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Sample records for non-protein nitrogen npn

  1. Penetapan Kadar Protein Dan Non Protein Nitrogen (NPN) Pada Ulat Kidu (Rhynchophorus ferrugineus) Dan Hasil Olahannya Dengan Metode Kjeldahl

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmawati, Vivi Maisari

    2013-01-01

    Edible larva is a source of protein that comes from the edible larva of bumblebee with red head lives in decayed sago palm. Frying and boiling process, will affect the protein content. This research aimed to study content of protein in edible larva and the effect of process frying and boiling to the its protein content. The sample is the edible larva bought from Pancur batu market, urban village of Tuntungan II, sub district of Pancur batu. The content of protein and NPN on edible’s larva...

  2. Penetapan Kadar Protein Dan Non Protein Nitrogen Pada Belut (Monopterus Albus) Beserta Hasil Olahannya

    OpenAIRE

    Simbolon, Romauli Fransiska

    2015-01-01

    Food processing will influence the protein content of the foods, because protein can be conferted into Non Protein Nitrogen (NPN). This research aimed to study the content of protein in fresh eel and the effect of process frying and boiling to the its protein content. The sample of eel obtained from traditional market of Kampung Lalang. Determination of protein content and NPN on the sample of eel was conducted before and after frying and boiling. The applied method was Kjeldahl method before...

  3. Crude Protein and Non-protein Nitrogen Content in Dairy Cow Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruska Diana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Milk composition is of prime economic importance for farmers. Milk total proteins are composed of casein, whey proteins and non-protein nitrogen. The objective of this work was to establish milk crude protein, non-protein nitrogen (NPN and urea content in dairy cow milk produced in different farms in Latvia. Cow milk samples (n=30 were collected in September 2012 from four different farms breeding diverse cow breeds. Average crude protein, casein and urea content in milk varied significantly among farms. NPN content in cow milk varies among farms - from 0.194% to 0.232%. Average crude protein and casein content was significantly higher (p<0.05 for Latvia Brown breed cows, while NPN content did not differ significantly among breeds. Regression between NPN and urea content in milk was R² = 0.458. Correlation between NPN and urea content was significant (r = 0.677. This study allowed establishing that crude protein and NPN content in milk varied significantly (p<0.05 in farms with differing dairy cow housing and feeding technologies

  4. Influence of dietary carnitine in growing sheep fed diets containing non-protein nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, A M.; Fernandez, J M.; White, T W.; Bunting, L D.; Gentry, L R.; Lovejoy, J C.; Owen, K Q.

    2001-04-01

    The influence of supplemental L-carnitine was investigated in growing sheep fed rations containing non-protein nitrogen (NPN). The experiment was conducted as a randomized block design with a 2x2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Lambs (77.4kg BW, n=24) were fed a total mixed ration (12.1-13.6% CP) with two levels of L-carnitine (0 or 250ppm) and two levels of NPN (urea contributing 0 or 50% of total dietary N) for a 50-day period. Jugular blood samples were collected at 0, 1, and 3h post-feeding, and ruminal fluid samples were collected at 1h post-feeding, during days 1, 8, 29, and 50 of the experiment. Average daily gain (121 versus 214g) was lower (P0.10) from the control group. Plasma urea N levels in both OULT 1 and OULT 2 were lower (P<0.0001) in the NPN and NPN with L-carnitine groups compared with the control and L-carnitine groups. In the present experiment, production and plasma criteria were affected by NPN incorporation in the diets. Production criteria were not affected by inclusion of L-carnitine in the diet, however, L-carnitine reduced experimentally induced hyperammonemia by day 50 of the trial.

  5. Analisis Kadar Protein Total dan Non Protein Nitrogen Pada Pakkat (Calamus caesius Blume.) dengan Metode Kjeldahl

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, Irma Yusnita

    2016-01-01

    Pakkat is a traditional food in Mandailing Natal is taken from the inside of the young rattan and the most commonly consumed by people is grilled pakkat. Pakkat can be used as vegetables and believed to cure many diseases that need to be researched content of nutrients in it and is expected to take it become one of the functional food. The purpose of this study was to determine the concentration of total protein and non protein nitrogen (NPN) in pakkat and their changes in fresh, grilled and ...

  6. Karakteristik Protein dan Nitrogen Non Protein Daging Ikan Cucut Lanyam (Charcharhinus limbatus (Characteristics of Protein and Non Protein Nitrogen in Lanyam Shark Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuspihana Fitrial

    2017-02-01

    Based on protein solubility of Lanyam muscle at pH 1.5 to 12 obtained two points which is minimum solubility at pH 4.5 and pH 9. Based on the classification Osborn, Lanyam muscle contained albumin (28.64%, globulin (13:44%, prolamin (03.29%, glutelin (33.70%. Observation of non-protein nitrogen levels indicated that the washing process was very effective to reduce non-protein nitrogen levels up to 62.34% and urea levels up to 58% . Differential Scanning Calorimetry Study of Lanyam mince showed two types of protein that has a different stability to heat and after added 2.5% NaCl formed a peak which is a fusion of both these proteins

  7. Cecotrophy behavior and use of urea as non-protein nitrogen (NPN) source for capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira-Filho, Sérgio Luiz Gama; Mendes, Alcester; Tavares, Ellis Fernanda Kowalski; da Cunha Nogueira, Selene Siqueira

    2013-11-01

    Fifteen female adult capybaras, with initial average body weight (BW) of 32.7 (± 5.8) kg, were kept in individual pens to evaluate effect of supplementation of concentrate feed and its supply time on cecotrophy behavior frequency. The animals were allocated in a completely randomized design, with five animals per treatment, receiving three diets: grass only, grass and grain corn offered in a single meal, and grass and grain corn offered in two daily meals; all cecotrophy acts were recorded. Later, in a second experiment, five capybaras received five levels of urea in their diet: 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 g urea/100 kg BW, replacing soybean meal as true protein source, in a 5 × 5 Latin square design. The animals were weighed and their blood was collected every 2 weeks. The frequency of cecotrophy (Ps capybaras were fed grass only (0.5 ± 0.07 acts/h) than when they received grass and corn in a single meal (0.3 ± 0.05 acts/h) and grass and corn supplied in separate meals (0.1 ± 0.03 acts/h). With increased urea in their diet, the capybaras showed initial signs of chronic intoxication, together with increments in serum urea (r = 0.87, P capybara diet, these must be mixed with roughage in a single meal to avoid high decrease in the frequency of cecotrophy behavior and increase in dry matter intake. The replacement of soybean meal with urea in capybara diet is not recommended.

  8. IN VITRO UTILIZATION OF NPN SOURCES BY INCREASING LEVELS OF CORN STARCH IN STRAW BASED DIETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. ALI, T. KHALIQ1, A. JAVAID, M. SARWAR, M. A. KHAN2, M. A. SHAHZAD AND S. ZAKIR3

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effect of replacement of 50% cottonseed meal (CSM nitrogen with various non protein nitrogen (NPN sources i.e. urea (CU, biuret (CB and diammonium phosphate (CD. The four energy sources were: wheat straw with no corn starch (WS, WS + 20% corn starch, WS + 30% corn starch and WS + 40% corn starch. These substrates were fermented with rumen liquor to measure in vitro dry matter digestibility (DMD, bacterial count and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N concentrations. The protein sources provided 2% nitrogen (12.5% CP. The control substrate contained CSM as the sole source of nitrogen and ground wheat straw as the sole sources of energy. The in vitro DMD increased to 49.10, 40.06 and 31.52% in substrates containing CB, CU and CD compared to 23.10% for CSM (P<0.01. Similarly, supplementation of straw with 20, 30 and 40% corn starch gave 24.31, 38.03 and 45.48% DMD compared to 23.10% for control (P<0.01. Increase of corn starch from 20 to 30% resulted in 13.72 units higher DMD which increased to a mere 7.45 units when the corn starch was raised from 30 to 40%. The interactions between nitrogen sources and starch levels revealed that substrate CB x 40% corn starch yielded 70.73% DMD, followed by 49.66% DMD with CU x 40% starch (P<0.01. The NH3-N increased due to 50% replacement of CSM with NPN sources on isonitrogenous basis. It was maximum with CU as nitrogen source, followed by CD, CB and CSM. The differences among the four nitrogen sources were significant (P<0.01. The substrates containing CU resulted in highest bacterial counts of 33.78x108 compared to 20.41x108, 17.06x108 and 11.34x108 for CB, CSM and CD, respectively (P<0.01. Addition of corn starch up to 20 and 30% to straw based substrates increased the bacterial counts to 23.25x108 and 23.12x108 and 40% corn starch yielded 15.58x108 bacterial counts which was significantly (P<0.01 lesser than 17.06x108 for substrates containing 0% corn starch. Bacterial count

  9. Utilization of the urease inhibitor and the non-protein nitrogen in ruminants%脲酶抑制剂与非蛋白氮的利用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李太翔; 刘凯丽; 陈峰

    2004-01-01

    非蛋白氮(NPN)系指非蛋白质的含氮物质,已广泛应用于反刍动物营养中,可部分代替饲料中的天然蛋白质,以缓解世界性的蛋白饲料资源不足的问题。目前人们已对20多种NPN应用于反刍动物的饲用价值进行了试验,效果比较好的是尿素和双缩脲。当前,普遍采用尿素作为非蛋白氮添加在反

  10. A New Slow-Release Non-Protein Nitrogen:Effects of Supplemental Level on Lactation Performance and Blood Biochemical Indices of Lactating Goats%一种新型缓释非蛋白氮添加水平对奶山羊泌乳性能及血液生化指标的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王会; 罗军; 张伟; 张天颖; 杨地坤

    2014-01-01

    本试验旨在探讨饲粮中添加不同水平的一种新型缓释非蛋白氮( srNPN)对奶山羊泌乳性能及血液生化指标的影响。选择2~3胎平均体重约为60 kg的健康西农萨能奶山羊泌乳羊48只,随机分为4组,每组12只。各组饲粮 srNPN 添加水平分别为0(对照组)、0.25%、0.50%、0.75%。预试期1周,正试期16周。结果表明:1)饲粮中添加不同水平的srNPN对奶山羊日均采食量无显著影响( P>0.05)。2)饲粮中添加srNPN可显著提高奶山羊日均产奶量(P0.05);各组乳中乳蛋白、乳糖及乳非脂固形物含量差异不显著( P>0.05)。4)饲粮中添加srNPN可显著降低血液尿素氮含量(P0.05)。由此得出,饲粮中添加srNPN能够提高奶山羊乳中乳脂含量,降低血液尿素氮含量,添加水平为0.50%时奶山羊日均产奶量最高。%This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of different supplemental level of a new slow-release non-protein nitrogen ( srNPN ) on lactation performance and blood biochemical indices of dairy goats. Forty-eight healthy lactating Xinong Saanen dairy goats with 2 to 3 parities and about 60 kg of average body weight were randomly assigned to 4 groups with 12 goats in each group. Goats in the 4 groups were fed diets supplemented with srNPN at 0, 0. 25%, 0. 50% and 0. 75%, respectively. There was a pretrial period of 1 week followed by an experimental period of 16 weeks. The results showed as follows:1 ) dietary supple-mentation of srNPN at different levels did not affect average daily feed intake of lactating goats ( P>0 . 05 ) . 2 ) The supplementation of srNPN significantly increased average daily milk yield ( P 0. 05); besides, the contents of milk protein, lac-tose and milk solids-non-fat were not significantly affected by the supplementation of srNPN ( P>0 . 05 ) . 4 ) The supplementation of srNPN could significantly decrease blood urea nitrogen content ( P0. 05). In conclusion, dietary supplementation of srNPN

  11. Toward Complementary Ionic Circuits: The npn Ion Bipolar Junction Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Tybrandt, Klas; Gabrielsson, Erik; Berggren, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Many biomolecules are charged and may therefore be transported with ionic currents. As a step toward addressable ionic delivery circuits, we report on the development of a npn ion bipolar junction transistor (npn-IBJT) as an active control element of anionic currents in general, and specifically, demonstrate actively modulated delivery of the neurotransmitter glutamic acid. The functional materials of this transistor are ion exchange layers and conjugated polymers. The npn-IBJT shows stable t...

  12. Variation in nitrogen components of sheep milk in sub-Mediterranean area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Matutinović

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate seasonal variation in urea content and other nitrogen compounds (protein, casein, non-protein nitrogen content of sheep milk as a tool for monitoring the protein nutritional status over the period of two years. The study was performed on three family farms with 150 to 300 sheep per farm using semi-extensive farming management based on pasture, typical for sub-Mediterranean area. Bulk-tank milk samples were taken during the entire milking period (from March to July or August, depending on the year and were analysed for protein, casein, non-protein nitrogen (NPN and urea content. Significant effect of the year was observed on urea and NPN content (P<0.05. In addition, seasons had a significant effect on milk protein, urea and casein content (P<0.01. Variations in nitrogen components of sheep milk in Dalmatian hinterland have been significant due to the fact that the semi-extensive farming systems could be strongly affected by climate which directly influence on the quantity and quality of pasture.

  13. Degradation mechanisms of current gain in NPN transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-Ji; Geng, Hong-Bin; Lan, Mu-Jie; Yang, De-Zhuang; He, Shi-Yu; Liu, Chao-Ming

    2010-06-01

    An investigation of ionization and displacement damage in silicon NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) is presented. The transistors were irradiated separately with 90-keV electrons, 3-MeV protons and 40-MeV Br ions. Key parameters were measured in-situ and the change in current gain of the NPN BJTS was obtained at a fixed collector current (Ic = 1 mA). To characterise the radiation damage of NPN BJTs, the ionizing dose Di and displacement dose Dd as functions of chip depth in the NPN BJTs were calculated using the SRIM and Geant4 code for protons, electrons and Br ions, respectively. Based on the discussion of the radiation damage equation for current gain, it is clear that the current gain degradation of the NPN BJTs is sensitive to both ionization and displacement damage. The degradation mechanism of the current gain is related to the ratio of Dd/(Dd + Di) in the sensitive region given by charged particles. The irradiation particles leading to lower Dd/(Dd + Di) within the same chip depth at a given total dose would mainly produce ionization damage to the NPN BJTs. On the other hand, the charged particles causing larger Dd/(Dd + Di) at a given total dose would tend to generate displacement damage to the NPN BJTs. The Messenger-Spratt equation could be used to describe the experimental data for the latter case.

  14. Toward complementary ionic circuits: the npn ion bipolar junction transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tybrandt, Klas; Gabrielsson, Erik O; Berggren, Magnus

    2011-07-06

    Many biomolecules are charged and may therefore be transported with ionic currents. As a step toward addressable ionic delivery circuits, we report on the development of a npn ion bipolar junction transistor (npn-IBJT) as an active control element of anionic currents in general, and specifically, demonstrate actively modulated delivery of the neurotransmitter glutamic acid. The functional materials of this transistor are ion exchange layers and conjugated polymers. The npn-IBJT shows stable transistor characteristics over extensive time of operation and ion current switch times below 10 s. Our results promise complementary chemical circuits similar to the electronic equivalence, which has proven invaluable in conventional electronic applications.

  15. Electron-induced damage to NPN transistors under different fluxes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Radiation damage of NPN transistors under different fluxes with electron energy of 1.5 MeV was investigated in this article. It has been shown that when NPN transistors were irradiated to a given fluence at different electron fluxes, the shift of base current was dependent on flux. With electron flux decreasing, the shift of base current becomes larger, while collector current almost keeps constant. Thus, more degradation of NPN transistors could be caused by low-electron-flux irradiation, similar to enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) of transistors under 60Co γ-irradiation. Finally, the underlying mechanisms were discussed here.

  16. Degradação in vitro da fibra em detergente neutro de forragem tropical de baixa qualidade em função da suplementação com proteína verdadeira e/ou nitrogênio não-proteico In vitro degradation of neutral detergent fiber of low-quality tropical forage according to supplementation with true protein and (or non-protein nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenio Detmann

    2011-06-01

    forragem de baixa qualidade.The objective was to evaluate in vitro degradation of neutral detergent fiber (NDF of low quality tropical forage according to supplementation with nitrogenous compounds at different true protein:non-protein nitrogen (NPN ratios. A sample of signal grass harvested at dry season was used as basal forage. Casein and the mixture urea:ammonium sulfate (U:AS, 9:1 were used as true protein and NPN source, respectively. The basal supplement for the other was defined by adding casein the incubation medium, in order to raise crude protein (CP level of the basal forage up to 8%, on dry matter basis. The other supplements were defined from the fractional replacement (0, 1/3, 2/3 and 1 of casein CP by U:AS protein equivalents. A control treatment (forage without supplementation was also evaluated. The treatments were evaluated by in vitro simulated ruminal environment, following the incubation times: 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hours. The procedure was repeated three times, totaling three evaluations by incubation time for each treatment. Incubation residues were evaluated for NDF contents and interpreted through a non-linear logistic model. Protein supplementation increased 56.8 to 96.0% the degradation rate of potentially degradable NDF (kpdNDF in relation to control and decreased discret lag around 4.5 to 7.4 hours. The exclusive supplementation with urea increased by 15.9% the kpdNDF estimates compared to exclusive supplementation with casein. It was observed maximum kpdNDF and microbial growth at 2/3 CP of U:AS:1/3 CP of casein. Supplements which provide 1/3 of CP protein from true proteinand 2/3 from non-protein nitrogen can optimize the degradation of NDF of low-quality forage.

  17. InP-based deep-ridge NPN transistor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, S.; Kong, D. H.; Zhu, H. L.; Zhao, L. J.; Pan, J. Q.; Wang, W.

    2011-08-01

    We report an InP-based deep-ridge NPN transistor laser (TL, λ˜1.5μm). By placing the quantum well (QW) active material above the heavily Zn-doped base layer, both the optical absorption of the heavily p-doped base material and the damage of the quality of the QWs resulted from the Zn diffusion into the QWs are decreased greatly. CW operation of the TL is achieved at -40°C, which is much better than the shallow-ridge InP-based NPN TL. With future optimization of the growth procedure, significant improvement of the performance of the deep-ridge InP-based NPN TLs is expected.

  18. ELDRS and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yu-Zhan; LU Wu; REN Di-Yuan; WANG Gai-Li; YU Xue-Feng; GUO Qi

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistors are investigated in this article.The results show that the vertical NPN transistors exhibit more degradation at low dose rate,and that this degradation is attributed to the increase on base current.The oxide trapped positive charge near the SiO2-Si interface and interface traps at the interface can contribute to the increase on base current and the two-stage hydrogen mechanism associated with space charge effect can well explain the experimental results.

  19. Non-Protein Coding RNAs

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Nils G; Batey, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    This book assembles chapters from experts in the Biophysics of RNA to provide a broadly accessible snapshot of the current status of this rapidly expanding field. The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to the discoverers of RNA interference, highlighting just one example of a large number of non-protein coding RNAs. Because non-protein coding RNAs outnumber protein coding genes in mammals and other higher eukaryotes, it is now thought that the complexity of organisms is correlated with the fraction of their genome that encodes non-protein coding RNAs. Essential biological processes as diverse as cell differentiation, suppression of infecting viruses and parasitic transposons, higher-level organization of eukaryotic chromosomes, and gene expression itself are found to largely be directed by non-protein coding RNAs. The biophysical study of these RNAs employs X-ray crystallography, NMR, ensemble and single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, optical tweezers, cryo-electron microscopy, and ot...

  20. Ionization damage in NPN transistors caused by lower energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingji; Xiao, Jingdong; Liu, Chaoming; Zhao, Zhiming; Geng, Hongbin; Lan, Mujie; Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu

    2010-09-01

    Electrical degradation of two type NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) with different emitter sizes was examined under exposures of 70 and 110 keV electrons. Base and collector currents as a function of base-emitter voltage were in-situ measured during exposure. Experimental results show that both the 70 and 110 keV electrons produce an evident ionization damage to the NPN BJTs. With increasing fluence, collector currents of the NPN BJTs hardly change in the whole range of base-emitter voltage from 0 to 1.2 V, while base currents increase in a gradually mitigative trend. Base currents vary more at lower base-emitter voltages than at higher ones for a given fluence. The change in the reciprocal of current gain at a fixed base-emitter voltage of 0.65 V increases non-linearly at lower fluences and tends to be gradually saturated at higher fluences. Sensitivity to ionization damage increases for BJTs with an emitter having a larger perimeter-to-area ratio.

  1. Swift Heavy Ion Irradiation Effects on NPN rf Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana; Gupta, S. K.; Revannasiddaiah, D.

    2011-07-01

    The dc characteristics of NPN rf power transistors were studied systematically before and after irradiation by 50 MeV Li3+ ions, 100 MeV F8+ ions and 140 MeV Si10+ ions in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The transistor parameters such as excess base current (ΔIB = IBpost-IBpre), dc current gain (hFE), and collector-saturation current (ICSat) were determined before and after irradiation. The base current (IB) was found to increase significantly after ion irradiation and this in turn decreases the hFE of the transistors. Further, the output characteristics of the irradiated devices exhibit the decrease in the collector current at the saturation region (ICSat) with increase of ion dose.

  2. UNJUK KERJA CATU DAYA 12 VOLT 2A DENGAN PASS ELEMENT TRANSISTOR NPN DAN PNP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathoni Fathoni

    2012-03-01

    Hasil  pengujian menunjukkan  bahwa catu daya  yang menggunakan  transistor  pelewat  jenis pnp lebih bagus regulasi bebannya dibanding transistor npn, yaitu 0,827 % dibandinng 2,149 %. Saat kondisi hubung singkat, berlaku sebaliknya, yaitu suhu heat sink transistor npn serta IC regulatornya lebih baik dibanding transistor pnp serta IC regulatornya, yaitu 52 °C dan 47 °C   untuk transistor npn dan IC regulatornya dibanding 58°dan 63 °C untuk transistor pnp dan IC regulatornya. Kata kunci: Hubung-singkat, IC regulator, regulasi-beban, transistor-pelewat

  3. Comparison of magnetoresistances of triangular and rectangular ballistic graphene npn junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Sei; Masubuchi, Satroru; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Machida, Tomoki

    2016-10-01

    We compared the magnetotransport properties of ballistic graphene npn junctions with two different geometries. We found that a rectangular npn junction shows a positive magnetoresistance around zero magnetic field; this finding can be explained by the suppression of Klein tunneling in a finite magnetic field. In contrast, a triangular npn junction shows a negative magnetoresistance because the transmission is enhanced in a commensurability magnetic field where the ballistic carriers in a cyclotron motion are injected perpendicularly to both the np and pn interfaces. These results suggest possibilities for manipulating ballistic carrier trajectories through the designs of local-gate geometries.

  4. The Development of CMOS Technology in NPN Bipolar%CMOS工艺中NPN bipolar的开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔金洪

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rapid development of growth and breakthrough technology, the manufacture of integrated circuits in a short span of 60 years, single grain can accommodate tens of millions of transistors ultra large integrated circuit, and the main process of the CMOS process, because it has low power consumption, integration high, low noise, the advantages of strong ability of resisting radiation, but the traditional bipolar technology has the advantages of high frequency, power, so want to integration in the CMOS tube triode, diode. The paper discusses the method of integration of NPN bipolar in 0.5 μm CMOS process, the shutdown technology index.%由于技术的迅速发展与突破,使集成电路的制造得以在短短的60年间,单一晶粒已经可以容纳数千万个电晶体的超大型集成电路。其主要工艺为CMOS工艺,原因是它有功耗低、集成度高、噪声低、抗辐射能力强等优点,但是传统bipolar工艺有频率高、功率大的优点,因此提出在CMOS中集成三极管、二极管。论述了在0.5μm CMOS工艺中集成NPN bipolar的方法以及各个关键技术指标的确定。

  5. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  6. 2,2-dinitro-1,3-bis-nitrooxy-propane (NPN): A new energetic plasticizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wingborg, Niklas; Eldsaeter, Carina [Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, SE-147 25 Tumba (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    A new energetic plasticizer, 2,2-dinitro-1,3-bis-nitrooxy-propane (NPN), has been characterized. Its high oxygen balance, +12.5%, and low glass transition temperature, -81.5 C (midpoint), makes it very attractive as an energetic plasticizer in solid propellants. The ability of NPN to lower the glass transition temperature and viscosity of uncured PolyNIMMO has been studied and compared to other energetic plasticizers, such as BDNPA/F and butyl-NENA. NPN has a similar plasticizing effect as butyl-NENA, both on depressing the glass transition temperature and lowering the viscosity. To increase the poor thermal stability of NPN, several conventional nitrocellulose/nitroglycerine stabilizers were evaluated. Further work is however needed to find a more effective stabilizer. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. High total dose proton irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, M. N.; Praveen, K. C.; Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2014-04-01

    The effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation on the I-V characteristics of NPN rf power transistors were studied in the dose range of 100 Krad to 100 Mrad. The different electrical characteristics like Gummel, current gain and output characteristics were systematically studied before and after irradiation. The recovery in the I-V characteristics of irradiated NPN BJTs were studied by isochronal and isothermal annealing methods.

  8. Neutron effects on the electrical and switching characteristics of NPN bipolar power transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca, Albert J.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1988-01-01

    The use of nuclear reactors to generate electrical power for future space missions will require the electrical components used in the power conditioning, control, and transmission subsystem to operate in the associated radiation environments. An initial assessment of neutron irradiation on the electrical and switching characteristics of commercial high power NPN bipolar transistors was investigated. The results clearly show the detrimental effects caused by neutron irradiation on the electrical and switching characteristics of the NPN bipolar power transistor.

  9. SHI induced damage in electrical properties of silicon NPN BJTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M. Vinay; Kumar, Santhosh; Yashoda, T.; Krishnaveni, S.

    2016-05-01

    The investigation of radiation damage in Si microelectronic circuitry and devices are being carried out by various research groups globally. In particular the Si Bipolar junction transistors are very sensitive to high energetic radiation. In the present study, radiation response of NPN Bipolar junction transistor (2N3773) has been examined for 60 MeV B4+ ion. Key electrical properties like Gummel, dc current gain and capacitance - voltage (C-V) characteristics of 60 MeV B4+ ion irradiated transistor were studied before and after irradiation. Ion irradiation and subsequent electrical characterizations were performed at room temperature. Current voltage (I-V) measurements showed the increase in collector current for VBE ≤ 0.4 V as a function of fluence, which is due to B4+ ion induced surface leakage currents. Base current is observed to be more sensitive than collector current and gain appears to be degraded with ion fluence. Also, C-V measurements shows that both built in potential and doping concentration increased significantly after irradiation.

  10. Effects of orientation of substrate on the enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) in NPN transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wu; ZHENG Yu-Zhan; WANG Yi-Yuan; REN Di-Yuan; GUO Qi; WANG Zhi-Kuan; WANG Jian-An

    2011-01-01

    The radiation effects and annealing characteristics of two types of domestic NPN bipolar junction transistors, fabricated with different orientations, were investigated under different dose-rate irradiation. The experimental results show that both types of the NPN transistors exhibit remarkable Enhanced Low-Dose-Rate Sensitivity (ELDRS). After irradiation at high or low dose rate, the excess base current of NPN transistors obviously increased, and the current gain would degrade rapidly. Moreover, the decrease of collector current was also observed. The NPN transistor with (111) orientation was more sensitive to ionizing radiation than that with (100) orientation. The underlying mechanisms of various experimental phenomena are discussed in detail in this paper.

  11. Effects of orientation of substrate on the enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) in NPN transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wu; Zheng, Yu-Zhan; Wang, Yi-Yuan; Ren, Di-Yuan; Guo, Qi; Wang, Zhi-Kuan; Wang, Jian-An

    2011-02-01

    The radiation effects and annealing characteristics of two types of domestic NPN bipolar junction transistors, fabricated with different orientations, were investigated under different dose-rate irradiation. The experimental results show that both types of the NPN transistors exhibit remarkable Enhanced Low-Dose-Rate Sensitivity (ELDRS). After irradiation at high or low dose rate, the excess base current of NPN transistors obviously increased, and the current gain would degrade rapidly. Moreover, the decrease of collector current was also observed. The NPN transistor with orientation was more sensitive to ionizing radiation than that with orientation. The underlying mechanisms of various experimental phenomena are discussed in detail in this paper.

  12. Comparing SiC switching power devices: MOSFET, NPN transistor and GTO thyristor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Alex Q.; Zhang, Bo

    2000-02-01

    This paper for the first time systematically analyzed the operation mechanism of SiC NPN transistors. Theoretical device figure-of-merits for switching power devices based on the conduction loss and switching loss were developed. The on-state loss and the switching loss of 4.5-kV SiC switching power devices (MOSFET, NPN transistor and GTO thyristor) were then compared by using theoretical and numerical calculations. Special emphasis is placed on comparing the total power loss of the devices at a given current density. Theoretical analyses and simulation results show that GTO thyristors have a large switching loss due to the long current tail at turn-off, hence restricting its maximum operation frequency. High voltage SiC MOSFETs have a large on-state power dissipation at high current levels due to the resistive nature of the drift region, restricting their applications at high current densities. SiC NPN transistors have a comparable switching loss as that of SiC MOSFETs, but at the same time, SiC NPN transistors have the lowest on-state loss. This study indicates that SiC NPN transistor is the most attractive switching power device at 4.5 kV.

  13. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: ELDRS and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu-Zhan; Lu, Wu; Ren, Di-Yuan; Wang, Gai-Li; Yu, Xue-Feng; Guo, Qi

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistors are investigated in this article. The results show that the vertical NPN transistors exhibit more degradation at low dose rate, and that this degradation is attributed to the increase on base current. The oxide trapped positive charge near the SiO2-Si interface and interface traps at the interface can contribute to the increase on base current and the two-stage hydrogen mechanism associated with space charge effect can well explain the experimental results.

  14. UNJUK KERJA CATU DAYA 12 VOLT 2A DENGAN PASS ELEMENT TRANSISTOR NPN DAN PNP

    OpenAIRE

    Fathoni Fathoni

    2012-01-01

    Transistor pelewat (pass element transistor) yang dipasang pada rangkain catu daya yang menggunakan IC regulator 3  terminal adalah untuk booster arus output. Ada dua cara pemasangan transistor  pelewat  yang  umum  digunakan,  yaitu  dengan  transistor  pnp  dan  npn.  Transistor  pnp dipasang dengan basis transistor yang terhubung pada input IC regulator sedangkan transistor npn dipasang dengan basis transistor yang terhubung pada output IC regulator. Untuk mengetahui unjuk kerja dari ke...

  15. Retrotransposons and non-protein coding RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Willerslev, Eske

    2009-01-01

    does not merely represent spurious transcription. We review examples of functional RNAs transcribed from retrotransposons, and address the collection of non-protein coding RNAs derived from transposable element sequences, including numerous human microRNAs and the neuronal BC RNAs. Finally, we review...

  16. Dietas com nitrogênio não-proteico para fêmeas bovinas superovuladas sem prévia adaptação durante curto tempo e em diferentes fases do ciclo estral Effect of short term non-protein nitrogen feeding for superovulated beef cows without previous adaptation and at different periods of the oestrus cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Rocha Alves

    2010-09-01

    effects of short term non-protein nitrogen feeding at different periods of the oestrus cycle in superovulated cows, without previous adaptation, on yield, quality and development degree of recovered embryos. A total of sixty-eight Nelore cows were distributed in three groups: the control group (C and two groups with urea supply before (UB; urea supply from day -5 to day 0 and after (UA; supply from day 0 to day 5 artificial insemination. Animals were kept grazing and received 3.0 kg/animal/day of concentrate during 16 days. Two concentrates were formulated and the total diets (concentrate and estimate forage intake showed 12.0% (control diet and 14.6% (non-protein diet of crude protein. Animals were synchronized, superovulated and inseminated. The embryos were collected and analysed seven days (day 7 after insemination (day 0. Blood samples were collected on days -5, 0 and 5 to determine concentration of plasmatic urea nitrogen, glucose, insulin and progesterone. The time of urea supply affected average plasmatic urea nitrogen concentration on days -5, 0 5 but it did not affect concetrations of glucose, insulin and progesterone. The moment of urea inclusion had effect on compact morula percentage in relation to the total number of structures (UB = 51.4 vs. UA = 15.3%, to the total number of fertilized oocytes (UB = 62.5 vs. UA = 30.6% and to the total number of viable embryos (UB = 68.8 vs. UA = 38.6%. In the after insemination group of urea supply there was 70.2% of reduction on compact morula proportion over the total structures in relation to the group that received urea before insemination. Non-protein nitrogen feeding immediately after insemination promotes faster rates of embryo development.

  17. Estimativa do teor de fenilalanina em sopas desidratadas instantâneas: importância do nitrogênio de origem não-protéica Estimation of phenylalanine (Phe contents in dehydrated soups: significance of non-protein nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Passos Guimarães

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A análise direta de fenilalanina (Phe em alimentos com reduzidos teores protéicos destinados a pacientes fenilcetonúricos é difícil, demorada e de alto custo. Emprega-se, geralmente, método indireto baseado na análise do teor protéico bruto, considerando que proteínas naturais contêm ao redor de 4% de Phe. Neste trabalho estimou-se a concentração de Phe em 22 amostras de sopas desidratadas instantâneas, considerando-se os teores de N total, N protéico e não-protéico e de glutamato monossódico (GMS, que foram analisados independentemente. A concentração de proteína bruta (N total multiplicado por fator de conversão adequado variou entre 6,1 e 21,5 g/100 g amostra, apresentando similaridade com os valores protéicos apresentados nos rótulos das sopas. Os teores protéicos reais foram reduzidos e a concentração de Phe calculada a partir desses dados variou entre 51 e 652 mg/100 g amostra. A concentração de GMS nessas amostras foi considerável, sendo que o N proveniente desse realçador de sabor contribuiu com 2,5 a 47,7% do N total. Concluiu-se que, devido à elevada participação de GMS na formulação das sopas, a estimativa de Phe deve ser precedida de extração prévia de substâncias nitrogenadas não protéicas, para evitar superestimação da proteína e, por conseqüência, dos teores de Phe. As sopas desidratadas com os menores teores de Phe podem representar uma diversificação no cardápio para fenilcetonúricos.The direct analysis of phenylalanine (Phe in food with low protein content is difficult, time consuming and expensive. In general, more convenient indirect methods based on raw protein contents have been used, considering that natural proteins contain about 4% of Phe. In this paper the Phe contents of 22 commercial dehydrated soups were estimated taking into account the contents of total N, protein N and non-protein nitrogen as well as the contents of monosodium glutamate (GMS which were analyzed

  18. Evaluation of temperature-enhanced gain degradation of verticle npn and lateral pnp bipolar transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witczak, S.C.; Lacoe, R.C. [Aerospace Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Electronics Technology Center; Galloway, K.F. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The effect of dose rate on radiation-induced gain degradation is compared for verticle npn and lateral pnp bipolar transistors. High dose rate irradiations at elevated temperatures are more effective at simulating low dose rate degradation in the lateral pnp transistors.

  19. The role of Sema3–Npn-1 signaling during diaphragm innervation and muscle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettl, Rosa-Eva; Hanuschick, Philipp; Amend, Anna-Lena; Alberton, Paolo; Aszodi, Attila; Huber, Andrea B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Correct innervation of the main respiratory muscle in mammals, namely the thoracic diaphragm, is a crucial pre-requisite for the functionality of this muscle and the viability of the entire organism. Systemic impairment of Sema3A–Npn-1 (Npn-1 is also known as NRP1) signaling causes excessive branching of phrenic nerves in the diaphragm and into the central tendon region, where the majority of misguided axons innervate ectopic musculature. To elucidate whether these ectopic muscles are a result of misguidance of myoblast precursors due to the loss of Sema3A–Npn-1 signaling, we conditionally ablated Npn-1 in somatic motor neurons, which led to a similar phenotype of phrenic nerve defasciculation and, intriguingly, also formation of innervated ectopic muscles. We therefore hypothesize that ectopic myocyte fusion is caused by additional factors released by misprojecting growth cones. Slit2 and its Robo receptors are expressed by phrenic motor axons and migrating myoblasts, respectively, during innervation of the diaphragm. In vitro analyses revealed a chemoattractant effect of Slit2 on primary diaphragm myoblasts. Thus, we postulate that factors released by motor neuron growth cones have an influence on the migration properties of myoblasts during establishment of the diaphragm. PMID:27466379

  20. Effects of orientation of substrate on the enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) in NPN transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wu; ZHENG Yu-Zhan; WANG Yi-Yuan; REN Di-Yuan; GUO Qi; WANG Zhi-Kuan; WANG Jian-An

    2011-01-01

    The radiation effects and annealing characteristics of two types of domestic NPN bipolar junction transistors, fabricated with different orientations, were investigated under different dose-rate irradiation. The experimental results show that both types o

  1. Technology and First Electrical Characteristics of Complementary NPN and PNP InAlAs/InGaAs Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Delong; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Sawdai, Donald; Chin, Patrick; Block, Tom

    2002-02-01

    A selective molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) regrowth approach is presented and applied in the demonstration of complementary InP heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) technology for monolithic integration of NPN and PNP HBTs. State-of-art performance has been observed: The DC gain was 35 for both integrated NPN and PNP HBTs. fT of 79.6 GHz and fmax of 109 GHz were achieved for NPN devices while fT of 11.6 GHz and fmax of 22.6 GHz were achieved for PNP devices. Little performance degradation has been observed compared with same design NPN or PNP HBT layers grown on individual substrates. Monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) based on complementary InP HBT technology have been studied for the first time using this technology and their electrical characteristics are presented.

  2. Reliability studies on NPN RF power transistors under swift heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpa, N.; Praveen, K. C.; Gnana Prakash, A. P.; Naik, P. S.; Cressler, John D.; Gupta, S. K.; Revannasiddaiah, D.

    2012-02-01

    NPN RF power transistors were irradiated with 140 MeV Si 10+ ions, 100 MeV F 8+ ions, 50 MeV Li 3+ ions and Co-60 gamma radiation in the dose range from 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The transistor characteristics are studied before and after irradiation from which the parameters such as Gummel characteristics, excess base current (Δ IB = IBpost - IBpre), dc current gain ( hFE), transconductance ( gm) and collector-saturation current ( ICSat) are determined. The degradation observed in the electrical characteristics is almost the same for different types of ion irradiated NPN RF power transistors with similar total doses although there is a large difference in the linear energy transfer (LET) of the ions. Further, it was observed more degradation in DC I- V characteristics of ion irradiated devices than the Co-60 gamma irradiated devices for higher doses.

  3. Dirac fermion reflector by ballistic graphene sawtooth-shaped npn junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Sei; Wilmart, Quentin; Masubuchi, Satoru; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Plaçais, Bernard; Machida, Tomoki

    2017-04-01

    We have realized a Dirac fermion reflector in graphene by controlling the ballistic carrier trajectory in a sawtooth-shaped npn junction. When the carrier density in the inner p-region is much larger than that in the outer n-regions, the first straight np interface works as a collimator, and the collimated ballistic carriers can be totally reflected at the second zigzag pn interface. We observed clear resistance enhancement around the np+n regime, which is in good agreement with the numerical simulation. Though the effect observed is mild and needs more validation for future application with better device design, the qualitative tunable reflectance of ballistic carriers could be an elementary and important step for realizing ultrahigh-mobility graphene field effect transistors utilizing Dirac fermion optics in the near future. We also comment on some possible guidelines to improve the quantitative device performance.

  4. New high-performance complementary bipolar technology featuring 45-GHz NPN and 20-GHz PNP devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Martin C.; Osborne, Peter H.; Thomas, Simon; Cook, Trevor

    1999-09-01

    A new high performance silicon complementary bipolar technology is introduced. In addition a novel process 'enhancement' technique based on a local oxidation is described and demonstrated and NPN devices with cut-off frequencies up to 45GHz and PNP devices of 20GHz have been fabricate. We propose that the technique we have used will allow specific transistors within a circuit to be optimized, as required.

  5. Total Ionizing Dose Test Report BFR92A NPN 5 GHz Wide Band Transistor from NXP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Anthony M.; Oldham, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this test was to characterize the Philips/NXP BFR92A NPN 5 gigahertz wide band silicon transistor for total dose response. This test shall serves as the radiation lot acceptance test (RLAT) for the lot date code (LDC) 1027. The BFR92A is packaged in a 3-pin plastic SOT23 package. Low dose rate (LDR/ELDRS) irradiations was performed.

  6. Degradation of Junction Parameters of an Electrically Stressed NPN Bipolar Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    N. Toufik; F. PéLanchon; P. Mialhe

    2001-01-01

    The effect of an electrical ageing on npn bipolar transistor has been studied. The current gain decreases substantially and the electrical properties are discussed. The emitter-base junction parameters are degraded during the electrical stress experiments. Both the amplitude and the rate of this degradation depend on the stress duration. The evaluation of these parameters allows to discuss hot carrier degradation process, to estimate the stress magnitude and to control the device.

  7. Efecto de Niveles Crecientes de Nitrógeno no Proteico Dietario en Vacas Lactantes sobre las Concentraciones de Metabolitos Nitrogenados en Orina, Sangre y Leche Effect of Increasing Levels of non Protein Nitrogen in Dairy Cows on Nitrogen Metabolites Concentrations in Urine, Blood and Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Darío Galvis Góez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Con el fin de evaluar el efecto de niveles crecientes de nitrógeno no proteico dietario (NNP en vacas lactantes sobre las concentraciones de metabolitos nitrogenados en orina, sangre y lehe, se evaluaron 15 vacas Holstein que cursaban los primeros 100 días posparto. Estas se asignaron aleatoriamente a tres tratamientos experimentales que consistieron en el suministro de un suplemento alimenticio comercial al que se le adicionó urea de tal manera que se incrementara el consumo de proteína degradable en rumen (PDR en aproximadamente 0,0 (T0, 10 (T1 y 15% (T2 respecto a los requerimientos. Para las 15 vacas se determinaron las concentraciones de nitrógeno ureico en sangre (NUS, orina (NUO y leche (NUL así como las de amonio en sangre (AS, amonio en orina (AO y la glicemia (GLIC, utilizando kit comerciales acoplados a espectrofotometría. Se realizó un balance de PDR donde se encontraron diferencias significativas entre los tratamientos (PIn order to test the effect of growing levels of dietary non nitrogen protein in lactating cows on urine, blood and milk nitrogen metabolites concentrations, fifteen cows Holstein in their first one hundred post calving days were used. They were three different experimental treatments assigned at random, which consisted on the supply a commercial feeding supplement without any addition of urea as a source of NNP (T0; the second treatment (T1 consisted on the supply of the same supplement with an addition of urea, so that the supply of PDR was increased 10% approximately to the requirements; finally, in the third treatment, (T2 consisted on the supply of the same supplement which was added with enough urea so that the supply of PDR was increased 15% approximately to the requirements. In these cows were determined concentrations of ureic nitrogen in blood (UNB, urine (UNU, milk (UNM, ammonium in blood (AB and urine (AU, and glycemia; through spectrophotometric analysis. Finding positive correlations between

  8. Consumo e dinâmica ruminal da fibra em detergente neutro em bovinos em pastejo no período das águas recebendo suplementação com nitrogênio não-proteico e/ou proteína verdadeira Intake and rumen dynamics of neutral detergent fiber in grazing cattle supplemented with non-protein nitrogen and, or true protein during the rainy season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Aparecida Carli Costa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar o efeito de diferentes relações entre proteína verdadeira e nitrogênio não-proteico sobre o consumo e a dinâmica de trânsito e degradação ruminal da fibra em detergente neutro (FDN da forragem em bovinos em pastejo durante o período das águas. Foram utilizados cinco novilhos mestiços Holandês × Zebu, castrados, com peso corporal inicial de 335±35 kg fistulados no rúmen e no abomaso. Os tratamentos foram: controle (somente pasto; e suplementos com ureia; com 2/3 de compostos nitrogenados oriundos da ureia e 1/3 de compostos nitrogenados oriundos da albumina; com 1/3 de compostos nitrogenados oriundos da ureia e 2/3 de compostos nitrogenados oriundos da albumina; e com albumina. Foram fornecidos 200 g/dia de proteína bruta (PB a partir dos suplementos. O experimento foi conduzido segundo delineamento em quadrado latino 5 × 5, com cinco períodos experimentais de 15 dias. Não foram observados efeitos da suplementação sobre o consumo voluntário, com exceção do consumo de PB, que aumentou com a suplementação. A substituição da ureia por albumina nos suplementos teve efeito linear sobre o consumo de PB. Os consumos dos demais componentes da dieta não foram afetados pela composição dos suplementos. Nenhum efeito foi observado sobre a taxa de passagem ruminal de compostos fibrosos. O fornecimento de suplementos ampliou, em média, a estimativa da taxa comum de latência e degradação da FDN. Contudo, não houve efeito da alteração na composição dos suplementos sobre este parâmetro. A suplementação de bovinos com fontes de compostos nitrogenados degradáveis no rúmen proteicos ou não-proteicos durante o período das águas não afeta o consumo voluntário de pasto.The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different true protein:non-protein nitrogen ratios in supplements on intake and ruminal transit and degradation dynamics of neutral detergent fiber (NDF in grazing cattle

  9. Optimisation of add-on NPN Transistor for a CMOS Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurola, Artto; Ronkainen, Hannu; Mellin, Joni

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this research was to add an npn-bipolar transistor for a CMOS process. This was to be done with minimal additional process steps and without changing any existing CMOS parameters. The minimum line width of the process was 1.2µm, the wafers were p-type and 100mm in diameter and no epitaxial or polysilicon layers were used. To minimise the additional process steps a triple diffused transistor was selected as the basis of the research. The emitter was formed from a diffusion contacting NMOSFET source and drain to aluminium. As collector diffusion two approaches were investigated the pnpbipolar transistors isolation nwell and the PMOSFET n-well. The only additional step to the CMOS process due to the npn-transistor fabrication resulted from the formation of base diffusion. The specifications for the npn-transistor were 80 for the current gain, 100V for the early voltage and 60MHz for the transition frequency at 1µA collector current. Four different transistor structures were investigated two octagonal transistors having either emitter or base in the centre and two minimum area rectangular transistors having either base or emitter in the middle. The octagonal transistor having the emitter in the centre was chosen as the basis of simulations. It was first simulated with a device simulator. Next combined process and device simulations were done. Based on simulation results different processes were tested on wafers. Only the octagonal transistor having the emitter in the middle satisfied the specifications when a pnp isolation n-well was used as a collector.

  10. Effect of 100MeV oxygen ion irradiation on silicon NPN power transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M. Vinay; Krishnakumar, K. S.; Dinesh, C. M.; Krishnaveni, S.; Ramani [Department of studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore (India); Department of Physics, APS College, Bengaluru (India); Department of Physics, DCE, Govt. First Grade College, Mangalore (India); Department of studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore (India); Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bengaluru (India)

    2012-06-05

    The radiation response of npn Bipolar junction transistor (BJT) has been examined for 100 MeV O{sup 7+} ion. Key electrical properties like Gummel characteristics, dc current gain and capacitance-voltage of 100MeV O{sup 7+} ion irradiated transistor were studied before and after irradiation. The device was decapped and the electrical characterizations were performed at room temperature. Base current is observed to be more sensitive than collector current and gain appears to be degraded with ion fluence, also considerable degradation in C-V characteristics is observed and doping concentration is found to be increased along with the increase in ion fluence.

  11. Effect of 100MeV oxygen ion irradiation on silicon NPN power transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M. Vinay; Krishnakumar, K. S.; Dinesh, C. M.; Krishnaveni, S.; Ramani

    2012-06-01

    The radiation response of npn Bipolar junction transistor (BJT) has been examined for 100 MeV O7+ ion. Key electrical properties like Gummel characteristics, dc current gain and capacitance-voltage of 100MeV O7+ ion irradiated transistor were studied before and after irradiation. The device was decapped and the electrical characterizations were performed at room temperature. Base current is observed to be more sensitive than collector current and gain appears to be degraded with ion fluence, also considerable degradation in C-V characteristics is observed and doping concentration is found to be increased along with the increase in ion fluence.

  12. Neutron Radiation Effect On 2N2222 And NTE 123 NPN Silicon Bipolar Junction Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Myo Min; Rashid, N. K. A. Md; Karim, J. Abdul; Zin, M. R. Mohamed; Hasbullah, N. F.

    2013-12-01

    This paper examines neutron radiation with PTS (Pneumatic Transfer System) effect on silicon NPN bipolar junction transistors (2N2222 and NTE 123) and analysis of the transistors in terms of electrical characterization such as current gain after neutron radiation. The key parameters are measured with Keithley 4200SCS. Experiment results show that the current gain degradation of the transistors is very sensitive to neutron radiation. The neutron radiation can cause displacement damage in the bulk layer of the transistor structure. The current degradation is believed to be governed by increasing recombination current between the base and emitter depletion region.

  13. Simulation Development for Silo Test Program (STP). Volume 2. Detonation Characterization of NA/NP (Aqueous Nitric Acid/Nitropropane) and NPN (Nitropropane Nitrate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-31

    for advice and information on NPN; and Dr. Roland Franzen, Ford Laboratories, Inc., for discussions on NPN. Within SRI, we thank Mr. Darwin R. Henley...for constructing the targets, Mr. Daniel F. Walter for operating electronic instrumentation, Mssrs. Hugh E. Hanna, George S. Cartwright , and Kennard E

  14. Reliability studies on NPN RF power transistors under swift heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushpa, N.; Praveen, K.C. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India); Gnana Prakash, A.P., E-mail: gnanaprakash@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India); Naik, P.S. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India); Cressler, John D. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta 30308 (United States); Gupta, S.K. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Revannasiddaiah, D. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India)

    2012-02-15

    NPN RF power transistors were irradiated with 140 MeV Si{sup 10+} ions, 100 MeV F{sup 8+} ions, 50 MeV Li{sup 3+} ions and Co-60 gamma radiation in the dose range from 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The transistor characteristics are studied before and after irradiation from which the parameters such as Gummel characteristics, excess base current ({Delta}I{sub B} = I{sub Bpost} - I{sub Bpre}), dc current gain (h{sub FE}), transconductance (g{sub m}) and collector-saturation current (I{sub CSat}) are determined. The degradation observed in the electrical characteristics is almost the same for different types of ion irradiated NPN RF power transistors with similar total doses although there is a large difference in the linear energy transfer (LET) of the ions. Further, it was observed more degradation in DC I-V characteristics of ion irradiated devices than the Co-60 gamma irradiated devices for higher doses.

  15. Swift heavy-ion irradiation effects on electrical and defect properties of NPN transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnana Prakash, A. P.; Ke, S. C.; Siddappa, K.

    2004-08-01

    NPN transistors were irradiated by 95 MeV oxygen ions in a fluence ranging from 5 × 1010 to 5 × 1012 ions cm-2. The dc current gain (hFE), excess base current (DgrIB = IBpost - IBpre), excess collector current (DgrIC = ICpost - ICpre) and collector-saturation current (ICS) of the ion-irradiated transistors were studied systematically. We found that both hFE and ICS of the transistors decrease drastically after ion irradiation. Secondly, a significant increase in the collector current (IC) along with the increase in the base current (IB) after ion irradiation was observed. The radiation-induced trap levels in the collector-base depletion region of NPN transistors were studied by employing the deep level transient spectroscopy technique and different types of trap levels were observed. The results obtained on the activation energy, density of trap levels, apparent capture cross section of the defects, introduction rate and space charge layer lifetime of different defects for different total fluence are presented and discussed.

  16. Npn-1 contributes to axon-axon interactions that differentially control sensory and motor innervation of the limb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa-Eva Huettl

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The initiation, execution, and completion of complex locomotor behaviors are depending on precisely integrated neural circuitries consisting of motor pathways that activate muscles in the extremities and sensory afferents that deliver feedback to motoneurons. These projections form in tight temporal and spatial vicinities during development, yet the molecular mechanisms and cues coordinating these processes are not well understood. Using cell-type specific ablation of the axon guidance receptor Neuropilin-1 (Npn-1 in spinal motoneurons or in sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG, we have explored the contribution of this signaling pathway to correct innervation of the limb. We show that Npn-1 controls the fasciculation of both projections and mediates inter-axonal communication. Removal of Npn-1 from sensory neurons results in defasciculation of sensory axons and, surprisingly, also of motor axons. In addition, the tight coupling between these two heterotypic axonal populations is lifted with sensory fibers now leading the spinal nerve projection. These findings are corroborated by partial genetic elimination of sensory neurons, which causes defasciculation of motor projections to the limb. Deletion of Npn-1 from motoneurons leads to severe defasciculation of motor axons in the distal limb and dorsal-ventral pathfinding errors, while outgrowth and fasciculation of sensory trajectories into the limb remain unaffected. Genetic elimination of motoneurons, however, revealed that sensory axons need only minimal scaffolding by motor axons to establish their projections in the distal limb. Thus, motor and sensory axons are mutually dependent on each other for the generation of their trajectories and interact in part through Npn-1-mediated fasciculation before and within the plexus region of the limbs.

  17. Npn-1 contributes to axon-axon interactions that differentially control sensory and motor innervation of the limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettl, Rosa-Eva; Soellner, Heidi; Bianchi, Elisa; Novitch, Bennett G; Huber, Andrea B

    2011-02-01

    The initiation, execution, and completion of complex locomotor behaviors are depending on precisely integrated neural circuitries consisting of motor pathways that activate muscles in the extremities and sensory afferents that deliver feedback to motoneurons. These projections form in tight temporal and spatial vicinities during development, yet the molecular mechanisms and cues coordinating these processes are not well understood. Using cell-type specific ablation of the axon guidance receptor Neuropilin-1 (Npn-1) in spinal motoneurons or in sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), we have explored the contribution of this signaling pathway to correct innervation of the limb. We show that Npn-1 controls the fasciculation of both projections and mediates inter-axonal communication. Removal of Npn-1 from sensory neurons results in defasciculation of sensory axons and, surprisingly, also of motor axons. In addition, the tight coupling between these two heterotypic axonal populations is lifted with sensory fibers now leading the spinal nerve projection. These findings are corroborated by partial genetic elimination of sensory neurons, which causes defasciculation of motor projections to the limb. Deletion of Npn-1 from motoneurons leads to severe defasciculation of motor axons in the distal limb and dorsal-ventral pathfinding errors, while outgrowth and fasciculation of sensory trajectories into the limb remain unaffected. Genetic elimination of motoneurons, however, revealed that sensory axons need only minimal scaffolding by motor axons to establish their projections in the distal limb. Thus, motor and sensory axons are mutually dependent on each other for the generation of their trajectories and interact in part through Npn-1-mediated fasciculation before and within the plexus region of the limbs.

  18. The 4H-SiC npn power bipolar junction transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Williams, B. W.

    1999-12-01

    The static and dynamic performance of the power silicon carbide BJT is investigated and compared with the silicon carbide UMOSFET by employing a numerical semiconductor simulator. The silicon carbide BJT exhibits superior current handling ability to and switching speed comparable with the SiC MOSFET in the voltage range simulated (1 kV-4 kV). The high current gain of the SiC BJT redresses the base drive problem of the silicon power BJT. It is proposed that research be carried out on the power silicon carbide NPN BJT, since it does not have the premature gate oxide breakdown and low inversion layer mobility problems associated with SiC MOSFET technology.

  19. Electrical characterization of commercial NPN bipolar junction transistors under neutron and gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OO Myo Min

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronics components such as bipolar junction transistors, diodes, etc. which are used in deep space mission are required to be tolerant to extensive exposure to energetic neutrons and ionizing radiation. This paper examines neutron radiation with pneumatic transfer system of TRIGA Mark-II reactor at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency. The effects of the gamma radiation from Co-60 on silicon NPN bipolar junction transistors is also be examined. Analyses on irradiated transistors were performed in terms of the electrical characteristics such as current gain, collector current and base current. Experimental results showed that the current gain on the devices degraded significantly after neutron and gamma radiations. Neutron radiation can cause displacement damage in the bulk layer of the transistor structure and gamma radiation can induce ionizing damage in the oxide layer of emitter-base depletion layer. The current gain degradation is believed to be governed by the increasing recombination current in the base-emitter depletion region.

  20. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: An enhanced close-in phase noise LC-VCO using parasitic V-NPN transistors in a CMOS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peijun, Gao; J, Oh N.; Hao, Min

    2009-08-01

    A differential LC voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) employing parasitic vertical-NPN (V-NPN) transistors as a negative gm-cell is presented to improve the close-in phase noise. The V-NPN transistors have lower flicker noise compared to MOS transistors. DC and AC characteristics of the V-NPN transistors are measured to facilitate the VCO design. The proposed VCO is implemented in a 0.18 μm CMOS RF/mixed signal process, and the measurement results show the close-in phase noise is improved by 3.5-9.1 dB from 100 Hz to 10 kHz offset compared to that of a similar CMOS VCO. The proposed VCO consumes only 0.41 mA from a 1.5 V power supply.

  1. Annealing effects and DLTS study on NPN silicon bipolar junction transistors irradiated by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoming; Li, Xingji; Yang, Jianqun; Rui, Erming

    2014-01-01

    Isochronal anneal sequences have been carried out on 3DG112 silicon NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) irradiated with 20 MeV bromine (Br) heavy ions. The Gummel curve is utilized to characterize the annealing behavior of defects in both the emitter-base depletion region and the neutral base. We find that the base current (IB) decreases with the increasing annealing temperature, while the collector current (IC) remains invariable. The current gain varies slightly, when the annealing temperature (TA) is lower than 400 K, while varies rapidly at TAtransistor. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) data is used to assign the relative magnitude of each of the important defects. Based on the in situ electrical measurement and DLTS spectra, it is clear that the V2(-/0)+V-P traps are the main contribution to the degradation of current gain after the 20 MeV Br ions irradiation. The V2(-/0)+V-P peak has many of the characteristics expected for the current gain degradation.

  2. Model of radiation-induced gain degradation of NPN bipolar junction transistor at different dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qifeng, Zhao; Yiqi, Zhuang; Junlin, Bao; Wei, Hu

    2015-06-01

    Ionizing-radiation-induced current gain degradation in NPN bipolar junction transistors is due to an increase in base current as a result of recombination at the surface of the device. A model is presented which identifies the physical mechanism responsible for current gain degradation. The increase in surface recombination velocity due to interface states results in an increase in base current. Besides, changing the surface potential along the base surface induced by the oxide-trapped charges can also lead to an increased base current. By combining the production mechanisms of oxide-trapped charges and interface states, this model can explain the fact that the current gain degradation is more severe at a low dose rate than at a high dose rate. The radiations were performed in a Co60 source up to a total dose of 70 krad(Si). The low dose rate was 0.1 rad(Si)/s and the high dose rate was 10 rad(Si)/s. The model accords well with the experimental results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61076101, 61204092).

  3. Annealing effects and DLTS study on NPN silicon bipolar junction transistors irradiated by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chaoming; Li, Xingji, E-mail: lxj0218@hit.edu.cn; Yang, Jianqun; Rui, Erming

    2014-01-21

    Isochronal anneal sequences have been carried out on 3DG112 silicon NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) irradiated with 20 MeV bromine (Br) heavy ions. The Gummel curve is utilized to characterize the annealing behavior of defects in both the emitter-base depletion region and the neutral base. We find that the base current (I{sub B}) decreases with the increasing annealing temperature, while the collector current (I{sub C}) remains invariable. The current gain varies slightly, when the annealing temperature (T{sub A}) is lower than 400 K, while varies rapidly at T{sub A}<450 K, and the current gain of the 3DG112 BJT annealing at 700 K almost restore to that of the pre-radiation transistor. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) data is used to assign the relative magnitude of each of the important defects. Based on the in situ electrical measurement and DLTS spectra, it is clear that the V{sub 2}(−/0)+V-P traps are the main contribution to the degradation of current gain after the 20 MeV Br ions irradiation. The V{sub 2}(−/0)+V-P peak has many of the characteristics expected for the current gain degradation.

  4. Studies on 2-amino-5-nitropyridinium nitrate (2A5NPN): A semi-organic third order nonlinear optical single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivasubramani, V.; Pandian, Muthu Senthil, E-mail: senthilpandianm@ssn.edu.in; Ramasamy, P. [SSN Research Centre, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam-603 110, Chennai, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-05-23

    2-amino-5-nitropyridinium nitrate (2A5NPN) is a semi-organic nonlinear optical crystal and optically good quality 2A5NPN single crystals were successfully grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique (SEST) at ambient temperature. The crystallographic structure of the grown crystal was determined by single crystal X-Ray diffraction analysis and it belongs to Monoclinic crystal system with centro symmetric crystalline nature. The crystallinity of the grown crystal was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction analysis. The other physical properties of grown crystals are also characterized using TG-DTA, UV-Visible NIR, chemical etching, photoconductivity and Z-scan measurements. The Z-scan method reveals that the 2A5NPN crystal possesses multi photon absorption behaviour and the significantly higher third order susceptibility and it is a promising potential NLO material.

  5. Non-protein amino acids in peptide design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Aravinda; N Shamala; Rituparna S Roy; P Balaram

    2003-10-01

    An overview of the use of non-protein amino acids in the design of conformationally well-defined peptides, based on work from the author’s laboratory, is discussed. The crystal structures of several designed oligopeptides illustrate the use -aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) in the construction of helices, D-amino acids in the design of helix termination segments and DPro-Xxx segments for nucleating of -hairpin structures. - and -amino acid residues have been used to expand the range of designed polypeptide structures.

  6. I- V and deep level transient spectroscopy studies on 60 MeV oxygen ion irradiated NPN transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnana Prakash, A. P.; Ke, S. C.; Siddappa, K.

    2004-02-01

    NPN transistors have been irradiated by 60 MeV oxygen ions in a fluence ranging from 5 × 10 10 to 1 × 10 13 ions/cm 2. The DC current gain ( hFE), excess base current ( ΔI B=I B post -I B pre ), excess collector current ( ΔI C=I C post -I C pre ) and collector saturation current (I C Sat ) of the ion irradiated transistors were studied systematically. The hFE of the transistors were found to be decreased drastically after ion irradiation. A significant increase has been observed in the collector current ( IC) along with the increase in the base current ( IB) after ion irradiation. The I C Sat of the ion irradiated transistors were also decreased significantly after irradiation. The radiation induced trap levels in the collector base depletion region of NPN transistors were studied by deep level transient spectroscopy technique and different types of trap levels were observed. The results obtained on the activation energy, density of trap levels, apparent capture cross section, introduction rate and space charge layer lifetime of different defects for different total fluence are presented and discussed.

  7. Effect of 50 MeV Li 3+ ion irradiation on electrical characteristics of high speed NPN power transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, C. M.; Ramani; Radhakrishna, M. C.; Dutt, R. N.; Khan, S. A.; Kanjilal, D.

    2008-04-01

    Silicon NPN overlay RF power high speed commercial bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) find applications in military, space and communication equipments. Here we report the effect of 50 MeV Li3+ ion irradiation in the fluence range 1 × 1011-1.8 × 1012 ions cm-2 on NPN power transistor. The range (R), electronic energy loss (Se), nuclear energy loss (Sn), total ionizing dose (TID) and total displacement damage (Dd) in the silicon target are calculated from TRIM Monte Carlo Code. Output resistance is 3.568 × 104 Ω for unirradiated device and it increases to 6 × 107 Ω as the fluence is increased from 1 × 1011 to 1.8 × 1012 ions cm-2. The capacitance of the emitter-base junction of the transistor decreases and dielectric loss of the emitter-base junction increases with increase in ion fluence. The built in voltage of the unirradiated sample is 0.5 V and it shifts to 0.4 V after irradiation at fluence of 1.8 × 1012 ions cm-2 and the corresponding doping density reduced to 5.758 × 1016 cm-3. The charge carrier removal rate varies linearly with the increase in ion fluence.

  8. DLTS Studies of bias dependence of defects in silicon NPN bipolar junction transistor irradiated by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoming; Li, Xingji; Geng, Hongbin; Rui, Erming; Yang, Jianqun; Xiao, Liyi

    2012-10-01

    The characteristic degradation in silicon NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) of 3DG130 type is examined under the irradiation with 35 MeV silicon (Si) ions under forward, grounded and reverse bias conditions, respectively. Different electrical parameters were in-situ measured during the exposure under each bias condition. Using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), deep level defects in the base-collector junction of 3DG130 transistors under various bias conditions are measured after irradiation. The activation energy, capture cross section and concentration of observed deep level defects are measured using DLTS technique. Based on the in situ electrical measurement and DLTS spectra, it is clearly that the bias conditions could affect the concentration of deep level defects, and the displacement damage induced by heavy ions.

  9. 80 MeV C6+ ion irradiation effects on the DC electrical characteristics of silicon NPN power transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, M. N.; Pushpa, N.; Vinayakprasanna, N. H.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2016-05-01

    The total dose effects of 80 MeV C6+ ions on the DC electrical characteristics of Silicon NPN rf power transistors have been studied in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The SRIM simulation was used to understand the energy loss and range of the ions in the transistor structure. The different electrical parameters such as Gummel characteristics, excess base current (ΔIB = IBpost - IBpre), dc forward current gain (hFE), transconductance (gm), displacement damage factor (K) and output characteristics (VCE-IC) were studied systematically before and after irradiation. The significant degradation in base current (IB) and hFE was observed after irradiation. Isochronal annealing study was conducted on the irradiated transistors to analyze the recovery in different electrical parameters. These results were compared with 60C0 gamma irradiation results in the same dose range.

  10. Analysis and Compact Modeling of a Vertical Grounded-Base NPN Bipolar Transistor used as ESD Protection in a Smart Power Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrand, Géraldine; Delage, Christelle; Bafleur, Marise; Nolhier, Nicolas; Dorkel, Jean-Marie; Nguyen, Quang; Mauran, Nicolas; Trémouilles, David; Perdu, Philippe

    2001-01-01

    9 pages; International audience; A thorough analysis of the physical mechanisms involved in a Vertical Grounded-Base NPN bipolar transistor (VGBNPN) under ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD) stress is first carried out by using 2D-device simulation, Transmission Line Pulse measurement (TLP) and photoemission experiments. This analysis is used to account for the unexpected low value of the VGBNPN snapback holding voltage under TLP stress. A compact model based on a new avalanche formulation resultin...

  11. A comparison of lower and higher LET heavy ion irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharathi, M.N. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570006 (India); Pushpa, N. [Department of PG Studies in Physics, JSS College, Ooty Road, Mysore 570025 (India); Vinayakprasanna, N.H. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570006 (India); Prakash, A.P. Gnana, E-mail: gnanaprakash@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570006 (India)

    2016-06-21

    The Silicon NPN rf power transistors were irradiated with 180 MeV Au{sup 14+} and 150 MeV Ag{sup 12+} ions in the dose range of 1 Mrad to 100 Mrad. The SRIM simulation was used to understand the energy loss and range of these ions in the transistor structure. The different electrical parameters such as Gummel characteristics, excess base current (∆I{sub B}), dc current gain (h{sub FE}), transconductance (g{sub m}), displacement damage factor (K) and output characteristics were studied systematically before and after irradiation. These results were compared with lower linear energy transfer (LET) ions such as 50 MeV Li{sup 3+}, 95 MeV O{sup 7+}, 100 MeV F{sup 8+}, 140 MeV Si{sup 10+} and 175 MeV Ni{sup 13+} ions in the same dose range. The degradation for 180 MeV Au{sup 14+} and 150 MeV Ag{sup 12+} ion irradiated transistors was significantly more when compared to lower LET ions, indicating that the transistors are vulnerable to higher LET ion irradiations. Isochronal annealing study was conducted on the irradiated transistors to analyze the recovery in different electrical parameters. After isochronal annealing, the recovery in h{sub FE} and other electrical parameters was around 67% for Ag{sup 12+} ion irradiated transistors and 60% for Au{sup 14+} ion irradiated transistors. - Highlights: • The effects of 80 MeV Au{sup 14+} and 150 MeV Ag{sup 12+} ions on Si NPN transistors are studied. • Lower LET Results are compared with lower LET ion irradiation results. • Ionization and displacement damages of ions in transistors are simulated using SRIM. • Higher LET ions degrade dc characteristics more when compared to lower LET ions. • Isochronal annealing study was conducted on the irradiated transistors. • After annealing, the recovery in h{sub FE} and other electrical parameters are significant.

  12. A comparison of lower and higher LET heavy ion irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, M. N.; Pushpa, N.; Vinayakprasanna, N. H.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2016-06-01

    The Silicon NPN rf power transistors were irradiated with 180 MeV Au14+ and 150 MeV Ag12+ ions in the dose range of 1 Mrad to 100 Mrad. The SRIM simulation was used to understand the energy loss and range of these ions in the transistor structure. The different electrical parameters such as Gummel characteristics, excess base current (∆IB), dc current gain (hFE), transconductance (gm), displacement damage factor (K) and output characteristics were studied systematically before and after irradiation. These results were compared with lower linear energy transfer (LET) ions such as 50 MeV Li3+, 95 MeV O7+, 100 MeV F8+, 140 MeV Si10+ and 175 MeV Ni13+ ions in the same dose range. The degradation for 180 MeV Au14+ and 150 MeV Ag12+ ion irradiated transistors was significantly more when compared to lower LET ions, indicating that the transistors are vulnerable to higher LET ion irradiations. Isochronal annealing study was conducted on the irradiated transistors to analyze the recovery in different electrical parameters. After isochronal annealing, the recovery in hFE and other electrical parameters was around 67% for Ag12+ ion irradiated transistors and 60% for Au14+ ion irradiated transistors.

  13. Junctionless nanowire TFET with built-in N-P-N bipolar action: Physics and operational principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimian, Morteza; Fathipour, Morteza

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel junctionless nanowire tunneling FET (JN-TFET) in which the source region is divided into an n+ as well as a p+ type region. We will show that this structure can provide a built-in n-p-n bipolar junction transistor (BJT) action in the on state of the device. In this regime, tunneling of electrons from the source valence band into the channel conduction band enhances the hole concentration in the p+ source region. Also, the potential in this region is increased, which drives a built-in BJT transistor by forward biasing the base-emitter junction. Thus, the BJT current adds up to the normal tunneling current in the JN-TFET. Owing to the sharp switching of the JN-TFET and the high BJT current gain, the overall performance of the device, herein called "BJN-TFET," is improved. On-state currents as high as 2.17 × 10-6 A/μm and subthreshold swings as low as ˜50 mV/dec at VDS = 1 V are achieved.

  14. High-resolution measurements of the exited states (n,pn), (n,dn) C-12 cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, M.; Angelone, M.; Belloni, F.; Geerts, W.; Loreti, S.; Milocco, A.; Plompen, A. J. M.

    2017-09-01

    Measurements of C12 cross sections for the excited states (n,p0) up to (n,p4) and (n,d0), (n,d1) have been carried out. The Van de Graaff neutron generator of the EC-JRC-IRMM laboratory has been used for these measurements. A very thin tritiated target (263 μg/cm2) was employed with deuteron beams energies impinging on the target in the range 2.5-4.0 MeV. Neutrons in the range 18.9-20.7 MeV were produced with an intrinsic energy spread of 0.2-0.25% FWHM. With such narrow neutron energy spread, using a high energy resolution device such as a single crystal diamond detector, several peaks from the outgoing charged particles produced by the (n,pn), (n,dn) and also (n,α0) reactions appear in the pulse height spectrum. The peaks can be identified using the reaction Q-values. The diamond detector used for these measurements has shown an intrinsic energy resolution lower than 0.9% FWHM. The analysis of the peaks has permitted to derive the partial carbon reaction cross sections for several excited states. The results are presented in this paper with the associated uncertainties and they are compared with different versions of TENDL compilation when these data are available (e.g. versions 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2015) and also with experimental results available in the EXFOR database.

  15. Contribution of exopeptidases to formation of nonprotein nitrogen during ensiling of alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, L; Zhou, H; Guo, X S; Long, R J; Zhu, Y; Cheng, W

    2011-08-01

    The experiment was conducted to investigate the exopeptidase classes in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) leaves, and to determine their contribution to the formation of nonprotein nitrogen (NPN) components during ensiling. Six classes of inhibitors that included bestatin (aminopeptidase inhibitor), potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI, carboxypeptidase inhibitor), 1,10-phenanthroline (dipeptidase inhibitor), diprotin A (dipeptidyl-peptidase inhibitor), butabindide (tripeptidyl-peptidase inhibitor), and dipeptide Phe-Arg (peptidyl-dipeptidase inhibitor) were used. To determine the contribution of each exopeptidase to the formation of NPN products, aqueous extracts of fresh alfalfa were fermented to imitate the proteolytic process of ensiled alfalfa and to ensure that each class of exopeptidase inhibitor would have immediate contact with the proteases in the alfalfa extract. Five classes of exopeptidases; namely, aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase, dipeptidase, dipeptidyl-peptidase, and tripeptidyl-peptidase, were shown to be present in alfalfa leaves, each playing a different role in alfalfa protein degradation. Aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase, and dipeptidase were the main exopeptidases contributing to the formation of NH(3)-N. Among the 5 exopeptidases, tripeptidyl-peptidase appeared to be the principal exopeptidase in hydrolyzing forage protein into peptides, whereas carboxypeptidase and dipeptidase appeared to be more important in contributing to the formation of amino acid-N. Dipeptidyl-peptidase and tripeptidyl-peptidase did not play a role in the formation of NH(3)-N or amino acid-N. Dipeptidase, carboxypeptidase, and tripeptidyl-peptidase were the principal exopeptidases for hydrolyzing forage protein into NPN during ensilage, and treatment with a mixture of the 5 inhibitors reduced the total NPN concentration in the fermented alfalfa extract to about 45% of that in the control after 21 d of fermentation. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association

  16. The influence of casein and urea as nitrogen sources on in vitro equine caecal fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, A.S.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Martin-Rosset, W.; Cotovio, M.; Silva, F.; Bennett, R.N.; Cone, J.W.; Bessa, R.J.B.; Rodrigues, M.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    To access the fermentative response of equine caecal microbial population to nitrogen availability, an in vitro study was conducted using caecal contents provided with adequate energy sources and nitrogen as limiting nutrient. Two nitrogen (N) sources were provided, protein (casein) and non-protein

  17. Room-temperature operation of npn- AlGaInAs/InP multiple quantum well transistor laser emitting at 1.3-µm wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirao, Mizuki; Sato, Takashi; Sato, Noriaki; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Arai, Shigehisa

    2012-02-13

    Room-temperature pulsed operation of a 1.3-µm wavelength transistor laser (TL), consisting of a buried heterostructure (BH) with an npn configuration and an AlGaInAs/InP multiple-quantum-well (MQW) active region, was successfully attained. A threshold base current of 18 mA (threshold emitter current of 150 mA) was obtained with a stripe width of 1.3 µm and a cavity length of 500 µm. The transistor activity as well as the lasing operation were achieved at the same time, which is essential for the high-speed operation of TLs.

  18. Effect of 50 MeV Li{sup 3+} ion irradiation on electrical characteristics of high speed NPN power transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinesh, C.M. [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560 056 (India)], E-mail: cm.dinesh@gamil.com; Ramani; Radhakrishna, M.C. [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560 056 (India); Dutt, R.N.; Khan, S.A.; Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2008-04-15

    Silicon NPN overlay RF power high speed commercial bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) find applications in military, space and communication equipments. Here we report the effect of 50 MeV Li{sup 3+} ion irradiation in the fluence range 1 x 10{sup 11}-1.8 x 10{sup 12} ions cm{sup -2} on NPN power transistor. The range (R), electronic energy loss (S{sub e}), nuclear energy loss (S{sub n}), total ionizing dose (TID) and total displacement damage (D{sub d}) in the silicon target are calculated from TRIM Monte Carlo Code. Output resistance is 3.568 x 10{sup 4} {omega} for unirradiated device and it increases to 6 x 10{sup 7} {omega} as the fluence is increased from 1 x 10{sup 11} to 1.8 x 10{sup 12} ions cm{sup -2}. The capacitance of the emitter-base junction of the transistor decreases and dielectric loss of the emitter-base junction increases with increase in ion fluence. The built in voltage of the unirradiated sample is 0.5 V and it shifts to 0.4 V after irradiation at fluence of 1.8 x 10{sup 12} ions cm{sup -2} and the corresponding doping density reduced to 5.758 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. The charge carrier removal rate varies linearly with the increase in ion fluence.

  19. Design and Analysis of ESD Protection Structure for Vertical NPN Transistors%纵向NPN管ESD保护结构的设计与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯逸辰; 高国平; 顾晓峰

    2012-01-01

    针对一种5 V 0.6 μm BiCMOS工艺的纵向NPN管,设计了ESD保护结构.为了克服传统纵向NPN管ESD自触发结构触发电压较高的缺陷,提出一种带P+/N阱二极管的改进型自触发ESD结构,利用NPN管集电极与基极之间的寄生电容和二极管作为电容耦合元件.流片及测试结果表明,该保护结构的触发电压得到有效降低,且抗ESD能力超过4 kV的人体模型.%ESD protection structure for vertical NPN transistor in a 5 V 0. 6 祄 BiCMOS process was designed. A modified self-triggered ESD protection structure with P+ /N well diode was proposed to solve the problem of high triggering voltage in traditional self-triggered ESD structure for vertical NPN device. Parasitic collector-base capacitance and PN junction capacitance were used as capacitor coupler. Test results indicated that triggering voltage of the protection structure could be effectively reduced, and its protection level exceeded 4 kV human body model.

  20. A comparative study of 30MeV boron{sup 4+} and 60MeV oxygen{sup 8+} ion irradiated Si NPN BJTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M. Vinay, E-mail: Vkm288@gmail.com; Krishnaveni, S. [Department of studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570006 (India); Yashoda, T. [Deparment of Physics, AVK College for women, Hassan-573201 (India); Dinesh, C. M. [Department of Physics, Govt. First grade college for women, Chintamani-563125 (India); Krishnakumar, K. S. [Department of Physics, APS College of Engineering (India); Jayashree, B. [Department of Physics, Maharanis Science College for Women, Bangalore-560001 (India); Ramani [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Jnanabharathi, Bangalore-560056 (India)

    2015-06-24

    The impact of 30MeV boron{sup 4+} and 60MeV oxygen{sup 8+} ion irradiation on electrical characteristics of 2N3773 Si NPN Bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) is reported in the present study. The transistors were decapped and irradiated at room temperature. Gummel characteristics, DC current gain and Capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics were studied before and after irradiation at different fluences. DC current gain has decreased significantly in both boron and oxygen ion irradiation. Also the value of capacitance decreased 3-4 times with increase in fluence. Both 30MeV boron ion and 60MeV oxygen ion induced similar extent of degradation in electrical characteristics of the transistor.

  1. A comparative study of 30MeV boron4+ and 60MeV oxygen8+ ion irradiated Si NPN BJTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M. Vinay; Yashoda, T.; Dinesh, C. M.; Krishnakumar, K. S.; Jayashree, B.; Ramani, Krishnaveni, S.

    2015-06-01

    The impact of 30MeV boron4+ and 60MeV oxygen8+ ion irradiation on electrical characteristics of 2N3773 Si NPN Bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) is reported in the present study. The transistors were decapped and irradiated at room temperature. Gummel characteristics, DC current gain and Capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics were studied before and after irradiation at different fluences. DC current gain has decreased significantly in both boron and oxygen ion irradiation. Also the value of capacitance decreased 3-4 times with increase in fluence. Both 30MeV boron ion and 60MeV oxygen ion induced similar extent of degradation in electrical characteristics of the transistor.

  2. 物理法造型在NPN晶体三极管模型建立的应用%THE USE OF PHYSICAL-METHOD MOULD-MAKINGIN THE ESTABLISHMENT OF NPN TRANSISTORS MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁春贤; 何益宏

    2000-01-01

    该文介绍器件物理法造型的基本步骤和方法,指出在建立NPN晶体三极管造型的过程中,如何选取物理变量,建立和简化模型方程,最终得出NPN晶体三极管的直流模型和直流伴随模型。%The aim of this essay is to introduce the basic steps and methods of physical-method mouldmaking to explain, in the course of establishing NPN transistors model, how to select the physical variable, how to establish and simplify the mould-making equation, in order to obtain the direct-current model and directcurrend accompangying model of NPN transistors.

  3. Design of High-Speed NPN Transistor Based on Poly-Silicon-Base and SIC Technology%基于多晶外基区及SIC技术的高速NPN管设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐昭焕; 甘明富; 钟怡; 谭开洲; 刘勇; 杨永晖; 胡刚毅; 徐学良; 李荣强

    2011-01-01

    提出了一种先进的双多晶硅非自对准NPN管的器件结构,并实际用于一种高性能NPN管的研制.该器件结构主要通过多晶外基区减小基区电阻和基区结面积,以及使用SIC技术减小集电极电阻的方式,极大地提升了NPN管的特征频率.通过实际工艺流片验证,实现了BVCEO=5.6 V、fT=13.5 GHz的高速NPN管.该器件结构较双多晶自对准器件结构易于加工,可以广泛用于其他高速互补双极器件的研制.%An advanced double poly-silicon non-self-aligned (DPNSA) structure of NPN device was proposed and experimentally demonstrated with a high performance NPN transistor. In the structure, poly-silicon base was used to reduce base resistance and base-junction area, and selectively implanted collector (SIC) was employed to reduce collector resistance, which significantly improved cut-off frequency (fT) of NPN device. Finally, NPN transistor with BVCEO of about 5.6 V and fT of about 13.5 GHz was fabricated. The novel structure is easier to fabricate,compared to double poly-silicon self-aligned structure, and so it can be used for high-speed complementary bipolar device.

  4. 基于β辐射伏特效应的NPN结型换能结构研究%The NPN Junction Energy Conversion Structure Research Based on Betavoltaic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明忠; 熊平; 邓建伟; 刘谋忠; 徐守龙; 陈铀; 郭萍

    2014-01-01

    Because the nuclear microbattery based on silicon PN junction suffers from small short-circuit current and can not achieve high collection efficiency,this paper raises for the first time that silicon NPN junction as the energy conversion structure for nuclear battery is expec-ted to achieve higher electrical power output. The double-sided of silicon NPN diode were irra-diated by electron beam and the electrical capabilities are measured during the irradiation. The experiment results indicate that NPN junction can increase depletion region width by lightly do-ping of P region,and reducing the thickness of batter to achieve a small body resistance,which result in the short-circuit current and energy conversion performance improving.%针对PN结型换能器件收集效率低,短路电流小等缺点,首次提出NPN结型核电池换能结构。用电子束对设计制作的NPN结型换能器件进行双面辐照实验,实验结果表明NPN结型换能结构能够通过降低P区掺杂浓度提高耗尽区宽度,减小换能器件厚度降低体电阻,增大短路电流,获得较大的能量转换效率。

  5. Effects of Uniconazole on Nitrogen Metabolism and Grain Protein Content of Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Zu-fen; YANG Wen-yu; REN Wan-jun; WANG Xiao-chun

    2005-01-01

    The effects of uniconazole by soaking seeds and spraying leaves at booting stage with different concentrations (0, 20 and40 mg/kg) on the nitrogen metabolism of flag leaf and grains after flowering, and rice grain protein content and yield were studied withhybrid rice combination Shanyou 63. Under uniconazole treatment, the soluble protein content in flag leaf was increased in early andmiddle period of grain filling, but this content was nearly the same as or even lower than that of control at maturity; Glutaminesynthetase activity in superior and inferior grains and non-protein nitrogen content in superior grains at early stage of graindevelopment were promoted, and moreover, the transforming speed from non-protein nitrogen to protein nitrogen was accelerated;Non-protein nitrogen content was lower than that of control at maturity, but protein nitrogen content at each stage was higher thanthose of control; Protein nitrogen content in superior and inferior grains and protein nitrogen absolutely accumulative content in agrain both were enhanced and protein content and yield in rice grain were raised. The application of uniconazole by soaking seedsand spraying leaves raised crude protein content by an average of 7.2% and 8.3%, and protein yield by an average of 13.1% and13.4%, respectively.

  6. An analysis of 100 MeV F 8+ ion and 50 MeV Li 3+ ion irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpa, N.; Praveen, K. C.; Gnana Prakash, A. P.; Prabhakara Rao, Y. P.; Tripati, Ambuj; Revannasiddaiah, D.

    2010-08-01

    The dc characteristics exhibited by NPN power transistors are studied systematically before and after irradiation by 100 MeV F 8+ ions and 50 MeV Li 3+ ions in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The transistor parameters such as excess base current (Δ IB= IBpost- IBpre), dc current gain ( hFE), transconductance ( gm), and collector-saturation current ( ICsat) were studied before and after irradiation. The damage factors ( k) for hFE were calculated for ion irradiated transistors using Messenger-Spratt relation. The base current ( IB) was found to increase significantly after ion irradiation and this in turn decreases the hFE of the transistors. The gm decreases significantly after ion irradiation. Moreover, the output characteristics of irradiated devices also show that the collector current ( IC) in the saturation region ( ICsat) decrease with increase in ion dose. The observed change in these characteristics may be due to the ion induced generation-recombination (G-R) centers in emitter-base (E-B) spacer oxide and the ion induced point defects and their complexes in the transistor structure.

  7. Comparative sequence analysis of the non-protein-coding mitochondrial DNA of inbred rat strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Abhyankar

    Full Text Available The proper function of mammalian mitochondria necessitates a coordinated expression of both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, most likely due to the co-evolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The non-protein coding regions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA including the D-loop, tRNA and rRNA genes form a major component of this regulated expression unit. Here we present comparative analyses of the non-protein-coding regions from 27 Rattus norvegicus mtDNA sequences. There were two variable positions in 12S rRNA, 20 in 16S rRNA, eight within the tRNA genes and 13 in the D-loop. Only one of the three neutrality tests used demonstrated statistically significant evidence for selection in 16S rRNA and tRNA-Cys. Based on our analyses of conserved sequences, we propose that some of the variable nucleotide positions identified in 16S rRNA and tRNA-Cys, and the D-loop might be important for mitochondrial function and its regulation.

  8. Avaliação da eficiência de extração de compostos nitrogenados da polpa de anchoíta (Engraulis anchoita Evaluation of the efficiency of nitrogen compounds extraction from the anchovy (Engraulis anchoita pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valcenir Júnior Mendes Furlan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a eficiência da extração de compostos nitrogenados, como proteínas solúveis (PS, nitrogênio total (NT, nitrogênio não proteico (NNP e nitrogênio proteico (NP da polpa de anchoíta (Engraulis anchoita, bem como obter informações a respeito de sua composição proximal e do frescor em relação ao seu local de captura. A polpa de anchoíta foi submetida a tratamento de extração de nitrogenados utilizando como soluções NaHCO3 (0,1; 0,2; 0,3 e 0,5%, NaCl 0,3% e água destilada. O ciclo de lavagem da polpa utilizando 0,1% de NaHCO3, dois ciclos de água destilada e um ciclo de NaCl 0,3% demonstrou maior eficiência na extração dos compostos nitrogenados, assim como das proteínas sarcoplasmáticas. Na determinação da composição proximal, a anchoíta in natura apresentou valores de umidade de 77,2%, proteína 16,8%, lipídios 3,4% e cinzas 2,4% e, para a polpa de anchoíta, foram encontrados valores de umidade de 78,1%, proteína 17,5%, lipídios 2,4% e cinzas 2,0%. A avaliação do frescor foi determinada através do pH, bases voláteis totais (N-BVT e trimetilamina (N-TMA, encontrando-se valores de 6,3; 11,5 mg.100 g-1 e 2,8 mg.100 g-1 para a anchoíta in natura e 6,7; 20,2 mg.100 g-1; 3,1 mg.100 g-1 para a polpa, respectivamente.The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of the nitrogen compounds extraction like soluble proteins (SP, total nitrogen (TN, non protein nitrogen (NPN, and nitrogen protein (NP from the anchovy pulp (Engraulis anchoita, as well to investigate their proximal composition and freshness alteration based on the capture place. The anchovy pulp was submitted to nitrogen extraction treatment using NaHCO3 (0.1; 0.2; 0.3 and 0.5%, NaCl 0.3% as solutions and distilled water. The pulp washing cycles using 0.1% NaHCO3, two cycles of distilled water, and one of NaCl 0.3% demonstrated improved efficiency in the extraction of the nitrogenous compounds and

  9. 4H-SiC npn双极型晶体管的研制%Study of 4H-SiC npn Bipolar Junction Transistor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田爱华; 潘宏菽; 赵彤; 王于辉; 陈昊

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of 4H-SiC npn bipolar junction transistor were realized on the homemade 4H-SiC epitaxy material and own technology of SiC bipolar junction transistor. In order to avoid high temperature p+ ion implantation or overgrowth, n+/p+/p/n~ epitaxy was used, which is etched to form double-mesa-structure. For good p-base contact, p+ layer was inserted between the n+ and p layer, which debased the emitter efficiency and the current gain at the same time. In order to increase the breakdown voltage of device, sacrifice oxygenation was used, which can reduce the etch damage and avoid electric field focus, and SiO2 formed by oxygenation of SiC supply device passiwation, too. Based on aforementioned, 4H-SiC npn bipolar junction transistor is realized with a Bvcbo of 200 V and a current gain of 3, and the leakage current is lower than 0. 05 mA at BVQba of 100 V.%采用国产的4H-SiC外延材料和自行开发的SiC双极晶体管的工艺技术,实现了4H-SiC npn双极晶体管特性.为避免二次外延或高温离子p+注入等操作,外延形成n+/p+/p/n -结构材料,然后根据版图设计进行相应的刻蚀,形成双台面结构.为保证p型基区能实现良好的欧姆接触,外延时在n+层和p层中间插入适当高掺杂的p+层外延,但也使双极晶体管发射效率降低,电流放大系数降低.为提高器件的击穿电压,在尽量实现低损伤刻蚀时,采用牺牲氧化等技术减少表面损伤及粗糙度,避免表面态及尖端电场集中,并利用SiC能形成稳定氧化层的优势来形成钝化保护.器件的集电结反向击穿电压达200 V,集电结在100 V下的反向截止漏电流小于0.05 mA,共发射极电流放大系数约为3.

  10. 西宁市不同来源牛乳氮分布研究%Study on distribution of nitrogen milk from different source in Xining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙万成; 罗毅皓; 石敏; 谢良朋

    2013-01-01

    利用凯氏定氮法对西宁市3个地区原料乳进行分析.牛乳氮元素的组成分布是大通牛乳非蛋白氮(NPN)在总氮中的质量分数要高于湟中和天露牛乳,可溶性蛋白(SN)质量分数高于湟中牛乳但低于天露,(非凝固蛋白)NCN质量分数远远高于湟中的和天露,副酪蛋白(PN)质量分数天露高于大通、湟中.%milk from three place analyzed by Kjeldahl method .The composition of the nitrogen element distribution was showed that the total nitrogen of NPN was higher than that of the Huangzhong and Tianlu , and SN content was higher than that of Huang zhong milk but less than that of the Tianlu. NCN content was higher than Huangzhong and Tianlu. The PN percentage of Tianlu was that of Datong and Huangzhong.

  11. Identification of β-phenylalanine as a non-protein amino acid in cultivated rice, Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoo, Takayuki; Takata, Ryo; Yan, Jian; Matsumoto, Fuka; Teraishi, Masayoshi; Okumoto, Yutaka; Jander, Georg; Mori, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Non-protein amino acids, often analogs of the standard 20 protein amino acids, have been discovered in many plant species. Recent research with cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) identified (3R)-β-tyrosine, as well as a tyrosine amino mutase that synthesizes (3R)-β-tyrosine from the protein amino acid (2S)-α-tyrosine. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) assays and comparison to an authentic standard showed that β-phenylalanine is also a relatively abundant non-protein amino acid in rice leaves and that its biosynthesis occurs independently from that of β-tyrosine.

  12. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  13. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  14. Intraerythrocyte Non-Protein-Bound Iron in Children with Bronchopulmonary Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Vasilyeva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 230 children having bronchopulmonary pathology (BPP were examined. Patients were divided into 4 groups according to their intraerythrocyte non-protein- bound iron (IE-NPBI levels. We investigated the relationship of the IE-NPBI level with parameters of respiratory function (RF tests, the severity of comorbidities, and level of other free intracellular ions, such as copper, zinc, and magnesium. The pronounced increase in IE-NPBI level was typical for patients with the connective tissue dysplasia, often accompanied by mitral valve prolapse, osteopenia, and mineral metabolism violation. The severe comorbid diagnoses were typical for patients with reduced levels of IE-NPBI (chronic cor pulmonale, tuberculosis infection. The largest number of comorbidities, aggravating the underlying disease, took place in the group of patients with a significant reduction in IE-NPBI level. A significant increase in IE-NPBI level, as well as a marked reduction of IE-NPBI level, was an unfavorable factor for the underlying disease. We found a correlation between IE-NPBI level and parameters of RF-test in patients with moderate increase in IE-NPBI level.

  15. Naming 'junk': Human non-protein coding RNA (ncRNA gene nomenclature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Mathew W

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, the majority of the human genome was thought to be 'junk' DNA with no functional purpose. Over the past decade, the field of RNA research has rapidly expanded, with a concomitant increase in the number of non-protein coding RNA (ncRNA genes identified in this 'junk'. Many of the encoded ncRNAs have already been shown to be essential for a variety of vital functions, and this wealth of annotated human ncRNAs requires standardised naming in order to aid effective communication. The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC is the only organisation authorised to assign standardised nomenclature to human genes. Of the 30,000 approved gene symbols currently listed in the HGNC database (http://www.genenames.org/search, the majority represent protein-coding genes; however, they also include pseudogenes, phenotypic loci and some genomic features. In recent years the list has also increased to include almost 3,000 named human ncRNA genes. HGNC is actively engaging with the RNA research community in order to provide unique symbols and names for each sequence that encodes an ncRNA. Most of the classical small ncRNA genes have now been provided with a unique nomenclature, and work on naming the long (> 200 nucleotides non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs is ongoing.

  16. Non-protein-bound iron and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts in classic autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorelli, Alessandra; Leoncini, Silvia; De Felice, Claudio; Signorini, Cinzia; Cerrone, Cosimina; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2013-02-01

    A link between oxidative stress and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) remains controversial with opposing views on its role in the pathogenesis of the disease. We investigated for the first time the levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), a pro-oxidant factor, and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts (4-HNE PAs), as a marker of lipid peroxidation-induced protein damage, in classic autism. Patients with classic autism (n=20, mean age 12.0±6.2years) and healthy controls (n=18, mean age 11.7±6.5years) were examined. Intraerythrocyte and plasma NPBI were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and 4-HNE PAs in erythrocyte membranes and plasma were detected by Western blotting. The antioxidant defences were evaluated as erythrocyte glutathione (GSH) levels using a spectrophotometric assay. Intraerythrocyte and plasma NPBI levels were significantly increased (1.98- and 3.56-folds) in autistic patients, as compared to controls (p=0.0019 and pautism patients, with a consequent imbalance between oxidative stress and antioxidant defences. Increased levels of NPBI could contribute to lipid peroxidation and, consequently, to increased plasma and erythrocyte membranes 4-HNE PAs thus amplifying the oxidative damage, potentially contributing to the autistic phenotype.

  17. The inhibition effect of non-protein thiols on dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity and HEMA cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Mohannad; Hiraishi, Noriko; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Tamura, Yukihiko; Otsuki, Masayuki; Kasugai, Shohei; Ohya, Keiichi; Tagami, Junji

    2014-03-01

    Phosphoric acid (PA) etching used in etch-and-rinse adhesives is known to activate host-derived dentinal matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs) and increase dentinal permeability. These two phenomena will result, respectively; in degradation of dentine-adhesive bond and leaching of some monomers especially 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) into the pulp that would negatively affect the viability of pulpal cells. This study is the first to investigate the inhibitory effect of non-protein thiols (NPSH); namely reduced glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on dentinal MMPs and compare their effects on HEMA cytotoxicity. Dentine powder was prepared from human teeth, demineralized with 1% PA and then treated with 2% GSH, 2% NAC or 2% chlorhexidine (CHX). Zymographic analysis of extracted proteins was performed. To evaluate the effect of GSH, NAC and CHX on HEMA cytotoxicity, solutions of these compounds were prepared with or without HEMA and rat pulpal cells were treated with the tested solutions for (6 and 24h). Cells viability was measured by means of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cytotoxicity data were analysed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests (pcytotoxicity inhibition. NPSH were effective to inhibit dentinal MMPs and HEMA cytotoxicity. The tested properties of NPSH provide promising clinical use of these agents which would enhance dentine-bond durability and decrease post-operative sensitivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Nitrogen metabolism and its control mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, H

    1989-01-01

    N intake in the form of protein has neither got an upper nor a lower limit for agricultural working animals within a diet and there is no control mechanism for it. A high surplus of certain amino acids results in a reduction of feed intake. N excretion in faeces depends on 1) the excretion of N containing indigestible feedstuffs, 2) bacterial nitrogen synthesis in the large intestine and 3) the excretion of true endogenous N containing substances (digestion enzymes, intestinal epithelium, N containing endogenous secretion). There are no other control mechanisms for N excretion in faeces. N excretion in urine mainly comprises the nitrogen from the degeneration of amino acids and nucleic acids. The interrelations between urea, NH3, allantoin, creatine and creatinine, uric acid and hippuric acid depend on the species (monogastric or ruminants), on the nitrogen and N amount consumed and on the recycling ratio of the amino acids. The absolute amount of N excretion is not subject to any control mechanism, it depends on the intake of protein and NPN substances, the interim stages, however, which lead to the formation of excretory products, are intermediately controlled. The most important interim stage is protein biosynthesis, which is a fixed, intermediately controlled value in maintenance level. Under growth conditions only, the protein synthesis quota can exceed the protein degradation quota of the total organism (positive N balance). The control mechanisms of protein biosynthesis have, according to current knowledge, the following structure: Stimulation: 1) growth hormone (STH) stimulates protein synthesis by means of somatomedins; 2) hormones of the thyroid gland (T4 and T3) are controlled by the hormone stimulating the thyroid gland (TSH); 3) insulin. Inhibition: 1) somatostatin inhibits STH, TSH and insulin; 2) cortisol directly inhibits protein synthesis and stimulates protein degradation. The control mechanisms of protein turnover in addition to genetic coding

  19. Comparison of methods for determination of testosterone and non-protein bound testosterone in men with alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Bennett, Patrick

    1986-01-01

    The serum concentrations of testosterone and of non-protein bound testosterone were determined in 28 men with alcoholic liver disease having normal to decreased serum albumin concentrations and normal to raised SHBG concentrations. Serum testosterone concentrations determined with two radioimmuno...

  20. Effect of the levels of N fertilizer, grass and supplementary feeds on nitrogen composition and renneting properties of milk from cows at pasture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, J E; Ostersen, S; Aaes, O

    1994-05-01

    In a 2 x 2 x 3 factorial design grazing experiment we investigated the effect of fertilizer (none or 240 kg N/ha), amounts of clover grass available (low or high) and type and level of daily supplementary feed for each cow (3.5 kg barley, 3.5 kg concentrate mixture rich in protein and fat, or both, 7 kg) on the protein composition and renneting properties of their milk. The experiment was carried out in two successive grazing seasons (years) and included a total of 79 Danish Holstein cows. The effect on milk protein composition was determined in both years whereas the effect on renneting properties was determined only in the second year. Fertilization of the clover grass significantly decreased total milk protein concentration (-1.4 g/kg; P whey protein N. Fertilization had no effect on renneting properties. Increased availability of clover grass significantly increased milk protein concentration (1 g/kg; P < 0.05) and resulted in significantly poorer renneting properties, that is increased clotting time (P < 0.01) and decreased coagulum development. These effects seemed to be mediated through an effect on the pH of the milk (+0.05; P < 0.05) as the effect was markedly reduced when statistical correction was made for the actual pH. Use of the protein- and fat-rich concentrate mix (3.5 kg) significantly reduced the total protein content of the milk (P < 0.05) and increased the proportion of non-protein N (NPN) in total N compared with use of the other supplementary feeds (P < 0.05). We found no effect on renneting properties of the different supplementary feeds. Throughout the grazing season and independent of the main treatments, the NPN proportion of milk N increased at the expense of casein N. At the same time, renneting properties became poorer, especially with high clover grass availability.

  1. Continuous-wave operation up to 20 °C of deep-ridge npn-InGaAsP/InP multiple quantum well transistor laser emitting at 1.5-μm wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, L J; Liang, S; Han, L S; Xu, J J; Zhu, H L; Wang, W

    2015-05-04

    We report continuous-wave (CW) operation up to 20 °C of 1.5-μm wavelength npn-InGaAsP/InP multiple quantum well (MQW) transistor laser (TL) with a deep-ridge structure. With CW laser emission, the common emitter current gain of the device can be over 3.5, which is significantly larger than those of the previously reported long wavelength TLs. It is found that at low base current, the laser operation occurs on the first excited state of the MQWs. At high base current, however, the device shows stimulated emissions on the ground state transition. The trend is contrary to what has been observed in the GaAs based TLs and is explained by the change of carrier flow at different base currents.

  2. Dynamic seasonal nitrogen cycling in response to anthropogenic N-loading in a tropical catchment, Athi–Galana–Sabaki River, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Marwick

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available As part of a broader study on the riverine biogeochemistry in the Athi–Galana–Sabaki (A–G–S River catchment (Kenya, we present data constraining the sources, transit and transformation of multiple nitrogen (N species as they flow through the A–G–S catchment (~47 000 km2. The data-set was obtained in August–September 2011, November 2011, and April–May 2012, covering the dry season, short-rain season and long-rain season respectively. Release of, largely untreated, waste water from the city of Nairobi had a profound impact on the biogeochemistry of the upper Athi river, leading to low dissolved oxygen (DO saturation levels (67–36%, high ammonium (NH4+ concentrations (1193–123 μmol L−1, and high dissolved methane (CH4 concentrations (6729–3765 nmol L−1. Total dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN concentrations entering the study area were highest during the dry season (1195 μmol L−1, while total DIN concentration was an order of magnitude lower during the short and long rain seasons (212 and 193 μmol L−1, respectively. During the rain seasons, low water residence time led to relatively minimal instream N-cycling prior to discharge to the ocean. Conversely, increased residence time during the dry season creates two differences comparative to wet season conditions, where (1 intense cycling and removal of DIN in the upper- to mid-catchment leads to significantly less DIN export during the dry season, and (2 as a result of the intense DIN cycling, dry season particulate N export is significantly enriched in the N stable isotope ratio (δ15NPN, strongly reflecting the dominance of organic matter as the prevailing source of riverine nitrogen. The rapid removal of NH4+ in the upper study area during the dry season was accompanied by a quantitatively similar production of NO3− and nitrous oxide (N2O downstream, pointing towards strong nitrification over this reach during the dry season. Nitrous oxide produced was rapidly

  3. Nitrogen responses and nitrogen management in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.

    2009-01-01

    Innumerable experiments have been carried out to establish the yield response of potato to the rate of nitrogen (N) supply. Given the continuing change in production level of potato and because of the need to maximise the nutrient use efficiency and to reduce losses of harmful nitrogenous compounds

  4. NPN bipolar effect and its influence on charge sharing in a tripe well CMOS technology with n^+ deep well%带有n^+深阱的三阱CMoS工艺中寄生NPN双极效应及其对电荷共享的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘必慰; 陈建军; 陈书明; 池雅庆

    2012-01-01

    基于三维TCAD器件模拟,研究了带有n^+深阱的90 nm三阱CMOS器件在重离子辐照下产生的电荷共享效应.研究结果表明在重离子辐照时,n^+深阱会导致寄生的NPN双极型晶体管触发,显著增强NMOS间的电荷共享,其放大因子达到双阱工艺中寄生PNP晶体管放大因子的2—4倍.进而分别研究了n阱接触和P阱接触对寄生NPN双极放大的影响,结果表明增大P阱接触的面积和减小n阱接触的距离将抑制NPN晶体管的放大作用,而增大n阱接触的面积将增强NPN的放大作用.%In this paper, we investigate the charge sharing collection induced by heavy ion radiation in a tripe well CMOS technology with n^+ deep well though 3-D TCAD device simulation. Result shows that n^+ deep well will induce the parasitical NPN bipolar transistor, and therefore enhance the charge sharing between NMOS remarkably. The enhancement factor is 2-4 times that in PNP bipolar in dual well technology. Furthermore, the effects of n-well contact and p-well contact on NPN bipolar are studied. The result shows that the NPN bipolar enhancement factor will decrease with the increase of p-well contact area and with the decreasing of its distance to device, while the NPN bipolar enhancement factor will increase with the increase of n-well contact area.

  5. Variation in nitrogen components of sheep milk in sub-Mediterranean area

    OpenAIRE

    Siniša Matutinović; Krešimir Salajpal; Samir Kalit

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate seasonal variation in urea content and other nitrogen compounds (protein, casein, non-protein nitrogen content) of sheep milk as a tool for monitoring the protein nutritional status over the period of two years. The study was performed on three family farms with 150 to 300 sheep per farm using semi-extensive farming management based on pasture, typical for sub-Mediterranean area. Bulk-tank milk samples were taken during the entire milking period (from Mar...

  6. 偏置条件对NPN及PNP双极晶体管电离辐射损伤的影响研究*%The influence of bias conditions on ionizing radiation damage of NPN and PNP transistors∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李兴冀; 兰慕杰; 刘超铭; 杨剑群; 孙中亮; 肖立伊; 何世禹

    2013-01-01

      本文采用低能电子辐照源对NPN及PNP晶体管进行辐照试验。在辐照试验过程中,针对NPN及PNP晶体管发射结施加不同的偏置条件,研究偏置条件对NPN及PNP晶体管辐射损伤的影响。使用Keithley 4200-SCS半导体特性测试仪在原位条件下测试了双极晶体管电性能参数随低能电子辐照注量的变化关系。测试结果表明,在相同的辐照注量条件下,发射结反向偏置时双极晶体管的辐照损伤程度最大;发射结正向偏置时双极晶体管的辐照损伤程度最小;发射结零偏时双极晶体管的辐照损伤程度居于上述情况之间。%Bipolar junction transistors (BJTs), as important electronic components in analog or mixed-signal integrated circuits (ICs) and BiCMOS (Bipolar Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) circuits, are employed in the space environment. Therefore, the research on characteristics and mechanisms of ionization damage in the BJTs is very important. Lower energy electrons are used as irradiation source to study the ionization damage in NPN and PNP transistors. Various bias conditions are imposed on the emitter-base junction to reveal the different bias conditions that contribute to the radiation effect on NPN and PNP transistors during irradiation processing. The semiconductor parameter analyzer, Keithley 4200-SCS, is used to measure the change of electrical parameters of transistors with increasing electron irradiation fluence in situ. Based on the measurement results, we find the degradation of transistors is severe under reverse emitter-base bias, and is lowest under forward emitter-base bias, while it is medium under zero emitter-base bias at a given irradiation fluence.

  7. Marine nitrogen cycle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.

    ://www.eoearth.org/article/Marine_nitrogen_cycle equatorial Pacific and the Southern Ocean where low concentration of a micronutrient (iron) appears to limit photosynthesis. In areas characterized by low dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentration in surface waters, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON...

  8. An analysis of 100 MeV F{sup 8+} ion and 50 MeV Li{sup 3+} ion irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushpa, N., E-mail: pushpa_gnp@hotmail.co [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India); Praveen, K.C.; Gnana Prakash, A.P. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India); Prabhakara Rao, Y.P. [Bharath Electronics Limited, Jalahalli, Bangalore 580 097 (India); Tripati, Ambuj [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Revannasiddaiah, D. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India)

    2010-08-21

    The dc characteristics exhibited by NPN power transistors are studied systematically before and after irradiation by 100 MeV F{sup 8+} ions and 50 MeV Li{sup 3+} ions in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The transistor parameters such as excess base current ({Delta}I{sub B}=I{sub Bpost}-I{sub Bpre}), dc current gain (h{sub FE}), transconductance (g{sub m}), and collector-saturation current (I{sub Csat}) were studied before and after irradiation. The damage factors (k) for h{sub FE} were calculated for ion irradiated transistors using Messenger-Spratt relation. The base current (I{sub B}) was found to increase significantly after ion irradiation and this in turn decreases the h{sub FE} of the transistors. The g{sub m} decreases significantly after ion irradiation. Moreover, the output characteristics of irradiated devices also show that the collector current (I{sub C}) in the saturation region (I{sub Csat}) decrease with increase in ion dose. The observed change in these characteristics may be due to the ion induced generation-recombination (G-R) centers in emitter-base (E-B) spacer oxide and the ion induced point defects and their complexes in the transistor structure.

  9. Sensory, biochemical and bacteriological properties of octopus (Cistopus indicus) stored in ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalini, R; Shakila, R Jeya; Jeyasekaran, G; Jeevithan, E

    2015-10-01

    Octopus (Cistopus indicus) were examined for the changes in autolytic activity, ammoniacal nitrogen, non-protein nitrogen (NPN), total volatile base nitrogen (TVBN), free fatty acid (FFA) content, aerobic plate count (APC) and sensory quality based on Quality Index Method (QIM) during ice storage. They were sensorily acceptable up to 7 days when QIM score was 10.97 out of 16.00. Autolytic activity increased from the initial value of 174 to 619 nmoles Tyr/g/h within day 3 and later decreased. There was also an increase in NPN (34.88 to 76.16 mg %), ammoniacal nitrogen (0 to 7.30 ppm) and free fatty acid content (0.35 to 1.69 % of oleic acid) during storage. TVBN values did not correlate with the spoilage, as it increased from 28 to 145 mg% within day 5, exceeding the limit of acceptability; although total QIM score was 7.47. Aerobic plate count did not show significant change suggesting that the spoilage in octopus was not microbial. The rapid spoilage in octopus was mainly due to the release of NPN compounds following autolytic activity leading to the formation of ammoniacal nitrogen, rather than microbial spoilage. Hence, ammoniacal nitrogen can be taken as an index for spoilage of ice stored octopus.

  10. Frações dos compostos nitrogenados de quatro gramíneas tropicais em diferentes idades de corte e doses de adubação nitrogenada Fractions of nitrogenous compounds of four tropical grasses in the different cutting ages and nitrogen fertilizer levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.T. Henriques

    2007-06-01

    intermediary degradations rates (fraction B1+B2, while the third factor was related to nonproteic nitrogenous compounds (NPN (fraction A. Cutting age affected nitrogenous compounds fractions of the grasses. The increase in cutting age resulted in a reduction of NPN fraction scores. The level of nitrogen fertilizer resulted in increases of NPN and B1+B2 fractions scores, however, no evident responses in other fractions were related to nitrogen fertilizer supply.

  11. Albert Behnke: nitrogen narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Casey A; Grover, David H

    2014-02-01

    As early as 1826, divers diving to great depths noted that descent often resulted in a phenomenon of intoxication and euphoria. In 1935, Albert Behnke discovered nitrogen as the cause of this clinical syndrome, a condition now known as nitrogen narcosis. Nitrogen narcosis consists of the development of euphoria, a false sense of security, and impaired judgment upon underwater descent using compressed air below 3-4 atmospheres (99 to 132 feet). At greater depths, symptoms can progress to loss of consciousness. The syndrome remains relatively unchanged in modern diving when compressed air is used. Behnke's use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures subsequent to his discovery during the 1939 rescue of the wrecked submarine USS Squalus pioneered the use of non-nitrogen-containing gas mixtures, which are used by modern divers when working at great depth to avoid the effects of nitrogen narcosis.

  12. Protein Nitrogen Determination by Kjeldahl Digestion and Ion Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiaoling; Pampati, Nagarani; McCormick, William M; Bhattacharyya, Lokesh

    2016-06-01

    We report development and validation of a simple, rapid, and accurate method for the quantitation of protein nitrogen, which combines Kjeldahl digestion and ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity detection and requires nanomolar amount of nitrogen in samples (≥10 μg protein). The mechanism of suppressed conductivity detection does not permit analysis of samples containing copper (present in Kjeldahl digestion solution) and aluminum (present in many vaccines as adjuvants) due to precipitation of their hydroxides within the suppressor. We overcame this problem by including 10 μM oxalic acid in Kjeldahl digests and in the eluent (30 mM methanesulfonic acid). The chromatography is performed using an IonPac CS-16 cation exchange column by isocratic elution. The method reduces the digestion time to less than 1 h and eliminates the distillation and titration steps of the Kjeldahl method, thereby reducing the analysis time significantly and improving precision and accuracy. To determine protein nitrogen in samples containing non-protein nitrogen, proteins are precipitated by a mixture of deoxycholate and trichloroacetic acid and the precipitates are analyzed after dissolving in KOH. The method is particularly useful for biological samples that are limited and can also be applied to food, environmental, and other materials.

  13. Molecular Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus by Non-Protein Coding RNA-Mediated Monoplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo Yean, Cheryl Yeap; Selva Raju, Kishanraj; Xavier, Rathinam; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Chinni, Suresh V.

    2016-01-01

    Non-protein coding RNA (npcRNA) is a functional RNA molecule that is not translated into a protein. Bacterial npcRNAs are structurally diversified molecules, typically 50–200 nucleotides in length. They play a crucial physiological role in cellular networking, including stress responses, replication and bacterial virulence. In this study, by using an identified npcRNA gene (Sau-02) in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), we identified the Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus. A Sau-02-mediated monoplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) assay was designed that displayed high sensitivity and specificity. Fourteen different bacteria and 18 S. aureus strains were tested, and the results showed that the Sau-02 gene is specific to S. aureus. The detection limit was tested against genomic DNA from MRSA and was found to be ~10 genome copies. Further, the detection was extended to whole-cell MRSA detection, and we reached the detection limit with two bacteria. The monoplex PCR assay demonstrated in this study is a novel detection method that can replicate other npcRNA-mediated detection assays. PMID:27367909

  14. Cadmium and manganese accumulation in Phytolacca americana L. and the roles of non-protein thiols and organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lu; Peng, Kejian; Xia, Yan; Wang, Guiping; Niu, Liyuan; Lian, Chunlan; Shen, Zhenguo

    2013-01-01

    Phytolacca americana L. can accumulate large amounts of heavy metals in its aerial tissues, especially cadmium (Cd) and manganese (Mn). It has great potential for use in phytoextraction of metals from multi-metal-contaminated soils. This study was conducted to further investigate the Cd- and Mn-tolerance strategies of this plant. Concentrations of non-protein thiols (NPTs) and phytochelatins (PCs) in leaves and roots increased significantly as the concentration of Cd in solution increased. The molar ratios of PCs:soluble Cd ranged from 1.8 to 3.6 in roots and 8.1 to 31.6 in leaves, suggesting that the cellular response involving PC synthesis was sufficient to complex Cd ions in the cytosol, especially that of leaves. In contrast, excess Mn treatments did not result in a significant increase in NPT or PC concentrations in leaves or roots. Oxalic acid concentrations in leaves of plants exposed to 2 or 20 mM Mn reached 69.4 to 89.3 mg (0.771 to 0.992 mmol) g(-1) dry weight, respectively, which was approximately 3.7- to 8.6-fold higher than the Mn level in the 0.6 M HCl extract. Thus, oxalic acid may play an important role in the detoxification of Mn.

  15. High Nitrogen Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    Kiev, 1993. 7. High Nitrogen Steels, edited by M. Kikuchi and Y. Mishima , Vol. 36, No. 7, Iron and Steel Institute of Japan Inernational, Tokyo...the Corrosion of Iron and Steels,” High Nitrogen Steels, edited by M. Kikuchi and Y. Mishima , Vol. 36, No. 7, Iron and Steel Institute of Japan

  16. Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oenema, O.

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for communications about resource use efficiency and for measures to increase the use efficiency of nutrients in relation to food production. This holds especially for nitrogen. Nitrogen (N) is essential for life and a main nutrient element. It is needed in relatively large quantitie

  17. Nitrogen trading tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nitrogen cycle is impacted by human activities, including those that increase the use of nitrogen in agricultural systems, and this impact can be seen in effects such as increased nitrate (NO3) levels in groundwater or surface water resources, increased concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) in th...

  18. Nitrogen Lewis Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogoreltsev, Alla; Tulchinsky, Yuri; Fridman, Natalia; Gandelman, Mark

    2017-03-22

    Being a major conception of chemistry, Lewis acids have found countless applications throughout chemical enterprise. Although many chemical elements can serve as the central atom of Lewis acids, nitrogen is usually associated with Lewis bases. Here, we report on the first example of robust and modifiable Lewis acids centered on the nitrogen atom, which provide stable and well-characterized adducts with various Lewis bases. On the basis of the reactivity of nitrogen Lewis acids, we prepared, for the first time, cyclic triazanes, a class of cyclic organic compounds sequentially bearing three all-saturated nitrogen atoms (N-N-N motif). Reactivity abilities of these N-Lewis acids were explained by theoretical calculations. Properties and future applications of nitrogen Lewis acids are intriguing.

  19. Nitrogen in Chinese coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D.; Lei, J.; Zheng, B.; Tang, X.; Wang, M.; Hu, Jiawen; Li, S.; Wang, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Three hundred and six coal samples were taken from main coal mines of twenty-six provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities in China, according to the resource distribution and coal-forming periods as well as the coal ranks and coal yields. Nitrogen was determined by using the Kjeldahl method at U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), which exhibit a normal frequency distribution. The nitrogen contents of over 90% Chinese coal vary from 0.52% to 1.41% and the average nitrogen content is recommended to be 0.98%. Nitrogen in coal exists primarily in organic form. There is a slight positive relationship between nitrogen content and coal ranking. ?? 2011 Science Press, Institute of Geochemistry, CAS and Springer Berlin Heidelberg.

  20. Effects of cadmium, zinc and nitrogen status on nonprotein thiols in the macroalgae Enteromorpha spp. from the Scheldt Estuary (SW Netherlands, Belgium) and Thermaikos Gulf (Greece, N Aegean Sea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malea, P.; Rijstenbil, J.W.; Haritonidis, S.

    2006-01-01

    Enteromorpha prolifera (Scheldt Estuary) and E. linza (Thermaikos Gulf) were incubated at three salinities with 100 and 200 µg L-1Cd and Zn. The objective was to measure effects of Cd, Zn and nitrogen (N) status on the pools of metal-binding non-protein thiols: glutathione and phytochelatins, (?-glu

  1. Molecular Biology of Nitrogen Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, K. T.; Valentine, Raymond C.

    1975-01-01

    Reports that as a result of our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of nitrogen fixation it might eventually be possible to increase the biological production of nitrogenous fertilizer from atmospheric nitrogen. (GS)

  2. Alternative preparation of inclusion bodies excludes interfering non-protein contaminants and improves the yield of recombinant proinsulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    The goal of simple, high-yield expression and purification of recombinant human proinsulin has proven to be a considerable challenge. First, proinsulin forms inclusion bodies during bacterial expression. While this phenomenon can be exploited as a capture step, conventionally prepared inclusion bodies contain significant amounts of non-protein contaminants that interfere with subsequent chromatographic purification. Second, the proinsulin molecules within the inclusion bodies are incorrectly folded, and likely cross-linked to one another, making it difficult to quantify the amount of expressed proinsulin. Third, proinsulin is an intermediate between the initial product of ribosomal translation (preproinsulin) and the final product secreted by pancreatic beta cells (insulin). Therefore, to be efficiently produced in bacteria, it must be produced as an N-terminally extended fusion protein, which has to be converted to authentic proinsulin during the purification scheme. To address all three of these problems, while simultaneously streamlining the procedure and increasing the yield of recombinant proinsulin, we have made three substantive modifications to our previous method for producing proinsulin:.•Conditions for the preparation of inclusion bodies have been altered so contaminants that interfere with semi-preparative reversed-phase chromatography are excluded while the proinsulin fusion protein is retained at high yield.•Aliquots are taken following important steps in the procedure and the quantity of proinsulin-related polypeptide in the sample is compared to the amount present prior to that step.•Final purification is performed using a silica-based reversed-phase matrix in place of a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based matrix.

  3. BMAA Inhibits Nitrogen Fixation in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntzon, Lotta; Erasmie, Sven; Celepli, Narin; Eriksson, Johan; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay), even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms. PMID:23966039

  4. BMAA Inhibits Nitrogen Fixation in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Bergman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA, proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay, even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms.

  5. 基于1/f噪声的NPN晶体管辐照感生电荷的定量分离∗%Quantitative separation of radiation induced charges for NPN bip olar junction transistors based on 1/f noise mo del

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵启凤; 庄奕琪; 包军林; 胡为

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing-radiation-induced oxide-trapped charges and interface states cause the current and 1/f noise degradation in bipolar junction transistors. In order to better understand these two degradation mechanisms and develop hardening approaches for a specific process technology, it is necessary to measure the effect of each mechanism separately. In recent years, several techniques have been developed, but no charge-separation approach based on 1/f noise for NPN bipolar junction transistors is available. In this paper, the effects of ionizing-radiation-induced oxide trapped charges and interface states on base current and 1/f noise in NPN bipolar junction transistors are studied in detail. Firstly, a new model of base surface current of NPN bipolar junction transistors is presented with some approximations, based on an available model for the base surface current under certain conditions;this model can identify the physical mechanism responsible for the current degradation. Secondly, combining the theory of carrier number fluctuation and the new model of base surface current another model is developed which can well explain the 1/f noise degradation. This model suggests that the induced oxide-trapped charges would make more carriers, involving the dynamic trapping-detrapping, which leads to the 1/f noise to increase; and the induced oxide-trapped charges and interface states can also bring about an increase in base surface current which can also cause the l/f noise increase. These two models suggest that the current and1/f noise degradations can be attributed to the same physical origin, and these two kinds of degradations are the result of accumulation of oxide-trapped charges and interface states. According to these two models, simple approaches for quantifying the effects of oxide-trapped charges and interface states are proposed. The base surface current can be extracted from the base current using the available method. The oxide-trapped charge density is

  6. Nitrogen Backbone Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; Eremets, Mikhail I; Troyan, Ivan; Liu, Hanyu; Ma, Yanming; Vereecken, Luc

    2015-08-19

    We found that nitrogen and hydrogen directly react at room temperature and pressures of ~35 GPa forming chains of single-bonded nitrogen atom with the rest of the bonds terminated with hydrogen atoms - as identified by IR absorption, Raman, X-ray diffraction experiments and theoretical calculations. At releasing pressures below ~10 GPa, the product transforms into hydrazine. Our findings might open a way for the practical synthesis of these extremely high energetic materials as the formation of nitrogen-hydrogen compounds is favorable already at pressures above 2 GPa according to the calculations.

  7. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  8. Commercial Nitrogen Fertilizer Purchased

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Amounts of fertilizer nitrogen (N) purchased by states in individual years 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009 and 2011, and the % change in average amounts purchased per year...

  9. Protein Nitrogen Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The protein content of foods can be determined by numerous methods. The Kjeldahl method and the nitrogen combustion (Dumas) method for protein analysis are based on nitrogen determination. Both methods are official for the purposes of nutrition labeling of foods. While the Kjeldahl method has been used widely for over a hundred years, the recent availability of automated instrumentation for the Dumas method in many cases is replacing use of the Kjeldahl method.

  10. Brucella, nitrogen and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronneau, Severin; Moussa, Simon; Barbier, Thibault; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Zuniga-Ripa, Amaia; Moriyon, Ignacio; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-01

    The brucellae are α-Proteobacteria causing brucellosis, an important zoonosis. Although multiplying in endoplasmic reticulum-derived vacuoles, they cause no cell death, suggesting subtle but efficient use of host resources. Brucellae are amino-acid prototrophs able to grow with ammonium or use glutamate as the sole carbon-nitrogen source in vitro. They contain more than twice amino acid/peptide/polyamine uptake genes than the amino-acid auxotroph Legionella pneumophila, which multiplies in a similar vacuole, suggesting a different nutritional strategy. During these two last decades, many mutants of key actors in nitrogen metabolism (transporters, enzymes, regulators, etc.) have been described to be essential for full virulence of brucellae. Here, we review the genomic and experimental data on Brucella nitrogen metabolism and its connection with virulence. An analysis of various aspects of this metabolism (transport, assimilation, biosynthesis, catabolism, respiration and regulation) has highlighted differences and similarities in nitrogen metabolism with other α-Proteobacteria. Together, these data suggest that, during their intracellular life cycle, the brucellae use various nitrogen sources for biosynthesis, catabolism and respiration following a strategy that requires prototrophy and a tight regulation of nitrogen use.

  11. 中子和电子辐照诱发硅NPN晶体管负电容现象的机理分析%Mechanism of neutron- and electron-irradiation-induced phenomena of negative capacitance in NPN-BJT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王靳君; 田野; 石瑞英; 龚敏; 温景超; 巫晓燕

    2011-01-01

    研究了硅NPN双极型晶体管(C2060)的中子和电子辐照效应.实验结果显示:经中子和电子辐照后,晶体管扩散电容出现退化,甚至出现负电容(NC)现象;电子辐照后晶体管势垒电容出现明显退化,而中子辐照后并无此现象.对中子和电子辐照后晶体管的退化机理进行了分析,认为:晶体管经中子和电子辐照后产生的缺陷团是产生NC现象的根本原因;中子和电子辐照后产生的缺陷团在晶体管内表现为复合中心,这些复合中心大大降低了少数载流子的数密度和寿命,从而使晶体管扩散电容出现严重退化,甚至出现NC现象;电子辐照产生的点缺陷使晶体管多子数密度降低,从而使势垒电容增大.%The effects of neutron irradiation and electron irradiation on Si NPN-BJT (bipolar junction transistor) were investigated. After neutron irradiation and electron irradiation, the diffusion capacitance of transistor degraded, and even the negative capacitance(NC) phenomenon occurred. After electron irradiation, the barrier capacitance of transistor degraded, but it did not after neutron irradiation. A detailed analysis was made on the degradation mechanism of the junction capacitance after neutron irra-diation and electron irradiation. The results indicate that, the defect is the cause of degradation. The defect clusters in transistor induced by both irradiations show as recombination centers, which greatly reduce the concentration and lifetime of minority carriers, giving rise to a serious degradation of transistor diffusion capacitance, and even NC phenomenon. The point defects generated by electron irradiation reduce the concentration of majority carriers, so that the barrier capacitance increases.

  12. Strategies for Cd accumulation in Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter: role of the cell wall, non-protein thiols and organic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, R; Fernández-Fuego, D; Bertrand, A; González, A

    2014-05-01

    Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter is plant species commonly found in degraded zones of Asturias (Spain), where it accumulates high levels of Cd, but the mechanisms involved in this response in non-model plants have not been elucidated. In this way, we analysed the fraction of the total Cd bound to the cell walls, the ultrastructural localization of this metal, and non-protein thiol and organic acid concentrations of two clones of D. viscosa: DV-A (from a metal-polluted soil) and DV-W (from a non-polluted area). After 10 days of hydroponic culture with Cd, fractionation and ultrastructural localisation studies showed that most of the Cd accumulated by D. viscosa was kept in the cell wall. The non-protein thiol content rose in D. viscosa with Cd exposure, especially in the non-metallicolous DV-W clone, and in both clones we found with Cd exposure a synthesis de novo of phytochelatins PC2 and PC3 in shoots and roots and also of other phytochelatin-related compounds, particularly in roots. Regarding organic acids, their concentration in both clones decreased in shoots after Cd treatment, but increased in roots, mainly due to changes in the citric acid concentration. Thus, retention of Cd in the cell wall seems to be the first strategy in response to metal entry in D. viscosa and once inside cells non-protein thiols and organic acids might also participate in Cd tolerance.

  13. Hydrolysis and loss of extractability of proteins during ripening of iberian ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, J J; Antequera, T; Ventanas, J; López-Bote, C; García, C; Asensio, M A

    1994-01-01

    To elucidate the extent of the hydrolysis and loss of extractability of protein during the traditional ripening of Iberian ham, the evolution during processing of non-protein nitrogen (NPN) and protein fractions soluble in 0·03 m pH 7·1 phosphate and 1·1 KI + 0·1 m phosphate pH 7·4 buffers and 6 m urea was followed from Semimembranosus and Biceps femoris muscles. The NPN steadily increased during processing, showing maximum intensity at salting and drying. Electrophoretic study of the proteins extracted, and microscopical examination of the pellet obtained after consecutive extractions with the above buffers, revealed that hydrolysis and insolubilization are more intense in myofibrillar than in sarcoplasmic proteins. Protein aggregation involves mainly the myofibrillar fraction, and occurs during the first stage of processing.

  14. The comparative study digestion and metabolism of nitrogen and purine derivatives in male, Thai, Swamp buffalo and Thai, Brahman cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetana, Thongsuk; Tasripoo, Kringsak; Vongpipatana, Cheerapath; Kitsamraj, Suriya; Sophon, Sunpeth

    2009-04-01

    Studies on in vivo digestion, rates of passages, metabolism of nitrogen, urinary purine derivative excretion and blood metabolites were carried out in Thai Brahman cattle and Thai swamp buffaloes (16 months old). The animals were fed mixed diets based on pineapple (Ananas comusus) waste silage containing urea-N (NPN) and true protein from a concentrate (TP). The Brahman cattle (310 +/- 15 kg) were heavier than the swamp buffaloes (195 +/- 9.4 kg) and had higher dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) intakes when compared on the basis of their metabolic body weight (BW(0.75)), but these intakes did not differ significantly when the diets of each animal species were compared. The total tract, apparent digestibilities of dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM) were not significantly different between the animal species when comparing the two types of diets. The NDF digestibility was significantly (P 0.05) different in animals fed different diets. The present study demonstrated that Brahman cattle were better in fiber digestibility than swamp buffaloes at utilizing pineapple waste silage with both N sources.

  15. Nitrogen use efficiency revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Tadaki

    2011-08-01

    Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) was originally defined as the dry mass productivity per unit N taken up from soil. The term was subsequently redefined as the product of nitrogen productivity (NP) and mean residence time of nitrogen (MRT). However, this redefinition was found to contradict the original definition under certain conditions, and confusion arose when the MRT defined for a steady-state system was applied to a system that was actually not at steady state. As MRT is the expected length of time that a unit of N newly taken up from soil is retained before being lost, it can be translated into the plant nitrogen duration (PND) divided by the total N uptake. This MRT is determined equally well for a steady state- and a non-steady state system and is in accordance with the original definition of NUE. It can be applied to a herbaceous perennial stand (that was at a steady state) and to an annual stand (that was not at a steady state) to determine NUE. NUE is also applicable when plant growth and reproduction are analyzed in relation to N use.

  16. Nitrogen recommendation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen fertilization for corn production is complicated by soil and weather variability, yet has far-reaching economic and environmental implications. To address this challenge, alternative N management strategies have been explored extensively in recent years by both public and private groups for...

  17. The Global Nitrogen Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    Once upon a time nitrogen did not exist. Today it does. In the intervening time the universe was formed, nitrogen was created, the Earth came into existence, and its atmosphere and oceans were formed! In this analysis of the Earth's nitrogen cycle, I start with an overview of these important events relative to nitrogen and then move on to the more traditional analysis of the nitrogen cycle itself and the role of humans in its alteration.The universe is ˜15 Gyr old. Even after its formation, there was still a period when nitrogen did not exist. It took ˜300 thousand years after the big bang for the Universe to cool enough to create atoms; hydrogen and helium formed first. Nitrogen was formed in the stars through the process of nucleosynthesis. When a star's helium mass becomes great enough to reach the necessary pressure and temperature, helium begins to fuse into still heavier elements, including nitrogen.Approximately 10 Gyr elapsed before Earth was formed (˜4.5 Ga (billion years ago)) by the accumulation of pre-assembled materials in a multistage process. Assuming that N2 was the predominate nitrogen species in these materials and given that the temperature of space is -270 °C, N2 was probably a solid when the Earth was formed since its boiling point (b.p.) and melting point (m.p.) are -196 °C and -210 °C, respectively. Towards the end of the accumulation period, temperatures were probably high enough for significant melting of some of the accumulated material. The volcanic gases emitted by the resulting volcanism strongly influenced the surface environment. Nitrogen was converted from a solid to a gas and emitted as N2. Carbon and sulfur were probably emitted as CO and H2S (Holland, 1984). N2 is still the most common nitrogen volcanic gas emitted today at a rate of ˜2 TgN yr-1 (Jaffee, 1992).Once emitted, the gases either remained in the atmosphere or were deposited to the Earth's surface, thus continuing the process of biogeochemical cycling. The rate of

  18. ODD NITROGEN PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Harold S.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter is in three parts. The first concerns interpretations that can be made from atmospheric observations regarding nitrogen compounds and ozone, the second reviews some predictions made by atmospheric models, and the third compares between certain model results and atmospheric measurements with an emphasis on detecting evidence of significant disagreements.

  19. Nitrogen Fixation in Cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stal, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria that are widespread in marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments, and many of them are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen. However, ironically, nitrogenase, the enzyme that is responsible for the reduction of N2, is extremely sensitive to

  20. Nitrogen Fixation in Cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stal, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria that are widespread in marine, freshwater and terrestrial environments, and many of them are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen. However, ironically, nitrogenase, the enzyme that is responsible for the reduction of N2, is extremely sensitive to

  1. Nitrogen Trading Tool (NTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) recently developed a prototype web-based nitrogen trading tool to facilitate water quality credit trading. The development team has worked closely with the Agriculture Research Service Soil Plant Nutrient Research Unit (ARS-SPNR) and the Environmenta...

  2. Dynamic detection of non-protein-bound strychnine and brucine in rabbit muscle and synovial fluid after topical application of total Strychnos alkaloid patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huaibo; Yan, Miao; Li, Huande; Xun, Tianrong; Deng, Yang; Zhao, Yeye; Deng, Long

    2014-04-01

    Semen Strychni, a known toxic drug in Chinese pharmacopoeia, is notable for its therapeutic effects on local muscle and joint pain. However, oral administration can be risky. Topically administered drugs accumulate in the topical muscles and knee joints without any major increase in plasma levels; only non-protein-bound drugs in the biological fluids of target tissues are effective for therapeutic effects. A sensitive and rapid ultra performance liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) method coupled with a microdialysis technique was developed to determine the non-protein-bound strychnine (Str) and brucine (Bru) in rabbit muscle and synovial fluid microdialysate. The UPLC separation was carried out using a 1.7μm BEH C18 column (50 mm × 2.1 mm) with a mobile phase consisting of methanol: water (29.5:70.5, v/v) with 0.1% formic acid and 20 mM ammonium acetate in water. The method was validated at concentrations ranging from 0.58 ng/ml to 467.20 ng/ml for Str and from 0.42 ng/ml to 422.40 ng/ml for Bru. Intra-day and inter-day accuracy ranged from 99.1% to 103.2% for Str and from 95.8% to 108.8% for Bru with intra-day and inter-day precision within 9.7%. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine non-protein-bound Str and Bru, and the analysates concentration remained stable in rabbit muscle and synovial fluid after topical application of total Strychnos alkaloid patches, which indicated that total Strychnos alkaloid patches could substitute for the traditional oral administration of Semen Strychni. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Molecular nitrogen yields from fuel nitrogen in backmixed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corlett, R.C.; Monteith, L.E.; Malte, P.C.

    1977-01-01

    The major species disposition of nitrogen from pyridine, added to a propane-argon-oxygen stream burned in a jet-stirred reactor, was investigated. Fuel/oxidant equivalence ratio ranged from 0.9 to 1.5, residence time from 10-50 ms, and temperature from 1500-1900/sup 0/K. Nitrogen mass fraction relative to propane plus pyridine was normally 0.01, in a few cases 0.02. Molecular nitrogen (measured by gas chromatograph) included with nitrogen oxides (chemiluminescent analyzer) and ammonia and hydrogen cyanide (wet chemistry) indicate for each reactor setting a complete nitrogen balance consistent with an estimated random error of approximately 10%. Examination of accumulated results for over 20 best quality cases suggest no systematic imbalance. The results are consistent with data from comparison runs using atmospheric air oxidant (hence no molecular nitrogen measurement) with fuel nitrogen provided in the form of pyridine again, and also as ammonia and nitric oxide.

  4. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  5. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Studies of the Marine Nitrogen Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The marine nitrogen cycle is a complex web of microbially mediated reactions that control the inventory, distribution, and speciation of nitrogen in the marine environment. Because nitrogen is a major nutrient that is required by all life, its availability can control biological productivity and ecosystem structure in both surface and deep-ocean communities. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate and nitrite have provided new insights into the rates and distributions of marine nitrogen cycle processes, especially when analyzed in combination with numerical simulations of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry. This review highlights the insights gained from dual-isotope studies applied at regional to global scales and their incorporation into oceanic biogeochemical models. These studies represent significant new advances in the use of isotopic measurements to understand the modern nitrogen cycle, with implications for the study of past ocean productivity, oxygenation, and nutrient status.

  6. 21 CFR 862.1515 - Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. 862.1515... Systems § 862.1515 Nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system. (a) Identification. A nitrogen (amino-nitrogen) test system is a device intended to measure amino acid nitrogen levels in serum, plasma, and...

  7. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25

    The purpose of our program is to explore fundamental chemistry relevant to the discovery of energy efficient methods for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into more value-added nitrogen-containing organic molecules. Such transformations are key for domestic energy security and the reduction of fossil fuel dependencies. With DOE support, we have synthesized families of zirconium and hafnium dinitrogen complexes with elongated and activated N-N bonds that exhibit rich N{sub 2} functionalization chemistry. Having elucidated new methods for N-H bond formation from dihydrogen, C-H bonds and Broensted acids, we have since turned our attention to N-C bond construction. These reactions are particularly important for the synthesis of amines, heterocycles and hydrazines with a range of applications in the fine and commodity chemicals industries and as fuels. One recent highlight was the discovery of a new N{sub 2} cleavage reaction upon addition of carbon monoxide which resulted in the synthesis of an important fertilizer, oxamide, from the diatomics with the two strongest bonds in chemistry. Nitrogen-carbon bonds form the backbone of many important organic molecules, especially those used in the fertilizer and pharamaceutical industries. During the past year, we have continued our work in the synthesis of hydrazines of various substitution patterns, many of which are important precursors for heterocycles. In most instances, the direct functionalization of N{sub 2} offers a more efficient synthetic route than traditional organic methods. In addition, we have also discovered a unique CO-induced N{sub 2} bond cleavage reaction that simultaneously cleaves the N-N bond of the metal dinitrogen compound and assembles new C-C bond and two new N-C bonds. Treatment of the CO-functionalized core with weak Broensted acids liberated oxamide, H{sub 2}NC(O)C(O)NH{sub 2}, an important slow release fertilizer that is of interest to replace urea in many applications. The

  8. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  9. Nitrogen Control in VIM Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, P. D.; Hawk, J. A.

    NETL has developed a design and control philosophy for the addition of nitrogen to austenitic and ferritic steels. The design approach uses CALPHAD as the centerpiece to predict the level to which nitrogen is soluble in both the melt and the solid. Applications of this technique have revealed regions of "exclusion" in which the alloy, while within specification limits of prescribed, cannot be made by conventional melt processing. Furthermore, other investigations have found that substantial retrograde solubility of nitrogen exists, which can become problematic during subsequent melt processing and/or other finishing operations such as welding. Additionally, the CALPHAD method has been used to adjust primary melt conditions. To that end, nitrogen additions have been made using chrome nitride, silicon nitride, high-nitrogen ferrochrome as well as nitrogen gas. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach will be discussed and NETL experience in this area will be summarized with respect to steel structure.

  10. HPLC Determination of the Major Non-protein Amino Acids and Common Biogenic Amines in Lathyrus sativus Using a Novel Extraction Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze Yi YAN; Cheng Jin JIAO; Feng Min LI; Yong Min LIANG; Zhi Xiao LI

    2005-01-01

    An assay is presented for simultaneously determining 5 biogenic amines and the major non-protein amino acids: the toxin β-N-oxalyl-L-α,β-diaminopropanoic acid (β-ODAP), its isomer α-ODAP and homoarginine in Lathyrus sativus extracts using the HPLC system after derivatization with para-nitrobenzyloxycarbonyl chloride (PNZ-C1). However, it is more worthy of noting that this paper also describes a new extraction method using 0.2 mol/L HC1O4. The new method has some advantages: shorter extraction-time, simultaneous extraction of free amino acids and polyamines, better inhibiting the isomerization of β-ODAP to α-ODAP, and so on.

  11. Nitrogen Forms in Humic Substances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUOSU-NENG; WENQI-XIAO

    1992-01-01

    In this paper,the nitrogen forms in newly-formed humic substances,including humic acid (HA),fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid in humin (HAI),were studied by using the 15N CP-MAS NMR technique in combination with chemical approaches.Results show that the majority of nitrogen in HA,FA and HAI was in the amide form with some presented as aliphatic and/ or aromatic amines and some as pyrrole type nitrogen,although the contents of nonhydrolyzable nitrogen in them differed greatly from each other (15-55%).

  12. Nitrogen accumulation and residual effects of nitrogen catch crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The nitrogen accumulation in Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), white mustard (Sinapis alba L.) and tansy phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia L.), under- or aftersown as nitrogen catch crops to spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and field pea (Pisum s...

  13. Nitrogen release during coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.L.; Mitchell, R.E.; Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.

    1995-02-01

    Experiments in entrained flow reactors at combustion temperatures are performed to resolve the rank dependence of nitrogen release on an elemental basis for a suite of 15 U.S. coals ranging from lignite to low-volatile bituminous. Data were obtained as a function of particle conversion, with overall mass loss up to 99% on a dry, ash-free basis. Nitrogen release rates are presented relative to both carbon loss and overall mass loss. During devolatilization, fractional nitrogen release from low-rank coals is much slower than fractional mass release and noticeably slower than fractional carbon release. As coal rank increases, fractional nitrogen release rate relative to that of carbon and mass increases, with fractional nitrogen release rates exceeding fractional mass and fractional carbon release rates during devolatilization for high-rank (low-volatile bituminous) coals. At the onset of combustion, nitrogen release rates increase significantly. For all coals investigated, cumulative fractional nitrogen loss rates relative to those of mass and carbon passes through a maximum during the earliest stages of oxidation. The mechanism for generating this maximum is postulated to involve nascent thermal rupture of nitrogen-containing compounds and possible preferential oxidation of nitrogen sites. During later stages of oxidation, the cumulative fractional loss of nitrogen approaches that of carbon for all coals. Changes in the relative release rates of nitrogen compared to those of both overall mass and carbon during all stages of combustion are attributed to a combination of the chemical structure of coals, temperature histories during combustion, and char chemistry.

  14. Microbial conversions of nitrogenous heterocycles

    OpenAIRE

    Parshikov, Igor A

    2015-01-01

    The monography describes examples of the application of microbial technologies for obtaining of derivatives from a series of nitrogen heterocycles (saturated nitrogen heterocycles, azaarenes and quinolones). It is proposed alternative ways for synthesize substances that are difficult to obtain by the methods of organic chemistry. Microbial technologies of synthesis of organic compounds may find out a practical application in the production of various drugs.

  15. Cationic Nitrogen Doped Helical Nanographenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Feng, Xinliang; Berger, Reinhard; Popov, Alexey A; Weigand, Jan J; Vincon, Ilka; Machata, Peter; Hennersdorf, Felix; Zhou, Youjia; Fu, Yubin

    2017-09-13

    Herein, we report on the synthesis of a series of novel cationic nitrogen doped nanographenes (CNDN) by rhodium catalyzed annulation reactions. This powerful method allows for the synthesis of cationic nanographenes with non-planar, axial chiral geometries. Single-crystal X-ray analysis reveals helical and cove-edged structures. Compared to their all-carbon analogues, the CNDN exhibit energetically lower lying frontier orbitals with a reduced optical energy gap and an electron accepting behavior. All derivatives show quasi reversible reductions in cyclic voltammetry. Depending on the number of nitrogen dopant, in situ spectroelectrochemistry proves the formation of neutral radicals (one nitrogen dopant) or radical cations (two nitrogen dopants) upon reduction. The developed synthetic protocol paves the way for the design and synthesis of expanded nanographenes or even graphene nanoribbons containing cationic nitrogen doping. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  17. Efficiency of nitrogen fertilizers for rice

    OpenAIRE

    Roger, Pierre-Armand; I. F. Grant; Reddy, P. M.; Watanabe, I.

    1987-01-01

    The photosynthetic biomass that develops in the floodwater of wetland rice fields affects nitrogen dynamics in the ecosystem. This review summarizes available data on the nature, productivity, and composition of the photosynthetic aquatic biomass, and its major activities regarding the nitrogen cycle, i.e., nitrogen fixation by free living blue-green algae and #Azolla$, nitrogen trapping, nitrogen accumulation at the soil surface, its effect on nitrogen losses by ammonia volatilization, nitro...

  18. 鲜牛乳中掺杂非蛋白氮及非乳蛋白的检测研究%Determination of non-protein-nitrogen and non-dairy protein in milk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李美桃; 王波; 葛冬梅

    2014-01-01

    利用氨基酸分析仪对鲜牛乳中的游离氨基酸及水解氨基酸进行分析,以确定牛乳中氨基酸质量浓度及比例组成,选出1种或多种氨基酸作为特征氨基酸,结合凯氏定氮法测定鲜牛乳中的粗蛋白质量浓度,用以辨别鲜牛乳中的蛋白质来源.

  19. Determination of Neurotoxin b-ODAP and Non-protein Amino Acids in Lathyrus Sativus by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Precolumn Derivatization with 6-Amino quinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl Carbamate (AQC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new method was developed for the quantitative determination of the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid, 3-N-oxalyl-L-2,3-diaminopropionic acid (b -ODAP), its nontoxic a -isomer and other non-protein amino acids in the plant samples of Lathyrus sativus after derivatization with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). 2-Amino butyric acid (ABA) was used as an internal standard. The RP HPLC detection limit for both isomers is 1.8 ng with good response linearity. The results are compared with a colorimetric method.

  20. High-nitrogen explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naud, D. (Darren); Hiskey, M. A. (Michael A.); Kramer, J. F. (John F.); Bishop, R. L. (Robert L.); Harry, H. H. (Herbert H.); Son, S. F. (Steven F.); Sullivan, G. K. (Gregg K.)

    2002-01-01

    The syntheses and characterization of various tetrazine and furazan compounds offer a different approach to explosives development. Traditional explosives - such as TNT or RDX - rely on the oxidation of the carbon and hydrogen atoms by the oxygen carrying nitro group to produce the explosive energy. High-nitrogen compounds rely instead on large positive heats of formation for that energy. Some of these high-nitrogen compounds have been shown to be less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine (BDT), several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. The compound, 3,3{prime}-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, detonates as a half inch rate stick despite having no oxygen in the molecule. Using perfluoroacetic acid, DAAT can be oxidized to give mixtures of N-oxide isomers (DAAT03.5) with an average oxygen content of about 3.5. This energetic mixture burns at extremely high rates and with low dependency on pressure. Another tetrazine compound of interest is 3,6-diguanidino-s-tetrazine(DGT) and its dinitrate and diperchlorate salts. DGT is easily synthesized by reacting BDT with guanidine in methanol. Using Caro's acid, DGT can be further oxidized to give 3,6-diguanidino-s-tetrazine-1,4-di-N-oxide (DGT-DO). Like DGT, the di-N-oxide can react with nitric acid or perchloric acid to give the dinitrate and the diperchlorate salts. The compounds, 4,4{prime}-diamino-3,3{prime}-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4{prime}-diamino-3,3{prime}-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB - the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAz

  1. 电子辐射环境中NPN输入双极运算放大器的辐射效应和退火特性%Radiation damage effect and p ost-annealing treatments of NPN-input bip olar op erational amplifier in electron radiation environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜柯; 陆妩; 胡天乐; 王信; 郭旗; 何承发; 刘默涵; 李小龙

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of the space technology, operational amplifier is widely used as the basic liner circuit in a satellite system. There are many charged particles trapped in the earth’s magnetosphere, most of the particles are protons and electrons. In BJTs, the damage caused by electrons causes both bulk recombination and surface recombination to increase and subsequently current gain to decrease. Transistor gain degradation is the primary cause of parametric shifts and functional failures in linear bipolar circuits. The severity of electron radiation response correlates with electron’s energy and flux, therefore it is important to understand the electron radiation response in different conditions. In this paper, the tested devices used in this study are NPN-input bipolar operational amplifiers commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) manufactured by Texas Instruments (TI). NPN-input bipolar operational amplifiers LM108 are irradiated with different energy and different beam current electrons respectively under different bias conditions to study the electron radiation damage effect. Experiment using 60Coγ-ray radiation is conducted to compare the different radiation damages between 60Co γ-ray and electron radiation. The total radiation experiments are carried out with the 60Coγ-ray source (Xinjiang Technical Institute of physics and chemistry). The radiation dose rates for the test samples are 1 Gy (Si)/s, and the total accumulated dose is 1000 Gy (Si). Subsequently, room temperature and high temperature annealings are conducted to analyze the parametric failure mechanism of LM108 caused by a total dose radiation for different biases. Result shows that 0.32 Gy(Si)/s beam current electrons can induce more damage than that caused by 1.53 Gy(Si)/s electrons with the same energy;1.8 MeV electrons can induce more damages than 1 MeV electrons with the same electron beam current because the former produces more displacement damage than the latter. Comparison

  2. Environmental friendly nitrogen fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Avi; Shaviv

    2005-01-01

    With the huge intensification of agriculture and the increasing awareness to human health and natural resources sustainability, there was a shift towards the development of environmental friendly N application approaches that support sustainable use of land and sustain food production.The effectiveness of such approaches depends on their ability to synchronize plant nitrogen demand with its supply and the ability to apply favored compositions and dosages of N-species.They are also influenced by farming scale and its sophistication, and include the following key concepts: (i) Improved application modes such as split or localized ("depot") application; (ii) use of bio-amendments like nitrification and urease inhibitors and combinations of (i) and (ii); (iii) use of controlled and slow release fertilizers; (iv) Fertigation-fertilization via irrigation systems including fully automated and controlled systems; and (v) precision fertilization in large scale farming systems. The paper describes the approaches and their action mechanisms and examines their agronomic and environmental significance. The relevance of the approaches for different farming scales, levels of agronomic intensification and agro-technical sophistication is examined as well.

  3. Identification and characterization of wheat long non-protein coding RNAs responsive to powdery mildew infection and heat stress by using microarray analysis and SBS sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Huiru

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biotic and abiotic stresses, such as powdery mildew infection and high temperature, are important limiting factors for yield and grain quality in wheat production. Emerging evidences suggest that long non-protein coding RNAs (npcRNAs are developmentally regulated and play roles in development and stress responses of plants. However, identification of long npcRNAs is limited to a few plant species, such as Arabidopsis, rice and maize, no systematic identification of long npcRNAs and their responses to abiotic and biotic stresses is reported in wheat. Results In this study, by using computational analysis and experimental approach we identified 125 putative wheat stress responsive long npcRNAs, which are not conserved among plant species. Among them, some were precursors of small RNAs such as microRNAs and siRNAs, two long npcRNAs were identified as signal recognition particle (SRP 7S RNA variants, and three were characterized as U3 snoRNAs. We found that wheat long npcRNAs showed tissue dependent expression patterns and were responsive to powdery mildew infection and heat stress. Conclusion Our results indicated that diverse sets of wheat long npcRNAs were responsive to powdery mildew infection and heat stress, and could function in wheat responses to both biotic and abiotic stresses, which provided a starting point to understand their functions and regulatory mechanisms in the future.

  4. Analysis of the small non-protein-coding RNA profile of mouse spermatozoa reveals specific enrichment of piRNAs within mature spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheon, Kate; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Stanger, Simone J; Bernstein, Ilana R; Dun, Matthew D; Eamens, Andrew L; Nixon, Brett

    2017-08-17

    Post-testicular sperm maturation and storage within the epididymis is a key determinant of gamete quality and fertilization competence. Here we demonstrate that mouse spermatozoa possess a complex small non-protein-coding RNA (sRNA) profile, the composition of which is markedly influenced by their epididymal transit. Thus, although miRNAs are highly represented in the spermatozoa of the proximal epididymis, this sRNA class is largely diminished in mature spermatozoa of the distal epididymis. Coincident with this, a substantial enrichment in Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) abundance in cauda spermatozoa was detected. Further, features of cauda piRNAs, including; predominantly 29-31 nts in length; preference for uracil at their 5' terminus; no adenine enrichment at piRNA nt 10, and; predominantly mapping to intergenic regions of the mouse genome, indicate that these piRNAs are generated by the PIWIL1-directed primary piRNA production pathway. Accordingly, PIWIL1 was detected via immunoblotting and mass spectrometry in epididymal spermatozoa. These data provide insight into the complexity and dynamic nature of the sRNA profile of spermatozoa and raise the intriguing prospect that piRNAs are generated in situ in maturing spermatozoa. Such information is of particular interest in view of the potential role for paternal sRNAs in influencing conception, embryo development and intergenerational inheritance.

  5. Identification and functional analysis of acute myeloid leukemia susceptibility associated single nucleotide polymorphisms at non-protein coding regions of RUNX1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Ren, Xiuyu; Wang, Haiying; Zhao, Yao; Yi, Zhengjun; Wang, Kaifeng; Zhang, Shizhuang; Wang, Lin; Samuelson, David J; Hu, Zhenbo

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the susceptibility to acute myeloid leukemia. We aim to search non-protein coding regions of key hematopoiesis transcription factors for genetic variations associated with acute myeloid leukemia susceptibility. We genotyped SNPs of RUNX1 P1 promoter, P2 promoter, +23 enhancer, intron 5.2 enhancer, PU.1 promoter, CEBPA promoter, and CEBPE promoter from acute myeloid leukemia patients and healthy controls. Rs2249650 and rs2268276 at RUNX1 intron 5.2 enhancer were found to be associated with acute myeloid leukemia susceptibility. Artificial reporters containing different rs2249650 and rs2268276 alleles showed differential activities in the K562 cell line, a human immortalized myeloid leukemia line. Rs2249650 contributes to reporter activities more than rs2268276. Gel shift assay is consistent with the luciferase assay. Supershift assay indicated that one potential binding protein was PU.1. To sum up, rs2268276 and especially rs2249650 may be qualified as new acute myeloid leukemia susceptibility-associated SNPs.

  6. Next-Generation Sequencing of Protein-Coding and Long Non-protein-Coding RNAs in Two Types of Exosomes Derived from Human Whole Saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yuko; Tsujimoto, Masafumi; Yanoshita, Ryohei

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles containing microRNAs and mRNAs that are produced by various types of cells. We previously used ultrafiltration and size-exclusion chromatography to isolate two types of human salivary exosomes (exosomes I, II) that are different in size and proteomes. We showed that salivary exosomes contain large repertoires of small RNAs. However, precise information regarding long RNAs in salivary exosomes has not been fully determined. In this study, we investigated the compositions of protein-coding RNAs (pcRNAs) and long non-protein-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) of exosome I, exosome II and whole saliva (WS) by next-generation sequencing technology. Although 11% of all RNAs were commonly detected among the three samples, the compositions of reads mapping to known RNAs were similar. The most abundant pcRNA is ribosomal RNA protein, and pcRNAs of some salivary proteins such as S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (protein S100-A8) were present in salivary exosomes. Interestingly, lncRNAs of pseudogenes (presumably, processed pseudogenes) were abundant in exosome I, exosome II and WS. Translationally controlled tumor protein gene, which plays an important role in cell proliferation, cell death and immune responses, was highly expressed as pcRNA and pseudogenes in salivary exosomes. Our results show that salivary exosomes contain various types of RNAs such as pseudogenes and small RNAs, and may mediate intercellular communication by transferring these RNAs to target cells as gene expression regulators.

  7. Concentration of nitrogen molecules needed by nitrogen nanobubbles existing in bulk water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张萌; 涂育松; 方海平

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the stability of nitrogen nanobubbles under dif-ferent concentrations of nitrogen molecules by molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the stability of nanobubbles is very sensitive to the concentration of nitrogen molecules in water. A sharp transition between disperse states and assemble states of nitrogen molecules is observed when the concentration of nitrogen molecules is changed. The relevant critical concentration of nitrogen molecules needed by the existing nitrogen nanobubbles is analyzed.

  8. Estimation of Symbiotically Fixed Nitrogen in Soybean Depending on Nitrogen Fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Objectives of investigations were to determine optimal nitrogen rates for the highest soybean seed yield, compare reaction of nodulating and nonodulating soybean varieties to nitrogen fertilization and estimate the amounts of symbiotically fixed nitrogen depending on nitrogen rates. Estimation of the amounts of symbiotically fixed nitrogen was done using the nitrogen contents in soil before and after the vegetation and nitrogen contents in whole plants of nodulating and nonodulating varieties...

  9. Total Nitrogen in Surface Water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess nitrogen in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALN is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including the...

  10. The nitrogen cycle on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    1989-01-01

    Nirtogen is an essential element for the evolution of life, because it is found in a variety of biologically important molecules. Therefore, N is an important element to study from a exobiological perspective. In particular, fixed nitrogen is the biologically useful form of nitrogen. Fixed nitrogen is generally defines as NH3, NH4(+), NO(x), or N that is chemically bound to either inorganic or organic molecules, and releasable by hydrolysis to NH3 or NH4(+). On Earth, the vast majority of nitrogen exists as N2 in the atmosphere, and not in the fixes form. On early Mars the same situations probably existed. The partial pressure of N2 on early Mars was thought to be 18 mb, significantly less than that of Earth. Dinitrogen can be fixed abiotically by several mechanisms. These mechanisms include thernal shock from meteoritic infall and lightning, as well as the interaction of light and sand containing TiO2 which produces NH3 that would be rapidly destroyed by photolysis and reaction with OH radicals. These mechanisms could have been operative on primitive Mars.The chemical processes effecting these compounds and possible ways of fixing or burying N in the Martian environment are described. Data gathered in this laboratory suggest that the low abundance of nitrogen along (compared to primitive Earth) may not significantly deter the origin and early evolution of a nitrogen utilizing organisms. However, the conditions on current Mars with respect to nitrogen are quite different, and organisms may not be able to utilize all of the available nitrogen.

  11. Enhanced nitrogen deposition over China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xuejun; Zhang, Ying; Han, Wenxuan; Tang, Aohan; Shen, Jianlin; Cui, Zhenling; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Fusuo [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Vitousek, Peter [Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Erisman, Jan Willem [VU University Amsterdam, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goulding, Keith [The Sustainable Soils and Grassland Systems Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Fangmeier, Andreas [Institute of Landscape and Plant Ecology, University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2013-02-28

    China is experiencing intense air pollution caused in large part by anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen. These emissions result in the deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, with implications for human and ecosystem health, greenhouse gas balances and biological diversity. However, information on the magnitude and environmental impact of N deposition in China is limited. Here we use nationwide data sets on bulk N deposition, plant foliar N and crop N uptake (from long-term unfertilized soils) to evaluate N deposition dynamics and their effect on ecosystems across China between 1980 and 2010. We find that the average annual bulk deposition of N increased by approximately 8 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare (P < 0.001) between the 1980s (13.2 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare) and the 2000s (21.1 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare). Nitrogen deposition rates in the industrialized and agriculturally intensified regions of China are as high as the peak levels of deposition in northwestern Europe in the 1980s, before the introduction of mitigation measures. Nitrogen from ammonium (NH4+) is the dominant form of N in bulk deposition, but the rate of increase is largest for deposition of N from nitrate (NO3-), in agreement with decreased ratios of NH3 to NOx emissions since 1980. We also find that the impact of N deposition on Chinese ecosystems includes significantly increased plant foliar N concentrations in natural and semi-natural (that is, non-agricultural) ecosystems and increased crop N uptake from long-term-unfertilized croplands. China and other economies are facing a continuing challenge to reduce emissions of reactive nitrogen, N deposition and their negative effects on human health and the environment.

  12. Anaerobic Nitrogen Fixers on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. G.

    2000-07-01

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen gas to the protein of living systems is an amazing process of nature. The first step in the process is biological nitrogen fixation, the transformation of N2 to NH3. The phenomenon is crucial for feeding the billions of our species on Earth. On Mars, the same process may allow us to discover how life can adapt to a hostile environment, and render it habitable. Hostile environments also exist on Earth. For example, nothing grows in coal refuse piles due to the oxidation of pyrite and marcasite to sulfuric acid. Yet, when the acidity is neutralized, alfalfa and soybean plants develop root nodules typical of symbiotic nitrogen fixation with Rhizobium species possibly living in the pyritic material. When split open, these nodules exhibited the pinkish color of leghemoglobin, a protein in the nodule protecting the active nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase against the toxic effects of oxygen. Although we have not yet obtained direct evidence of nitrogenase activity in these nodules (reduction of acetylene to ethylene, for example), these findings suggested the possibility that nitrogen fixation was taking place in this hostile, non-soil material. This immediately raises the possibility that freeliving anaerobic bacteria which fix atmospheric nitrogen on Earth, could do the same on Mars.

  13. Nitrogen balance during growth of cauliflower

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaarts, A.P.

    2000-01-01

    The potential for loss of nitrogen to the environment during growth of cauliflower was investigated. A comparison was made between cauliflower growth and nitrogen uptake without, and with, nitrogen application of the recommended amount (=225 kg ha-1 minus mineral nitrogen in the soil layer 0–60 cm,

  14. Nitrogen nutrition effects on development, growth and nitrogen accumulation of vegetables.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, H.

    1995-01-01

    In order to be able to match nitrogen supply and nitrogen requirement of vegetable crops, insight is necessary in the responses to nitrogen of important processes of growth and development. This study focused on effects of amount of nitrogen applied and fractionation of nitrogen supply on leaf attri

  15. Nitrogen Fixation in Denitrified Marine Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Camila Fernandez; Laura Farías; Osvaldo Ulloa

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation is an essential process that biologically transforms atmospheric dinitrogen gas to ammonia, therefore compensating for nitrogen losses occurring via denitrification and anammox. Currently, inputs and losses of nitrogen to the ocean resulting from these processes are thought to be spatially separated: nitrogen fixation takes place primarily in open ocean environments (mainly through diazotrophic cyanobacteria), whereas nitrogen losses occur in oxygen-depleted intermediate wat...

  16. Nitrogen Compounds in Radiation Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, H.E. [NNL Sellafield (United Kingdom); Dey, G.R. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Vaudey, C.E.; Peaucelle, C. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon - IPNL, 69 - Lyon (France); Boucher, J.L. [Lab. de Chimie et Biochimie Pharmacologiques et Toxicologiques, UMR 8601 CNRS 45 rue des Saints Peres, 75270 Paris cedex 06, Univ Paris 5, 75 (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (France); Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay (France); Bererd, N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon (France); IUT Departement Chimie, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (France); Koppenol, W.H. [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Janata, E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Materialien und Energie, Solar Energy Research, Berlin (Germany); Dauvois, V.; Durand, D.; Legand, S.; Roujou, J.L.; Doizi, D.; Dannoux, A.; Lamouroux, C. [Laboratoire de Speciation des Radionucleides et des Molecules, DEN/DPC/Service d' Etude du Comportement des Radionucleides, CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur yvette (France)

    2009-07-01

    Water radiolysis in presence of N{sub 2} is probably the topic the most controversy in the field of water radiolysis. It still exists a strong discrepancy between the different reports of ammonia formation by water radiolysis in presence of N{sub 2} and moreover in absence of oxygen there is no agreement on the formation or not of nitrogen oxide like NO{sub 2}- and NO{sub 3}-. These discrepancies come from multiple sources: - the complexity of the reaction mechanisms where nitrogen is involved - the experimental difficulties - and, the irradiation conditions. The aim of the workshop is to capitalize the knowledge needed to go further in simulations and understanding the problems caused (or not) by the presence of nitrogen / water in the environment of radioactive materials. Implications are evident in terms of corrosion, understanding of biological systems and atmospheric chemistry under radiation. Topics covered include experimental and theoretical approaches, application and fundamental researches: - Nitrate and Ammonia in radiation chemistry in nuclear cycle; - NOx in biological systems and atmospheric chemistry; - Formation of Nitrogen compounds in Nuclear installations; - Nitrogen in future power plant projects (Gen4, ITER...) and large particle accelerators. This document gathers the transparencies available for 7 of the presentations given at this workshop. These are: - H.E SIMS: 'Radiation Chemistry of Nitrogen Compounds in Nuclear Power Plant'; - G.R. DEY: 'Nitrogen Compounds Formation in the Radiolysis of Aqueous Solutions'; - C.E. VAUDEY et al.: 'Radiolytic corrosion of nuclear graphite studied with the dedicated gas irradiation cell of IPNL'; - J.L. BOUCHER: 'Roles and biosynthesis of NO in eukaryotes and prokaryotes'; - W.H. KOPPENOL: 'Chemistry of NOx'; - E. JANATA: 'Yield of OH in N{sub 2}O saturated aqueous solution'; - V. DAUVOIS: 'Analytical strategy for the study of radiolysis gases'

  17. Protein and non-protein sulfhydryls and disulfides in gastric mucosa and liver after gastrotoxic chemicals and sucralfate: Possible new targets of pharmacologic agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lajos Nagy; Miki Nagata; Sandor Szabo

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of major non-protein and protein sulfhydryls and disulfides in chemically induced gastric hemorrhagic mucosal lesions (HML) and the mechanism of gastroprotective effect of sucralfate.METHODS: Rats were given 1 mL of 75% ethanol, 25%NaCl, 0.6 mol/L HCI, 0.2 mol/L NaOH or 1% ammonia solutions intragastrically (i.g.) and sacrificed 1, 3, 6 or 12 min later. Total (reduced and oxidized) glutathione (GSH + GSSG), glutathione disulfide (GSSG), protein free sulfhydryls (PSH), protein-glutathione mixed disulfides (PSSG) and protein cystine disulfides (PSSP) were measured in gastric mucosa and liver.RESULTS: Reduced glutathione (GSH) was depleted in the gastric mucosa after ethanol, HCI or NaCl exposure,while oxidized glutathione (GSSG) concentrations increased, except by HCI and NaOH exposure. Decreased levels of PSH after exposure to ethanol were observed,NaCl or NaOH while the total protein disulfides were increased. Ratios of reduced to oxidized glutathione or sulfhydrils to disulfides were decreased by all chemicals.No changes in thiol homeostasis were detected in the liver after i.g. abbreviation should be spelled out the first time here administration of ethanol. Sucralfate increased the concentrations of GSH and PSH and prevented the ethanol-induced changes in gastric mucosal thiol concentrations.CONCLUSION: Our modified methods are now suitable for direct measurements of major protein and nonprotein thiols/disulfides in the gastric mucosa or liver.A common element in the pathogenesis of chemically induced HML and in the mechanism of gastroprotective drugs seems to be the decreased ratios of reduced and oxidized glutathione as well as protein sulfhydryls and disulfides.

  18. Membrane rejection of nitrogen compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Lueptow, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    Rejection characteristics of nitrogen compounds were examined for reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and low-pressure reverse osmosis membranes. The rejection of nitrogen compounds is explained by integrating experimental results with calculations using the extended Nernst-Planck model coupled with a steric hindrance model. The molecular weight and chemical structure of nitrogen compounds appear to be less important in determining rejection than electrostatic properties. The rejection is greatest when the Donnan potential exceeds 0.05 V or when the ratio of the solute radius to the pore radius is greater than 0.8. The transport of solute in the pore is dominated by diffusion, although convective transport is significant for organic nitrogen compounds. Electromigration contributes negligibly to the overall solute transport in the membrane. Urea, a small organic compound, has lower rejection than ionic compounds such as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite, indicating the critical role of electrostatic interaction in rejection. This suggests that better treatment efficiency for organic nitrogen compounds can be obtained after ammonification of urea.

  19. Interactions of Water Management and Nitrogen Fertilizer on Nitrogen Absorption and Utilization in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shao-hua; CAO Wei-xing; DING Yan-feng; TIAN Yong-chao; JIANG Dong

    2003-01-01

    The interactions of water management and nitrogen fertilizer on nitrogen absorption and utili-zation were studied in rice with Wuxiangjing9 (japonica). The results showed that the nitrogen uptake and re-maining in straw increased and the percentage of nitrogen translocation (PNT) from vegetative organs, nitro-gen dry matter production efficiency (NDMPE) and nitrogen grain production efficiency (NGPE) decreasedwith nitrogen increasing. The nitrogen uptake and NGPE decreased when severe water stressed. However, ricenot only decreased the nitrogen uptake but also increased the PNT from vegetative organs, NDMPE and NGPEwhen mild water stressed. There were obvious interactions between nitrogen fertilizer and water management,such as with water stress increasing the effect of nitrogen on increasing nitrogen uptake was reduced and thaton decreasing NDMPE was intensified.

  20. Characteristics of Nitrogen Balances of Large-scale Stock Farms and Reduction of Environmental Nitrogen Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Toshihiro; Takamatsu, Rieko

    We calculated nitrogen balances on farm gate and soil surface on large-scale stock farms and discussed methods for reducing environmental nitrogen loads. Four different types of public stock farms (organic beef, calf supply and daily cows) were surveyed in Aomori Prefecture. (1) Farm gate and soil surface nitrogen inflows were both larger than the respective outflows on all types of farms. Farm gate nitrogen balance for beef farms were worse than that for dairy farms. (2) Soil surface nitrogen outflows and soil nitrogen retention were in proportion to soil surface nitrogen inflows. (3) Reductions in soil surface nitrogen retention were influenced by soil surface nitrogen inflows. (4) In order to reduce farm gate nitrogen retention, inflows of formula feed and chemical fertilizer need to be reduced. (5) In order to reduce soil surface nitrogen retention, inflows of fertilizer need to be reduced and nitrogen balance needs to be controlled.

  1. Terrestrial nitrogen cycles: Some unanswered questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, P.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrogen is generally considered to be the element which most often limits the growth of plants in both natural and agricultural ecosystems. It regulates plant growth because photosynthetic rates are strongly dependent on the concentration of nitrogen in leaves, and because relatively large mounts of protein are required for cell division and growth. Yet nitrogen is abundant in the biosphere - the well-mixed pool in the atmosphere is considered inexhaustible compared to biotic demand, and the amount of already fixed organic nitrogen in soils far exceeds annual plant uptake in terrestrial ecosystems. In regions where natural vegetation is not nitrogen limited, continuous cultivation induces nitrogen deficiency. Nitrogen loss from cultivated lands is more rapid than that of other elements, and nitrogen fertilization is generally required to maintain crop yield under any continuous system. The pervasiveness of nitrogen deficiency in many natural and most managed sites is discussed.

  2. Managing nitrogen for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Davidson, Eric A.; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Searchinger, Timothy D.; Dumas, Patrice; Shen, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Improvements in nitrogen use efficiency in crop production are critical for addressing the triple challenges of food security, environmental degradation and climate change. Such improvements are conditional not only on technological innovation, but also on socio-economic factors that are at present poorly understood. Here we examine historical patterns of agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency and find a broad range of national approaches to agricultural development and related pollution. We analyse examples of nitrogen use and propose targets, by geographic region and crop type, to meet the 2050 global food demand projected by the Food and Agriculture Organization while also meeting the Sustainable Development Goals pertaining to agriculture recently adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. Furthermore, we discuss socio-economic policies and technological innovations that may help achieve them.

  3. Managing nitrogen for sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Davidson, Eric A; Mauzerall, Denise L; Searchinger, Timothy D; Dumas, Patrice; Shen, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Improvements in nitrogen use efficiency in crop production are critical for addressing the triple challenges of food security, environmental degradation and climate change. Such improvements are conditional not only on technological innovation, but also on socio-economic factors that are at present poorly understood. Here we examine historical patterns of agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency and find a broad range of national approaches to agricultural development and related pollution. We analyse examples of nitrogen use and propose targets, by geographic region and crop type, to meet the 2050 global food demand projected by the Food and Agriculture Organization while also meeting the Sustainable Development Goals pertaining to agriculture recently adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. Furthermore, we discuss socio-economic policies and technological innovations that may help achieve them.

  4. Nitrogen-doped hydrothermal carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; White, Robin J. [Max-Planck-Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany). Dept. of Colloid Chemistry; Zhao, Li [Max-Planck-Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany). Dept. of Colloid Chemistry; National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing (China)

    2012-07-01

    Nitrogen doped carbon materials are now playing an important role in cutting edge innovations for energy conversion and storage technologies such as supercapacitors and proton exchange membrane fuel cells as well as in catalytic applications, adsorption and CO{sub 2} capture. The production of such materials using benign aqueous based processes, mild temperatures and renewable precursors is of great promise in addressing growing environmental concerns for cleaner power sources at a time of increasing global demand for energy. In this perspective, we show that nitrogen doped carbons prepared using sustainable processes such as ''Hydrothermal Carbonisation'' has advantages in many applications over the conventional carbons. We also summarize an array of synthetic strategies used to create such nitrogen doped carbons, and discuss the application of these novel materials. (orig.)

  5. Insects as a Nitrogen Source for Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2013-07-31

    Many plants have evolved adaptations in order to survive in low nitrogen environments. One of the best-known adaptations is that of plant symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria; this is the major route by which nitrogen is incorporated into plant biomass. A portion of this plant-associated nitrogen is then lost to insects through herbivory, and insects represent a nitrogen reservoir that is generally overlooked in nitrogen cycles. In this review we show three specialized plant adaptations that allow for the recovery of insect nitrogen; that is, plants gaining nitrogen from insects. First, we show specialized adaptations by carnivorous plants in low nitrogen habitats. Insect carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and sundews (Nepenthaceae/Sarraceniaceae and Drosera respectively) are able to obtain substantial amounts of nitrogen from the insects that they capture. Secondly, numerous plants form associations with mycorrhizal fungi that can provide soluble nitrogen from the soil, some of which may be insect-derived nitrogen, obtained from decaying insects or insect frass. Finally, a specialized group of endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungi (EIPF) provide host plants with insect-derived nitrogen. These soil-inhabiting fungi form a remarkable symbiosis with certain plant species. They can infect a wide range of insect hosts and also form endophytic associations in which they transfer insect-derived nitrogen to the plant. Root colonizing fungi are found in disparate fungal phylogenetic lineages, indicating possible convergent evolutionary strategies between taxa, evolution potentially driven by access to carbon-containing root exudates.

  6. Insects as a Nitrogen Source for Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Bidochka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Many plants have evolved adaptations in order to survive in low nitrogen environments. One of the best-known adaptations is that of plant symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing bacteria; this is the major route by which nitrogen is incorporated into plant biomass. A portion of this plant-associated nitrogen is then lost to insects through herbivory, and insects represent a nitrogen reservoir that is generally overlooked in nitrogen cycles. In this review we show three specialized plant adaptations that allow for the recovery of insect nitrogen; that is, plants gaining nitrogen from insects. First, we show specialized adaptations by carnivorous plants in low nitrogen habitats. Insect carnivorous plants such as pitcher plants and sundews (Nepenthaceae/Sarraceniaceae and Drosera respectively are able to obtain substantial amounts of nitrogen from the insects that they capture. Secondly, numerous plants form associations with mycorrhizal fungi that can provide soluble nitrogen from the soil, some of which may be insect-derived nitrogen, obtained from decaying insects or insect frass. Finally, a specialized group of endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungi (EIPF provide host plants with insect-derived nitrogen. These soil-inhabiting fungi form a remarkable symbiosis with certain plant species. They can infect a wide range of insect hosts and also form endophytic associations in which they transfer insect-derived nitrogen to the plant. Root colonizing fungi are found in disparate fungal phylogenetic lineages, indicating possible convergent evolutionary strategies between taxa, evolution potentially driven by access to carbon-containing root exudates.

  7. Supplementary nitrogen in leeks based on crop nitrogen status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, R.; Meurs, E.J.J.

    2002-01-01

    From a number of basic relationships between several crop ecological components (Booij et al., 1996a) a system was developed for giving supplementary nitrogen application in leeks, that was based on the measurement of light interception. A description of the approach is given and a comparison is

  8. Supplementary nitrogen in leeks based on crop nitrogen status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, R.; Meurs, E.J.J.

    2002-01-01

    From a number of basic relationships between several crop ecological components (Booij et al., 1996a) a system was developed for giving supplementary nitrogen application in leeks, that was based on the measurement of light interception. A description of the approach is given and a comparison is mad

  9. High-altitude atomic nitrogen densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, E. S.; Strobel, D. F.; Mauersberger, K.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of the seasonal and diurnal variations of atomic nitrogen are compared with measurements made by the open source neutral mass spectrometer on the AE-C satellite. With the simultaneous measurements of molecular nitrogen and atomic oxygen densities as input, model calculations of odd nitrogen densities predict the same trends in atomic nitrogen as those observed. From these comparisons it is inferred that horizontal transport significantly reduces the diurnal variation of atomic nitrogen. Estimates are given of the sensitivity of atomic nitrogen densities to variations in the photoelectron flux, the neutral temperatures, and the neutral winds.

  10. Replenishment and mobilization of intracellular nitrogen pools decouples wine yeast nitrogen uptake from growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Alicia; Sancho, Marta; Beltran, Gemma; Guillamon, José Manuel; Warringer, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    Wine yeast capacity to take up nitrogen from the environment and catabolize it to support population growth, fermentation, and aroma production is critical to wine production. Under nitrogen restriction, yeast nitrogen uptake is believed to be intimately coupled to reproduction with nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) suggested mediating this link. We provide a time- and strain-resolved view of nitrogen uptake, population growth, and NCR activity in wine yeasts. Nitrogen uptake was found to be decoupled from growth due to early assimilated nitrogen being used to replenish intracellular nitrogen pools rather than being channeled directly into reproduction. Internally accumulated nitrogen was later mobilized to support substantial population expansion after external nitrogen was depleted. On good nitrogen sources, the decoupling between nitrogen uptake and growth correlated well with relaxation of NCR repression, raising the potential that the latter may be triggered by intracellular build-up of nitrogen. No link between NCR activity and nitrogen assimilation or growth on poor nitrogen sources was found. The decoupling between nitrogen uptake and growth and its influence on NCR activity is of relevance for both wine production and our general understanding of nitrogen use.

  11. Adaptive Management Tools for Nitrogen: Nitrogen Index, Nitrogen Trading Tool and Nitrogen Losses Environmental Assessment Package (NLEAP-GIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Average nitrogen (N) use efficiencies are approximately fifty percent and can be even lower for shallower rooted systems grown on irrigated sandy soils. These low N use efficiencies need to be increased if reactive N losses to the environmental are to be reduced. Recently, USDA-NRCS identified Adapt...

  12. Utilization of nitrogen fixing trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewbaker, J.L.; Beldt, R. van den; MacDicken, K.; Budowski, G.; Kass, D.C.L.; Russo, R.O.; Escalante, G.; Herrera, R.; Aranguren, J.; Arkcoll, D.B.; Doebereinger, J. (cord.)

    1983-01-01

    Six papers from the symposium are noted. Brewbaker, J.L., Beldt, R. van den, MacDicken, K. Fuelwood uses and properties of nitrogen-fixing trees, pp 193-204, (Refs. 15). Includes a list of 35 nitrogen-fixing trees of high fuelwood value. Budowski, G.; Kass, D.C.L.; Russo, R.O. Leguminous trees for shade, pp 205-222, (Refs. 68). Escalante, G., Herrera, R., Aranguren, J.; Nitrogen fixation in shade trees (Erythrina poeppigiana) in cocoa plantations in northern Venezuela, pp 223-230, (Refs. 13). Arkcoll, D.B.; Some leguminous trees providing useful fruits in the North of Brazil, pp 235-239, (Refs. 13). This paper deals with Parkia platycephala, Pentaclethra macroloba, Swartzia sp., Cassia leiandra, Hymenaea courbaril, dipteryz odorata, Inga edulis, I. macrophylla, and I. cinnamonea. Baggio, A.J.; Possibilities of the use of Gliricidia sepium in agroforestry systems in Brazil, pp 241-243; (Refs. 15). Seiffert, N.F.; Biological nitrogen and protein production of Leucaena cultivars grown to supplement the nutrition of ruminants, pp 245-249, (Refs. 14). Leucaena leucocephala cv. Peru, L. campina grande (L. leucocephala), and L. cunningham (L. leucocephalae) were promising for use as browse by beef cattle in central Brazil.

  13. Nitrogen deposition and terrestrial biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher M. Clark; Yongfei Bai; William D. Bowman; Jane M. Cowles; Mark E. Fenn; Frank S. Gilliam; Gareth K. Phoenix; Ilyas Siddique; Carly J. Stevens; Harald U. Sverdrup; Heather L. Throop

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen deposition, along with habitat losses and climate change, has been identified as a primary threat to biodiversity worldwide (Butchart et al., 2010; MEA, 2005; Sala et al., 2000). The source of this stressor to natural systems is generally twofold: burning of fossil fuels and the use of fertilizers in modern intensive agriculture. Each of these human...

  14. Nitrogen Fixation by Cyclopentadienyltitanium compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weij, Frederik Willem

    1977-01-01

    This thesis describes investigations of the mechanism of reduction of dinitrogen by systems consisting of n5-cyclopentadie-nyltitanium complexes and a reducing agent. Analysis of the reduced nitrogen- and titanium-containing products after hydrolysis of the reaction mixtures has been used to derive

  15. [Characteristics of dry matter production and nitrogen accumulation in barley genotypes with high nitrogen utilization efficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Li, Ting-Xuan; Zhang, Xi-Zhou; Ji, Lin

    2014-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted under low (125 mg x kg-1) and normal (250 mg x kg(-1)) nitrogen treatments. The nitrogen uptake and utilization efficiency of 22 barley cultivars were investigated, and the characteristics of dry matter production and nitrogen accumulation in barley were analyzed. The results showed that nitrogen uptake and utilization efficiency were different for barley under two nitrogen levels. The maximal values of grain yield, nitrogen utilization efficiency for grain and nitrogen harvest index were 2.87, 2.91 and 2.47 times as those of the lowest under the low nitrogen treatment. Grain yield and nitrogen utilization efficiency for grain and nitrogen harvest index of barley genotype with high nitrogen utilization efficiency were significantly greater than low nitrogen utilization efficiency, and the parameters of high nitrogen utilization efficiency genotype were 82.1%, 61.5% and 50.5% higher than low nitrogen utilization efficiency genotype under the low nitrogen treatment. Dry matter mass and nitrogen utilization of high nitrogen utilization efficiency was significantly higher than those of low nitrogen utilization efficiency. A peak of dry matter mass of high nitrogen utilization efficiency occurred during jointing to heading stage, while that of nitrogen accumulation appeared before jointing. Under the low nitrogen treatment, dry matter mass of DH61 and DH121+ was 34.4% and 38.3%, and nitrogen accumulation was 54. 8% and 58.0% higher than DH80, respectively. Dry matter mass and nitrogen accumulation seriously affected yield before jointing stage, and the contribution rates were 47.9% and 54.7% respectively under the low nitrogen treatment. The effect of dry matter and nitrogen accumulation on nitrogen utilization efficiency for grain was the largest during heading to mature stages, followed by sowing to jointing stages, with the contribution rate being 29.5% and 48.7%, 29.0% and 15.8%, respectively. In conclusion, barley genotype with high

  16. A capillary electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry methodology for the determination of non-protein amino acids in vegetable oils as novel markers for the detection of adulterations in olive oils.

    OpenAIRE

    Crego Navazo, Antonio Luis; Sánchez Hernández, Laura; Marina Alegre, María Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Accepted, revised and published in "Journal of Cromatography A", 2001, 1218 (30), pp. 4944-4951. DOI: 10.1016/j.chroma.2011.01.045 A new analytical methodology based on capillary electrophoresis–mass spectrometry (CE–MS2) is presented in this work, enabling the identification and determination of six non-protein amino acids (ornithine, β-alanine, GABA, alloisoleucine, citrulline and pyroglutamic acid) in vegetable oils. This methodology is based on a previous derivatization with butanol...

  17. Nitrogen: It Always Needs a Fix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    2005-02-01

    The fixation of nitrogen was a popular topic in early issues of the Journal of Chemical Education . This column, From Past Issues, briefly summarizes articles on the nonbiological methods for nitrogen fixation.

  18. Global nitrogen fertilizer supply and demand outlook

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michel; Prud'homme

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the world nitrogen fertilizer demand, high-lights trends in the global and regional developments of production capacity and provides a medium-term perspective of the global nitrogen supply/demand balance.

  19. Ordered Semiconducting Nitrogen-Graphene Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between substitutional nitrogen atoms in graphene is studied by performing first-principles calculations. The effective nearest-neighbor interaction between nitrogen dopants is found to be highly repulsive because of the strong electrostatic repulsion between nitrogen atoms. This interaction prevents the full nitrogen-carbon phase separation in nitrogen-doped graphene. Interestingly, there are two relatively stable nitrogen-nitrogen pair configurations, whose stability can be attributed to the anisotropy in the charge redistribution induced by nitrogen doping. We reveal two stable, ordered, semiconducting N-doped graphene structures, C_{3}N and C_{12}N, through the cluster-expansion technique and particle-swarm optimization method. In particular, we show that C_{12}N has a direct band gap of 0.98 eV. The heterojunctions between C_{12}N and graphene nanoribbons might be a promising basis for organic solar cells.

  20. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  1. A Bipolar Mixer for Low Frequency Receiver Using V- NPN Transistors in Deep N- well CMOS Technology%基于CMOS工艺V-NPN晶体管设计的用于接收机的双极型有源混频器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建恩; 华斯亮; 王东辉; 侯朝焕

    2010-01-01

    随着声纳通信技术的发展,需要使用CMOS工艺设计用于声纳通信接收机中的低噪声低频混频器.由于MOSFETs的闪烁噪声拐角频率通常在几MHz,在低频工作时会有非常大的闪烁噪声.这使得用MOSFETs设计的传统CMOS有源混频器,在低频低噪声系统中不能使用.本文提出了使用深N阱CMOS工艺中的垂直寄生NPN晶体管(V-NPN)设计的双极型有源混频器.该垂直寄生NPN晶体管的闪烁噪声拐角频率通常为几KHz,因此可以用来设计低噪声低频混频器.本文使用0.18μm CMOS工艺中的V-NPN晶体管设计了一个双极型有源混频器.仿真结果显示,工作电压为3.3V,LO频率为50KHz,RF频率为40KHz时,该双极型有源混频器的电压增益为18.3dB,NFdsb为15.99dB,等效输出噪声,P1dB为-9.88dBm,IIP3为-1.65dBm.

  2. Nitrogen matter changes during ripening of semihard cheese based on milk protein coaggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana Jovanović

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Cheeses made on milk protein coaggregate basis are different thantraditionally made cheeses, in technological production process and sensory characteristics, especially texture and taste. In this research it was assumed that applied milk thermal treatment, as well as curd processing, will have appropriate influence on proteins as substratum. During ripening, due to a presence of whey proteins, which influence decrease of casein content in total cheese proteins, substratum is hydrolyzed. In traditionally made cheeses, casein is the basis of protein matrix. In comparison to whey proteins, casein is substantially faster changed during ripening, while whey proteins incorporated in the curd give so called «unspecific» ripening. Besides, application of high temperatures influences decrease of plasmin activity in cheese, regardless of its significant thermal stability. During 4 months ofexperimental cheeses ripening, changes of nitrogen matter were investigated. Significant changes of milk proteins, such as increase of soluble nitrogen matter content, the primary and secondary nitrogen products of protein breakdown during cheese ripening, as well as non-protein nitrogen (12 % TCA and phospho-tungstic-soluble nitrogen (5 % PTA were observed. The average content of soluble nitrogen after production after 15, 30, 60 and 120 days of ripening were: 135.48 mg %, 358.72 mg %, 473.52 mg %, 672.32 mg % and 845.13 mg %,respectively. According to soluble nitrogen content increase, coefficient of ripening also increased and for the same ripening period was: 4.42 %, 10.14 %, 12.95 %, 18.21 % and 23.60 %, respectively. Content of primary and secondary products of protein breakdown during cheese ripening had significant rising trend from the first day of production to 120th day of ripening. At the end of investigated ripening period, content of primary products of protein decomposition was 4.90 times higher compared to the first day of ripening, while content of

  3. Compost and manure effects on sugarbeet nitrogen uptake, nitrogen recovery, and nitrogen use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    To maximize recoverable sucrose from sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.), producers must effectively manage added nitrogen (N), whether it be from urea or organic sources such as manure or composted manure. Our multi-site study’s objective was to determine the effects of a one-time application of stockpil...

  4. Nitrogenius: a nitrogen decision support system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erisman, J.W.; Hensen, A.; Vries, de W.; Kros, H.; Wal, van der T.; Winter, de W.; Wien, J.E.; Elswijk, van M.; Maat, M.; Sanders, K.

    2002-01-01

    A nitrogen decision support system in the form of a game (NitroGenius) was developed for the Second International Nitrogen Conference. The aims were to: i) improve understanding among scientists and policy makers about the complexity of nitrogen pollution problems in an area of intensive agricultura

  5. Toward a nitrogen footprint calculator for Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutton, Mary Olivia; Leach, A.M.; Leip, Adrian; Galloway, J.N.; Bekunda, M.; Sullivan, C.; Lesschen, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    We present the first nitrogen footprint model for a developing country: Tanzania. Nitrogen (N) is a crucial element for agriculture and human nutrition, but in excess it can cause serious environmental damage. The Sub-Saharan African nation of Tanzania faces a two-sided nitrogen problem: while there

  6. 21 CFR 184.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nitrogen. 184.1540 Section 184.1540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1540 Nitrogen. (a) Nitrogen (empirical formula N2, CAS Reg. No....

  7. 21 CFR 582.1540 - Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitrogen. 582.1540 Section 582.1540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS... Nitrogen. (a) Product. Nitrogen. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1755 - Nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitrogen. 154.1755 Section 154.1755 Shipping COAST GUARD... Nitrogen. Except for deck tanks and their piping systems, cargo containment systems and piping systems carrying nitrogen must be specially approved by the Commandant (CG-522)....

  9. Identification of genotypic variation for nitrogen response in potato (Solanum tuberosum) under low nitrogen input circumstances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiemens-Hulscher, M.; Lammerts Van Bueren, E.; Struik, P.C.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for crop growth. The demand for nitrogen in the potato crop is relatively high. However, in organic farming nitrogen input is rather limited, compared with conventional farming. In this research nine potato varieties were tested at three nitrogen levels. Genotypic v

  10. Nitrogen Fractions in Arable Soils in Relation to Nitrogen Mineralization and Plant Uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bregliani, M.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Hagg, E.S.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) as a major constituent of all plants is one of the most important nutrients. Minimizing input of mineral nitrogen fertilizer is needed to avoid harm to the environment. Optimal input of mineral nitrogen should take the nitrogen supply of the soil into account. Many different soil tests

  11. Can the anaerobic potentially mineralizable nitrogen test improve predictions of fertilizer nitrogen rates in the Cornbelt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correctly estimating the amount of mineralizable nitrogen (N) can enhance nitrogen use efficiency. The anaerobic potentially mineralizable nitrogen (PMNAn) test is a tool that may help improve predictions of N uptake, grain yield, and the economical optimum nitrogen rate (EONR) of corn (Zea mays L...

  12. Modeling nitrogen fluxes in Germany - where does the nitrogen go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Laura; Bach, Martin; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    According to the latest inventory of the EU Water Framework Directive, 26.3% of German groundwater bodies are in a poor chemical state regarding nitrate. Additionally, the EU initiated infringement proceedings against Germany for not meeting the quality standards of the EU Nitrate Directive. Agriculture has been determined as the main source of nitrate pollution due to over-fertilization and regionally high density of livestock farming. The nitrogen balance surplus is commonly used as an indicator characterizing the potential of nitrate leaching into groundwater bodies and thus also serves as a foundation to introduce legislative restrictions or to monitor the success of mitigation measures. Currently, there is an ongoing discussion which measures are suitable for reducing the risk of nitrate leaching and also to what extent. However, there is still uncertainty about just how much the nitrogen surplus has to be reduced to meet the groundwater quality standards nationwide. Therefore, the aims of our study were firstly to determine the level of the nitrogen surplus that would be acceptable at the utmost and secondly whether the currently discussed target value of 30 kg N per hectare agricultural land for the soil surface nitrogen balance would be sufficient. The models MONERIS (Modeling Nutrient Emissions in River System) and MoRE (Modelling of Regionalized Emissions), the latter based on the first, are commonly used for estimating nitrogen loads into the river system in Germany at the mesoscale, as well as the effect of mitigation measures in the context of the EU directive 2008/105/EC (Environmental quality standards applicable to surface water). We used MoRE to calculate nitrate concentration for 2759 analytical units in Germany. Main factors are the surplus of the soil surface nitrogen balance, the percolation rate and an exponent representing the denitrification in the vadose zone. The modeled groundwater nitrate concentrations did not correspond to the regional

  13. Mineral Composition and Antinutritional Components of Shrubs: Rangeland Species from the Upland Balochistan, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Islam

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Little of the rangeland resources of Balochistan, Pakistan have been assessed and there is little to no information on how abiotic factors such as soil type and topography influence the nutritive value of native species. Leaf nitrogen concentrations in all species showed broadly similar patterns of change with season. In all species, non-protein nitrogen (NPN accounted for more than 35-50% of total N. The effect of season on the concentration of phosphorus was highly significant. In all shrubs, there was similar response of concentration of Ca, Mg and K. There was a significant effect of season on the concentration of both total phenol and condensed tannins in all species.

  14. Effect of Nitrogen Supply on the Nitrogen Use Efficiency of an Annual Herb, Helianthus annuus L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-You YUAN; Ling-Hao LI; Jian-Hui HUANG; Xing-Guo HAN; Shi-Qiang WAN

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) is the product of nitrogen productivity (NP) and the mean residence time of nitrogen (MRT). Theory suggests that there should be a trade-off between both components,but direct experimental evidence is still scarce. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the effect of varying nitrogen supply levels on NUEand its two components (NP, MRT) in Helianthus annuus L., an annual herb.The plants investigated were subjected to six nitrogen levels (0, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 g N/m2). Total plant production increased substantially with increasing nitrogen supply. Nitrogen uptake and loss also in creased with nitrogen supply. Nitrogen influx (rin) and outflux (rout) were defined as the rates of nitrogen uptake and loss per unit aboveground nitrogen, respectively. Both rin and rout increased with increasing nitrogen supply. In addition, rin was far higher than rout. Consequently, the relative rate of nitrogen incre ment (rin- rout) also increased with nitrogen supply. There were marked differences between treatments with respect to parameters related to the stress resistance syndrome: nitrogen pool size, leaf nitrogen concentration,and net aboveground productivity increased with nitrogen supply. Plants at high nitrogen levels showed a higher NP (the growth rate per unit aboveground nitrogen) and a shorter MRT (the inverse of rout), whereas plants at low nitrogen levels displayed the reverse pattern. Shorter MRT for plants at high nitrogen levels was caused by the abscission of leaves that contained relatively large fractions of total plant nitrogen. We found a negative relationship between NP and MRT, the components of NUE, along the gradient of nitrogen availability, suggesting that there was a trade-off between NP and MRT. The NUE increased with increasing nitrogen availability, up to a certain level, and then decreased. These results offer support for the hypoth esis that adaptation to infertile habitats involves a low nitrogen loss (long MRT in the

  15. Identification of genotypic variation for nitrogen response in potato (Solanum tuberosum) under low nitrogen input circumstances

    OpenAIRE

    Tiemens-Hulscher, M.; Lammerts Van Bueren, E.; Struik, P.C.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for crop growth. The demand for nitrogen in the potato crop is relatively high. However, in organic farming nitrogen input is rather limited, compared with conventional farming. In this research nine potato varieties were tested at three nitrogen levels. Genotypic variation for yield, leaf area index, period of maximum soil cover, sensitivity for N-shortage and nitrogen efficiency under low input circumstances was found. However, in these experiments varietie...

  16. NITROGEN REMOVAL FROM NATURAL GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.A. Lokhandwala; M.B. Ringer; T.T. Su; Z. He; I. Pinnau; J.G. Wijmans; A. Morisato; K. Amo; A. DaCosta; R.W. Baker; R. Olsen; H. Hassani; T. Rathkamp

    1999-12-31

    The objective of this project was to develop a membrane process for the denitrogenation of natural gas. Large proven reserves in the Lower-48 states cannot be produced because of the presence of nitrogen. To exploit these reserves, cost-effective, simple technology able to reduce the nitrogen content of the gas to 4-5% is required. Technology applicable to treatment of small gas streams (below 10 MMscfd) is particularly needed. In this project membranes that selectively permeate methane and reject nitrogen in the gas were developed. Preliminary calculations show that a membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 3 to 5 is required to make the process economically viable. A number of polymer materials likely to have the required selectivities were evaluated as composite membranes. Polyacetylenes such as poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) [PTMSP] and poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP] had high selectivities and fluxes, but membranes prepared from these polymers were not stable, showing decreasing flux and selectivity during tests lasting only a few hours. Parel, a poly(propylene oxide allyl glycidyl ether) had a selectivity of 3 at ambient temperatures and 4 or more at temperatures of {minus}20 C. However, Parel is no longer commercially available, and we were unable to find an equivalent material in the time available. Therefore, most of our experimental work focused on silicone rubber membranes, which have a selectivity of 2.5 at ambient temperatures, increasing to 3-4 at low temperatures. Silicone rubber composite membranes were evaluated in bench-scale module tests and with commercial-scale, 4-inch-diameter modules in a small pilot plant. Over six days of continuous operation at a feed gas temperature of {minus}5 to {minus}10 C, the membrane maintained a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 3.3. Based on the pilot plant performance data, an analysis of the economic potential of the process was prepared. We conclude that a stand-alone membrane process is the lowest

  17. Gross Nitrogen Mineralization in Surface Sediments of the Yangtze Estuary

    OpenAIRE

    Xianbiao Lin; Lijun Hou; Min Liu; Xiaofei Li; Guoyu Yin; Yanling Zheng; Fengyu Deng

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen mineralization is a key biogeochemical process transforming organic nitrogen to inorganic nitrogen in estuarine and coastal sediments. Although sedimentary nitrogen mineralization is an important internal driver for aquatic eutrophication, few studies have investigated sedimentary nitrogen mineralization in these environments. Sediment-slurry incubation experiments combined with 15N isotope dilution technique were conducted to quantify the potential rates of nitrogen mineralization i...

  18. Seasonal Cycle Analysis of the Nitrate Nitrogen and Nitrite Nitrogen in the Bohai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Qiang; Chen Jianglin; Li Chongde

    2002-01-01

    During 1985~1987, the concentration of nitrate nitrogen was higher in the Laizhou Bay and the Bohai Bay while that of nitrite nitrogen was higher in the Liaodong Bay and the Bohai Bay. The concentration of nitrate nitrogen was highest in winter and lowest in summer while that of nitrite nitrogen was highest in autumn and lowest in spring. The seasonal variation of the concentration of nitrate nitrogen was maximum in the Laizhou Bay and the Bohai Bay while that of the concentration of nitrite nitrogen was maximum in the Liaodong Bay. There was a great difference in the concentration of nitrate nitrogen between the surface and the bottom in autumn and in the concentration of nitrite nitrogen between the surface and the bottom in summer. The main reason for the seasonal variations of the concentration of nitrate nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen was the marine biochemical process. The nitrate nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen in the Bohai Sea basically maintained a quasi-equilibrium state seasonal cycle. The quasi-equilibrium state seasonal cycle of nitrate nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen at the bottom was stable while that at the surface was liable to variations caused by other factors.

  19. Nitrogen and Carbon Dynamics Across Trophic Levels Along an Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissinger, B. D.; Bell, M. D.; Newingham, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition has altered soil biogeochemical processes and plant communities across the United States. Prior investigations have demonstrated these alterations; however, little is known about the effects of elevated nitrogen on higher trophic levels. Building upon previous research that revealed an atmospheric nitrogen deposition gradient from the San Bernardino Mountains through Joshua Tree National Park in California, we investigated atmospheric nitrogen and its effects on soils, plants, and harvester ants. We measured nitrogen and carbon concentrations, along with carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes, across trophic levels at eighteen urban and unpopulated sites along the deposition gradient. Carbon and nitrogen attributes were determined in atmospheric nitric acid, soil, Larrea tridentata and Ambrosia dumosa leaves, seeds from selected plant species, and ants. We predicted carbon and nitrogen ratios and isotopes to change in areas with higher nitrogen deposition and vary along the deposition gradient. Nitrogen (p=0.02) and carbon (p=0.05) concentrations, as well as C:N ratios (p=<0.001), significantly differed in Messor pergandei individuals among sites; however, no correlation was found between these carbon and nitrogen attributes and the nitrogen deposition gradient (%N r2=0.02, %C r2=0.007, C:N r2=0.02). The δ15N and δ13C values of the ants, leaf tissues, and seeds measured across the gradient follow similar patterns with r2 values all below 0.20. Our results suggest the current and previous rates of nitrogen deposition in this area are not enough to modify nitrogen and carbon concentrations and isotope values. Compensatory nitrogen cycling processes in the soil may reduce the effects of increased nitrogen on plants and thus higher trophic levels. Nitrogen and carbon dynamics across trophic levels might change after longer ecosystem exposure to elevated nitrogen; however, other abiotic and biotic factors are likely driving current

  20. Nitrogen Flow Analysis in Huizhou, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhaoyin; Yin, Zegao; Koenig, Albert

    2008-03-01

    Eutrophication due to uncontrolled discharges of nitrogen and phosphorus has become a serious pollution problem in many Chinese rivers. This article analyzes the nitrogen flow in Huizhou City in the East River watershed in south China. The material accounting method was applied to investigate the nitrogen flows related to human activities, which consist of the natural and anthropogenic systems. In Huizhou City, the nonpoint source pollution was quantified by the export coefficient method and the domestic discharge was estimated as the product of per capita nitrogen contribution and population. This research was conducted based on statistical information and field data from 1998 in the Huizhou City. The results indicated that the major nitrogen flows in this area were river loads, fertilizer and feedstuff imports, atmospheric deposition, animal manure volatilization, and processes related to burning and other emissions. In 1998, about 40% of the nitrogen was retained in the system and could result in potential environmental problems. Nitrogen export was mainly by rivers, which account for about 57% of the total nitrogen exported. Comparisons made between the East River and the Danube and Yangtze Rivers show that the unit area nitrogen export was of the same magnitude and the per capita nitrogen export was comparable.

  1. Changes in Nitrogen Status of Soybean Under Influence of Symbiotically Fixed and Bound Nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    GADIMOV, A.G.; SAFARALIEV, P.M.

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of different nitrogen sources (nitrate 15 N-NO 3 and symbiotic N-N 2 ) to the nitrogen status of soybean in ontogenesis was studied. Nitrate was assimilated effectively during the vegetative growth, whereas later on the nitrogen-fixation by root nodules became the basic source of nitrogen. The applying of a low dose of nitrate (22.2 mg N/plant) increased the total nitrogen content in the plant and did not depress the nitrogen fixation. Distribution of the symbiotic and nitrat...

  2. Proteins in Soy Might Have a Higher Role in Cancer Prevention than Previously Expected: Soybean Protein Fractions Are More Effective MMP-9 Inhibitors Than Non-Protein Fractions, Even in Cooked Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lima

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The search for anticancer MMP-9 inhibitors (MMPIs in food products has become a major goal for research. MMPIs in soy have been related only to saponins and isoflavones, but recently, low specific protein fractions in soybeans were shown to reduce MMP-9 activity as well. The present work aimed at comparing the MMPI potential of protein fractions (P and non-protein fractions (NP isolated from soybean seeds, before and after soaking and cooking, mimicking dietary exposures. Reverse and substrate zymography, as well as a fluoregenic DQ gelatin assay were used to evaluate MMP-9 activities. Colon cancer cell migration and proliferation was also tested in HT29 cells. Regarding MMP-9 inhibition, proteins in soy presented IC50 values 100 times lower than non-protein extracts, and remained active after cooking, suggesting that proteins may be more effective MMP-9 inhibitors than non-protein compounds. Using the determined IC50 concentrations, NP fractions were able to induce higher inhibitions of HT29 cell migration and proliferation, but not through MMP-9 inhibition, whilst protein fractions were shown to specifically inhibit MMP-9 activity. Overall, our results show that protein fractions in soybeans might have a higher role in soy-related cancer prevention as MMPIs than previously expected. Being nontoxic and active at lower concentrations, the discovery of these heat-resistant specific MMPI proteins in soy can be of significant importance for cancer preventive diets, particularly considering the increasing use of soy proteins in food products and the controversy around isoflavones amongst consumers.

  3. Proteins in Soy Might Have a Higher Role in Cancer Prevention than Previously Expected: Soybean Protein Fractions Are More Effective MMP-9 Inhibitors Than Non-Protein Fractions, Even in Cooked Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Ana; Oliveira, Jennifer; Saúde, Filipe; Mota, Joana; Ferreira, Ricardo Boavida

    2017-02-27

    The search for anticancer MMP-9 inhibitors (MMPIs) in food products has become a major goal for research. MMPIs in soy have been related only to saponins and isoflavones, but recently, low specific protein fractions in soybeans were shown to reduce MMP-9 activity as well. The present work aimed at comparing the MMPI potential of protein fractions (P) and non-protein fractions (NP) isolated from soybean seeds, before and after soaking and cooking, mimicking dietary exposures. Reverse and substrate zymography, as well as a fluoregenic DQ gelatin assay were used to evaluate MMP-9 activities. Colon cancer cell migration and proliferation was also tested in HT29 cells. Regarding MMP-9 inhibition, proteins in soy presented IC50 values 100 times lower than non-protein extracts, and remained active after cooking, suggesting that proteins may be more effective MMP-9 inhibitors than non-protein compounds. Using the determined IC50 concentrations, NP fractions were able to induce higher inhibitions of HT29 cell migration and proliferation, but not through MMP-9 inhibition, whilst protein fractions were shown to specifically inhibit MMP-9 activity. Overall, our results show that protein fractions in soybeans might have a higher role in soy-related cancer prevention as MMPIs than previously expected. Being nontoxic and active at lower concentrations, the discovery of these heat-resistant specific MMPI proteins in soy can be of significant importance for cancer preventive diets, particularly considering the increasing use of soy proteins in food products and the controversy around isoflavones amongst consumers.

  4. Can mushrooms fix atmospheric nitrogen?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H S Jayasinghearachchi; Gamini Seneviratne

    2004-09-01

    It is generally reported that fungi like Pleurotus spp. can fix nitrogen (N2). The way they do it is still not clear. The present study hypothesized that only associations of fungi and diazotrophs can fix N2. This was tested in vitro. Pleurotus ostreatus was inoculated with a bradyrhizobial strain nodulating soybean and P. ostreatus with no inoculation was maintained as a control. At maximum mycelial colonization by the bradyrhizobial strain and biofilm formation, the cultures were subjected to acetylene reduction assay (ARA). Another set of the cultures was evaluated for growth and nitrogen accumulation. Nitrogenase activity was present in the biofilm, but not when the fungus or the bradyrhizobial strain was alone. A significant reduction in mycelial dry weight and a significant increase in nitrogen concentration were observed in the inoculated cultures compared to the controls. The mycelial weight reduction could be attributed to C transfer from the fungus to the bradyrhizobial strain, because of high C cost of biological N2 fixation. This needs further investigations using 14C isotopic tracers. It is clear from the present study that mushrooms alone cannot fix atmospheric N2. But when they are in association with diazotrophs, nitrogenase activity is detected because of the diazotrophic N2 fixation. It is not the fungus that fixes N2 as reported earlier. Effective N2 fixing systems, such as the present one, may be used to increase protein content of mushrooms. Our study has implications for future identification of as yet unidentified N2 systems occurring in the environment.

  5. Forest fuel reduces the nitrogen load - calculations of nitrogen flows; Skogsbraensle minskar kvaevebelastningen - Beraekningar av kvaevefloeden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burstroem, F.; Johansson, Jan

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen deposition in Sweden has increased strongly during recent decades, particularly in southern Sweden. Nitrogen appears to be largely accumulated in biomass and in the soil. It is therefore desirable to check the accumulation of nitrogen in the forest. The most suitable way of doing this is to remove more nitrogen-rich biomass from the forest, i.e., increase the removal of felling residues from final fellings and cleanings. An ecological condition for intensive removal of fuel is that the ashes are returned. The critical load for nitrogen, CL(N), indicates the level of nitrogen deposition that the forest can withstand without leading to ecological changes. Today, nitrogen deposition is higher than the CL(N) in almost all of Sweden. CL(N) is calculated in such a manner that nitrogen deposition should largely be balanced by nitrogen losses through harvesting during a forest rotation. The value of CL(N) thus largely depends on how much nitrogen is removed with the harvested biomass. When both stems and felling residues are harvested, the CL(N) is about three times higher than in conventional forestry. The increase is directly related to the amount of nitrogen in the removed biofuel. Use of biofuel also causes a certain amount of nitrogen emissions. From the environmental viewpoint there is no difference between the sources of the nitrogen compounds. An analysis of the entire fuel chain shows that, compared with the amount of nitrogen removed from the forest with the fuel, about 5 % will be emitted as nitrogen oxides or ammonia during combustion, and a further ca 5 % during handling and transports. A net amount of about 90 % of biomass nitrogen is removed from the system and becomes inert nitrogen (N{sub 2}). 60 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs, 11 appendices

  6. Apple wine processing with different nitrogen contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Alberti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the nitrogen content in different varieties of apple musts and to study the effect of different nitrogen concentrations in apple wine fermentation. The average total nitrogen content in 51 different apples juices was 155.81 mg/L, with 86.28 % of the values above 100 mg/L. The apple must with 59.0, 122.0 and 163.0 mg/L of total nitrogen content showed the maximum population of 2.05x 10(7; 4.42 x 10(7 and 8.66 x 10(7 cell/mL, respectively. Therefore, the maximum fermentation rates were dependent on the initial nitrogen level, corresponding to 1.4, 5.1 and 9.2 g/L.day, respectively. The nitrogen content in the apple musts was an important factor of growth and fermentation velocity.

  7. Nitrogen loss during solar drying of biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, S A; Song, I; Artiola, J F; Choi, C Y

    2008-01-01

    Solar drying has been used extensively to dewater biosolids for ease of transportation and to a lesser degree to reduce pathogens prior to land application. The nitrogen in biosolids makes them a relatively inexpensive but valuable source of fertilizer. In this study, nitrogen loss from tilled and untilled biosolids was investigated during the solar drying process. Samples of aerobically and anaerobically digested biosolids during three solar drying experiments were analyzed for their nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) ions concentrations. Nitrogen losses varied depending on the solar drying season and tillage. Although not directly measured, the majority of nitrogen loss occurred through ammonia volatilization; organic nitrogen content (organic N) remained relatively stable for each sample, nitrate concentrations for the majority of samples remained below detectable levels and the decline of ammonium-nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) generally followed the trend of moisture loss in the biosolids.

  8. Determination of nitrogen balance in agroecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Upendra M Sainju

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen balance in agroecosystems provides a quantitative framework of N inputs and outputs and retention in the soil that examines the sustainability of agricultural productivity and soil and environmental quality. Nitrogen inputs include N additions from manures and fertilizers, atmospheric depositions including wet and dry depositions, irrigation water, and biological N fixation. Nitrogen outputs include N removal in crop grain and biomass and N losses through leaching, denitrification, v...

  9. Liquid nitrogen ingestion followed by gastric perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrizbeitia, Luis D; Calello, Diane P; Dhir, Nisha; O'Reilly, Colin; Marcus, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Ingestion of liquid nitrogen is rare but carries catastrophic complications related to barotrauma to the gastrointestinal tract. We describe a case of ingestion of liquid nitrogen followed by gastric perforation and respiratory insufficiency and discuss the mechanism of injury and management of this condition. Liquid nitrogen is widely available and is frequently used in classroom settings, in gastronomy, and for recreational purposes. Given the potentially lethal complications of ingestion, regulation of its use, acquisition, and storage may be appropriate.

  10. Nitrogen in Ancient Mud: A Biosignature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüeken, Eva E.

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for all life on Earth and possibly elsewhere. Burial of nitrogen bound to organic matter constitutes the major flux of nitrogen into sediments today, which has led to the inference that nitrogen enrichments in sedimentary rocks may be a biosignature. However, abiotic processes such as lightning or volcanism can fix atmospheric N2 and contribute to sedimentary nitrogen burial in the absence of life. It is therefore uncertain whether observed nitrogen enrichments of up to 430 ppm in Paleoarchean metasedimentary biotite grains are indeed biogenic. This study seeks to address that problem with a numerical model. The NH4+ concentration of an abiotic ocean is modeled as a function of source fluxes, pH-dependent NH3 volatilization, and equilibrated adsorption of NH4+ onto clay particles. The results suggest that the observed nitrogen concentrations in Paleoarchean biotite can only be reconciled with purely abiotic processes if the ocean was more acidic (pH origin. While this does not necessitate a particular metabolism such as biological N2 fixation, the data provide evidence of nitrogen utilization back to 3.8 Gyr. Nitrogen abundances could thus provide useful information in extraterrestrial missions.

  11. Substantial nitrogen pollution embedded in international trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oita, Azusa; Malik, Arunima; Kanemoto, Keiichiro; Geschke, Arne; Nishijima, Shota; Lenzen, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen to the atmosphere and water bodies can damage human health and ecosystems. As a measure of a nation’s contribution to this potential damage, a country’s nitrogen footprint has been defined as the quantity of reactive nitrogen emitted during the production, consumption and transportation of commodities consumed within that country, whether those commodities are produced domestically or internationally. Here we use global emissions databases, a global nitrogen cycle model, and a global input-output database of domestic and international trade to calculate the nitrogen footprints for 188 countries as the sum of emissions of ammonia, nitrogen oxides and nitrous oxide to the atmosphere, and of nitrogen potentially exportable to water bodies. Per-capita footprints range from under 7 kg N yr-1 in some developing countries to over 100 kg N yr-1 in some wealthy nations. Consumption in China, India, the United States and Brazil is responsible for 46% of global emissions. Roughly a quarter of the global nitrogen footprint is from commodities that were traded across country borders. The main net exporters have significant agricultural, food and textile exports, and are often developing countries, whereas important net importers are almost exclusively developed economies. We conclude that substantial local nitrogen pollution is driven by demand from consumers in other countries.

  12. Research on the Iron-Nitrogen System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-01-01

    Boundaries in the Iron-Nitrogen System 71 X Solubility of Nitrogen in Alpha Iron at One Atmosphere Pressure 74 XI The Composition of the Alpha and...compound Fe2 He reported that the maximum I , -. ,* solubility of nitrogen in alpha iron was about 0.02 percent, since no evidence of nitride needles...and Fe8N. The alpha iron at this temperature contained a maximum of 0.108 percent nitrogen. Sawyer also observed a second arrest point at 7000 C

  13. Harvesting of organic nitrogen from intercropped Leucaena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palled, Y.B.; Hosmani, M.M.; Patil, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Maize was sown on 6 June 1981 and interplanted with Leucaena leucocephala variety K8 at 45 days in the ratios of 1:1 - 1:5 rows. After harvesting the maize, the Leucaena was cut and total DM production and nitrogen uptake were calculated. Both DM production and nitrogen uptake were greatest when maize was intercropped with Leucaena at 1:5 rows. This nitrogen uptake (85.56 kg/ha) can meet 60-100% of the nitrogen requirements of some crops. 1 reference.

  14. Nitrogen camera: detection of antipersonnel mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trower, W. Peter; Saunders, Anna W.; Shvedunov, Vasiliy I.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a nuclear technique, the nitrogen camera, with which we have produced images of elemental nitrogen in concentrations and with surface densities typical of buried plastic anti-personnel mines. We have, under laboratory conditions, obtained images of nitrogen in amounts substantially less than in these small 200 g mines. We report our progress in creating the enabling technology to make the nitrogen camera a field deployable instrument: a mobile 70 MeV electron racetrack microtron and scintillator/semiconductor materials and the detectors based on them.

  15. Nitrogen on Mars: Insights from Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J. C.; Sutter, B.; Jackson, W. A.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; McKay, Chrisopher P.; Ming, W.; Archer, P. Douglas; Glavin, D. P.; Fairen, A. G.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent detection of nitrate on Mars indicates that nitrogen fixation processes occurred in early martian history. Data collected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Curiosity Rover can be integrated with Mars analog work in order to better understand the fixation and mobility of nitrogen on Mars, and thus its availability to putative biology. In particular, the relationship between nitrate and other soluble salts may help reveal the timing of nitrogen fixation and post-depositional behavior of nitrate on Mars. In addition, in situ measurements of nitrogen abundance and isotopic composition may be used to model atmospheric conditions on early Mars.

  16. The social costs of nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Bonnie L.; Gourevitch, Jesse D.; Polasky, Stephen; Isbell, Forest; Tessum, Chris W.; Hill, Jason D.; Marshall, Julian D.

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing recognition of the negative externalities associated with reactive nitrogen (N), the damage costs of N to air, water, and climate remain largely unquantified. We propose a comprehensive approach for estimating the social cost of nitrogen (SCN), defined as the present value of the monetary damages caused by an incremental increase in N. This framework advances N accounting by considering how each form of N causes damages at specific locations as it cascades through the environment. We apply the approach to an empirical example that estimates the SCN for N applied as fertilizer. We track impacts of N through its transformation into atmospheric and aquatic pools and estimate the distribution of associated costs to affected populations. Our results confirm that there is no uniform SCN. Instead, changes in N management will result in different N-related costs depending on where N moves and the location, vulnerability, and preferences of populations affected by N. For example, we found that the SCN per kilogram of N fertilizer applied in Minnesota ranges over several orders of magnitude, from less than $0.001/kg N to greater than $10/kg N, illustrating the importance of considering the site, the form of N, and end points of interest rather than assuming a uniform cost for damages. Our approach for estimating the SCN demonstrates the potential of integrated biophysical and economic models to illuminate the costs and benefits of N and inform more strategic and efficient N management. PMID:27713926

  17. Modification of the Kjeldahl noncasein nitrogen method to include bovine milk concentrates and milks from other species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Karen L; Barbano, David M

    2015-11-01

    The objective of our research was to modify the current indirect casein method for bovine milk to enable it to be applied to bovine milk, bovine milk concentrates, and milks of other species that contain a protein concentration up to 9% (wt/wt). Our work used a series of bovine milk concentrates from about 3 to 9% protein with the same casein as a percentage of true protein to determine the amount of buffer required and pH of the noncasein nitrogen (NCN) filtrate to achieve consistent estimates of casein and casein as percent of true protein. As the concentration of protein in milk increased (either in bovine milk concentrates or in milks of other species), the amount of buffer needed for the NCN sample preparation method to achieve a filtrate pH of 4.6 increased. In the first part of the study using a series of bovine milk concentrates, it was demonstrated that the method gave more consistent predictions of casein as a percentage of true protein when the final NCN filtrate pH was between 4.5 and 4.6 at 38°C. When the amount of buffer added to the sample was not sufficient (i.e., the filtrate pH was too high), the filtrates were not clear. A polynomial equation was developed for prediction of the amount of acetic acid or sodium acetate buffer required to achieve pH 4.5 to 4.6 for milk protein concentrations from 3 to 9% protein using bovine milk and milk concentrates. When the equation developed using cow milk was applied to goat, sheep, and water buffalo milks, it correctly predicted the volume of reagents needed to achieve a final NCN filtrate pH of 4.6 at 38°C. We also verified as part of this work that the ability to measure NPN content of milk was not influenced by protein content of milk in the range from 3 to 9% protein. The results of this study will be used as the basis for proposed changes in the official methods for measurement of the casein content of milk to expand the scope of the method so it can be used to achieve accurate results for milk

  18. Competition and facilitation between unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria and non-nitrogen-fixing phytoplankton species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agawin, N.S.; Rabouille, S.; Veldhuis, M.; Servatius, L.; Hol, S.; van Overzee, H.M.J.; Huisman, J.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Recent discoveries show that small unicellular nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria are more widespread than previously thought and can make major contributions to the nitrogen budget of the oceans. We combined theory and experiments to investigate competition for nitrogen and light between these

  19. Nitrogen and energy metabolism of sows during several reproductive cycles in relation to nitrogen intake.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, H.

    1994-01-01

    By feeding the same diet during pregnancy and lactation sows are fed above the nitrogen requirement during pregnancy due to the relatively high nitrogen requirement during lactation. For feeding closer to the requirements at least two diets are needed: one diet with a low nitrogen content during pre

  20. Nitrogen concentrations in mosses indicate the spatial distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmens, H., E-mail: hh@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Norris, D.A., E-mail: danor@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Cooper, D.M., E-mail: cooper@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Mills, G., E-mail: gmi@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Steinnes, E., E-mail: Eiliv.Steinnes@chem.ntnu.no [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Kubin, E., E-mail: Eero.Kubin@metla.fi [Finnish Forest Research Institute, Kirkkosaarentie 7, 91500 Muhos (Finland); Thoeni, L., E-mail: lotti.thoeni@fub-ag.ch [FUB-Research Group for Environmental Monitoring, Alte Jonastrasse 83, 8640 Rapperswil (Switzerland); Aboal, J.R., E-mail: jesusramon.aboal@usc.es [University of Santiago de Compostela, Faculty of Biology, Department of Ecology, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alber, R., E-mail: Renate.Alber@provinz.bz.it [Environmental Agency of Bolzano, 39055 Laives (Italy); Carballeira, A., E-mail: alejo.carballeira@usc.es [University of Santiago de Compostela, Faculty of Biology, Department of Ecology, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Coskun, M., E-mail: coskunafm@yahoo.com [Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biology, 17100 Canakkale (Turkey); De Temmerman, L., E-mail: ludet@var.fgov.be [Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Centre, Tervuren (Belgium); Frolova, M., E-mail: marina.frolova@lvgma.gov.lv [Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Agency, Riga (Latvia); Gonzalez-Miqueo, L., E-mail: lgonzale2@alumni.unav.es [Univ. of Navarra, Irunlarrea No 1, 31008 Pamplona (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In 2005/6, nearly 3000 moss samples from (semi-)natural location across 16 European countries were collected for nitrogen analysis. The lowest total nitrogen concentrations in mosses (<0.8%) were observed in northern Finland and northern UK. The highest concentrations ({>=}1.6%) were found in parts of Belgium, France, Germany, Slovakia, Slovenia and Bulgaria. The asymptotic relationship between the nitrogen concentrations in mosses and EMEP modelled nitrogen deposition (averaged per 50 km x 50 km grid) across Europe showed less scatter when there were at least five moss sampling sites per grid. Factors potentially contributing to the scatter are discussed. In Switzerland, a strong (r{sup 2} = 0.91) linear relationship was found between the total nitrogen concentration in mosses and measured site-specific bulk nitrogen deposition rates. The total nitrogen concentrations in mosses complement deposition measurements, helping to identify areas in Europe at risk from high nitrogen deposition at a high spatial resolution. - Highlights: > Nitrogen concentrations in mosses were determined at ca. 3000 sites across Europe. > Moss concentrations were compared with EMEP modelled nitrogen deposition. > The asymptotic relationship for Europe showed saturation at ca. 15 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}. > Linear relationships were found with measured nitrogen deposition in some countries. > Moss concentrations complement deposition measurements at high spatial resolution. - Mosses as biomonitors of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Europe.

  1. Effect of nitrogen supply on leaf growth, leaf nitrogen economy and photosynthetic capacity in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.; Putten, van der P.E.L.

    1998-01-01

    Literature reports show little effect of nitrogen supply on radiation use efficiency in potato and in other dicotyledonous C3 species. This paper tests the hypothesis that potato reduces leaf size rather than leaf nitrogen concentration and photosynthetic capacity when nitrogen is in short supply. F

  2. Nitrogen and energy metabolism of sows during several reproductive cycles in relation to nitrogen intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, H.

    1994-01-01

    By feeding the same diet during pregnancy and lactation sows are fed above the nitrogen requirement during pregnancy due to the relatively high nitrogen requirement during lactation. For feeding closer to the requirements at least two diets are needed: one diet with a low nitrogen content

  3. Nitrogen speciation in mantle and crustal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Keppler, Hans

    2014-03-01

    Seventy-nine experiments have been carried out at 600-1400 °C, 2-35 kbar, and oxygen fugacities ranging from the Fe-FeO to the Re-ReO2 buffer to investigate the nitrogen speciation in mantle and crustal N-H-O fluids. Laser Raman analyses of fluid inclusions trapped in situ in quartz and olivine crystals show that N2 and/or NH3 are the only detectable nitrogen species in the fluids at the conditions of the present study. The results further show that in the fluids of the oxidized shallow upper mantle, nitrogen is mostly present as N2, while in the deep reduced upper mantle, NH3 is the dominant nitrogen species. Nitrogen speciation in subduction zone fluids is also calculated from the experimental data to constrain the efficiency of nitrogen recycling. The data show that a hot, oxidized slab is an efficient barrier for deep nitrogen subduction, while a cold, reduced slab would favor recycling nitrogen into the deep mantle. The nitrogen species in magmatic fluids of mid-ocean ridge basalt and arc magmas are predominantly N2, but a significant fraction of nitrogen can be NH3 at certain conditions. The nitrogen species in fluids released from the solidifying magma ocean and the reduced young mantle may have been mostly NH3. The release of such fluids may have created a reduced atmosphere on the every early Earth, with an elevated concentration of NH3. This may not only resolve the faint young Sun paradox but may also have created favorable conditions for the formation of biomolecules through Miller-Urey type reactions.

  4. Effects of nitrogen fertilizer on nitrogen use efficiency and yield of rice under different soil conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Quanbao; ZHANG Hongcheng; WEI Haiyan; ZHANG Ying; WANG Benfu; XIA Ke; HUO Zhongyang; DAI Qigen; XU Ke

    2007-01-01

    Four rice cultivars were used to study the effects of nitrogen fertilizer on nitrogen use efficiency,yield and characteristics of nitrogen uptake under two soil conditions (sandy and clay soil)in soil culture pool.The results were as follows.First,yield of rice in sandy and clay soil was increased by nitrogen application,and that in clay soil was higher than that in sandy soil,but the effect of nitrogen on yield increment was greater in sandy soil than in clay soil.Second,nitrogen utilization of rice was different under different soil conditions.Nitrogen harvest index(NHI)and physiological Nitrogen use efficiency(PNUE)were higher in sandy soil than in clay soil.Apparent Nitrogen recovery efficiency (ANRE),partial factor productivity for applied Nitrogen (PFP),and soil Nitrogen dependent rate(SNDR)were higher in clay soil than in sandy soil.Agronomic Nitrogen use efficiency(ANUE)was varied in different cultivars under different soil conditions.Third,N harvest index,agronomic N use efficiency,physiological N use efficiency,partial factor productivity for applied N,and soil N dependent rate were decreased significantly with the increment of the amount of nitrogen applied under two soil conditions.In sandy soil,ANRE was increased with the increasing nitrogen application and reached the highest value at high nitrogen level.However,in clay soil,ANRE was increased with the increasing of nitrogen application at first,and reached the highest value at medium nitrogen level,then decreased dramatically at high nitrogen level.Fourth,N uptake rate for rice straw and for rice grain and total N uptake rate for rice were higher in sandy clay soil than in sandy soil,but the difference between them was relatively small.Fifth,under different soil conditions,there were significant genotypic differences in the effects of applying nitrogen fertilizer on nitrogen use efficiency,yield,and characteristics of nitrogen uptake.

  5. Nitrogen use efficiency in intensive grassland farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenen, P.J.A.G.

    1994-01-01


    This thesis describes the effects of fertilizer nitrogen on herbage yield under rotational and continuous grazing of perennial ryegrass swards with beef cattle and dairy cows, and under cutting only on both a sand and a silty loam soil. Furthermore effects are described of nitrogen input

  6. Histiocytosis X: treatment with topical nitrogen mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, B; Chang, D L; Shupack, J L

    1980-07-01

    The case histories of two elderly patients with cutaneous histiocytosis X treated topically with nitrogen mustard are presented. The cutaneous lesions cleared within 2 to 3 weeks, and remission was maintained with daily topical administration of nitrogen mustard. The clinical impression of improvement was substantiated by light and electron microscopic studies prior to and after therapy.

  7. Economic Costs of Nitrogen Management in Agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oenema, O.; Gyldenkaerne, S.; Oenema, J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) management is one of the measures of Annex IX of the revised Gothenburg Protocol and described in detail in the Guidance Document (Bittman et al., Options for ammonia mitigation: guidance from the UNECE task force on reactive nitrogen. Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Edinburgh,

  8. The Oxides of Nitrogen in Air Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Air Resources Board, Sacramento.

    Research on the health effects of oxides of nitrogen and on the role of oxides of nitrogen in producing photochemical smog effects is presented in this report. Prepared by the California State Department of Public Health at the request of the State Legislature, it gives a comprehensive review of available information, as well as the need for air…

  9. Crystalline amino acids and nitrogen emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, M.W.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    2003-01-01

    Reductions in dietary protein level and supplementation with certain crystalline amino acids is a well-established method of formulating diets to achieve a more ideal amino acid pattern and to reduce nitrogen excretion. Up to 35% reduction in nitrogen excretion may be achieved by supplementing pig

  10. Economics of low nitrogen feeding strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuuren, van A.M.; Pineiro, C.; Hoek, Van der K.W.; Oenema, O.

    2015-01-01

    Livestock retains typically between 10 and 40 % of the protein-nitrogen in the animal feed in milk, egg and/or meat, depending also on animal productivity and management. The remaining 60–90 % of the nitrogen (N) is excreted in urine and faeces, and contributes to the emissions of ammonia (NH3) and

  11. Electro-catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLarnon, C.R.

    1989-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides have been linked to a broad range of air pollution problems including acid rain and the atmospheric production of photochemical ozone. Over twenty million tons of nitrogen oxides are emitted into the atmosphere each year as a result of the high temperature combustion of fossil fuels. Efforts to control nitrogen oxides emissions have lagged because of the generally low discharge concentrations of nitrogen oxides in combustion exhaust and because nitrogen oxides are more difficult to remove due to their lower reactivity. No catalyst has yet been found that will achieve significant reduction of nitrogen oxides in an oxidizing environment. Oxygen in the exhaust stream competes with nitrogen oxides for the active catalyst sites. Also, the dissociated oxygen atoms produced by decomposition of nitrogen oxides deactivate the surface of the catalyst. Externally applied electric fields have been used to control oxygen adsorption on metal and semi-conductor surfaces. In this investigation, a stream containing nitric oxide has been subjected to intense electric fields in the presence of catalyst materials including steel, stainless steel, and gold plated stainless steel wools and glass wool. The electric fields have been generated using DC, AC and rectified AC potentials in the range of 0--20 KV. The effect of parameters such as inlet nitric oxide concentration, oxygen and water content, gas residence time and temperature have also been studied.

  12. Cycling of grain legume residue nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes is the main input of nitrogen in ecological agriculture. The cycling of N-15-labelled mature pea (Pisum sativum L.) residues was studied during three years in small field plots and lysimeters. The residual organic labelled N declined rapidly during the initial...... management methods in order to conserve grain legume residue N sources within the soil-plant system....

  13. Production of nitrogen containing chemicals from cyanophycin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Könst, P.M.

    2011-01-01


    Currently nitrogen containing bulk chemicals are produced from naphtha. However, as explained in Chapter 1 it would be more energy efficient, less capital intensive and eventually more economical to start from functionalized compounds that already have nitrogen incorporated, such as amino aci

  14. Cascading costs: An economic nitrogen cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William R. Moomaw; Melissa B. L. Birch

    2005-01-01

    The chemical nitrogen cycle is becoming better characterized in terms of fluxes and reservoirs on a variety of scales. Galloway has demonstrated that reactive nitrogen can cascade through multiple ecosystems causing environmental damage at each stage before being denitrifled to N2. We propose to construct a parallel economic nitrogen cascade (ENC) in which economic impacts of nitrogen fluxes can be estimated by the costs associated with each stage of the chemical cascade. Using economic data for the benefits of damage avoided and costs of mitigation in the Chesapeake Bay basin, we have constructed an economic nitrogen cascade for the region. Since a single tonne of nitrogen can cascade through the system, the costs also cascade.Therefore evaluating the benefits of mitigating a tonne of reactive nitrogen released needs to consider the damage avoided in all of the ecosystems through which that tonne would cascade.The analysis reveals that it is most cost effective to remove a tonne of nitrogen coming from combustion since it has the greatest impact on human health and creates cascading damage through the atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic and coastal ecosystems. We will discuss the implications of this analysis for determining the most cost effective policy option for achieving environmental quality goals.

  15. Crystalline amino acids and nitrogen emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, M.W.A.; Jongbloed, A.W.

    2003-01-01

    Reductions in dietary protein level and supplementation with certain crystalline amino acids is a well-established method of formulating diets to achieve a more ideal amino acid pattern and to reduce nitrogen excretion. Up to 35% reduction in nitrogen excretion may be achieved by supplementing pig d

  16. Nitrogen narcosis attenuates shivering thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekjavić, I B; Savić, S A; Eiken, O

    1995-06-01

    Thermoregulatory responses of eight healthy subjects (six men and two women) were compared when they were head-out immersed in 15 degrees C water at both 1 and 6 ATA. Both trials were conducted in a hyperbaric chamber. During the immersions, esophageal temperature (T(es)) and skin temperature at two sites (chest and calf) were recorded at minute intervals. Oxygen uptake was determined at 5-min intervals with the Douglas bag method. The order of the two trials was alternated. The rate of T(es) cooling was greater during the 6-ATA trial [2.1 +/- 0.5 degrees C/h (SE)] than during the 1-ATA trial (1.3 +/- 0.5 degrees C/h; P nitrogen on central neural structures involved in temperature regulation.

  17. The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

  18. Nitrogen fixation by marine cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehr, Jonathan P

    2011-04-01

    Discrepancies between estimates of oceanic N(2) fixation and nitrogen (N) losses through denitrification have focused research on identifying N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria and quantifying cyanobacterial N(2) fixation. Previously unrecognized cultivated and uncultivated unicellular cyanobacteria have been discovered that are widely distributed, and some have very unusual properties. Uncultivated unicellular N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria (UCYN-A) lack major metabolic pathways including the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxygen-evolving photosystem II. Genomes of the oceanic N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria are highly conserved at the DNA level, and genetic diversity is maintained by genome rearrangements. The major cyanobacterial groups have different physiological and ecological constraints that result in highly variable geographic distributions, with implications for the marine N-cycle budget.

  19. Nitrogen fractionation in Titan's aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Kuga, Maia; Marty, Bernard; Fleury, Benjamin; Marrocchi, Yves

    2016-06-01

    A strong nitrogen fractionation is found by Cassini in Titan's atmosphere with the detection of 15N-rich HCN relative to N2. Photodissociation of N2 associated or not to self-shielding might involve 15N-rich radicals prone to incorporation into forming organics. However the isotopic composition is only available for very simple gaseous N-bearing compounds, and the propagation and conservation of such a large N-isotopic fractionation upon polymerization is actually out of reach with the instruments onboard Cassini. We will therefore present a first laboratory investigation of the possible enrichment in the solid organic aerosols. We will also discuss the space instrumention required in the future to answer this pending issue on Titan.

  20. Methanotrophs Contribute to Peatland Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmola, Tuula; Leppänen, Sanna M.; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Aarva, Maija; Merilä, Päivi; Fritze, Hannu; Tiirola, Marja

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N2) fixation is potentially an important N input mechanism to peatland ecosystems, but the extent of this process may have been underestimated because of the methods traditionally used inhibit the activity of methanothrophs. We examined the linkage of methane (CH4) oxidation and N2 fixation using 15N2 technique. Dominant flark and hummock Sphagnum species were collected from twelve pristine peatlands in Siikajoki, Finland, which varied in age from 200 to 2,500 y due to the postglacial rebound. The mosses were incubated in a two-day field 15N2 and 13CH4 pulse labelling experiment and the incorporation of 15N2 and 13CH4 in biomass was measured with Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer. The rates of Sphagnum-associated N2 fixation (0.1-2.9 g N m-2 y-1) were up to 10 times the current N deposition rates. Methane-induced N2 fixation contributed to over 1/3 of moss-associated N2 fixation in younger stages, but was switched off in old successional stages, despite active CH4 oxidation in these stages. Both the N2 fixation rates and the methanotrophic contribution to N2 fixation during peatland succession were primarily constrained by phosphorus availability. Previously overlooked methanotrophic N contribution may explain rapid peat and N accumulation during fen stages of peatland development. Reference. Larmola T., Leppänen S.M., Tuittila E.-S, Aarva M., Merilä P., Fritze H., Tiirola M. (2014) Methanotrophy induces nitrogen fixation during peatland development. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 111 (2): 734-739.

  1. Nitrogen use scenario in India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.; P.; Gupta

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen is one of the major plant nutrients without which the agricultural production is not possible. Nitrogen use in Indian agriculture was nearly 55000 tons in 1950-1951 that increased to 11.31 million tons in 2001-2002. The total food production of the country has also experienced the similar increase from 50.83 to 222 million tons in the respective years. Interestingly the N fertilizer consumption of India remained almost constant during the last six years indicating the possibility of reducing N consumption. The highest N consumption is in North zone owing to the introduction of rice-wheat cropping system followed by West, South and East.The N use efficiency has been reported to be varying between 30% to 50% depending on the crops and the management. But in most of the cases, N use efficiency has been calculated based on the total N removed by the crops (above ground part only) ignoring the N content left in the roots. It has been observed in controlled experiments that the total N uptake by roots varied from 18% to 44% of the total N removed by the above ground parts, i.e. grain and straw. If the root N is also accounted, the N use efficiency will be higher than reported. The management of other organic sources has to be improved so as to increase the fertilizer use efficiency as well as to check the direct release of N in the atmosphere. In this review all these issues will be dealt.

  2. Kinetics of Nitrogen Indiffusion in Czochralski Silicon Annealed in Nitrogen Ambient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming; MA Xiang-Yang; YANG De-Ren

    2008-01-01

    By means of low-temperature(10K)Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy,the kinetics of nitrogen indiffusion in Czochralski(CZ)silicon annealed 8t 1150-1250°C in nitrogen ambient is investigated.Moreover,the nitrogen diffusivities in CZ silicon at elevated temperatures deduced herein are in good agreement with those previously obtained in float-zone silicon,thus leading to the conclusion that the nitrogen indiffusion in CZ silicon at elevated temperatures is via nitrogen pairs.

  3. Intake, digestibility, and rumen and metabolic characteristics of cattle fed low-quality tropical forage and supplemented with nitrogen and different levels of starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia de Oliveira Franco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective Effects of nitrogen supplementation associated with different levels of starch on voluntary intake, digestibility, and rumen and metabolic characteristics of cattle fed low-quality tropical forage (Brachiaria decumbens hay, 7.4% crude protein, CP were evaluated using ruminal and abomasal cannulated steers. Methods Five European×Zebu young bulls (186 kg body weight, BW were distributed according to a 5×5 Latin square. The following treatments were evaluated: control, supplementation with 300 g CP/d (0:1, supplementation with 300 g starch/d and 300 g CP/d (1:1, supplementation with 600 g starch/d and 300 g CP/d (2:1, and supplementation with 900 g starch/d and 300 g CP/d (3:1. A mixture of nitrogenous compounds provided 1/3 from true protein (casein and 2/3 from non-protein nitrogen (mixture of urea and ammonium sulphate, 9:1 was used as the nitrogen supplement. In order to supply energy a unique source of corn starch was used. Results Supplements increased (p0.05 forage intake. There was a cubic effect (p0.05 neutral detergent fibre corrected for ash and protein (NDFap digestibility. There was a positive linear effect (p0.05 by the amount of supplemental starch. Ruminal ammonia nitrogen concentrations were higher (p<0.05 in supplemented animals, however, a negative linear effect (p<0.05 of amount of starch was observed. Supplements increased (p<0.05 the nitrogen balance (NB and efficiency of nitrogen utilization. These effects were attributed to increased body anabolism, supported by higher (p<0.05 serum concentration of insulin-like growth factor 1. Increasing the amount of starch tended (p<0.06 to linearly increase the NB. In spite of this, there was a highest NB value for the 2:1 starch:CP ratio amongst the treatments with supplementation. Conclusion Nitrogen supplementation in cattle fed low-quality tropical forage increases nitrogen retention in the animal’s body. An additional supply of starch increases nitrogen retention by

  4. Nitrogen Catabolite Repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the expression of all known nitrogen catabolite pathways are regulated by four regulators known as Gln3, Gat1, Da180, and Deh1. This is known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). They bind to motifs in the promoter region to the consensus sequence S' GATAA 3'. Gln3...... and Gat1 act positively on gene expression whereas :Da180 and Deh1 act negatively. Expression of nitrogen catabolite pathway genes known to be regulated by these four regulators are glutamine, glutamate, proline, urea, arginine, GABA, and allantoine. In addition, the expression of the genes encoding...... thereby providing a nitrogen source to the cell.In this review, all known promoter sequences related to expression of nitrogen catabolite pathways are discussed as well as other regulatory proteins. Overview of metabolic pathways and promoters are presented....

  5. Atmospheric Nitrogen input to the Kattegat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asman, W.A.H.; Hertel, O.; Berkowicz, R.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of the processes involved in the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen compounds. These processes are incorporated in an atmospheric transport model that is used to calculate the nitrogen input to the Kattegat, the sea area between Denmark and Sweden. The model results show...... that the total atmospheric nitrogen input to the Kattegat is approximately 960 kg N km(-2) yr(-1). The nitrogen input to the Kattegat is dominated by the wet depositions of NHx (42%) and NOy (30%). The contribution from the dry deposition of NHx is 17% and that of the dry deposition of NOy is 11......%. The contribution of the atmospheric input of nitrogen to the Kattegat is about 30% of the total input including the net transport from other sea areas, runoff etc....

  6. Evaluation of the impact of alveolar nitrogen excretion on indices derived from multiple breath nitrogen washout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Nielsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large body of evidence has now accumulated describing the advantages of multiple breath washout tests over conventional spirometry in cystic fibrosis (CF. Although the majority of studies have used exogenous sulphur hexafluoride (SF6 as the tracer gas this has also led to an increased interest in nitrogen washout tests, despite the differences between these methods. The impact of body nitrogen excreted across the alveoli has previously been ignored. METHODS: A two-compartment lung model was developed that included ventilation heterogeneity and dead space (DS effects, but also incorporated experimental data on nitrogen excretion. The model was used to assess the impact of nitrogen excretion on washout progress and accuracy of functional residual capacity (FRC and lung clearance index (LCI measurements. RESULTS: Excreted nitrogen had a small effect on accuracy of FRC (1.8% in the healthy adult model. The error in LCI calculated with true FRC was greater (6.3%, and excreted nitrogen contributed 21% of the total nitrogen concentration at the end of the washout. Increasing DS and ventilation heterogeneity both caused further increase in measurement error. LCI was increased by 6-13% in a CF child model, and excreted nitrogen increased the end of washout nitrogen concentration by 24-49%. CONCLUSIONS: Excreted nitrogen appears to have complex but clinically significant effects on washout progress, particularly in the presence of abnormal gas mixing. This may explain much of the previously described differences in washout outcomes between SF6 and nitrogen.

  7. [Effects of water deficit and nitrogen fertilization on winter wheat growth and nitrogen uptake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, You-Ling; Zhang, Fu-Cang; Li, Kai-Feng

    2009-10-01

    Winter wheat plants were cultured in vitro tubes to study their growth and nitrogen uptake under effects of water deficit at different growth stages and nitrogen fertilization. Water deficit at any growth stages could obviously affect the plant height, leaf area, dry matter accumulation, and nitrogen uptake. Jointing stage was the most sensitive stage of winter wheat growth to water deficit, followed by flowering stage, grain-filling stage, and seedling stages. Rewatering after the water deficit at seedling stage had a significant compensation effect on winter wheat growth, and definite compensation effect was observed on the biomass accumulation and nitrogen absorption when rewatering was made after the water deficit at flowering stage. Under the same nitrogen fertilization levels, the nitrogen accumulation in root with water deficit at seedling, jointing, flowering, and grain-filling stages was reduced by 25.82%, 55.68%, 46.14%, and 16.34%, and the nitrogen accumulation in aboveground part was reduced by 33.37%, 51.71%, 27.01%, and 2.60%, respectively, compared with no water deficit. Under the same water deficit stages, the nitrogen content and accumulation of winter wheat decreased with decreasing nitrogen fertilization level, i. e., 0.3 g N x kg(-1) FM > 0.2 g N x kg(-1) FM > 0.1 g N x kg(-1) FM. Nitrogen fertilization had obvious regulation effect on winter wheat plant growth, dry matter accumulation, and nitrogen uptake under water stress.

  8. [Estimation of potentially available protein in infant starting formulas for term and preterm neonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binaghi, María J; Baroni, Andrea; Greco, Carola; Ronayne de Ferrer, Patricia A; Valencia, Mirta

    2002-03-01

    Sixteen milk-based starting formulas were analyzed with the aim of calculating their "true protein" content and assessing "in vitro" protein digestibility, in order to estimate levels of potentially available protein. Ten of them were designed for term infants: 7 had a casein:whey protein ratio 40:60 (adapted formulas) and 3 a ratio 80:20 (non-adapted); the 6 remaining formulas (all adapted) were for preterm infants. Nitrogen was determined by the Kjeldahl method. True protein was calculated as (total N--non-protein N) x 6.25. NPN was determined in the soluble fraction, after protein precipitation with 24% trichloroacetic acid and centrifugation. Digestibility was assessed by digestion with pepsin and pancreatin, and defined as the increase in non-protein N after enzymatic digestion. Values for true protein were from 1.3 to 2.3 g/dL and for non protein N, from 4.5 to 13.7%. Digestibility values varied between 59.0 and 92.5%; an inverse trend was observed between protein digestibility and protein content. Considering both the "true protein" levels and their digested proportions, all preterm and 60% of the term formulas would present potentially available amounts below those recommended. These observations constitute an alert, even though this method of assessing "in vitro" protein digestibility represents only an approximation to physiological processes; however, it could be useful in order to evaluate the intensity of the heat treatments to which these formulas were subjected. On the other hand, since NPN allows the estimation of the true protein provided by the formulas, either its percentage or the true protein content could be included on the label.

  9. Toward a nitrogen footprint calculator for Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Mary Olivia; Leach, Allison M.; Leip, Adrian; Galloway, James N.; Bekunda, Mateete; Sullivan, Clare; Lesschen, Jan Peter

    2017-03-01

    We present the first nitrogen footprint model for a developing country: Tanzania. Nitrogen (N) is a crucial element for agriculture and human nutrition, but in excess it can cause serious environmental damage. The Sub-Saharan African nation of Tanzania faces a two-sided nitrogen problem: while there is not enough soil nitrogen to produce adequate food, excess nitrogen that escapes into the environment causes a cascade of ecological and human health problems. To identify, quantify, and contribute to solving these problems, this paper presents a nitrogen footprint tool for Tanzania. This nitrogen footprint tool is a concept originally designed for the United States of America (USA) and other developed countries. It uses personal resource consumption data to calculate a per-capita nitrogen footprint. The Tanzania N footprint tool is a version adapted to reflect the low-input, integrated agricultural system of Tanzania. This is reflected by calculating two sets of virtual N factors to describe N losses during food production: one for fertilized farms and one for unfertilized farms. Soil mining factors are also calculated for the first time to address the amount of N removed from the soil to produce food. The average per-capita nitrogen footprint of Tanzania is 10 kg N yr-1. 88% of this footprint is due to food consumption and production, while only 12% of the footprint is due to energy use. Although 91% of farms in Tanzania are unfertilized, the large contribution of fertilized farms to N losses causes unfertilized farms to make up just 83% of the food production N footprint. In a developing country like Tanzania, the main audiences for the N footprint tool are community leaders, planners, and developers who can impact decision-making and use the calculator to plan positive changes for nitrogen sustainability in the developing world.

  10. Improvements to the Characterization of Organic Nitrogen Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  11. Improvements to the Characterization of Organic Nitrogen Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  12. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation. Final program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  13. GaN_Si npn HBT特性研究%GaN_Si npn HBT Characteristics of Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董果香; 李建清

    2013-01-01

    采用二维器件仿真软件对GaN/Si异质结双极晶体管进行了特性仿真研究.对GaN/Si异质结双极晶体管建立了合理准确的物理模型,包括不完全电离模型、能带模型、能带变窄模型、迁移率模型与复合模型.结果表明,GaN/Si异质结开启电压为2.5 eV.在Ib=0.2 mA时,电流放大倍数为100倍.击穿电压为900V,使其在大功率器件方面有很大应用前景.最高截止频率为100 GHz,使其可工作在射频和微波频段.%GaN/Si heterojunction bipolar transistor characteristics simulation was studied using two-dimensional device simulation software. GaN/Si heterojunction bipolar transistor to establish a series of reasonably accurate physical models,including incomplete ionization model,band narrows model,mobility model and the composite model. The results from experiment showed that in the GaN/Si hetero-junction ,the turn-on voltage is 2.5 eV. Ib =0.2 mA ,the current amplification factor is 100 times and the breakdown voltage is 900V,which make this hetero-junction bipolor transistor obtain a great application prospected in the area of high-power devices. The highest cut-off frequency is 100 GHz,so that it can work in the RF and microwave frequency bands.

  14. Nitrogen isotopes link mycorrhizal fungi and plants to nitrogen dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbie, Erik A; Högberg, Peter

    2012-10-01

    In this review, we synthesize field and culture studies of the 15N/14N (expressed as δ15N) of autotrophic plants, mycoheterotrophic plants, parasitic plants, soil, and mycorrhizal fungi to assess the major controls of isotopic patterns. One major control for plants and fungi is the partitioning of nitrogen (N) into either 15N-depleted chitin, ammonia, or transfer compounds or 15N-enriched proteinaceous N. For example, parasitic plants and autotrophic hosts are similar in δ15N (with no partitioning between chitin and protein), mycoheterotrophic plants are higher in δ15 N than their fungal hosts, presumably with preferential assimilation of fungal protein, and autotrophic, mycorrhizal plants are lower in 15N than their fungal symbionts, with saprotrophic fungi intermediate, because mycorrhizal fungi transfer 15N-depleted ammonia or amino acids to plants. Similarly, nodules of N2-fixing bacteria transferring ammonia are often higher in δ15N than their plant hosts. N losses via denitrification greatly influence bulk soil δ15N, whereas δ15N patterns within soil profiles are influenced both by vertical patterns of N losses and by N transfers within the soil-plant system. Climate correlates poorly with soil δ15N; climate may primarily influence δ15N patterns in soils and plants by determining the primary loss mechanisms and which types of mycorrhizal fungi and associated vegetation dominate across climatic gradients.

  15. Root responses to nitrogen pulse frequency under different nitrogen amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing-Ye; Wang, Pu; Liu, Lu; Dong, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2017-04-01

    Responses of morphology and biomass allocation of roots to frequency of nitrogen (N) pulse potentially influence the fitness of plants, but such responses may be determined by root size. We grew 12 plant species of three functional groups (grasses, forbs, and legumes) under two N pulse frequencies (high vs. low supply frequency) and two N amounts (high vs. low supply amount). Compared to low-amount N supply, high-amount N supply stimulated biomass accumulation and root growth by either increasing the thickness and length of roots or decreasing the root mass fraction. Compared to low-frequency N supply, high-frequency N supply improved biomass accumulation and root growth in forbs or grasses, but not in legumes. Furthermore, the magnitude of the response to N frequency was significantly negatively correlated with root size at the species scale, but this was only true when the N amount was high. We conclude that root responses to N frequency are related to plant functional types, and non-legume species is more sensitive to N frequency than legume species. Our results also suggest that root size is a determinant of root responses to N frequency when N supply amount is high.

  16. Ruminal characteristics, blood pH, blood urea nitrogen and nitrogen balance in Nili-Ravi buffalo (bubalus bubalis bulls fed diets containing various level of ruminally degradable protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Shahzad

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ruminal degradable protein (RDP is considered essential for ruminal microbial growth. This not only improves the ruminal fermentation but it also ensures an adequate supply of microbial protein to the host animal. One of the most effective methods to enhance ruminal microbial protein supplies to the host is an efficient utilization of non-protein nitrogen substances (Sarwar et al., 2004. This makes the ruminant animal production cost-effective through minimizing its ruminally undegradable protein (RUP needs (Blummel et al., 1999. Urea can be used all or a part of the supplemental protein to meet the dairy cow requirement (Russell et al., 1992. It is documented that exotic lactating cows perform equally good when urea contributes to build up 12 % RDP of the ration (Gould, 1969. However, scientific information regarding this effect in buffalo is limited. Therefore the present study was planned to determine the impact of varying level of RDP on ruminal characteristics, digestibility, blood pH, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and N balance in buffalo bulls.

  17. Estimating Nitrogen Load Resulting from Biofuel Mandates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Alshawaf

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA of 2007 were enacted to reduce the U.S. dependency on foreign oil by increasing the use of biofuels. The increased demand for biofuels from corn and soybeans could result in an increase of nitrogen flux if not managed properly. The objectives of this study are to estimate nitrogen flux from energy crop production and to identify the catchment areas with high nitrogen flux. The results show that biofuel production can result in an increase of nitrogen flux to the northern Gulf of Mexico from 270 to 1742 thousand metric tons. Using all cellulosic (hay ethanol or biodiesel to meet the 2022 mandate is expected to reduce nitrogen flux; however, it requires approximately 25% more land when compared to other scenarios. Producing ethanol from switchgrass rather than hay results in three-times more nitrogen flux, but requires 43% less land. Using corn ethanol for 2022 mandates is expected to have double the nitrogen flux when compared to the EISA-specified 2022 scenario; however, it will require less land area. Shifting the U.S. energy supply from foreign oil to the Midwest cannot occur without economic and environmental impacts, which could potentially lead to more eutrophication and hypoxia.

  18. Solubility characteristics of nitrogen gas in SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, J. W.; Sung, K. W.; Chio, M. S.; Lee, E. H.; Kim, W. C.; Chio, B. S.; Lee, D. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen gas is used in a pressurizer to regulate the pressure of the primary system of SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor). Some of the nitrogen gas in the upper part of the pressurizer is dissolved into the coolant water in the pressurizer and then diffused to primary coolant in reactor core. The solubility of nitrogen in the primary coolant at high temperature and pressure, is important to the reliable operation and the management of water chemistry of SMART. Nitrogen solubility was calculated as the function of temperature and pressure by Himmelblau equation based on Henry's law. As a result, nitrogen solubility in water showed a minimum value at about 85 .deg. C and a maximum value at about 280 .deg. C with total system pressure (150 atm). At the operation condition of SMART, the equilibrium concentration of dissolved nitrogen in the core and the concentration change and the bubble formation of nitrogen gas in water with a temperature change were analyzed.

  19. Nitrogen fixation in Red Sea seagrass meadows

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Malak

    2017-05-01

    Seagrasses are key coastal ecosystems, providing many ecosystem services. Seagrasses increase biodiversity as they provide habitat for a large set of organisms. In addition, their structure provides hiding places to avoid predation. Seagrasses can grow in shallow marine coastal areas, but several factors regulate their growth and distribution. Seagrasses can uptake different kinds of organic and inorganic nutrients through their leaves and roots. Nitrogen and phosphorous are the most important nutrients for seagrass growth. Biological nitrogen fixation is the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia by diazotrophic bacteria. This process provides a significant source of nitrogen for seagrass growth. The nitrogen fixation is controlled by the nif genes which are found in diazotrophs. The main goal of the project is to measure nitrogen fixation rates on seagrass sediments, in order to compare among various seagrass species from the Red Sea. Moreover, we will compare the fixing rates of the Vegetated areas with the bare sediments. This project will help to ascertain the role of nitrogen fixing bacteria in the development of seagrass meadows.

  20. Nitrogen control of photosynthetic protein synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1986-09-01

    Plant growth is severely affected by impaired photosynthesis resulting from nitrogen deficiency. The molecular aspects of this effect are being studied in the green alga Chlamydomonas grown in continuous culture systems. Photosynthetic membranes of nitrogen-limited cells are dramatically depleted in chlorophylls, xanthophylls and proteins of the light-harvesting complexes. In contrast, enzymes of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle and electron transport chain complexes are reduced only 40 to 65% on a per cell basis comparison with nitrogen-sufficient cultures. From analyses of mRNA levels by in vitro translation and hybridization analyses with cloned DNA sequences for photosynthetic proteins, we have found there are rather minor effects of nitrogen deficiency on nuclear or chloroplast gene transcription. Maturation of a transcript of the nuclear-encoded small subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase is inhibited in nitrogen-deficient cells and causes accumulation of large amounts of mRNA precursors. Most of the effects of nitrogen deficiency on photosynthetic proteins appear to result from posttranscriptional regulatory processes: light-harvesting protein synthesis may be sustained but their import into chloroplasts or translocation to photosynthetic membranes is impaired. Nitrogen-deficient cells lack violaxanthin, a pigment that is essential for the structure, function and biogenesis of the major antenna complexes. The absence of this pigment may be a causative factor for the deficiency of light harvesting complexes. Finally, the accumulation of massive amounts of starch and triglycerides in nitrogen-limited cells indicate there are some genes whose maximal expression is dependent upon nitrogen-limiting conditions. 10 refs.

  1. 偏置条件对NPN型锗硅异质结双极晶体管电离辐射效应的影响%Bias effects on total ionizing dose radiation response of NPN silicon-germanium hetero-junction bipolar transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘默寒; 陆妩; 马武英; 王信; 郭旗; 何承发; 姜柯

    2015-01-01

    Background: Silicon germanium hetero-junction bipolar transistors (SiGe HBTs) technology has been considered to be one of the promising candidate for future space applications due to its exciting built-in tolerance of total ionizing dose (TID) radiation and displacement damage (DD) performance.Purpose: The bias effects on total ionizing dose radiation response of the NPN commercial SiGe HBTs produced domestic were investigated with the 60Coγ ray under the different bias of Emitter-Base Junction. And the potential mechanisms of the different responses of the radiation under different bias are analyzed.Methods:The devices were mounted in the irradiation boards with different bias conditions during the irradiation and annealing process, and irradiated to a maximum total ionizing dose level of 11 kGy(Si). The electrical parameters including Gummel characteristics and direct current gain of the devices were measured with Keithley 4200-SCS Semiconductor Parameter Analyzer removed from the irradiation room within 20 min at room temperature before and after each specified value of accumulated dose.Results: The radiation sensitive electric parameters of the SiGe HBTs are base current and current gain. And, the damage of the devices with reverse bias is greater than that of zero bias, the degradation of the forward bias is the smallest.Conclusion: The difference of the radiation response under different bias conditions are due to the different amounts of the oxide and interface trap charge induced by the radiation under diverse electric field.%本文研究了不同偏置条件下国产商用NPN型锗硅异质结双极晶体管(Silicon germanium hetero-junction bipolar transistors, SiGe HBTs)在60Coγ辐射环境中电离辐照响应特性和变化规律。实验结果表明,在0.8 Gy(Si)·s−1剂量率辐照下,总累积剂量达到1.1×104 Gy(Si)时,发射结反向偏置条件下60Coγ射线辐照对SiGe HBTs造成的损伤最大,零偏次之,正偏损伤最小

  2. Production of Nitrogen-Bearing Stainless Steel by Injecting Nitrogen Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-yuan; LI Jing-she; ZHANG Li-feng; YANG Shu-feng

    2011-01-01

    To replace nickel-based stainless steel, a nitrogen-bearing stainless steel was produced to lower the production cost stemming from the shortage of nickel recourses. Thermodynamic model to calculate the saturated nitrogen content in the stainless steel was developed and the model was validated by experimental measurements performed with a high temperature induction furnace. Nitrogen gas under constant pressure was injected into the molten steel with a top lance. Thus, the nitrogen was transferred to the molten stainless steel. The effects of chemical composition, temperature, superficial active elements and nitrogen flow rate on the transfer of nitrogen to the steel were investigated and discussed. The results showed that the dissolution rate of nitrogen in the molten steel increases with a higher temperature and larger nitrogen flow rate but decreases significantly with an increase in the content of surface- active elements. Alloying elements such as chromium and manganese having a negative interaction coefficient can increase the dissolution of nitrogen in the molten steel. It was also proposed that the primary factor affecting the final saturated nitrogen content is temperature rather than the dissolved oxygen content.

  3. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steels Manufactured by Nitrogen Gas Alloying and Adding Nitrided Ferroalloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua-bing; JIANG Zhou-hua; SHEN Ming-hui; YOU Xiang-mi

    2007-01-01

    A simple and feasible method for the production of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels involves nitrogen gas alloying and adding nitrided ferroalloys under normal atmospheric conditions. Alloying by nitrogen gas bubbling in Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo series alloys was carried out in MoSi2 resistance furnace and air induction furnace under normal atmospheric conditions. The results showed that nitrogen alloying could be accelerated by increasing nitrogen gas flow rate, prolonging residence time of bubbles, increasing gas/molten steel interfaces, and decreasing the sulphur and oxygen contents in molten steel. Nitrogen content of 0.69% in 18Cr18Mn was obtained using air induction furnace by bubbling of nitrogen gas from porous plug. In addition, the nickel-free, high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels with sound and compact macrostructure had been produced in the laboratory using vacuum induction furnace and electroslag remelting furnace under nitrogen atmosphere by the addition of nitrided alloy with the maximum nitrogen content of 0.81 %. Pores were observed in the ingots obtained by melting and casting in vacuum induction furnace with the addition of nitrided ferroalloys and under nitrogen atmosphere. After electroslag remelting of the cast ingots, they were all sound and were free of pores. The yield of nitrogen increased with the decrease of melting rate in the ESR process. Due to electroslag remelting under nitrogen atmosphere and the consequential addition of aluminum as deoxidizer to the slag, the loss of manganese decreased obviously. There existed mainly irregular Al2O3 inclusions and MnS inclusions in ESR ingots, and the size of most of the inclusions was less than 5 μm. After homogenization of the hot rolled plate at 1 150 ℃× 1 h followed by water quenching, the microstructure consisted of homogeneous austenite.

  4. Symposium on nitrogen fixation in tropical trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobereiner, J.

    1984-01-01

    A special issue containing the proceedings of an international symposium held on 19-24 September 1983 at Rio de Janeiro. Some 35 papers were presented in six sessions: Importance of leguminous trees (2 papers); Occurrence of leguminous trees (5); Nitrogen fixation in trees (12); Utilization of nitrogen fixing trees (7); Nutrition of leguminous trees (5); and Agroforestry systems (4). Recommendations of the symposium are presented on p. 341-344 (Pt, En), and a List of nitrogen fixing trees which should receive immediate attention in Brazil (26 species) is given on p. 345.

  5. Carbon-nitrogen interactions in forest ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen, Per; Berg, Bjørn; Currie, W.S.

    This report is a summary of the main results from the EU project “Carbon – Nitrogen Interactions in Forest Ecosystems” (CNTER). Since carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are bound together in organic matter we studied both the effect of N deposition on C cycling in forest ecosystems, and the effect of C...... accumulation on N storage and release. Based on compiled databases on element pools and fluxes from several hundred forest sites, process studies in long-term nitrogen manipulation experiments and modelling efforts we estimated C sequestration and N retention in European forest soils. Further, we studied...

  6. Carbon-nitrogen interactions in forest ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen, Per; Berg, Bjørn; Currie, W.S.;

    This report is a summary of the main results from the EU project “Carbon – Nitrogen Interactions in Forest Ecosystems” (CNTER). Since carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are bound together in organic matter we studied both the effect of N deposition on C cycling in forest ecosystems, and the effect of C...... accumulation on N storage and release. Based on compiled databases on element pools and fluxes from several hundred forest sites, process studies in long-term nitrogen manipulation experiments and modelling efforts we estimated C sequestration and N retention in European forest soils. Further, we studied...... the impact of forest management on C sequestration, N retention and N leaching....

  7. The Nitrogen Budget of Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We comprehensively compile and review N content in geologic materials to calculate a new N budget for Earth. Using analyses of rocks and minerals in conjunction with N-Ar geochemistry demonstrates that the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) contains \\sim7\\pm4 times present atmospheric N (4\\times10^18 kg N, PAN), with 27\\pm16\\times10^18 kg N. Comparison to chondritic composition, after subtracting N sequestered into the core, yields a consistent result, with BSE N between 17\\pm13\\times10^18 kg to 31\\pm24\\times10^18 kg N. In the chondritic comparison we calculate a N mass in Earth's core (180\\pm110 to 300\\pm180\\times10^18 kg) and discuss the Moon as a proxy for the early mantle. Significantly, we find the majority of the planetary budget of N is in the solid Earth. The N estimate herein precludes the need for a "missing N" reservoir. Nitrogen-Ar systematics in mantle rocks and basalts identify two mantle reservoirs: MORB-source like (MSL) and high-N. High-N mantle is composed of young, N-rich material subducted from the...

  8. Automatic Transmission Of Liquid Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumedh Mhatre

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Liquid Nitrogen is one of the major substance used as a chiller in industry such as Ice cream factory Milk Diary Storage of blood sample Blood Bank etc. It helps to maintain the required product at a lower temperature for preservation purpose. We cannot fully utilise the LN2 so practically if we are using 3.75 litre LN2 for a single day then around 12 of LN2 450 ml is wasted due to vaporisation. A pressure relief valve is provided to create a pressure difference. If there is no pressure difference between the cylinder carrying LN2 and its surrounding it will results in damage of container as well as wastage of LN2.Transmission of LN2 from TA55 to BA3 is carried manually .So care must be taken for the transmission of LN2 in order to avoid its wastage. With the help of this project concept the transmission of LN2 will be carried automatically so as to reduce the wastage of LN2 in case of manual operation.

  9. Chemical Composition, Nitrogen Fractions and Amino Acids Profile of Milk from Different Animal Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Saima; Huma, Nuzhat; Pasha, Imran; Sameen, Aysha; Mukhtar, Omer; Khan, Muhammad Issa

    2016-07-01

    Milk composition is an imperative aspect which influences the quality of dairy products. The objective of study was to compare the chemical composition, nitrogen fractions and amino acids profile of milk from buffalo, cow, sheep, goat, and camel. Sheep milk was found to be highest in fat (6.82%±0.04%), solid-not-fat (11.24%±0.02%), total solids (18.05%±0.05%), protein (5.15%±0.06%) and casein (3.87%±0.04%) contents followed by buffalo milk. Maximum whey proteins were observed in camel milk (0.80%±0.03%), buffalo (0.68%±0.02%) and sheep (0.66%±0.02%) milk. The non-protein-nitrogen contents varied from 0.33% to 0.62% among different milk species. The highest r-values were recorded for correlations between crude protein and casein in buffalo (r = 0.82), cow (r = 0.88), sheep (r = 0.86) and goat milk (r = 0.98). The caseins and whey proteins were also positively correlated with true proteins in all milk species. A favorable balance of branched-chain amino acids; leucine, isoleucine, and valine were found both in casein and whey proteins. Leucine content was highest in cow (108±2.3 mg/g), camel (96±2.2 mg/g) and buffalo (90±2.4 mg/g) milk caseins. Maximum concentrations of isoleucine, phenylalanine, and histidine were noticed in goat milk caseins. Glutamic acid and proline were dominant among non-essential amino acids. Conclusively, current exploration is important for milk processors to design nutritious and consistent quality end products.

  10. Protection with cycloheximide or emetine against pulmonary edema induced by ozone or nitrogen dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nambu, Z.; Yokoyama, E.

    1982-03-01

    Pretreatment with cycloheximide or emetine provided significant protection against pulmonary edema in rats exposed to ozone or nitrogen dioxide. Other inhibitors of protein-synthesis, actinomycin D or puromycin, failed to show such effects. Possible actions of these agents as well as the doses and times that afforded the significant protection were investigated. These agents, by themselves, did not alter the water content of the lungs. In vitro study revealed that both cycloheximide and emetine hardly acted as scavengers of oxidant. Pretreatment with either agent was associated with a significant increase in the activity of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase of the lungs, but the increase did not necessarily coincide with the protection. Activity levels of non-protein SH, glutathione-peroxidase and -reductase in the lungs of rats treated with either agent were scarcely altered. The effect of these agents administered in vivo or in vitro on the in vitro lipid peroxidation by air was also investigated. Other possible mechanisms of these agents responsible for the protective effect against pulmonary edema induced by oxidants were also discussed.

  11. Formation of unidentified nitrogen in plants: an implication for a novel nitrogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Hiromichi; Takahashi, Misa; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Matsubara, Toshiyuki; Arimura, Gen-Ichiro; Kawamura, Yoshifumi; Fukunaga, Kazunari; Fujita, Kounosuke; Sakurai, Naoki; Hirata, Toshifumi; Ide, Hiroshi; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Suzuki, Hitomi

    2004-05-01

    Plants take up inorganic nitrogen and store it unchanged or convert it to organic forms. The nitrogen in such organic compounds is stoichiometrically recoverable by the Kjeldahl method. The sum of inorganic nitrogen and Kjeldahl nitrogen has long been known to equal the total nitrogen in plants. However, in our attempt to study the mechanism of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) metabolism, we unexpectedly discovered that about one-third of the total nitrogen derived from (15)N-labeled NO(2) taken up by Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants was converted to neither inorganic nor Kjeldahl nitrogen, but instead to an as yet unknown nitrogen compound(s). We here refer to this nitrogen as unidentified nitrogen ( UN). The generality of the formation of UN across species, nitrogen sources and cultivation environments for plants has been shown as follows. Firstly, all of the other 11 plant species studied were found to form the UN in response to fumigation with (15)NO(2). Secondly, tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants fed with (15)N-nitrate appeared to form the UN. And lastly, the leaves of naturally fed vegetables, grass and roadside trees were found to possess the UN. In addition, the UN appeared to comprise a substantial proportion of total nitrogen in these plant species. Collectively, all of our present findings imply that there is a novel nitrogen mechanism for the formation of UN in plants. Based on the analyses of the exhaust gas and residue fractions of the Kjeldahl digestion of a plant sample containing the UN, probable candidates for compounds that bear the UN were deduced to be those containing the heat-labile nitrogen-oxygen functions and those recalcitrant to Kjeldahl digestion, including organic nitro and nitroso compounds. We propose UN-bearing compounds may provide a chemical basis for the mechanism of the reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and thus that cross-talk may occur between UN and RNS metabolisms in plants. A mechanism for the formation of UN

  12. ROE Total Nitrogen Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of nitrogen in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991 at a set of point locations across the...

  13. ROE Total Nitrogen Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of nitrogen in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013 at a set of point locations across the...

  14. Total Nitrogen in Surface Water (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excess nitrogen in surface water can result in eutrophication. TOTALNFuture is reported in kilograms/hectare/year. More information about these resources, including...

  15. Economic incentives and alternative nitrogen regulation schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Ørum, Jens Erik

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to investigate economic incentives associated with changes in nitrogen regulation, including the distribution between farm types and geographically. The analysis is carried out on a partial equilibrium simulation model of the Danish agricultural sector—ESMERALDA. ......The objective of this chapter is to investigate economic incentives associated with changes in nitrogen regulation, including the distribution between farm types and geographically. The analysis is carried out on a partial equilibrium simulation model of the Danish agricultural sector...

  16. Recollision induced superradiance of ionized nitrogen molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yi; Lambert, Guillaume; Houard, Aurelien; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir; Mysyrowicz, Andre

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism to explain the origin of optical gain in the transitions between excited and ground state of the ionized nitrogen molecule following irradiation of neutral nitrogen molecules with an intense ultra short laser pulse. An efficient transfer of population to the excited state is achieved via field-induced multiple recollisions. We show that the proposed excitation mechanism must lead to a super-radiant emission, a feature that we confirm experimentally.

  17. Hydraulic response and nitrogen retention in bioretention mesocosms with regulated outlets: part II--nitrogen retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, William C; Greenway, Margaret

    2011-08-01

    We observed dissolved nitrogen retention in vegetated bioretention mesocosms using different media with varying hydraulic conductivities. Elevated outlets were installed to regulate hydraulic response, with one treatment left free draining. The treatments (three replicates each) were loaded weekly with 50 cm of effluent averaging 2.47 mg/L nitrogen oxides (NOx) and 4.67 mg/L total nitrogen for 1 year. The NOx and total nitrogen retention by the outlet regulated treatments was significantly greater than the unregulated treatment. The systems then were dosed 6 times with 53 cm of synthetic stormwater averaging 0.77 mg/ L NOx and 1.46 mg/L total nitrogen, applied over 90 minutes. The outlet regulated treatment retained 68% NOx and 60% total nitrogen, while the corresponding free draining treatment retained 25% NOx and 27% total nitrogen. Over the following winter, the outlet regulated treatment retained 50% NOx and 73% total nitrogen, while the corresponding free draining treatment exported 17% more NOx, while retaining 50% total nitrogen.

  18. Variation in foliar nitrogen and albedo in response to nitrogen fertilization and elevated CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklein, Haley F; Ollinger, Scott V; Martin, Mary E; Hollinger, David Y; Lepine, Lucie C; Day, Michelle C; Bartlett, Megan K; Richardson, Andrew D; Norby, Richard J

    2012-08-01

    Foliar nitrogen has been shown to be positively correlated with midsummer canopy albedo and canopy near infrared (NIR) reflectance over a broad range of plant functional types (e.g., forests, grasslands, and agricultural lands). To date, the mechanism(s) driving the nitrogen–albedo relationship have not been established, and it is unknown whether factors affecting nitrogen availability will also influence albedo. To address these questions, we examined variation in foliar nitrogen in relation to leaf spectral properties, leaf mass per unit area, and leaf water content for three deciduous species subjected to either nitrogen (Harvard Forest, MA, and Oak Ridge, TN) or CO(2) fertilization (Oak Ridge, TN). At Oak Ridge, we also obtained canopy reflectance data from the airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) to examine whether canopy-level spectral responses were consistent with leaf-level results. At the leaf level, results showed no differences in reflectance or transmittance between CO(2) or nitrogen treatments, despite significant changes in foliar nitrogen. Contrary to our expectations, there was a significant, but negative, relationship between foliar nitrogen and leaf albedo, a relationship that held for both full spectrum leaf albedo as well as leaf albedo in the NIR region alone. In contrast, remote sensing data indicated an increase in canopy NIR reflectance with nitrogen fertilization. Collectively, these results suggest that altered nitrogen availability can affect canopy albedo, albeit by mechanisms that involve canopy-level processes rather than changes in leaf-level reflectance.

  19. The Nitrogen Footprint Tool network: A multi-institution program to reduce nitrogen pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Elizabeth A.; Leah, Allison M.; Leary, Neal; Baron, Jill; Compton, Jana E.; Galloway, James N.; Hastings, Meredith G.; Kimiecik, Jacob; Lantz-Trissel, Jonathan; de la Riguera, Elizabeth; Ryals, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic sources of reactive nitrogen have local and global impacts on air and water quality and detrimental effects on human and ecosystem health. This paper uses the nitrogen footprint tool (NFT) to determine the amount of nitrogen (N) released as a result of institutional consumption. The sectors accounted for include food (consumption and upstream production), energy, transportation, fertilizer, research animals, and agricultural research. The NFT is then used for scenario analysis to manage and track reductions, which are driven by the consumption behaviors of both the institution itself and its constituent individuals. In this paper, the first seven completed institution nitrogen footprint results are presented. The institution NFT network aims to develop footprints for many institutions to encourage widespread upper-level management strategies that will create significant reductions in reactive nitrogen released to the environment. Energy use and food purchases are the two largest sectors contributing to institution nitrogen footprints. Ongoing efforts by institutions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions also help to reduce the nitrogen footprint, but the impact of food production on nitrogen pollution has not been directly addressed by the higher-ed sustainability community. The NFT Network found that institutions could reduce their nitrogen footprints by optimizing food purchasing to reduce consumption of animal products and minimize food waste, as well as reducing dependence on fossil fuels for energy.

  20. Nitrogen fixation in trees - 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobereiner, J.; Gauthier, D.L.; Diem, H.G.; Dommergues, Y.R.; Bonetti, R.; Oliveira, L.A.; Magalhaes, F.M.M.; Faria, S.M. de; Franco, A.A.; Menandro, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Six papers are presented from the symposium. Dobereiner, J.; Nodulation and nitrogen fixation in leguminous trees, 83-90, (15 ref.), reviews studies on Brazilian species. Gauthier, D.L., Diem, H.G., Dommergues, Y.R., Tropical and subtropical actinorhizal plants, 119-136, (Refs. 50), reports on studies on Casuarinaceae. Bonetti, R., Oliveira, L.A., Magalhaes, F.M.M.; Rhizobium populations and occurrence of VA mycorrhizae in plantations of forest trees, 137-142, (Refs. 15), studies Amazonia stands of Cedrelinga catenaeformis, Calophyllum brasiliense, Dipteryx odorata, D. potiphylla, Carapa guianensis, Goupia glabra, Tabebuia serratifolia, Clarisia racemosa, Pithecellobium racemosum, Vouacapoua pallidior, Eperua bijuga, and Diplotropis species. Nodulation was observed in Cedrelinga catenaeformis and V. pallidior. Faria, S.M. de, Franco, A.A., Menandro, M.S., Jesus, R.M. de, Baitello, J.B.; Aguiar, O.T. de, Doebereiner, J; survey of nodulation in leguminous tree species native to southeastern Brazil, 143-153, (Refs. 7), reports on 119 species, with first reports of nodulation in the genera Bowdichia, Poecilanthe, Melanoxylon, Moldenhaurea (Moldenhawera), and Pseudosamanea. Gaiad, S., Carpanezzi, A.A.; Occurrence of Rhizobium in Leguminosae of silvicultural interest for south Brazil, 155-158, (Refs. 2). Nodulation is reported in Mimosa scabrella, Acacia mearnsii, A. longifolia various trinervis, Enterolobium contortisiliquum, and Erythrina falcata. Magalhaes, L.M.S., Blum, W.E.H., Nodulation and growth of Cedrelinga catanaeformis in experimental stands in the Manaus region - Amazonas, 159-164, (Refs. 5). Results indicate that C. catenaeformis can be used in degraded areas of very low soil fertility.

  1. Recent changes in anthropogenic reactive nitrogen compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronache, Constantin

    2014-05-01

    Significant anthropogenic perturbations of the nitrogen cycle are the result of rapid population growth, with mounting need for food and energy production. The increase of reactive nitrogen compounds (such as NOx, HNO3, NH3, and N2O) has a significant impact on human health, environment, and climate. NOx emissions contribute to O3 chemistry, aerosol formation and acidic precipitation. Ammonia is a notable atmospheric pollutant that may deteriorate ecosystems and contribute to respiratory problems. It reacts with acidic gases to form aerosols or is deposited back to ecosystems. The application of fertilizers accounts for most of the N2O production, adding to greenhouse gas emissions. We analyze the change of some reactive nitrogen compounds based on observations, in eastern United States. Results show that the control of NOx and SO2 emissions over the last decades caused a significant decrease of acidic deposition. The nitrate deposition is highest in eastern US, while the ammonium ion concentration is highest in central US regions. Overall, the inorganic nitrogen wet deposition from nitrate and ammonium is enhanced in central, and eastern US. Research shows that sensitive ecosystems in northeastern regions exhibit a slow recovery from the accumulated effects of acidic deposition. Given the growing demand for nitrogen in agriculture and industry, we discuss possible pathways to reduce the impact of excess reactive nitrogen on the environment.

  2. Perspectives in Biological Nitrogen Fixation Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Cheng

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation, along with photosynthesis is the basis of all life on earth. Current understanding suggests that no plant fixes its own nitrogen. Some plants (mainly legumes) fix nitrogen via symbiotic anaerobic microorganisms (mainly rhizobia). The nature of biological nitrogen fixation is that the dinitrogenase catalyzes the reaction-splitting triple-bond inert atmospheric nitrogen (N2) into organic ammonia molecule (NH3). All known nitrogenases are found to be prokaryotic,multi.complex and normally oxygen liable. Not surprisingly, the engineering of autonomous nitrogen-fixing plants would be a long-term effort because it requires the assembly of a complex enzyme and provision of anaerobic conditions. However,in the light of evolving protein catalysts, the anaerobic enzyme has almost certainly been replaced in many reactions by the more efficient and irreversible aerobic version that uses O2. On the other hand, nature has shown numerous examples of evolutionary convergence where an enzyme catalyzing a highly specific, O2-requiring reaction has an oxygen-independent counterpart, able to carry out the same reaction under anoxic conditions. In this review, I attempt to take the reader on a simplified journey from conventional nitrogenase complex to a possible simplified version of a yet to be discovered Ilght-utilizing nitrogenase.

  3. Metabolism of nitrogenous compounds by ruminant liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, C K

    1992-03-01

    Ruminants absorb substantial amounts of ammonia nitrogen and very little glucose. Ammonia absorbed is removed by the liver and converted to urea, which can be recycled to the digestive tract and add to the pool of ammonia absorbed. When ammonia absorption and liver urea production are increased by changes in nitrogen intake, an associated increase in liver alpha-amino nitrogen removal has been observed. Reasons for the increase in liver removal of amino acids with greater ureagenesis are uncertain, but the aspartate/glutamate requirement of ureagenesis and the complex relationships between ureagenesis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, glucogenesis, liver energy metabolism and redox state all may be involved. Amino acids represent potential sources of carbon for liver glucogenesis and precise reckonings of the contributions of amino acid carbon to glucogenesis are needed for ruminants fed differing diets. There is evidence for the involvement of peptides in liver nitrogen exchanges and amino acids in peptides represent a potential source of carbon for glucogenesis and nitrogen for ureagenesis. A number of endocrine factors have an impact on liver nitrogen metabolism in ruminants. Growth hormone decreases liver urea release and increases liver glutamate release.

  4. Mineralization of nitrogen by protozoan activity in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuikman, P.

    1990-01-01

    In general, more than 95% of the nitrogen in soils is present in organic forms. This nitrogen is not directly available to plants unless microbial decomposition takes place with the release of mineral nitrogen. In modern agriculture, nitrogen is often applied to arable soils as a fertilizer

  5. Mineralization of nitrogen by protozoan activity in soil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuikman, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    In general, more than 95% of the nitrogen in soils is present in organic forms. This nitrogen is not directly available to plants unless microbial decomposition takes place with the release of mineral nitrogen. In modern agriculture, nitrogen is often applied to arable soils as a fertilizer to suppo

  6. Mesoscale, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, O.

    1994-01-01

    Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen.......Projektet Mesoscales, Sources and Models: Sources for Nitrogen in the Atmosphere er opdelt i 3 delprojekter: Sources - farmland, Sources - sea og Sources - biogenic nitrogen....

  7. Nitrogen cycle in microbial mats: completely unknown?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, O.; Bebout, B.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial mats are thought to have originated around 3.7 billion years ago, most likely in the areas around submarine hydrothermal vents, which supplied a source of energy in the form of reduced chemical species from the Earth's interior. Active hydrothermal vents are also believed to exist on Jupiter's moon Europa, Saturn's moon Enceladus, and on Mars, earlier in that planet's history. Microbial mats have been an important force in the maintenance of Earth's ecosystems and the first photosynthesis was also originated there. Microbial mats are believed to exhibit most, if not all, biogeochemical processes that exist in aquatic ecosystems, due to the presence of different physiological groups of microorganisms therein. While most microbially mediated biogeochemical transformations have been shown to occur within microbial mats, the nitrogen cycle in the microbial mats has received very little study in spite of the fact that nitrogen usually limits growth in marine environments. We will present the first results in the determination of a complete nitrogen budget for a photosynthetic microbial mat. Both in situ sources and sinks of nitrogen in photosynthetic microbial mats are being measured using stable isotope techniques. Our work has a particular focus on recently described, but poorly understood, processes, e.g., anammox and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, and an emphasis on understanding the role that nitrogen cycling may play in generating biogenic nitrogen isotopic signatures and biomarker molecules. Measurements of environmental controls on nitrogen cycling should offer insight into the nature of co-evolution of these microbial communities and their planets of origin. Identifying the spatial (microscale) as well as temporal (diel and seasonal) distribution of nitrogen transformations, e.g., rates of nitrification and denitrification, within mats, particularly with respect to the distribution of photosynthetically-produced oxygen, is anticipated. The results

  8. Effects of Controlled-Release Urea on Grain Yield of Spring Maize, Nitrogen Use Efficiency and Nitrogen Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JI Jing-hong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of mixing controlled-released urea (CRU (release period of resin coated urea is 90 days and urea (U on maize yield, nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen balance were studied by 4 plot experiments (site:Shuangcheng, Binxian, Harbin and Zhaoyuan in two years (from year 2011 to 2012 to clarify the effect of controlled release urea on spring maize and soil nitrogen balance. Results were as follow:Spring maize yield and nitrogen absorption were increased with the increasing nitrogen fertilizer. Compared with applying urea treatment, applying CRU could increase yield, nitrogen absorption, nitrogen use efficiency, agriculture efficiency of nitrogen and nitrogen contribution rate. Under the same amount of nitrogen (100%, 75%, 50%, compared with 100% U as basic fertilizer treatment, maize yield of 100% CRU treatment increased 391, 427, 291 kg·hm-2, nitrogen use efficiency increased by 5.9%,4.9% and 5.1%, agriculture efficiency of nitrogen increased 2.0, 2.6, 2.6 kg·kg-1, and nitrogen contribution rate increased 2.7%, 3.1% and 2.4%, respectively. The value of maize yield, nitrogen absorption, nitrogen use efficiency and agriculture efficiency of nitrogen between the treatment four (40% urea as basic fertilizer+60% urea as topdressing and treatment five (40% urea plus 60% controlled release urea as basic fertilizer were similar. Apparent profit and loss of nitrogen decreased with the increase of nitrogen nitrogen fertilizer. Nitrogen apparent loss by applying 100% controlled release urea was reduced of 15.0 kg·hm-2 than applying 100% U treatment;Nitrogen apparent loss amount was decreased of 23.9 kg·hm-2 under treatment five. The method of mixing 40% urea and 60% controlled release urea should be applied in maize production in Heilongjiang Province.

  9. NITROGEN CONCENTRATION OF STOMACH CONTENTS AS AN INDEX OF DIETARY NITROGEN FOR HISPID COTTON RATS (SIGMODON HISPIDUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the reliability of using nitrogen concentration of stomach contents from hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) as an index of diet nitrogen. Stomach contents of cotton rats fed diets varying in nitrogen concentration were analyzed for stomach nitrogen. Regression a...

  10. NITROGEN CONCENTRATION OF STOMACH CONTENTS AS AN INDEX OF DIETARY NITROGEN FOR HISPID COTTON RATS (SIGMODON HISPIDUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the reliability of using nitrogen concentration of stomach contents from hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) as an index of diet nitrogen. Stomach contents of cotton rats fed diets varying in nitrogen concentration were analyzed for stomach nitrogen. Regression a...

  11. The economic impact of future biological nitrogen fixation technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Tauer, Loren W.

    1988-01-01

    The economic impact of some future biological nitrogen fixation technologies are estimated using AGSIM, a dynamic, partial equilibrium, econometric model of the U.S. agricultural sector. Five separate scenarios were modeled: (1) legumes fix more nitrogen, (2) legumes fix more nitrogen with an increase in legumes yields of 10 percent, (3) nitrogen fertilization requirements on all crops are reduced 50 percent with no yield changes, (4) total elimination of nitrogen fertilization and (5) total ...

  12. Tissue Nitrogen and Fructan Translocation in Bread Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU You-liang; L.O'Brien; ZHONG Gai-rong

    2002-01-01

    Translocation of previously accumulated nitrogen and carbohydrates from vegetative tissue of the wheat plant is a major assimilate source for grain filling. This study was conducted to examine genotype differences in nitrogen and fructan translocation and their relationships to grain yield and protein content. Effects indicated that significant genotype differences existed for nitrogen accumulation at anthesis and fructan at milk stage and their translocation. Two high protein genotypes, Cunningham and PST90-19, accumulated more nitrogen before anthesis and had greater nitrogen translocation, but lower post-anthesis nitrogen uptake,than two low protein genotypes, SUN109A and TM56. Among plant parts, leaves were the major storage for tissue nitrogen and provided the overwhelming proportion of the total nitrogen translocation, whereas for fructan accumulation and translocation it was the stems. The two high protein genotypes had a higher percentage of their grain nitrogen derived from nitrogen translocation, while for the two low protein ones, it was from postanthesis nitrogen uptake and assimilation. Increasing nitrogen application increased nitrogen accumulation and translocation, but decreased fructan accumulation and translocation. High grain protein content was associated with high nitrogen translocation from leaves, stems and the total plant, while high grain yield was related to high fructan translocation from stems and the total plant. Fructan translocation was negatively correlated to grain protein content. Nitrogen and fructan translocation were not correlated with each other.

  13. Nitrogen recycling through the gut and the nitrogen economy of ruminants: An asynchronous symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, C K; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2007-01-01

    The extensive development of the ruminant forestomach sets apart their nitrogen (N) economy from that of nonruminants in a number of respects. Extensive pre-gastric fermentation alters the profile of protein reaching the small intestine, largely through the transformation of nitrogenous compounds...

  14. Nitrogen Mineralization Response to Tillage Practices on Low and High Nitrogen Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    In strip tillage, crop residue is left on soil surface, decreasing the contact between soil and the residue, and therefore reducing decomposition rates compared to conventional tillage methods. Decomposition rates directly affect carbon and nitrogen ratios, which can affect nitrogen mineralization r...

  15. Effects of nitrogen on the growth and nitrogenous compounds of Ceratophyllum demersum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, E.P.H.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of high concentrations of nitrogen on Ceratophyllum demersum L. were studied. Nitrogen was added in the form of nitrate or ammonia. Growth and morphology were not affected by nitrate up to a concentration of 105 mg l−1. Ammonia, supplied in low concentration during a short period, stimul

  16. Actual and potential nitrogen fixation in pea and field bean as affected by combined nitrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mil, van M.

    1981-01-01

    Actual nitrogen fixation of pea and field-bean plants, grown in soil in the open air, was determined as the acetylene reduction of nodulated roots. During the major part of the vegetative growth of these plants, actual nitrogen fixation was equal to the potential maximum nitrogenase activity of the

  17. Effect of combined nitrogen on symbiotic nitrogen fixation in pea plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwaard, F.

    1979-01-01

    The nitrogen-fixing activity of the symbiotic system of Pisum sativum with Rhizobium leguminosarum is adversely affected by combined nitrogen. Both ammonium chloride and potassium nitrate, when added to the roots, lower the nitrogenase activity (acetylene-reduction) of intact pea plants. During a 3-

  18. Discrimination between extraneous nitrogen input and interior nitrogen release in lakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO; Huayun; LIU; Congqiang

    2004-01-01

    In this study the authors determined the nitrogen isotopes of nitrate and the carbon and nitrogen contents of water samples from the Hongfeng Lake and inflowing streams, and, on this basis, discriminated the extraneous nitrogen input and the interior nitrogen release (organic matter decomposition) in the lake. The results showed that the amount of extraneous nitrogen input into the Hongfeng Lake increases and the interior nitrogen release from the lake is intensified in winter and spring. Nitrogen mixing is relatively obvious at the catchments between the lake inlet and inflowing streams, while organic matter decomposition (nitrification) is most intense in the middle and lower reaches of the lake. In winter and spring the organic matter decomposition takes place mainly at the middle level of the water column in the middle and lower reaches of the lake, which has a bearing on the abundance of degraded organic matter at this water level. This part of degraded organic matter contains a considerable proportion of hydrogenous nitrogen in the lake.

  19. Effects of Nitrogen Application Levels on Ammonia Volatilization and Nitrogen Utilization during Rice Growing Season

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhong-cheng; XU Ke; WEI Hai-yan; DAi Qi-gen; YE Shi-chao; WU Fu-guan; JIA Yu-shu; CHEN Jing-dou; XU Lu-sheng; ZHANG Hong-cheng; HUO Zhong-yang

    2012-01-01

    We conducted field trials of rice grown in sandy soil and clay soil to determine the effects of nitrogen application levels on the concentration of NH4+-N in surface water,loss of ammonia through volatilization from paddy fields,rice production,nitrogen-use efficiency,and nitrogen content in the soil profile.The concentration of NH4+-N in surface water and the amount of ammonia lost through volatilization increased with increasing nitrogen application level,and peaked at 1-3 d after nitrogen application.Less ammonia was lost via volatilization from clay soil than from sandy soil.The amounts of ammonia lost via volatilization after nitrogen application differed depending on the stage when it was applied,from the highest loss to the lowest:N application to promote tillering > the first N topdrossing to promote panicle initiation (applied at the last 4-leaf stage) > basal fertilizer > the second N topdressing to promote panicle initiation (applied at the last 2-leaf stage).The total loss of ammonia via volatilization from clay soil was 10.49-87.06 kg/hm2,equivalent to 10.92%-21.76% of the nitrogen applied.The total loss of ammonia via volatilization from sandy soil was 11.32-102.43 kg/hm2,equivalent to 11.32%-25.61% of the nitrogen applied.The amount of ammonia lost via volatilization and the concentration of NH4+-N in surface water peaked simultaneously after nitrogen application; both showed maxima at the tillering stage with the ratio between them ranging from 23.76% to 33.65%.With the increase in nitrogen application level,rice production and nitrogen accumulation in plants increased,but nitrogen-use efficiency decreased.Rice production and nitrogen accumulation in plants were slightly higher in clay soil than in sandy soil.In the soil,the nitrogen content was the lowest at a depth of 40-50 cm.In any sbecific soil layer,the soil nitrogen content increased with increasing nitrogen application level,and the soil nitrogen content was higher in clay

  20. Nitrogen fixation, denitrification, and ecosystem nitrogen pools in relation to vegetation development in the Subarctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Pernille Lærkedal; Jonasson, Sven Evert; Michelsen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    measurements of temperature, light, and soil moisture. Nitrogen fixation rate was high with seasonal input estimated at 1.1 g N m2 on frostheaved sorted circles, which was higher than the total plant N content and exceeded estimated annual plant N uptake several-fold but was lower than the microbial N content......Nitrogen (N) fixation, denitrification, and ecosystem pools of nitrogen were measured in three subarctic ecosystem types differing in soil frost-heaving activity and vegetation cover. N2-fixation was measured by the acetylene reduction assay and converted to absolute N ecosystem input by estimates...... of conversion factors between acetylene reduction and 15N incorporation. One aim was to relate nitrogen fluxes and nitrogen pools to the mosaic of ecosystem types of different stability common in areas of soil frost movements. A second aim was to identify abiotic controls on N2-fixation by simultaneous...

  1. Studies on nitrogen retention in growing pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorbek, G; Henckel, S; Chwalibog, André;

    1987-01-01

    Nitrogen retention (RN) was measured in 60 barrows of Danish Landrace and a total of 470 balance periods was carried out during the growth period from 20 to 85 kg live weight. In the first serie (Expt A) six different feed compounds of high biological value (HBV) were fed to 48 barrows, while...... in the second serie (Expt B) 12 barrows were measured on feed compounds of HBV or low biological value (LBV). Three different levels of gross energy were used in Expt B. Individual differences of 10-20% in the pigs capability for nitrogen retention were observed. Nitrogen retention increased from 12 to 21 g N....../d on the HBV-compounds and was not influenced by increasing nitrogen or energy intake. Nitrogen retention was curvilinear in relation to metabolic live weight (kg0.75) in both series. A parabolic function on kg0.75 gave the best fit to the data with the following regression equations: Expt A + B: RN, g/d = 1...

  2. Microbial nitrogen cycling in Arctic snowpacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larose, Catherine; Dommergue, Aurélien; Vogel, Timothy M.

    2013-09-01

    Arctic snowpacks are often considered as chemical reactors for a variety of chemicals deposited through wet and dry events, but are overlooked as potential sites for microbial metabolism of reactive nitrogen species. The fate of deposited species is critical since warming leads to the transfer of contaminants to snowmelt-fed ecosystems. Here, we examined the role of microorganisms and the potential pathways involved in nitrogen cycling in the snow. Next generation sequencing data were used to follow functional gene abundances and a 16S rRNA (ribosomal ribonucleic acid) gene microarray was used to follow shifts in microbial community structure during a two-month spring-time field study at a high Arctic site, Svalbard, Norway (79° N). We showed that despite the low temperatures and limited water supply, microbial communities inhabiting the snow cover demonstrated dynamic shifts in their functional potential to follow several different pathways of the nitrogen cycle. In addition, microbial specific phylogenetic probes tracked different nitrogen species over time. For example, probes for Roseomonas tracked nitrate concentrations closely and probes for Caulobacter tracked ammonium concentrations after a delay of one week. Nitrogen cycling was also shown to be a dominant process at the base of the snowpack.

  3. Atmospheric nitrogen evolution on Earth and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wordsworth, R. D.

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen is the most common element in Earth's atmosphere and also appears to be present in significant amounts in the mantle. However, its long-term cycling between these two reservoirs remains poorly understood. Here a range of biotic and abiotic mechanisms are evaluated that could have caused nitrogen exchange between Earth's surface and interior over time. In the Archean, biological nitrogen fixation was likely strongly limited by nutrient and/or electron acceptor constraints. Abiotic fixation of dinitrogen becomes efficient in strongly reducing atmospheres, but only once temperatures exceed around 1000 K. Hence if atmospheric N2 levels really were as low as they are today 3.0-3.5 Ga, the bulk of Earth's mantle nitrogen must have been emplaced in the Hadean, most likely at a time when the surface was molten. The elevated atmospheric N content on Venus compared to Earth can be explained abiotically by a water loss redox pump mechanism, where oxygen liberated from H2O photolysis and subsequent H loss to space oxidises the mantle, causing enhanced outgassing of nitrogen. This mechanism has implications for understanding the partitioning of other Venusian volatiles and atmospheric evolution on exoplanets.

  4. Nitrogen footprints: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, James N.; Winiwarter, Wilfried; Leip, Adrian; Leach, Allison M.; Bleeker, Albert; Willem Erisman, Jan

    2014-11-01

    The human alteration of the nitrogen cycle has evolved from minimal in the mid-19th century to extensive in the present time. The consequences to human and environmental health are significant. While much attention has been given to the extent and impacts of the alteration, little attention has been given to those entities (i.e., consumers, institutions) that use the resources that result in extensive reactive nitrogen (Nr) creation. One strategy for assessment is the use of nitrogen footprint tools. A nitrogen footprint is generally defined as the total amount of Nr released to the environment as a result of an entity’s consumption patterns. This paper reviews a number of nitrogen footprint tools (N-Calculator, N-Institution, N-Label, N-Neutrality, N-Indicator) that are designed to provide that attention. It reviews N-footprint tools for consumers as a function of the country that they live in (N-Calculator, N-Indicator) and the products they buy (N-Label), for the institutions that people work in and are educated in (N-Institution), and for events and decision-making regarding offsets (N-Neutrality). N footprint tools provide a framework for people to make decisions about their resource use and show them how offsets can be coupled with behavior change to decrease consumer/institution contributions to N-related problems.

  5. Biofilm formation enables free-living nitrogen-fixing rhizobacteria to fix nitrogen under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Xu, Anming; Elmerich, Claudine; Ma, Luyan Z

    2017-07-01

    The multicellular communities of microorganisms known as biofilms are of high significance in agricultural setting, yet it is largely unknown about the biofilm formed by nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Here we report the biofilm formation by Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501, a free-living rhizospheric bacterium, capable of fixing nitrogen under microaerobic and nitrogen-limiting conditions. P. stutzeri A1501 tended to form biofilm in minimal media, especially under nitrogen depletion condition. Under such growth condition, the biofilms formed at the air-liquid interface (termed as pellicles) and the colony biofilms on agar plates exhibited nitrogenase activity in air. The two kinds of biofilms both contained large ovoid shape 'cells' that were multiple living bacteria embedded in a sac of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). We proposed to name such large 'cells' as A1501 cyst. Our results suggest that the EPS, especially exopolysaccharides enabled the encased bacteria to fix nitrogen while grown under aerobic condition. The formation of A1501 cysts was reversible in response to the changes of carbon or nitrogen source status. A1501 cyst formation depended on nitrogen-limiting signaling and the presence of sufficient carbon sources, yet was independent of an active nitrogenase. The pellicles formed by Azospirillum brasilense, another free-living nitrogen-fixing rhizobacterium, which also exhibited nitrogenase activity and contained the large EPS-encapsuled A1501 cyst-like 'cells'. Our data imply that free-living nitrogen-fixing bacteria could convert the easy-used carbon sources to exopolysaccharides in order to enable nitrogen fixation in a natural aerobic environment.

  6. Effects of “NPN” Supplement on Milk Production in Holstein Dairy Cow%“NPN”补充料对增加奶牛产奶量效果的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关超

    2011-01-01

    为探讨NPN (non protein nitrogen非蛋白氮简称NPN)补充料在奶牛养殖业中的作用,选取相关材料和方法进行研究.中国荷斯坦奶牛32头随机分为试验组和对照组,每组16头.试验组在精料中用NPN补充料取代一定数量的常规蛋白质补充料,对照组饲喂常规饲料,不添加NPN补充料.经过60天的试验,结果表明:试验组奶牛总产奶量16108kg,比对照组的15289 kg增产819kg,平均每头每日增产0.85 kg,以当地鲜奶时价2元/kg计,计算出日增收1.7元.再来计算饲料成本,在用NPN补充料替换出常规蛋白质补充料胡麻饼时,精饲料总成本降低544元,即试验组比对照组饲料成本节省544元,通过相关计算可得试验组平均每头每日节约饲料成本0.57元.从而得出NPN补充料对奶牛产奶量及经济效益的影响结果,对其在生产中推广应用有指导作用.%To explore the NPN supplement; in the role of breeding industry of cows, select, related materials and methods to research. Choose thirty-two China Holstein dairy cows, and then randomly divided them into two groups: experiment group and control group, each group is sixteen .In the experimental group feed with NPN supplement to replace a certain number of conventional protein supplement. The control group feed with conventional material, do not add NPN supplementary material .After years of experimentation, The results shows: experimental group output is 16108 kg and control group output is 15289 kg. The former more than the latter 819 kg. The average daily milk yield number of cow per day increase 0.85 kg, decides on a price 2 yuan/kg ideas by the fresh milk to be the equivalent to increase 1.7 yuan per day. Calculate the cost of feed while with NPN supplementary material replacing the conventional protein supplementary material in Hu sesame seed cake. The concentrated feed total cost drops 544 yuan. Namely the experimental group drops 544 yuan compared to the control group feed

  7. Environmentally friendly slow-release nitrogen fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Boli; Liu, Mingzhu; Lü, Shaoyu; Xie, Lihua; Wang, Yanfang

    2011-09-28

    To sustain the further world population, more fertilizers are required, which may become an environmental hazard, unless adequate technical and socioeconomic impacts are addressed. In the current study, slow-release formulations of nitrogen fertilizer were developed on the basis of natural attapulgite (APT) clay, ethylcellulose (EC) film, and sodium carboxymethylcellulose/hydroxyethylcellulose (CMC/HEC) hydrogel. The structural and chemical characteristics of the product were examined. The release profiles of urea, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium chloride as nitrogen fertilizer substrates were determined in soil. To further compare the release profiles of nitrogen from different fertilizer substrates, a mathematical model for nutrient release from the coated fertilizer was applied to calculate the diffusion coefficient D. The influence of the product on water-holding and water-retention capacities of soil was determined. The experimental data indicated that the product can effectively reduce nutrient loss, improve use efficiency of water, and prolong irrigation cycles in drought-prone environments.

  8. Prediction of boron carbon nitrogen phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sanxi; Zhang, Hantao; Widom, Michael

    We studied the phase diagram of boron, carbon and nitrogen, including the boron-carbon and boron-nitrogen binaries and the boron-carbon-nitrogen ternary. Based on the idea of electron counting and using a technique of mixing similar primitive cells, we constructed many ''electron precise'' structures. First principles calculation is performed on these structures, with either zero or high pressures. For the BN binary, our calculation confirms that a rhmobohedral phase can be stablized at high pressure, consistent with some experimental results. For the BCN ternary, a new ground state structure is discovered and an Ising-like phase transition is suggested. Moreover, we modeled BCN ternary phase diagram and show continuous solubility from boron carbide to the boron subnitride phase.

  9. Human Decisions: Nitrogen Footprints and Environmental Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, A. M.; Bleeker, A.; Galloway, J. N.; Erisman, J.

    2012-12-01

    Human consumption choices are responsible for growing losses of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to the environment. Once in the environment, Nr can cause a cascade of negative impacts such as smog, acid rain, coastal eutrophication, climate change, and biodiversity loss. Although all humans must consume nitrogen as protein, the food production process releases substantial Nr to the environment. This dilemma presents a challenge: how do we feed a growing population while reducing Nr? Although top-down strategies to reduce Nr losses (e.g., emissions controls) are necessary, the bottom-up strategies focusing on personal consumption patterns will be imperative to solve the nitrogen challenge. Understanding the effects of different personal choices on Nr losses and the environment is an important first step for this strategy. This paper will utilize information and results from the N-Calculator, a per capita nitrogen footprint model (www.N-Print.org), to analyze the impact of different food consumption patterns on a personal food nitrogen footprint and the environment. Scenarios will analyze the impact of the following dietary patterns on the average United States (28 kg Nr/cap/yr) food nitrogen footprint: 1) Consuming only the recommended protein as defined by the WHO and the USDA; 2) Reducing food waste by 50%; 3) Consuming a vegetarian diet; 4) Consuming a vegan diet; 5) Consuming a demitarian diet (replacing half of animal protein consumption with vegetable protein); 6) Substituting chicken (a more efficient animal protein) with beef (a less efficient animal protein); 7) Consuming sustainably-produced food; and 8) Using advanced wastewater treatment. Preliminary results suggest that widespread advanced wastewater treatment with nutrient removal technology and halving food waste would each reduce the US personal food nitrogen footprint by 13%. In addition, reducing protein consumption to the recommended levels would reduce the footprint by about 42%. Combining these measures

  10. Deposition of nitrogen into the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeuw, G. de; Skjøth, C.A.; Hertel, O.;

    2003-01-01

    The flux of nitrogen species from the atmosphere into the ocean, with emphasis on coastal waters, was addressed during the ANICE project (Atmospheric Nitrogen Inputs into the Coastal Ecosystem). ANICE focused on quantifying the deposition of atmospheric inputs of inorganic nitrogen compounds (HNO3......, NO3-, NH3 and NH4+) into the North Sea and the processes governing this deposition. The Southern North Sea was studied as a prototype. Because the physical and chemical processes are described, as opposed to empirical relations, the results can potentially be transferred to other regional seas like...... the Mediterranean, the North Atlantic continental shelf area and the Baltic. Two intensive field experiments were undertaken, centred around the offshore tower Meetpost Noordwijk and the Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory in East Anglia (UK). Long-term measurements were made on a ferry sailing between Hamburg...

  11. Nitrogen heat pipe for cryocooler thermal shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Green, G.F.; Roth, E.W. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A nitrogen heat pipe was designed, built and tested for the purpose of providing a thermal shunt between the two stages of a Gifford-McMahan (GM) cryocooler during cooldown. The nitrogen heat pipe has an operating temperature range between 63 and 123 K. While the heat pipe is in the temperature range during the system cooldown, it acts as a thermal shunt between the first and second stage of the cryocooler. The heat pipe increases the heat transfer to the first stage of the cryocooler, thereby reducing the cooldown time of the system. When the heat pipe temperature drops below the triple point, the nitrogen working fluid freezes, effectively stopping the heat pipe operation. A small heat leak between cryocooler stages remains because of axial conduction along the heat pipe wall. As long as the heat pipe remains below 63 K, the heat pipe remains inactive. Heat pipe performance limits were measured and the optimum fluid charge was determined.

  12. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Foliar Nitrogen Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazikhin, Yuri; Schull, Mitchell A.; Stenberg, Pauline; Moettus, Matti; Rautiainen, Miina; Yang, Yan; Marshak, Alexander; Carmona, Pedro Latorre; Kaufmann, Robert K.; Lewis, Philip; Disney, Mathias I.; Vanderbilt, Vern; Davis, Anthony B.; Baret, Frederic; Jacquemoud, Stephane; Lyapustin, Alexei; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2013-01-01

    A strong positive correlation between vegetation canopy bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) in the near infrared (NIR) spectral region and foliar mass-based nitrogen concentration (%N) has been reported in some temperate and boreal forests. This relationship, if true, would indicate an additional role for nitrogen in the climate system via its influence on surface albedo and may offer a simple approach for monitoring foliar nitrogen using satellite data. We report, however, that the previously reported correlation is an artifact - it is a consequence of variations in canopy structure, rather than of %N. The data underlying this relationship were collected at sites with varying proportions of foliar nitrogen-poor needleleaf and nitrogen-rich broadleaf species, whose canopy structure differs considerably. When the BRF data are corrected for canopy-structure effects, the residual reflectance variations are negatively related to %N at all wavelengths in the interval 423-855 nm. This suggests that the observed positive correlation between BRF and %N conveys no information about %N. We find that to infer leaf biochemical constituents, e.g., N content, from remotely sensed data, BRF spectra in the interval 710-790 nm provide critical information for correction of structural influences. Our analysis also suggests that surface characteristics of leaves impact remote sensing of its internal constituents. This further decreases the ability to remotely sense canopy foliar nitrogen. Finally, the analysis presented here is generic to the problem of remote sensing of leaf-tissue constituents and is therefore not a specific critique of articles espousing remote sensing of foliar %N.

  13. Nitrogen Emission and Deposition: The European Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Willem Erisman

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Europe has been successful in reducing the emissions of several nitrogenous pollutants over recent decades. This is reflected in concentrations and deposition rates that have decreased for several components. Emissions of nitrogen containing gases are estimated to have decreased in Europe by 10%, 21%, and 14% for NO, NOx, and NH3, respectively, between 1990 and 1998. The main reductions are the result of a decrease in industrial and agricultural activities in the east of Europe as a result of the economic situation, measures in the transport sector, industry and agricultural sector, with only a small part of the reduction due to specific measures designed to reduce emissions. The reduction is significant, but far from the end goal for large areas in Europe in relation to different environmental problems. The Gothenburg Protocol will lead to reductions of 50 and 12% in 2010 relative to 1990 for NOx and NH3, respectively. The N2O emissions are expected to grow between 1998 and 2010 by 9%. Further reductions are necessary to reach critical limits for ecosystem protection, air quality standards and climate change. Emissions of nitrogen compounds result from an overload of reactive nitrogen, which is produced by combustion processes, by synthesis of ammonia or by import from other areas as concentrated animal feeds. Although some improvements can be made by improving the efficiency of combustion processes and agricultural systems, measures to reduce emissions substantially need to be focused on decreasing the production or import of reactive N. Reactive N ceilings for regions based on critical limits for all N-related effects can help to focus such measures. An integrated approach might have advantages over the pollutant specific approach to combat nitrogen pollution. This could provide the future direction for European policy to reduce the impacts of excess nitrogen.

  14. Hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped carbon membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2017-08-03

    The present invention is a structure, method of making and method of use for a novel macroscopic hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped, nano-porous carbon membrane (HNDCMs) with asymmetric and hierarchical pore architecture that can be produced on a large-scale approach. The unique HNDCM holds great promise as components in separation and advanced carbon devices because they could offer unconventional fluidic transport phenomena on the nanoscale. Overall, the invention set forth herein covers a hierarchically structured, nitrogen-doped carbon membranes and methods of making and using such a membranes.

  15. Kinetics of Nitrogen Diffusion in Granular Manganese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-zhu; XU Chu-shao; ZHAO Yue-ping

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and the influence of time on granular manganese nitriding were studied by means of a vacuum resistance furnace, X-ray diffraction technique, and LECO TC-436 oxygen/nitrogen determinator. The longer the nitriding time, the more the nitrogen pickup. Except for a trace of oxide MnO that developed, the metal manganese could thoroughly be nitrided to form Mn4N and a little ζ-phase (the stoichiometric components as Mn2N) with the nitriding time lasting. A kinetic model is developed to reveal the nitriding situation and agrees well with the experimental results.

  16. Development of liquid nitrogen Centrifugal Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, M; Sagiyama, R; Tsuchiya, H [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Takayama, T [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 38 Nishigo-Naka, Myodaiji, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Torii, Y [OMNIX, 1-15-3 Nishishinjuku, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 160-0023 (Japan); Nakamura, M [YN Nakamura Ltd, 3-9-25 Ohjima, Koto, Tokyo, 136-0072 (Japan); Hoshino, Y [JECC TORISHA Co. Ltd, 2-8-52 Yoshinodai, Kawagoe-shi, Saitama, 350-0833 (Japan); Odashima, Y [Department of Basic Sciences, University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)], E-mail: mirei@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2009-02-01

    Usually liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) transfer from a container to a laboratory equipment takes place by applying pressure to the container to push out liquid or pouring liquid into the cryostat directly by lifting the container. In order to overcome inconvenience of pressuring or lifting containers, we have been developing the Liquid Nitrogen Centrifugal Pump of a small electric turbine pump. Significant advantages that both reducing time to fill LN{sub 2}and controlling the flow rate of liquid into the cryostat are obtained by introducing this pump. We have achieved the lift of about 800mm with the vessel's opening diameter of 28mm.

  17. On The Cosmic Origins Of Carbon & Nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, R B C; Köppen, J

    2001-01-01

    We employ analytical and numerical chemical evolution models to study observed trends in abundance ratios involving carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Several sets of published stellar yields for both intermediate-mass and massive stars are considered, and the most appropriate sets are selected through the use of analytical models. These yields are then used in the numerical models to match observed data trends in C/O, N/O, and O/H. We conclude that the principal production site for carbon is massive stars, while that for nitrogen is intermediate-mass stars.

  18. Health risk evaluation of nitrogen oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, M.; Ewetz, L.; Gustafsson, L.; Moldeus, P.; Pershagen, G.; Victorin, K. [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Inst. of Environmental Medicine

    1995-12-31

    At the request of the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency a criteria document on nitrogen oxides has been prepared, and is intended to serve as a basis for revised air quality standards in Sweden. The criteria document is based on a thorough literature survey, and the health risk assessment is summarized in this presentation. The present standard for nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) is 110 {mu}g/m{sup 3} as 1-hour mean (98th percentile); 75 {mu}g/m{sup 3} as 24- hour mean (98th percentile); and 50 {mu}g/m{sup 3} as 6-month mean (arithmetic eman during winter half-year). (author)

  19. Modelling the carbon and nitrogen cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas A Varotsos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The issues of air pollution are inextricably linked to the mechanisms underlying the physicochemical functioning of the biosphere which together with the atmosphere, the cryosphere, the lithosphere, and the hydrosphere constitute the climate system. We herewith present a review of the achievements and unresolved problems concerning the modeling of the biochemical cycles of basic chemicals of the climate system, such as carbon and nitrogen. Although the achievements in this area can roughly describe the carbon and nitrogen cycles, serious problems still remain associated with the accuracy and precision of the processes and assessments employed in the relevant modeling.

  20. Purging dissolved oxygen by nitrogen bubble aeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Tatsuya; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    We apply aeration with nitrogen microbubbles to water in order to see whether oxygen gas originally dissolved in the water at one atmosphere is purged by the aeration. The concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) is detected by a commercial DO meter. To detect the dissolved nitrogen (DN) level, we observe the growth of millimetre-sized bubbles nucleated at glass surfaces in contact with the aerated water and compare it with the Epstein-Plesset theory that accounts for DO/DN diffusions and the presence of the glass surfaces. Comparisons between the experiment and the theory suggest that the DO in the water are effectively purged by the aeration.

  1. Analysis of Nitrogen in Sodium by Spectrophotometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Sodium sample in which nitrogen exists in form of sodium nitride, lithium nitride and calcium nitrideis solved by distilled water and produce ammonia. Ammonia is relieved when solution is heated, then it isabsorbed by hydrochloric acid to produce ammnium chloride. In alkaline solution, ammonium chlorideconverts into ammonia. Ammonia reacts with hypochlorite and phenol that produces a blue indophenol.Nitrogen is determined by 751G type spectrophotometry at the absorption wavelength of 635 nm. The work condition of 751G type spectroscopy, colorimetric condition, smicture of the apparatus

  2. Electrostatic Precipitation in Nearly Pure Gaseous Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Charles; Calle, Carlos; Clements, Sid; Cox, Bobby; Ritz, Mindy

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitation was performed in a nearly pure gaseous nitrogen system as a possible remedy for black dust contaminant from high pressure 6000 psi lines at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The results of a prototype electrostatic precipitator that was built and tested using nitrogen gas at standard atmospheric pressures is presented. High voltage pulsed waveforms are generated using a rotating spark gap system at 30 Hz. A unique dust delivery system utilizing the Venturi effect was devised that supplies a given amount of dust per unit time for testing purposes.

  3. Characterization of nitrogen species incorporated into graphite using low energy nitrogen ion sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Hisao; Kondo, Takahiro; Sakurai, Masataka; Guo, Donghui; Nakamura, Junji; Niwa, Hideharu; Miyawaki, Jun; Kawai, Maki; Oshima, Masaharu; Harada, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The electronic structures of nitrogen species incorporated into highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), prepared by low energy (200 eV) nitrogen ion sputtering and subsequent annealing at 1000 K, were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), angle-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and Raman spectroscopy. An additional peak was observed at higher binding energy of 401.9 eV than 400.9 eV for graphitic1 N (graphitic N in the basal plane) in N 1s XPS, where graphitic2 N (graphitic N in the zigzag edge and/or vacancy sites) has been theoretically expected to appear. N 1s XPS showed that graphitic1 N and graphitic2 N were preferably incorporated under low nitrogen content doping conditions (8 × 10(13) ions cm(-2)), while pyridinic N and graphitic1 N were dominantly observed under high nitrogen content doping conditions. In addition, angle-dependent N 1s XAS showed that the graphitic N and pyridinic N atoms were incorporated into the basal plane of HOPG and thus were highly oriented. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy revealed that low energy sputtering resulted in almost no fraction of the disturbed graphite surface layers under the lowest nitrogen doping condition. The suitable nitrogen doping condition was discovered for realizing the well-controlled nitrogen doped HOPG. The electrochemical properties for the oxygen reduction reaction of these samples in acidic solution were examined and discussed.

  4. Ecological effects of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on soil enzyme activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cong-yan; Lv Yan-na; LIU Xue-yan Liu; WANG Lei

    2013-01-01

    The continuing increase in human activities is causing global changes such as increased deposition of atmospheric nitrogen.There is considerable interest in understanding the effects of increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition on soil enzyme activities,specifically in terms of global nitrogen cycling and its potential future contribution to global climate change.This paper summarizes the ecological effects of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on soil enzyme activities,including size-effects,stage-effects,site-effects,and the effects of different levels and forms of atmospheric nitrogen deposition.We discuss needs for further research on the relationship between atmospheric nitrogen deposition and soil enzymes.

  5. Advances in the research of nitrogen containing stainless steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The current status of nitrogen containing stainless steels at home and aboard has been introduced. The function and existing forms of nitrogen in the stainless steels, influence of nitrogen on mechanical properties and anti-corrosion properties as well as the application of nitrogen containing cast stainless steels were discussed in this paper. It is clear that nitrogen will be a potential and important alloying element in stainless steels. And Argon Oxygen Decarbonization (AOD) refining can provide an advanced manufacture process for nitrogen containing stainless steels with ultra-low- carbon and high cleanliness.

  6. Characterization of nitrogen compound types in hydrotreated Paraho shale oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, S.A.; Latham, D.R.

    1980-10-01

    Results from the separation and characterization of nitrogen compound types in hydrotreated Paraho shale oil samples were obtained. Two samples of Paraho shale oil were hydrotreated by Chevron Research Company such that one sample contained about 0.05 wt. percent nitrogen and the other sample contained about 0.10 wt. percent nitrogen. A separation method concentrate specific nitrogen compound types was developed. Characterization of the nitrogen types was accomplished by infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, potentiometric titration, and elemental analysis. The distribution of nitrogen compound types in both samples and in the Paraho crude shale oil is compared.

  7. Nitrogen fixation during an unusual summer Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Maren; Dalsgaard, Tage; Fabian, Jenny

    Nitrogen fixation is a major nitrogen source for the open ocean. Also the land-locked, partly anoxic Baltic Sea receives almost as much nitrogen from nitrogen fixation as it receives from eutrophied rivers. Growth conditions for cyanobacteria are usually very favorable with low N/P ratios after...... variety in nitrogen fixing species than usual was observed. Under these conditions nitrogen fixation rates were studied over a three weeks period throughout the upper water column. Moreover, a methods comparison was performed to test the dissolved dinitrogen gas additions against the bubble addition...

  8. Effectiveness of Ammonium-Nitrogen and Nitrate-Nitrogen in Irrigation Water in Paddy Rice without Topdressed Nitrogen at the Panicle Formation Stage

    OpenAIRE

    池田, 元輝; 渡辺, 孝賢; Ikeda, Motoki; Watanabe, Takayasu

    2002-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of ammonium- and nitrate- nitrogen contained in irrigation water during the reproductive growth period of paddy rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Hinohikari) that did not receive topdressed nitrogen at the panicle formation stage. lrrigation of water containing a low level of nitrogen (7mgNL^-1) did not increase yields so much compared to topdressed nitrogen. lrrigation of water containing a high level of nitrogen (14mgNL^-1) caused substantia...

  9. [Interactions of straw, nitrogen fertilizer and bacterivorous nematodes on soil labile carbon and nitrogen and greenhouse gas emissions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng-Hao; Wang, Nan; Liu, Man-Qiang; Li, Fang-Hui; Zhu, Kang-Li; Li, Hui-Xin; Hu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    A 3 x 2 factorial design of microcosm experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects of straw, nitrogen fertilizer and bacterivorous nematodes on soil microbial biomass carbon (C(mic)) and nitrogen (N(mic)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON), mineral nitrogen (NH(4+)-N and NO(3-)-N), and greenhouse gas (CO2, N2O and CH4) emissions. Results showed that straw amendment remarkably increased the numbers of bacterivorous nematodes and the contents of Cmic and Nmic, but Cmic and Nmic decreased with the increasing dose of nitrogen fertilization. The effects of bacterivorous nematodes strongly depended on either straw or nitrogen fertilization. The interactions of straw, nitrogen fertilization and bacterivorous nematodes on soil DOC, DON and mineral nitrogen were strong. Straw and nitrogen fertilization increased DOC and mineral nitrogen contents, but their influences on DON depended on the bacterivorous nematodes. The DOC and mineral nitrogen were negatively and positively influenced by the bacterivorous nematodes, re- spectively. Straw significantly promoted CO2 and N2O emissions but inhibited CH4 emission, while interactions between nematodes and nitrogen fertilization on emissions of greenhouse gases were obvious. In the presence of straw, nematodes increased cumulative CO2 emissions with low nitrogen fertilization, but decreased CO2 and N2O emissions with high nitrogen fertilization on the 56th day after incubation. In summary, mechanical understanding the soil ecological process would inevitably needs to consider the roles of soil microfauna.

  10. The contribution of nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria to particulate organic nitrogen in a constructed wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; PAN, X.; MA, M.; Li, W.; Cui, L.

    2016-12-01

    N-fixing cyanobacteria can create extra nitrogen for aquatic ecosystems. Previous studies reported inconsistence patterns of the contribution of biological nitrogen fixation to the nitrogen pools in aquatic ecosystems. However, there were few studies concerning the effect of fixed nitrogen by cyanobacteria on the nitrogen removal efficiency in constructed wetlands. This study was performed at the Beijing Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Centre, where a constructed lake for the habitation of waterfowls and a constructed wetland for purifying sewage from the lake are located. The composition of phytoplankton communities, the concentrations of particulate organic nitrogen (PON) and nitrogen fixation rates (Rn) in the constructed lake and the constructed wetland were compared throughout a growing season. We counted the densities of genus Anabaena and Microcystis cells, and explored their relationships with PON and Rn in water. The proportions of PON from various sources, including the ambient N2, waterfowl faeces, wetland sediments and the nitrates, were calculated by the natural abundance of 15N with the IsoSource software. The result revealed that the constructed lake was alternately dominated by Anabaena and Microcystis throughout the growing season, and the Rn was positively correlated with PON and the cell density of Anabaena (P constructed lake and wetland respectively during the growing season. The proportions of PON from N2 increased to more than 80% when the Rn reached the highest in September. The result demonstrated that the nitrogen fixed by Anabaena might be utilized by non-N-fixing Microcystis which formed water blooms in summer. Therefore, the decline of the removal efficiency of PON in the constructed wetland in summer might indirectly result from the nitrogen fixation, since the proliferated algal were difficult to sediment in surface flow wetlands.

  11. Gene Deletions Resulting in Increased Nitrogen Release by Azotobacter vinelandii: Application of a Novel Nitrogen Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, Lauren J.; Ohlert, Janet M.; Knutson, Carolann M.; Plunkett, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a widely studied model diazotrophic (nitrogen-fixing) bacterium and also an obligate aerobe, differentiating it from many other diazotrophs that require environments low in oxygen for the function of the nitrogenase. As a free-living bacterium, A. vinelandii has evolved enzymes and transporters to minimize the loss of fixed nitrogen to the surrounding environment. In this study, we pursued efforts to target specific enzymes and further developed screens to identify individual colonies of A. vinelandii producing elevated levels of extracellular nitrogen. Targeted deletions were done to convert urea into a terminal product by disrupting the urease genes that influence the ability of A. vinelandii to recycle the urea nitrogen within the cell. Construction of a nitrogen biosensor strain was done to rapidly screen several thousand colonies disrupted by transposon insertional mutagenesis to identify strains with increased extracellular nitrogen production. Several disruptions were identified in the ammonium transporter gene amtB that resulted in the production of sufficient levels of extracellular nitrogen to support the growth of the biosensor strain. Further studies substituting the biosensor strain with the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed that levels of nitrogen produced were sufficient to support the growth of this organism when the medium was supplemented with sufficient sucrose to support the growth of the A. vinelandii in coculture. The nature and quantities of nitrogen released by urease and amtB disruptions were further compared to strains reported in previous efforts that altered the nifLA regulatory system to produce elevated levels of ammonium. These results reveal alternative approaches that can be used in various combinations to yield new strains that might have further application in biofertilizer schemes. PMID:25888177

  12. Protein digestion in ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    protein nitrogen (NPN) in the rumen, the effect of digestible energy on the rate and .... Fahey, 1982) and inhibitors of amino acid deamination. (Chalupa & Scott, 1976). ... the omasum, although both urea and ammonia may be absorbed (0,9 gld.

  13. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria in Mediterranean seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) roots

    KAUST Repository

    Garcias Bonet, Neus

    2016-03-09

    Biological nitrogen fixation by diazotrophic bacteria in seagrass rhizosphere and leaf epiphytic community is an important source of nitrogen required for plant growth. However, the presence of endophytic diazotrophs remains unclear in seagrass tissues. Here, we assess the presence, diversity and taxonomy of nitrogen-fixing bacteria within surface-sterilized roots of Posidonia oceanica. Moreover, we analyze the nitrogen isotopic signature of seagrass tissues in order to notice atmospheric nitrogen fixation. We detected nitrogen-fixing bacteria by nifH gene amplification in 13 out of the 78 roots sampled, corresponding to 9 locations out of 26 meadows. We detected two different types of bacterial nifH sequences associated with P. oceanica roots, which were closely related to sequences previously isolated from the rhizosphere of a salt marsh cord grass and a putative anaerobe. Nitrogen content of seagrass tissues showed low isotopic signatures in all the sampled meadows, pointing out the atmospheric origin of the assimilated nitrogen by seagrasses. However, this was not related with the presence of endophytic nitrogen fixers, suggesting the nitrogen fixation occurring in rhizosphere and in the epiphytic community could be an important source of nitrogen for P. oceanica. The low diversity of nitrogen-fixing bacteria reported here suggests species-specific relationships between diazotrophs and P. oceanica, revealing possible symbiotic interactions that could play a major role in nitrogen acquisition by seagrasses in oligotrophic environments where they form lush meadows.

  14. Mean age distribution of inorganic soil-nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Dong K.; Kumar, Praveen

    2016-07-01

    Excess reactive nitrogen in soils of intensively managed landscapes causes adverse environmental impact, and continues to remain a global concern. Many novel strategies have been developed to provide better management practices and, yet, the problem remains unresolved. The objective of this study is to develop a model to characterize the "age" of inorganic soil-nitrogen (nitrate, and ammonia/ammonium). We use the general theory of age, which provides an assessment of the time elapsed since inorganic nitrogen has been introduced into the soil system. We analyze a corn-corn-soybean rotation, common in the Midwest United States, as an example application. We observe two counter-intuitive results: (1) the mean nitrogen age in the topsoil layer is relatively high; and (2) mean nitrogen age is lower under soybean cultivation compared to corn although no fertilizer is applied for soybean cultivation. The first result can be explained by cation-exchange of ammonium that retards the leaching of nitrogen, resulting in an increase in the mean nitrogen age near the soil surface. The second result arises because the soybean utilizes the nitrogen fertilizer left from the previous year, thereby removing the older nitrogen and reducing mean nitrogen age. Estimating the mean nitrogen age can thus serve as an important tool to disentangle complex nitrogen dynamics by providing a nuanced characterization of the time scales of soil-nitrogen transformation and transport processes.

  15. Stress tolerant crops from nitrogen fixing trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, R.; Saunders, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Notes are given on the nutritional quality and uses of: pods of Geoffroea decorticans, a species tolerant of saline and limed soils and saline water; seeds of Olneya tesota which nodulates readily and fixes nitrogen and photosynthesizes at low water potential; and pods of Prosopis chilensis and P. tamarugo which tolerate long periods without rain. 3 references.

  16. Nitrogen starvation affects bacterial adhesion to soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Maria Tereza; Nascimento, Antônio Galvão; Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Tótola, Marcos Rogério

    2008-01-01

    One of the main factors limiting the bioremediation of subsoil environments based on bioaugmentation is the transport of selected microorganisms to the contaminated zones. The characterization of the physiological responses of the inoculated microorganisms to starvation, especially the evaluation of characteristics that affect the adhesion of the cells to soil particles, is fundamental to anticipate the success or failure of bioaugmentation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of nitrogen starvation on cell surface hydrophobicity and cell adhesion to soil particles by bacterial strains previously characterized as able to use benzene, toluene or xilenes as carbon and energy sources. The strains LBBMA 18-T (non-identified), Arthrobacter aurescens LBBMA 98, Arthrobacter oxydans LBBMA 201, and Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204–1 were used in the experiments. Cultivation of the cells in nitrogen-deficient medium caused a significant reduction of the adhesion to soil particles by all the four strains. Nitrogen starvation also reduced significantly the strength of cell adhesion to the soil particles, except for Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204–1. Two of the four strains showed significant reduction in cell surface hydrophobicity. It is inferred that the efficiency of bacterial transport through soils might be potentially increased by nitrogen starvation. PMID:24031246

  17. Atmospheric nitrogen evolution on Earth and Venus

    CERN Document Server

    Wordsworth, R D

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is the most common element in Earth's atmosphere and also appears to be present in significant amounts in the mantle. However, its long-term cycling between these two reservoirs remains poorly understood. Here a range of biotic and abiotic mechanisms are evaluated that could have caused nitrogen exchange between Earth's surface and interior over time. In the Archean, biological nitrogen fixation was likely strongly limited by nutrient and/or electron acceptor constraints. Abiotic fixation of dinitrogen becomes efficient in strongly reducing atmospheres, but only once temperatures exceed around 1000 K. Hence if atmospheric N2 levels really were as low as they are today 3.0 - 3.5 Ga, the bulk of Earth's mantle nitrogen must have been emplaced in the Hadean, most likely at a time when the surface was molten. The elevated atmospheric N content on Venus compared to Earth can be explained abiotically by a water loss redox pump mechanism, where oxygen liberated from H2O photolysis and subsequent H loss to s...

  18. The global stoichiometry of litter nitrogen mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano Manzoni; Robert B. Jackson; John A. Trofymow; Amilcare Porporato

    2008-01-01

    Plant residue decomposition and the nutrient release to the soil play a major role in global carbon and nutrient cycling. Although decomposition rates vary strongly with climate, nitrogen immobilization into litter and its release in mineral forms are mainly controlled by the initial chemical composition of the residues. We used a data set of ~2800 observations to show...

  19. Nitrogen fixation in the phyllosphere of Gramineae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bessems, E.P.M.

    1973-01-01

    The investigation was carried out with Zea mays , grown under temperate conditions, and with Tripsacum laxum Nash, grown in the tropics. The conditions for nitrogen fixation were found to be unfavourable in the leachate, obtained by spray irrigation of the aerial plant

  20. Calendula and camelina response to nitrogen fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emerging oil-seed crops calendula (Calendula officinalis) and camelina (Camelina sativa L.) can provide a domestic, renewable, non-food alternative to imported oil sources for bioenergy and industrial purposes. However, very little information exists concerning nitrogen (N) fertilizer guidelines...

  1. Uptake of organic nitrogen by plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgny Nasholm; Knut Kielland; Ulrika. Ganeteg

    2009-01-01

    Languishing for many years in the shadow of plant inorganic nitrogen (N) nutrition research, studies of organic N uptake have attracted increased attention during the last decade. The capacity of plants to acquire organic N, demonstrated in laboratory and field settings, has thereby been well established. Even so, the ecological significance of organic N uptake for...

  2. Determination of nitrogen balance in agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainju, Upendra M

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen balance in agroecosystems provides a quantitative framework of N inputs and outputs and retention in the soil that examines the sustainability of agricultural productivity and soil and environmental quality. Nitrogen inputs include N additions from manures and fertilizers, atmospheric depositions including wet and dry depositions, irrigation water, and biological N fixation. Nitrogen outputs include N removal in crop grain and biomass and N losses through leaching, denitrification, volatilization, surface runoff, erosion, gas emissions, and plant senescence. Nitrogen balance, which is the difference between N inputs and outputs, can be reflected in changes in soil total (organic + inorganic) N during the course of the experiment duration due to N immobilization and mineralization. While increased soil N retention and mineralization can enhance crop yields and decrease N fertilization rate, reduced N losses through N leaching and gas emissions (primarily NH4 and NOx emissions, out of which N2O is a potent greenhouse gas) can improve water and air quality. •This paper discusses measurements and estimations (for non-measurable parameters due to complexity) of all inputs and outputs of N as well as changes in soil N storage during the course of the experiment to calculate N balance.•The method shows N flows, retention in the soil, and losses to the environment from agroecosystems.•The method can be used to measure agroecosystem performance and soil and environmental quality from agricultural practices.

  3. Nitridation of silicon by nitrogen neutral beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Yasuhiro, E-mail: yasuhirohara2002@yahoo.co.jp [Organization for Research and Development of Innovative Science and Technology, Kansai University, Yamate-cho 3-3-35, Suita 564-8680, Osaka (Japan); Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shoso [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai University, Yamate-cho 3-3-35, Suita 564-8680, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nitrided silicon was formed by nitrogen neutral beam at room temperature. • Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer was formed at the acceleration voltage more than 20 V. • Formed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer show the effective as the passivation film in the wet etching process. - Abstract: Silicon nitridation was investigated at room temperature using a nitrogen neutral beam (NB) extracted at acceleration voltages of less than 100 V. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirmed the formation of a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer on a Si (1 0 0) substrate when the acceleration voltage was higher than 20 V. The XPS depth profile indicated that nitrogen diffused to a depth of 36 nm for acceleration voltages of 60 V and higher. The thickness of the silicon nitrided layer increased with the acceleration voltages from 20 V to 60 V. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layer thickness of 3.1 nm was obtained at an acceleration voltage of 100 V. Moreover, it was proved that the nitrided silicon layer formed by the nitrogen NB at room temperature was effective as the passivation film in the wet etching process.

  4. How much fertilizer nitrogen does sugarcane need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen rate recommendations for sugarcane in Louisiana take into account crop age (plant cane or stubble) and soil texture (light or heavy). Recommended rates in the 1950s ranged from 40 pounds N/A for plant cane on light-textured soil to 100 pounds of N/A for stubble cane on heavy-textured soil a...

  5. Potential nitrogen credits from peanut residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Availability of residue nitrogen (N) to succeeding crops is dependent on N mineralization rates during decomposition. Following peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) production, extension currently recommends 22-67 kg N ha-1 credit to subsequent crops, but these recommendations are not supported in the liter...

  6. EPA Nitrogen and Co-Pollutant Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross-media, integrated, multi-disciplinary approach to sustainably manage reactive nitrogen and co-pollutant loadings to air and water to reduce adverse impacts on the environment and human health. The goal of the Roadmap is to develop a common understanding of the Agency's rese...

  7. Molecular diffusion in monolayer and submonolayer nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Bruch, Ludwig Walter

    2001-01-01

    The orientational and translational motions in a monolayer fluid of physisorbed molecular nitrogen are treated using molecular dynamics simulations. Dynamical response functions and several approximations to the coefficient of translational diffusion are determined for adsorption on the basal pla...... where the ballistic approximation to the translational molecular self-correlation function is accurate....

  8. Nitrogen transformations in stratified aquatic microbial ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbech, Niels Peter; Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Schramm, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Abstract  New analytical methods such as advanced molecular techniques and microsensors have resulted in new insights about how nitrogen transformations in stratified microbial systems such as sediments and biofilms are regulated at a µm-mm scale. A large and ever-expanding knowledge base about n...

  9. Stabilized nitrogen fertilizers and application rate influence nitrogen losses under rainfed spring wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) losses associated with fertilizer application have negative economic and environmental consequences, but urease and nitrification inhibitors have potential to reduce N losses. The effectiveness of these inhibitors has been studied extensively in irrigated but not rainfed systems. Theref...

  10. A nitrogen index to track changes in butterfly species assemblages under nitrogen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallis de Vries, Michiel; Swaay, van Chris A.M.

    2017-01-01

    The impacts of nitrogen deposition (N) on animal communities are still poorly understood in comparison to plant communities. Long-term monitoring of community changes may contribute to this understanding, complementing experimental studies on underlying mechanisms. Butterflies are particularly

  11. POPULATION DYNAMICS OF SMALL MAMMALS ACROSS A NITROGEN AMENDED LANDSCAPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biogeochemical alterations of the nitrogen cycle from anthropogenic activities could have significant effects on ecological processes at the population, community and ecosystem levels. Nitrogen additions in grasslands have produced qualitative and quantitative changes in vegetat...

  12. The European nitrogen assessment: sources, effects, and policy perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sutton, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    .... The five key societal threats posed by reactive nitrogen are assessed, providing a framework for joined-up management of the nitrogen cycle in Europe, including the first cost-benefit analysis...

  13. Key ecological responses to nitrogen are altered by climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we review the effects of nitrogen and climate (e.g. temperature and precipitation) on four aspects of ecosystem structure and function including hydrologic-coupled nitrogen cycling, carbon cycling, acidification and biodiversity.

  14. Controlled dissolution of colossal quantities of nitrogen in stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in austenitic stainless steel was investigated thermogravimetrically by equilibrating thin foils of AISI 304 and AISI 316 in ammonia/hydrogen gas mixtures. Controlled dissolution of colossal amounts of nitrogen under metastable equilibrium conditions was realized...

  15. Zinc, nitrogen and salinity interaction on agronomic traits and some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... study the response of canola to different nitrogen and zinc fertilizer levels under two doses ... moderately calcareous, low in nitrogen, low in organic matter and alkaline in reaction ...... Effect of foliar application of zinc, selenium ...

  16. Inorganic Nitrogen Wet Deposition for the Conterminous United States, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Annual inorganic nitrogen wet deposition were estimated for the conterminous United States for 1962. The estimates were derived from inorganic nitrogen...

  17. Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Dwayne T.; Babcock, Walter C.; Edlund, David J.; Lyon, David K.; Miller, Warren K.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

  18. Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulich, Ted R.; Olson, Edwin S.; Jiang, Junhua

    2013-03-19

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers including ammonium nitrate, urea, urea-ammonium nitrate, and/or ammonia utilizing a source of carbon, a source of nitrogen, and/or a source of hydrogen. Implementing an electrolyte serving as ionic charge carrier, (1) ammonium nitrate is produced via the reduction of a nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a nitrogen source at the anode; (2) urea or its isomers are produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source; (3) ammonia is produced via the reduction of nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a hydrogen source at the anode; and (4) urea-ammonium nitrate is produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source, and anodic oxidation of a nitrogen source. The electrolyte can be solid.

  19. Inorganic Nitrogen Wet Deposition for the Conterminous United States, 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Annual inorganic nitrogen wet deposition were estimated for the conterminous United States for 1984. The estimates were derived from inorganic nitrogen...

  20. Nitrogen uptake by phytoplankton and zooxanthellae in a coral atoll

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wafar, M.V.M.; Devassy, V.P.; Slawyk, G.; Goes, J.I.; Jayakumar, D.A.; Rajendran, A.

    of the Lakshadweep Archipelago (Indian Ocean). This paper also presents the ambient concentrations of these nitrogenous nutrients in the lagoon and surrounding waters. In addition, the excretion of these nitrogen compounds by major coral species of the atoll was also...

  1. Nitrogen dose and plant density effects on popcorn grain yield

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... randomized complete block design with a split-plot arrangement with three replications. Nitrogen ... also cultural practices such as nitrogen fertilizer rates and .... procedures using the Statistical Software Package (MSTAT-C).

  2. Quality Protein Maize Response to Nitrogen Rate and Plant Density ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality Protein Maize Response to Nitrogen Rate and Plant Density in the Guinea Savanna Zone of Ghana. ... protein maize (Zea mays L.) hybrid to plant density and nitrogen (N) fertilizer. ... Optimal N rate was not affected by plant density.

  3. Effect of Phosphorus Fertilizer on Nitrogen Fixation by Some Grain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    ABSTRACT: Nitrogen fixation by grain legumes contributes N to tropical soils. But in Sudano –. Sahelian .... at 650C, weighed and analyzed for the N concentrations (Marr ... The increase of whole plant growth and plant nitrogen concentration ...

  4. Inorganic Nitrogen Wet Deposition for the Conterminous United States, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Annual inorganic nitrogen wet deposition were estimated for the conterminous United States for 1963. The estimates were derived from inorganic nitrogen...

  5. Inorganic Nitrogen Wet Deposition for the Conterminous United States, 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Annual inorganic nitrogen wet deposition were estimated for the conterminous United States for 1983. The estimates were derived from inorganic nitrogen...

  6. Inorganic Nitrogen Wet Deposition for the Conterminous United States, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Annual inorganic nitrogen wet deposition were estimated for the conterminous United States for 1961. The estimates were derived from inorganic nitrogen...

  7. Inorganic Nitrogen Wet Deposition for the Conterminous United States, 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Annual inorganic nitrogen wet deposition were estimated for the conterminous United States for 1964. The estimates were derived from inorganic nitrogen...

  8. Nitrogen-neutrality: a step towards sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leip, Adrian; Leach, Allison; Musinguzi, Patrick; Tumwesigye, Trust; Olupot, Giregon; Tenywa, John Stephen; Mudiope, Joseph; Hutton, Olivia; Cordovil, Claudia M. d. S.; Bekunda, Mateete; Galloway, James

    2014-11-01

    We propose a novel indicator measuring one dimension of the sustainability of an entity in modern societies: Nitrogen-neutrality. N-neutrality strives to offset Nr releases an entity exerts on the environment from the release of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to the environment by reducing it and by offsetting the Nr releases elsewhere. N-neutrality also aims to increase awareness about the consequences of unintentional releases of nitrogen to the environment. N-neutrality is composed of two quantified elements: Nr released by an entity (e.g. on the basis of the N footprint) and Nr reduction from management and offset projects (N offset). It includes management strategies to reduce nitrogen losses before they occur (e.g., through energy conservation). Each of those elements faces specific challenges with regard to data availability and conceptual development. Impacts of Nr releases to the environment are manifold, and the impact profile of one unit of Nr release depends strongly on the compound released and the local susceptibility to Nr. As such, N-neutrality is more difficult to conceptualize and calculate than C-neutrality. We developed a workable conceptual framework for N-neutrality which was adapted for the 6th International Nitrogen Conference (N2013, Kampala, November 2013). Total N footprint of the surveyed meals at N2013 was 66 kg N. A total of US 3050 was collected from the participants and used to offset the conference’s N footprint by supporting the UN Millennium Village cluster Ruhiira in South-Western Uganda. The concept needs further development in particular to better incorporate the spatio-temporal variability of impacts and to standardize the methods to quantify the required N offset to neutralize the Nr releases impact. Criteria for compensation projects need to be sharply defined to allow the development of a market for N offset certificates.

  9. Effect of Different Application Rate of Nitrogen Fertilizer Under Straw Return on Maize Yield and Inorganic Nitrogen Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Xin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the influences of different nitrogen fertilizer rate on maize production, nitrogen use efficiency and soil nitrate nitrogen at straw return farmland for two years. The results showed that maize production increased with the increment of nitrogen fertilizer. The maize production was the highest at 216 kg·hm -2(N216of nitrogen use and began to decrease when the amount of nitrogen use was beyond 216 kg· hm -2. There were significant interannual differences on maize production in the same treatment. The maize production in 2010 increased 0.69%~4.75% compared with that in 2009. Nitrogen use efficiency, nitrogen agronomic efficiency and nitrogen harvest index improved with the year of straw return. The highest nitrate nitrogen accumulation was found in the treatment of 240 kg· hm -2(N240in 0~100 cm soil layer. Soil nitrate content increased with the depth of soil. This may potentially increased the risk of nitrate pollution on shallow groundwater. Compared with N240, the nitrate nitrogen accumulation of N168(168 kg·hm -2 , N192(192 kg·hm -2 and N216(216 kg·hm -2 were equally reduced by respectively 39.87%, 35.84% and 29.38% in 0~100 cm soil layer. Considering the maize production, nitrogen use efficiency and ecological environmental benefits, the optimum amount of nitrogen use should be 200 kg·hm -2.

  10. Variation Dynamics of Total Nitrogen and Nicotine of Burley Tobacco at Various Growing Stages under Different Nitrogen Nutrition Levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to investigate the variation dynamics of total nitrogen and nicotine of burtey tobacco at various growing stages under different ni- trogen nutrition levels to provide reference for optimizing fertilization technologies for burley tobacco. [Method] Fresh burley tobacco leaves were collected at various growing stages and dried to measure the content of total nitrogen, protein and nico- tine by using INTEGRAL automated chemical analyzer and analyze the correlation with nitrogen application level. [Result] Regardless of the nitrogen application level, the content of total nitrogen and protein showed a downward trend since root ex- tending stage and reached the minimum at mature stage; the content of nicotine showed an upward trend since early vigorous growing stage and increased to the maximum at mature stage; the content of total nitrogen, protein and nicotine all in- creased after air curing; the content of total nitrogen, protein and nicotine showed positive correlation with nitrogen application level, while total nitrogen/nicotine was negatively correlated. The results indicate that nitrogen level is closely related to the total nitrogen and nicotine of burley tobacco at growing period and post-air curing, rational application of nitrogen is an important measure to regulate the content of total nitrogen and nicotine of tobacco. [Conclusion] This study provides scientific ba- sis for rational fertilization of burley tobacco.

  11. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation for photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Fisher, R. A.; Travis, B. J.; Wilson, C. J.; McDowell, N. G.

    2011-12-01

    The nitrogen limitation is an important regulator for vegetation growth and global carbon cycle. Most current ecosystem process models simulate nitrogen effects on photosynthesis based on a prescribed relationship between leaf nitrogen and photosynthesis; however, there is a large amount of variability in this relationship with different light, temperature, nitrogen availability and CO2 conditions, which can affect the reliability of photosynthesis prediction under future climate conditions. To account for the variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationship under different environmental conditions, in this study, we developed a mechanistic model of nitrogen limitation for photosynthesis based on nitrogen trade-offs among light absorption, electron transport, carboxylization and carbon sink. Our model shows that strategies of nitrogen storage allocation as determined by tradeoff among growth and persistence is a key factor contributing to the variability in relationship between leaf nitrogen and photosynthesis. Nitrogen fertilization substantially increases the proportion of nitrogen in storage for coniferous trees but much less for deciduous trees, suggesting that coniferous trees allocate more nitrogen toward persistence compared to deciduous trees. The CO2 fertilization will cause lower nitrogen allocation for carboxylization but higher nitrogen allocation for storage, which leads to a weaker relationship between leaf nitrogen and maximum photosynthesis rate. Lower radiation will cause higher nitrogen allocation for light absorption and electron transport but less nitrogen allocation for carboxylyzation and storage, which also leads to weaker relationship between leaf nitrogen and maximum photosynthesis rate. At the same time, lower growing temperature will cause higher nitrogen allocation for carboxylyzation but lower allocation for light absorption, electron transport and storage, which leads to a stronger relationship between leaf nitrogen and maximum

  12. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition to China: A model analysis on nitrogen budget and critical load exceedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanhong; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Youfan; Liu, Xuejun; Xu, Wen; Pan, Yuepeng; Duan, Lei

    2017-03-01

    We present a national-scale model analysis on the sources and processes of inorganic nitrogen deposition over China using the GEOS-Chem model at 1/2° × 1/3° horizontal resolution. Model results for 2008-2012 are evaluated with an ensemble of surface measurements of wet deposition flux and gaseous ammonia (NH3) concentration, and satellite measurements of tropospheric NO2 columns. Annual total inorganic nitrogen deposition fluxes are simulated to be generally less than 10 kg N ha-1 a-1 in western China (less than 2 kg N ha-1 a-1 over Tibet), 15-50 kg N ha-1 a-1 in eastern China, and 16.4 kg N ha-1 a-1 averaged over China. Annual total deposition to China is 16.4 Tg N, with 10.2 Tg N (62%) from reduced nitrogen (NHx) and 6.2 Tg N from oxidized nitrogen (NOy). Domestic anthropogenic sources contribute 86% of the total deposition; foreign anthropogenic sources 7% and natural sources 7%. Annually 23% of domestically emitted NH3 and 36% for NOx are exported outside the terrestrial land of China. We find that atmospheric nitrogen deposition is about half of the nitrogen input from fertilizer application (29.6 Tg N a-1), and is much higher than that from natural biological fixation (7.3 Tg N a-1) over China. A comparison of nitrogen deposition with critical load estimates for eutrophication indicates that about 15% of the land over China experiences critical load exceedances, demonstrating the necessity of nitrogen emission controls to avoid potential negative ecological effects.

  13. Indigenous nitrogen in the Moon: Constraints from coupled nitrogen-noble gas analyses of mare basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füri, Evelyn; Barry, Peter H.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Marty, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen and noble gas (Ne-Ar) abundances and isotope ratios, determined by step-wise CO2 laser-extraction, static-mass spectrometry analysis, are reported for bulk fragments and mineral separates of ten lunar mare basalts (10020, 10057, 12008, 14053, 15555, 70255, 71557, 71576, 74255, 74275), one highland breccia (14321), and one ferroan anorthosite (15414). The mare basalt sub-samples 10057,183 and 71576,12 contain a large amount of solar noble gases, whereas neon and argon in all other samples are purely cosmogenic, as shown by their 21Ne/22Ne ratios of ≈0.85 and 36Ar/38Ar ratios of ≈0.65. The solar-gas-free basalts contain a two-component mixture of cosmogenic 15N and indigenous nitrogen (Earth's primordial mantle or an enstatite chondrite-like impactor. While the lowest δ15 N values allow for nitrogen trapped in the Moon's interior to be inherited from the proto-Earth and/or the impactor, the more 15N-enriched compositions require that carbonaceous chondrites provided nitrogen to the lunar magma ocean prior to the solidification of the crust. Since nitrogen can efficiently be incorporated into mafic minerals (olivine, pyroxene) under oxygen fugacities close to or below the iron-wustite buffer (Li et al., 2013), the mare basalt source region is likely characterized by a high nitrogen storage capacity. In contrast, anorthosite 15414 shows no traces of indigenous nitrogen, suggesting that nitrogen was not efficiently incorporated into the lunar crust during magma ocean differentiation.

  14. Ammonia nitrogen desorption from sanitary landfill leachate in filling towers

    OpenAIRE

    Leite,Valderi D.; Barros,Aldre J. M.; Lopes,Wilton S.; Sousa,José T. de

    2014-01-01

    Sanitary landfill leachates present high concentrations of carbonaceous and nitrogenous materials. The crucial point is that carbonaceous materials are of difficult biodegradation, what compromises the performance of biological treatment processes, while nitrogenous materials, such as ammonia nitrogen, probably preclude the use of biological treatments. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the desorption process of ammonia nitrogen from sanitary landfill leachate in filling towers. De...

  15. Nitrogen narcosis and alcohol consumption--a scuba diving fatality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalodimitrakis, E; Patsalis, A

    1987-07-01

    Nitrogen narcosis can cause death among experienced scuba divers. Nitrogen under pressure affects the brain by acting as an anesthetic agent. Furthermore, the consumption of ethanol along with diving will cause the symptoms of nitrogen narcosis to occur at depths less than 30 m. Our case deals with an experienced diver who drank alcoholic beverages before diving and developed symptoms of nitrogen narcosis at a shallow depth. These two conditions contributed to his death by drowning.

  16. Nitrogen and protein contents in some aquatic plant species

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Bytniewska

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen and protein contents in higher aquatic plants deriving from a natural habitat were determined. The following plants were examined: Spirodela polyrrhiza (L.) Schleid., Elodea canadensis Rich., Riccia fluitans L. Total nitrogen and nitrogen of respective fractions were determined by the Kjeldahl method. Nitrogen compounds were fractionated according to Thimann et al. Protein was extracted after Fletcher and Osborne and fractionated after Osborne. It was found, that total protein conten...

  17. Nitrogen use efficiency in six perennial grasses from contrasting habitats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vazquez de Aldana, B.R.; Berendse, F.

    1997-01-01

    1. We studied the nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) in six perennial grasses adapted to a wide range of nutrient availability. The glasshouse experiment was carried out in pots containing nutrient solution, with two fertility treatments. Nitrogen-use efficiency was considered as the product of nitrogen

  18. Nitrogen uptake in the northeastern Arabian Sea during winter cooling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, S.; Ramesh, R.; Dwivedi, R.M.; Raman, M.; Sheshshayee, M.S.; DeSouza, W.

    . Hattenschwiler, L. Olander, and S. Allison, “Nitrogen and nature,” Ambio, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 97–101, 2002. [2] J. J. MacIsaac and R. C. Dugdale, “Interactions of light and inorganic nitrogen in controlling nitrogen uptake in the sea,” Deep-Sea Research...

  19. SOIL CONTAMINATION BY NITROGEN COMPOUNDS DURING ORGANIC FUEL COMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Bubnov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a transition mechanism of flue gas nitrogen oxides being formed due to organic fuel combustion from atmosphere into soil. Mechanisms of nitrogen compound origination and transformation in atmosphere and their transition into soil have been presented in the paper. The paper recommends a generalized equation for mathematical description of nitrogen migration into soil. 

  20. Microbial nitrogen cycling on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Telling

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen inputs and microbial nitrogen cycling were investigated along a 79 km transect into the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS during the main ablation season in summer 2010. The depletion of dissolved nitrate and production of ammonium (relative to icemelt in cryoconite holes on Leverett Glacier, within 7.5 km of the ice sheet margin, suggested microbial uptake and ammonification respectively. Positive in situ acetylene assays indicated nitrogen fixation both in a debris-rich 100 m marginal zone and up to 5.7 km upslope on Leverett Glacier (with rates up to 16.3 μmoles C2H4 m−2 day−1. No positive acetylene assays were detected > 5.7 km into the ablation zone of the ice sheet. Potential nitrogen fixation only occurred when concentrations of dissolved and sediment-bound inorganic nitrogen were undetectable. Estimates of nitrogen fluxes onto the transect suggest that nitrogen fixation is likely of minor importance to the overall nitrogen budget of Leverett Glacier and of negligible importance to the nitrogen budget on the main ice sheet itself. Nitrogen fixation is however potentially important as a source of nitrogen to microbial communities in the debris-rich marginal zone close to the terminus of the glacier, where nitrogen fixation may aid the colonization of subglacial and moraine-derived debris.

  1. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862.1770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  2. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa...

  3. Nitrogen diffusion and nitrogen depth profiles in expanded austenite: experimental assessment, numerical simulation and role of stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper addresses the experimental assessment of the concentration dependent nitrogen diffusion coefficient in stress free expanded austenite foils from thermogravimetry, the numerical simulation of nitrogen concentration depth profiles on growth of expanded austenite into stainless steel...

  4. Digestion, absorption and utilization of single-cell protein by the preruminant calf. The true digestibility of milk and bacterial protein and the apparent digestibility and utilization of their constituent amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgman, C A; Roy, J H; Thomas, J; Stobo, I J; Ganderton, P

    1985-07-01

    Two experiments of Latin square design were made, each with four Friesian bull calves fitted with re-entrant duodenal and ileal cannulas at 4-10 d of age. The calves were used to study the effect of giving milk-substitutes containing 0, 300, 500 and 700 g bacterial protein (Pruteen)/kg total protein on apparent digestibility of nitrogen fractions and amino acids and true digestibility of 3H-labelled milk protein and 35S-labelled bacterial protein in the small intestine. A third experiment of Latin square design with four intact Friesian calves was used to measure apparent digestibility of nutrients throughout the alimentary tract and retention of N, calcium and phosphorus. At the duodenum, volume of outflow, its pH, and outflow of total-N(TN), protein-N (PN) and non-protein-N (NPN) decreased with time after feeding. At the ileum, volume of outflow and TN outflow were unaffected by time after feeding but PN outflow decreased; NPN outflow at the ileum increased to a maximum 6 h after feeding and then declined. Increased inclusion of Pruteen did not affect the volume of outflow at the duodenum or ileum, but duodenal PN outflow increased. At the ileum, pH values were lower and TN, PN and NPN outflows were higher with increasing concentration of Pruteen in the diet. Apparent digestibility in the small intestine tended to decrease with greater amounts of Pruteen, but was only significant for NPN. Apparent digestibility from mouth to ileum significantly decreased for TN and PN as Pruteen inclusion increased. Amino acid concentration in duodenal outflow, with the exception of that of arginine, reflected intake. The total amount of each amino acid in ileal outflow increased and the apparent digestibility of most amino acids decreased with greater amounts of Pruteen in the diet. Apparent digestibility of nucleic acid-N from Pruteen was very high. True digestibility in the small intestine and between mouth and ileum of 3H-labelled milk protein was high and did not differ

  5. [Coupling effects of partitioning alternative drip irrigation with plastic mulch and nitrogen fertilization on cotton dry matter accumulation and nitrogen use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei-Ling; Zhang, Fu-Cang

    2013-02-01

    A field experiment with complete combination design was conducted to study the effects of partitioning alternative drip irrigation with plastic mulch and nitrogen fertilization on the dry matter accumulation and nitrogen use efficiency of cotton plant. Three levels of irrigation (260, 200, and 140 mm) and of nitrogen fertilizer (270, 180, and 90 kg.hm-2) were installed. The cotton dry mass was the highest in treatments medium nitrogen/high water and high nitrogen/high water. As compared with that in high nitrogen/high water treatment, the nitrogen use efficiency for dry matter accumulation in medium nitrogen/high water treatment was increased by 34.0% -44.6%, with an average of 34.7% , while the water use efficiency was decreased by 6.4% -10.7%, averagely 10.2%. As for the nitrogen accumulation in cotton plant, the nitrogen use efficiency was the highest in medium nitrogen/high water treatment, and the water use efficiency was the highest in high nitrogen/medium water treatment. Compared with high nitrogen/high water treatment, medium nitrogen/high water treatment increased the nitrogen use efficiency for cotton nitrogen accumulation by 29.0% -41.7%, but decreased the water use efficiency for cotton nitrogen accumulation by 5.5%-14.0%. Among the treatments of coupling water and nitrogen of higher cotton yield, treatment medium nitrogen/high water had the higher cotton nitrogen recovery rate, nitrogen agronomic efficiency, and apparent use efficiency than the treatments high nitrogen/medium water and high nitrogen/high water, but no significant differences were observed in the nitrogen absorption ratio and nitrogen physiological efficiency. Treatment medium nitrogen/high water was most beneficial to the coupling effects of water and nitrogen under partitioning alternate drip irrigation with plastic mulch and nitrogen fertilization.

  6. Measurement of cross sections for the scattering of neutrons in the energy range from 2 MeV to 4 MeV with the {sup 15}N(p,n) reaction as neutron source; Messung von Wirkungsquerschnitten fuer die Streuung von Neutronen im Energiebereich von 2 MeV bis 4 MeV mit der {sup 15}N(p,n)-Reaktion als Neutronenquelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenitz, Erik

    2010-04-26

    In future nuclear facilities, the materials lead and bismuth can play a more important role than in today's nuclear reactors. Reliable cross section data are required for the design of those facilities. In particular the neutron transport in the lead spallation target of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Reactor strongly depends on the inelastic neutron scattering cross sections in the energy region from 0.5 MeV to 6 MeV. In the recent 20 years, elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections were measured with high precision for a variety of elements at the PTB time-of-flight spectrometer. The D(d,n) reaction was primarily used for the production of neutrons. Because of the Q value of the reaction and the available deuteron energies, neutrons in the energy range from 6 MeV to 16 MeV can be produced. For the cross section measurement at lower energies, however, another neutron producing reaction is required. The {sup 15}N(p,n){sup 15}O reaction was chosen, as it allows the production of monoenergetic neutrons with up to 5.7MeV energy. In this work, the {sup 15}N(p,n) reaction was studied with focus on the suitability as a source for monoenergetic neutrons in scattering experiments. This includes the measurement of differential cross sections for the neutron producing reaction and the choice of optimum target conditions. Differential elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections were measured for lead at four energies in the region from 2 MeV to 4 MeV incident neutron energy using the time-of-flight technique. A lead sample with natural isotopic composition was used. NE213 liquid scintillation detectors with well-known detection efficiencies were used for the detection of the scattered neutrons. Angle-integrated cross sections were determined by a Legendre polynomial expansion using least-squares methods. Additionally, measurements were carried out for isotopically pure {sup 209}Bi and {sup 181}Ta samples at 4 MeV incident neutron energy

  7. Effects of Controlled-Release Urea on Grain Yield of Spring Maize, Nitrogen Use Efficiency and Nitrogen Balance

    OpenAIRE

    JI Jing-hong; Li, Yu-Ying; Liu, Shuang-Quan; TONG Yu-xin; REN Gui-lin; Li, Jie; Liu,Ying; ZHANG Ming-yi

    2017-01-01

    The effects of mixing controlled-released urea (CRU) (release period of resin coated urea is 90 days) and urea (U) on maize yield, nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen balance were studied by 4 plot experiments (site:Shuangcheng, Binxian, Harbin and Zhaoyuan) in two years (from year 2011 to 2012) to clarify the effect of controlled release urea on spring maize and soil nitrogen balance. Results were as follow:Spring maize yield and nitrogen absorption were increased with the increasing nitrog...

  8. [Effects of watering and nitrogen fertilization on the growth, grain yield, and water- and nitrogen use efficiency of winter wheat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Hong, Jian-Ping; Wang, Hong-Ting; Xiu, Ying-He; Zhang, Lu

    2013-05-01

    A field experiment with split-plot design was conducted to study the effects of watering, nitrogen fertilization, and their interactions on the growth, grain yield, and water- and nitrogen use efficiency of winter wheat. Four watering levels (0, 900, 1200, and 1500 m3 x hm(-2)) in main plots and five nitrogen fertilization levels (0, 90, 150, 210, and 270 kg N x hm(-2)) in sub-plots were designed. The results showed that the grain yield, nitrogen absorption, nitrogen use efficiency, and nitrogen productive efficiency of winter wheat increased with increasing level of watering, but the nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen productive efficiency decreased with increasing nitrogen fertilization level. The grain yield, nitrogen absorption, and nitrogen harvest index were increased with increasing nitrogen fertilization level when the nitrogen application rate was 0-150 kg N x hm(-2), but not further increased significantly when the nitrogen application rate exceeded 150 kg x hm(-2). With the increasing level of watering, the water consumption amount (WCA) and the total water use efficiency increased, while the proportion of precipitation and soil water supply to WCA as well as the irrigation water use efficiency decreased. With the increasing level of nitrogen fertilization, the proportion of precipitation and watering amount to WCA increased, that of soil water supply to WCA decreased, and the total water use efficiency and irrigation water use efficiency decreased after an initial increase, with no significant differences among the treatments of 150, 210, and 270 kg N x hm(-2). It was considered that under our experimental condition, 1500 m3 x hm(-2) of watering amount plus 150 kg x hm(-2) of nitrogen fertilization could be the optimal combination for the high yielding and high efficiency.

  9. Kinetics of Nitrogen and Potassium Uptake by Various Rice Cultivars at Differnt Nitrogen Lvels from Purple Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGZHENGYIN; XUWEIHONG; 等

    1998-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of nitrogen fertilizer on nitrogen and potassium uptake by four rice cultivars.Results showed that the quadratic parabola relationship between biomass of rice and nitrogen levels was observed ,with the maximum biomass at the nitrogen level of 150 mg kg-1.The rate of nitrogen and potassium uptake by the four rice cultivars depended on growth stage and rice cultivar with the maximum rate of N in Shanyou-63 and maximum rate of K in Kaiyou-5(hybrid rice),respectively,The kinetics of nitrogen and potasssium uptake by rice plant could be quantitatively described by the following equations:y=a+blogt,y=ab+t1/2 and y=ae-bt,The b value in the equations was correlated significantly to the rates of nitrogen and potassium uptake (-↑NR and -↑KR,r=0.901**-0.990**),suggesting that the b value could be used to distinguish the index of nitrogen and potassium uptake capacity of rice .The maximum values of nitrogen uptake by plant(b value)and apparent recovery of fertilizer nitrogen were observed in Shanyou-63,and the minimum value in Eryou-6078,However,the capacity of potassium uptake (b value)by kaiyou-5 ranked first and that by Shanyou-63 second.There was a significant linear relationship between nitrogen level and nitrogen uptake by rice,but a quadratic parabola relationship was found between nitrogen level and patassium uptake by rice.The application of nitrogen fertilzier decreased the ratios of potassium to nitrogen uptake by rice plant.The greatest reduction in the ratio was observed at hiht nitrogen level,and the least reduction was foun in Kaiyou-5 and Shanyou-63 due to their greater ability to absorb potassium.

  10. Effects of Controlled-Release Urea on Grain Yield of Spring Maize, Nitrogen Use Efficiency and Nitrogen Balance

    OpenAIRE

    JI Jing-hong; Li, Yu-Ying; LIU Shuang-quan; TONG Yu-xin; REN Gui-lin; Li,Jie; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Ming-Yi

    2017-01-01

    The effects of mixing controlled-released urea (CRU) (release period of resin coated urea is 90 days) and urea (U) on maize yield, nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen balance were studied by 4 plot experiments (site:Shuangcheng, Binxian, Harbin and Zhaoyuan) in two years (from year 2011 to 2012) to clarify the effect of controlled release urea on spring maize and soil nitrogen balance. Results were as follow:Spring maize yield and nitrogen absorption were increased with the increasing nitrog...

  11. Nitrogen Controls on Climate Model Evapotranspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Robert E.; Berry, Joseph A.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Collatz, G. James; Field, Christopher B.; Fung, Inez Y.; Goulden, Michael; Hoffmann, William A.; Jackson, Robert B.; Myneni, Ranga; Sellers, Piers J.; Shaikh, Muhammad

    2002-02-01

    Most evapotranspiration over land occurs through vegetation. The fraction of net radiation balanced by evapotranspiration depends on stomatal controls. Stomates transpire water for the leaf to assimilate carbon, depending on the canopy carbon demand, and on root uptake, if it is limiting. Canopy carbon demand in turn depends on the balancing between visible photon-driven and enzyme-driven steps in the leaf carbon physiology. The enzyme-driven component is here represented by a Rubisco-related nitrogen reservoir that interacts with plant-soil nitrogen cycling and other components of a climate model. Previous canopy carbon models included in GCMs have assumed either fixed leaf nitrogen, that is, prescribed photosynthetic capacities, or an optimization between leaf nitrogen and light levels so that in either case stomatal conductance varied only with light levels and temperature.A nitrogen model is coupled to a previously derived but here modified carbon model and includes, besides the enzyme reservoir, additional plant stores for leaf structure and roots. It also includes organic and mineral reservoirs in the soil; the latter are generated, exchanged, and lost by biological fixation, deposition and fertilization, mineralization, nitrification, root uptake, denitrification, and leaching. The root nutrient uptake model is a novel and simple, but rigorous, treatment of soil transport and root physiological uptake. The other soil components are largely derived from previously published parameterizations and global budget constraints.The feasibility of applying the derived biogeochemical cycling model to climate model calculations of evapotranspiration is demonstrated through its incorporation in the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme land model and a 17-yr Atmospheric Model Inter comparison Project II integration with the NCAR CCM3 GCM. The derived global budgets show land net primary production (NPP), fine root carbon, and various aspects of the nitrogen cycling are

  12. Nitrogen distribution between aqueous fluids and silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Huang, Ruifang; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Keppler, Hans

    2015-02-01

    The partitioning of nitrogen between hydrous fluids and haplogranitic, basaltic, or albitic melts was studied at 1-15 kbar, 800-1200 °C, and oxygen fugacities (fO2) ranging from the Fe-FeO buffer to 3log units above the Ni-NiO buffer. The nitrogen contents in quenched glasses were analyzed either by electron microprobe or by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), whereas the nitrogen contents in fluids were determined by mass balance. The results show that the nitrogen content in silicate melt increases with increasing nitrogen content in the coexisting fluid at given temperature, pressure, and fO2. Raman spectra of the silicate glasses suggest that nitrogen species change from molecular N2 in oxidized silicate melt to molecular ammonia (NH3) or the ammonium ion (NH4+) in reduced silicate melt, and the normalized Raman band intensities of the nitrogen species linearly correlate with the measured nitrogen content in silicate melt. Elevated nitrogen contents in silicate melts are observed at reduced conditions and are attributed to the dissolution of NH3/NH4+. Measured fluid/melt partition coefficients for nitrogen (DNfluid/ melt) range from 60 for reduced haplogranitic melts to about 10 000 for oxidized basaltic melts, with fO2 and to a lesser extent melt composition being the most important parameters controlling the partitioning of nitrogen. Pressure appears to have only a minor effect on DNfluid/ melt in the range of conditions studied. Our data imply that degassing of nitrogen from both mid-ocean ridge basalts and arc magmas is very efficient, and predicted nitrogen abundances in volcanic gases match well with observations. Our data also confirm that nitrogen degassing at present magma production rates is insufficient to accumulate the atmosphere. Most of the nitrogen in the atmosphere must have degassed very early in Earth's history and degassing was probably enhanced by the oxidation of the mantle.

  13. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Chonggang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Rosie [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cai, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions

  14. Nitrogen regulation of fungal secondary metabolism in fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina eTudzynski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fungi occupy diverse environments where they are constantly challenged by stressors such as extreme pH, temperature, UV exposure and nutrient deprivation. Nitrogen is an essential requirement for growth, and the ability to metabolize a wide variety of nitrogen sources enable fungi to colonize different environmental niches and survive nutrient limitations. Favored nitrogen sources, particularly ammonium and glutamine, are used preferentially, while the expression of genes required for the use of various secondary nitrogen sources is subject to a regulatory mechanism called nitrogen metabolite repression. Studies on gene regulation in response to nitrogen availability were carried out first in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus nidulans, and Neurospora crassa. These studies revealed that fungi respond to changes in nitrogen availability with physiological and morphological alterations and activation of differentiation processes. In all fungal species studied, the major GATA transcription factor AreA and its co-repressor Nmr are central players of the nitrogen regulatory network. In addition to growth and development, the quality and quantity of nitrogen also affects the formation of a broad range of secondary metabolites (SMs. Recent studies, mainly on species of the genus Fusarium, revealed that AreA does not only regulate a large set of nitrogen catabolic genes, but can also be involved in regulating production of SMs. Furthermore, several other regulators, e.g. a second GATA transcription factor, AreB, that was proposed to negatively control nitrogen catabolic genes by competing with AreA for binding to GATA elements, was shown to act as activator of some nitrogen-repressed as well as nitrogen-induced SM gene clusters. This review highlights our latest understanding of canonical (AreA-dependent and non-canonical nitrogen regulation mechanisms by which fungi may regulate biosynthesis of certain SMs in response to nitrogen availability.

  15. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chonggang Xu

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO(2 concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO(2 concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V(c,max (maximum carboxylation rate and J(max (maximum electron transport rate. A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO(2 concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the

  16. Growth reduction of Sphagnum magellanicum subjected to high nitrogen deposition: the role of amino acid nitrogen concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpens, J.; Berendse, F.

    2003-01-01

    We tested the relationship between Sphagnum growth and the amount of nitrogen stored in free amino acids in a fertilisation experiment with intact peat monoliths in an open greenhouse in The Netherlands. Three nitrogen deposition scenarios were used: no nitrogen deposition, field conditions and a do

  17. Investigation on the Assimilation of Nitrogen by Maize Roots and the Transport of Some Major Nitrogen Compounds by Xylem Sap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanko, S.; Ingversen, J.

    1971-01-01

    The uptake and assimilation of nitrate and ammonia have been studied in Zea mays. Nitrogen-starved maize roots are capable of accumulating a potential capacity for nitrogen uptake and assimilation. Reestablishment of nitrogen supply leads to intense uptake, reaching 154 % of the reference variant...

  18. Effects of split nitrogen fertilization on post-anthesis photoassimilates, nitrogen use efficiency and grain yield in malting barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Jian; Jiang, Dong; Liu, Fulai

    2011-01-01

    . The remobilization of pre-anthesis stored assimilates from vegetative organs into grains was hardly significantly affected by fractions of topdressed nitrogen. Grain yield was the highest for fraction of topdressed nitrogen of 30%, which coincided with the highest plant nitrogen uptake and physiological...

  19. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures and nitrogen profile to identify adulteration in organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verenitch, Sergei; Mazumder, Asit

    2012-08-29

    Recently it has been shown that stable isotopes of nitrogen can be used to discriminate between organic and synthetic fertilizers, but the robustness of the approach is questionable. This work developed a comprehensive method that is far more robust in identifying an adulteration of organic nitrogen fertilizers. Organic fertilizers of various types (manures, composts, blood meal, bone meal, fish meal, products of poultry and plant productions, molasses and seaweed based, and others) available on the North American market were analyzed to reveal the most sensitive criteria as well as their quantitative ranges, which can be used in their authentication. Organic nitrogen fertilizers of known origins with a wide δ(15)N range between -0.55 and 28.85‰ (n = 1258) were characterized for C and N content, δ(13)C, δ(15)N, viscosity, pH, and nitrogen profile (urea, ammonia, organic N, water insoluble N, and NO3). A statistically significant data set of characterized unique organic nitrogen fertilizers (n = 335) of various known origins has been assembled. Deliberately adulterated samples of different types of organic fertilizers mixed with synthetic fertilizers at a wide range of proportions have been used to develop the quantitative critical characteristics of organic fertilizers as the key indicators of their adulteration. Statistical analysis based on the discriminant functions of the quantitative critical characteristics of organic nitrogen fertilizers from 14 different source materials revealed a very high average rate of correct classification. The developed methodology has been successfully used as a source identification tool for numerous commercial nitrogen fertilizers available on the North American market.

  20. Effects of Nitrogen Forms on Carbon and Nitrogen Accumulation in Tomato Seedling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Ti-da; SONG Shi-wei; CHI Ming-han; HUANG Dan-feng; K Iwasaki

    2008-01-01

    Utilization of organic nitrogen (N) is an important aspect of plant N assimilation and has potential application in sustainable agriculture. The aim of this study was to investigate the plant growth, C and N accumulation in leaves and roots of tomato seedlings in response to inorganic (NH4+-N, NO3--N) and organic nitrogen (Gly-N). Different forms of nitrogen (NH4+-N, NO3--N, Gly-N) were supplied to two tomato cultivars (Shenfen 918 and Huying 932) using a hydroponics system. The plant dry biomass, chlorophyll content, root activity, total carbon and nitrogen content in roots and leaves, and total N absorption, etc. were assayed during the cultivation. Our results showed that no significant differences in plant height, dry biomass, and total N content were found within the first 16 d among three treatments; however, significant differences in treatments on 24 d and 32 d were observed, and the order was NO3--N > GIy-N > NH4+-N. Significant differences were also observed between the two tomato cultivars. Chlorophyll contents in the two cultivars were significantly increased by the GIy-N treatment, and root activity showed a significant decrease in NH4+-N treatment. Tomato leaf total carbon content was slightly affected by different N forms; however, total carbon in root and total nitrogen in root and leaf were promoted significantly by inorganic and organic N. Among the applied N forms, the increasing effects of the NH4+-N treatment were larger than that of the Gly-N. In a word, different N resources resulted in different physiological effects in tomatoes. Organic nitrogen (e.g., Gly-N) can be a proper resource of plant N nutrition. Tomatoes of different genotypes had different responses under organic nitrogen (e.g., Gly-N) supplies.

  1. meta-Tyrosine induces modification of reactive nitrogen species level, protein nitration and nitrosoglutathione reductase in tomato roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska, Urszula; Andrzejczak, Olga; Staszek, Paweł; Borucki, Wojciech; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2017-08-01

    A non-protein amino acid (NPAA) - meta-Tyrosine (m-Tyr), is a harmful compound produced by fescue roots. Young (3-4 days old) tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings were supplemented for 24-72 h with m-Tyr (50 or 250 μM) inhibiting root growth by 50 or 100%, without lethal effect. Fluorescence of DAF-FM and APF derivatives was determined to show reactive nitrogen species (RNS) localization and level in roots of tomato plants. m-Tyr-induced restriction of root elongation growth was related to formation of nitrated proteins described as content of 3-nitrotyrosine. Supplementation with m-Tyr enhanced superoxide radicals generation in extracts of tomato roots and stimulated protein nitration. It correlated well to increase of fluorescence of DAF-FM derivatives, and transiently stimulated fluorescence of APF derivatives corresponding respectively to NO and ONOO(-) formation. Alterations in RNS formation induced by m-Tyr were linked to metabolism of nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Activity of nitrosoglutatione reductase (GSNOR), catalyzing degradation of GSNO was enhanced by long term plant supplementation with m-Tyr, similarly as protein abundance, while transcripts level were only slightly altered by tested NPAA. We conclude, that although in animal cells m-Tyr is considered as a marker of oxidative stress, its secondary mode of action in tomato plants involves perturbation in RNS formation, alteration in GSNO metabolism and modification of protein nitration level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nitrogen doping study in ingot niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Kneisel, Peter [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Makita, Junki [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Thermal diffusion of nitrogen in niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities at temperature ~800 °C has resulted in the increase in quality factor with a low-field Q-rise extending to Bp > 90 mT. However, the maximum accelerating gradient of these doped cavities often deteriorates below the values achieved by standard treatments prior to doping. Here, we present the results of the measurements on ingot niobium cavities doped with nitrogen at 800 °C. The rf measurements were carried out after the successive electropolishing to remove small amount of material from the inner surface layer. The result showed higher breakdown field with lower quality factor as material removal increases.

  3. Transcriptome response to nitrogen starvation in rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hongmei Cai; Yongen Lu; Weibo Xie; Tong Zhu; Xingming Lian

    2012-09-01

    Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient required for plant growth and development. Insufficient nitrogen (N) supply triggers extensive physiological and biochemical changes in plants. In this study, we used Affymetrix GeneChip rice genome arrays to analyse the dynamics of rice transcriptome under N starvation. N starvation induced or suppressed transcription of 3518 genes, representing 10.88% of the genome. These changes, mostly transient, affected various cellular metabolic pathways, including stress response, primary and secondary metabolism, molecular transport, regulatory process and organismal development. 462 or 13.1% transcripts for N starvation expressed similarly in root and shoot. Comparative analysis between rice and Arabidopsis identified 73 orthologous groups that responded to N starvation, demonstrated the existence of conserved N stress coupling mechanism among plants. Additional analysis of transcription profiles of microRNAs revealed differential expression of miR399 and miR530 under N starvation, suggesting their potential roles in plant nutrient homeostasis.

  4. P300 latency indexes nitrogen narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, B; Pogue, J; Porlier, G

    1990-03-01

    This experiment investigated the effects of nitrogen narcosis on reaction time (RT) and P300 latency and amplitude. Ten subjects breathed either air or a non-narcotic 20% oxygen-80% helium (heliox) mixture in a hyperbaric chamber at 6.5, 8.3 and 10 atmospheres absolute (ATA). The subjects responded under controlled accuracy conditions to visually presented male or female names in an oddball paradigm. Single-trial analysis revealed a strong relationship between RT and P300 latency, both of which were slowed in a dose-related manner by hyperbaric air but not by heliox. A clear-cut dose-response relationship could not be established for P300 amplitude. These results indicate that P300 latency indexes nitrogen narcosis and are interpreted as support for the slowed processing model of inert gas narcosis.

  5. The Atmospheric Fate of Organic Nitrogen Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borduas, Nadine

    Organic nitrogen compounds are present in our atmosphere from biogenic and anthropogenic sources and have impacts on air quality and climate. Due to recent advances in instrumentation, these compounds are being detected in the gas and particle phases, raising questions as to their source, processing and sinks in the environment. With their recently identified role as contributors to aerosol formation and growth, their novel large scale use as solvents in carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology and their emissions from cigarette smoke, it is now important to address the gaps in our understanding of the fate of organic nitrogen. Experimentally and theoretically, I studied the chemical atmospheric fate of specific organic nitrogen compounds in the amine, amide and isocyanate families, yielding information that can be used in chemical transport models to assess the fate of this emerging class of atmospheric molecules. I performed kinetic laboratory studies in a smog chamber to measure the room temperature rate coefficient for reaction with the hydroxyl radical of monoethanolamine, nicotine, and five different amides. I employed online-mass spectrometry techniques to quantify the oxidation products. I found that amines react quickly with OH radicals with lifetimes of a few hours under sunlit conditions, producing amides as oxidation products. My studies on amides revealed that they have much longer lifetimes in the atmosphere, ranging from a few hours to a week. Photo-oxidation of amides produces isocyanates and I investigated these mechanisms in detail using ab initio calculations. Furthermore, I experimentally measured isocyanic acid's Henry's Law constant as well as its hydrolysis rate constants to better understand its sinks in the atmosphere. Finally, I re-examined the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of organic nitrogen molecules for improved model parameterizations.

  6. Nitrogen Fixing Legumes in the Plant Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A.A. Al-Fredan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems statement: Numerous authors have used energetic to explain the ecological success of N-fixing plants. Legume biodiversity assessment, species dynamics, nitrogen fixation monitoring and environment impact assessment of these ecological events in Al-Hassa Oasis, Saudi Arabia are rare and need to be continuous and more frequent. Approach: Thus the objectives of this study were to analyze legume abundance within and outside Al-Hassa Oasis and relate it to the distribution of the different genera. Results: Thirty two legume plant species from 20 genera have been recorded within and outside the Oasis. The largest genera were Cassia (4 species, Indigofera (4 and Acacia (3. Annual herbs were the dominant growth form (34% of species recorded, followed by shrubs (28%, perennial herbs (19% and trees (19%. Eighteen alien plant species were recorded (maybe an underestimated number. The nitrogen fixation of the legume plant species in Al-Hassa Oasis was estimated/analyzing the fixing potentiality of these species and nonfixing reference species (Panicum turgidum using the 15N natural abundance method. Species with great nitrogen fixing capacity in Al-Hassa include: Medicago sativa, Vicia faba, Vicia sativa, Melitotus indicus, Dolicus lablab, Melitotus alba and Cliforia ternate. The mean biological fixation contribution of most of the recorded legume plants were high, varying from 3.9% (Indigofera argentea to 64.6% (Medicago sativa. Conclusion: Al-Hassa Oasis is richer than expected based on its location within the desert zone. This study confirms the importance of the Oasis for national flora conservation in the Kingdom. results showed a good potential for use of the 15N natural abundance methodology for evaluating the nitrogen fixation ability of the legume plants under field conditions as well as for the estimation of %Ndfa.

  7. Do foliar endophytic bacteria fix nitrogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueppers, L. M.; Moyes, A. B.; Frank, C.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Carper, D.; Vandehey, N.; O'Neil, J.; Dekas, A.

    2015-12-01

    Endophytic microorganisms - bacteria and fungi that live inside healthy plant tissue - are a relatively unexplored source of functional diversity in natural ecosystems. Prior to modern sequencing technology, detecting uncultured endophytic bacteria and assessing their putative functions was challenging. However, recent work has revealed a remarkable diversity of as yet non-culturable endophytic taxa and is beginning to identify functional roles within plant microbiomes. We recently examined bacterial communities in the foliage of a long-lived, high-elevation conifer species, limber pine (Pinus flexilis), and discovered a community strongly dominated by acetic acid bacteria (Acetobacteraceae), with several taxa closely related to known nitrogen fixers. Given limber pine's status as a pioneer species that is able to grow in low fertility soils, we hypothesized that this bacterial community has a potential functional role in fixing atmospheric nitrogen, providing a source of this limiting nutrient to the host tree. We used the radioisotope 13N2 to confirm that N2 rapidly diffuses into pine needles, where it could potentially be fixed. With an acetylene reduction assay we confirmed nitrogenase enzyme activity inside excised twigs 4 times over a growing season, and estimate potential rates of N2 fixation at 0.1 nmol N2 g needle-1 hr-1. Scaled to the stand level, this N input could be on the order of ~20 mg N m-2 d-1 over a growing season. While these rates are low, the long lifespan of individual trees (~1000 years) makes them biologically meaningful. Still, measured rates of acetylene reduction and bulk 15N2 incorporation are quite variable in space and time. Much work remains to better characterize the plant-microbial interactions in this system, including the rates of nitrogen fixation and their variability over the growing season, across edaphic conditions, among host species, and through plant development; and to determine which community members are responsible

  8. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  9. A Mathematic Approach to Nitrogen Fixation Through Earth History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Bonal, Alfonso; Martín-Torres, F. Javier

    Nitrogen is essential for life as we know it. According to phylogenetic studies, all organisms capable of fixing nitrogen are prokaryotes, both bacteria and archaea, suggesting that nitrogen fixation and ammonium assimilation were metabolic features of the Last Universal Common Ancestor of all organisms. At present time the amount of biologically fixed nitrogen is around 2 × 1{0}^{13} g/year (Falkowski 1997), an amount much larger than the corresponding to the nitrogen fixed abiotically (between 2. 6 ×109 and 3 × 1{0}^{11} g/year) (Navarro-González et al. 2001). The current amount of nitrogen fixed is much higher than it was on Earth before the Cambrian explosion, where the symbiotic associations with leguminous plants, the major nitrogen fixer currently, did not exist and nitrogen was fixed only by free-living organisms as cyanobacteria. It has been suggested (Navarro-González et al. 2001) that abiotic sources of nitrogen fixation during Early Earth times could have an important role triggering a selection pressure favoring the evolution of nitrogenase and an increase in the nitrogen fixation rate. In this study we present briefly a method to analyze the amount of fixed nitrogen, both biotic and abiotic, through Earth's history.

  10. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1998-05-01

    This project was directed toward understanding at the physiological, biochemical and molecular levels of how photosynthetic organisms adapt to long-term nitrogen-deficiency conditions is quite incomplete even though limitation of this nutrient is the most commonly restricts plant growth and development. For our work on this problem, the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was grown in continuous cultures in which steady-state levels of nitrogen can be precisely controlled. N-limited cells exhibit the classical symptoms of deficiency of this nutrient, chlorosis and slow growth rates, and respond to nitrogen provision by rapid greening and chloroplast differentiation. We have addressed three aspects of this problem: (1) the regulation of pigment synthesis; (2) control of expression of nuclear genes encoding photosynthetic proteins; (3) changes in metabolic and electron transport pathways that enable sustained CO{sub 2} fixation even though they cannot be readily converted into amino and nucleic acids. For the last, principle components are: (a) enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity intimately associated with photosynthates, and (b) the occurrence in thylakoids of a supplemental electron transport pathway that facilitates reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Together, these distinguishing features of N-limited cells are likely to enable cell survival, especially under conditions of high irradiance stress.

  11. Nitrogen chronology of massive main sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, K; Brott, I; Langer, N; de Koter, A

    2012-01-01

    Rotational mixing in massive main sequence stars is predicted to monotonically increase their surface nitrogen abundance with time. We use this effect to design a method for constraining the age and the inclination angle of massive main sequence stars, given their observed luminosity, effective temperature, projected rotational velocity and surface nitrogen abundance. This method relies on stellar evolution models for different metallicities, masses and rotation rates. We use the population synthesis code STARMAKER to show the range of applicability of our method. We apply this method to 79 early B-type main sequence stars near the LMC clusters NGC 2004 and N 11 and the SMC clusters NGC 330 and NGC 346. From all stars within the sample, 17 were found to be suitable for an age analysis. For ten of them, which are rapidly rotating stars without a strong nitrogen enhancement, it has been previously concluded that they did not evolve as rotationally mixed single stars. This is confirmed by our analysis, which fla...

  12. Response of Nerica Rice to Nitrogen Fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Shultana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted during T. Aman season, 2014 at the Agronomy Research Field, Bangladesh Rice Research Institute, Gazipur to determine the optimum rate of nitrogen fertilizer for higher yield in nerica rice. The experiment comprised of three rice varieties viz. NERICA1, NERICA10 and BRRI dhan57; and five nitrogen levels viz. 0, 23, 46, 69 and 92 kg ha-1. The rice var. BRRI dhan57 with 69 and 92 kg N ha-1 produced significantly identical with higher panicles m-2. But NERICA1 and NERICA10 produced higher number of panicles with 46 and 69 kg N ha-1, respectively. However, BRRI dhan57 with 46 kg N ha-1 produced highest grains panicle-1 but NERICA1 and NERICA10 produced higher number of grains panicle-1 with 23 kg N ha-1. The highest percentage of sterility was recorded in NERICA10 with 69 kg N ha-1. The regression analysis gave the optimum dose of nitrogen for NERICA1, NERICA10 and BRRI dhan57 which were 69.25, 74.25 and 85.75 kg N ha-1, respectively.

  13. Dissolved organic nitrogen measurement using dialysis pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wontae; Westerhoff, Paul

    2005-02-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is important for ecological and engineering researches. Quantification of low DON concentrations in waters with elevated dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) using existing methods is inaccurate. In this study, a dialysis-based pretreatment technique was optimized and adopted to reduce the interference from DIN to the quantification of DON in natural water. A cellulose ester dialysis tube (nominal molecular weight cutoff = 100 Da) was used in batch and continuous-flow dialysis steps with model compounds, natural organic matter isolates, and bulk waters to develop a dialysis pretreatment approach that selectively reduces DIN from solutions containing DON. By reducing DIN concentrations, propagation of analytical variance in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and DIN species concentrations allows more accurate determination of DON (DON = TDN - NO3 - NO2- - NH3/NH4+). Dialysis for 24 h against continuously flowing distilled water reduced DIN species by 70%. With dialysis pretreatment, DON recoveries of more than 95% were obtained for surface water and finished drinking water, but wastewater experienced a slight loss (approximately 10%) of DON possibly due to the adsorption of organics onto the dialysis membrane, permeation of low molecular weight fractions, or biodegradation. Dialysis experiments using surface water spiked with different DIN/TDN ratios concluded that dialysis pretreatment leads to more accurate DON determination than no dialysis when DIN/TDN ratios exceed 0.6 mg of N/mg of N.

  14. Study of Nitrogen Concentration in Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Yan, Cheng-Feng; Kong, Hai-Kuan; Chen, Jian-Jun; Xin, Jun; Shi, Er-Wei; Yang, Jian-Hua

    2013-06-01

    This work focused on studying the nitrogen concentration ( C N) in SiC. The variations of C N in the synthesis of SiC powder as well as the transport during SiC crystal growth have been investigated for broad ranges of temperature and Ar pressure. Before SiC crystal growth, SiC powders were synthesized from high-purity silicon and carbon powders. The concentrations of nitrogen, free C, and free Si in the as-prepared powders were all measured. C N in the SiC source powder decreased with increasing temperature and decreasing Ar pressure, whereas it did not show a remarkable trend with the molar ratio of free Si to free C. SiC crystal was then grown by the physical vapor transport (PVT) technique using the as-prepared powder. The distribution of C N in the remaining material indirectly indicated the temperature field of crystal growth. In addition, compared with introducing N2 during SiC crystal growth, doping with nitrogen during synthesis of the SiC source powder might be a better method to control C N in SiC crystals.

  15. Biological Nitrogen Fixation: Perspective and Limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N D Purwantari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The demand of chemical fertilizer, N in particular will be increasing until 2020. In Indonesia, the demand of fertilizer from 1999 – 2002 increased 37.5 and 12.4% for urea and ammonium sulphate, respectively. At the same time, the price of this fertilizer is also increasing and it can not be afforded by the farmer. Other problem in using chemical fertilizer is damaging to the soil and environment. One of the problem solvings for this condition is to maximize biological nitrogen fixation (BNF. BNF is the fixation of N atmosphere by association between soil bacteria rhizobia and leguminous plant. BNF is sustainable and environmentally friendly in providing nitrogen fertilizer. Therefore, it would reduce the requirement of chemical nitrogen fertilizer for the plant. Gliricidia sepium fixes 170 kg N/ha/12 months, equivalent with 377 kg urea, Sesbania sesban 179 kg N/ha/10 months, equivalent 397 kg with urea, soybean 26 – 57 kg/2 months equivalent with 57 – 126 kg urea. The amount of N2- fixed varies, affected by species, environmental and biological factors. There are some limitations in applying this technology. The effect of N contribution is very slow at the beginning but in the long term, it would be beneficial for plant production and at the same time, maintain condition of physical and chemical of soil, soil microbes and therefore soil fertility.

  16. Elevated CO2 and Soil Nitrogen Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmockel, K.; Schlesinger, W.

    2002-12-01

    Although forests can be large terrestrial carbon sinks, soil fertility can limit carbon sequestration in response to increased atmospheric CO2. During five years of CO2 fertilization (ambient + 200ppm) at the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site, net primary production increased significantly by an average of 25% in treatment plots. Total nitrogen in the foliar canopy increased by 16%, requiring an additional 1.3 g N m-2yr-1 to be taken up from soils under elevated CO2. Mechanisms supporting increased nitrogen acquisition have not been identified. Here we report on biological N-fixation rates, using the acetylene reduction assay, in litter and mineral soil during three years of the CO2 enrichment experiment. Lack of a significant CO2 treatment effect on acetylene reduction indicates that carbon is not directly limiting biological N fixation. Nutrient addition experiments using a complete block design with glucose, Fe, Mo and P indicate biological N fixation is co-limited by molybdenum and carbon. These results suggest even if elevated atmospheric CO2 enhances below-ground carbon availability via root exudation, biological nitrogen fixation may not be stimulated due to micronutrient limitations. Assessment of future carbon sequestration by forest stands must consider limitations imposed by site fertility, including micronutrients.

  17. Reducing human nitrogen use for food production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junguo; Ma, Kun; Ciais, Philippe; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    Reactive nitrogen (N) is created in order to sustain food production, but only a small fraction of this N ends up being consumed as food, the rest being lost to the environment. We calculated that the total N input (TN) of global food production was 171 Tg N yr‑1 in 2000. The production of animal products accounted for over 50% of the TN, against 17% for global calories production. Under current TN per unit of food production and assuming no change in agricultural practices and waste-to-food ratios, we estimate that an additional TN of 100 Tg N yr‑1 will be needed by 2030 for a baseline scenario that would meet hunger alleviation targets for over 9 billion people. Increased animal production will have the largest impact on increasing TN, which calls for new food production systems with better N-recycling, such as cooperation between crop and livestock producing farms. Increased N-use efficiency, healthier diet and decreased food waste could mitigate this increase and even reduce TN in 2030 by 8% relative to the 2000 level. Achieving a worldwide reduction of TN is a major challenge that requires sustained actions to improve nitrogen management practices and reduce nitrogen losses into the environment.

  18. Studies of Wettability of Medical PVC by Remote Nitrogen Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ru; Chen, Jierong

    2006-05-01

    The effects of remote nitrogen plasma and nitrogen plasma on medical PVC's surface modification are studied. The surface properties are characterized by the contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that the remote nitrogen plasma treatments modify the PVC surface in both morphology and composition and the treatment by the remote nitrogen plasma in PVC surface modification is more effective than that by the nitrogen plasma. Remote nitrogen plasma can modify the surface more uniformly. After the PVC surface is treated for 2 min by remote nitrogen plasma, the [w(O)+ w(N)]/w(C)] value increases from 0.13 to 0.51 and the water contact angle decreases from 89o to 18o.

  19. Nitrogen-dependent calcineurin activation in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Celia; Galindo, Luis R; Siverio, José M

    2013-04-01

    Non-preferred nitrogen sources, unlike preferred ones, raised total cell Ca(2+) content and expression of ENA1, a very well-known calcineurin-regulated gene. This indicates calcineurin activation is regulated by nitrogen source. Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) and nitrate induction mechanisms, both regulating nitrate assimilation in Hansenula polymorpha, are controlled by calcineurin. Concerning NCR, lack of calcineurin (cnb1 mutant) decreased nitrate-assimilation gene expression, levels of the transcription factor Gat1 and growth in several nitrogen sources. We found that the role of calcineurin in NCR was mediated by Crz1 via Gat1. Regarding nitrate induction, calcineurin also affects the levels of transcription factors Gat2 and Yna2 involved in this process. We conclude that Ca(2+) and calcineurin play a central role in nitrogen signalling and assimilation. Thus, the nitrogen source modulates Ca(2+) content and calcineurin activation. Calcineurin in turn regulates nitrogen assimilation genes.

  20. Export of nitrogen from catchments: a worldwide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Cobelas, M; Angeler, D G; Sánchez-Carrillo, S

    2008-11-01

    This study reviews nitrogen export rates from 946 rivers of the world to determine the influence of quantitative (runoff, rainfall, inhabitant density, catchment area, percentage of land use cover, airborne deposition, fertilizer input) and qualitative (dominant type of forest, occurrence of stagnant waterbodies, dominant land use, occurrence of point sources, runoff type) environmental factors on nitrogen fluxes. All fractions (total, nitrate, ammonia, dissolved organic and particulate organic) of nitrogen export showed a left-skewed distribution, which suggests a relatively pristine condition for most systems. Total nitrogen export showed the highest variability whereas total organic nitrogen export comprised the dominant fraction of export. Nitrogen export rates were only weakly explained by our qualitative and quantitative environmental variables. Our study suggests that the consideration of spatial and temporal scales is important for predicting nitrogen export rates using simple and easy-to-get environmental variables. Regionally based modelling approaches prove more useful than global-scale analyses.

  1. Estimation of Nitrogen Fertilizer Use Efficiency in Dryland Agroecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shi-qing; LI Sheng-xiu

    2001-01-01

    A field trial was carried out to study the nitrogen fertilizer recovery by four crops in succession in manurial loess soil in Yangling. The results showed that the nitrogen fertilizer not only had the significant effects on the first crop , but also had longer residual effects, even on the fourth crop. The average apparent nitrogen fertilizer recovery by the first crop was 31.7%, and the accumulative nitrogen recovery by the 4 crops was high as 62.3%, and the latter was double as the former. It is quite clear that the nitrogen fertilizer recovery by the first crop was not reliable for estimating the nitrogen fertilizer unless the residual effect of nitrogen fertilizer was included.

  2. Wetland response to sedimentation and nitrogen loading: diversification and inhibition of nitrogen-fixing microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseman-Valtierra, S M; Armaiz-Nolla, K; Levin, L A

    2010-09-01

    Anthropogenic inputs of nutrients and sediment simultaneously impact coastal ecosystems, such as wetlands, especially during storms. Independent and combined effects of sediment and ammonium nitrate loading on nitrogen fixation rates and diversity of microbes that fix nitrogen (diazotrophs) were tested via field manipulations in Spartina foliosa and unvegetated zones at Tijuana Estuary (California, USA). This estuary is subject to episodic nitrogen enrichment and sedimentation associated with rain-driven flooding and slope instabilities, the latter of which may worsen as the Triple Border Fence is constructed along the U.S.-Mexico border. Responses of diazotrophs were assessed over 17 days using acetylene reduction assays and genetic fingerprinting (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism [T-RFLP]) of nifH, which codes for dinitrogenase reductase. Sulfate-reducing bacteria performed approximately 70% of nitrogen fixation in Spartina foliosa rhizospheres in the absence of nitrogen loading, based on sodium molybdate inhibitions in the laboratory. Following nutrient additions, richness (number of T-RFs [terminal restriction fragments]) and evenness (relative T-RF fluorescence) of diazotrophs in surface sediments increased, but nitrogen fixation rates decreased significantly within 17 days. These responses illustrate, within a microbial community, conformance to a more general ecological pattern of high function among assemblages of low diversity. Diazotroph community composition (T-RF profiles) and rhizosphere diversity were not affected. Pore water ammonium concentrations were higher and more persistent for 17 days in plots receiving sediment additions (1 cm deep), suggesting that recovery of diazotroph functions may be delayed by the combination of sediment and nutrient inputs. Nitrogen fixation constitutes a mechanism for rapid transfer of fixed N to S. foliosa roots and a variety of primary consumers (within 3 and 8 days, respectively), as determined via

  3. Impact of nitrogen reduction measures on the nitrogen loads of the river Ems and Rhine (Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendland, F.; Bogena, H.; Goemann, H.; Hake, J. F.; Kreins, P.; Kunkel, R.

    The REGFLUD-project, commissioned by Germany’s Federal Research Ministry (BMBF), addresses the problem of reducing diffuse pollution from agricultural production. The objective of the project is the development and application of multi-criteria scientific methods, which are able to predict diffuse pollution in river basins subject to economic feasibility and social acceptability. The selected river basins (the entire Ems basin and sub-catchments of the Rhine) cover a variety of landscape units with different hydrological, hydrogeological and socio-economic characteristics. This paper focuses on the analysis of the effects of certain policy measures to reduce diffuse pollution by nitrogen. For this purpose, a model system consisting of an agricultural sector model, a water balance model and a residence time/denitrification model was combined and applied. First results indicate a wide range of annual nitrogen surpluses for the rural areas between less than 10 N ha -1 a -1 up 200 kg N ha -1 a -1, or more depending on the type and intensity of farming. Compared to the level of nitrogen surpluses the level of nitrogen inputs into the surface waters is relatively moderate because of degradation processes during transport in soil and groundwater. Policy impact analyses for a nitrogen tax and a limitation of the livestock density stress the importance of regionally adjusted measures.

  4. Effect of Nitrogen Source and Carbon to Nitrogen Ratio on Hydrogen Production using C. acetobutylicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Sahaid Kalil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: One of the main factors influenced the bacterial productivity and total yield of hydrogen is the nitrogen source and its concentration. Approach: Using different nitrogen source with different concentration on bacterial productivity of hydrogen showed to affect on both bacterial productivity of hydrogen and biomass concentration. Results: Yeast extract as nitrogen source at concentration of 13 g L-1 was the best organic nitrogen source and resulted in hydrogen yield YP/S of 308 mL g-1 glucose utilized with biomass concentration of 1.1 g L-1, hydrogen yield per biomass YP/X of 280 mL g-1 L-1, biomass per substrate utilized YX/S of 0.22 and produced hydrogen in gram per gram of glucose utilized YH2/S of 0.0275. C/N of 70 enhanced the YP/S from 308-350 mL g?1 glucose utilized with biomass concentration of 1.22 gL-1, YP/X of 287 mL g-1 L-1, YX/S of 0.244 and YH2/S of 0.03125. Conclusion: Nitrogen source with proper C:N ratio enhanced the hydrogen production.

  5. [Effects of simulated nitrogen deposition on soil available nitrogen forms and their contents in typical temperate forest stands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-xin; Duan, Wen-biao

    2011-08-01

    An indoor experiment was conducted to study the effects of simulated nitrogen deposition on the soil available N in typical temperate forest stands. During the experiment period, nitrogen deposition increased the soil NH4+ -N, NO3- -N, and available N contents, as compared with the control, but the increments differed with stand types, soil layers, nitrogen treatment types, and treatment duration. Mixed forest soil had weaker responses in its available N contents to the nitrogen deposition than broad-leaved forest soil but stronger responses than artificially pure coniferous forest soil, and soil A horizon was more sensitive to nitrogen deposition than soil B horizon. Ammonium nitrogen deposition had larger effects on soil NH4+ -N content, nitrate nitrogen deposition had larger effects on soil NO3- -N content, while mixed ammonium and nitrate nitrogen deposition increased the contents of both soil NH4+ -N and soil NO3- -N, and the increments were higher than those of ammonium nitrogen deposition and nitrate nitrogen deposition, suggesting the additive effects of the mixed ammonium and nitrate nitrogen deposition on the forest soil available N.

  6. Can the foliar nitrogen concentration of upland vegetation be used for predicting atmospheric nitrogen deposition? Evidence from field surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, W K; Leith, I D; Woodin, S J; Fowler, D

    2000-03-01

    The deposition of atmospheric nitrogen can be enhanced at high altitude sites as a consequence of cloud droplet deposition and orographic enhancement of wet deposition on hills. The degree to which the increased deposition of nitrogen influences foliar nitrogen concentration in a range of upland plant species was studied in a series of field surveys in northern Britain. A range of upland plant species sampled along altitudinal transects at sites of known atmospheric nitrogen deposition showed marked increases in foliar nitrogen concentration with increasing nitrogen deposition and altitude (and hence with decreasing temperature). For Nardus stricta L., Deschampsia flexuosa (L.) Trin., Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull, Erica cinerea L. and Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) Br. Eur. on an unpolluted hill, foliar nitrogen increased by 0.07, 0.12, 0.15, 0.08 and 0.04% dry weight respectively for each 1 kg ha(-1) year(-1) increase in nitrogen deposition. Most species showed an approximately linear relationship between foliar nitrogen concentration and altitude but no trend with altitude for foliar phosphorus concentration. This provided evidence that the tissue nutrient status of upland plants reflects nutrient availability rather than the direct effects of climate on growth. However, differences in the relationship between foliar nitrogen concentration and atmospheric nitrogen deposition for N. stricta sampled on hills in contrasting pollution climates show that the possibility of temperature-mediated growth effects on foliar nitrogen concentration should not be ignored. Thus, there is potential to use upland plant species as biomonitors of nitrogen deposition, but the response of different species to nitrogen addition, in combination with climatic effects on growth, must be well characterised.

  7. Modelling the ecosystem effects of nitrogen deposition: Model of Ecosystem Retention and Loss of Inorganic Nitrogen (MERLIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Cosby

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A catchment-scale mass-balance model of linked carbon and nitrogen cycling in ecosystems has been developed for simulating leaching losses of inorganic nitrogen. The model (MERLIN considers linked biotic and abiotic processes affecting the cycling and storage of nitrogen. The model is aggregated in space and time and contains compartments intended to be observable and/or interpretable at the plot or catchment scale. The structure of the model includes the inorganic soil, a plant compartment and two soil organic compartments. Fluxes in and out of the ecosystem and between compartments are regulated by atmospheric deposition, hydrological discharge, plant uptake, litter production, wood production, microbial immobilization, mineralization, nitrification, and denitrification. Nitrogen fluxes are controlled by carbon productivity, the C:N ratios of organic compartments and inorganic nitrogen in soil solution. Inputs required are: 1 temporal sequences of carbon fluxes and pools- 2 time series of hydrological discharge through the soils, 3 historical and current external sources of inorganic nitrogen; 4 current amounts of nitrogen in the plant and soil organic compartments; 5 constants specifying the nitrogen uptake and immobilization characteristics of the plant and soil organic compartments; and 6 soil characteristics such as depth, porosity, bulk density, and anion/cation exchange constants. Outputs include: 1 concentrations and fluxes of NO3 and NH4 in soil solution and runoff; 2 total nitrogen contents of the organic and inorganic compartments; 3 C:N ratios of the aggregated plant and soil organic compartments; and 4 rates of nitrogen uptake and immobilization and nitrogen mineralization. The behaviour of the model is assessed for a combination of land-use change and nitrogen deposition scenarios in a series of speculative simulations. The results of the simulations are in broad agreement with observed and hypothesized behaviour of nitrogen

  8. Food, Feed and Fuel: a Story About Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, J. N.; Burke, M. B.; Mooney, H. A.; Steinfeld, H.

    2008-12-01

    Humans obtain metabolic energy by eating food. Nitrogen is required to grow food, but natural supplies of N for human purposes have been inadequate since the beginning of the twentieth century. The Haber-Bosch process now provides a virtually inexhaustible supply of nitrogen, limited primarily by the cost of energy. However, most nitrogen used in food production is lost to the environment, where it cascades through environmental reservoirs contributing to many of the major environmental issues of the day. Furthermore, growing international trade in nitrogen-containing commodities is increasingly replacing wind and water as an important international transporter of nitrogen around the globe. Finally, the rapid growth in crop-based biofuels, and its attendant effects on the global production and trade of all agricultural commodities, could greatly affect global patterns of N use and loss. In the light of the findings above, this paper examines the role of nitrogen in food, feed and fuel production. It describes the beneficial consequences for food production and the negative consequences associated with the commodity nitrogen cascade and the environmental nitrogen cascade. The paper reviews estimates of future projections of nitrogen demands for food and fuel, including the impact of changing diets in the developing world. The paper concludes by presenting the potential interactions among global change, agricultural production and the nitrogen and carbon cycles.

  9. Molybdenum limitation of asymbiotic nitrogen fixation in tropical forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Alexander R.; Wurzburger, Nina; Bellenger, Jean Phillipe; Wright, S. Joseph; Kraepiel, Anne M. L.; Hedin, Lars O.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation, the biological conversion of di-nitrogen to plant-available ammonium, is the primary natural input of nitrogen to ecosystems, and influences plant growth and carbon exchange at local to global scales. The role of this process in tropical forests is of particular concern, as these ecosystems harbour abundant nitrogen-fixing organisms and represent one third of terrestrial primary production. Here we show that the micronutrient molybdenum, a cofactor in the nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase, limits nitrogen fixation by free-living heterotrophic bacteria in soils of lowland Panamanian forests. We measured the fixation response to long-term nutrient manipulations in intact forests, and to short-term manipulations in soil microcosms. Nitrogen fixation increased sharply in treatments of molybdenum alone, in micronutrient treatments that included molybdenum by design and in treatments with commercial phosphorus fertilizer, in which molybdenum was a `hidden' contaminant. Fixation did not respond to additions of phosphorus that were not contaminated by molybdenum. Our findings show that molybdenum alone can limit asymbiotic nitrogen fixation in tropical forests and raise new questions about the role of molybdenum and phosphorus in the tropical nitrogen cycle. We suggest that molybdenum limitation may be common in highly weathered acidic soils, and may constrain the ability of some forests to acquire new nitrogen in response to CO2 fertilization.

  10. Environmentally Friendly Nitrogen Fertilizers Appplication for Winter Cereals Considering the Mineral Nitrogen Content in Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Timbare, R.; Bušmanis, M.

    2006-01-01

    In order to improve nitrogen fertilizers application recommendations for cereals, the soil mineral nitrogen (Nmin) investigations (1995 – 2000) were carried out on sod – podzolic and brown – lesssive loamy sand and loamy soils in co-operation with other research institutions. The soil samples for determination of NO3 – N and NH4 – N were taken in depth 0 - 20, 21 – 40 and 41 – 60 cm in spring before the start of growth on winter cereals fields, but in 2001,2002- also in autumn before the sowi...

  11. Estimated global nitrogen deposition using NO2 column density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuehe; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiuying; Liu, Jinxun; Zhang, Zhen; Jin, Jiaxin; Wang, Ying; Xu, Jianhui; Cheng, Miaomiao

    2013-01-01

    Global nitrogen deposition has increased over the past 100 years. Monitoring and simulation studies of nitrogen deposition have evaluated nitrogen deposition at both the global and regional scale. With the development of remote-sensing instruments, tropospheric NO2 column density retrieved from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) sensors now provides us with a new opportunity to understand changes in reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere. The concentration of NO2 in the atmosphere has a significant effect on atmospheric nitrogen deposition. According to the general nitrogen deposition calculation method, we use the principal component regression method to evaluate global nitrogen deposition based on global NO2 column density and meteorological data. From the accuracy of the simulation, about 70% of the land area of the Earth passed a significance test of regression. In addition, NO2 column density has a significant influence on regression results over 44% of global land. The simulated results show that global average nitrogen deposition was 0.34 g m−2 yr−1 from 1996 to 2009 and is increasing at about 1% per year. Our simulated results show that China, Europe, and the USA are the three hotspots of nitrogen deposition according to previous research findings. In this study, Southern Asia was found to be another hotspot of nitrogen deposition (about 1.58 g m−2 yr−1 and maintaining a high growth rate). As nitrogen deposition increases, the number of regions threatened by high nitrogen deposits is also increasing. With N emissions continuing to increase in the future, areas whose ecosystem is affected by high level nitrogen deposition will increase.

  12. [Effects of soil fertility and nitrogen application rate on nitrogen absorption and translocation, grain yield, and grain protein content of wheat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuefu; Yu, Zhenwen; Li, Xiangxia; Yu, Songlie

    2003-11-01

    The results of this study showed that nitrogen application improved the nitrogen uptake by wheat, especially during its late growth stage. Although a higher nitrogen application rate could increase the amount of absorbed nitrogen, an excess of nitrogen would remain in vegetative organs at the stage after flowering, owing to the low translocation rate of nitrogen from these organs to the grain, and hence, the nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen harvest index were decreased. Compared with that on high fertility soil, the ratio of nitrogen absorbed from fertilizer to total absorbed nitrogen was higher when the wheat was grown on low fertility soil. On high fertility soil, wheat plant absorbed more nitrogen from top-dressed fertilizer than from basis fertilizer, and top-dressed fertilizer contributed more nitrogen to the grain. It was reversed on low fertility soil.

  13. Impact of bioenergy on regionalized nitrogen balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häußermann, Uwe; Klement, Laura; Bach, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Results of regionalized and overall net-N-balances are used to fulfil different reporting obligations, as well as input data for nitrate leaching modelling (Bach et al. 2014). For Germany, these regionalized net-N-balances are calculated for 402 administrative units on the NUTS-III-level (Landkreise and kreisfreie Städte in Germany), 16 administrative units on the NUTS-I-level (Bundesländer in Germany) and the whole country for every year from 1995 to 2015. The so far existing net-N-balancing method includes nitrogen inputs and outputs of crop production and animal husbandry, however, not the utilization of crops and farmyard manure for energy production (Bach et al. 2014). Due to the introduction of guaranteed feed in tariffs for electricity production from biomass by the German renewable energy law in 2000 and the introduction of more favourable conditions for electricity production from biogas in 2004 (EEG 2000, EEG 2004) in the frame of the German policy of energy transition towards renewable energies („Energiewende"), the electric capacity of biogas plants had a steep increase in the years afterwards, the installed electric capacity increased from 149 MW in 2004 to 5080 MW in 2015 (BMWi and AGEE Stat 2016). The cropping area for the production of energy cops for biogas production increased as well from 0.4 Mio ha in 2007 to 1.393 Mio ha in 2015 (Statista 2017). We introduced a method to calculate the nitrogen input via energy crops, farmyard manure and organic waste, output via biogas digestates and gaseous nitrogen losses via NH3, N2O, NOx and N2 during the anaerobic digestion, digestate storage and spreading on the field, the emission factors for these nitrogen species are obtained from the report on methods and data for the agricultural part of the German national greenhouse gas inventory and informative inventory report (Haenel et al. 2016). To obtain highly resolved information on the distribution and capacity of biogas plants on NUTS-III-level, we

  14. [Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application on cotton biomass, nitrogen utilization and soil urease activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Ning; Yin, Fei-hu; Chen, Yun; Gao, Zhi-jian; Liu, Yu; Shi, Lei

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a semi-open-top artificial climate chamber was used to study the effect of CO2 enrichment (360 and 540 µmol · mol(-1)) and nitrogen addition (0, 150, 300 and 450 kg · hm(-2)) on cotton dry matter accumulation and distribution, nitrogen absorption and soil urease activity. The results showed that the dry matter accumulation of bud, stem, leaf and the whole plant increased significantly in the higher CO2 concentration treatment irrespective of nitrogen level. The dry matter of all the detected parts of plant with 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen addition was significantly higher than those with the other nitrogen levels irrespective of CO2 concentration, indicating reasonable nitrogen fertilization could significantly improve cotton dry matter accumulation. Elevated CO2 concentration had significant impact on the nitrogen absorption contents of cotton bud and stem. Compared to those under CO2 concentration of 360 µmol · mol(-1), the nitrogen contents of bud and stem both increased significantly under CO2 concentration of 540 µmol · mol(-1). The nitrogen content of cotton bud in the treatment of 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen was the highest among the four nitrogen fertilizer treatments. While the nitrogen contents of cotton stem in the treatments of 150 kg · hm(-2) and 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen levels were higher than those in the treatment of 0 kg · hm(-2) and 450 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen levels. The nitrogen content of cotton leaf was significantly influenced by the in- teraction of CO2 elevation and N addition as the nitrogen content of leaf increased in the treatments of 0, 150 and 300 kg · hm(-2) nitrogen levels under the CO2 concentration of 540 µmol · mol(-1). The nitrogen content in cotton root was significantly increased with the increase of nitrogen fertilizer level under elevated CO2 (540 µmol · mol(-1)) treatment. Overall, the cotton nitrogen absorption content under the elevated CO2 (540 µmol · mol(-1)) treatment was higher than that

  15. The effect of the rate and method of nitrogen application on nitrogen uptake and utilization by broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica)

    OpenAIRE

    Everaarts, A.P.; Willigen, de, P.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the rate and method of nitrogen application on nitrogen uptake and utilization by broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) was studied in four field experiments. The methods of application were broadcast application vs band placement and split application. Maximum uptake of nitrogen by the crop was around 300 kg ha-1. In one experiment, band placement positively influenced nitrogen uptake. Split application did not influence nitrogen uptake. Nitrogen application resulted in a h...

  16. Nitrogen oxide formation from chemically-bound nitrogen during the combustion of fossil fuels. [Extended Zeldovich reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R.E.

    1976-06-01

    One of the many problems associated with the firing of fossil fuels is the impact on the ambient levels of nitrogen oxides. Since the use of coals, oils and coal-derived fuels is expected to triple by 1985, it is urgent that the formation of nitrogen oxides from molecular nitrogen and organo-nitrogen species be fully characterized so that emission abatement strategies can be formulated. The thermal fixation of atmospheric nitrogen and the free radical reactions of nitrogenous species are the sources of NO/sub x/. The fixation reactions can be described by the extended Zeldovich mechanism, and techniques such as staged combustion and flue gas recirculation have been employed to reduce combustion temperatures and, hence, thermally formed NO. These techniques have had little effect, however, on the conversion of chemically-bound nitrogen to NO/sub x/. The fate of chemically-bound nitrogen depends upon such factors as the nitrogen content of the fuel and the equivalence ratio and upon the physical processes governing combustion. Research is proposed to establish the kinetic processes involved in the conversion of fuel nitrogen to NO and N/sub 2/ in environments characteristic of fossil fuel combustion and to identify those conditions which favor the reduction of NO to N/sub 2/.

  17. Net anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (NANI) into the Yangtze River basin and the relationship with riverine nitrogen export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yanling; Yin, Guoyu; Lin, Xianbiao; Li, Xiaofei; Zong, Haibo; Deng, Fengyu; Gao, Juan; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated net anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (NANI, including atmospheric nitrogen deposition, nitrogenous fertilizer use, net nitrogen import in food and feed, and agricultural nitrogen fixation) and the associated relationship with riverine dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export in the Yangtze River basin during the 1980-2012 period. The total NANI in the Yangtze River basin has increased by more than twofold over the past three decades (3537.0 ± 615.3 to 8176.6 ± 1442.1 kg N km-2 yr-1). The application of chemical fertilizer was the largest component of NANI in the basin (51.1%), followed by net nitrogen import in food and feed (26.0%), atmospheric nitrogen deposition (13.2%), and agricultural nitrogen fixation (9.7%). A regression analysis showed that the riverine DIN export was strongly correlated with NANI and the annual water discharge (R2 = 0.90, p export. We also forecasted future variations in NANI and riverine DIN export for the years 2013 to 2030, based on possible future changes in human activities and the climate. This work provides a quantitative understanding of NANI in the Yangtze River basin and its effects on riverine DIN export and helps to develop integrated watershed nitrogen management strategies.

  18. CONAN; Chemistry of Nitrogen-A Nascence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    and Carbon Tetrachloride," NR 092-531, 6 (!971). 59. Berg, H.C. and Kleppner, D., "Storage Technique for Atomic Hydrogen," Rev. Sci. instrum. 3 , 248...M.J., "Nascent NO Vibrational Distribution from 2485 & NO2 Photodissociation ," J. Chem. Phys 79, 2231 (1983). 91. Her, R. R. , Sul.ivan, .. and...1964). 138. Chu, A.L., Reeves, R.R., and Halstead, J.A., "Surface-Catalvzea Formation of Electronically Excited Nitrogen Dioxide and Oxygen, ’ J

  19. [Nitrogen balance assessment in burn patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beça, Andreia; Egipto, Paula; Carvalho, Davide; Correia, Flora; Oliveira, Bruno; Rodrigues, Acácio; Amarante, José; Medina, J Luís

    2010-01-01

    The burn injury probably represents the largest stimulus for muscle protein catabolism. This state is characterized by an accelerated catabolism of the lean or skeletal mass that results in a clinical negative balance of nitrogen and muscle wasting. The determination of an appropriate value for protein intake is essential, since it is positively related to the nitrogen balance (NB) and accordingly several authors argue that a positive NB is the key parameter associated with nutritional improvement of a burn patient. Evaluation of the degree of protein catabolism by assessment of the Nitrogen Balance; Defining of nutritional support (protein needs) to implement in patients with burned surface area (BSA) = 10%. We prospectively evaluated the clinical files and scrutinized the clinical variables of interest. The NB was estimated according to three formulae. Each gram of nitrogen calculated by the NB was then converted into grams of protein, subtracted or added to protein intake (or administered enteric or parenterically) and divided by kg of reference Weight (kg Rweight), in an attempt to estimate the daily protein needs. The cohort consisted of 10 patients, 6 females, with average age of 58(23) years old, a mean of BSA of 21.4(8.4)%, ranging from a minimum of 10.0% and máximum of 35.0%. On average, patients were 58 (23) years old. The average number of days of hospitalization in the burn unit was 64.8(36.5) days. We observed significant differences between the 3 methods used for calculating the NB (p = 0.004), on average the NB was positive. When the formula A was used the average value of NB was higher. Regarding the attempt to estimate the needs of g prot/kg Rweight/day most of the values did not exceed, on average, 2.6 g Prot/kg Rweight/day and no significant differences between patients with a BSA% of 10-20% and with BSA% > 20% were found. Despite being able to estimate the protein catabolism through these formulas and verifying that most values were above zero

  20. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Resource Management; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1986-09-01

    The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

  1. The nitrogen vacancy in aluminium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vail, J M [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Chevrier, D K [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2 (Canada); Pandey, R [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Blanco, M A [Departamento de QuImica Fisica y AnalItica, Universidad de Oviedo, E-33006-Oviedo (Spain)

    2006-02-22

    We have carried out a computational study for the nitrogen vacancy in charge states +3, +2 and +1 in AlN in the metastable zinc-blende phase. The vacancy and its four nearest-neighbour Al ions are treated as a molecular cluster, embedded in an infinite classical shell-model crystal. The following ground state properties, all of which are determinable from experiment, have been calculated: total spin, nearest-neighbour displacement, electron spin density at nearest-neighbour nuclei and breathing-mode force constant. The issue of disproportionation among the three charge states is also addressed. Most importantly, the optical excitation energies are evaluated.

  2. Nitrogen transformations along a shallow subterranean estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Mathilde; Tommi-Morin, Gwendoline; Sirois, Maude; Rao, Alexandra; Nozais, Christian; Chaillou, Gwénaëlle

    2017-07-01

    The transformations of chemical constituents in subterranean estuaries (STEs) control the delivery of nutrient loads from coastal aquifers to the ocean. It is important to determine the processes and sources that alter nutrient concentrations at a local scale in order to estimate accurate regional and global nutrient fluxes via submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), particularly in boreal environments, where data are still very scarce. Here, the biogeochemical transformations of nitrogen (N) species were examined within the STE of a boreal microtidal sandy beach located in the Magdalen Islands (Quebec, Canada). This study revealed the vertical and horizontal distribution of nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), ammonia (NH4+), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) measured in beach groundwater during four spring seasons (June 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2015) when aquifer recharge was maximal after snowmelt. Inland groundwater supplied high concentrations of NOx and DON to the STE, whereas inputs from seawater infiltration were very limited. Non-conservative behaviour was observed along the groundwater flow path, leading to low NOx and high NH4+ concentrations in the discharge zone. The long transit time of groundwater within the beach (˜ 166 days), coupled with oxygen-depleted conditions and high carbon concentrations, created a favourable environment for N transformations such as heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification and ammonium production. Biogeochemical pathways led to a shift in nitrogen species along the flow path from NOx-rich to NOx-poor groundwater. An estimate of SGD fluxes of N was determined to account for biogeochemical transformations within the STE based on a N-species inventory and Darcy's flow. Fresh inland groundwater delivered 37 mol NOx yr-1 per metre of shoreline and 63 mol DON m-1 yr-1 to the STE, and NH4+ input was negligible. Near the discharge zone, the potential export of N species was estimated around 140, 1

  3. Heats of adsorption for charcoal nitrogen systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, M.; Akkimaradi, B.S.; Rastogi, S.C. [ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore (India). Thermal Systems Group; Rao, R.R. [Government College for Boys, Kolar, Karnataka (India); Srinivasan, K. [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1999-07-01

    This paper develops an empirical equation for correlation of the loading dependence of the heat of adsorption for two samples of activated charcoal-nitrogen systems. Details are given of the use of isotherm data, the evaluation of the heat of adsorption using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, the plotting of primary adsorption data, and the plotting of the heat of adsorption as a function of the loading of the two samples. The need to consider the heat of adsorption property when designing a system in which a gaseous medium is adsorbed by a solid sorbent is discussed. (UK)

  4. Studies on nitrogen utilization in ruminants

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Erick Darlisson

    2015-01-01

    In cattle, efficiency of nitrogen (N) utilization (g N in product/g N intake) is lower compared to others species (e.g., pig, chicken). For that reason, there is an extensive loss of N in manure, leading to environmental pollution. However, understanding the key mechanisms involved in control of N metabolism, such as efficiency of N capture in the rumen from recycled N and metabolism of amino acids (AA) in the body can improve efficiency of N utilization. To understand these factors, this dis...

  5. Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Cycle Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, D.; Chaoka, S.; Kumar, P.; Quijano, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Second generation bioenergy crops, such as miscanthus (Miscantus × giganteus) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), are regarded as clean energy sources, and are an attractive option to mitigate the human-induced climate change. However, the global climate change and the expansion of perennial grass bioenergy crops have the power to alter the biogeochemical cycles in soil, especially, soil carbon storages, over long time scales. In order to develop a predictive understanding, this study develops a coupled hydrological-soil nutrient model to simulate soil carbon responses under different climate scenarios such as: (i) current weather condition, (ii) decreased precipitation by -15%, and (iii) increased temperature up to +3C for four different crops, namely miscanthus, switchgrass, maize, and natural prairie. We use Precision Agricultural Landscape Modeling System (PALMS), version 5.4.0, to capture biophysical and hydrological components coupled with a multilayer carbon and ¬nitrogen cycle model. We apply the model at daily time scale to the Energy Biosciences Institute study site, located in the University of Illinois Research Farms, in Urbana, Illinois. The atmospheric forcing used to run the model was generated stochastically from parameters obtained using available data recorded in Bondville Ameriflux Site. The model simulations are validated with observations of drainage and nitrate and ammonium concentrations recorded in drain tiles during 2011. The results of this study show (1) total soil carbon storage of miscanthus accumulates most noticeably due to the significant amount of aboveground plant carbon, and a relatively high carbon to nitrogen ratio and lignin content, which reduce the litter decomposition rate. Also, (2) the decreased precipitation contributes to the enhancement of total soil carbon storage and soil nitrogen concentration because of the reduced microbial biomass pool. However, (3) an opposite effect on the cycle is introduced by the increased

  6. Demonstrating superconductivity at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, E. A.; Seaman, C. L.; Yang, K. N.; Maple, M. B.

    1988-07-01

    This article describes two demonstrations of superconductivity at the boiling temperature of liquid nitrogen (77 K) using the 90 K superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ(δ≊0.2). Both demonstrations involve the repulsion of a permanent magnet by a superconductor due to the expulsion of the magnetic field from the interior of the latter. In the first demonstration, the repulsion is manifested in the separation of a permanent magnet and a superconductor that are suspended from separate threads, while in the second it results in the levitation of a permanent magnet above a flat superconducting disk.

  7. SSTs, nitrogen fertiliser and stratospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.; Poppoff, I. G.; Capone, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A recently revised model of the stratosphere is used to show that a substantial enhancement in the ozone layer could accompany worldwide SST fleet operations and that water vapor may be an important factor in SST assessments. Revised rate coefficients for various ozone-destroying reactions are employed in calculations which indicate a slight increase in the total content of stratospheric ozone for modest-sized fleets of SSTs flying below about 25 km. It is found that water-vapor chemical reactions can negate in large part the NOx-induced ozone gains computed below 25 km and that increased use of nitrogen fertilizer might also enhance the ozone layer.

  8. Marine Engines and Nitrogen Oxides Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu Moroianu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Current international policy initiatives by the International Maritime Organization (IMO to reduce emissions from ship propulsion systems (NOx and SOx, primarily mark the first efforts to define a framework to address this issue. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx emissions from ship engines are significant on a global level. NOx emissions participate in the formation of photochemical smog and acid rain. Marine sourced emissions have significant impact on air quality on land. The challenge is to control NOx emissions without increasing fuel consumption and smoke. Most engine manufacturers can meet the current IMO limits by engine tuning measures

  9. Nitrogen deposition in California forests: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bytnerowicz, A; Fenn, M E

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations and deposition of the major nitrogenous (N) compounds and their biological effects in California forests are reviewed. Climatic characteristics of California are summarized in light of their effects on pollutant accumulation and transport. Over large areas of the state dry deposition is of greater magnitude than wet deposition due to the arid climate. However, fog deposition can also be significant in areas where seasonal fogs and N pollution sources coincide. The dominance of dry deposition is magnified in airsheds with frequent temperature inversions such as occur in the Los Angeles Air Basin. Most of the deposition in such areas occurs in summer as a result of surface deposition of nitric acid vapor (HNO3) as well as particulate nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Internal uptake of gaseous N pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO), HNO3, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), ammonia (NH3), and others provides additional N to forests. However, summer drought and subsequent lower stomatal conductance of plants tend to limit plant utilization of gaseous N. Nitrogen deposition is much greater than S deposition in California. In locations close to photochemical smog source areas, concentrations of oxidized forms of N (NO2, HNO3, PAN) dominate, while in areas near agricultural activities the importance of reduced N forms (NH3, NH4+) significantly increases. Little data from California forests are available for most of the gaseous N pollutants. Total inorganic N deposition in the most highly-exposed forests in the Los Angeles Air Basin may be as high as 25-45 kg ha(-1) year(-1). Nitrogen deposition in these highly-exposed areas has led to N saturation of chaparral and mixed conifer stands. In N saturated forests high concentrations of NO3- are found in streamwater, soil solution, and in foliage. Nitric oxide emissions from soil and foliar N:P ratios are also high in N saturated sites. Further research is needed to determine the

  10. Coupling GIS with Nitrogen Leaching Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Geographical information systems (GIS) are increasingly being applied to surface and subsurface flow and transport modeling issues. In this paper, more attentions are focused on the methodology and strategies of coupling GIS with non-point pollution models. Suggestions are made on how to best integrate current available or selected nitrogen leaching models, especially in the aspect of programming development so as to effectively and flexibly address the specific tasks. The new possibilities for dealing with non-point pollution problems at a regional scale are provided in the resulting integrated approach, including embedding grid-based GIS components in models.

  11. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Jochen; Snively, Christopher M.; Vijay, Rohit; Hendershot, Reed; Feist, Ben

    2010-10-12

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  12. Photocatalytic property of nitrogen and nicked codoped titanium oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Yong; Jun, Kyeong Mun; Kwon, Ki Young [Dept. of Chemistry, Research Institute of Natural Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seok Hoon; Hwang, Jun Yeon [Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Wanju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Nitrogen or nitrogen and nickel codoped TiO{sub 2}s are prepared by a hydrothermal method. The doped TiO{sub 2}s are applied to the photodecomposition of methylene blue (MB) under visible-light irradiation. The chemical and physical properties of catalysts are characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping, zeta potential, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller. We found that nickel and nitrogen atoms are well dispersed in TiO{sub 2}. While the adsorption of MB on the TiO{sub 2} surface are improved by the nitrogen doping, the photodecomposition capability of MB is barely affected by the nitrogen doping level. Particularly, the photodegradation power of the nickel and nitrogen codoped TiO{sub 2} is better than that of commercial TiO{sub 2} (Degussa P25)

  13. Evolution of Photosynthesis and Biospheric Oxygenation Contingent Upon Nitrogen Fixation?

    CERN Document Server

    Grula, J W

    2006-01-01

    How photosynthesis by Precambrian cyanobacteria oxygenated Earth's biosphere remains incompletely understood. Here it is argued that the oxic transition, which took place between approximately 2.3 and 0.5 Gyr ago, required a great proliferation of cyanobacteria, and this in turn depended on their ability to fix nitrogen via the nitrogenase enzyme system. However, the ability to fix nitrogen was not a panacea, and the rate of biospheric oxygenation may still have been affected by nitrogen constraints on cyanobacterial expansion. Evidence is presented for why cyanobacteria probably have a great need for fixed nitrogen than other prokaryotes, underscoring the importance of their ability to fix nitrogen. The connection between nitrogen fixation and the evolution of photosynthesis is demonstrated by the similarities between nitrogenase and enzymes critical for the biosynthesis of (bacterio)chlorophyll. It is hypothesized that biospheric oxygenation would not have occurred if the emergence of cyanobacteria had not ...

  14. Nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria stimulates production in Baltic food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlson, Agnes M L; Duberg, Jon; Motwani, Nisha H; Hogfors, Hedvig; Klawonn, Isabell; Ploug, Helle; Barthel Svedén, Jennie; Garbaras, Andrius; Sundelin, Brita; Hajdu, Susanna; Larsson, Ulf; Elmgren, Ragnar; Gorokhova, Elena

    2015-06-01

    Filamentous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria form extensive summer blooms in the Baltic Sea. Their ability to fix dissolved N2 allows cyanobacteria to circumvent the general summer nitrogen limitation, while also generating a supply of novel bioavailable nitrogen for the food web. However, the fate of the nitrogen fixed by cyanobacteria remains unresolved, as does its importance for secondary production in the Baltic Sea. Here, we synthesize recent experimental and field studies providing strong empirical evidence that cyanobacterial nitrogen is efficiently assimilated and transferred in Baltic food webs via two major pathways: directly by grazing on fresh or decaying cyanobacteria and indirectly through the uptake by other phytoplankton and microbes of bioavailable nitrogen exuded from cyanobacterial cells. This information is an essential step toward guiding nutrient management to minimize noxious blooms without overly reducing secondary production, and ultimately most probably fish production in the Baltic Sea.

  15. Deposition of nitrogen and phosphorus on the Baltic Sea: seasonal patterns and nitrogen isotope composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rolff

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and phosphorus on the central Baltic Sea (Baltic Proper was estimated monthly at two coastal stations and two isolated islands in 2001 and 2002. Yearly nitrogen deposition ranged between 387 and 727 mg N m−2 yr−1 (average 617 and was composed of ~10% organic N and approximately equal amounts of ammonium and nitrate. Winter nitrate peaks at the isolated islands possibly indicated ship emissions. Load weighted δ15N of deposited N was 3.7‰ and 0.35‰ at the coastal stations and the isolated islands respectively. Winter δ15N was ~3‰ lighter than in summer, reflecting winter dominance of nitrate. The light isotopic composition of deposited nitrogen may cause overestimates of nitrogen fixation in basin-wide isotopic budgeting, whereas relatively heavy deposition of ammonium during summer instead may cause underestimates of fixation in budgets of the upper mixed layer. δ15N in atmospherically deposited nitrate and ammonium was estimated by regression to −7.9 and 13.5‰ respectively. Phosphorus deposition showed no clear seasonal pattern and was considerably lower at the isolated islands. Organic P constituted 20–40% of annual P deposition. P deposition is unlikely to be a major source for cyanobacterial blooms but may potentially prolong an ongoing bloom.

  16. Effects of watershed land use on nitrogen concentrations and δ15 nitrogen in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Marci L.; Kroeger, Kevin D.; McClelland, J.W.; Valiela, I.

    2006-01-01

    Eutrophication is a major agent of change affecting freshwater, estuarine, and marine systems. It is largely driven by transportation of nitrogen from natural and anthropogenic sources. Research is needed to quantify this nitrogen delivery and to link the delivery to specific land-derived sources. In this study we measured nitrogen concentrations and δ 15N values in seepage water entering three freshwater ponds and six estuaries on Cape Cod, Massachusetts and assessed how they varied with different types of land use. Nitrate concentrations and δ 15N values in groundwater reflected land use in developed and pristine watersheds. In particular, watersheds with larger populations delivered larger nitrate loads with higher δ 15N values to receiving waters. The enriched δ 15N values confirmed nitrogen loading model results identifying wastewater contributions from septic tanks as the major N source. Furthermore, it was apparent that N coastal sources had a relatively larger impact on the N loads and isotopic signatures than did inland N sources further upstream in the watersheds. This finding suggests that management priorities could focus on coastal sources as a first course of action. This would require management constraints on a much smaller population.

  17. Nitrogen cycling in summer active perennial grass systems in South Australia: Non-symbiotic nitrogen fixation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, V.V.S.R.; Kroker, S.J.; Hicks, M.; Davoren, W.; Descheemaeker, K.K.E.; Llewellyn, R.

    2014-01-01

    Non-symbiotic nitrogen (N2) fixation by diazotrophic bacteria is a potential source for biological N inputs in non-leguminous crops and pastures. Perennial grasses generally add larger quantities of above- and belowground plant residues to soil, and so can support higher levels of soil biological

  18. Will breeding for nitrogen use efficient crops lead to nitrogen use efficient cropping systems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dresbøll, Dorte Bodin; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of improving nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in crops are typically studied through the performance of the individual crop. However, in order to increase yields in a sustainable way, improving NUE of the cropping systems must be the aim. We did a model simulation study to investigate h...

  19. Structural Underpinnings of Nitrogen Regulation by the Prototypical Nitrogen-Responsive Transcriptional Factor NrpR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Dranow, David M.; Lie, Thomas J.; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Patskovsky, Yury; Ozyurt, Sinem A.; Sauder, J. Michael; Almo, Steven C.; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Burley, Stephen K.; Leigh, John A.; Gonen, Tamir (UWASH); (Einstein); (Lilly)

    2010-11-29

    Plants and microorganisms reduce environmental inorganic nitrogen to ammonium, which then enters various metabolic pathways solely via conversion of 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) to glutamate and glutamine. Cellular 2OG concentrations increase during nitrogen starvation. We recently identified a family of 2OG-sensing proteins - the nitrogen regulatory protein NrpR - that bind DNA and repress transcription of nitrogen assimilation genes. We used X-ray crystallography to determine the structure of NrpR regulatory domain. We identified the NrpR 2OG-binding cleft and show that residues predicted to interact directly with 2OG are conserved among diverse classes of 2OG-binding proteins. We show that high levels of 2OG inhibit NrpRs ability to bind DNA. Electron microscopy analyses document that NrpR adopts different quaternary structures in its inhibited 2OG-bound state compared with its active apo state. Our results indicate that upon 2OG release, NrpR repositions its DNA-binding domains correctly for optimal interaction with DNA thereby enabling gene repression.

  20. Cultivar and nitrogen fertilizer rate affect yield and nitrogen use efficiency in irrigated durum wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optimizing nitrogen (N) management and using cultivars with high N use efficiency (NUE) are of great importance for durum wheat (Triticum durum L.) producers in irrigated desert production systems. Field experiments with six durum wheat cultivars (Ocotillo, Orita, Kronos, Havasu, Duraking, and Toppe...

  1. Milk urea nitrogen (MUN) tool reduces nitrogen emissions from dairy farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The milk urea nitrogen (MUN) tool was developed to monitor dietary crude protein (CP) use and feed costs. MUN within the range of 12 to 10 mg/100 ml milk usually indicates the recommended dietary CP level of 16.5%. MUN levels greater than 12 mg/100 ml indicate dietary CP is being wasted and excreted...

  2. The Position of Mineral Nitrogen Fertilizer in Efficient Use of Nitrogen and Land: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroder, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Our attitude towards mineral nitrogen (N) fertilizers is ambivalent. N fertilizers have on one hand increased our supply of food, feed and other bio-based raw materials tremendously and also improved the use efficiency of land and labor, but have on the other hand a negative impact on the quality of

  3. Emiliania Huxleyi (Prymnesiophyceae): Nitrogen-metabolism genes and their expression in response to external nitrogen souces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Annette; LaRoche, Julie; Richardson, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    . In this study, the complete amino acid sequences for three functional genes involved in nitrogen metabolism in E. huxleyi were identified: a putative formamidase, a glutamine synthetase (GSII family), and assimilatory nitrate reductase. Expression patterns of the three enzymes in cells grown on inorganic...

  4. A New GIS-Nitrogen Trading Tool Concept to Minimize Reactive Nitrogen losses to the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential element which is needed to maximize agricultural production and sustainability of worldwide agroecosystems. N losses to the environment are impacting water and air quality that has become an environmental concern for the future generations. It has led to the need for dev...

  5. Nitrogen acquisition in Agave tequilana from degradation of endophytic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Beltran-Garcia, Miguel J.; White, JR; Prado, Fernanda M; Prieto, Katia R.; Yamaguchi, Lydia F.; Torres, Monica S.; Kato, Massuo J.; Medeiros, Marisa H. G.; Di Mascio,Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Plants form symbiotic associations with endophytic bacteria within tissues of leaves, stems, and roots. It is unclear whether or how plants obtain nitrogen from these endophytic bacteria. Here we present evidence showing nitrogen flow from endophytic bacteria to plants in a process that appears to involve oxidative degradation of bacteria. In our experiments we employed Agave tequilana and its seed-transmitted endophyte Bacillus tequilensis to elucidate organic nitrogen transfer from 15N-labe...

  6. Reduction of forest soil respiration in response to nitrogen deposition

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Janssens; Dieleman, W.; S. Luyssaert; Subke, J-A.; M. Reichstein; Ceulemans, R; Ciais, P; Dolman, A.J.; J. Grace; Matteucci, G.; Papale, D.; S. L. Piao; Schulze, E-D.; Tang, J.; Law, B.E.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The use of fossil fuels and fertilizers has increased the amount of biologically reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere over the past century. As a consequence, forests in industrialized regions have experienced greater rates of nitrogen deposition in recent decades. This unintended fertilization has stimulated forest growth, but has also affected soil microbial activity, and thus the recycling of soil carbon and nutrients. A meta-analysis suggests that nitrogen depositio...

  7. Gross Nitrogen Mineralization in Surface Sediments of the Yangtze Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xianbiao; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Li, Xiaofei; Yin, Guoyu; Zheng, Yanling; Deng, Fengyu

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen mineralization is a key biogeochemical process transforming organic nitrogen to inorganic nitrogen in estuarine and coastal sediments. Although sedimentary nitrogen mineralization is an important internal driver for aquatic eutrophication, few studies have investigated sedimentary nitrogen mineralization in these environments. Sediment-slurry incubation experiments combined with 15N isotope dilution technique were conducted to quantify the potential rates of nitrogen mineralization in surface sediments of the Yangtze Estuary. The gross nitrogen mineralization (GNM) rates ranged from 0.02 to 5.13 mg N kg(-1) d(-1) in surface sediments of the study area. The GNM rates were generally higher in summer than in winter, and the relative high rates were detected mainly at sites near the north branch and frontal edge of this estuary. The spatial and temporal distributions of GNM rates were observed to depend largely on temperature, salinity, sedimentary organic carbon and nitrogen contents, and extracellular enzyme (urease and L-glutaminase) activities. The total mineralized nitrogen in the sediments of the Yangtze Estuary was estimated to be about 6.17 × 10(5) t N yr(-1), and approximately 37% of it was retained in the estuary. Assuming the retained mineralized nitrogen is totally released from the sediments into the water column, which contributed 12-15% of total dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) sources in this study area. This result indicated that the mineralization process is a significant internal nitrogen source for the overlying water of the Yangtze Estuary, and thus may contribute to the estuarine and coastal eutrophication.

  8. Gross Nitrogen Mineralization in Surface Sediments of the Yangtze Estuary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianbiao Lin

    Full Text Available Nitrogen mineralization is a key biogeochemical process transforming organic nitrogen to inorganic nitrogen in estuarine and coastal sediments. Although sedimentary nitrogen mineralization is an important internal driver for aquatic eutrophication, few studies have investigated sedimentary nitrogen mineralization in these environments. Sediment-slurry incubation experiments combined with 15N isotope dilution technique were conducted to quantify the potential rates of nitrogen mineralization in surface sediments of the Yangtze Estuary. The gross nitrogen mineralization (GNM rates ranged from 0.02 to 5.13 mg N kg(-1 d(-1 in surface sediments of the study area. The GNM rates were generally higher in summer than in winter, and the relative high rates were detected mainly at sites near the north branch and frontal edge of this estuary. The spatial and temporal distributions of GNM rates were observed to depend largely on temperature, salinity, sedimentary organic carbon and nitrogen contents, and extracellular enzyme (urease and L-glutaminase activities. The total mineralized nitrogen in the sediments of the Yangtze Estuary was estimated to be about 6.17 × 10(5 t N yr(-1, and approximately 37% of it was retained in the estuary. Assuming the retained mineralized nitrogen is totally released from the sediments into the water column, which contributed 12-15% of total dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN sources in this study area. This result indicated that the mineralization process is a significant internal nitrogen source for the overlying water of the Yangtze Estuary, and thus may contribute to the estuarine and coastal eutrophication.

  9. Effect of Increasing Nitrogen Deposition on Soil Microbial Communities

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Increasing nitrogen deposition, increasing atmospheric CO2, and decreasing biodiversity are three main environmental changes occurring on a global scale. The BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) ecological experiment site at the University of Minnesota's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve started in 1997, to better understand how these changes would affect soil systems. To understand how increasing nitrogen deposition affects the microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functi...

  10. Nitrogen and phosphorus intake by phytoplankton in the Xiamen Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林彩; 林辉; 贺青; 许焜灿; 吴省三; 张元标; 陈金民; 陈宝红; 林力斌; 卢美鸾; 陈维芬; 汤荣坤; 暨卫东

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a time series experiment examining the nitrogen and phosphorus intake of natural phytoplankton communities by a microcosms approach.Seawater samples containing natural phytoplankton communities were collected from waters around Baozhu Islet in inner Xiamen Bay and around Qingyu Islet in the outer bay.The goal was to elucidate the relationship between phytoplankton population enhancement,the biological removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from the seawater,and the phytoplankton nitrogen an...

  11. Fine tuning soil nitrogen to maximize petroleum bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walworth, J.; Pond, A. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Snape, I.; Rayner, J.; Ferguson, S.; Harvey, P. [Australian Antarctic Division, Kingston, Tasmania (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    Although many studies indicate positive effects from the application of nitrogen to support bioremediation, a surprisingly large number report no benefit, or even deleterious effects when excessive levels of nitrogen are applied. Inhibitory effects include an increased lag phase and preferential inhibition of aromatic degradation. Microbial inhibition has been reported at lower application rates. In this study, oil was collected from a petroleum contaminated site on Macquarie Island, Australia, where the Australian Antarctic Division has maintained a permanent station since 1948. The soil used in this study was collected from a site where an overflow of fuel was reported in 1975. Soil was placed in glass bottles and brought to the University of Arizona. Petroleum hydrocarbons were extracted from 10 g samples of soil with 10 ml of hexane, and 0.5 ml of an internal standard solution. Sieve analysis included: nitrogen levels; water potential depression resulting from the addition of inorganic nitrogen fertilizer; and oxygen consumption during incubation of petroleum contaminated soil. Oxygen (O{sub 2}) consumption was monitored with an N-Con respirometer for approximately 4 months. Maximum O{sub 2} uptake was observed with 125 and 250 mg nitrogen/kg of soil application rates. Respiration in the 625 mg/kg treatment was slightly lower than that in the untreated soil, although they were statistically identical. The nitrogen application rate related to microbial inhibition was lower than in previous studies. Results suggested that a reasonable cutoff level for added plus native inorganic soil nitrogen should be approximately 1,800 mg of nitrogen per kg of soil in water, a lower value than previously recommended. It appeared that this level was applicable without regard to soil salinity. Use of sparingly soluble nitrogen sources may permit the addition of higher nitrogen doses by minimizing osmotic stress. Additionally, nitrogen applications can be split into multiple

  12. How important are air-sea nitrogen exchanges?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jickells, Tim

    2017-04-01

    We have recently reported an assessment of the magnitude and impact of atmospheric nitrogen (excluding N2 gas) deposition on the oceans (Jickells et al. Global Biogeochemical Cycles in press). The nitrogen budgets we present show a substantial component of the gross nitrogen deposition to the oceans being contributed from recycled marine emissions of organic nitrogen and ammonia. This recycling means that the net deposition of nitrogen to the oceans is 25% less than gross deposition, with 40% of gross deposition of ammonia/ammonium and organic nitrogen from recycled marine sources (Kanakidou et al., Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 2012). There is no doubt that these recycling fluxes occur. However, their relative importance, compared to atmospheric inputs from land based emissions, is uncertain. In the case of ammonia, the recycling mechanism is believed to be via direct emissions of ammonia from seawater. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that such ammonia emissions should occur predominantly at low latitudes. In the case of organic nitrogen, the emission mechanism is likely to be via organic nitrogen associated with sea-spray production, because volatile organic nitrogen concentrations in seawater are too low to sustain any significant flux. There is some indirect evidence both in support of, and in contradiction of, these large recycling fluxes for both organic nitrogen and ammonia. This reveals a major uncertainty in our understanding of the marine nitrogen cycle, one of the key biogeochemical cycles regulating the Earth system. In this contribution I will illustrate the scale of this uncertainty in the nitrogen cycle, consider the evidence in support of quantitatively large scale recycling, and consider methods by which these uncertainties can be reduced.

  13. 40 CFR 60.72 - Standard for nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for nitrogen oxides. 60.72... Plants § 60.72 Standard for nitrogen oxides. (a) On and after the date on which the performance test...) Contain nitrogen oxides, expressed as NO2, in excess of 1.5 kg per metric ton of acid produced (3.0 lb...

  14. Nitrogen transformation in alpine soils of the Northern Caucasus: effect of nitrogen source and low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Mikhail; Ermak, Anton; Malysheva, Tatiana; Mulyukova, Olga

    2010-05-01

    The alpine landscape supports a variety of plant communities whose distribution corresponds to their topographic position. Topography controls snow accumulation and hence soil winter temperature, length of growing season and soil water availability. The research was conducted at the Teberda Biosphere Reserve (Northern Caucasus, Russia). The study sites were located at Mt. Malaya Khatipara (43°27'N, 41°42'E) between 2700 and 2750 m a.s.l. The investigated toposequence was representative of the soil and plant community associations in the alpine zone of the Teberda Reserve: the wind-exposed ridges and upper slopes are covered by low-productive alpine lichen heaths; intermediate topographic positions are occupied by the most productive grasslands and meadows; the slope bottom is occupied by low-productive snowbed community. Under intensive snow cover accumulation typical for many alpine ecosystems, the temperature of soil within winter makes nearby 0 °C, while in case of absence or thin snow cover, characteristic for a lichen heath, the temperature can fall to -10 °C. The influence of nitrogen source, low temperatures and soil drying on processes of nitrogen mineralization, nitrification and plant/microbial immobilization was studied in the field and laboratory incubation experiments. 15N labeled ammonium, nitrate, glycine and aspartic acid were injected in situ before growth of aboveground biomass into the soil of lichen heath to investigate how the different nitrogen sources was subsequently utilized and cycled in the ecosystem. We analyzed the distribution of 15N between plants, soil microorganisms and different soil nitrogen compounds during all growing season in order to reveal differences for separate nitrogen sources. We concluded that the soil microorganisms were more efficient than plants in nitrogen uptake (especially amino acids) under natural conditions. In the laboratory, fresh and dry-rewetted soils of different alpine ecosystems were incubated at

  15. Effects of Watering and Nitrogen Fertilization on Yield and Water and Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Cropping Oil Sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAN Jian-xin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The field experiment with split-plot design was conducted to study the effects of the interaction of water and nitrogen fertilization on the growth and yield of oil sunflower, water and nitrogen use efficiency of cropping oil sunflower. This experiment set three irrigation rate treatments, including high irrigation treatment (5 250 m3·hm-2, middle irrigation treatment (3 750 m3·hm-2, low irrigation treatment (2 250 m3·hm-2, and four nitrogen application rate treatments, covering no nitrogen fertilization treatment (0 kg·hm-2, low nitrogen application treatment (120 kg·hm-2, middle nitrogen application treatment (240 kg·hm-2 and high nitrogen application treatment (360 kg·hm-2. The results showed that the nitrogen absorption and nitrogen use efficiency of cropping oil sunflower increased as the irrigation rate increased. With the nitrogen application rate increased, the yield of cropping oil sunflower was increased when the nitrogen application rate was 0~240 kg·hm-2, but beyond the 240 kg·hm-2, there was no significant increase. With the irrigation rate increased, the water consumption amount of cropping oil sunflower increased all the time, but the water use efficiency increased first, and hen decreased. Besides there was no significant difference between 240 kg·hm-2 and 360 kg·hm-2 treatment. Under our experiment condition, during the cropping oil sunflower growth period, when the irrigation rate was 5 250 m3·hm-2 (high irrigation rate and the nitrogen ertilization was 360 m3·hm-2 (high nitrogen application rate, the yield of cropping oil sunflower was 3 598 kg·hm-2. When the irrigation rate was 3 750 m3·hm-2 (middle irrigation rate and the nitrogen fertilization was 240 m3·hm-2 (middle nitrogen application rate, the yield was 3 518 kg·hm-2, with the yield components similar with the high irrigation rate and high nitrogen application rate treatment. Considering various factors, middle irrigation rate and middle nitrogen

  16. Acidification and Nitrogen Eutrophication of Austrian Forest Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jandl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effect of acidic deposition and nitrogen on Austrian forests soils. Until thirty years ago air pollution had led to soil acidification, and concerns on the future productivity of forests were raised. Elevated rates of nitrogen deposition were believed to cause nitrate leaching and imbalanced forest nutrition. We used data from a soil monitoring network to evaluate the trends and current status of the pH and the C : N ratio of Austrian forest soils. Deposition measurements and nitrogen contents of Norway spruce needles and mosses were used to assess the nitrogen supply. The pH values of soils have increased because of decreasing proton depositions caused by reduction of emissions. The C : N ratio of Austrian forest soils is widening. Despite high nitrogen deposition rates the increase in forest stand density and productivity has increased the nitrogen demand. The Austrian Bioindicator Grid shows that forest ecosystems are still deficient in nitrogen. Soils retain nitrogen efficiently, and nitrate leaching into the groundwater is presently not a large-scale problem. The decline of soil acidity and the deposition of nitrogen together with climate change effects will further increase the productivity of the forests until a limiting factor such as water scarcity becomes effective.

  17. Distribution and transportation of nitrogen in Miyun reservoir waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiujuan; XIAO Changlai; YANG Tianxing; WANG Jing; LIU Xiaoduan

    2005-01-01

    The Miyun reservoir is an important water supply for Beijing city. The distribution laws of nitrogen in the Miyun reservoir waters and the transportation factors have been systematically analyzed in space and time by using water monitoring data sampled in the high-water and low-flow periods in 2001 and 2002. The nitrogen in east and west reservoir waters is distributed differently in space. It shows the change characteristics in high-water and low-flow periods and is affected by the source of nitrogen, runoff conditions, hydrodynamic conditions, precipitation and the control of bed mud, of which the source of nitrogen controls the change of concentration of nitrogen, the peripheral runoff controls the distribution law of nitrogen, bed mud controls the vertical distribution of nitrogen, and the contents of nitrogen and its change in the surrounding environment directly cause the change of concentration of total nitrogen in the waters. The improvement and protection of the waters in the Miyun reservoir basically rests with the amelioration of the peripheral environment.

  18. STRESS INDUCED NITROGEN DIFFUSION IN NITRITED CoCr ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKVILĖ PETRAITIENĖ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the nitrogen transport mechanism in plasma nitrited CoCr alloy at moderate temperature ( 400ºC is explained by non-Fickian diffusion model. This mechanism is considered by stress induced diffusion model. The model involves diffusion of nitrogen induced by internal stresses created during nitriding process. The model considers the diffusion of nitrogen in the presence of  internal stresses gradient induced by penetrating nitrogen as the next driving force of diffusion after concentration gradient. This model is commonly used for analysis of stainless steel nitriding, however, in this work it is shown that the same nitrogen penetration mechanism takes place in CoCr alloy. For mathematical description of stress induced diffusion process the equation of baro-diffusion is used which involves concentration dependant baro-diffusion concentration. For calculation of stress gradient it is assumed that stress depth profile linearly relates with nitrogen concentration depth profile. The fitting is done using experimental curves of nitrogen depth profiles for medical grade CoCr alloy (ISO 5831-12 nitrited at 400 ºC temperature. The experimental curves are taken from literature. The nitriding duration was 2h, 6h, 20h. Calculated nitrogen depth profiles in CoCr alloy are in good agreement with experimental nitrogen depth profiles.  The diffusion coefficient D is found from fitting of experimental data.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.5711

  19. Stable nitrogen isotopes in coastal macroalgae: geographic and anthropogenic variability

    OpenAIRE

    González-Viana, I. (Inés); Bode, A.

    2013-01-01

    Proyectos ANILE (CTM2009-08396 and CTM2010-08804-E) del Plan Nacional de I+D+i y RADIALES del Instituto Español de Oceanografía (IEO). I.G.V. recibió un contrato FPI del Ministerio de Economía y Competividad Growing human population add to the natural nitrogen loads to coastal waters. As the excess nitrogen is readily incorporated in new biomass anthropogenic and natural nitrogen sources may be traced by the measurement of stable nitrogen isotopes (δ15N). In this study δ15N was dete...

  20. Nitrogen fixed by cyanobacteria is utilized by deposit-feeders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karlson, Agnes M L; Gorokhova, Elena; Elmgren, Ragnar

    2014-01-01

    .... Here, we examine utilization of cyanobacterial nitrogen by deposit-feeding benthic macrofauna following a cyanobacteria bloom at three stations during two consecutive years and link these changes...