mediterranean region. These products could be useful for the control of this pest in organic production of almonds, but higher number of applications could be necessary. However, the possible detrimental effects on the almond orchard ecosystem should be evaluated. In the present work, the effects observed on the non-target arthropod fauna of the almond trees canopy in those field assays are shown. First, a comprehensive report of the non-target arthropod fauna of the almond tree is provided. Regarding natural enemies, most of the predatory arthropods captured were spiders belonging to different families like Salticidae, Thomisidae, Philodromidae, Theridiidae, Araneidae or Oxyopidae. Other predatory families that appeared in significant numbers were Chrysopidae, Anthocoridae, Aeolothripidae, Coccinellidae, Phytoseiidae, Erythraeidae or Forficulidae. Among parasitoids, the most abundant families were Eulophidae, Scelionidae and Dryinidae. Kaolin reduced the abundance of natural enemies and other non-target arthropods as well as their diversity and number of species. On the contrary, PSTEO only produced a slight reduction in the number of natural enemies, whereas no effect was found on the diversity and species richness. These effects were observed despite the reduced number of applications, so greater effect is expected if its frequency is increased in order to achieve an efficient control of M. unicostata.

  12. Compatibility of organic farming treatments against Monosteira unicostata with non-target arthropod fauna of almond trees canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Sánchez-Ramos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Field trials had shown that 1-2 applications of kaolin and potassium salts of fatty acids combined with thyme essential oil (PSTEO reduced the abundance of the lace bug Monosteira unicostata (Mulsant & Rey (Hemiptera: Tingidae, an important pest of almond trees in the Mediterranean region. These products could be useful for the control of this pest in organic production of almonds, but higher number of applications could be necessary. However, the possible detrimental effects on the almond orchard ecosystem should be evaluated. In the present work, the effects observed on the non-target arthropod fauna of the almond trees canopy in those field assays are shown. First, a comprehensive report of the non-target arthropod fauna of the almond tree is provided. Regarding natural enemies, most of the predatory arthropods captured were spiders belonging to different families like Salticidae, Thomisidae, Philodromidae, Theridiidae, Araneidae or Oxyopidae. Other predatory families that appeared in significant numbers were Chrysopidae, Anthocoridae, Aeolothripidae, Coccinellidae, Phytoseiidae, Erythraeidae or Forficulidae. Among parasitoids, the most abundant families were Eulophidae, Scelionidae and Dryinidae. Kaolin reduced the abundance of natural enemies and other non-target arthropods as well as their diversity and number of species. On the contrary, PSTEO only produced a slight reduction in the number of natural enemies, whereas no effect was found on the diversity and species richness. These effects were observed despite the reduced number of applications, so greater effect is expected if its frequency is increased in order to achieve an efficient control of M. unicostata.

  13. Compatibility of organic farming treatments against Monosteira unicostata with non-target arthropod fauna of almond trees canopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez-Ramos, I.; Marcotegui, A.; Pascual, S.; Fernández, C.E.; Cobos, G.; González-Núñez, M.

    2017-01-01

    Field trials had shown that 1-2 applications of kaolin and potassium salts of fatty acids combined with thyme essential oil (PSTEO) reduced the abundance of the lace bug Monosteira unicostata (Mulsant & Rey) (Hemiptera: Tingidae), an important pest of almond trees in the Mediterranean region. These products could be useful for the control of this pest in organic production of almonds, but higher number of applications could be necessary. However, the possible detrimental effects on the almond orchard ecosystem should be evaluated. In the present work, the effects observed on the non-target arthropod fauna of the almond trees canopy in those field assays are shown. First, a comprehensive report of the non-target arthropod fauna of the almond tree is provided. Regarding natural enemies, most of the predatory arthropods captured were spiders belonging to different families like Salticidae, Thomisidae, Philodromidae, Theridiidae, Araneidae or Oxyopidae. Other predatory families that appeared in significant numbers were Chrysopidae, Anthocoridae, Aeolothripidae, Coccinellidae, Phytoseiidae, Erythraeidae or Forficulidae. Among parasitoids, the most abundant families were Eulophidae, Scelionidae and Dryinidae. Kaolin reduced the abundance of natural enemies and other non-target arthropods as well as their diversity and number of species. On the contrary, PSTEO only produced a slight reduction in the number of natural enemies, whereas no effect was found on the diversity and species richness. These effects were observed despite the reduced number of applications, so greater effect is expected if its frequency is increased in order to achieve an efficient control of M. unicostata.

  14. Effect of an insecticide on growth and metabolism of some non-target soil micro-organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, A.; Nilakantan, Gita

    1975-01-01

    Aldicarb, a systemic insecticide, enhanced the growth of Rhizobium japonicum in vitro at 1 ppm concentration but inhibited it at 5 ppm level. The cell yields of Azotobacter chroococcum and Pseudomonas solanacearum were reduced by both the concentrations of the chemical. 1 and 5 ppm levels of the insecticide the incorporation of 14 C-glucose by R. japonicum, but it was stimulated in the case of R. chroococcum. In the case of P. solanacearum, however, 1 ppm level of the insecticide enhanced the incorporation of the label. Uptake of 32 P-di-potassium hydrogen phosphate by the cells was also significantly reduced indicating that the metabolic activities of these non-target soil micro-organisms are altered by the insecticide treatment. (author)

  15. Effect of the entomopathogenic fungus Lecanicillium muscariumon the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis as a non-target organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donka, András; Sermann, Helga; Büttner, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    In biological control, different benefit organisms have to combine for an effective management. If entomopathogenic fungi will be integrated, than it has to be considered also the effect on non-target organisms Like beneficial arthropods. Because of the high importance of predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis in biological control it was to determine side effects of Leconicillium muscarium on this species. In two standardised biotests in petri dish and on plants (P. vulgaris) individuals were dipped in suspension or set down on leafs after spraying with L. muscarium at different spore density. Results indicate pathogenicity for the predatory mite in principle. But the dimension of infection risk decrease, all the more conditions approach to practical sequence. Under practical conditions on plants and in practical relevant concentration of 10(6) and 10(7) sp./ml no risk is to expect on the plant.

  16. Side Effects of Nitrification Inhibitors on Non Target Microbial Processes in Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes Carl Gottlieb Ottow; Gero Benckiser; Ferisman Tindaon

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural chemicals have been used extensively in modern agriculture and toxicological studies suggest a great potential for inducing undesirable effects on non target organisms. A model experiment was conducted in order to determine side effects of three nitrification inhibitors (NIs, 3,4dimethylpyrazolephosphate = DMPP, 4-Chlormethylpyrazole phosphate = ClMPP and dicyandiamide = DCD) on non target microbial processes in soils. Side effects and dose response curve of three NIs were quanti...

  17. Social exclusion impairs distractor suppression but not target enhancement in selective attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengsi; Li, Zhiai; Diao, Liuting; Fan, Lingxia; Zhang, Lijie; Yuan, Shuge; Yang, Dong

    2017-11-01

    Social exclusion has been thought to weaken one's ability to exert inhibitory control. Existing studies have primarily focused on the relationship between exclusion and behavioral inhibition, and have reported that exclusion impairs behavioral inhibition. However, whether exclusion also affects selective attention, another important aspect of inhibitory control, remains unknown. Therefore, the current study aimed to explore whether social exclusion impairs selective attention, and to specifically examine its effect on two hypothesized mechanisms of selective attention: target enhancement and distractor suppression. The Cyberball game was used to manipulate social exclusion. Participants then performed a visual search task while event-related potentials were recorded. In the visual search task, target and salient distractor were either both presented laterally or one was presented on the vertical midline and the other laterally. Results showed that social exclusion differentially affected target and distractor processing. While exclusion impaired distractor suppression, reflected as smaller distractor-positivity (Pd) amplitudes for the exclusion group compared to the inclusion group, it did not affect target enhancement, reflected as similar target-negativity (Nt) amplitudes for both the exclusion and inclusion groups. Together, these results extend our understanding of the relationship between exclusion and inhibitory control, and suggest that social exclusion affects selective attention in a more complex manner than previously thought. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Radiation responses of stem cells: targeted and non-targeted effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, J.N.; Waring, E.J.; Prise, K.M.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are fundamental to the development of any tissue or organism via their ability to self-renew, which is aided by their unlimited proliferative capacity and their ability to produce fully differentiated offspring, often from multiple lineages. Stems cells are long lived and have the potential to accumulate mutations, including in response to radiation exposure. It is thought that stem cells have the potential to be induced into a cancer stem cell phenotype and that these may play an important role in resistance to radiotherapy. For radiation-induced carcinogenesis, the role of targeted and non-targeted effects is unclear with tissue or origin being important. Studies of genomic instability and bystander responses have shown consistent effects in haematopoietic models. Several models of radiation have predicted that stem cells play an important role in tumour initiation and that bystander responses could play a role in proliferation and self-renewal. (authors)

  19. The effects of body image impairment on the quality of life of non-operated Portuguese female IBD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Inês A; Ferreira, Cláudia; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2017-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and their treatment are known to negatively impact on patients' body image, especially female patients. However, although there are broad evidences of body image impairment in female IBD patients, its negative impact on the quality of life (QoL) of non-operated women is not clearly and specifically studied. The aim of the current study was therefore to analyse, in a sample of non-operated female IBD patients, the factors that contribute to body image impairment and its impact on QoL. Ninety-six non-operated women (39.7 % with CD and 60.3 % with UC), aged between 18 and 40 years old, completed an online survey with validated self-report measures, which included the Body Image Scale and the WHO Brief Quality of Life Assessment Scale. Negative body image was correlated with lower psychological and physical QoL and increased corticosteroids use, associated medical complications, body mass index (BMI), and IBD symptomatology. Regression analyses revealed that BMI and IBD symptomatology significantly predicted body image impairment. Furthermore, results from path analyses indicated that BMI and IBD symptomatology's effect on psychological and physical QoL was mediated through the negative effects of body image impairment. This model explained 31 % of psychological QoL and 41 % of physical QoL. These findings suggest that non-operated female patients are subject to pervasive and harmful effects of body image impairment on psychological and physical functioning. Therefore, psychological interventions aiming to target body dissatisfaction should be implemented in the health care of IBD, independently of patients' operative status.

  20. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, O.V.

    2008-01-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects and genomic instability. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm would cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (orig.)

  1. Next-generation phylogeography: a targeted approach for multilocus sequencing of non-model organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan B Puritz

    Full Text Available The field of phylogeography has long since realized the need and utility of incorporating nuclear DNA (nDNA sequences into analyses. However, the use of nDNA sequence data, at the population level, has been hindered by technical laboratory difficulty, sequencing costs, and problematic analytical methods dealing with genotypic sequence data, especially in non-model organisms. Here, we present a method utilizing the 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing platform with the capacity to simultaneously sequence two species of sea star (Meridiastra calcar and Parvulastra exigua at five different nDNA loci across 16 different populations of 20 individuals each per species. We compare results from 3 populations with traditional Sanger sequencing based methods, and demonstrate that this next-generation sequencing platform is more time and cost effective and more sensitive to rare variants than Sanger based sequencing. A crucial advantage is that the high coverage of clonally amplified sequences simplifies haplotype determination, even in highly polymorphic species. This targeted next-generation approach can greatly increase the use of nDNA sequence loci in phylogeographic and population genetic studies by mitigating many of the time, cost, and analytical issues associated with highly polymorphic, diploid sequence markers.

  2. Non-Verbal Communication in Children with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallineni, Sharmila; Nutheti, Rishita; Thangadurai, Shanimole; Thangadurai, Puspha

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine: (a) whether children with visual and additional impairments show any non-verbal behaviors, and if so what were the common behaviors; (b) whether two rehabilitation professionals interpreted the non-verbal behaviors similarly; and (c) whether a speech pathologist and a rehabilitation professional interpreted…

  3. Efficacy and Ecotoxicity of Novel Anti-Fouling Nanomaterials in Target and Non-Target Marine Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelelas, Francisco; Martins, Roberto; Oliveira, Tânia; Maia, Frederico; Malheiro, Eliana; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana; Tedim, João

    2017-04-01

    Biofouling is a global problem that affects virtually all the immersed structures. Currently, several novel environmentally friendly approaches are being tested worldwide to decrease the toxicity of biocides in non-fouling species, such as the encapsulation/immobilization of commercially available biocides, in order to achieve control over the leaching rate. The present study addresses the toxicity of two widely used booster biocides, zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) and copper pyrithione (CuPT), in its free and incorporated forms in order to assess their toxicity and anti-fouling efficacy in target and non-target species. To achieve this goal, the following marine organisms were tested; the green microalgae Tetraselmis chuii (non-target species) and both target species, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and the mussel Mytilus edulis. Organisms were exposed to both biocides, two unloaded nanostructured materials and nanomaterials loaded with biocides, from 10 μg/L to 100 mg/L total weight, following standard protocols. The most eco-friendly and simultaneously efficient anti-fouling solution against the two photosynthetic species (nanoclays loaded with ZnPT) was then tested on mussels to assess its lethal efficacy (LC 50  = 123 μg/L) and compared with free biocide (LC 50  = 211 μg/L) and unloaded material (LC 50  > 1000 μg/L). A second exposure test with sub-lethal concentrations (lower than 100 μg/L), using mussels, was carried out to assess biochemical changes caused by the tested compounds. Oxidative stress, detoxification and neurotransmission markers were not responsive; however, different antioxidant patterns were found with free ZnPT and loaded nanoclay exposures. Thus, the immobilization of the biocide ZnPT into nanoclays proved to be a promising efficient and eco-friendly anti-fouling strategy.

  4. Non-MHC Antigenic Targets of the Humoral Immune Response in Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qiuheng; Reed, Elaine F.

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing body of data supporting a role for non-HLA antibodies in acute and chronic rejection of solid organ transplants. While many of these non-HLA antigens remain poorly defined, the principle antigenic targets are expressed on cells of the allograft including endothelium and epithelium. These non-HLA antigens are classified as either alloantigens, such as the major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) or MICB, or tissue-specific autoantigens such as vim...

  5. Dual inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 perturbs cytoskeletal organization and impairs endothelial cell elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji-Tamura, Kiyomi; Ogawa, Minetaro

    2018-02-26

    Elongation of endothelial cells is an important process in vascular formation and is expected to be a therapeutic target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. We have previously demonstrated that inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 impaired endothelial cell elongation, although the mechanism has not been well defined. In this study, we analyzed the effects of the mTORC1-specific inhibitor everolimus and the mTORC1/mTORC2 dual inhibitor KU0063794 on the cytoskeletal organization and morphology of endothelial cell lines. While both inhibitors equally inhibited cell proliferation, KU0063794 specifically caused abnormal accumulation of F-actin and disordered distribution of microtubules, thereby markedly impairing endothelial cell elongation and tube formation. The effects of KU0063794 were phenocopied by paclitaxel treatment, suggesting that KU0063794 might impair endothelial cell morphology through over-stabilization of microtubules. Although mTORC1 is a key signaling molecule in cell proliferation and has been considered a target for preventing angiogenesis, mTORC1 inhibitors have not been sufficient to suppress angiogenesis. Our results suggest that mTORC1/mTORC2 dual inhibition is more effective for anti-angiogenic therapy, as it impairs not only endothelial cell proliferation, but also endothelial cell elongation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neurocognitive impairment in deficit and non-deficit schizophrenia: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, E; Binnur Akdede, B; Alptekin, K

    2017-10-01

    Most studies suggested that patients with deficit schizophrenia have more severe impairment compared with patients with non-deficit schizophrenia. However, it is not clear whether deficit and non-deficit schizophrenia are associated with differential neurocognitive profiles. The aim of this meta-analytic review was to compare cognitive performances of deficit and non-deficit patients with each other and with healthy controls. In the current meta-analysis, differences in cognitive abilities between 897 deficit and 1636 non-deficit patients with schizophrenia were examined. Cognitive performances of 899 healthy controls were also compared with 350 patients with deficit and 592 non-deficit schizophrenia. Both deficit (d = 1.04-1.53) and non-deficit (d = 0.68-1.19) schizophrenia were associated with significant deficits in all cognitive domains. Deficit patients underperformed non-deficit patients in all cognitive domains (d = 0.24-0.84) and individual tasks (d = 0.39-0.93). The relationship between deficit syndrome and impairment in olfaction, social cognition, verbal fluency, and speed-based cognitive tasks were relatively stronger. Our findings suggest that there is consistent evidence for a significant relationship between deficit syndrome and more severe cognitive impairment in schizophrenia.

  7. Impaired colour vision in workers exposed to organic solvents: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur-Sánchez, A M; Vásquez-Trespalacios, E M; Sardi-Correa, C

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate recent evidence concerning the relationship between the exposure to organic solvents and the impairment of colour vision. A bibliographic search was conducted for scientific papers published in the last 15 years, in the LILACS, PubMed, Science Direct, EBSCO, and Cochrane databases that included observational studies assessing the relationship between impairment in colour vision and exposure to organic solvents. Eleven studies were selected that were performed on an economically active population and used the Lanthony D-15 desaturated test (D-15d), measured the exposure to organic solvents, and included unexposed controls. It was found that there is a statistically significant relationship between the exposure to organic solvents and the presence of an impairment in colour vision. The results support the hypothesis that exposure to organic solvents could induce acquired dyschromatopsia. The evaluation of colour vision with the D-15d test is simple and sensitive for diagnosis. More studies need to be conducted on this subject in order to better understand the relationship between impaired colour vision and more severe side effects caused by this exposure. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of target and non-target interplay in spatial attention task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeti; Joshi, Deepak; Panigrahi, B K; Anand, Sneh; Santhosh, Jayasree

    2018-02-01

    Selective visual attention is the ability to selectively pay attention to the targets while inhibiting the distractors. This paper aims to study the targets and non-targets interplay in spatial attention task while subject attends to the target object present in one visual hemifield and ignores the distractor present in another visual hemifield. This paper performs the averaged evoked response potential (ERP) analysis and time-frequency analysis. ERP analysis agrees to the left hemisphere superiority over late potentials for the targets present in right visual hemifield. Time-frequency analysis performed suggests two parameters i.e. event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP) and inter-trial coherence (ITC). These parameters show the same properties for the target present in either of the visual hemifields but show the difference while comparing the activity corresponding to the targets and non-targets. In this way, this study helps to visualise the difference between targets present in the left and right visual hemifields and, also the targets and non-targets present in the left and right visual hemifields. These results could be utilised to monitor subjects' performance in brain-computer interface (BCI) and neurorehabilitation.

  9. Side Effects of Nitrification Inhibitors on Non Target Microbial Processes in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Carl Gottlieb Ottow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural chemicals have been used extensively in modern agriculture and toxicological studies suggest a great potential for inducing undesirable effects on non target organisms. A model experiment was conducted in order to determine side effects of three nitrification inhibitors (NIs, 3,4dimethylpyrazolephosphate = DMPP, 4-Chlor-methylpyrazole phosphate = ClMPP and dicyandiamide = DCD on non target microbial processes in soils. Side effects and dose response curve of three NIs were quantified under laboratory conditions using silty clay, loam and a sandy soils. Dehydrogenase, dimethylsulfoxide reductase as well as nitrogenase activity (NA and potential denitrification capacity were measured as common and specific non target microbial processes. The influence of 5-1000 times the base concentration, dose response curves were examined, and no observable effect level = NOEL, as well as effective dose ED10 and ED50 (10% and 50% inhibition were calculated. The NOEL for microbial non target processes were about 30–70 times higher than base concentration in all investigated soils. The potential denitrification capacity revealed to be the most sensitive parameter. ClMPP exhibited the strongest influence on the non target microbial processes in the three soils. The NOEL, ED10 and ED50 values were higher in clay than in loamy or sandy soil. The NIs was the most effective in sandy soils.

  10. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts target organ damage in Chinese patients with metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhigang; Nie, Hai; He, Hongbo

    2007-01-01

    with metabolic syndrome. A total of 1082 consecutive patients of Chinese origin were screened for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and target organ damage, including cardiac hypertrophy......Observational studies established high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a risk factor for cardiovascular events in the general population. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between target organ damage and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in a cohort of Chinese patients......, carotid intima-media thickness, and renal impairment, were investigated. The median (25th and 75th percentiles) of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in 619 patients with metabolic syndrome was 2.42 mg/L (0.75 and 3.66 mg/L) compared with 1.13 mg/L (0.51 and 2.46 mg/L) among 463 control subjects (P

  11. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  12. Are leaves that fall from imidacloprid-treated maple trees to control Asian longhorned beetles toxic to non-target decomposer organisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzweiser, David P; Good, Kevin P; Chartrand, Derek T; Scarr, Taylor A; Thompson, Dean G

    2008-01-01

    The systemic insecticide imidacloprid may be applied to deciduous trees for control of the Asian longhorned beetle, an invasive wood-boring insect. Senescent leaves falling from systemically treated trees contain imidacloprid concentrations that could pose a risk to natural decomposer organisms. We examined the effects of foliar imidacloprid concentrations on decomposer organisms by adding leaves from imidacloprid-treated sugar maple trees to aquatic and terrestrial microcosms under controlled laboratory conditions. Imidacloprid in maple leaves at realistic field concentrations (3-11 mg kg(-1)) did not affect survival of aquatic leaf-shredding insects or litter-dwelling earthworms. However, adverse sublethal effects at these concentrations were detected. Feeding rates by aquatic insects and earthworms were reduced, leaf decomposition (mass loss) was decreased, measurable weight losses occurred among earthworms, and aquatic and terrestrial microbial decomposition activity was significantly inhibited. Results of this study suggest that sugar maple trees systemically treated with imidacloprid to control Asian longhorned beetles may yield senescent leaves with residue levels sufficient to reduce natural decomposition processes in aquatic and terrestrial environments through adverse effects on non-target decomposer organisms.

  13. Quality and Chemical Composition of Organic and Non-Organic Vetiver Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Kadarohman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vetiver oil (Vetiveria zizanoides has been used as perfume materials, cosmetics, fragrance soaps, anti-inflammation, repellent, and insecticidal agents. Organic vetiver oil has higher economical value than non-organic vetiver oil and it has been regarded to be able to compete in the global market. Therefore, studies have been carried out using 1 hectare of land and the first generation of organic vetiver oil has produced 0.57% of yield, greater than non-organic (0.50%. The quality of organic and non-organic vetiver oil was analyzed by Indonesian Standard (SNI parameter, pesticide residue test, chemical composition by GC/MS, and the appearance of vetiver root. In general, the result of organic and non-organic vetiver oil has fulfilled the national standard; the quality of organic vetiver oil was better than non-organic one. Physically, the appearance of organic vetiver root was better than non-organic vetiver root; organic vetiver root was denser, more appealing, and did not have any black spots. The pesticide residue of organic vetiver oil was lower than non-organic vetiver oil. Based on SNI test, vetiverol (oxygen compounds in organic vetiver oil was higher than non-organic vetiver oil.

  14. The beta-receptor blocker metoprolol alters detoxification processes in the non-target organism Dreissena polymorpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contardo-Jara, Valeska, E-mail: contardo@igb-berlin.d [Dpt. Ecophysiology and Aquaculture, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Pflugmacher, Stephan, E-mail: pflugmacher@igb-berlin.d [Dpt. Ecophysiology and Aquaculture, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Nuetzmann, Gunnar, E-mail: nuetzmann@igb-berlin.d [Dpt. Ecohydrology, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Kloas, Werner, E-mail: werner.kloas@igb-berlin.d [Dpt. Ecophysiology and Aquaculture, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany); Wiegand, Claudia, E-mail: wiegand@biology.sdu.d [University of Southern Denmark Institute of Biology, Campusvej 55, 5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2010-06-15

    Due to increasing amounts of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) in the aquatic environment, their largely unknown effects to non-target organisms need to be assessed. This study examined physiological changes in the freshwater mussel Dreissena polymorpha exposed to increasing concentrations (0.534, 5.34, 53.4 and 534 mug L{sup -1}) of the beta-blocker metoprolol in a flow-through system for seven days. The two lower concentrations represent the environmentally relevant range. Surprisingly, metallothionein mRNA was immediately up-regulated in all treatments. For the two higher concentrations mRNA up-regulation in gills was found for P-glycoprotein after one day, and after four days for pi class glutathione S-transferase, demonstrating elimination and biotransformation processes, respectively. Additionally, catalase and superoxide dismutase were up-regulated in the digestive gland indicating oxidative stress. In all treated mussels a significant up-regulation of heat shock protein mRNA was observed in gills after four days, which suggests protein damage and the requirement for repair processes. Metoprolol was 20-fold bioaccumulated for environmentally relevant concentrations. - Evidence for significant physiological changes in an aquatic mollusc due to exposure to a pharmaceutically active compound detected by real-time PCR.

  15. Quality of life is significantly impaired in non-allergic rhinitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segboer, Christine L.; Terreehorst, Ingrid; Gevorgyan, Artur; Hellings, Peter W.; van Drunen, Cornelis M.; Fokkens, Wytske J.

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to the well-known significant impairment of quality of life (QoL) in allergic rhinitis (AR), the degree of impairment in QoL in non-allergic rhinitis (NAR) remained unknown for a long time, due to a lack of a validated questionnaire to assess QoL in the NAR patient group. In this study a

  16. Artificial neural network study on organ-targeting peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Kim, Junhyoung; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Minkyoung; Rhee, Hokyoung; Shin, Jae-Min; Choi, Kihang; Kang, Sang-Kee; Lee, Nam Kyung; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2010-01-01

    We report a new approach to studying organ targeting of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information. The positive control data sets consist of organ-targeting peptide sequences identified by the peroral phage-display technique for four organs, and the negative control data are prepared from random sequences. The capacity of our models to make appropriate predictions is validated by statistical indicators including sensitivity, specificity, enrichment curve, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (the ROC score). VHSE descriptor produces statistically significant training models and the models with simple neural network architectures show slightly greater predictive power than those with complex ones. The training and test set statistics indicate that our models could discriminate between organ-targeting and random sequences. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the selection of organ-targeting peptides for generating peptide drugs or peptidomimetics.

  17. Applying the prudence principle in non-profit organizations and financial institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Otavová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes in detail the accounting principle of prudence in non-profit organizations and financial institutions. It defines its application in such organizations and based on comparison it evaluates the practical use of the prudence principle and its reflection in the accounting books. The main focus is on differences in applying the prudence principle that result from differences in the purpose activities and methods of asset management in these organizations. The practical application of the prudence principle in accounting consists mainly in the creation and use of provisions and impairments. These methods are defined by the Implementing Regulation to the Accounting Act No. 563/1991. The paper also provides tables where the creation and use of impairments and provisions in the above-mentioned organizations is compared with how business companies proceed in creating impairments and provisions. The key legislation standardizing accounting in the Czech Republic is the Accounting Act No. 563/1991, as amended, which stipulates the general accounting principles, the so-called accounting philosophy. The accounting is built around the general accounting principles, which are perceived as the pillars of accounting. Even though they are not stipulated in any particular law, they are legally enforceable and their ignorance can be sanctioned. The general accounting principles represent a set of rules to be observed in keeping the accounting books, preparing the accounting reports and submitting the accounting reports to users. The keystone accounting principle is the principle of true and fair refl ection of facts the essential goal of which is to report in the fi nancial statement actual assets and the fi nancial position of the accounting unit with an essential focus on reporting events that occurred during the accounting period with respect to their content.

  18. Non-kinetic capabilities: complementing the kinetic prevalence to targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Ducheine, P.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting is used in military doctrine to describe a military operational way, using (military) means to influence a target (or addressee) in order to achieve designated political and/or military goals. The four factors italicized are used to analyse non-kinetic targeting, complementing our knowledge and understanding of the kinetic prevalence. Paradoxically, non-kinetic targeting is not recognized as a separate concept: kinetic and non-kinetic are intertwined facets of targeting. Kinetic tar...

  19. World Health Organization cardiovascular risk stratification and target organ damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskorz, D; Bongarzoni, L; Citta, L; Citta, N; Citta, P; Keller, L; Mata, L; Tommasi, A

    2016-01-01

    Prediction charts allow treatment to be targeted according to simple markers of cardiovascular risk; many algorithms do not recommend screening asymptomatic target organ damage which could change dramatically the assessment. To demonstrate that target organ damage is present in low cardiovascular risk hypertensive patients and it is more frequent and severe as global cardiovascular risk increases. Consecutive hypertensive patients treated at a single Latin American center. Cardiovascular risk stratified according to 2013 WHO/ISH risk prediction chart America B. Left ventricular mass assessed by Devereux method, left ventricular hypertrophy considered >95g/m(2) in women and >115g/m(2) in men. Transmitral diastolic peak early flow velocity to average septal/lateral peak early diastolic relaxation velocity (E/e' ratio) measured cut off value >13. Systolic function assessed by tissue Doppler average interventricular septum/lateral wall mitral annulus rate systolic excursion (s wave). A total of 292 patients were included of whom 159 patients (54.5%) had cardiovascular risk of 20%. Left ventricular hypertrophy was detected in 17.6% low risk patients, 27.8% in medium risk and 23.3% in high risk (p<0.05), abnormal E/e' ratio was found in 13.8%, 31.1% and 27.9%, respectively (p<0.05). Mean s wave was 8.03+8, 8.1+9 and 8.7+1cm/s for low, intermediate and high risk patients, respectively (p<0.025). Target organ damage is more frequent and severe in high risk; one over four subjects was misclassified due to the presence of asymptomatic target organ damage. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Selective synaptic targeting of the excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic organizers FGF22 and FGF7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Akiko; Timmons, Kendall M; Kikuma, Koto; Pechmann, Yvonne; Kneussel, Matthias; Umemori, Hisashi

    2015-01-15

    Specific formation of excitatory and inhibitory synapses is crucial for proper functioning of the brain. Fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22) and FGF7 are postsynaptic-cell-derived presynaptic organizers necessary for excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic differentiation, respectively, in the hippocampus. For the establishment of specific synaptic networks, these FGFs must localize to appropriate synaptic locations - FGF22 to excitatory and FGF7 to inhibitory postsynaptic sites. Here, we show that distinct motor and adaptor proteins contribute to intracellular microtubule transport of FGF22 and FGF7. Excitatory synaptic targeting of FGF22 requires the motor proteins KIF3A and KIF17 and the adaptor protein SAP102 (also known as DLG3). By contrast, inhibitory synaptic targeting of FGF7 requires the motor KIF5 and the adaptor gephyrin. Time-lapse imaging shows that FGF22 moves with SAP102, whereas FGF7 moves with gephyrin. These results reveal the basis of selective targeting of the excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic organizers that supports their different synaptogenic functions. Finally, we found that knockdown of SAP102 or PSD95 (also known as DLG4), which impairs the differentiation of excitatory synapses, alters FGF7 localization, suggesting that signals from excitatory synapses might regulate inhibitory synapse formation by controlling the distribution of the inhibitory presynaptic organizer. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Targeting MEK5 Enhances Radiosensitivity of Human Prostate Cancer and Impairs Tumor-Associated Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    analysis of tumor necrosis factor - alpha resistant human breast cancer cells reveals a MEK5/Erk5-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0296 TITLE: Targeting MEK5 Enhances Radiosensitivity of Human Prostate Cancer and Impairs Tumor - Associated...Cancer and Impairs Tumor -Associated Angiogenesis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0296 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  2. The effect of target and non-target similarity on neural classification performance: A boost from confidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar R Marathe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain computer interaction (BCI technologies have proven effective in utilizing single-trial classification algorithms to detect target images in rapid serial visualization presentation tasks. While many factors contribute to the accuracy of these algorithms, a critical aspect that is often overlooked concerns the feature similarity between target and non-target images. In most real-world environments there are likely to be many shared features between targets and non-targets resulting in similar neural activity between the two classes. It is unknown how current neural-based target classification algorithms perform when qualitatively similar target and non-target images are presented. This study address this question by comparing behavioral and neural classification performance across two conditions: first, when targets were the only infrequent stimulus presented amongst frequent background distracters; and second when targets were presented together with infrequent non-targets containing similar visual features to the targets. The resulting findings show that behavior is slower and less accurate when targets are presented together with similar non-targets; moreover, single-trial classification yielded high levels of misclassification when infrequent non-targets are included. Furthermore, we present an approach to mitigate the image misclassification. We use confidence measures to assess the quality of single-trial classification, and demonstrate that a system in which low confidence trials are reclassified through a secondary process can result in improved performance.

  3. Hypertensive target organ damage in Ghanaian civil servants with hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet Addo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Low levels of detection, treatment and control of hypertension have repeatedly been reported from sub Saharan Africa, potentially increasing the likelihood of target organ damage.A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1015 urban civil servants aged > or = 25 years from seven central government ministries in Accra, Ghana. Participants diagnosed to have hypertension were examined for target organ involvement. Hypertensive target organ damage was defined as the detection of any of the following: left ventricular hypertrophy diagnosed by electrocardiogram, reduction in glomerular filtration rate, the presence of hypertensive retinopathy or a history of a stroke.Of the 219 hypertensive participants examined, 104 (47.5% had evidence of target organ damage. The presence of target organ damage was associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The odds of developing hypertensive target organ damage was five to six times higher in participants with blood pressure (BP > or = 180/110 mmHg compared to those with BP < 140/90 mmHg, and there was a trend to higher odds of target organ damage with increasing BP (p = 0.001. Women had about lower odds of developing target organ damage compared to men.The high prevalence of target organ damage in this working population associated with increasing blood pressure, emphasises the need for hypertension control programs aimed at improving the detection of hypertension, and importantly addressing the issues inhibiting the effective treatment and control of people with hypertension in the population.

  4. Activating transcription factor 3 is a target molecule linking hepatic steatosis to impaired glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Park, Keon Jae; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Kim, Gyu Hee; Lee, DaeYeon; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Song, Eun Hyun; Yoo, Min-Gyu; Kim, Bong-Jo; Suh, Young Ho; Roh, Gu Seob; Gao, Bin; Kim, Won; Kim, Won-Ho

    2017-08-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) contributes to impaired glucose tolerance, leading to type 2 diabetes (T2D); however, the precise mechanisms and target molecules that are involved remain unclear. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is associated with β-cell dysfunction that is induced by severe stress signals in T2D. We aimed to explore the exact functional role of ATF3 as a mechanistic link between hepatic steatosis and T2D development. Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats were utilized for animal experiments. An in vivo-jetPEI siRNA delivery system against ATF3 was used for loss-of-function experiments. We analyzed the baseline cross-sectional data derived from the biopsy-proven NAFLD registry (n=322). Human sera and liver tissues were obtained from 43 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD and from seven healthy participants. ATF3 was highly expressed in the livers of ZDF rats and in human participants with NAFLD and/or T2D. Insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis were associated with increased ATF3 expression and decreased fatty acid oxidation via mitochondrial dysfunction and were attenuated by in vivo ATF3 silencing. Knockdown of ATF3 also ameliorated glucose intolerance, impaired insulin action, and inflammatory responses in ZDF rats. In patients with NAFLD and/or T2D, a significant positive correlation was observed between hepatic ATF3 expression and surrogate markers of T2D, mitochondrial dysfunction, and macrophage infiltration. Increased hepatic ATF3 expression is closely associated with hepatic steatosis and incident T2D; therefore, ATF3 may serve as a potential therapeutic target for NAFLD and hepatic steatosis-induced T2D. Hepatic activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) may play an important role in oxidative stress-mediated hepatic steatosis and the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in a Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat model and in human patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Therefore, ATF3 may be a useful biomarker for

  5. Management trends: Internationalization of non-profit organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inić Branimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-profit organizations are increasingly gaining importance in the modern economy with their development and their numbers increasing day by day. It is very important to note that non-profit organizations are often subject to various benefits that the for-profit companies are not. Thus, for example, preferential tax status of non-profit organizations is manifested primarily in the form of exemption from corporate income tax. In addition, private non-profit organizations enjoy various other state, local and federal taxes exemptions. Under certain conditions, these organizations are exempt from taxes on donations and membership fees. A feature that differentiates various non-profit organizations and profit-oriented companies is their source of income. Profit oriented companies depend on their income, obtained from sales of their goods or services to customers, who usually cover the price and cost of goods and services plus the profit. In contrast, nonprofit organizations are very dependent on membership fees, tax exemptions, members donations or depend on funds of the sponsoring agency which covers most of their costs, for example a federal government agency. Those non-profit organizations that have substantial operating costs beyond national borders and do not identify themselves as purely domestic in their mandate are International non-profit organizations. Most non-profit organizations remain in their national boundaries, on the territory of the country in which they were created, but a large number of non-profit organizations rapidly internationalize, and some larger non-profits have grown into important global actors. The paper includes the following sections: (1 introduction, (2 why is the 'non-profit' important, (3 the internationalization of non-profit organizations, (4 sources of income of non-profit organizations (4.1. causality of impact and of strategic decisions in cases pertaining to universities, (5 the limits of strategic

  6. 22 CFR 231.05 - Non-impairment of the Guarantee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-impairment of the Guarantee. 231.05 Section 231.05 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ARAB REPUBLIC OF EGYPT LOAN GUARANTEES ISSUED UNDER THE EMERGENCY WARTIME SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT OF 2003, PUBLIC LAW 108-11-STANDARD...

  7. The mental health of UK ex-servicemen with a combat-related or a non-combat-related visual impairment: does the cause of visual impairment matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevelink, Sharon A M; Malcolm, Estelle M; Gill, Pashyca C; Fear, Nicola T

    2015-08-01

    Since the start of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, the numbers of young service personnel who have sustained a combat-related visual impairment have increased. This cross-sectional study examined the mental well-being of ex-servicemen (aged 22-55 years) with a visual impairment and determined if the mental health of those with a combat-related visual impairment differed from those whose visual impairment is not combat-related. Male ex-service personnel with a visual impairment completed a telephone interview assessing the presence of depressive symptomatology, probable anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology and alcohol misuse. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. 77 participants were included in the study, reflecting a response rate of 76.2%. Of those with complete data (n=74), 20 ex-servicemen had a combat-related visual impairment. Among ex-service personnel with a combat-related visual impairment, 10.0% (95% CI 0 to 23.2) screened positive for a probable depression, 25.0% (95% CI 6.0 to 44.0) for probable anxiety and 10.0% (95% CI 0 to 23.2) for probable PTSD. The prevalence of probable depression and probable PTSD differed among those with a non-combat-related visual impairment, namely 18.5% (95% CI 8.1 to 28.9) and 16.7% (95% CI 6.8 to 26.7), respectively. Probable anxiety was 18.5% (95% CI 8.1 to 28.9) among non-combat-related visually impaired ex-service personnel. 45.0% (95% CI 23.2 to 66.8) of combat-related visually impaired personnel reported hazardous drinking, compared with 20.4% (95% CI 9.7 to 31.2) of those with a non-combat-related visual impairment. Mental health problems were prevalent among visually impaired younger ex-servicemen. No statistically significant differences were found in the prevalence of mental health problems among ex-servicemen with a combat-related visual impairment compared with those with a non-combat-related visual impairment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  8. Community composition of target vs. non-target fungi in fungicide treated wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, Kamilla; Jørgensen, Lise Nistrup; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer

    2012-01-01

    disease in wheat and within the last decade, new aggressive strains of yellow rust has caused severe epidemics that lead to substantial yield losses. This study explored the community composition of target versus non-target fungi in yellow rust infected wheat as affected by treatment timing and dose......Fungicide treatments are common control strategies used to manage fungal pathogens in agricultural fields, however, effects of treatments on the composition of total fungal communities, including non-target fungi, in the phyllosphere is not well known. Yellow rust (Puccinia striiformis) is a common...

  9. Impacts of transgenic poplar-cotton agro-ecosystems upon target pests and non-target insects under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D J; Liu, J X; Lu, Z Y; Li, C L; Comada, E; Yang, M S

    2015-07-27

    Poplar-cotton agro-ecosystems are the main agricultural planting modes of cotton fields in China. With increasing acres devoted to transgenic insect-resistant poplar and transgenic insect-resistant cotton, studies examining the effects of transgenic plants on target and non-target insects become increasingly important. We systematically surveyed populations of both target pests and non-target insects for 4 different combinations of poplar-cotton eco-systems over 3 years. Transgenic Bt cotton strongly resisted the target insects Fall webworm moth [Hyphantria cunea (Drury)], Sylepta derogata Fabrieius, and American bollworm (Heliothis armigera), but no clear impact on non-target insect cotton aphids (Aphis gossypii). Importantly, intercrops containing transgenic Pb29 poplar significantly increased the inhibitory effects of Bt cotton on Fall webworm moth in ecosystem IV. Highly resistant Pb29 poplar reduced populations of the target pests Grnsonoma minutara Hubner and non-target insect poplar leaf aphid (Chaitophorus po-pulialbae), while Fall webworm moth populations were unaffected. We determined the effects of Bt toxin from transgenic poplar and cotton on target and non-target pests in different ecosystems of cotton-poplar intercrops and identified the synergistic effects of such combinations toward both target and non-target insects.

  10. Radar automatic target recognition (ATR) and non-cooperative target recognition (NCTR)

    CERN Document Server

    Blacknell, David

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect and locate targets by day or night, over wide areas, regardless of weather conditions has long made radar a key sensor in many military and civil applications. However, the ability to automatically and reliably distinguish different targets represents a difficult challenge. Radar Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) and Non-Cooperative Target Recognition (NCTR) captures material presented in the NATO SET-172 lecture series to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art and continuing challenges of radar target recognition. Topics covered include the problem as applied to th

  11. TRANSPARENCY IN ITALIAN NON PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Gazzola

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to evaluate the accountability and transparency of Italian non profits organizations. The main goal is to understand if a general accountability or transparency problem, or a systematic publicity deficit, exist in the third sector in Italy. Non profit organizations have an ethical obligation to their stakeholder and to the public to conduct their activities with accountability and transparency. Non profit organizations should regularly and openly convey information to the stakeholder about their vision, mission, objectives, activities, accomplishments, decision-making processes and organizational structure. Information from a non profit organization should be easily accessible to the stakeholder and should create external visibility, public understanding and trust in the organization, conditions necessary to find donors. Non profit organizations work with communities and community donors need to know how their money is used. In the first part the analysis of the definition of transparency and accountability is made and the sustainability report like an important instrument of communication is considered. In the second part an empirical research is presented. The Italian law allows taxpayers to devote 5 per thousand of their income tax to non profit organizations, choosing between charities, social promotion associations, recognized associations, entities dedicated to scientific research and health care, universities, municipal social services and other non profit organizations. The present study present a quantitative research and it’s based on an empirical analysis of non-profit organizations that receive this donation in Italy in the year 2010 and 2011. In the paper we analyze the transparency and the accountability of the top 100 non profit organizations that have received the contribution of 5 per thousand, checking whether they prepare their Sustainability Report or any other kind of report for communicate the use

  12. Organic vs. Non-Organic Food Products: Credence and Price Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Wang; Zhanguo Zhu; Feng Chu

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the organic and non-organic production choices of two firms by considering customers’ trust in organic food products. In the context of customers’ possible willingness to pay a premium price and their mistrust in organic food products, two firms first make choices on offering organic and non-organic food products. If offering organic products, a firm can further invest in the credence system to increase customers’ trust in their organic products. At the final stage, two firms deter...

  13. Association of body mass index with amnestic and non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment risk in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Zhao, Minghui; Han, Zhaoli; Li, Dai; Zhang, Shishuang; Zhang, Yongqiang; Kong, Xiaodong; Sun, Ning; Zhang, Qiang; Lei, Ping

    2017-09-15

    Previous studies focused on the relationship between body mass index and cognitive disorder and obtained many conflicting results. This study explored the potential effects of body mass index on the risk of mild cognitive impairment (amnestic and non-amnestic) in the elderly. The study enrolled 240 amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients, 240 non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients and 480 normal cognitive function controls. Data on admission and retrospective data at baseline (6 years ago) were collected from their medical records. Cognitive function was evaluated using Mini-Mental State Examination and Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Being underweight, overweight or obese at baseline was associated with an increased risk of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (OR: 2.30, 95%CI: 1.50 ~ 3.52; OR: 1.74, 95%CI: 1.36 ~ 2.20; OR: 1.71, 95%CI: 1.32 ~ 2.22, respectively). Being overweight or obese at baseline was also associated with an increased risk of non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment (OR: 1.51, 95%CI: 1.20 ~ 1.92; OR: 1.52, 95%CI: 1.21 ~ 1.97, respectively). In subjects with normal weights at baseline, an increased or decreased body mass index at follow-up was associated with an elevated risk of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (OR: 1.80, 95%CI: 1.10 ~ 3.05; OR: 3.96, 95%CI: 2.88 ~ 5.49, respectively), but only an increased body mass index was associated with an elevated risk of non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment (OR: 1.71, 95%CI: 1.16 ~ 2.59). Unhealthy body mass index levels at baseline and follow-up might impact the risk of both types of mild cognitive impairment (amnestic and non-amnestic).

  14. Real-time non-rigid target tracking for ultrasound-guided clinical interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachiu, C.; Ries, M.; Ramaekers, P.; Guey, J.-L.; Moonen, C. T. W.; de Senneville, B. Denis

    2017-10-01

    Biological motion is a problem for non- or mini-invasive interventions when conducted in mobile/deformable organs due to the targeted pathology moving/deforming with the organ. This may lead to high miss rates and/or incomplete treatment of the pathology. Therefore, real-time tracking of the target anatomy during the intervention would be beneficial for such applications. Since the aforementioned interventions are often conducted under B-mode ultrasound (US) guidance, target tracking can be achieved via image registration, by comparing the acquired US images to a separate image established as positional reference. However, such US images are intrinsically altered by speckle noise, introducing incoherent gray-level intensity variations. This may prove problematic for existing intensity-based registration methods. In the current study we address US-based target tracking by employing the recently proposed EVolution registration algorithm. The method is, by construction, robust to transient gray-level intensities. Instead of directly matching image intensities, EVolution aligns similar contrast patterns in the images. Moreover, the displacement is computed by evaluating a matching criterion for image sub-regions rather than on a point-by-point basis, which typically provides more robust motion estimates. However, unlike similar previously published approaches, which assume rigid displacements in the image sub-regions, the EVolution algorithm integrates the matching criterion in a global functional, allowing the estimation of an elastic dense deformation. The approach was validated for soft tissue tracking under free-breathing conditions on the abdomen of seven healthy volunteers. Contact echography was performed on all volunteers, while three of the volunteers also underwent standoff echography. Each of the two modalities is predominantly specific to a particular type of non- or mini-invasive clinical intervention. The method demonstrated on average an accuracy of

  15. [Predictors of cognitive impairment in population over 64 years institutionalized and non-institutionalized].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Saldaña, Antonio; Sánchez-Ramos, José Luis; León-Jariego, José Carlos; Palacios-Gómez, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Describe the factors which can be associated with cognitive impairment in institutionalized and non-institutionalized elderly. Cross-sectional study of 200 people aged over 64 in Huelva (Spain) in 2014. Of these, 100 people were institutionalized in a residential facility and 100 were not. Cognitive impairment was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE-35), basic activities of daily living by Barthel index, general health through the Goldberg GHQ-28 and social, clinical and behavioural variables were contemplated in the study. The association of cognitive impairment with all the variables was analysed using Chi-square test. Finally, a multivariate analysis was performed using logistic regression to identify possible joint influence of variables to study on the cognitive impairment. The prevalence of cognitive impairment in those institutionalized was 47%, higher than that of non-institutionalized group which was only 8% (p<.001). The dependence for basic activities for daily living and learning activities were the only variables in both groups which were associated with the cognitive impairment. Institutionalization (OR=5.368), age (OR=1.066) and dependence for basic activities (OR=5.036) were negatively associated with CI, while learning activities (OR=.227) were associated in a positive way. Conducting learning activities and the promotion of personal autonomy can delay cognitive impairment in older people. It is important to include cognitive stimulation programs aimed at the old population, especially in residential institutions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Organic vs. Non-Organic Food Products: Credence and Price Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the organic and non-organic production choices of two firms by considering customers’ trust in organic food products. In the context of customers’ possible willingness to pay a premium price and their mistrust in organic food products, two firms first make choices on offering organic and non-organic food products. If offering organic products, a firm can further invest in the credence system to increase customers’ trust in their organic products. At the final stage, two firms determine prices. We provide serval insights. First, we characterize the market conditions in which only one firm, both firms or neither firm will choose to offer organic food products. We find that the higher the production costs or credence investment costs for organic food products are, the more likely firms are to choose to produce non-organic food products. Second, if it is expensive enough to invest in organic credence, offering organic food products may still be uncompetitive, even if organic production cost appears to have no disadvantage compared to non-organic food products. Third, we highlight how the prices of organic food products in equilibrium are affected by market parameters. We show that when only one firm offers organic food products, this firm tends to offer a relatively low price if organic credence investment is expensive. Fourth, we highlight how one firm’s credence investment decision in equilibrium can be affected by the product type choice of the other firm. We find that the investment in organic credence is lower when both firms offer organic food products compared with the case when only one firm offers organic food products.

  17. Assessing Potential Impact of Bt Eggplants on Non-Target Arthropods in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navasero, Mario V.; Candano, Randolph N.; Hautea, Desiree M.; Hautea, Randy A.; Shotkoski, Frank A.; Shelton, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on potential adverse effects of genetically engineered crops are part of an environmental risk assessment that is required prior to the commercial release of these crops. Of particular concern are non-target organisms (NTOs) that provide important ecosystem services. Here, we report on studies conducted in the Philippines over three cropping seasons with Bt eggplants expressing Cry1Ac for control of the eggplant fruit and shoot borer (EFSB), Leucinodes orbonalis, to examine potential effects on field abundance, community composition, structure and biodiversity of NTO’s, particularly non-target arthropod (NTA) communities. We document that many arthropod taxa are associated with Bt eggplants and their non-Bt comparators and that the number of taxa and their densities varied within season and across trials. However, we found few significant differences in seasonal mean densities of arthropod taxa between Bt and non-Bt eggplants. As expected, a lower abundance of lepidopteran pests was detected in Bt eggplants. Higher abundance of a few non-target herbivores was detected in non-Bt eggplants as were a few non-target beneficials that might control them. Principal Response Curve (PRC) analyses showed no statistically significant impact of Bt eggplants on overall arthropod communities through time in any season. Furthermore, we found no significant adverse impacts of Bt eggplants on species abundance, diversity and community dynamics, particularly for beneficial NTAs. These results support our previous studies documenting that Bt eggplants can effectively and selectively control the main pest of eggplant in Asia, the EFSB. The present study adds that it can do so without adverse effects on NTAs. Thus, Bt eggplants can be a foundational component for controlling EFSB in an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program and dramatically reduce dependence on conventional insecticides. PMID:27798662

  18. Impairment-targeted exercises for older adults with knee pain: protocol for a proof-of-principle study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise therapy for knee pain and osteoarthritis remains a key element of conservative treatment, recommended in clinical guidelines. Yet systematic reviews point to only modest benefits from exercise interventions. One reason for this might be that clinical trials tend to use a one-size-fits-all approach to exercise, effectively disregarding the details of their participants' clinical presentations. This uncontrolled before-after study (TargET-Knee-Pain aims to test the principle that exercises targeted at the specific physical impairments of older adults with knee pain may be able to significantly improve those impairments. It is a first step towards testing the effectiveness of this more individually-tailored approach. Methods/Design We aim to recruit 60 participants from an existing observational cohort of community-dwelling older adults with knee pain. Participants will all have at least one of the three physical impairments of weak quadriceps, a reduced range of knee flexion and poor standing balance. Each participant will be asked to undertake a programme of exercises, targeted at their particular combination and degree of impairment(s, over the course of twelve weeks. The exercises will be taught and progressed by an experienced physiotherapist, with reference to a "menu" of agreed exercises for each of the impairments, over the course of six fortnightly home visits, alternating with six fortnightly telephone calls. Primary outcome measures will be isometric quadriceps strength, knee flexion range of motion, timed single-leg standing balance and the "Four Balance Test Scale" at 12 weeks. Key secondary outcome measures will be self-reported levels of pain, stiffness and difficulties with day-to-day functional tasks (WOMAC. Outcome measures will be taken at three time-points (baseline, six weeks and twelve weeks by a study nurse blinded to the exercise status of the participants. Discussion This study (Targ

  19. Does Bt rice pose risks to non-target arthropods? Results of a meta-analysis in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic Bt rice expressing the protoxin proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) have been developed since 1989. Their ecological risks toward non-target organisms have been investigated. However, these studies were conducted individually, yielding inconsistent conclusions and u...

  20. Does cognitive impairment impact adherence? A systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between cognitive impairment and medication non-adherence in stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rohde, Daniela

    2017-12-08

    While medication adherence is essential for the secondary prevention of stroke, it is often sub-optimal, and can be compromised by cognitive impairment. This study aimed to systematically review and meta-analyse the association between cognitive impairment and medication non-adherence in stroke.

  1. Non-Taylor magnetohydrodynamic self-organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Shao-ping; Horiuchi, Ritoku; Sato, Tetsuya.

    1994-10-01

    A self-organization process in a plasma with a finite pressure is investigated by means of a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation. It is demonstrated that a non-Taylor finite β self-organized state is realized in which a perpendicular component of the electric current is generated and the force-free(parallel) current decreases until they reach to almost the same level. The self-organized state is described by an MHD force-balance relation, namely, j perpendicular = B x ∇p/B·B and j parallel = μB where μ is not a constant, and the pressure structure resembles the structure of the toroidal magnetic field intensity. Unless an anomalous perpendicular thermal conduction arises, the plasma cannot relax to a Taylor state but to a non-Taylor (non-force-free) self-organized state. This state becomes more prominent for a weaker resistivity condition. The non-Taylor state has a rather universal property, for example, independence of the initial β value. Another remarkable finding is that the Taylor's conjecture of helicity conservation is, in a strict sense, not valid. The helicity dissipation occurs and its rate slows down critically in accordance with the stepwise relaxation of the magnetic energy. It is confirmed that the driven magnetic reconnection caused by the nonlinearly excited plasma kink flows plays the leading role in all of these key features of the non-Taylor self-organization. (author)

  2. A Single Unexpected Change in Target- but Not Distractor Motion Impairs Multiple Object Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauke S. Meyerhoff

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent research addresses the question whether motion information of multiple objects contributes to maintaining a selection of objects across a period of motion. Here, we investigate whether target and/or distractor motion information is used during attentive tracking. We asked participants to track four objects and changed either the motion direction of targets, the motion direction of distractors, neither, or both during a brief flash in the middle of a tracking interval. We observed that a single direction change of targets is sufficient to impair tracking performance. In contrast, changing the motion direction of distractors had no effect on performance. This indicates that target- but not distractor motion information is evaluated during tracking.

  3. Non-targeted mutagenesis of unirradiated lambda phage in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.D.; Hutchinson, F.

    1984-01-01

    Non-targeted mutagenesis of lambda phage by ultraviolet light is the increase over background mutagenesis when non-irradiated phage are grown in irradiated Escherichia coli host cells. Such mutagenesis is caused by different processes from targeted mutagenesis, in which mutations in irradiated phage are correlated with photoproducts in the phage DNA. Non-irradiated phage grown in heavily irradiated uvr + host cells showed non-targeted mutations, which were 3/4 frameshifts, whereas targeted mutations were 2/3 transitions. For non-targeted mutagenesis in heavily irradiated host cells, there were one or two mutant phage per mutant burst. From the results of a series of experiments with various mutant host cells, a major pathway of non-targeted mutagenesis by ultraviolet light was proposed which acts in addition to ''SOS induction''. This pathway involves binding of the enzyme DNA polymerase I to damaged genomic DNA, and low polymerase activity leads to frameshift mutations during semiconservative DNA replication. The data suggest that this process will play a much smaller role in ultraviolet mutagenesis of the bacterial genome than it does in the mutagenesis of lambda phage. (author)

  4. The effect of target and non-target similarity on neural classification performance: A boost from confidence

    OpenAIRE

    Amar R Marathe; Anthony J Ries; Vernon J Lawhern; Vernon J Lawhern; Brent J Lance; Jonathan eTouryan; Kaleb eMcDowell; Hubert eCecotti

    2015-01-01

    Brain computer interaction (BCI) technologies have proven effective in utilizing single-trial classification algorithms to detect target images in rapid serial visualization presentation tasks. While many factors contribute to the accuracy of these algorithms, a critical aspect that is often overlooked concerns the feature similarity between target and non-target images. In most real-world environments there are likely to be many shared features between targets and non-targets resulting in si...

  5. The effect of target and non-target similarity on neural classification performance: a boost from confidence

    OpenAIRE

    Marathe, Amar R.; Ries, Anthony J.; Lawhern, Vernon J.; Lance, Brent J.; Touryan, Jonathan; McDowell, Kaleb; Cecotti, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Brain computer interaction (BCI) technologies have proven effective in utilizing single-trial classification algorithms to detect target images in rapid serial visualization presentation tasks. While many factors contribute to the accuracy of these algorithms, a critical aspect that is often overlooked concerns the feature similarity between target and non-target images. In most real-world environments there are likely to be many shared features between targets and non-targets resulting in si...

  6. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisko Salomaa

    2006-01-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (author)

  7. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisko Salomaa [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (author)

  8. Toxicological Evaluation of a New Lepidopteran Insecticide, Flubendiamide, in Non-Target Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Sarkar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flubendiamide, comparatively a new pesticide designed to eradicate lepidopteran insect pests is known to have low risk to birds, mammals, fish, algae, honey bees, non-target arthropods, earthworms, soil macro- and micro-organisms, non-target plants as well as sewage treatment organisms; however, the risk assessment for aquatic invertebrates from metabolite could not be finalized with available data. Methods: Different concentrations of flubendiamide (TATA TAKUMI®, Rallis, India were introduced to larvae, pupae, and adult flies. A wide range of comparatively higher concentrations was selected for acute LC50 than chronic LC50 due to their exposure duration. Furthermore, relatively lower concentrations were introduced to larvae for assessment of emergence. Results: At chronic exposure, the effect-concentration relationship exhibited a linear response when adult emergence was considered in Drosophila melanogaster. When acute LC50 of flubendiamide in 3rd instar larvae was compared with the chronic LC50 then it was seen to be approximately 21 fold higher whereas chronic LC50 for adult flies was nearly 19 times less than the adult acute LC50. Similarly, adult emergence was seen to lower by 91.95% at 1500 µg/mL concentration. The chronic LC50 of the flubendiamide in Drosophila was approximately 170303 times more than the reported No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC. Conclusion: Hence, the chemical, flubendiamide can induce its effects at very low concentration, far below the lethal ones. Thus, the study is of relevance for the non-target insects as well as the insect dependent organisms.

  9. Non-targeted mutagenesis of unirradiated lambda phage in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, R.D.; Hutchinson, F. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Dept. of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

    1984-03-05

    Non-targeted mutagenesis of lambda phage by ultraviolet light is the increase over background mutagenesis when non-irradiated phage are grown in irradiated Escherichia coli host cells. Such mutagenesis is caused by different processes from targeted mutagenesis, in which mutations in irradiated phage are correlated with photoproducts in the phage DNA. Non-irradiated phage grown in heavily irradiated uvr/sup +/ host cells showed non-targeted mutations, which were 3/4 frameshifts, whereas targeted mutations were 2/3 transitions. For non-targeted mutagenesis in heavily irradiated host cells, there were one or two mutant phage per mutant burst. From the results of a series of experiments with various mutant host cells, a major pathway of non-targeted mutagenesis by ultraviolet light was proposed which acts in addition to ''SOS induction''. This pathway involves binding of the enzyme DNA polymerase I to damaged genomic DNA, and low polymerase activity leads to frameshift mutations during semiconservative DNA replication. The data suggest that this process will play a much smaller role in ultraviolet mutagenesis of the bacterial genome than it does in the mutagenesis of lambda phage.

  10. Death receptor pathways mediate targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiations in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, A.; Courtin, A.; Levalois, C.; Altmeyer-Morel, S.; Chevillard, S.; Lebeau, J.; Romeo, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Delayed cell death by mitotic catastrophe is a frequent mode of solid tumor cell death after γ-irradiation, a widely used treatment of cancer. Whereas the mechanisms that underlie the early γ-irradiation-induced cell death are well documented, those that drive the delayed cell death are largely unknown. Here we show that the Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α death receptor pathways mediate the delayed cell death observed after γ-irradiation of breast cancer cells. Early after irradiation, we observe the increased expression of Fas, TRAIL-R and TNF-R that first sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Later, the increased expression of FasL, TRAIL and TNF-α permit the apoptosis engagement linked to mitotic catastrophe. Treatments with TNF-α, TRAIL or anti-Fas antibody, early after radiation exposure, induce apoptosis, whereas the neutralization of the three death receptors pathways impairs the delayed cell death. We also show for the first time that irradiated breast cancer cells excrete soluble forms of the three ligands that can induce the death of sensitive bystander cells. Overall, these results define the molecular basis of the delayed cell death of irradiated cancer cells and identify the death receptors pathways as crucial actors in apoptosis induced by targeted as well as non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. (authors)

  11. Conditional and future tense impairment in non-fluent aphasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rofes, Adrià; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Martínez-Ferreiro, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Background:Morphological errors of tense and agreement are salient in agrammatic aphasia. The PADILIH predicts impairments in discourse linking that translate to greater difficulties in referring to a past event time than to a future or a present event time. In Catalan, the Periphrastic conditional...... between verb forms that refer to an irrealis future event (Simple conditional and Future). We also assessed whether problems in time reference extend to individuals with non-fluent aphasia that are not typical agrammatic Broca aphasia. Methods & Procedures:A sentence completion task that included 60...... sentences (20 per type) of equal length in a Conditional structure (if-sentences) was designed. We tested three sentence types: Periphrastic conditional, Simple conditional and Future. The task was administered to nine participants with non-fluent aphasia and nine age-matched non-brain-damaged participants...

  12. Macromolecular target prediction by self-organizing feature maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Gisbert; Schneider, Petra

    2017-03-01

    Rational drug discovery would greatly benefit from a more nuanced appreciation of the activity of pharmacologically active compounds against a diverse panel of macromolecular targets. Already, computational target-prediction models assist medicinal chemists in library screening, de novo molecular design, optimization of active chemical agents, drug re-purposing, in the spotting of potential undesired off-target activities, and in the 'de-orphaning' of phenotypic screening hits. The self-organizing map (SOM) algorithm has been employed successfully for these and other purposes. Areas covered: The authors recapitulate contemporary artificial neural network methods for macromolecular target prediction, and present the basic SOM algorithm at a conceptual level. Specifically, they highlight consensus target-scoring by the employment of multiple SOMs, and discuss the opportunities and limitations of this technique. Expert opinion: Self-organizing feature maps represent a straightforward approach to ligand clustering and classification. Some of the appeal lies in their conceptual simplicity and broad applicability domain. Despite known algorithmic shortcomings, this computational target prediction concept has been proven to work in prospective settings with high success rates. It represents a prototypic technique for future advances in the in silico identification of the modes of action and macromolecular targets of bioactive molecules.

  13. Communicating the non-targeted effects of radiation from irradiated to non-irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiakis, E.C.; Morgan, W.F.

    2005-01-01

    For many years, the central dogma in radiobiology has been that energy deposited in the cell nucleus is responsible for the biological effects associated with radiation exposure. However, non-targeted and delayed effects of radiation have shifted this belief. The studies of radiation-induced genomic instability, the bystander and abscopal effects, clastogenic factors, and the Death Inducing Effect have dominated the interest of the radiobiology field of late. The passing of signals from irradiated to non-irradiated cells can be accomplished through cell-to-cell gap junction communication or secretion of molecules, which in turn can elicit a response through activation of signal transduction pathways. Proposed mediators of this phenotype include proteins involved with inflammation. Given their size and connection with oxidative stress, cytokines are an attractive candidate as mediators of the induction of the non-targeted effects of radiation. Here we review the evidence for a possible connection between these delayed non-targeted effects of radiation and the cytokine cascades associated with inflammation. (author)

  14. Short communication. Incidence of the OLIPE mass-trapping on olive non-target arthropods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcel, M.; Ruano, F.; Sanllorente, O.; Caballero, J. A.; Campos, M.

    2009-07-01

    Due to the widespread of mass-trapping systems for Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin) (Diptera: Tephritidae) control in organic olive cropping, an assessment of the impact on arthropods of the olive agroecosystem was undertaken for the OLIPE trap type. The sampling was carried out in Los Pedroches valley (Cordoba, southern Spain) in three different organic orchard sites. Six OLIPE traps baited with diammonium phosphate were collected from each site (18 in total) from July to November 2002 every 15 days on average. Additionally, in the latest sampling dates, half the traps were reinforced with pheromone to assess its impact on non-target arthropods. From an average of 43.0 catches per trap (cpt) of non-target arthropods during the whole sampling period, the highest number of captures corresponds to the Order Diptera (that represents a 68.5%), followed distantly by the family Formicidae (12.9%) and the Order Lepidoptera (10.4%). Besides the impact on ant populations, other beneficial groups were recorded such as parasitoids (Other Hymenoptera: 2.6%) and predators (Araneae: 1.0%; Neuroptera s.l.: 0.4%). Concerning the temporal distribution of catches, total captures peaked on July and had a slight increase at the beginning of autumn. No significant differences were observed between traps with and without pheromone. The results evidence that a considerable amount of non-specific captures could be prevented by improving the temporal planning of the mass-trapping system. (Author) 25 refs.

  15. The Influence of Manifest Strabismus and Stereoscopic Vision on Non-Verbal Abilities of Visually Impaired Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gligorovic, Milica; Vucinic, Vesna; Eskirovic, Branka; Jablan, Branka

    2011-01-01

    This research was conducted in order to examine the influence of manifest strabismus and stereoscopic vision on non-verbal abilities of visually impaired children aged between 7 and 15. The sample included 55 visually impaired children from the 1st to the 6th grade of elementary schools for visually impaired children in Belgrade. RANDOT stereotest…

  16. Non-linear models for the detection of impaired cerebral blood flow autoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, Max; Jara, José Luis; Miranda, Rodrigo; Katsogridakis, Emmanuel; Panerai, Ronney B

    2018-01-01

    The ability to discriminate between normal and impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA), based on measurements of spontaneous fluctuations in arterial blood pressure (BP) and cerebral blood flow (CBF), has considerable clinical relevance. We studied 45 normal subjects at rest and under hypercapnia induced by breathing a mixture of carbon dioxide and air. Non-linear models with BP as input and CBF velocity (CBFV) as output, were implemented with support vector machines (SVM) using separate recordings for learning and validation. Dynamic SVM implementations used either moving average or autoregressive structures. The efficiency of dynamic CA was estimated from the model's derived CBFV response to a step change in BP as an autoregulation index for both linear and non-linear models. Non-linear models with recurrences (autoregressive) showed the best results, with CA indexes of 5.9 ± 1.5 in normocapnia, and 2.5 ± 1.2 for hypercapnia with an area under the receiver-operator curve of 0.955. The high performance achieved by non-linear SVM models to detect deterioration of dynamic CA should encourage further assessment of its applicability to clinical conditions where CA might be impaired.

  17. The effects of organochlorine pesticides on some non-target organisms in maize and cowpea agro-ecosystems in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montford, K.G.

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the effects of organochlorine pesticides on non-target organisms under tropical conditions, a three-year study was conducted in Ghana applying lindane at 1 kg AI. ha -1 and endosulfan at 0.75 kg AI. ha -1 to maize and cowpeas respectively. The endosulfan treatment was preceded by two consecutive treatments with cypermethrin at 50 g AI ha -1 . Lindane significantly reduced the numbers of ants, spiders and springtails trapped though the numbers of ants and spiders generally recovered within the cropping period. Lindane significantly increased the numbers of leafhoppers caught from maize plots probably due to the elimination of a natural enemy. Ant, spider and springtail numbers were also significantly reduced by the endosulfan treatment in cowpea plots 5. Lindane did not significantly increase maize yields in two of the three years. Endosulfan contributed to significant yield increases and reduced seed damage in cowpeas. Neither lindane nor endosulfan seemed to have any significant adverse effects on the activities of soil microfauna and microflora based on the rates of decomposition of leaf discs buried in the experimental plots. (author). 12 refs, 10 figs, 9 tabs

  18. Korsakoff Syndrome in Non-alcoholic Psychiatric Patients. Variable Cognitive Presentation and Impaired Frontotemporal Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Nikolakaros

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff syndrome are greatly underdiagnosed. There are very few reported cases of neuropsychologically documented non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI data are scarce.Methods: We report clinical characteristics and neuropsychological as well as radiological findings from three psychiatric patients (one woman and two men with a history of probable undiagnosed non-alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy and subsequent chronic memory problems.Results: All patients had abnormal neuropsychological test results, predominantly in memory. Thus, the neuropsychological findings were compatible with Korsakoff syndrome. However, the neuropsychological findings were not uniform. The impairment of delayed verbal memory of the first patient was evident only when the results of the memory tests were compared to her general cognitive level. In addition, the logical memory test and the verbal working memory test were abnormal, but the word list memory test was normal. The second patient had impaired attention and psychomotor speed in addition to impaired memory. In the third patient, the word list memory test was abnormal, but the logical memory test was normal. All patients had intrusions in the neuropsychological examination. Executive functions were preserved, except for planning and foresight, which were impaired in two patients. Conventional MRI examination was normal. DTI showed reduced fractional anisotropy values in the uncinate fasciculus in two patients, and in the corpus callosum and in the subgenual cingulum in one patient.Conclusions: Non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome can have diverse neuropsychological findings. This may partly explain its marked underdiagnosis. Therefore, a strong index of suspicion is needed. The presence of intrusions in the neuropsychological examination supports the diagnosis. Damage in frontotemporal white matter tracts, particularly in the

  19. Korsakoff Syndrome in Non-alcoholic Psychiatric Patients. Variable Cognitive Presentation and Impaired Frontotemporal Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakaros, Georgios; Kurki, Timo; Paju, Janina; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Vataja, Risto; Ilonen, Tuula

    2018-01-01

    Background: Non-alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff syndrome are greatly underdiagnosed. There are very few reported cases of neuropsychologically documented non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data are scarce. Methods: We report clinical characteristics and neuropsychological as well as radiological findings from three psychiatric patients (one woman and two men) with a history of probable undiagnosed non-alcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy and subsequent chronic memory problems. Results: All patients had abnormal neuropsychological test results, predominantly in memory. Thus, the neuropsychological findings were compatible with Korsakoff syndrome. However, the neuropsychological findings were not uniform. The impairment of delayed verbal memory of the first patient was evident only when the results of the memory tests were compared to her general cognitive level. In addition, the logical memory test and the verbal working memory test were abnormal, but the word list memory test was normal. The second patient had impaired attention and psychomotor speed in addition to impaired memory. In the third patient, the word list memory test was abnormal, but the logical memory test was normal. All patients had intrusions in the neuropsychological examination. Executive functions were preserved, except for planning and foresight, which were impaired in two patients. Conventional MRI examination was normal. DTI showed reduced fractional anisotropy values in the uncinate fasciculus in two patients, and in the corpus callosum and in the subgenual cingulum in one patient. Conclusions: Non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome can have diverse neuropsychological findings. This may partly explain its marked underdiagnosis. Therefore, a strong index of suspicion is needed. The presence of intrusions in the neuropsychological examination supports the diagnosis. Damage in frontotemporal white matter tracts, particularly in the uncinate

  20. Pharmacological and Non-pharmacological Therapies of Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elzbieta; Morel, Agnieszka; Redlicka, Justyna; Miller, Igor; Saluk, Joanna

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the most important clinical features of neurodegenerative disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS). Conducted research shows that up to 65 percent of MS patients have cognitive deficits such as episodic memory, sustained attention, reduced verbal fluency; however, the cognitive MS domain is information processing speed. It is the first syndrome of cognitive dysfunction and the most widely affected in MS. Occasionally these impairments occur even before the appearance of physical symptoms. Therefore, this review focused on the current status of our knowledge about possible methods of treatment cognitive impairment in MS patients including novel strategies. Research and online content was performed using Medline and EMBASE databases. The most recent research suggests that cognitive impairment is correlated with brain lesion volume and brain atrophy. The examination of the cognitive impairment is usually based on particular neuropsychological batteries. However, it can be not enough to make a precise diagnosis. This creates a demand to find markers that might be useful for identifying patients with risk of cognitive impairment at an early stage of the disease. Currently the most promising methods consist of neuroimaging indicators, such as diffusion tensor imaging, the magnetization transfer ratio, and N-acetyl aspartate levels. Diagnosis problems are strictly connected with treatment procedures. There are two main cognitive therapies: pharmacological (disease modifying drugs (DMD), symptomatic treatments) and non-pharmacological interventions that are focused on psychological and physical rehabilitation. Some trials have shown a positive association between physical activity and the cognitive function. This article is an overview of the current state of knowledge related to cognition impairment treatment in MS. Additionally, novel strategies for cognitive impairments such as cryostimulation and other complementary methods are

  1. 5-HT1A receptor blockade targeting the basolateral amygdala improved stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation and retrieval in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardari, M; Rezayof, A; Zarrindast, M-R

    2015-08-06

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible role of basolateral amygdala (BLA) 5-HT1A receptors in memory formation under stress. We also examined whether the blockade of these receptors is involved in stress-induced state-dependent memory. Adult male Wistar rats received cannula implants that bilaterally targeted the BLA. Long-term memory was examined using the step-through type of passive avoidance task. Behavioral stress was evoked by exposure to an elevated platform (EP) for 10, 20 and 30min. Post-training exposure to acute stress (30min) impaired the memory consolidation. In addition, pre-test exposure to acute stress-(20 and 30min) induced the impairment of memory retrieval. Interestingly, the memory impairment induced by post-training exposure to stress was restored in the animals that received 20- or 30-min pre-test stress exposure, suggesting stress-induced state-dependent memory retrieval. Post-training BLA-targeted injection of a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, (S)-WAY-100135 (2μg/rat), prevented the impairing effect of stress on memory consolidation. Pre-test injection of the same doses of (S)-WAY-100135 that was targeted to the BLA also reversed stress-induced memory retrieval impairment. It should be considered that post-training or pre-test BLA-targeted injection of (S)-WAY-100135 (0.5-2μg/rat) by itself had no effect on the memory formation. Moreover, pre-test injection of (S)-WAY-100135 (2μg/rat) that targeted the BLA inhibited the stress-induced state-dependent memory retrieval. Taken together, our findings suggest that post-training or pre-test exposure to acute stress induced the impairment of memory consolidation, retrieval and state-dependent learning. The BLA 5-HT1A receptors have a critical role in learning and memory under stress. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Organic and Non-Organic Language Disorders after Awake Brain Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke De Witte

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Awake surgery with Direct Electrical Stimulation (DES is considered the ‘gold standard’ to resect brain tumours in the language dominant hemisphere (De Witte & Mariën, 2013. Although transient language impairments are common in the immediate postoperative phase, permanent postoperative language deficits seem to be rare (Duffau, 2007. Milian et al. (2014 stated that most patients tolerate the awake procedure well and would undergo a similar procedure again. However, postoperative psychological symptoms including recurrent distressing dreams and persistent avoidance of stimuli have been recorded following awake surgery (Goebel, Nabavi, Schubert, & Mehdorn, 2010; Milian et al., 2014. To the best of our knowledge, psychogenic language disturbances have never been described after awake surgery. In general, only a handful of non-organic, psychogenic language disorders have been reported in the literature (De Letter et al., 2012. We report three patients with left brain tumours (see table 1 who presented linguistic symptoms after awake surgery that were incompatible with the lesion location, suggesting a psychogenic origin. METHODS: Neurocognitive (language, memory, executive functions investigations were carried out before, during and after awake surgery (6 weeks, 6 months postsurgery on the basis of standardised tests. Pre- and postoperative (fMRI images, DTI results and intraoperative DES findings were analysed. A selection of tasks was used to map language intraoperatively (De Witte et al., 2013. In the postoperative phase spontaneous speech and behavioural phenomena to errors were video-recorded. RESULTS: Preoperative language tests did not reveal any speech or language problems. Intraoperatively, eloquent sites were mapped and preserved enabling good language skills at the end of the awake procedure. However, assessments in the first weeks postsurgery disclosed language and behavioural symptoms that support the hypothesis of a

  3. Non-LTE effects in inertial confinement fusion target chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, J.J.; Moses, G.A.; Peterson, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    In previous studies of transport processes in inertial confinement fusion target chambers, the radiative properties of the background plasma were calculated under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). In this paper, the authors present a study of the equation of state and the radiative properties of high temperature, low-to-moderate density ( 21 cm -3 ) plasmas for the determination of the conditions under which non-LTE effects become important and for an assessment of the importance of non-LTE processes in target chambers during high yield inertial fusion target explosions. For this purpose, two-body (radiative and dielectronic) and three-body (collisional) recombination and de-excitation processes are considered in calculating the steady state ionization and excitation populations. The results of this study indicate that non-LTE processes generally become important at temperatures of > or approx. 1, 10 and 100 eV for plasma densities of 10 18 , 10 19 and 10 21 cm -3 , respectively. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations utilizing the equation of state and the opacities for a non-LTE argon plasma were performed to study the response of a background gas to an inertial fusion target explosion. These calculations indicate that non-LTE processes are often the dominant atomic processes in the background plasma and that they can strongly affect the radiative and shock properties as energy is transported away from the point of the target explosion. (author). 22 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  4. A novel Trojan-horse targeting strategy to reduce the non-specific uptake of nanocarriers by non-cancerous cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Hao; Yang, Sugeun; Ma, Xuehua; Li, Zihou; Tan, Mingqian; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-11-01

    One big challenge with active targeting of nanocarriers is non-specific binding between targeting molecules and non-target moieties expressed on non-cancerous cells, which leads to non-specific uptake of nanocarriers by non-cancerous cells. Here, we propose a novel Trojan-horse targeting strategy to hide or expose the targeting molecules of nanocarriers on-demand. The non-specific uptake by non-cancerous cells can be reduced because the targeting molecules are hidden in hydrophilic polymers. The nanocarriers are still actively targetable to cancer cells because the targeting molecules can be exposed on-demand at tumor regions. Typically, Fe3O4 nanocrystals (FN) as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents were encapsulated into albumin nanoparticles (AN), and then folic acid (FA) and pH-sensitive polymers (PP) were grafted onto the surface of AN-FN to construct PP-FA-AN-FN nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) results confirm successful construction of PP-FA-AN-FN. According to difference of nanoparticle-cellular uptake between pH 7.4 and 5.5, the weight ratio of conjugated PP to nanoparticle FA-AN-FN (i.e. graft density) and the molecular weight of PP (i.e. graft length) are optimized to be 1.32 and 5.7 kDa, respectively. In vitro studies confirm that the PP can hide ligand FA to prevent it from binding to cells with FRα at pH 7.4 and shrink to expose FA at pH 5.5. In vivo studies demonstrate that our Trojan-horse targeting strategy can reduce the non-specific uptake of the PP-FA-AN-FN by non-cancerous cells. Therefore, our PP-FA-AN-FN might be used as an accurately targeted MRI contrast agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of genetically modified maize expressing Cry 3Bb1 on some non-target arthropods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hussein, Hany; Svobodová, Zdeňka; Habuštová, Oxana; Půža, Vladimír; Sehnal, František

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2012), s. 5124-5131 ISSN 1819-544X R&D Projects: GA MZe QH91093 Grant - others:projekt MOBITAG(CZ) REGPOT-2008-1, GA 229518 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : MON 88017 * Cry3Bb1 * non-target organisms Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection http://www.aensiweb.com/jasr/jasr/2012/5124-5131.pdf

  6. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation—Implications for low dose risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadhim, Munira; Salomaa, Sisko; Wright, Eric

    2013-01-01

    and adaptive responses are powered by fundamental, but not clearly understood systems that maintain tissue homeostasis. Despite excellent research in this field by various groups, there are still gaps in our understanding of the likely mechanisms associated with non-DNA targeted effects, particularly......Non-DNA targeted effects of ionising radiation, which include genomic instability, and a variety of bystander effects including abscopal effects and bystander mediated adaptive response, have raised concerns about the magnitude of low-dose radiation risk. Genomic instability, bystander effects....... Furthermore, it is still not known what the initial target and early interactions in cells are that give rise to non-targeted responses in neighbouring or descendant cells. This paper provides a commentary on the current state of the field as a result of the non-targeted effects of ionising radiation (NOTE...

  7. Selection of focal earthworm species as non-target soil organisms for environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Capelle, Christine; Schrader, Stefan; Arpaia, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    By means of a literature survey, earthworm species of significant relevance for soil functions in different biogeographical regions of Europe (Atlantic, Boreal, Mediterranean) were identified. These focal earthworm species, defined here according to the EFSA Guidance Document on the environmental risk assessment (ERA) of genetically modified plants, are typical for arable soils under crop rotations with maize and/or potatoes within the three regions represented by Ireland, Sweden and Spain, respectively. Focal earthworm species were selected following a matrix of four steps: Identification of functional groups, categorization of non-target species, ranking species on ecological criteria, and final selection of focal species. They are recommended as appropriate non-target organisms to assess environmental risks of genetically modified (GM) crops; in this case maize and potatoes. In total, 44 literature sources on earthworms in arable cropping systems including maize or potato from Ireland, Sweden and Spain were collected, which present information on species diversity, individual density and specific relevance for soil functions. By means of condensed literature data, those species were identified which (i) play an important functional role in respective soil systems, (ii) are well adapted to the biogeographical regions, (iii) are expected to occur in high abundances under cultivation of maize or potato and (iv) fulfill the requirements for an ERA test system based on life-history traits. First, primary and secondary decomposers were identified as functional groups being exposed to the GM crops. In a second step, anecic and endogeic species were categorized as potential species. In step three, eight anecic and endogeic earthworm species belonging to the family Lumbricidae were ranked as relevant species: Aporrectodea caliginosa, Aporrectodea rosea, Aporrectodea longa, Allolobophora chlorotica, Lumbricus terrestris, Lumbricus friendi, Octodrilus complanatus and

  8. Are patients with schizophrenia impaired in processing non-emotional features of human faces?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley eDarke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is known that individuals with schizophrenia exhibit signs of impaired face processing, however, the exact perceptual and cognitive mechanisms underlying these deficits are yet to be elucidated. One possible source of confusion in the current literature is the methodological and conceptual inconsistencies that can arise from the varied treatment of different aspects of face processing relating to emotional and non-emotional aspects of face perception. This review aims to disentangle the literature by focusing on the performance of patients with schizophrenia in a range of tasks that required processing of non-emotional features of face stimuli (e.g. identity or gender. We also consider the performance of patients on non-face stimuli that share common elements such as familiarity (e.g. cars and social relevance (e.g. gait. We conclude by exploring whether observed deficits are best considered as face-specific and note that further investigation is required to properly assess the potential contribution of more generalised attentional or perceptual impairments.

  9. Simultaneous quantification of tumor uptake for targeted and non-targeted liposomes and their encapsulated contents by ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhiliang; Zaki, Ajlan Al; Hui, James Z; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Liposomes are intensively being developed for biomedical applications including drug and gene delivery. However, targeted liposomal delivery in cancer treatment is a very complicated multi-step process. Unfavorable liposome biodistribution upon intravenous administration and membrane destabilization in blood circulation could result in only a very small fraction of cargo reaching the tumors. It would therefore be desirable to develop new quantitative strategies to track liposomal delivery systems to improve the therapeutic index and decrease systemic toxicity. Here, we developed a simple and non-radiative method to quantify the tumor uptake of targeted and non-targeted control liposomes as well as their encapsulated contents simultaneously. Specifically, four different chelated lanthanide metals were encapsulated or surface-conjugated onto tumor-targeted and non-targeted liposomes, respectively. The two liposome formulations were then injected into tumor-bearing mice simultaneously and their tumor delivery was determined quantitatively via inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), allowing for direct comparisons. Tumor uptake of the liposomes themselves and their encapsulated contents were consistent with targeted and non-targeted liposome formulations that were injected individually. PMID:22882145

  10. Assessing environmental impacts of genetically modified plants on non-target organisms: The relevance of in planta studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaia, Salvatore; Birch, A Nicholas E; Kiss, Jozsef; van Loon, Joop J A; Messéan, Antoine; Nuti, Marco; Perry, Joe N; Sweet, Jeremy B; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2017-04-01

    In legal frameworks worldwide, genetically modified plants (GMPs) are subjected to pre-market environmental risk assessment (ERA) with the aim of identifying potential effects on the environment. In the European Union, the EFSA Guidance Document introduces the rationale that GMPs, as well as their newly produced metabolites, represent the potential stressor to be evaluated during ERA. As a consequence, during several phases of ERA for cultivation purposes, it is considered necessary to use whole plants or plant parts in experimental protocols. The importance of in planta studies as a strategy to address impacts of GMPs on non-target organisms is demonstrated, to evaluate both effects due to the intended modification in plant phenotype (e.g. expression of Cry proteins) and effects due to unintended modifications in plant phenotype resulting from the transformation process (e.g. due to somaclonal variations or pleiotropic effects). In planta tests are also necessary for GMPs in which newly expressed metabolites cannot easily be studied in vitro. This paper reviews the scientific literature supporting the choice of in planta studies as a fundamental tool in ERA of GMPs in cultivation dossiers; the evidence indicates they can realistically mimic the ecological relationships occurring in their receiving environments and provide important insights into the biology and sustainable management of GMPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Upper Limb Kinematics in Stroke and Healthy Controls Using Target-to-Target Task in Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Netha; Alt Murphy, Margit; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S

    2018-01-01

    Kinematic analysis using virtual reality (VR) environment provides quantitative assessment of upper limb movements. This technique has rarely been used in evaluating motor function in stroke despite its availability in stroke rehabilitation. To determine the discriminative validity of VR-based kinematics during target-to-target pointing task in individuals with mild or moderate arm impairment following stroke and in healthy controls. Sixty-seven participants with moderate (32-57 points) or mild (58-65 points) stroke impairment as assessed with Fugl-Meyer Assessment for Upper Extremity were included from the Stroke Arm Longitudinal study at the University of Gothenburg-SALGOT cohort of non-selected individuals within the first year of stroke. The stroke groups and 43 healthy controls performed the target-to-target pointing task, where 32 circular targets appear one after the other and disappear when pointed at by the haptic handheld stylus in a three-dimensional VR environment. The kinematic parameters captured by the stylus included movement time, velocities, and smoothness of movement. The movement time, mean velocity, and peak velocity were discriminative between groups with moderate and mild stroke impairment and healthy controls. The movement time was longer and mean and peak velocity were lower for individuals with stroke. The number of velocity peaks, representing smoothness, was also discriminative and significantly higher in both stroke groups (mild, moderate) compared to controls. Movement trajectories in stroke more frequently showed clustering (spider's web) close to the target indicating deficits in movement precision. The target-to-target pointing task can provide valuable and specific information about sensorimotor impairment of the upper limb following stroke that might not be captured using traditional clinical scale. The trial was registered with register number NCT01115348 at clinicaltrials.gov, on May 4, 2010. URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2

  12. Upper Limb Kinematics in Stroke and Healthy Controls Using Target-to-Target Task in Virtual Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netha Hussain

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundKinematic analysis using virtual reality (VR environment provides quantitative assessment of upper limb movements. This technique has rarely been used in evaluating motor function in stroke despite its availability in stroke rehabilitation.ObjectiveTo determine the discriminative validity of VR-based kinematics during target-to-target pointing task in individuals with mild or moderate arm impairment following stroke and in healthy controls.MethodsSixty-seven participants with moderate (32–57 points or mild (58–65 points stroke impairment as assessed with Fugl-Meyer Assessment for Upper Extremity were included from the Stroke Arm Longitudinal study at the University of Gothenburg—SALGOT cohort of non-selected individuals within the first year of stroke. The stroke groups and 43 healthy controls performed the target-to-target pointing task, where 32 circular targets appear one after the other and disappear when pointed at by the haptic handheld stylus in a three-dimensional VR environment. The kinematic parameters captured by the stylus included movement time, velocities, and smoothness of movement.ResultsThe movement time, mean velocity, and peak velocity were discriminative between groups with moderate and mild stroke impairment and healthy controls. The movement time was longer and mean and peak velocity were lower for individuals with stroke. The number of velocity peaks, representing smoothness, was also discriminative and significantly higher in both stroke groups (mild, moderate compared to controls. Movement trajectories in stroke more frequently showed clustering (spider’s web close to the target indicating deficits in movement precision.ConclusionThe target-to-target pointing task can provide valuable and specific information about sensorimotor impairment of the upper limb following stroke that might not be captured using traditional clinical scale.Trial registration detailsThe trial was registered with register number

  13. Non-governmental organizations internal communication in reputation management

    OpenAIRE

    Vaicekauskaitė, Renata

    2010-01-01

    The object of this study is non-governmental organization’s internal communication and its role in reputation management. The aim of this study is to analyse the context of non-governmental organization reputation management and according to it find out the significance of the internal communication factors in non-governmental organization reputation management. The tasks of the study: to analyse the factors which have settled the need of non-governmental organization reputation management; t...

  14. Evaluation of Biogenic Amines in Organic and Non-Organic Wines by HPLC OPA Derivatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Üren

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic and non-organic wines, selected on the basis of consumers’ preference towards healthy products, were produced from the grapes of Vitis vinifera varieties Semillon, Colombard, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Carignan and possible effects of different wine making techniques were considered. Concentrations of histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine, ethylamine, methylamine, tryptamine, agmatine and β-phenylethylamine were quantified by HPLC fluorescence detection of o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA derivatives. The order of analyzed parameters in all wines from the highest to the lowest quantities was determined as follows: putrescine > histamine > ethylamine > methylamine > agmatine > tyramine > cadaverine > tryptamine. One of the analyzed compounds (β-phenylethylamine was not detected. The highest average values for organic and non-organic wines were found as follows (in mg/L: putrescine 5.55, ethylamine 0.825 and histamine 0.628 in organic wines, and putrescine 3.68, histamine 1.14 and agmatine 0.662 in non-organic wines. Considering the wine type (organic/non-organic, an important difference was determined for putrescine. Putrescine content in organic wines was significantly greater than in non-organic ones (p=0.008. Evaluating colour of wines (white/red, a statistically significant difference was obtained for methylamine (p=0.028. Taking into account only grape varieties, statistically significant differences were found for histamine, methylamine, tyramine and cadaverine (p<0.05. The results of principal component analysis demonstrated close relations between the following biogenic amines and wines: agmatine and non-organic Colombard; tryptamine or cadaverine and both organic and non-organic Cabernet Sauvignon wines.

  15. Recent Advances in Targetable Therapeutics in Metastatic Non-Squamous NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranshu eBansal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lung adenocarcinoma is the most common subtype of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. With the discovery of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK rearrangements and effective targeted therapies, therapeutic options are expanding for patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Here, we review novel therapies in non-squamous NSCLC, which are directed against oncogenic targets, including EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF, MET, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, RET and NTRK. With the rapidly evolving molecular testing and development of new targeted agents, our ability to further personalize therapy in non-squamous NSCLC is rapidly expanding.

  16. Obscurin Depletion Impairs Organization of Skeletal Muscle in Developing Zebrafish Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maide Ö. Raeker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During development, skeletal myoblasts differentiate into myocytes and skeletal myotubes with mature contractile structures that are precisely oriented with respect to surrounding cells and tissues. Establishment of this highly ordered structure requires reciprocal interactions between the differentiating myocytes and the surrounding extracellular matrix to form correctly positioned and well-organized attachments from the skeletal muscle to the bony skeleton. Using the developing zebrafish embryo as a model, we examined the relationship between new myofibril assembly and the organization of the membrane domains involved in cell-extracellular matrix interactions. We determined that depletion of obscurin, a giant muscle protein, resulted in irregular cell morphology and disturbed extracellular matrix organization during skeletal muscle development. The resulting impairment of myocyte organization was associated with disturbance of the internal architecture of the myocyte suggesting that obscurin participates in organizing the internal structure of the myocyte and translating those structural cues to surrounding cells and tissues.

  17. Obscurin Depletion Impairs Organization of Skeletal Muscle in Developing Zebrafish Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeker, Maide Ö.; Russell, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    During development, skeletal myoblasts differentiate into myocytes and skeletal myotubes with mature contractile structures that are precisely oriented with respect to surrounding cells and tissues. Establishment of this highly ordered structure requires reciprocal interactions between the differentiating myocytes and the surrounding extracellular matrix to form correctly positioned and well-organized attachments from the skeletal muscle to the bony skeleton. Using the developing zebrafish embryo as a model, we examined the relationship between new myofibril assembly and the organization of the membrane domains involved in cell-extracellular matrix interactions. We determined that depletion of obscurin, a giant muscle protein, resulted in irregular cell morphology and disturbed extracellular matrix organization during skeletal muscle development. The resulting impairment of myocyte organization was associated with disturbance of the internal architecture of the myocyte suggesting that obscurin participates in organizing the internal structure of the myocyte and translating those structural cues to surrounding cells and tissues. PMID:22190853

  18. Epilepsy and non-organic non-affective psychosis. National epidemiologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredkjaer, S R; Mortensen, P B; Parnas, Josef

    1998-01-01

    : The incidences of the spectrum of non-organic non-affective psychosis, non-affective psychosis and schizophrenia were significantly increased both for men and women, even after exclusion of people diagnosed as suffering from a learning disability or substance misuse. CONCLUSION: This study supports the notion...

  19. Target organs for avian pancreatic polypeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, J.R.; Pollock, H.G.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of the physiological function of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) has been approached by attempting to identify target organs. Avian PP (aPP) labeled with 125I at either the C-terminus (aPP-C) or the N-terminus (aPP-N) was injected into fasted chickens and allowed to circulate for 3-120 min. At the end of the equilibration period, the anesthetized bird was perfused first with saline, then with Buoin's solution. Samples of fixed tissue from various organs were collected, weighed, and counted. Control experiments consisted of coinjection of unlabeled aPP to compete for receptors. The rate of disappearance of aPP-N from plasma was greater than that of aPP-C. Binding of aPP-N by spleen, duodenum, ileum, pancreas, and bone marrow was markedly reduced by coinjection of unlabeled aPP. A similar but less marked reduction in binding was found in liver and proventriculus. aPP-C gave less conclusive results. The maximal competitive effect of unlabeled PP could be achieved in most cases with 30 microgram unlabeled aPP. It is concluded that pancreas, duodenum, ileum, spleen, and bone marrow, and probably liver and proventriculus, are target organs for aPP in the chicken and that the C-terminal region of aPP is involved in receptor binding

  20. Contribution Of Brain Tissue Oxidative Damage In Hypothyroidism-associated Learning and Memory Impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Baghcheghi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a critical target organ for thyroid hormones, and modifications in memory and cognition happen with thyroid dysfunction. The exact mechanisms underlying learning and memory impairments due to hypothyroidism have not been understood yet. Therefore, this review was aimed to compress the results of previous studies which have examined the contribution of brain tissues oxidative damage in hypothyroidism-associated learning and memory impairments.

  1. Comparative Corporate Governance of Non-Profit Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Steen

    2014-01-01

    Based on the impressive work of Hopt and von Hippel (2010), I review the comparative corporate governance of non-profit organizations and propose topics for future research. There is evidence of agency problems in non-profit as well as for-profit organizations, but the governance mechanisms...

  2. Organic non-volatile memories from ferroelectric phase-separated blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Kamal; de Leeuw, Dago M.; de Boer, Bert; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2008-07-01

    New non-volatile memories are being investigated to keep up with the organic-electronics road map. Ferroelectric polarization is an attractive physical property as the mechanism for non-volatile switching, because the two polarizations can be used as two binary levels. However, in ferroelectric capacitors the read-out of the polarization charge is destructive. The functionality of the targeted memory should be based on resistive switching. In inorganic ferroelectrics conductivity and ferroelectricity cannot be tuned independently. The challenge is to develop a storage medium in which the favourable properties of ferroelectrics such as bistability and non-volatility can be combined with the beneficial properties provided by semiconductors such as conductivity and rectification. Here we present an integrated solution by blending semiconducting and ferroelectric polymers into phase-separated networks. The polarization field of the ferroelectric modulates the injection barrier at the semiconductor-metal contact. The combination of ferroelectric bistability with (semi)conductivity and rectification allows for solution-processed non-volatile memory arrays with a simple cross-bar architecture that can be read out non-destructively. The concept of an electrically tunable injection barrier as presented here is general and can be applied to other electronic devices such as light-emitting diodes with an integrated on/off switch.

  3. Emotion causes targeted forgetting of established memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan A. Strange

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Reconsolidation postulates that reactivation of a memory trace renders it susceptible to disruption by treatments similar to those that impair initial memory consolidation. Despite evidence that implicit, or non-declarative, human memories can be disrupted at retrieval, a convincing demonstration of selective impairment in retrieval of target episodic memories following reactivation is lacking. In human subjects, we demonstrate that if reactivation of a verbal memory, through successful retrieval, is immediately followed by an emotionally aversive stimulus, a significant impairment is evident in its later recall. This effect is time-dependent and persists for at least six days. Thus, in line with a reconsolidation hypothesis, established human episodic memories can be selectively impaired following their retrieval.

  4. Emotion causes targeted forgetting of established memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Bryan A; Kroes, Marijn C W; Fan, Judith E; Dolan, Raymond J

    2010-01-01

    Reconsolidation postulates that reactivation of a memory trace renders it susceptible to disruption by treatments similar to those that impair initial memory consolidation. Despite evidence that implicit, or non-declarative, human memories can be disrupted at retrieval, a convincing demonstration of selective impairment in retrieval of target episodic memories following reactivation is lacking. In human subjects, we demonstrate that if reactivation of a verbal memory, through successful retrieval, is immediately followed by an emotionally aversive stimulus, a significant impairment is evident in its later recall. This effect is time-dependent and persists for at least 6 days. Thus, in line with a reconsolidation hypothesis, established human episodic memories can be selectively impaired following their retrieval.

  5. Exogenous Nitric Oxide Suppresses in Vivo X-ray-Induced Targeted and Non-Targeted Effects in Zebrafish Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Y. Kong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper studied the X-ray-induced targeted effect in irradiated zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio, as well as a non-targeted effect in bystander naïve embryos partnered with irradiated embryos, and examined the influence of exogenous nitric oxide (NO on these targeted and non-targeted effects. The exogenous NO was generated using an NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP. The targeted and non-targeted effects, as well as the toxicity of the SNAP, were assessed using the number of apoptotic events in the zebrafish embryos at 24 h post fertilization (hpf revealed through acridine orange (AO staining. SNAP with concentrations of 20 and 100 µM were first confirmed to have no significant toxicity on zebrafish embryos. The targeted effect was mitigated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 100 µM SNAP prior to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy but was not alleviated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 µM SNAP. On the other hand, the non-targeted effect was eliminated in the bystander naïve zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 or 100 µM SNAP prior to partnering with zebrafish embryos having been subjected to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy. These findings revealed the importance of NO in the protection against damages induced by ionizing radiations or by radiation-induced bystander signals, and could have important impacts on development of advanced cancer treatment strategies.

  6. Investigating ecological speciation in non-model organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foote, Andrew David

    2012-01-01

    Background: Studies of ecological speciation tend to focus on a few model biological systems. In contrast, few studies on non-model organisms have been able to infer ecological speciation as the underlying mechanism of evolutionary divergence. Questions: What are the pitfalls in studying ecological...... speciation in non-model organisms that lead to this bias? What alternative approaches might redress the balance? Organism: Genetically differentiated types of the killer whale (Orcinus orca) exhibiting differences in prey preference, habitat use, morphology, and behaviour. Methods: Review of the literature...... on killer whale evolutionary ecology in search of any difficulty in demonstrating causal links between variation in phenotype, ecology, and reproductive isolation in this non-model organism. Results: At present, we do not have enough evidence to conclude that adaptive phenotype traits linked to ecological...

  7. Identification of target organs of copper nanoparticles with ICP-MS technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen Chen; Huan Meng; Yun Wang; Chengcheng Zhang; Yuliang Zhao

    2007-01-01

    Nanosized copper particles are widely used in fields of lubricants, polymers/plastic, metallic coating and ink. Recently, we found that copper particles in different sizes can lead to different toxicological effects. To clarify the target organs of copper particles of different sizes, the inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was employed to evaluate the distribution of copper in different organs of mice after a single dose oral exposure. The results suggest that the main target organs for copper nanoparticles are kidney, liver and blood. Liver is the main damaged organ. (author)

  8. Non-HLA antibodies post-transplantation: clinical relevance and treatment in solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragun, Duska; Hegner, Bjorn

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies and B cells are increasingly recognized as major modulators of allograft function and survival. Improved immunohistochemical and serologic diagnostic procedures have been developed to monitor antibody responses against HLA antigens during the last decade. Acute and chronic allograft rejection can occur in HLA-identical sibling transplants implicating the importance of immune response against non-HLA targets. Non-HLA anti-bodies may occur as alloantiboides, yet they seem to be predominantly autoantibodies. Antigenic targets of non-HLA antibodies described thus far include various minor histocompatibility antigens, vascular receptors, adhesion molecules, and intermediate filaments. Non-HLA antibodies may function as complement- and non-complement-fixing antibodies and they may induce a wide variety of allograft injuries, reflecting the complexity of their acute and chronic actions. Refined approaches considering the subtle mechanistic differences in the individual antibody responses directed against non-HLA antigens may help to define patients at particular risk for irreversible acute or chronic allograft injuries and improve over-all outcomes. We attempted to summarize the current state of research, development in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, and to address some emerging problems in the area of humoral response against non-HLA antigens beyond ABO blood group and MHC class I chain-related gene A and B (MICA and MICB) antigens in solid organ transplantation. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Role of renal function in risk assessment of target non-attainment after standard dosing of meropenem in critically ill patients: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmann, Lisa; Zoller, Michael; Minichmayr, Iris K; Scharf, Christina; Maier, Barbara; Schmitt, Maximilian V; Hartung, Niklas; Huisinga, Wilhelm; Vogeser, Michael; Frey, Lorenz; Zander, Johannes; Kloft, Charlotte

    2017-10-21

    Severe bacterial infections remain a major challenge in intensive care units because of their high prevalence and mortality. Adequate antibiotic exposure has been associated with clinical success in critically ill patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the target attainment of standard meropenem dosing in a heterogeneous critically ill population, to quantify the impact of the full renal function spectrum on meropenem exposure and target attainment, and ultimately to translate the findings into a tool for practical application. A prospective observational single-centre study was performed with critically ill patients with severe infections receiving standard dosing of meropenem. Serial blood samples were drawn over 4 study days to determine meropenem serum concentrations. Renal function was assessed by creatinine clearance according to the Cockcroft and Gault equation (CLCR CG ). Variability in meropenem serum concentrations was quantified at the middle and end of each monitored dosing interval. The attainment of two pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic targets (100%T >MIC , 50%T >4×MIC ) was evaluated for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 2 mg/L and 8 mg/L and standard meropenem dosing (1000 mg, 30-minute infusion, every 8 h). Furthermore, we assessed the impact of CLCR CG on meropenem concentrations and target attainment and developed a tool for risk assessment of target non-attainment. Large inter- and intra-patient variability in meropenem concentrations was observed in the critically ill population (n = 48). Attainment of the target 100%T >MIC was merely 48.4% and 20.6%, given MIC values of 2 mg/L and 8 mg/L, respectively, and similar for the target 50%T >4×MIC . A hyperbolic relationship between CLCR CG (25-255 ml/minute) and meropenem serum concentrations at the end of the dosing interval (C 8h ) was derived. For infections with pathogens of MIC 2 mg/L, mild renal impairment up to augmented renal function was

  10. The genetics of blood pressure regulation and its target organs from association studies in 342,415 individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasman, Daniel I.; Jackson, Anne U.; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Johnson, Toby; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Luan, Jian'an; Donnelly, Lousie A.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Pihur, Vasyl; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Shungin, Dmitry; Hughes, Maria F.; Meirelles, Osorio; Kaakinen, Marika; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Kristiansson, Kati; Shah, Sonia; Kleber, Marcus E.; Guo, Xiuqing; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Fava, Cristiano; Eriksson, Niclas; Nolte, Ilja M.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Salfati, Elias L.; Rallidis, Loukianos S.; Theusch, Elizabeth; Smith, Andrew J.P.; Folkersen, Lasse; Witkowska, Kate; Pers, Tune H.; Joehanes, Roby; Kim, Stuart K.; Lataniotis, Lazaros; Jansen, Rick; Johnson, Andrew D.; Warren, Helen; Kim, Young Jin; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Ying; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Bochud, Murielle; Absher, Devin; Adair, Linda S.; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E.; Axelsson, Tomas; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barnes, Michael R.; Barroso, Inês; Bevan, Stephen; Bis, Joshua C.; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Burnier, Michel; Cabrera, Claudia P.; Chambers, John C.; Chang, I-Shou; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chines, Peter S.; Chung, Ren-Hua; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John M.; Döring, Angela; Dallongeville, Jean; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; Delgado, Graciela; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Doney, Alex S.F.; Drenos, Fotios; Edkins, Sarah; Eicher, John D.; Elosua, Roberto; Enroth, Stefan; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Per; Esko, Tonu; Evangelou, Evangelos; Evans, Alun; Fall, Tove; Farrall, Martin; Felix, Janine F.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Forrester, Terrence; Franceschini, Nora; Duran, Oscar H. Franco; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Fraser, Ross M.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Gao, He; Gertow, Karl; Gianfagna, Francesco; Gigante, Bruna; Giulianini, Franco; Goel, Anuj; Goodall, Alison H.; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Gorski, Mathias; Gräßler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassinen, Maija; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Hercberg, Serge; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Jostein; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Howard, Phil; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hunt, Steven C.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jensen, Richard A.; Kähönen, Mika; Kang, Hyun; Kathiresan, Sekar; Keating, Brendan J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Kim, Eric; Kivimaki, Mika; Klopp, Norman; Kolovou, Genovefa; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kosova, Gulum; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kutalik, Zoltan; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Lakka, Timo A; Lee, Nanette R.; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Levy, Daniel; Li, Xiaohui; Liang, Kae-Woei; Lin, Honghuang; Lin, Li; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Männistö, Satu; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Mach, François; Markus, Hugh S.; Marouli, Eirini; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Menni, Cristina; Metspalu, Andres; Mijatovic, Vladan; Moilanen, Leena; Montasser, May E.; Morris, Andrew D.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Mulas, Antonella; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nikus, Kjell; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Ong, Ken K.; Paccaud, Fred; Palmer, Cameron D.; Parsa, Afshin; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Poulter, Neil; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Rasheed, Asif; Rayner, N William N.W.R.; Renström, Frida; Rettig, Rainer; Rice, Kenneth M.; Roberts, Robert; Rose, Lynda M.; Rossouw, Jacques; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schunkert, Heribert; Sebert, Sylvain; Sheu, Wayne H.-H.; Shin, Young-Ah; Sim, Xueling; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Albert V.; Sosa, Maria X.; Spector, Tim D.; Stančáková, Alena; Stanton, Alice; Stirrups, Kathleen E.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sundstrom, Johan; Swift, Amy J.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tai, E-Shyong; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Teumer, Alexander; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tobin, Martin D.; Tremoli, Elena; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Vaez, Ahmad; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Aline; Wain, Louise V.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Weder, Alan B.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wilks, Rainford; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Wong, Tien Y.; Yang, Tsun-Po; Yao, Jie; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Bovet, Pascal; Cooper, Richard S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Saleheen, Danish; Lee, Jong-Young; Elliott, Paul; Gierman, Hinco J.; Willer, Cristen J.; Franke, Lude; Hovingh, G Kees; Taylor, Kent D.; Dedoussis, George; Sever, Peter; Wong, Andrew; Lind, Lars; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Njølstad, Inger; Schwarz, Peter EH.; Langenberg, Claudia; Snieder, Harold; Caulfield, Mark J.; Melander, Olle; Laakso, Markku; Saltevo, Juha; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Ingelsson, Erik; Lehtimäki, Terho; Hveem, Kristian; Palmas, Walter; März, Winfried; Kumari, Meena; Salomaa, Veikko; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Froguel, Philippe; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Lakatta, Edward G.; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Franks, Paul W.; Hamsten, Anders; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Stefansson, Kari; Ridker, Paul M; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Deloukas, Panos; Morris, Andrew P.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2016-01-01

    To dissect the genetic architecture of blood pressure and assess effects on target-organ damage, we analyzed 128,272 SNPs from targeted and genome-wide arrays in 201,529 individuals of European ancestry and genotypes from an additional 140,886 individuals were used for validation. We identified 66 blood pressure loci, of which 17 were novel and 15 harbored multiple distinct association signals. The 66 index SNPs were enriched for cis-regulatory elements, particularly in vascular endothelial cells, consistent with a primary role in blood pressure control through modulation of vascular tone across multiple tissues. The 66 index SNPs combined in a risk score showed comparable effects in 64,421 individuals of non-European descent. The 66-SNP blood pressure risk score was significantly associated with target-organ damage in multiple tissues, with minor effects in the kidney. Our findings expand current knowledge of blood pressure pathways and highlight tissues beyond the classic renal system in blood pressure regulation. PMID:27618452

  11. The genetics of blood pressure regulation and its target organs from association studies in 342,415 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Georg B; Ferreira, Teresa; Chasman, Daniel I; Jackson, Anne U; Schmidt, Ellen M; Johnson, Toby; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Luan, Jian'an; Donnelly, Lousie A; Kanoni, Stavroula; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Pihur, Vasyl; Strawbridge, Rona J; Shungin, Dmitry; Hughes, Maria F; Meirelles, Osorio; Kaakinen, Marika; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Kristiansson, Kati; Shah, Sonia; Kleber, Marcus E; Guo, Xiuqing; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Fava, Cristiano; Eriksson, Niclas; Nolte, Ilja M; Magnusson, Patrik K; Salfati, Elias L; Rallidis, Loukianos S; Theusch, Elizabeth; Smith, Andrew J P; Folkersen, Lasse; Witkowska, Kate; Pers, Tune H; Joehanes, Roby; Kim, Stuart K; Lataniotis, Lazaros; Jansen, Rick; Johnson, Andrew D; Warren, Helen; Kim, Young Jin; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Ying; Tayo, Bamidele O; Bochud, Murielle; Absher, Devin; Adair, Linda S; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E; Axelsson, Tomas; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barnes, Michael R; Barroso, Inês; Bevan, Stephen; Bis, Joshua C; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Brown, Morris J; Burnier, Michel; Cabrera, Claudia P; Chambers, John C; Chang, I-Shou; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Ren-Hua; Collins, Francis S; Connell, John M; Döring, Angela; Dallongeville, Jean; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; Delgado, Graciela; Dominiczak, Anna F; Doney, Alex S F; Drenos, Fotios; Edkins, Sarah; Eicher, John D; Elosua, Roberto; Enroth, Stefan; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Per; Esko, Tonu; Evangelou, Evangelos; Evans, Alun; Fall, Tove; Farrall, Martin; Felix, Janine F; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Forrester, Terrence; Franceschini, Nora; Duran, Oscar H Franco; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Fraser, Ross M; Ganesh, Santhi K; Gao, He; Gertow, Karl; Gianfagna, Francesco; Gigante, Bruna; Giulianini, Franco; Goel, Anuj; Goodall, Alison H; Goodarzi, Mark O; Gorski, Mathias; Gräßler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassinen, Maija; Havulinna, Aki S; Hayward, Caroline; Hercberg, Serge; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Jostein; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Howard, Phil; Hsiung, Chao A; Hunt, Steven C; Ikram, M Arfan; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jensen, Richard A; Kähönen, Mika; Kang, Hyun; Kathiresan, Sekar; Keating, Brendan J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Kim, Eric; Kivimaki, Mika; Klopp, Norman; Kolovou, Genovefa; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kosova, Gulum; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kutalik, Zoltan; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Lakka, Timo A; Lee, Nanette R; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Levy, Daniel; Li, Xiaohui; Liang, Kae-Woei; Lin, Honghuang; Lin, Li; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Männistö, Satu; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Mach, François; Markus, Hugh S; Marouli, Eirini; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Menni, Cristina; Metspalu, Andres; Mijatovic, Vladan; Moilanen, Leena; Montasser, May E; Morris, Andrew D; Morrison, Alanna C; Mulas, Antonella; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nikus, Kjell; O'Donnell, Christopher J; O'Reilly, Paul F; Ong, Ken K; Paccaud, Fred; Palmer, Cameron D; Parsa, Afshin; Pedersen, Nancy L; Penninx, Brenda W; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Poulter, Neil; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rao, Dabeeru C; Rasheed, Asif; Rayner, N William N W R; Renström, Frida; Rettig, Rainer; Rice, Kenneth M; Roberts, Robert; Rose, Lynda M; Rossouw, Jacques; Samani, Nilesh J; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schunkert, Heribert; Sebert, Sylvain; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shin, Young-Ah; Sim, Xueling; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Albert V; Sosa, Maria X; Spector, Tim D; Stančáková, Alena; Stanton, Alice; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Stringham, Heather M; Sundstrom, Johan; Swift, Amy J; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tai, E-Shyong; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tarasov, Kirill V; Teumer, Alexander; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tobin, Martin D; Tremoli, Elena; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Uusitupa, Matti; Vaez, Ahmad; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van Iperen, Erik P A; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Verwoert, Germaine C; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Voight, Benjamin F; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Aline; Wain, Louise V; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Weder, Alan B; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wilks, Rainford; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Wong, Tien Y; Yang, Tsun-Po; Yao, Jie; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Bovet, Pascal; Cooper, Richard S; Mohlke, Karen L; Saleheen, Danish; Lee, Jong-Young; Elliott, Paul; Gierman, Hinco J; Willer, Cristen J; Franke, Lude; Hovingh, G Kees; Taylor, Kent D; Dedoussis, George; Sever, Peter; Wong, Andrew; Lind, Lars; Assimes, Themistocles L; Njølstad, Inger; Schwarz, Peter Eh; Langenberg, Claudia; Snieder, Harold; Caulfield, Mark J; Melander, Olle; Laakso, Markku; Saltevo, Juha; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Ingelsson, Erik; Lehtimäki, Terho; Hveem, Kristian; Palmas, Walter; März, Winfried; Kumari, Meena; Salomaa, Veikko; Chen, Yii-Der I; Rotter, Jerome I; Froguel, Philippe; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Lakatta, Edward G; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Franks, Paul W; Hamsten, Anders; Wichmann, H-Erich; Palmer, Colin N A; Stefansson, Kari; Ridker, Paul M; Loos, Ruth J F; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Deloukas, Panos; Morris, Andrew P; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Munroe, Patricia B

    2016-10-01

    To dissect the genetic architecture of blood pressure and assess effects on target organ damage, we analyzed 128,272 SNPs from targeted and genome-wide arrays in 201,529 individuals of European ancestry, and genotypes from an additional 140,886 individuals were used for validation. We identified 66 blood pressure-associated loci, of which 17 were new; 15 harbored multiple distinct association signals. The 66 index SNPs were enriched for cis-regulatory elements, particularly in vascular endothelial cells, consistent with a primary role in blood pressure control through modulation of vascular tone across multiple tissues. The 66 index SNPs combined in a risk score showed comparable effects in 64,421 individuals of non-European descent. The 66-SNP blood pressure risk score was significantly associated with target organ damage in multiple tissues but with minor effects in the kidney. Our findings expand current knowledge of blood pressure-related pathways and highlight tissues beyond the classical renal system in blood pressure regulation.

  12. Non-fullerene electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenekhe, Samson A.; Li, Haiyan; Earmme, Taeshik; Ren, Guoqiang

    2017-11-07

    Non-fullerene electron acceptors for highly efficient organic photovoltaic devices are described. The non-fullerene electron acceptors have an extended, rigid, .pi.-conjugated electron-deficient framework that can facilitate exciton and charge derealization. The non-fullerene electron acceptors can physically mix with a donor polymer and facilitate improved electron transport. The non-fullerene electron acceptors can be incorporated into organic electronic devices, such as photovoltaic cells.

  13. Disruption of Transient Serotonin Accumulation by Non-Serotonin-Producing Neurons Impairs Cortical Map Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms that alter serotonin transporter SERT expression and functionality increase the risks for autism and psychiatric traits. Here, we investigate how SERT controls serotonin signaling in developing CNS in mice. SERT is transiently expressed in specific sets of glutamatergic neurons and uptakes extrasynaptic serotonin during perinatal CNS development. We show that SERT expression in glutamatergic thalamocortical axons (TCAs dictates sensory map architecture. Knockout of SERT in TCAs causes lasting alterations in TCA patterning, spatial organizations of cortical neurons, and dendritic arborization in sensory cortex. Pharmacological reduction of serotonin synthesis during the first postnatal week rescues sensory maps in SERTGluΔ mice. Furthermore, knockdown of SERT expression in serotonin-producing neurons does not impair barrel maps. We propose that spatiotemporal SERT expression in non-serotonin-producing neurons represents a determinant in early life genetic programming of cortical circuits. Perturbing this SERT function could be involved in the origin of sensory and cognitive deficits associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  14. Intercomparison of Dosimeters for Non-Target Organ Dose Measurements in Radiotherapy - Activity of EURADOS WG 9: Radiation Protection in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miljanic, S.; Knezevic, Z.; Bessieres, I.; Bordy, J.-M.; D'Agostino, E.; d'Errico, F.; di Fulvio, A.; Domingo, C.; Olko, P.; Stolarczyk; Silari, M.; Harrison, R.

    2011-01-01

    It has been known for a long time that patients treated with ionizing radiation carry a risk of developing radiation induced cancer in their lifetimes. It is recognized that cure/survival rates in radiotherapy are increasing, but so are secondary cancers. These occurrences are amplified by the early detection of disease in younger patients. These patients are cured from the primary disease and have long life-expectancies, which increase their chances of developing secondary malignancies. The motivation of the EURADOS Working Group 9 (WG 9) ''Radiation protection dosimetry in medicine'' is to assess undue non-target patient doses in radiotherapy and the related risks of secondary malignancy with the most accredited available methods and with the emphasis on a thorough evaluation of dosimetry methods for the measurements of doses remote from the target volume, in phantom experiments. The development of a unified and comprehensive dosimetry methodology for non-target dose estimation is the key element of the WG9 current work. The first scientific aim is to select and review dosimeters suitable for photon and neutron dosimetry in radiotherapy and to evaluate the characteristics of dosimeters at CEA LIST Saclay in reference clinical LINAC beam. (author)

  15. Manifestations and mechanisms of non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Eric G.

    2010-01-01

    A well-established radiobiological paradigm is that the biological effects of ionizing radiation occur in irradiated cells as a consequence of the DNA damage they incur. However, many observations of, so-called, non-targeted effects indicate that genetic alterations are not restricted to directly irradiated cells. Non-targeted effects are responses exhibited by non-irradiated cells that are the descendants of irradiated cells (radiation-induced genomic instability) or by cells that have communicated with irradiated cells (radiation-induced bystander effects). Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by chromosomal abnormalities, gene mutations and cell death. Similar effects, as well as responses that may be regarded as protective, have been attributed to bystander mechanisms. The majority of studies to date have used in vitro systems but some non-targeted effects have been demonstrated in vivo and there is also evidence for radiation-induced instability in the mammalian germ line. However, there may be situations where radiation-induced genomic instability in vivo may not necessarily identify genomically unstable somatic cells but the manifestation of responses to ongoing production of damaging signals generated by genotype-dependent mechanisms having properties in common with inflammatory processes. Non-targeted mechanisms have significant implications for understanding mechanisms of radiation action but the current state of knowledge does not permit definitive statements about whether these phenomena have implications for assessing radiation risk.

  16. Inference of expanded Lrp-like feast/famine transcription factor targets in a non-model organism using protein structure-based prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Justin; Plaisier, Christopher L; Lo, Fang Yin; Reiss, David J; Baliga, Nitin S

    2014-01-01

    Widespread microbial genome sequencing presents an opportunity to understand the gene regulatory networks of non-model organisms. This requires knowledge of the binding sites for transcription factors whose DNA-binding properties are unknown or difficult to infer. We adapted a protein structure-based method to predict the specificities and putative regulons of homologous transcription factors across diverse species. As a proof-of-concept we predicted the specificities and transcriptional target genes of divergent archaeal feast/famine regulatory proteins, several of which are encoded in the genome of Halobacterium salinarum. This was validated by comparison to experimentally determined specificities for transcription factors in distantly related extremophiles, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, and cis-regulatory sequence conservation across eighteen related species of halobacteria. Through this analysis we were able to infer that Halobacterium salinarum employs a divergent local trans-regulatory strategy to regulate genes (carA and carB) involved in arginine and pyrimidine metabolism, whereas Escherichia coli employs an operon. The prediction of gene regulatory binding sites using structure-based methods is useful for the inference of gene regulatory relationships in new species that are otherwise difficult to infer.

  17. Role of Non-Myocyte Gap Junctions and Connexin Hemichannels in Cardiovascular Health and Disease: Novel Therapeutic Targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert D; Camelliti, Patrizia

    2018-03-15

    The heart is a complex organ composed of multiple cell types, including cardiomyocytes and different non-myocyte populations, all working closely together to determine the hearts properties and maintain normal cardiac function. Connexins are abundantly expressed proteins that form plasma membrane hemichannels and gap junctions between cells. Gap junctions are intracellular channels that allow for communication between cells, and in the heart they play a crucial role in cardiac conduction by coupling adjacent cardiomyocytes. Connexins are expressed in both cardiomyocytes and non-myocytes, including cardiac fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Non-myocytes are the largest population of cells in the heart, and therefore it is important to consider what roles connexins, hemichannels, and gap junctions play in these cell types. The aim of this review is to provide insight into connexin-based signalling in non-myocytes during health and disease, and highlight how targeting these proteins could lead to the development of novel therapies. We conclude that connexins in non-myocytes contribute to arrhythmias and adverse ventricular remodelling following myocardial infarction, and are associated with the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. Therefore, therapeutic interventions targeting these connexins represent an exciting new research avenue with great potential.

  18. Type I-E CRISPR-Cas Systems Discriminate Target from Non-Target DNA through Base Pairing-Independent PAM Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datsenko, Kirill A.; Jackson, Ryan N.; Wiedenheft, Blake; Severinov, Konstantin; Brouns, Stan J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Discriminating self and non-self is a universal requirement of immune systems. Adaptive immune systems in prokaryotes are centered around repetitive loci called CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat), into which invader DNA fragments are incorporated. CRISPR transcripts are processed into small RNAs that guide CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to invading nucleic acids by complementary base pairing. However, to avoid autoimmunity it is essential that these RNA-guides exclusively target invading DNA and not complementary DNA sequences (i.e., self-sequences) located in the host's own CRISPR locus. Previous work on the Type III-A CRISPR system from Staphylococcus epidermidis has demonstrated that a portion of the CRISPR RNA-guide sequence is involved in self versus non-self discrimination. This self-avoidance mechanism relies on sensing base pairing between the RNA-guide and sequences flanking the target DNA. To determine if the RNA-guide participates in self versus non-self discrimination in the Type I-E system from Escherichia coli we altered base pairing potential between the RNA-guide and the flanks of DNA targets. Here we demonstrate that Type I-E systems discriminate self from non-self through a base pairing-independent mechanism that strictly relies on the recognition of four unchangeable PAM sequences. In addition, this work reveals that the first base pair between the guide RNA and the PAM nucleotide immediately flanking the target sequence can be disrupted without affecting the interference phenotype. Remarkably, this indicates that base pairing at this position is not involved in foreign DNA recognition. Results in this paper reveal that the Type I-E mechanism of avoiding self sequences and preventing autoimmunity is fundamentally different from that employed by Type III-A systems. We propose the exclusive targeting of PAM-flanked sequences to be termed a target versus non-target discrimination mechanism. PMID:24039596

  19. Olfactory identification in amnestic and non-amnestic mild cognitive impairment and its neuropsychological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnalek, Martin; Magerova, Hana; Andel, Ross; Nikolai, Tomas; Kadlecova, Alexandra; Laczo, Jan; Hort, Jakub

    2015-02-15

    Olfactory identification impairment in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) patients is well documented and considered to be caused by underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology, contrasting with less clear evidence in non-amnestic MCI (naMCI). The aim was to (a) compare the degree of olfactory identification dysfunction in aMCI, naMCI, controls and mild AD dementia and (b) assess the relation between olfactory identification and cognitive performance in aMCI compared to naMCI. 75 patients with aMCI and 32 with naMCI, 26 patients with mild AD and 27 controls underwent the multiple choice olfactory identification Motol Hospital Smell Test with 18 different odors together with a comprehensive neuropsychological examination. Controlling for age and gender, patients with aMCI and naMCI did not differ significantly in olfactory identification and both performed significantly worse than controls (pmemory and visuospatial tests were significantly related to better olfactory identification ability. Conversely, no cognitive measure was significantly related to olfactory performance in naMCI. Olfactory identification is similarly impaired in aMCI and naMCI. Olfactory impairment is proportional to cognitive impairment in aMCI but not in naMCI. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Structural and functional effects of herbicides on non-target organisms in aquatic ecosystems with an emphasis on atrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, James; Kortekamp, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    for controlling nuisance aquatic vegetation. Although aquatic herbicide exposure has been widely documented, these exposures are not necessarily related to adverse non-target ecological effects on natural communities in aquatic environments. This chapter evaluates the potential for effects of herbicides on the structure and function of aquatic envrionments at the population, community, and ecosystem levels of biological organization. In this manuscript I examine several critical aspects of the subject matter area: primary herbicides in use and chemical modes of action; the regulatory process used for registration and risk assessment of herbicides; data regarding non-target risks and the relative sensitivity of aquatic plants, inveretebrates, and fish to herbicides; and emerging areas of science regarding the potential for endocrine-disrupting effects of herbicides on aquatic vertebrates. Much of the focus of this paper is on atrazine due to the extensive database which exists regarding its fate and effects. 

  1. Lean management in a non-manufacturing organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Žvorc

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the possibilities of a lean approach to non-manufacturing functions, i.e. a market-oriented organization. This refers to purchasing, shipment, storage, sale and delivery of goods; marketing, etc. A lean approach to business operations is discussed and several lean business methods are developed on the basis of which lean management can be used not only in manufacturing, but also in non-manufacturing organizations.

  2. Non-cancer diseases and non-targeted effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrandt, Guido, E-mail: guido.hildebrandt@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 9a, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy, University of Rostock, Suedring 75, 18059 Rostock (Germany)

    2010-05-01

    It is well established that moderate to high doses of radiation can increase the occurrence also of a variety of non-cancer effects in exposed individuals, but for radiation protection purposes it has generally been assumed that there is a threshold of dose below which no significant non-cancer effects (apart from hereditary disease) arise. In recent years, there is growing epidemiological evidence of excess risk of late occurring cardiovascular disease at much lower radiation doses and occurring over much longer intervals after radiation exposure without a clear cut threshold. However, the epidemiological evidence available so far for non-cancer health effects after exposure to moderate or low radiation doses is suggestive rather than persuasive. The mechanisms of radiation-induced vascular disease induction are far away from being understood. However, it seems to be very likely that inflammatory responses are involved. Recent experimental studies by Stewart et al. could demonstrate that high dose exposure to the cardiovascular system is associated with an earlier onset and accelerated development of macrophage-rich, inflammatory atherosclerotic lesions prone to intra-plaque hemorrhage and may also cause a decrease in myocardial perfusion. Both, macro-vascular and micro-vascular radiation effects involve the endothelium and pro-inflammatory signalling cascades. If modulation of inflammatory response is arguably also the most likely cause of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease after low dose exposure, this also implies a role for non-targeted radiation effects. In the absence of a convincing mechanistic explanation of the currently available epidemiological evidence for radiation-induced cardiovascular risk at low radiation doses, caution is required in the interpretation of the statistical associations. On the other hand, the possibility of such a causal explanation cannot be reliably excluded. Further epidemiological and biological evidence from currently

  3. Non-pharmacological interventions in cognitively impaired and demented patients--a comparison with cholinesterase inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijpen, Marijn W.; Scherder, Erik J. A.; van Someren, Eus J. W.; Swaab, Dick F.; Sergeant, Joseph A.

    2003-01-01

    The present paper reviews studies examining the effects of non-pharmacological stimulation, i.e. bright light, physical activity and tactile stimulation (touch), on cognition, affective behaviour, and the sleep-wake rhythm of impaired and demented elderly, both in a qualitative (narrative) and

  4. Students with hearing impairment at a South African university: Self-identity and disclosure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Bell

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: It is crucially important for academic, support and administrative staff to be aware of both the assumed ‘hearing’ identity and therefore subsequent non-disclosure practices of students with a hearing impairment using the oral method of communication. Universities need to put measures in place to encourage students to voluntarily disclose their hearing impairment in order to provide more targeted teaching and learning support. This could lead to improved educational outcomes for students.

  5. Social media as a tool for positioning of youth non-governmental organizations activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Shvab

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the social media analysis, as an important tool of the mass media in the youth non-governmental organizations activity. The article is about special popularity of social media among youth because of the rapid information technologies development. The author emphasizes that social media is a main online channel of communication among young generation, that should be taken into the consideration during the external communication creation. Youth organizations often use social media for target audience involvement, information dissimilation and exchange, service promotion and online dialogue. The author analyses different social media tools, such as: blogs, microblogs (Twitter, social networking sites (Facebook, VKontakte, video-sharing websites (YouTube and others. All these tools are easy in use, do not need any special skills and resources, they are low-cost as well. The author considers that it would be useful to include the organization’s Internet addresses on all social media websites and in traditional media publications, to make it as easy as possible for customers to find the youth non-governmental organizations they are looking for among the broad range of social media communities and services.

  6. Use of anticoagulant rodenticides in outdoor urban areas: considerations and proposals for the protection of public health and non-target species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutto, M; Di Domenico, D; Rubbiani, M

    2018-01-01

    Rodent control operations represent an important tool for the prevention and management of infestations, in outdoor environments, by synanthropic rodents (Rattus rattus and R. norvegicus), which are a source of economic and environmental damage with significant sanitary implications. Although the use of anticoagulants is safer to humans and pets compared to the use of acute poisoning substances, an intrinsic hazard of the active ingredients exists, i.e. the possible poisoning of non-target organisms (e.g., children, pets and wildlife) following exposure. The risks arising from the use of anticoagulants for rodent control operations in anthropic contexts can therefore only be mitigated by a proper selection of the active ingredient, bait formulation and administration techniques, since an active ingredient with selective action towards non-target species does not currently exist on the market. This document lists practical proposals aimed at reducing the possibility of toxic exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides and mitigate the toxicological risk of human baits and non-target species.

  7. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation. Proceedings of the RISC-RAD specialised training course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, O.V.

    2008-12-01

    The training course 'Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation' took place at the STUK, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki, Finland 14-16 February 2005. Proceeding of this course is collected in this volume. The idea of the course was to convene a number of scientists leading in the area of non-targeted effects of ionising radiation with the aim to outline their visions for the role of these effects and outline the future directions of radiation research on the basis of their expertise. The course was supported by the RISC-RAD IP FI6R-CT-2003-508842, Euratom specific programme for research and training on nuclear energy, 6th FP of the EC. The main objectives of the training course were: (1) to clarify the mechanisms of non-targeted effects, in particular, bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response; (2) to look if and how non-targeted effects modulate the cancer risk in the low dose region, and whether they relate to protective or harmful functions; (3) to clarify if ionising radiation can cause non-cancer diseases or beneficial effects at low and intermediate doses; (4) address the issue of individual susceptibility and other factors modifying non-targeted responses; (5) attempt to assess the relevance of non-targeted effects for radiation protection and to set the scientific basis for a modern, more realistic, radiation safety system; (6) and finally to contribute to the conceptualisation of a new paradigm in radiation biology that would cover both the classical direct (DNA-targeted) and non-targeted (indirect) effects

  8. Immunotherapy by targeting of VGKC complex for seizure control and prevention of cognitive impairment in a mouse model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhiliang; Feng, Xiaojuan; Fan, Zhigang; Zhu, Xingyuan; Yin, Shaohua

    2018-05-09

    Epilepsy is a type of refractory neurologic disorder mental disease, which is associated with cognitive impairments and memory dysfunction. However, the potential mechanisms of epilepsy are not well understood. Previous evidence has identified the voltage gated potassium channel complex (VGKC) as a target in various cohorts of patients with epilepsy. In the present study, the efficacy of an antibody against VGKC (anti‑VGKC) for the treatment of epilepsy in mice was investigated. A mouse model of lithium‑pilocarpine temporal lobe epilepsy was established and anti‑VGKC treatment was administered for 30 days. Memory impairment, anxiety, visual attention, inhibitory control and neuronal loss were measured in the mouse model of lithium‑pilocarpine temporal lobe epilepsy. The results revealed that epileptic mice treated with anti‑VGKC were able to learn the task and presented attention impairment, even a tendency toward impulsivity and compulsivity. It was also exhibited that anti‑VGKC treatment decreased neuronal loss in structures classically associated with attentional performance in hippocampus. Mice who received Anti‑VGKC treatment had inhibited motor seizures and hippocampal damage as compared with control mice. In conclusion, these results indicated that anti‑VGKC treatment may present benefits for improvements of the condition of motor attention impairment and cognitive competence, which suggests that VGKC may be a potential target for the treatment of epilepsy.

  9. Habituation in non-neural organisms: evidence from slime moulds

    OpenAIRE

    Boisseau, Romain P.; Vogel, David; Dussutour, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Learning, defined as a change in behaviour evoked by experience, has hitherto been investigated almost exclusively in multicellular neural organisms. Evidence for learning in non-neural multicellular organisms is scant, and only a few unequivocal reports of learning have been described in single-celled organisms. Here we demonstrate habituation, an unmistakable form of learning, in the non-neural organism Physarum polycephalum. In our experiment, using chemotaxis as the behavioural output and...

  10. Shared effects of organic microcontaminants and environmental stressors on biofilms and invertebrates in impaired rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabater, S.; Barceló, D.; De Castro-Català, N.; Ginebreda, A.; Kuzmanovic, M.; Petrovic, M.; Picó, Y.; Ponsatí, L.; Tornés, E.; Muñoz, I.

    2016-01-01

    Land use type, physical and chemical stressors, and organic microcontaminants were investigated for their effects on the biological communities (biofilms and invertebrates) in several Mediterranean rivers. The diversity of invertebrates, and the scores of the first principal component of a PCA performed with the diatom communities were the best descriptors of the distribution patterns of the biological communities against the river stressors. These two metrics decreased according to the progressive site impairment (associated to higher area of agricultural and urban-industrial, high water conductivity, higher dissolved organic carbon and dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations, and higher concentration of organic microcontaminants, particularly pharmaceutical and industrial compounds). The variance partition analyses (RDAs) attributed the major share (10%) of the biological communities' response to the environmental stressors (nutrients, altered discharge, dissolved organic matter), followed by the land use occupation (6%) and of the organic microcontaminants (2%). However, the variance shared by the three groups of descriptors was very high (41%), indicating that their simultaneous occurrence determined most of the variation in the biological communities. - Highlights: • River impairment was associated to increasing agricultural and urban-industrial areas, and sites were having waters with high water conductivity and nutrient concentrations, and higher concentrations of organic microcontaminants, particularly pharmaceutical and alkylphenol compounds. • Physico-chemical stressors (high nutrients and dissolved organic matter, altered water flow) were the ones mostly affecting biodiversity. • The simultaneous occurrence of microcontaminants with physico-chemical stressors in urban-industrial areas produced a much higher effect than the simple addition of stressors. - Organic microcontaminants reinforce the effects of environmental and land use stressors on

  11. Effects of neonicotinoids and fipronil on non-target invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisa, L W; Amaral-Rogers, V; Belzunces, L P; Bonmatin, J M; Downs, C A; Goulson, D; Kreutzweiser, D P; Krupke, C; Liess, M; McField, M; Morrissey, C A; Noome, D A; Settele, J; Simon-Delso, N; Stark, J D; Van der Sluijs, J P; Van Dyck, H; Wiemers, M

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the state of knowledge regarding the effects of large-scale pollution with neonicotinoid insecticides and fipronil on non-target invertebrate species of terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments. A large section of the assessment is dedicated to the state of knowledge on sublethal effects on honeybees (Apis mellifera) because this important pollinator is the most studied non-target invertebrate species. Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths), Lumbricidae (earthworms), Apoidae sensu lato (bumblebees, solitary bees) and the section "other invertebrates" review available studies on the other terrestrial species. The sections on freshwater and marine species are rather short as little is known so far about the impact of neonicotinoid insecticides and fipronil on the diverse invertebrate fauna of these widely exposed habitats. For terrestrial and aquatic invertebrate species, the known effects of neonicotinoid pesticides and fipronil are described ranging from organismal toxicology and behavioural effects to population-level effects. For earthworms, freshwater and marine species, the relation of findings to regulatory risk assessment is described. Neonicotinoid insecticides exhibit very high toxicity to a wide range of invertebrates, particularly insects, and field-realistic exposure is likely to result in both lethal and a broad range of important sublethal impacts. There is a major knowledge gap regarding impacts on the grand majority of invertebrates, many of which perform essential roles enabling healthy ecosystem functioning. The data on the few non-target species on which field tests have been performed are limited by major flaws in the outdated test protocols. Despite large knowledge gaps and uncertainties, enough knowledge exists to conclude that existing levels of pollution with neonicotinoids and fipronil resulting from presently authorized uses frequently exceed the lowest observed adverse effect concentrations and are thus likely to have large

  12. Managing the effects of cultural diversity in HR in a non profit organization, Case organization: Moniheli

    OpenAIRE

    Irfan, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Non-profit organizations traditionally operate within limited resources. They cannot spend much of their resources to increase motivation. Especially when the bigger goal of the organization is to promote cultural diversity in society, it is very interesting to observe how a non-profit organization manages the cultural diversity that exists within its own human resources. This report is an attempt to identify the ways through which the case organization Moniheli, a non-profit network of diffe...

  13. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Yahui; Tong Jian

    2007-01-01

    Non-targeted and delayed effects are relative phenomena in cellular responses to ionizing radiation. These effects (bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses) have been studied most extensively for radiation exposures. It is clear that adaptive responses, bystander effects and genomic instability will play an important role in the low dose-response to radiation. This review will provide a synthesis of the known, and proposed interrelationships amongst low-dose cellular responses to radiation, It also will examine the potential biological significance of non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. (authors)

  14. White matter damage impairs access to consciousness in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Françoise; Del Cul, Antoine; Malikova, Irina; Naccache, Lionel; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Cohen, Laurent; Cherif, André Ali; Cozzone, Patrick J; Pelletier, Jean; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Dehaene, Stanislas; Audoin, Bertrand

    2009-01-15

    Global neuronal workspace theory predicts that damage to long-distance white matter (WM) tracts should impair access to consciousness during the perception of brief stimuli. To address this issue, we studied visual backward masking in 18 patients at the very first clinical stage of multiple sclerosis (MS), a neurological disease characterized by extensive WM damage, and in 18 matched healthy subjects. In our masking paradigm, the visibility of a digit stimulus increases non-linearly as a function of the interval duration between this target and a subsequent mask. In order to characterize quantitatively, for each subject, the transition between non-conscious and conscious perception of the stimulus, we used non-linear regression to fit a sigmoid curve to objective performance and subjective visibility reports as a function of target-mask delay. The delay corresponding to the inflexion point of the sigmoid, where visibility suddenly increases, was termed the "non-linear transition threshold" and used as a summary measure of masking efficiency. Objective and subjective non-linear transition thresholds were highly correlated across subjects in both groups, and were higher in patients compared to controls. In patients, variations in the non-linear transition threshold were inversely correlated to the Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) values inside the right dorsolateral prefrontal WM, the right occipito-frontal fasciculus and the left cerebellum. This study provides clinical evidence of a relationship between impairments of conscious access and integrity of large WM bundles, particularly involving prefrontal cortex, as predicted by global neuronal workspace theory.

  15. Effect of mannose targeting of hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimers on cellular and organ biodistribution in a neonatal brain injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anjali; Porterfield, Joshua E; Smith, Elizabeth; Sharma, Rishi; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2018-06-05

    Neurotherapeutics for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders must overcome challenges relating to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), brain tissue penetration, and the targeting of specific cells. Neuroinflammation mediated by activated microglia is a major hallmark of several neurological disorders, making these cells a desirable therapeutic target. Building on the promise of hydroxyl-terminated generation four polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (D4-OH) for penetrating the injured BBB and targeting activated glia, we explored if conjugation of targeting ligands would enhance and modify brain and organ uptake. Since mannose receptors [cluster of differentiation (CD) 206] are typically over-expressed on injured microglia, we conjugated mannose to the surface of multifunctional D4-OH using highly efficient, atom-economical, and orthogonal Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry and evaluated the effect of mannose conjugation on the specific cell uptake of targeted and non-targeted dendrimers both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro results indicate that the conjugation of mannose as a targeting ligand significantly changes the mechanism of dendrimer internalization, giving mannosylated dendrimer a preference for mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis as opposed to non-specific fluid phase endocytosis. We further investigated the brain uptake and biodistribution of targeted and non-targeted fluorescently labeled dendrimers in a maternal intrauterine inflammation-induced cerebral palsy (CP) rabbit model using quantification methods based on fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy. We found that the conjugation of mannose modified the distribution of D4-OH throughout the body in this neonatal rabbit CP model without lowering the amount of dendrimer delivered to injured glia in the brain, even though significantly higher glial uptake was not observed in this model. Mannose conjugation to the dendrimer modifies the dendrimer

  16. Anticoagulant rodenticide toxicity to non-target wildlife under controlled exposure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Mastrota, F. Nicholas; van den Brink, Nico; Elliott, J.; Shore, R.; Rattner, B.

    2018-01-01

    wildlife. Ecological risk assessments of anticoagulant rodenticides would be improved with additional data on (i) interspecific differences in sensitivity, particularly for understudied taxa, (ii) sublethal effects unrelated to coagulopathy, (iii) responses to mixtures and sequential exposures, and (iv) the role of vitamin K status on toxicity, and significance of inclusion of supplemental vitamin K or menadione (provitamin) in the diet of test organisms. A more complete understanding of the toxicity of anticoagulant rodenticides in non-target wildlife would enable regulators and natural resource managers to better predict and even mitigate risk.

  17. Non-LTE radiation in laser-disk target couply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Peijun; Fei Weibing; Feng Tinggui; Wu Changshu

    2004-11-01

    The coupling of laser-disk target has been studied by Multi-group radiation transfer code RDMGL. The results show that the X-ray spectra are strongly non-LTE and dependent on the atomic model. The plasma states, laser energy absorption and X-ray conversion rates are almost the same as those simulated by three-temperature model code, which fact shows that the three-temperature model is reasonable to describe the exchange of different kinds of energy and the hydrodynamic phenomena of plasmas in laser-target coupling. (authors)

  18. Heterotic non-linear sigma models with anti-de Sitter target spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalogiorgakis, Georgios; Gubser, Steven S.

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the beta function of non-linear sigma models with S D+1 and AdS D+1 target spaces in a 1/D expansion up to order 1/D 2 and to all orders in α ' . This beta function encodes partial information about the spacetime effective action for the heterotic string to all orders in α ' . We argue that a zero of the beta function, corresponding to a worldsheet CFT with AdS D+1 target space, arises from competition between the one-loop and higher-loop terms, similarly to the bosonic and supersymmetric cases studied previously in [J.J. Friess, S.S. Gubser, Non-linear sigma models with anti-de Sitter target spaces, Nucl. Phys. B 750 (2006) 111-141]. Various critical exponents of the non-linear sigma model are calculated, and checks of the calculation are presented

  19. Toxicity of noradrenaline, a novel anti-biofouling component, to two non-target zooplankton species, Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overturf, C L; Wormington, A M; Blythe, K N; Gohad, N V; Mount, A S; Roberts, A P

    2015-05-01

    Noradrenaline (NA) is the active component of novel antifouling agents and acts by preventing attachment of fouling organisms. The goal of this study was to examine the toxicity of NA to the non-target zooplankton D. magna and C. dubia. Neonates were exposed to one of five concentrations of NA and effects on survival, reproduction and molting were determined. Calculated LC50 values were determined to be 46 and 38 μM in C. dubia and D. magna, respectively. A 10-day C. dubia study found that reproduction metrics were significantly impacted at non-lethal concentrations. In D. magna, concentrations greater than 40 μM significantly impacted molting. A toxicity test was conducted with D. magna using oxidized NA, which yielded similar results. These data indicate that both NA and oxidized NA are toxic to non-target zooplankton. Results obtained from this study can be used to guide future ecological risk assessments of catecholamine-based antifouling agents. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation (note). A new European integrated project, 2006-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomaa, S.; Wright, E.G.; Hildebrandt, G.; Kadhim, M.; Little, M.P.; Prise, K.M.; Belyakov, O.V.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The general objectives of the NOTE project are: (1) to investigate the mechanisms of nontargeted effects, in particular, bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response; (2) to investigate if and how non-targeted effects modulate the cancer risk in the low dose region, and whether they relate to protective or harmful functions; (3) to investigate if ionising radiation can cause non-cancer diseases or beneficial effects at low and intermediate doses; (4) to investigate individual susceptibility and other factors modifying non-targeted responses; (5) to assess the relevance of non-targeted effects for radiation protection and to set the scientific basis for a modern, more realistic, radiation safety system; (6) to contribute to the conceptualisation of a new paradigm in radiation biology that would cover both the classical direct (DNA-targeted) and non-targeted (indirect) effects. The NOTE brings together 19 major European and Canadian groups involved in the discovery, characterisation and mechanistic investigation of non-targeted effects of ionising radiation in cellular, tissue and animal models. The NOTE research activities are organised in six work packages. Four work packages (WPs 2-5) are problem-oriented, focussing on major questions relevant for the scientific basis of the system of radiation protection: WP2 Mechanisms of non-targeted effects, WP3 Non-cancer diseases, WP4 Factors modifying non-targeted responses, WP5 Modelling of non-targeted effects. The integration activities provided by WP6 strengthen the collaboration by supporting the access to infrastructures, mobility and training. WP7 provides dissemination and exploitation activities in the form of workshops and a public website. Managerial activities (WP1) ensure the organisation and structures for decision making, monitoring of progress, knowledge management and efficient flow of information and financing. Coordinator of the NOTE project is Prof

  1. Non-governmental organizations in international health: past successes, future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellert, G A

    1996-01-01

    Non-governmental organizations, or NGOs, are increasingly instrumental to the implementation of international health programs. Following an overview of current conditions in global health and the problems that could be targeted by NGOs, this article describes the activities and philosophies of several representative approaches in this sector. The attributes of NGOs that increase their potential effectiveness are discussed, including ability to reach areas of severe need, promotion of local involvement, low cost of operations, adaptiveness and innovation, independence, and sustainability. A summary is provided of major future challenges in international health that may be addressed by NGOs, with particular emphasis on tobacco-related disease, communicable diseases and the AIDS epidemic, maternal mortality and women's health, injury prevention and control, and the need to secure durable financial support.

  2. Emotion-induced impairments in speeded word recognition tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeelenberg, René; Bocanegra, Bruno R; Pecher, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies show that emotional stimuli impair the identification of subsequently presented, briefly flashed stimuli. In the present study, we investigated whether emotional distractors (primes) impaired target processing when presentation of the target stimulus was not impoverished. In lexical decision, animacy decision, rhyme decision, and nonword naming, targets were presented in such a manner that they were clearly visible (i.e., targets were not masked and presented until participants responded). In all tasks taboo-sexual distractors caused a slowdown in responding to the subsequent neutral target. Our results indicate that the detrimental effects of emotional distractors are not confined to paradigms in which visibility of the target is limited. Moreover, impairments were obtained even when semantic processing of stimuli was not required.

  3. Non-target trials with Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A, a lethal control agent of dreissenid mussels (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2013-01-01

    these invertebrate and vertebrate non-target trials areencouraging, but it would be unrealistic to think that dreissenids are the only aquatic organisms sensitive to Pf-CL145A’s dreissenid-killingnatural product. Additional testing is needed to better define Pf-CL145A’s margin of safety by identifying the sensitivity of other susceptibleorganisms. The results of these non-target safety trials – in combination with equally promising mussel control efficacy data – have now ledto Pf-CL145A’s commercialization under the product name Zequanox®, with dead cells as the product’s active ingredient. The commercialavailability of only dead-cell Zequanox formulations will eliminate the risk of any possible non-target infection by Pf-CL145A, furtherreducing environmental concerns. During the non-target project reported herein, the limited quantities of Pf-CL145A cells that we were ableto culture severely restricted the number and size of our trials. In contrast, the availability of Zequanox will now greatly expand theopportunities for non-target testing. The trials reported herein – exposing non-target organisms under aerated conditions to unformulated,laboratory-cultured cells – clearly point to Pf-CL145A’s potential for high host specificity, but non-target trials with Zequanox – using Pf-CL145A cells cultured, killed, and formulated using industrial-scale protocols – will be even more important as they will define the nontargetsafety limits of the actual commercial products under a wide range of environmental conditions.

  4. Memory impairment due to fipronil pesticide exposure occurs at the GABAA receptor level, in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Antonio Francisco; de Oliveira Souza, Ana Carolina; Carvalho, Caio Cristóvão; Horta, Daniel França; De Fraia, Daniel; Anselmo, Fabio; Chaguri, João Leandro; Faria, Caique Aparecido

    2016-10-15

    Fipronil (F) a pesticide considered of second generation cause various toxic effects in target and non-target organisms including humans in which provoke neurotoxicity, having the antagonism of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) as their main mechanism for toxic action. GABAergic system has been involved in processes related to the memory formation and consolidation. The present work studied the importance of GABA to the mechanisms involved in the very early development of fipronil-induced memory impairment in rats. Memory behavior was assessed using new object recognition task (ORT) and eight radial arm maze task (8-RAM) to study effects on cognitive and spatial memory. Locomotor behavior was assessed using open field task (OF). The dose of fipronil utilized was studied through a pilot experiment. The GABA antagonist picrotoxin (P) was used to enhance fipronil effects on GABAergic system. Fipronil or picrotoxin decrease memory studied in ORT and 8-RAM tasks. Additionally, F and P co-exposure enhanced effects on memory compared to controls, F, and P, suggesting strongly a GABAergic effect. Weight gain modulation and fipronil in blood were utilized as animal's intoxication indicators. In conclusion, here we report that second-generation pesticides, such as fipronil, can have toxic interactions with the CNS of mammals and lead to memory impairment by modulating the GABAergic system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Organic non-aqueous cation-based redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Huang, Jinhua; Burrell, Anthony

    2018-05-08

    The present invention provides a non-aqueous redox flow battery comprising a negative electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid negative electrolyte, a positive electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid positive electrolyte, and a cation-permeable separator (e.g., a porous membrane, film, sheet, or panel) between the negative electrolyte from the positive electrolyte. During charging and discharging, the electrolytes are circulated over their respective electrodes. The electrolytes each comprise an electrolyte salt (e.g., a lithium or sodium salt), a transition-metal free redox reactant, and optionally an electrochemically stable organic solvent. Each redox reactant is selected from an organic compound comprising a conjugated unsaturated moiety, a boron cluster compound, and a combination thereof. The organic redox reactant of the positive electrolyte comprises a tetrafluorohydroquinone ether compound or a tetrafluorocatechol ether compound.

  6. Fast track, dynein-dependent nuclear targeting of human immunodeficiency virus Vpr protein; impaired trafficking in a clinical isolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caly, Leon [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. 3800 (Australia); Kassouf, Vicki T. [Centre for Virus Research, The Westmead Institute for Medical Research, The University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia); Moseley, Gregory W. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. 3800 (Australia); Diefenbach, Russell J.; Cunningham, Anthony L. [Centre for Virus Research, The Westmead Institute for Medical Research, The University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW 2145 (Australia); Jans, David A., E-mail: david.jans@monash.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, Vic. 3800 (Australia)

    2016-02-12

    Nuclear import of the accessory protein Vpr is central to infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We previously identified the Vpr F72L mutation in a HIV-infected, long-term non-progressor, showing that it resulted in reduced Vpr nuclear accumulation and altered cytoplasmic localisation. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the effects of nuclear accumulation of the F72L mutation are due to impairment of microtubule-dependent-enhancement of Vpr nuclear import. We use high resolution imaging approaches including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and other approaches to document interaction between Vpr and the dynein light chain protein, DYNLT1, and impaired interaction of the F72L mutant with DYNLT1. The results implicate MTs/DYNLT1 as drivers of Vpr nuclear import and HIV infection, with important therapeutic implications. - Highlights: • HIV-1 Vpr utilizes the microtubule network to traffic towards the nucleus. • Mechanism relies on interaction between Vpr and dynein light chain protein DYNLT1. • Long-term non-progressor derived mutation (F72L) impairs this interaction. • Key residues in the vicinity of F72 contribute to interaction with DYNLT1.

  7. Fast track, dynein-dependent nuclear targeting of human immunodeficiency virus Vpr protein; impaired trafficking in a clinical isolate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caly, Leon; Kassouf, Vicki T.; Moseley, Gregory W.; Diefenbach, Russell J.; Cunningham, Anthony L.; Jans, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear import of the accessory protein Vpr is central to infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We previously identified the Vpr F72L mutation in a HIV-infected, long-term non-progressor, showing that it resulted in reduced Vpr nuclear accumulation and altered cytoplasmic localisation. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the effects of nuclear accumulation of the F72L mutation are due to impairment of microtubule-dependent-enhancement of Vpr nuclear import. We use high resolution imaging approaches including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and other approaches to document interaction between Vpr and the dynein light chain protein, DYNLT1, and impaired interaction of the F72L mutant with DYNLT1. The results implicate MTs/DYNLT1 as drivers of Vpr nuclear import and HIV infection, with important therapeutic implications. - Highlights: • HIV-1 Vpr utilizes the microtubule network to traffic towards the nucleus. • Mechanism relies on interaction between Vpr and dynein light chain protein DYNLT1. • Long-term non-progressor derived mutation (F72L) impairs this interaction. • Key residues in the vicinity of F72 contribute to interaction with DYNLT1.

  8. Estrogens induce rapid cytoskeleton re-organization in human dermal fibroblasts via the non-classical receptor GPR30.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Carnesecchi

    Full Text Available The post-menopausal decrease in estrogen circulating levels results in rapid skin deterioration pointing out to a protective effect exerted by these hormones. The identity of the skin cell type responding to estrogens is unclear as are the cellular and molecular processes they elicit. Here, we reported that lack of estrogens induces rapid re-organization of the human dermal fibroblast cytoskeleton resulting in striking cell shape change. This morphological change was accompanied by a spatial re-organization of focal adhesion and a substantial reduction of their number as evidenced by vinculin and actin co-staining. Cell morphology and cytoskeleton organization was fully restored upon 17β-estradiol (E2 addition. Treatment with specific ER antagonists and cycloheximide respectively showed that the E2 acts independently of the classical Estrogen Receptors and that cell shape change is mediated by non-genomic mechanisms. E2 treatment resulted in a rapid and transient activation of ERK1/2 but not Src or PI3K. We show that human fibroblasts express the non-classical E2 receptor GPR30 and that its agonist G-1 phenocopies the effect of E2. Inhibiting GPR30 through treatment with the G-15 antagonist or specific shRNA impaired E2 effects. Altogether, our data reveal a novel mechanism by which estrogens act on skin fibroblast by regulating cell shape through the non-classical G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 and ERK1/2 activation.

  9. Estrogens induce rapid cytoskeleton re-organization in human dermal fibroblasts via the non-classical receptor GPR30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnesecchi, Julie; Malbouyres, Marilyne; de Mets, Richard; Balland, Martial; Beauchef, Gallic; Vié, Katell; Chamot, Christophe; Lionnet, Claire; Ruggiero, Florence; Vanacker, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    The post-menopausal decrease in estrogen circulating levels results in rapid skin deterioration pointing out to a protective effect exerted by these hormones. The identity of the skin cell type responding to estrogens is unclear as are the cellular and molecular processes they elicit. Here, we reported that lack of estrogens induces rapid re-organization of the human dermal fibroblast cytoskeleton resulting in striking cell shape change. This morphological change was accompanied by a spatial re-organization of focal adhesion and a substantial reduction of their number as evidenced by vinculin and actin co-staining. Cell morphology and cytoskeleton organization was fully restored upon 17β-estradiol (E2) addition. Treatment with specific ER antagonists and cycloheximide respectively showed that the E2 acts independently of the classical Estrogen Receptors and that cell shape change is mediated by non-genomic mechanisms. E2 treatment resulted in a rapid and transient activation of ERK1/2 but not Src or PI3K. We show that human fibroblasts express the non-classical E2 receptor GPR30 and that its agonist G-1 phenocopies the effect of E2. Inhibiting GPR30 through treatment with the G-15 antagonist or specific shRNA impaired E2 effects. Altogether, our data reveal a novel mechanism by which estrogens act on skin fibroblast by regulating cell shape through the non-classical G protein-coupled receptor GPR30 and ERK1/2 activation.

  10. An Automatic Multi-Target Independent Analysis Framework for Non-Planar Infrared-Visible Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xinglong; Xu, Tingfa; Zhang, Jizhou; Zhao, Zishu; Li, Yuankun

    2017-07-26

    In this paper, we propose a novel automatic multi-target registration framework for non-planar infrared-visible videos. Previous approaches usually analyzed multiple targets together and then estimated a global homography for the whole scene, however, these cannot achieve precise multi-target registration when the scenes are non-planar. Our framework is devoted to solving the problem using feature matching and multi-target tracking. The key idea is to analyze and register each target independently. We present a fast and robust feature matching strategy, where only the features on the corresponding foreground pairs are matched. Besides, new reservoirs based on the Gaussian criterion are created for all targets, and a multi-target tracking method is adopted to determine the relationships between the reservoirs and foreground blobs. With the matches in the corresponding reservoir, the homography of each target is computed according to its moving state. We tested our framework on both public near-planar and non-planar datasets. The results demonstrate that the proposed framework outperforms the state-of-the-art global registration method and the manual global registration matrix in all tested datasets.

  11. 9th International Symposium on the Biosafety of Genetically Modified Organisms. Session II: Identifying and defining hazards and potential consequences I: Concepts for problem formulation and non-target risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Franz

    2006-01-01

    The scientific organizers of the symposium put much emphasis on the identification and definition of hazard and the potential consequences thereof and three full sessions with a total of 13 presentations encompassing a wide range of related themes were planned for this topic. Unfortunately, one talk had to be cancelled because of illness of the speaker (BM Khadi, India). Some presentations covered conceptual approaches for environmental risk assessment (ERA) of GM plants (problem formulation in the risk assessment framework, familiarity approach, tiered and methodological frameworks, non-target risk assessment) and the use of models in assessing invasiveness and weediness of GM plants. Other presentations highlighted the lessons learned for future ERA from case studies and commercialized GM crops, and from monitoring of unintended releases to the environment. When the moderators of the three sessions came together after the presentations to align their summaries, there was an obvious need to restructure the 12 presentations in a way that allowed for a consistent summarizing discussion. The following new organization of the 12 talks was chosen: (1) Concepts for problem formulation and non-target risk assessment, (2) Modeling as a tool for predicting invasiveness of GM plants, (3) Case-studies of ERA of large-scale release, (4) Lessons learned for ERA from a commercialized GM plant, (5) Monitoring of unintended release of Bt maize in Mexico. The new thematic structure facilitates a more in-depth discussion of the presentations related to a specific topic, and the conclusions to be drawn are thus more consistent. Each moderator agreed to take responsibility for summarizing one or more themes and to prepare the respective report.

  12. Atypical Structural Connectome Organization and Cognitive Impairment in Young Survivors of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Shelli R; Gugel, Meike; Huston-Warren, Emily; Watson, Christa

    2016-05-01

    Survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk for cognitive impairments that disrupt everyday functioning and decrease quality of life. The specific biological mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment following ALL remain largely unclear, but previous studies consistently demonstrate significant white matter pathology. We aimed to extend this literature by examining the organization of the white matter connectome in young patients with a history of ALL treated with chemotherapy only. We applied graph theoretical analysis to diffusion tensor imaging obtained from 31 survivors of ALL age 5-19 years and 39 matched healthy controls. Results indicated significantly lower small-worldness (p = 0.007) and network clustering coefficient (p = 0.019), as well as greater cognitive impairment (p = 0.027) in the ALL group. Regional analysis indicated that clustered connectivity in parietal, frontal, hippocampal, amygdalar, thalamic, and occipital regions was altered in the ALL group. Random forest analysis revealed a model of connectome and demographic variables that could automatically classify survivors of ALL as having cognitive impairment or not (accuracy = 0.89, p < 0.0001). These findings provide further evidence of brain injury in young survivors of ALL, even those without a history of central nervous system (CNS) disease or cranial radiation. Efficiency of local information processing, reorganization of hub connectivity, and cognitive reserve may contribute to cognitive outcome in these children. Certain connectome properties showed U-shaped relationships with cognitive impairment suggesting an optimal range of regional connectivity.

  13. Non-Invasive Radiofrequency-Induced Targeted Hyperthermia for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Raoof

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted biological therapies for hepatocellular cancer have shown minimal improvements in median survival. Multiple pathways to oncogenesis leading to rapid development of resistance to such therapies is a concern. Non-invasive radiofrequency field-induced targeted hyperthermia using nanoparticles is a radical departure from conventional modalities. In this paper we underscore the need for innovative strategies for the treatment of hepatocellular cancer, describe the central paradigm of targeted hyperthermia using non-invasive electromagnetic energy, review the process of characterization and modification of nanoparticles for the task, and summarize data from cell-based and animal-based models of hepatocellular cancer treated with non-invasive RF energy. Finally, future strategies and challenges in bringing this modality from bench to clinic are discussed.

  14. Implications of the World Trade Organization in combating non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A; Voon, T

    2011-12-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has proposed a number of strategies to combat non-communicable diseases such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes by targeting the risk factors of tobacco use, harmful use of alcohol and poor diet. A number of the domestic regulatory responses contemplated by WHO and individual countries have the potential to restrict or distort trade, raising the question of whether they are consistent with the obligations imposed on Members of the World Trade Organization (WTO). This article demonstrates that WTO rules do limit Members' flexibility in implementing public health measures to address these diseases. However, the focus of WTO provisions on preventing discrimination against or between imports and the exceptions incorporated in various WTO agreements leave sufficient scope for Members to design carefully directed measures to achieve genuine public health goals while minimizing negative effects on international trade. Copyright © 2011 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Person-Organization Commitment: Bonds of Internal Consumer in the Context of Non-profit Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juaneda-Ayensa, Emma; Clavel San Emeterio, Mónica; González-Menorca, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    From an Organizational Behavior perspective, it is important to recognize the links generated between individuals and the organization that encourage a desire for permanence. After more than a half century of research, Organizational Commitment remains one of the open questions in the Psychology of Organizations. It is considered an essential factor for explaining individual behavior in the organization such as satisfaction, turnover intention, or loyalty. In this paper, we analyze different contributions regarding the nature of the bond between the individual and the organization. Taking into account the peculiarities of Non-profit Organizations, we present different interpretation for later validation, comparing results from the Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the four models obtained using exploratory factor analysis, both conducted on a sample of 235 members of Non-profit Organizations.

  16. Organic non-aqueous cation-based redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Andrew N.; Vaughey, John T.; Chen, Zonghai; Zhang, Lu; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-03-29

    The present invention provides a non-aqueous redox flow battery comprising a negative electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid negative electrolyte, a positive electrode immersed in a non-aqueous liquid positive electrolyte, and a cation-permeable separator (e.g., a porous membrane, film, sheet, or panel) between the negative electrolyte from the positive electrolyte. During charging and discharging, the electrolytes are circulated over their respective electrodes. The electrolytes each comprise an electrolyte salt (e.g., a lithium or sodium salt), a transition-metal free redox reactant, and optionally an electrochemically stable organic solvent. Each redox reactant is selected from an organic compound comprising a conjugated unsaturated moiety, a boron cluster compound, and a combination thereof. The organic redox reactant of the positive electrolyte is selected to have a higher redox potential than the redox reactant of the negative electrolyte.

  17. The effect of lindane on non-target fauna in a maize agro-ecosystem in Zambia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deedat, Y.D.; Chanda, S.; Chivundu, A.M.; Kalembe, G.; Mecha, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of lindane on non-target fauna in a maize agro-ecosystem was studied in Zambia in 1992 and 1993. While lindane was effective against the stalk borers, a target pest, it also affected other non-target fauna. Ants, spiders and springtails were significantly reduced. However the effect was only transient and lasted for approximately two months. Lindane appeared to have no real effect on aerial non-target fauna or on soil inhabiting microorganisms. (author). 8 refs, 6 tabs

  18. Injuries from non-retention in gillnet fisheries suppress reproductive maturation in escaped fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Matthew R; Swanson, Penny; Young, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Exploitation of fisheries resources has unintended consequences, not only in the bycatch and discard of non-target organisms, but also in damage to targeted fish that are injured by gear but not landed (non-retention). Delayed mortality due to non-retention represents lost reproductive potential in exploited stocks, while not contributing to harvest. Our study examined the physiological mechanisms by which delayed mortality occurs and the extent to which injuries related to disentanglement from commercial gear compromise reproductive success in spawning stocks of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.). We found evidence for elevated stress in fish injured via non-retention in gillnet fisheries. Plasma cortisol levels correlated with the severity of disentanglement injury and were elevated in fish that developed infections related to disentanglement injuries. We also analyzed sex steroid concentrations in females (estradiol-17β and 17,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one) to determine whether non-retention impairs reproductive potential in escaped individuals. We demonstrate evidence for delayed or inhibited maturation in fish with disentanglement injuries. These findings have important implications for effective conservation and management of exploited fish stocks and suggest means to improve spawning success in such stocks if retention in commercial fisheries is improved and incidental mortality reduced.

  19. Injuries from non-retention in gillnet fisheries suppress reproductive maturation in escaped fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Baker

    Full Text Available Exploitation of fisheries resources has unintended consequences, not only in the bycatch and discard of non-target organisms, but also in damage to targeted fish that are injured by gear but not landed (non-retention. Delayed mortality due to non-retention represents lost reproductive potential in exploited stocks, while not contributing to harvest. Our study examined the physiological mechanisms by which delayed mortality occurs and the extent to which injuries related to disentanglement from commercial gear compromise reproductive success in spawning stocks of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.. We found evidence for elevated stress in fish injured via non-retention in gillnet fisheries. Plasma cortisol levels correlated with the severity of disentanglement injury and were elevated in fish that developed infections related to disentanglement injuries. We also analyzed sex steroid concentrations in females (estradiol-17β and 17,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one to determine whether non-retention impairs reproductive potential in escaped individuals. We demonstrate evidence for delayed or inhibited maturation in fish with disentanglement injuries. These findings have important implications for effective conservation and management of exploited fish stocks and suggest means to improve spawning success in such stocks if retention in commercial fisheries is improved and incidental mortality reduced.

  20. p53-dependent non-coding RNA networks in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blume, C. J.; Hotz-Wagenblatt, A.; Hüllein, J.; Sellner, L.; Jethwa, A.; Stolz, T.; Slabicki, M.; Lee, K.; Sharathchandra, A.; Benner, A.; Dietrich, S.; Oakes, C. C.; Dreger, P.; te Raa, D.; Kater, A. P.; Jauch, A.; Merkel, O.; Oren, M.; Hielscher, T.; Zenz, T.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of the tumor suppressor p53 lead to chemotherapy resistance and a dismal prognosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Whereas p53 targets are used to identify patient subgroups with impaired p53 function, a comprehensive assessment of non-coding RNA targets of p53 in CLL is missing. We

  1. Review of the effects of manufactured nanoparticles on mammalian target organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianshu; Tang, Meng

    2018-01-01

    Nanotechnology had matured significantly during the last two decades as it has transitioned from bench top science to applied technology. Even though the issue of safety of nanotechnology has been raised nearly one decade ago, the rapid progress in development and use of nanomaterials has not yet been matched by toxicological investigations. Many recent studies have simply outlined the toxic effects of nanoparticles (NPs), but few have systematically addressed their potentially adverse biological effects on target organs. Some animal models have shown that NPs could be accumulated in various organs. These accumulations can access the vasculature and target other organs, resulting in a potential health risks. After the brief description of current knowledge on the wide applications of several common NPs, their applications and the toxicokinetics, this review focused on effects of NPs on organ functions and mammal health after acute or chronic exposure, and potential mechanisms of action. Due to their physical properties, the liver, kidneys and lung are the main target organs of NPs. Most of NPs show slight toxicity when exposed to animals, while certain toxic effects like oxidative stress generation, inflammation and DNA damage are commonly observed. The severity of NPs toxicity is dependent upon several factors, including exposure dose and administration, NPs chemistry, size, shape, agglomeration state, and electromagnetic properties, which could provide useful information necessary to control the toxicity of NPs. Finally, the safety evaluation of nanotoxicity was addressed. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Proteomic profiling of non-obese type 2 diabetic skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Mullen, Edel; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal glucose handling has emerged as a major clinical problem in millions of diabetic patients worldwide. Insulin resistance affects especially one of the main target organs of this hormone, the skeletal musculature, making impaired glucose metabolism in contractile fibres a major feature of type 2 diabetes. High levels of circulating free fatty acids, an increased intramyocellular lipid content, impaired insulin-mediated glucose uptake, diminished mitochondrial functioning and an overall...

  3. Psychiatric comorbidity and psychosocial impairment among patients with vertigo and dizziness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmann, Claas; Henningsen, Peter; Brandt, Thomas; Strupp, Michael; Jahn, Klaus; Dieterich, Marianne; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret; Feuerecker, Regina; Dinkel, Andreas; Schmid, Gabriele

    2015-03-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are often not fully explained by an organic illness, but instead are related to psychiatric disorders. This study aimed to evaluate psychiatric comorbidity and assess psychosocial impairment in a large sample of patients with a wide range of unselected organic and non-organic (ie, medically unexplained) vertigo/dizziness syndromes. This cross-sectional study involved a sample of 547 patients recruited from a specialised interdisciplinary treatment centre for vertigo/dizziness. Diagnostic evaluation included standardised neurological examinations, structured clinical interview for major mental disorders (SCID-I) and self-report questionnaires regarding dizziness, depression, anxiety, somatisation and quality of life. Neurological diagnostic workup revealed organic and non-organic vertigo/dizziness in 80.8% and 19.2% of patients, respectively. In 48.8% of patients, SCID-I led to the diagnosis of a current psychiatric disorder, most frequently anxiety/phobic, somatoform and affective disorders. In the organic vertigo/dizziness group, 42.5% of patients, particularly those with vestibular paroxysmia or vestibular migraine, had a current psychiatric comorbidity. Patients with psychiatric comorbidity reported more vertigo-related handicaps, more depressive, anxiety and somatisation symptoms, and lower psychological quality of life compared with patients without psychiatric comorbidity. Almost half of patients with vertigo/dizziness suffer from a psychiatric comorbidity. These patients show more severe psychosocial impairment compared with patients without psychiatric disorders. The worst combination, in terms of vertigo-related handicaps, is having non-organic vertigo/dizziness and psychiatric comorbidity. This phenomenon should be considered when diagnosing and treating vertigo/dizziness in the early stages of the disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  4. An integrated miRNA functional screening and target validation method for organ morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebustini, Ivan T; Vlahos, Maryann; Packer, Trevor; Kukuruzinska, Maria A; Maas, Richard L

    2016-03-16

    The relative ease of identifying microRNAs and their increasing recognition as important regulators of organogenesis motivate the development of methods to efficiently assess microRNA function during organ morphogenesis. In this context, embryonic organ explants provide a reliable and reproducible system that recapitulates some of the important early morphogenetic processes during organ development. Here we present a method to target microRNA function in explanted mouse embryonic organs. Our method combines the use of peptide-based nanoparticles to transfect specific microRNA inhibitors or activators into embryonic organ explants, with a microRNA pulldown assay that allows direct identification of microRNA targets. This method provides effective assessment of microRNA function during organ morphogenesis, allows prioritization of multiple microRNAs in parallel for subsequent genetic approaches, and can be applied to a variety of embryonic organs.

  5. [WMN: a negative ERPs component related to working memory during non-target visual stimuli processing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lun; Wei, Jin-he

    2003-10-01

    To study non-target stimuli processing in the brain. Features of the event-related potentials (ERPs) from non-target stimuli during selective response task (SR) was compared with that during visual selective discrimination (DR) task in 26 normal subjects. The stimuli consisted of two color LED flashes (red and green) appeared randomly in left (LVF) or right (RVF) visual field with same probability. ERPs were derived at 9 electrode sites on the scalp under 2 task conditions: a) SR, making switch response to the target (NT) stimuli from LVF or RVF in one direction and making no response to the non-target (NT) ones; b) DR, making switching response to T stimuli differentially, i.e., to the left for T from LVF and to the right for T from RVF. 1) the non-target stimuli in DR conditions, compared with that in SR condition, elicited smaller P2 and P3 components and larger N2 component at the frontal brain areas; 2) a significant negative component, named as WMN (working memory negativity), appeared in the non-target ERPs during DR in the period of 100 to 700 ms post stimulation which was predominant at the frontal brain areas. According to the major difference between brain activities for non-target stimuli during SR and DR, the predominant appearance of WMN at the frontal brain areas demonstrated that the non-target stimulus processing was an active process and was related to working memory, i.e., the temporary elimination and the retrieval of the response mode which was stored in working memory.

  6. PCI-GC-MS-MS approach for identification of non-amino organic acid and amino acid profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hemi; Yang, Lin; Ji, Fenfen; Cai, Zongwei

    2017-03-15

    Alkyl chloroformate have been wildly used for the fast derivatization of metabolites with amino and/or carboxyl groups, coupling of powerful separation and detection systems, such as GC-MS, which allows the comprehensive analysis of non-amino organic acids and amino acids. The reagents involving n-alkyl chloroformate and n-alcohol are generally employed for providing symmetric labeling terminal alkyl chain with the same length. Here, we developed an asymmetric labeling strategy and positive chemical ionization gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (PCI-GC-MS-MS) approach for determination of non-amino organic acids and amino acids, as well as the short chain fatty acids. Carboxylic and amino groups could be selectively labelled by propyl and ethyl groups, respectively. The specific neutral loss of C 3 H 8 O (60Da), C 3 H 5 O 2 (74Da) and C 4 H 8 O 2 (88Da) were useful in the selective identification for qualitative analysis of organic acids and amino acid derivatives. PCI-GC-MS-MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was applied for semi-quantification of typical non-amino organic acids and amino acids. This method exhibited a wide range of linear range, good regression coefficient (R 2 ) and repeatability. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of targeted metabolites showed excellent intra- and inter-day precision (chloroformate derivatization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantification of non-coding RNA target localization diversity and its application in cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lixin; Leung, Kwong-Sak

    2018-04-01

    Subcellular localization is pivotal for RNAs and proteins to implement biological functions. The localization diversity of protein interactions has been studied as a crucial feature of proteins, considering that the protein-protein interactions take place in various subcellular locations. Nevertheless, the localization diversity of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) target proteins has not been systematically studied, especially its characteristics in cancers. In this study, we provide a new algorithm, non-coding RNA target localization coefficient (ncTALENT), to quantify the target localization diversity of ncRNAs based on the ncRNA-protein interaction and protein subcellular localization data. ncTALENT can be used to calculate the target localization coefficient of ncRNAs and measure how diversely their targets are distributed among the subcellular locations in various scenarios. We focus our study on long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), and our observations reveal that the target localization diversity is a primary characteristic of lncRNAs in different biotypes. Moreover, we found that lncRNAs in multiple cancers, differentially expressed cancer lncRNAs, and lncRNAs with multiple cancer target proteins are prone to have high target localization diversity. Furthermore, the analysis of gastric cancer helps us to obtain a better understanding that the target localization diversity of lncRNAs is an important feature closely related to clinical prognosis. Overall, we systematically studied the target localization diversity of the lncRNAs and uncovered its association with cancer.

  8. Development Of International Non-Governmental Organizations And Legal Traditions Of Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra A. Dorskaya

    2015-01-01

    The article examines the role of international non-governmental organizations in the maintenance and creation of a positive attitude to national legal traditions. The basic stages of development of international non-governmental organizations. Analyzed their advantages and disadvantages. Considered as the legal traditions of the Russian society are reflected in the activities of legal entities and individuals - members of international non-governmental organizations.

  9. SAR Imaging of Ground Moving Targets with Non-ideal Motion Error Compensation(in English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Hui

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Conventional ground moving target imaging algorithms mainly focus on the range cell migration correction and the motion parameter estimation of the moving target. However, in real Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR data processing, non-ideal motion error compensation is also a critical process, which focuses and has serious impacts on the imaging quality of moving targets. Non-ideal motion error can not be compensated by either the stationary SAR motion error compensation algorithms or the autofocus techniques. In this paper, two sorts of non-ideal motion errors that affect the Doppler centroid of the moving target is analyzed, and a novel non-ideal motion error compensation algorithm is proposed based on the Inertial Navigation System (INS data and the range walk trajectory. Simulated and real data processing results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  10. 20 CFR 416.921 - What we mean by a not severe impairment(s) in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What we mean by a not severe impairment(s) in an adult. 416.921 Section 416.921 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL... Disability § 416.921 What we mean by a not severe impairment(s) in an adult. (a) Non-severe impairment(s). An...

  11. Development Of International Non-Governmental Organizations And Legal Traditions Of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A. Dorskaya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the role of international non-governmental organizations in the maintenance and creation of a positive attitude to national legal traditions. The basic stages of development of international non-governmental organizations. Analyzed their advantages and disadvantages. Considered as the legal traditions of the Russian society are reflected in the activities of legal entities and individuals - members of international non-governmental organizations.

  12. Targeting nanoparticles to M cells with non-peptidic ligands for oral vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fievez, Virginie; Plapied, Laurence; des Rieux, Anne; Pourcelle, Vincent; Freichels, Hélène; Wascotte, Valentine; Vanderhaeghen, Marie-Lyse; Jerôme, Christine; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Préat, Véronique

    2009-09-01

    The presence of RGD on nanoparticles allows the targeting of beta1 integrins at the apical surface of human M cells and the enhancement of an immune response after oral immunization. To check the hypothesis that non-peptidic ligands targeting intestinal M cells or APCs would be more efficient for oral immunization than RGD, novel non-peptidic and peptidic analogs (RGD peptidomimitic (RGDp), LDV derivative (LDVd) and LDV peptidomimetic (LDVp)) as well as mannose were grafted on the PEG chain of PCL-PEG and incorporated in PLGA-based nanoparticles. RGD and RGDp significantly increased the transport of nanoparticles across an in vitro model of human M cells as compared to enterocytes. RGD, LDVp, LDVd and mannose enhanced nanoparticle uptake by macrophages in vitro. The intraduodenal immunization with RGDp-, LDVd- or mannose-labeled nanoparticles elicited a higher production of IgG antibodies than the intramuscular injection of free ovalbumin or intraduodenal administration of either non-targeted or RGD-nanoparticles. Targeted formulations were also able to induce a cellular immune response. In conclusion, the in vitro transport of nanoparticles, uptake by macrophages and the immune response were positively influenced by the presence of ligands at the surface of nanoparticles. These targeted-nanoparticles could thus represent a promising delivery system for oral immunization.

  13. Novel targets for ATM-deficient malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Johannes; Hofmann, Kay; Chen, Shuhua

    2014-01-01

    Conventional chemo- and radiotherapies for the treatment of cancer target rapidly dividing cells in both tumor and non-tumor tissues and can exhibit severe cytotoxicity in normal tissue and impair the patient's immune system. Novel targeted strategies aim for higher efficacy and tumor specificity. The role of ATM protein in the DNA damage response is well known and ATM deficiency frequently plays a role in tumorigenesis and development of malignancy. In addition to contributing to disease development, ATM deficiency also renders malignant cells heavily dependent on other pathways that cooperate with the ATM-mediated DNA damage response to ensure tumor cell survival. Disturbing those cooperative pathways by inhibiting critical protein components allows specific targeting of tumors while sparing healthy cells with normal ATM status. We review druggable candidate targets for the treatment of ATM-deficient malignancies and the mechanisms underlying such targeted therapies. PMID:27308314

  14. Non-targeted analysis of unexpected food contaminants using LC-HRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzelmann, Marco; Winter, Martin; Åberg, Magnus; Hellenäs, Karl-Erik; Rosén, Johan

    2018-03-29

    A non-target analysis method for unexpected contaminants in food is described. Many current methods referred to as "non-target" are capable of detecting hundreds or even thousands of contaminants. However, they will typically still miss all other possible contaminants. Instead, a metabolomics approach might be used to obtain "true non-target" analysis. In the present work, such a method was optimized for improved detection capability at low concentrations. The method was evaluated using 19 chemically diverse model compounds spiked into milk samples to mimic unknown contamination. Other milk samples were used as reference samples. All samples were analyzed with UHPLC-TOF-MS (ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry), using reversed-phase chromatography and electrospray ionization in positive mode. Data evaluation was performed by the software TracMass 2. No target lists of specific compounds were used to search for the contaminants. Instead, the software was used to sort out all features only occurring in the spiked sample data, i.e., the workflow resembled a metabolomics approach. Procedures for chemical identification of peaks were outside the scope of the study. Method, study design, and settings in the software were optimized to minimize manual evaluation and faulty or irrelevant hits and to maximize hit rate of the spiked compounds. A practical detection limit was established at 25 μg/kg. At this concentration, most compounds (17 out of 19) were detected as intact precursor ions, as fragments or as adducts. Only 2 irrelevant hits, probably natural compounds, were obtained. Limitations and possible practical use of the approach are discussed.

  15. Health care costs, work productivity and activity impairment in non-malignant chronic pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Christian; Handberg, Gitte; Axelsen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the costs of non-malignant chronic pain in patients awaiting treatment in a multidisciplinary pain clinic in a hospital setting. Health care costs due to chronic pain are particular high during the first year after pain onset, and remain high compared with health care costs be...... before pain onset. The majority of chronic pain patients incur the costs of alternative treatments. Chronic pain causes production losses at work, as well as impairment of non-work activities.......This study explores the costs of non-malignant chronic pain in patients awaiting treatment in a multidisciplinary pain clinic in a hospital setting. Health care costs due to chronic pain are particular high during the first year after pain onset, and remain high compared with health care costs...

  16. Non-pharmacological modulation of cerebral white matter organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Tina D; Mandl, Rene C W; Jepsen, Jens R M

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Neuroplasticity is a well-described phenomenon, but effects of non-pharmacological interventions on white matter (WM) are unclear. Here we review associations between active non-pharmacological interventions and WM organization in healthy subjects and in psychiatric patients. METHOD...

  17. Non-ETS emission targets for 2030. Indication of emission targets for the Netherlands and other EU Member States under the European Effort Sharing Decision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdonk, M.; Hof, A.

    2013-10-15

    As European Member States are making progress towards their 2020 targets in the Effort Sharing Decision, the attention of policymakers is shifting to a framework beyond 2020. The European Commission launched a discussion with its Green Paper on a possible policy framework for 2030. This PBL Note aims to contribute to that discussion by analysing the effects of various assumptions on Member States' non-ETS emission targets for 2030. The effort sharing of the current European target for 2020 has resulted in an emission target of +20% relative to 2005 levels for the least wealthy Member State and -20% for the three wealthiest Member States. The targets for all other Member States were determined based on per-capita income levels of 2005. For possible non-ETS targets for 2030, we assumed a Europe-wide emission reduction target of 40% for 2030, compared to 1990 levels. This target is considered by the European Commission as the most cost-efficient to achieve a low-carbon economy by 2050. The 2030 target was split into a target for emissions covered by the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) and one for emissions that are not covered by the ETS (non-ETS). According to our estimations, European non-ETS emissions need to be reduced by around 30% by 2030, compared to 2005 levels. We distributed the non-ETS reduction target of 30% over the Member States by using similar effort sharing principles that are applied in the EU Effort Sharing Decision for 2020, but with different targets assumed for the least wealthy Member State. We also took recent per-capita income levels into account. However, we did not take into account the costs and effects of emission reductions on GDP. This PBL Note analyses two possible scenarios that differ in the target assumed for the least wealthy Member State, in order to assess the effects of differing assumptions on the 2030 non-ETS targets. These scenarios should be considered as 'what if' scenarios and not as political positions

  18. Role of non-fossil energy in meeting China's energy and climate target for 2020

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Sheng; Tong, Qing; Yu, Sha; Wang, Yu; Chai, Qimin; Zhang, Xiliang

    2012-01-01

    China is the largest energy consumer and CO 2 emitter in the world. The Chinese government faces growing challenges of ensuring energy security and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. To address these two issues, the Chinese government has announced two ambitious domestic indicative autonomous mitigation targets for 2020: increasing the ratio of non-fossil energy to 15% and reducing carbon dioxide emissions per unit of GDP by 40–45% from 2005 levels. To explore the role of non-fossil energy in achieving these two targets, this paper first provides an overview of current status of non-fossil energy development in China; then gives a brief review of GDP and primary energy consumption; next assesses in detail the role of the non-fossil energy in 2020, including the installed capacity and electricity generation of non-fossil energy sources, the share and role of non-fossil energy in the electricity structure, emissions reduction resulting from the shift to non-fossil energy, and challenges for accomplishing the mitigation targets in 2020; finally, conclusions and policy measures for non-fossil energy development are proposed.

  19. Working while unwell: Workplace impairment in people with severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiles, Sarah A; Harvey, Erin S; McDonald, Vanessa M; Peters, Matthew; Bardin, Philip; Reynolds, Paul N; Upham, John W; Baraket, Melissa; Bhikoo, Zaheerodin; Bowden, Jeffrey; Brockway, Ben; Chung, Li Ping; Cochrane, Belinda; Foxley, Gloria; Garrett, Jeffrey; Hew, Mark; Jayaram, Lata; Jenkins, Christine; Katelaris, Constance; Katsoulotos, Gregory; Koh, Mariko S; Kritikos, Vicky; Lambert, Marina; Langton, David; Rivero, Alexis Lara; Marks, Guy B; Middleton, Peter G; Nanguzgambo, Aldoph; Radhakrishna, Naghmeh; Reddel, Helen; Rimmer, Janet; Southcott, Anne Marie; Sutherland, Michael; Thien, Francis; Wark, Peter Ab; Yang, Ian A; Yap, Elaine; Gibson, Peter G

    2018-04-20

    Severe asthma affects quality of life; however, its impact on workplace productivity is poorly understood. To compare workplace productivity - absenteeism and presenteeism - and impairment in daily activities in severe and non-severe asthma over time and identify characteristics associated with presenteeism in severe asthma. The Severe Asthma Web-based Database (SAWD) is an ongoing observational registry from Australia, New Zealand and Singapore. At April 2017, 434 patients with severe asthma and 102 with non-severe asthma were enrolled (18 to 88 years; 59% female). Participants provided comprehensive clinical and questionnaire data at baseline and were followed-up every 6 months for 24 months. Absenteeism (percentage of time not at work), presenteeism (self-reported impairment at work) and impairment in daily activities outside work due to health problems in the last week were calculated. At baseline, 61.4% of participants with severe asthma and 66.2% with non-severe asthma under 65 years were employed. At younger ages (30-50 years), fewer severe asthma participants were employed (69% vs 100%). Presenteeism and impairment in daily activity were more frequently reported in severe asthma and in participants with poorer asthma control, poorer lung function and more past-year exacerbations (pworkplace. Improving asthma control and mental health may be important targets for optimising workplace productivity in severe asthma. Presenteeism and absenteeism may represent key metrics for assessing intervention efficacy in people with severe asthma of working age. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. ATR-dependent bystander effects in non-targeted cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdak-Rothkamm, S.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Radiation induced non-targeted bystander effects have been reported for a range of endpoints including the induction of γH2AX foci which serve as a marker for DNA double strand breaks. We have recently reported the induction of γH2AX foci in non-targeted bystander cells up to 48 hours after irradiation and the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and TGF-beta 1 in the induction of γH2AX foci (Oncogene (2007) 26:993-1002). Here, we wanted to determine the role of the PI3-like kinases ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in DNA damage signalling in bystander cells. Conditioned medium from T98G cells irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays was transferred onto non-irradiated cells that were subsequently analysed for the induction of γH2AX, ATR and 53BP1 foci as well as clonogenic survival. Irradiated T98G glioma cells generated signals that induced γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in cells treated with the conditioned medium from irradiated cells. These foci co-localised with ATR foci. Inhibition of ATM and DNA-PK could not suppress the induction of bystander γH2AX foci whereas the mutation of ATR in Seckel cells abrogated bystander foci induction. A restriction of bystander foci to the S-phase of the cell cycle both in T98G cells and in ATR- proficient fibroblasts was observed. These results identify ATR as a central player within the bystander signalling cascade leading to γH2AX and 53BP1 foci formation, and suggest a mechanism of DNA damage induction in non-targeted cells. Further investigations have shown decreased clonogenic cell survival in bystander T98G and ATR wild-type fibroblasts. ATR mutated Seckel cells and also ATM-/- fibroblasts were resistant to this effect suggesting a role for both ATR and ATM in the bystander signalling cascade with regard to cell survival. Taken together, these observations support a hypothesis of DNA damage-induced accumulation of stalled replication forks in bystander cells which are subsequently processed by

  1. The "Robustness" of Vocabulary Intervention in the Public Schools: Targets and Techniques Employed in Speech-Language Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M.; Schmitt, Mary Beth; Murphy, Kimberly A.; Pratt, Amy; Biancone, Tricia

    2014-01-01

    This study examined vocabulary intervention--in terms of targets and techniques--for children with language impairment receiving speech-language therapy in public schools (i.e., non-fee-paying schools) in the United States. Vocabulary treatments and targets were examined with respect to their alignment with the empirically validated practice of…

  2. [Exposure degree of important non-target arthropods to Cry2Aa in Bt rice fields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Ling; Li, Yun-He; Hua, Hong-Xia; Yang, Chang-Ju; Wu, Hong-Jin; Peng, Yu-Fa

    2013-06-01

    Based on the principle of "risk = hazard x exposure", the selected representative nontarget organisms in the assessment of the potential effects of insect-resistant genetically modified (GM) crops on non-target arthropods in laboratory are generally the arthropod species highly exposed to the insecticidal proteins expressed by the GM crops in farmland ecosystem. In order to understand the exposure degree of the important arthropod species to Cry proteins in Bt rice fields, and to select the appropriate non-target arthropods in the risk assessment of insect-resistant GM crops, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was conducted to measure the Cry2Aa protein concentration in the arthropods collected from the cry2Aa rice fields at different rice growth stages. The results showed that there was a significant difference in the Cry2Aa content protein concentration in different arthropod species. Some species did not contain Cry2Aa protein, while some species contained larger amounts of Cry2Aa protein. Relative to the arthropods colleted after rice anthesis, the arthropods colleted in rice anthesis contained relative higher concentrations of Cry2Aa protein, especially for the predacious arthropods. No Cry proteins were detected in parasitic arthropods. This study provided references for the laboratory assessment of the effects of GM rice on nontarget arthropods.

  3. Lactobacillus salivarius reverse diabetes-induced intestinal defense impairment in mice through non-defensin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Pei-Hsuan; Wu, Ying-Ying; Chen, Pei-Hsuan; Fung, Chang-Phone; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Chen, Lee-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Altered intestinal microbiota and subsequent endotoxemia play pathogenic roles in diabetes. We aimed to study the mechanisms of intestinal defense impairment in type 1 diabetes and the effects of Lactobacillus salivarius as well as fructooligosaccharides (FOS) supplementation on diabetes-induced bacterial translocation. Alterations in the enteric microbiome, expression of mucosal antibacterial proteins and bacteria-killing activity of the intestinal mucosa in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice and Ins2(Akita) mice were investigated. The effects of dead L. salivarius (2×10(8)CFU/ml) and FOS (250 mg per day) supplementation for 1 week on endotoxin levels and Klebsiella pneumoniae translocation were also examined. Finally, germ-free mice were cohoused with wild-type or Ins2(Akita) mice for 2 weeks to examine the contribution of microbiota on the antibacterial protein expression. STZ-induced diabetic mice developed intestinal defense impairment as demonstrated by decreased mucosal bacteria-killing activity; reduction of non-defensin family proteins, such as Reg3β, Reg3γ, CRP-ductin and RELMβ, but not the defensin family proteins; and increased bacterial translocation. Intestinal bacteria overgrowth, enteric dysbiosis and increased intestinal bacterial translocation, particularly pathogenic K. pneumoniae in STZ-induced diabetic mice and Ins2(Akita) mice, were noted. Treating diabetic mice with dead L. salivarius or FOS reversed enteric dysbiosis, restored mucosal antibacterial protein and lessened endotoxin levels as well as K. pneumoniae translocation. Moreover, germ-free mice cohoused with wild-type mice demonstrated more intestinal Reg3β and RELMβ expression than those cohoused with Ins2(Akita) mice. These results indicate that hyperglycemia induces enteric dysbiosis, reduction of non-defensin proteins as well as bacteria-killing activity of the intestinal mucosa and intestinal defense impairment. Reversal of enteric dysbiosis with dead L. salivarius or

  4. SFACTOR: a computer code for calculating dose equivalent to a target organ per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in a source organ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Pleasant, J.C.; Killough, G.G.

    1977-11-01

    A computer code SFACTOR was developed to estimate the average dose equivalent S (rem/..mu..Ci-day) to each of a specified list of target organs per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in source organs in man. Source and target organs of interest are specified in the input data stream, along with the nuclear decay information. The SFACTOR code computes components of the dose equivalent rate from each type of decay present for a particular radionuclide, including alpha, electron, and gamma radiation. For those transuranic isotopes which also decay by spontaneous fission, components of S from the resulting fission fragments, neutrons, betas, and gammas are included in the tabulation. Tabulations of all components of S are provided for an array of 22 source organs and 24 target organs for 52 radionuclides in an adult.

  5. SFACTOR: a computer code for calculating dose equivalent to a target organ per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in a source organ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Pleasant, J.C.; Killough, G.G.

    1977-11-01

    A computer code SFACTOR was developed to estimate the average dose equivalent S (rem/μCi-day) to each of a specified list of target organs per microcurie-day residence of a radionuclide in source organs in man. Source and target organs of interest are specified in the input data stream, along with the nuclear decay information. The SFACTOR code computes components of the dose equivalent rate from each type of decay present for a particular radionuclide, including alpha, electron, and gamma radiation. For those transuranic isotopes which also decay by spontaneous fission, components of S from the resulting fission fragments, neutrons, betas, and gammas are included in the tabulation. Tabulations of all components of S are provided for an array of 22 source organs and 24 target organs for 52 radionuclides in an adult

  6. Proteomic Identification of Non-Gal Antibody Targets After Pig-to-Primate Cardiac Xenotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Guerard W.; Stalboerger, Paul G.; Davila, Eduardo; Heppelmann, Carrie J.; Gazi, Mozammel H.; McGregor, Hugh C. J.; LaBreche, Peter T.; Davies, William R.; Rao, Vinay P.; Oi, Keiji; Tazelaar, Henry D.; Logan, John S.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Experience with non-antigenic galactose α1,3 galactose (αGal) polymers and development of αGal deficient pigs has reduced or eliminated the significance of this antigen in xenograft rejection. Despite these advances, delayed xenograft rejection (DXR) continues to occur most likely due to antibody responses to non-Gal endothelial cell (EC) antigens. Methods To gauge the diversity of the non-Gal antibody response we used antibody derived from CD46 transgenic heterotopic cardiac xenografts performed without T-cell immunosuppression, Group A (n = 4) and Gal knockout (GT-KO) heart transplants under tacrolimus and sirolimus immunosuppression, Group B (n = 8). Non-Gal antibody was measured by flow cytometry and by Western blots using GT-KO EC membrane antigens. A nanoLC/MS/MS analysis of proteins recovered from 2D gels was used to identify target antigens. Results Group A recipients exhibited a mixed cellular and humoral rejection. Group B recipients mainly exhibited classical DXR. Western blot analysis showed a non-Gal antibody response induced by GT+ and GT-KO hearts to an overlapping set of pig aortic EC membrane antigens. Proteomic analysis identified 14 potential target antigens but failed to define several immunodominant targets. Conclusions These experiments indicate that the non-Gal antibody response is directed to a number of stress response and inflammation related pig EC antigens and a few undefined targets. Further analysis of these antibody specificities using alternative methods is required to more fully define the repertoire of non-Gal antibody responses. PMID:18957049

  7. Oracle Inequalities for Convex Loss Functions with Non-Linear Targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caner, Mehmet; Kock, Anders Bredahl

    This paper consider penalized empirical loss minimization of convex loss functions with unknown non-linear target functions. Using the elastic net penalty we establish a finite sample oracle inequality which bounds the loss of our estimator from above with high probability. If the unknown target...... of the same order as that of the oracle. If the target is linear we give sufficient conditions for consistency of the estimated parameter vector. Next, we briefly discuss how a thresholded version of our estimator can be used to perform consistent variable selection. We give two examples of loss functions...

  8. Valuing goodwill: not-for-profits prepare for annual impairment testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Christian; Travers, Mary Ann K

    2011-02-01

    Accounting standards for valuing goodwill and intangible assets are becoming more rigorous for not-for-profit organizations: Not-for-profit healthcare organizations need to test for goodwill impairment at least annually. Impairment testing is a two-stage process: initial analysis to determine whether impairment exists and subsequent calculation of the magnitude of impairment. Certain "triggering" events compel all organizations--whether for-profit or not-for-profit--to perform an impairment test for goodwill or intangible assets.

  9. Habituation in non-neural organisms: evidence from slime moulds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisseau, Romain P; Vogel, David; Dussutour, Audrey

    2016-04-27

    Learning, defined as a change in behaviour evoked by experience, has hitherto been investigated almost exclusively in multicellular neural organisms. Evidence for learning in non-neural multicellular organisms is scant, and only a few unequivocal reports of learning have been described in single-celled organisms. Here we demonstrate habituation, an unmistakable form of learning, in the non-neural organism Physarum polycephalum In our experiment, using chemotaxis as the behavioural output and quinine or caffeine as the stimulus, we showed that P. polycephalum learnt to ignore quinine or caffeine when the stimuli were repeated, but responded again when the stimulus was withheld for a certain time. Our results meet the principle criteria that have been used to demonstrate habituation: responsiveness decline and spontaneous recovery. To distinguish habituation from sensory adaptation or motor fatigue, we also show stimulus specificity. Our results point to the diversity of organisms lacking neurons, which likely display a hitherto unrecognized capacity for learning, and suggest that slime moulds may be an ideal model system in which to investigate fundamental mechanisms underlying learning processes. Besides, documenting learning in non-neural organisms such as slime moulds is centrally important to a comprehensive, phylogenetic understanding of when and where in the tree of life the earliest manifestations of learning evolved. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Targeting nanoparticles to M cells with non-peptidic ligands for oral vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Fievez, Virginie; Plapied, Laurence; des Rieux, Anne; Pourcelle, Vincent; Freichels, Hélène; Wascotte, Valentine; Vanderhaegen, Marie-Lyse; Jérôme, Christine; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline; Préat, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    The presence of RGD on nanoparticles allows the targeting of β1 integrins at the apical surface of human M cells and the enhancement of an immune response after oral immunization. To check the hypothesis that non-peptidic ligands targeting intestinal M cells or APCs would be more efficient for oral immunization than RGD, novel non-peptidic and peptidic analogs (RGD peptidomimitic (RGDp), LDV derivative (LDVd) and LDV peptidomimetic (LDVp)) as well as mannose were grafted on the PEG chain of P...

  11. The implementation of flipped classroom model in CIE in the environment of non-target language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Renfei; Mustofa, Ali; Zhang, Fang; Su, Xiaoxue

    2018-01-01

    This paper sets a theoretical framework that it’s both feasible and indispensable of flipping classroom in Chinese International Education (CIE) in the non-target language environments. There are mainly three sections included: 1) what is flipped classroom and why it becomes inevitable existence; 2) why should we flip the classroom in CIE environments, especially in non-target language environments; 3) take Pusat Bahasa Mandarin Universitas Negeri Surabaya as an instance to discuss the application of flipped classroom in non-target language environments.

  12. Non-Metastatic Cutaneous Melanoma Induces Chronodisruption in Central and Peripheral Circadian Clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis, Leonardo Vinícius Monteiro; Moraes, Maria Nathália; Magalhães-Marques, Keila Karoline; Kinker, Gabriela Sarti; da Silveira Cruz-Machado, Sanseray; Castrucci, Ana Maria de Lauro

    2018-04-03

    The biological clock has received increasing interest due to its key role in regulating body homeostasis in a time-dependent manner. Cancer development and progression has been linked to a disrupted molecular clock; however, in melanoma, the role of the biological clock is largely unknown. We investigated the effects of the tumor on its micro- (TME) and macro-environments (TMaE) in a non-metastatic melanoma model. C57BL/6J mice were inoculated with murine B16-F10 melanoma cells and 2 weeks later the animals were euthanized every 6 h during 24 h. The presence of a localized tumor significantly impaired the biological clock of tumor-adjacent skin and affected the oscillatory expression of genes involved in light- and thermo-reception, proliferation, melanogenesis, and DNA repair. The expression of tumor molecular clock was significantly reduced compared to healthy skin but still displayed an oscillatory profile. We were able to cluster the affected genes using a human database and distinguish between primary melanoma and healthy skin. The molecular clocks of lungs and liver (common sites of metastasis), and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) were significantly affected by tumor presence, leading to chronodisruption in each organ. Taken altogether, the presence of non-metastatic melanoma significantly impairs the organism's biological clocks. We suggest that the clock alterations found in TME and TMaE could impact development, progression, and metastasis of melanoma; thus, making the molecular clock an interesting pharmacological target.

  13. Study on the non-target effect of ionizing radiation using single cell gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Li Deguan; Liu Jianfeng; Chu Liping; Liu Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the non-target effect of ionizing radiation by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Methods: Cross incubated the irradiated( 137 Cs; 2Gy) or non-irradiated lymphocytes of human peripheral blood in the irradiated or non-irradiated plasma respectively, then, assess the DNA damage of lymphocytes using SCGE analysis. Results: The lymphocytes incubated in the irradiated plasma presented more obvious DNA damage than the incubated in the non-irradiated plasma dose (P<0.05). Conclusion: The non-target effect of ionizing radiation can be assessed by SCGE, and the results confirm that cytokines may play a great role in it. (authors)

  14. Fabrication of nano-mosquitocides using chitosan from crab shells: Impact on non-target organisms in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Anitha, Jaganathan; Dinesh, Devakumar; Suresh, Udaiyan; Rajaganesh, Rajapandian; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Paulpandi, Manickam; Vadivalagan, Chitravel; Amuthavalli, Pandiyan; Wang, Lan; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Wei, Hui; Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Kumar, Suresh; Pugazhendy, Kannaiyan; Higuchi, Akon; Nicoletti, Marcello; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    Mosquitoes are arthropods of huge medical and veterinary relevance, since they vector pathogens and parasites of public health importance, including malaria, dengue and Zika virus. Currently, nanotechnology is considered a potential eco-friendly approach in mosquito control research. We proposed a novel method of biofabrication of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) using chitosan (Ch) from crab shells. Ch-AgNP nanocomposite was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FTIR, SEM, EDX and XRD. Ch-AgNP were tested against larvae and pupae of the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi obtaining LC50 ranging from 3.18 ppm (I) to 6.54 ppm (pupae). The antibacterial properties of Ch-AgNP were proved against Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhi, while no growth inhibition was reported in assays conducted on Proteus vulgaris. Concerning non-target effects, in standard laboratory considtions the predation efficiency of Danio rerio zebrafishes was 68.8% and 61.6% against I and II instar larvae of A. stephensi, respectively. In a Ch-AgNP-contaminated environment, fish predation was boosted to 89.5% and 77.3%, respectively. Quantitative analysis of antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT and LPO from hepatopancreas of fresh water crabs Paratelphusa hydrodromous exposed for 16 days to a Ch-AgNP-contaminated aquatic environment were conducted. Notably, deleterious effects of Ch-AgNP contaminating aquatic enviroment on the non-target crab P. hydrodromous were observed, particularly when doses higher than 8-10ppm are tested. Overall, this research highlights the potential of Ch-AGNP for the development of newer control tools against young instar populations of malaria mosquitoes, also highlighting some risks concerned the employ of nanoparticles in aquatic environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes in gene expression in PBMCs profiles of PPARα target genes in obese and non-obese individuals during fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicidade, Ingrid; Marcarini, Juliana Cristina; Carreira, Clísia Mara; Amarante, Marla Karine; Afman, Lydia A; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has risen dramatically and the World Health Organization estimates that 700 million people will be obese worldwide by 2015. Approximately, 50% of the Brazilian population above 20 years of age is overweight, and 16% is obese. This study aimed to evaluate the differences in the expression of PPARα target genes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and free fatty acids (FFA) in obese and non-obese individuals after 24 h of fasting. We first presented evidence that Brazilian people exhibit expression changes in PPARα target genes in PBMCs under fasting conditions. Q-PCR was utilized to assess the mRNA expression levels of target genes. In both groups, the FFA concentrations increased significantly after 24 h of fasting. The basal FFA mean concentration was two-fold higher in the obese group compared with the non-obese group. After fasting, all genes evaluated in this study showed increased expression levels compared with basal expression in both groups. However, our results reveal no differences in gene expression between the obese and non-obese, more studies are necessary to precisely delineate the associated mechanisms, particularly those that include groups with different degrees of obesity and patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 because the expression of the main genes that are involved in β-oxidation and glucose level maintenance are affected by these factors. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Traditions and Management Perspectives of Community and Non-Profit Organizations in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Stasiukynas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – To overview the traditions and management perspectives of community and non-profit organizations in Lithuania.Methodology – For the purpose of this research a literature analysis on community and non-profit organization case studies was conducted. The case studies describing stories of success were singled out and leaders of these organizations were interviewed.Findings – The research has showed the growth of the number of community and nonprofit organizations during the last twenty years and the difficulties of collecting the statistical data. This study presupposes the possibility to identify the tendencies of management in community and non-profit organizations, including the following: increasing use of the social networks for communication; proliferation of strategic planning; greater emphasis on educating and empowering new generation of leaders.Research implications – Prior studies in this area in Lithuania have not exhaustively analyzed the components of human resource management of non-profit organizations. An important follow up on this study would be to analyze the human resource management in community organizations.Practical implications – This study covered the management aspects important for the improvement of how community and non-profit organizations work.Originality/Value – This study expands the knowledge on Lithuanian community and non-profit organization development and management.Research type – literature review, research paper.

  17. Relationship between increased arterial stiffness and other markers of target organ damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Enrique; Costa, José Antonio; Pérez-Lahiguera, Francisco; González, Carmen; Pascual, José María

    2010-04-24

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship of arterial stiffness with other markers of target organ damage, and the clinical factors related to it. Cross-sectional study that included 208 (115 men) never treated hypertensive, non-diabetic patients (mean age, 49+/-12 years). In addition to a full clinical study, 24h ambulatory blood pressure (BP), and determination of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and microalbuminuria were performed. Clinical arterial stiffness was assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) obtained with applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor-System). PWV was 8.3 (7.3-9.9)m/s (median, interquartile range). Stepwise regression analysis revealed that age (beta=0.086, p12m/s (indicating target organ lesion) was present in only 16 (7.7%) patients, less frequent than LVH (28% of the patients) and microalbuminuria (16%). However, of the 16 patients with elevated PWV, 10 (62%) had neither LVH or microalbuminuria. In a logistic multivariate regression analysis the factors related to elevated PWV were age > or =45 in man and > or =55 in women (OR: 23.8, 95% CI: 2.7-195.5; p=0.004), LDL cholesterol > or =160mg/dl (OR: 10.6, 95% CI: 2.6-42.7; p=0.001) and increased 24-h pulse pressure > or =55mmHg (OR: 3.9, 95% CI: 1.2-12.9; p=0.03). In untreated middle age hypertensives arterial stiffness assessed by PWV is less frequent than LVH or microalbuminuria. PWV is mainly related to age, LDL cholesterol, and pulse pressure values. 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-classical structures of organic compounds: unusual stereochemistry and hypercoordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkin, Vladimir I; Minyaev, Ruslan M; Hoffmann, Roald

    2002-01-01

    Non-classical structures of organic compounds are defined as molecules containing non-tetrahedral tetracoordinate and/or hypercoordinate carbon atoms. The evolution of the views on this subject is considered and the accumulated theoretical and experimental data on the structures and dynamic transformations of non-classical organic compounds are systematised. It is shown that computational analysis using the methods and the software potential of modern quantum chemistry has now acquired high predictive capacity and is the most important source of data on the structures of non-classical compounds. The bibliography includes 227 references.

  19. Greenhouse gas fluxes from agricultural soils under organic and non-organic management — A global meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, Colin; Gattinger, Andreas; Muller, Adrian; Mäder, Paul; Fließbach, Andreas; Stolze, Matthias; Ruser, Reiner; Niggli, Urs

    2014-01-01

    It is anticipated that organic farming systems provide benefits concerning soil conservation and climate protection. A literature search on measured soil-derived greenhouse gas (GHG) (nitrous oxide and methane) fluxes under organic and non-organic management from farming system comparisons was conducted and followed by a meta-analysis. Up to date only 19 studies based on field measurements could be retrieved. Based on 12 studies that cover annual measurements, it appeared with a high significance that area-scaled nitrous oxide emissions from organically managed soils are 492 ± 160 kg CO 2 eq. ha −1 a −1 lower than from non-organically managed soils. For arable soils the difference amounts to 497 ± 162 kg CO 2 eq. ha −1 a −1 . However, yield-scaled nitrous oxide emissions are higher by 41 ± 34 kg CO 2 eq. t −1 DM under organic management (arable and use). To equalize this mean difference in yield-scaled nitrous oxide emissions between both farming systems, the yield gap has to be less than 17%. Emissions from conventionally managed soils seemed to be influenced mainly by total N inputs, whereas for organically managed soils other variables such as soil characteristics seemed to be more important. This can be explained by the higher bioavailability of the synthetic N fertilisers in non-organic farming systems while the necessary mineralisation of the N sources under organic management leads to lower and retarded availability. Furthermore, a higher methane uptake of 3.2 ± 2.5 kg CO 2 eq. ha −1 a −1 for arable soils under organic management can be observed. Only one comparative study on rice paddies has been published up to date. All 19 retrieved studies were conducted in the Northern hemisphere under temperate climate. Further GHG flux measurements in farming system comparisons are required to confirm the results and close the existing knowledge gaps. - Highlights: • Lower area-scaled nitrous oxide emissions from soils managed organically compared

  20. Effects of seed mixture sowing with resistant and susceptible rice on population dynamics of target planthoppers and non-target stemborers and leaffolders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Wan, Guijun; Wang, Long; Parajulee, Megha N; Zhao, Zihua; Chen, Fajun

    2018-07-01

    The widespread planting of insect-resistant crops has caused a dramatic shift in agricultural landscapes, thus raising concerns about the potential impact on both target and non-target pests worldwide. In this study, we examined the potential effects of six seed mixture ratios of insect-resistance dominance [100% (R100), 95% (S05R95), 90% (S10R90), 80% (S20R80), 60% (S40R60), and 0% (S100)] on target and non-target pests in a 2-year field trial in southern China. The occurrence of the target pests Nilaparvata lugens and Sogatella furcifera decreased with an increase in the ratio of resistant rice, and mixture ratios with ≥90% resistant rice significantly increased the pest suppression efficiency, with the lowest occurrences of the non-target pests Sesamia inferens, Chilo suppressalis and Cnaphalocrocis medinalis for S100 and S10R90 seed mixture ratios. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in the 1000-grain dry weight and grain yield between R100 and other treatments with ≥80% resistant seeds in the mixture (S20R80, S10R90 and S05R95). S10R90 produced a good yield and provided the most effective control of both target and non-target pests, with the potential to significantly reduce the application of chemical pesticides for integrated pest management in paddy fields. It is further presumed that the strategy of seed mixture with resistant and susceptible rice would be advantageous for rice yield stability. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. A Review on the Toxicity and Non-Target Effects of Macrocyclic Lactones in Terrestrial and Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumaret, Jean-Pierre; Errouissi, Faiek; Floate, Kevin; Römbke, Jörg; Wardhaugh, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The avermectins, milbemycins and spinosyns are collectively referred to as macrocyclic lactones (MLs) which comprise several classes of chemicals derived from cultures of soil micro-organisms. These compounds are extensively and increasingly used in veterinary medicine and agriculture. Due to their potential effects on non-target organisms, large amounts of information on their impact in the environment has been compiled in recent years, mainly caused by legal requirements related to their marketing authorization or registration. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present knowledge about the acute and chronic ecotoxicological effects of MLs on organisms, mainly invertebrates, in the terrestrial and aquatic environment. Detailed information is presented on the mode-of-action as well as the ecotoxicity of the most important compounds representing the three groups of MLs. This information, based on more than 360 references, is mainly provided in nine tables, presenting the effects of abamectin, ivermectin, eprinomectin, doramectin, emamectin, moxidectin, and spinosad on individual species of terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates as well as plants and algae. Since dung dwelling organisms are particularly important non-targets, as they are exposed via dung from treated animals over their whole life-cycle, the information on the effects of MLs on dung communities is compiled in an additional table. The results of this review clearly demonstrate that regarding environmental impacts many macrocyclic lactones are substances of high concern particularly with larval instars of invertebrates. Recent studies have also shown that susceptibility varies with life cycle stage and impacts can be mitigated by using MLs when these stages are not present. However information on the environmental impact of the MLs is scattered across a wide range of specialised scientific journals with research focusing mainly on ivermectin and to a lesser extent on abamectin

  2. Metabolic syndrome indicators and target organ damage in urban active coping African and Caucasian men: the SABPA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kock, A; Malan, L; Potgieter, J C; Steenekamp, W; van der Merwe, M T

    2012-05-01

    Psychosocial stress relating to an urban environment or acculturation increases the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS). The objectives of this study were firstly to indicate and compare differences regarding appraisal of stress or active coping responses in urban African (n=88) and Caucasian (n=101) male teachers of South Africa, in accord with the prevalence of MetS indicators. And secondly to investigate the extent to which utilisation of active coping responses, together with MetS indicators, predict target organ damage, in these men. The Coping Strategy Indicator determined high and low active coping responses in male teachers from the Sympathetic Activity and Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Africans (SABPA) study. SABPA inclusion and exclusion criteria were used. Additionally, diabetic medication users (n=8), and participants with renal impairment (n=2) or HIV positive (n=13), were excluded. MetS indicators included glucose, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood pressure, and waist circumference, independent of confounders (age, physical activity, gamma glutamyl transferase). Microalbuminuria and carotid intima-media thickness indicated target organ damage. More MetS indicators exceeded the IDF cut-off points in high active coping African men (14.71%) than in their Caucasian counterparts (3.33%), as determined from χ² analyses. Furthermore, stepwise regressions indicated that more MetS indicators predicted endothelial dysfunction, especially in the high active coping African men. High active coping African men showed more manifestation of MetS, compared to their Caucasian counterparts, and revealed progress towards endothelial dysfunction. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Vaginally administered PEGylated LIF antagonist blocked embryo implantation and eliminated non-target effects on bone in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Menkhorst

    Full Text Available Female-controlled contraception/HIV prevention is critical to address health issues associated with gender inequality. Therefore, a contraceptive which can be administered in tandem with a microbicide to inhibit sexually transmitted infections, is desirable. Uterine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF is obligatory for blastocyst implantation in mice and associated with infertility in women. We aimed to determine whether a PEGylated LIF inhibitor (PEGLA was an effective contraceptive following vaginal delivery and to identify non-uterine targets of PEGLA in mice.Vaginally-applied (125I-PEGLA accumulated in blood more slowly (30 min vs 10 min and showed reduced tissue and blood retention (24 h vs 96 h compared to intraperitoneal injection in mice. Vaginally-applied PEGLA blocked implantation. PEGLA administered by intraperitoneal injection inhibited bone remodelling whereas vaginally-applied PEGLA had no effect on bone. Further, PEGLA had no effect in an animal model of multiple sclerosis, experimental auto-immune encephalomyelitis, suggesting PEGLA cannot target the central nervous system.Vaginally-administered PEGLA is a promising non-hormonal contraceptive, one which could be delivered alone, or in tandem with a microbicide. Vaginal application reduced the total dose of PEGLA required to block implantation and eliminated the systemic effect on bone, showing the vagina is a promising site of administration for larger drugs which target organs within the reproductive tract.

  4. Disrupted topological organization of resting-state functional brain network in subcortical vascular mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Li-Ye; Liang, Xia; Liu, Da-Ming; Sun, Bo; Ying, Sun; Yang, Dong-Bo; Li, Qing-Bin; Jiang, Chuan-Lu; Han, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated both structural and functional abnormalities in widespread brain regions in patients with subcortical vascular mild cognitive impairment (svMCI). However, whether and how these changes alter functional brain network organization remains largely unknown. We recruited 21 patients with svMCI and 26 healthy control (HC) subjects who underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Graph theory-based network analyses were used to investigate alterations in the topological organization of functional brain networks. Compared with the HC individuals, the patients with svMCI showed disrupted global network topology with significantly increased path length and modularity. Modular structure was also impaired in the svMCI patients with a notable rearrangement of the executive control module, where the parietal regions were split out and grouped as a separate module. The svMCI patients also revealed deficits in the intra- and/or intermodule connectivity of several brain regions. Specifically, the within-module degree was decreased in the middle cingulate gyrus while it was increased in the left anterior insula, medial prefrontal cortex and cuneus. Additionally, increased intermodule connectivity was observed in the inferior and superior parietal gyrus, which was associated with worse cognitive performance in the svMCI patients. Together, our results indicate that svMCI patients exhibit dysregulation of the topological organization of functional brain networks, which has important implications for understanding the pathophysiological mechanism of svMCI. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Non-verbal communication and executive function impairment after traumatic brain injury: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainson, C

    2007-05-01

    Following post-traumatic impairment in executive function, failure to adjust to communication situations often creates major obstacles to social and professional reintegration. The analysis of pathological verbal communication has been based on clinical scales since the 1980s, but that of nonverbal elements has been neglected, although their importance should be acknowledged. The aim of this research was to study non-verbal aspects of communication in a case of executive-function impairment after traumatic brain injury. During the patient's conversation with an interlocutor, all nonverbal parameters - coverbal gestures, gaze, posture, proxemics and facial expressions - were studied in as much an ecological way as possible, to closely approximate natural conversation conditions. Such an approach highlights the difficulties such patients experience in communicating, difficulties of a pragmatic kind, that have so far been overlooked by traditional investigations, which mainly take into account the formal linguistic aspects of language. The analysis of the patient's conversation revealed non-verbal dysfunctions, not only on a pragmatic and interactional level but also in terms of enunciation. Moreover, interactional adjustment phenomena were noted in the interlocutor's behaviour. The two inseparable aspects of communication - verbal and nonverbal - should be equally assessed in patients with communication difficulties; highlighting distortions in each area might bring about an improvement in the rehabilitation of such people.

  6. Role of non-governmental organizations in formation of non-proliferation culture in new independent countries (NIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevchik, M.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose of the report is demonstrate the non-governmental organizations (NGO) role in formation of non-proliferation culture in former Soviet Union. Activity of Center of Non-proliferation Problems Investigation (CNPI) of Monterey Institute of International Investigations and its collaboration with existing in Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) non-governmental organizations is considered as example. Brief information about CNPI and reasons for it representatives opening of in Kazakhstan and in other CIS-countries, as well as cooperation of NGO in Belarus, Kazakhstan, Russia and Ukraine for creation on Central Asia zone free from nuclear weapon ia given. Some measures which could promote to formation of non-proliferation culture in region are suggested

  7. Greenhouse gas fluxes from agricultural soils under organic and non-organic management — A global meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Colin, E-mail: colin.skinner@fibl.org [Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 21, 5070 Frick (Switzerland); Gattinger, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.gattinger@fibl.org [Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 21, 5070 Frick (Switzerland); Muller, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.mueller@fibl.org [Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 21, 5070 Frick (Switzerland); Mäder, Paul, E-mail: paul.maeder@fibl.org [Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 21, 5070 Frick (Switzerland); Fließbach, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.fliessbach@fibl.org [Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 21, 5070 Frick (Switzerland); Stolze, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.stolze@fibl.org [Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 21, 5070 Frick (Switzerland); Ruser, Reiner, E-mail: reiner.ruser@uni-hohenheim.de [Fertilisation and Soil Matter Dynamics (340i), Institute of Crop Science, University of Hohenheim, Fruwirthstraße 20, 70599 Stuttgart (Germany); Niggli, Urs, E-mail: urs.niggli@fibl.org [Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 21, 5070 Frick (Switzerland)

    2014-01-01

    It is anticipated that organic farming systems provide benefits concerning soil conservation and climate protection. A literature search on measured soil-derived greenhouse gas (GHG) (nitrous oxide and methane) fluxes under organic and non-organic management from farming system comparisons was conducted and followed by a meta-analysis. Up to date only 19 studies based on field measurements could be retrieved. Based on 12 studies that cover annual measurements, it appeared with a high significance that area-scaled nitrous oxide emissions from organically managed soils are 492 ± 160 kg CO{sub 2} eq. ha{sup −1} a{sup −1} lower than from non-organically managed soils. For arable soils the difference amounts to 497 ± 162 kg CO{sub 2} eq. ha{sup −1} a{sup −1}. However, yield-scaled nitrous oxide emissions are higher by 41 ± 34 kg CO{sub 2} eq. t{sup −1} DM under organic management (arable and use). To equalize this mean difference in yield-scaled nitrous oxide emissions between both farming systems, the yield gap has to be less than 17%. Emissions from conventionally managed soils seemed to be influenced mainly by total N inputs, whereas for organically managed soils other variables such as soil characteristics seemed to be more important. This can be explained by the higher bioavailability of the synthetic N fertilisers in non-organic farming systems while the necessary mineralisation of the N sources under organic management leads to lower and retarded availability. Furthermore, a higher methane uptake of 3.2 ± 2.5 kg CO{sub 2} eq. ha{sup −1} a{sup −1} for arable soils under organic management can be observed. Only one comparative study on rice paddies has been published up to date. All 19 retrieved studies were conducted in the Northern hemisphere under temperate climate. Further GHG flux measurements in farming system comparisons are required to confirm the results and close the existing knowledge gaps. - Highlights: • Lower area-scaled nitrous

  8. Effects of persistent insecticides on beneficial soil arthropod in conventional fields compared to organic fields, puducherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbarashan, Padmavathy; Gopalswamy, Poyyamoli

    2013-07-15

    The usage of synthetic fertilizers/insecticides in conventional farming has dramatically increased over the past decades. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of bio-pesticides and insecticides/pesticides on selected beneficial non targeted arthropods. Orders Collembola, Arachinida/Opiliones, Oribatida and Coleoptera were the main groups of arthropods found in the organic fields and Coleoptera, Oribatida, Gamasida and Collembola in conventional fields. Pesticides/insecticides had a significant effect on non-targeted arthropods order- Collembola, Arachinida/Opiliones, Hymenoptera and Thysonoptera were suppressed after pesticides/insecticides spraying. Bio-insecticides in organic fields had a non-significant effect on non targeted species and they started to increase in abundance after 7 days of spraying, whereas insecticide treatment in conventional fields had a significant long-term effect on non targeted arthropods and short term effect on pests/insects, it started to increase after 21 days of the spraying. These results indicate that insecticide treatment kept non targeted arthropods at low abundance. In conclusion, organic farming does not significantly affected the beneficial-non targeted arthropods biodiversity, whereas preventive insecticide application in conventional fields had significant negative effects on beneficial non targeted arthropods. Therefore, conventional farmers should restrict insecticide applications, unless pest densities reach the thresholds and more desirably can switch to organic farming practices.

  9. Risk-Based Treatment Targets for Onsite Non-Potable Water Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation presents risk-based enteric pathogen log reduction targets for non-potable and potable uses of a variety of alternative source waters (i.e., municipal wastewater, locally-collected greywater, rainwater, and stormwater). A probabilistic, forward Quantitative Micr...

  10. Explicit instructions facilitate performance of OCD participants but impair performance of non-OCD participants on a serial reaction time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soref, Assaf; Liberman, Nira; Abramovitch, Amitai; Dar, Reuven

    2018-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that individuals diagnosed with OCD tend to rely on explicit processing while performing implicit learning tasks. We sought to investigate whether individuals with OCD are capable of implicit learning, but would demonstrate improved performance when explicit processing strategies are enhanced. Twenty-four participants with OCD and 24 non-psychiatric control (NPC) participants performed an implicit learning task in which they responded to a single target stimulus that successively appears at one of four locations according to an underlying sequence. We manipulated the learning strategy by informing half of the participants that the target stimulus location was determined by an underlying sequence, which they should identify (intentional learning). The other half of the participants was not informed of the existence of the underlying sequence, and was expected to learn the sequence implicitly (standard learning). We predicted that OCD participants will exhibit inferior performance compared to NPC participants in the standard learning condition, and that intentional learning instructions would impair the performance of NPC participants, but enhance the performance of OCD participants. The results supported these predictions and suggest that individuals with OCD prefer controlled to automatic processing. We discuss the implications of this conclusion to our understanding of OCD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of multifunctional targeting epirubicin liposomes in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song X

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-li Song,1 Rui-jun Ju,2 Yao Xiao,1 Xin Wang,1 Shuang Liu,1 Min Fu,1 Jing-jing Liu,1 Li-yan Gu,1 Xue-tao Li,1 Lan Cheng1 1School of Pharmacy, Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Dalian, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing, China Abstract: Chemotherapy for aggressive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC usually results in a poor prognosis due to tumor metastasis, vasculogenic mimicry (VM channels, limited killing of tumor cells, and severe systemic toxicity. Herein, we developed a kind of multifunctional targeting epirubicin liposomes to enhance antitumor efficacy for NSCLC. In the liposomes, octreotide was modified on liposomal surface for obtaining a receptor-mediated targeting effect, and honokiol was incorporated into the lipid bilayer for inhibiting tumor metastasis and eliminating VM channels. In vitro cellular assays showed that multifunctional targeting epirubicin liposomes not only exhibited the strongest cytotoxic effect on Lewis lung tumor cells but also showed the most efficient inhibition on VM channels. Action mechanism studies showed that multifunctional targeting epirubicin liposomes could downregulate PI3K, MMP-2, MMP-9, VE-Cadherin, and FAK and activate apoptotic enzyme caspase 3. In vivo results exhibited that multifunctional targeting epirubicin liposomes could accumulate selectively in tumor site and display an obvious antitumor efficacy. In addition, no significant toxicity of blood system and major organs was observed at a test dose. Therefore, multifunctional targeting epirubicin liposomes may provide a safe and efficient therapy strategy for NSCLC. Keywords: octreotide, honokiol, chemotherapy, vasculogenic mimicry, tumor metastasis, targeting drug delivery

  12. Age-dependent impairment of auditory processing under spatially focused and divided attention: an electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild-Wall, Nele; Falkenstein, Michael

    2010-01-01

    By using event-related potentials (ERPs) the present study examines if age-related differences in preparation and processing especially emerge during divided attention. Binaurally presented auditory cues called for focused (valid and invalid) or divided attention to one or both ears. Responses were required to subsequent monaurally presented valid targets (vowels), but had to be suppressed to non-target vowels or invalidly cued vowels. Middle-aged participants were more impaired under divided attention than young ones, likely due to an age-related decline in preparatory attention following cues as was reflected in a decreased CNV. Under divided attention, target processing was increased in the middle-aged, likely reflecting compensatory effort to fulfill task requirements in the difficult condition. Additionally, middle-aged participants processed invalidly cued stimuli more intensely as was reflected by stimulus ERPs. The results suggest an age-related impairment in attentional preparation after auditory cues especially under divided attention and latent difficulties to suppress irrelevant information.

  13. Non-organ donors' attitudes toward incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Makmor; Noh, Abdillah; Chong, Chin-Sieng; Lim, Soo-Kun; Abdullah, Nawi; Ng, Kok-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Malaysians indicating that they did not intend to become organ donors upon their death were surveyed regarding interest in non-fungible financial incentives to be granted to surviving family members. Among the 730 (56% of the total sample of 1311) indicating unwillingness to be donors, 29.6% (216/730) subsequently indicated that they would be willing donors if the government introduced policies that, upon their death, "rewarded your (their) family with incentives for your (their) deeds." Among the 69% (504/730) who insisted that they would not become organ donor even with incentive, nearly 80% (404/501) of them were able to identify relevant incentives they thought should be provided by the state to those who make organ donations upon death. The majority of both groups preferred the state provide medical benefits to a surviving family member, suggesting this may be an attractive policy option for the state to raise the deceased organ donation pool. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Orbit Determination for a Microsatellite Rendezvous with a Non-Cooperative Target

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foster, Brian

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the minimum requirements to establish a satellite tracking system architecture for a hostile "parasitic microsatellite" to rendezvous with a larger, non-cooperative target satellite...

  15. Development of suspect and non-target screening methods for detection of organic contaminants in highway runoff and fish tissue with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bowen; Lofton, Jonathan M; Peter, Katherine T; Gipe, Alexander D; James, C Andrew; McIntyre, Jenifer K; Scholz, Nathaniel L; Baker, Joel E; Kolodziej, Edward P

    2017-09-20

    Untreated urban stormwater runoff contributes to poor water quality in receiving waters. The ability to identify toxicants and other bioactive molecules responsible for observed adverse effects in a complex mixture of contaminants is critical to effective protection of ecosystem and human health, yet this is a challenging analytical task. The objective of this study was to develop analytical methods using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) to detect organic contaminants in highway runoff and in runoff-exposed fish (adult coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch). Processing of paired water and tissue samples facilitated contaminant prioritization and aided investigation of chemical bioavailability and uptake processes. Simple, minimal processing effort solid phase extraction (SPE) and elution procedures were optimized for water samples, and selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) procedures were optimized for fish tissues. Extraction methods were compared by detection of non-target features and target compounds (e.g., quantity and peak area), while minimizing matrix interferences. Suspect screening techniques utilized in-house and commercial databases to prioritize high-risk detections for subsequent MS/MS characterization and identification efforts. Presumptive annotations were also screened with an in-house linear regression (log K ow vs. retention time) to exclude isobaric compounds. Examples of confirmed identifications (via reference standard comparison) in highway runoff include ethoprophos, prometon, DEET, caffeine, cotinine, 4(or 5)-methyl-1H-methylbenzotriazole, and acetanilide. Acetanilide was also detected in runoff-exposed fish gill and liver samples. Further characterization of highway runoff and fish tissues (14 and 19 compounds, respectively with tentative identification by MS/MS data) suggests that many novel or poorly characterized organic contaminants exist in urban

  16. Spokespersons in media campaigns of non-profit organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Dragana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this research is how spokespersons can be used in campaigns of non-profit organizations, with a goal to increase their visibility and gain public support. Namely, many companies employ celebrities for their media campaigns as protagonists and promoters of brand values. With their appearance and engagement, celebrities transfer part of their image and credibility to the brand, which widens and enriches the field of associations which brands trigger in consumers' conscience. Non-profit organizations could get similar benefits out of these campaigns. In a society where there is a certain level of fascination with celebrities, i.e. celebrity culture, their influence can be used not only to attract attention to the goods, but also to ideas. The goal of the paper is to show how spokespersons can influence behavior and attitudes of the public by participating in media campaigns, and also the important aspects of choosing a spokesperson. The paper is supposed to be a starting point for practitioners,so they can design creative ideas based on this technique on the non-profit organizations market, especially in Serbia.

  17. Non-targeted effects of radiation exposure: recent advances and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadhim, M.A.; Hill, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The target theory of radiation-induced effects has been challenged by numerous studies, which indicate that in addition to biological effects resulting from direct DNA damage within the cell, a variety of non-DNA targeted effects (NTE) may make important contributions to the overall outcome. Ionising radiation induces complex, global cellular responses, such as genomic instability (GI) in both irradiated and never-irradiated 'bystander' cells that receive molecular signals produced by irradiated cells. GI is a well-known feature of many cancers, increasing the probability of cells to acquire the 'hallmarks of cancer' during the development of tumours. Although epidemiological data include contributions of both direct and NTE, they lack (i) statistical power at low dose where differences in dose response for NTE and direct effects are likely to be more important and (ii) heterogeneity of non-targeted responses due to genetic variability between individuals. In this article, NTE focussing on GI and bystander effects were critically examined, the specific principles of NTE were discussed and the potential influence on human health risk assessment from low-dose radiation was considered. (authors)

  18. Meta-Analysis of PECS with Individuals with ASD: Investigation of Targeted versus Non-Targeted Outcomes, Participant Characteristics, and Implementation Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Jennifer B.; Davis, John L.; Lund, Emily M.; Goodwyn, Fara D.; Simpson, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a widely used picture/icon aided augmentative communication system designed for learners with autism and other developmental disorders. This meta-analysis analyzes the extant empirical literature for PECS relative to targeted (functional communication) and non-targeted concomitant outcomes…

  19. Core hydrophobicity tuning of a self-assembled particle results in efficient lipid reduction and favorable organ distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Bhabatosh; Wen, Ru; Marrache, Sean; Kumar, Anil; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Dhar, Shanta

    2017-12-21

    Atherosclerosis, the deadliest disease in the United States, arises due to the build up of plaques in the arteries as a result of excessive cholesterol deposition and an impaired cholesterol removal process. High density lipoproteins (HDL), popularly known as "good cholesterol", are naturally occurring nano-sized particles that, along with apolipoproteins, are deployed to maintain cholesterol homeostasis in the body. Both cholesterol efflux, from the fat-laden macrophages in the arteries, and intracellular lipid transport, to deliver cholesterol to the mitochondria of liver cells for metabolism, hold key responsibilities to maintain healthy lipid levels inside the body. We designed a library of nine mitochondria targeted polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles (NPs), comprised of completely synthetic yet biodegradable components, that are capable of performing HDL-like functions. Using this library, we optimized a superior mitochondria targeted NP candidate, which can show favourable organ distribution, therapeutic potential, and non-toxic properties. Two targeted NP formulations with optimum NP size, zeta potential, and cholesterol binding and release properties were identified. Lipid reduction and anti-oxidative properties of these two NPs demonstrated cholesterol removal ability. In vivo therapeutic evaluation of the targeted-NP formulations in apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE - / - ) mice indicated lipid reduction and anti-inflammatory properties compared to non-targeted NPs. This synthetic targeted NP with potential abilities to participate in both extra- and intracellular cholesterol transport might potentiate therapeutic interventions for heart diseases.

  20. Non-statistical fluctuations in fragmentation of target nuclei in high energy nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Alokananda; Roy, Jaya

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of target fragmented ''black'' particles in nuclear emulsion from high energy relativistic interactions initiated by 16 O at 2.1 GeV/nucleon and 12 C and 24 Mg at 4.5 GeV/nucleon reveal the existence of non-statistical fluctuations in the azimuthal plane of interaction. The asymmetry or the non-statistical fluctuations, while found to be independent of projectile mass or incident energy, are dependent on the excitation energy of the target nucleus. (Author)

  1. Differentiation of organic and non-organic winter wheat cultivars from a controlled field trial by crystallization patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Johannes; Busscher, Nicolaas; Mergardt, Gaby; Mäder, Paul; Torp, Torfinn; Ploeger, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for authentication tools in order to verify the existing certification system. Recently, markers for analytical authentication of organic products were evaluated. Herein, crystallization with additives was described as an interesting fingerprint approach which needs further evidence, based on a standardized method and well-documented sample origin. The fingerprint of wheat cultivars from a controlled field trial is generated from structure analysis variables of crystal patterns. Method performance was tested on factors such as crystallization chamber, day of experiment and region of interest of the patterns. Two different organic treatments and two different treatments of the non-organic regime can be grouped together in each of three consecutive seasons. When the k-nearest-neighbor classification method was applied, approximately 84% of Runal samples and 95% of Titlis samples were classified correctly into organic and non-organic origin using cross-validation. Crystallization with additive offers an interesting complementary fingerprint method for organic wheat samples. When the method is applied to winter wheat from the DOK trial, organic and non-organic treated samples can be differentiated significantly based on pattern recognition. Therefore crystallization with additives seems to be a promising tool in organic wheat authentication. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. 13 CFR 124.509 - What are non-8(a) business activity targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... non-8(a) business activity targets. These include requiring the Participant to obtain management..., business development, financing, marketing, accounting, or proposal preparation. (5) SBA may initiate... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are non-8(a) business...

  3. Non-targeted Colonization by the Endomycorrhizal Fungus, Serendipita vermifera, in Three Weeds Typically Co-occurring with Switchgrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasun Ray

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Serendipita vermifera (=Sebacina vermifera; isolate MAFF305830 is a mycorrhizal fungus originally isolated from the roots of an Australian orchid that we have previously shown to be beneficial in enhancing biomass yield and drought tolerance in switchgrass, an important bioenergy crop for cellulosic ethanol production in the United States. However, almost nothing is known about how this root-associated fungus proliferates and grows through the soil matrix. Such information is critical to evaluate the possibility of non-target effects, such as unintended spread to weedy plants growing near a colonized switchgrass plant in a field environment. A microcosm experiment was conducted to study movement of vegetative mycelia of S. vermifera between intentionally inoculated switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L. and nearby weeds. We constructed size-exclusion microcosms to test three different common weeds, large crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis L., Texas panicum (Panicum texanum L., and Broadleaf signalgrass (Brachiaria platyphylla L., all species that typically co-occur in Southern Oklahoma and potentially compete with switchgrass. We report that such colonization of non-target plants by S. vermifera can indeed occur, seemingly via co-mingled root systems. As a consequence of colonization, significant enhancement of growth was noted in signalgrass, while a mild increase (albeit not significant was evident in crabgrass. Migration of the fungus seems unlikely in root-free bulk soil, as we failed to see transmission when the roots were kept separate. This research is the first documentation of non-targeted colonization of this unique root symbiotic fungus and highlights the need for such assessments prior to deployment of biological organisms in the field.

  4. ZFNGenome: A comprehensive resource for locating zinc finger nuclease target sites in model organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voytas Daniel F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs have tremendous potential as tools to facilitate genomic modifications, such as precise gene knockouts or gene replacements by homologous recombination. ZFNs can be used to advance both basic research and clinical applications, including gene therapy. Recently, the ability to engineer ZFNs that target any desired genomic DNA sequence with high fidelity has improved significantly with the introduction of rapid, robust, and publicly available techniques for ZFN design such as the Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN method. The motivation for this study is to make resources for genome modifications using OPEN-generated ZFNs more accessible to researchers by creating a user-friendly interface that identifies and provides quality scores for all potential ZFN target sites in the complete genomes of several model organisms. Description ZFNGenome is a GBrowse-based tool for identifying and visualizing potential target sites for OPEN-generated ZFNs. ZFNGenome currently includes a total of more than 11.6 million potential ZFN target sites, mapped within the fully sequenced genomes of seven model organisms; S. cerevisiae, C. reinhardtii, A. thaliana, D. melanogaster, D. rerio, C. elegans, and H. sapiens and can be visualized within the flexible GBrowse environment. Additional model organisms will be included in future updates. ZFNGenome provides information about each potential ZFN target site, including its chromosomal location and position relative to transcription initiation site(s. Users can query ZFNGenome using several different criteria (e.g., gene ID, transcript ID, target site sequence. Tracks in ZFNGenome also provide "uniqueness" and ZiFOpT (Zinc Finger OPEN Targeter "confidence" scores that estimate the likelihood that a chosen ZFN target site will function in vivo. ZFNGenome is dynamically linked to ZiFDB, allowing users access to all available information about zinc finger reagents, such as the

  5. A statistical simulation model for field testing of non-target organisms in environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedhart, Paul W; van der Voet, Hilko; Baldacchino, Ferdinando; Arpaia, Salvatore

    2014-04-01

    Genetic modification of plants may result in unintended effects causing potentially adverse effects on the environment. A comparative safety assessment is therefore required by authorities, such as the European Food Safety Authority, in which the genetically modified plant is compared with its conventional counterpart. Part of the environmental risk assessment is a comparative field experiment in which the effect on non-target organisms is compared. Statistical analysis of such trials come in two flavors: difference testing and equivalence testing. It is important to know the statistical properties of these, for example, the power to detect environmental change of a given magnitude, before the start of an experiment. Such prospective power analysis can best be studied by means of a statistical simulation model. This paper describes a general framework for simulating data typically encountered in environmental risk assessment of genetically modified plants. The simulation model, available as Supplementary Material, can be used to generate count data having different statistical distributions possibly with excess-zeros. In addition the model employs completely randomized or randomized block experiments, can be used to simulate single or multiple trials across environments, enables genotype by environment interaction by adding random variety effects, and finally includes repeated measures in time following a constant, linear or quadratic pattern in time possibly with some form of autocorrelation. The model also allows to add a set of reference varieties to the GM plants and its comparator to assess the natural variation which can then be used to set limits of concern for equivalence testing. The different count distributions are described in some detail and some examples of how to use the simulation model to study various aspects, including a prospective power analysis, are provided.

  6. Grants Management Guidance for Non-Profit Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guidance is intended to provide non-profit grant recipients with information to ensure that their organizations remain in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Office of Management (OMB) cost principles, and the terms and conditions.

  7. Ultrastructural observations of target-organs of the crayfish Orconectes limosus exposed to metallic pollutants: application to uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasset, G.; Simon, O.; Floriani, M.

    2004-01-01

    Using electron microscopy associated with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDAXTEM), ultrastructure and elemental analysis in subcellular micro-localization can bring understanding to both metabolic cycle of a metallic pollutant and its potential effects at the subcellular scale. The approach consists in comparing both structures and micro-localization in various tissues/organs ultrathin sections (70-140 nm thickness) obtained from control organisms (i.e. not exposed to a given metal) and exposed organisms. However, the observations of ultrastructural effects of metal exposure involved robust comparison to reference subcellular and cellular organization. Consequently, preliminary developments presented in this poster have been performed from the non-contaminated freshwater crayfish Orconectes limosus (adult at inter-moult state). Studies of ultrastructural images and elemental composition of subcellular mineral deposits were carried out on target organs of uranium accumulation such as the digestive gland, the gills, the intestine and the antennal gland, organs participating in the detoxification, primary accumulation and depuration mechanisms. Observations indicated cell-specific architecture (identification of main organelles, frequency, length of cells), the range of natural variation of the cell organisation between individuals and identification of cellular types. Information will allow then to focus on these identified specific organization after metallic exposure. These ultrastructural observations performed on reference organisms constitute necessarily a first set of data for the cellular metallic effects analysis. (author)

  8. Shared effects of organic microcontaminants and environmental stressors on biofilms and invertebrates in impaired rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater, S; Barceló, D; De Castro-Català, N; Ginebreda, A; Kuzmanovic, M; Petrovic, M; Picó, Y; Ponsatí, L; Tornés, E; Muñoz, I

    2016-03-01

    Land use type, physical and chemical stressors, and organic microcontaminants were investigated for their effects on the biological communities (biofilms and invertebrates) in several Mediterranean rivers. The diversity of invertebrates, and the scores of the first principal component of a PCA performed with the diatom communities were the best descriptors of the distribution patterns of the biological communities against the river stressors. These two metrics decreased according to the progressive site impairment (associated to higher area of agricultural and urban-industrial, high water conductivity, higher dissolved organic carbon and dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations, and higher concentration of organic microcontaminants, particularly pharmaceutical and industrial compounds). The variance partition analyses (RDAs) attributed the major share (10%) of the biological communities' response to the environmental stressors (nutrients, altered discharge, dissolved organic matter), followed by the land use occupation (6%) and of the organic microcontaminants (2%). However, the variance shared by the three groups of descriptors was very high (41%), indicating that their simultaneous occurrence determined most of the variation in the biological communities. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Fearful contextual expression impairs the encoding and recognition of target faces: an ERP study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyan eLin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous event-related potential (ERP studies have shown that the N170 to faces is modulated by the emotion of the face and its context. However, it is unclear how the encoding of emotional target faces as reflected in the N170 is modulated by the preceding contextual facial expression when temporal onset and identity of target faces are unpredictable. In addition, no study as yet has investigated whether contextual facial expression modulates later recognition of target faces. To address these issues, participants in the present study were asked to identify target faces (fearful or neutral that were presented after a sequence of fearful or neutral contextual faces. The number of sequential contextual faces was random and contextual and target faces were of different identities so that temporal onset and identity of target faces were unpredictable. Electroencephalography (EEG data was recorded during the encoding phase. Subsequently, participants had to perform an unexpected old/new recognition task in which target face identities were presented in either the encoded or the non-encoded expression. ERP data showed a reduced N170 to target faces in fearful as compared to neutral context regardless of target facial expression. In the later recognition phase, recognition rates were reduced for target faces in the encoded expression when they had been encountered in fearful as compared to neutral context. The present findings suggest that fearful compared to neutral contextual faces reduce the allocation of attentional resources towards target faces, which results in limited encoding and recognition of target faces.

  10. Non-statistical fluctuations in fragmentation of target nuclei in high energy nuclear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Alokananda; Roy, Jaya [Jadavpur Univ., Calcutta (India)

    1994-07-01

    Analysis of target fragmented ''black'' particles in nuclear emulsion from high energy relativistic interactions initiated by [sup 16]O at 2.1 GeV/nucleon and [sup 12]C and [sup 24]Mg at 4.5 GeV/nucleon reveal the existence of non-statistical fluctuations in the azimuthal plane of interaction. The asymmetry or the non-statistical fluctuations, while found to be independent of projectile mass or incident energy, are dependent on the excitation energy of the target nucleus. (Author).

  11. Insulin resistance in non-obese subjects is associated with activation of the JNK pathway and impaired insulin signaling in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh B Masharani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of insulin resistance in the absence of obesity is unknown. In obesity, multiple stress kinases have been identified that impair the insulin signaling pathway via serine phosphorylation of key second messenger proteins. These stress kinases are activated through various mechanisms related to lipid oversupply locally in insulin target tissues and in various adipose depots.To explore whether specific stress kinases that have been implicated in the insulin resistance of obesity are potentially contributing to insulin resistance in non-obese individuals, twenty healthy, non-obese, normoglycemic subjects identified as insulin sensitive or resistant were studied. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained during euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp were evaluated for insulin signaling and for activation of stress kinase pathways. Total and regional adipose stores and intramyocellular lipids (IMCL were assessed by DXA, MRI and (1H-MRS. In muscle of resistant subjects, phosphorylation of JNK was increased (1.36±0.23 vs. 0.78±0.10 OD units, P<0.05, while there was no evidence for activation of p38 MAPK or IKKβ. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation was increased (1.30±0.09 vs. 0.22±0.03 OD units, P<0.005 while insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation decreased (10.97±0.95 vs. 0.89±0.50 OD units, P<0.005. IMCL levels were twice as high in insulin resistant subjects (3.26±0.48 vs. 1.58±0.35% H(2O peak, P<0.05, who also displayed increased total fat and abdominal fat when compared to insulin sensitive controls.This is the first report demonstrating that insulin resistance in non-obese, normoglycemic subjects is associated with activation of the JNK pathway related to increased IMCL and higher total body and abdominal adipose stores. While JNK activation is consistent with a primary impact of muscle lipid accumulation on metabolic stress, further work is necessary to determine the relative contributions of the various mediators of impaired

  12. Role of Auditory Non-Verbal Working Memory in Sentence Repetition for Bilingual Children with Primary Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Kerry Danahy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sentence repetition performance is attracting increasing interest as a valuable clinical marker for primary (or specific) language impairment (LI) in both monolingual and bilingual populations. Multiple aspects of memory appear to contribute to sentence repetition performance, but non-verbal memory has not yet been considered. Aims: To…

  13. [Concomitant impact of organic pathology on the development of cognitive impairment in patients with attack-like paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libin, L Ia; Tagil'tseva, A V; Lifanova, D E; Ganzenko, M A; Gritsevskaia, T M; Ivanov, M B

    2014-01-01

    The study included 47 patients (23 men, 24 women) with ICD-10 diagnosis of attack-like paranoid schizophrenia. Patients were divided into two groups: with- (25 patients) or without (22 patients) a concomitant organic disease. Memory, attention and thinking were assessed with psychometric tests. Inter- and intra-group differences were identified that indicated a considerable impact of a concomitant CNS organic pathology on the development of cognitive impairment in the schizophrenic process and active antipsychotic therapy. The data obtained can be used in the development of a differentiated approach to the treatment of patients with concomitant organic pathology.

  14. Screening for mild cognitive impairment in patients with cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaneva-Sirakova T

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Teodora Yaneva-Sirakova,1 Latchezar Traykov,2 Julia Petrova,2 Ivan Gruev,3 Dobrin Vassilev1 1Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiology Clinic, 2Department of Neurology, Neurology Clinic, Medical University Sofia, 3Cardiology Clinic, National Transport Hospital “Tsar Boris III”, Sofia, Bulgaria Aim: Cardiovascular risk factors are also risk factors for cognitive impairment. They have cumulative effect in target organ damage. The precise correlation between cardiovascular risk factors and cognitive impairment, as well as assessing the extent to which they may affect cognitive functioning, is difficult to ascertain in everyday clinical practice. Quick, specific, and sensitive neuropsychological tests may be useful in screening for, and the prophylaxis of, target organ damage in hypertensive patients.Methods: We gathered full anamnesis, performed physical examination, laboratory screening and echocardiography. These variables were observed at office and home for all patients, For half of the patients, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and neuropsychological testing using Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, Geriatric Depression Scale, and the 4-instrumental activities of daily living scale were undertaken.Results: For a period of 2 years, 931 patients were included after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The mean age was 65.90±10.00 years. Two hundred and sixty three patients (85 [32.32%] males and 178 [67.68%] females were reevaluated after a mean follow-up period of 12 months (6–20 months. The mean results of MoCA and MMSE were significantly lower (p<0.05 in the group of patients with poorly controlled blood pressure and cardiovascular risk factors. There was mild to intermediate negative correlation between Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE and the neuropsychological tests’ results.Conclusion: Cardiovascular risk factors play an important role for the development

  15. Non-targeted plasma metabolome of early and late lactation gilts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Female pigs nursing their first litter (first-parity gilts) have increased energy requirements not only to support their piglets, but they themselves are still maturing. Non-targeted plasma metabolomics were used to investigate the differences between (1) post-farrowing and weaning (early or late l...

  16. Gender-related differences in adolescent hypertension and in target organ effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Mária; Katona, Eva; Settakis, Georgios; Paragh, György; Molnár, Csilla; Fülesdi, Béla; Páll, Dénes

    2010-04-01

    To assess whether a gender difference exists in adolescent hypertension and its target organ damage and to compare potential confounding factors and target organ damage in hypertensive and normotensive adolescent girls. From the Debrecen Hypertension Study, the anthropometric, blood pressure, and laboratory data as well as intima-media thickness (IMT) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) of 58 hypertensive boys, 56 hypertensive girls, and 30 normotensive girls were analyzed. Both systolic and mean blood pressure values were higher in adolescent hypertensive boys than in girls. This difference was also present when comparing 24-hour average blood pressure values. Plasma concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin-1 were not different in the two gender groups. IMT of the carotid arteries were similar in hypertensive boys and girls, but a significantly higher LVMI was detected in boys. A significant difference was detected in anthropometric data (height, weight, and body mass index [BMI]), plasma concentration of NO (lower levels in hypertensives), and IMT in hypertensive and normotensive girls (higher IMT in hypertensive girls). There is a difference between the severity of hypertension between hypertensive adolescent girls and boys. Hypertensive girls differ from normotensive girls not only in blood pressure values but also in risk factors and subclinical target organ effects. Further studies are needed to explain the gender differences in adolescent hypertension. The potential role of sex hormones in hypertensive teenagers also needs to be clarified in future works.

  17. Non-Profit Organizations in a Bureaucratic Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Grout, Paul; Schnedler, Wendelin

    2008-01-01

    How does the environment of an organization influence whether workers voluntarily provide effort? We study the power relationship between a non-profit unit (e.g. university department, NGO, health trust), where workers care about the result of their work, and a bu- reaucrat, who supplies some input to the non-profit unit, but has opportunity costs in doing so (e.g. Dean of faculty, corrupt representative, government agency). We find that marginal changes in the balance of power eventually hav...

  18. Impaired heat shock response in cells expressing full-length polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidhartha M Chafekar

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms by which polyglutamine (polyQ-expanded huntingtin (Htt causes neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease (HD remain unclear. The malfunction of cellular proteostasis has been suggested as central in HD pathogenesis and also as a target of therapeutic interventions for the treatment of HD. We present results that offer a previously unexplored perspective regarding impaired proteostasis in HD. We find that, under non-stress conditions, the proteostatic capacity of cells expressing full length polyQ-expanded Htt is adequate. Yet, under stress conditions, the presence of polyQ-expanded Htt impairs the heat shock response, a key component of cellular proteostasis. This impaired heat shock response results in a reduced capacity to withstand the damage caused by cellular stress. We demonstrate that in cells expressing polyQ-expanded Htt the levels of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1 are reduced, and, as a consequence, these cells have an impaired a heat shock response. Also, we found reduced HSF1 and HSP70 levels in the striata of HD knock-in mice when compared to wild-type mice. Our results suggests that full length, non-aggregated polyQ-expanded Htt blocks the effective induction of the heat shock response under stress conditions and may thus trigger the accumulation of cellular damage during the course of HD pathogenesis.

  19. Progesterone impairs antigen-non-specific immune protection by CD8 T memory cells via interferon-γ gene hypermethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yushi; Li, Hui; Ding, Jie; Xia, Yixin; Wang, Lei

    2017-11-01

    Pregnant women and animals have increased susceptibility to a variety of intracellular pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes (LM), which has been associated with significantly increased level of sex hormones such as progesterone. CD8 T memory(Tm) cell-mediated antigen-non-specific IFN-γ responses are critically required in the host defense against LM. However, whether and how increased progesterone during pregnancy modulates CD8 Tm cell-mediated antigen-non-specific IFN-γ production and immune protection against LM remain poorly understood. Here we show in pregnant women that increased serum progesterone levels are associated with DNA hypermethylation of IFN-γ gene promoter region and decreased IFN-γ production in CD8 Tm cells upon antigen-non-specific stimulation ex vivo. Moreover, IFN-γ gene hypermethylation and significantly reduced IFN-γ production post LM infection in antigen-non-specific CD8 Tm cells are also observed in pregnant mice or progesterone treated non-pregnant female mice, which is a reversible phenotype following demethylation treatment. Importantly, antigen-non-specific CD8 Tm cells from progesterone treated mice have impaired anti-LM protection when adoptive transferred in either pregnant wild type mice or IFN-γ-deficient mice, and demethylation treatment rescues the adoptive protection of such CD8 Tm cells. These data demonstrate that increased progesterone impairs immune protective functions of antigen-non-specific CD8 Tm cells via inducing IFN-γ gene hypermethylation. Our findings thus provide insights into a new mechanism through which increased female sex hormone regulate CD8 Tm cell functions during pregnancy.

  20. Progesterone impairs antigen-non-specific immune protection by CD8 T memory cells via interferon-γ gene hypermethylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushi Yao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pregnant women and animals have increased susceptibility to a variety of intracellular pathogens including Listeria monocytogenes (LM, which has been associated with significantly increased level of sex hormones such as progesterone. CD8 T memory(Tm cell-mediated antigen-non-specific IFN-γ responses are critically required in the host defense against LM. However, whether and how increased progesterone during pregnancy modulates CD8 Tm cell-mediated antigen-non-specific IFN-γ production and immune protection against LM remain poorly understood. Here we show in pregnant women that increased serum progesterone levels are associated with DNA hypermethylation of IFN-γ gene promoter region and decreased IFN-γ production in CD8 Tm cells upon antigen-non-specific stimulation ex vivo. Moreover, IFN-γ gene hypermethylation and significantly reduced IFN-γ production post LM infection in antigen-non-specific CD8 Tm cells are also observed in pregnant mice or progesterone treated non-pregnant female mice, which is a reversible phenotype following demethylation treatment. Importantly, antigen-non-specific CD8 Tm cells from progesterone treated mice have impaired anti-LM protection when adoptive transferred in either pregnant wild type mice or IFN-γ-deficient mice, and demethylation treatment rescues the adoptive protection of such CD8 Tm cells. These data demonstrate that increased progesterone impairs immune protective functions of antigen-non-specific CD8 Tm cells via inducing IFN-γ gene hypermethylation. Our findings thus provide insights into a new mechanism through which increased female sex hormone regulate CD8 Tm cell functions during pregnancy.

  1. The future impacts of non-targeted effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Scott; Kadhim, Munira

    2018-04-11

    Ionizing radiation was traditionally thought to exert its detrimental effects through interaction with sensitive cellular targets, nuclear DNA being of most importance. This theory has since merged with a more recently described radiation response called non-targeted effects (NTE). This review will briefly look at the various types of NTE and the potential implications they may have for radiobiology research and its applications. The most well-known NTE are genomic instability (GI) and bystander effects (BE). Other NTE include abscopal effects, which are similar to bystander effects but are generally based in a clinical environment with immune involvement as the defining feature. Currently, our understanding of NTE is limited to certain signaling pathways/molecules, and as yet there is no theory that describes or can accurately predict the occurrence or outcome of these NTE. There are numerous groups investigating these processes in vitro and in vivo, and thus steady progress is being made. Developing a deeper understanding of NTE has potential impacts for therapy and diagnosis, safer occupational exposures, space flight and our general understanding of radiation biology.

  2. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and impaired proinsulin conversion as newly identified predictors of the long-term non-response to a lifestyle intervention for diabetes prevention: results from the TULIP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Vera; Wagner, Robert; Sailer, Corinna; Fritsche, Louise; Kantartzis, Konstantinos; Peter, Andreas; Heni, Martin; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Stefan, Norbert; Fritsche, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Lifestyle intervention is effective to prevent type 2 diabetes. However, a considerable long-term non-response occurs to a standard lifestyle intervention. We investigated which risk phenotypes at baseline and their changes during the lifestyle intervention predict long-term glycaemic non-response to the intervention. Of 300 participants at high risk for type 2 diabetes who participated in a 24 month lifestyle intervention with diet modification and increased physical activity, 190 participants could be re-examined after 8.7 ± 1.6 years. All individuals underwent a five-point 75 g OGTT and measurements of body fat compartments and liver fat content with MRI and spectroscopy at baseline, 9 and 24 months during the lifestyle intervention, and at long-term follow-up. Fasting proinsulin to insulin conversion (PI/I ratio) and insulin sensitivity and secretion were calculated from the OGTT. Non-response to lifestyle intervention was defined as no decrease in glycaemia, i.e. no decrease in AUC for glucose at 0-120 min during OGTT (AUCglucose 0-120 min ). Before the lifestyle intervention, 56% of participants had normal glucose regulation and 44% individuals had impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance. At long-term follow-up, 11% had developed diabetes. Multivariable regression analysis with adjustment for age, sex, BMI and change in BMI during the lifestyle intervention revealed that baseline insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, as well as change in insulin sensitivity during the lifestyle intervention, predicted long-term glycaemic control after 9 years. In addition, increased hepatic lipid content as well as impaired fasting proinsulin conversion at baseline were newly detected phenotypes that independently predicted long-term glycaemic control. Increased hepatic lipid content and impaired proinsulin conversion are new predictors, independent of change in body weight, for non-response to lifestyle intervention in addition to the

  3. Assessment of renal impairment by non-contrast-enhanced conventional magnetic resonance imaging. Comparison with 99mTc-DTPA renography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Fumitaka; Amano, Yasuo; Takahama, Katsuya; Takagi, Ryo; Murakami, Ryusuke; Onozawa, Shiro; Kumita, Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect three levels of renal impairment by evaluating the differences and agreement with 99m Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) renography. A total of 28 patients with kidney disease were enrolled in the study. MRI findings, including visual corticomedullary differentiation (CMD) on T1- and T2-weighted imaging (T1WI, T2WI), cortical irregularity, the number of renal cysts, and the volume of the kidney, were evaluated for individual kidneys and pairs of kidneys. The differences and agreement between MRI findings and the three levels of renal impairment based on the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measured using 99m Tc-DTPA renography were analyzed. All MRI findings except the number of renal cysts in pairs of kidneys were consistent with the patient's classification. The agreement between the patient's classifications based on GFR and that based on the visual CMD on T1WI and T2WI was almost perfect or substantial in both individual kidneys and pairs of kidneys. Non-contrast-enhanced MRI was capable of distinguishing three levels of renal function, including serious renal impairment. (author)

  4. Radiation dose in critical organs due to non-coplanar irradiation of the pituitary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, R.W.M.; Rittmann, K.L.; Meinass, H.J.; Rennicke, P.

    1996-01-01

    In order to estimate the somatic and genetic risk associated with a non-coplanar linac-based radiation technique of the pituitary gland, systematic secondary-dose measurements in a phantom and sample measurements of the dose near critical organs of patients were performed. For measurements of the dose outside the primary radiation field an acrylic-PVC phantom was used which was irradiated with a single field (4x4 cm 2 ). Eight patients with pituitary tumors were treated isocentrically with a combination of sagittal and transverse rotational arcs. To measure the dose in critical organs, LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) in chip form were placed onto 1 eyelid, the skin over the thyroid, and the patient's clothes covering the region of breasts and ovaries of female patients and the testicles of male patients. Measurements were performed for all patients during 1 sagittal irradiation and for the majority of patients during 1 transverse irradiation. The phantom measurements demonstrated that the secondary dose measured on the patients surface can be considered as a good approximation for the dose in adjacent organs. The median dose in critical organs for sagittal irradiation was in the range of 25.8 mGy (eyes) to 1.9 mGy (testicles), and for transverse irradiation in the range of 23.3 mGy (eyes) to 1.3 mGy (testicles). The ratio of median organ doses for sagittal and transverse irradiation was 2.1 for the thyroid gland, 1.1 for the eyes, and 1.5 for the other organs. The dose in critical organs due to non-coplanar irradiation of the pituitary gland is only a small fraction of the dose delivered to the reference point of the planning target volume. The risk of a radiation-induced tumor and a genetic consequence associated with these small doses is generally less than 1% and 0.1%, respectively. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Effects of seed mixture sowing with transgenic Bt rice and its parental line on the population dynamics of target stemborers and leafrollers, and non-target planthoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Li, Li-Kun; Liu, Bin; Wang, Long; Parajulee, Megha N; Chen, Fa-Jun

    2018-01-24

    The widespread planting of insect-resistant crops has caused a dramatic shift in agricultural landscapes, thus raising concerns about the potential impacts on both target and non-target pests. In this study, we examined the potential effects of intra-specific seed mixture sowing with transgenic Bt rice (Bt) and its parental non-transgenic line (Nt) (100% Bt rice [Bt 100 ], 5% Nt+95% Bt [Nt 05 Bt 95 ], 10% Nt+90% Bt [Nt 10 Bt 90 ], 20% Nt+80% Bt [Nt 20 Bt 80 ], 40% Nt+60% Bt [Nt 40 Bt 60 ] and 100% Nt rice [Nt 100 ]) on target and non-target pests in a 2-year field trial in southern China. The occurrence of target pests, Sesamia inferens, Chilo suppressalis and Cnaphalocrocis medinalis, decreased with the increased ratio of Bt rice, and the mixture ratios with more than 90% Bt rice (Bt 100 and Nt 05 Bt 95 ) significantly increased the pest suppression efficiency, with the lowest occurrences of non-target planthoppers, Nilaparvata lugens and Sogatella furcifera in Nt 100 and Nt 05 Bt 95 . Furthermore, there were no significant differences in 1000-grain dry weight and grain dry weight per 100 plants between Bt 100 and Nt 05 Bt 95 . Seed mixture sowing of Bt rice with ≤10% (especially 5%) of its parent line was sufficient to overcome potential compliance issues that exist with the use of block or structured refuge to provide most effective control of both target and non-target pests without compromising the grain yield. It is also expected that the strategy of seed mixture sowing with transgenic Bt rice and the non-transgenic parental line would provide rice yield stability while decreasing the insecticide use frequency in rice production. © 2018 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. A yeast model for target-primed (non-LTR retrotransposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busby Jason N

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Target-primed (non-LTR retrotransposons, such as the human L1 element, are mobile genetic elements found in many eukaryotic genomes. They are often present in large numbers and their retrotransposition can cause mutations and genomic rearrangements. Despite their importance, many aspects of their replication are not well understood. Results We have developed a yeast model system for studying target-primed retrotransposons. This system uses the Zorro3 element from Candida albicans. A cloned copy of Zorro3, tagged with a retrotransposition indicator gene, retrotransposes at a high frequency when introduced into an appropriate C. albicans host strain. Retrotransposed copies of the tagged element exhibit similar features to the native copies, indicating that the natural retrotransposition pathway is being used. Retrotransposition is dependent on the products of the tagged element's own genes and is highly temperature-regulated. The new assay permits the analysis of the effects of specific mutations introduced into the cloned element. Conclusion This Zorro3 retrotransposition assay system complements previously available target-primed retrotransposition assays. Due to the relative simplicity of the growth, manipulation and analysis of yeast cells, the system should advance our understanding of target-primed retrotransposition.

  7. The Developmental Roles of Non-Governmental Organizations: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Roles of Non-Governmental Organizations: A Sociological Perspective. ... have a clearly defined constituency and are accountable to that constituency, have ... are self serving but geared towards humanitarian objectives and programmes.

  8. Chemically different non-thermal plasmas target distinct cell death pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, O.; Zablotskyy, V.; Chrupina, O.; Lunova, M.; Jirsa, M.; Dejneka, A.; Kubinová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, apr (2017), s. 600 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : chemically different * non-thermal plasmas * target distinct cell death pathways Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  9. Predicted allowable doses to normal organs for biologically targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donoghue, J.A.; Wheldon, T.E.; Western Regional Hospital Board, Glasgow

    1988-01-01

    The authors have used Dale's extension to the ''linear quadratic'' (LQ) model (Dale, 1985) to evaluate ''equivalent doses'' in cases involving exponentially decaying dose rates. This analysis indicates that the dose-rate effect will be a significant determinant of allowable doses to organs such as liver, kidney and lung. These organ tolerance doses constitute independent constraints on the therapeutic intensity of biologically targeted radiotherapy in exactly the same way as for conventional external beam radiotherapy. In the context of marrow rescue they will in all likelihood constitute the dose-limiting side-effects and thus be especially important. (author)

  10. Towards the concept of disease-modifier in post-stroke or vascular cognitive impairment: a consensus report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordet, Régis; Ihl, Ralf; Korczyn, Amos D; Lanza, Giuseppe; Jansa, Jelka; Hoerr, Robert; Guekht, Alla

    2017-05-24

    Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is a complex spectrum encompassing post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) and small vessel disease-related cognitive impairment. Despite the growing health, social, and economic burden of VCI, to date, no specific treatment is available, prompting the introduction of the concept of a disease modifier. Within this clinical spectrum, VCI and PSCI remain advancing conditions as neurodegenerative diseases with progression of both vascular and degenerative lesions accounting for cognitive decline. Disease-modifying strategies should integrate both pharmacological and non-pharmacological multimodal approaches, with pleiotropic effects targeting (1) endothelial and brain-blood barrier dysfunction; (2) neuronal death and axonal loss; (3) cerebral plasticity and compensatory mechanisms; and (4) degenerative-related protein misfolding. Moreover, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment in PSCI or VCI requires valid study designs clearly stating the definition of basic methodological issues, such as the instruments that should be used to measure eventual changes, the biomarker-based stratification of participants to be investigated, and statistical tests, as well as the inclusion and exclusion criteria that should be applied. A consensus emerged to propose the development of a disease-modifying strategy in VCI and PSCI based on pleiotropic pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches.

  11. Visual and non-visual motion information processing during pursuit eye tracking in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillenberg, Peter; Sprenger, Andreas; Talamo, Silke; Herold, Kirsten; Helmchen, Christoph; Verleger, Rolf; Lencer, Rebekka

    2017-04-01

    Despite many reports on visual processing deficits in psychotic disorders, studies are needed on the integration of visual and non-visual components of eye movement control to improve the understanding of sensorimotor information processing in these disorders. Non-visual inputs to eye movement control include prediction of future target velocity from extrapolation of past visual target movement and anticipation of future target movements. It is unclear whether non-visual input is impaired in patients with schizophrenia. We recorded smooth pursuit eye movements in 21 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder, 22 patients with bipolar disorder, and 24 controls. In a foveo-fugal ramp task, the target was either continuously visible or was blanked during movement. We determined peak gain (measuring overall performance), initial eye acceleration (measuring visually driven pursuit), deceleration after target extinction (measuring prediction), eye velocity drifts before onset of target visibility (measuring anticipation), and residual gain during blanking intervals (measuring anticipation and prediction). In both patient groups, initial eye acceleration was decreased and the ability to adjust eye acceleration to increasing target acceleration was impaired. In contrast, neither deceleration nor eye drift velocity was reduced in patients, implying unimpaired non-visual contributions to pursuit drive. Disturbances of eye movement control in psychotic disorders appear to be a consequence of deficits in sensorimotor transformation rather than a pure failure in adding cognitive contributions to pursuit drive in higher-order cortical circuits. More generally, this deficit might reflect a fundamental imbalance between processing external input and acting according to internal preferences.

  12. Effects of the herbicide glyphosate on non-target plant native species from Chaco forest (Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florencia, Ferreira María; Carolina, Torres; Enzo, Bracamonte; Leonardo, Galetto

    2017-10-01

    Agriculture based on transgenic crops has expanded in Argentina into areas formerly occupied by Chaco forest. Even though glyphosate is the herbicide most widely used in the world, increasing evidence indicates severe ecotoxicological effects on non-target organisms as native plants. The aim of this work is to determine glyphosate effects on 23 native species present in the remaining Chaco forests immersed in agricultural matrices. This is a laboratory/greenhouse approach studying acute effects on seedlings after 21 days. A gradient of glyphosate rates (525, 1050, 2100, 4200, and 8400g ai/Ha; recommended field application rate (RFAR) = 2100g ai/Ha) was applied on four-week seedlings cultivated in a greenhouse and response variables (phytotoxicity, growth reduction, and sensitivity to the herbicide) were measured. This gradient of herbicide rates covers realistic rates of glyphosate applications in the crop field and also those that can reach vegetation of forest relicts by off-target drift and overspray. Testing was performed following guidelines for vegetative vigour (post-germination spray). All species showed lethal or sublethal effects after the application of the 25% of RFAR (50% of species showed severe phytotoxicity or death and 70% of species showed growth reduction). The results showed a gradient of sensitivity to glyphosate by which some of the studied species are very sensitive to glyphosate and seedlings died with 25% of RFAR while other species can be classified as herbicide-tolerant. Thus, the vegetation present in the forest relicts could be strongly affected by glyphosate application on crops. Lethal and sublethal effects of glyphosate on non-target plants could promote both the loss of biodiversity in native forest relicts immersed in the agroecosystems and the selection of new crop weeds considering that some biotypes are continuously exposed to low doses of glyphosate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Passive Target Tracking in Non-cooperative Radar System Based on Particle Filtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shuo; TAO Ran

    2006-01-01

    We propose a target tracking method based on particle filtering(PF) to solve the nonlinear non-Gaussian target-tracking problem in the bistatic radar systems using external radiation sources. Traditional nonlinear state estimation method is extended Kalman filtering (EKF), which is to do the first level Taylor series extension. It will cause an inaccuracy or even a scatter estimation result on condition that there is either a highly nonlinear target or a large noise square-error. Besides, Kalman filtering is the optimal resolution under a Gaussian noise assumption, and is not suitable to the non-Gaussian condition. PF is a sort of statistic filtering based on Monte Carlo simulation that is using some random samples (particles) to simulate the posterior probability density of system random variables. This method can be used in any nonlinear random system. It can be concluded through simulation that PF can achieve higher accuracy than the traditional EKF.

  14. Morphological self-organizing feature map neural network with applications to automatic target recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shijun; Jing, Zhongliang; Li, Jianxun

    2005-01-01

    The rotation invariant feature of the target is obtained using the multi-direction feature extraction property of the steerable filter. Combining the morphological operation top-hat transform with the self-organizing feature map neural network, the adaptive topological region is selected. Using the erosion operation, the topological region shrinkage is achieved. The steerable filter based morphological self-organizing feature map neural network is applied to automatic target recognition of binary standard patterns and real-world infrared sequence images. Compared with Hamming network and morphological shared-weight networks respectively, the higher recognition correct rate, robust adaptability, quick training, and better generalization of the proposed method are achieved.

  15. Subcellular Targeting of Methylmercury Lyase Enhances Its Specific Activity for Organic Mercury Detoxification in Plants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizily, Scott P.; Kim, Tehryung; Kandasamy, Muthugapatti K.; Meagher, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    Methylmercury is an environmental pollutant that biomagnifies in the aquatic food chain with severe consequences for humans and other animals. In an effort to remove this toxin in situ, we have been engineering plants that express the bacterial mercury resistance enzymes organomercurial lyase MerB and mercuric ion reductase MerA. In vivo kinetics experiments suggest that the diffusion of hydrophobic organic mercury to MerB limits the rate of the coupled reaction with MerA (Bizily et al., 2000). To optimize reaction kinetics for organic mercury compounds, the merB gene was engineered to target MerB for accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum and for secretion to the cell wall. Plants expressing the targeted MerB proteins and cytoplasmic MerA are highly resistant to organic mercury and degrade organic mercury at 10 to 70 times higher specific activity than plants with the cytoplasmically distributed wild-type MerB enzyme. MerB protein in endoplasmic reticulum-targeted plants appears to accumulate in large vesicular structures that can be visualized in immunolabeled plant cells. These results suggest that the toxic effects of organic mercury are focused in microenvironments of the secretory pathway, that these hydrophobic compartments provide more favorable reaction conditions for MerB activity, and that moderate increases in targeted MerB expression will lead to significant gains in detoxification. In summary, to maximize phytoremediation efficiency of hydrophobic pollutants in plants, it may be beneficial to target enzymes to specific subcellular environments. PMID:12586871

  16. Inactivation of Pol θ and C-NHEJ eliminates off-target integration of exogenous DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelensky, Alex N; Schimmel, Joost; Kool, Hanneke; Kanaar, Roland; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2017-07-07

    Off-target or random integration of exogenous DNA hampers precise genomic engineering and presents a safety risk in clinical gene therapy strategies. Genetic definition of random integration has been lacking for decades. Here, we show that the A-family DNA polymerase θ (Pol θ) promotes random integration, while canonical non-homologous DNA end joining plays a secondary role; cells double deficient for polymerase θ and canonical non-homologous DNA end joining are devoid of any integration events, demonstrating that these two mechanisms define random integration. In contrast, homologous recombination is not reduced in these cells and gene targeting is improved to 100% efficiency. Such complete reversal of integration outcome, from predominately random integration to exclusively gene targeting, provides a rational way forward to improve the efficacy and safety of DNA delivery and gene correction approaches.Random off-target integration events can impair precise gene targeting and poses a safety risk for gene therapy. Here the authors show that repression of polymerase θ and classical non-homologous recombination eliminates random integration.

  17. Non-adjacent dependency learning in Cantonese-speaking\\ud children with and without a history of specific language\\ud impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Iao, L-S; Ng, LY; Wong, AMY; Lee, OT

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated non-adjacent dependency learning in Cantonese-speaking children with and without a history of Specific Language Impairment (SLI) in an artificial linguistic context.\\ud \\ud Method: Sixteen Cantonese-speaking children with SLI history and 16 Cantonese-speaking children with typical language development (TLD) were tested with a non-adjacent dependency learning task using artificial languages that mimic Cantonese.\\ud \\ud Results: Children with TLD performed above...

  18. Impaired theta-gamma coupling during working memory performance in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Mera S; Rajji, Tarek K; Zomorrodi, Reza; Radhu, Natasha; George, Tony P; Blumberger, Daniel M; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2017-11-01

    Working memory deficits represent a core feature of schizophrenia. These deficits have been associated with dysfunctional dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) cortical oscillations. Theta-gamma coupling describes the modulation of gamma oscillations by theta phasic activity that has been directly associated with the ordering of information during working memory performance. Evaluating theta-gamma coupling may provide greater insight into the neural mechanisms mediating working memory deficits in this disorder. Thirty-eight patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 38 healthy controls performed the verbal N-Back task administered at 4 levels, while EEG was recorded. Theta (4-7Hz)-gamma (30-50Hz) coupling was calculated for target and non-target correct trials for each working memory load. The relationship between theta-gamma coupling and accuracy was determined. Theta-gamma coupling was significantly and selectively impaired during correct responses to target letters among schizophrenia patients compared to healthy controls. A significant and positive relationship was found between theta-gamma coupling and 3-Back accuracy in controls, while this relationship was not observed in patients. These findings suggest that impaired theta-gamma coupling contribute to working memory dysfunction in schizophrenia. Future work is needed to evaluate the predictive utility of theta-gamma coupling as a neurophysiological marker for functional outcomes in this disorder. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Bt crop effects on functional guilds of non-target arthropods: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L LaReesa Wolfenbarger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uncertainty persists over the environmental effects of genetically-engineered crops that produce the insecticidal Cry proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt. We performed meta-analyses on a modified public database to synthesize current knowledge about the effects of Bt cotton, maize and potato on the abundance and interactions of arthropod non-target functional guilds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared the abundance of predators, parasitoids, omnivores, detritivores and herbivores under scenarios in which neither, only the non-Bt crops, or both Bt and non-Bt crops received insecticide treatments. Predators were less abundant in Bt cotton compared to unsprayed non-Bt controls. As expected, fewer specialist parasitoids of the target pest occurred in Bt maize fields compared to unsprayed non-Bt controls, but no significant reduction was detected for other parasitoids. Numbers of predators and herbivores were higher in Bt crops compared to sprayed non-Bt controls, and type of insecticide influenced the magnitude of the difference. Omnivores and detritivores were more abundant in insecticide-treated controls and for the latter guild this was associated with reductions of their predators in sprayed non-Bt maize. No differences in abundance were found when both Bt and non-Bt crops were sprayed. Predator-to-prey ratios were unchanged by either Bt crops or the use of insecticides; ratios were higher in Bt maize relative to the sprayed non-Bt control. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, we find no uniform effects of Bt cotton, maize and potato on the functional guilds of non-target arthropods. Use of and type of insecticides influenced the magnitude and direction of effects; insecticde effects were much larger than those of Bt crops. These meta-analyses underscore the importance of using controls not only to isolate the effects of a Bt crop per se but also to reflect the replacement of existing agricultural practices. Results will

  20. Ancient Origin of the U2 Small Nuclear RNA Gene-Targeting Non-LTR Retrotransposons Utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kenji K; Jurka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Most non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons encoding a restriction-like endonuclease show target-specific integration into repetitive sequences such as ribosomal RNA genes and microsatellites. However, only a few target-specific lineages of non-LTR retrotransposons are distributed widely and no lineage is found across the eukaryotic kingdoms. Here we report the most widely distributed lineage of target sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons, designated Utopia. Utopia is found in three supergroups of eukaryotes: Amoebozoa, SAR, and Opisthokonta. Utopia is inserted into a specific site of U2 small nuclear RNA genes with different strength of specificity for each family. Utopia families from oomycetes and wasps show strong target specificity while only a small number of Utopia copies from reptiles are flanked with U2 snRNA genes. Oomycete Utopia families contain an "archaeal" RNase H domain upstream of reverse transcriptase (RT), which likely originated from a plant RNase H gene. Analysis of Utopia from oomycetes indicates that multiple lineages of Utopia have been maintained inside of U2 genes with few copy numbers. Phylogenetic analysis of RT suggests the monophyly of Utopia, and it likely dates back to the early evolution of eukaryotes.

  1. The role and importance of Non-Profit Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Ciucescu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In a complex and challenging background of the whole country, and the NGO sector also, the non-profit organizations are established with the aim of providing public services to communities where they operate, making them as an intermediary between citizens and authorities. In any democratic society these organizations are meant to serve different types of needs and interests of the community, from both a strategic perspective and ethics, that those which are not covered by other categories of institutions and organizations, mean time providing a framework for civic participation, where citizens may participate to the public life.

  2. Confirm calculation of 12 MeV non-destructive testing electron linear accelerator target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Shudong; Zhang Rutong; Guo Yanbin; Zhou Yuan; Li Xuexian; Chen Yan

    2012-01-01

    The confirm calculation of 12 MeV non-destructive testing (NDT) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) target was studied. Firstly, the most optimal target thickness and related photon dose yield, distributions of dose rate, and related photon conversion efficiencies were got by calculation with specific analysis of the physical mechanism of the interactions between the beam and target; Secondly, the photon dose rate distribution, converter efficiencies, and thickness of various kinds of targets, such as W, Au, Ta, etc. were verified by MCNP simulation and the most optimal target was got using the MCNP code; Lastly, the calculation results of theory and MCNP were compared to confirm the validity of target calculation. (authors)

  3. Non-Fullerene Electron Acceptors for Use in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Nielsen, Christian B.; Holliday, Sarah; Chen, Hung-Yang; Cryer, Samuel J.; McCulloch, Iain

    2015-01-01

    The active layer in a solution processed organic photovoltaic device comprises a light absorbing electron donor semiconductor, typically a polymer, and an electron accepting fullerene acceptor. Although there has been huge effort targeted

  4. Non-Targeted effects of ionising radiation and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjostedt, Svetlana; Bezak, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Modern radiobiology is undergoing rapid change due to new discoveries contradicting the target concept which is currently used to predict dose-response relationships. Thus relatively recently discovered radiation induced bystander effects (RlBEs), that include additional death, mutation and radio-adaptation in non-irradiated cells, change our understanding of the target concept and broadens its boundaries. This can be significant from a radioprotection point of view and also has the potential to reassess radiation damage models currently used in radiotherapy. This article reviews briefly the general concepts of RlBEs such as the proposed underlying mechanisms of signal induction and propagation, experimental approaches and biological end points used to investigate these phenomena. It also summ rises several mathematical models currently proposed in an attempt to quantify RlBE. The main emphasis of this al1icle is to review and highlight the potential impact of the bystander phenomena in radiotherapy.

  5. Development of a qualitative real-time PCR method to detect 19 targets for identification of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Wang, Pengfei; Xu, Xiaoli; Wang, Xiaofu; Wei, Wei; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xu, Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    As the amount of commercially available genetically modified organisms (GMOs) grows recent years, the diversity of target sequences for molecular detection techniques are eagerly needed. Considered as the gold standard for GMO analysis, the real-time PCR technology was optimized to produce a high-throughput GMO screening method. With this method we can detect 19 transgenic targets. The specificity of the assays was demonstrated to be 100 % by the specific amplification of DNA derived from reference material from 20 genetically modified crops and 4 non modified crops. Furthermore, most assays showed a very sensitive detection, reaching the limit of ten copies. The 19 assays are the most frequently used genetic elements present in GM crops and theoretically enable the screening of the known GMO described in Chinese markets. Easy to use, fast and cost efficient, this method approach fits the purpose of GMO testing laboratories.

  6. MiR-17-5p impairs trafficking of H-ERG K+ channel protein by targeting multiple er stress-related chaperones during chronic oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To investigate if microRNAs (miRNAs play a role in regulating h-ERG trafficking in the setting of chronic oxidative stress as a common deleterious factor for many cardiac disorders. METHODS: We treated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and HEK293 cells with stable expression of h-ERG with H2O2 for 12 h and 48 h. Expression of miR-17-5p seed miRNAs was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Protein levels of chaperones and h-ERG trafficking were measured by Western blot analysis. Luciferase reporter gene assay was used to study miRNA and target interactions. Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were employed to record h-ERG K(+ current. RESULTS: H-ERG trafficking was impaired by H2O2 after 48 h treatment, accompanied by reciprocal changes of expression between miR-17-5p seed miRNAs and several chaperones (Hsp70, Hsc70, CANX, and Golga2, with the former upregulated and the latter downregulated. We established these chaperones as targets for miR-17-5p. Application miR-17-5p inhibitor rescued H2O2-induced impairment of h-ERG trafficking. Upregulation of endogenous by H2O2 or forced miR-17-5p expression either reduced h-ERG current. Sequestration of AP1 by its decoy molecule eliminated the upregulation of miR-17-5p, and ameliorated impairment of h-ERG trafficking. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, deregulation of the miR-17-5p seed family miRNAs can cause severe impairment of h-ERG trafficking through targeting multiple ER stress-related chaperones, and activation of AP1 likely accounts for the deleterious upregulation of these miRNAs, in the setting of prolonged duration of oxidative stress. These findings revealed the role of miRNAs in h-ERG trafficking, which may contribute to the cardiac electrical disturbances associated with oxidative stress.

  7. MiR-17-5p impairs trafficking of H-ERG K+ channel protein by targeting multiple er stress-related chaperones during chronic oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Hu, Weina; Lei, Mingming; Wang, Yong; Yan, Bing; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ren; Jin, Yuanzhe

    2013-01-01

    To investigate if microRNAs (miRNAs) play a role in regulating h-ERG trafficking in the setting of chronic oxidative stress as a common deleterious factor for many cardiac disorders. We treated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and HEK293 cells with stable expression of h-ERG with H2O2 for 12 h and 48 h. Expression of miR-17-5p seed miRNAs was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. Protein levels of chaperones and h-ERG trafficking were measured by Western blot analysis. Luciferase reporter gene assay was used to study miRNA and target interactions. Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were employed to record h-ERG K(+) current. H-ERG trafficking was impaired by H2O2 after 48 h treatment, accompanied by reciprocal changes of expression between miR-17-5p seed miRNAs and several chaperones (Hsp70, Hsc70, CANX, and Golga2), with the former upregulated and the latter downregulated. We established these chaperones as targets for miR-17-5p. Application miR-17-5p inhibitor rescued H2O2-induced impairment of h-ERG trafficking. Upregulation of endogenous by H2O2 or forced miR-17-5p expression either reduced h-ERG current. Sequestration of AP1 by its decoy molecule eliminated the upregulation of miR-17-5p, and ameliorated impairment of h-ERG trafficking. Collectively, deregulation of the miR-17-5p seed family miRNAs can cause severe impairment of h-ERG trafficking through targeting multiple ER stress-related chaperones, and activation of AP1 likely accounts for the deleterious upregulation of these miRNAs, in the setting of prolonged duration of oxidative stress. These findings revealed the role of miRNAs in h-ERG trafficking, which may contribute to the cardiac electrical disturbances associated with oxidative stress.

  8. Impaired cognition and decision-making in bipolar depression but no 'affective bias' evident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsztein, J S; Michael, A; Underwood, B R; Tempest, M; Sahakian, B J

    2006-05-01

    Depression is usually the predominant affective state in bipolar disorder. There are few studies, with discrepant views, examining the extent of cognitive impairment in patients with bipolar depression. To our knowledge, there are no previous studies examining decision-making ability or whether there is an affective attentional bias in bipolar depression. We ascertained 24 depressed bipolar I patients from acute psychiatric hospital wards and out-patient clinics and 26 age- and IQ-matched healthy controls. Using computerized tests we evaluated their performance on 'neutral' (non-emotional) cognitive tasks (i.e. memory, attention and executive function) and on novel tasks of emotional cognition (i.e. the decision-making task and the affective go/no-go task). Accuracy measures were significantly impaired on tests of visual and spatial recognition and attentional set-shifting in bipolar depression compared with age- and IQ-matched controls. The quality of decision-making was also significantly impaired in the patients. A mood-congruent attentional bias for 'sad' targets was not evident on the affective go/no-go task. We found widespread evidence of significant cognitive impairment and impaired quality of decision-making in symptomatically severe depressed bipolar patients. This cognitive impairment may contribute to difficulties with daily living, decision-making and the ability to engage and comply with psychological and drug treatments.

  9. Non-destructive testing of the MEGAPIE target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Y., E-mail: yong.dai@psi.ch; Wohlmuther, M.; Boutellier, V.; Hahl, S.; Lagotzki, A.; Leu, H.; Linder, H.P.; Schwarz, R.; Spahr, A.; Zanini, L.; Kuster, D.; Gavillet, D.; Wagner, W.

    2016-01-15

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) is one important part of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the MEGAPIE target. It includes visual inspection and ultrasonic measurement of the beam window of the T91 LBE container and gamma mapping of the beam window of the AlMg{sub 3} safety-container. The visual inspection showed no visible failure in the proton beam window area of the T91 LBE container. The ultrasonic measurement demonstrated no detectable change in the wall thickness of the T91 beam window, which implies no severe corrosion effect induced by flowing LBE during the four-month irradiation period. The gamma mapping provided the distribution of {sup 22}Na, a spallation product, in the proton beam window area of the AlMg{sub 3} safety-container. The result was used to evaluate the accumulated proton fluence distribution profile, the input data for determining irradiation parameters. A maximum proton fluence of 1.9 × 10{sup 25} p/m2 was deduced. The corresponding displacement damage degree in the T91 beam window was 7.1 dpa. - Highlights: • MEGAPIE is to design, build, operate and explore a liquid lead–bismuth (LBE) spallation target for 1 MW of beam power. • NDT of the target components exposed to high fluxes of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons was conducted. • There are no evident failures and corrosion effect of LBE in the T91 steel liquid metal container after irradiation to 7.1 dpa.

  10. Chemically different non-thermal plasmas target distinct cell death pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Lunova, M.; Jirsa, M.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-17, č. článku 600. ISSN 2045-2322 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : chemically different * non-thermal plasmas * target distinct cell death pathways Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  11. Targeted organ generation using Mixl1-inducible mouse pluripotent stem cells in blastocyst complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-15

    Generation of functional organs from patients' own cells is one of the ultimate goals of regenerative medicine. As a novel approach to creation of organs from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), we employed blastocyst complementation in organogenesis-disabled animals and successfully generated PSC-derived pancreas and kidneys. Blastocyst complementation, which exploits the capacity of PSCs to participate in forming chimeras, does not, however, exclude contribution of PSCs to the development of tissues-including neural cells or germ cells-other than those specifically targeted by disabling of organogenesis. This fact provokes ethical controversy if human PSCs are to be used. In this study, we demonstrated that forced expression of Mix-like protein 1 (encoded by Mixl1) can be used to guide contribution of mouse embryonic stem cells to endodermal organs after blastocyst injection. We then succeeded in applying this method to generate functional pancreas in pancreatogenesis-disabled Pdx1 knockout mice using a newly developed tetraploid-based organ-complementation method. These findings hold promise for targeted organ generation from patients' own PSCs in livestock animals.

  12. MiR-34a targeting of Notch ligand delta-like 1 impairs CD15+/CD133+ tumor-propagating cells and supports neural differentiation in medulloblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualino de Antonellis

    Full Text Available Through negative regulation of gene expression, microRNAs (miRNAs can function as oncosuppressors in cancers, and can themselves show altered expression in various tumor types. Here, we have investigated medulloblastoma tumors (MBs, which arise from an early impairment of developmental processes in the cerebellum, where Notch signaling is involved in many of the cell-fate-determining stages. Notch regulates a subset of MB cells that have stem-cell-like properties and can promote tumor growth. On the basis of this evidence, we hypothesized that miRNAs targeting the Notch pathway can regulate these phenomena, and can be used in anti-cancer therapies.In a screening of potential targets within Notch signaling, miR-34a was seen to be a regulator of the Notch pathway through its targeting of Notch ligand Delta-like 1 (Dll1. Down-regulation of Dll1 expression by miR-34a negatively regulates cell proliferation, and induces apoptosis and neural differentiation in MB cells. Using an inducible tetracycline on-off model of miR-34a expression, we show that in Daoy MB cells, Dll1 is the first target that is regulated in MB, as compared to the other targets analyzed here: Cyclin D1, cMyc and CDK4. MiR-34a expression negatively affects CD133(+/CD15(+ tumor-propagating cells, then we assay through reverse-phase proteomic arrays, Akt and Stat3 signaling hypo-phosphorylation. Adenoviruses carrying the precursor miR-34a induce neurogenesis of tumor spheres derived from a genetic animal model of MB (Patch1(+/- p53(-/-, thus providing further evidence that the miR-34a/Dll1 axis controls both autonomous and non autonomous signaling of Notch. In vivo, miR-34a overexpression carried by adenoviruses reduces tumor burden in cerebellum xenografts of athymic mice, thus demonstrating an anti-tumorigenic role of miR-34a in vivo.Despite advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of MB, one-third of patients with MB remain incurable. Here, we show that stable nucleic

  13. Interarm blood pressure difference and target organ damage in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jouni K; Puukka, Pauli J; Jula, Antti M

    2014-02-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate interarm differences of blood pressure (BP) and its determinants, and to clarify whether both arms are equally good in assessing BP and target organ damage in the general population. We studied a representative sample of Finnish adult population with 484 study participants, ages 25-74 years. BP was measured twice by an oscillometric monitor simultaneously on both arms. Study participants underwent a clinical examination including measurements of serum lipids, glucose and indicators of target organ damage. BP was 2.3/0.2 mmHg higher on right than on left arm (P differences). SBP and DBP measured on right and left arms correlated equally with left ventricular mass index (LVMI), interventricular septal thickness (IVST), posterior wall thickness (PWT), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and albuminuria. Higher SBP level was an independent determinant of both greater systolic and diastolic interarm BP difference. Exaggerated absolute diastolic interarm BP difference (>5 mmHg) was associated with higher BMI, arm circumference, LVMI, IVST and PWT, whereas exaggerated absolute systolic interarm BP difference (>10 mmHg) was not associated with any clinical variables. There was only a small difference in BP between arms in a healthy general population. Both arms are equally good determinants of target organ damage. BP should be measured at least once on both arms and prefer the arm with higher BP readings in the future BP measurements.

  14. Non-targeted effects of radiation: applications for radiation protection and contribution to LNT discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, O.V.; Folkard, M.; Prise, K.M.; Michael, B.D.; Mothersill, C.

    2002-01-01

    According to the target theory of radiation induced effects (Lea, 1946), which forms a central core of radiation biology, DNA damage occurs during or very shortly after irradiation of the nuclei in targeted cells and the potential for biological consequences can be expressed within one or two cell generations. A range of evidence has now emerged that challenges the classical effects resulting from targeted damage to DNA. These effects have also been termed non-(DNA)-targeted (Ward, 1999) and include radiation-induced bystander effects (Iyer and Lehnert, 2000a), genomic instability (Wright, 2000), adaptive response (Wolff, 1998), low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) (Joiner, et al., 2001), delayed reproductive death (Seymour, et al., 1986) and induction of genes by radiation (Hickman, et al., 1994). An essential feature of non-targeted effects is that they do not require a direct nuclear exposure by irradiation to be expressed and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a new paradigm for radiation biology that challenges the universality of target theory. In this paper we will concentrate on the radiation-induced bystander effects because of its particular importance for radiation protection

  15. Non-target adjacent stimuli classification improves performance of classical ERP-based brain computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, G. A.; Hernández, L. F.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The classical ERP-based speller, or P300 Speller, is one of the most commonly used paradigms in the field of Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI). Several alterations to the visual stimuli presentation system have been developed to avoid unfavorable effects elicited by adjacent stimuli. However, there has been little, if any, regard to useful information contained in responses to adjacent stimuli about spatial location of target symbols. This paper aims to demonstrate that combining the classification of non-target adjacent stimuli with standard classification (target versus non-target) significantly improves classical ERP-based speller efficiency. Approach. Four SWLDA classifiers were trained and combined with the standard classifier: the lower row, upper row, right column and left column classifiers. This new feature extraction procedure and the classification method were carried out on three open databases: the UAM P300 database (Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico), BCI competition II (dataset IIb) and BCI competition III (dataset II). Main results. The inclusion of the classification of non-target adjacent stimuli improves target classification in the classical row/column paradigm. A gain in mean single trial classification of 9.6% and an overall improvement of 25% in simulated spelling speed was achieved. Significance. We have provided further evidence that the ERPs produced by adjacent stimuli present discriminable features, which could provide additional information about the spatial location of intended symbols. This work promotes the searching of information on the peripheral stimulation responses to improve the performance of emerging visual ERP-based spellers.

  16. Non-invasive detection and quantification of brain microvascular deficits by near-infrared spectroscopy in a rat model of Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallacoglu, Bertan; Sassaroli, Angelo M.; Rosenberg, Irwin H.; Troen, Aron; Fantini, Sergio

    2011-02-01

    Structural abnormalities in brain microvasculature are commonly associated with Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias. However, the extent to which structural microvascular abnormalities cause functional impairments in brain circulation and thereby to cognitive impairment is unclear. Non-invasive, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) methods can be used to determine the absolute hemoglobin concentration and saturation in brain tissue, from which additional parameters such as cerebral blood volume (a theoretical correlate of brain microvascular density) can be derived. Validating such NIRS parameters in animal models, and understanding their relationship to cognitive function is an important step in the ultimate application of these methods to humans. To this end we applied a non-invasive multidistance NIRS method to determine the absolute concentration and saturation of cerebral hemoglobin in rat, by separately measuring absorption and reduced scattering coefficients without relying on pre- or post-correction factors. We applied this method to study brain circulation in folate deficient rats, which express brain microvascular pathology1 and which we have shown to develop cognitive impairment.2 We found absolute brain hemoglobin concentration ([HbT]) and oxygen saturation (StO2) to be significantly lower in folate deficient rats (n=6) with respect to control rats (n=5) (for [HbT]: 73+/-10 μM vs. 95+/-14 μM for StO2: 55%+/-7% vs. 66% +/-4%), implicating microvascular pathology and diminished oxygen delivery as a mechanism of cognitive impairment. More generally, our study highlights how noninvasive, absolute NIRS measurements can provide unique insight into the pathophysiology of Vascular Cognitive Impairment. Applying this method to this and other rat models of cognitive impairment will help to validate physiologically meaningful NIRS parameters for the ultimate goal of studying cerebral microvascular disease and cognitive decline in humans.

  17. 24 CFR 982.203 - Special admission (non-waiting list): Assistance targeted by HUD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special admission (non-waiting list... Admission to Tenant-Based Program § 982.203 Special admission (non-waiting list): Assistance targeted by HUD... family residing in a multifamily rental housing project when HUD sells, forecloses or demolishes the...

  18. Social media for non-profit organizations in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thy

    2016-01-01

    The thesis presents about social media in general and social media for non-profit organizations in Vietnam in particular. The writer wanted to explore the disadvantages that non-profits in Vietnam face when using social media and search for recommendations which helps them to use it more efficiently. In the theoretic part, core concepts related to social media were introduced, namely, definition of social media, its types, the popular platforms, situation of social media in Vietnam, pros...

  19. Platelets and Multi-Organ Failure in Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Greco

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Platelets have received increasing attention for their role in the pathophysiology of infectious disease, inflammation, and immunity. In sepsis, a low platelet count is a well-known biomarker for disease severity and more recently authors have focused their attention on the active role of platelets in the pathogenesis of multi-organ failure. Septic shock is characterised by a dysregulated inflammatory response, which can impair the microcirculation and lead to organ injury. Being at the crossroads between the immune system, clotting cascade, and endothelial cells, platelets seem to be an appealing central mediator and possible therapeutic target in sepsis. This review focuses on the pathogenic role of platelets in septic organ dysfunction in humans and animal models.

  20. Platelets and Multi-Organ Failure in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Elisabetta; Lupia, Enrico; Bosco, Ornella; Vizio, Barbara; Montrucchio, Giuseppe

    2017-10-20

    Platelets have received increasing attention for their role in the pathophysiology of infectious disease, inflammation, and immunity. In sepsis, a low platelet count is a well-known biomarker for disease severity and more recently authors have focused their attention on the active role of platelets in the pathogenesis of multi-organ failure. Septic shock is characterised by a dysregulated inflammatory response, which can impair the microcirculation and lead to organ injury. Being at the crossroads between the immune system, clotting cascade, and endothelial cells, platelets seem to be an appealing central mediator and possible therapeutic target in sepsis. This review focuses on the pathogenic role of platelets in septic organ dysfunction in humans and animal models.

  1. Non-equilibrium and band tailing in organic conductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Non-equilibrium ... Introduction. Study of organic conductors and semiconductors continues to generate interest with the ... Band tailing reduces band gap or the acti- ..... (9), we can identify Eg(0) with the focal point and is proportional to P2. 1 .

  2. Mild Cognitive Impairment: Diagnosis, Longitudinal Course, and Emerging Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Jennifer N.; Newhouse, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is widely regarded as the intermediate stage of cognitive impairment between the changes seen in normal cognitive aging and those associated with dementia. Elderly patients with MCI constitute a high-risk population for developing dementia, in particular Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although the core clinical criteria for MCI have remained largely unchanged, the operational definition of MCI has undergone several revisions over the course of the last decade and remains an evolving diagnosis. Prognostic implications of this diagnosis are becoming clearer with regard to the risk of progressive cognitive deterioration. Although patients with MCI may represent an optimal target population for pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions, results from clinical trials have been mixed and a definitive effective treatment remains elusive. This article provides a brief overview of the evolution of the concept of MCI and reviews current diagnostic criteria, the longitudinal course of the disorder, and current and emerging treatments for MCI. PMID:25160795

  3. Cognitive Function as a Transdiagnostic Treatment Target in Stimulant Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofuoglu, Mehmet; DeVito, Elise E; Waters, Andrew J; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Stimulant use disorder is an important public health problem, with an estimated 2.1 million current users in the United States alone. No pharmacological treatments are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for stimulant use disorder and behavioral treatments have variable efficacy and limited availability. Most individuals with stimulant use disorder have other comorbidities, most with overlapping symptoms and cognitive impairments. The goal of this article is to present a rationale for cognition as a treatment target in stimulant use disorder and to outline potential treatment approaches. Rates of lifetime comorbid psychiatric disorders among people with stimulant use disorders are estimated at 65% to 73%, with the most common being mood disorders (13% to 64%) and anxiety disorders (21% to 50%), as well as non-substance-induced psychotic disorders (addictive behavior, but the dual process model particularly highlights the relevance of cognitive impairments and biases to the development and maintenance of addiction. This model explains addictive behavior as a balance between automatic processes and executive control, which in turn are related to individual (genetics, comorbid disorders, psychosocial factors) and other (craving, triggers, drug use) factors. Certain cognitive impairments, such as attentional bias and approach bias, are most relevant to automatic processes, while sustained attention, response inhibition, and working memory are primarily related to executive control. These cognitive impairments and biases are also common in disorders frequently comorbid with stimulant use disorder and predict poor treatment retention and clinical outcomes. As such, they may serve as feasible transdiagnostic treatment targets. There are promising pharmacological, cognitive, and behavioral approaches that aim to enhance cognitive function. Pharmacotherapies target cognitive impairments associated with executive control and include cholinesterase inhibitors

  4. Role Of Governmental And Non-Governmental Organizations In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... non-infected community members, managers of the organizations implementing HIV/AIDS programmes and service providers. In the process 1331 households were interviewed using qualitative and quantitative data collection instruments. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) and Nudist 4 packages were used ...

  5. Step-and-Shoot versus Compensator-based IMRT: Calculation and Comparison of Integral Dose in Non-tumoral and Target Organs in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Shirani Tak Abi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT is becoming an increasingly routine treatment method. IMRT can be delivered by use of conventional Multileaf Collimators (MLCs and/or physical compensators. One of the most important factors in selecting an appropriate IMRT technique is integral dose. Integral dose is equal to the mean energy deposited in the total irradiated volume of the patient. The aim of the present study was to calculate and compare the integral dose in normal and target organs in two different procedures of IMRT: Step-and-Shoot (SAS and compensator-based IMRT. Materials and Methods In this comparative study, five patients with prostate cancer were selected. Module Integrated Radiotherapy System was applied, using three energy ranges. In both treatment planning methods, the integral dose dramatically decreased by increasing energy. Results Comparison of two treatment methods showed that on average, the integral dose of body in SAS radiation therapy was about 1.62% lower than that reported in compensator-based IMRT. In planning target volume, rectum, bladder, and left and right femoral heads, the integral doses for SAS method were 1.01%, 1.02%, 1.11%, 1.47%, and 1.40% lower than compensator-based IMRT, respectively. Conclusion Considering the treatment conditions, the definition of dose volume constraints for healthy tissues, and the equal volume of organs in both treatment methods, SAS radiation therapy by providing a lower integral dose seems to be more advantageous and efficient for prostate cancer treatment, compared to compensator-based IMRT.

  6. Targeting solid tumors with non-pathogenic obligate anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro; Fujimori, Minoru; Sasaki, Takayuki; Tsutsui, Hiroko; Shimatani, Yuko; Seki, Keiichi; Amano, Jun

    2010-09-01

    Molecular-targeting drugs with fewer severe adverse effects are attracting great attention as the next wave of cancer treatment. There exist, however, populations of cancer cells resistant to these drugs that stem from the instability of tumor cells and/or the existence of cancer stem cells, and thus specific toxicity is required to destroy them. If such selectivity is not available, these targets may be sought out not by the cancer cell types themselves, but rather in their adjacent cancer microenvironments by means of hypoxia, low pH, and so on. The anaerobic conditions present in malignant tumor tissues have previously been regarded as a source of resistance in cancer cells against conventional therapy. However, there now appears to be a way to make use of these limiting factors as a selective target. In this review, we will refer to several trials, including our own, to direct attention to the utilizable anaerobic conditions present in malignant tumor tissues and the use of bacteria as carriers to target them. Specifically, we have been developing a method to attack solid cancers using the non-pathogenic obligate anaerobic bacterium Bifidobacterium longum as a vehicle to selectively recognize and target the anaerobic conditions in solid cancer tissues. We will also discuss the existence of low oxygen pressure in tumor masses in spite of generally enhanced angiogenesis, overview current cancer therapies, especially the history and present situation of bacterial utility to treat solid tumors, and discuss the rationality and future possibilities of this novel mode of cancer treatment. © 2010 Japanese Cancer Association.

  7. Plenary panel 1: The scientific bases of radiation protection. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomaa, S.

    2006-01-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (L.N.T.) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (authors)

  8. Plenary panel 1: The scientific bases of radiation protection. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomaa, S. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (L.N.T.) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (authors)

  9. Association between muscle power impairment and WHODAS 2.0 in older adults with physical disability in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Liao, Hua-Fang; Yen, Chia-Fan; Hwang, Ai-Wen; Chi, Wen-Chou; Escorpizo, Reuben; Liou, Tsan-Hon

    2015-01-01

    To explore the association between muscle power impairment and each World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule second edition (WHODAS 2.0) domain score among subjects with physical disability. Subjects (≥ 60 years) with physical disability related to neurological diseases, including 730 subjects with brain disease (BD) and 126 subjects with non-BD, were enrolled from a data bank of persons with disabilities from 1 July 2011 to 29 February 2012. Standardized WHODAS 2.0 scores ranging from 0 (least difficulty) to 100 (greatest difficulty) points were calculated for each domain. More than 50% of subjects with physical disability had the greatest difficulty in household activities and mobility. Muscle power impairment (adjusted odds ratios range among domains, 2.75-376.42, p < 0.001), age (1.38-4.81, p < 0.05), and speech impairment (1.94-5.80, p < 0.05) were associated with BD subjects experiencing the greatest difficulty in most WHODAS 2.0 domains. But a few associated factors were identified for the non-BD group in the study. Although the patterns of difficulty in most daily activities were similar between the BD and non-BD groups, factors associated with the difficulties differed between those two groups. Muscle power impairment, age and speech impairment were important factors associated with difficulties in subjects with BD-related physical disability. Older adults with physical disability often experience difficulties in household activities and mobility. Muscle power impairment is associated with difficulties in daily life in subjects with physical disability related to brain disease. Those subjects with brain disease who had older age, a greater degree of muscle power impairment, and the presence of speech impairment were at higher risk of experiencing difficulties in most daily activities.

  10. Organic non-volatile memories from ferroelectric phase separated blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Kamal; de Leeuw, Dago; de Boer, Bert; Blom, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Ferroelectric polarisation is an attractive physical property for non-volatile binary switching. The functionality of the targeted memory should be based on resistive switching. Conductivity and ferroelectricity however cannot be tuned independently. The challenge is to develop a storage medium in which the favourable properties of ferroelectrics such as bistability and non-volatility can be combined with the beneficial properties provided by semiconductors such as conductivity and rectification. In this contribution we present an integrated solution by blending semiconducting and ferroelectric polymers into phase separated networks. The polarisation field of the ferroelectric modulates the injection barrier at the semiconductor--metal contact. This combination allows for solution-processed non-volatile memory arrays with a simple cross-bar architecture that can be read-out non-destructively. Based on this general concept a non-volatile, reversible switchable Schottky diode with relatively fast programming time of shorter than 100 microseconds, long information retention time of longer than 10^ days, and high programming cycle endurance with non-destructive read-out is demonstrated.

  11. Financing of Romanian Non-governmental Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Ion CEPTUREANU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-governmental organizations (NGOs have become increasingly important in the last decade for the Romanian society. They raise public awareness for human rights, promote development of democracy and seek to improve the well-being of communities by being increasingly engaging in various development, educational, social or health projects. Unfortunately, many NGOs has to cope with significant financing problems since competition for resources amplified and some of the traditional donors cut or reduced support. This paper analyze financing issues in NGOs, based on a quantitative analysis, using a structured questionnaire. Since it is one of the very few studies covering Romania, the scope of the paper was to provide for those involved or interested in NGO sector new data concerning, for instance, sources of revenue or destination of resources, enabling NGOs executives to build financial sustainable organizations.

  12. Linear and non-linear amplification of high-mode perturbations at the ablation front in HiPER targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olazabal-Loume, M; Breil, J; Hallo, L; Ribeyre, X [CELIA, UMR 5107 Universite Bordeaux 1-CNRS-CEA, 351 cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence (France); Sanz, J, E-mail: olazabal@celia.u-bordeaux1.f [ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    The linear and non-linear sensitivity of the 180 kJ baseline HiPER target to high-mode perturbations, i.e. surface roughness, is addressed using two-dimensional simulations and a complementary analysis by linear and non-linear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor models. Simulations provide an assessment of an early non-linear stage leading to a significant deformation of the ablation surface for modes of maximum linear growth factor. A design using a picket prepulse evidences an improvement in the target stability inducing a delay of the non-linear behavior. Perturbation evolution and shape, evidenced by simulations of the non-linear stage, are analyzed with existing self-consistent non-linear theory.

  13. Spatial Cytoskeleton Organization Supports Targeted Intracellular Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Anne E.; Rieger, Heiko

    2018-03-01

    The efficiency of intracellular cargo transport from specific source to target locations is strongly dependent upon molecular motor-assisted motion along the cytoskeleton. Radial transport along microtubules and lateral transport along the filaments of the actin cortex underneath the cell membrane are characteristic for cells with a centrosome. The interplay between the specific cytoskeleton organization and the motor performance realizes a spatially inhomogeneous intermittent search strategy. In order to analyze the efficiency of such intracellular search strategies we formulate a random velocity model with intermittent arrest states. We evaluate efficiency in terms of mean first passage times for three different, frequently encountered intracellular transport tasks: i) the narrow escape problem, which emerges during cargo transport to a synapse or other specific region of the cell membrane, ii) the reaction problem, which considers the binding time of two particles within the cell, and iii) the reaction-escape problem, which arises when cargo must be released at a synapse only after pairing with another particle. Our results indicate that cells are able to realize efficient search strategies for various intracellular transport tasks economically through a spatial cytoskeleton organization that involves only a narrow actin cortex rather than a cell body filled with randomly oriented actin filaments.

  14. Indirect Effects of Functional Communication Training on Non-Targeted Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieltz, Kelly M.; Wacker, David P.; Harding, Jay W.; Berg, Wendy K.; Lee, John F.; Padilla Dalmau, Yaniz C.; Mews, Jayme; Ibrahimovic, Muska

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of functional communication training (FCT) on the occurrence of non-targeted disruptive behavior. The 10 participants were preschool-aged children with developmental disabilities who engaged in both destructive (property destruction, aggression, self-injury) and disruptive (hand flapping,…

  15. Target Product Profile for a Diagnostic Assay to Differentiate between Bacterial and Non-Bacterial Infections and Reduce Antimicrobial Overuse in Resource-Limited Settings: An Expert Consensus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Dittrich

    Full Text Available Acute fever is one of the most common presenting symptoms globally. In order to reduce the empiric use of antimicrobial drugs and improve outcomes, it is essential to improve diagnostic capabilities. In the absence of microbiology facilities in low-income settings, an assay to distinguish bacterial from non-bacterial causes would be a critical first step. To ensure that patient and market needs are met, the requirements of such a test should be specified in a target product profile (TPP. To identify minimal/optimal characteristics for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial fever test, experts from academia and international organizations with expertise in infectious diseases, diagnostic test development, laboratory medicine, global health, and health economics were convened. Proposed TPPs were reviewed by this working group, and consensus characteristics were defined. The working group defined non-severely ill, non-malaria infected children as the target population for the desired assay. To provide access to the most patients, the test should be deployable to community health centers and informal health settings, and staff should require 90% and >80% for sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Other key characteristics, to account for the challenging environment at which the test is targeted, included: i time-to-result <10 min (but maximally <2 hrs; ii storage conditions at 0-40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity with a minimal shelf life of 12 months; iii operational conditions of 5-40°C, ≤90% non-condensing humidity; and iv minimal sample collection needs (50-100μL, capillary blood. This expert approach to define assay requirements for a bacterial vs. non-bacterial assay should guide product development, and enable targeted and timely efforts by industry partners and academic institutions.

  16. The sedating antidepressant trazodone impairs sleep-dependent cortical plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J Aton

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings indicate that certain classes of hypnotics that target GABA(A receptors impair sleep-dependent brain plasticity. However, the effects of hypnotics acting at monoamine receptors (e.g., the antidepressant trazodone on this process are unknown. We therefore assessed the effects of commonly-prescribed medications for the treatment of insomnia (trazodone and the non-benzodiazepine GABA(A receptor agonists zaleplon and eszopiclone in a canonical model of sleep-dependent, in vivo synaptic plasticity in the primary visual cortex (V1 known as ocular dominance plasticity.After a 6-h baseline period of sleep/wake polysomnographic recording, cats underwent 6 h of continuous waking combined with monocular deprivation (MD to trigger synaptic remodeling. Cats subsequently received an i.p. injection of either vehicle, trazodone (10 mg/kg, zaleplon (10 mg/kg, or eszopiclone (1-10 mg/kg, and were allowed an 8-h period of post-MD sleep before ocular dominance plasticity was assessed. We found that while zaleplon and eszopiclone had profound effects on sleeping cortical electroencephalographic (EEG activity, only trazodone (which did not alter EEG activity significantly impaired sleep-dependent consolidation of ocular dominance plasticity. This was associated with deficits in both the normal depression of V1 neuronal responses to deprived-eye stimulation, and potentiation of responses to non-deprived eye stimulation, which accompany ocular dominance plasticity.Taken together, our data suggest that the monoamine receptors targeted by trazodone play an important role in sleep-dependent consolidation of synaptic plasticity. They also demonstrate that changes in sleep architecture are not necessarily reliable predictors of how hypnotics affect sleep-dependent neural functions.

  17. Organization of Circadian Behavior Relies on Glycinergic Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Lia; Muraro, Nara I; Beltrán González, Andrea N; Marcora, María S; Bernabó, Guillermo; Hermann-Luibl, Christiane; Romero, Juan I; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Castaño, Eduardo M; Marino-Busjle, Cristina; Calvo, Daniel J; Ceriani, M Fernanda

    2017-04-04

    The small ventral lateral neurons (sLNvs) constitute a central circadian pacemaker in the Drosophila brain. They organize daily locomotor activity, partly through the release of the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF), coordinating the action of the remaining clusters required for network synchronization. Despite extensive efforts, the basic principles underlying communication among circadian clusters remain obscure. We identified classical neurotransmitters released by sLNvs through disruption of specific transporters. Adult-specific RNAi-mediated downregulation of the glycine transporter or impairment of glycine synthesis in LNv neurons increased period length by nearly an hour without affecting rhythmicity of locomotor activity. Electrophysiological recordings showed that glycine reduces spiking frequency in circadian neurons. Interestingly, downregulation of glycine receptor subunits in specific sLNv targets impaired rhythmicity, revealing involvement of glycine in information processing within the network. These data identify glycinergic inhibition of specific targets as a cue that contributes to the synchronization of the circadian network. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. No association between the use of Bti for mosquito control and the dynamics of non-target aquatic invertebrates in French coastal and continental wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagadic, Laurent; Schäfer, Ralf B.; Roucaute, Marc; Szöcs, Eduard; Chouin, Sébastien; Maupeou, Jérôme de; Duchet, Claire

    2016-01-01

    The environmental safety of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is still controversial, mainly because most of the previous field studies on its undesired effects were spatially limited and did not address the relationship between community similarity and application time and frequency. No general statement can therefore be drawn on the usage conditions of Bti that insure protection of non-target organisms. The present study was conducted in eight sites distributed over the main geographical sectors where mosquito control is implemented in mainland France and Corsica. Changes in non-target aquatic invertebrates were followed at elapsed time after repeated applications of two Bti formulations (VectoBac® WDG or 12AS) up to four consecutive years. We examined the influence of both larvicide treatments and environmental variables on community dynamics and dissimilarity between treated and control areas. As it can be argued that chironomids are the most vulnerable group of non-target invertebrates, we scrutinised potential Bti-related effects on the dynamics of their community. The use of VectoBac® WDG and 12AS in coastal and continental wetlands had no immediate or long-term detectable effect on the taxonomic structure and taxa abundance of non-target aquatic invertebrate communities, including chironomids. This applied to the main habitats where mosquito larvae occur, regardless of their geographic location. Flooding, whose frequency and duration depend on local meteorological and hydrological conditions, was identified as the main environmental driver of invertebrate community dynamics. Our findings add support to the environmental safety of currently available Bti formulations when following recommended application rates and best mosquito control practices. - Highlights: • Bti is used in a variety of continental and coastal wetlands against mosquito larvae. • Bti dosages recommended for mosquito control do not affect non-target invertebrates.

  19. No association between the use of Bti for mosquito control and the dynamics of non-target aquatic invertebrates in French coastal and continental wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagadic, Laurent, E-mail: Laurent.Lagadic@rennes.inra.fr [INRA, UMR985 Écologie et Santé des Écosystèmes, Agrocampus Ouest, 65 rue de Saint Brieuc, F-35042 Rennes (France); Schäfer, Ralf B. [Quantitative Landscape Ecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, Fortstraße 7, D-76829 Landau (Germany); Roucaute, Marc [INRA, UMR985 Écologie et Santé des Écosystèmes, Agrocampus Ouest, 65 rue de Saint Brieuc, F-35042 Rennes (France); Szöcs, Eduard [Quantitative Landscape Ecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, Fortstraße 7, D-76829 Landau (Germany); Chouin, Sébastien; Maupeou, Jérôme de [Etablissement Interdépartemental pour la Démoustication du Littoral Atlantique, 1 rue Toufaire, F-17300 Rochefort-sur-Mer (France); Duchet, Claire [Entente Interdépartementale pour la Démoustication du Littoral Méditerranéen, 165 avenue Paul-Rimbaud, F-34184 Montpellier (France); and others

    2016-05-15

    The environmental safety of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is still controversial, mainly because most of the previous field studies on its undesired effects were spatially limited and did not address the relationship between community similarity and application time and frequency. No general statement can therefore be drawn on the usage conditions of Bti that insure protection of non-target organisms. The present study was conducted in eight sites distributed over the main geographical sectors where mosquito control is implemented in mainland France and Corsica. Changes in non-target aquatic invertebrates were followed at elapsed time after repeated applications of two Bti formulations (VectoBac® WDG or 12AS) up to four consecutive years. We examined the influence of both larvicide treatments and environmental variables on community dynamics and dissimilarity between treated and control areas. As it can be argued that chironomids are the most vulnerable group of non-target invertebrates, we scrutinised potential Bti-related effects on the dynamics of their community. The use of VectoBac® WDG and 12AS in coastal and continental wetlands had no immediate or long-term detectable effect on the taxonomic structure and taxa abundance of non-target aquatic invertebrate communities, including chironomids. This applied to the main habitats where mosquito larvae occur, regardless of their geographic location. Flooding, whose frequency and duration depend on local meteorological and hydrological conditions, was identified as the main environmental driver of invertebrate community dynamics. Our findings add support to the environmental safety of currently available Bti formulations when following recommended application rates and best mosquito control practices. - Highlights: • Bti is used in a variety of continental and coastal wetlands against mosquito larvae. • Bti dosages recommended for mosquito control do not affect non-target invertebrates.

  20. Non-organ specific autoantibodies in children with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, F; Vajro, P; Balli, F; Giacchino, R; Crivellaro, C; Barbera, C; Cataleta, M; Muratori, L; Pontisso, P; Nebbia, G; Zancan, L; Bertolini, A; Alberti, A; Bianchi, F

    1996-11-01

    Recent studies in adult patients have established a relationship between hepatitis C virus infection and the presence of liver-kidney microsomal autoantibody type 1 (LKM1). Conversely, little is known regarding the relationship between hepatitis C and autoimmunity in children. In this study, we investigated non-organ specific autoantibodies in 40 otherwise healthy Italian children with chronic hepatitis C. All but four patients included in the study were asymptomatic. Liver histology, obtained in 35, showed features ranging from minimal to mild chronic hepatitis. Autoantibodies were investigated by indirect immunofluorescence. HCV RNA was assayed by the polymerase chain reaction in 34 cases and viral genotypes were determined. Antinuclear antibodies were detected in three (7.5%) cases, one with a homogeneous pattern; smooth muscle autoantibodies in seven (17.5%) cases, always with V (vessels only) specificity and LKM1 in four (10%), at titers ranging from 1:20 and 1:2560. Clinical and virologic features did not significantly differ between autoantibody positive and negative cases, although infections with HCV genotypes 1a and 2 were more frequent in LKM1-positive patients. During observation, the child with the highest LKM1 titre was unsuccessfully treated with alpha interferon but responded to steroids. Twelve LKM1 negative children were also treated with interferon and one developed low LKM1 titers concomitant with an alanine aminotransferase flare. The sera of the five LKM1-positive children with investigated by immunoblotting with a human microsomal fraction and peptide 257-269 of cytochrome P450IID6. Only the serum of the child with the highest LKM1 titers was reactive. These results show that a consistent proportion of children with chronic hepatitis C circulate non-organ specific autoantibodies. The prevalence of LKM1 is greater than in adults and this could raise problems for the treatment of the disease with interferon. The analysis of LKM1 target antigens

  1. A study on accumulation of magnetic drug in the capillary vessel of target organ using superconducting MDDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic Drug Delivery System (MDDS) is one of the drug therapy technologies to accumulate the drug at the targeted part efficiently. The ferromagnetic particle is attached to the medicine, antibody, hormones and so on. The magnetic seeded drug is injected into the blood vessel, and then is accumulated in capillary vessel of target organ by magnetic field generated by the superconducting magnet placed outside of the body. The technology is great prospective for not only human medical treatment but also stockbreeding field. Treatment for cow ovarian diseases (decay of ovarian hormone secretion) requires an improvement in suppression of the drug diffusion to non-diseased part by the blood flow. In order to solve the problem, the applicability of the MDDS was examined. The behavior of the magnetic drug under the magnetic field generated by high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk magnet were studied by the model experiment and computer simulation with the capillary model of the corpus luteum. As a result, it was shown that MDDS is able to apply to the capillaries of the corpus luteum (yellow body).

  2. Multiple factors, including non-motor impairments, influence decision making with regard to exercise participation in Parkinson's disease: a qualitative enquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Christine; Clemson, Lindy; Canning, Colleen G

    2016-01-01

    To explore how the meaning of exercise and other factors interact and influence the exercise behaviour of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) enrolled in a 6-month minimally supervised exercise program to prevent falls, regardless of whether they completed the prescribed exercise or not. This qualitative study utilised in-depth semi-structured interviews analysed using grounded theory methodology. Four main themes were constructed from the data: adapting to change and loss, the influence of others, making sense of the exercise experience and hope for a more active future. Participation in the PD-specific physiotherapy program involving group exercise provided an opportunity for participants to reframe their identity of their "active" self. Three new influences on exercise participation were identified and explored: non-motor impairments of apathy and fatigue, the belief in a finite energy quota, and the importance of feedback. A model was developed incorporating the themes and influences to explain decision-making for exercise participation in this group. Complex and interacting issues, including non-motor impairments, need to be considered in order to enhance the development and ongoing implementation of effective exercise programmes for people with PD. Exercise participation can assist individuals to reframe their identity as they are faced with losses associated with Parkinson's disease and ageing. Non-motor impairments of apathy and fatigue may influence exercise participation in people with Parkinson's disease. Particular attention needs to be paid to the provision of feedback in exercise programs for people with Parkinson's disease as it important for their decision-making about continuing exercise.

  3. Transcription Factors Expressed in Lateral Organ Boundaries: Identification of Downstream Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Patricia S

    2010-07-12

    The processes of lateral organ initiation and patterning are central to the generation of mature plant form. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes is essential to our understanding of plant development. Communication between the shoot apical meristem and initiating organ primordia is important both for functioning of the meristem and for proper organ patterning, and very little is known about this process. In particular, the boundary between meristem and leaf is emerging as a critical region that is important for SAM maintenance and regulation of organogenesis. The goal of this project was to characterize three boundary-expressed genes that encode predicted transcription factors. Specifically, we have studied LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES (LOB), LATERAL ORGAN FUSION1 (LOF1), and LATERAL ORGAN FUSION2 (LOF2). LOB encodes the founding member of the LOB-DOMAIN (LBD) plant-specific DNA binding transcription factor family and LOF1 and LOF2 encode paralogous MYB-domain transcription factors. We characterized the genetic relationship between these three genes and other boundary and meristem genes. We also used an ectopic inducible expression system to identify direct targets of LOB.

  4. No association between the use of Bti for mosquito control and the dynamics of non-target aquatic invertebrates in French coastal and continental wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagadic, Laurent; Schäfer, Ralf B; Roucaute, Marc; Szöcs, Eduard; Chouin, Sébastien; de Maupeou, Jérôme; Duchet, Claire; Franquet, Evelyne; Le Hunsec, Benoit; Bertrand, Céline; Fayolle, Stéphanie; Francés, Benoît; Rozier, Yves; Foussadier, Rémi; Santoni, Jean-Baptiste; Lagneau, Christophe

    2016-05-15

    The environmental safety of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is still controversial, mainly because most of the previous field studies on its undesired effects were spatially limited and did not address the relationship between community similarity and application time and frequency. No general statement can therefore be drawn on the usage conditions of Bti that insure protection of non-target organisms. The present study was conducted in eight sites distributed over the main geographical sectors where mosquito control is implemented in mainland France and Corsica. Changes in non-target aquatic invertebrates were followed at elapsed time after repeated applications of two Bti formulations (VectoBac® WDG or 12AS) up to four consecutive years. We examined the influence of both larvicide treatments and environmental variables on community dynamics and dissimilarity between treated and control areas. As it can be argued that chironomids are the most vulnerable group of non-target invertebrates, we scrutinised potential Bti-related effects on the dynamics of their community. The use of VectoBac® WDG and 12AS in coastal and continental wetlands had no immediate or long-term detectable effect on the taxonomic structure and taxa abundance of non-target aquatic invertebrate communities, including chironomids. This applied to the main habitats where mosquito larvae occur, regardless of their geographic location. Flooding, whose frequency and duration depend on local meteorological and hydrological conditions, was identified as the main environmental driver of invertebrate community dynamics. Our findings add support to the environmental safety of currently available Bti formulations when following recommended application rates and best mosquito control practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Do non-targeted effects increase or decrease low dose risk in relation to the linear-non-threshold (LNT) model?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review the evidence for departure from linearity for malignant and non-malignant disease and in the light of this assess likely mechanisms, and in particular the potential role for non-targeted effects. Excess cancer risks observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in many medically and occupationally exposed groups exposed at low or moderate doses are generally statistically compatible. For most cancer sites the dose-response in these groups is compatible with linearity over the range observed. The available data on biological mechanisms do not provide general support for the idea of a low dose threshold or hormesis. This large body of evidence does not suggest, indeed is not statistically compatible with, any very large threshold in dose for cancer, or with possible hormetic effects, and there is little evidence of the sorts of non-linearity in response implied by non-DNA-targeted effects. There are also excess risks of various types of non-malignant disease in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in other groups. In particular, elevated risks of cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and digestive disease are observed in the A-bomb data. In contrast with cancer, there is much less consistency in the patterns of risk between the various exposed groups; for example, radiation-associated respiratory and digestive diseases have not been seen in these other (non-A-bomb) groups. Cardiovascular risks have been seen in many exposed populations, particularly in medically exposed groups, but in contrast with cancer there is much less consistency in risk between studies: risks per unit dose in epidemiological studies vary over at least two orders of magnitude, possibly a result of confounding and effect modification by well known (but unobserved) risk factors. In the absence of a convincing mechanistic explanation of epidemiological evidence that is, at present, less than persuasive, a cause-and-effect interpretation of the reported

  6. Targeting of non-dominant antigens as a vaccine strategy to broaden T-cell responses during chronic viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Ragonnaud, Emeline

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we compared adenoviral vaccine vectors with the capacity to induce equally potent immune responses against non-dominant and immunodominant epitopes of murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Our results demonstrate that vaccination targeting non-dominant epitopes facilita......In this study, we compared adenoviral vaccine vectors with the capacity to induce equally potent immune responses against non-dominant and immunodominant epitopes of murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Our results demonstrate that vaccination targeting non-dominant epitopes...... was lost over time in T cells specific for the dominant T cell epitopes, and these cells were fully capable of expanding in response to a new viral challenge. Overall, our data suggests a potential for broadening of the antiviral CD8+ T-cell response by selecting non-dominant antigens to be targeted...

  7. Hope for children and families: targeting abusive parenting and the associated impairment of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentovim, Arnon; Elliott, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to distill the "effective practice elements" from randomised controlled interventions (RCTs) to prevent the recurrence of abusive and neglectful parenting and the associated health and developmental impairment of children. The resulting elements would be used then to develop a step-by-step modular-systemic approach to intervention that is suitable to the needs of a variety of frontline practitioners in social care, health, and education. A series of 22 randomised RCTs were analysed using the distillation and matching approach to establish the presence of effective practice elements. The focus was physical and sexual abuse, victims and children, and young people as perpetrators; neglect including failure to thrive, emotional abuse (exposure to violence and mental health issues). The studies were analysed for effective practice elements, across different approaches matched to interventions focused on parenting, on children and young people, and on family/professional relationships. The proportion of practice elements utilised in each form of maltreatment was defined. The distillation process resulted in a total of 47 practice elements present across all forms of maltreatment studied. An experienced group of practitioners from statutory and voluntary agencies ordered and integrated the most frequently utilised emerging elements into a series of step-by-step modules, which could fit the complex needs of families when maltreatment had occurred. The resulting manual, Hope for Children and Families, provides a "menu" of evidence-based, step-by-step modular interventions targeting the profile of abusive and neglectful parenting and associated impairments of children. To be effective for frontline practitioners, the manual will need to be delivered in a user-friendly format, training developed, and supervision and support provided.

  8. Cognitive Function as a Trans-Diagnostic Treatment Target in Stimulant Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofuoglu, Mehmet; DeVito, Elise E.; Waters, Andrew J.; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulant use disorder is an important public health problem, with an estimated 2.1 million current users in the United States alone. No pharmacological treatments are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stimulant use disorder and behavioral treatments have variable efficacy and limited availability. Most individuals with stimulant use disorder have other comorbidities, most with overlapping symptoms and cognitive impairments. The goal of this article is to present a rationale for cognition as a treatment target in stimulant use disorder, and to outline potential treatment approaches. Rates of lifetime comorbid psychiatric disorders among people with stimulant use disorders are estimated at 65% - 73%, with the most common being mood disorders (13% - 64%) and anxiety disorders (21% - 50%), as well as non-substance induced psychotic disorders (under 10%). There are several models of addictive behavior, but the dual process model particularly highlights the relevance of cognitive impairments and biases to the development and maintenance of addiction. This model explains addictive behavior as a balance between automatic processes and executive control, which in turn are related to individual (genetics, comorbid disorders, psychosocial factors) and other (craving, triggers, drug use) factors. Certain cognitive impairments, such as attentional bias and approach bias, are most relevant to automatic processes, while sustained attention, response inhibition, and working memory are primarily related to executive control. These cognitive impairments and biases are also common in disorders frequently comorbid with stimulant use disorder, and predict poor treatment retention and clinical outcomes. As such, they may serve as feasible trans-diagnostic treatment targets. There are promising pharmacological, cognitive, and behavioral approaches that aim to enhance cognitive function. Pharmacotherapies target cognitive impairments associated with executive

  9. Impairments to Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an external Non-Government web site. Impairments to Vision Normal Vision Diabetic Retinopathy Age-related Macular Degeneration In this ... pictures, fixate on the nose to simulate the vision loss. In diabetic retinopathy, the blood vessels in ...

  10. Drugs affecting prelamin A processing: Effects on heterochromatin organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattioli, Elisabetta; Columbaro, Marta; Capanni, Cristina; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir M.; D'Apice, M. Rosaria; Novelli, Giuseppe; Riccio, Massimo; Squarzoni, Stefano; Foisner, Roland; Lattanzi, Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    Increasing interest in drugs acting on prelamin A has derived from the finding of prelamin A involvement in severe laminopathies. Amelioration of the nuclear morphology by inhibitors of prelamin A farnesylation has been widely reported in progeroid laminopathies. We investigated the effects on chromatin organization of two drugs inhibiting prelamin A processing by an ultrastructural and biochemical approach. The farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI-277 and the non-peptidomimetic drug N-acetyl-S-farnesyl-L-cysteine methylester (AFCMe) were administered to cultured control human fibroblasts for 6 or 18 h. FTI-277 interferes with protein farnesylation causing accumulation of non-farnesylated prelamin A, while AFCMe impairs the last cleavage of the lamin A precursor and is expected to accumulate farnesylated prelamin A. FTI-277 caused redistribution of heterochromatin domains at the nuclear interior, while AFCMe caused loss of heterochromatin domains, increase of nuclear size and nuclear lamina thickening. At the biochemical level, heterochromatin-associated proteins and LAP2α were clustered at the nuclear interior following FTI-277 treatment, while they were unevenly distributed or absent in AFCMe-treated nuclei. The reported effects show that chromatin is an immediate target of FTI-277 and AFCMe and that dramatic remodeling of chromatin domains occurs following treatment with the drugs. These effects appear to depend, at least in part, on the accumulation of prelamin A forms, since impairment of prelamin A accumulation, here obtained by 5-azadeoxycytidine treatment, abolishes the chromatin effects. These results may be used to evaluate downstream effects of FTIs or other prelamin A inhibitors potentially useful for the therapy of laminopathies

  11. Impact Of Non-Governmental Organizations\\' Activities In Creating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examines the impact of Non-Governmental Organizations\\' (NGOs) intervention in creating awareness and changing the mindset of people in typical rural communities in Kaduna State towards victims of HIV/AIDS. Structured questionnaire were used to collect data from adult male and female as well as young ...

  12. Modelling the impacts of challenging 2020 non-ETS GHG emissions reduction targets on Ireland′s energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiodi, Alessandro; Gargiulo, Maurizio; Deane, J.P.; Lavigne, Denis; Rout, Ullash K.; Ó Gallachóir, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on Ireland's ambitious target for 2020 to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 20% below 2005 levels for sectors not covered by ETS (Non-ETS). Ireland is an interesting case study due to the role of agriculture (a particularly challenging sector with regard to GHG emissions reduction), that represents 29% of Ireland's GHG emissions compared with less than 10% for the EU. The analysis is carried out with the Irish TIMES model, a bottom-up energy systems modelling tool with detailed characterization of Ireland's energy system. The paper uses scenario analysis to provide pathways that demonstrate how Ireland can meet the non-ETS target at least cost. The paper considers the impacts (in terms of different technology choices and higher marginal abatement costs) arising from higher targets for the energy system to compensate for growth in agriculture activity and low mitigation potential in that sector. The results point to a need to reconsider Ireland's renewable energy focus, with a need for increased effort in renewable transport and renewable heat in particular. The results also point to significant electrification of residential heating. The results also point to a high marginal abatement cost (€213/tCO 2 ), which challenges the analysis carried out at EU level to establish Ireland's non-ETS target. - Highlights: • Techno-economic energy model to deliver EU GHG mitigation target by 2020 in Ireland. • Agriculture represents nearly half of Non-ETS emissions in Ireland. • The target set for Non-ETS GHG for Ireland is far from a cost optimal target. • The results point to a need to reconsider Ireland's renewable energy focus. • Key pathways: electrification of heating in buildings and biofuels in transport

  13. [Clinical characteristics in Parkinson's disease patients with cognitive impairment and effects of cognitive impairment on sleep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yan; Xiong, Kang-ping; Mao, Cheng-jie; Huang, Juan-ying; Hu, Wei-dong; Han, Fei; Chen, Rui; Liu, Chun-feng

    2013-09-03

    To analyze the clinical characteristics, correlation factors and clinical heterogeneities in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with cognitive impairment and identify whether cognitive impairment could influence the aspect of sleep. A total of 130 PD outpatients and inpatients of sleep center at our hospital were eligible for participation. According to Montreal cognitive assessment (MOCA), they were divided into cognitive normal group (MOCA ≥ 26) (n = 51) and cognitive impairment group (MOCA cognitive impairment (MOCA cognitive impairment, the PD patients with cognitive impairment had significantly higher score of HAMD (10 ± 7 vs 7 ± 4), increased incidence of hallucinations (40.50% vs 19.60%) and REM behavior disorders (RBD) (63.29% vs 39.21%), significantly higher H-Y stage [2.5(2.0-3.0) vs 2.0 (2.0-2.5)] , United Kingdom Parkinson Disease Society (UPDRS) part III (22 ± 10 vs 19 ± 10) and levodopa-equivalent daily dose (LED) (511 ± 302vs 380 ± 272) (all P 0.05). Non-conditional Logistic regression analysis showed that PD duration, score of HAMD and H-Y stage were the major influencing factors of cognition. On PSG, significantly decreased sleep efficiency (57% ± 21% vs 66% ± 17%), higher percentage of non-REM sleep stage 1 (NREMS1) (37% ± 21% vs 27% ± 13%), lower percentage of NREMS2 (40% ± 17% vs 46% ± 13%) and REM sleep (39% ± 28% vs 54% ± 36%) were found for PD patients with cognitive impairment (all P cognitive impairment have more severe disease and partial nonmotor symptoms. And the severity of disease and depression is closely associated with cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment may also affect sleep to cause decreased sleep efficiency and severe sleep structure disorder.

  14. Toxicological effects of pyrethroids on non-target aquatic insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi, Frank B; Reddy, Gadi V P

    2015-11-01

    The toxicological effects of pyrethroids on non-target aquatic insects are mediated by several modes of entry of pyrethroids into aquatic ecosystems, as well as the toxicological characteristics of particular pyrethroids under field conditions. Toxicokinetics, movement across the integument of aquatic insects, and the toxicodynamics of pyrethroids are discussed, and their physiological, symptomatic and ecological effects evaluated. The relationship between pyrethroid toxicity and insecticide uptake is not fully defined. Based on laboratory and field data, it is likely that the susceptibility of aquatic insects (vector and non-vector) is related to biochemical and physiological constraints associated with life in aquatic ecosystems. Understanding factors that influence aquatic insects susceptibility to pyrethroids is critical for the effective and safe use of these compounds in areas adjacent to aquatic environments. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Intervention for Mixed Receptive-Expressive Language Impairment: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, James; McCartney, Elspeth; O'Hare, Anne; Law, James

    2010-01-01

    Studies indicate that language impairment that cannot be accounted for by factors such as below-average non-verbal ability, hearing impairment, behaviour or emotional problems, or neurological impairments affects some 6% of school-age children. Language impairment with a receptive language component is more resistant to intervention than specific…

  16. Find Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Blind or Visually Impaired Find Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired Category All ... Territory Other (International) Organization Name Find Services for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired Browse All ...

  17. The modality-specific organization of grammatical categories: evidence from impaired spoken and written sentence production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, B; Caramazza, A

    1997-02-01

    We describe the case of a brain-damaged individual whose speech is characterized by difficulty with practically all words except for elements of the closed class vocabulary. In contrast, his written sentence production exhibits a complementary impairment involving the omission of closed class vocabulary items and the relative sparing of nouns. On the basis of these differences we argue: (1) that grammatical categories constitute an organizing parameter of representation and/or processing for each of the independent, modality-specific lexicons, and (2) that these observations contribute to the growing evidence that access to the orthographic and phonological forms of words can occur independently.

  18. A systematic review of medication non-adherence in persons with dementia or cognitive impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Smith

    Full Text Available Adherence to medication is vital for disease management while simultaneously reducing healthcare expenditure. Older persons with cognitive impairment (CI are at risk for non-adherence as cognitive processes are needed to manage medications. This systematic review focuses on the relationship between medication non-adherence and specific cognitive domains in persons with CI, and explores determinants of medication non-adherence. When available, relationships and factors are compared with cognitively intact populations.A seven database systematic search of studies published between 1 January 1949-31 December 2015 examining medication non-adherence in community dwelling persons with CI or dementia was conducted. Articles reporting medication non-adherence in people with CI or dementia in the community, with or without caregiver supports were eligible for inclusion. Papers reporting adherence to treatments in cognitively intact populations, populations from hospital or institutional settings, for non-prescribed medication or those describing dementia as a factor predicting medication non-adherence were excluded. Data on study and population characteristics, research design, data sources and analysis, specific cognitive domains, non-adherence prevalence, measurement of adherence, salient findings, factors associated with adherence and strategies to improve medication adherence were extracted. Study limitations included inconsistencies between data sources and definitions, resulting in a loss of fidelity in the value and comprehensiveness of data, as well as exclusion of non-pharmacological treatments and regimens.Fifteen studies met inclusion criteria. Adherence among CI subjects ranged from 10.7%-38% with better rates of adherence in non-CI individuals. Medication non-adherence definitions varied considerably. New-learning, memory and executive functioning were associated with improved adherence and formed the focus of most studies. Multiple factors

  19. Losing memories during sleep after targeted memory reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Katharine C N S; Gómez, Rebecca L; Nadel, Lynn

    2018-03-17

    Targeting memories during sleep opens powerful and innovative ways to influence the mind. We used targeted memory reactivation (TMR), which to date has been shown to strengthen learned episodes, to instead induce forgetting (TMR-Forget). Participants were first trained to associate the act of forgetting with an auditory forget tone. In a second, separate, task they learned object-sound-location pairings. Shortly thereafter, some of the object sounds were played during slow wave sleep, paired with the forget tone to induce forgetting. One week later, participants demonstrated lower recall of reactivated versus non-reactivated objects and impaired recognition memory and lowered confidence for the spatial location of the reactivated objects they failed to spontaneously recall. The ability to target specific episodic memories for forgetting during sleep has implications for developing novel therapeutic techniques for psychological disorders such as PTSD and phobias. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficient Nonlocal M-Control and N-Target Controlled Unitary Gate Using Non-symmetric GHZ States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Bing; Lu, Hong

    2018-03-01

    Efficient local implementation of a nonlocal M-control and N-target controlled unitary gate is considered. We first show that with the assistance of two non-symmetric qubit(1)-qutrit(N) Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states, a nonlocal 2-control and N-target controlled unitary gate can be constructed from 2 local two-qubit CNOT gates, 2 N local two-qutrit conditional SWAP gates, N local qutrit-qubit controlled unitary gates, and 2 N single-qutrit gates. At each target node, the two third levels of the two GHZ target qutrits are used to expose one and only one initial computational state to the local qutrit-qubit controlled unitary gate, instead of being used to hide certain states from the conditional dynamics. This scheme can be generalized straightforwardly to implement a higher-order nonlocal M-control and N-target controlled unitary gate by using M non-symmetric qubit(1)-qutrit(N) GHZ states as quantum channels. Neither the number of the additional levels of each GHZ target particle nor that of single-qutrit gates needs to increase with M. For certain realistic physical systems, the total gate time may be reduced compared with that required in previous schemes.

  1. Non-target screening to trace ozonation transformation products in a wastewater treatment train including different post-treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schollée, Jennifer E; Bourgin, Marc; von Gunten, Urs; McArdell, Christa S; Hollender, Juliane

    2018-05-25

    Ozonation and subsequent post-treatments are increasingly implemented in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) for enhanced micropollutant abatement. While this technology is effective, micropollutant oxidation leads to the formation of ozonation transformation products (OTPs). Target and suspect screening provide information about known parent compounds and known OTPs, but for a more comprehensive picture, non-target screening is needed. Here, sampling was conducted at a full-scale WWTP to investigate OTP formation at four ozone doses (2, 3, 4, and 5 mg/L, ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 gO 3 /gDOC) and subsequent changes during five post-treatment steps (i.e., sand filter, fixed bed bioreactor, moving bed bioreactor, and two granular activated carbon (GAC) filters, relatively fresh and pre-loaded). Samples were measured with online solid-phase extraction coupled to liquid chromatography high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS/MS) using electrospray ionization (ESI) in positive and negative modes. Existing non-target screening workflows were adapted to (1) examine the formation of potential OTPs at four ozone doses and (2) compare the removal of OTPs among five post-treatments. In (1), data processing included principal component analysis (PCA) and chemical knowledge on possible oxidation reactions to prioritize non-target features likely to be OTPs. Between 394 and 1328 unique potential OTPs were detected in positive ESI for the four ozone doses tested; between 12 and 324 unique potential OTPs were detected in negative ESI. At a specific ozone dose of 0.5 gO 3 /gDOC, 27 parent compounds were identified and were related to 69 non-target features selected as potential OTPs. Two OTPs were confirmed with reference standards (venlafaxine N-oxide and chlorothiazide); 34 other potential OTPs were in agreement with literature data and/or reaction mechanisms. In (2), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was applied on profiles detected in positive ESI mode across the

  2. Macromolecular Design Strategies for Preventing Active-Material Crossover in Non-Aqueous All-Organic Redox-Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doris, Sean E; Ward, Ashleigh L; Baskin, Artem; Frischmann, Peter D; Gavvalapalli, Nagarjuna; Chénard, Etienne; Sevov, Christo S; Prendergast, David; Moore, Jeffrey S; Helms, Brett A

    2017-02-01

    Intermittent energy sources, including solar and wind, require scalable, low-cost, multi-hour energy storage solutions in order to be effectively incorporated into the grid. All-Organic non-aqueous redox-flow batteries offer a solution, but suffer from rapid capacity fade and low Coulombic efficiency due to the high permeability of redox-active species across the battery's membrane. Here we show that active-species crossover is arrested by scaling the membrane's pore size to molecular dimensions and in turn increasing the size of the active material above the membrane's pore-size exclusion limit. When oligomeric redox-active organics (RAOs) were paired with microporous polymer membranes, the rate of active-material crossover was reduced more than 9000-fold compared to traditional separators at minimal cost to ionic conductivity. This corresponds to an absolute rate of RAO crossover of less than 3 μmol cm -2  day -1 (for a 1.0 m concentration gradient), which exceeds performance targets recently set forth by the battery industry. This strategy was generalizable to both high and low-potential RAOs in a variety of non-aqueous electrolytes, highlighting the versatility of macromolecular design in implementing next-generation redox-flow batteries. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Butenolide inhibits marine fouling by altering the primary metabolism of three target organisms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yifan; Zhang, Huoming; He, Lisheng; Liu, Changdong; Xü , Ying; Qian, Peiyuan

    2012-01-01

    Butenolide is a very promising antifouling compound that inhibits ship hull fouling by a variety of marine organisms, but its antifouling mechanism was previously unknown. Here we report the first study of butenolides molecular targets in three

  4. Color stability and lipid oxidation of broiler breast meat from animals raised on organic versus non-organic production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, F M; Canto, A C V C S; Costa-Lima, B R C; Salim, A P A A; Conte-Junior, C A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present research was to evaluate the influence of organic and non-organic production systems on color stability and lipid oxidation of broiler meat Pectoralis major (PM) stored under refrigeration (4°C) for 9 days. PM samples from organic (ORG) and non-organic (NORG) production systems were compared based on physicochemical analyses (instrumental color, myoglobin concentration, metmyoglobin reducing activity (MRA), pH, and lipid oxidation) performed in 4 different trials (n = 4). In general, NORG broilers demonstrated higher (P color stability observed in NORG samples can be partly due to lipid oxidation. Therefore, the production system can affect color and lipid stability of broiler breast meat during storage. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  5. The association of short-term memory and cognitive impairment with ghrelin, leptin, and cortisol levels in non-diabetic and diabetic elderly individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yu Ming; Wang, Li Jun; Mao, Hong Xian; Lou, Xue Yong; Zhu, Yi Jun

    2018-06-01

    This study assessed short-term memory and biochemical indicators with the levels of ghrelin, leptin, and cortisol between cognitive impairment and normal older adults with or without diabetes. We enrolled 286 older adults (aged 65-85 years) with or without diabetes from the local community. Short-term memory was assessed using pictures of common objects; cognitive functioning was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). The physiological indexes assessed were plasma levels of fasting ghrelin and leptin, ghrelin level at 2_h after breakfast, 24-h urinary cortisol value, body mass index, and plasma cortisol levels at 8:00 a.m., 4:00 p.m., and 12:00 p.m. In both non-diabetic and diabetic subjects, short-term memory was significantly lower in the impaired cognition group (5.99 ± 2.90 in non-diabetic subjects and 4.71 ± 2.14 in diabetic subjects) than in the normal cognition group (8.14 ± 2.23 in non-diabetic subjects and 7.82 ± 3.37 in diabetic subjects). Baseline ghrelin level was significantly lower in the impaired cognition group (9.07 ± 1.13 ng/mL in non-diabetic subjects and 7.76 ± 1.34 ng/mL in diabetic subjects) than in the normal cognition group (10.94 ± 1.53 ng/mL in non-diabetic subjects and 9.93 ± 1.76 ng/mL in diabetic subjects); plasma cortisol levels at 8:00 a.m., 4:00 p.m., and 12:00 p.m. were significantly higher in the impaired cognition group than in the normal cognition group, while no significant difference was observed in plasma levels of fasting leptin between different groups. Fasting plasma ghrelin and cortisol levels may be markers of cognitive decline and memory loss. It is possible that adjusting their levels may have a therapeutic effect, and this should be investigated in future studies.

  6. The Role of Non-Governmental Organizations in Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of non-governmental organizations in rural transformation in Odukpani Local Government Area of Cross River State, Nigeria. The activities they have engaged in and what result they achieved and how this impacted on rural livelihoods and development. A sample ...

  7. Tone language fluency impairs pitch discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle ePeretz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Here we present evidence that native speakers of a tone language, in which pitch contributes to word meaning, are impaired in the discrimination of falling pitches in tone sequences, as compared to speakers of a non-tone language. Both groups were presented with monotonic and isochronous sequences of five tones (i.e., constant pitch and intertone interval. They were required to detect when the fourth tone was displaced in pitch or time. While speakers of a tone language performed more poorly in the detection of downward pitch changes, they did not differ from non-tone language speakers in their perception of upward pitch changes or in their perception of subtle time changes. Moreover, this impairment cannot be attributed to low musical aptitude since the impairment remains unchanged when individual differences in musical pitch-based processing is taken into account. Thus, the impairment appears highly specific and may reflect the influence of statistical regularities of tone languages.

  8. Different Neural Networks are Involved in Cross-Modal Non-Spatial Inhibition of Return (IOR: The Effect of the Sensory Modality of Behavioral Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Chen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We employed a novel cross-modal non-spatial inhibition of return (IOR paradigm with fMRI to investigate whether object concept is organized by supramodal or modality-specific systems. A precue-neutral cue-target sequence was presented and participants were asked to discriminate whether the target was a dog or a cat. The precue and the target could be either a picture or vocalization of a dog or a cat. The neutral cue (bird was always from the same modality as the precue. Behaviorally, for both visual and auditory targets, the main effect of cue validity was the only significant effect, p<0.01, with equivalent effects for within- and cross-modal IOR. Neurally, for visual targets, left inferior frontal gyrus and left medial temporal gyrus showed significantly higher neural activity in cued than uncued condition, irrespective of the precue-target relationship, indicating that the two areas are involved in inhibiting a supramodal representation of previously attended object concept. For auditory targets, left lateral occipital gyrus and right postcentral gyrus showed significantly higher neural activity in uncued than cued condition irrespective of the cue-target relationship, indicating that the two areas are involved in creating a new supramodal representation when a novel object concept appears.

  9. Adaptive evolution of drug targets in producer and non-producer organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Sun, Xin E.; Genee, Hans Jasper

    2012-01-01

    MPA (mycophenolic acid) is an immunosuppressive drug produced by several fungi in Penicillium subgenus Penicillium. This toxic metabolite is an inhibitor of IMPDH (IMP dehydrogenase). The MPA-biosynthetic cluster of Penicillum brevicompactum contains a gene encoding a B-type IMPDH, IMPDH-B, which...... confers MPA resistance. Surprisingly, all members of the subgenus Penicillium contain genes encoding IMPDHs of both the A and B types, regardless of their ability to produce MPA. Duplication of the IMPDH gene occurred before and independently of the acquisition of the MPAbiosynthetic cluster. Both P....... brevicompactum IMPDHs are MPA-resistant, whereas the IMPDHs from a non-producer are MPA-sensitive. Resistance comes with a catalytic cost: whereas P. brevicompactum IMPDH-B is >1000-fold more resistant to MPA than a typical eukaryotic IMPDH, its value of kcat/Km is 0.5%of ‘normal’. Curiously, IMPDH...

  10. A study on applying image dictionary to inner organ registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuno, Takamichi; Asai, Takeshi; Iwata, Takuya; Hontani, Hidekata

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we report on selecting image features that are useful for registering organ surface in medical image based on image dictionary constructed for the organ. Here, the image dictionary denotes a basis set, which is non-orthogonal and over-complete one and is designed to represent images of the target organ. We propose a method that refers to a combination of the basis obtained for reconstructing a given image in order to estimate the location of the target organ. (author)

  11. Preliminary evaluation of child self-rating using the Child Tourette Syndrome Impairment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloes, Kelly Isaacs; Barfell, Kara S Francis; Horn, Paul S; Wu, Steve W; Jacobson, Sarah E; Hart, Kathleen J; Gilbert, Donald L

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate and compare how children with Tourette syndrome and parents rate tic and non-tic behavioral related impairment in home, school, and social domains; to compare these with clinician tic ratings; and to identify factors that may predict greater impairment. In a sample of 85 Tourette syndrome and 92 healthy control families, the Child Tourette Syndrome Impairment Scale, designed for parent-report and which includes 37 items rated for tic and non-tic impairment, was administered to parents and, with the referent modified, to children ages 9 to 17 years. Tic severity was rated using the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS). Analyses utilized descriptive and multivariate statistics. Tourette syndrome children's and parents' impairment ratings were higher than HC (ptic impairment ratings correlated with YGTSS (r=0.36 to 0.37; ptic and all 37 non-tic impairment items. For 29 items, children self-rated impairment higher for tics than non-tics. Diagnoses of attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder had larger effects on parent impairment ratings. The Child Tourette Syndrome Impairment Scale appears informative for child self-rating in Tourette syndrome. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  12. Overview of one transistor type of hybrid organic ferroelectric non-volatile memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Young; Tea; Chun; Daping; Chu

    2015-01-01

    Organic ferroelectric memory devices based on field effect transistors that can be configured between two stable states of on and off have been widely researched as the next generation data storage media in recent years.This emerging type of memory devices can lead to a new instrument system as a potential alternative to previous non-volatile memory building blocks in future processing units because of their numerous merits such as cost-effective process,simple structure and freedom in substrate choices.This bi-stable non-volatile memory device of information storage has been investigated using several organic or inorganic semiconductors with organic ferroelectric polymer materials.Recent progresses in this ferroelectric memory field,hybrid system have attracted a lot of attention due to their excellent device performance in comparison with that of all organic systems.In this paper,a general review of this type of ferroelectric non-volatile memory is provided,which include the device structure,organic ferroelectric materials,electrical characteristics and working principles.We also present some snapshots of our previous study on hybrid ferroelectric memories including our recent work based on zinc oxide nanowire channels.

  13. Targeting myeloid cells to the brain using non-myeloablative conditioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chotima Böttcher

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs are able to colonize the central nervous system (CNS at sites of damage. This ability makes BMDCs an ideal cellular vehicle for transferring therapeutic genes/molecules to the CNS. However, conditioning is required for bone marrow-derived myeloid cells to engraft in the brain, which so far has been achieved by total body irradiation (TBI and by chemotherapy (e.g. busulfan treatment. Unfortunately, both regimens massively disturb the host's hematopoietic compartment. Here, we established a conditioning protocol to target myeloid cells to sites of brain damage in mice using non-myeloablative focal head irradiation (HI. This treatment was associated with comparatively low inflammatory responses in the CNS despite cranial radiation doses which are identical to TBI, as revealed by gene expression analysis of cytokines/chemokines such as CCL2, CXCL10, TNF-α and CCL5. HI prior to bone marrow transplantation resulted in much lower levels of blood chimerism defined as the percentage of donor-derived cells in peripheral blood ( 95% or busulfan treatment (> 50%. Nevertheless, HI effectively recruited myeloid cells to the area of motoneuron degeneration in the brainstem within 7 days after facial nerve axotomy. In contrast, no donor-derived cells were detected in the lesioned facial nucleus of busulfan-treated animals up to 2 weeks after transplantation. Our findings suggest that myeloid cells can be targeted to sites of brain damage even in the presence of very low levels of peripheral blood chimerism. We established a novel non-myeloablative conditioning protocol with minimal disturbance of the host's hematopoietic system for targeting BMDCs specifically to areas of pathology in the brain.

  14. Role of Non-Government Organizations in strengthening Kazakstan nuclear export control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazhibaeva, L.; Prokhodtseva, T.

    2002-01-01

    Non-governmental organizations (NGO) are the structures that were born by the time, the time when deep changes in our society led us to new trends in the all spheres of society development, to new decisions and, as a consequence, to new structural findings that where able to govern, to support and put into reality the new ideas the could not be inserted in the structure assemblies of the former society. All non-governmental organizations in Kazakhstan are younger than ten years old, but they already could be considered highly experienced, for intensity of their activity is rather high. The main advantages of NGOs are flexibility and independent source of ideas, basic data and policy assessment. There are several non-government organizations that are working in the field of non-proliferation and export control. Kazakhstan Nuclear Technology Safety Center (NTSC) is among them. Non-proliferation and export control is only a small part of activity that NTSC is involved in. Non-governmental organizations could be of several types: NGOs that are affiliated with university or institute, independent associations, quasi-governmental structures and various foundations. NTSC complementing efforts of Kazakhstan Atomic Energy Committee (KAEC) in the field of non-proliferation and export control. The activity of NTSC in the field of non-proliferation includes: Holding conferences, seminars and workshops; Creating databases and reports; Develop proposal for legislation; Provide specialized training; Analyze data. NTSC is involved in a number of projects devoted to non-proliferation and export control. The following projects are supported by the US Department of Energy cooperation program on nuclear export controls for Russia and the Newly Independent States: System to review Kazakhstan exports (STROKE); Computerization of historical licensing data; Export control reference materials for Kazakhstan organizations; Additional Protocol. STROKE is a technical analysis database for

  15. Non-target activity detection by post-radioembolization yttrium-90 PET/CT: Image assessment technique and case examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Hsiang eKao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution yttrium-90 (90Y imaging of post-radioembolization microsphere biodistribution may be achieved by conventional positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT scanners that have time-of-flight capability. However, reconstructed 90Y PET/CT images have high background noise, making non-target activity detection technically challenging. This educational article describes our image assessment technique for non-target activity detection by 90Y PET/CT which qualitatively overcomes the problem of background noise. We present selected case examples of non-target activity in untargeted liver, stomach, gallbladder, chest wall and kidney, supported by angiography and 90Y bremsstrahlung single photon emission computed tomography with integrated computed tomography (SPECT/CT or technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin SPECT/CT.

  16. Protection capacity against low-density lipoprotein oxidation and antioxidant potential of some organic and non-organic wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan Yildirim, Hatice; Delen Akçay, Yasemin; Güvenç, Ulgar; Yildirim Sözmen, Eser

    2004-08-01

    Current research suggests that phenolics from wine may play a positive role against oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which is a key step in the development of atherosclerosis. Considering the effects of different wine-making techniques on phenols and the wine consumption preference influencing the benefical effects of the product, organically and non-organically produced wines were obtained from the grapes of Vitis vinifera origin var: Carignan, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Grenache, Columbard and Semillon. Levels of total phenols [mg/l gallic acid equivalents (GAE)], antioxidant activity (%) and inhibition of LDL oxidation [%, inhibition of diene and malondialdehyde (MDA) formation] were determined. Some phenolic acids (gallic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, syringic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid and vanillic acid) were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with an electrochemical detection carried at +0.65 V (versus Ag/AgCl, 0.5 microA full scale). The highest concentrations of gallic, syringic and ferulic acids were found in organic Cabernet Sauvignon; 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid in organic Carignan and p-coumaric and vanillic acids in non-organic Merlot wine. High levels of antioxidant activity (AOA), inhibition of LDL oxidation and total phenol levels were found in non-organic Merlot (101.950% AOA; 88.570% LDL-diene; 41.000% LDL-MDA; 4700.000 mg/l GAE total phenol) and non-organic Cabernet Sauvignon (92.420% AOA; 91.430% LDL-diene; 67.000% LDL-MDA; 3500.000 mg/l GAE total phenol) grape varieties. Concentrations of some individual phenolic constituents (ferulic, p-coumaric, vanillic) are correlated with high antioxidant activity and inhibition of LDL oxidation. The best r value for all examined characteristics was determined for gallic acid, followed by 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic, syringic, ferulic and p-coumaric acids. Negative correlation of vanillic with MDA and p-hydroxybenzoic acid with LDL were

  17. Targeting proteasomes in infectious organisms to combat disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibo-Verdugo, Betsaida; Jiang, Zhenze; Caffrey, Conor R; O'Donoghue, Anthony J

    2017-05-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit, energy-dependent, proteolytic complexes that play an essential role in intracellular protein turnover. They are present in eukaryotes, archaea, and in some actinobacteria species. Inhibition of proteasome activity has emerged as a powerful strategy for anticancer therapy and three drugs have been approved for treatment of multiple myeloma. These compounds react covalently with a threonine residue located in the active site of a proteasome subunit to block protein degradation. Proteasomes in pathogenic organisms such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Plasmodium falciparum also have a nucleophilic threonine residue in the proteasome active site and are therefore sensitive to these anticancer drugs. This review summarizes efforts to validate the proteasome in pathogenic organisms as a therapeutic target. We describe several strategies that have been used to develop inhibitors with increased potency and selectivity for the pathogen proteasome relative to the human proteasome. In addition, we highlight a cell-based chemical screening approach that identified a potent, allosteric inhibitor of proteasomes found in Leishmania and Trypanosoma species. Finally, we discuss the development of proteasome inhibitors as anti-infective agents. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Polar and non-polar organic aerosols from large-scale agricultural-waste burning emissions in Northern India: Implications to organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Prashant; Sarin, M M

    2014-05-01

    This study focuses on characteristics of organic aerosols (polar and non-polar) and total organic mass-to-organic carbon ratio (OM/OC) from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy- and wheat-residue) burning emissions in Northern India. Aerosol samples from an upwind location (Patiala: 30.2°N, 76.3°E) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain were analyzed for non-polar and polar fractions of organic carbon (OC1 and OC2) and their respective mass (OM1 and OM2). On average, polar organic aerosols (OM2) contribute nearly 85% of the total organic mass (OM) from the paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. The water-soluble-OC (WSOC) to OC2 ratio, within the analytical uncertainty, is close to 1 from both paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. However, temporal variability and relatively low WSOC/OC2 ratio (Av: 0.67±0.06) is attributed to high moisture content and poor combustion efficiency during paddy-residue burning, indicating significant contribution (∼30%) of aromatic carbon to OC2. The OM/OC ratio for non-polar (OM1/OC1∼1.2) and polar organic aerosols (OM2/OC2∼2.2), hitherto unknown for open agricultural-waste burning emissions, is documented in this study. The total OM/OC ratio is nearly identical, 1.9±0.2 and 1.8±0.2, from paddy- and wheat-residue burning emissions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-Metastatic Cutaneous Melanoma Induces Chronodisruption in Central and Peripheral Circadian Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Vinícius Monteiro de Assis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The biological clock has received increasing interest due to its key role in regulating body homeostasis in a time-dependent manner. Cancer development and progression has been linked to a disrupted molecular clock; however, in melanoma, the role of the biological clock is largely unknown. We investigated the effects of the tumor on its micro- (TME and macro-environments (TMaE in a non-metastatic melanoma model. C57BL/6J mice were inoculated with murine B16-F10 melanoma cells and 2 weeks later the animals were euthanized every 6 h during 24 h. The presence of a localized tumor significantly impaired the biological clock of tumor-adjacent skin and affected the oscillatory expression of genes involved in light- and thermo-reception, proliferation, melanogenesis, and DNA repair. The expression of tumor molecular clock was significantly reduced compared to healthy skin but still displayed an oscillatory profile. We were able to cluster the affected genes using a human database and distinguish between primary melanoma and healthy skin. The molecular clocks of lungs and liver (common sites of metastasis, and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN were significantly affected by tumor presence, leading to chronodisruption in each organ. Taken altogether, the presence of non-metastatic melanoma significantly impairs the organism’s biological clocks. We suggest that the clock alterations found in TME and TMaE could impact development, progression, and metastasis of melanoma; thus, making the molecular clock an interesting pharmacological target.

  20. Innovative Mechanism of Rural Organization Based on Self-Organization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The paper analyzes the basic situation of the formation of innovative rural organizations with the form of self-organization;reveals the features of self-organization,including the four aspects of openness of rural organization,innovation of rural organization far away from equilibrium,the non-linear response mechanism of rural organization innovation and the random rise and fall of rural organization innovation.The evolution mechanism of rural organization innovation is revealed according to the growth stage,the ideal stage,the decline and the fall stage.The paper probes into the basic restriction mechanism of the self-organization evaluation of rural organization from three aspects,including target recognition,path dependence and knowledge sharing.The basic measures on cultivating the innovative mechanism of rural organization are put forward.Firstly,constructing the dissipative structure of rural organization innovation;secondly,cultivating the dynamic study capability of rural organization innovation system;thirdly,selecting the step-by-step evolution strategy of rural organization innovation system.

  1. Targeting Nursing Homes Under the Quality Improvement Organization Program’s 9th Statement of Work

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, David G.; Mor, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    In the Quality Improvement Organization (QIO) program’s latest Statement of Work, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is targeting its nursing home activities toward facilities that perform poorly on two quality measures—pressure ulcers and restraint use. The designation of target facilities is a shift in strategy for CMS and a direct response to criticism that QIO program resources were not being targeted effectively to facilities or clinical areas that most needed improveme...

  2. New insights into non-conventional epitopes as T cell targets: The missing link for breaking immune tolerance in autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbige, James; Eichmann, Martin; Peakman, Mark

    2017-11-01

    The mechanism by which immune tolerance is breached in autoimmune disease is poorly understood. One possibility is that post-translational modification of self-antigens leads to peripheral recognition of neo-epitopes against which central and peripheral tolerance is inadequate. Accumulating evidence points to multiple mechanisms through which non-germline encoded sequences can give rise to these non-conventional epitopes which in turn engage the immune system as T cell targets. In particular, where these modifications alter the rules of epitope engagement with MHC molecules, such non-conventional epitopes offer a persuasive explanation for associations between specific HLA alleles and autoimmune diseases. In this review article, we discuss current understanding of mechanisms through which non-conventional epitopes may be generated, focusing on several recently described pathways that can transpose germline-encoded sequences. We contextualise these discoveries around type 1 diabetes, the prototypic organ-specific autoimmune disease in which specific HLA-DQ molecules confer high risk. Non-conventional epitopes have the potential to act as tolerance breakers or disease drivers in type 1 diabetes, prompting a timely re-evaluation of models of a etiopathogenesis. Future studies are required to elucidate the disease-relevance of a range of potential non-germline epitopes and their relationship to the natural peptide repertoire. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Vascular cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Vakhnina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular pathology of the brain is the second most common cause of cognitive impairment after Alzheimer's disease. The article describes the modern concepts of etiology, pathogenetic mechanisms, clinical features and approaches to diagnosis and therapy of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI. Cerebrovascular accident, chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency and their combination, sometimes in combination with a concomitant neurodegenerative process, are shown to be the major types of brain lesions leading to VCI. The clinical presentation of VCI is characterized by the neuropsychological status dominated by impairment of the executive frontal functions (planning, control, attention in combination with focal neurological symptoms. The diagnosis is based on comparing of the revealed neuropsychological and neurological features with neuroimaging data. Neurometabolic, acetylcholinergic, glutamatergic, and other vasoactive drugs and non-pharmacological methods are widely used to treat VCI. 

  4. Do non-monetary prices target the poor? Evidence from a field experiment in India

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    This paper uses willingness to pay (WTP) data from a field experiment in Hyderabad, India in 2013 to determine whether non-monetary prices better target health products to the poor than monetary prices. Monetary WTP is increasing in income and non-monetary WTP is weakly decreasing in income. Household fixed effects in a pooled sample of monetary WTP and non-monetary WTP are used to compare the correlation of income and WTP across price types. It is found that non-monetary WTP falls relative t...

  5. Glomerular Filtration Rate Estimation in Renal and Non-Renal Solid Organ Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mads; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Following transplantation (TX) of both renal and non-renal organs, a large proportion of patients have renal dysfunction. There are multiple causes for this. Chronic nephrotoxicity and high doses of calcineurin inhibitors are important factors. Preoperative and perioperative factors like hyperten......Following transplantation (TX) of both renal and non-renal organs, a large proportion of patients have renal dysfunction. There are multiple causes for this. Chronic nephrotoxicity and high doses of calcineurin inhibitors are important factors. Preoperative and perioperative factors like...... hypertension, hypotension, drugs and infections may play a causative role as well. Organ-specific causes include hepatorenal syndrome, cirrhosis, low cardiac function, low respiratory function and diabetes developed both before and after TX. It is important to be able to perform precise and valid measurements...... rate methods for use in renal and non-renal TX....

  6. Downregulation of Protein 4.1R impairs centrosome function,bipolar spindle organization and anaphase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, Jeffrey R.; Go, Minjoung M.; Bahmanyar, S.; Barth,A.I.M.; Krauss, Sharon Wald

    2006-03-17

    Centrosomes nucleate and organize interphase MTs and areinstrumental in the assembly of the mitotic bipolar spindle. Here wereport that two members of the multifunctional protein 4.1 family havedistinct distributions at centrosomes. Protein 4.1R localizes to maturecentrioles whereas 4.1G is a component of the pericentriolar matrixsurrounding centrioles. To selectively probe 4.1R function, we used RNAinterference-mediated depletion of 4.1R without decreasing 4.1Gexpression. 4.1R downregulation reduces MT anchoring and organization atinterphase and impairs centrosome separation during prometaphase.Metaphase chromosomes fail to properly condense/align and spindleorganization is aberrant. Notably 4.1R depletion causes mislocalizationof its binding partner NuMA (Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus Protein),essential for spindle pole focusing, and disrupts ninein. Duringanaphase/telophase, 4.1R-depleted cells have lagging chromosomes andaberrant MT bridges. Our data provide functional evidence that 4.1R makescrucial contributions to centrosome integrity and to mitotic spindlestructure enabling mitosis and anaphase to proceed with the coordinatedprecision required to avoid pathological events.

  7. Peripherally Administered Nanoparticles Target Monocytic Myeloid Cells, Secondary Lymphoid Organs and Tumors in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kourtis, Iraklis C.; Hirosue, Sachiko; de Titta, Alexandre; Kontos, Stephan; Stegmann, Toon; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Swartz, Melody A.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been extensively developed for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. While the focus of nanoparticle trafficking in vivo has traditionally been on drug delivery and organ-level biodistribution and clearance, recent work in cancer biology and infectious disease suggests that targeting different cells within a given organ can substantially affect the quality of the immunological response. Here, we examine the cell-level biodistribution kinetics after administering ultrasma...

  8. Cognitive Impairment in Adults with Non-CNS Cancers (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognitive impairment (problems with memory and thinking) is often reported by cancer patients and survivors and is sometimes called "chemobrain" or "chemofog.” Get detailed information about cognitive impairment and treatment in this expert-reviewed summary.

  9. Safety culture in the nuclear versus non-nuclear organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, S.B.; Shurberg, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of safety culture in the safe and reliable operation of nuclear organizations is not a new concept. The greatest barriers to this area of research are twofold: (1) the definition and criteria of safety culture for a nuclear organization and (2) the measurement of those attributes in an objective and systematic fashion. This paper will discuss a proposed resolution of those barriers as demonstrated by the collection of data across nuclear and non-nuclear facilities over a two year period

  10. Intrinsic non-radiative voltage losses in fullerene-based organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benduhn, Johannes; Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Piersimoni, Fortunato; Ullbrich, Sascha; Fan, Yeli; Tropiano, Manuel; McGarry, Kathryn A.; Zeika, Olaf; Riede, Moritz K.; Douglas, Christopher J.; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R.; Neher, Dieter; Spoltore, Donato; Vandewal, Koen

    2017-06-01

    Organic solar cells demonstrate external quantum efficiencies and fill factors approaching those of conventional photovoltaic technologies. However, as compared with the optical gap of the absorber materials, their open-circuit voltage is much lower, largely due to the presence of significant non-radiative recombination. Here, we study a large data set of published and new material combinations and find that non-radiative voltage losses decrease with increasing charge-transfer-state energies. This observation is explained by considering non-radiative charge-transfer-state decay as electron transfer in the Marcus inverted regime, being facilitated by a common skeletal molecular vibrational mode. Our results suggest an intrinsic link between non-radiative voltage losses and electron-vibration coupling, indicating that these losses are unavoidable. Accordingly, the theoretical upper limit for the power conversion efficiency of single-junction organic solar cells would be reduced to about 25.5% and the optimal optical gap increases to 1.45-1.65 eV, that is, 0.2-0.3 eV higher than for technologies with minimized non-radiative voltage losses.

  11. Non-proinflammatory and responsive nanoplatforms for targeted treatment of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yin; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Xiangjun; Xu, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Yidan; Guo, Jiawei; Zhang, Dinglin; Wang, Ruibing; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianxiang

    2017-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of many fatal cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Whereas nanomedicines are promising for targeted therapy of atherosclerosis, great challenges remain in development of effective, safe, and translational nanotherapies for its treatment. Herein we hypothesize that non-proinflammatory nanomaterials sensitive to low pH or high reactive oxygen species (ROS) may serve as effective platforms for triggerable delivery of anti-atherosclerotic therapeutics in cellular and tissue microenvironments of inflammation. To demonstrate this hypothesis, an acid-labile material of acetalated β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) (Ac-bCD) and a ROS-sensitive β-CD material (Ox-bCD) were separately synthesized by chemical modification of β-CD, which were formed into responsive nanoparticles (NPs). Ac-bCD NP was rapidly hydrolyzed in mildly acidic buffers, while hydrolysis of Ox-bCD NP was selectively accelerated by H 2 O 2 . Using an anti-atherosclerotic drug rapamycin (RAP), we found stimuli-responsive release of therapeutic molecules from Ac-bCD and Ox-bCD nanotherapies. Compared with non-responsive poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based NP, Ac-bCD and Ox-bCD NPs showed negligible inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. By endocytosis in cells and intracellularly releasing cargo molecules in macrophages, responsive nanotherapies effectively inhibited macrophage proliferation and suppressed foam cell formation. After intraperitoneal (i.p.) delivery in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE -/- ) mice, fluorescence imaging showed accumulation of NPs in atherosclerotic plaques. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that the lymphatic translocation mediated by neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages may contribute to atherosclerosis targeting of i.p. administered NPs, in addition to targeting via the leaky blood vessels. Correspondingly, i.p. treatment with different nanotherapies afforded desirable efficacies. Particularly, both pH and ROS

  12. Role of governmental and non-governmental organizations in mitigation of stigma and discrimination among HIV/AIDS persons in Kibera, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odindo, Margaret A; Mwanthi, Mutuku A

    2008-04-01

    This study assessed the role of governmental and non-governmental organizations in mitigation of stigma and discrimination among people infected and affected by HIV/AIDS in informal settlements of Kibera. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study and used a multi stage stratified sampling method. The study was conducted in Kibera, an informal settlement with a population of over one million people which makes it the largest slum not only in Kenya but in sub-Saharan Africa. The study targeted infected individuals, non-infected community members, managers of the organizations implementing HIV/AIDS programmes and service providers. In the process 1331 households were interviewed using qualitative and quantitative data collection instruments. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) and Nudist 4 packages were used to analyze the quantitative and qualitative data respectively. More than 61% of the respondents had patients in their households. Fifty five percent (55%) of the households received assistance from governmental and non-governmental organizations in taking care of the sick. Services provided included awareness, outreach, counseling, testing, treatment, advocacy, home based care, assistance to the orphans and legal issues. About 90% of the respondents perceived health education, counseling services and formation of post counseling support groups to combat stigma and discrimination to be helpful. Stigma and discrimination affects the rights of People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs). Such stigmatization and discrimination goes beyond and affects those who care for the PLWHAs, and remains the biggest impediment in the fight against HIV/AIDS in Kibera. Governmental and non-governmental organizations continue to provide key services in the mitigation of stigma and discrimination in Kibera. However, personal testimonies by PLWHAs showed that HIV positive persons still suffer from stigma and discrimination. Approximately 43% of the study population experienced

  13. Targeted and non-targeted drug screening in whole blood by UHPLC-TOF-MS with data-independent acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Christian Brinch; Dalsgaard, Petur Weihe; Mardal, Marie

    2017-01-01

    of peaks to inspect by three orders of magnitude, down to four peaks per DUID sample. The screening allowed for tentative identification of metabolites and drugs not included in the initial screening, and three drugs and thirteen metabolites were tentatively identified in the authentic DUID samples......High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is widely used for the drug screening of biological samples in clinical and forensic laboratories. With the continuous addition of new psychoactive substances (NPS), keeping such methods updated is challenging. HRMS allows for combined targeted and non......-targeted screening; first, peaks are identified by software algorithms, and identifications are based on reference standard data. Remaining unknown peaks are attempted identified with in silico and literature data. However, several thousand peaks remain where most are unidentifiable or uninteresting in drug...

  14. No-lose targets as an option to integrate non-Annex I countries in global emission reduction efforts. A game-theoretical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duscha, Vicki

    2012-07-01

    Substantial greenhouse gas emission reductions of 50% and more below 1990 levels by 2050 are necessary, to limit mean temperature increase below 2 C above pre-industrial levels. While the Kyoto Protocol foresees emission reduction targets for Annex I countries only, current and projected greenhouse gas emissions, as well as the growing economic importance of emerging economies call for an integration of non-Annex I countries in global reduction efforts. No-lose targets set emission reduction targets and define incentives for meeting the target, in contrast to binding reduction targets that use penalties to ensure compliance. One form of incentive is the participation in an international emissions trading market. While a few conceptual and quantitative analyses of no-lose targets can be found in the literature, economic analyses have not been carried out so far. In this thesis, two theoretical frameworks are introduced to analyze the potential of no-lose targets to contribute to global emission reduction efforts. First, a two-player, two-stage model is developed to model a non-Annex I country's participation decision and derive the contribution to global emission reductions. Then a two-player participation game is introduced to analyze the effects that the participation decision of one non-Annex I country has on another non-Annex I country also facing a no-lose target. Two market forms, a perfectly competitive market, and a market with market power on the side of the non-Annex I country are analyzed. In order to complement the highly stylized theoretical frameworks, a quantitative analysis applying marginal abatement cost curves is conducted to estimate the contribution of no-lose targets to reaching the 2 C target. The analyses show that no-lose targets can result in substantial contributions from non-Annex I countries to global emission reductions, in particular if the reduction potential in the non-Annex I countries is large, compared to that of the Annex I

  15. Quantitative modeling of responses to chronic ionizing radiation exposure using targeted and non-targeted effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shuryak

    Full Text Available The biological effects of chronic ionizing radiation exposure can be difficult to study, but important to understand in order to protect the health of occupationally-exposed persons and victims of radiological accidents or malicious events. They include targeted effects (TE caused by ionizations within/close to nuclear DNA, and non-targeted effects (NTE caused by damage to other cell structures and/or activation of stress-signaling pathways in distant cells. Data on radiation damage in animal populations exposed over multiple generations to wide ranges of dose rates after the Chernobyl nuclear-power-plant accident are very useful for enhancing our understanding of these processes. We used a mechanistically-motivated mathematical model which includes TE and NTE to analyze a large published data set on chromosomal aberrations in pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis embryos collected over 16 years from water bodies contaminated by Chernobyl fallout, and from control locations. The fraction of embryo cells with aberrations increased dramatically (>10-fold and non-linearly over a dose rate range of 0.03-420 μGy/h (0.00026-3.7 Gy/year. NTE were very important for describing the non-linearity of this radiation response: the TE-only model (without NTE performed dramatically worse than the TE+NTE model. NTE were predicted to reach ½ of maximal intensity at 2.5 μGy/h (0.022 Gy/year and to contribute >90% to the radiation response slope at dose rates <11 μGy/h (0.1 Gy/year. Internally-incorporated 90Sr was possibly more effective per unit dose than other radionuclides. The radiation response shape for chromosomal aberrations in snail embryos was consistent with data for a different endpoint: the fraction of young amoebocytes in adult snail haemolymph. Therefore, radiation may affect different snail life stages by similar mechanisms. The importance of NTE in our model-based analysis suggests that the search for modulators of NTE-related signaling pathways

  16. Targeting brain metastases in ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Isabella; Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Palmer, Joshua D; Mehra, Ranee; Lu, Bo

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of brain metastases has increased as a result of improved systemic control and advances in imaging. However, development of novel therapeutics with CNS activity has not advanced at the same rate. Research on molecular markers has revealed many potential targets for antineoplastic agents, and a particularly important aberration is translocation in the ALK gene, identified in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ALK inhibitors have shown systemic efficacy against ALK-rearranged NSCLC in many clinical trials, but the effectiveness of crizotinib in CNS disease is limited by poor blood-brain barrier penetration and acquired drug resistance. In this Review, we discuss potential pathways to target ALK-rearranged brain metastases, including next generation ALK inhibitors with greater CNS penetration and mechanisms to overcome resistance. Other important mechanisms to control CNS disease include targeting pathways downstream of ALK phosphorylation, increasing the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, modifying the tumour microenvironment, and adding concurrent radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Do children with autism have a theory of mind? A non-verbal test of autism vs. specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Livia; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Hill, Jacqueline

    2007-04-01

    Children with autism have delays in the development of theory of mind. However, the sub-group of children with autism who have little or no language have gone untested since false belief tests (FB) typically involve language. FB understanding has been reported to be intact in children with specific language impairment (SLI). This raises the possibility that a non-verbal FB test would distinguish children with autism vs. children with SLI. The present study tested two predictions: (1) FB understanding is to some extent independent of language ability; and (2) Children with autism with low language levels show specific impairment in theory of mind. Results confirmed both predictions. Results are discussed in terms of the role of language in the development of mindreading.

  18. The Role of Non-Governmental Non-Profit Organizations in the Provision of Social Services and the Palliation of Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Bronić

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available After introductory considerations, arguments are put forward for non-governmental organisations as exclusive providers of social services. The negative characteristics of the non-governmental organization are subject of the third part of the paper. In the fourth part, the meaning of the social funds is explained (they are a kind of non-governmental organisations, and in Part 5, we explain the importance of the synergy between the government and society in the provision of social services. After the explanation of the situation in Croatia, in the Part 6 of the paper we give our final considerations. In Croatia non-governmental organizations that provide social services are slowly developing. In their further strengthening it is necessary to change the general viewpoints concerning the role and importance of the non-governmental sector in the alleviation of poverty, as well as to achieve better coordination between the state and the sector.

  19. ISOLASI KOI HERPESVIRUS (KHV DARI BEBERAPA ORGAN TARGET DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN KULTUR SEL KT-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuti Sumiati

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Kasus kematian massal pada ikan mas dan koi (Cyprinus carpio yang disebabkan oleh koi herpesvirus (KHV terjadi sejak tahun 2002 dan masih berlangsung hingga sekarang. Pemilihan sampel yang tepat sangat penting untuk mendeteksi dan mengidentifikasi penyakit KHV tersebut. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui jaringan yang menjadi target infeksi KHV dengan cara isolasi virus menggunakan kultur sel KT-2. Kultur sel diinokulasi dengan ekstrak jaringan organ target (otak, mata, insang, ginjal, limfa, hati, jantung, dan usus, serta gabungan insang, ginjal, dan limfa dan diinkubasi pada suhu 25oC selama 14 hari. Kerusakan sel terjadi pada kultur sel yang diinokulasi dengan ekstrak dari jaringan insang, ginjal dan gabungan organ insang, ginjal, dan limfa. Uji PCR dari media kultur dan sel yang mengalami CPE menunjukkan bahwa CPE disebabkan oleh KHV.

  20. Sport as an effective goal to increase self-concept and hope: a comparison study between athlete and non-athlete women with visual impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Khodabakhshi Koolaee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Nowadays, improving the quality of life for individuals with physical disabilities is a goal of rehabilitation. Among these, one of the most common and important physical disability groups is the Visual Impairment (VI. The aim of the present study was to compare the VI in athlete and non-athlete women in terms of self-concept and hope.  Methods: In the present case-control study, 120 blind athlete and non-athlete women, resident of Tehran (60 participants in each group, were selected using simple random sampling method, according to the list provided by Goal Ball and Track-and-Field teams of the Blind and Visually Impaired Federation (60 blind athlete women and Association of the Blind, Visually Impaired, and White Cane (60 blind non-athlete women from March 2015 to August 2016. Both groups responded to Rogers' self-concept and Snyder's hope scales. Data were analyzed using t-test for independent measures.   Results: The results showed that there was a significant difference between two VI groups of athletes and non-athletes in terms of real self-concept (t=6.02, P<0.001, ideal self-concept (t=3.6, P=0.005, and hope (t=4.4, P<0.001. Therefore, the VI athlete women had better self-concept and higher hope compared with the non-athletes.  Conclusion: According to the findings, it seems that the exercise and physical activity, as a facilitating and health-promoting factor, plays a significant role in two variables of self-concept and hope in blind women. Hence, the inclusion of sport activities in programs for disabled people, especially for the VIs, can significantly be helpful to improve their psychological state.

  1. Non-targeted bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects refer to those responses occurring in cells that were not subject to energy deposition events following ionizing radiation. These bystander cells may have been neighbors of irradiated cells, or physically separated but subject to soluble secreted signals from irradiated cells. Bystander effects have been observed in vitro and in vivo and for various radiation qualities. In tribute to an old friend and colleague, Anthony V. Carrano, who would have said 'well what are the critical questions that should be addressed, and so what?', we review the evidence for non-targeted radiation-induced bystander effects with emphasis on prevailing questions in this rapidly developing research field, and the potential significance of bystander effects in evaluating the detrimental health effects of radiation exposure

  2. Alcohol-impaired driving and its consequences in the United States: the past 25 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allan F

    2006-01-01

    Progress in dealing with the alcohol-impaired driving problem in the United States during the past 25 years is addressed. Trends in various measures of the problem were tracked and a thorough review of the relevant literature conducted. In the 1980s and continuing into the early 1990s, major decreases occurred in alcohol-impaired driving and its consequences. The contribution of alcohol to fatal crashes dropped by 35-40% during this period. Two primary reasons for the decline appear to be the emergence of citizen activist groups that mobilized public support and attention to the problem, and the proliferation of effective laws. Since about 1995 the alcohol-impaired driving problem has stabilized at a reduced but still quite high level. Highway safety organizations and citizen activist groups have continued to highlight the problem, but its status as a social issue has diminished. We basically know what the primary target groups are, and we know measures that would work to reduce the problem if implemented more fully. We know that political leadership, state task forces, and media advocacy are important ingredients in addressing the problem. It is likely that a resurgence in citizen activism will be necessary to foster these elements and refocus the nation on the unfinished battle against alcohol-impaired driving. Alcohol-impaired driving is still a major problem that needs continuing attention.

  3. Non-fatal occupational injuries among non-governmental employees in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, Adinegara Bin Lutfi; Said, Abdul Razzak Bin Mohd; Mohammed, Mohammed Azman Bin Aziz; Sathiakumar, Nalini

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed data on non-fatal occupational injuries reported to Malaysia's social security organization from 2002 to 2006. There was a decrease in both the absolute number and the incidence rates of these injuries over time. About 40% of cases occurred in the manufacturing sector followed by the service (17%) and trading (17%) sectors. The agriculture sector reported the highest incidence rate (24.1/1,000), followed by the manufacturing sector subcategories of wood-product manufacturing (22.1/1,000) and non-metallic industries (20.8/1,000). Men age 40 to 59 and persons of Indian ethnicity had a greater tendency to sustain injuries. Government and non-governmental organizations should strive to develop strategies to reduce the occupational injuries targeting vulnerable groups. Enforcement of safety measures will further play an important role to ensure that both employees and employers take special precautions to address workplace hazards.

  4. Scalable printed electronics: an organic decoder addressing ferroelectric non-volatile memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tse Nga; Schwartz, David E.; Lavery, Leah L.; Whiting, Gregory L.; Russo, Beverly; Krusor, Brent; Veres, Janos; Bröms, Per; Herlogsson, Lars; Alam, Naveed; Hagel, Olle; Nilsson, Jakob; Karlsson, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Scalable circuits of organic logic and memory are realized using all-additive printing processes. A 3-bit organic complementary decoder is fabricated and used to read and write non-volatile, rewritable ferroelectric memory. The decoder-memory array is patterned by inkjet and gravure printing on flexible plastics. Simulation models for the organic transistors are developed, enabling circuit designs tolerant of the variations in printed devices. We explain the key design rules in fabrication of complex printed circuits and elucidate the performance requirements of materials and devices for reliable organic digital logic. PMID:22900143

  5. Involvement of ways of death receptors in the target and non target effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, A.

    2008-10-01

    Delayed cell death by mitotic catastrophe is a frequent mode of breast cancer cell death after γ-irradiation. Whereas the mechanisms that underlie the early γ-irradiation-induced cell death are well documented, those that drive the delayed cell death are largely unknown. Here we show that the Fas, TRAIL and TNF-α death receptor pathways mediate the delayed cell death observed after γ-irradiation of breast cancer cells. Receptors of the three pathways are over expressed early after irradiation and sensitize cells to apoptosis, whereas their ligands are over expressed three to four days after γ-irradiation, leading to apoptosis of the irradiated cells through a mitotic catastrophe. We also show for the first time that irradiated breast cancer cells excrete soluble forms of the three ligands which can induce the death of sensitive bystander cells. Altogether, these results define the molecular basis of the delayed cell death induced by targeted and non-targeted effects of γ-irradiation. (author)

  6. Non-hazardous organic solvents in the paraffin-embedding technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Inger Lindebo; Lyon, Hans; Prentø, Poul

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to substitute hazardous compounds, used in tissue processing and dewaxing, with compounds having lowest possible toxicity and inflammability without impairing the morphology, staining characteristics, or diagnostic value of the tissue sections. All aromatic compounds...... and aliphatic hydrocarbons (e.g. alkanes, isoparaffins, petroleum distillates, etc.) were rejected, primarily due to their high vapour pressure. Based on a theoretical study of compounds used for clearing, a number of non-hazardous potential substitutes were chosen. The following experimental study narrowed...... the group to three unbranched, saturated, aliphatic monoesters containing 12-14 carbon atoms. On large-scale testing of these compounds, we found butyldecanoate to be the closest to an ideal substitute for aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons in the histology department: the section quality is at least equal...

  7. Long Non-Coding RNAs in Metabolic Organs and Energy Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maude Giroud

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Single cell organisms can surprisingly exceed the number of human protein-coding genes, which are thus not at the origin of the complexity of an organism. In contrast, the relative amount of non-protein-coding sequences increases consistently with organismal complexity. Moreover, the mammalian transcriptome predominantly comprises non-(protein-coding RNAs (ncRNA, of which the long ncRNAs (lncRNAs constitute the most abundant part. lncRNAs are highly species- and tissue-specific with very versatile modes of action in accordance with their binding to a large spectrum of molecules and their diverse localization. lncRNAs are transcriptional regulators adding an additional regulatory layer in biological processes and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we review lncRNAs affecting metabolic organs with a focus on the liver, pancreas, skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, brain, and adipose organ. In addition, we will discuss the impact of lncRNAs on metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. In contrast to the substantial number of lncRNA loci in the human genome, the functionally characterized lncRNAs are just the tip of the iceberg. So far, our knowledge concerning lncRNAs in energy homeostasis is still in its infancy, meaning that the rest of the iceberg is a treasure chest yet to be discovered.

  8. The preparation of accelerator targets by the evaporation of acetate-organic solutions in the presence of NH3 gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, S.Y.; Ghiorso, A.; Hoffman, D.C.

    1987-03-01

    The chemical methods described in this paper have been developed for preparation of isotopic targets for bombardment by accelerator-produced ions. Three systems are compared: nitrate-, chloride-, and acetate-organic solutions. The best method was found to be the metallic acetate-organic solution system, evaporated onto the substrate in the presence of ammonia gas. A detailed procedure is given for this method. The targets obtained by the acetate-organic solution system are uniform and adherent. The hydroxide forms fine crystals of good quality for target thicknesses from a few μg/cm 2 to several mg/cm 2 . Thicknesses up to 5 mg/cm 2 of Eu as the oxide were obtained by this method. The process is simple and fast. 18 refs., 1 tab

  9. Butenolide inhibits marine fouling by altering the primary metabolism of three target organisms

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yifan

    2012-06-15

    Butenolide is a very promising antifouling compound that inhibits ship hull fouling by a variety of marine organisms, but its antifouling mechanism was previously unknown. Here we report the first study of butenolides molecular targets in three representative fouling organisms. In the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite, butenolide bound to acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1), which is involved in ketone body metabolism. Both the substrate and the product of ACAT1 increased larval settlement under butenolide treatment, suggesting its functional involvement. In the bryozoan Bugula neritina, butenolide bound to very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADVL), actin, and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). ACADVL is the first enzyme in the very long chain fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. The inhibition of this primary pathway for energy production in larvae by butenolide was supported by the finding that alternative energy sources (acetoacetate and pyruvate) increased larval attachment under butenolide treatment. In marine bacterium Vibrio sp. UST020129-010, butenolide bound to succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit (SCSβ) and inhibited bacterial growth. ACAT1, ACADVL, and SCSβ are all involved in primary metabolism for energy production. These findings suggest that butenolide inhibits fouling by influencing the primary metabolism of target organisms. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Inhaled Cadmium Oxide Nanoparticles: Their in Vivo Fate and Effect on Target Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Dumkova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing amount of heavy metals used in manufacturing equivalently increases hazards of environmental pollution by industrial products such as cadmium oxide (CdO nanoparticles. Here, we aimed to unravel the CdO nanoparticle destiny upon their entry into lungs by inhalations, with the main focus on the ultrastructural changes that the nanoparticles may cause to tissues of the primary and secondary target organs. We indeed found the CdO nanoparticles to be transported from the lungs into secondary target organs by blood. In lungs, inhaled CdO nanoparticles caused significant alterations in parenchyma tissue including hyperemia, enlarged pulmonary septa, congested capillaries, alveolar emphysema and small areas of atelectasis. Nanoparticles were observed in the cytoplasm of cells lining bronchioles, in the alveolar spaces as well as inside the membranous pneumocytes and in phagosomes of lung macrophages. Nanoparticles even penetrated through the membrane into some organelles including mitochondria and they also accumulated in the cytoplasmic vesicles. In livers, inhalation caused periportal inflammation and local hepatic necrosis. Only minor changes such as diffusely thickened filtration membrane with intramembranous electron dense deposits were observed in kidney. Taken together, inhaled CdO nanoparticles not only accumulated in lungs but they were also transported to other organs causing serious damage at tissue as well as cellular level.

  11. Inhaled Cadmium Oxide Nanoparticles: Their in Vivo Fate and Effect on Target Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumkova, Jana; Vrlikova, Lucie; Vecera, Zbynek; Putnova, Barbora; Docekal, Bohumil; Mikuska, Pavel; Fictum, Petr; Hampl, Ales; Buchtova, Marcela

    2016-06-03

    The increasing amount of heavy metals used in manufacturing equivalently increases hazards of environmental pollution by industrial products such as cadmium oxide (CdO) nanoparticles. Here, we aimed to unravel the CdO nanoparticle destiny upon their entry into lungs by inhalations, with the main focus on the ultrastructural changes that the nanoparticles may cause to tissues of the primary and secondary target organs. We indeed found the CdO nanoparticles to be transported from the lungs into secondary target organs by blood. In lungs, inhaled CdO nanoparticles caused significant alterations in parenchyma tissue including hyperemia, enlarged pulmonary septa, congested capillaries, alveolar emphysema and small areas of atelectasis. Nanoparticles were observed in the cytoplasm of cells lining bronchioles, in the alveolar spaces as well as inside the membranous pneumocytes and in phagosomes of lung macrophages. Nanoparticles even penetrated through the membrane into some organelles including mitochondria and they also accumulated in the cytoplasmic vesicles. In livers, inhalation caused periportal inflammation and local hepatic necrosis. Only minor changes such as diffusely thickened filtration membrane with intramembranous electron dense deposits were observed in kidney. Taken together, inhaled CdO nanoparticles not only accumulated in lungs but they were also transported to other organs causing serious damage at tissue as well as cellular level.

  12. The structure, organization and radiation of Sadhu non-long terminal repeat retroelements in Arabidopsis species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangwala Sanjida H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sadhu elements are non-autonomous retroposons first recognized in Arabidopsis thaliana. There is a wide degree of divergence among different elements, suggesting that these sequences are ancient in origin. Here we report the results of several lines of investigation into the genomic organization and evolutionary history of this element family. Results We present a classification scheme for Sadhu elements in A. thaliana, describing derivative elements related to the full-length elements we reported previously. We characterized Sadhu5 elements in a set of A. thaliana strains in order to trace the history of radiation in this subfamily. Sequences surrounding the target sites of different Sadhu insertions are consistent with mobilization by LINE retroelements. Finally, we identified Sadhu elements grouping into distinct subfamilies in two related species, Arabidopsis arenosa and Arabidopsis lyrata. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that the Sadhu retroelement family has undergone target primed reverse transcription-driven retrotransposition during the divergence of different A. thaliana strains. In addition, Sadhu elements can be found at moderate copy number in three distinct Arabidopsis species, indicating that the evolutionary history of these sequences can be traced back at least several millions of years.

  13. Preserved otolith organ function in caspase-3-deficient mice with impaired horizontal semicircular canal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Patrick A; Wood, Scott J; Shimizu, Naoki; Kuster, Kael; Perachio, Adrian; Makishima, Tomoko

    2015-06-01

    Genetically engineered mice are valuable models for elucidation of auditory and vestibular pathology. Our goal was to establish a comprehensive vestibular function testing system in mice using: (1) horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (hVOR) to evaluate semicircular canal function and (2) otolith-ocular reflex (OOR) to evaluate otolith organ function and to validate the system by characterizing mice with vestibular dysfunction. We used pseudo off-vertical axis rotation to induce an otolith-only stimulus using a custom-made centrifuge. For the OOR, horizontal slow-phase eye velocity and vertical eye position were evaluated as a function of acceleration. Using this system, we characterized hVOR and OOR in the caspase-3 (Casp3) mutant mice. Casp3 (-/-) mice had severely impaired hVOR gain, while Casp3 (+/-) mice had an intermediate response compared to WT mice. Evaluation of OOR revealed that at low-to-mid frequencies and stimulus intensity, Casp3 mutants and WT mice had similar responses. At higher frequencies and stimulus intensity, the Casp3 mutants displayed mildly reduced otolith organ-related responses. These findings suggest that the Casp3 gene is important for the proper function of the semicircular canals but less important for the otolith organ function.

  14. Preserved otolith organ function in caspase-3 deficient mice with impaired horizontal semicircular canal function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Patrick A; Wood, Scott J; Shimizu, Naoki; Kuster, Kael; Perachio, Adrian; Makishima, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered mice are valuable models for elucidation of auditory and vestibular pathology. Our goal was to establish a comprehensive vestibular function testing system in mice using: 1) horizontal angular vestibular-ocular reflex (hVOR) to evaluate semicircular canal function, and 2) otolith-ocular reflex (OOR) to evaluate otolith organ function, and to validate the system by characterizing mice with vestibular dysfunction. We used pseudo-off vertical axis rotation (pOVAR) to induce an otolith-only stimulus using a custom-made centrifuge. For the OOR, horizontal slow phase eye velocity (HEV) and vertical eye position (VEP) was evaluated as a function of acceleration. Using this system, we characterized hVOR and OOR in the caspase-3 (Casp3) mutant mice. Casp3 −/− mice had severely impaired hVOR gain, while Casp3 +/− mice had an intermediate response compared to WT mice. Evaluation of OOR revealed that at low to mid frequencies and stimulus intensity, Casp3 mutants and WT mice had similar responses. At higher frequencies and stimulus intensity, the Casp3 mutants displayed mildly reduced otolith organ related responses. These findings suggest that the Casp3 gene is important for the proper function of the semicircular canals but less important for the otolith organ function. PMID:25827332

  15. Radioisotope treatment for benign strictures of non-vascular luminal organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon

    2006-01-01

    Tissue hyperplasia in one of the most frequently encountered complications when self-expanding stents are placed in benign non-vascular luminal organ strictures, thus causing of the lumen. The investigators postulated that ionizing irradiation could be applied to prevent restenosis caused by tissue hyperplasia in non-vascular luminal organs as it reduced coronary or peripheral arterial narrowing successfully. The authors combined β-irradiation using 188 Re-MAG 3 solution with balloon for animal and clinical studies because this new treatment approach had the advantages such as low penetration depth of β-ray, self-centering irradiation, and mechanical effect of balloon dilation over using γ-irradiation with afterloading devices. In this article, the concept and mechanism of radioisotope balloon dilation, and animal and clinical studies using radioisotope balloon dilation are reviewed

  16. Targeting Adenosine Signaling in Parkinson's Disease: From Pharmacological to Non-pharmacological Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza R. Nazario

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease displaying negative impacts on both the health and social ability of patients and considerable economical costs. The classical anti-parkinsonian drugs based in dopaminergic replacement are the standard treatment, but several motor side effects emerge during long-term use. This mini-review presents the rationale to several efforts from pre-clinical and clinical studies using adenosine receptor antagonists as a non-dopaminergic therapy. As several studies have indicated that the monotherapy with adenosine receptor antagonists reaches limited efficacy, the usage as a co-adjuvant appeared to be a promising strategy. The formulation of multi-targeted drugs, using adenosine receptor antagonists and other neurotransmitter systems than the dopaminergic one as targets, have been receiving attention since Parkinson's disease presents a complex biological impact. While pharmacological approaches to cure or ameliorate the conditions of PD are the leading strategy in this area, emerging positive aspects have arisen from non-pharmacological approaches and adenosine function inhibition appears to improve both strategies.

  17. Targeted genome editing in Aedes aegypti using TALENs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Azadeh; Myles, Kevin M; Adelman, Zach N

    2014-08-15

    The Culicine mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is both a major vector of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) and a genetic model organism for arbovirus transmission. TALE nucleases (TALENs), a group of artificial enzymes capable of generating site-specific DNA lesions, consist of a non-specific FokI endonuclease cleavage domain fused to an engineered DNA binding domain specific to a target site. While TALENs have become an important tool for targeted gene disruption in a variety of organisms, application to the mosquito genome is a new approach. We recently described the use of TALENs to perform heritable genetic disruptions in A. aegypti. Here, we provide detailed methods that will allow other research laboratories to capitalize on the potential of this technology for understanding mosquito gene function. We describe target site selection, transient embryo-based assays to rapidly assess TALEN activity, embryonic microinjection and downstream screening steps to identify target site mutations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. STARTING DETERMINANTS OF STRATEGIC APPROACH TO MARKETING OF NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS: THEORETICAL ELABORATION

    OpenAIRE

    Pavičić, Jurica

    2001-01-01

    Non-profit organizations have remarkably important role in contemporary societies since they participate in solutions of numerous problems which enable or prevent functioning of society in an optimal way. In this, systematic application of marketing influences more efficient activity of non-profit organizations in practice, and by this indirectly contributes to better solution of social problems. If qualitative or systematic application of marketing is observed from the aspect of forming and ...

  19. Speech Perception and Phonological Short-Term Memory Capacity in Language Impairment: Preliminary Evidence from Adolescents with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucas, Tom; Riches, Nick Greatorex; Charman, Tony; Pickles, Andrew; Simonoff, Emily; Chandler, Susie; Baird, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    Background: The cognitive bases of language impairment in specific language impairment (SLI) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) were investigated in a novel non-word comparison task which manipulated phonological short-term memory (PSTM) and speech perception, both implicated in poor non-word repetition. Aims: This study aimed to investigate the…

  20. Tritium ingestion as organically bound tritium (OBT) - incorporation in different organs of pregnant and non-pregnant rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, A.L.; Pollaris, K.; Vandecasteele, C.M.; Kowalska, M.

    1998-01-01

    For a better understanding of the hazard of tritium, its bound form in the food constituents (organically bound tritium (OBT)) has not been investigated though study on tritiated water are many. Hence an evaluation of the uptake of tritium incorporated in basic constituents of food viz, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids is warranted. Present study cells with the incorporated three organically bound tritium components separated from tritiated milk powder (casein, butter and lactose). This is further compared in the organs of pregnant (after parturition) and non-pregnant rats

  1. Competitive release and outbreaks of non-target pests associated with transgenic Bt cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Adam R; Olson, Dawn M; Andow, David A

    2016-06-01

    The adoption of transgenic Bt cotton has, in some cases, led to environmental and economic benefits through reduced insecticide use. However, the distribution of these benefits and associated risks among cotton growers and cotton-growing regions has been uneven due in part to outbreaks of non-target or secondary pests, thereby requiring the continued use of synthetic insecticides. In the southeastern USA, Bt cotton adoption has resulted in increased abundance of and damage from stink bug pests, Euschistus servus and Nezara viridula (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae). While the impact of increased stink bug abundance has been well-documented, the causes have remained unclear. We hypothesize that release from competition with Bt-susceptible target pests may drive stink bug outbreaks in Bt cotton. We first examined the evidence for competitive release of stink bugs through meta-analysis of previous studies. We then experimentally tested if herbivory by Bt-susceptible Helicoverpa zea increases stink bug leaving rates and deters oviposition on non-Bt cotton. Consistent with previous studies, we found differences in leaving rates only for E servus, but we found that both species strongly avoided ovipositing on H. zea-damaged plants. Considering all available evidence, competitive release of stink bug populations in Bt cotton likely contributes to outbreaks, though the relative importance of competitive release remains an open question. Ecological risk assessments of Bt crops and other transgenic insecticidal crops would benefit from greater understanding of the ecological mechanisms underlying non-target pest outbreaks and greater attention to indirect ecological effects more broadly.

  2. Room temperature triplet state spectroscopy of organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineke, Sebastian; Baldo, Marc A

    2014-01-21

    Organic light-emitting devices and solar cells are devices that create, manipulate, and convert excited states in organic semiconductors. It is crucial to characterize these excited states, or excitons, to optimize device performance in applications like displays and solar energy harvesting. This is complicated if the excited state is a triplet because the electronic transition is 'dark' with a vanishing oscillator strength. As a consequence, triplet state spectroscopy must usually be performed at cryogenic temperatures to reduce competition from non-radiative rates. Here, we control non-radiative rates by engineering a solid-state host matrix containing the target molecule, allowing the observation of phosphorescence at room temperature and alleviating constraints of cryogenic experiments. We test these techniques on a wide range of materials with functionalities spanning multi-exciton generation (singlet exciton fission), organic light emitting device host materials, and thermally activated delayed fluorescence type emitters. Control of non-radiative modes in the matrix surrounding a target molecule may also have broader applications in light-emitting and photovoltaic devices.

  3. The postnatal growth of ICRP target organs in reference humans: Spleen and liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    Attempts to improve radiation dose estimates to infants and children are hampered because of the lack of mathematical models that describe the age variation in anatomical and physiological parameters. Specifically, for one anatomical parameter, organ size, there are no growth models available to the health physics community. In this paper, an empirical mathematical model is introduced for estimating age-specific masses of two ICRP target organs: the spleen and liver. That model, the Power Logistic Additive (PLA) growth model, is fitted to ICRP 23 organ growth data to determine five growth parameters. This model assumes that organs grow under the influence of two main processes: a primary (power function) and a sexual maturation (logistic function) process, which are additive from birth to adulthood. The results show that the model describes the ICRP growth data quite well. Growth parameters and tables listing the predicted masses and mass velocities as a function of age for each organ are provided for application in the ICRP modeling system

  4. Peripherally administered nanoparticles target monocytic myeloid cells, secondary lymphoid organs and tumors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtis, Iraklis C; Hirosue, Sachiko; de Titta, Alexandre; Kontos, Stephan; Stegmann, Toon; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Swartz, Melody A

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been extensively developed for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. While the focus of nanoparticle trafficking in vivo has traditionally been on drug delivery and organ-level biodistribution and clearance, recent work in cancer biology and infectious disease suggests that targeting different cells within a given organ can substantially affect the quality of the immunological response. Here, we examine the cell-level biodistribution kinetics after administering ultrasmall Pluronic-stabilized poly(propylene sulfide) nanoparticles in the mouse. These nanoparticles depend on lymphatic drainage to reach the lymph nodes and blood, and then enter the spleen rather than the liver, where they interact with monocytes, macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells. They were more readily taken up into lymphatics after intradermal (i.d.) compared to intramuscular administration, leading to ∼50% increased bioavailability in blood. When administered i.d., their distribution favored antigen-presenting cells, with especially strong targeting to myeloid cells. In tumor-bearing mice, the monocytic and the polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cell compartments were efficiently and preferentially targeted, rendering this nanoparticulate formulation potentially useful for reversing the highly suppressive activity of these cells in the tumor stroma.

  5. Peripherally administered nanoparticles target monocytic myeloid cells, secondary lymphoid organs and tumors in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraklis C Kourtis

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have been extensively developed for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. While the focus of nanoparticle trafficking in vivo has traditionally been on drug delivery and organ-level biodistribution and clearance, recent work in cancer biology and infectious disease suggests that targeting different cells within a given organ can substantially affect the quality of the immunological response. Here, we examine the cell-level biodistribution kinetics after administering ultrasmall Pluronic-stabilized poly(propylene sulfide nanoparticles in the mouse. These nanoparticles depend on lymphatic drainage to reach the lymph nodes and blood, and then enter the spleen rather than the liver, where they interact with monocytes, macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells. They were more readily taken up into lymphatics after intradermal (i.d. compared to intramuscular administration, leading to ∼50% increased bioavailability in blood. When administered i.d., their distribution favored antigen-presenting cells, with especially strong targeting to myeloid cells. In tumor-bearing mice, the monocytic and the polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cell compartments were efficiently and preferentially targeted, rendering this nanoparticulate formulation potentially useful for reversing the highly suppressive activity of these cells in the tumor stroma.

  6. Conditional and future tense impairment in non-fluent aphasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rofes, Adria; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Martinez-Ferreiro, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Morphological errors of tense and agreement are salient in agrammatic aphasia. The PADILIH predicts impairments in discourse linking that translate to greater difficulties in referring to a past event time than to a future or a present event time. In Catalan, the Periphrastic conditional

  7. The brain is a target organ after acute exposure to depleted uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestaevel, P; Houpert, P; Bussy, C; Dhieux, B; Gourmelon, P; Paquet, F

    2005-09-01

    The health effects of depleted uranium (DU) are mainly caused by its chemical toxicity. Although the kidneys are the main target organs for uranium toxicity, uranium can also reach the brain. In this paper, the central effects of acute exposure to DU were studied in relation to health parameters and the sleep-wake cycle of adult rats. Animals were injected intraperitoneally with 144+/-10 microg DU kg-1 as nitrate. Three days after injection, the amounts of uranium in the kidneys represented 2.6 microg of DU g-1 of tissue, considered as a sub-nephrotoxic dosage. The central effect of uranium could be seen through a decrease in food intake as early as the first day after exposure and shorter paradoxical sleep 3 days after acute DU exposure (-18% of controls). With a lower dosage of DU (70+/-8 microg DU kg-1), no significant effect was observed on the sleep-wake cycle. The present study intends to illustrate the fact that the brain is a target organ, as are the kidneys, after acute exposure to a moderate dosage of DU. The mechanisms by which uranium causes these early neurophysiological perturbations shall be discussed.

  8. NASCENT: an automatic protein interaction network generation tool for non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banky, Daniel; Ordog, Rafael; Grolmusz, Vince

    2009-04-24

    Large quantity of reliable protein interaction data are available for model organisms in public depositories (e.g., MINT, DIP, HPRD, INTERACT). Most data correspond to experiments with the proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens, Caenorhabditis elegans, Escherichia coli and Mus musculus. For other important organisms the data availability is poor or non-existent. Here we present NASCENT, a completely automatic web-based tool and also a downloadable Java program, capable of modeling and generating protein interaction networks even for non-model organisms. The tool performs protein interaction network modeling through gene-name mapping, and outputs the resulting network in graphical form and also in computer-readable graph-forms, directly applicable by popular network modeling software. http://nascent.pitgroup.org.

  9. The effect of antibiotics and diet on enterolactone concentration and metabolome studied by targeted and non-targeted LC-MS metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolvig, Anne Katrine; Nørskov, Natalja; Hedemann, Mette Skou

    2017-01-01

    with lower levels of ENL. Here, we investigate the link between antibiotic use and lignan metabolism in pigs using LC-MS/MS. The effect of lignan intake and antibiotic use on the gut microbial community and the pig metabolome is studied by 16S rRNA sequencing and non-targeted LC-MS. Treatment...

  10. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor targeting in non-small cell lung cancer: revisiting different strategies against the same target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañón, Eduardo; Martín, Patricia; Rolfo, Christian; Fusco, Juan P; Ceniceros, Lucía; Legaspi, Jairo; Santisteban, Marta; Gil-Bazo, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have changed the paradigm of treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular biology study of EGFR has led to clinical trials that select patients more accurately, regarding the presence of EGFR activating mutations. Nonetheless, a lack of response or a temporary condition of the response has been detected in patients on EGFR TKIs. This has urged to study potential resistance mechanisms underneath. The most important ones are the presence of secondary mutations in EGFR, such as T790M, or the overexpression of mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) that may explain why patients who initially respond to EGFR TKIs, may ultimately become refractory. Several approaches have been taken and new drugs both targeting EGFR resistance-mutation or MET are currently being developed. Here we review and update the EGFR biological pathway as well as the clinical data leading to approval of the EGFR TKIs currently in the market. New compounds under investigation targeting resistance mutations or dually targeting EGFR and other relevant receptors are also reviewed and discussed.

  11. Aging impairs recipient T cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors in response to transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Shen

    Full Text Available As increasing numbers of older people are listed for solid organ transplantation, there is an urgent need to better understand how aging modifies alloimmune responses. Here, we investigated whether aging impairs the ability of donor dendritic cells or recipient immunity to prime alloimmune responses to organ transplantation.Using murine experimental models, we found that aging impaired the host environment to expand and activate antigen specific CD8(+ T cells. Additionally, aging impaired the ability of polyclonal T cells to induce acute allograft rejection. However, the alloimmune priming capability of donor dendritic cells was preserved with aging.Aging impairs recipient responses, both T cell intrinsic and extrinsic, in response to organ transplantation.

  12. The genetics of blood pressure regulation and its target organs from association studies in 342,415 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehret, Georg B; Ferreira, Teresa; Chasman, Daniel I

    2016-01-01

    To dissect the genetic architecture of blood pressure and assess effects on target organ damage, we analyzed 128,272 SNPs from targeted and genome-wide arrays in 201,529 individuals of European ancestry, and genotypes from an additional 140,886 individuals were used for validation. We identified ...

  13. The genetics of blood pressure regulation and its target organs from association studies in 342,415 individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.B. Ehret (Georg); T. Ferreira (Teresa); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); A.U. Jackson (Anne); E.M. Schmidt (Ellen); T. Johnson (Toby); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); J. Luan (Jian'An); L.A. Donnelly (Louise); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); A.K. Petersen; V. Pihur (Vasyl); R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); D. Shungin (Dmitry); Hughes, M.F. (Maria F.); O. Meirelles; M. Kaakinen (Marika); N. Bouatia-Naji (Nabila); K. Kristiansson (Kati); S. Shah (Sonia); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); X. Guo (Xiuqing); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); C. Fava (Cristiano); N. Eriksson (Niclas); I.M. Nolte (Ilja); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); E. Salfati (Elias); L.S. Rallidis (Loukianos); Theusch, E. (Elizabeth); A.J.P. Smith; L. Folkersen (Lasse); H.E. Witkowska (Ewa); T.H. Pers (Tune); R. Joehanes (Roby); Kim, S.K. (Stuart K.); L. Lataniotis (Lazaros); R. Jansen; A.D. Johnson (Andrew); H. Warren (Helen); Y.J. Kim; Zhao, W. (Wei); Y. Wu (Ying); B. Tayo (Bamidele); M. Bochud (Murielle); D. Absher (Devin); L.S. Adair (Linda); N. Amin (Najaf); D.E. Arking (Dan); T. Axelsson (Tomas); D. Baldassarre (Damiano); B. Balkau (Beverley); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); M.J. Barnes (Michael); I.E. Barroso (Inês); Bevan, S. (Stephen); J.C. Bis (Joshua); Bjornsdottir, G. (Gyda); M. Boehnke (Michael); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); M.J. Brown (Morris); M. Burnier (Michel); Cabrera, C.P. (Claudia P.); J.C. Chambers (John); Chang, I.-S. (I-Shou); Cheng, C.-Y. (Ching-Yu); P.S. Chines (Peter); Chung, R.-H. (Ren-Hua); F.S. Collins (Francis); Connell, J.M. (John M.); A. Döring (Angela); J. Dallongeville; J. Danesh (John); U. de Faire (Ulf); G. Delgado; A. Dominiczak (Anna); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); F. Drenos (Fotios); T. Edkins (Ted); Eicher, J.D. (John D.); R. Elosua (Roberto); S. Enroth (Stefan); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); P. Eriksson (Per); T. Esko (Tõnu); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); A. Evans (Alun); M. Fall (Magnus); M. Farrall (Martin); J.F. Felix (Janine); J. Ferrieres (Jean); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); M. Fornage (Myriam); T. Forrester (Terrence); N. Franceschini (Nora); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Franco-Cereceda (Anders); R.M. Fraser (Ross); S.K. Ganesh (Santhi); Gao, H. (He); K. Gertow (Karl); F. Gianfagna (Francesco); B. Gigante (Bruna); F. Giulianini (Franco); A. Goel (Anuj); A.H. Goodall (Alison); M. Goodarzi (Mark); M. Gorski (Mathias); J. Gräßler (Jürgen); C.J. Groves (Christopher); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); G. Hallmans (Göran); A.L. Hartikainen; Hassinen, M. (Maija); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); C. Hayward (Caroline); S. Hercberg (Serge); K.H. Herzig; A.A. Hicks (Andrew); A. Hingorani (Aroon); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); Hofman, A. (Albert); Holmen, J. (Jostein); O.L. Holmen (Oddgeir); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); P. Howard (Philip); Hsiung, C.A. (Chao A.); S.C. Hunt (Steven); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); T. Illig (Thomas); C. Iribarren (Carlos); Jensen, R.A. (Richard A.); M. Kähönen (Mika); H.M. Kang (Hyun Min); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); J. Keating (John); K.T. Khaw; Y.K. Kim (Yun Kyoung); E. Kim (Eric); M. Kivimaki (Mika); N. Klopp (Norman); Kolovou, G. (Genovefa); P. Komulainen (Pirjo); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); Kosova, G. (Gulum); R.M. Krauss (Ronald); D. Kuh (Diana); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); K. Kvaløy (Kirsti); T.A. Lakka (Timo); N.R. Lee (Nanette); I.T. Lee; W.-J. Lee (Wen-Jane); D. Levy (Daniel); X. Li (Xiaohui); Liang, K.-W. (Kae-Woei); Lin, H. (Honghuang); Lin, L. (Li); J. Lindström (Jaana); S. Lobbens (Stéphane); S. Männistö (Satu); G. Müller (Gabriele); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); F. MacH (François); H.S. Markus (Hugh); E. Marouli (Eirini); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); C.A. McKenzie (Colin); P. Meneton (Pierre); C. Menni (Cristina); A. Metspalu (Andres); Mijatovic, V. (Vladan); L. Moilanen (Leena); M.E. Montasser (May E.); A.D. Morris (Andrew); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); Mulas, A. (Antonella); R. Nagaraja (Ramaiah); N. Narisu (Narisu); K. Nikus (Kjell); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); P.F. O'Reilly (Paul); K.K. Ong (Ken); Paccaud, F. (Fred); C. Palmer (Cameron); A. Parsa (Afshin); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); M. Perola (Markus); A. Peters (Annette); N.R. Poulter (Neil); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); T. Quertermous (Thomas); D.C. Rao (Dabeeru C.); A. Rasheed (Asif); N.W. Rayner (Nigel William); F. Renström (Frida); R. Rettig (Rainer); K.M. Rice (Kenneth); R. Roberts (Robert); L.M. Rose (Lynda); Rossouw, J. (Jacques); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); S. Sanna (Serena); J. Saramies (Jouko); H. Schunkert (Heribert); S. Sebert (Sylvain); Sheu, W.H.-H. (Wayne H.-H.); Shin, Y.-A. (Young-Ah); X. Sim (Xueling); G.D. Smith; A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); M.X. Sosa (Maria X.); T.D. Spector (Timothy); A. Stancáková (Alena); A. Stanton (Alice); K. Stirrups (Kathy); H.M. Stringham (Heather); Sundstrom, J. (Johan); A.J. Swift (Amy); A.C. Syvänen; Tai, E.-S. (E-Shyong); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); K.V. Tarasov (Kirill); A. Teumer (Alexander); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); M.D. Tobin (Martin); E. Tremoli (Elena); Uitterlinden, A.G. (Andre G.); M. Uusitupa (Matti); A. Vaez (Ahmad); D. Vaidya (Dhananjay); Van Duijn, C.M. (Cornelia M.); E.P.A. van Iperen (Erik); Vasan, R.S. (Ramachandran S.); G.C. Verwoert (Germaine); J. Virtamo (Jarmo); Vitart, V. (Veronique); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); P. Vollenweider (Peter); Wagner, A. (Aline); Wain, L.V. (Louise V.); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); A.B. Weder (Alan); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); Wilks, R. (Rainford); T. Wilsgaard (Tom); J.F. Wilson (James F.); Wong, T.Y. (Tien Y.); T.-P. Yang (Tsun-Po); J. Yao (Jiefen); L. Yengo (Loic); W. Zhang (Weihua); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); X. Zhu (Xiaofeng); P. Bovet (Pascal); Cooper, R.S. (Richard S.); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); Saleheen, D. (Danish); J.-Y. Lee (Jong-Young); P. Elliott (Paul); L.M. Gierman (Lobke); C.J. Willer (Cristen); L. Franke (Lude); G. Kees Hovingh; K.D. Taylor (Kent); G.V. Dedoussis (George); P. Sever (Peter); A. Wong (Andrew); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); I. Njølstad (Inger); P.E.H. Schwarz (Peter); C. Langenberg (Claudia); H. Snieder (Harold); M. Caulfield (Mark); O. Melander (Olle); M. Laakso (Markku); J. Saltevo (Juha); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); Ingelsson, E. (Erik); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); K. Hveem (Kristian); W. Palmas (Walter); W. März (Winfried); M. Kumari (Meena); V. Salomaa (Veikko); Y.D. Chen (Y.); Rotter, J.I. (Jerome I.); P. Froguel (Philippe); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); E. Lakatta (Edward); K. Kuulasmaa (Kari); P.W. Franks (Paul); A. Hamsten (Anders); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); Stefansson, K. (Kari); P.M. Ridker (Paul); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); A.P. Morris (Andrew); C. Newton-Cheh (C.); P. Munroe (Patricia)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTo dissect the genetic architecture of blood pressure and assess effects on target organ damage, we analyzed 128,272 SNPs from targeted and genome-wide arrays in 201,529 individuals of European ancestry, and genotypes from an additional 140,886 individuals were used for validation. We

  14. An integrated control scheme for space robot after capturing non-cooperative target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingming; Luo, Jianjun; Yuan, Jianping; Walter, Ulrich

    2018-06-01

    How to identify the mass properties and eliminate the unknown angular momentum of space robotic system after capturing a non-cooperative target is of great challenge. This paper focuses on designing an integrated control framework which includes detumbling strategy, coordination control and parameter identification. Firstly, inverted and forward chain approaches are synthesized for space robot to obtain dynamic equation in operational space. Secondly, a detumbling strategy is introduced using elementary functions with normalized time, while the imposed end-effector constraints are considered. Next, a coordination control scheme for stabilizing both base and end-effector based on impedance control is implemented with the target's parameter uncertainty. With the measurements of the forces and torques exerted on the target, its mass properties are estimated during the detumbling process accordingly. Simulation results are presented using a 7 degree-of-freedom kinematically redundant space manipulator, which verifies the performance and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Targeted therapy for localized non-small-cell lung cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paleiron N

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas Paleiron,1 Olivier Bylicki,2 Michel André,1 Emilie Rivière,1 Frederic Grassin,1 Gilles Robinet,3 Christos Chouaïd4 On behalf of the GFPC Group 1Chest Department, HIA Clermont Tonnerre, Brest, 2Chest Department, HIA Percy, Clamart, 3Chest Department, CHU de Brest, Brest, 4GRC OncoEst, Université Paris XII, Paris, France Abstract: Targeted therapies have markedly improved the management of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, but their efficacy in localized NSCLC is less well established. The aim of this review is to analyze trials of targeted therapies in localized NSCLC. In patients with wild-type EGFR, tyrosine kinase inhibitors have shown no efficacy in Phase III trials. Few data are available for EGFR-mutated localized NSCLC, as routine biological profiling is not recommended. Available studies are small, often retrospectives, and/or conducted in a single-center making it difficult to draw firm conclusions. Ongoing prospective Phase III trials are comparing adjuvant tyrosine kinase inhibitor administration versus adjuvant chemotherapy. By analogy with the indication of bevacizumab in advanced NSCLC, use of antiangiogenic agents in the perioperative setting is currently restricted to nonsquamous NSCLC. Several trials of adjuvant or neoadjuvant bevacizumab are planned or ongoing, but for the moment there is no evidence of efficacy. Data on perioperative use of biomarkers in early-stage NSCLC come mainly from small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies. Assessment of customized adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy in localized NSCLC (with or without oncogenic driver mutations is a major challenge. Keywords: targeted therapy, non-small-cell lung cancer, adjuvant, neo-adjuvant, surgery 

  16. Non-homologous end joining mediated DNA repair is impaired in the NUP98-HOXD13 mouse model for myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthiyaveetil, Abdul Gafoor; Reilly, Christopher M; Pardee, Timothy S; Caudell, David L

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations typically impair cell differentiation and often require secondary mutations for malignant transformation. However, the role of a primary translocation in the development of collaborating mutations is debatable. To delineate the role of leukemic translocation NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) in secondary mutagenesis, DNA break and repair mechanisms in stimulated mouse B lymphocytes expressing NHD13 were analyzed. Our results showed significantly reduced expression of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated DNA repair genes, DNA Pkcs, DNA ligase4, and Xrcc4 leading to cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. Our results showed that expression of NHD13 fusion gene resulted in impaired NHEJ-mediated DNA break repair. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Proposal of the Changes in the Taxation of Income of the Non-profit Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Otavová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the issue of the taxation of incomes of the non-governmental non-profit organizations, especially the civic associations in the conditions of the Czech Republic and in the selected countries of the European Union (Austria, Slovakia, Germany. The main emphasis is put on the comparison of the corporate income tax of the studied countries. Particularly the tax benefits that are provided to the non-profit organizations in the individual countries are compared here. This paper points to the current situation in the Czech Republic, where there is no clear legislation that would regulate the activities by the studied organizations. Changes in the taxation of the incomes of non-profit organizations are designed to eliminate absences with regard to the simplicity and clarity of the individual provisions, and also to prevent misuse of the benefits and to the speculative behavior of tax entities.

  18. Children of non-Western origin with end-stage renal disease in the Netherlands, Belgium and a part of Germany have impaired health-related quality of life compared with Western children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenmaker, Nikki J; Haverman, Lotte; Tromp, Wilma F; van der Lee, Johanna H; Offringa, Martin; Adams, Brigitte; Bouts, Antonia H M; Collard, Laure; Cransberg, Karlien; van Dyck, Maria; Godefroid, Nathalie; van Hoeck, Koenraad; Koster-Kamphuis, Linda; Lilien, Marc R; Raes, Ann; Taylan, Christina; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Groothoff, Jaap W

    2014-02-01

    Many children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) living in Western Europe are of non-Western European origin. They have unfavourable somatic outcomes compared with ESRD children of Western origin. In this study, we compared the Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL) of both groups. All children (5-18 years) with ESRD included in the RICH-Q project (Renal Insufficiency therapy in Children-Quality assessment and improvement) or their parents were asked to complete the generic version of the Paediatric Quality-of-Life Inventory 4.0 (PedsQL). RICH-Q comprises the Netherlands, Belgium and a part of Germany. Children were considered to be of non-Western origin if they or at least one parent was born outside Western-European countries. Impaired HRQoL for children with ESRD of Western or non-Western origin was defined as a PedsQL score less than fifth percentile for healthy Dutch children of Western or non-Western origin, respectively. Of the 259 eligible children, 230 agreed to participate. One hundred and seventy-four children responded (response rate 67%) and 55 (32%) were of non-Western origin. Overall, 31 (56%) of the ESRD children of non-Western origin, and 58 (49%) of Western origin had an impaired total HRQoL score. Total HRQoL scores of children with ESRD of Western origin and non-Western origin were comparable, but scores on emotional functioning and school functioning were lower in non-Western origin (P=0.004 and 0.01, respectively). The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for ESRD children of non-Western origin to have impaired emotional functioning and school functioning, compared with Western origin, were 3.3(1.5-7.1) and 2.2(1.1-4.2), respectively. Children with ESRD of non-Western origin in three Western countries were found to be at risk for impaired HRQoL on emotional and school functioning. These children warrant special attention.

  19. Sex differences in the vaccine-specific and non-targeted effects of vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flanagan, Katie L; Klein, Sabra L; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2011-01-01

    Vaccines have non-specific effects (NSE) on subsequent morbidity and mortality from non-vaccine related infectious diseases. Thus NSE refers to any effect that cannot be accounted for by the induction of immunity against the vaccine-targeted disease. These effects are sex-differential, generally...... being more pronounced in females than males. Furthermore, the NSE are substantial causing greater than fifty percent changes in all cause mortality in certain settings, yet have never been systematically tested despite the fact that millions of children receive vaccines each year. As we strive...... to eliminate infectious diseases through vaccination programmes, the relative impact of NSE of vaccines on mortality is likely to increase, raising important questions regarding the future of certain vaccine schedules. A diverse group of scientists met in Copenhagen to discuss non-specific and sex...

  20. Minimizing the non-specific binding of nanoparticles to the brain enables active targeting of Fn14-positive glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Craig S; Perez, Jimena G; Cheng, Emily; Zhang, Clark; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Hanes, Justin; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Woodworth, Graeme F; Kim, Anthony J

    2015-02-01

    A major limitation in the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and deadly primary brain cancer, is delivery of therapeutics to invading tumor cells outside of the area that is safe for surgical removal. A promising way to target invading GBM cells is via drug-loaded nanoparticles that bind to fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14), thereby potentially improving efficacy and reducing toxicity. However, achieving broad particle distribution and nanoparticle targeting within the brain remains a significant challenge due to the adhesive extracellular matrix (ECM) and clearance mechanisms in the brain. In this work, we developed Fn14 monoclonal antibody-decorated nanoparticles that can efficiently penetrate brain tissue. We show these Fn14-targeted brain tissue penetrating nanoparticles are able to (i) selectively bind to recombinant Fn14 but not brain ECM proteins, (ii) associate with and be internalized by Fn14-positive GBM cells, and (iii) diffuse within brain tissue in a manner similar to non-targeted brain penetrating nanoparticles. In addition, when administered intracranially, Fn14-targeted nanoparticles showed improved tumor cell co-localization in mice bearing human GBM xenografts compared to non-targeted nanoparticles. Minimizing non-specific binding of targeted nanoparticles in the brain may greatly improve the access of particulate delivery systems to remote brain tumor cells and other brain targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of visual impairment and hearing impairment on functional dependence status among people in Taiwan—An evaluation using the WHODAS 2.0 score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Fang Chang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Visual impairment (VI and hearing impairment (HI are the two most common types of sensory disability encountered clinically. However, VI and HI result in different limitations in daily life. We assessed the level of functioning in patients with VI or HI based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. Methods: This nationwide, cross-sectional study included 312 people with VI and 540 people with HI. Each participant's degree of functioning and disability was evaluated using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0. The standardized WHODAS 2.0 scores ranged from 0 (least difficulty to 100 (most difficulty. Results: Patients with VI and those with HI had a mean (±standard error 32-item WHODAS 2.0 score of 42.4 ± 2.9 and 27.1 ± 1.6, respectively. The degree of restriction was positively related to the level of VI. Specifically, the patients with VI and a WHODAS 2.0 score of 33.7–35.3 or higher were likely to experience barriers to accessing mobility products, communication products, and education products. Furthermore, patients with a score of 42.9 or higher might experience barriers to accessing ingestion products and living products. Conclusion: WHODAS 2.0 scores are strongly correlated with the severity of VI. Mild VI should be targeted for treatment and referral as early as possible. Compared with the patients with HI, the patients with VI more frequently experience barriers to accessing environmental factors. Keywords: Disability, Functioning, Hearing impairment, International Classification of Functioning (ICF, Visual impairment, WHODAS 2.0

  2. The genetics of blood pressure regulation and its target organs from association studies in 342,415 individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehret, Georg B.; Ferreira, Teresa; Chasman, Daniel I.; Jackson, Anne U.; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Johnson, Toby; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Luan, Jian'an; Donnelly, Louise A.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Pihur, Vasyl; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Shungin, Dmitry; Hughes, Maria F.; Meirelles, Osorio; Kaakinen, Marika; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Kristiansson, Kati; Shah, Sonia; Kleber, Marcus E.; Guo, Xiuqing; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Fava, Cristiano; Eriksson, Niclas; Nolte, Ilja M.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Salfati, Elias L.; Rallidis, Loukianos S.; Theusch, Elizabeth; Smith, Andrew J. P.; Folkersen, Lasse; Witkowska, Kate; Pers, Tune H.; Joehanes, Roby; Kim, Stuart K.; Lataniotis, Lazaros; Jansen, Rick; Johnson, Andrew D.; Warren, Helen; Kim, Young Jin; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Ying; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Bochud, Murielle; Absher, Devin; Adair, Linda S.; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E.; Axelsson, Tomas; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barnes, Michael R.; Barroso, Inês; Bevan, Stephen; Bis, Joshua C.; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Burnier, Michel; Cabrera, Claudia P.; Chambers, John C.; Chang, I.-Shou; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chines, Peter S.; Chung, Ren-Hua; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John M.; Döring, Angela; Dallongeville, Jean; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; Delgado, Graciela; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Drenos, Fotios; Edkins, Sarah; Eicher, John D.; Elosua, Roberto; Enroth, Stefan; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Per; Esko, Tonu; Evangelou, Evangelos; Evans, Alun; Fall, Tove; Farrall, Martin; Felix, Janine F.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Forrester, Terrence; Franceschini, Nora; Franco, Oscar H.; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Fraser, Ross M.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Gao, He; Gertow, Karl; Gianfagna, Francesco; Gigante, Bruna; Giulianini, Franco; Goel, Anuj; Goodall, Alison H.; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Gorski, Mathias; Gräßler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassinen, Maija; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Hercberg, Serge; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Jostein; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Howard, Phil; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hunt, Steven C.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jensen, Richard A.; Kähönen, Mika; Kang, Hyun Min; Kathiresan, Sekar; Keating, Brendan J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Kim, Eric; Kivimaki, Mika; Klopp, Norman; Kolovou, Genovefa; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kosova, Gulum; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kutalik, Zoltan; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Lakka, Timo A.; Lee, Nanette R.; Lee, I.-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Levy, Daniel; Li, Xiaohui; Liang, Kae-Woei; Lin, Honghuang; Lin, Li; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Männistö, Satu; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Mach, François; Markus, Hugh S.; Marouli, Eirini; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Menni, Cristina; Metspalu, Andres; Mijatovic, Vladan; Moilanen, Leena; Montasser, May E.; Morris, Andrew D.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Mulas, Antonella; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nikus, Kjell; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Ong, Ken K.; Paccaud, Fred; Palmer, Cameron D.; Parsa, Afshin; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Poulter, Neil; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Rasheed, Asif; Rayner, N. William; Renström, Frida; Rettig, Rainer; Rice, Kenneth M.; Roberts, Robert; Rose, Lynda M.; Rossouw, Jacques; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schunkert, Heribert; Sebert, Sylvain; Sheu, Wayne H.-H.; Shin, Young-Ah; Sim, Xueling; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Albert V.; Sosa, Maria X.; Spector, Tim D.; Stančáková, Alena; Stanton, Alice V.; Stirrups, Kathleen E.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sundstrom, Johan; Swift, Amy J.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tai, E.-Shyong; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Teumer, Alexander; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tobin, Martin D.; Tremoli, Elena; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Vaez, Ahmad; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Aline; Wain, Louise V.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Weder, Alan B.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wilks, Rainford; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Wong, Tien Y.; Yang, Tsun-Po; Yao, Jie; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Bovet, Pascal; Cooper, Richard S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Saleheen, Danish; Lee, Jong-Young; Elliott, Paul; Gierman, Hinco J.; Willer, Cristen J.; Franke, Lude; Hovingh, G. Kees; Taylor, Kent D.; Dedoussis, George; Sever, Peter; Wong, Andrew; Lind, Lars; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Njølstad, Inger; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Langenberg, Claudia; Snieder, Harold; Caulfield, Mark J.; Melander, Olle; Laakso, Markku; Saltevo, Juha; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Ingelsson, Erik; Lehtimäki, Terho; Hveem, Kristian; Palmas, Walter; März, Winfried; Kumari, Meena; Salomaa, Veikko; Chen, Yii-der I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Froguel, Philippe; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Lakatta, Edward G.; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Franks, Paul W.; Hamsten, Anders; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Stefansson, Kari; Ridker, Paul M.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Deloukas, Panos; Morris, Andrew P.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2016-01-01

    To dissect the genetic architecture of blood pressure and assess effects on target organ damage, we analyzed 128,272 SNPs from targeted and genome-wide arrays in 201,529 individuals of European ancestry, and genotypes from an additional 140,886 individuals were used for validation. We identified 66

  3. AREN - A non-governmental organization acting in public formation and information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauna, Traian; Anghelescu, Serban Mihnea

    1998-01-01

    The Romanian Association for Nuclear Energy - AREN, founded eight years ago as non-governmental and non-profit organization, is deploying its activity on a voluntary basis. The association comprises 248 fellows, as physical persons, 17 juridical supporting fellows and eight honorary fellows, outstanding personalities with special contributions in promoting Romanian nuclear power development, 'Ionel Purica' - prize winners. AREN co-operates with other domestic NGO's and other sister organizations from abroad, is a collective member of the General Association of Romanian Engineers and is affiliated to European Nuclear Society (ENS). For specialist and public information AREN is publishing and disseminating the following four publications: 1 - 'Energia Nucleara' (Nuclear Energy) journal; 2 - the bulletin 'Nucleus' brought from ENS and translated in Romanian language; 3 - the news 'NUC NET', adopted, worked up and translated in Romanian; 4 - the periodic bulletin 'Nuclear News'. Yearly, AREN organizes the 'Nuclear Energy Days' and the biennial International Symposium of Nuclear Energy (SIEN). (authors)

  4. Exercise-related changes of networks in aging and mild cognitive impairment brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei eHuang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aging and mild cognitive impairment are accompanied by decline of cognitive functions. Meanwhile, the most common form of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease, which is characterized by loss of memory and other intellectual abilities serious to make difficulties for patients in their daily life. Mild cognitive impairment is a transition period between normal aging and dementia, which has been used for early detection of emerging dementia. It converts to dementia with an annual rate of 5-15% as compared to normal aging with 1% rate. Small decreases in the conversion rate of mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer’s disease might significantly reduce the prevalence of dementia. Thus, it is important to intervene at the preclinical stage. Since there are still no effective drugs to treat Alzheimer’s disease, non-drug intervention is crucial for the prevention and treatment of cognitive decline in aging and mild cognitive impairment populations. Previous studies have found some cognitive brain networks disrupted in aging and mild cognitive impairment population, and physical exercise could effectively remediate the function of these brain networks. Understanding the exercise-related mechanisms is crucial to design efficient and effective physical exercise programs for treatment/intervention of cognitive decline. In this review, we provide an overview of the neuroimaging studies on physical training in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment to identify the potential mechanisms underlying current physical training procedures. Studies of functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography and positron emission tomography on brain networks were all included. Based on our review, the default mode network, fronto-parietal network and fronto-executive network are probably the three most valuable targets for efficiency evaluation of interventions.

  5. CD20-targeted therapy: a breakthrough in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meerten, T.; Hagenbeek, A.

    2009-01-01

    Targeting the CD20 antigen on B lymphocytes with the monoclonal antibody rituximab has greatly improved the outcome of patients with B-cell malignancies. Despite the success of rituximab, resistance occurs in about half of the patients, resulting in non-response to treatment or early relapse of the

  6. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and exercise impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, Jane E B; Bridenstine, Mark; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2013-03-01

    Limitations in physical fitness, a consistent finding in individuals with both type I and type 2 diabetes mellitus, correlate strongly with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. These limitations may significantly contribute to the persistent excess cardiovascular mortality affecting this group. Exercise impairments in VO2 peak and VO2 kinetics manifest early on in diabetes, even with good glycemic control and in the absence of clinically apparent complications. Subclinical cardiac dysfunction is often present but does not fully explain the observed defect in exercise capacity in persons with diabetes. In part, the cardiac limitations are secondary to decreased perfusion with exercise challenge. This is a reversible defect. Similarly, in the skeletal muscle, impairments in nutritive blood flow correlate with slowed (or inefficient) exercise kinetics and decreased exercise capacity. Several correlations highlight the likelihood of endothelial-specific impairments as mediators of exercise dysfunction in diabetes, including insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, decreased myocardial perfusion, slowed tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and impairment in mitochondrial function. Both exercise training and therapies targeted at improving insulin sensitivity and endothelial function improve physical fitness in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Optimization of exercise functions in people with diabetes has implications for diabetes prevention and reductions in mortality risk. Understanding the molecular details of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes may provide specific therapeutic targets for the remediation of this defect. Rat models to test this hypothesis are under study.

  7. Metal-organic molecular device for non-volatile memory storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radha, B.; Sagade, Abhay A.; Kulkarni, G. U.

    2014-01-01

    Non-volatile memory devices have been of immense research interest for their use in active memory storage in powered off-state of electronic chips. In literature, various molecules and metal compounds have been investigated in this regard. Molecular memory devices are particularly attractive as they offer the ease of storing multiple memory states in a unique way and also represent ubiquitous choice for miniaturized devices. However, molecules are fragile and thus the device breakdown at nominal voltages during repeated cycles hinders their practical applicability. Here, in this report, a synergetic combination of an organic molecule and an inorganic metal, i.e., a metal-organic complex, namely, palladium hexadecylthiolate is investigated for memory device characteristics. Palladium hexadecylthiolate following partial thermolysis is converted to a molecular nanocomposite of Pd(II), Pd(0), and long chain hydrocarbons, which is shown to exhibit non-volatile memory characteristics with exceptional stability and retention. The devices are all solution-processed and the memory action stems from filament formation across the pre-formed cracks in the nanocomposite film.

  8. Spallation Neutron Source Accelerator Facility Target Safety and Non-safety Control Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, Ronald E.; DeVan, B.; Munro, John K. Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a proton accelerator facility that generates neutrons for scientific researchers by spallation of neutrons from a mercury target. The SNS became operational on April 28, 2006, with first beam on target at approximately 200 W. The SNS accelerator, target, and conventional facilities controls are integrated by standardized hardware and software throughout the facility and were designed and fabricated to SNS conventions to ensure compatibility of systems with Experimental Physics Integrated Control System (EPICS). ControlLogix Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) interface to instruments and actuators, and EPICS performs the high-level integration of the PLCs such that all operator control can be accomplished from the Central Control room using EPICS graphical screens that pass process variables to and from the PLCs. Three active safety systems were designed to industry standards ISA S84.01 and IEEE 603 to meet the desired reliability for these safety systems. The safety systems protect facility workers and the environment from mercury vapor, mercury radiation, and proton beam radiation. The facility operators operated many of the systems prior to beam on target and developed the operating procedures. The safety and non-safety control systems were tested extensively prior to beam on target. This testing was crucial to identify wiring and software errors and failed components, the result of which was few problems during operation with beam on target. The SNS has continued beam on target since April to increase beam power, check out the scientific instruments, and continue testing the operation of facility subsystems

  9. Organic solution-processible electroluminescent molecular glasses for non-doped standard red OLEDs with electrically stable chromaticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Xiaoman; Zuo, Weiwei; Liu, Yingliang, E-mail: liuylxn@sohu.com; Zhang, Zhenru; Zeng, Cen; Xu, Shengang; Cao, Shaokui, E-mail: caoshaokui@zzu.edu.cn

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The D–A–D electroluminescent molecular glasses are synthesized. • Non-doped red electroluminescent film is fabricated by spin-coating. • Red OLED shows stable wavelength, luminous efficiency and chromaticity. • CIE1931 coordinate is in accord with standard red light in PAL system. - Abstract: Organic light-emitting molecular glasses (OEMGs) are synthesized through the introduction of nonplanar donor and branched aliphatic chain into electroluminescent emitters. The target OEMGs are characterized by {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR, IR, UV–vis and fluorescent spectra as well as elemental analysis, TG and DSC. The results indicated that the optical, electrochemical and electroluminescent properties of OEMGs are adjusted successfully by the replacement of electron-donating group. The non-doped OLED device with a standard red electroluminescent emission is achieved by spin-coating the THF solution of OEMG with a triphenylamine moiety. This non-doped red OLED device takes on an electrically stable electroluminescent performance, including the stable maximum electroluminescent wavelength of 640 nm, the stable luminous efficiency of 2.4 cd/A and the stable CIE1931 coordinate of (x, y) = (0.64, 0.35), which is basically in accord with the CIE1931 coordinate (x, y) = (0.64, 0.33) of standard red light in PAL system.

  10. SCF(SAP) controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-04-06

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size.

  11. Liver cell-targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong-Hun; Toita, Riki; Murata, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    The liver is the largest internal organ in mammals and is involved in metabolism, detoxification, synthesis of proteins and lipids, secretion of cytokines and growth factors and immune/inflammatory responses. Hepatitis, alcoholic or non-alcoholic liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatic veno-occlusive disease, and liver fibrosis and cirrhosis are the most common liver diseases. Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic molecules (drugs, genes or proteins) into the liver is very important to increase the clinical efficacy of these molecules and to reduce their side effects in other organs. Several liver cell-targeted delivery systems have been developed and tested in vivo or ex vivo/in vitro. In this review, we discuss the literature concerning liver cell-targeted delivery systems, with a particular emphasis on the results of in vivo studies.

  12. Baby or bathwater? Referrals of "non-cases" in a targeted early identification intervention for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Gerald; Kinkaid, Miriam; Iyer, Srividya N; Joober, Ridha; Goldberg, Karen; Malla, Ashok; Shah, Jai L

    2018-03-14

    To explore the unintended impact of a targeted case identification (TCI) campaign for first episode psychosis (FEP) on people not experiencing FEP ("non-cases") with respect to referral patterns and reasons for being a non-case. Sources of referral, reasons for being a non-case, and subsequent referral destinations of non-cases were examined before and after a TCI. Following the TCI, a greater proportion of non-cases lived outside the study catchment area. A smaller proportion was referred by the parent hospital's emergency room or had a substance-induced psychosis. TCIs for FEP may have unintended effects, with implications for early case identification and early intervention services.

  13. Vision In Stroke cohort: Profile overview of visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J

    2017-11-01

    To profile the full range of visual disorders from a large prospective observation study of stroke survivors referred by stroke multidisciplinary teams to orthoptic services with suspected visual problems. Multicenter prospective study undertaken in 20 acute Trust hospitals. Standardized screening/referral forms and investigation forms documented data on referral signs and symptoms plus type and extent of visual impairment. Of 1,345 patients referred with suspected visual impairment, 915 were recruited (59% men; mean age at stroke onset 69 years [SD 14]). Initial visual assessment was at median 22 days post stroke onset. Eight percent had normal visual assessment. Of 92% with confirmed visual impairment, 24% had reduced central visual acuity visual field loss was present in 52%, most commonly homonymous hemianopia. Fifteen percent had visual inattention and 4.6% had other visual perceptual disorders. Overall 84% were visually symptomatic with visual field loss the most common complaint followed by blurred vision, reading difficulty, and diplopia. Treatment options were provided to all with confirmed visual impairment. Targeted advice was most commonly provided along with refraction, prisms, and occlusion. There are a wide range of visual disorders that occur following stroke and, frequently, with visual symptoms. There are equally a wide variety of treatment options available for these individuals. All stroke survivors require screening for visual impairment and warrant referral for specialist assessment and targeted treatment specific to the type of visual impairment.

  14. Using non-human primates to benefit humans: research and organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David; Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido

    2014-11-01

    Emerging biotechnology may soon allow the creation of genetically human organs inside animals, with non-human primates (henceforth simply "primates") and pigs being the best candidate species. This prospect raises the question of whether creating organs in primates in order to then transplant them into humans would be more (or less) acceptable than using them for research. In this paper, we examine the validity of the purported moral distinction between primates and other animals, and analyze the ethical acceptability of using primates to create organs for human use.

  15. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: I. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A long-standing dogma in the radiation sciences is that energy from radiation must be deposited in the cell nucleus to elicit a biological effect. A number of non-targeted, delayed effects of ionizing radiation have been described that challenge this dogma and pose new challenges to evaluating potential hazards associated with radiation exposure. These effects include induced genomic instability and non-targeted bystander effects. The in vitro evidence for non-targeted effects in radiation biology will be reviewed, but the question as to how one extrapolates from these in vitro observations to the risk of radiation-induced adverse health effects such as cancer remains open.

  16. Non-target effects of fungicides on nectar-inhabiting fungi of almond flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Robert N; Vannette, Rachel L; Brittain, Claire; Williams, Neal M; Fukami, Tadashi

    2017-04-01

    Nectar mediates interactions between plants and pollinators in natural and agricultural systems. Specialized microorganisms are common nectar inhabitants, and potentially important mediators of plant-pollinator interactions. However, their diversity and role in mediating pollination services in agricultural systems are poorly characterized. Moreover, agrochemicals are commonly applied to minimize crop damage, but may present ecological consequences for non-target organisms. Assessment of ecological risk has tended to focus on beneficial macroorganisms such as pollinators, with less attention paid to microorganisms. Here, using culture-independent methods, we assess the impact of two widely-used fungicides on nectar microbial community structure in the mass-flowering crop almond (Prunus dulcis). We predicted that fungicide application would reduce fungal richness and diversity, whereas competing bacterial richness would increase, benefitting from negative effects on fungi. We found that fungicides reduced fungal richness and diversity in exposed flowers, but did not significantly affect bacterial richness, diversity, or community composition. The relative abundance of Metschnikowia OTUs, nectar specialists that can impact pollination, was reduced by both fungicides. Given growing recognition of the importance of nectar microorganisms as mediators of plant-pollinator mutualisms, future research should consider the impact of management practices on plant-associated microorganisms and consequences for pollination services in agricultural landscapes. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Targeting neural endophenotypes of eating disorders with non-invasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine A Dunlop

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The term eating disorders (ED encompasses a wide variety of disordered eating and compensatory behaviors, and so the term is associated with considerable clinical and phenotypic heterogeneity. This heterogeneity makes optimizing treatment techniques difficult. One class of treatments is non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS. NIBS, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS are accessible forms of neuromodulation that alter the cortical excitability of a target brain region. It is crucial for NIBS to be successful that the target is well selected for the patient population in question. Targets may best be selected by stepping back from conventional DSM-5 diagnostic criteria to identify neural substrates of more basic phenotypes, including behavior related rewards and punishment cognitive control, and social processes. These phenotypic dimensions have been recently laid out by the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC initiative. Consequently, this review is intended to identify potential dimensions as outlined by the RDoC and their underlying behavioral and neurobiological targets associated with ED as potential candidates for NIBS and review the available literature on rTMS and tDCS in ED. This review systematically reviews abnormal neural circuitry in ED within the RDoC framework, and also systematically reviews the available literature investigating NIBS as a treatment for ED.

  18. NON-INVASIVE RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION OF CANCER TARGETED BY GOLD NANOPARTICLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Jon; Klune, John Robert; Chory, Eamon; Jeyabalan, Geetha; Kanzius, John S.; Nalesnik, Michael; Geller, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Current radiofrequency ablation (RFA) techniques require invasive needle placement and are limited by accuracy of targeting. The purpose of this study was to test a novel non-invasive radiowave machine that uses RF energy to thermally destroy tissue. Gold nanoparticles were designed and produced to facilitate tissue heating by the radiowaves. Methods A solid state radiowave machine consisting of a power generator and transmitting/receiving couplers which transmit radiowaves at 13.56 MHz was used. Gold nanoparticles were produced by citrate reduction and exposed to the RF field either in solutions testing or after incubation with HepG2 cells. A rat hepatoma model using JM-1 cells and Fisher rats was employed using direct injection of nanoparticles into the tumor to focus the radiowaves for select heating. Temperatures were measured using a fiber-optic thermometer for real-time data. Results Solutions containing gold nanoparticles heated in a time- and power-dependent manner. HepG2 liver cancer cells cultured in the presence of gold nanoparticles achieved adequate heating to cause cell death upon exposure to the RF field with no cytotoxicity attributable to the gold nanoparticles themselves. In vivo rat exposures at 35W using gold nanoparticles for tissue injection resulted in significant temperature increases and thermal injury at subcutaneous injection sites as compared to vehicle (water) injected controls. Discussion These data show that non-invasive radiowave thermal ablation of cancer cells is feasible when facilitated by gold nanoparticles. Future studies will focus on tumor selective targeting of nanoparticles for in vivo tumor destruction. PMID:18656617

  19. Cognitive impairment and driving safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, David W; Molnar, Lisa J

    2012-11-01

    As the populations of many countries continue to age, cognitive impairment will likely become more common. Individuals with cognitive impairment pose special challenges for families, health professionals, driving safety professionals, and the larger community, particularly if these older adults depend on driving as their primary means of community mobility. It is vital that we continue to extend our knowledge about the driving behavior of individuals' with cognitive impairment, as well as try to develop effective means of screening and assessing these individuals for fitness to drive and help facilitate their transition to non-driving when appropriate. This special issue is intended to provide researchers and practitioners an opportunity to present the most recent research findings on driving-related issues among older adults with cognitive impairment. The issue contains 11 original contributions from seven countries. The topics covered by these papers are: crash risks; screening, assessment, and fitness to drive; driving performance using a driving simulator; and driving behaviors and driving-related decisions of people with cognitive impairments. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Non-destructive testing of the MEGAPIE target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Y.; Wohlmuther, M.; Boutellier, V.; Hahl, S.; Lagotzki, A.; Leu, H.; Linder, H. P.; Schwarz, R.; Spahr, A.; Zanini, L.; Kuster, D.; Gavillet, D.; Wagner, W.

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) is one important part of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the MEGAPIE target. It includes visual inspection and ultrasonic measurement of the beam window of the T91 LBE container and gamma mapping of the beam window of the AlMg3 safety-container. The visual inspection showed no visible failure in the proton beam window area of the T91 LBE container. The ultrasonic measurement demonstrated no detectable change in the wall thickness of the T91 beam window, which implies no severe corrosion effect induced by flowing LBE during the four-month irradiation period. The gamma mapping provided the distribution of 22Na, a spallation product, in the proton beam window area of the AlMg3 safety-container. The result was used to evaluate the accumulated proton fluence distribution profile, the input data for determining irradiation parameters. A maximum proton fluence of 1.9 × 1025 p/m2 was deduced. The corresponding displacement damage degree in the T91 beam window was 7.1 dpa.

  1. Pdgfrb-Cre targets lymphatic endothelial cells of both venous and non-venous origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvmar, Maria H; Martinez-Corral, Ines; Stanczuk, Lukas; Mäkinen, Taija

    2016-06-01

    The Pdgfrb-Cre line has been used as a tool to specifically target pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. Recent studies showed additional targeting of cardiac and mesenteric lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) by the Pdgfrb-Cre transgene. In the heart, this was suggested to provide evidence for a previously unknown nonvenous source of LECs originating from yolk sac (YS) hemogenic endothelium (HemEC). Here we show that Pdgfrb-Cre does not, however, target YS HemEC or YS-derived erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs). Instead, a high proportion of ECs in embryonic blood vessels of multiple organs, as well as venous-derived LECs were targeted. Assessment of temporal Cre activity using the R26-mTmG double reporter suggested recent occurrence of Pdgfrb-Cre recombination in both blood and lymphatic ECs. It thus cannot be excluded that Pdgfrb-Cre mediated targeting of LECs is due to de novo expression of the Pdgfrb-Cre transgene or their previously established venous endothelial origin. Importantly, Pdgfrb-Cre targeting of LECs does not provide evidence for YS HemEC origin of the lymphatic vasculature. Our results highlight the need for careful interpretation of lineage tracing using constitutive Cre lines that cannot discriminate active from historical expression. The early vascular targeting by the Pdgfrb-Cre also warrants consideration for its use in studies of mural cells. genesis 54:350-358, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Genesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Genesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The brain is a target organ after acute exposure to depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lestaevel, P.; Houpert, P.; Bussy, C.; Dhieux, B.; Gourmelon, P.; Paquet, F.

    2005-01-01

    The health effects of depleted uranium (DU) are mainly caused by its chemical toxicity. Although the kidneys are the main target organs for uranium toxicity, uranium can also reach the brain. In this paper, the central effects of acute exposure to DU were studied in relation to health parameters and the sleep-wake cycle of adult rats. Animals were injected intraperitoneally with 144 ± 10 μg DU kg -1 as nitrate. Three days after injection, the amounts of uranium in the kidneys represented 2.6 μg of DU g -1 of tissue, considered as a sub-nephrotoxic dosage. The central effect of uranium could be seen through a decrease in food intake as early as the first day after exposure and shorter paradoxical sleep 3 days after acute DU exposure (-18% of controls). With a lower dosage of DU (70 ± 8 μg DU kg -1 ), no significant effect was observed on the sleep-wake cycle. The present study intends to illustrate the fact that the brain is a target organ, as are the kidneys, after acute exposure to a moderate dosage of DU. The mechanisms by which uranium causes these early neurophysiological perturbations shall be discussed

  3. Injuries from Non-Retention in Gillnet Fisheries Suppress Reproductive Maturation in Escaped Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Matthew R.; Swanson, Penny; Young, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Exploitation of fisheries resources has unintended consequences, not only in the bycatch and discard of non-target organisms, but also in damage to targeted fish that are injured by gear but not landed (non-retention). Delayed mortality due to non-retention represents lost reproductive potential in exploited stocks, while not contributing to harvest. Our study examined the physiological mechanisms by which delayed mortality occurs and the extent to which injuries related to disentanglement fr...

  4. Metaphors of Teacher Candidates' Regarding the Concept of "Non-Governmental Organizations" (NGOs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selanik-Ay, Tugba

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a learning area in social studies curriculum called "Groups, institutions and social organizations" was used. It can be seen that an important role for teachers in a social studies programme is to benefit from non-governmental organizations. The aim of this study is to investigate primary school teacher candidates' social…

  5. Identification of a novel homozygous mutation in MYO3A in a Chinese family with DFNB30 non-syndromic hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ronggui; Sang, Qing; Xu, Yao; Feng, Ruizhi; Jin, Li; He, Lin; Wang, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Hearing loss is a common sensory impairment. Several genetic loci or genes responsible for non-syndrome hearing loss have been identified, including the well-known deafness genes GJB2, MT-RNR1 and SLC26A4. MYO3A belongs to the myosin superfamily. Previously only three mutations in this gene have been found in an Isreali family with DFNB30, in which patients demonstrated progressive hearing loss. In this study, we characterized a consanguineous Kazakh family with congenital hearing loss. By targeted sequence capture and next-generation sequencing, we identified a homozygous mutation and did bioinformatics analysis to this mutation. A homozygous mutation, MYO3A:c.1841C>T (p.S614F), was identified to be responsible for the disease. Ser614 is located in the motor domain of MYO3A that is highly conserved among different species. Molecular modeling predicts that the conserved Ser614 may play an important role in maintaining the stability of β-sheet and the interaction between neighboring β-strand. This is the second report on MYO3A mutations in deafness and the first report in China. The finding help facilitate establishing a better relationship between MYO3A mutation and hearing phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Performances and stability of a 2.4 ton Gd organic liquid scintillator target for ν-bar e detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, I R; Bezrukov, L B; Danilov, N A; Krilov, Yu S; Yanovich, E A; Malguin, A S; Cattadori, C M; Vacri, A di; Ioannucci, L; Bruno, G; Aglietta, M; Bonardi, A; Fulgione, W; Porta, A; Kemp, E; Selvi, M

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report the performance and the chemical and physical properties of a 2 x 1.2 ton organic liquid scintillator target doped with Gd up to ∼ 0.1%, and the results of a 3 year long stability survey of the target. In particular we have measured and monitored the optical and fluorescent properties of the Gd-doped liquid scintillator (LS), the amount of both Gd and primary fluor in solution, and the performance of the two Gd doped targets as neutron detectors, namely neutron capture efficiency and average capture time. The experimental survey is ongoing, the targets being continuously monitored. From the spectrophotometric measurements performed on samples periodically extracted along the three years, we can exclude, at 99% C.L. level, a degradation of the light transmittance of the Gd-doped liquid scintillator larger than 1% y -1 ; from the in-tank measurements no significant decrease of the neutron capture efficiency and neutron capture time is observed. This is the largest stable Gd-doped organic liquid scintillator target ever produced and continuously operated for a long period.

  7. Age-related modifications of type I collagen impair DDR1-induced apoptosis in non-invasive breast carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Saby; Hassan, Rammal; Kevin, Magnien; Emilie, Buache; Sylvie, Brassart-Pasco; Laurence, Van-Gulick; Pierre, Jeannesson; Erik, Maquoi; Hamid, Morjani

    2018-05-07

    Type I collagen and DDR1 axis has been described to decrease cell proliferation and to initiate apoptosis in non-invasive breast carcinoma in three-dimensional cell culture matrices. Moreover, MT1-MMP down-regulates these effects. Here, we address the effect of type I collagen aging and MT1-MMP expression on cell proliferation suppression and induced-apoptosis in non-invasive MCF-7 and ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma. We provide evidence for a decrease in cell growth and an increase in apoptosis in the presence of adult collagen when compared to old collagen. This effect involves a differential activation of DDR1, as evidenced by a higher DDR1 phosphorylation level in adult collagen. In adult collagen, inhibition of DDR1 expression and kinase function induced an increase in cell growth to a level similar to that observed in old collagen. The impact of aging on the sensitivity of collagen to MT1-MMP has been reported recently. We used the MT1-MMP expression strategy to verify whether, by degrading adult type I collagen, it could lead to the same phenotype observed in old collagen 3D matrix. MT1-MMP overexpression abrogated the proliferation suppression and induced-apoptosis effects only in the presence of adult collagen. This suggests that differential collagen degradation by MT1-MMP induced a structural disorganization of adult collagen and inhibits DDR1 activation. This could in turn impair DDR1-induced cell growth suppression and apoptosis. Taken together, our data suggest that modifications of collagen structural organization, due to aging, contribute to the loss of the growth suppression and induced apoptosis effect of collagen in luminal breast carcinoma. MT1-MMP-dependent degradation and aging of collagen have no additive effects on these processes.

  8. Transgenic Epigenetics: Using Transgenic Organisms to Examine Epigenetic Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori A. McEachern

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-model organisms are generally more difficult and/or time consuming to work with than model organisms. In addition, epigenetic analysis of model organisms is facilitated by well-established protocols, and commercially-available reagents and kits that may not be available for, or previously tested on, non-model organisms. Given the evolutionary conservation and widespread nature of many epigenetic mechanisms, a powerful method to analyze epigenetic phenomena from non-model organisms would be to use transgenic model organisms containing an epigenetic region of interest from the non-model. Interestingly, while transgenic Drosophila and mice have provided significant insight into the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary conservation of the epigenetic processes that target epigenetic control regions in other model organisms, this method has so far been under-exploited for non-model organism epigenetic analysis. This paper details several experiments that have examined the epigenetic processes of genomic imprinting and paramutation, by transferring an epigenetic control region from one model organism to another. These cross-species experiments demonstrate that valuable insight into both the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary conservation of epigenetic processes may be obtained via transgenic experiments, which can then be used to guide further investigations and experiments in the species of interest.

  9. The prevalence and causes of visual impairment in seven-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Soraya; Hashemi, Hassan; Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Yekta, Abbasali; Ostadimoghaddam, Hadi; Mirzajani, Ali; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2018-05-01

    To report the prevalence and causes of visual impairment in seven-year-old children in Iran and its relationship with socio-economic conditions. In a cross-sectional population-based study, first-grade students in the primary schools of eight cities in the country were randomly selected from different geographic locations using multistage cluster sampling. The examinations included visual acuity measurement, ocular motility evaluation, and cycloplegic and non-cycloplegic refraction. Using the definitions of the World Health Organization (presenting visual acuity less than or equal to 6/18 in the better eye) to estimate the prevalence of vision impairment, the present study reported presenting visual impairment in seven-year-old children. Of 4,614 selected students, 4,106 students participated in the study (response rate 89 per cent), of whom 2,127 (51.8 per cent) were male. The prevalence of visual impairment according to a visual acuity of 6/18 was 0.341 per cent (95 per cent confidence interval 0.187-0.571); 1.34 per cent (95 per cent confidence interval 1.011-1.74) of children had visual impairment according to a visual acuity of 6/18 in at least one eye. Sixty-six (1.6 per cent) and 23 (0.24 per cent) children had visual impairment according to a visual acuity of 6/12 in the worse and better eye, respectively. The most common causes of visual impairment were refractive errors (81.8 per cent) and amblyopia (14.5 per cent). Among different types of refractive errors, astigmatism was the main refractive error leading to visual impairment. According to the concentration index, the distribution of visual impairment in children from low-income families was higher. This study revealed a high prevalence of visual impairment in a representative sample of seven-year-old Iranian children. Astigmatism and amblyopia were the most common causes of visual impairment. The distribution of visual impairment was higher in children from low-income families. Cost

  10. Hypercaloric diet prevents sexual impairment induced by maternal food restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, M M; Macrini, D J; Teodorov, E; Bonamin, L V; Dalboni, L C; Coelho, C P; Chaves-Kirsten, G P; Florio, J C; Queiroz-Hazarbassanov, N; Bondan, E F; Kirsten, T B

    2017-05-01

    Prenatal undernutrition impairs copulatory behavior and increases the tendency to become obese/overweight, which also reduces sexual behavior. Re-feeding rats prenatally undernourished with a normocaloric diet can restore their physiological conditions and copulatory behavior. Thus, the present study investigated whether a hypercaloric diet that is administered in rats during the juvenile period prevents sexual impairments that are caused by maternal food restriction and the tendency to become overweight/obese. Female rats were prenatally fed a 40% restricted diet from gestational day 2 to 18. The pups received a hypercaloric diet from postnatal day (PND) 23 to PND65 (food restricted hypercaloric [FRH] group) or laboratory chow (food restricted control [FRC] group). Pups from non-food-restricted dams received laboratory chow during the entire experiment (non-food-restricted [NFR] group). During the juvenile period and adulthood, body weight gain was evaluated weekly. The day of balanopreputial separation, sexual behavior, sexual organ weight, hypodermal adiposity, striatal dopamine and serotonin, serum testosterone, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were evaluated. The FRH group exhibited an increase in body weight on PND58 and PND65. The FRC group exhibited an increase in the latency to the first mount and intromission and an increase in serum TNF-α levels but a reduction of dopaminergic activity. The hypercaloric diet reversed all of these effects but increased adiposity. We concluded that the hypercaloric diet administered during the juvenile period attenuated reproductive impairments that were induced by maternal food restriction through increases in the energy expenditure but not the tendency to become overweight/obese. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 40 CFR 156.85 - Non-target organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... oral LD50 of 100 mg/kg or less, the statement, “This pesticide is toxic to wildlife” is required. (2) If a pesticide intended for outdoor use contains an active ingredient with a fish acute LC50 of 1 ppm... for outdoor use contains an active ingredient with an avian acute oral LD50 of 100 mg/kg or less, or a...

  12. Relevance of MICA and other non-HLA antibodies in clinical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumitran-Holgersson, Suchitra

    2008-10-01

    The clinical importance of HLA-specific antibodies for organ allograft outcome is well established. In the past few years, there has been an increasing interest in non-HLA antigens as targets of injury in organ transplant recipients. This increased interest has been spurred by the fact that HLA-identical kidney transplants also undergo immunological rejections. Polymorphisms within non-HLA genes associated with evoking an immune response to alloantigens are currently being studied for their association with transplant outcome. Non-HLA antigens, such as the polymorphic MHC class I-related chain A (MICA), expressed on endothelial cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hyperacute, acute and chronic organ allograft rejections. Use of endothelial cells as targets may clarify the specificities of other clinically relevant non-HLA antibodies in graft rejections. This review summarizes past and current knowledge of the clinical importance and specificities of non-HLA antibodies, and mechanisms by which these antibodies may contribute to graft destruction in clinical transplantation. The aims of current research into the role of non-HLA antigens and their genetics in predicting outcome are to develop an improved insight into the basic science of transplantation and to develop a risk or prognostic index for use in the clinical setting. Non-HLA antibody responses are receiving increasing interest in acute and chronic rejection and specificity, affinity, and pathogenicity need to be investigated to estimate their contribution. Undoubtedly, this will continue to be an area of interest in terms of fully understanding the role of non-HLA antigens as targets of immune-mediated injury and the potential for clinical intervention.

  13. Impaired activity of bile bile canalicular organic anion transporter (Mrp2/cmoat) is not the main cause of ethinylestradiol-induced cholestasis in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopen, NR; Wolters, H; Havinga, R; Vonk, RJ; Jansen, PLM; Muller, M; Kuipers, F

    To test the hypothesis that impaired activity of the bile canalicular organic anion transporting system mrp2 (cmoat) is a key event in the etiology of 17 alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE)-induced intrahepatic cholestasis in rats, EE (5 mg/kg subcutaneously daily) was administered to male normal Wistar

  14. Assessing risks to non-target species during poison baiting programs for feral cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Buckmaster

    Full Text Available Poison baiting is used frequently to reduce the impacts of pest species of mammals on agricultural and biodiversity interests. However, baiting may not be appropriate if non-target species are at risk of poisoning. Here we use a desktop decision tree approach to assess the risks to non-target vertebrate species in Australia that arise from using poison baits developed to control feral house cats (Felis catus. These baits are presented in the form of sausages with toxicant implanted in the bait medium within an acid-soluble polymer capsule (hard shell delivery vehicle, or HSDV that disintegrates after ingestion. Using criteria based on body size, diet and feeding behaviour, we assessed 221 of Australia's 3,769 native vertebrate species as likely to consume cat-baits, with 47 of these likely to ingest implanted HSDVs too. Carnivorous marsupials were judged most likely to consume both the baits and HSDVs, with some large-bodied and ground-active birds and reptiles also consuming them. If criteria were relaxed, a further 269 species were assessed as possibly able to consume baits and 343 as possibly able to consume HSDVs; most of these consumers were birds. One threatened species, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii was judged as definitely able to consume baits with implanted HSDVs, whereas five threatened species of birds and 21 species of threatened mammals were rated as possible consumers. Amphibia were not considered to be at risk. We conclude that most species of native Australian vertebrates would not consume surface-laid baits during feral cat control programs, and that significantly fewer would be exposed to poisoning if HSDVs were employed. However, risks to susceptible species should be quantified in field or pen trials prior to the implementation of a control program, and minimized further by applying baits at times and in places where non-target species have little access.

  15. Assessing risks to non-target species during poison baiting programs for feral cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, Tony; Dickman, Christopher R; Johnston, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Poison baiting is used frequently to reduce the impacts of pest species of mammals on agricultural and biodiversity interests. However, baiting may not be appropriate if non-target species are at risk of poisoning. Here we use a desktop decision tree approach to assess the risks to non-target vertebrate species in Australia that arise from using poison baits developed to control feral house cats (Felis catus). These baits are presented in the form of sausages with toxicant implanted in the bait medium within an acid-soluble polymer capsule (hard shell delivery vehicle, or HSDV) that disintegrates after ingestion. Using criteria based on body size, diet and feeding behaviour, we assessed 221 of Australia's 3,769 native vertebrate species as likely to consume cat-baits, with 47 of these likely to ingest implanted HSDVs too. Carnivorous marsupials were judged most likely to consume both the baits and HSDVs, with some large-bodied and ground-active birds and reptiles also consuming them. If criteria were relaxed, a further 269 species were assessed as possibly able to consume baits and 343 as possibly able to consume HSDVs; most of these consumers were birds. One threatened species, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) was judged as definitely able to consume baits with implanted HSDVs, whereas five threatened species of birds and 21 species of threatened mammals were rated as possible consumers. Amphibia were not considered to be at risk. We conclude that most species of native Australian vertebrates would not consume surface-laid baits during feral cat control programs, and that significantly fewer would be exposed to poisoning if HSDVs were employed. However, risks to susceptible species should be quantified in field or pen trials prior to the implementation of a control program, and minimized further by applying baits at times and in places where non-target species have little access.

  16. Disease-specific monoclonal antibodies targeting glutamate decarboxylase impair GABAergic neurotransmission and affect motor learning and behavioral functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario U Manto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies to the smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase can be found in patients with type 1 diabetes and a number of neurological disorders, including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and limbic encephalitis. The detection of disease-specific autoantibody epitopes led to the hypothesis that distinct glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies may elicit specific neurological phenotypes. We explored the in vitro/in vivo effects of well-characterized monoclonal glutamate decarboxylase antibodies. We found that glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies present in patients with stiff person syndrome (n = 7 and cerebellar ataxia (n = 15 recognized an epitope distinct from that recognized by glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies present in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 10 or limbic encephalitis (n = 4. We demonstrated that the administration of a monoclonal glutamate decarboxylase antibody representing this epitope specificity (1 disrupted in vitro the association of glutamate decarboxylase with γ-Aminobutyric acid containing synaptic vesicles, (2 depressed the inhibitory synaptic transmission in cerebellar slices with a gradual time course and a lasting suppressive effect, (3 significantly decreased conditioned eyelid responses evoked in mice, with no modification of learning curves in the classical eyeblink-conditioning task, (4 markedly impaired the facilitatory effect exerted by the premotor cortex over the motor cortex in a paired-pulse stimulation paradigm, and (5 induced decreased exploratory behavior and impaired locomotor function in rats. These findings support the specific targeting of glutamate decarboxylase by its autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of stiff-person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia. Therapies of these disorders based on selective removal of such glutamate decarboxylase antibodies could be envisioned.

  17. Writing Motivation of Students with Specific Language Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Kyle Lee

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the writing motivation of students with specific language impairments with their non-disabled peers. Due to the cognitive and linguistic demands of the writing process, students with language impairments face unique difficulties during the writing process. It was hypothesized that students with specific language…

  18. The cultivation of Bt corn producing Cry1Ac toxins does not adversely affect non-target arthropods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Guo

    Full Text Available Transgenic corn producing Cry1Ac toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt provides effective control of Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée, and thus reduces insecticide applications. However, whether Bt corn exerts undesirable effects on non-target arthropods (NTAs is still controversial. We conducted a 2-yr study in Shangzhuang Agricultural Experiment Station to assess the potential impact of Bt corn on field population density, biodiversity, community composition and structure of NTAs. On each sampling date, the total abundance, Shannon's diversity index, Pielou's evenness index and Simpson's diversity index were not significantly affected by Bt corn as compared to non-Bt corn. The "sampling dates" had a significant effect on these indices, but no clear tendencies related to "Bt corn" or "sampling dates X corn variety" interaction were recorded. Principal response curve analysis of variance indicated that Bt corn did not alter the distribution of NTAs communities. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity and distance analysis showed that Cry1Ac toxin exposure did not increase community dissimilarities between Bt and non-Bt corn plots and that the evolution of non-target arthropod community was similar on the two corn varieties. The cultivation of Bt corn failed to show any detrimental evidence on the density of non-target herbivores, predators and parasitoids. The composition of herbivores, predators and parasitoids was identical in Bt and non-Bt corn plots. Taken together, results from the present work support that Bt corn producing Cry1Ac toxins does not adversely affect NTAs.

  19. Impact of metabolic, hemodynamic and inflammatory factors on target organ damage in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blicher, M.; Kruger, R.; Olesen, Thomas Bastholm

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We wanted to test the impact of metabolic, hemodynamic and inflammatory factors on target organ damage (TOD) defined as cardiac hypertrophy, atherosclerosis, arterioclerosis and microvascular damage. Design and method: In a population based cohort study of 2115 healthy subjects (1049...... associated to hypertrophy, arteriosclerosis and microvascular damage in healthy subjects....

  20. Preclinical studies identify non-apoptotic low-level caspase-3 as therapeutic target in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Luyet

    Full Text Available The majority of pemphigus vulgaris (PV patients suffer from a live-threatening loss of intercellular adhesion between keratinocytes (acantholysis. The disease is caused by auto-antibodies that bind to desmosomal cadherins desmoglein (Dsg 3 or Dsg3 and Dsg1 in mucous membranes and skin. A currently unresolved controversy in PV is whether apoptosis is involved in the pathogenic process. The objective of this study was to perform preclinical studies to investigate apoptotic pathway activation in PV pathogenesis with the goal to assess its potential for clinical therapy. For this purpose, we investigated mouse and human skin keratinocyte cultures treated with PV antibodies (the experimental Dsg3 monospecific antibody AK23 or PV patients IgG, PV mouse models (passive transfer of AK23 or PVIgG into adult and neonatal mice as well as PV patients' biopsies (n=6. A combination of TUNEL assay, analyses of membrane integrity, early apoptotic markers such as cleaved poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP and the collapse of actin cytoskeleton failed to provide evidence for apoptosis in PV pathogenesis. However, the in vitro and in vivo PV models, allowing to monitor progression of lesion formation, revealed an early, transient and low-level caspase-3 activation. Pharmacological inhibition confirmed the functional implication of caspase-3 in major events in PV such as shedding of Dsg3, keratin retraction, proliferation including c-Myc induction, p38MAPK activation and acantholysis. Together, these data identify low-level caspase-3 activation downstream of disrupted Dsg3 trans- or cis-adhesion as a major event in PV pathogenesis that is non-synonymous with apoptosis and represents, unlike apoptotic components, a promising target for clinical therapy. At a broader level, these results posit that an impairment of adhesive functions in concert with low-level, non-lethal caspase-3 activation can evoke profound cellular changes which may be of relevance for other

  1. Targeted therapies in development for non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanyanan Reungwetwattana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The iterative discovery in various malignancies during the past decades that a number of aberrant tumorigenic processes and signal transduction pathways are mediated by "druggable" protein kinases has led to a revolutionary change in drug development. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, the ErbB family of receptors (e.g., EGFR [epidermal growth factor receptor], HER2 [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2], RAS (rat sarcoma gene, BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1, MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase c-MET (c-mesenchymal-epithelial transition, FGFR (fibroblast growth factor receptor, DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2, PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog, AKT (protein kinase B, ALK (anaplastic lym phoma kinase, RET (rearranged during transfection, ROS1 (reactive oxygen species 1 and EPH (erythropoietin-producing hepatoma are key targets of various agents currently in clinical development. These oncogenic targets exert their selective growth advantage through various intercommunicating pathways, such as through RAS/RAF/MEK, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin and SRC-signal transduction and transcription signaling. The recent clinical studies, EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and crizotinib were considered as strongly effective targeted therapies in metastatic NSCLC. Currently, five molecular targeted agents were approved for treatment of advanced NSCLC: Gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib for positive EGFR mutation, crizotinib for positive echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4-ALK translocation and bevacizumab. Moreover, oncogenic mutant proteins are subject to regulation by protein trafficking pathways, specifically through the heat shock protein 90 system. Drug combinations affecting various nodes in these signaling and intracellular processes are predicted and demonstrated to be synergistic and

  2. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 improves impaired dermal wound healing in old mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyanenko, Ilya A; Popova, Ekaterina N; Zakharova, Vlada V; Ilyinskaya, Olga P; Vasilieva, Tamara V; Romashchenko, Valeria P; Fedorov, Artem V; Manskikh, Vasily N; Skulachev, Maxim V; Zinovkin, Roman A; Pletjushkina, Olga Yu; Skulachev, Vladimir P; Chernyak, Boris V

    2015-07-01

    The process of skin wound healing is delayed or impaired in aging animals. To investigate the possible role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) in cutaneous wound healing of aged mice, we have applied the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1. The SkQ1 treatment resulted in accelerated resolution of the inflammatory phase, formation of granulation tissue, vascularization and epithelization of the wounds. The wounds of SkQ1-treated mice contained increased amount of myofibroblasts which produce extracellular matrix proteins and growth factors mediating granulation tissue formation. This effect resembled SkQ1-induced differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblast, observed earlierin vitro. The Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFb) produced by SkQ1-treated fibroblasts was found to stimulated motility of endothelial cells in vitro, an effect which may underlie pro-angiogenic action of SkQ1 in the wounds. In vitro experiments showed that SkQ1 prevented decomposition of VE-cadherin containing contacts and following increase in permeability of endothelial cells monolayer, induced by pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF. Prevention of excessive reaction of endothelium to the pro-inflammatory cytokine(s) might account for anti-inflammatory effect of SkQ1. Our findings point to an important role of mtROS in pathogenesis of age-related chronic wounds.

  3. Piracetam treatment in patients with cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Mukund G; Holla, Bharath; Varambally, Shivarama; Raveendranathan, Dhanya; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2013-01-01

    Piracetam is a cognitive-enhancing agent that is used for the treatment of cognitive impairments of various etiologies. Little is known about its side effect profile, especially in those with psychiatric illness. We herewith present two cases with cognitive impairment who had contrasting responses to piracetam. One of them with organic amnestic syndrome had significant improvement, whereas the other who had an organic personality change as well as a family history of mental illness had significant worsening of behavioral problems after piracetam was introduced. This report highlights the need for caution in the use of piracetam, especially in those with past or family history of psychiatric illness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of neonicotinoids and fipronil on non-target invertebrates : Environmental Science and Pollution Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisa, L.W.; Amaral-Rogers, V.; Belzunces, L.P.; Bonmatin, J.M.; Downs, C.A.; Goulson, D.; Kreutzweiser, D.P.; Krupke, C.; Liess, M.; McField, M.; Morrissey, C.A.; Noome, D.A.; Settele, J.; Simon-Delso, N.; Stark, J.D.; Van der Sluijs, J.P.; Van Dyck, H.; Wiemers, M.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the state of knowledge regarding the effects of large-scale pollution with neonicotinoid insecticides and fipronil on non-target invertebrate species of terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments. A large section of the assessment is dedicated to the state of knowledge on sublethal

  5. Impaired fatty acid oxidation as a cause for lipotoxicity in cardiomyocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haffar, T. [Université de Montreal (Canada); Montreal Heart Institute (Canada); Bérubé-Simard, F. [Montreal Heart Institute (Canada); Bousette, N., E-mail: nicolas.bousette@umontreal.ca [Université de Montreal (Canada); Montreal Heart Institute (Canada)

    2015-12-04

    A major cause for diabetic cardiomyopathy is excess lipid accumulation. To elucidate mechanisms of lipotoxicity mediated diabetic heart disease we need to further our understanding of how lipid metabolism is altered in the diabetic heart. Here we investigated the role of lipid clearance by oxidation as a regulator of lipid-mediated toxicity (lipotoxicity). We evaluated the effect of pre-treating rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (NCMs) with either oleate (mono-unsaturated fatty acid) or palmitate (saturated fatty acid) on fatty acid oxidation (FAO) by measuring {sup 14}C–CO{sub 2} production. We evaluated carnitine palmitoyltransferase (Cpt1b) expression by western blotting and mitochondrial membrane potential by quantitative and qualitative fluorescence analyses using the JC-1 dye. We inhibited the Cpt1b pharmacologically using etomoxir and genetically by knocking down its expression using LentiVector mediated transduction of siRNAs targeting the Cpt1b gene. We found that palmitate had a slower clearance rate from NCMs than oleate, and this was associated with a significant decrease in FAO. This impairment in FAO was not the result of either loss of Cpt1b protein or mitochondrial integrity. Enhancing FAO with either oleate or carnitine was associated with a significant attenuation of palmitate mediated lipotoxicity. In contrast impairing FAO in oleate treated NCMs caused lipotoxicity. Here we demonstrate that a major difference between non-toxic unsaturated fatty acids and toxic saturated fatty acids is there ability to stimulate or inhibit fatty acid oxidation, respectively. This has important implications for diabetic cardiomyopathy since diabetic hearts consistently exhibit elevated lipid accumulation. - Highlights: • Palmitate had a slower clearance rate from NCMs than oleate. • Palmitate caused a significant decrease in fatty acid oxidation in cardiomyocytes. • Impaired FAO was not due to loss of Cpt1b protein or mitochondrial integrity. • Enhancing FAO

  6. Impaired fatty acid oxidation as a cause for lipotoxicity in cardiomyocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffar, T.; Bérubé-Simard, F.; Bousette, N.

    2015-01-01

    A major cause for diabetic cardiomyopathy is excess lipid accumulation. To elucidate mechanisms of lipotoxicity mediated diabetic heart disease we need to further our understanding of how lipid metabolism is altered in the diabetic heart. Here we investigated the role of lipid clearance by oxidation as a regulator of lipid-mediated toxicity (lipotoxicity). We evaluated the effect of pre-treating rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (NCMs) with either oleate (mono-unsaturated fatty acid) or palmitate (saturated fatty acid) on fatty acid oxidation (FAO) by measuring "1"4C–CO_2 production. We evaluated carnitine palmitoyltransferase (Cpt1b) expression by western blotting and mitochondrial membrane potential by quantitative and qualitative fluorescence analyses using the JC-1 dye. We inhibited the Cpt1b pharmacologically using etomoxir and genetically by knocking down its expression using LentiVector mediated transduction of siRNAs targeting the Cpt1b gene. We found that palmitate had a slower clearance rate from NCMs than oleate, and this was associated with a significant decrease in FAO. This impairment in FAO was not the result of either loss of Cpt1b protein or mitochondrial integrity. Enhancing FAO with either oleate or carnitine was associated with a significant attenuation of palmitate mediated lipotoxicity. In contrast impairing FAO in oleate treated NCMs caused lipotoxicity. Here we demonstrate that a major difference between non-toxic unsaturated fatty acids and toxic saturated fatty acids is there ability to stimulate or inhibit fatty acid oxidation, respectively. This has important implications