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Sample records for non-responders educational testing

  1. Test of a Web and Paper Employee Satisfaction Survey: Comparison of Respondents and Non-Respondents

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    Sabina B. Gesell

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined if administering an employee satisfaction survey using the Internet affected the rates or quality of employees’ participation. 644 hospital employees were randomly assigned to complete a satisfaction survey using either a Web survey or a traditional paper measure. Response rates were relatively high across both modes. No evidence for a very large difference in response rates was detected. A plurality of respondents showed no preference for survey mode while the remainder tended to express a preference for the mode they had been randomly assigned to complete in this study. Respondents did not differ from non-respondents by sex, race, or education. Other response differences (such as age and employment status are likely to be a function of the survey topic. Overall, Web and mail respondents did not differ in the level of employee satisfaction reported, the primary outcome being measured.

  2. Marital status, educational level and household income explain part of the excess mortality of survey non-respondents.

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    Tolonen, Hanna; Laatikainen, Tiina; Helakorpi, Satu; Talala, Kirsi; Martelin, Tuija; Prättälä, Ritva

    2010-02-01

    Survey respondents and non-respondents differ in their demographic and socio-economic position. Many of the health behaviours are also known to be associated with socio-economic differences. We aimed to investigate how much of the excess mortality of survey non-respondents can be explained by the socio-economic differences between respondents and non-respondents. Questionnaire-based adult health behaviour surveys have been conducted in Finland annually since 1978. Data from the 1978 to 2002 surveys, including non-respondents, were linked with mortality data from the Finnish National Cause of Death statistics and with demographic and socio-economic register data (marital status, education and household income) obtained from Statistics Finland. The mortality follow-up lasted until 2006, in which period there were 12,762 deaths (7,994 in men and 4,768 in women) during the follow-up. Total and cause-specific mortality were higher among non-respondents in both men and women. Adjusting results for marital status, educational level and average household income decreased the excess total and cause-specific mortality of non-respondents in both men and women. Of the total excess mortality of non-respondents, 41% in men and 20% in women can be accounted for demographic and socio-economic factors. A part of the excess mortality among non-respondents can be accounted for their demographic and socio-economic characteristics. Based on these results we can assume that non-respondents tend to have more severe health problems, acute illnesses and unhealthy behaviours, such as smoking and excess alcohol use. These can be reasons for persons not taking part in population surveys.

  3. What is wrong with non-respondents?

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    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Ekholm, Ola; Gray, Linsay

    2015-01-01

    and different types of non-respondents to estimate alcohol-, drug- and smoking related mortality and morbidity among non-respondents. DESIGN: Prospective follow-up study of respondents and non-respondents in two cross-sectional health surveys. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: A total sample of 39,540 Danish...

  4. Predicting risk among non-respondents in prospective studies.

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    Sheikh, K

    1986-03-01

    Potential non-response bias was investigated in a follow-up study of 2,011 chronically disabled patients. 82.5% and 73.3% of the study subjects responded to self-administered mail questionnaires respectively at 6-month and 1-year follow-up. Information on employment status, the outcome of interest, of approximately 90% of the non-respondents was obtained from indirect sources. Employment rate was lower among the non-respondents than the respondents. Non-response was associated with age, social class, previous employment record, and the type of disability; but none of these characteristics were associated with the outcome. Out of the five known independent risk factors for unemployment, only one (incompletion of rehabilitation course) was associated with non-response. The employment rate among the respondents was also assessed according to the delay in response, that is the number of reminders sent to achieve response. The outcome among the late respondents was similar to that among the non-respondents. These data suggest that risk estimates may be biased even when the response rate is greater than 80%, the prevalence of risk factors among non-respondents may not indicate the presence or the degree of non-response bias, but reliable estimates can be obtained from extrapolations of the rates among the respondents according to the delay in response.

  5. Repeated vaccinations do not improve specific immune defenses against Hepatitis B in non-responder health care workers.

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    Zaffina, Salvatore; Marcellini, Valentina; Santoro, Anna Paola; Scarsella, Marco; Camisa, Vincenzo; Vinci, Maria Rosaria; Musolino, Anna Maria; Nicolosi, Luciana; Rosado, M Manuela; Carsetti, Rita

    2014-12-05

    Hepatitis B is a major infectious occupational hazard for health care workers and can be prevented with a safe and effective vaccine. The serum titer of anti-HBsAg antibodies is the most commonly used correlate of protection and post-vaccination anti-HBsAg concentrations of ≥ 10 mIU/ml are considered protective. Subjects with post-vaccination anti-HBsAg titers of <10 mIU/ml 1-6 months post-vaccination, who tested negative for HBsAg and anti-HBc, are defined as non-responders. The question of whether non-responders should be repeatedly vaccinated is still open. The aim of the study was to (i) evaluate the distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations and the percentage of HBsAg-specific memory B cells in responders and non-responders (ii) assess whether non-responders can be induced to produce antibodies after administration of a booster dose of vaccine (iii) determine whether booster vaccination increases the number of specific memory B cells in non-responders. Combining flow-cytometry, ELISPOT and serology we tested the integrity and function of the immune system in 24 health care workers, confirmed to be non-responders after at least three vaccine injections. We compared the results with those obtained in 21 responders working in the same institution. We found that the great majority of the non-responders had a functional immune system and a preserved ability to respond to other conventional antigens. Our most important findings are that the frequency of HBsAg-specific memory B cells is comparable in non-responders and controls and that booster immunization does not lead either to antibody production or memory B cell increase in non-responders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Are non-responders in a quitline evaluation more likely to be smokers?

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    Gilljam Hans

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In evaluation of smoking cessation programs including surveys and clinical trials the tradition has been to treat non-responders as smokers. The aim of this paper is to assess smoking behaviour of non-responders in an evaluation of the Swedish national tobacco cessation quitline a nation-wide, free of charge service. Methods A telephone interview survey with a sample of people not participating in the original follow-up. The study population comprised callers to the Swedish quitline who had consented to participate in a 12 month follow-up but had failed to respond. A sample of 84 (18% of all non-responders was included. The main outcome measures were self-reported smoking behaviour at the time of the interview and at the time of the routine follow-up. Also, reasons for not responding to the original follow-up questionnaire were assessed. For statistical comparison between groups we used Fischer's exact test, odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI on proportions and OR. Results Thirty-nine percent reported to have been smoke-free at the time they received the original questionnaire compared with 31% of responders in the original study population. The two most common reasons stated for not having returned the original questionnaire was claiming that they had returned it (35% and that they had not received the questionnaire (20%. Non-responders were somewhat younger and were to a higher degree smoke-free when they first called the quitline. Conclusion Treating non-responders as smokers in smoking cessation research may underestimate the true effect of cessation treatment.

  7. METHYLPREDNISOLONE PULSE THERAPY IN MANAGEMENT OF NON RESPONDER NEPHROTIC SYNDROME

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    A. Madani

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Some patients with the diagnosis of childhood nephrotic syndrome are unresponsive to conventional treatment regimens. Recent studies of more aggressive therapies have provided strong evidence of the benefit of high dose methylprednisolonc (MP protocol with alternate - day prednisone alone or with alternate - day prednisone plus an alkylating agent (I in these patients."nFrom May 1996 to May 1997 we have treated 14 patients with non-responder nephrotic syndrome with mcthyprcdnisolone protocol. Eight patients had histologic diagnosis of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, 3 diffuse mesangial proliferation and 3 has minimal change disease. C'ylosporin was added in two patients to methylprcdnisotonc at the beginning of the second course of therapy. Tfie patients were observed for an average of 8 months (range 4-12 months. In the last follow up there were no patients in remission and all remained nephrotic. Seven patients had persistent massive proteinuria with normal creatinine clearance (CrCI. Two had decreased CrCl. Five progressed to end-stage renal disease. Tlicsc observations suggest that "Puke" methy{prednisolone is not effective in patients with non respondcr nephrotic syndrome.

  8. INTRAMUSCULAR VERSUS INTRADERMAL HEPATITIS B REVACCINATION IN HEALTHY NON-RESPONDER CHILDREN:A 5-YEAR PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED STUDY

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    Zhuang Guihua; Yan Hong; Wang Xueliang; Wu Qian; Wang Lirong; Gao Haiyan

    2005-01-01

    Objective With the same times of injection to compare low-dose intradermal regimen with routine-dose intramuscular inoculation in revaccination of non-responders to hepatitis B vaccine. Methods 40 healthy non-responder children collected by screening were administrated a three-dose revaccination randomly by intramuscular or intradermal route (10 vs 2 g per dose), and regularly tested for serologic markers up to five years. By the end of follow-up, a booster dose (5 μg) was given to those who had lost anti-HBs of ≥10 mIU/mL (seroprotection) and anamnestic response was estimated thereafter. Results All 17 intramuscular and 22 of 23 intradermal children effected seroprotection after revaccination. Intradermal children lost seroprotection over time significantly rapider compared with intramuscular children (Log Rank test, P= 0.029). In year 5, 50% of intramuscular but only 18.2% of intradermal children still maintained seroprotection (P=0.075). 12-14 days after the booster dose, all the eight intramuscular children developed an anamnestic response with anti-HBs titer increasing greater, but two of the 18 intradermal children failed to mount seroprotective level. Conclusion Three-routine-dose intramuscular revaccination was significantly effective than low-dose intradermal one with the same times of injection, especially in long-term immunity. We recommend routine-dose intramuscular protocol in revaccination of non-responders.

  9. A Comparison of Gene Expression Profiles between Glucocorticoid Responder and Non-Responder Bovine Trabecular Meshwork Cells Using RNA Sequencing

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    Bermudez, Jaclyn Y.; Webber, Hannah C.; Brown, Bartley; Braun, Terry A.; Clark, Abbot F.; Mao, Weiming

    2017-01-01

    The most common ocular side effect of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is GC-induced ocular hypertension (OHT) and GC-induced glaucoma (GIG). GC-induced OHT occurs in about 40% of the general population, while the other 60% are resistant. This study aims to determine the genes and pathways involved in differential GC responsiveness in the trabecular meshwork (TM). Using paired bovine eyes, one eye was perfusion-cultured with 100nM dexamethasone (DEX), while the fellow eye was used to establish a bovine TM (BTM) cell strain. Based on maximum IOP change in the perfused eye, the BTM cell strain was identified as a DEX-responder or non-responder strain. Three responder and three non-responder BTM cell strains were cultured, treated with 0.1% ethanol or 100nM DEX for 7 days. RNA and proteins were extracted for RNA sequencing (RNAseq), qPCR, and Western immunoblotting (WB), respectively. Data were analyzed using the human and bovine genome databases as well as Tophat2 software. Genes were grouped and compared using Student’s t-test. We found that DEX induced fibronectin expression in responder BTM cells but not in non-responder cells using WB. RNAseq showed between 93 and 606 differentially expressed genes in different expression groups between responder and non-responder BTM cells. The data generated by RNAseq were validated using qPCR. Pathway analyses showed 35 pathways associated with differentially expressed genes. These genes and pathways may play important roles in GC-induced OHT and will help us to better understand differential ocular responsiveness to GCs. PMID:28068412

  10. Effect on trend estimates of the difference between survey respondents and non-respondents: results from 27 populations in the WHO MONICA Project.

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    Tolonen, Hanna; Dobson, Annette; Kulathinal, Sangita

    2005-01-01

    In the World Health Organization (WHO) MONICA (multinational MONItoring of trends and determinants in CArdiovascular disease) Project considerable effort was made to obtain basic data on non-respondents to community based surveys of cardiovascular risk factors. The first purpose of this paper is to examine differences in socio-economic and health profiles among respondents and non-respondents. The second purpose is to investigate the effect of non-response on estimates of trends. Socio-economic and health profile between respondents and non-respondents in the WHO MONICA Project final survey were compared. The potential effect of non-response on the trend estimates between the initial survey and final survey approximately ten years later was investigated using both MONICA data and hypothetical data. In most of the populations, non-respondents were more likely to be single, less well educated, and had poorer lifestyles and health profiles than respondents. As an example of the consequences, temporal trends in prevalence of daily smokers are shown to be overestimated in most populations if they were based only on data from respondents. The socio-economic and health profiles of respondents and non-respondents differed fairly consistently across 27 populations. Hence, the estimators of population trends based on respondent data are likely to be biased. Declining response rates therefore pose a threat to the accuracy of estimates of risk factor trends in many countries.

  11. Initial non-responders to ranibizumab in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD

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    Otsuji T

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tsuyoshi Otsuji,1 Yoshimi Nagai,2 Kenichiro Sho,1 Akiko Tsumura,1 Naoko Koike,1 Mei Tsuda,1 Tetsuya Nishimura,1 Kanji Takahashi2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Kansai Medical University, Takii Hospital, Osaka, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata Hospital, Osaka, Japan Background: Patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD who did not respond to ranibizumab at the induction phase were assessed and referred to as initial non-responders. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 215 patients (218 eyes with exudative AMD. For the initial treatments, patients received three intravitreal injections of ranibizumab (IVR every 4 weeks. Minimum follow-up period was 12 months. We defined patients with no improvement of best corrected logMAR visual acuity (BCVA, and with no decrease of central retinal thickness (CRT at the end of the initial treatment, as initial non-responders. Patients who had previous treatment history prior to this investigation were included, but patients who had photodynamic therapy (PDT with IVR were excluded. Results: Twenty-two eyes (10.1% were identified as initial non-responders. The mean BCVA of initial non-responders before IVR and after induction phase were 0.39 and 0.36, respectively. There was no significant difference between these values, however the mean BCVA decreased significantly to 0.55 at 12 months after the beginning of the induction phase (P = 0.021. The mean greatest linear dimension (GLD of the lesion before IVR of initial non-responders was 4,121 µm. We found 16 eyes with typical AMD, and six eyes with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy. One eye had predominantly classic choroidal neovascularization (CNV, and others had occult CNV of typical AMD. As additional treatments, twelve eyes received PDT, and in three of the eyes exudation remained after PDT. Conclusion: Initial non-responders were more prevalent in patients with occult CNV than in

  12. Transcriptional changes induced by bevacizumab combination therapy in responding and non-responding recurrent glioblastoma patients

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    Urup, Thomas; Staunstrup, Line Maersk; Michaelsen, Signe Regner

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy produces clinical durable response in 25-30% of recurrent glioblastoma patients. This group of patients has shown improved survival and quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in gene expression associated with response...... and resistance to bevacizumab combination therapy.Methods: Recurrent glioblastoma patients who had biomarker-accessible tumor tissue surgically removed both before bevacizumab treatment and at time of progression were included. Patients were grouped into responders (n = 7) and non-responders (n = 14). Gene...... mesenchymal phenotype at the time of progression.Conclusions: Bevacizumab combination treatment demonstrated a significant impact on the transcriptional changes in responders; but only minimal changes in non-responders. This suggests that non-responding glioblastomas progress chaotically without following...

  13. [HCV non-responder patients: definition of non-response and treatment strategy].

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    Marcellin, Patrick; Bourlière, Marc; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Ouzan, Denis

    2007-01-01

    About half of patients with chronic hepatitis C do not respond to the current treatment combining pegylated interferon and ribavirin. One must distinguish the "false" non responders who did not receive an optimal treatment and the "true" non responders who received an optimal treatment. In "false" non responders, the management of the factors of non response (alcohol consumption, body overweight...) or the improvement of tolerability to therapy (anti-depressive therapy, erythropoietin...) may allow an optimized retreatment with a chance of viral eradication. On the opposite, in "true" non responders, the probability to obtain with retreatment a viral eradication is very low and one must envisage, in case of severe liver disease (fibrosis stage F3 or F4), maintenance therapy. The objective of maintenance therapy is to decrease the activity of the chronic hepatitis and stabilize fibrosis in order to decrease the risk of complications and hepatocellular carcinoma. The ongoing trials will determine the optimal schedule of maintenance therapy. The new antivirals, mainly protease inhibitors and polymerase inhibitors, will probably be used in triple therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. The drugs, currently in phase 1 and 2, which will demonstrate their efficacy and safety, should not be available before several years.

  14. Autologous chondrocyte implantation-derived synovial fluids display distinct responder and non-responder proteomic profiles.

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    Hulme, Charlotte H; Wilson, Emma L; Peffers, Mandy J; Roberts, Sally; Simpson, Deborah M; Richardson, James B; Gallacher, Pete; Wright, Karina T

    2017-06-30

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) can be used in the treatment of focal cartilage injuries to prevent the onset of osteoarthritis (OA). However, we are yet to understand fully why some individuals do not respond well to this intervention. Identification of a reliable and accurate biomarker panel that can predict which patients are likely to respond well to ACI is needed in order to assign the patient to the most appropriate therapy. This study aimed to compare the baseline and mid-treatment proteomic profiles of synovial fluids (SFs) obtained from responders and non-responders to ACI. SFs were derived from 14 ACI responders (mean Lysholm improvement of 33 (17-54)) and 13 non-responders (mean Lysholm decrease of 14 (4-46)) at the two stages of surgery (cartilage harvest and chondrocyte implantation). Label-free proteome profiling of dynamically compressed SFs was used to identify predictive markers of ACI success or failure and to investigate the biological pathways involved in the clinical response to ACI. Only 1 protein displayed a ≥2.0-fold differential abundance in the preclinical SF of ACI responders versus non-responders. However, there is a marked difference between these two groups with regard to their proteome shift in response to cartilage harvest, with 24 and 92 proteins showing ≥2.0-fold differential abundance between Stages I and II in responders and non-responders, respectively. Proteomic data has been uploaded to ProteomeXchange (identifier: PXD005220). We have validated two biologically relevant protein changes associated with this response, demonstrating that matrix metalloproteinase 1 was prominently elevated and S100 calcium binding protein A13 was reduced in response to cartilage harvest in non-responders. The differential proteomic response to cartilage harvest noted in responders versus non-responders is completely novel. Our analyses suggest several pathways which appear to be altered in non-responders that are worthy of further

  15. Clinical-biochemical correlates of migraine attacks in rizatriptan responders and non-responders.

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    Sarchielli, P; Pini, L A; Zanchin, G; Alberti, A; Maggioni, F; Rossi, C; Floridi, A; Calabresi, P

    2006-03-01

    The present study was aimed at verifying the clinical characteristics of a typical attack in 20 migraine patients, 10 responders and 10 non-responders to rizatriptan, and at investigating any differences in the levels of neuropeptides of the trigeminovascular or parasympathetic systems [calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neurokinin A (NKA) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) measured by radioimmunoassay methods in external jugular blood] between responders and non-responders. In all responders to rizatriptan, pain was unilateral, severe, and pulsating, and in five of them at least one sign suggestive of parasympathetic system activation was recorded. Five patients who were non-responders to rizatriptan referred bilateral and non-pulsating pain, even though severe in most of them. CGRP and NKA levels measured before rizatriptan administration were significantly higher in responders than in non-responders (P rizatriptan responders, detectable VIP levels were found at baseline. One hour after rizatriptan administration, a decrease in CGRP and NKA levels was evident in the external jugular venous blood of rizatriptan responders, and this corresponded to a significant pain relief and alleviation of accompanying symptoms. VIP levels were also significantly reduced at the same time in the five patients with autonomic signs. After rizatriptan administration, CGRP and NKA levels in non-responder patients showed less significant variations at all time points after rizatriptan administration compared with rizatriptan responders. The present study, although carried out on a limited number of patients, supports recent clinical evidence of increased trigeminal activation associated with a better triptan response in migraine patients accompanied by parasympathetic activation in a subgroup of patients with autonomic signs. In contrast, the poor response seems to be correlated with a lesser degree of trigeminal activation, lower variations of trigeminal neuropeptides after

  16. Brain Changes in Responders versus Non-Responders in Chronic Migraine: Markers of Disease Reversal

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    Catherine S Hubbard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify structural and functional brain changes that accompanied the transition from chronic (CM; ≥ 15 headache days/month to episodic (EM; < 15 headache days/month migraine following prophylactic treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA. Specifically, we examined whether CM patients responsive to prophylaxis (responders; n = 11, as evidenced by a reversal in disease status (defined by at least a 50% reduction in migraine frequency and < 15 headache days/month, compared to CM patients whose migraine frequency remained unchanged (non-responders; n = 12, showed differences in cortical thickness using surface-based morphometry. We also investigated whether areas showing group differences in cortical thickness displayed altered resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC using seed-to-voxel analyses. Migraine characteristics measured across groups included disease duration, pain intensity and headache frequency. Patient reports’ of headache frequency over the four weeks prior to (pre-treatment and following (post-treatment prophylaxis were compared (post minus pre and this measure served as the clinical endpoint that determined group assignment. All patients were scanned within two weeks of the post-treatment visit. Results revealed that responders showed significant cortical thickening in the right primary somatosensory cortex (SI and anterior insula, and left superior temporal gyrus and pars opercularis compared to non-responders. In addition, disease duration was negatively correlated with cortical thickness in fronto-parietal and temporo-occipital regions in responders but not non-responders, with the exception of the primary motor cortex (MI that showed the opposite pattern; disease duration was positively associated with MI cortical thickness in responders versus non-responders. Our seed-based RS-FC analyses revealed anti-correlations between the SI seed and lateral occipital (LOC and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices

  17. Anxious Children and Adolescents Non-responding to CBT: Clinical Predictors and Families' Experiences of Therapy.

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    Lundkvist-Houndoumadi, Irene; Thastum, Mikael

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine clinical predictors of non-response to manualized cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) among youths (children and adolescents) with anxiety disorders, and to explore families' perspective on therapy, using a mixed methods approach. Non-response to manualized group CBT was determined among 106 youths of Danish ethnicity (7-17 years old) with a primary anxiety disorder, identified with the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement Scale at the 3-month follow-up. Twenty-four youths (22.6 %) had not responded to treatment, and a logistic regression analysis revealed that youths with a primary diagnosis of social phobia were seven times more likely not to respond, whereas youths with a comorbid mood disorder were almost four times more likely. Families of non-responding youths with primary social phobia and/or a comorbid mood disorder (n = 15) were interviewed, and data were analysed through interpretative phenomenological analysis. Two superordinate themes emerged: youths were not involved in therapy work, and manualized group format posed challenges to families. The mixed methods approach provided new perspectives on the difficulties that may be encountered by families of non-responding youths with a primary social phobia diagnosis and youths with a comorbid mood disorder during manualized group CBT. Clinical implications related to youths' clinical characteristics, and families' experience and suggestions are drawn. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Youths with an anxiety disorder, who had a primary social phobia diagnosis and those, who had a comorbid mood disorder, were more likely not to respond to manualized group CBT. Parents of those non-responding youths often considered them as motivated to overcome their difficulties, but due to their symptomatology, they were unreceptive, reluctant and ambivalent and therefore not actively involved in therapy. The non-responding youths with social phobia felt evaluated and

  18. Survival benefits of terlipressin and non-responder state in hepatorenal syndrome: A meta-analysis

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    Sharanabasayyaswamy B Hiremath

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Methods: Electronic databases and relevant articles were searched for all types of studies related to HRS and use of terlipressin in HRS. Reduction in all-cause mortality rate was the primary outcome measure. Reduction in mortality rate due to HRS and other causes of death were also analyzed. Results: With total 377 patients analyzed from eight eligible studies; terlipressin reduced all-cause mortality rate by 15% (Risk Difference: -0.15%, 95% CI:-0.26 to -0.03. Reduction in the mortality rate due to HRS at three months was 9% (Risk Difference:-0.09%, 95% CI:-0.18 to 0.00. Conclusion: Terlipressin has long term survival benefits perhaps at least up to three months but only with HRS as a cause of death not for other causes of death. Benefits and role of antioxidants like N- Acetylcysteine (NAC in non-responder patients′ needs to be studied further. Long-term use of low dose terlipressin (<4mg/d plus albumin and addition of antioxidant NAC to this regimen may help in improving both HRS reversal rate and survival rate in non-responders to terlipressin.

  19. Locally advanced rectal cancer: predicting non-responders to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy using apparent diffusion coefficient textures.

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    Liu, Ming; Lv, Han; Liu, Li-Heng; Yang, Zheng-Han; Jin, Er-Hu; Wang, Zhen-Chang

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) textures could identify patient with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) who would not respond to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT). Twenty-six patients who underwent MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging at a 3.0 T system before NCRT were enrolled. Texture analysis of pre-therapy ADC mapping was carried out, and a total of 133 ADC textures as well as routine mean ADC value of the primary tumor were extracted for each patient. Texture parameters and mean ADC were compared between responsive group and non-responsive group. Logistic regression was used to determine the independent predictors for non-responders. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) was performed to evaluate the predictive performance of the significant parameters. Eighteen of the 133 texture parameters significantly differed between responsive and non-responsive groups (p variance and SdGa47 were identified as independent predictors for non-responders to NCRT; this logistic model achieved an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.908. Texture analysis based on pre-therapy ADC mapping could potentially be helpful to identify patients with LARC who would not respond to NCRT.

  20. Diagnostic testing and educational assessment.

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    Tweed, Mike; Wilkinson, Tim

    2012-10-01

    Clinicians are familiar with making diagnostic decisions based on information gathered from history, clinical examination and diagnostic tests. Although many clinicians assess students, they may be less familiar with ways to assimilate assessment information to inform educational decisions. We draw parallels between the processes used to make a clinical diagnosis and the similar processes needed to make an educational decision. There are several indices that describe the performance and utility of diagnostic tests, which we have extrapolated to educational assessment. We provide a clinical diagnostic question and an education assessment question, and use examples of indices of performance and utility for both of these situations to explore: reliability, indeterminate results, certainty in decisions, acceptable levels of sensitivity and specificity, pre-test probability and dealing with limitations. Test reliability requires adequate sampling and consistency between observers. Seeking more information should be targeted to situations where decisions are not certain. Altering score cut-points alters test sensitivity and specificity, which in assessment will alter the numbers of falsely passing or falsely failing candidates. Just as the pre-test probability of a diagnosis influences how to interpret diagnostic tests, so too does the pre-test probability of failure alter the performance characteristics of assessments. In clinical situations, a 'wait and see' approach may be limited by clinical urgency. Likewise, in assessment the 'wait and see' approach may be limited by a duty to society. Clinicians familiar with the performance and utility of diagnostic tests can extrapolate that knowledge to make better interpretations of educational assessments. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  1. Testing Metaphorical Educational FPS Games

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    John R. Rankin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that there is value in making use of modern Games Technology in Serious Games for educational purposes in the classroom and yet tools that enable teachers to construct such Educational Serious Games (ESGs with minimal programming, artistic, or GT skills are not yet widely available. In this paper we investigate the feasibility of employing the FPS game genre for teaching purposes in the classroom. This is done by starting with a typical FPS game and constructing metaphorical correspondences with the desired ESG category. This mapping highlights the mentality level of FPS games and what it would take to modify them towards the level for real knowledge acquisition as in ESGs. By changing the game world rules to correspond with a classroom study area, we create a metaphorical educational FPS game. In this paper we describe two metaphorical educational FPS games and report on preliminary testing of their use in education. If testing of these metaphorical educational FPS games indicates that they would be beneficial in school classes then we intend to pursue the design of software tools and tutorials to enable teachers to develop their own metaphorical educational FPS games in two months or less.

  2. Drug use among complete responders, partial responders and non-responders in a longitudinal survey of nonagenarians

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    Wastesson, Jonas W; Rasmussen, Lotte; Oksuzyan, Anna;

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: In observational studies, non-response can limit representativity and introduce bias. We aimed to investigate the longitudinal changes in the number of used drugs among complete responders, partial responders, and non-responders in a whole birth cohort of Danish nonagenarians participating...... in a longitudinal survey. METHODS: We obtained prescription data on all individuals born in 1905 and living in Denmark when the Danish 1905 cohort study was initiated in 1998 (n = 3600) using the Danish National Prescription Registry. Drug use was assessed for complete responders, non-responders at baseline......, and partial responders (i.e., dropouts) in the 4-month period preceding each wave of the study (1998, 2000, 2003, and 2005), that is, as the cohort aged from 92-93 to 99-100 years. RESULTS: Complete responders, non-responders, and partial responders used a similar number of drugs at baseline, on average 4...

  3. Treatment with telmisartan, a long-acting angiotensin II receptor blocker, prevents migraine attacks in Japanese non-responders to lomerizine.

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    Ikeda, Ken; Hanashiro, Sayori; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Sawada, Masahiro; Kyuzen, Maya; Morioka, Harumi; Ebina, Junya; Nagasawa, Junpei; Yanagihashi, Masaru; Miura, Ken; Hirayama, Takehisa; Takazawa, Takanori; Kano, Osamu; Kawabe, Kiyokazu; Iwasaki, Yasuo

    2017-05-01

    Lomerizine, calcium channel blocker, is the most used medication for migraine prophylaxis in Japan. The effectiveness of this drug is reported as 50-75%. Telmisartan is angiotensin II receptor blockers which plasma half-life is 24 h. We examined whether telmisartan has preventative benefits in lomerizine non-responsive migraineurs. Lomerizine non-responders received telmisartan (20 mg/day) for 3 months after the investigation period of 3 months. Blood pressure, frequency of headache days/month, headache severity, and doses of triptans and analgesics were analyzed by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Thirty-three migraineurs (25 women and 8 men) participated in this study. Seven patients had migraine with aura and 26 patients had migraine without aura. Mean age (SD) was 46.6 (10.3) years. Mean duration (SD) of migraine was 20.4 (12.5) years. Headache severity exhibited mild degree in 5 patients, moderate degree in 9 patients and severe degree in 19 patients. Mean frequency (SD) of headache days was 10.9 (8.5) days/month. Mean usage (SD) of triptans was 4.8 (5.1) tablets/month and that of analgesics was 15.2 (22.2) tablets/month. Five patients (15%) had hypertension. Telmisartan administration had benefits in 30 patients (90%). This medication significantly decreased frequency of headache days (P telmisartan treatment (P telmisartan, mean (SD) of systolic blood pressure was significantly decreased (P telmisartan treatment had preventive effects in 90% of lomerizine non-responders. Telmisartan non-responders (10%) exhibited chronic migraine and long migraine duration.

  4. Standards for educational and psychological testing

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Developed jointly by the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, and the National Council on Measurement in Education, Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing (Revised 2014) addresses professional and technical issues of test development and use in education, psychology, and employment. It includes changes in federal law and measurement trends affecting validity, testing individuals with disabilities or different linguistic backgrounds, and new types of tests, as well as new uses of existing tests.

  5. Educational ultrasound nondestructive testing laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genis, Vladimir; Zagorski, Michael

    2008-09-01

    The ultrasound nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of materials course was developed for applied engineering technology students at Drexel University's Goodwin College of Professional Studies. This three-credit, hands-on laboratory course consists of two parts: the first part with an emphasis on the foundations of NDE, and the second part during which ultrasound NDE techniques are utilized in the evaluation of parts and materials. NDE applications are presented and applied through real-life problems, including calibration and use of the latest ultrasonic testing instrumentation. The students learn engineering and physical principles of measurements of sound velocity in different materials, attenuation coefficients, material thickness, and location and dimensions of discontinuities in various materials, such as holes, cracks, and flaws. The work in the laboratory enhances the fundamentals taught during classroom sessions. This course will ultimately result in improvements in the educational process ["The greater expectations," national panel report, http://www.greaterexpectations.org (last viewed February, 2008); R. M. Felder and R. Brent "The intellectual development of Science and Engineering Students. Part 2: Teaching to promote growth," J. Eng. Educ. 93, 279-291 (2004)] since industry is becoming increasingly reliant on the effective application of NDE technology and the demand on NDE specialists is increasing. NDE curriculum was designed to fulfill levels I and II NDE in theory and training requirements, according to American Society for Nondestructive Testing, OH, Recommended Practice No. SNT-TC-1A (2006).

  6. Low dose revaccination induces robust protective anti-HBs antibody response in the majority of healthy non-responder neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, A; Zarei, S; Shokri, F

    2008-01-10

    A sizeable proportion (1-10%) of healthy adults and to lesser extent neonates vaccinated with triple 10 microg hepatitis B (HB) vaccine fail to mount a protective antibody response. Revaccination with the same vaccine dose has proved to be effective in a significant number of primary non-responders. The influence of revaccination with lower vaccine doses however has not been studied adequately in non-responder neonates. This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of supplementary vaccination with a single low and standard dose of a recombinant hepatitis B (HB) vaccine in healthy Iranian non-responder neonates to primary vaccination. Iranian neonates unable to respond to primary vaccination with 10, 5 or 2.5 microg doses of recombinant HB vaccine were revaccinated with a single additional dose of the same concentration. Serum anti-HBs antibody titer was measured by sandwich ELISA. Administration of a single additional dose induced seroprotection (anti-HBs> or =10IU/L) in 10/12 (83%), 10/12 (83%) and 21/24 (87.5%) of non-responder neonates in 10, 5 and 2.5 microg vaccine recipients with geometric mean titers (and 95% confidence limits) of 1358 (258-7142), 401 (79-2038) and 164 (62-433) IU/L, respectively. The log-transformed antibody titer obtained for the 10 microg dose recipients was significantly higher than that of the 2.5 microg dose vaccinees (p=0.028). No significant differences in anti-HBs titer were observed between other groups of vaccinees. However, the total seroprotection rates obtained after administration of four low doses of 2.5 and 5 microg were significantly higher than that obtained after administration of the classical three 10 microg doses (p=0.029 and p=0.006, respectively). The total seroprotection rates were similar between all groups of vaccines receiving four doses of 2.5, 5 and 10 microg vaccine doses. These results indicate that a significant proportion of non-responder neonates can be induced to develop a protective anti

  7. Characteristics of first-trimester screening of non-responders in a high-uptake population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, Hanne Trap; Wulff, Camilla Bernt; Ekelund, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    with the following factors: country of origin other than Denmark (p education (p ... of a conscious choice based on ethical considerations, rather than being the result of a lack of information. However, a low response rate decreases the strength of our conclusions. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  8. Characteristics of first-trimester screening of non-responders in a high-uptake population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, Hanne Trap; Wulff, Camilla Bernt; Ekelund, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Our aim was to compare demographic, social and reproductive health-related medical factors between women who did and women who did not undergo combined first-trimester screening (cFTS) and to examine their reasons for declining a screening offer, especially whether non...... with the following factors: country of origin other than Denmark (p education (p

  9. The value of time-intensity curves obtained after microbubble contrast agent injection to discriminate responders from non-responders to anti-inflammatory medication among patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaia, Emilio; Cabibbo, Biagio; De Paoli, Luca; Toscano, William; Poillucci, Gabriele; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2013-06-01

    To assess the value of time-intensity curves obtained after sulphur hefluoride-filled microbubble contrast agent injection to discriminate responders from non-responders among patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Forty-three patients (29 male and 14 female; mean age ± SD, 48.5 ± 17.17 years) with initial diagnosis of active CD were recruited. In each patient, the therapeutic outcome was assessed after 12 weeks from the beginning of pharmacologic treatment. The terminal ileal loop was scanned after sulphur hexafluoride-filled microbubble injection, and the digital cine-clip registered during the first-pass dynamic enhancement was quantified in gray-scale levels. The percentage of maximal enhancement, time to peak enhancement, and area under the time-intensity curve in responders vs. non-responders were compared by Mann-Whitney U non-parametric test. Responders (n = 25 patients) vs. non-responders (n = 18) differed in the area under the time-intensity curve (621.58 ± 374.53 vs. 1,199.64 ± 386.39 P < 0.05), while they did not differ in percentage of maximal enhancement (41.26 ± 15.22 vs. 43.17 ± 4.41, P = 0.25) and time to peak enhancement (11.31 ± 3.06 vs. 10.12 ± 3.47, P = 0.15). The area under the time-intensity curve obtained after microbubble injection was the only parameter to discriminate responders from non-responders among patients with CD during pharmacologic treatment. • Dynamic ultrasound using microbubble contrast agents can help assess inflammatory bowel disease • Time-intensity curves can assess therapeutic outcome in Crohn's disease (CD) • The area under the time-intensity curve differentiates responders from non-responders during pharmacological treatment.

  10. Parents' difficulties as co-therapists in CBT among non-responding youths with anxiety disorders: Parent and therapist experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundkvist-Houndoumadi, Irene; Thastum, Mikael; Nielsen, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    No increased effect has been associated with parent involvement in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for youths with anxiety disorders. The purpose of this study was to explore parent and therapist experiences of CBT among non-responding youths with anxiety disorders, with a primary focus on parent involvement in therapy. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was applied to 24 sets of semi-structured interviews with families and therapists of anxiety-disordered youths who had not profited from CBT with parental inclusion. From the superordinate theme parents' difficulties acting as co-therapists, which emerged from the analyses, two master themes represented the perspectives of parents (difficulty working together with the youth and feeling unqualified, with limited resources), and two represented the perspectives of therapists (family dynamics stood in the way of progress and difficulty transferring control to parents). Parent and therapist experiences complemented each other, offering two different perspectives on parent difficulties as co-therapists. However, the two groups' views on their respective roles in therapy were in conflict. Parents wished to remain being "just the parents" and for the experts to take over, while therapists wished to act as facilitators transferring the control to parents. Clinical implications are drawn for parental involvement and enhancement of treatment outcomes for likely non-responders.

  11. Enhancement of Leishmania amazonensis infection in BCG non-responder mice by BCG-antigen specific vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia da Silva Calabrese

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Different patterns of cutaneous leishmaniasis can be induced when a challenge of alike dose of Leishmania amazonensis amastigotes in various inbred strains was applied. Two strains of mice, the Balb/c and C57 BL/10J, showed exceptional suscepbility, and 10(elevado a sexta potência amastigotes infective dose lead, to ulcerative progressive lesions with cutaneous metastasis and loss by necrosis of leg on wich the footpad primary lesion occured. Lesions were also progressive but in a lower degree when C3H/HeN and C57BL/6 were infected. Lesions progress slowly in DBA/2 mice presenting lesions wich reach a discreet peack after 12 weeks, do not heal but do not uncerate. DBA/2 mice is, therefore, a good model for immunomodualtion. In attempt to determine the influence of BCG in vaccination schedule using microsomal fraction, DBA/2 became an excellent model, since it is also a non-responder to BCG. Vaccination of DBA/2 mice, receiving the same 10(elevado a sexta potência BCG viable dose and 10 *g or 50 *g of protein content of microsomal fraction, lead to a progressive disease with time course similar to those observed in susceptible non-vaccinated C57BL/10J mice after 6 months of observation. An enhancement of infection in BCG non-responder mice suggests that use of BCG as immunostimulant in humans could be critical for both vaccination and immunoprophylactic strategies.

  12. Treatment of primary biliary cholangitis ursodeoxycholic acid non-responders: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraweera, Duminda; Rahal, Harman; Jimenez, Melissa; Viramontes, Matthew; Choi, Gina; Saab, Sammy

    2017-05-18

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), formerly known as primary biliary cirrhosis, is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized by an immune mediated destruction of intrahepatic bile ducts. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been the primary medication for the treatment of PBC, resulting in improved liver tests, resolution of symptoms and increased transplant free survival. However, not all patients respond to UDCA. The aim of this systematic review is to provide an evidence based assessment of the medications that have been studied in patients who are refractory to UDCA. We performed a systematic literature search on MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews of the published literature. A total of 23 articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria were found. Several studies have shown an improvement in liver biochemistries with the use of obeticholic acid in conjunction with UDCA. Fibrates, including fenofibrate and bezafibrate, have evidence supporting benefit in this population but need more robust studies to confirm these observational results. Neither obeticholic acid nor fibrates have shown to increase transplant free survival. While there may be some benefit with methotrexate, colchicine, budesonide, mycophenolate mofetil and azathioprine, these findings were not consistent and the benefits were marginal. Further investigation is needed. In patients with PBC refractory to UDCA, obeticholic acid or a fibrate is a reasonable choice as an adjunctive treatment to UDCA. Further investigation with randomized controlled trials is needed to provide high quality evidence to formulate standardized therapies in this difficult to treat population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. High-stakes educational testing and democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydesen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the relation between high-stakes educational testing and democracy drawn from the experiences of 20th-century high-stakes educational testing practices in the Danish history of education. The article presents various concepts of democracy using leading propositions within...... the field of education. Then a sample of relevant historic case studies are examined in light of these definitions. Among other things, the article concludes that a combination of different evaluation technologies – some formative and some summative – might be the safest way to go from a democratic...

  14. Geriatric Respondents and Non-Respondents To Probiotic Intervention Can Be Differentiated By Inherent Gut Microbiome Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suja eSenan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Scope: Probiotic interventions are known to have been shown to influence the composition of the intestinal microbiota in geriatrics. The growing concern is the apparent variation in response to identical strain dosage among human volunteers. One factor that governs this variation is the host gut microbiome. In this study, we attempted to define a core gut metagenome which could act as a predisposition signature marker of inherent bacterial community that can help predict the success of a probiotic intervention. Methods and Results: To characterize the geriatric gut microbiome we designed primers targeting the 16S rRNA hypervariable region V2-V3 followed by semiconductor sequencing using Ion Torrent PGM. Among respondents and non- respondents the chief genera of phylum Firmicutes that showed significant differences are Lactobacillus, Clostridium, Eubacterium, and Blautia (q< 0.002 while in the genera of phylum Proteobacteria included Shigella, Escherichia, Burkholderia and Camphylobacter (q <0.002. Conclusion: We have identified potential microbial biomarkers and taxonomic patterns that correlate with a positive response to probiotic intervention in geriatric volunteers. Future work with larger cohorts of geriatrics with diverse dietary influences could reveal the potential of the signature patterns of microbiota for personalized nutrition.

  15. Minoxidil dose response study in female pattern hair loss patients determined to be non-responders to 5% topical minoxidil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, J; Goren, A; Kovacevic, M; Shapiro, J

    2016-01-01

    Topical minoxidil is the only US FDA approved drug for the treatment of female pattern hair loss (FPHL). 5% minoxidil foam is only effective at re-growing hair in a minority of women (approximately 40%). Thus, the majority of FPHL patients remain untreated. Previously, we demonstrated that nonresponders to 5% minoxidil have low metabolism of minoxidil in hair follicles. As such, we hypothesized that increasing the dosage of topical minoxidil to low metabolizers would increase the number of responders without increasing the incidence of adverse events. In this study, we recruited FPHL subjects that were identified as non-responders to 5% topical minoxidil utilizing the previously validated assay for minoxidil response. Subjects were treated for 12 weeks with a novel 15% topical minoxidil solution. At 12 weeks, 60% of subjects achieved a clinically significant response based on target area hair counts (>13.7% from baseline), as well as significant improvement in global photographic assessment. None of the subjects experienced significant hemodynamic changes or any other adverse events. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the potentially beneficial effect of a higher dosage of minoxidil in FPHL subjects who fail to respond to 5% minoxidil.

  16. Educational Testing as an Accountability Measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydesen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    analysis of the origins and impacts of test-based accountability measures applying both top-down and bottom-up perspectives. These historical perspectives offer the opportunity to gain a fuller understanding of this contemporary accountability concept and its potential, appeal, and implications...... for continued use in contemporary educational settings. Accountability measures and practices serve as a way to govern schools; by analysing the history of accountability as the concept has been practised in the education sphere, the article will discuss both pros and cons of such a methodology, particularly......This article reveals perspectives based on experiences from twentieth-century Danish educational history by outlining contemporary, test-based accountability regime characteristics and their implications for education policy. The article introduces one such characteristic, followed by an empirical...

  17. Educational Testing as an Accountability Measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydesen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    analysis of the origins and impacts of test-based accountability measures applying both top-down and bottom-up perspectives. These historical perspectives offer the opportunity to gain a fuller understanding of this contemporary accountability concept and its potential, appeal, and implications...... for continued use in contemporary educational settings. Accountability measures and practices serve as a way to govern schools; by analysing the history of accountability as the concept has been practised in the education sphere, the article will discuss both pros and cons of such a methodology, particularly......This article reveals perspectives based on experiences from twentieth-century Danish educational history by outlining contemporary, test-based accountability regime characteristics and their implications for education policy. The article introduces one such characteristic, followed by an empirical...

  18. 用彩色多普勒超声法研究西地那非不响应和响应者的不同血液动力学反应%Different hemodynamic responses by color Doppler ultrasonography studies between sildenafil non-responders and responders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.T.Huang; M.L.Hsieh

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To determine if there are different penile hemodynamic patterns between sildenafil non-responders and responders by using color Doppler ultrasonography. Methods: A total of 69 erectile dysfunction (ED) patients aged 22-79 years were enrolled into the present study. Thirty-eight (55.1%) men with ED who did not respond to four attempts of treatment with 100 mg sildenafil after re-education were classified as sildenafil non-responders. A combination of three vasodilator drugs, 1.25 mg papaverine, 0.4 mg phentolamine and 5 μg prostaglandin El, was given by intracavernous injection before penile Doppler ultrasonography was carried out. The erectile response to intracavernous injection and vascular parameters including peak systolic velocity (PSV), resistance index (RI), end diastolic velocity (EDV) and cavernosa artery diameter (CD) were measured and the results between sildenafil nonresponders and responders were compared. Results: No statistical difference in vascular parameters measured by Doppler ultrasonography studies between non-responders and responders was noted. Sildenafil non-responders had a poorer penile rigidity response to intracavernous injection than responders (P < 0.05). Among patients with adequate PSV (≥ 30 cm/s) and abnormal EDV (> 5 cm/s), individuals in the non-responder group had fewer positive responses to intracavernous vasodilator injection than in the responder group (35.3% vs. 72.2%, P < 0.05). Advanced age and comorbidity with diabetes mellitus were significantly associated with sildenafil non-response (P < 0.05).Conclusion: Sildenafil non-responders were characterized by a poorer penile rigidity response to intracavernous injection and had an associated impaired veno-occlusive mechanism. Advanced age and comorbidity with diabetes mellitus were two common factors associated with non-response.

  19. Weight-based combination therapy with peginterferon alpha-2b and ribavirin for Naïve, relapser and non-responder patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Lopes Gonçales Jr.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Combination therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin is considered the new standard therapy for naïve patients with chronic hepatitis C. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of treatment with weight-based peginterferon alpha-2b (1.5 mg/kg per week plus ribavirin (800-1,200 mg/day for 48 weeks in naïve, relapser and non-responder (to previous treatment with interferon plus ribavirin patients with chronic hepatitis C. Sixty-seven naïve, 26 relapser and 40 non-responder patients were enrolled. The overall sustained virological response (SVR for the intention-to-treat population was 54% for naïve, 62% for relapser and 38% for non-responder patients. In the naïve subgroup, SVR was significantly higher in patients with the non-1 genotype (67% compared to those with genotype 1 (45%. In relapsers and non-responders, SVR was, respectively, 69% and 24% in patients with genotype 1 and 43% and 73% in those with genotype non-1. There were no significant differences in SVR rates among the three body weight ranges ( 85 kg in any of the subgroups. Early virological response (EVR was reached by 78%, 81% and 58% of naïve, relapser and non-responder patients, respectively, and among those with EVR, 63%, 67% and 61%, respectively, subsequently achieved SVR. All of the non-responder patients who did not have EVR reached SVR. Treatment was discontinued in 13% of the patients, due to loss to follow-up, hematological abnormalities or depression.

  20. Sildenafil failures may be due to inadequate patient instructions and follow-up: a study on 100 non-responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzichristou, Dimitrios; Moysidis, Kyriakos; Apostolidis, Apostolos; Bekos, Athanasios; Tzortzis, Vasilios; Hatzimouratidis, Konstantinos; Ioannidis, Evangelos

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors that affect efficacy response rate to sildenafil in the clinical practice. The study comprised 100 consecutive sildenafil non-responders. Mean patient age was 59+/-14.4 years and mean duration of ED 5.5+/-6.4 years. All patients underwent detailed medical and sexual history and completed the IIEF and a questionnaire regarding the previous use of sildenafil. When inadequate instructions were reported, information on the appropriate use of sildenafil was given and patients were asked to use at least 4 tablets at home. Pharmacologic efficacy was re-evaluated in a scheduled follow-up visit. Mean Erectile Function Domain (ED) of the IIEF score was 14+/-9.9. In 56 patients inappropriate use of sildenafil was recognized; 45 had never used the highest recommended dose (100 mg), 32 had taken the pill with a full stomach right after a meal, 22 had taken the pill just before the initiation of sexual activity and 12 were not aware that sexual stimulation was mandatory to achieve an erection. Furthermore, 8 patients had tried the 100mg dose, despite the presence of factors associated with sildenafil clearance reduction (renal insufficiency, cimetidine treatment). Only 34 patients reported that their physician had scheduled a follow-up visit. Following adequate dose titration and time adjustment, 31 patients responded to sildenafil; 10 patients used the 50 mg dose and 21 the 100 mg. Second and third-line treatment options were offered to the rest of the patients. ED patients may receive inadequate instructions with their prescriptions. Response rate to sildenafil may be maximized after receiving appropriate dose titration and instructions on administration. ED should be treated in the same way as other chronic conditions; follow-up is necessary to evaluate the appropriate application and pharmacologic efficacy of the proposed treatment.

  1. Reliability of patient-reported functional outcome in a joint replacement registry. A comparison of primary responders and non-responders in the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polk, Anne; Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Brorson, Stig;

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are used by some arthroplasty registries to evaluate results after surgery, but non-response may bias the results. The aim was to identify a potential bias in the outcome scores of subgroups in a cohort of patients from the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty...... Registry (DSR) and to characterize non-responders....

  2. Standardized Index of Shape (SIS): a quantitative DCE-MRI parameter to discriminate responders by non-responders after neoadjuvant therapy in LARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrillo, Antonella; Fusco, Roberta; Petrillo, Mario; Granata, Vincenza [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Radiology; Sansone, Mario [Naples Univ. ' ' Federico II' ' (Italy). Dept. of Biomedical, Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering; Avallone, Antonio [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology; Delrio, Paolo [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Gastrointestinal surgical Oncology; Pecori, Biagio [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Radiotherapy; Tatangelo, Fabiana [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy). Div. of Diagnostic Pathology; Ciliberto, Gennaro [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Giovanni Pascale - IRCCS, Naples (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    To investigate the potential of DCE-MRI to discriminate responders from non-responders after neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). We investigated several shape parameters for the time-intensity curve (TIC) in order to identify the best combination of parameters between two linear parameter classifiers. Seventy-four consecutive patients with LARC were enrolled in a prospective study approved by our ethics committee. Each patient gave written informed consent. After surgery, pathological TNM and tumour regression grade (TRG) were estimated. DCE-MRI semi-quantitative analysis (sqMRI) was performed to identify the best parameter or parameter combination to discriminate responders from non-responders in response monitoring to CRT. Percentage changes of TIC shape descriptors from the baseline to the presurgical scan were assessed and correlated with TRG. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and linear classifier were applied. Forty-six patients (62.2 %) were classified as responders, while 28 subjects (37.8 %) were considered as non-responders. sqMRI reached a sensitivity of 93.5 % and a specificity of 82.1 % combining the percentage change in Maximum Signal Difference (ΔMSD) and Wash-out Slope (ΔWOS), the Standardized Index of Shape (SIS). SIS obtains the best result in discriminating responders from non-responders after CRT in LARC, with a cut-off value of -3.0 %. (orig.)

  3. The influence of multilevel upper airway surgery on CPAP tolerance in non-responders to obstructive sleep apnea surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azbay, Sule; Bostanci, Asli; Aysun, Yasin; Turhan, Murat

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of multilevel upper airway surgery on subsequent continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) use and tolerance in patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The study cohort enrolled 67 consecutive patients, who underwent septoplasty plus modified uvulopharyngopalatoplasty (mUPPP) with or without modified tongue base suspension (mTBS) due to CPAP intolerance, and who had residual OSA requiring CPAP therapy [non-responders to surgery, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >15 events/h] that had been confirmed by control polysomnography at the sixth month postoperatively. A questionnaire including questions on postoperative CPAP use, problems faced during CPAP use after the surgery, change in OSA symptoms, and satisfaction with the surgery was designed, and filled through interviews. Seventeen (25.4 %) patients had septoplasty plus mUPPP and 50 (74.6 %) had septoplasty plus mUPPP combined with mTBS. Postoperatively, mean AHI (45.00 ± 19.76 vs. 36.60 ± 18.34), Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) score (18.00 ± 4.45 vs. 13.00 ± 4.72), oxygen desaturation index (ODI) (48.98 ± 16.73 vs. 37.81 ± 17.03), and optimal CPAP level (11.80 ± 1.40 vs. 8.96 ± 1.20) were decreased (p CPAP before surgery, almost half (47.8 %) of the cases used CPAP without problems postoperatively. Postoperative CPAP users had significantly higher postoperative AHI (p = 0.001), supine AHI (p = 0.009), ESS (p = 0.019), and ODI (p = 0.014), and significantly lower postoperative minimum O2 saturation (p = 0.001) compared with non-users. Multilevel upper airway surgery with less invasive techniques may improve CPAP tolerance in well-selected patients.

  4. Education in Japan: testing the limits of asian education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Blake Willis

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A re-imagining of education is taking place throughout the world with the 21st century in mind and nowhere is this being tested, probed, and critiqued more than in Asia. This new era sees social phenomena as polycentric and polycontextual rather than bilateral or unidirectional. Asia is first and foremost where education in the 21st century is seeing its most spectacular engagement and growth. We view the Japa- nese example with its multiple, textured approaches as one of the heralds of this new global conversation for an education that responds to the transnational, transcultural characteristics of the new age that has daw- ned upon us. Combining Confucian, North American, European, and global approaches – all of which are having an impact on other nations of Asia – Japan represents the cutting edge of a new wave for understan- ding education that has movement as a central motif and strategy.

  5. Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, 2014 Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Educational Research Association (AERA), 2014

    2014-01-01

    Developed jointly by the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, and the National Council on Measurement in Education, "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" (Revised 2014) addresses professional and technical issues of test development and use in education, psychology, and…

  6. Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, 2014 Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Educational Research Association (AERA), 2014

    2014-01-01

    Developed jointly by the American Educational Research Association, American Psychological Association, and the National Council on Measurement in Education, "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" (Revised 2014) addresses professional and technical issues of test development and use in education, psychology, and…

  7. Use of a 12 months' self-referral reminder to facilitate uptake of bowel scope (flexible sigmoidoscopy) screening in previous non-responders: a London-based feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrison, Robert S; McGregor, Lesley M; Marshall, Sarah; Isitt, John; Counsell, Nicholas; Wardle, Jane; von Wagner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background: In March 2013, NHS England extended its national Bowel Cancer Screening Programme to include ‘one-off' Flexible Sigmoidoscopy screening (NHS Bowel Scope Screening, BSS) for men and women aged 55. With less than one in two people currently taking up the screening test offer, there is a strong public health mandate to develop system-friendly interventions to increase uptake while the programme is rolling out. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of sending a reminder to previous BSS non-responders, 12 months after the initial invitation, with consideration for its potential impact on uptake. Method: This study was conducted in the ethnically diverse London Boroughs of Brent and Harrow, where uptake is below the national average. Between September and November 2014, 160 previous non-responders were randomly selected to receive a reminder of the opportunity to self-refer 12 months after their initial invitation. The reminder included instructions on how to book an appointment, and provided options for the time and day of the appointment and the gender of the endoscopist performing the test. To address barriers to screening, the reminder was sent with a brief locally tailored information leaflet designed specifically for this study. Participants not responding within 4 weeks were sent a follow-up reminder, after which there was no further intervention. Self-referral rates were measured 8 weeks after the delivery of the follow-up reminder and accepted as final. Results: Of the 155 participants who received the 12 months' reminder (returned to sender, n=5), 30 (19.4%) self-referred for an appointment, of which 24 (15.5%) attended and were successfully screened. Attendance rates differed by gender, with significantly more women attending an appointment than men (20.7% vs 8.8%, respectively; OR=2.73, 95% CI=1.02–7.35, P=0.05), but not by area (Brent vs Harrow) or area-level deprivation. Of the 30 people who self-referred for an appointment, 27 (90

  8. A Comparison of Community College Responders and Non-Responders to the VEDS Student Follow-Up Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carifio, James; And Others

    In September 1984, a Vocational Education Data System (VEDS) follow-up survey was conducted of all 5,267 students who had graduated from Massachusetts public community colleges in 1982-83. Of these graduates, 1,881 (35.7%) returned the survey, and 3,386 (64.3%) did not. A subsequent study was conducted to compare the characteristics of survey…

  9. Contactable Non-responders Show Different Characteristics Compared to Lost to Follow-Up Participants: Insights from an Australian Longitudinal Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shu-Kay; Scott, Rani; Scuffham, Paul A

    2016-07-01

    Objective This research aims to identify predictors of attrition in a longitudinal birth cohort study in Australia and assess differences in baseline characteristics and responses in subsequent follow-up phases between contactable non-responders and uncontactable non-responders deemed "lost to follow-up (LTF)". Methods 3368 women recruited from three public hospitals in Southeast Queensland and Northern New South Wales during antenatal visits in 2006-2011 completed a baseline questionnaire to elicit information on multiple domains of exposures. A follow-up questionnaire was posted to each participant at 1 year after birth to obtain mother's and child's health and development information. Multivariate logistic regression was used to model the association between exposures and respondents' status at 1 year. The effect of an inverse-probability-weighting method to adjust for non-response was studied. Results Overall attrition at 1-year was 35.4 %; major types of attrition were "contactable non-response" (27.6 %) and "LTF" (6.7 %). These two attrition types showed different responses at the 3-year follow-up and involved different predictors. Besides shared predictors (first language not English, higher risk of psychological distress, had smoked during pregnancy, higher levels of family conflict), distinguishable predictors of contactable non-responders were younger age, having moved home in the past year and having children under 16 in the household. Attrition rates increased substantially from 20 % in 2006 to 54 % in 2011. Conclusions This observed trend of increased attrition rates raises concern about the use of traditional techniques, such as "paper-based" questionnaires, in longitudinal cohort studies. The supplementary use of electronic communications, such as online survey tools and smart-device applications, could provide a better alternative.

  10. Anti-hepatitis C virus treatment may prevent the progression of liver fibrosis in non-responder human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Sagnelli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate changes in liver histology in patients with human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection non-responders to a suboptimal Interferon+Ribavirine regimen. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated 49 patients with two sequential liver biopsies: 18 were non-responders to Interferon+Ribavirine treatment (Group hepatitis C virus Rx administered after the 1st liver biopsy who underwent a 2nd liver biopsy after a median period of 3.92 year and 31 were patients who remained untreated for hepatitis C virus disease (Group hepatitis C virus untreated after the 1st liver biopsy because of refusal and underwent a 2nd liver biopsy after a median period of 5.05-years. Most patients in both groups were under highly active antiretroviral therapy. At the time of 1st liver biopsy similar degrees of necro-inflammation, fibrosis and steatosis were observed in both groups. Changes in liver lesions between 1st and 2nd liver biopsys were adjusted for different intervals between liver biopsys by a mathematic formula. RESULTS: Liver fibrosis did not change in 88.9% of patients in Group hepatitis C virus Rx and in 77.4% in Group hepatitis C virus untreated. A marked deterioration in liver fibrosis was observed in 5 (16% patients in Group hepatitis C virus untreated and in none in Group hepatitis C virus treated. Necro-inflammation and steatosis remained substantially unchanged in both groups. CONCLUSION: Liver histology remained substantially unchanged in human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus patients non-responder to anti-hepatitis C virus therapy over 4 years observation, suggesting an effective anti-hepatitis C virus early treatment for all hepatitis C virus/human immunodeficiency virus coinfected patients who can reasonably tolerate therapy.

  11. MRP1 and P-glycoprotein expression assays would be useful in the additional detection of treatment non-responders in CML patients without ABL1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Hyuk; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Kim, Dae-Young; Lee, Bo-Ra; Kim, Young Jin; Cho, Young-Uk; Jang, Seongsoo

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the ability of the rhodamine-123 efflux assay, multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1) expression assay and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression assay to discriminate chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients who had failed treatment or were at risk of failure. Each assay was performed in blood samples from CML patients (n=224) treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, taken at diagnosis (n=14) and follow-up (n=210). Patient samples were categorized as optimal response (n=120), suboptimal response (n=54), and treatment failure (n=36). Treatment-failed patients had a significantly higher MRP1 expression (5.24% vs. 3.54%, P=0.006) and Pgp expression (5.25% vs. 3.48%, P=0.005) than responders. Both MRP1 (%) and Pgp (%) were highly specific (95.2% and 94.5%) and relatively accurate (83.0% and 82.5%) in the detection of treatment non-responders. Of treatment-failed patients, 41.2% had a positive result in at least one assay and of these patients without ABL1 kinase domain mutation, 51.9% were positive in at least one assay. However, the rhodamine-123 efflux assay failed to discriminate two patient groups. Thus, both MRP1 and Pgp expression assays could be useful for additional identification of treatment non-responders in CML patients without ABL1 mutation.

  12. Advance telephone calls ahead of reminder questionnaires increase response rate in non-responders compared to questionnaire reminders only: The RECORD phone trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Graeme; McDonald, Alison; McPherson, Gladys; Treweek, Shaun; Avenell, Alison

    2014-01-08

    Postal questionnaires are simple and economical for collecting outcome data for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) but are prone to non-response. In the RECORD trial (a large pragmatic publicly funded RCT in UK) non-responders were sent a reminder and another questionnaire at 1 year, of which 40% were returned. In subsequent years we investigated the effect of an advance telephone call to non-responders on responses rate to reminder questionnaires and the next questionnaire 4 months later. Non-responders to annual questionnaires were randomised to receive a telephone call from the trial office ahead of the reminder questionnaire in addition to the usual reminder schedule (n=390) or to a control group that received the usual reminder schedule only (n=363). The primary outcome was response to the reminder questionnaire within 21 days; secondary outcomes were response to a questionnaire 4 months later; completeness of quality of life instruments; and the number of participants declining further follow-up. Results are presented as odds ratios from a logistic regression intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis and then percentage difference and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for both ITT and average treatment effect on the treated (ATT) analyses. The proportions that responded were 67.8% (265/390) in the intervention group compared to 62.5% (227/363) in the control group. The ITT estimate was a 5.4% increase (95% CI -1.4 to 12.2). Four months later percentages responding were 51.8% (202) and 42.7% (155). The ITT estimate was a 9.1% increase (95% CI 2.0 to 16.2). In the intervention group 12.3% (48/390) of participants were not telephoned because questionnaires were returned before the scheduled telephone call. ATT estimates adjusting for this were 6.2% (95% CI -1.6 to 14.0) and 10.4% (95% CI 2.2 to 18.5), respectively. The telephone call resulted in a slight increase in response to the reminder questionnaire, however at 4 months later the proportion in the telephoned group

  13. Testing Educational System Typologies Using Colombian Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Carlos M.; Yano, Masakazu

    2005-01-01

    International Lending Institutions (ILIs) and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) continuously design and implement Educational System Typologies (ESTs) in order to evaluate a nation's educational performance in terms of quality of life improvements; Traditional ESTs are therefore constantly put at odds by the advent of new ESTs. This study aims…

  14. The genetic differences with whole genome linkage disequilibrium mapping between responder and non-responder in interferon-alpha and ribavirin combined therapy for chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P-J; Hwang, Y; Lin, C G-J; Wu, Y-J; Wu, L S-H

    2008-04-01

    Interferon-alpha and ribavirin combined therapy has been a mainstream treatment for hepatitis C infection. The efficacy of this combined treatment is around 30% to 60%, and the factors affecting the responsiveness are still poorly defined. Our study is intended to investigate the genetic differences between responder and non-responder patients. The genome-wide linkage disequilibrium screening for loci associated with genetic difference between two patient groups was conducted by using 382 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) markers involving 92 patients. We have identified 19 STR markers displaying different allele frequencies between the two patient groups. In addition, based on their genomic location and biological function, we selected the CD81 and IL15 genes to perform single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. In conclusion, this study may provide a new approach for identifying the associated polymorphisms and the susceptible loci for interferon-alpha and ribavirin combined therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

  15. The CYP4502D6 *4 and *6 alleles are the molecular genetic markers for drug response: implications in colchicine non-responder FMF patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcıntepe, Sinem; Ozdemır, Ozturk; Sılan, Coskun; Ozen, Filiz; Uludag, Ahmet; Candan, Ferhan; Sılan, Fatma

    2016-06-01

    The cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the oxidative biotransformation of the xenobiotics, carcinogens and various clinically important drugs. Patients are evaluated in three sub-groups of extensive (EM), intermediate (IM) and poor metabolizer (PM) phenotypes due to their drug-metabolising ability for the target CYP2D6 gene. Colchicine non-responsive FMF patients were prospectively genotyped for the major CYP2D6 alleles in the current study. Major CYP2D6 alleles of *1, *3, *4, *5, and *6 were genotyped for 30 responsive and 60 non-responsive FMF patients by multiplex PCR-based reverse-hybridization StripAssay and real-time PCR methods. DNA banks isolated from blood-EDTA were retrospectively used in the current patients and results were compared statistically. Increased CYP2D6 *4 and *6 allele frequencies were highly detected in the colchicine non-responsive FMF patients when compared to the responsive group. Results showed the frequencies of major CYP2D6 *1(wild), *3(2637A > delA), *4(G1934A), *5(total gene deletion) and *6(1707T del) alleles in 0.550, 0.042, 0.158, 0.025 and 0.225 for non-responder and 0.880 and 0.120 (CYP2D6*1 and *4) for the responder groups, respectively. Despite small sample size, this study suggests that there is an association between CYP2D6*4 and CYP2D6*6 alleles and drug intoxicants in colchicine non-responder FMF patients.

  16. Open-Book Testing and Education for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Morris

    1994-01-01

    The educational advantages of open-book testing are explored, considering the changes in teaching method that are necessary for open-book testing to be successful. How open-book testing should work is illustrated through the example of tests for Spanish-language classes. (SLD)

  17. Introducing National Tests in Swedish Primary Education: Implications for Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyroos, Mikaela; Wiklund-Hornqvist, Carola

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Swedish government has decided to introduce national tests in primary education. Swedish pupils in general have few tests and a recognised possible adverse effect of testing is test anxiety among pupils, which may have a negative impact on examination performance. However, there has been little research on effects of testing on…

  18. Testing and school reform in Danish education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Kristine; Hamre, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    This chapter will focus on shared characteristics of the Danish national standardized testing in public school and the ideals of being a student according to the Danish School Reform of 2014. In the chapter we argue that both kinds of materials (documents regarding the newly implemented national...... that the national testing program applies computer adaptive testing (CAT), i.e. the testing program adapts to how the student answer to the single test item and related to this, delivers more difficult or more easy test items to the individual student during test taking. The theoretical framework is based...... School reform and secondly ethnographic inspired fieldwork in Danish public schools. The analysis in the chapter consists of theoretical informed readings of the empirical material. The material is read through different dispositives, that is the dispositive of discipline; of security and optimization...

  19. Progress testing in postgraduate medical education.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksterhuis, M.G.; Scheele, F.; Schuwirth, L.W.; Essed, G.G.M.; Nijhuis, J.G.; Braat, D.D.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of knowledge in postgraduate medical education has often been discussed. However, recent insights from cognitive psychology and the study of deliberate practice recognize that expert problem solving requires a well-organized knowledge database. This implies that postgraduate ass

  20. What do educational test scores really measure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, James; D. Munk, Martin

    Latent class Poisson count models are used to analyze a sample of Danish test score results from a cohort of individuals born in 1954-55 and tested in 1968. The procedure takes account of unobservable effects as well as excessive zeros in the data. The bulk of unobservable effects are uncorrelate...

  1. What do educational test scores really measure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, James; D. Munk, Martin

    measure of pure cognitive ability. We find that variables which are not closely associated with traditional notions of intelligence explain a significant proportion of the variation in test scores. This adds to the complexity of interpreting test scores and suggests that school culture, attitudes...

  2. Knowledge tests in patient education: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesänen, Jukka; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Arifulla, Dinah; Siekkinen, Mervi; Valkeapää, Kirsi

    2014-06-01

    This study describes knowledge tests in patient education through a systematic review of the Medline, Cinahl, PsycINFO, and ERIC databases with the guidance of the PRISMA Statement. Forty-nine knowledge tests were identified. The contents were health-problem related, focusing on biophysiological and functional knowledge. The mean number of items was 20, with true-false or multiple-choice scales. Most of the tests were purposely designed for the studies included in the review. The most frequently reported quality assessments of knowledge tests were content validity and internal consistency. The outcome measurements for patient-education needs were comprehensive, validating knowledge tests that cover multidimensional aspects of knowledge. Besides the measurement of the outcomes of patient education, knowledge tests could be used for several purposes in patient education: to guide the content of education as checklists, to monitor the learning process, and as educational tools. There is a need for more efficient content and health problem-specific knowledge-test assessments.

  3. Prevalence of Non-responders for Glucose Control Markers after 10 Weeks of High-Intensity Interval Training in Adult Women with Higher and Lower Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Cristian; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Exercise training improves performance and biochemical parameters on average, but wide interindividual variability exists, with individuals classified as responders (R) or non-responders (NRs), especially between populations with higher or lower levels of insulin resistance. This study assessed the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and the prevalence of NRs in adult women with higher and lower levels of insulin resistance. Methods: Forty adult women were assigned to a HIIT program, and after training were analyzed in two groups; a group with higher insulin resistance (H-IR, 40 ± 6 years; BMI: 29.5 ± 3.7 kg/m(2); n = 20) and a group with lower insulin resistance (L-IR, 35 ± 9 years; 27.8 ± 2.8 kg/m(2); n = 20). Anthropometric, cardiovascular, metabolic, and performance variables were measured at baseline and after 10 weeks of training. Results: There were significant training-induced changes [delta percent (Δ%)] in fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) scores in the H-IR group (-8.8, -26.5, -32.1%, p sedentary adult women. This research demonstrates the protective effect of HIIT against cardiometabolic disease progression in a sedentary population.

  4. St. John's Wort in patients non-responders to clopidogrel undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: a single-center randomized open-label trial (St. John's Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trana, Catalina; Toth, Gabor; Wijns, William; Barbato, Emanuele

    2013-06-01

    We assessed if St. John's Wort (SJW) improves platelet response in patients (pts) resistant to clopidogrel after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Stable angina pts non-responders to 600 mg clopidogrel (P2Y12 reaction units (PRU) >240) were randomized (2:1) to SJW (n = 15) or placebo (n = 8). SJW (300 mg × 3/day) was administrated for 2 weeks after PCI. Platelet reactivity was assessed by VerifyNowTM before (BL), 2 (T1), and 4 weeks (T2) after PCI. PRU significantly changed during protocol in SJW (BL (316 ± 60) vs. T1 (170 ± 87) vs. T2 (220 ± 96), p < 0.0001) and placebo group (BL (288 ± 36) vs. T1 (236 ± 31) vs. T2 (236 ± 62), p = 0.046). Yet, PRU changes from BL were higher at T1 in SJW than in placebo group (Δ%, -47 ± 24 vs. -16 ± 15, p = 0.0033), with no differences at T2 between the groups (Δ%, -30 ± 29 vs. -17 ± 24, p = 0.30). Residual platelet reactivity improved with SJW during the first month post-PCI.

  5. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Differentially Affects Lithium Sensitivity of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines from Lithium Responder and Non-responder Bipolar Disorder Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Elena; Hadar, Adva; Maffioletti, Elisabetta; Werner, Haim; Shomron, Noam; Gennarelli, Massimo; Schulze, Thomas G; Costa, Marta; Del Zompo, Maria; Squassina, Alessio; Gurwitz, David

    2015-07-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic psychiatric illness with an unknown etiology. Lithium is considered the cornerstone in the management of BD, though about 50-60 % of patients do not respond sufficiently to chronic treatment. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has been identified as a candidate gene for BD susceptibility, and its low expression has been suggested as a putative biomarker for lithium unresponsiveness. In this study, we examined the in vitro effects of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on lithium sensitivity in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from lithium responder (R) and non-responder (NR) bipolar patients. Moreover, we evaluated levels of microRNA let-7c, a small RNA predicted to target IGF1. We found that exogenous IGF-1 added to serum-free media increased lithium sensitivity selectively in LCLs from NR BD patients. However, no significant differences were observed when comparing let-7c expression in LCLs from R vs. NR BD patients. Our data support a key role for IGF-1 in lithium resistance/response in the treatment of bipolar disorder.

  6. America's Mediocre Test Scores: Education Crisis or Poverty Crisis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrilli, Michael J.; Wright, Brandon L.

    2016-01-01

    At a time when the national conversation is focused on lagging upward mobility, it is no surprise that many educators point to poverty as the explanation for mediocre test scores among U.S. students compared to those of students in other countries. If American teachers in struggling U.S. schools taught in Finland, says Finnish educator Pasi…

  7. America's Mediocre Test Scores: Education Crisis or Poverty Crisis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrilli, Michael J.; Wright, Brandon L.

    2016-01-01

    At a time when the national conversation is focused on lagging upward mobility, it is no surprise that many educators point to poverty as the explanation for mediocre test scores among U.S. students compared to those of students in other countries. If American teachers in struggling U.S. schools taught in Finland, says Finnish educator Pasi…

  8. Post-Secondary Educators' Perceptions of Students' Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connon, Hannah A.; Rash, Joshua A.; Allen Gerwing, Alyssa M.; Bramble, Beverly; Landine, Jeff; Gerwing, Travis G.

    2016-01-01

    Student test anxiety (TA) is a far-reaching concern in many post-secondary institutions as it can have a negative impact on student performance and retention. Educator perceptions of TA may influence the incidence of TA as well as treatment success. As such, we surveyed educators at a medium-sized Canadian university about their perceptions and…

  9. Valuing Assessment in Teacher Education - Multiple-Choice Competency Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dona L.; Itter, Diane

    2014-01-01

    When our focus is on assessment educators should work to value the nature of assessment. This paper presents a new approach to multiple-choice competency testing in mathematics education. The instrument discussed here reflects student competence, encourages self-regulatory learning behaviours and links content with current curriculum documents and…

  10. Impact of Educational Level on Performance on Auditory Processing Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cristina F B; Rabelo, Camila M; Silagi, Marcela L; Mansur, Letícia L; Schochat, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that a higher level of education is associated with better performance on cognitive tests among middle-aged and elderly people. However, the effects of education on auditory processing skills have not yet been evaluated. Previous demonstrations of sensory-cognitive interactions in the aging process indicate the potential importance of this topic. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of middle-aged and elderly people with different levels of formal education on auditory processing tests. A total of 177 adults with no evidence of cognitive, psychological or neurological conditions took part in the research. The participants completed a series of auditory assessments, including dichotic digit, frequency pattern and speech-in-noise tests. A working memory test was also performed to investigate the extent to which auditory processing and cognitive performance were associated. The results demonstrated positive but weak correlations between years of schooling and performance on all of the tests applied. The factor "years of schooling" was also one of the best predictors of frequency pattern and speech-in-noise test performance. Additionally, performance on the working memory, frequency pattern and dichotic digit tests was also correlated, suggesting that the influence of educational level on auditory processing performance might be associated with the cognitive demand of the auditory processing tests rather than auditory sensory aspects itself. Longitudinal research is required to investigate the causal relationship between educational level and auditory processing skills.

  11. Modes of Continuing Professional Education: A Test of Houle's Typology with Business Education Instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powlette, Nina M.; Young, Darius R.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy of Houle's typology in providing an accurate conceptual description of systematic structural forms of continuing professional education and business education instructors was tested via a survey of 98 (of 129) business educators. Results of rotation factor analysis added inquiry/reinforcement to Houle's 3 learning modes of…

  12. Improved cell mediated immune responses after successful re-vaccination of non-responders to the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) vaccine using the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Jessica; Cardell, Kristina; Björnsdottir, Thora Björg; Fryden, Aril; Hultgren, Catharina; Sällberg, Matti

    2008-11-01

    We successfully re-vaccinated hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine non-responders using a double dose of the combined hepatitis A virus (HAV) and HBV vaccine. The hope was to improve priming of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-specific cell mediated immune response (CMI) by an increased antigen dose and a theoretical adjuvant-effect from the local presence of a HAV-specific CMI. A few non-responders had a detectable HBsAg-specific CMI before re-vaccination. An in vitro detectable HBsAg-specific CMI was primed equally effective in non-responders (58%) as in first time vaccine recipients (68%). After the third dose a weak, albeit significant, association was observed between the magnitude of HBsAg-specific proliferation and anti-HBs levels. This regimen improves the priming of HBsAg-specific CMIs and antibodies.

  13. Educational Testing as an Accountability Measure: Drawing on Twentieth-Century Danish History of Education Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ydesen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This article reveals perspectives based on experiences from twentieth-century Danish educational history by outlining contemporary, test-based accountability regime characteristics and their implications for education policy. The article introduces one such characteristic, followed by an empirical analysis of the origins and impacts of test-based…

  14. The evaluation of Tetanus-diphtheria (Td vaccine impacts on immune response to hepatitis B (HB vaccine in non-responder dialysis patientsFNx01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Shahidi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Hepatitis B (HB vaccine response in hemodialysis patients is less than healthy individuals. Different strategies have been taken into account to improve the response rate. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of tetanus and diphtheria (Td vaccine as an adjuvant therapy to HB vaccination. Methods: Sixty three end-stage renal disease patients were recruited on dialysis that were older than 18 years and had passed at least 3 doses of HB vaccination schedule, and had HBS antibody (Ab with titer less than 10 IU/L. The patients were divided into two groups; A (30 patients and B (33 patients. Both of the groups received a 3-dose HB vaccination schedule of 40 μ g intramuscularly in the left deltoid muscle at 0, 1 and 6 months. Group A also received Td vaccine intramuscularly simultaneous with the first dose of HB vaccine. HBS Ab was measured in periods of 1 and 6 months after completion of the vaccination. Results: One month after completion of the vaccination, group A had better but not significant response rate (96% than group B (83.9% (p > 0.05; in addition, after 6 month there was no difference between the two groups (87.5% vs. 83.3% (p > 0.05. Patients with HCV infection had lower response rate than patients who did not have HCV infection (33.3% vs. 92.5% (p < 0.05. Age had negative effect on immune response to HB vaccination (r = -0.339; p = 0.005. Conclusions: The use of Td vaccine concurrent with HB vaccination may increase the response rate in non-responder individuals; however, it seems it does not have any role in the persistence of immune response. Age and HCV infection negatively affected the response to HB vaccination in dialysis patients.

  15. On Washback of Testing to General English Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TangShengping; XuChongning

    2004-01-01

    The educational society identifies that important testing has on teaching and learning great effects which are referred to as washback, Although there is controversy about its benefi cialor harmful effect on teaching and learning, it is generally accepted that testing generates both negative and positive washback, By making a comparison between NMET (the

  16. Educational credentials and external effects : A test for the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes and uses a new test to discriminate between on the one hand the human capital model and on the other hand the credentialists and signalling models. Previous tests used only one source of variation between years spend in education and obtained degrees. Most use the variation among

  17. Construction and Analysis of Educational Tests Using Abductive Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Alfy, El-Sayed M.; Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in educational technologies and the wide-spread use of computers in schools have fueled innovations in test construction and analysis. As the measurement accuracy of a test depends on the quality of the items it includes, item selection procedures play a central role in this process. Mathematical programming and the item response…

  18. Construction and Analysis of Educational Tests Using Abductive Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Alfy, El-Sayed M.; Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in educational technologies and the wide-spread use of computers in schools have fueled innovations in test construction and analysis. As the measurement accuracy of a test depends on the quality of the items it includes, item selection procedures play a central role in this process. Mathematical programming and the item response…

  19. Test Anxiety and High-Stakes Test Performance between School Settings: Implications for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Embse, Nathaniel; Hasson, Ramzi

    2012-01-01

    With the enactment of standards-based accountability in education, high-stakes tests have become the dominant method for measuring school effectiveness and student achievement. Schools and educators are under increasing pressure to meet achievement standards. However, there are variables which may interfere with the authentic measurement of…

  20. Failing Tests: Commentary on "Adapting Educational Measurement to the Demands of Test-Based Accountability"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thissen, David

    2015-01-01

    In "Adapting Educational Measurement to the Demands of Test-Based Accountability" Koretz takes the time-honored engineering approach to educational measurement, identifying specific problems with current practice and proposing minimal modifications of the system to alleviate those problems. In response to that article, David Thissen…

  1. Combination of "low-dose" ribavirin and interferon alfa-2a therapy followed by interferon alfa-2a monotherapy in chronic HCV-infected non-responders and relapsers after interferon alfa-2a monotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Perdita Wietzke-Braun; Volker Meier; Felix Braun; Giuliano Ramadori

    2001-01-01

    AIM To report on the efficacy, safety and tolerability of interferon alfa-2a combined with a "low dose" of ribavirin for relapsers and non responders to alpha interferon monotherapy.METHODS Thirty-four chronic hepatitis C virus-infected non-responders to interferon alfa2a monotherapy (a course of at least 3 months treatment) and 13 relapsers to interferon alfa 2a monotherapy (a dose of 3 to 6 million units three times per week for at least 20 weeks but not more than 18 months) were treated with the same dose of interferon alfa-2a used before (3 to 6 million units three times per week) and ribavirin (10 mg/ kg daily) for 6 months. In complete responders, interferon alfa-2a was administered for further 6 months at the same dose used before as monotherapy.RESULTS Seven (20.6%) of 34 non-responders stopped the combined therapy due to adverse events, including two patients with histological and clinical Child A cirrhosis. In 17/27 (63%)non-responders, the combined therapy was stopped after three months because of non-response. Ten of the 27 non-responders completed the 1;2-month treatment course. At a mean follow up of 28 months (16- 37 months)after the treatment, 4/10 (15%) previous non-responders still remained complete responders,All 13 previous relapsers completed the 12-month treatment course. At a mean follow up of 22months (9 - 36 months) after treatment, 6/13(46%) the previous relapsers were stillsustained complete responders.CONCLUSION Our treatment schedule of the combined therapy for 6 months of interferon alfa2a with a low dose of ribavirin (10 mg/kg/day)followed by 6 months of interferon alfa-2amonotherapy is able to induce a sustainedcomplete response rate in 15% of non-responders and 46% of relapsers with chronic hepatitis C virus-related liver diseases comparable to those obtained with the standarddoses of ribavirin 1000 - 1200 mg/day.Randomized prospective controlled trials using lower total amounts of ribavirin in combination with interferon should be

  2. Interventions to Educate Family Physicians to Change Test Ordering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Edmund Thomas MD, PhD, CCFP, MRCGP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to systematically review randomised controlled trials (RCTs to change family physicians’ laboratory test-ordering. We searched 15 electronic databases (no language/date limitations. We identified 29 RCTs (4,111 physicians, 175,563 patients. Six studies specifically focused on reducing unnecessary tests, 23 on increasing screening tests. Using Cochrane methodology 48.5% of studies were low risk-of-bias for randomisation, 7% concealment of randomisation, 17% blinding of participants/personnel, 21% blinding outcome assessors, 27.5% attrition, 93% selective reporting. Only six studies were low risk for both randomisation and attrition. Twelve studies performed a power computation, three an intention-to-treat analysis and 13 statistically controlled clustering. Unweighted averages were computed to compare intervention/control groups for tests assessed by >5 studies. The results were that fourteen studies assessed lipids (average 10% more tests than control, 14 diabetes (average 8% > control, 5 cervical smears, 2 INR, one each thyroid, fecal occult-blood, cotinine, throat-swabs, testing after prescribing, and urine-cultures. Six studies aimed to decrease test groups (average decrease 18%, and two to increase test groups. Intervention strategies: one study used education (no change: two feedback (one 5% increase, one 27% desired decrease; eight education + feedback (average increase in desired direction >control 4.9%, ten system change (average increase 14.9%, one system change + feedback (increases 5-44%, three education + system change (average increase 6%, three education + system change + feedback (average 7.7% increase, one delayed testing. The conclusions are that only six RCTs were assessed at low risk of bias from both randomisation and attrition. Nevertheless, despite methodological shortcomings studies that found large changes (e.g. >20% probably obtained real change.

  3. A Comparison of the Abilities Measured by the Cambridge and Educational Testing Service EFL Test Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Lyle F.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The abilities measured by the First Certificate of English (FCE) administered by the Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate are compared with the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) administered by the Educational Testing Service. The analyses suggest that the FCE and TOEFL appear to measure the same common aspect of language…

  4. Students’ Perceptions of Language Testing and Assessment in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyhan Agcam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessment is any of a variety of procedures used to obtain information about student performance (Linn & Gronlund, 2000, p. 32. As reported by Pellegrino, Chudowsky, and Glaser (2001, it provides feedback to students, educators, parents, policy makers, and the public about the effectiveness of educational services. Related research on language testing and assessment in foreign language education, which is one of the most controversial issues in Turkey, have been carried out with a focus on perspectives of teachers rather than the students who obviously play the leading role in the process. Hence, the current study is primarily motivated to explore the perceptions of students on foreign language assessment in higher education in Turkey. A total of 103 undergraduate students attending an English Language Preparatory Program at a state university in Turkey took part in the study. They were assigned a questionnaire consisting of open- and closed-ended items to reveal their perceptions on the applications of language assessment in higher education (e.g. core language skills, assessment types employed in testing foreign language development, and types of questions used in the tests throughout an academic year. The findings have demonstrated that most participants found assessment necessary in their foreign language education, and that speaking and listening are considered the most important skills, while grammar and reading are regarded as the least important. As for question types, Selected Response Items (e.g. Matching, MC, Odd-one-out, and T-F have revealed the most-favored by students in comparison to the Constructed Response Items (e.g. Sentence Completion, Wh- Questions, and etc. and Personal Response items (e.g. writing a paragraph, which might be attributed to the less challenging and demanding structure of the selected response items. The study concludes with a few pedagogical implications on language assessment in higher education, and

  5. Educational differentials in the Netherlands : Testing rational action theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Need, Ariana; Jong, Uulkje de

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we test how well Rational Action Theory, as developed to explain educational differentials, applies in the Dutch situation. The question we address is the extent to which the mechanisms assumed to be at work can explain class and gender differentials in participation in higher educati

  6. Sources of Validity Evidence for Educational and Psychological Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizek, Gregory J.; Rosenberg, Sharyn L.; Koons, Heather H.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates aspects of validity reflected in a large and diverse sample of published measures used in educational and psychological testing contexts. The current edition of "Mental Measurements Yearbook" served as the data source for this study. The validity aspects investigated included perspective on validity represented, number and…

  7. Education governance and standardised tests in Denmark and England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Karen Egedal; Ydesen, Christian; Kelly, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this study we identify and compare the impact of standardised student assessment in England, an established neoliberal context, and in Denmark where a neoliberal education reform agenda is emerging in response to both national concerns and international governance. National reading tests...

  8. Prevalence of Non-responders for Glucose Control Markers after 10 Weeks of High-Intensity Interval Training in Adult Women with Higher and Lower Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Álvarez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exercise training improves performance and biochemical parameters on average, but wide interindividual variability exists, with individuals classified as responders (R or non-responders (NRs, especially between populations with higher or lower levels of insulin resistance. This study assessed the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT and the prevalence of NRs in adult women with higher and lower levels of insulin resistance.Methods: Forty adult women were assigned to a HIIT program, and after training were analyzed in two groups; a group with higher insulin resistance (H-IR, 40 ± 6 years; BMI: 29.5 ± 3.7 kg/m2; n = 20 and a group with lower insulin resistance (L-IR, 35 ± 9 years; 27.8 ± 2.8 kg/m2; n = 20. Anthropometric, cardiovascular, metabolic, and performance variables were measured at baseline and after 10 weeks of training.Results: There were significant training-induced changes [delta percent (Δ%] in fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR scores in the H-IR group (−8.8, −26.5, −32.1%, p < 0.0001, whereas no significant changes were observed in the L-IR. Both groups showed significant pre-post changes in other anthropometric variables [waist circumference (−5.2, p < 0.010, and −3.8%, p = 0.046 and tricipital (−13.3, p < 0.010, and −13.6%, p < 0.0001, supra-iliac (−19.4, p < 0.0001, and −13.6%, p < 0.0001, and abdominal (−18.2, p < 0.0001, and −15.6%, p < 0.010 skinfold measurements]. Systolic blood pressure decreased significantly only in the L-IR group (−3.2%, p < 0.010. Both groups showed significant increases in 1RMLE (+12.9, p < 0.010, and +14.7%, p = 0.045. There were significant differences in the prevalence of NRs between the H-IR and L-IR groups for fasting glucose (25 vs. 95%, p < 0.0001 and fasting insulin (p = 0.025 but not for HOMA-IR (25 vs. 45%, p = 0.185.Conclusion: Independent of the “magnitude” of the

  9. Ethics, policy, and educational issues in genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Janet K; Skirton, Heather; Masny, Agnes

    2006-01-01

    Analyze ethics, public policy, and education issues that arise in the United States (US) and the United Kingdom (UK) when genomic information acquired as a result of genetic testing is introduced into healthcare services. Priorities in the Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues Research Program include privacy, integration of genetic services into clinical health care, and educational preparation of the nursing workforce. These constructs are used to examine health policies in the US and UK, and professional interactions of individuals and families with healthcare providers. Individual, family, and societal goals may conflict with current healthcare practices and policies when genetic testing is done. Current health policies do not fully address these concerns. Unresolved issues include protection of privacy of individuals while considering genetic information needs of family members, determination of appropriate monitoring of genetic tests, addressing genetic healthcare discrepancies, and assuring appropriate nursing workforce preparation. Introduction of genetic testing into health care requires that providers are knowledgeable regarding ethical, policy, and practice issues in order to minimize risk for harm, protect the rights of individuals and families, and consider societal context in the management of genetic test results. Understanding of these issues is a component of genetic nursing competency that must be addressed at all levels of nursing education.

  10. Real-world effectiveness of natalizumab and fingolimod compared with self-injectable drugs in non-responders and in treatment-naïve patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosperini, Luca; Saccà, Francesco; Cordioli, Cinzia; Cortese, Antonio; Buttari, Fabio; Pontecorvo, Simona; Bianco, Assunta; Ruggieri, Serena; Haggiag, Shalom; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo; Capra, Ruggero; Centonze, Diego; Di Battista, Giancarlo; Ferraro, Elisabetta; Francia, Ada; Galgani, Simonetta; Gasperini, Claudio; Millefiorini, Enrico; Mirabella, Massimiliano; Pozzilli, Carlo

    2017-02-01

    In this independent, multicentre post-marketing study we directly compared the effectiveness of natalizumab (NTZ), fingolimod (FNG) and self-injectable drugs (INJ), in non-responders to first immunomodulating treatment and in highly active treatment-naïve patients with multiple sclerosis. As main outcome measure we considered the proportions of patients with no evidence of disease activity (NEDA-3), defined as absence of relapses, disability worsening and radiological activity. A total of 567 non-responders to interferon beta (IFNB) or glatiramer acetate (GA) [dataset A] and 216 highly active treatment-naïves [dataset B] were followed up to 24 months from the beginning of NTZ, FNG or INJ, i.e. switching from IFNB to GA or viceversa (in the case of non-responders) or starting high-dose IFNB (in the case of highly active treatment-naïves). Propensity score matching in a 1:1:1 ratio was used to select only patients with similar baseline characteristics, retaining 330 and 120 patients in dataset A and B, respectively. In dataset A, the 24-month proportion with NEDA-3 was greater in both NTZ group (67%) and FNG group (42%) than in INJ group (35%) (p ≤ 0.016); however, NTZ was superior to FNG in promoting the attainment of NEDA-3 status (p = 0.034). In dataset B, the 24-month proportion with NEDA-3 was greater in NTZ group (75%) and FNG group (67%) than in INJ group (40%), but the small cohort sizes most likely prevented the detection of any statistically significant difference. Our study provides real-world evidence that NTZ was more effective than both FNG and INJ in non-responders, while it could seem that, in highly active treatment-naïves, NTZ was as effective as FNG and both were superior to INJ.

  11. Procedures and reasoning for skill proficiency testing in physical education teacher education programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Baghurst

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine how the testing of skill proficiency is being conducted in physical education teacher education (PETE programs in the USA and how fitness or skill proficiencies, as attributes of a physical educator, are perceived. Participants were 312 college PETE program coordinators who completed an online survey about skill testing in their program. The eligible respondents yielded a 52.7% total response rate. Most participants believed that skill proficiency for PETE students was important, but only 46% of programs reported testing within their program. Many participants stated it was possible for their students to graduate without demonstrating proficiency in skill technique, yet were confident their students would pass an independent skill test. Only 46.2% of respondents indicated their students needed to demonstrate proper skill technique in order to graduate, and there was no consistent method of assessment. Responses were evenly split regarding the importance of a physical educator being able to demonstrate proper skill technique or be physically fit. The lack of skill testing in programs, combined with the variation in assessment, is concerning, and the development of a standardized skill-based test may provide more rigor to this important area of teacher credibility and effectiveness.

  12. Collaborative testing as a learning strategy in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandahl, Sheryl S

    2010-01-01

    A primary goal of nursing education is to prepare nurses to work collaboratively as members of interprofessional health care teams on behalf of patients. Collaborative testing is a collaborative learning strategy used to foster knowledge development, critical thinking in decision making, and group processing skills. This study incorporated a quasi-experimental design with a comparison group to examine the effect of collaborative testing as a learning strategy on student learning and retention of course content as well as group process skills and student perceptions of their learning and anxiety. The setting was a baccalaureate nursing program; the sample consisted of two groups of senior students enrolled in Medical-Surgical Nursing II. Student learning, as measured by unit examination scores, was greater for students taking examinations collaboratively compared to individually. Retention of course content, as measured by final examination scores, was not greater for students taking examinations collaboratively compared to individually. Student perceptions were overwhelmingly positive, with students reporting increased learning as a result of the collaborative testing experiences. Despite the lack of data to support increased retention, collaborative testing may be a learning strategy worth implementing in nursing education. Students reported more positive interactions and collaboration with their peers, skills required by the professional nurse.

  13. Standardized Testing for Outcome Assessment: Analysis of the Educational Testing Systems MBA Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    The use of standardized tests for outcome assessment has grown dramatically in recent years. Two driving factors have been the No Child Left Behind legislation, and the increase in outcome assessment measures by accrediting agencies such as AACSB, the international accrediting body for business schools. Despite the growth in usage, little effort…

  14. Testing Results and Prospects of Educational Module “Individualization and Personalization of Educational Work with Students of Different Types”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaslavskaya O.Y.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the testing results of educational module “Individualization and Personalization of Educational Work with Students of Different Types” in pedagogical master program, Teacher education (secondary general education teacher training direction. The module based on the professional direction, involving the connection of the objectives, content, forms, tools, and educational results with the main educational results according to Federal State Educational standard, as well as the content of different professional activities of future teachers of secondary education, are contained in the professional standards of the teacher. We characterized the structure and content of module subjects, the kinds of master educational activity organization, assessment tools which were used for the module educational outcomes (competencies, job functions and teacher activity in master students. The article describes the changes and updates that have been made in teaching and guidance documents on the results of the module testing and presents the perspectives of module in master students training.

  15. Symptomatic response to blocked and unblocked pentagastrin stimulation in functional dyspepsia - Comparison of responders and non-responders to omeprazole identified in a single-subject trial model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, L.G.; Bytzer, P.

    2008-01-01

    -over design. Epigastric pain was assessed every 15 for 90 min after stimulation using a 5-graded Likert scale and a VAS scale. A positive acid provocation test was defined as an increase of the Likert score of epigastric pain by at least one grade after pentagastrin stimulation during placebo treatment...

  16. Creating an Educational Testing Profession in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, 1910-1960

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydesen, Christian; Ludvigsen, Kari; Lundahl, Christian

    2013-01-01

    , and Danish testing communities. The aim is to understand the workings of these professionalization movements rooted in the creation of an international fellowship of like-mindedness and a knowledge monopoly connected with standardised educational tests. Viewed from a contemporary perspective, this type......, universities, and teachers’ unions in a joint endeavour that promoted educational psychology and testing in the three Scandinavian educational fields.......In Norway, Sweden and Denmark national testing communities advocating the introduction and expanded use of standardised educational tests in the national educational systems emerged around World War I. Using international research and cross-border networking activities, these coteries were able...

  17. Educational testing and validity of conclusions in the scholarship of teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Michael J; Beltyukova, Svetlana A; Martin, Beth A

    2013-11-12

    Validity and its integral evidence of reliability are fundamentals for educational and psychological measurement, and standards of educational testing. Herein, we describe these standards of educational testing, along with their subtypes including internal consistency, inter-rater reliability, and inter-rater agreement. Next, related issues of measurement error and effect size are discussed. This article concludes with a call for future authors to improve reporting of psychometrics and practical significance with educational testing in the pharmacy education literature. By increasing the scientific rigor of educational research and reporting, the overall quality and meaningfulness of SoTL will be improved.

  18. The Rise of High-Stakes Educational Testing in Denmark (1920-1970)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydesen, Christian

    The Rise of High-Stakes Educational Testing in Denmark (1920–1970) is an attempt to determine why and how tests rose to prominence in an educational system that used to rely on qualitative tests and teacher evaluations. The study addresses the important issues of how testing interacts...... with and influences an educational system, and which common factors are involved in order to implement testing in an educational system. The study is based on three relatively unknown case studies – illustrious examples of high-stakes educational testing practices in the Danish public school system. The first case...... study discusses the sorting of children into remedial education based on standardised intelligence testing in the Frederiksberg municipality from 1930 to 1943. The second case study deals with the comprehensive testing programme conducted at the Copenhagen experimental school of Emdrupborg from 1948...

  19. Understanding and Testing for "Critical Thinking" with Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles, Christopher B.

    Teaching and testing for critical thinking can be a challenge for new and experienced social work educators because critical thinking has no operational definition. Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives is a tool from the wider context of education that can help new and experienced social work educators to think more precisely about what it…

  20. Teaching and Testing for Critical Thinking with Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles, Christopher B.

    Teaching and testing for critical thinking can be a challenge for new and experienced social work educators because critical thinking has no operational definition. Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives is a tool from the wider context of education that can help new and experienced social work educators to think more precisely about what it…

  1. Vouchers, Tests, Loans, Privatization: Will They Help Tackle Corruption in Russian Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipian, Ararat L.

    2009-01-01

    Higher education in Russia is currently being reformed. A standardized computer-graded test and educational vouchers were introduced to make higher education more accessible, fund it more effectively, and reduce corruption in admissions to public colleges. The voucher project failed and the test faces furious opposition. This paper considers…

  2. Vouchers, Tests, Loans, Privatization: Will They Help Tackle Corruption in Russian Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipian, Ararat L.

    2009-01-01

    Higher education in Russia is currently being reformed. A standardized computer-graded test and educational vouchers were introduced to make higher education more accessible, fund it more effectively, and reduce corruption in admissions to public colleges. The voucher project failed and the test faces furious opposition. This paper considers…

  3. High-Stakes Educational Testing and Democracy--Antagonistic or Symbiotic Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ydesen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that high-stakes educational testing, along with the attendant questions of power, education access, education management and social selection, cannot be considered in isolation from society at large. Thus, high-stakes testing practices bear numerous implications for democratic conditions in society. For decades, advocates of…

  4. MOTIVATION AND PERFORMANCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION: AN EXPERIMENTAL TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Moreno

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyse, experimentally, the relationships between motivation and performance in a lateral movement test in physical education. The study group consisted of 363 students (227 boys and 136 girls, aged between 12 and 16, who were randomly divided into three groups: an experimental group in which an incremental ability belief was induced, another experimental group in which an entity ability belief was induced, and a control group where there was no intervention. Measurements were made of situational intrinsic motivation, perceived competence in executing the task and performance. The results revealed that the incremental group reported higher scores on the situational intrinsic motivation scale. The entity group demonstrated better performance in the first test attempt than the incremental group but, in the second attempt, the performance was similar in the different groups. Perhaps the initial differences in performance disappeared because the incremental group counted on improving in the second attempt. These results are discussed in relation to the intensity with which the teacher conveys information relating to incremental ability belief of the pupil to increase intrinsic motivation and performance

  5. Policy Reform: Testing Times for Teacher Education in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Tanya; Knipe, Sally

    2016-01-01

    In Australia as well as elsewhere, initial teacher education has become centre stage to a political agenda that calls for global competitiveness in the knowledge economy. The common problem cited has been declining educational standards linked with the quality of teaching and teacher education. The avalanche of review and policy reform has exposed…

  6. [Information Concerning Mean Test Scores for the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), Law School Admission Test (LSAT), Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT), and Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) for the National Commission on Excellence in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Robert J.

    Data are provided to the National Commission on Excellence in Education on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), Law School Admission Test (LSAT), Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT), and Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Statistics are provided on the following: yearly GMAT mean scores 1965-1966…

  7. Defining integrated science education and putting it to test

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Åström

    2008-01-01

    The thesis is made up by four studies, on the comprehensive theme of integrated and subjectspecific science education in Swedish compulsory school. A literature study on the matter is followed by an expert survey, then a case study and ending with two analyses of students’ science results from PISA 2003 and PISA 2006. The first two studies explore similarities and differences between integrated and subject-specific science education, i. e. Science education and science taught as Biology, Chem...

  8. Comparing General and Special Education Preservice Teachers' Test Performance Using Traditional and Anchored Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, D. Michael; Langone, John

    2005-01-01

    Data comparing the effects of traditional lectures and instruction paired with video anchors on test scores of general education and special education preservice teachers are presented. The sample in both the experimental and control groups included a mixture of preservice teachers including those beginning a general education early childhood…

  9. 75 FR 53681 - Office of Elementary and Secondary Education Overview Information; Advanced Placement (AP) Test...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... Office of Elementary and Secondary Education Overview Information; Advanced Placement (AP) Test Fee... Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA), requires that grant funds provided under.... Thelma Mel ndez de Santa Ana, Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education. BILLING...

  10. Testing the Participatory Education Evaluation Concept in a National Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilainen, Ville

    2012-01-01

    The article focuses on the realisation of participatory evaluation (PE) in national educational evaluation activity. The realisation of PE is examined by adapting the Daigneault and Jacob model (2009; originally Cousins & Whitmore, 1998) to five national-level educational evaluations carried out in Finland. According to the chosen frame of…

  11. Apps for Physical Education: Teacher Tested, Kid Approved!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Amber; Rodenbeck, Myshel; Clegg, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    Physical education teachers have been encouraged to use technology in their classes to enhance student motivation and learning. The purpose of this article is to share iOS applications (apps) that K-12 physical education teachers and students have found useful.

  12. Sorting Test, Tower Test and BRIEF-SR do not predict school performance of healthy adolescents in preuniversity education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie eBoschloo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Executive functions (EF such as self-monitoring, planning and organizing are known to develop through childhood and adolescence. They are of potential importance for learning and school performance. Earlier research into the relation between executive functions and school performance did not provide clear results possibly because confounding factors such as educational track, boy-girl differences and parental education were not taken into account. The present study therefore investigated the relation between executive function tests and school performance in a highly controlled sample of 173 healthy adolescents aged 12-18. Only students in the pre-university educational track were used and the performance of boys was compared to that of girls. Results showed that there was no relation between the report marks obtained and the performance on executive function tests, notably the Sorting Test and the Tower Test of the Delis-Kaplan Executive Functions System (D-KEFS. Likewise, no relation was found between the report marks and the scores on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function – Self-Report Version (BRIEF-SR after these were controlled for grade, sex, and level of parental education.The findings indicate that executive functioning as measured with widely used instruments such as the BRIEF-SR does not predict school performance of adolescents in preuniversity education any better than a student’s grade, sex, and level of parental education. ed

  13. Knowledge, Tests, and Fadeout in Educational Interventions. NBER Working Paper No. 18038

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Elizabeth U.; Staiger, Douglas O.

    2012-01-01

    Educational interventions are often evaluated and compared on the basis of their impacts on test scores. Decades of research have produced two empirical regularities: interventions in later grades tend to have smaller effects than the same interventions in earlier grades, and the test score impacts of early educational interventions almost…

  14. Initial Development and Factor Structure of the Educator Test Stress Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Embse, Nathaniel P.; Kilgus, Stephen P.; Solomon, Hadley J.; Bowler, Mark; Curtiss, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    With the proliferation of test-based accountability policies, educators and students alike are under pressure to improve test performance. However, little is known regarding the stress experienced by educators in response to these policies. The purpose of this article is to describe the initial development and validation of a new measure of stress…

  15. Reporting Diagnostic Scores in Educational Testing: Temptations, Pitfalls, and Some Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sandip; Puhan, Gautam; Haberman, Shelby J.

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic scores are of increasing interest in educational testing due to their potential remedial and instructional benefit. Naturally, the number of educational tests that report diagnostic scores is on the rise, as are the number of research publications on such scores. This article provides a critical evaluation of diagnostic score reporting…

  16. A Historical Perspective and Current Views on the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Wayne J.; Lane, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    The "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" have evolved in the breadth and depth of coverage of issues in educational testing and measurement since their first publication in 1954. There were a number of substantive changes in the 1999 revision that addressed validity, fairness, accommodations, and compliance with the…

  17. Licensure tests for special education teachers: how well they assess knowledge of reading instruction and mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotsky, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    To determine the extent to which knowledge of evidence-based reading instruction and mathematics is assessed on licensure tests for prospective special education teachers, this study drew on information provided by Educational Testing Service (ETS), the American Board for Certification of Teacher Excellence, and National Evaluation Systems (now Evaluation Systems group of Pearson). It estimated the percentage of test items on phonemic awareness, phonics, and vocabulary knowledge and on mathematics content. It also analyzed descriptions of ETS's tests of "principles of teaching and learning." Findings imply that prospective special education teachers should be required to take both a dedicated test of evidence-based reading instructional knowledge, as in California, Massachusetts, and Virginia, and a test of mathematical knowledge, as in Massachusetts. States must design their own tests of teaching principles to assess knowledge of evidence-based educational theories.

  18. Influence of Age and Education on Neuropsychological Tests in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    relationship between self-reported years of education and .... the one hand and age or reported years of schooling on the other. ... Grooved Pegboard (Dominant & Non Dominant Hands). Domain ..... Attention and memory evaluation across.

  19. Collaboration for Nondestructive Testing Education — Extending the Reach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Brian; Schmerr, Lester

    2003-03-01

    The development of NDT related educational materials has been the focus of the North Central Collaboration for NDT Education for the past four years. The Collaboration was started as a National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technology Education (ATE) program and united a number of community colleges and Iowa State University. The Collaboration developed advanced teaching methods and new materials that have allowed students to learn NDT concepts better and in less time. These materials have been made available over the Internet and have been well received. The Collaboration has recently received a second NSF ATE grant to develop an Internet site that will serve as a national focal point for NDT. In this phase of activities, the collaboration will develop a coordinated, multi-level approach that 1) promotes NDT as a career field to students, teachers and counselors in junior and senior high schools, 2) serves as an educational resource for students and instructors of two-year NDT programs and their graduates who are working in the industry, and 3) supplies educational materials that will allow educators in other technology programs (such as manufacturing and welding) to introduce their students to NDT methods. This paper will review the current activities of the Collaboration.

  20. Acceptance of Genetic Testing in a General Population: Age, Education and Gender Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aro, A. R.; Hakonen, A.; Hietala, M.; Lonnqvist, J.; Niemela, P.; Peltonen, L; Aula, P.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of age, education, and gender on acceptance of genetic testing were studied. Finnish participants responded to a questionnaire presenting reasons for and against genetic testing (N=1,967). Intentions to take genetic tests, worries, and experience of genetic test or hereditary disease were also assessed. Results are presented and discussed.…

  1. A Human Capital Model of Educational Test Scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, James; D. Munk, Martin

    Latent class Poisson count models are used to analyze a sample of Danish test score results from a cohort of individuals born in 1954-55 and tested in 1968. The procedure takes account of unobservable effects as well as excessive zeros in the data. The bulk of unobservable effects are uncorrelate...

  2. How Is Educational Measurement Supposed to Deal with Test Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Lyle

    2013-01-01

    At the outset of his thoughtful and thought-provoking article, Haertel (this issue) clearly identifies the issue with which he will be dealing: The disjunct, or gap, in current approaches to evaluating the merits of a given test, between the intended uses of that test and the validity of its score-based interpretations. The author thinks that…

  3. Echoes of a Forgotten Past: Eugenics, Testing, and Education Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoskopf, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Review of the work of Goddard, Terman, and Thorndike and the role of eugenics and the intelligence quotient in testing points out dangers to be avoided in the current testing climate, such as use of the business model, single-number scores, and tracking. (Contains 42 references.) (SK)

  4. How Is Educational Measurement Supposed to Deal with Test Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Lyle

    2013-01-01

    At the outset of his thoughtful and thought-provoking article, Haertel (this issue) clearly identifies the issue with which he will be dealing: The disjunct, or gap, in current approaches to evaluating the merits of a given test, between the intended uses of that test and the validity of its score-based interpretations. The author thinks that…

  5. A Human Capital Model of Educational Test Scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIntosh, James; D. Munk, Martin

    measure of pure cognitive ability. We find that variables which are not closely associated with traditional notions of intelligence explain a significant proportion of the variation in test scores. This adds to the complexity of interpreting test scores and suggests that school culture, attitudes...

  6. Problems and Issues in Translating International Educational Achievement Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arffman, Inga

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews research and findings on problems and issues faced when translating international academic achievement tests. The purpose is to draw attention to the problems, to help to develop the procedures followed when translating the tests, and to provide suggestions for further research. The problems concentrate on the following: the…

  7. Testing Students with Special Educational Needs in Large-Scale Assessments - Psychometric Properties of Test Scores and Associations with Test Taking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Steffi; Südkamp, Anna; Hardt, Katinka; Carstensen, Claus H; Weinert, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Assessing competencies of students with special educational needs in learning (SEN-L) poses a challenge for large-scale assessments (LSAs). For students with SEN-L, the available competence tests may fail to yield test scores of high psychometric quality, which are-at the same time-measurement invariant to test scores of general education students. We investigated whether we can identify a subgroup of students with SEN-L, for which measurement invariant competence measures of adequate psychometric quality may be obtained with tests available in LSAs. We furthermore investigated whether differences in test-taking behavior may explain dissatisfying psychometric properties and measurement non-invariance of test scores within LSAs. We relied on person fit indices and mixture distribution models to identify students with SEN-L for whom test scores with satisfactory psychometric properties and measurement invariance may be obtained. We also captured differences in test-taking behavior related to guessing and missing responses. As a result we identified a subgroup of students with SEN-L for whom competence scores of adequate psychometric quality that are measurement invariant to those of general education students were obtained. Concerning test taking behavior, there was a small number of students who unsystematically picked response options. Removing these students from the sample slightly improved item fit. Furthermore, two different patterns of missing responses were identified that explain to some extent problems in the assessments of students with SEN-L.

  8. Fitness Testing in Physical Education--A Misdirected Effort in Promoting Healthy Lifestyles and Physical Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cale, Lorraine; Harris, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Background: Physical fitness testing is commonplace within schools and the physical education (PE) curriculum, with advocates claiming one of the key purposes of testing to be the promotion of healthy lifestyles and physical activity. Despite this, much controversy has surrounded the fitness testing of young people. Purpose: This paper draws on…

  9. The National Council for Geographic Education Standards-Based Geography Test. Intermediate Level. Directions for Administering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council for Geographic Education.

    This document contains a test designed by the National Council for Geographic Education for middle school students to determine what knowledge, skills, and understandings students have developed in geography. The document also contains directions for administering the test, test performance data from a sample of 468 middle school students in 18…

  10. Steps toward More Effective Implementation of the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretz, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing is to improve testing practices, but their impact on practice appears spotty. Self-regulation clearly fails in some instances. The establishment of an external agency to oversee testing practices and adherence to the Standards would face substantial hurdles, and the ambiguity of…

  11. Fitness Testing in Physical Education--A Misdirected Effort in Promoting Healthy Lifestyles and Physical Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cale, Lorraine; Harris, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Background: Physical fitness testing is commonplace within schools and the physical education (PE) curriculum, with advocates claiming one of the key purposes of testing to be the promotion of healthy lifestyles and physical activity. Despite this, much controversy has surrounded the fitness testing of young people. Purpose: This paper draws on…

  12. Eugenics and Education: A Note on the Origins of the Intelligence Testing Movement in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Roy

    1980-01-01

    Examines influence of Francis Galton and the Eugenics Education Society in the intelligence testing movement in England (early 1900s). For eugenicists, the central issue confronting society was the problem of racial deterioration. They responded with modification of the Binet-Simon tests and developed tests to examine the whole ability range.…

  13. The education system of Finland and its success in the PISA test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Jesús Lizarte Simón

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Once again, the Finnish educational system has scored well in the PISA-tests. Among its various organizational structures and policies, the consensus of the educational policy - which is reflected by uniform structures and directions for developing the curriculum - can be identified as a reason for the success. The municipalities are responsible for the organization and realization of the primary education as well as establishing a more detailed curriculum in accordance with the goals of the National Board of Education. The schools and the teachers are allowed a great deal of independence when developing the pedagogical content and choosing a method. This orientation reflects an adjustment in the goals of the curriculum which now emphasizes practical usefulness of the information acquired by the students rather than strict adherence to a rigid curriculum. Also the change in the inspection system and the development of the education after the primary education are important aspects considering the Finnish success in the PISA tests.

  14. Unit testing as a teaching tool in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peláez Canek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unit testing in the programming world has had a profound impact in the way modern complex systems are developed. Many Open Source and Free Software projects encourage (and in some cases, mandate the use of unit tests for new code submissions, and many software companies around the world have incorporated unit testing as part of their standard developing practices. And although not all software engineers use them, very few (if at all object their use. However, there is almost no research available pertaining the use of unit tests as a teaching tool in introductory programming courses. I have been teaching introductory programming courses in the Computer Sciences program at the Sciences Faculty in the National Autonomous University of Mexico for almost ten years, and since 2013 I have been using unit testing as a teaching tool in those courses. The intent of this paper is to discuss the results of this experience.

  15. Relation between education and dementia: the role of test bias revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmand, B; Lindeboom, J; Hooijer, C; Jonker, C

    1995-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that dementia screening tests may be biased against low levels of education, whereas others find that a low level of education is a genuine risk factor for dementia. The present paper attempts to reconcile these conflicting views by examining item bias and test bias indices of the mini mental state examination (MMSE). Psychometric calculations and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses of sensitivity and specificity as performed by earlier studies were replicated and extended from the database of the Amsterdam Study of the Elderly. This is a population survey on cognitive decline and dementia (age range 65-84). Subjects with a low level of education (primary school) were compared with better educated subjects (at least some secondary education). Cases were matched by age and sex. The results indicate that the MMSE is not educationally biased as far as item characteristics, reliability, and construct validity are concerned. Yet its predictive validity as a screening test for dementia is educationally biased. This bias will effectively be eliminated with a two point higher cut off score for the subjects whose education extends beyond primary school. Even after such score correction, a low level of education probably remains a genuine risk factor for dementia. PMID:7629532

  16. The Changing Faces of Corruption in Georgian Higher Education: Access through Times and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkodashvili, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a comparative-historical analysis of access to higher education in Georgia. It describes the workings of corrupt channels during the Soviet and early post-Soviet periods and the role of standardized tests in fighting corruption in higher education admission processes after introduction of the Unified National Entrance…

  17. The Changing Faces of Corruption in Georgian Higher Education: Access through Times and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkodashvili, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a comparative-historical analysis of access to higher education in Georgia. It describes the workings of corrupt channels during the Soviet and early post-Soviet periods and the role of standardized tests in fighting corruption in higher education admission processes after introduction of the Unified National Entrance…

  18. School-Age Test Proficiency and Special Education After Congenital Heart Disease Surgery in Infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkey, Sarah B; Bai, Shasha; Luo, Chunqiao; Cleavenger, Jordyn E; Gibson, Neal; Holland, Greg; Mosley, Bridget S; Kaiser, Jeffrey R; Bhutta, Adnan T

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate test proficiency and the receipt of special education services in school-age children who had undergone surgery for congenital heart disease (CHD) at age Education longitudinal database containing achievement test scores in literacy and mathematics for grades 3-4 and special education codes. The primary negative outcome was not achieving grade-level proficiency on achievement tests. Logistic regression accounting for repeated measures was used to evaluate for associations between achieving proficiency and demographic data, maternal education, and clinical factors. A total of 362 of 458 (79%) children who underwent surgery for CHD were matched to the Arkansas Department of Education database, 285 of whom had grade 3 and/or 4 achievement tests scores. Fewer students with CHD achieved proficiency in literacy and mathematics (P education predicted proficiency in literacy (P special education services (26.9% vs 11.6%; P special education services than all state students. Results from this study support the need for neurodevelopmental evaluations as standard practice in children with CHD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. In Search of "Time-Tested Truths": Historical Perspectives on Educational Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This article has a dual purpose. The first is to pay tribute to the work of Richard Selleck and Geoffrey Sherington; the second to argue that historians of education can make substantial contributions to current and future educational policy and practice by identifying what Ravitch has called "time-tested truths". The nature and purpose…

  20. Neuropsychological Test Performance in Cognitively Normal Spanish-speaking Nonagenarians with Little Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Berroa, Elizabeth; Schmeidler, James; Raventos, Henriette; Valerio, Daniel; Beeri, Michal Schnaider; Carrión-Baralt, José R; Mora-Villalobos, Lara; Bolaños, Patricia; Sano, Mary; Silverman, Jeremy M

    2016-06-01

    To find associations of age, sex, and education with neuropsychological test performance in cognitively normal Spanish-speaking Costa Rican nonagenarians with little education; to provide norms; and to compare their performance with similar Puerto Ricans. For 95 Costa Ricans (90-102 years old, 0-6 years of education), multiple regression assessed associations with demographics of performance on six neuropsychological tests. Analyses of covariance compared them with 23 Puerto Ricans (90-99 years old). Younger age and being female-but not education-were associated with better performance on some neuropsychological tests, in particular episodic memory. The Puerto Ricans performed better on learning and memory tasks. In cognitively intact Spanish-speaking nonagenarians with little or no education, education did not affect test performance. Additional studies of the effect of education on cognitive performance are warranted in other samples with extremely low education or old age. National differences in performance highlight the importance of group-specific norms.

  1. Advantages of the Rasch Measurement Model in Analysing Educational Tests: An Applicator's Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormakangas, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Educational achievement is a very important issue for parents, teachers, and the government. An accurate measurement plays a very important role in evaluating achievement fairly, and, therefore, analysis methods have been developed considerably in recent years. Education based on long-time learning processes forms a fruitful base for item tests,…

  2. State Spending on Higher Education: Testing the Balance Wheel over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Jennifer A.; Doyle, William R.

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the role of higher education in state budgets. It empirically models and tests the balance wheel hypothesis in a robust framework. The balance wheel model posits that in good economic times, higher education is an attractive area for states to fund and tends to be funded at a higher rate than other state budget categories.…

  3. The Influence of Education and Age on Neurocognitive Test Performance in Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    DenBesten, Nicholas P.

    2009-01-01

    This research involves an examination of the relationship between education and age on a wide array of neuropsychological test measures among patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's and vascular dementia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of education as an attenuating factor to neurocognitive decline in dementia. Although numerous…

  4. Implications and Applications of Modern Test Theory in the Context of Outcomes Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrich, David

    2002-01-01

    Uses a framework previously developed to relate outcomes based education and B. Bloom's "Taxonomy of Educational Objectives" to consider ways in which modern test theory can be used to connect aspects of assessment to the curriculum framework and to consider insights this connection might provide. (SLD)

  5. The impact of educational level on performance on auditory processing tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina F.B. Murphy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Research has demonstrated that a higher level of education is associated with better performance on cognitive tests among middle-aged and elderly people. However, the effects of education on auditory processing skills have not yet been evaluated. Previous demonstrations of sensory-cognitive interactions in the aging process indicate the potential importance of this topic. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of middle-aged and elderly people with different levels of formal education on auditory processing tests. A total of 177 adults with no evidence of cognitive, psychological or neurological conditions took part in the research. The participants completed a series of auditory assessments, including dichotic digit, frequency pattern and speech-in-noise tests. A working memory test was also performed to investigate the extent to which auditory processing and cognitive performance were associated. The results demonstrated positive but weak correlations between years of schooling and performance on all of the tests applied. The factor years of schooling was also one of the best predictors of frequency pattern and speech-in-noise test performance. Additionally, performance on the working memory, frequency pattern and dichotic digit tests was also correlated, suggesting that the influence of educational level on auditory processing performance might be associated with the cognitive demand of the auditory processing tests rather than auditory sensory aspects itself. Longitudinal research is required to investigate the causal relationship between educational level and auditory processing skills.

  6. Language Testing: An Overview and Language Testing in Educational Institutions of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md. Mahroof; Ahmed, Md. Kawser

    2015-01-01

    Test is procedures for measuring ability, knowledge or performance. Testing can be defined as a method of assessment and improvement of the students. Language testing in any point is an extremely multifarious task that ought to be based on method as well as exercise. The results of assessments are used for one or more purposes. So they have an…

  7. Creating an Educational Testing Profession in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, 1910-1960

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydesen, Christian; Ludvigsen, Kari; Lundahl, Christian

    2013-01-01

    , and Danish testing communities. The aim is to understand the workings of these professionalization movements rooted in the creation of an international fellowship of like-mindedness and a knowledge monopoly connected with standardised educational tests. Viewed from a contemporary perspective, this type...... of analysis is relevant, because specialised knowledge and experts with knowledge monopolies remain prevalent in the modern-day field of education policy and practice. Thus, the roots of this inherent tendency towards expert knowledge in modern welfare state educational settings can be more adequately grasped...

  8. Alternatives to Animal Use in Research, Testing, and Education. Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    With an estimated 17-22 million animals used in laboratories annually in the United States, public interest in animal welfare has sparked an often emotional debate over such uses of animals. Concerns focus on balancing societal needs for continued progress in biomedical and behavioral research, for toxicity testing to safeguard the public, and for…

  9. Two Questions about Critical-Thinking Tests in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Roger

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author argues first, that critical-thinking skills do exist independent of disciplinary thinking skills and are not compromised by interaction effects with the major; and second, that standardized tests (e.g., the Collegiate Learning Assessment, or CLA, which is his example throughout the article) are the best way to measure…

  10. Curriculum and Testing Strategies to Maximize Special Education STAAR Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William L.; Johnson, Annabel M.; Johnson, Jared W.

    2015-01-01

    This document is from a presentation at the 2015 annual conference of the Science Teachers Association of Texas (STAT). The two sessions (each listed as feature sessions at the state conference) examined classroom strategies the presenter used in his chemistry classes to maximize Texas end-of-course chemistry test scores for his special population…

  11. Testing the effectiveness of existing psycho-educational material ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of the existing ... material given to people suffering from schizophrenia and their caregivers has to be adapted to their ..... themselves and to take home for self-study and to do ...

  12. Pilot Test of an Innovative Interprofessional Education Assessment Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, Michelle Christine

    2011-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to test an innovative way of assessing students' teamwork skills in a controlled environment. Twenty-four second year students from Western University of Health Sciences (WesternU) participated in the experimental group and 22 third year students from WesternU participated in the control group. Students in the…

  13. Two Questions about Critical-Thinking Tests in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Roger

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author argues first, that critical-thinking skills do exist independent of disciplinary thinking skills and are not compromised by interaction effects with the major; and second, that standardized tests (e.g., the Collegiate Learning Assessment, or CLA, which is his example throughout the article) are the best way to measure…

  14. Correlates of participation in AIDS education and HIV antibody testing by methadone patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magura, S; Grossman, J I; Lipton, D S; Amann, K R; Koger, J; Gehan, K

    1989-01-01

    The authors examined the factors associated with methadone patients' decisions about participating in a clinic-based AIDS prevention protocol. Despite the offer of incentives, only 27 percent attended AIDS education and only 12 percent obtained voluntary HIV antibody (ab) testing. However, AIDS education was attended by proportionately more of those who were at highest risk for AIDS because of current intravenous drug use. The availability of HIV-ab testing neither encouraged nor discouraged participation in AIDS education. Patients who were relatively more likely to choose HIV-ab testing were older, had been or were married, had plans to have children, believed the test to be useful, and believed that their counselors support their decision to be tested. Those who declined to be tested were reluctant to confront the emotional aspects of their risk status, were concerned about possible breaches of confidentiality, and doubted the value of testing. The implications of the findings for implementing AIDS prevention measures in methadone programs are discussed. Programs need either to require attendance at AIDS education or give patients an incentive to attend. HIV-ab testing should be available but should remain voluntary. A stronger medical rationale for testing is developing and may increase future participation. Methadone programs must continue to engage patients actively in AIDS risk reduction efforts.

  15. Effects of an Education Intervention about HPV Self-Testing for Healthcare Providers and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presser, Brynne E; Katz, Mira L; Shoben, Abigail B; Moore, Deborah; Ruffin, Mack T; Paskett, Electra D; Reiter, Paul L

    2017-01-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) self-testing is an emerging cervical cancer screening strategy, yet efforts to educate healthcare providers and staff about HPV self-testing are lacking. We report the findings of a brief education intervention about HPV self-testing for healthcare providers and staff. We conducted education sessions during 2015 with healthcare providers and staff (n = 33) from five federally qualified health centers located in Appalachian Ohio. Participants attended a one-time session and completed pre- and post-intervention surveys. Analyses for paired data assessed changes in knowledge and beliefs about HPV, HPV-related disease, and HPV self-testing. The intervention increased participants' knowledge and affected many of the beliefs examined. Participants answered an average of 4.67 of six knowledge items correctly on pre-intervention surveys and 5.82 items correctly on post-intervention surveys (p HPV self-testing as a potential cervical cancer screening strategy, that their female patients would be willing to use an HPV self-test at home by themselves, and that they have the knowledge to talk with their patients about HPV self-testing (all p HPV self-testing among healthcare providers and staff. Findings will be valuable for planning and developing future HPV self-test interventions that include an education component for healthcare providers and staff.

  16. Micro-Jet Test Facility for Aerospace Propulsion Engineering Education

    OpenAIRE

    López Juste, Gregorio; Montañés García, José Luis; Velázquez, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology that has been developed and implemented at the School ofAeronautics (ETSIA) of the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM) to familiarize aerospaceengineering students with the operation of real complex jet engine systems. This methodology has atwo-pronged approach: students carry out preparatory work by using, first, a gas turbineperformance prediction numerical code; then they validate their assumptions and results on anexperimental test rig. When lookin...

  17. What Are Standardized Literacy and Numeracy Tests Testing? Evidence of the Domain-General Contributions to Students' Standardized Educational Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Steven J.; Woodcock, Stuart; Ehrich, John; Bokosmaty, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    Background: A fundamental aim of standardized educational assessment is to achieve reliable discrimination between students differing in the knowledge, skills and abilities assessed. However, questions of the purity with which these tests index students' genuine abilities have arisen. Specifically, literacy and numeracy assessments may also engage…

  18. Use of "t"-Test and ANOVA in Career-Technical Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Lee, In Heok; Gemici, Sinan

    2012-01-01

    Use of t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA) procedures in published research from three scholarly journals in career and technical education (CTE) during a recent 5-year period was examined. Information on post hoc analyses, reporting of effect size, alpha adjustments to account for multiple tests, power, and examination of assumptions…

  19. Strategies Underlying Psychometric Test Responses in Young and Middle-aged Adults of Varying Educational Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrae, Kristina S.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the strategies leading to test item responses in 60 young (20-25 years) and 60 middle-aged (35-40 years) adults, whose highest level of education had been either secondary, technical or university. Subjects were individually administered a 12 item test similar to Raven's Progressive Matrices, and were…

  20. Industry-Oriented Laboratory Development for Mixed-Signal IC Test Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J.; Haffner, M.; Yoder, S.; Scott, M.; Reehal, G.; Ismail, M.

    2010-01-01

    The semiconductor industry is lacking qualified integrated circuit (IC) test engineers to serve in the field of mixed-signal electronics. The absence of mixed-signal IC test education at the collegiate level is cited as one of the main sources for this problem. In response to this situation, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at…

  1. The Relative Effectiveness of Varied Visual Testing Formats in Retrieving Information Related to Different Educational Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jaison; Dwyer, Francis

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to: (1) examine the relative effectiveness with which different types of visual test formats facilitated information retrieval on tests measuring different educational objectives; (2) measure the effect that prior knowledge had on information retrieval; and (3) to determine whether an interaction existed between prior…

  2. Multidimensional Adaptive Testing in Educational and Psychological Measurement: Current State and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Andreas; Seitz, Nicki-Nils

    2009-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of multidimensional adaptive testing (MAT) and evaluates its applicability in educational and psychological testing. The approach of Segall (1996) is described as a general framework for MAT. The main advantage of MAT is its capability to increase measurement efficiency. In simulation studies conceptualizing situations…

  3. Strategies Underlying Psychometric Test Responses in Young and Middle-aged Adults of Varying Educational Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrae, Kristina S.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the strategies leading to test item responses in 60 young (20-25 years) and 60 middle-aged (35-40 years) adults, whose highest level of education had been either secondary, technical or university. Subjects were individually administered a 12 item test similar to Raven's Progressive Matrices, and were…

  4. Louisiana Educational Assessment Program (LEAP): A Historical Analysis of Louisiana's High Stakes Testing Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decuir, Erica L.

    2012-01-01

    High stakes testing is popularly examined in educational research, but contemporary analyses tend to reflect a qualitative or quantitative research design (e.g., Au, 2007; Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 2006; Gamble, 2010). Exhaustive debate over the relative success or failure of high stakes testing is often framed between competing visions of…

  5. Instructional Topics in Educational Measurement (ITEMS) Module: Using Automated Processes to Generate Test Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis

    2013-01-01

    Changes to the design and development of our educational assessments are resulting in the unprecedented demand for a large and continuous supply of content-specific test items. One way to address this growing demand is with automatic item generation (AIG). AIG is the process of using item models to generate test items with the aid of computer…

  6. A Method for Generating Educational Test Items That Are Aligned to the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis; Hogan, James B.; Matovinovic, Donna

    2015-01-01

    The demand for test items far outstrips the current supply. This increased demand can be attributed, in part, to the transition to computerized testing, but, it is also linked to dramatic changes in how 21st century educational assessments are designed and administered. One way to address this growing demand is with automatic item generation.…

  7. Competition in the Sandbox: A Test of the Effects of Preschool Competition on Educational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Gary T.; Gordon, Craig S.

    2006-01-01

    The emergence of publicly subsidized preschool raises important policy questions about the role of market forces and, in places where competition to provide these services exists, presents a setting in which the effects of competition on educational outcomes can be tested. We test neo-institutional hypotheses concerning the effects of competition…

  8. Development and operation of a mobile test facility for education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher T.

    The automotive industry saw a large shift towards vehicle electrification after the turn of the century. It became necessary to ensure that new and existing engineers were qualified to design and calibrate these new systems. To ensure this training, Michigan Tech received a grant to develop a curriculum based around vehicle electrification. As part of this agenda, the Michigan Tech Mobile Laboratory was developed to provide hands-on training for professional engineers and technicians in hybrid electric vehicles and vehicle electrification. The Mobile Lab has since then increased the scope of the delivered curriculum to include other automotive areas and even customizable course content to meet specific needs. This thesis outlines the development of the Mobile Laboratory and its powertrain test facilities. The focus of this thesis is to discuss the different hardware and software systems within the lab and test cells. Detailed instructions on the operation and maintenance of each of the systems are discussed. In addition, this thesis outlines the setup and operation of the necessary equipment for several of the experiments for the on and off campus courses and seminars.

  9. Qualitative analysis of the Clock Drawing Test by educational level and cognitive profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Teixeira Fabricio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of a qualitative scale for the Clock Drawing Test (CDT may add information about the pattern of errors committed. Objective: To translate and adapt the Modified Qualitative Error Analysis of Rouleau into Brazilian Portuguese and to examine the pattern of errors according to educational level and cognitive profile. Method: 180 adults (47-82 years completed the CDT. Participants were stratified into age and educational levels and separated between those with and without changes in cognitive screening tests (Mini-Mental State Examination, Verbal Fluency. Results: No significant differences were found in CDT scores among age groups. Among participants without cognitive impairment, those with lower education often presented graphic difficulties, conceptual deficits and spatial deficits. Participants with cognitive deficits, demonstrated more frequently conceptual and spatial errors. Conclusion: The qualitative analysis of the CDT may contribute to the identification of cognitive changes. Education level has to be taken into consideration during the analysis.

  10. AN AUTOMATIC TEST ENVIRONMENT FOR MICROELECTRONICS EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Sandoval-Ibarra

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available An automatic test environment (ATE based on a PSoC has been developed to perform electricalcharacterization of integrated circuits (ICs. The ICs are designed for academic and research purposesas part of the Electronic Design graduate program at CINVESTAV-Guadalajara Unit; these ICs aremanufactured in standard N-well, 5-V, 1.5μm/0.5μm CMOS technologies. The ATE offers programmablecapabilities to develop master-slave architectures, memory for data storage, functions generator tostimulate circuits and systems, current/voltage sources for several purposes, current-voltagemeasurements, and ports to download experimental data to a PC. To date, several ICs have been testedwith the help of the ATE. In this paper, however, examples based on MOS Transistors only arepresented in order to describe the ATE performance and also to show how experimental data of thedevices under characterization were validated through SPICE simulations, experimental data given bymanufacturers, and using commercial equipment as well.

  11. The Effects of Testing Circumstance and Education Level on MMPI-2 Correction Scale Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Report The Effects of Testing Circumstance and Education Level on MMPI - 2 Correction Scale Scores DOT/FAA/AM-10/3 Office of Aerospace Medicine Washington...Education Level on MMPI - 2 Correction Scale Scores 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) 8. Performing Organization Report No...Inventory- 2 ( MMPI - 2 ) is used by the Federal Aviation Administration to assess psychopathology in air traffic control specialist applicants after a

  12. The achievement impact of the inclusion model on the standardized test scores of general education students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett-Rainey, Syrena

    The purpose of this study was to compare the achievement of general education students within regular education classes to the achievement of general education students in inclusion/co-teach classes to determine whether there was a significant difference in the achievement between the two groups. The school district's inclusion/co-teach model included ongoing professional development support for teachers and administrators. General education teachers, special education teachers, and teacher assistants collaborated to develop instructional strategies to provide additional remediation to help students to acquire the skills needed to master course content. This quantitative study reviewed the end-of course test (EoCT) scores of Grade 10 physical science and math students within an urban school district. It is not known whether general education students in an inclusive/co-teach science or math course will demonstrate a higher achievement on the EoCT in math or science than students not in an inclusive/co-teach classroom setting. In addition, this study sought to determine if students classified as low socioeconomic status benefited from participating in co-teaching classrooms as evidenced by standardized tests. Inferential statistics were used to determine whether there was a significant difference between the achievements of the treatment group (inclusion/co-teach) and the control group (non-inclusion/co-teach). The findings can be used to provide school districts with optional instructional strategies to implement in the diverse classroom setting in the modern classroom to increase academic performance on state standardized tests.

  13. Testing and Diversity in Postsecondary Education: The Case of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Koretz

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The past several years have seen numerous efforts to scale back or eliminate affirmative action in postsecondary admissions. In response, policymakers and postsecondary institutions in many states are searching for ways to maintain the diversity of student populations without resorting to a prohibited focus on race. In response to these changes, this study used data from California and a simplified model of the University of California admissions process to explore how various approaches to admissions affect the diversity of the admitted student population. "Race-neutral" admissions based solely on test scores and grades were compared with the results of actual admissions before and after the elimination of affirmative action. A final set of analyses explored the effects on diversity of alternative approaches that take into account factors other than grades and scores, but not race or ethnicity. Replacing the former admissions process that included preferences with a race-neutral model based solely on GPA and SAT-I scores substantially reduced minority representation at the two most selective UC campuses but had much smaller effects at the other six, less selective campuses. SAT-I scores contributed to but were not the sole cause of the underrepresentation of African American and Hispanic students. A race-neutral model based solely on GPA also produced an underrepresentation of minorities, albeit a less severe one. None of the alternative admissions models analyzed could replicate the composition of the student population that was in place before the termination of affirmative action in California. The only approach that substantially increased the representation of minority students was accepting most students on the basis of within-school rather than statewide rankings, and this approach caused a sizable drop in both the average SAT scores and the average GPA of admitted applicants, particularly among African American and Hispanic students

  14. Evaluating the relationship between education level and cognitive impairment with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancar Demir, Esra; Özcan, Tuba

    2015-09-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is defined as 'a cognitive decline greater than that expected for an individual's age and education level but that does not interfere notably with activities of daily life'. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is a screening test for MCI. We investigated the performance of the Turkish version of the MoCA in detecting MCI among elderly persons in a rural area, the majority of whom have a low level of education. We evaluated 50 consecutive men referred from an outpatient clinic. Educational level was divided into three categories: group 1, less than primary (5 years). We evaluated the effect of education on MoCA scores and compared subjects' test performance among the different categories of education level. A total of 50 male patients with MCI (mean age: 70.74 ± 7.87) met the inclusion criteria. There were no differences in the total scores based on education or in the subscores for visuospatial/executive function, naming, attention, abstraction and delayed recall. Language was the only domain that showed significant differences between the groups. In post-hoc analysis, differences were found between groups 1 and 3 and between groups 1 and 2. Group 1 had significantly lower scores for language. The repeat subscore for language was significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2. In fluency, there were significant differences between groups 2 and 3 and between group 1 and 3. To our knowledge, this is the first study to analyze the applicability of the Turkish version of MoCA in populations with little education. Our results emphasize the need to adapt the language sections of this test, so it can be easily used in populations with low education levels. © 2014 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2014 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  15. Several neuropsychological tests to assist dementia diagnosis in low education elderly population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-hao Zhao; Zhen-xin Zhang; Xia Hong; Jue-Bing Huang; ling Wei

    2000-01-01

    Objective: ScnsitMty and specificity of several psychometric tests were evaluated to provide practical instruments tor dementia diagnosis in low educational population. Method: A total of 3244 residents aged 55 ycars and over were drawn through a stratified multiple cluster sampling, 62 percent were illiterate or have elementary education. Door to door screening to all participants were conducted in phase 1 using Chinese version of Mini-Mental State Examination (CMMSE), then followed up and identified dementia through a set of diagnostic examination in phase Il . Cases were ascertained by DSM-Ⅳ criteria for dementia. 457 subjects1 had competed more than one of these psychometric tests, including Fuld Object-Memory Evaluation (FOM), Rapid Verbal Retreve(RVR), Block Design (BD), and Digit Span (DS). 145 cases were divided into 3 subgroup, illiterate group (48.28%), elementary education group (26.2 l%), and high education group (25.54%). Result: Specificity of FOM and RVR were more than 94% in all groups while Sensitivity were between 52-78%. Specificity of BD and DS were between 72-85% and 78-98% respectively. Specificity of BD and DS have tendency to increasing while sensitivity of BD and DS declined obviously with increasing of educationievel. Specificity of series test was more than 97% except for BD and DS. Conclusion: Sensitivity and specificity of FOM amd RVR were good in different education group. BD and DS were good in low educational group. So the four psychometric tests were suitable instruments tor low education level population in our country.

  16. Peer effects in early childhood education: testing the assumptions of special-education inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M; Logan, Jessica A R; Lin, Tzu-Jung; Kaderavek, Joan N

    2014-09-01

    There has been a push in recent years for students with disabilities to be educated alongside their typically developing peers, a practice called inclusion. In this study, we sought to determine whether peer effects operate within early-childhood special-education (ECSE) classrooms in which preschoolers with disabilities are educated alongside typical peers. Peer effects specific to language growth were assessed for 670 preschoolers (mean age = 52 months) in 83 ECSE classrooms; 55% of the children had disabilities. We found that the average language skills of classmates, as assessed in the fall of the year, significantly predicted children's language skills in the spring (after controlling for their relative skill level in the fall); in addition, there was a significant interactive effect of disability status (i.e., the presence or absence of a disability) and peers' language skills. Peer effects were the least consequential for children without disabilities whose classmates had relatively strong language skills, and the most consequential for children with disabilities whose classmates had relatively poor language skills. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. ANALYSIS AND QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR RESULTS OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS APPLICATION BY MEANS OF DIAGNOSTIC TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Kon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The problem actuality for creation, control and estimation of results for competence-oriented educational programs is formulated and proved. Competences elements and components, assembled in modules, course units and parts of educational program, are defined as objects of control. Specific tasks of proficiency examination for competences and their components are stated; subject matter of the paper is formulated. Methods of Research. Some adapted statements and methods of technical science are offered to be applied for control tasks solution, decoding and estimation of education results. The approach to quantitative estimation of testing results with the use of additive integrated differential criterion of estimation is offered. Main Results. Statements, defining conditions of certain and uncertain (indeterminacy decision-making about proficiency examination for elements of discipline components controlled by test according to test realization results, are formulated and proved. Probabilistic characteristicsof both decision-making variants are estimated. Variants of determinate and fuzzy logic mathematic methods application for decreasing decision-making indeterminancy are offered; further research direction is selected for development of methods and algorithms for results decoding of diagnostic tests set realization. Practical Relevance. It is shown, that proposed approach to quantitative estimation of testing results will give the possibility to automate the procedure of formation and analysis for education results, specified in the competence format.

  18. Ethnicity, educational level and attitudes contribute to parental intentions about genetic testing for child obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocken, Paul L; Theunissen, Meinou H C; Schönbeck, Yvonne; Henneman, Lidewij; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Detmar, Symone B

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess parental beliefs and intentions about genetic testing for their children in a multi-ethnic population with the aim of acquiring information to guide interventions for obesity prevention and management. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in parents of native Dutch children and children from a large minority population (Turks) selected from Youth Health Care registries. The age range of the children was 5-11 years. Parents with lower levels of education and parents of non-native children were more convinced that overweight has a genetic cause and their intentions to test the genetic predisposition of their child to overweight were firmer. A firmer intention to test the child was associated with the parents' perceptions of their child's susceptibility to being overweight, a positive attitude towards genetic testing, and anticipated regret at not having the child tested while at risk for overweight. Interaction effects were found in ethnic and socio-economic groups. Ethnicity and educational level play a role in parental beliefs about child overweight and genetic testing. Education programmes about obesity risk, genetic testing and the importance of behaviour change should be tailored to the cultural and behavioural factors relevant to ethnic and socio-economic target groups.

  19. Policy Studies: Teacher Competency Assessment and R&D Needs in Educational Testing and Evaluation. Research into Practice Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Eva; Herman, Joan

    This report summarizes the results of two educational policy studies: (1) an analysis of current problems in teacher competency testing; and (2) an exploration of educational testing and evaluation research and development needs. In the first study, information on teacher competency testing was gathered from a literature review and meetings with…

  20. A mathematical simulation approach to testing innovative models of dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Marc; Kruger, Estie

    2010-03-01

    A combination of the increasing costs associated with providing a complex clinical program and an ever-reducing education-based income finds dental schools throughout Australia continuing to face serious financial risk. Even more important is the growing workforce crisis in academic staffing faced in almost all dental schools as the impact of the widening gap between private practice incomes and academic remuneration takes effect. This study developed a model of core variables and their relationship that was then transformed into a mathematical simulation tool that can be applied to test various scenarios and variable changes. The simulation model was tested against a theoretical dental education arrangement and found that this arrangement was a commercially viable pathway for new providers to enter the dental education market. This type of mathematical simulation approach is an important technique for analysis of the complex financial and operational management of modern dental schools.

  1. [The importance of test control for the post-graduate education in clinical rhinology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosulia, E V; Kim, I A; Kosiakov, S Ia; Piskunov, G Z; Vinnikov, A K

    2014-01-01

    This publication deals with the problems pertaining to the improvement of the system of the post-graduate education in otorhinolaryngology with special reference to one of its topical fields, clinical rhinology. The authors emphasize the importance of one of the principal components of the post-graduate education under the present-day conditions, namely organization of control and self-control of learning the new material, self-monitoring and individual correction of the level of knowledge. Special attention is given to the training tests that can be used to adequately simulate the decision-making process with respect to a concrete clinical situation. It is concluded that the systematic application of test control is one of the most important prerequisites for the enhancement of the effectiveness of the post-graduate education in clinical otorhinolaryngology.

  2. Intraindividual neuropsychological test variability in healthy individuals with high average intelligence and educational attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyanka, Daniel J; Holster, Jessica L; Golden, Charles J

    2013-08-01

    Knowledge of patterns of neuropsychological performance among normal, healthy individuals is integral to the practice of clinical neuropsychology, because clinicians may not always account for intraindividual variability (IIV) before coming to diagnostic conclusions. The IIV was assessed among a sample of 46 healthy individuals with high average intelligence and educational attainment, utilizing a battery of neuropsychological tests, including the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Memory Scale, Fourth Edition (WMS-IV). The data indicated substantial variability in neurocognitive abilities. All participants were found to demonstrate scores considered impaired by at least 2 standard deviations (SDs). Despite adjusting for outliers, no participant produced a "normal" testing profile with an intraindividual maximum discrepancy (MD) of less than 1 SD in either direction. When WAIS-IV Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) was considered, participants generally demonstrated cognitive test scores ranging from 2 SDs less than to 1.5 SDs greater than their FSIQ. Furthermore, after demographic corrections, the majority (59%) of participants demonstrated at least 1 impaired cognitive test score, as defined by being 1 to 1.5 SDs below the mean. Overall, results substantiate the need for clinicians to consider FSIQ and educational attainment in interpretation of neuropsychological testing results, given the relevant commonality of "abnormal" test scores within this population. This may ultimately reduce the likelihood of making false-positive conclusions of impairment when educational attainment and intelligence are high, thus improving diagnostic accuracy.

  3. Quality of Education Outcomes: The Role of the Graduate Management Admission Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamala, Robert; Buyinza, Mukadasi

    2013-01-01

    Although the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is considered by leading business institutions worldwide as a predictor of success in graduate programs, an issue of contention is whether the introduction of the examination enhances the quality of education outcomes. This study sought to obtain an understanding of this issue, focusing on…

  4. The Development and Testing of an Evaluation Model for Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Lyndon Limuel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a model which addresses special education program evaluation needs. As such, the focus was on development. Often development and research are seen as one (e.g., Department of R&D; Director of R&D). They are, however distinctively different in process and product. The model developed provides…

  5. Assessing Student Performance in Distance Education Courses: Implications for Testing Accommodations for Students with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Manju; Brinckerhoff, Loring C.

    2002-01-01

    This article highlights some of the defining characteristics of distance education courses and their impact on traditional assessment practices for instructors and students, including those with learning disabilities. Factors that instructors need to consider for dealing with test accommodations for students with learning disabilities are…

  6. Inequality of Higher Education in China: An Empirical Test Based on the Perspective of Relative Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Liming

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to examine what makes Chinese college students dissatisfied with entrance opportunities for higher education. Based on the author's survey data, we test two parameters which could be a potential cause of this dissatisfaction: 1) distributive inequality, which emphasizes the individual's dissatisfaction caused by…

  7. Critical Perspectives on Testing Teaching: Reframing Teacher Education for English Medium Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Da-Fu; Singh, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The investigation reported here provides a basis for considering the role of corrective and transformative critiques in producing knowledge through testing teaching for reframing teacher education in response to, and as an expression of, the globalisation of English. This knowledge-producing approach to critique begins with a literature review of…

  8. Bibliography of Educational and Psychological Tests and Measurements. Bulletin, 1923, No. 55

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Margaret, Comp.; MacLatchy, Josephine, Comp.

    1924-01-01

    The bibliography presented in this bulletin purports to cover the printed material issued in this country concerning intelligence and educational tests during the period from January 1, 1918 to June 30, 1922. It has been the purpose of the compilers to make the bibliography as useful to students and to practical school people as possible. To that…

  9. Teachers' Preferences for Educational Planning: Dynamic Testing, Teaching Experience and Teachers' Sense of Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosma, Tirza; Hessels, Marco G. P.; Resing, Wilma C. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study surveyed a sample of 188 elementary teachers with respect to their preference for information regarding educational planning, in particular information captured with dynamic testing procedures. The influence of teachers' experience and sense of efficacy on teachers' preferences was also investigated. Results indicated teachers'…

  10. A Dataset of Three Educational Technology Experiments on Differentiation, Formative Testing and Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haelermans, Carla; Ghysels, Joris; Prince, Fernao

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a dataset with data from three individually randomized educational technology experiments on differentiation, formative testing and feedback during one school year for a group of 8th grade students in the Netherlands, using administrative data and the online motivation questionnaire of Boekaerts. The dataset consists of pre-…

  11. A Test-Retest Analysis of the Vanderbilt Assessment for Leadership in Education in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Elizabeth Covay; Porter, Andrew C.; Murphy, Joseph; Goldring, Ellen; Elliott, Stephen N.

    2017-01-01

    The Vanderbilt Assessment for Leadership in Education (VAL-ED) is a 360-degree learning-centered behaviors principal evaluation tool that includes ratings from the principal, supervisors, and teachers. The current study assesses the test-retest reliability of the VAL-ED for a sample of seven school districts as part of multiple validity and…

  12. Mixed parents, mixed results : Testing the effects of cross-nativity partnership on children's educational attainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonds, Viktor; van Tubergen, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we have used panel data from the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Survey (N = 3,337) to test several mechanisms (English proficiency, friends with native parents, parental socioeconomic status [SES], educational attitudes, bilingualism, and family stability) by which mixed

  13. The role of Rasch analysis when conducting science education research utilizing multiple-choice tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, William J.; Scantlebury, Kathryn

    2006-03-01

    Recent international studies note that countries whose students perform well on international science assessments report the need to change science education. Some countries use assessments for diagnostic purposes to assist teachers in addressing their students' needs. However, in the United States, standards-based reform has focused the national discussion on documenting students' attainment of high educational standards. Students' science achievement is one of those standards, and in many states, high-stakes tests determine the resultant achievement measures. Policymakers and administrators use those tests to rank school performance, to prevent students' graduation, and to evaluate teachers. With science test measures used in different ways, statistical confidence in the measures' validity and reliability is essential. Using a science achievement test from one state's systemic reform project as an example, this paper discusses the strengths of the Rasch model as a psychometric tool and analysis technique, referring to person item maps, anchoring, differential item functioning, and person item fit. Furthermore, the paper proposes that science educators should carefully inspect the tools they use to measure and document changes in educational systems.

  14. Moving beyond Test-Prep Pedagogy: Dialoguing with Multicultural Preservice Teachers for a Quality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Louie F.

    2013-01-01

    In a "post-NCLB era," the schooling experiences of mostly low-income students of color continue to be consumed by a test-prep pedagogy--narrowed curriculum, low expectations, and ignored relationships. In this article the author describes a pedagogical approach using educational dialogues to engage preservice teachers to critically…

  15. Empirical Test of the Know, See, Plan, Do Model for Curriculum Design in Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Beth Ann; Allen, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    This research assesses the Know, See, Plan, portions of the Know, See, Plan, Do (KSPD) model for curriculum design in leadership education. There were 3 graduate student groups, each taught using 1 of 3 different curriculum designs (KSPD and 2 control groups). Based on a pretest, post-test design, students' performance was measured to assess their…

  16. Community Mental Health Service Providers' Codes of Ethics and the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacc, Nicholas A.; Juhnke, Gerald A.; Nilsen, Keith A.

    2001-01-01

    Compares the codes of ethics of 13 professional organizations for community mental health service providers. Results suggest that only two of the codes of ethics address many of the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing." Provides implications and recommendations for professional organizations. (Contains 20 references and…

  17. The Impact of Digital Skills on Educational Outcomes: Evidence from Performance Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Laura; Argentin, Gianluca; Gui, Marco; Stanca, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Digital skills are increasingly important for labour market outcomes and social participation. Do they also matter for academic performance? This paper investigates the effects of digital literacy on educational outcomes by merging data from the Italian National Assessment in secondary schools with an original data-set on performance tests of…

  18. Reactions to the Implicit Association Test as an Educational Tool: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillard, Amy L.; Ryan, Carey S.; Gervais, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    We examined reactions to the Race Implicit Association Test (IAT), which has been widely used but rarely examined as an educational tool to raise awareness about racial bias. College students (N = 172) were assigned to read that the IAT reflected either personal beliefs or both personal and extrapersonal factors (single vs. multiple explanation…

  19. Lawyers and Courts as Architects of Educational Policy: The Case of Minimal Competence Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Jon E.; Glass, Gene V.

    1979-01-01

    The authors critique legal arguments which have been used by attorneys, especially Merle S. McClung of the Center for Law and Education, in opposing minimum competency testing programs in the schools. The arguments mainly concern the 14th Amendment, racial discrimination, and the denial of due process. (SJL)

  20. USING COMPUTER-BASED TESTING AS ALTERNATIVE ASSESSMENT METHOD OF STUDENT LEARNING IN DISTANCE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia SAPRIATI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the use of computer-based testing in distance education, based on the experience of Universitas Terbuka (UT, Indonesia. Computer-based testing has been developed at UT for reasons of meeting the specific needs of distance students as the following: Ø students’ inability to sit for the scheduled test, Ø conflicting test schedules, and Ø students’ flexibility to take examination to improve their grades. In 2004, UT initiated a pilot project in the development of system and program for computer-based testing method. Then in 2005 and 2006 tryouts in the use of computer-based testing methods were conducted in 7 Regional Offices that were considered as having sufficient supporting recourses. The results of the tryouts revealed that students were enthusiastic in taking computer-based tests and they expected that the test method would be provided by UT as alternative to the traditional paper and pencil test method. UT then implemented computer-based testing method in 6 and 12 Regional Offices in 2007 and 2008 respectively. The computer-based testing was administered in the city of the designated Regional Office and was supervised by the Regional Office staff. The development of the computer-based testing was initiated with conducting tests using computers in networked configuration. The system has been continually improved, and it currently uses devices linked to the internet or the World Wide Web. The construction of the test involves the generation and selection of the test items from the item bank collection of the UT Examination Center. Thus the combination of the selected items compromises the test specification. Currently UT has offered 250 courses involving the use of computer-based testing. Students expect that more courses are offered with computer-based testing in Regional Offices within easy access by students.

  1. Educational attainment and health transitions over the life course: testing the potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elovainio, Marko; Rosenström, Tom; Hakulinen, Christian; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Mullola, Sari; Jokela, Markus; Josefsson, Kim; Raitakari, Olli T; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown that higher education associates with health outcomes, but the less is known about the specific mechanisms mediating this association. We examined whether higher education would associate with long-term health transitions from childhood to adulthood and whether health behaviors, self-esteem, social support and work-related health hazards could mediate or confound this association. The participants were from a population-based sample of 3596 men and women from the Young Finns study aged 3-18 years at the beginning of the study in 1980, and who responded to repeated surveys of educational attainment and self-rated health in four study phases from 1997 to 2012. The associations were tested using multistate Markov models for the health-state transition intensities. Our results suggested that a 1-year difference in education was related to a 16% higher transition probability from mediocre to good self-rated health over the 5-year follow-up. Depressive symptoms and job strain seemed to partly mediate or confound the association, but self-esteem and social support did not. These results suggest that educational attainment is associated with good self-rated health transitions from childhood to adulthood, and multiple processes rather than a single underlying mechanism are likely to drive the educational differences in self-rated health. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The Relationship between Education and Foreign Direct Investment: Testing the Inverse U Shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Seref Akin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Zhang-Markusen (ZM theory hypothesizes an inverse U-shaped relationship between human capital and foreign direct investment (FDI. Therefore, low wage countries with low human capital cannot attract FDI. To test this hypothesis, we regress FDI on educational levels across countries while grouping them in different income cohorts. Our findings partly support ZM. Rich countries with high human capital and poor countries with low human capital demonstrate an inverse correlation between FDI and human capital proxies. However, for middle-income and upper middle-income countries, human capital (especially tertiary education has a positive relationship with FDI.

  3. The Relationship between Education and Foreign Direct Investment: Testing the Inverse U Shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Seref Akin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Zhang-Markusen (ZM theory hypothesizes an inverse U-shaped relationship between human capital and foreign direct investment (FDI. Therefore, low wage countries with low human capital cannot attract FDI. To test this hypothesis, we regress FDI on educational levels across countries while grouping them in different income cohorts. Our findings partly support ZM. Rich countries with high human capital and poor countries with low human capital demonstrate an inverse correlation between FDI and human capital proxies. However, for middle-income and upper middle-income countries, human capital (especially tertiary education has a positive relationship with FDI.

  4. Reference data for the Ruff Figural Fluency Test stratified by age and educational level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerbrand J Izaks

    Full Text Available The Ruff Figural Fluency Test (RFFT was developed to avoid the difficulties that were encountered in earlier tests of figural fluency. Although the test characteristics of the RFFT seem to be good and it is a valuable addition to neuropsychological assessments, reference data are still scarce. To this aim, we required 2,404 community dwelling persons in Groningen, The Netherlands to perform the RFFT. All 1,651 persons with a complete RFFT and known educational level formed the reference sample. Their age ranged from 35 to 82 years and their educational level from primary school to university grade. Ninety-six percent of the persons were of Western European descent. All tests were analyzed by two independent examiners and subsequently three measures were calculated: number of unique designs, number of perseverative errors and error ratio. The main finding was that performance on the RFFT was dependent on age and educational level. This was not only observed in older persons but also in young and middle-aged persons. Reference data for the three RFFT measures are presented in groups of five years of age ranging from 35-39 years to 75 years or older.

  5. Effectiveness of web-based teaching modules: test-enhanced learning in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Tate H; Hannum, Wallace H; Koroluk, Lorne; Proffit, William R

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effectiveness of self-tests as a component of web-based self-instruction in predoctoral orthodontics and pediatric dentistry. To this end, the usage patterns of online teaching modules and self-tests by students enrolled in three courses at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Dentistry were monitored and correlated to final exam grade and course average. We recorded the frequency of access to thirty relevant teaching modules and twenty-nine relevant self-tests for 157 second- and third-year D.D.S. students during the course of our data collection. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between frequency of accessing self-tests and course performance in one course that was totally based on self-instruction with seminars and multiple-choice examination (Level IV): Spearman correlation between frequency of self-test access and final exam grade, rho=0.23, p=0.044; correlation between frequency of self-test access and course average: rho=0.39, p=0.0004. In the other two courses we monitored, which included content beyond self-instruction with self-tests, the correlations were positive but not statistically significant. The students' use of online learning resources varied significantly from one course (Level I) to the next (Level II): Wilcoxon matched pairs signed-rank tests, S=-515.5, p=.0057 and S=1086, pweb-based self-tests may be correlated with more effective learning in predoctoral dental education by virtue of the testing effect and that dental students' usage of resources for learning changes significantly over the course of their education.

  6. What Is the Role and Importance of the Revised AERA, APA, NCME "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plake, Barbara S.; Wise, Lauress L.

    2014-01-01

    With the 2014 publication of the 5th revision of the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing," the cochairs of the Joint Committee for the revision process were asked to consider the role and importance of the "Standards" for the educational testing community, and in particular for members of the National Council…

  7. NEUROPSI: a brief neuropsychological test battery in Spanish with norms by age and educational level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrosky-Solís, F; Ardila, A; Rosselli, M

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop, standardize, and test the reliability of a short neuropsychological test battery in the Spanish language. This neuropsychological battery was named "NEUROPSI," and was developed to assess briefly a wide spectrum of cognitive functions, including orientation, attention, memory, language, visuoperceptual abilities, and executive functions. The NEUROPSI includes items that are relevant for Spanish-speaking communities. It can be applied to illiterates and low educational groups. Administration time is 25 to 30 min. Normative data were collected from 800 monolingual Spanish-speaking individuals, ages 16 to 85 years. Four age groups were used: (1) 16 to 30 years, (2) 31 to 50 years, (3) 51 to 65 years, and (4) 66 to 85 years. Data also are analyzed and presented within 4 different educational levels that were represented in this sample; (1) illiterates (zero years of school); (2) 1 to 4 years of school; (2) 5 to 9 years of school; and (3) 10 or more years of formal education. The effects of age and education, as well as the factor structure of the NEUROPSI are analyzed. The NEUROPSI may fulfill the need for brief, reliable, and objective evaluation of a broad range of cognitive functions in Spanish-speaking populations.

  8. Introduction of Pack Test for Participative Environmental Monitoring and Environmental Education for Sustainability in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faiz Bin Abd Rahman

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pack Test which provided by Kyoritsu Chemical-Check Lab. Corporation has been assumed as a professional easy-to-use onsite water quality checker. The aim of this study is to examine the possibility of application of Pack Test in Malaysia, and to assess the required matters during introduction processes. Two workshops were sampled to prove the potential function of Pack Test in environmental education and participative environmental monitoring. Two hours lecture of Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM was facilitated as a workshop by author on September 23, 2010, and then the author has assisted a workshop in Putrajaya on October 9, 2010. Questionnaire forms were applied to test as if peoples feeling are positive or not towards Pack Test as preliminary research. Water quality parameters were simultaneously measured by Pack Test, such as, COD, NO3-, CI-, and NH4+ in UTM, pH and NO3- were measured in Putrajaya workshop, respectively. Participant�s feeling in the both workshops showed strong positive potential for Pack Test. Results of water qualities from UTM workshop had big variation in COD and NO3-. Considering the reason, the UTM workshop was conducted without proper support for both facilitator and participant. Participants were able to classify the water quality level in a short time. As for the Putrajaya workshop, with deep support and well skilled instruction by facilitator team, the data showed small variation i.e. good and consistent water quality result. It was obvious that Pack Test was always applicable to assess water environment and it was well functioned as user friendly easy-to-use water quality checker. Thereby the role of Pack Test was segregated from conventional standard methods. The participant�s feeling to Pack Test was strong positive for implementation and to improve public environmental awareness. Simultaneously, they were feeling that peoples can participate more effectively in water environment issues by Pack Test. It

  9. An educational activity for middle school teachers: analysis of Invalsi mathematics tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Martignone

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available  This paper shows how the analysis of items of Italian national standardized mathematics tests (Invalsi can become a means to develop teacher education programs for mathematics middle school teachers. Through the comparison among peers and the teacher educator, the teachers can develop new lenses to look at the Invalsi mathematics tests using interpretative tools from research in mathematics education. In particular, in the educational activities that will be described, the teachers share a structured approach in the development of an a priori analysis of mathematics problems that takes into account institutional, epistemological, cognitive, and didactic aspects. These educational activities foster the development and sharing of knowledge and skills that can be identified as specialized knowledge for teaching. Un’attività di formazione per insegnanti di scuola secondaria di primo grado: analisi di prove Invalsi di matematicaQuesto articolo mostra come l’analisi di quesiti delle prove Invalsi di matematica possa diventare un mezzo per sviluppare attività di formazione per insegnanti di matematica di scuola secondaria di primo grado. Attraverso il confronto tra pari e con il docente formatore, gli insegnanti possono acquisire nuove chiavi di lettura delle prove Invalsi di matematica facendo propri alcuni strumenti interpretativi e di analisi provenienti dalla ricerca in didattica della matematica. In particolare, nelle attività di formazione che saranno descritte, gli insegnanti condividono un approccio strutturato nello sviluppo di un’analisi a priori di quesiti di matematica che tiene conto dell’intreccio di aspetti istituzionali, epistemologici, cognitivi e didattici. Queste attività di formazione hanno favorito lo sviluppo e la condivisione di conoscenze e abilità che possono essere identificate come conoscenze specialistiche per l’insegnamento.

  10. [Usefulness of ubiquitous-based testing for evaluations in medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh Young; Rhee, Sang Youl; Choi, Joong Myung; Kim, Young Seol

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability (convenience, objectiveness, and satisfaction) of ubiquitous-based testing (UBT) as a medical education evaluation tool. UBT was administered using a smart pad in our medical school in May 2012. A questionnaire was given twice. The pre-UBT questionnaire examined possession of a tablet computer, skillfulness of smart devices, the convenience of UBT, and the usefulness of a medical educational assessment tool. The post-UBT questionnaire evaluated the satisfaction, convenience, and preference of UBT and the usefulness of a medical educational assessment tool, as in the pre-UBT test. The survey was measured on a 4-point scale: 1 is "strongly disagree" and 4 is "strongly agree." One hundred three students (male, 55.3%) participated in the UBT. The mean age was 29.2±2.4 years. In the pre-UBT questionnaire analysis, students responded affirmatively to the items about the skillfulness of smart devices, clinical skill assessment, and achievement of educational objectives. The responses to the items on the convenience and satisfaction with the UBT were positive in the post-UBT. The factors that affected the post-UBT questionnaire were as follows: knowledge assessment (p=0.041) and achievement of educational objectives (p=0.015) were significant, based on gender, and satisfaction with the UBT (p=0.002) was significant, based on possession of a tablet computer. The relationship between the ranks of this UBT and the average ranks of the three previous semesters was statistically significant (p<0.001). Convenience, objectiveness, knowledge assessment, and composition and completion were useful items in the UBT.

  11. Options in Education, Transcript for November 10, 1975: College Enrollment, Standardized Testing, Hyperactive School Children, Sex Discrimination in Education, Telephone Installation, and Adult Functional Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    "Options in Education" is a radio news program which focuses on issues and developments in education. This transcript of the show contains discussions of college enrollment; standardized testing; hyperactivity in school children, the drugs given to these children, and the biochemical effects of artificial flavors and colors on…

  12. Effectiveness of a computer based medication calculation education and testing programme for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Karen; Burston, Sarah; Wallis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of an on-line, medication calculation education and testing programme. The outcome measures were medication calculation proficiency and self efficacy. This quasi-experimental study involved the administration of questionnaires before and after nurses completed annual medication calculation testing. The study was conducted in two hospitals in south-east Queensland, Australia, which provide a variety of clinical services including obstetrics, paediatrics, ambulatory, mental health, acute and critical care and community services. Participants were registered nurses (RNs) and enrolled nurses with a medication endorsement (EN(Med)) working as clinicians (n=107). Data pertaining to success rate, number of test attempts, self-efficacy, medication calculation error rates and nurses' satisfaction with the programme were collected. Medication calculation scores at first test attempt showed improvement following one year of access to the programme. Two of the self-efficacy subscales improved over time and nurses reported satisfaction with the online programme. Results of this study may facilitate the continuation and expansion of medication calculation and administration education to improve nursing knowledge, inform practise and directly improve patient safety.

  13. The TMA-93: A New Memory Test for Alzheimer's Disease in Illiterate and Less Educated People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillet, Didier; Narme, Pauline; Amieva, Hélène; Matharan, Fanny; Bailon, Olivier; Clésiau, Hervé Le; Belin, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed at validating the Memory Associative Test of the district of Seine-Saint-Denis (TMA)-93, a new test of episodic memory. The TMA-93 was proposed to mostly less educated and multicultural elderly population composed of 376 healthy controls (HC) and 94 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The construct validity was checked by studying correlations with a widely used memory test (the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test [FCSRT]) in the subsample of literate patients. Results showed that (i) all the TMA-93 scores of the patients with AD were lower than those of the HC, (ii) the TMA-93 total score identified patients with AD with a high sensitivity (88%) and very high specificity (97%), and (iii) the TMA-93 total score was strongly correlated with both free recall and total recall scores of the FCSRT. Taken together, results showed that the TMA-93 is a reliable tool to assess episodic memory in a multicultural, less educated, or illiterate population, with good construct validity for AD diagnostic accuracy.

  14. [The "Lector"--a testing method to determine verbal educational level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reischies, F M; Wertenauer, F; Kühl, K-P

    2005-07-01

    Assessment of the educational level is important to prevent false neuropsychological diagnostic decisions. In the German-speaking countries some instruments for this assessment already exist, but there are problems involved in the practical application. There still is no reading test, which is a common standard in international neuropsychological test batteries. The lector investigates how subjects read rare German words or foreign words used in German-speaking countries. Words were selected which are pronounced differently from German pronunciation rules. A subject who does not know the word will pronounce it false, i.e., according to the German pronunciation rule. Norms (percentiles), estimation of reliability, and first data about validity were calculated from three samples with a total of 503 subjects. On the basis of the data presented, the Lector Test can be used as a control variable in research with groups as well as in neuropsychological diagnostics.

  15. Can Intelligence Testing Inform Educational Intervention for Children with Reading Disability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian G. Elliott

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the value of intelligence testing for the purpose of informing us how best to intervene with children with reading disability. While the original function of IQ testing was to ascertain whether a child was capable of profiting from schooling, there are many who now claim that cognitive assessment offers a range of diagnostic and prescriptive functions which can help teachers in delivering effective educational programs. This paper interrogates such assertions in relation to the assessment of IQ, cognitive strengths and weaknesses, executive functions, and the use of dynamic testing/assessment. The paper concludes that current evidence indicates that cognitive measures have limited relevance for instructional planning, and cognitive training programs have yet to show sufficient academic gains. For these reasons, it is recommended that our energies should be directed to the continuing development of powerful forms of academic skills-based instruction operating within a response to intervention framework.

  16. Can script concordance testing be used in nursing education to accurately assess clinical reasoning skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Tyia; Comer, Linda; Kossick, Mark A; Neubrander, Judy

    2014-05-01

    The Script Concordance Test (SCT) has been used successfully in medical schools to assess clinical reasoning in medical students, but it has not been widely used in nursing education. The purpose of this study was to provide additional evidence of the validity and reliability of the SCT in evaluating clinical reasoning in nursing students by replicating a previous study. The test was administered to 48 first-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing students. A scoring grid was developed using the aggregate scores method based on the modal responses of 13 panel members. The reliability of the scores was measured by Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and the scores of the students and the panel were compared using a t test. The difference between the panel's and the students' scores was statistically significant, and the reliability of the scores is high. The SCT provides a reliable, standardized, and easy-to-administer method of evaluating clinical reasoning in nursing students. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Group Differences in Student Performance in the Selection to Higher Education: Tests vs Grades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Wikström

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Student selection in the Swedish admission to higher education system is based on two fundamentally different performance measures: their criterion-referenced upper secondary grade point average (GPA and their score on a norm-referenced and multiple-choice admissions test [Swedish admissions test (SweSAT]. Several student characteristics are known to affect rankings in such assessments. The objectives of this study are to assess main and interactive effects of several variables that influence rankings obtained from these measures in greater detail than previously attempted and assess the findings from a fairness perspective. The data consist of test scores, upper secondary grades, and background information for SweSAT participants aged 19–25 years, who took the test in the autumn of 2011 (N = 23,214 or spring of 2012 (N = 27,075. The data were analyzed through correlation and regression analyses. The results support previous findings that gender, parents’ education, and immigration status are all influential. Males obtain better SweSAT scores than females, while females obtain better GPAs, in accordance with previous findings regarding gender-related variations in rankings provided by similar instruments. Moreover, we found the same pattern in scores for specific components of the test and grades in specific subjects, suggesting that the test and GPA measure different, gender-related, things. In addition, students with an immigrant background seem to be more highly ranked by grades than by the SweSAT, largely due to differences in assessments of their verbal skills.

  18. Psycho Education Program for Prevention of Test Anxiety on 8th Grade Students to Reduce Anxiety and Indecisiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Kaya

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of psycho-education program on reducing the test anxiety and personal indecisiveness. The study was carried out with a group of ten 8th class volunteer students whose test anxiety scores were high. The test anxiety which is one of the study's variables was tested with Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI) that is adapted to Turkish by Öner (1990). Besides, Personal Indecisiveness Scale (PIS) that was developed by Bacanli (2000) was applied. The Psyco-education...

  19. Estimating the Impacts of Educational Interventions Using State Tests or Study-Administered Tests. NCEE 2012-4016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Robert B.; Unlu, Fatih; Price, Cristofer; Jaciw, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    This report examines the differences in impact estimates and standard errors that arise when these are derived using state achievement tests only (as pre-tests and post-tests), study-administered tests only, or some combination of state- and study-administered tests. State tests may yield different evaluation results relative to a test that is…

  20. Single-tone and Polyharmonic Eddy Current Metal Detection and Non-Destructive Testing Education Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svatoš, J.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the design of a measuring chain for polyharmonic metal detectors used for education in laboratory exercises at Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Department of Measurement. The Measuring chain is composed of DDS signal generator, Digitiser and PC with software programmed in Labview. Eddy current principles or more specifically eddy current metal detectors are an important part of nondestructive testing, instrumentations and measurement. A short introduction to the background and principles of eddy current metal detectors are presented. Next part of the article deals with a brief description of the most common methods, as well as, non-traditional polyharmonic methods for eddy current metal detection. The following part contains an implementation of the proposed algorithms in LabVIEW graphical programming language. Finally, the created program for education of eddy current metal detectors and results obtained on the metal detector ATMID are discussed.

  1. Developing a Numerical Ability Test for Students of Education in Jordan: An Application of Item Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Eman Rasmi; Al-Absi, Mohammad Mustafa; Abu shindi, Yousef Abdelqader

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is developing a test to measure the numerical ability for students of education. The sample of the study consisted of (504) students from 8 universities in Jordan. The final draft of the test contains 45 items distributed among 5 dimensions. The results revealed that acceptable psychometric properties of the test;…

  2. Retest Effects in Matrix Test Performance: Differential Impact of Predictors at Different Hierarchy Levels in an Educational Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Philipp Alexander; Holling, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    If tests of cognitive ability are repeatedly taken, test scores rise. Such retest effects have been observed for a long time and for a variety of tasks. This study investigates retest effects on figural matrix items in an educational context. A short term effect is assumed for the direct retest administration in the same test session, and a long…

  3. Usability Testing Analysis on The Bana Game as Education Game Design References on Junior High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Adnan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning media is one of the important elements in the learning process. Technological development support makes learning media more varied. The approach of using digital technology as a learning media has a better and more effective impact than other approaches. In order to increase the students’ learning interest, it requires the support of an interesting learning media. The use of gaming applications as learning media can improve learning outcomes. The benefits of using the maximum application cannot be separated from the determination of application design. The Bana game aims to increase the ability of critical thinking of the junior high school students. The usability-testing analysis on the Bana game application is used in order to get the design reference as an educational game development. The game is used as an object of the analysis because it has the same characteristics and goals with the game application to be developed. Usability Testing is a method used to measure the ease of use of an application by users. The Usability Testing consists of learnability, efficiency, memorability, errors, and satisfaction. The results of the analysis obtained will be used as a reference for educational game applications that will be developed.

  4. Predicting Pre-Service Classroom Teachers' Civil Servant Recruitment Examination's Educational Sciences Test Scores Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Metin

    2015-01-01

    This study predicts the number of correct answers given by pre-service classroom teachers in Civil Servant Recruitment Examination's (CSRE) educational sciences test based on their high school grade point averages, university entrance scores, and grades (mid-term and final exams) from their undergraduate educational courses. This study was…

  5. Rifaximin has a Marginal Impact on Microbial Translocation, T-cell Activation and Inflammation in HIV-Positive Immune Non-responders to Antiretroviral Therapy – ACTG A5286

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Allan R.; Chan, Ellen S.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Macatangay, Bernard J. C.; Read, Sarah W.; Yesmin, Suria; Taiwo, Babafemi; Margolis, David M.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Landay, Alan L.; Wilson, Cara C.; Mellors, John W.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Rodriguez, Benigno; Aziz, Mariam; Presti, Rachel; Deeks, Steven; Ebiasah, Ruth; Myers, Laurie; Borowski, LuAnn; Plants, Jill; Palm, David A.; Weibel, Derek; Putnam, Beverly; Lindsey, Elizabeth; Player, Amy; Albrecht, Mary; Kershaw, Andrea; Sax, Paul; Keenan, Cheryl; Walton, Patricia; Baum, Jane; Stroberg, Todd; Hughes, Valery; Coster, Laura; Kumar, Princy N.; Yin, Michael T.; Noel-Connor, Jolene; Tebas, Pablo; Thomas, Aleshia; Davis, Charles E.; Redfield, Robert R.; Sbrolla, Amy; Flynn, Teri; Davis, Traci; Whitely, Kim; Singh, Baljinder; Swaminathan, Shobha; McGregor, Donna; Palella, Frank; Aberg, Judith; Cavanagh, Karen; Santana Bagur, Jorge L.; Flores, Olga Méndez; Fritsche, Janice; Sha, Beverly; Slamowitz, Debbie; Valle, Sandra; Tashima, Karen; Patterson, Helen; Harber, Heather; Para, Michael; Eaton, Molly; Maddox, Dale; Currier, Judith; Cajahuaringa, Vanessa; Luetkemeyer, Annie; Dwyer, Jay; Fichtenbaum, Carl J.; Saemann, Michelle; Ray, Graham; Campbell, Thomas; Fischl, Margaret A.; Bolivar, Hector; Oakes, Jonathan; Chicurel-Bayard, Miriam; Tripoli, Christine; Weinman, D. Renee; Adams, Mary; Hurley, Christine; Dunaway, Shelia; Storey, Sheryl; Klebert, Michael; Royal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background. Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable antibiotic that decreases lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cirrhotics, may decrease the elevated levels of microbial translocation, T-cell activation and inflammation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive immune nonresponders to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods. HIV-positive adults receiving ART for ≥96 weeks with undetectable viremia for ≥48 weeks and CD4+ T-cell counts <350 cells/mm3 were randomized 2:1 to rifaximin versus no study treatment for 4 weeks. T-cell activation, LPS, and soluble CD14 were measured at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, and 8. Wilcoxon rank sum tests compared changes between arms. Results. Compared with no study treatment (n = 22), rifaximin (n = 43) use was associated with a significant difference between study arms in the change from baseline to week 4 for CD8+T-cell activation (median change, 0.0% with rifaximin vs +0.6% with no treatment; P = .03). This difference was driven by an increase in the no-study-treatment arm because there was no significant change within the rifaximin arm. Similarly, although there were significant differences between study arms in change from baseline to week 2 for LPS and soluble CD14, there were no significant changes within the rifaximin arm. Conclusions. In immune nonresponders to ART, rifaximin minimally affected microbial translocation and CD8+T-cell activation. Trial registration number. NCT01466595. PMID:25214516

  6. Pasa la voz (spread the word): using women's social networks for HIV education and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Rebeca L; Ferreira-Pinto, João B; Rusch, Melanie L A; Ramos, Maria Elena

    2010-01-01

    Pasa la Voz (spread the word) is a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention methodology inspired by respondent-driven sampling (RDS) that uses social networks to access hard-to-reach populations. As field testing showed the approach to be efficacious among at-risk women in West Texas and Southern New Mexico, we set out to evaluate the methodology in a Mexican context. A local community organization, Programa Compañeros, first implemented a traditional one-on-one outreach strategy using promotoras (outreach workers) in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, from September 2005 to January 2006. This was followed by implementation of Pasa la Voz from February 2006 to January 2007. The percentage of women agreeing to be tested increased from 11.9% to 49.9%, and staff time declined from 22.70 hours to 3.68 hours per HIV test, comparing the one-on-one with the Pasa la Voz methodology, respectively. Pasa la Voz was successful at imparting a cost-savings prevention education program with significant increases in the number of at-risk women being tested for HIV.

  7. Assessing readiness for medical education: evolution of the medical college admission test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C

    2002-09-01

    The attrition rate of 5% to 50% from US medical schools in the 1920s propelled the development of a test that would measure aptitude for medical studies. Since its development in 1928, the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) has undergone 5 revisions. The first version was divided into 6 to 8 subtests that focused on memory, knowledge of scientific terminology, reading and comprehension, and logic. The second, which appeared in 1946, was reduced to 4 categories: verbal and quantitative skills, science knowledge, and added a category called understanding modern society. The major difference in the third version, launched in 1962, expanded the test's understanding modern society section to a broader test of general information. In 1977, the MCAT underwent its fourth change: its science section, reading and quantitative skill assessment sections were expanded; its general liberal arts knowledge section was eliminated; its scoring report structure and scoring range were altered; and its cultural and social bias was minimized. The current version, beginning in 1991, has undergone another significant change. Although it does not contain independent measures of either liberal arts or numeracy as separate categories, quantitative skills are needed to solve some of the problems in biological and physical sciences. However, its principal innovation is the writing sample section. Through its 74-year history, the various renditions of the MCAT demonstrate that the definition of aptitude for medical education reflects the professional and social mores and values of the time.

  8. Gender equality and education: Increasing the uptake of HIV testing among married women in Kenya, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kavita; Luseno, Winnie; Haney, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Gender equality and education are being promoted as strategies to combat the HIV epidemic in Africa, but few studies have looked at the role of gender equality and education in the uptake of a vital service - HIV testing. This study looks at the associations between education (a key input needed for gender equality) and key gender equality measures (financial decision making and attitudes toward violence) with ever tested for HIV and tested for HIV in the past year. The study focused on currently married women ages between15-24 and 25-34 in three countries - Kenya, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The data came from the Demographic and Health Surveys. Logistic regression was used to study the role of gender equality and education on the HIV testing outcomes after controlling for both social and biological factors. Results indicated that education had a consistent positive relationship with testing for both age groups, and the associations were always significant for young women aged 15-24 years (pgender-based violence is unacceptable was positively associated with testing for women aged 25-34 in all the three countries, although the associations were only significant in Kenya (among women reporting ever being tested: OR 1.58, pgender equality are important strategies for increasing uptake of a vital HIV service, and thus are important tools for protecting girls and young women against HIV.

  9. Observation evaluation to assess race and educational bias in state-mandated standard testing of nurse aides in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, S L; Stoskopf, C H; Ciesla, J R; Glik, D C; Cover, C M

    1996-01-01

    This article presents an assessment of whether race, education, gender, or other testing bias was present in a state-mandated nurse aide competency test. This assessment was carried out with data from two sources: (a) a statewide standardized test for all nurse aides that was given by a nationally known testing company, (b) an independent observational evaluation with a Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (BARS) for nurse aides' performance that was carried out by the investigators. The results show that race and education level were predictors of performance on written and manual portions of the standardized test. Gender, age, and years of experience were also shown to predict test success. Comparing data from the two sources suggests that a possible bias in the standardized nurse aid test. The independent observation of performance on the job with the BARS is shown to be less biased.

  10. The Balance between Student Drug Testing and Fourth Amendment Rights in Response to Board of Education v. Earls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonson, Stacey L.

    This report--part of a collection of 54 papers from the 48th annual conference of the Education Law Association held in November 2002-- discusses student drug testing in Texas public schools. It contains the results of a 2001 study of student drug-testing policies in all 1,056 Texas public-school districts. In response to the Supreme Court's June…

  11. THE AUTOMATED TESTING SYSTEM OF PROGRAMS WITH THE GRAPHIC USER INTERFACE WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes the problems of automation of educational process at the course "Programming on high level language. Algorithmic languages". Complexities of testing of programs with the user interface are marked. Existing analogues was considered. Methods of automation of student's jobs testing are offered.

  12. High-­Stakes Schooling: What We Can Learn from Japan's Experiences with Testing, Accountability, and Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    If there is one thing that describes the trajectory of American education, it is this: more high-stakes testing. In the United States, the debates surrounding this trajectory can be so fierce that it feels like we are in uncharted waters. As Christopher Bjork reminds us in this study, however, we are not the first to make testing so central to…

  13. Designing and Testing an Inventory for Measuring Social Media Competency of Certified Health Education Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Jay M; Stellefson, Michael; Weiler, Robert M; Anderson-Lewis, Charkarra; Miller, M David; MacInnes, Jann

    2015-01-01

    Background Social media can promote healthy behaviors by facilitating engagement and collaboration among health professionals and the public. Thus, social media is quickly becoming a vital tool for health promotion. While guidelines and trainings exist for public health professionals, there are currently no standardized measures to assess individual social media competency among Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES). Objective The aim of this study was to design, develop, and test the Social Media Competency Inventory (SMCI) for CHES and MCHES. Methods The SMCI was designed in three sequential phases: (1) Conceptualization and Domain Specifications, (2) Item Development, and (3) Inventory Testing and Finalization. Phase 1 consisted of a literature review, concept operationalization, and expert reviews. Phase 2 involved an expert panel (n=4) review, think-aloud sessions with a small representative sample of CHES/MCHES (n=10), a pilot test (n=36), and classical test theory analyses to develop the initial version of the SMCI. Phase 3 included a field test of the SMCI with a random sample of CHES and MCHES (n=353), factor and Rasch analyses, and development of SMCI administration and interpretation guidelines. Results Six constructs adapted from the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology and the integrated behavioral model were identified for assessing social media competency: (1) Social Media Self-Efficacy, (2) Social Media Experience, (3) Effort Expectancy, (4) Performance Expectancy, (5) Facilitating Conditions, and (6) Social Influence. The initial item pool included 148 items. After the pilot test, 16 items were removed or revised because of low item discrimination (r.90), or based on feedback received from pilot participants. During the psychometric analysis of the field test data, 52 items were removed due to low discrimination, evidence of content redundancy, low R-squared value, or

  14. Designing and Testing an Inventory for Measuring Social Media Competency of Certified Health Education Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alber, Julia M; Bernhardt, Jay M; Stellefson, Michael; Weiler, Robert M; Anderson-Lewis, Charkarra; Miller, M David; MacInnes, Jann

    2015-09-23

    Social media can promote healthy behaviors by facilitating engagement and collaboration among health professionals and the public. Thus, social media is quickly becoming a vital tool for health promotion. While guidelines and trainings exist for public health professionals, there are currently no standardized measures to assess individual social media competency among Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES). The aim of this study was to design, develop, and test the Social Media Competency Inventory (SMCI) for CHES and MCHES. The SMCI was designed in three sequential phases: (1) Conceptualization and Domain Specifications, (2) Item Development, and (3) Inventory Testing and Finalization. Phase 1 consisted of a literature review, concept operationalization, and expert reviews. Phase 2 involved an expert panel (n=4) review, think-aloud sessions with a small representative sample of CHES/MCHES (n=10), a pilot test (n=36), and classical test theory analyses to develop the initial version of the SMCI. Phase 3 included a field test of the SMCI with a random sample of CHES and MCHES (n=353), factor and Rasch analyses, and development of SMCI administration and interpretation guidelines. Six constructs adapted from the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology and the integrated behavioral model were identified for assessing social media competency: (1) Social Media Self-Efficacy, (2) Social Media Experience, (3) Effort Expectancy, (4) Performance Expectancy, (5) Facilitating Conditions, and (6) Social Influence. The initial item pool included 148 items. After the pilot test, 16 items were removed or revised because of low item discrimination (r.90), or based on feedback received from pilot participants. During the psychometric analysis of the field test data, 52 items were removed due to low discrimination, evidence of content redundancy, low R-squared value, or poor item infit or outfit

  15. Bluetooth Low Energy Peripheral Android Health App for Educational and Interoperability Testing Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohner, Matthias; Urbauer, Philipp; Sauermann, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Based on recent telemonitoring activities in Austria for enabling integrated health care, the communication interfaces between personal health devices (e.g. blood pressure monitor) and personal health gateway devices (e.g. smartphone, routing received information to wide area networks) play an important role. In order to ease testing of the Bluetooth Low Energy interface functionality of the personal health gateway devices, a personal health device simulator was developed. Based on specifications from the Bluetooth SIG a XML software test configuration file structure is defined that declares the specific features of the personal health devices simulated. Using this configuration file, different scenarios are defined, e.g. send a single measurement result from a blood pressure reading or sending multiple (historic) weight scale readings. The simulator is intended to be used for educational purposes in lectures, where the number of physical personal health devices can be reduced and learning can be improved. It could be shown that this simulator assists the development process of mHealth applications by reducing the time needed for development and testing.

  16. Quality of Education Predicts Performance on the Wide Range Achievement Test-4th Edition Word Reading Subtest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Philip; Arentoft, Alyssa; Thaler, Nicholas S.; Dean, Andy C.; Thames, April D.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined whether self-rated education quality predicts Wide Range Achievement Test-4th Edition (WRAT-4) Word Reading subtest and neurocognitive performance, and aimed to establish this subtest's construct validity as an educational quality measure. In a community-based adult sample (N = 106), we tested whether education quality both increased the prediction of Word Reading scores beyond demographic variables and predicted global neurocognitive functioning after adjusting for WRAT-4. As expected, race/ethnicity and education predicted WRAT-4 reading performance. Hierarchical regression revealed that when including education quality, the amount of WRAT-4's explained variance increased significantly, with race/ethnicity and both education quality and years as significant predictors. Finally, WRAT-4 scores, but not education quality, predicted neurocognitive performance. Results support WRAT-4 Word Reading as a valid proxy measure for education quality and a key predictor of neurocognitive performance. Future research should examine these findings in larger, more diverse samples to determine their robust nature. PMID:25404004

  17. The Legitimation of OECD's Global Educational Governance: Examining PISA and AHELO Test Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Clara; Shahjahan, Riyad A.

    2014-01-01

    Although international student assessments and the role of international organisations (IOs) in governing education via an evidence-based educational policy discourse are of growing interest to educational researchers, few have explored the complex ways in which an IO, such as the OECD, gains considerable influence in governing education during…

  18. The Legitimation of OECD's Global Educational Governance: Examining PISA and AHELO Test Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Clara; Shahjahan, Riyad A.

    2014-01-01

    Although international student assessments and the role of international organisations (IOs) in governing education via an evidence-based educational policy discourse are of growing interest to educational researchers, few have explored the complex ways in which an IO, such as the OECD, gains considerable influence in governing education during…

  19. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  20. Age and education influence the performance of elderly women on the dual-task Timed Up and Go test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele de Cássia Gomes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gait variability is related to functional decline in the elderly. The dual-task Timed Up and Go Test (TUG-DT reflects the performance in daily activities. Objective To evaluate the differences in time to perform the TUG with and without DT in elderly women with different ages and levels of education and physical activity. Method Ninety-two elderly women perfomed the TUG at usual and fast speeds, with and without motor and cognitive DT. Results Increases in the time to perform the TUG-DT were observed at older ages and lower educational levels, but not at different levels of physical activity. More educated women performed the test faster with and without DT at both speeds. When age was considered, significant differences were found only for the TUG-DT at both speeds. Conclusion Younger women with higher education levels demonstrated better performances on the TUG-DT.

  1. Age and education influence the performance of elderly women on the dual-task Timed Up and Go test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Gisele de Cássia; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi; Fonseca, Bruna Espeschit; Freitas, Flávia Alexandra Silveira de; Fonseca, Maria Luísa Morais; Pacheco, Bruna Débora; Gonçalves, Marisa Rocha; Caramelli, Paulo

    2015-03-01

    Gait variability is related to functional decline in the elderly. The dual-task Timed Up and Go Test (TUG-DT) reflects the performance in daily activities. Objective To evaluate the differences in time to perform the TUG with and without DT in elderly women with different ages and levels of education and physical activity. Method Ninety-two elderly women perfomed the TUG at usual and fast speeds, with and without motor and cognitive DT. Results Increases in the time to perform the TUG-DT were observed at older ages and lower educational levels, but not at different levels of physical activity. More educated women performed the test faster with and without DT at both speeds. When age was considered, significant differences were found only for the TUG-DT at both speeds. Conclusion Younger women with higher education levels demonstrated better performances on the TUG-DT.

  2. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 PMID:7389197

  3. Handling missing data by re-approaching non-respondents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Mark; Krol, B; Van Sonderen, E

    1998-01-01

    When handling missing data, a researcher should be aware of the mechanism underlying the missingness. In the presence of non-randomly missing data, a model of the missing data mechanism should be included in the analyses to prevent the analyses based on the data from becoming biased. Modeling the mi

  4. An Application of the Wiles Test in the Formulation of Education Strategy for the Newly-Upgraded Colleges of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Zhu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Using graduates from the newly-upgraded colleges as a sample, we used the Wiles test on the Human Capital Hypothesis vs. the Screening Hypothesis of education economics. The results were in favor of the former, i.e., higher education was more likely a production means than just a signal in the job market. Thus the newly-upgraded colleges should adjust their curriculum and faculty structure to accommodate the skill demands in job markets.

  5. High Stakes Testing Policy Issues in Education: An Analysis of Litigation Involving High Stakes Testing and the Denial of Diplomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed the legal documents of cases involving the denial of a high school diploma as the result of not passing a high stakes exam in public education. The qualitative extrapolation of consistent themes in the court documents revealed information regarding the court's interpretation of the intersection of state authority to…

  6. Situational judgement tests in medical education and training: Research, theory and practice: AMEE Guide No. 100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Fiona; Zibarras, Lara; Ashworth, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    Why use SJTs? Traditionally, selection into medical education professions has focused primarily upon academic ability alone. This approach has been questioned more recently, as although academic attainment predicts performance early in training, research shows it has less predictive power for demonstrating competence in postgraduate clinical practice. Such evidence, coupled with an increasing focus on individuals working in healthcare roles displaying the core values of compassionate care, benevolence and respect, illustrates that individuals should be selected on attributes other than academic ability alone. Moreover, there are mounting calls to widen access to medicine, to ensure that selection methods do not unfairly disadvantage individuals from specific groups (e.g. regarding ethnicity or socio-economic status), so that the future workforce adequately represents society as a whole. These drivers necessitate a method of assessment that allows individuals to be selected on important non-academic attributes that are desirable in healthcare professionals, in a fair, reliable and valid way. What are SJTs? Situational judgement tests (SJTs) are tests used to assess individuals' reactions to a number of hypothetical role-relevant scenarios, which reflect situations candidates are likely to encounter in the target role. These scenarios are based on a detailed analysis of the role and should be developed in collaboration with subject matter experts, in order to accurately assess the key attributes that are associated with competent performance. From a theoretical perspective, SJTs are believed to measure prosocial Implicit Trait Policies (ITPs), which are shaped by socialisation processes that teach the utility of expressing certain traits in different settings such as agreeable expressions (e.g. helping others in need), or disagreeable actions (e.g. advancing ones own interest at others, expense). Are SJTs reliable, valid and fair? Several studies, including good

  7. Teacher Education Graduates' Entrance into the Teaching Profession: Development and Test of a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots, Isabel; Aelterman, Antonia

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to advance insight into the relationship between teacher education and graduates' intended and actual entrance into the teaching profession. Moreover, it indicates how this relationship varies between teacher training for primary education (i.e., programs for class teachers-to-be) and teacher training for secondary education (i.e.,…

  8. Improving of the teaching methods of chemical subjects by using of teaching tests in high educational institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulzahira Turebekova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the information technologies may cause great pedagogical effect: using of computer opens the opportunity for organization of problem teaching developing the creative thinking, forming research, practical skills of students, creation of the steady positive motivation of the students. Technical facilities of the computer technology allow solving the teaching and research tasks in the chemistry come as original catalyst of creation of different types of information technology systems and projection on their basis the novel ways and methods of their application. Use of computer technology in education helps to support necessary educational level of students and pay attention to their independent work. The article represents that the computer testing can be widely used for control of knowledge and for teaching. Teaching testing arouses interest in subject and develops ability of self-preparation and self – education, provides in-door and out- door work.

  9. The physical education predisposition scale: Preliminary tests of reliability and validity in Australian students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilland, Toni A; Brown, Trent D; Fairclough, Stuart J

    2017-03-30

    The main aim of this study was to psychometrically test the Physical Education Predisposition Scale (PEPS) with a cohort of Australian students, to assess secondary school students' perceived PE ability and PE worth. Secondary aims were to explore how the two variables were related and to investigate age and gender differences. Altogether, 266 Year 7, 8, 9 and 10 students (aged 12-16 years), from four schools within the South Eastern region of Melbourne, completed the PEPS at both time points. Principal components analysis revealed the presence of a simple two-factor structure explaining 66.9% of the variance. Factor 1 (labelled perceived PE worth) reflected enjoyment and attitude (α = .91), and factor 2 (labelled perceived PE ability) represented perceptions of competence and self-efficacy (α = .92). Significant positive correlations were observed between the two factors (r = .50-.82, P < .001). Boys scored significantly higher than girls on perceived PE ability (P = .01), and year 7 students scored significantly higher compared to Year 9 students (P = .002). Our results support the potential of the PEPS as a concise measurement tool for use in the PE setting, for both teachers and researchers.

  10. A pilot study to test the effectiveness of an innovative interprofessional education assessment strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, Michelle Christine; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    The goals of this quasi-experimental pilot study were to test an assessment tool designed to evaluate students' teamwork skills, and to assess the effectiveness of an interprofessional education (IPE) course. Participants were health professional students (physical therapy, pharmacy, dental and osteopathic medicine), 24 of whom were second-year students who had previously taken part in an IPE course (experimental group), and 22 of whom were third years that had not (control group). Students interacted with a standardized patient and her son during an asynchronous Team Objective Structured Clinical Exam (TOSCE), after which they were scored on their teamwork skills using newly designed teamwork rating scales. Cronbach Alpha calculations suggest that the rating scales are reliable when rater scores are aggregated (0.81). Pearson coefficient calculations determined that teamwork scores of live raters and video raters were significantly correlated (p teamwork skills. The results of this study contribute to the much needed IPE assessment literature, and suggest that teamwork skills can be taught and effectively assessed using this new rating scale.

  11. Summary of Benefits under the Educational Assistance Test Program Section 901 of Public Law 96-342. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Veterans Affairs, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Section 901 is an Educational Assistance Test Program created by the Department of Defense Authorization Act of 1981 (Public Law 96-342) to individuals who entered on active duty after September 30, 1980, and before October 1, 1981 (or before October 1, 1982, if entry was under a delayed enlistment contract signed between September 30, 1980, and…

  12. The Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing: Proceedings of a Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Inst. of Lab. Animal Resources.

    This volume contains the prepared papers and discussions of a National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council Symposium on the Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing. The purpose of the symposium was to examine the past, present, and future contributions of animals to human health…

  13. Something That Test Scores Do Not Show: Engaging in Community Diversity as a Local Response to Global Education Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdiviezo, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    At Smith Street Elementary School, the globalizing education trends that English language learner (ELL) teachers face focus on measuring student achievement through testing and the English mainstreaming of non-dominant students as opposed to the cultivation of the students' linguistic and cultural diversity. The ELL teachers at Smith Street…

  14. The Impact of Prerequisite General Education Courses on the ETS Major Field Test for Business (MFT-B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Charles Michael; Rodriguez, Linda Carol; Harrison, David S.; Wates, Kathleen W.

    2014-01-01

    The authors explore the relationship between general education prerequisite courses, used for schools of business admission, and predicted grade point averages (PGPAs) with the Major Field Test in Business (MFT-B). The MFT-B is designed to assess the general business knowledge of students at the end of their programs. There is no known literature…

  15. Legal Issues in the Use of Student Test Scores and Value-Added Models (VAM) to Determine Educational Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullin, Diana

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of states and local schools across the country have adopted educator evaluation and accountability programs based on the use of student test scores and value-added models (VAM). A wide array of potential legal issues could arise from the implementation of these programs. This article uses legal analysis and social science evidence…

  16. Dietary Interventions in Multiple Sclerosis: Development and Pilot-Testing of an Evidence Based Patient Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann-Lorenz, Karin; Eilers, Marlene; von Geldern, Gloria; Schulz, Karl-Heinz; Köpke, Sascha; Heesen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background Dietary factors have been discussed to influence risk or disease course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Specific diets are widely used among patients with MS. Objective To design and pilot-test an evidence based patient education program on dietary factors in MS. Methods We performed a systematic literature search on the effectiveness of dietary interventions in MS. A web-based survey among 337 patients with MS and 136 healthy controls assessed knowledge, dietary habits and information needs. An interactive group education program was developed and pilot-tested. Results Fifteen randomised-controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the systematic review. Quality of evidence was low and no clear benefit could be seen. Patients with MS significantly more often adhered to a `Mediterranean Diet`(29.7% versus 14.0%, pnutrition and MS (43%). A pilot test of our newly developed patient education program with 13 participants showed excellent comprehensibility and the MS-specific content was judged as very important. However, the poor evidence base for dietary approaches in MS was perceived disappointing. Conclusions Development and pilot-testing of an evidence-based patient education program on nutrition and MS is feasible. Patient satisfaction with the program suffers from the lack of evidence. Further research should focus on generating evidence for the potential influence of lifestyle habits (diet, physical activity) on MS disease course thus meeting the needs of patients with MS. PMID:27764237

  17. Association between Education and Domestic Violence among Women Being Offered an HIV Test in Urban and Rural Areas in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuya, Benta A.; Onsomu, Elijah O.; Moore, DaKysha; Piper, Crystal N.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between education and domestic violence among women being offered an HIV test in urban and rural areas in Kenya. A sample selection of women who experienced physical (n = 4,308), sexual (n = 4,309), and emotional violence (n = 4,312) aged 15 to 49 allowed for the estimation of the…

  18. The Meaning of Validity in the New "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing": Implications for Measurement Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Laura D.; Leech, Nancy L.

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of validity in the newest edition of "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" is quite different from coverage in earlier editions of the Standards and in most measurement textbooks. The view of validity in the 1999 Standards is discussed, and suggestions for instructors of measurement courses are offered. (Contains 56…

  19. Prediction of the Science Inquiry Skill of Seventeen-Year-Olds: A Test of the Model of Educational Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J.

    1985-01-01

    This study: (1) tested the effectiveness of the Model of Educational Productivity for predicting the inquiry skill of 17-year-olds; (2) investigated if the prediction of inquiry differed for males and females; and (3) if the prediction of inquiry skill differed for white and nonwhite students. (JN)

  20. The Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing: Proceedings of a Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Inst. of Lab. Animal Resources.

    This volume contains the prepared papers and discussions of a National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council Symposium on the Future of Animals, Cells, Models, and Systems in Research, Development, Education, and Testing. The purpose of the symposium was to examine the past, present, and future contributions of animals to human health…

  1. Application of the Test of Scientific Literacy Skills in the Assessment of a General Education Natural Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Jennifer Turner

    2014-01-01

    The peer-reviewed and psychometrically validated Test of Scientific Literacy Skills developed by Gormally et al. was used to assess the strengths and weaknesses of a general education natural science program. By comparing the scores of students who had already taken at least one course in this area with the scores of those who had not, and by…

  2. Empirical Testing of a Theoretical Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model: An Exploratory Study of Educational Wikis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xun

    2010-01-01

    This study extended the technology acceptance model and empirically tested the new model with wikis, a new type of educational technology. Based on social cognitive theory and the theory of planned behavior, three new variables, wiki self-efficacy, online posting anxiety, and perceived behavioral control, were added to the original technology…

  3. An educational intervention to increase awareness reduces unnecessary laboratory testing in an internal medicine resident-run clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Erika; Song, Shuang; Al-Abboud, Omar; Shams, Shahed; English, John; Naji, Wisam; Huang, Yafei; Robison, Leon; Balis, Fred; Kawsar, Hameem I

    2017-07-01

    At our resident-run clinic in an underserved community, laboratory test costs in 2013 exceeded the government subsidy by $400 000. To optimize limited resources and improve patient care, an education program to reduce testing was implemented. Between November 2014 and January 2015, residents attended lectures on utilization of laboratory testing, focusing on standard practice guidelines, and analyses of unnecessary tests. Multivariate nonparametric statistical methods and subgroup analysis were used to evaluate cost reduction. There were 453 clinic visits during the intervention period and 471 visits during the control period. Lectures were independently associated with a significant laboratory cost reduction. Median laboratory cost per visit decreased from $106.00 to $74.00. Total cost in the study period decreased from $79 403 to $51 463. There were similar reductions of laboratory costs in two subgroups: age groups of <50 years and ≥50 years, new encounters, and follow-up visits . In the analysis of individual tests, the cost of TSH and Vitamin D tests had the greatest reduction ($8176 and $5088 respectively). An appropriate physician education program can reduce laboratory tests and costs. Screening tests with inadequate evidence support were reduced most, whereas those with proven benefits did not decrease significantly.

  4. Parents' Involvement in Inclusive Education: An Empirical Test for the Psycho-Educational Development of Learners with Special Education Needs (SENs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolabi, Olusegun Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that involvement paradigm is a major strategy that supports positive learning outcomes and is critically vital for educating learners with special educational needs (SENs). To illuminate the parental involvement concept and potential in a concrete context, this paper explains 1) the empirical literature that explains the…

  5. Aptitude Tests Versus School Exams as Selection Tools for Higher Education and the Case for Assessing Educational Achievement in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Advocates of using a US-style SAT for university selection claim that it is fairer to applicants from disadvantaged backgrounds than achievement tests because it assesses potential, not achievement, and that it allows finer discrimination between top applicants than GCEs. The pros and cons of aptitude tests in principle are discussed, focusing on…

  6. Developing and testing the nurse educator scale: a robust measure of students' intentions to pursue an educator role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Samra, Haifa; McGrath, Jacqueline M; Estes, Tracy

    2013-06-01

    No instrument exists that measures student perceptions of the faculty role. Such a measure is necessary to evaluate the efficacy of interventions aimed at attracting students to the faculty career path. We developed the Nurse Educator Scale (NES). The initial scale items were generated using the social cognitive career theory (SCCT) constructs and were reviewed by an expert panel to ensure content validity. Exploratory factor analysis was used. The optimized 25-item, 7-point Likert scale has a Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient of 0.85, with a total variance of 42%. The underlying factor structure supported three defining characteristics congruent with SCCT: outcome expectations (alpha = 0.79), relevant knowledge (alpha = 0.67), and social influence (alpha = 0.80). A stand-alone, item-measuring goal setting was also supported. The NES provides a valid and reliable measure of students' intentions and motivations to pursue a future career as a nurse educator or scientist. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Testing the Benefits of Blended Education: Using Social Technology to Foster Collaboration and Knowledge Sharing in Face-to-Face LIS Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, Denise E.; Copeland, Andrea J.; Zach, Lisl

    2013-01-01

    Blended education, which mixes elements of face-to-face and online educational delivery, can occur at the activity, course, program, or administrative level. This study examined the use of student blogs to test the benefits of course-level blended educational delivery for LIS students enrolled in a face-to-face course. Data collected from…

  8. Use of an Aptitude Test in University Entrance--A Validity Study: Updated Analyses of Higher Education Destinations, Including 2007 Entrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, Catherine; Wheater, Rebecca; Morrison, Jo; Durbin, Ben

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) was commissioned to evaluate the potential value of using an aptitude test as an additional tool in the selection of candidates for admission to higher education (HE). This five-year study is co-funded by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER), the Department for…

  9. Preliminary Testing of an Asthma Distance Education Program (ADEP) for School Nurses in Appalachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman-Casdorph, Heidi; Pinto, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Asthma remains one of the most challenging chronic illnesses faced by school nurses both nationally and in the State of West Virginia. There is a clear need to provide ongoing continuing asthma education to school nurses. However, nurses face many barriers to receiving this education. The purpose of this pilot project was to develop and evaluate…

  10. [SUGAR: a self-test to unfold glucose-affection educational requirements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Andrés, Concepción; Jorge Cascón, Ana Isabel; Seoane López, Maria Teresa; Pérez Martín, Rosa María; Castro Melián, Natalia; Aguirre-Jaime, Armando; Ramos Fuentes, Manuel Jesús

    2005-06-01

    To obtain a valid, reliable, stable and easy to use questionnaire to be used by professionals non-trained in diabetes education that allowed them to decide priority for diabetical education to a diabetic patient. The initial aim of the study is considered to have been achieved.

  11. The Expansion of National Educational Systems: Tests of a Population Ecology Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Francois; Hannan, Michael T.

    1977-01-01

    This paper investigates the expansion of enrollments in national systems of education during the 1950-1970 period from the point of view of the population ecology of organizations. A simplified dynamic model of the growth of a population of educational organizations is estimated using various techniques for pooling time series of data. (Author/JM)

  12. Argumentation Based Bioethics Education: Sample Implementation on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) and Genetic Screening Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer Keskin, Melike; Keskin Samanci, Nilay; Yaman, Hale

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, there is a need in science education to consider scientific research and its applications alongside ethical consensus. Even though classroom debates of value issues have been demonstrated to significantly contribute to the raising of social consciousness and awareness, research shows that neither academics in higher education nor…

  13. Contemporary Test Validity in Theory and Practice: A Primer for Discipline-Based Education Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Todd D.; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2016-01-01

    Most discipline-based education researchers (DBERs) were formally trained in the methods of scientific disciplines such as biology, chemistry, and physics, rather than social science disciplines such as psychology and education. As a result, DBERs may have never taken specific courses in the social science research methodology--either quantitative…

  14. "Ducking and Diving" Adult Educator Agency in Testing Times: Insights from England and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowl, Marion

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the possibilities for adult educators to exercise professional agency in contexts which have become dominated by neoliberalism. It draws on research undertaken in England and New Zealand which investigated the impact of global discourses and policies on experienced adult educators whose philosophy of practice was orientated…

  15. Developing, Testing, and Using Theoretical Models for Promoting Quality in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creemers, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2015-01-01

    This paper argues that the dynamic model of educational effectiveness can be used to establish stronger links between educational effectiveness research (EER) and school improvement. It provides research evidence to support the validity of the model. Thus, the importance of using the dynamic model to establish an evidence-based and theory-driven…

  16. Argumentation Based Bioethics Education: Sample Implementation on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) and Genetic Screening Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer Keskin, Melike; Keskin Samanci, Nilay; Yaman, Hale

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, there is a need in science education to consider scientific research and its applications alongside ethical consensus. Even though classroom debates of value issues have been demonstrated to significantly contribute to the raising of social consciousness and awareness, research shows that neither academics in higher education nor…

  17. The Enactment of Reforms in State Governance of Higher Education: Testing the Political Instability Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLendon, Michael K.; Deaton, Russ; Hearn, James C.

    2007-01-01

    A growing body of research indicates that the manner in which states govern higher education "matters." Thus, the restructuring of governance patterns may hold important implications for higher education policy, finance, and management. Somewhat more abstractly, shifting governance patterns afford researchers an excellent opportunity to test…

  18. Using Aptitude Testing to Diversify Higher Education Intake--An Australian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Daniel; Coates, Hamish; Friedman, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Australian higher education is currently entering a new phase of growth. Within the remit of this expansion is an express commitment to widen participation in higher education among under-represented groups--in particular those from low socioeconomic backgrounds. This paper argues that one key mechanism for achieving this goal should be the…

  19. Development and Testing of a Junior High School Oral Hygiene Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffa, Joseph; Kugler, John F., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Described is a program to be woven into the curriculum in such a way that it becomes part of the the total education plan. It should be taught in the classroom by the teacher and would thus necessitate inservice education. (Author)

  20. Breast Self-Examination and the Older Woman: Field Testing an Educational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Judith A.

    1989-01-01

    Compared effectiveness of theoretically based educational strategy with standard breast self-examination educational strategy. Found that women in experimental group (N=68) were significantly more likely to perform breast self-examination appropriately three months following instruction than were women in standard treatment group (N=66) after…

  1. EXAMINATION OF THE RELATION BETWEEN SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT STUDENTS' APPROACH TO LEARNING AND STUDYING AND TEST ANXIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ender

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the aim of this study was to examine the relation between school of physical education and sport students' approach to learning and studying and test anxiety. Students in departments of physical education and sport teacher (n=103, coaching education (n=155 and sport management (n=110 at Mugla Sıtkı Koçman University participated in the study (n=368. 145 of participant were female, 223 of them were male. Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI, developed by Speilberger (1980 and adapted to Turkish by Öner and Albayrak-Kaymak (1993 (cited in Erözkan, 2004, was used to identify students' test anxiety levels. Approaches to Learning and Studying Inventory (ALSI, developed by Hounsell, Entwistle, Anderson et al. (2002 and adapted to Turkish by Topyaka, Yaka and Öğretmen (2011, was used to identify students' approaches to learning and studying. ALSI consists of 18 items with 5 Likert. TAI consists of 20 items with 4 likert. One-Way ANOVA and Independent T-Test in SPSS 16.0 were used to analyze the collected data. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA was used to find out whether used inventories were suitable for the sample. When the differences about approaches to learning and studying between departments were examined, while no significant difference was found in surface and deep approaches, significant difference was found in strategic approaches. No significant difference was found between grades. Significant gender differences were found in emotionality, worry and total test anxiety. Positive correlation was found between surface approach and emotionality, worry and total test anxiety. Consequently, it was found that students who adopt surface approach have high-test anxiety, because it was found that while adopting surface approach, students could have high-level of emotionality and worry. It is important to create learning environment that discourage students to adopt surface approach.

  2. Narrative-based educational nursing intervention for managing hospitalized older adults at risk for delirium: field testing and qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Louise; Ducharme, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Though delirium is a common complication among hospitalized older adults and the nursing care required in these situations is complex, the subject has received little attention in the literature on continuing nursing education. A study was undertaken to field test and qualitatively evaluate a narrative-based educational intervention for nurses in hospital units with a high incidence of delirium. Triangulated data collection allowed carrying out a qualitative evaluation of the intervention process and outcomes. Process evaluation showed that the intervention was facilitated by the participants' attitudes and diversity of experience, as well as by the use of real care situations, which allowed integrating theory and practice. Outcome evaluation brought to light numerous elements of empirical, ethical and esthetic knowledge expressed by the participants. Study results evidence the applicability of such interventions as part of continuing nursing education and their contribution to knowledge development.

  3. Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    method for the delivery of educational services. Social Support Parental involvement in the education process is critical for improving...student performance as parental involvement in their children’s education.” 28

  4. Preliminary testing of an asthma distance education program (ADEP) for school nurses in Appalachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman-Casdorph, Heidi; Pinto, Susan

    2011-12-01

    Asthma remains one of the most challenging chronic illnesses faced by school nurses both nationally and in the State of West Virginia. There is a clear need to provide ongoing continuing asthma education to school nurses. However, nurses face many barriers to receiving this education. The purpose of this pilot project was to develop and evaluate distance learning technology as a method to deliver continuing asthma education to school nurses in West Virginia. A sample of 20 school nurses from 2 counties in West Virginia participated in the study using the Wimba live classroom distance learning program. Significant modest improvements were found in both the intervention groups compared to a control group postintervention. The results of this pilot study are promising and show that distance learning technology could be a viable solution for school nurses to receive asthma continuing education.

  5. Testing the effects of educational strategies on comprehension of a genomic concept using virtual reality technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Persky, Susan; McCall, Cade; Lachance, Christina; Loewenstein, Johanna; Beall, Andrew C; Blascovich, Jim

    2009-11-01

    Applying genetic susceptibility information to improve health will likely require educating patients about abstract concepts, for which there is little existing research. This experimental study examined the effect of learning mode on comprehension of a genomic concept. 156 individuals aged 18-40 without specialized knowledge were randomly assigned to either a virtual reality active learning or didactic learning condition. The outcome was comprehension (recall, transfer, mental models). Change in recall was greater for didactic learning than for active learning (pconcepts. Didactic, interpersonal health education approaches may be more effective than interactive games in educating patients about abstract, unfamiliar concepts. These findings indicate the importance of traditional health education approaches in emerging areas like genomics.

  6. Usability Testing of Web Based Educational Multimedia by Eye Tracking Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servet BAYRAM

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Usability is one of the factors that can affect the success of students where learning processes are supported by internet and web technologies. In this study, usability factors for effective design and usage of web based multimedia packages created for educational purposes are evaluated. The research, experiments and analysis are done in the Human–Computer Interaction Laboratory that resides in Computer Education and Instructional Technologies Department of Marmara University. Data for the experiment are collected by using screen records which contain eye and mouse motions. For the analysis of data, fixation count, sequence and dwell time values in gridded area of interest; fixation count, heat map and scanpath values in whole are considered. The results obtained from this study can be used for design and validation of computer-based materials like virtual class applications, learning objects, educational applications, training applications and educational games.

  7. Embedding Patient Education in Mobile Platform for Patients With Heart Failure: Theory-Based Development and Beta Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athilingam, Ponrathi; Osorio, Richard E; Kaplan, Howard; Oliver, Drew; O'neachtain, Tara; Rogal, Philip J

    2016-02-01

    Health education is an important component of multidisciplinary disease management of heart failure. The educational information given at the time of discharge after hospitalization or at initial diagnosis is often overwhelming to patients and is often lost or never consulted again. Therefore, the aim of this developmental project was to embed interactive heart failure education in a mobile platform. A patient-centered approach, grounded on several learning theories including Mayer's Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning, Sweller's Cognitive Load, Instructional Design Approach, and Problem-Based Learning, was utilized to develop and test the mobile app. Ten heart failure patients, who attended an outpatient heart failure clinic, completed beta testing. A validated self-confidence questionnaire was utilized to assess patients' confidence in using the mobile app. All participants (100%) reported moderate to extreme confidence in using the app, 95% were very likely to use the app, 100% reported the design was easy to navigate, and content on heart failure was appropriate. Having the information accessible on their mobile phone was reported as a positive, like a health coach by all patients. Clinicians and nurses validated the content. Thus, embedding health education in a mobile app is proposed in promoting persistent engagement to improve health outcomes.

  8. Contemporary Test Validity in Theory and Practice: A Primer for Discipline-Based Education Researchers

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Most discipline-based education researchers (DBERs) were formally trained in the methods of scientific disciplines such as biology, chemistry, and physics, rather than social science disciplines such as psychology and education. As a result, DBERs may have never taken specific courses in the social science research methodology—either quantitative or qualitative—on which their scholarship often relies so heavily. One particular aspect of (quantitative) social science research that differs mark...

  9. Diagnostic value of serum procalcitonin in identifying the etiology of non-responding community-acquired pneumonia after initial antibiotic therapy%血清降钙素原对早期抗菌治疗无效的社区获得性肺炎病因诊断的意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪铮; 张晓菊; 吴纪珍; 张文平; 况红艳; 李晓; 轩伟霞; 王凯; 马利军

    2014-01-01

    钙素原水平差异无统计学意义(F=3.025,P=0.094).用入院时降钙素原>0.13 μg/L区分细菌感染和其他原因导致的治疗无效时,其敏感度、特异度和受试者工作特征曲线下面积分别为100% (11/11)、83% (19/23)和0.955.用入院时降钙素原>0.13 μg/L区分感染与非感染导致的治疗无效时,其敏感度、特异度和受试者工作特征曲线下面积分别为65%(14/23)、91%(10/11)和0.802.结论 未覆盖感染病原体、出现感染并发症和误诊分别是CAP早期抗菌治疗无效的主要原因;初诊时降钙素原水平难以预测CAP患者对治疗的反应,但其水平及动态变化有助于判断细菌感染引起的治疗无效的CAP.%Objective This study was to investigate the diagnostic value of serum procalcitonin (PCT) in identifying the etiology of non-responding community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) after initial antibiotic therapy.Methods A retrospective analysis was performed for 232 hospitalized CAP patients admitted to the People' s Hospital of Zhengzhou University during June 2013 and January 2014.Early treatment failure was defined as the presence of persistent fever (> 38 ℃) and/or clinical symptoms (malaise,cough,expectoration,dyspnea) or deterioration after at least 72 h of initial antimicrobial treatment,or development of respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation,or septic shock.Bronchoscopy or transthoracic lung biopsy was performed in case of early treatment failure when indicated.Serum level of PCT was detected by double antibody sandwich method.The differences between 2 or more groups were compared using 2-independent student t test,one-way ANOVA; Mann-Whitney U test,KruskalWallis rank sum test,or x2 test.Risk factors and odds ratios for nonresponsiveness were analyzed by setting up a Logistic regression model.The diagnostic values of PCT were determined by receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC curves).Results Of the 232 CAP patients enrolled,124

  10. The impact of education and acculturation on nonverbal neuropsychological test performance among Latino/a patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saez, Pedro A; Bender, Heidi Allison; Barr, William B; Rivera Mindt, Monica; Morrison, Chris E; Hassenstab, Jason; Rodriguez, Marivelisse; Vazquez, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between various sociocultural factors (e.g., acculturation, education), neurological variables (e.g., epilepsy duration and seizure frequency) and nonverbal neuropsychological (NP) test performance in a sample of 305 Latino/a and Non-Latino/a White adults with and without epilepsy. All participants completed nonverbal NP measures of visuospatial skills, memory, executive functioning, and psychomotor speed. An acculturation scale was administered to Spanish-speaking epilepsy patients and controls. Education was strongly correlated with performance on all but one of the nonverbal measures across the entire sample. Among Spanish-speaking Latino/a patients with epilepsy, level of acculturation to U.S. culture was associated with a measure of behavioral inflexibility (p test performance (p test performance than did neurological factors. These results provide further evidence that sociocultural factors are strong predictors of NP test performance in clinical populations, even on nonverbal tests. Assessment of acculturation may be as critical as assessment of disease factors in interpreting cognitive performance in Latino/a individuals.

  11. Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Valk, H.; Crul, M.; Crul, M.; Heering, L.

    2008-01-01

    Education is of crucial importance in the lives of young adults. Attending school is not only a major part of everyday life, but education is a decisive factor for the future. In literature, educational attainment has been tied to a host of outcomes in adult life. Education is perceived as the key f

  12. THE EXAMINATION OF FEAR LEVELS FROM PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORTS LESSON OF STUDENTS BY ILLUSTRATED PHOBIA TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zekiye

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical education and sports classes are generally amongst the students’ favourite classes. Children manifest themselves primarily with their behaviours in social life. Thus, physical education classes play a crucial role in improving individual differences and biological structure. The behaviours that were seen in the other classes may differ from those in the physical education classes. While the danger of injury in physical education classes may discourage the students, that is not the case in the other classes. The aim of this study is to investigate the sixth-graders' fears towards physical education classes by taking into consideration some variances.The study that was done in 2012-2013 spring term was carried out in the provinces of Van, Trabzon, Gümüşhane, Erzurum, Muş and Ağrı with 262 sixth-graders consisting of 147 females and 115 males by testing them with the illustrated phobia test. In the study, it has been investigated whether the variances such as the students' genders, residences, number of siblings, educational background of their parents, type of the movies they watch have any effects on liking or having phobia of the physical education lesson with the help of the illustrated phobia test. As a method, the illustrated phobia test’s part that was prepared for the sports hall and that was improved by Bös / Mechling (1985 has been used. It consisted of 6 pictures that were taken in sports hall and 7 pictures that were taken in water. In the data analysis t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA and correlation analysis were used.According to analysis of variance results, thoughts of jumping over the vault overcoming the medic ball obstacle, walking over balance beam, hands free hanging downward on chin-up bar with feet differentiated significiantly according to their love rates of physical education (p<0.05. Also, thoughts of hanging one handed on the climbing hawser, hands free hanging downward on chin-up bar with feet

  13. Diagnostic Test in College Algebra for Freshman Non-Education Students of Westmead International School: Input to Proposed Remedial Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhemson C. Elis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The major thrust of this study is to develop a diagnostic test in college algebra to know the level of performance in College Algebra of non – education freshman students of Westmead International School through the use of a diagnostic test. The researcher used the descriptive method of research. The level of performance of freshman non – education students of Westmead International School in Algebraic operation has a mean of 80.66 with the highest score of 88 percent and lowest score of 68, while 22 or 31.43 percent had an average performance ranging from 79 - 84. This indicates that students had average mathematical skills and knowledge acquired from their mathematics foundation during high school. The level of performance of freshman non – education students of Westmead International School in arithmetic operation has 77.78 of the mean score with the highest score of 94 and lowest score of 68, which indicates that the students have difficulties in some areas in arithmetic operations. There was a significant relationship between mathematics foundation and the level of performance of the students. The output made by the researcher was a set of Remedial Activities in College Algebra, which is composed of different topics based on the result of the study and on the suggestions of the college instructors of Westmead International School based on their observation. The topics were operation on integers, operation involving polynomials, and special products. It was recommended that the freshman college students need to take the diagnostic test in College Algebra to determine their level of performance. If they fail in the diagnostic test, they will take Math Plus (Basic Mathematics instead of College Algebra. The students with good performance in the diagnostic test will take College Algebra.

  14. Optimal cutoff points in single and multiple tests for psychological and educational decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ben-Yashar, Ruth; Nitzan, Shmuel; Vos, Hendrik J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper compares the determination of optimal cutoff points for single and multiple tests in the field of personnel selection. Decisional skills of predictor tests composing the multiple test are assumed to be endogenous variables that depend on the cutting points to be set. The main result

  15. A eficácia do milnaciprano em pacientes ambulatoriais com transtorno depressivo maior não respondedores ao tratamento com ISRSs: um estudo aberto de 12 semanas Efficacy of milnacipran in outpatients experiencing major depression non respondent to SSRIs: a 12-week open study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo P. Fleck

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar a eficácia do milnaciprano em pacientes ambulatoriais com depressão maior grave que não respondem em tempo e em dosagem adequados à terapia com ISRSs. MÉTODOS: Um estudo aberto multicêntrico com a duração de 12 semanas foi elaborado para avaliar a eficácia do milnaciprano após falha em um experimento com ISRS. Remissão completa (HAMD-17 50%, CGI e avaliação da qualidade de vida (WHOQOL-Bref. RESULTADOS: O escore HAMD-17 médio da amostra foi de 27 (7,2. As taxas de remissão com o milnaciprano foram de 17,5%, e as de resposta, 61,3%. Na linha de base, 70,9% dos pacientes foram classificados como gravemente sintomáticos. Ao final do tratamento, 48,1% dos pacientes foram classificados como normais assintomáticos ou sintomáticos limítrofes e 20,2% eram moderadamente sintomáticos. Além disso, os quatro domínios do WHOQOL-Bref, um instrumento genérico de mensuração de qualidade de vida, apresentou diferenças clínicas e estatísticas: CONCLUSÃO: Nossos resultados sugerem que o milnaciprano é uma possível opção para pacientes que não respondem a ISRSs. Uma vez que não há evidências na literatura de um antidepressivo que seja a melhor opção quando um ISRS falha, o uso do milnaciprano deveria ser considerado em casos de pacientes com depressão severa.BACKGROUND: The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of milnacipran in outpatients experiencing severe MDD non-respondent to adequate time and dosing of SSRI therapy. METHODS: A 12 week multi-centric study open study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of milnacipran after a SRRI trial failure. Complete remission (HAMD-17 50%, CGI and quality of life measure (WHOQOL-Bref. RESULTS: The mean HAMD-17 score of the sample was 27 (7.2. The remission rates for minalcipran were 17.5% and response 61.3%. At baseline, 70.9% of the patients were markedly or severely ill. At treatment end, 48.1% of the patients were normal

  16. Diferenças quanto à escolaridade em adultos no desempenho no teste de cancelamento dos sinos Differences regarding education in adults in the bells test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochele Ferronato Correa da Silva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available O papel de variáveis sociodemográficas na cognição humana, em especial da escolaridade, vem sendo estudado em indivíduos saudáveis. Esta pesquisa objetivou verificar se há diferenças entre grupos de diferentes níveis educacionais no processamento atencional visual avaliado pelo Teste de Cancelamento dos Sinos. Participaram 124 adultos jovens, distribuídos em três grupos, 5-8, 9-11 e 12 ou mais anos de educação formal, emparelhados por idade. As variáveis de acurácia e tempo, assim como os resultados qualitativos de estratégias utilizadas, foram comparados entre grupos (ANCOVA One-Way e Qui-quadrado. Observou-se uma discrepância entre dados quantitativos e qualitativos. Os grupos de diferentes escolaridades não se diferenciaram entre si quanto a acurácia e tempo; houve, porém, diferenças significativas quanto à distribuição de participantes por coluna em que o primeiro sino foi cancelado e pelas estratégias de cancelamento utilizadas. Novos estudos são relevantes com grupos de diferentes idades e com populações clínicas neurológicas e/ou psiquiátricas.The role of socio-demographic variables on human cognition, particularly education, has been studied in healthy individuals. This research aimed to verify if there are differences among educational groups regarding the visual attentional processing assessed by means of Bells Test. The sample was comprised of 124 young adults, divided into three groups, 5-8, 9-11 and 12 or more years of formal education, matched by age. Accuracy and time data were analyzed by one-way ANCOVA and the qualitative results on strategies were compared between groups by Chi-square. The results showed a discrepancy between the quantitative and qualitative analysis. There were no quantitative differences among educational groups regarding accuracy and time variables. However, significant differences were found in the distribution of participants by chosen column where the first bell was canceled

  17. Montreal Cognitive Assessment for screening mild cognitive impairment: variations in test performance and scores by education in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tze Pin; Feng, Lei; Lim, Wee Shiong; Chong, Mei Sian; Lee, Tih Shih; Yap, Keng Bee; Tsoi, Tung; Liew, Tau Ming; Gao, Qi; Collinson, Simon; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Yap, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was developed as a screening instrument for mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We evaluated the MoCA's test performance by educational groups among older Singaporean Chinese adults. The MoCA and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were evaluated in two independent studies (clinic-based sample and community-based sample) of MCI and normal cognition (NC) controls, using receiver operating characteristic curve analyses: area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity (Sn), and specificity (Sp). The MoCA modestly discriminated MCI from NC in both study samples (AUC = 0.63 and 0.65): Sn = 0.64 and Sp = 0.36 at a cut-off of 28/29 in the clinic-based sample, and Sn = 0.65 and Sp = 0.55 at a cut-off of 22/23 in the community-based sample. The MoCA's test performance was least satisfactory in the highest (>6 years) education group: AUC = 0.50 (p = 0.98), Sn = 0.54, and Sp = 0.51 at a cut-off of 27/28. Overall, the MoCA's test performance was not better than that of the MMSE. In multivariate analyses controlling for age and gender, MCI diagnosis was associated with a education was associated with a 3- to 5-point decrement (η(2) = 0.115 and η(2) = 0.162, respectively). The MoCA's ability to discriminate MCI from NC was modest in this Chinese population, because it was far more sensitive to the effect of education than MCI diagnosis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Age and education adjusted normative data and discriminative validity for Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test in the elderly Greek population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinis, Lambros; Nasios, Grigorios; Mougias, Antonios; Politis, Antonis; Zampakis, Petros; Tsiamaki, Eirini; Malefaki, Sonia; Gourzis, Phillipos; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) is a widely used neuropsychological test to assess episodic memory. In the present study we sought to establish normative and discriminative validity data for the RAVLT in the elderly population using previously adapted learning lists for the Greek adult population. We administered the test to 258 cognitively healthy elderly participants, aged 60-89 years, and two patient groups (192 with amnestic mild cognitive impairment, aMCI, and 65 with Alzheimer's disease, AD). From the statistical analyses, we found that age and education contributed significantly to most trials of the RAVLT, whereas the influence of gender was not significant. Younger elderly participants with higher education outperformed the older elderly with lower education levels. Moreover, both clinical groups performed significantly worse on most RAVLT trials and composite measures than matched cognitively healthy controls. Furthermore, the AD group performed more poorly than the aMCI group on most RAVLT variables. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to examine the utility of the RAVLT trials to discriminate cognitively healthy controls from aMCI and AD patients. Area under the curve (AUC), an index of effect size, showed that most of the RAVLT measures (individual and composite) included in this study adequately differentiated between the performance of healthy elders and aMCI/AD patients. We also provide cutoff scores in discriminating cognitively healthy controls from aMCI and AD patients, based on the sensitivity and specificity of the prescribed scores. Moreover, we present age- and education-specific normative data for individual and composite scores for the Greek adapted RAVLT in elderly subjects aged between 60 and 89 years for use in clinical and research settings.

  19. Tests, Tasks, and Taylorism: A Model-T Approach to the Management of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, David

    1990-01-01

    Criticizes the Scottish Education Department for its 1987 consultation paper "Curriculum and Assessment in Scotland: A Policy for the 90s" seeking to revive the managerial style of entrepreneurial capitalism, namely Taylorism. The new policy is under attack for countermanding teachers' newly acquired decision-making powers. Includes 34…

  20. Coloniality and a Global Testing Regime in Higher Education: Unpacking the OECD's AHELO Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahjahan, Riyad A.

    2013-01-01

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is currently engaging in a worldwide feasibility study entitled International Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO). This feasibility study seeks to develop measures that would assess student learning outcomes that would be valid across different languages,…

  1. Testing tools for outdoor recreation, environmental education, and stewardship: Allowing children to choose the rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura E. Baird; Logan O. Park

    2014-01-01

    Engaging children in natural settings enhances learning, promotes early childhood development, and makes use of protected natural areas. Unfortunately, many schoolchildren, especially from economically disadvantaged areas, lack support for environmental education (EE) to develop skills and attitudes that increase rates of appropriate outdoor behaviors. Improved access...

  2. A Comparison of Special Education Teacher and Psychologist Scoring of the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Glen G.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Ten special education teachers and two school psychologists scored the Bender-Gestalt protocals of elementary school children using the Koppitz scoring system. The reported correlations between teachers and school psychologists compared favorably to correlations between school psychologists as well as to interrater reliabilities reported in the…

  3. Market Tested Business Education: Corporate Sector Perceptions of Saudi Graduates Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Adnan; Zenchenkov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    University-industry collaboration patterns in more advanced economies have greatly impacted expectations for higher educational systems in developing countries. In Saudi Arabia, generally poor innovation performance of domestic industry has been perceived as a constraint in global competitiveness. The purpose of this study was to determine if…

  4. Solar Energy Education. Social studies: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Solar energy information is made available to students through classroom instruction by way of the Solar Energy Education teaching manuals. In this manual solar energy, as well as other energy sources like wind power, is introduced by performing school activities in the area of social studies. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  5. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

  6. Can a Brief Educational Intervention Improve Parents' Knowledge of Healthy Children's Sleep? A Pilot-Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Caroline H. D.; Owens, Judith A.; Pham, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Insufficient and poor quality sleep is prevalent in children, and is a significant public health concern due to the negative consequences for health. Certain sleep-related behaviours are associated with improved sleep, and sleep behaviours are amenable to efforts targeted towards behaviour change. Parental educational interventions have…

  7. Experience of Testing Practice-Oriented Educational Model of Pedagogical Master's Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukshina, Tatjana I.; Buyanova, Irina B.; Gorshenina, Svetlana N.; Neyasova, Irina A.

    2016-01-01

    The recent changes in the Russian educational regulations have predetermined the search for new conceptual approaches and ways to improve the content and arrangement of pedagogical staff training. More attention is paid to the implementation of the professional standard of a teacher intended to set the etalon of a graduate of a pedagogical higher…

  8. Simulation and Gaming to Promote Health Education: Results of a Usability Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albu, Mihai; Atack, Lynda; Srivastava, Ishaan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Motivating clients to change the health behaviour, and maintaining an interest in exercise programmes, is an ongoing challenge for health educators. With new developments in technology, simulation and gaming are increasingly being considered as ways to motivate users, support learning and promote positive health behaviours. The purpose…

  9. The Testing and Militarization of K-12 Education: Eugenic Assault on Urban School Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlep, Nicholas Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This paper attempts to discuss eugenics in education and how this eugenic legacy continues to haunt American schooling and nonwhite students. Eugenic praxes and pedagogy continue to proliferate inside the American school systems' teachers may be unaware that they are teaching in such a way that maintains this ethos. This paper and seminar's…

  10. A Procedure for Assessing Fidelity of Implementation in Experiments Testing Educational Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael C.; Cordray, David S.; Hulleman, Chris S.; Darrow, Catherine L.; Sommer, Evan C.

    2010-01-01

    An educational intervention's effectiveness is judged by whether it produces positive outcomes for students, with the randomized controlled trial (CRT) as a valuable tool for determining intervention effects. However, the intervention-as-implemented in an experiment frequently differs from the intervention-as-designed, making it unclear whether…

  11. Media Representations of National and International Standardized Testing in the Israeli Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemini, Miri; Gordon, Noa

    2017-01-01

    This study applies discourse analysis to Israeli media coverage of national and international standardized examinations within Israel's public education system. Through systematic analysis of the topic in the two main Israeli financial publications between the years 2000 and 2013, we explore the nature and narrative of the media and compare the…

  12. A Test of Self-Determination Theory in School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standage, Martyn; Duda, Joan L.; Ntoumanis, Nikos

    2005-01-01

    Background: Contemporary research conducted in the context of school physical education (PE) has increasingly embraced various tenets of self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985, 1991). Despite this increase in research attention, some postulates of the framework remain unexplored (e.g. impact of a need-supportive climate). As such, the…

  13. The Virtual Anatomy Laboratory: Usability Testing to Improve an Online Learning Resource for Anatomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubleday, Eldridge G.; O'Loughlin, Valerie D.; Doubleday, Alison F.

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of instructors are seeking to provide students with online anatomy resources. Many researchers have attempted to identify associations between resource use and student learning but few studies discuss the importance of usability testing in resource design and modification. Usability testing provides information about ease of…

  14. Simulation: The Effects of Simulation on High Stakes Testing in Undergradute Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Many nursing programs use standardized testing packages in order to evaluate students' content mastery as well as predict probability of passing the National Council Licensure for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Instead of a diagnosis for weak content areas, programs implement testing policies in the belief that such policies ensure student success…

  15. Pre-Gas Drilling Drinking Water Testing--An Educational Opportunity for Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swistock, Brian; Clark, James

    2015-01-01

    The increase in shale gas drilling in Pennsylvania has resulted in thousands of landowners receiving predrilling testing of their drinking water. Landowners often have difficulty understanding test reports resulting in low awareness of pre-existing problems. Extension and several partners developed a program to improve understanding of…

  16. Developing an Achievement Test for the Subject of Sound in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sözen, Merve; Bolat, Mualla

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an achievement test which includes the basic concepts about the subject of sound and its properties in middle school science lessons and which at the same time aims to reveal the alternative concepts that the students already have. During the process of the development of the test, studies in the field and…

  17. Hiding behind High-Stakes Testing: Meritocracy, Objectivity and Inequality in U.S. Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses how high-stakes, standardised testing became the policy tool in the U.S. that it is today and discusses its role in advancing an ideology of meritocracy that fundamentally masks structural inequalities related to race and economic class. This paper first traces the early history of high-stakes testing within the U.S. context,…

  18. Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002/12) Third Follow-up Field Test Report. Working Paper Series. NCES 2012-03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingels, Steven J.; Pratt, Daniel J.; Jewell, Donna M.; Mattox, Tiffany; Dalton, Ben; Rosen, Jeffrey; Lauff, Erich; Hill, Jason

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the methodologies and results of the third follow-up Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002/12) field test which was conducted in the summer of 2011. The field test report is divided into six chapters: (1) Introduction; (2) Field Test Survey Design and Preparation; (3) Data Collection Procedures and Results; (4) Field…

  19. Constructing a Criterion-Referenced Test for Measuring the Statistical Competencies of the Postgraduate Students in Education Colleges in Yemeni Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasem, Mamun Ali Naji; Altrairy, Abdulrhman; Govil, Punita

    2012-01-01

    This research has aimed at constructing Criterion Referenced Test to measure the statistical competencies of the Post-graduate Students in Education Colleges in Yemeni Universities, at examining the validity of the test's grades (the descriptive validity and the Domain Selection Validity), at examining the test's grades Reliability according to…

  20. Pilot testing an educational intervention to improve communication with patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Tina; Robinson, Sherry; Mercer, Sandra; Berry, Tammy; Barnes, Mary; Plunkett, Dee; Vollmer, Charlene; Foster, Teresa; Friedrich, Lisa; Allen, Laurie; Holmes, Jennifer; Kirkbride, Geri

    2011-01-01

    Approximately one quarter of all hospitalized patients over age 75 years have a secondary diagnosis of dementia. A unique hospital-wide program to encourage appropriate communication techniques with patients who have dementia was provided to all departments of a hospital. Evaluation indicated improvement in some communication techniques. Additional education is needed to disperse the information to as many staff as possible and to sustain the change.

  1. A Multigroup Structural Equation Modeling Approach To Test for Differences in the Educational Outcomes Process for African American Students from Different Socioeconomic Backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosset, Jane M.

    This research tested a structural equation model of educational outcomes for three socioeconomic status (SES) groups of African-American students enrolled in a community college (total sample of 315). The structural model, which was based on a variant of Tinto's (1987) model, contained two exogenous constructs, educational intentions and…

  2. Thalidomide with peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin in the treatment of non-responders genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C patients: proof of concept Talidomida, peginterferón alfa-2b y ribavirina en el tratamiento de pacientes no respondedores con hepatitis crónica C genotipo 1: estudio piloto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamín Pardo-Yules

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: fewer than half of patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV achieve sustained viral clearance after peginterferon alfa/ribavirin (Peg-IFN/RBV therapy. Aims: thalidomide posses anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties through inhibition of tumor necrosis factor and costimulatory effect on human CD8+ T cells. Methods: we started a prospective, open label trial of retreatment of very-difficult-to-treat genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C patients (CHC patients, who had failed to respond to the (Peg-IFN/RBV, with a triple therapy consisting in these same antivirals plus thalidomide 200 mg/day (the TRITAL study. Results: none of the eleven patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria and included in the trial reached complete early virological response or sustained virological response. Viral load decline after 12 weeks of triple therapy thalidomide-based retreatment did not differ from viral dynamics during the first course. The triple therapy was well tolerated and only one patient developed mild bilateral neuropathy. Conclusions: thalidomide addition to standard therapy is tolerated and did not increase the SVR rate in very-difficult-to-treat genotype 1 CHC patients. Different schedules are warranted to improve attempting retreatment of non responder CHC patients.Antecedentes: menos de la mitad de los pacientes con hepatitis C logra eliminar el virus de manera sostenida después de la terapia con peginterferón alfa y ribavirina (Peg-IFN/RBV. Objetivos: la talidomida posee propiedades antiinflamatorias e inmunomoduladoras a través de la inhibición del TNF-α y al efecto estimulador sobre las células T CD8+. Métodos: se inició un estudio prospectivo y abierto de re-tratamiento de pacientes con hepatitis crónica C genotipo 1, no respondedores al tratamiento con Peg-IFN/RBV, mediante triple terapia añadiendo a los mismos antivirales 200 mg/día de talidomida. Resultados: ninguno de los once pacientes que fueron incluidos en

  3. Development of Bengali Audio-Visual Test Battery for Assessment of Pragmatic Skills: Preliminary Normative Data Based on Educational Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Madhushree; Biswas, Atanu; Pal, Sandip; Chatterjee, Amita

    2016-05-31

    Pragmatic competence may be disrupted due to psychological and neurological causes. For appropriate remedy and rehabilitation, a precise assessment of pragmatic skills is important. However, there is no test battery in the Bengali language, and consequently, there is no published data on pragmatic ability of Bengali speakers. Due to the vast diversity of the population, it becomes increasingly difficult to assess pragmatic ability of an individual without a proper knowledge of the normal variations. To address this problem we have developed a test battery in Bengali, and to begin with, we have administered it to one hundred and five (105) normal healthy persons having different levels of education. The four groups having 17 years and above, 15 to normative score of 193, 189, 171 and 150, respectively. These normative scores will allow clinicians to make a proper assessment of patients suffering from pragmatic deficits and help avoid interpreting social differences as neurological deficits.

  4. The Effects of Family Background, Test Scores, Personality Traits and Education on Economic Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jencks, Christopher; Rainwater, Lee

    Ten surveys of American men aged 25-64 were analyzed to determine the effects of family background, adolescent personality traits, cognitive test scores, and years of schooling on occupational status and earnings in maturity. Some of the findings follow: Data on brothers indicated that prior research has underestimated the effect of family…

  5. Ethnicity, educational level and attitudes contribute to parental intentions about genetic testing for child obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocken, P.L.; Theunissen, M.H.C.; Schönbeck, Y.; Henneman, L.; Janssens, A.C.J.W.; Detmar, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess parental beliefs and intentions about genetic testing for their children in a multi-ethnic population with the aim of acquiring information to guide interventions for obesity prevention and management. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in parents of

  6. Relationship of Friends, Physical Education, and State Test Scores: Implications for School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between dimensions of wellness and academic performance for 634 third through fifth grade students in Title One schools in rural Mississippi, using composites of the Five Factor Wellness Inventory for Elementary Children and Reading, Language, and Math Scores of the Mississippi Curriculum Test (a state level…

  7. Test-Taking Engagement in PIAAC. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 133

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhammer, Frank; Martens, Thomas; Christoph, Gabriela; Lüdtke, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how empirical indicators of test-taking engagement can be defined, empirically validated, and used to describe group differences in the context of the Programme of International Assessment of Adult Competences (PIAAC). The approach was to distinguish between disengaged and engaged response behavior by means of…

  8. Cardio-Pulmonary Function Testing. Continuing Education Curriculum for Respiratory Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Paul Technical Vocational Inst., MN.

    Compiled from interviews with personnel in pulmonary function testing (PFT) laboratories in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area, this competency-based curriculum guide is intended to provide a knowledge of PFT for persons who provide respiratory care. The guide contains 20 sections covering the following topics: vital capacity, flow measurements,…

  9. Mnemonic Aids during Tests: Worthless Frivolity or Effective Tool in Statistics Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larwin, Karen H.; Larwin, David A.; Gorman, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have explored many pedagogical approaches in an effort to assist students in finding understanding and comfort in required statistics courses. This study investigates the impact of mnemonic aids used during tests on students' statistics course performance in particular. In addition, the present study explores several hypotheses that…

  10. Sources of Validity Evidence for Educational and Psychological Tests: A Follow-Up Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizek, Gregory J.; Bowen, Daniel; Church, Keri

    2010-01-01

    This study followed up on previous work that examined the incidence of reporting evidence based on test consequences in "Mental Measurements Yearbook". In the present study, additional possible outlets for what has been called "consequential validity" evidence were investigated, including all articles published in the past 10 years in several…

  11. Endovascular Device Testing with Particle Image Velocimetry Enhances Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Priya; Ankeny, Casey J.; Ryan, Justin; Okcay, Murat; Frakes, David H.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the use of a new system, HemoFlow™, which utilizes state of the art technologies such as particle image velocimetry to test endovascular devices as part of an undergraduate biomedical engineering curriculum. Students deployed an endovascular stent into an anatomical model of a cerebral aneurysm and measured intra-aneurysmal flow…

  12. Assessing Attitudes about Genetic Testing as a Component of Continuing Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, Michael; Koenig, Barbara; Skime, Michelle; Snyder, Karen; Hook, Christopher; Black, John, III; Mrazek, David

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the attitudes among mental health professionals regarding the use of genetic testing. Methods: Psychiatrists and other mental health professionals (N = 41) who were enrolled in a week-long course in psychiatric genomics completed questionnaires before and after the course designed to assess how diagnostic genetic tests…

  13. Ethnicity, educational level and attitudes contribute to parental intentions about genetic testing for child obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocken, P.L.; Theunissen, M.H.C.; Schönbeck, Y.; Henneman, L.; Janssens, A.C.J.W.; Detmar, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess parental beliefs and intentions about genetic testing for their children in a multi-ethnic population with the aim of acquiring information to guide interventions for obesity prevention and management. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in parents of nati

  14. Estimation of Pap-test coverage in an area with an organised screening program: challenges for survey methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raggi Patrizio

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytological screening programme of Viterbo has completed the second round of invitations to the entire target population (age 25–64. From a public health perspective, it is important to know the Pap-test coverage rate and the use of opportunistic screening. The most commonly used study design is the survey, but the validity of self-reports and the assumptions made about non respondents are often questioned. Methods From the target population, 940 women were sampled, and responded to a telephone interview about Pap-test utilisation. The answers were compared with the screening program registry; comparing the dates of Pap-tests reported by both sources. Sensitivity analyses were performed for coverage over a 36-month period, according to various assumptions regarding non respondents. Results The response rate was 68%. The coverage over 36 months was 86.4% if we assume that non respondents had the same coverage as respondents, 66% if we assume they were not covered at all, and 74.6% if we adjust for screening compliance in the non respondents. The sensitivity and specificity of the question, "have you ever had a Pap test with the screening programme" were 84.5% and 82.2% respectively. The test dates reported in the interview tended to be more recent than those reported in the registry, but 68% were within 12 months of each other. Conclusion Surveys are useful tools to understand the effectiveness of a screening programme and women's self-report was sufficiently reliable in our setting, but the coverage estimates were strongly influenced by the assumptions we made regarding non respondents.

  15. Designing Proficiency Tests to Accredit Previous Knowledge in American and British Literature in a Bilingual Education Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    León Chica César Julio

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at identifying the kind of American and British literature tests that can be designed to allow students who enter a bilingual education program at a private university in Colombia to have their previous knowledge in these two subjects accredited through a proficiency test. Students’ needs, opinions, beliefs, existing commercial tests, the University’s (specifically, the one where the study was conducted literature programs, several anthologies, and competences required in the education program were all taken into consideration. Then the tests were developed, piloted, and validated with a focus group composed of ten students of said program. The results indicated that students require previous knowledge, literary competence, and command of the English language because those are determining factors in successfully passing the tests. Key words: Previous knowledge, proficiency tests, American and British literature, competences Este artículo busca identificar un modelo óptimo para un examen de literatura americana y británica que se puede diseñar para que los estudiantes que inician el programa de educación bilingüe de una universidad privada en Colombia puedan acreditar el conocimiento previo en estas dos materias, mediante un examen de suficiencia. Para el diseño de los exámenes se tuvieron en cuenta las necesidades y opiniones de los estudiantes, así como exámenes comerciales existentes, los programas de literatura de la universidad, varias antologías y las competencias requeridas por el programa de educación. Los exámenes diseñados se pilotearon y se validaron con un grupo de 10 estudiantes del programa en mención. Se determinó que los estudiantes requieren un conocimiento previo, competencia en literatura y un nivel competitivo en inglés, para aprobar satisfactoriamente los exámenes. Palabras clave: conocimiento previo, acreditación, exámenes de literatura americana y británica, competencias

  16. The primary parental investment in children in the contemporary USA is education : Testing the Trivers-Willard hypothesis of parental investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopcroft, Rosemary L; Martin, David O

    2014-06-01

    This paper tests the Trivers-Willard hypothesis that high-status individuals will invest more in sons and low-status individuals will invest more in daughters using data from the 2000 to 2010 General Social Survey and the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. We argue that the primary investment U.S. parents make in their children is in their children's education, and this investment is facilitated by a diverse market of educational choices at every educational level. We examine two measures of this investment: children's years of education and the highest degree attained. Results show that sons of high-status fathers receive more years of education and higher degrees than daughters, whereas daughters of low-status fathers receive more years of education and higher degrees than sons. Further analyses of possible mechanisms for these findings yield null results. We also find that males are more likely to have high-status fathers than females.

  17. Continued Testing of Head-Mounted Displays for Deaf Education in a Planetarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, Eric G.; Jones, M.; Lawler, J.; Bench, N.; Mangrubang, F. R.

    2013-06-01

    For more than a year now we have been developing techniques for using Head-Mounted Displays (HMD) to help accommodate a deaf audience in a planetarium environment. Our target audience is primarily children from 8 to 13 years of age, but the methodologies can be used for a wide variety of audiences. Applications also extend beyond the planetarium environment. Three tests have been done to determine if American Sign Language (ASL) can be delivered to the HMD and the student view both the planetarium show and the ASL ‘sound track’. From those early results we are now at the point of testing for comprehension improvement on a number of astronomical subjects. We will present a number of these early results.

  18. Life skills in educational contexts : testing the effects of an intervention program

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, António Rui; Marques, Brazelina

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a training program on students’ acquisition of life skills, life satisfaction, life orientation and expectations about academic achievement. Participants were allocated to either an intervention group (n = 41) that took part in a life skills program, or a control group (n = 43). Participants completed the Youth Experiences Scale 2.0, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, the Life Orientation Test-Revised, and the Expectations about Academic Achievement. Results ...

  19. Developing and testing multimedia educational tools to teach Polar Sciences in the Italian school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macario, Maddalena; Cattadori, Matteo; Bianchi, Cristiana; Zattin, Massimiliano; Talarico, Franco Maria

    2013-04-01

    In the last few years science education moved forward rapidly by connecting the expertise and enthusiasm of polar educators worldwide. The interest in Polar Sciences determined the creation of a global professional network for those that educate in, for, and about the Polar Regions. In Italy, this cooperation is well represented by APECS-Italy, the Italian section of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) that is composed by young researchers and teachers of the Italian School. The Polar Regions represent one of the best natural environments where students can investigate directly on global changes. In this sense, the working group UNICAMearth of the Geology Division of School of Science and Technology, University of Camerino (Italy), promotes the arrangement of instructional resources based on real data coming from the research world. Our project aims to develop innovative teaching resources and practices designed to bring the importance of the Polar Regions closer to home. Consequently, Polar Sciences could become a focus point in the new national school curricula, where Earth Sciences have to be thought and learnt in an integrated way together with other sciences. In particular, M. Macario is producing a teaching tool package, starting from a case study, which includes a dozen of full lesson plans based on multimedia tools (images, smart board lessons and videos of lab experiments) as well as on hands-on activities about polar issues and phenomena. Among the resources the teaching tool package is referring to, there is also an App for tablet named CLAST (CLimate in Antartica from Sediments and Tectonics). This App has been designed by a team made up of polar scientists belonging to the University of Siena and University of Padova, two science teachers of the Museo delle Scienze (MUSE) of Trento other than M. Macario. CLAST has been funded by two Research Projects, CLITEITAM ("CLImate-TEctonics Interactions along the TransAntarctic Mountains

  20. Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Master Plan for California Public Education, March 2000, 1; available at <http://www.kern.org/ masterplan / access.html>. 43 Ravitch, Left Back, 19. 44...Access and Equity for All Students.” A Master Plan for California Public Education, March 2000. Available at <http://www.kern.org/ masterplan

  1. Why assessment in medical education needs a solid foundation in modern test theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauber, Stefan K; Hecht, Martin; Nouns, Zineb M

    2017-03-16

    Despite the frequent use of state-of-the-art psychometric models in the field of medical education, there is a growing body of literature that questions their usefulness in the assessment of medical competence. Essentially, a number of authors raised doubt about the appropriateness of psychometric models as a guiding framework to secure and refine current approaches to the assessment of medical competence. In addition, an intriguing phenomenon known as case specificity is specific to the controversy on the use of psychometric models for the assessment of medical competence. Broadly speaking, case specificity is the finding of instability of performances across clinical cases, tasks, or problems. As stability of performances is, generally speaking, a central assumption in psychometric models, case specificity may limit their applicability. This has probably fueled critiques of the field of psychometrics with a substantial amount of potential empirical evidence. This article aimed to explain the fundamental ideas employed in psychometric theory, and how they might be problematic in the context of assessing medical competence. We further aimed to show why and how some critiques do not hold for the field of psychometrics as a whole, but rather only for specific psychometric approaches. Hence, we highlight approaches that, from our perspective, seem to offer promising possibilities when applied in the assessment of medical competence. In conclusion, we advocate for a more differentiated view on psychometric models and their usage.

  2. The usefulness of commercially available 'culture fair' tests in the assessment of educational success in Grade 1 Black pupils in South Africa - an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, André; Bham, Amina

    2003-03-01

    School failure among Grade 1 pupils and the subsequent drop out rate is of major concern in South Africa, especially as far as Black pupils are concerned. The school drop out rate is estimated to be four times higher in Black pupils than White children. The dilemma for the professionals in assessing children, who are experiencing difficulty at school, and who are from disadvantaged, non-English speaking communities, is the paucity of reliable, objective tests to identify children at risk. The purpose of this study was to determine whether commercially available 'culture fair' tests could be used to evaluate Black pupils early in Grade 1 and if they were associated with educational success. A parental questionnaire was used to examine non-academic predictors of educational success, such as birth history, socio-economic status and the medical profile. One hundred and three Grade 1 pupils were tested in the first term. The tests used were the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales, WISC mazes, Raven's Progressive Matrices, Developmental Test of Visual Motor Integration (VMI), Motor-free Visual Perceptual Test (MVPT), Test of Visual Perceptual Skills (TVPS) and the Draw-a-Person Test (DAP). Several backward elimination stepwise regression analysis procedures were used to examine the multivariate associations between the psychometric and nonacademic variables and three outcome variables, namely the mid and end of year aggregates and a pass/fail dichotomous variable. Non-academic variables that were significantly associated with academic success were asphyxia, overcrowding and maternal education. The psychometric subtests that were significantly associated with academic achievement were the VMI, DAP, the Raven's Progressive Matrices, TVPS and WISC mazes. Commercially available 'culture fair' tests are significantly associated with educational success in Black Grade 1 pupils where standardised, comprehensive tests are not available. To evaluate to what extent these tests

  3. Is the Physical Being Taken out of Physical Education? On the Possible Effects of High-Stakes Testing on an Embattled Profession's Curriculum Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Clancy; Garrison, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Building on recent discussions regarding how current national standards for physical education promote cognitive outcomes over physical outcomes, the authors explore how a new era in high-stakes testing is also contributing to an emphasis on the cognitive, over the physical. While high-stakes testing has been linked to reducing the amount of…

  4. Is the Physical Being Taken out of Physical Education? On the Possible Effects of High-Stakes Testing on an Embattled Profession's Curriculum Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Clancy; Garrison, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Building on recent discussions regarding how current national standards for physical education promote cognitive outcomes over physical outcomes, the authors explore how a new era in high-stakes testing is also contributing to an emphasis on the cognitive, over the physical. While high-stakes testing has been linked to reducing the amount of…

  5. A Theory-based Comparison of the Reliabilities of Fixed-length and Trials-to-criterion Scoring of Physical Education Skills Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldt, Leonard S.

    This paper considers, from a theoretical point of view, two measurement approaches used in measuring success and failure in skills tests in physical education. The first, "fixed length" (FL) testing, entails counting the number of successful performances in a fixed number of trials. The second, "trials-to-criterion" (TTC)…

  6. Linking Errors between Two Populations and Tests: A Case Study in International Surveys in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Hastedt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This simulation study was prompted by the current increased interest in linking national studies to international large-scale assessments (ILSAs such as IEA's TIMSS, IEA's PIRLS, and OECD's PISA. Linkage in this scenario is achieved by including items from the international assessments in the national assessments on the premise that the average achievement scores from the latter can be linked to the international metric. In addition to raising issues associated with different testing conditions, administrative procedures, and the like, this approach also poses psychometric challenges. This paper endeavors to shed some light on the effects that can be expected, the linkage errors in particular, by countries using this practice. The ILSA selected for this simulation study was IEA TIMSS 2011, and the three countries used as the national assessment cases were Botswana, Honduras, and Tunisia, all of which participated in TIMSS 2011. The items selected as items common to the simulated national tests and the international test came from the Grade 4 TIMSS 2011 mathematics items that IEA released into the public domain after completion of this assessment. The findings of the current study show that linkage errors seemed to achieve acceptable levels if 30 or more items were used for the linkage, although the errors were still significantly higher compared to the TIMSS' cutoffs. Comparison of the estimated country averages based on the simulated national surveys and the averages based on the international TIMSS assessment revealed only one instance across the three countries of the estimates approaching parity. Also, the percentages of students in these countries who actually reached the defined benchmarks on the TIMSS achievement scale differed significantly from the results based on TIMSS and the results for the simulated national assessments. As a conclusion, we advise against using groups of released items from international assessments in national

  7. Ethnicity, educational level and attitudes contribute to parental intentions about genetic testing for child obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Kocken, Paul L; Theunissen, Meinou H. C.; Schönbeck, Yvonne; Henneman, Lidewij; Janssens, A. Cecile J. W.; Detmar, Symone B

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess parental beliefs and intentions about genetic testing for their children in a multi-ethnic population with the aim of acquiring information to guide interventions for obesity prevention and management. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in parents of native Dutch children and children from a large minority population (Turks) selected from Youth Health Care registries. The age range of the children was 5–11 years. Parents with lower levels of educat...

  8. Accuracy of Bayes and Logistic Regression Subscale Probabilities for Educational and Certification Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Rudner

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the machine learning literature, it is commonly accepted as fact that as calibration sample sizes increase, Na ve Bayes classifiers initially outperform Logistic Regression classifiers in terms of classification accuracy. Applied to subtests from an on-line final examination and from a highly regarded certification examination, this study shows that the conclusion also applies to the probabilities estimated from short subtests of mental abilities and that small samples can yield excellent accuracy. The calculated Bayes probabilities can be used to provide meaningful examinee feedback regardless of whether the test was originally designed to be unidimensional.

  9. Interactive internet-based clinical education: an efficient and cost-savings approach to point-of-care test training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Herschel; Chan, Kee; Anaya, Henry D; Goetz, Matthew B

    2011-06-01

    We successfully created and implemented an effective HIV rapid testing training and certification curriculum using traditional in-person training at multiple sites within the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System. Considering the multitude of geographically remote facilities in the nationwide VA system, coupled with the expansion of HIV diagnostics, we developed an alternate training method that is affordable, efficient, and effective. Using materials initially developed for in-person HIV rapid test in-services, we used a distance learning model to offer this training via live audiovisual online technology to educate clinicians at a remote outpatient primary care VA facility. Participants' evaluation metrics showed that this form of remote education is equivalent to in-person training; additionally, HIV testing rates increased considerably in the months following this intervention. Although there is a one-time setup cost associated with this remote training protocol, there is potential cost savings associated with the point-of-care nurse manager's time productivity by using the Internet in-service learning module for teaching HIV rapid testing. If additional in-service training modules are developed into Internet-based format, there is the potential for additional cost savings. Our cost analysis demonstrates that the remote in-service method provides a more affordable and efficient alternative compared with in-person training. The online in-service provided training that was equivalent to in-person sessions based on first-hand supervisor observation, participant satisfaction surveys, and follow-up results. This method saves time and money, requires fewer personnel, and affords access to expert trainers regardless of geographic location. Further, it is generalizable to training beyond HIV rapid testing. Based on these consistent implementation successes, we plan to expand use of online training to include remote VA satellite facilities spanning

  10. Effects of an educational intervention based on the protection motivation theory and implementation intentions on first and second pap test practice in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehdari, Tahereh; Hassani, Laleh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Abedini, Mehrandokht

    2014-01-01

    Few Iranian women take the Papanicolaou test despite its important role in preventing cervical cancer. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of an educational intervention based on the protection motivation theory (PMT) variables and implementation intentions in the first and second Pap test practice among Iranian women. In this quasi-randomized controlled trial, 200 women who were referred to 30 primary health care clinics in Tehran were randomly selected. PMT variables and Pap test practice were measured at baseline and again after 3 and 15 months. The 4-week educational intervention program was conducted for the intervention group. Following the intervention, the mean scores of self-efficacy, perceived vulnerability, and behavior intention variables were significantly higher in the intervention group when compared to the control group (ptheory-based framework for developing educational interventions regarding Pap test practice in Iran.

  11. Introducing Computer-Based Testing in High-Stakes Exams in Higher Education: Results of a Field Experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja J Boevé

    Full Text Available The introduction of computer-based testing in high-stakes examining in higher education is developing rather slowly due to institutional barriers (the need of extra facilities, ensuring test security and teacher and student acceptance. From the existing literature it is unclear whether computer-based exams will result in similar results as paper-based exams and whether student acceptance can change as a result of administering computer-based exams. In this study, we compared results from a computer-based and paper-based exam in a sample of psychology students and found no differences in total scores across the two modes. Furthermore, we investigated student acceptance and change in acceptance of computer-based examining. After taking the computer-based exam, fifty percent of the students preferred paper-and-pencil exams over computer-based exams and about a quarter preferred a computer-based exam. We conclude that computer-based exam total scores are similar as paper-based exam scores, but that for the acceptance of high-stakes computer-based exams it is important that students practice and get familiar with this new mode of test administration.

  12. Introducing Computer-Based Testing in High-Stakes Exams in Higher Education: Results of a Field Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boevé, Anja J; Meijer, Rob R; Albers, Casper J; Beetsma, Yta; Bosker, Roel J

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of computer-based testing in high-stakes examining in higher education is developing rather slowly due to institutional barriers (the need of extra facilities, ensuring test security) and teacher and student acceptance. From the existing literature it is unclear whether computer-based exams will result in similar results as paper-based exams and whether student acceptance can change as a result of administering computer-based exams. In this study, we compared results from a computer-based and paper-based exam in a sample of psychology students and found no differences in total scores across the two modes. Furthermore, we investigated student acceptance and change in acceptance of computer-based examining. After taking the computer-based exam, fifty percent of the students preferred paper-and-pencil exams over computer-based exams and about a quarter preferred a computer-based exam. We conclude that computer-based exam total scores are similar as paper-based exam scores, but that for the acceptance of high-stakes computer-based exams it is important that students practice and get familiar with this new mode of test administration.

  13. Development and testing of Schisto and Ladders™, an innovative health educational game for control of schistosomiasis in schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejike, Cynthia Uchechukwu; Oluwole, Akinola Stephen; Mogaji, Hammed Oladeji; Adeniran, Adebiyi Abdulhakeem; Alabi, Oladimeji Michael; Ekpo, Uwem Friday

    2017-06-28

    Schistosomiasis remains a public health problem in many regions of the world, including Nigeria. Current control strategy involves mass drug administration with praziquantel to the endemic population. To complement and sustain on-going preventive chemotherapy, we developed a health educational game named Schisto and Ladders™ and tested its potential for the control of schistosomiasis among schoolchildren living in Imala-Odo, a highly endemic community near Abeokuta, Nigeria. One hundred school children were randomly selected and divided into intervention and control groups through balloting. Their knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) concerning schistosomiasis transmission, control and prevention were assessed using structured questionnaires. Schisto and Ladders™ game were given to the intervention group and the popular Snake and Ladders™ game to the control group. Both games were played for 2 months under the supervision of their class teachers. A post-KAP assessment was carried out in both groups, including focus group discussions (FGDs) to investigate knowledge and the impact of the games. Knowledge about urinary schistosomiasis and its transmission significantly improved (P = 0.000) in the intervention group (68.0%) compared to the control group (8.0%). FGDs showed that the frequency of visits to dam water also significantly reduced (P = 0.048) in the intervention group (18.0%) compared to the control group (40.0%). There was a significant increase in knowledge regarding risk behaviours, prevention and control of schistosomiasis among the intervention group, but no new knowledge gained in the control group. This study demonstrates the potential of the health education game Schisto and Ladders™ for teaching basic health education and promoting behavioural changes among schoolchildren in endemic communities.

  14. Development and Pilot Testing of Multimedia Patient Education Tools for Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis, Osteoporosis, and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Olivo, Maria A; Ingleshwar, Aparna; Volk, Robert J; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria; Barbo, Andrea; Saag, Kenneth; Leong, Amye; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2017-05-02

    We developed and tested multimedia patient education tools (video tools) for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), osteoporosis (OP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We followed an "edutainment" model, incorporating educational patient story lines. The goals were designed to make the programs both didactic and entertaining, with navigation and graphical user interfaces as simple as possible. We created both English and Spanish-language versions. Once the video tool was finalized, 60 patients, 20 per disease, were shown the tool and were interviewed. Disease knowledge was our primary outcome and decision conflict, disease management, and acceptability were secondary outcomes. We observed statistically significant differences in pre-post knowledge questionnaire scores (before and after viewing the video tool) (OA, p=0.03; OP, p=0.001; RA, pmaterials be well organized. Multimedia tools that incorporate videos may help patients better understand and manage their disease. Patient involvement in the development process is essential to ensure relevant content and usability. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Semantic memory for actions as assessed by the Kissing and Dancing Test: Education and age effects in cognitively healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Roque Baradel

    Full Text Available Action semantics is a relevant part of cognitive-linguistic assessment and the "Kissing and Dancing Test" (KDT has been used extensively for this purpose, evidencing clinical distinctions among brain-damaged patients. To enhance its use, reference values are necessary, especially for populations with heterogeneous educational levels and socioeconomic backgrounds.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of schooling and age on the KDT in cognitively unimpaired individualMETHODS: The KDT was applied to seventy-four healthy subjects. Sociodemographic factors were investigated through correlational and between-group analyses. Reference values according to age and schooling were provided.RESULTSKDT performance correlated significantly with schooling (r=0.757, p<0.01, age (r=-0.496, p<0.01 and socioeconomic status (r=0.418 p<0.01 but these variables were intercorrelated. Correlation with schooling and age remained signifi when controlling for age and socioeconomic status (r=0.530, p<0.01, and for schooling (-0.305,<0.01, respectively. When controlling for schooling, correlation between socioeconomic status and KDT was not significant (p=0.164. Between-group analyses revealed no age effects. Significant differences were found in performance according to educational level. Scores below 39/52 and below 47/52 (percentile 25 for individuals with 8 or less years of schooling and for individuals with 9 or more years of schooling, respectively, seem suggestive of an impairment in Action Semantics Processing and shall be further investigatedCONCLUSION KDT performance was influenced both by age and schooling, indicating the need to consider these demographic features as covariates when analyzing performance on the test and to adjust cut-off scores according to these demographic characteristics in clinical practice.

  16. Differential validity for cognitive ability tests in employment and educational settings: not much more than range restriction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Philip L; Le, Huy; Oh, In-Sue; Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Buster, Maury A; Robbins, Steve B; Campion, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The concept of differential validity suggests that cognitive ability tests are associated with varying levels of validity across ethnic groups, such that validity is lower in certain ethnic subgroups than in others. A recent meta-analysis has revived the viability of this concept. Unfortunately, data were not available in this meta-analysis to correct for range restriction within ethnic groups. We reviewed the differential validity literature and conducted 4 studies. In Study 1, we empirically demonstrated that using a cognitive ability test with a common cutoff decreases variance in test scores of Black subgroup samples more than in White samples. In Study 2, we developed a simulation that examined the effects of range restriction on estimates of differential validity. Results demonstrated that different levels of range restriction for subgroups can explain the apparent observed differential validity results in employment and educational settings (but not military settings) when no differential validity exists in the population. In Study 3, we conducted a simulation in which we examined how one corrects for range restriction affects the accuracy of these corrections. Results suggest that the correction approach using a common range restriction ratio for various subgroups may create or perpetuate the illusion of differential validity and that corrections are most accurate when done within each subgroup. Finally, in Study 4, we conducted a simulation in which we assumed differential validity in the population. We found that range restriction artificially increased the size of observed differential validity estimates when the validity of cognitive ability tests was assumed to be higher among Whites. Overall, we suggest that the concept of differential validity may be largely artifactual and current data are not definitive enough to suggest such effects exist.

  17. Can education alter attitudes, behaviour and knowledge about organ donation? A pretest–post-test study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlade, Donal; Pierscionek, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Objective The emergence of evidence suggests that student nurses commonly exhibit concerns about their lack of knowledge of organ donation and transplantation. Formal training about organ donation has been shown to positively influence attitude, encourage communication and registration behaviours and improve knowledge about donor eligibility and brain death. The focus of this study was to determine the attitude and behaviour of student nurses and to assess their level of knowledge about organ donation after a programme of study. Design A quantitative questionnaire was completed before and after participation in a programme of study using a pretest–post-test design. Setting Participants were recruited from a University based in Northern Ireland during the period from February to April 2011. Participants 100 preregistration nurses (female : male=96 : 4) aged 18–50 years (mean (SD) 24.3 (6.0) years) were recruited. Results Participants’ knowledge improved over the programme of study with regard to the suitability of organs that can be donated after death, methods available to register organ donation intentions, organ donation laws, concept of brain death and the likelihood of recovery after brain death. Changes in attitude postintervention were also observed in relation to participants’ willingness to accept an informed system of consent and with regard to participants’ actual discussion behaviour. Conclusions The results provide support for the introduction of a programme that helps inform student nurses about important aspects of organ donation. PMID:24381257

  18. Assessment of HIV-related stigma in a US faith-based HIV education and testing intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannette Y Berkley-Patton

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The African American church is a highly influential institution with the potential to greatly increase the reach of HIV prevention interventions and address HIV-related stigma in US African American communities. However, there are few studies on HIV-related stigma and African American church populations. This study explored HIV-related stigma among church and community members participating in an HIV education and testing intervention pilot study in African American churches, named Taking It to the Pews. Methods: Four African American churches located in Kansas City, MO and KS, were randomized to either intervention or comparison groups. Churches assigned to the intervention group received religiously tailored HIV education, testing and compassion messages/activities (e.g. sermons, brochures/church bulletins, testimonials via the Taking It to the Pews HIV Tool Kit. Comparison churches received non-religiously tailored HIV information. HIV-related stigma was assessed with 543 church members and with community members served through church outreach services (e.g. food/clothing pantries, social services in the four churches. Participants completed surveys at baseline, 6 months and 12 months to assess their HIV-related stigma beliefs, exposure to intervention components and satisfaction with the study. Results: At baseline, HIV-related stigma beliefs were similar across experimental groups and were quite low. Mean HIV-related stigma scores were not significantly different between experimental groups at 6 months (p=0.92 or at 12 months (p=0.70. However, mean HIV-related stigma scores within both groups showed decreasing trends at six months, which approached significance. Analysis of previously studied HIV-related stigma factors (e.g. age, gender, income, HIV knowledge, religiosity did not yield changes in the null findings. Intervention group participants were highly exposed to several intervention components (sermons, HIV resource

  19. Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundja, J. O.; Decrosta, J. T.; Lechuga, P.

    2009-05-01

    Government schools in Congo kinshasa are not providing quality education to the masses since many years, and this phenomenon has not escaped the eyes of experts, activists, and policy makers. However, there seems to be a general perception that the main, and sometimes even the sole, source of this problem are the low levels of government expenditure of education. And to prove their case supports of this view cite educational expenditure to GDP ratios in Congo kinshasa in comparison with that of some other nations. Though there may be reasonable arguments to increase the level of government expenditure on education, such hijacking of public debate to focus on - the level of expenditure - often overlooks more important issues. Contrary to common perception the level of per student expenditure on government schools in Delhi is reasonable, ranging from Fc.6000 to Fc.12000 p.a. There are a number of organisational deficiencies which do not create checks and balances for appropriate utilization of fund. Moreover, the division of these funds among social groups and for different purposes is also questionable. Though, female literacy lags significantly behind male literacy, about 15% points, extra resources provided for female education are insignificant. And in some schemes such as the one run for 'street children' and 'child labourers', large amounts are budgeted year after year without a single French congolese being spent. Also government schools catering to richer regions of Kinshasa seem to be spending more per child as compared to the poorer counterparts. The paper also proposes an education voucher model, which may have the potential to address some of the issues raised in the paper. Trends in expenditure under some schemes have been studied in relation to the purpose of expenditure. The issue of government expenditure on education is a complex one, and public space should be utilized to discuss them as they are, rather than reducing discussion to dogmatic wars

  20. Educational Accountability Tests, Social and Legal Inclusion Approaches to Discrimination for Students with Disability: A National Case Study from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, J. Joy; Dickson, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability promotes equal and full participation by children in education. Equity of educational access for all students, including students with disability, free from discrimination, is the first-stated national goal of Australian education. Australian federal disability discrimination law, the…

  1. The Stick Design Test on the assessment of older adults with low formal education: evidences of construct, criterion-related and ecological validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Jonas Jardim; Costa, Mônica Vieira; Bocardi, Matheus Bortolosso; Cortezzi, Mariana; De Moraes, Edgar Nunes; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro Fernandes

    2013-12-01

    The assessment of visuospatial abilities is usually performed by drawing tasks. In patients with very low formal education, the use of these tasks might be biased by their cultural background. The Stick Design Test was developed for the assessment of this population. We aim to expand the test psychometric properties by assessing its construct, criterion-related and ecological validity in older adults with low formal education. Healthy older adults (n = 63) and Alzheimer's disease patients (n = 92) performed the Stick Design Test, Mini-Mental State Examination, Digit Span Forward and the Clock Drawing Test. Their caregivers answered Personal Care and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living). Construct validity was assessed by factor analysis, convergent correlations (with the Clock Drawing Test), and divergent correlations (with Digit Span Forward); criterion-related validity by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and binary logistic regression; and Ecological validity by correlations with ADL. The test factor structure was composed by one component (R 2 = 64%). Significant correlations with the Clock Drawing Test and Digit Span Forward were found, and the relationship was stronger with the first measure. The test was less associated with formal education than the Clock Drawing Test. It classified about 76% of the participants correctly and had and additive effect with the Mini-Mental State Examination (84% of correct classification). The test also correlated significantly with measures of ADL, suggesting ecological validity. The Stick Design Test shows evidence of construct, criterion-related and ecological validity. It is an interesting alternative to drawing tasks for the assessment of visuospatial abilities.

  2. Use of the Oslo-Potsdam Solution to test the effect of an environmental education model on tangible measures of environmental protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Philip Craig

    The fundamental goals of environmental education include the creation of an environmentally literate citizenry possessing the knowledge, skills, and motivation to objectively analyze environmental issues and engage in responsible behaviors leading to issue resolution and improved or maintained environmental quality. No existing research, however, has linked educational practices and environmental protection. In an original attempt to quantify the pedagogy - environmental protection relationship, both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to investigate local environmental records and environmental quality indices that reflected the results of student actions. The data were analyzed using an educational adaptation of the "Oslo-Potsdam Solution for International Environmental Regime Effectiveness." The new model, termed the Environmental Education Performance Indicator (EEPI), was developed and evaluated as a quantitative tool for testing and fairly comparing the efficacy of student-initiated environmental projects in terms of environmental quality measures. Five case studies were developed from descriptions of student actions and environmental impacts as revealed by surveys and interviews with environmental education teachers using the IEEIA (Investigating and Evaluating Environmental Issues and Actions) curriculum, former students, community members, and agency officials. Archival information was also used to triangulate the data. In addition to evaluating case study data on the basis of the EEPI model, an expert panel of evaluators consisting of professionals from environmental education, natural sciences, environmental policy, and environmental advocacy provided subjective assessments on the effectiveness of each case study. The results from this study suggest that environmental education interventions can equip and empower students to act on their own conclusions in a manner that leads to improved or maintained environmental conditions. The EEPI model

  3. Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Frank Sosa, Dept. of the Air Force Col Juan Urbano , Peruvian Army Dr. Francis A’Hearn, Faculty Prof. William Mayall, Faculty COL Mark McGuire...Germany House of Commons, Parliamentary Undersecretary State for Education, England Ministry of Science, Research, and Art , Stuttgart, Germany...markets. Fifty percent of the elementary market is composed of reading and language arts . Mathematics and a combination social sciences/science and

  4. Perceived teaching behaviors and self-determined motivation in physical education: a test of self-determination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koka, Andre; Hagger, Martin S

    2010-03-01

    In the present study, we tested the effects of specific dimensions of perceived teaching behaviors on students' self-determined motivation in physical education. In accordance with the tenets of self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985, 2000), we expected the psychological needs for competence, autonomy, and relatedness would mediate these effects. Secondary school students (N=498) ages 12-17 years completed measures of perceived teaching behaviors for seven dimensions: (a) democratic behavior, (b) autocratic behavior (c) teaching and instruction, (d) situation consideration, (e) positive general feedback, (f) positive nonverbal feedback, and (h) negative nonverbal feedback. They also completed measures of perceived satisfaction for competence, autonomy, relatedness, and self-determined motivation. A path-analytic model revealed a positive, indirect effect of perceived positive general feedback on self-determined motivation. The effects of perceived autocratic behavior and negative nonverbal feedback were direct and negative, whereas the effects of teaching and instruction and situation consideration were direct and positive. Results suggest that feedback, situation consideration, and teaching and instruction are essential antecedents to self-determined motivation.

  5. Suggestions from Representatives of the International Language Testing Association for Revision of the "AERA/APA/NCME Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Charles W.; Spolsky, Bernard

    The International Language Testing Association has some 250 members in 15 countries. Most are specialists in the testing of second language skills, with a special interest in performance assessment because of the testing of speaking and writing performance that is critical to second language skills assessment. The association believes that certain…

  6. Category fluency test: effects of age, gender and education on total scores, clustering and switching in Brazilian Portuguese-speaking subjects

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    Brucki S.M.D.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Verbal fluency tests are used as a measure of executive functions and language, and can also be used to evaluate semantic memory. We analyzed the influence of education, gender and age on scores in a verbal fluency test using the animal category, and on number of categories, clustering and switching. We examined 257 healthy participants (152 females and 105 males with a mean age of 49.42 years (SD = 15.75 and having a mean educational level of 5.58 (SD = 4.25 years. We asked them to name as many animals as they could. Analysis of variance was performed to determine the effect of demographic variables. No significant effect of gender was observed for any of the measures. However, age seemed to influence the number of category changes, as expected for a sensitive frontal measure, after being controlled for the effect of education. Educational level had a statistically significant effect on all measures, except for clustering. Subject performance (mean number of animals named according to schooling was: illiterates, 12.1; 1 to 4 years, 12.3; 5 to 8 years, 14.0; 9 to 11 years, 16.7, and more than 11 years, 17.8. We observed a decrease in performance in these five educational groups over time (more items recalled during the first 15 s, followed by a progressive reduction until the fourth interval. We conclude that education had the greatest effect on the category fluency test in this Brazilian sample. Therefore, we must take care in evaluating performance in lower educational subjects.

  7. What Makes a Test Score? The Respective Contributions of Pupils, Schools and Peers in Achievement in English Primary Education. CEE DP 102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramarz, Francis; Machin, Stephen; Ouazad, Amine

    2009-01-01

    What makes a test score? There is a great deal of uncertainty surrounding the exact contribution of school quality, pupil background, and peers in educational achievement. If peers make most of the difference, then diversity and heterogeneous classrooms may narrow the gap between high- and low-performing students. If pupil background is the first…

  8. A Comparative Analysis of the Bender-Gestalt and Beery/Buktenica Tests of Visual-Motor Integration as a Function of Grade Level for Regular Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Joanne; Breen, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    Regular education students (N=125) in grades K-3 were administered the Bender-Gestalt and Beery/Buktenica tests of visual-motor integration. Found significant differences between the mean Bender and Beery age equivalent scores at each grade level. Discusses implications for their utilization in assessing fine motor readiness development.…

  9. The Level of Diagnostic Tests' Preparation Skills among the Teachers of the First Three Elementary Grades' Teachers at the Directorate of Education of Bani Kinana District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghmour, Kholoud Subhi; Obaidat, Luai Taleb; Hamadneh, Qaseem Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at exploring the level of Diagnostic Tests' Preparation Skills among the teachers of the first Three Elementary Grades at the Directorate of Education of Bani Kinana District, and its relationship to the variables of gender, academic qualification, and years of experience. The sample of the study consisted of (264) male and female…

  10. Human and Financial Capital in the Rural Educational Environment: The Effects of Exceeding the Carrying Capacity Threshold on Standardized Test Scores in Rural Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Glenn

    The Rural Educational Environment (REE) is a complex mixture of demographic and economic forces that interact to impact the rural school corporation. The condition of REE financial and human capital indicates REE health and may influence student performance on standardized tests. This paper proposes an ecosystem model of the impact of financial,…

  11. The Performance of American Indian Children on the Draw-A-Man Test. National Study of American Indian Education, Series III, No. 2, Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levensky, Kay

    As a part of the National Study of American Indian Education, this document reports on 1700 American Indian primary school children (representing 14 tribal groups and 12 states) who were administered the Goodenough Draw-A-Man Test (DAM) as a measure of mental alertness. A comparison is given of the Indian and white children's scores. It appears…

  12. Evaluation of the Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition, Screening Test for Use in States' Child Outcomes Measurement Systems under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaum, Batya; Gattamorta, Karina A.; Penfield, Randall D.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition, Screening Test (BDI-2 ST) for use in states' child outcomes accountability systems under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Complete Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition (BDI-2), assessment data were obtained for 142 children, ages 2 to 62 months, who…

  13. Increased Uptake of HCV Testing through a Community-Based Educational Intervention in Difficult-to-Reach People Who Inject Drugs: Results from the ANRS-AERLI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrine Roux

    Full Text Available The community-based AERLI intervention provided training and education to people who inject drugs (PWID about HIV and HCV transmission risk reduction, with a focus on drug injecting practices, other injection-related complications, and access to HIV and HCV testing and care. We hypothesized that in such a population where HCV prevalence is very high and where few know their HCV serostatus, AERLI would lead to increased HCV testing.The national multisite intervention study ANRS-AERLI consisted in assessing the impact of an injection-centered face-to-face educational session offered in volunteer harm reduction (HR centers ("with intervention" compared with standard HR centers ("without intervention". The study included 271 PWID interviewed on three occasions: enrolment, 6 and 12 months. Participants in the intervention group received at least one face-to-face educational session during the first 6 months.The primary outcome of this analysis was reporting to have been tested for HCV during the previous 6 months. Statistical analyses used a two-step Heckman approach to account for bias arising from the non-randomized clustering design. This approach identified factors associated with HCV testing during the previous 6 months.Of the 271 participants, 127 and 144 were enrolled in the control and intervention groups, respectively. Of the latter, 113 received at least one educational session. For the present analysis, we selected 114 and 88 participants eligible for HCV testing in the control and intervention groups, respectively. In the intervention group, 44% of participants reported having being tested for HCV during the previous 6 months at enrolment and 85% at 6 months or 12 months. In the control group, these percentages were 51% at enrolment and 78% at 12 months. Multivariable analyses showed that participants who received at least one educational session during follow-up were more likely to report HCV testing, compared with those who did not

  14. Increased Uptake of HCV Testing through a Community-Based Educational Intervention in Difficult-to-Reach People Who Inject Drugs: Results from the ANRS-AERLI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Perrine; Rojas Castro, Daniela; Ndiaye, Khadim; Debrus, Marie; Protopopescu, Camélia; Le Gall, Jean-Marie; Haas, Aurélie; Mora, Marion; Spire, Bruno; Suzan-Monti, Marie; Carrieri, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Aims The community-based AERLI intervention provided training and education to people who inject drugs (PWID) about HIV and HCV transmission risk reduction, with a focus on drug injecting practices, other injection-related complications, and access to HIV and HCV testing and care. We hypothesized that in such a population where HCV prevalence is very high and where few know their HCV serostatus, AERLI would lead to increased HCV testing. Methods The national multisite intervention study ANRS-AERLI consisted in assessing the impact of an injection-centered face-to-face educational session offered in volunteer harm reduction (HR) centers (“with intervention”) compared with standard HR centers (“without intervention”). The study included 271 PWID interviewed on three occasions: enrolment, 6 and 12 months. Participants in the intervention group received at least one face-to-face educational session during the first 6 months. Measurements The primary outcome of this analysis was reporting to have been tested for HCV during the previous 6 months. Statistical analyses used a two-step Heckman approach to account for bias arising from the non-randomized clustering design. This approach identified factors associated with HCV testing during the previous 6 months. Findings Of the 271 participants, 127 and 144 were enrolled in the control and intervention groups, respectively. Of the latter, 113 received at least one educational session. For the present analysis, we selected 114 and 88 participants eligible for HCV testing in the control and intervention groups, respectively. In the intervention group, 44% of participants reported having being tested for HCV during the previous 6 months at enrolment and 85% at 6 months or 12 months. In the control group, these percentages were 51% at enrolment and 78% at 12 months. Multivariable analyses showed that participants who received at least one educational session during follow-up were more likely to report HCV testing

  15. Memory Alteration Test to Detect Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Early Alzheimer’s Dementia in Population with Low Educational Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Custodio

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Short tests to early detection of the cognitive impairment are necessary in primary care setting, particularly in populations with low educational level. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of Memory Alteration Test (M@T to discriminate controls, patients with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI and patients with early Alzheimer’s Dementia (AD in a sample of individuals with low level of education.Methods: Cross-sectional study to assess the performance of the M@T (study test, compared to the neuropsychological evaluation (gold standard test scores in 247 elderly subjects with low education level from Lima-Peru. The cognitive evaluation included three sequential stages: (1 screening (to detect cases with cognitive impairment; (2 nosological diagnosis (to determinate specific disease; and (3 classification (to differentiate disease subtypes. The subjects with negative results for all stages were considered as cognitively normal (controls. The test performance was assessed by means of area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. We calculated validity measures (sensitivity, specificity and correctly classified percentage, the internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient, and concurrent validity (Pearson’s ratio coefficient between the M@T and Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR scores.Results: The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.79 and Pearson’s ratio coefficient was 0.79 (p < 0.01. The AUC of M@T to discriminate between early AD and aMCI was 99.60% (sensitivity = 100.00%, specificity = 97.53% and correctly classified = 98.41% and to discriminate between aMCI and controls was 99.56% (sensitivity = 99.17%, specificity = 91.11%, and correctly classified = 96.99%.Conclusions: The M@T is a short test with a good performance to discriminate controls, aMCI and early AD in individuals with low level of education from urban settings.

  16. Memory Alteration Test to Detect Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment and Early Alzheimer’s Dementia in Population with Low Educational Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodio, Nilton; Lira, David; Herrera-Perez, Eder; Montesinos, Rosa; Castro-Suarez, Sheila; Cuenca-Alfaro, José; Valeriano-Lorenzo, Lucía

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims: Short tests to early detection of the cognitive impairment are necessary in primary care setting, particularly in populations with low educational level. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of Memory Alteration Test (M@T) to discriminate controls, patients with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) and patients with early Alzheimer’s Dementia (AD) in a sample of individuals with low level of education. Methods: Cross-sectional study to assess the performance of the M@T (study test), compared to the neuropsychological evaluation (gold standard test) scores in 247 elderly subjects with low education level from Lima-Peru. The cognitive evaluation included three sequential stages: (1) screening (to detect cases with cognitive impairment); (2) nosological diagnosis (to determinate specific disease); and (3) classification (to differentiate disease subtypes). The subjects with negative results for all stages were considered as cognitively normal (controls). The test performance was assessed by means of area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. We calculated validity measures (sensitivity, specificity and correctly classified percentage), the internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient), and concurrent validity (Pearson’s ratio coefficient between the M@T and Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scores). Results: The Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.79 and Pearson’s ratio coefficient was 0.79 (p < 0.01). The AUC of M@T to discriminate between early AD and aMCI was 99.60% (sensitivity = 100.00%, specificity = 97.53% and correctly classified = 98.41%) and to discriminate between aMCI and controls was 99.56% (sensitivity = 99.17%, specificity = 91.11%, and correctly classified = 96.99%). Conclusions: The M@T is a short test with a good performance to discriminate controls, aMCI and early AD in individuals with low level of education from urban settings. PMID:28878665

  17. Don't Forget, Thursday Is Test[icle] Time! The Use of Humour in Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality and humour share a fraught relationship at school, so that how humour might be productively employed in sexuality education constitutes a "risky" consideration. This paper explores the role of humour in sexuality education as observed in a Year 9 New Zealand health class. Adding to existing literature emphasising students' use…

  18. Developing and Testing a Self-Regulated Learning Assessment Methodology Combined with Virtual-Patient Simulation in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-09

    Educational Psychologist, 40, 199-209. Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action : A social cognitive theory . Englewood Cliffs, NJ... reasoning , motivation, self-regulated learning (SRL), SRL microanalysis, undergraduate medical education, virtual patients Unclassified Unclassified...outcomes,4 but they also can be used to document shifts in students’ motivational beliefs and SRL during clinical reasoning activities.5 Further, recent

  19. Don't Forget, Thursday Is Test[icle] Time! The Use of Humour in Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality and humour share a fraught relationship at school, so that how humour might be productively employed in sexuality education constitutes a "risky" consideration. This paper explores the role of humour in sexuality education as observed in a Year 9 New Zealand health class. Adding to existing literature emphasising students' use…

  20. Short Sprint or an Endurance Test: The Perceived Impact of the National Award for Special Educational Needs Coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julian; Doveston, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates the perceived impact of the National Award (NA) for Special Educational Needs (SEN) Coordination in English mainstream schools. The Award was introduced in 2009 and has been mandatory for all new Special Educational Needs Coordinators (SENCos) since its inception. The framework used for the evaluation is based on the learning…

  1. Pre-Test and Post-Test Applications to Shape the Education of Phlebotomists in A Quality Management Program: An Experience in A Training Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykal Güzin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: After the introduction of modern laboratory instruments and information systems, preanalytic phase is the new field of battle. Errors in preanalytical phase account for approximately half of total errors in clinical laboratory. The objective of this study was to share an experience of an education program that was believed to be successful in decreasing the number of rejected samples received from the Emergency Department (ED.

  2. Using Evidence Based Practice in LIS Education: Results of a Test of a Communities of Practice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Yukawa

    2010-03-01

    the end of the course may indicate that an effective balance between face‐to‐face and online media was achieved. At the meso‐level, students valued learning in community for developing mutual respect, confidence building, risk taking, deeper and more varied learning, learning with and from their peers, and greater enjoyment in the classes. Students found that the online environments were useful for organizing the class objectives and subject matter, “staying connected” between classes, sharing ideas, keeping track of their work, and preparing them for future work in blended environments. At the macro‐level, the findings of the effects on student growth related to core LIS concepts, practices, professional identity and leadership skills were inconclusive. However, students’ expressed a high regard for the value of collaboration, and there were indications that the model supported differentiated learning of professional knowledge and skills.Conclusion ‐ The findings strongly suggest that the use of the CoP model had positive effects on the learning process. Students’ high regard for the value of collaboration appears to be a clear effect of using the CoP model. The assessment methods were sufficient for testing the efficacy of most aspects of the model under the limited conditions of this study. Student responses led to refinements in both the model and methods. This study contributes to social constructivist learning approaches and LIS curricular development by presenting an innovative model for supporting professional growth among adult learners, as well as a conceptual framework to guide evidence based practice. Further testing and refinement of the model in other contexts and by other educators are needed to ensure that the model is robust and broadly applicable.

  3. La interrelación entre pruebas nacionales y educación democrática según actores educativos costarricenses / The interrelationship between national tests and the democratic education according to costa rican education stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavieres Fernández, Eduardo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: En el ámbito mundial, las políticas educativas privilegian las mediciones estandarizadas. Algunos países como Costa Rica combinan este énfasis en mediciones con características estandarizadas con orientaciones para la formación democrática de sus ciudadanos. Este estudio exploratorio de carácter cualitativo, basado en entrevistas a diversos actores del sistema educativo costarricense, analiza la interrelación de estos diversos elementos en el currículo, ofreciendo evidencia de que tal interrelación es deficiente por la sobrevalorización de las pruebas nacionales. En momentos en que el Ministerio de Educación reflexiona sobre cómo fortalecer los elementos cívicos del currículum, este trabajo aporta algunos puntos de reflexión para ser considerados en investigaciones futuras.Abstract: World trends in educational policies privilege standardized testing. Countries like Costa Rica combine this standardized testing with policies oriented towards democratic education. The present qualitative exploratory study, consisting of interviews of participants from different educational settings, analyses the extent to which these various elements interrelate; it also offers evidence that this interrelation is not satisfactory because of the overemphasis on national testing. While the Ministry of Education discusses how to give emphasis to civic aspects of the curriculum, this study offers some basic premises to be considered and expanded in the future.

  4. Testing the social cognitive career theory in Thai nurses' interest to become nurse educators: A structural equation modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thungjaroenkul, Petsunee; G Cummings, Greta; Tate, Kaitlyn

    2016-09-01

    A shortage of nurse educators generates a systemic problem in nursing education. A model to develop interventions directed at enhancing graduate nursing student interest in assuming a future faculty role is needed. This study used a social cognitive career theory perspective to examine the effects of past performance in teaching and supervision, social influence, observing others teaching, perceived task demands for nurse educators, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations on Thai graduate nursing students' (n=236) interest to become a nurse educator. Results of structural equation modeling analyses revealed that social influence and past performance in teaching and supervision had significant effects on interest to become a nurse educator when mediated by self-efficacy and outcome expectations. Observing others teaching and perceived task demands for nurse educators did not significantly predict interest in faculty roles. These findings provide new knowledge about factors and their influence on the development of interest to assume faculty roles. Implications for nursing education include the design of feasible graduate curricula that enhance students' abilities in faculty role and increases valuation of teaching careers.

  5. Relationship between High School Mathematics Grade and Number of Attempts Required to Pass the Medication Calculation Test in Nurse Education: An Explorative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanne Alteren

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In Norwegian nurse education, students are required to achieve a perfect score in a medication calculation test before undertaking their first practice period during the second semester. Passing the test is a challenge, and students often require several attempts. Adverse events in medication administration can be related to poor mathematical skills. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between high school mathematics grade and the number of attempts required to pass the medication calculation test in nurse education. The study used an exploratory design. The participants were 90 students enrolled in a bachelor’s nursing program. They completed a self-report questionnaire, and statistical analysis was performed. The results provided no basis for the conclusion that a statistical relationship existed between high school mathematics grade and number of attempts required to pass the medication calculation test. Regardless of their grades in mathematics, 43% of the students passed the medication calculation test on the first attempt. All of the students who had achieved grade 5 had passed by the third attempt. High grades in mathematics were not crucial to passing the medication calculation test. Nonetheless, the grade may be important in ensuring a pass within fewer attempts.

  6. Translation, cultural adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the Leganés cognitive test in a low educated elderly Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vescia Vieira de Alencar Caldas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To validate the Leganés cognitive test (LCT for cognitive screening in low educated elderly Brazilians. METHODS: The study sample was composed of 59 elderly residents from the city of Santa Cruz, in Brazil, with low schooling levels. Reliability was analyzed with a two-day interval between assessments, and concurrent validity was assessed using the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE. RESULTS: According to the LCT, the prevalence of dementia was 11.8%. The scale items showed a moderate to strong correlation between domains (p<0.01, and inter-rater reliability exhibited ICC=0.81, 95%CI=0.72-0.88. The factor analysis resulted in two factors: memory and orientation. Interscale agreement was considered poor (k=-0.02, supporting the hypothesis of an educational impact on final MMSE scores. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that LCT has acceptable levels of reliability for use in low-educated Brazilian elderly.

  7. The effects of violating standard item writing principles on tests and students: the consequences of using flawed test items on achievement examinations in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Steven M

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effects of violations of standard multiple-choice item writing principles on test characteristics, student scores, and pass-fail outcomes. Four basic science examinations, administered to year-one and year-two medical students, were randomly selected for study. Test items were classified as either standard or flawed by three independent raters, blinded to all item performance data. Flawed test questions violated one or more standard principles of effective item writing. Thirty-six to sixty-five percent of the items on the four tests were flawed. Flawed items were 0-15 percentage points more difficult than standard items measuring the same construct. Over all four examinations, 646 (53%) students passed the standard items while 575 (47%) passed the flawed items. The median passing rate difference between flawed and standard items was 3.5 percentage points, but ranged from -1 to 35 percentage points. Item flaws had little effect on test score reliability or other psychometric quality indices. Results showed that flawed multiple-choice test items, which violate well established and evidence-based principles of effective item writing, disadvantage some medical students. Item flaws introduce the systematic error of construct-irrelevant variance to assessments, thereby reducing the validity evidence for examinations and penalizing some examinees.

  8. EDUCATION POLICY AND EFL CURRICULUM IN INDONESIA: BETWEEN THE COMMITMENT TO COMPETENCE AND THE QUEST FOR HIGHER TEST SCORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Lie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Education policies and curricula provide the context and specific expectations that drive student learning and achievement towards a sustainable future. The underlying policies and practices in the EFL classrooms do not always match consistently. There is an emerging need to counterbalance the power of policymakers in ensuring that balanced, pedagogically sound education policies and EFL curriculum are produced, carried out, and monitored. As one of civil society organizations, TEFLIN is well positioned to serve that mission. TEFLIN may take the initiative to engage in the EFL curriculum review project, EFL curriculum design, and reform in EFL teacher education and certification.

  9. Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Education Program of IPEN aims to develop human resources through scientific training programs and to provide and disseminate scientific information in nuclear and correlated areas. IPEN is responsible for the graduate program in the nuclear area at University of Sao Paulo: the Nuclear Technology Program IPEN/USP. Since its creation, in 1976, the Program was evaluated with grade A by the Federal Government Evaluation (CAPES), the highest in this classification. In 2003 CAPES changed the evaluation criteria; since then, it has been considered a program of Excellence, with grade 6. Levels 6 and 7 are granted only to those programs having internationally recognized expertise. Level 6 was maintained in the last evaluation considering the period 2010-2012. Along its 37 years the Nuclear Technology Program awarded 2,217 titles: 1,511 masters and 706 doctoral degrees. The institution is also responsible for the Professional Master Degree - Lasers in Dentistry, in partnership with the School of Dentistry from University of Sao Paulo. IPEN has a Scientific Initiation Program for undergraduate students aiming to stimulate young people to enter the scientific research career. This program allows the student to have the opportunity to develop a specially assigned study under the guidance of a supervisor. CNEN and CNPq are the main funding agencies supporting this Program. The institute also offers, since 2000, undergraduate disciplines for students of University of Sao Paulo. A total of 33 disciplines have been approved by the University. In the period considered over 1,000 students attended the courses. There is also a Scholarship Program for graduate students, funded by CNPq, CAPES and IPEN. Scholarships funded by FAPESP and CNEN are also available on demand, according to the conditions set forth in the respective notices. Concerning scientific information support, there is available a central specialized library, which offers, beyond traditional collections and services

  10. NEUROPSI ATTENTION AND MEMORY: a neuropsychological test battery in Spanish with norms by age and educational level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrosky-Solis, Feggy; Esther Gomez-Perez, Ma; Matute, Esmeralda; Rosselli, Monica; Ardila, Alfredo; Pineda, David

    2007-01-01

    Health care professionals are now faced with a growing number of patients from different ethnic groups, and from different socioeconomical backgrounds. In the field of neuropsychology there is an increasing need of reliable and culturally fair assessment measures. Spanish is the official language in more than 20 countries and the second most spoken language in the world. The purpose of this research was to develop and standardize the neuropsychological battery NEUROPSI ATTENTION AND MEMORY, designed to assess orientation, attention and concentration, executive functions, working memory and immediate and delayed verbal and visual memory. The developmental sequences of attention and memory as well as the educational effects were analyzed in a sample of 521 monolingual Spanish Speaking subjects, aged 6 to 85 years. Educational level ranged from 0 to 22 years of education. The consideration of the developmental sequence, and the effects of education, can improve the sensitivity and specificity of neuropsychological measures.

  11. The Revised Test of Visual-Motor Integration: Its Relation to the Test of Visual-Motor Integration and Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test for Regular Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, Julaine C.; Breen, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    Compared three tests of visual-motor integration: The Revised Test of Visual-Motor Integration (VMI-R), the Test of Visual-Motor Integration (VMI), and the Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test (BG). Results showed significantly higher BG age equivalent scores. Highly significant correlations were found among all variables. (WAS)

  12. Building and Thinking of Standardized Test Center for National Education Examination%国家教育考试标准化考点建设与思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王忠华

    2013-01-01

    In recent years,the construction of standardized test center for national education examination has been implemented vigorously. Introduces the principle and specific content of the construc-tion of standardized test center in details, puts forward the problems faced by the standardized test center and the ideas to guarantee the effectiveness of the construction of standardized test center.%近年来我国大力推进实施国家教育考试标准化考点建设。详细介绍学校标准化考点建设原则和具体内容,提出标准化考点面临的问题和持续保证标准化考点建设成效的解决思路。

  13. The Effect of Utilizing Organizational Culture Improvement Model of Patient Education on Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Patients’ Anxiety and Satisfaction: Theory Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Mansoureh Ashghali; Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Norouzinezhad, Faezeh; Orak, Roohangiz Jamshidi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to the increasing prevalence of arteriosclerosis and the mortality caused by this disease, Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) has become one of the most common surgical procedures. Utilization of patient education is approved as an effective solution for increasing patient survival and outcomes of treatment. However, failure to consider different aspects of patient education has turned this goal into an unattainable one. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of utilizing the organizational culture improvement model of patient education on CABG patients’ anxiety and satisfaction. Methods The present study is a randomized controlled trial. This study was conducted on eighty CABG patients. The patients were selected from the CCU and Post-CCU wards of a hospital affiliated with Iran University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran, during 2015. Eshpel Burger’s Anxiety Inventory and Patients’ Satisfaction Questionnaire were used to collect the required information. Levels of anxiety and satisfaction of patients before intervention and at the time of release were measured. The intervention took place after preparing a programmed package based on the organizational culture improvement model for the following dimensions: effective communication, participatory decision-making, goal setting, planning, implementation and recording, supervision and control, and improvement of motivation. After recording the data, it was analyzed in the chi-square test, t-independent and Mann-Whitney U tests. The significance level of tests was assumed to be 0.05. SPSS version 18 was also utilized for data analysis. Results Research results revealed that variations in the mean scores of situational and personality anxiety of the control and experiment group were descending following the intervention, but the decrease was higher in the experiment group (p≤0.0001). In addition, the variations of the mean scores of patients’ satisfaction with

  14. 健康教育对考试焦虑干预效果的评价%Evaluation of the intervention effect of health education on test anxiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯霞; 张红

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨健康教育在改善高中生考试焦虑中的应用效果。方法:采用考试焦虑量表(TAS)对南京某区764名高中生进行考试焦虑水平的测试,从得分≥12分的436名学生中随机抽取250名,分为干预组与对照组各125名。干预组给予健康教育干预措施,12周后两组进行考试焦虑量表的复测。结果:高中生考试焦虑检出率57.07%。健康教育干预后,干预组焦虑状况显著改善(P<0.05)。结论:健康教育干预措施可有效改善高中生的考试焦虑状况。%Objective:To explore the application effect of health education on the improvement of high school students test anxiety. Methods:764 high school students of Nanjing one district were given test anxiety level tests by using Test Anxiety Scale(TAS).250 students were randomly selected from 436 students with score equal or more than 12 points.They were divided into the intervention group and the control group with 125 cases in each.The intervention group was given health education intervention measure.After 12 weeks,the two groups were given Test Anxiety Scale retest.Results:The detection rate of high school students test anxiety was 57.07% .After health education intervention,the anxiety status of the intervention group was significantly improved(P<0.05).Conclusion:Health education intervention measure can effectively improve the test anxiety status of high school students.

  15. Do Sequentially-Presented Answer Options Prevent the Use of Testwiseness Cues on Continuing Medical Education Tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willing, Sonja; Ostapczuk, Martin; Musch, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Testwiseness--that is, the ability to find subtle cues towards the solution by the simultaneous comparison of the available answer options--threatens the validity of multiple-choice (MC) tests. Discrete-option multiple-choice (DOMC) has recently been proposed as a computerized alternative testing format for MC tests, and presumably allows for a…

  16. Hogskoleprovet: "En Andra Chans" Eller "Ytterligare en Oppen Dorr." Fem gymnasielarare om egna och gymnasieelevers synpunkter pa betyg och hogskoleprovet (Effects in Upper Secondary School of a More Extensive Use of the Higher Education Selection Test in the Admission to Higher Education).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Maria

    This study was designed to examine the attitudes of teachers and students in Swedish upper secondary schools in regard to the use of higher education scholastic aptitude test (SAT) scores in lieu of secondary school grades to gain entrance into higher education programs. Since 1991 applicants to higher education have been allowed to take the…

  17. High school science teacher perceptions of the science proficiency testing as mandated by the State of Ohio Board of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Samuel Shird

    There is a correlation between the socioeconomic status of secondary schools and scores on the State of Ohio's mandated secondary science proficiency tests. In low scoring schools many reasons effectively explain the low test scores as a result of the low socioeconomics. For example, one reason may be that many students are working late hours after school to help with family finances; parents may simply be too busy providing family income to realize the consequences of the testing program. There are many other personal issues students face that may cause them to score poorly an the test. The perceptions of their teachers regarding the science proficiency test program may be one significant factor. These teacher perceptions are the topic of this study. Two sample groups ware established for this study. One group was science teachers from secondary schools scoring 85% or higher on the 12th grade proficiency test in the academic year 1998--1999. The other group consisted of science teachers from secondary schools scoring 35% or less in the same academic year. Each group of teachers responded to a survey instrument that listed several items used to determine teachers' perceptions of the secondary science proficiency test. A significant difference in the teacher' perceptions existed between the two groups. Some of the ranked items on the form include teachers' opinions of: (1) Teaching to the tests; (2) School administrators' priority placed on improving average test scores; (3) Teacher incentive for improving average test scores; (4) Teacher teaching style change as a result of the testing mandate; (5) Teacher knowledge of State curriculum model; (6) Student stress as a result of the high-stakes test; (7) Test cultural bias; (8) The tests in general.

  18. Developing an Educational Computer Game for Migratory Bird Identification Based on a Two-Tier Test Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Chang, Shao-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Although educational computer games have been recognized as being a promising approach, previous studies have indicated that, without supportive models, students might only show temporary interest during the game-based learning process, and their learning performance is often not as good as expected. Therefore, in this paper, a two-tier test…

  19. Usability Testing and Expert Inspections Complemented by Educational Evaluation: A Case Study of an e-Learning Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granic, Andrina; Cukusic, Maja

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive usability study conducted within the context of a Europe-wide project. The design of the evaluated e-learning platform is based on an innovative approach to the education of young Europeans by integrating into the curricula of a Europe-wide network of 14 schools different state-of-the-art technologies in…

  20. Computer Based Testing Using "Digital Ink": Participatory Design of a Tablet PC Based Assessment Application for Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siozos, Panagiotis; Palaigeorgiou, George; Triantafyllakos, George; Despotakis, Theofanis

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we identify key challenges faced by computer-based assessment (CBA) in secondary education and we put forward a framework of design considerations: design with the students and teachers, select the most appropriate media platform and plan an evolution rather than a revolution of prior practices. We present the CBA application…

  1. Experimental Longitudinal Test of the Influence of Autonomy-Supportive Teaching on Motivation for Participation in Elementary School Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptokaridou, Elisavet T.; Vlachopoulos, Symeon P.; Papaioannou, Athanasios G.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the efficacy of autonomy-supportive teaching during elementary school physical education (PE) in influencing pupils' enjoyment, fear of failure, boredom and effort. A sample of 54 pupils attending fifth and sixth grades comprised the control group (typical instruction; n = 27) and the experimental group…

  2. How Californians View Education Standards, Testing and Accountability: Results from the Third PACE/USC Rossier Poll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, David N.; Brewer, Dominic J.; Polikoff, Morgan; Hall, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    California is in the midst of sweeping education changes. The state is rolling out the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and a new system of assessments. Voters approved a temporary statewide tax increase that will provide additional funding to schools after years of spending cuts. The Legislature adopted a new system for funding schools (the…

  3. To Test or Not to Test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circle, David

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses whether music educators should push for national testing of music students. The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) did test music students in 1997. Even though the results of that test did not indicate students were very accomplished, there was a general feeling that at least NAEP and the nation recognized…

  4. 注重考务管理,提供公平的育人环境%Good Test Management,Fair Education Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛萌

    2013-01-01

    Based on years of teaching and practical work experience, the author analyzes the causes, characteristics and solutions of university test cheating, hoping to effectively solve the problem and improve the educational quality of colleges and universities and provide a fair educational environment.%本文结合作者多年教学与实际工作经历浅谈高校作弊现象的原因、特点以及解决办法,希望能有效的解决高校作弊问题,切实提高高校的办学质量为育人提供公平、公正的环境。

  5. 76 FR 56188 - Tests Determined To Be Suitable for Use in the National Reporting System for Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ... (Life and Work, Life Skills, Reading for Citizenship, Reading for Language Arts--Secondary Level). We... NRS for a period of seven years from February 2, 2010 (75 FR 5303): (1) BEST (Basic English Skills... Instructional Needs (GAIN)--Test of English Skills. We are clarifying that the computer-based test (CBT) is an...

  6. Formative Assessment in Teacher Education: The Development of a Diagnostic Language Test for Trainee Teachers of German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of a diagnostic test of German and its integration in a programme of formative assessment during a one-year initial teacher-training course. The test focuses on linguistic aspects that cause difficulty for trainee teachers of German as a foreign language and assesses implicit and explicit…

  7. Teachers' Use of Test-Item Banks for Student Assessment in North Carolina Secondary Agricultural Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Joy Morgan

    2014-01-01

    Higher expectations are on all parties to ensure students successfully perform on standardized tests. Specifically in North Carolina agriculture classes, students are given a CTE Post Assessment to measure knowledge gained and proficiency. Prior to students taking the CTE Post Assessment, teachers have access to a test item bank system that…

  8. Teachers' Use of Test-Item Banks for Student Assessment in North Carolina Secondary Agricultural Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Joy Morgan

    2014-01-01

    Higher expectations are on all parties to ensure students successfully perform on standardized tests. Specifically in North Carolina agriculture classes, students are given a CTE Post Assessment to measure knowledge gained and proficiency. Prior to students taking the CTE Post Assessment, teachers have access to a test item bank system that…

  9. The latitudinal tilts of wealth and education in Peru: Testing them, explaining them, and reflecting on them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico R. León

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparisons between countries around the globe reported since 1999 reveal that nations’ wealth consistently increases with distance from the Equator. Is Peru’s territory exempt from this trend? This study used GPS coordinates, questionnaire data, climate files, and census information from the 2000 Peru Demographic and Health Survey, Climate Wizard, and G-Econ data sets toreconcile the contradictory national evidence and understand the role of certain geophysical and social variables. Household assets increase from north to south in the Brack ecological regionswith latitudinal orientation which were studied (Desert, Puna, Yunga, Amazon, especially in rural settings, and as does women’s education, except in the Amazon. Neither temperature nor fourteen other geophysical and social variables account for such effects, though women’s domestic power explains them in the Yunga ecoregion. The findings can be understood through two theoretical perspectives: one, according to the evolutionary theses of Lynn, Rushton, and Kanazawa, suggests the genetic fixation of differential intellectual levels caused by an ancestral adaptation of Peruvian to various conditions of climate and altitude. The other, combining what is known about ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D, and production of sexual hormones with Zajon’sconfluence theory, is defined by fertility rate and the consequent intellectual home environment for the child. Both predict the increment of IQ and educational PISA scores from north to south Peru, but one points toward education and the other to family planning as human development strategies.

  10. Evaluar la Coordinación Motriz Global en Educación Secundaria: El Test Motor SportComp. [Motor co-ordination assessment in Secondary Education: The SportComp Test].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Ruiz-Perez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue el desarrollo y evaluación métrica del Test Motor SportComp, instrumento diseñado para ayudar a los profesores de educación física en la evaluación de la coordinación motriz global de sus alumnos de Educación Secundaria. En la actualidad no existen tests que evalúen la coordinación motriz de forma válida y fiable y que puedan ser empleados por el profesorado de educación física en el contexto de sus clases de manera rápida y económica. El presente test se construyó a partir de una revisión de la literatura científica sobre medición motriz entre los 12 y 17 años. La validez de contenido de las pruebas empleadas fue evaluada por expertos y las pruebas seleccionadas fueron aplicadas a 5732 escolares de estas edades. Se analizaron los resultados mediante la técnica de componentes principales que permitió la extracción de un solo factor formado por 5 tareas motrices relacionadas con la coordinación motriz global. El Coeficiente de Correlación Intraclase (CCI permitió obtener una fiabilidad test-retest de (CCI=0,91. Asimismo, mostró una satisfactoria validez criterial con la batería MABC-2 uno de los más reconocidos para la detección de problemas de coordinación motriz. Las propiedades métricas del presente test son muy satisfactorias y ofrecen buenas posibilidades para ser empleado por los profesores de educación física en sus clases por su bajo coste económico, poco tiempo de aplicación reclamado y poseer normas ajustadas por edad y sexo. Asimismo, este test ofrece el potencial de poder servir para detectar a los alumnos con sospecha de poseer problemas de coordinación motriz y por lo tanto contribuir a la mejora de los programas de educación física que palíen esta condición. Abstract The purpose of this study was the development and metric evaluation of the SportComp Motor Test, an instrument designed to aid physical education teachers in the assessment of gross motor

  11. Feasibility of recruiting peer educators to promote HIV testing using Facebook among men who have sex with men in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Luis A Menacho; Galea, Jerome T; Young, Sean D.

    2015-01-01

    A peer leader-based intervention using social media can be an effective means to encourage Peruvian gay men to test for HIV. The objective was to explore the feasibility of recruiting and training leaders to deliver a peer intervention via Facebook to promote HIV testing. Training consisted of three sessions focused on HIV epidemiology, consequences of stigma associated with HIV, and ways to use Facebook. We performed pre- and post-training evaluations to assess HIV knowledge and comfort usin...

  12. FEDIX on-line information service: Design, develop, test, and implement, an on-line research and education information service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodman, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The FEDIX Annual Status Report provides details regarding an on-line information project designed, developed and implemented by Federal Information Exchange, Inc., a diversified information services company. This document details the project design activities, summarizes the developmental phases of the project and describes the implementation activities generated to fulfill the project's objectives. The information contained in this document illustrates FIE's continuing commitment to serve as the link that facilitates the dissemination of federal information to the education community. This report reviews the project accomplishments and describes intended service enhancements.

  13. Applying a Danish version of the Learning Transfer System Inventory and testing it for different types of education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peter; Stegeager, Nikolaj W.M.; Bates, Reid

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to answer two research questions. First, will an exploratory factor analysis of a Danish version of the Learning Transfer System Inventory (LTSI) result in a factor structure which is consistent with the original American LTSI factor structure? Second, does the mean...... in the original American LTSI. The study also found that the mean score differs in a statistically significant way between the different types of education. Specifically, LTSI may be more suitable in measuring transfer systems and therefore promoting transfer in relation to short courses offering training...

  14. The effect of dislike of school on risk of teenage pregnancy: testing of hypotheses using longitudinal data from a randomised trial of sex education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonell, C; Allen, E; Strange, V; Copas, A; Oakley, A; Stephenson, J; Johnson, A

    2005-03-01

    To examine whether attitude to school is associated with subsequent risk of teenage pregnancy. To test two hypotheses that attitude to school is linked to pregnancy via pathways involving young people having "alternative" expectations or deficits in sexual health knowledge and confidence. Analysis of longitudinal data arising from a trial of sex education. Examination of associations between attitude to school and protected first sex, unprotected first sex, unprotected and protected last sex, and pregnancy, both crude and adjusting in turn for expectation of parenting by age 20, lack of expectation of education/training at age 20, and sexual health knowledge and confidence. Schools in central and southern England. Girls of median age 13.7 years at baseline, 14.7 years at follow up 1, and 16.0 years at follow up 2. In unadjusted analysis, attitude to school was significantly associated with protected and unprotected first sex by follow up 1, protected first sex between follow up 1 and 2, unprotected last sex, and pregnancy. Dislike of school was more strongly associated with increased risk of these outcomes than was ambivalence to school. These associations remained after adjusting for socioeconomic status and for expectation of parenting, lack of expectation of education/training, and various indicators of knowledge and confidence about sexual health. Dislike of school is associated with subsequent increased risk of teenage pregnancy but the mechanism underlying any possible causal link is unlikely to involve "alternative" expectations or deficits in sexual health knowledge or confidence.

  15. Conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics, part III: network forensics and penetration testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2014-02-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. From year to year, incidents and crimes increase that target IT systems or were done with their help. More and more companies and authorities have security problems in their own IT infrastructure. To respond to these incidents professionally, it is important to have well trained staff. The fact that many agencies and companies work with very sensitive data make it necessary to further train the own employees in the field of network forensics and penetration testing. Motivated by these facts, this paper - a continuation of a paper of January 2012 [1], which showed the conception of a course for professional training and education in the field of computer and mobile forensics - addresses the practical implementation important relationships of network forensic and penetration testing.

  16. Design of monitoring system for distance education test paper flow%远程教育考试试卷流转监控系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艺萌; 王侃伟

    2014-01-01

    针对在远程教育考试中一直困扰的试卷流转安全问题,设计了远程教教育考试试卷流转监控系统,它是基于物联网三层体系结构,由无线传感器监控网络、数据传输网络、远程监控中心三个部分组成。在此基础上还结合了GPS、GPRS、Web GIS等技术,实现试卷流转过程中动态跟踪与可视化监控,包括试卷流转过程中的异常行为报警、快速追踪定位等功能。%A remote education test paper flow monitoring system was designed to solve the safety problem troubled in test paper flow of the distance education examination. It is based on the three-layer system structure of Internet of Things,and com-posed of wireless sensor monitoring network,data transmission network and remote monitoring center. In combination with GPS, GPRS and Web GIS technologies,the system realized the dynamic tracking and visual monitoring in the process of the test pa-per flow,including abnormal behavior alarm,fast tracking and positioning functions in the process of test paper transfer.

  17. ENGLISH IN INDONESIAN ISLAMIC HIGHER EDUCATION: Examining The Relationship between Performance in The Yes/No Test and Reading Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahiruddin Sahiruddin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between performance in the Yes/No test of English recognition vocabulary and reading skills in Indonesian Islamic learners of English as a foreign language (EFL. Participants in the study were 83 Indonesian undergraduate students, comprising an Advanced group (n=41 and Intermediate group (n=42 of EFL learners enrolled in the English department at the State Islamic University (UIN of Malang, Indonesia. All participants completed both tests. The results reveal that the hits accuracy performance between the Advanced EFL group and the Intermediate EFL group was statistically significant, indicating that Yes/No test performance, in context of hits accuracy, did discriminate between levels of English proficiency. However, the differences disappeared with corrected scores since both groups indicated a high false alarm rate. In addition, this study also reveals that there was no evidence of a relationship between Yes/No performance and reading scores. Several pedagogical implications for EFL language teachers are discussed.

  18. Testing the modernization hypothesis and the socialist ideology hypothesis : a comparative sibling analysis of educational attainment and occupational status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieben, Inge; Graaf, Paul M. de

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we present a comparative sibling analysis. This enables us to test two major social mobility hypotheses, i.e. the modernization hypothesis and the socialist ideology hypothesis. We employ survey data on brothers in England, Hungary, the Netherlands, Scotland, Spain, and the USA, cover

  19. Implementation and Use of Simulated Students for Test and Validation of New Adaptive Educational Systems: A Practical Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorça, Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Studies attest that learning is facilitated if teaching strategies are in accordance with students learning styles, making learning process more effective and considerably improving students performances. In this context, one major research point--and a challenge--is to efficiently discover students' learning styles. But, the test and validation…

  20. State Education Agencies, Information Systems, and the Expansion of State Power in the Era of Test-Based Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulos, Dorothea; Rutledge, Stacey; Bali, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how SEAs in three states designed, installed, and operated statewide, longitudinal student information systems (SLSIS). SLSIS track individual students' progress in K-12 schools, college, and beyond and link it to individual schools and teachers. They are key components of the information infrastructure of test-based…

  1. The Dragon in School Backyards: The Influence of Mandated Testing on School Contexts and Educators' Narrative Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Cheryl J.

    2004-01-01

    Researched in the narrative inquiry tradition, this article examines the influence of state-mandated accountability testing on Eagle High School's dramatically shifting context and the embodied knowledge held and expressed by principal, Henry Richards, and the Eagle teachers. Through carefully unpacking Richards's dragon in school backyards…

  2. THE EFFECT OF AGE AS A VARIABLE ON THE SCORES OF THE HARRIS-GOODENOUGH DRAWING TEST OF EDUCABLE RETARDATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEVY, IRWIN S.

    IN ORDER TO DETERMINE THE RELIABILITY OF PERFORMANCE OF RETARDED ADOLESCENTS ON THE HARRIS REVISION OF THE GOODENOUGH DRAW-A-MAN TEST (DAM) AND WHETHER THE DECLINE IN PERFORMANCE WHICH OCCURS IN NORMAL ADOLESCENTS AT THE MID-TEENS ALSO OCCURS WITH RETARDED ADOLESCENTS, 213 MALE AND 130 FEMALE SUBJECTS, AGED 11-20 YEARS AND WITH IQ'S OF 56-72, IN…

  3. Development of Bengali Audio-Visual Test Battery for Assessment of Pragmatic Skills: Preliminary Normative Data Based on Educational Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Madhushree; Biswas, Atanu; Pal, Sandip; Chatterjee, Amita

    2017-01-01

    Pragmatic competence may be disrupted due to psychological and neurological causes. For appropriate remedy and rehabilitation, a precise assessment of pragmatic skills is important. However, there is no test battery in the Bengali language, and consequently, there is no published data on pragmatic ability of Bengali speakers. Due to the vast…

  4. Understanding the negative effects of legal education on law students: a longitudinal test of self-determination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Kennon M; Krieger, Lawrence S

    2007-06-01

    Longitudinal studies suggest that law school has a corrosive effect on the well-being, values, and motivation of students, ostensibly because of its problematic institutional culture. In a 3-year study of two different law schools, the authors applied self-determination theory's (SDT) dynamic process model of thriving to explain such findings. Students at both schools declined in psychological need satisfaction and well-being over the 3 years. However, student reports of greater perceived autonomy support by faculty predicted less radical declines in need satisfaction, which in turn predicted better well-being in the 3rd year and also a higher grade point average, better bar exam results, and more self-determined motivation for the first job after graduation. Institution-level analyses showed that although students at both schools suffered, one school was perceived as more controlling than the other, predicting greater difficulties for its students. Implications for SDT and for legal education are discussed.

  5. Bone Density Testing: An Under-Utilised and Under-Researched Health Education Tool for Osteoporosis Prevention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Jones

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Feedback of fracture risk based on bone mineral density (BMD is an under-explored potential osteoporosis education intervention. We performed a randomised controlled trial of either an osteoporosis information leaflet or small group education (the Osteoporosis Prevention and Self-Management Course (OPSMC, combined with individualised fracture risk feedback in premenopausal women over two years. Women with a mean T-score at spine and hip of < 0 were informed they were at higher risk of fracture in later life and those with T-score ≥ 0 were informed they were not. Women receiving feedback of high fracture risk had a greater increase in femoral neck, but not lumbar spine, BMD compared to the low risk group (1.6% p.a. vs. 0.7% p.a., p = 0.0001. Participation in the OPSMC had no greater effect on BMD than receiving the leaflet. Femoral neck BMD change was associated with starting calcium supplements (1.3% p.a., 95% CI +0.49, +2.17 and self-reported physical activity change (0.7% p.a., 95% CI +0.22, +1.22. Mother’s report of increasing their children’s calcium intake was associated with receiving the OPSMC (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4, 3.8 and feedback of high fracture risk (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2, 3.3. Fracture risk feedback based on BMD could potentially make an important contribution to osteoporosis prevention but confirmation of long-term benefits and cost effectiveness is needed before implementation can be recommended.

  6. 绘画测验在高校心理健康教育中的应用%Application of the Drawing Test in College Psychological Health Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张甜

    2015-01-01

    Drawing test is one form of art therapy, which is based on brain lateralization theory and projection of psychoanalysis theory, and it has been more and more used in psychological consulting and therapy. Bases on drawing test theory and existing applications analysis, this article explores the application scope of drawing test in psychological health education and discusses the advantages and problems of drawing test.%绘画测验属于艺术治疗的一种,它以大脑偏侧化理论和精神分析流派的投射理论为基础,越来越多的应用于心理咨询与治疗中。本文从绘画测验的理论及现有应用领域的分析出发,探讨绘画测验在高校心理健康教育工作中的应用范围,并对绘画测验应用的优势和问题进行展望。

  7. Characteristics of first-trimester screening of non-responders in a high-uptake population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, Hanne Trap; Wulff, Camilla Bernt; Ekelund, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Our aim was to compare demographic, social and reproductive health-related medical factors between women who did and women who did not undergo combined first-trimester screening (cFTS) and to examine their reasons for declining a screening offer, especially whether non-participation......INTRODUCTION: Our aim was to compare demographic, social and reproductive health-related medical factors between women who did and women who did not undergo combined first-trimester screening (cFTS) and to examine their reasons for declining a screening offer, especially whether non...... of a conscious choice based on ethical considerations, rather than being the result of a lack of information. However, a low response rate decreases the strength of our conclusions. FUNDING: none. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  8. Recent advances in vaccination of non-responders to standard dose hepatitis B virus vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saqib; Walayat; Zohair; Ahmed; Daniel; Martin; Srinivas; Puli; Michael; Cashman; Sonu; Dhillon

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus(HBV) infection is a global health problem. It is estimated there are more than 2 billion individuals exposed to the virus and 250 million are chronically infected. Hepatitis B is the cause of more than 600000 annual deaths due to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. An effective vaccine exists and preventative initiatives center around universal vaccination especially in those at highest risk. Effective vaccination algorithms have led to a significant decline in the development of new infections and its devastating consequences. The vaccine is administered intramuscularly in three doses, with 95% showing long lasting serologic immunity. An additional fourth dose or a repeated higher dose three course regimen is given to those that fail to show immunity. Despite these additional regimens, some remain vulnerable to hepatitis B and are deemed nonresponders. Individuals with chronic disease states such as kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes mellitus, as well as those with a genetic predisposition, and those on immunomodulation therapy, have the highest likelihood of non-response. Various strategies have been developed to elicit an immune response in these individuals. These include increased vaccination dose, intradermal administration, alternative adjuvants, alternative routes of administration, co-administration with other vaccines, and other novel therapies. These alternative strategies can show improved response and lasting immunity. In summary, HBV vaccination is a major advance of modern medicine and all individuals at risk should be sought and vaccinated with subsequent adequate titers demonstrated.

  9. A comparison of small monetary incentives to convert survey non-respondents: a randomized control trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Griffin, Joan M; Simon, Alisha Baines; Hulbert, Erin; Stevenson, John; Grill, Joseph P; Noorbaloochi, Siamak; Partin, Melissa R

    2011-01-01

    .... Monetary incentives are often used to improve response rates, but little is known about whether larger incentives improve response rates in those who previously have been unenthusiastic about participating in research...

  10. Successful treatment of activated occult hepatitis B in a non-responder chronic hepatitis C patient

    OpenAIRE

    Emara Mohamed H; Radwan Mohamed I

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We reported a 23 years old male with chronic hepatitis C virus infection, discontinued from pegylated interferon/ribavirin combination therapy due to a lack of early virological response. He has developed activation of occult hepatitis B virus that was successfully treated by a one year of lamivudine therapy.

  11. Southern Federal University in Relation to Teacher Education Modernization Project: Strategic Reflection of the Testing Results of Integrative Modules of the “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education” Research Master’s Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernaya A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the experience of a strategic reflection of the Southern Federal University participation in the project of modernization of teacher education. It analyses how theoretical, methodological and organizational-activity basis of “Cultural-Historical Psychology and Activity Approach in Education” research master’s program designed by Moscow State University of Psychology & Education relates to the strategic objectives of Southern Federal University. Priorities and forward-looking statements in the strategy for the training of specialists in education based on action-competence approach, integrative principle of educational modules construction, network forms of cooperation of educational institutions are shown. Basic methodological ideas of culturalhistorical psychology and activity theory and their applicability to the needs of modern education objectified in the draft are specially considered. The article presents the preliminary test results of integrative modules of research master’s program for Southern Federal University

  12. Feasibility of Recruiting Peer Educators to Promote HIV Testing Using Facebook Among Men Who have Sex with Men in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menacho, Luis A; Galea, Jerome T; Young, Sean D

    2015-06-01

    A peer leader-based intervention using social media can be an effective means to encourage Peruvian gay men to test for HIV. The objective was to explore the feasibility of recruiting and training leaders to deliver a peer intervention via Facebook to promote HIV testing. Training consisted of three sessions focused on HIV epidemiology, consequences of stigma associated with HIV, and ways to use Facebook. We performed pre- and post-training evaluations to assess HIV knowledge and comfort using Facebook. We trained 34 peer leaders. At baseline, the majority of peer leaders were already qualified and knowledgeable about HIV prevention and use of social media. We found a significant increase in proportion of peer leaders who were comfortable using social media to discuss about sexual partners and about STIs. It is feasible to recruit peer leaders who are qualified to conduct a social media based HIV prevention intervention in Peru.

  13. Curriculum Innovation: Legal Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sametz, Lynn; Mcloughlin, Caven S.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a study that dealt with the results of tests of teachers' and administrators' knowledge of education-related Supreme Court decisions and school law. Concluded that courses on educational legislation should be incorporated into teacher education programs. (JOW)

  14. Testing a TheoRY-inspired MEssage ('TRY-ME': a sub-trial within the Ontario Printed Educational Message (OPEM trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eccles Martin P

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A challenge for implementation researchers is to develop principles that could generate testable hypotheses that apply across a range of clinical contexts, thus leading to generalisability of findings. Such principles may be provided by systematically developed theories. The opportunity has arisen to test some of these theoretical principles in the Ontario Printed Educational Materials (OPEM trial by conducting a sub-trial within the existing trial structure. OPEM is a large factorial cluster-randomised trial evaluating the effects of short directive and long discursive educational messages embedded into informed, an evidence-based newsletter produced in Canada by the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES and mailed to all primary care physicians in Ontario. The content of educational messages in the sub-trial will be constructed using both standard methods and methods inspired by psychological theory. The aim of this study is to test the effectiveness of the TheoRY-inspired MEssage ('TRY-ME' compared with the 'standard' message in changing prescribing behaviour. Methods The OPEM trial participants randomised to receive the short directive message attached to the outside of informed (an 'outsert' will be sub-randomised to receive either a standard message or a message informed by the theory of planned behaviour (TPB using a two (long insert or no insert by three (theory-based outsert or standard outsert or no outsert design. The messages will relate to prescription of thiazide diuretics as first line drug treatment for hypertension (described in the accompanying protocol, "The Ontario Printed Educational Materials trial". The short messages will be developed independently by two research teams. The primary outcome is prescription of thiazide diuretics, measured by routinely collected data available within ICES. The study is designed to answer the question, is there any difference in guideline adherence (i

  15. Diagnosing the Diagnostic Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popham, W. James

    2009-01-01

    Scads of pseudodiagnostic tests are peddled by commercial vendors who recognize that desperate educators will do almost anything to dodge an impending accountability cataclysm. And this "almost anything" includes buying tests that promise to help a teacher raise test scores--even if they don't. Accordingly, today's educators need to be aware of…

  16. Knowing One’s Place: Parental Educational Background Influences Social Identification with Academia, Test Anxiety, and Satisfaction with Studying at University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Janke

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available First-generation students (i.e., students whose parents did not attend university often experience difficulties fitting in with the social environment at universities. This experience of personal misfit is supposedly associated with an impaired social identification with their aspired in-group of academics compared to continuing-generation students (i.e., students with at least one parent with an academic degree. In this article, we investigate how the postulated differences in social identification with the group of academics affect first-generation students’ satisfaction with studying and test anxiety over time. We assume that first-generation students’ impaired social identification with the group of academics leads to decreased satisfaction with studying and aggravated test anxiety over the course of the first academic year. In a longitudinal study covering students’ first year at a German university, we found that continuing-generation students consistently identified more strongly with their new in-group of academics than first-generation students. The influence of social identification on test anxiety and satisfaction with studying differed between groups. For continuing-generation students, social identification with the group of academics buffered test anxiety and helped them maintain satisfaction with studying over time. We could not find these direct effects within the group of first-generation students. Instead, first-generation students were more sensitive to effects of test anxiety on satisfaction with studying and vice versa over time. The results suggest that first-generation students might be more sensitive to the anticipation of academic failure. Furthermore, continuing-generation students’ social identification with the group of academics might have buffered them against the impact of negative experiences during the entry phase at university. Taken together, our findings underscore that deficit-driven approaches

  17. The Causal Effect of Student Mobility on Standardized Test Performance: A Case Study with Possible Implications for Accountability Mandates within the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selya, Arielle S; Engel-Rebitzer, Eden; Dierker, Lisa; Stephen, Eric; Rose, Jennifer; Coffman, Donna L; Otis, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a limited case study examining the causal inference of student mobility on standardized test performance, within one middle-class high school in suburban Connecticut. Administrative data were used from a district public high school enrolling 319 10th graders in 2010. Propensity score methods were used to estimate the causal effect of student mobility on Math, Science, Reading, and Writing portions of the Connecticut Academic Performance Test (CAPT), after matching mobile vs. stable students on gender, race/ethnicity, eligibility for free/reduced lunches, and special education status. Analyses showed that mobility was associated with lower performance in the CAPT Writing exam. Follow-up analyses revealed that this trend was only significant among those who were ineligible for free/reduced lunches, but not among eligible students. Additionally, mobile students who were ineligible for free/reduced lunches had lower performance in the CAPT Science exam according to some analyses. Large numbers of students transferring into a school district may adversely affect standardized test performance. This is especially relevant for policies that affect student mobility in schools, given the accountability measures in the No Child Left Behind that are currently being re-considered in the recent Every Student Succeeds Act.

  18. The Causal Effect of Student Mobility on Standardized Test Performance: A Case Study with Possible Implications for Accountability Mandates within the Elementary and Secondary Education Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielle Selya

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a limited case study examining the causal inference of student mobility on standardized test performance, within one middle-class high school in suburban Connecticut. Administrative data were used from a district public high school enrolling 319 10th graders in 2010. Propensity score methods were used to estimate the causal effect of student mobility on Math, Science, Reading, and Writing portions of the Connecticut Academic Performance Test (CAPT, after matching mobile vs. stable students on gender, race/ethnicity, eligibility for free/reduced lunches, and special education status. Analyses showed that mobility was associated with lower performance in the CAPT Writing exam. Follow-up analyses revealed that this trend was only significant among those who were ineligible for free/reduced lunches, but not among eligible students. Additionally, mobile students who were ineligible for free/reduced lunches had lower performance in the CAPT Science exam according to some analyses. Large numbers of students transferring into a school district may adversely affect standardized test performance. This is especially relevant for policies that affect student mobility in schools, given the accountability measures in the No Child Left Behind that are currently being re-considered in the recent Every Student Succeeds Act.

  19. What to do with the results of psychological tests of Education students, in the area of Counseling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marhilde Sánchez de Gallardo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available All students of Education, in the area of Counseling, at the University of Zulia have started their studies after approving the process of selection administered by the Department of Psychology. Data on 129 people who initiate their university studies when concluding diversified high-school and 57 students who entered by career switch, restarting studies, studying 2 careers. This study is descriptive, documentary, retrospective, cross-sectional was based on results obtained in previous studies where a low performance was determined; similarities in emotional intelligence and indicators (teenager correction, while the correction of adults, revealed a significantly greater average of emotional indicators those who enter by modality. In personality, were similarities in the efficiency in the processing of information, emotional resources to face challenges, enthusiasm, capacity of benefit, sensitivity, control of the behavior, level of tendency to the preoccupation, innovation, analysis of traditions, degree of self-sufficiency and tension. They reveal important differences, with greater grades in those of modality in aggressiveness, irritability, jealousy, dogmatism, will-forcing, little conventionalism and imagination. Significant differences were identified, with greater scores in the group that entered when culminating studies of diversified cycle, in affectivity, respect to the authority, and pursuit of group norms, boldness and facility in the social contacts, emotional expressiveness, group loyalty, situational attitude, and impulsiveness. It is recommended to present/display the results of individual way in order of promoting in the members of both groups to attend individual and/or group therapy, to foment the development of potentialities, to strengthen the psychological well-being, the resilience, to create support networks, to optimize personal resources. Also to investigate situations of familiar load, children, economy, that could

  20. A minority research and education information service: Design, develop, pilot test, and implement on-line access for historically black colleges and universities and government agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodman, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    This Annual Status Report describes the design, development and implementation of the Minority On-Line Information Service (MOLIS) project by Federal Information Exchange, Inc. for the period of April 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992. Summary information detailing developments prior to this reporting period will also be included to establish a comprehensive perspective of the project. The goal of the MOLIS project, was to develop, design, pilot test on-line access to current information on minority colleges and universities and federal minority opportunities. Federal Information Exchange, Inc. (FIE), a diversified information services company recognized by researchers and educators as a leader in the field of information delivery services, was awarded a 5 year small business research grant to develop and implement MOLIS. Since April 29, 1991, the inauguration of its on-line service, MOLIS has provided current information on 138 Black and Hispanic colleges and universities -- including faculty and student profiles, financial data, research centers and equipment information, pre-college and education programs, emerging capabilities, enrollment data, administrative personnel data, and current events -- as well as minority opportunities from 8 participating federal agencies.

  1. Parallel to the Situational Judgement Test: is the Educational Performance Measure fair in ranking medical students on the UK Foundation Programme?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sidhu H

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Harmeet Singh Sidhu,1 Adil Mahmood,2 Ranjodh Sanghera,1 Jay Mandan11Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK; 2Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King’s College London, London, UKWe readily appraised the expert opinion by Singagireson et al which explored the fairness of using the Situational Judgement Test (SJT to rank medical students as part of the UK Foundation Programme.1 Although we agree with many of the points raised, we feel it is equally important to discuss the role of the Educational Performance Measure (EPM, which has comparable weighting to the SJT in ranking medical students. Therefore, we aim to explore whether the EPM is a fair measure in determining the allocation of foundation-training jobs to newly qualified doctors.View the original paper by Singagireson et al

  2. Using hierarchical linear models to test differences in Swedish results from OECD’s PISA 2003: Integrated and subject-specific science education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Åström

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The possible effects of different organisations of the science curriculum in schools participating in PISA 2003 are tested with a hierarchical linear model (HLM of two levels. The analysis is based on science results. Swedish schools are free to choose how they organise the science curriculum. They may choose to work subject-specifically (with Biology, Chemistry and Physics, integrated (with Science or to mix these two. In this study, all three ways of organising science classes in compulsory school are present to some degree. None of the different ways of organising science education displayed statistically significant better student results in scientific literacy as measured in PISA 2003. The HLM model used variables of gender, country of birth, home language, preschool attendance, an economic, social and cultural index as well as the teaching organisation.

  3. PREDICATIVE VALUE OF SOME COMMON MOBILITY TESTS CRUCIAL FOR FORMING MARK IN THE PHYiCAL EDUCATION TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela Bulatović

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Up to the sam ple of 86 stu dents from 5th class of Ele men tary School »Ok to ih« in Pod go ri ca, we ma de re se arch in or der to esta blish the le vel of sta ti sti cal im por tan ce of the com mon mo bi lity tests in fl u en ce for for ming of the physi cal edu ca tion mark. By using of Pir son cor re la ti ve analysis, fol lo wed by the re gres si ve analysis, it was esta blis hed the im por tant mu tual con nec tion bet we en pre di ca ti ve and cri te rion va ri a ble. The co ef fi ci ent of cor re la tion has been spread from the mid dle (MT600= . 488, to the high nu me ri cal va lu es (MSDM =. 735.

  4. Learning to Work with Databases in Astronomy: Quantitative Analysis of Science Educators' and Students' Pre-/Post-Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwortz, Andria C.; Burrows, Andrea C.; Myers, Adam D.

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is increasingly moving towards working with large databases, from the state-of-the-art Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10, to the historical Digital Access to a Sky Century at Harvard. Non-astronomy fields as well tend to work with large datasets, be it in the form of warehouse inventory, health trends, or the stock market. However very few fields explicitly teach students the necessary skills to analyze such data. The authors studied a matched set of 37 participants working with 200-entry databases in astronomy using Google Spreadsheets, with limited information about a random set of quasars drawn from SDSS DR5. Here the authors present the quantitative results from an eight question pre-/post-test, with questions designed to span Bloom's taxonomy, on both the topics of the skills of using spreadsheets, and the content of quasars. Participants included both Astro 101 summer students and professionals including in-service K-12 teachers and science communicators. All groups showed statistically significant gains (as per Hake, 1998), with the greatest difference between women's gains of 0.196 and men's of 0.480.

  5. Who Trusts the Tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, Roger

    1978-01-01

    The author reviews the advantages and disadvantages of standardized reading tests, with special reference to the new national reading tests designed by the Assessment of Performance Unit of the Department of Education and Science. (SJL)

  6. Comparing two methods of education (virtual versus traditional) on learning of Iranian dental students: a post-test only design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazami, Fariborz; Bahrampour, Ehsan; Azar, Mohammad Reza; Jahedi, Farzad; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-03-05

    The importance of using technologies such as e-learning in different disciplines is discussed in the literature. Researchers have measured the effectiveness of e-learning in a number of fields.Considering the lack of research on the effectiveness of online learning in dental education particularly in Iran, the advantages of these learning methods and the positive university atmosphere regarding the use of online learning. This study, therefore, aims to compare the effects of two methods of teaching (virtual versus traditional) on student learning. This post-test only design study approached 40, fifth year dental students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. From this group, 35 students agreed to participate. These students were randomly allocated into two groups, experimental (virtual learning) and comparison (traditional learning). To ensure similarity between groups, we compared GPAs of all participants by the Mann-Whitney U test (P > 0.05). The experimental group received a virtual learning environment courseware package specifically designed for this study, whereas the control group received the same module structured in a traditional lecture form. The virtual learning environment consisted of online and offline materials. Two identical valid, reliable post-tests that consisted of 40 multiple choice questions (MCQs) and 4 essay questions were administered immediately (15 min) after the last session and two months later to assess for knowledge retention. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20. A comparison of the mean knowledge score of both groups showed that virtual learning was more effective than traditional learning (effect size = 0.69). The newly designed virtual learning package is feasible and will result in more effective learning in comparison with lecture-based training. However further studies are needed to generalize the findings of this study.

  7. The development and validation of a three-tier diagnostic test measuring pre-service elementary education and secondary science teachers' understanding of the water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Dannah Lynn

    The main goal of this research study was to develop and validate a three-tier diagnostic test to determine pre-service teachers' (PSTs) conceptual knowledge of the water cycle. For a three-tier diagnostic test, the first tier assesses content knowledge; in the second tier, a reason is selected for the content answer; and the third tier allows test-takers to select how confident they are in their answers for the first two tiers. The second goal of this study was to diagnose any alternative conceptions PSTs might have about the water cycle. The Water Cycle Diagnostic Test (WCDT) was developed using the theoretical framework by Treagust (1986, 1988, and 1995), and in similar studies that developed diagnostic tests (e.g., Calean & Subramaniam, 2010a; Odom & Barrow, 2007; Pesman & Eryilmaz, 2010). The final instrument consisted of 15 items along with a demographic survey that examined PSTs' weather-related experiences that may or may not have affected the PSTs' understanding of the water cycle. The WCDT was administered to 77 PSTs enrolled in science methods courses during the fall of 2012. Among the 77 participants, 37 of the PSTs were enrolled in elementary education (EPST) and 40 in secondary science (SPST). Using exploratory factor analysis, five categories were factored out for the WCDT: Phase Change of Water; Condensation and Storage; Clouds; Global Climate Change; and Movement through the Water Cycle. Analysis of the PSTs' responses demonstrated acceptable reliability (alpha = 0.62) for the instrument, and acceptable difficulty indices and discrimination indices for 12 of the items. Analysis indicated that the majority of the PSTs had a limited understanding of the water cycle. Of the PSTs sampled, SPSTs were significantly more confident in their answers' on the WCDT than the EPSTs. Completion of an undergraduate atmospheric science and/or meteorology course, as well as a higher interest in listening and/or viewing weather-related programs, resulted in PSTs

  8. Variations in the relation between education and cause-specific mortality in 19 European populations: a test of the "fundamental causes" theory of social inequalities in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenbach, Johan P; Kulhánová, Ivana; Bopp, Matthias; Deboosere, Patrick; Eikemo, Terje A; Hoffmann, Rasmus; Kulik, Margarete C; Leinsalu, Mall; Martikainen, Pekka; Menvielle, Gwenn; Regidor, Enrique; Wojtyniak, Bogdan; Östergren, Olof; Lundberg, Olle

    2015-02-01

    Link and Phelan have proposed to explain the persistence of health inequalities from the fact that socioeconomic status is a "fundamental cause" which embodies an array of resources that can be used to avoid disease risks no matter what mechanisms are relevant at any given time. To test this theory we compared the magnitude of inequalities in mortality between more and less preventable causes of death in 19 European populations, and assessed whether inequalities in mortality from preventable causes are larger in countries with larger resource inequalities. We collected and harmonized mortality data by educational level on 19 national and regional populations from 16 European countries in the first decade of the 21st century. We calculated age-adjusted Relative Risks of mortality among men and women aged 30-79 for 24 causes of death, which were classified into four groups: amenable to behavior change, amenable to medical intervention, amenable to injury prevention, and non-preventable. Although an overwhelming majority of Relative Risks indicate higher mortality risks among the lower educated, the strength of the education-mortality relation is highly variable between causes of death and populations. Inequalities in mortality are generally larger for causes amenable to behavior change, medical intervention and injury prevention than for non-preventable causes. The contrast between preventable and non-preventable causes is large for causes amenable to behavior change, but absent for causes amenable to injury prevention among women. The contrast between preventable and non-preventable causes is larger in Central & Eastern Europe, where resource inequalities are substantial, than in the Nordic countries and continental Europe, where resource inequalities are relatively small, but they are absent or small in Southern Europe, where resource inequalities are also large. In conclusion, our results provide some further support for the theory of "fundamental causes". However

  9. From Test Takers to Test Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kari

    2009-01-01

    As a classroom teacher, Kari Smith realized that traditional objective tests don't always assess what students actually know. But tests are so deeply embedded in the education system that it would be difficult to do away with them entirely. Smith decided to make tests into learning tools. In this article, Smith describes three strategies for…

  10. From Test Takers to Test Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kari

    2009-01-01

    As a classroom teacher, Kari Smith realized that traditional objective tests don't always assess what students actually know. But tests are so deeply embedded in the education system that it would be difficult to do away with them entirely. Smith decided to make tests into learning tools. In this article, Smith describes three strategies for…

  11. Test Technical Manual 2014 GED® Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    GED Testing Service, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This manual was written to provide technical information regarding the General Educational Development (GED®) test as evidence that the GED® test is technically sound. Throughout this manual, documentation is provided regarding the development of the GED® test and data collection activities, as well as evidence of reliability and validity. This…

  12. The development and pilot testing of the Self-management Programme of Activity, Coping and Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (SPACE for COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apps LD

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay D Apps,1 Katy E Mitchell,1 Samantha L Harrison,1 Louise Sewell,1 Johanna E Williams,1 Hannah ML Young,1 Michael Steiner,1 Mike Morgan,1 Sally J Singh1,2 1National Institute of Health Research CLAHRC-LNR Pulmonary Rehabilitation Research Group, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS, Leicester, UK; 2Applied Research Centre, Health and Lifestyle Interventions, Coventry University, Coventry, UK Purpose: There is no independent standardized self-management approach available for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The aim of this project was to develop and test a novel self-management manual for individuals with COPD. Patients: Participants with a confirmed diagnosis of COPD were recruited from primary care. Methods: A novel self-management manual was developed with health care professionals and patients. Five focus groups were conducted with individuals with COPD (N = 24 during development to confirm and enhance the content of the prototype manual. The Self-management Programme of Activity, Coping and Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (SPACE for COPD manual was developed as the focus of a comprehensive self-management approach facilitated by health care professionals. Preference for delivery was initial face-to-face consultation with telephone follow-up. The SPACE for COPD manual was piloted with 37 participants in primary care. Outcome measures included the Self-Report Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire, Incremental Shuttle Walk Test, and Endurance Shuttle Walking Test (ESWT; measurements were taken at baseline and 6 weeks. Results: The pilot study observed statistically significant improvements for the dyspnea domain of the Self-Report Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire and ESWT. Dyspnea showed a mean change of 0.67 (95% confidence interval 0.23–1.11, P = 0.005. ESWT score increased by 302.25 seconds (95% confidence interval 161.47–443.03, P < 0.001. Conclusion: This article describes the development and

  13. Deconstructing Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putwain, David William

    2008-01-01

    Recent changes to educational policy which have focused attention on the use of high stakes testing as performance and accountability measures have renewed interest in test anxiety both in the UK and the USA. The aim of this paper is to provide a critical examination of the test anxiety construct, and explore the ways in which test anxiety is…

  14. Utilizing a Diabetes Risk Test and A1c Point-of-Care Instrument to Identify Increased Risk for Diabetes In an Educational Dental Hygiene Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Lori J; Rainchuso, Lori; Rothman, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to demonstrate the number of patients at increased risk for type 2 diabetes development using a validated survey; and to assess the rate of compliance for A1c screening in an educational dental hygiene setting. This was a descriptive study using a purposive sample of patients in an academic dental hygiene clinic, who were 18 years or older, not diagnosed with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Utilizing the American Diabetes Association adopted diabetes risk survey, patients determined to be at increased risk for type 2 diabetes were offered the opportunity for further assessment by having their A1c tested using a point of care instrument. Patients demonstrating an increased risk for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, with either the survey or the point of care instrument, were referred to their primary physician for further evaluation. A total 179 of the 422 solicited patients agreed to participate in the American Diabetes Association adopted diabetes risk survey. According to the survey guidelines, 77 participants were considered increased risk for type 2 diabetes for an at-risk prevalence of 48% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 40 to 56%). The at-risk participants were then asked to have an A1c test of which 45 agreed (compliance rate 58%, 95% CI: 47 to 70%). Using American Diabetes Association A1c parameters, 60.98% (n=25) indicated a prediabetes (5.7 to 6.4%) range, and 4.88% (n=2) indicated a diabetes (≥6.5%) range. Utilizing the American Diabetes Association adopted diabetes risk survey in any dental setting could provide patients with invaluable health information, and potentially improve overall health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  15. Officer Standardized Educational Testing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    GENERAL 511 = FASHION MERCHANDISING 512 = RETAILING AND SALES 513 = TRAVEL SERVICES AND TOURISM 520 = COMMUNICATIONS & COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY...HOME ECONOMICS, GENERAL 781 = CHILD DEVELOPMENT, CARE AND GUIDANCE 782 = CHILD CARE AIDE/ASSISTING 783 = CULINARY ARTS A-28 784 = FAMILY/CONSUMER...PURCHASING 150 = REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 151 = RECREATION AND TOURISM 152 = SECRETARIAL STUDIES 153 = TRANSPORTATION AND PUBLIC UTILITIES 160

  16. Touch the comet! Testing of the "Rosetta's Comet Touchdown" educational kit in the Széchenyi István High School, Sopron, Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, A.; Wesely, N.; Soós, B.; Sléber, B.; Majnovics, Z.; Ettingshausen, M.; Bodnár, L.; Németh, A.; Roos, M.

    2011-10-01

    In our school works a course in robotics where students build and program robots from a LEGO MINDSTORMS kit. We took part in the Hunveyor- Husar project with a Mars rover based on a rover model kit, of which the operating arms are built out of LEGO and controlled by an MINDSTORMS NXT computer. We presented our rover on the EPSC in Rome last September 2010 We presented our rover on the EPSC in Rome in September 2010. At that same conference the "Rosetta's Comet Touchdown" educational kit was officially presented. We were very interested and in conversation with the people from the project, we agreed that our school in Sopron would also participate in testing the kit. . The kit comes with a set of Interdisciplinary Activity Sheets (IAS, downloadable from Vimeo channel1) and a great feature is that the proposed activities in the IAS cover three areas: science, art/history and engineering. The 31 students from our class divided up in groups and each group chose a different topic: History of comets in Hungarian culture; Designing a T-shirt; Research on comets; Hungary in the Rosetta mission; Animation of Rosetta's orbit in space; building a LEGO MINDSTORM model; a film was made of the activities . In this presentation we report in particular the activities of the LEGO building team.

  17. A community-based trial of educational interventions with fecal immunochemical tests for colorectal cancer screening uptake among blacks in community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Shannon M; Davis, Stacy N; Williams, Kimberly R; Zhao, Xiuhua; Govindaraju, Swapomthi K; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Lin, Hui-Yi; Sutton, Steven K; Roethzeim, Richard R; Shibata, David; Meade, Cathy D; Gwede, Clement K

    2016-11-15

    Intervention studies among individuals in diverse community settings are needed to reduce health disparities in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and mortality rates. The current study compared the efficacy of 2 intervention conditions promoting CRC screening among black individuals. Black individuals ages 50 to 75 years (N = 330) were recruited in community settings in 4 Tampa Bay counties. After obtaining consent and conducting a baseline interview to assess sociodemographic and health-related variables, participants received either a culturally targeted CRC photonovella booklet plus a fecal immunochemical test (FIT) kit or a standard CRC screening brochure plus an FIT kit. The primary outcome was FIT kit screening uptake. FIT screening uptake at 6 months was 86.7% overall (90.3% in the brochure group and 81.9% in the photonovella group). Controlling for baseline between-group differences, there was no influence of intervention on FIT kit uptake (P = .756). Significant predictors of not returning an FIT kit included being unable to work (P = .010), having higher religious belief scores (P = .015), and living farther from the cancer center (P = .015). Providing FIT kits and educational print materials to black individuals in community settings resulted in high rates of CRC screening. The study also identified subgroups of participants who were less likely to return an FIT kit and provides insight for future interventions. Cancer 2016;122:3288-3296. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  18. The Influence of Educational Experience on the Development of Cognitive Skills as Measured in Formal Tests and Experiments: A Case Study from the Mexican States of Yucatan and Quintana Roo. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Donald W.; Cole, Michael

    The major purpose of the research reported was to assess whether developmental changes in performance on standard psychological tests may be more a reflection of educational experience than maturation or traditional socialization practices. The investigation was reported in three phases: 1) description of the general and specific experimental…

  19. Testing a Technology Integration Education Model for Millennial Preservice Teachers: Exploring the Moderating Relationships of Goals, Feedback, Task Value, and Self-Regulation among Motivation and Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Denise D.; Piper, Randy T.

    2016-01-01

    The technology integration education model is a 12 construct model that includes 8 primary constructs and 4 moderator constructs. By testing the relationships among two primary constructs (motivation and technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge competencies) and four moderator constructs (goals, feedback, task value, and self-regulation),…

  20. The Design and Development of a Semi-Auto Computer Generated Testing Paper System--A Case Study in the School of Continuing Education at China University of Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Han, Xibin; Zhou, Qian

    2011-01-01

    With the rapidly increasing entrance examinations for the School of Continuing education of CUGB, there is an urgent need of the examination papers that have the parallel testing ability for the same academic program. Based on the analysis of parallel factors and the comparison of the manual generated mode and the computer generated mode, the most…

  1. Development and pilot testing of an online module for ethics education based on the Nigerian National Code for Health Research Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The formulation and implementation of national ethical regulations to protect research participants is fundamental to ethical conduct of research. Ethics education and capacity are inadequate in developing African countries. This study was designed to develop a module for online training in research ethics based on the Nigerian National Code of Health Research Ethics and assess its ease of use and reliability among biomedical researchers in Nigeria. Methodology This was a three-phased evaluation study. Phase one involved development of an online training module based on the Nigerian Code of Health Research Ethics (NCHRE) and uploading it to the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) website while the second phase entailed the evaluation of the module for comprehensibility, readability and ease of use by 45 Nigerian biomedical researchers. The third phase involved modification and re-evaluation of the module by 30 Nigerian biomedical researchers and determination of test-retest reliability of the module using Cronbach’s alpha. Results The online module was easily accessible and comprehensible to 95% of study participants. There were significant differences in the pretest and posttest scores of study participants during the evaluation of the online module (p = 0.001) with correlation coefficients of 0.9 and 0.8 for the pretest and posttest scores respectively. The module also demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability and internal consistency as shown by Cronbach’s alpha coefficients of 0.92 and 0.84 for the pretest and posttest respectively. Conclusion The module based on the Nigerian Code was developed, tested and made available online as a valuable tool for training in cultural and societal relevant ethical principles to orient national and international biomedical researchers working in Nigeria. It would complement other general research ethics and Good Clinical Practice modules. Participants suggested that awareness of the

  2. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  3. The career interest test. A brief, standardized assessment of interests for use in educational and vocational guidance = El test de intereses profesionales. Un instrumento de diagnóstico breve y estandarizado para su uso en orientación educativa y profesional

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasou, James A

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the Career Interest Test (Version 3.0), which is a 63-item forced choice, individually- or group-administered assessment of seven vocational interest categories: Outdoor, Practical, Scientific, Creative, Business, Office and People Contact interests It is designed for use in educational and vocational contexts as a practical guide to adolescent career planning. The Career Interest Test is now made freely available for professional use and is also available for free on-l...

  4. Perceptions of competence, implicit theory of ability, perception of motivational climate, and achievement goals: a test of the trichotomous conceptualization of endorsement of achievement motivation in the physical education setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cury, F; Da Fonséca, D; Rufo, M; Sarrazin, P

    2002-08-01

    To test and extend the conceptualization of the endorsement of achievement goals in the physical education setting Mastery, Performance-approach, and Performance-approach goals, Perception of the physical education competence, Implicit theory about sport ability, and Perception of the motivational climate were assessed among 682 boys attending five French schools. Analysis indicated that (1) Performance-approach goals were positively associated with perception of physical education Competence, Entity beliefs about sport ability, the Performance dimension of the motivational climate, and negatively associated with Incremental beliefs about sport ability. (2) Mastery goals were positively associated with perception of physical education Competence, Incremental beliefs about sport ability, the Mastery dimension of the motivational climate, and negatively associated with the Performance dimension of the motivational climate. Also, (3) Performance-avoidance goals were positively associated with Entity beliefs about sport ability and the Performance dimension of the motivational climate; these goals were negatively associated with Incremental beliefs about sport ability and perception of physical education Competence. These results clearly attested to the validity of the trichotomous model in the physical education setting.

  5. Development and pilot testing of an educational intervention for parents, caregivers and teachers of children with verbal communication disabilities in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parada-Toro, Irene; Gómez-Quiroz, Rosa M; Treviño-Siller, Sandra

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement and test an educational intervention aimed at training parents/caregivers and teachers in strategies to support children with verbal communication disabilities (VCDs). We carried out a descriptive observational research conducted in two phases during 2013-2014: a mixed-method diagnosis and intervention development. We used convenience sampling to select the parents/caregivers and teachers of first-to-third graders with VCDs across four public elementary schools in a suburban community in central Mexico. Diagnosis was based on questionnaires conducted with parents/caregivers (n = 38) and teachers (n = 16). The instruments focused not only on the respondents' socioeconomic characteristics and general knowledge about VCDs but also included open questions (24/42) about their common practices and support for children with VCDs. The intervention was built on data collected through the questionnaires, and was designed according to the Integral Intervention Model framework based on the ecosystemic approach. Participants were parents/caregivers and teachers of children with VCDs. Main results showed that the participants were trained in various support techniques, they gained knowledge about VCDs and changed their perception of their own ability to help children with language impairments. As an important upshot of the intervention, communication and networking among parents/caregivers and teachers increased. The main strengths of this research reside in its solid theoretical foundation and the fact that intervention design was based on the specific needs of the target group. In as much as the public health problem of VCDs in Mexico has barely been studied and has received minimal official support, it is essential to engage additional social actors, stakeholders and decision-makers in the implementation of permanent actions. Our study emphasises the importance of recognising this form of health impairment as a social

  6. Norm-Referenced Cognitive and Achievement Scores as Predictors of State-Wide High-Stakes Test Scores with Students Referred for Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkle, James M., II

    2013-01-01

    Relatively recent federal education initiatives, such as No Child Left Behind (NCLB; 2001), have focused on school accountability for student achievement including achievement of traditionally at-risk populations, such as students in special education, students from low-income or high poverty areas, and students who speak English as a new second…

  7. Test Scores Soar: A Comparision Study of 7th Grade Students with Disabilities Math Achievement in Full Inclusion and Self-Contained Special Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Donise

    2014-01-01

    Educational institutions are placing students with disabilities in inclusive programming to meet legislative requirements. School districts have been mandated to develop rigorous programs that can increase the academic achievement of students with disabilities, as well as their participation in general education classrooms. Many school districts,…

  8. A Comparison of Student Test Results: Business and Marketing Education National Board Certified Teachers and Non-National Board Certified Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, William Jr.; Hollomon, Harold L., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The underlying question for the educational community is to determine the effect of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards on creating a higher quality professional who, in turn, imparts knowledge so that their students are better educated to compete in a global economy. Thus, does the attainment of National Board Certification by…

  9. Project RELATE: An Identification and Test of Some Propositions Regarding the Preparation of Teachers. Teacher Education Forum Series. Vol. 1, No. 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harste, Jerome C.; Newman, Anabel P.

    This paper identifies some basic propositions regarding teacher preparation utilized by a curriculum development team in the development of a competency-based teacher education curriculum in reading and language arts. The propositions underlying this development effort had their genesis in the research and literature in teacher education, were…

  10. Computer-Based Testing System. Project STEEL. A Special Project To Develop and Implement a Computer-Based Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory. Volume III. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Theodore W.; And Others

    The document is part of the final report on Project STEEL (Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory) intended to extend the utilization of technology in the training of preservice special education teachers. This volume focuses on the third of four project objectives, the development and implementation of a computer-based testing…

  11. Listen-Identify-Brainstorm-Reality-Test-Encourage (LIBRE) Problem-Solving Model: Addressing Special Education Teacher Attrition through a Cognitive-Behavioral Approach to Teacher Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Norma S.; Hernandez, Art; Hector, Alison M.; Crosby, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Special education teacher attrition rates continue to challenge the profession. A cognitive-behavioral problem-solving approach was used to examine three alternative certification program special education teachers' professional development through a series of 41 interviews conducted over a 2-year period. Beginning when they were novice special…

  12. Service evaluation of an educational intervention to improve sexual health services in primary care implemented using a step-wedge design: analysis of chlamydia testing and diagnosis rate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, Katy; McNulty, Cliodna A M; Ricketts, Ellie J; Hartney, Thomas; Nardone, Anthony; Folkard, Kate A; Charlett, Andre; Dunbar, J Kevin

    2016-08-02

    Providing sexual health services in primary care is an essential step towards universal provision. However they are not offered consistently. We conducted a national pilot of an educational intervention to improve staff's skills and confidence to increase chlamydia testing rates and provide condoms with contraceptive information plus HIV testing according to national guidelines, known as 3Cs&HIV. The effectiveness of the pilot on chlamydia testing and diagnosis rates in general practice was evaluated. The pilot was implemented using a step-wedge design over three phases during 2013 and 2014 in England. The intervention combined educational workshops with posters, testing performance feedback and continuous support. Chlamydia testing and diagnosis rates in participating general practices during the control and intervention periods were compared adjusting for seasonal trends in chlamydia testing and differences in practice size. Intervention effect modification was assessed for the following general practice characteristics: chlamydia testing rate compared to national median, number of general practice staff employed, payment for chlamydia screening, practice urban/rurality classification, and proximity to sexual health clinics. The 460 participating practices conducted 26,021 tests in the control period and 18,797 tests during the intervention period. Intention-to-treat analysis showed no change in the unadjusted median tests and diagnoses per month per practice after receiving training: 2.7 vs 2.7; 0.1 vs 0.1. Multivariable negative binomial regression analysis found no significant change in overall testing or diagnoses post-intervention (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.01, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.96-1.07, P = 0.72; 0.98 CI 0.84-1.15, P = 0.84, respectively). Stratified analysis showed testing increased significantly in practices where payments were in place prior to the intervention (IRR 2.12 CI 1.41-3.18, P educational training sessions found no

  13. FEDIX on-line information service: Design, develop, test, and implement an on-line research and education information service. Annual status report, September 1992--August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodman, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    Federal Information Exchange, Inc. (FIE) is a diversified information services company that is recognized as the major electronic link between the higher education community and the Federal government in the field of research administration. FIE provides a range of information related services to the government, academic and private sectors, including database management, software development and technical support. FEDIX is the on-line information service designed, developed and implemented by FIE to accomplish the following objectives: (1). Broaden the participation of the education community in Federal research and education programs by providing free and unrestricted on-line access to information from all participating Federal agencies; and (2). Provide the education community with on-line access to a single keyword-searchable system for research and educational funding opportunities at the participating Federal agencies.

  14. Educational Inequality in English Primary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Colin

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarises some English research findings related to educational inequality, particularly in inner urban schools. It documents how differences related to relative poverty are reflected in patterns of educational attainment as revealed by national tests results. It considers and evaluates how the issue of educational inequality in…

  15. Selected response test items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomey, A M

    1999-01-01

    Classroom assessment is complex and challenging. Teachers need to consider the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor levels for achievement of their educational objectives. This series of six articles discusses how to develop testing blue-prints; selected-response tests, including multiple-choice, true-false, matching, or other objective tests; completion or essay testing; problem solving/critical thinking activities; performance assessment; and computer-based testing.

  16. IELTS口语测试对高校英语口语教学的启示%Enlightenment of IELTS’ oral test on Teaching Speaking in Tertiary Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄永新; 张黎黎

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, oral English teaching is not paid much attention in higher education and quite a few problems in teaching and testing of English speaking ability. While IETLS test is gaining a really high reputation in the world, and the speaking testing part of IELTS can inspire much about the current oral English teaching in tertiary education, including testing topics, answering frames, cultural consciousness, and assessment criteria. The research result is of great referential value for the reform of oral English teaching in higher education.%当前高校英语口语教学重视程度不足,教学和测试均存在诸多问题。而IELTS考试在世界范围内享有很高的声誉,其口语测试对中国高校口语教学可以提供很多有价值的启示:话题内容、答题思路、文化意识、评分标准。研究结果对我国高校口语教学改革具有重要的借鉴意义。

  17. Volunteer bias in medical education research: an empirical study of over three decades of longitudinal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Clara A; Hojat, Mohammadreza; Gonnella, Joseph S

    2007-08-01

    The issue of whether medical education research outcomes can be biased by students' refusal to allow their data to be used in outcomes research should be empirically addressed to assure the validity of research findings. Given that institutions are expected to document the outcomes of their educational programmes, evaluations of clinical performance subsequent to medical school are crucial, but are often incomplete when graduates decline to permit data collection. This study aimed to examine the demographic and performance differences between research volunteers and others. A total of 7415 doctors graduated from Jefferson Medical College between 1970 and 2004; 75% (n = 5575) agreed to participate in medical education research by granting written permission for the collection of data from their postgraduate training directors on their behalf (research volunteers); 20% (n = 1489) refused to grant such permission (non-volunteers), and 5% (n = 351) did not return the permission form (non-respondents). This prospective longitudinal study compared research volunteers, non-volunteers and non-respondents on gender, ethnicity, performance measures prior to, during and after medical school, scores on medical licensing examinations, and board certification status. Doctors who granted permission (volunteers) generally performed better during and after medical school. In addition, they scored higher on medical licensing examinations and had a higher certification rate. Women and members of ethnic minority groups were less likely to grant permission. The study raises questions about the validity of research findings as a result of volunteerism in medical education research. The implications for guidelines regarding the protection of human subjects in medical education research, and for educational outcomes, are discussed.

  18. Addressing Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salend, Spencer J.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that between 25% to 40% of students experience test anxiety, with students with disabilities and those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds having higher prevalence rates. Since test anxiety impacts student well-being and the validity of the important educational decisions based on testing data, this article…

  19. Test Science, Not Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J.; Gee, Thomas C.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews some of the ways researchers estimate readability with a focus on multiple choice test items in science. Presents criteria to consider for minimizing readability problems in test items. Examines samples from the National Assessment of Educational Progress test bank for readability. (ML)

  20. National Tests and minorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Karen Egedal

    during the design of test materials (eg. Banks, 2009; Coronel-Molina & McCarthy, 2016). While initiatives have been taken to adapt national test practices to certain regional conditions, the dominant culture will continue to be imposed via both tests and national educational objectives observed...

  1. Testing History As Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James R.; Hart, James

    1973-01-01

    Some obvious difficulties of teaching and testing history as inquiry are reviewed. Examples of test items that require students to utilize thought processes developed through inquiry teaching are presented together with a rationale for their use. Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives is proposed as a useful tool in test construction. (SM)

  2. The challenging issues of testing and standardization in education: modern references for restructuring the philosophy of thinking and integration of Ukraine into the system of international rating PISA-2018

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Megega

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The European vector in the foreign policy of our state brought up a number of serious challenges for the system of domestic education. They include not only the reorganization of the philosophy of thinking, but also the conscious, objective study of the essence of our system’s entering into the so-called European standards. It would be a mistake to think that the transfer of principles, approaches, forms and methods of work from the educational systems of different countries of the world will immediately produce a positive effect. Each system has its pros and cons. Practical experience of the use of different testing and standardization methods in different countries has already revealed a number of negative trends. Despite the fact that the testing industry is on the rise, the problems of the education quality still remain unsolved. In addition, politicians and officials are constantly tempted to give education assessments based on the results of rating and monitoring studies. Consequently, the objective picture of the essence and depth of the transformations, so necessary for the modern school, has disappeared from the analysis. Moreover, the competent evaluation of the activity of the main figure of the educational process – i.e. the teacher – has not been done. Testing, in a number of cases, turns a school into a training ground for testing tools, and it makes socialization, creativity, artwork and the formation of competencies to be a secondary task. Therefore, the critical view of the experience, which has been presented in the study, will tell practitioners how to enter the system of international standards and how to evaluate without repeating other people’s mistakes. The expediency of such analysis becomes especially urgent on the eve of Ukraine’s participation in 2018 PISA testing. At the same time, one cannot help paying attention to the undeniable conclusions about the direct connection between the results of testing the

  3. Motivation and Test Anxiety in Test Performance across Three Testing Contexts: The CAEL, CET, and GEPT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liying; Klinger, Don; Fox, Janna; Doe, Christine; Jin, Yan; Wu, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This study examined test-takers' motivation, test anxiety, and test performance across a range of social and educational contexts in three high-stakes language tests: the Canadian Academic English Language (CAEL) Assessment in Canada, the College English Test (CET) in the People's Republic of China, and the General English Proficiency Test (GEPT)…

  4. Education, education, education

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Education is a recurring theme of our 60th anniversary year, as I was reminded last week when we had a visit from the winners of the Spanish schools competition launched with the Prince of Asturias Award prize money (see here).   Young people are always remarkable in their curiosity and inventiveness, and this was very clear in all the submissions for the competition. I was most impressed with the six winners, but have to give a special mention to the youngest, Sofía Isabella Villamizar Villegas, who at just seven years of age made a lovely video explaining the Higgs mechanism by analogy to moving a balloon with and without static charge through a field of suspended strips of paper. It was not only charming, but also very effective as analogies go. The Spanish visit came in the middle of judging to find a winner of the Beamline for Schools competition, which closed at the end of March having received almost 300 proposals for experiments from schools all over the world. These vary ...

  5. Precision Gains from Publically Available School Proficiency Measures Compared to Study-Collected Test Scores in Education Cluster-Randomized Trials. NCEE 2010-4003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deke, John; Dragoset, Lisa; Moore, Ravaris

    2010-01-01

    In randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where the outcome is a student-level, study-collected test score, a particularly valuable piece of information is a study-collected baseline score from the same or similar test (a pre-test). Pre-test scores can be used to increase the precision of impact estimates, conduct subgroup analysis, and reduce bias…

  6. How Much Do Parents Matter? Testing the Reciprocal Association between Parental Involvement and Children's Educational Trajectories among Native and Immigrant Families

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Connie S.

    2012-01-01

    That parental involvement makes a positive impact on children's educational outcomes is well established (Fan & Chen, 2001). However, several gaps remain in when and how parental involvement influences children's educational progress: (1) parental involvement is mainly studied at particular points in the life course, but not across the developmental continuum, (2) the parental involvement-achievement link is generally modeled as a unidirectional relationship as compared with a transactional p...

  7. The effect of education on second births in Hungary: A test of the time-squeeze, self-selection and partner-effect hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Bartus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In recent years, several studies have reported a positive effect of women's education on the transition to second births. This finding contradicts the economic theory of fertility. Three explanations were proposed: the selection, the time-squeeze, and the partner effect hypotheses. OBJECTIVE We propose a modification of the economic theory to account for the positive educational gradient with regard to second births. We empirically examine the effect of women's education on the timing of second births. METHODS We use a sample of women born between 1946 and 1983 from all three waves of the Hungarian Generations and Gender Survey (GGS data. We estimate lognormal survival models of the timing of second births. RESULTS We find that female education reduces the waiting time to second conception in Hungary. The results remain robust after controlling for sample selection and cannot be explained away in terms of time-squeeze and the partner's education. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that the relationship between women's education and spacing behavior might be a causal one.

  8. The Danish Dyslexia Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads; Elbro, Carsten; Møller, Helene Lykke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dyslexia is a long lasting problem in learning to decode written words accurately and fluently. This definition suggests that dyslexia remains sufficiently constant to be assessed reliably with just one wide-range test across all educational levels. The current study investigated...... this possibility by asking whether students who receive special support in reading differ from other students on the same scale of decoding across all educational levels. Method: Decoding and spelling measures from a newly developed, web-based Danish dyslexia test were taken from 1564 students from Grade 3...... of decoding can be a valid marker of dyslexia across educational levels. A unified test may simplify testing and facilitate a common understanding of dyslexia throughout the educational system....

  9. Standardized Tests: Purpose Is the Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popham, W. James

    2016-01-01

    "U.S. students are being educated less well these days than they should be," writes W. James Popham. One key contributing factor is that educators often use the wrong tests to make their most important educational decisions. Two recent events have made it a perfect time to change the way we conduct our educational testing: growing…

  10. Improvement of quantitative testing of liver function in patients with chronic hepatitis C after installment of antiviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias Ocker; Marion Ganslmayer; Steffen Zopf; Susanne Gahr; Christopher Janson; Eckhart G. Hahn; Christoph Herold

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if and to what extent antiviral therapy influenced a broad panel of quantitative testing of liver function (QTLF).METHODS: Fifty patients with chronic hepatitis C were either treated with interferon (n = 8), interferon/ribavirin (n = 19) or peg-interferon/ribavirin (n = 23). Quantitative testing of liver function, including aminopyrine breath test (ABT), galactose elimination capacity (GEC), sorbitol clearance (SCI) and indocyanine green clearance (ICG)was performed before and 3 mo after initiation of antiviral therapy.RESULTS: After 3 mo of antiviral treatment, 36 patients showed normal transaminases and were negative for HCV-RNA, 14 patients did not respond to therapy. ABT and GEC as parameters of microsomal and cytosolic liver function were reduced in all patients before therapy initiation and returned to normal values in the 36 therapy responders after 3 mo. Parameters of liver perfusion (SCI and ICG) were not affected by antiviral therapy. In the 14 non-responders,no changes in QTLF values were observed during the treatment period.CONCLUSION: ICG and SCI remained unaffected in patients with chronic hepatitis C, while ABT and GEC were significantly compromised. ABT and GEC normalized in responders to antiviral therapy. Early determination of ABT and GEC may differentiate responders from non-responders to antivJral treatment in hepatitis C.

  11. Effects of a health education and telephone counseling program on patients with a positive fecal occult blood test result for colorectal cancer screening: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hui-Chuan; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Chen, Shu-Ching

    2016-11-17

    Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of a health education and telephone counseling program on knowledge and attitudes about colorectal cancer and screening and the psychological impact of positive screening results. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 2 groups using a pretest and posttest measures design. Patients with positive colorectal cancer screening results were selected and randomly assigned to an experimental (n = 51) or control (n = 51) group. Subjects in the experimental group received a health education and telephone counseling program, while the control group received routine care only. Patients were assessed pretest before intervention (first visit to the outpatient) and posttest at 4 weeks after intervention (4 weeks after first visit to the outpatient). Patients in the experimental group had a significantly better level of knowledge about colorectal cancer and the psychological impact of a positive screening result than did the control group. Analysis of covariance revealed that the health education and telephone counseling program had a significant main effect on colorectal cancer knowledge. A health education and telephone counseling program can improve knowledge about colorectal cancer and about the psychological impact in patients with positive colorectal cancer screening results. The health education and telephone counseling program is an easy, simple, and convenient method of improving knowledge, improving attitudes, and alleviating psychological distress in patients with positive colorectal cancer screening results, and this program can be expanded to other types of cancer screening. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Analyzing 2007——2011 English Tests of Sichuan Higher Education Entrance Examination%2007—2011年四川高考英语试卷分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜海波

    2012-01-01

      Education department of Sichuan Province took out listening tests for foreign language tests in National Higher Education Entrance Examination (NHEEE) of 2008, since then English Tests of Sichuan Higher Education Entrance Examination have went through a period of normalization, standardization and stabilization from 2008 to 2011. In this thesis, the latest 5-year-English tests are analyzed statistically by using vertical paper analysis method combined with the synopsis of the English test in NHEEE, furthermore, the three items of Grammar and Vocabulary, Reading Comprehension and Writing are classified in order to find out the law of their scope, frequency and the way how they are set in the exam, hoping to correctly direct English teaching and exam preparation in Sichuan Senior High School..%  2008年四川省教育厅取消普通高考外语科听力考试,自此,从2008至2011年,四川高考英语试卷经历了规范、标准、稳定的过程。本文结合全国高考英语考试大纲,使用纵向试卷分析法对近5年四川高考英语试卷做了量化统计,然后通过对语法和词汇知识,阅读理解及写作3大题做了进一步的归类分析,以求总结出相关知识块的命题范围、命题频度、命题方式等规律,从而正确地指导四川高中英语的教学与备考。

  13. Tests in Print II: An Index to Tests, Test Reviews, and the Literature on Specific Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buros, Oscar K., Ed.

    Tests in Print II is a comprehensive, annotated bibliography of all in-print tests published as separates for use with English-speaking subjects. The 1,155 two-column pages list 2,467 tests in print as of early 1974; 16,574 references through 1971 on specific tests; a reprinting of the 1974 APA-AERA-NCME Standards for Educational andPsychological…

  14. A randomized controlled trial of a multicomponent, targeted, low-literacy educational intervention compared with a nontargeted intervention to boost colorectal cancer screening with fecal immunochemical testing in community clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Stacy N; Christy, Shannon M; Chavarria, Enmanuel A; Abdulla, Rania; Sutton, Steven K; Schmidt, Alyssa R; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Simmons, Vani N; Ufondu, Chukwudi B; Ravindra, Chitra; Schultz, Ida; Roetzheim, Richard G; Shibata, David; Meade, Cathy D; Gwede, Clement K

    2017-04-15

    The objective of the current study was to improve colorectal cancer (CRC) screening uptake with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT). The current study investigated the differential impact of a multicomponent, targeted, low-literacy educational intervention compared with a standard, nontargeted educational intervention. Patients aged 50 to 75 years who were of average CRC risk and not up-to-date with CRC screening were recruited from either a federally qualified health center or a primary care community health clinic. Patients were randomized to the intervention condition (targeted photonovella booklet/DVD plus FIT kit) or comparison condition (standard Centers for Disease Control and Prevention brochure plus FIT kit). The main outcome was screening with FIT within 180 days of delivery of the intervention. Of the 416 participants, 54% were female; the participants were racially and ethnically diverse (66% white, 10% Hispanic, and 28% African American), predominantly of low income, and insured (the majority had county health insurance). Overall, the FIT completion rate was 81%, with 78.1% of participants in the intervention versus 83.5% of those in the comparison condition completing FIT (P =  .17). In multivariate analysis, having health insurance was found to be the primary factor predicting a lack of FIT screening (adjusted odds ratio, 2.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-4.26 [P =  .04]). The multicomponent, targeted, low-literacy materials were not found to be significantly different or more effective in increasing FIT uptake compared with the nontargeted materials. Provision of a FIT test plus education may provide a key impetus to improve the completion of CRC screening. The type of educational material (targeted vs nontargeted) may matter less. The findings of the current study provide a unique opportunity for clinics to adopt FIT and to choose the type of patient education materials based on clinic, provider, and patient preferences. Cancer 2017

  15. The Effect of Using XO Computers on Students' Mathematics and Reading Abilities: Evidences from Learning Achievement Tests Conducted in Primary Education Schools in Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Shinobu; Sukhbaatar, Javzan; Takada, Jun-ichi; Dayan-Ochir, Khishigbuyan

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, Mongolia took part in One Laptop per Child (OLPC) project. Since that time, over 10,000 students in grades 2-5 in 43 primary education schools are using XO computers. This paper presents the findings of a study conducted in 2012 to evaluate the impact of the OLPC initiatives on students' literacy and math skills. This study covered 14…

  16. Reading the Bible as a Pedagogical Text: Testing, Testament, and Some Postmodern Considerations about Religion/the Bible in Contemporary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, Avner; Burke, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    While it is true that following various Supreme Court decisions in the last century, religion is, in most cases, no longer explicitly taught in public school classrooms, we use this article to explore the ways in which implicit religious understandings regarding curriculum and pedagogy still remain prevalent in current public education. Building…

  17. Peer relations with disabilities : A research design to test the effectiveness of an educational intervention to promote social acceptance of kindergarten students with disabilities and their peers’ attitudes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademaker, Florianne

    2016-01-01

    Children with disabilities often experience difficulties in their social participation within inclusive classrooms and interventions are needed to combat this problem. This poster describes the research design of a quasi-experimental study in which we will examine the effectiveness of an educational

  18. Providing preoperative information for children undergoing surgery: a randomized study testing different types of educational material to reduce children's preoperative worries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, S C; Arriaga, P; Esteves, F

    2014-12-01

    This study developed three types of educational preoperative materials and examined their efficacy in preparing children for surgery by analysing children's preoperative worries and parental anxiety. The sample was recruited from three hospitals in Lisbon and consisted of 125 children, aged 8-12 years, scheduled to undergo outpatient surgery. The participants were randomly assigned to one of the seven independent conditions that were combined into the following three main groups: an experimental group, which received educational materials with information about surgery and hospitalization (a board game, a video or a booklet); a comparison group, which received entertaining material with the same format type; and a control group, which did not receive any material. Children's preoperative worries and parental anxiety were evaluated after the experimental manipulation. Children who received educational materials were significantly less worried about surgery and hospital procedures than children in the comparison and the control groups, although no statistically differences were found between the type of materials within the experimental group, and no significant effect occurred on parental state anxiety. These results do however support the hypothesis that providing preoperative materials with educational information reduce children's preoperative worries.

  19. Perceived Quality of Educational Technology Matters: A Secondary Analysis of Students' ICT Use, ICT-Related Attitudes, and PISA 2012 Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petko, Dominik; Cantieni, Andrea; Prasse, Doreen

    2017-01-01

    In large-scale international assessments such as the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), or the Progress in International Reading Study (PISA), research has struggled to find positive associations between the frequency of educational technology use in schools and…

  20. Perceived Quality of Educational Technology Matters: A Secondary Analysis of Students' ICT Use, ICT-Related Attitudes, and PISA 2012 Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petko, Dominik; Cantieni, Andrea; Prasse, Doreen

    2017-01-01

    In large-scale international assessments such as the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), or the Progress in International Reading Study (PISA), research has struggled to find positive associations between the frequency of educational technology use in schools and…